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Sample records for catalytic h2o-3h exchange

  1. Multidimentional Normal Mode Calculations for the OH Vibrational Spectra of (H_2O)_3^+, (H_2O)_3^+Ar, H^+(H_2O)_3, and H^+(H_2O)_3Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying-Cheng; Chuang, Hsiao-Han; Tan, Jake Acedera; Takahashi, Kaito; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2014-06-01

    Recent experimental observations of (H_2O)_3^+, (H_2O)_3^+Ar, H^+(H_2O)_3, and H^+(H_2O)_3Ar clusters in the region 1400-3800 wn show that the OH stretching vibration has distinct characteristics. Multidimensional normal mode calculations were carried out for OH stretching vibrations in the 1200-4000 wn photon energy range. The potential energy and dipole surfaces were evaluated by using first-principles methods. By comparing the calculated frequencies and intensities of OH stretching vibration with experimental spectra, we found that the assignment of OH strecthing of H_3O^+ moiety and free OH strectching vibration have resonable agreement with experimental data. Jeffrey M. Headrick, Eric G. Diken, Richard S. Walters, Nathan I. Hammer, Richard A. Christie, Jun Cui, Evgeniy M. Myshakin, Michael A. Duncan, Mark A. Johnson, Kenneth D. Jordan, Science, 2005, 17, 1765. Kenta Mizuse, Jer-Lai Kuo and Asuka Fujii, Chem. Sci., 2011, 2, 868 Kenta Mizuse and Asuka Fujii, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 929.

  2. Dynamics of Catalytic Resolution of 2-Lithio-N-Boc-piperidine by Ligand Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Beng, Timothy K.; Tyree, William S.; Parker, Trent; Su, Chicheung; Williard, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of the racemization, catalytic and stoichiometric dynamic resolution of 2-lithio-N-Boc-piperidine, 7, have been investigated. The kinetic order in TMEDA, for both racemization and resolution of the title compound, and the kinetic order in resolving ligands, have been determined. The catalytic dynamic resolution is 0.5-order in chiral ligand 8, 0.265 order in chiral ligand 10, and second order in TMEDA. The X-ray crystal structure of ligand 10 shows it to be an octamer. Dynamic NMR studies of the resolution process were obtained. Some of the requirements for a successful catalytic dynamic resolution by ligand exchange have been identified. PMID:22967289

  3. Catalytic Oxidation of Methane into Methanol over Copper-Exchanged Zeolites with Oxygen at Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Karthik; Iyoki, Kenta; Dinh, Kimberly; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-06-22

    The direct catalytic conversion of methane to liquid oxygenated compounds, such as methanol or dimethyl ether, at low temperature using molecular oxygen is a grand challenge in C-H activation that has never been met with synthetic, heterogeneous catalysts. We report the first demonstration of direct, catalytic oxidation of methane into methanol with molecular oxygen over copper-exchanged zeolites at low reaction temperatures (483-498 K). Reaction kinetics studies show sustained catalytic activity and high selectivity for a variety of commercially available zeolite topologies under mild conditions (e.g., 483 K and atmospheric pressure). Transient and steady state measurements with isotopically labeled molecules confirm catalytic turnover. The catalytic rates and apparent activation energies are affected by the zeolite topology, with caged-based zeolites (e.g., Cu-SSZ-13) showing the highest rates. Although the reaction rates are low, the discovery of catalytic sites in copper-exchanged zeolites will accelerate the development of strategies to directly oxidize methane into methanol under mild conditions.

  4. Catalytic Oxidation of Methane into Methanol over Copper-Exchanged Zeolites with Oxygen at Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The direct catalytic conversion of methane to liquid oxygenated compounds, such as methanol or dimethyl ether, at low temperature using molecular oxygen is a grand challenge in C–H activation that has never been met with synthetic, heterogeneous catalysts. We report the first demonstration of direct, catalytic oxidation of methane into methanol with molecular oxygen over copper-exchanged zeolites at low reaction temperatures (483–498 K). Reaction kinetics studies show sustained catalytic activity and high selectivity for a variety of commercially available zeolite topologies under mild conditions (e.g., 483 K and atmospheric pressure). Transient and steady state measurements with isotopically labeled molecules confirm catalytic turnover. The catalytic rates and apparent activation energies are affected by the zeolite topology, with caged-based zeolites (e.g., Cu-SSZ-13) showing the highest rates. Although the reaction rates are low, the discovery of catalytic sites in copper-exchanged zeolites will accelerate the development of strategies to directly oxidize methane into methanol under mild conditions. PMID:27413787

  5. Metal nanoparticles in catalytic polymer membranes and ion-exchange systems for advanced purification of water from molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V. V.; Kravchenko, T. A.; Roldughin, Vyacheslav I.

    2013-05-01

    Methods of synthesis of metal nanoparticles and metal/polymer nanocomposites including ion-exchange materials are considered. The effect of the composition and size of nanoparticles on their catalytic activity is analyzed. Attention is focused on the composites used in catalytic processes, namely, catalytic membranes and ion-exchange systems. The problems associated with the removal of dissolved oxygen from water by means of such composites are discussed. The bibliography includes 225 references.

  6. Catalytic activity of rhodium complex immobilized on AN-31 ion exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Parshikova, G.N.; Korneva, L.I.; Kononov, Yu.S.

    1995-08-10

    Immobilized platinum-metal complexes are of interest as heterogeneous catalysts. Ion-exchange resins may be used as supports for catalytically active complexes. However, immobilized metal complexes are often unstable, are washed out from supports, and are lost with reaction products. Secure immobilization of metal complexes on supports is possible, for example, via coordination of the central metal by electron-donor groups of the support. This is the case when platinum metals are sorbed from solutions by nitrogen-containing ion exchangers. Complexes thus immobilized have high catalytic activity. Previously the authors demonstrated that rhodium(III) is sorbed from solutions containing rhodium aqua-chloro complexes as stable complexes with AN-31. These complexes were not desorbed with 10 M hydrochloric acid. Stable amino complexes of transition metals sorbed on ion exchangers are known to be active in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. In this work, the authors have studied catalytic properties of rhodium complex with the ion exchanger under atmospheric pressure at 25-80{degrees}C.

  7. Dynamics of catalytic resolution of 2-lithio-N-Boc-piperidine by ligand exchange.

    PubMed

    Beng, Timothy K; Tyree, William S; Parker, Trent; Su, Chicheung; Williard, Paul G; Gawley, Robert E

    2012-10-10

    The dynamics of the racemization and catalytic and stoichiometric dynamic resolution of 2-lithio-N-Boc-piperidine (7) have been investigated. The kinetic order in tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) for both racemization and resolution of the title compound and the kinetic orders in two resolving ligands have been determined. The catalytic dynamic resolution is second order in TMEDA and 0.5 and 0.265 order in chiral ligands 8 and 10, respectively. The X-ray crystal structure of ligand 10 shows it to be an octamer. Dynamic NMR studies of the resolution process were carried out. Some of the requirements for a successful catalytic dynamic resolution by ligand exchange have been identified.

  8. Mass transfer model liquid phase catalytic exchange column simulation applicable to any column composition profile

    SciTech Connect

    Busigin, A.

    2015-03-15

    Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) is a key technology used in water detritiation systems. Rigorous simulation of LPCE is complicated when a column may have both hydrogen and deuterium present in significant concentrations in different sections of the column. This paper presents a general mass transfer model for a homogenous packed bed LPCE column as a set of differential equations describing composition change, and equilibrium equations to define the mass transfer driving force within the column. The model is used to show the effect of deuterium buildup in the bottom of an LPCE column from non-negligible D atom fraction in the bottom feed gas to the column. These types of calculations are important in the design of CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) water detritiation systems.

  9. Experimental study of an integral catalytic combustor: Heat exchanger for Stirling engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulzan, D. L.

    1982-02-01

    The feasibility of using catalytic combustion with heat removal for the Stirling engine to reduce exhaust emissions and also improve heat transfer to the working fluid was studied using spaced parallel plates. An internally air-cooled heat exchanger was placed between two noble metal catalytic plates. A preheated fuel-air mixture passed between the plates and reacted on the surface of the catalyzed plates. Heat was removed from the catalytic surface by radiation and convection to the aircooled heat exchangers to control temperature and minimize thermal nitrogen oxide emissions. Test conditions were inlet combustion air temperatures from 850 to 900 K, inlet velocities of about 10 m/s, equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 0.9, and pressures from 1.3x10 to the 5th power to 2.0x10 to the 5th power Pa. Propane fuel was used for all testing. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were measured. Nitrogen oxide emissions ranged from 1.7 to 3.3 g NO2/kg fuel. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and indicate that further investigation of the concept is warranted.

  10. [Determination of acrylic acid from catalytic preparation lactic acid by anion-exchange chromatography].

    PubMed

    Shi, Haining; Wang, Hui; Tao, Lizhi; Wang, Zonghua; Ding, Mingyu

    2010-06-01

    Acrylic acid is a kind of important monomer and basic organic chemical raw material. In the process of catalytic preparation of acrylic acid from lactic acid, in order to monitor the catalytic process effectively and timely, an anion-exchange chromatographic (AEC) method has been established for the simultaneous determination of lactic acid and acrylic acid. The separation was carried out on a Metrohm A Supp 5 anion-exchange column (150 mm x 4.0 mm) with 2 mmol/L Na2CO3 +2 mmol/L NaHCO3 as the mobile phase. The flow rate of the mobile phase was 0.7 mL/min. A chemically suppressed conductivity detector was used. The linear ranges of calibration curves were 0.1-500 mg/L for lactic acid and 0.1-200 mg/L for acrylic acid. The detection limits with S/N = 3 were 0.030 mg/L for lactic acid and 0. 035 mg/L for acrylic acid. The recoveries of lactic acid and acrylic acid were 100.7%-106% and 99.6%-103% with the relative standard deviations of 2.16%-2.49% and 2.42%-2.48%, respectively. This method is accurate, speedy, sensitive and reproducible, and has been successfully used for the determination of lactic acid and acrylic acid in the catalytic reaction product.

  11. Catalytic Ester–Amide Exchange Using Group (IV) Metal Alkoxide–Activator Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chong; Lee, Jonathan P.; Lobkovsky, Emil; Porco, John A.

    2005-01-01

    A process for preparation of amides from unactivated esters and amines has been developed using a catalytic system comprised of group (IV) metal alkoxides in conjunction with additives including 1-hydroxy-7-azabenzotriazole (HOAt). In general, ester–amide exchange proceeds using a variety of structurally diverse esters and amines without azeotropic reflux to remove the alcohol byproduct. Initial mechanistic studies on the Zr(Ot-Bu)4–HOAt system revealed that the active catalyst is a novel, dimeric zirconium complex as determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:16011366

  12. Synthesis, structural characterization, and catalytic properties of tungsten-exchanged H-ZSM5

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Weiping; Meitzner, George D.; Marler, David O.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2001-01-18

    W-exchanged H-ZSM5 was prepared by sublimation of WCl6 at 673 K followed by hydrolysis of exchanged WClx species at 523 K. D2 exchange with residual OH groups showed that each W initially replaced about two zeolitic protons for W/Al ratios of 0.29 and 0.44, consistent with the formation of (WO2)2+ containing W6+ species bridging two cation exchange sites. As temperatures reached973 K during D2-OH exchange, these species reduced to (WO2)+ with the concurrent formation of one OD group. CH4 conversion turnover rates (per W) and C2-C1 2 selectivities are very similar to those observed on a Mo/H-ZSM5 sample with similar cation exchange level. As in the case of Mo/H-ZSM5, WOx/H-ZSM5 precursors are initially inactive in CH4 reactions, but they activate during induction with the concurrent evolution of CO, H2O, and an excess amount of H2. The reduction and carburization processes occurring during CH4 reactions and the structure of the exchanged WOx precursors was probed using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). XAS studies confirmed the isolated initial nature of the exchanged WOx precursors after hydrolysis and dehydration and the formation of WCx clusters 0.6 nm in diameter during CH4 reactions at 973 K. The structural and catalytic resemblance between W- and Mo-exchanged H-ZSM5 is not unexpected, in view of chemical similarities between oxides or carbides of Mo and W. The synthesis of exchanged WOx precursors and their subsequent carburization during CH4 reactions, however, are more difficult than the corresponding processes for the MoOx counterparts. This may account for previous reports of lower CH4 reaction rates and aromatics selectivities on W/H-ZSM5 compared with those observed on Mo/H-ZSM5 and with those reported here for rigorously exchanged W/H-ZSM5.

  13. Synergistic integration of ion-exchange and catalytic reduction for complete decomposition of perchlorate in waste water.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Na; Choi, Minkee

    2014-07-01

    Ion-exchange has been frequently used for the treatment of perchlorate (ClO4(-)), but disposal or regeneration of the spent resins has been the major hurdle for field application. Here we demonstrate a synergistic integration of ion-exchange and catalytic decomposition by using Pd-supported ion-exchange resin as an adsorption/catalysis bifunctional material. The ion-exchange capability of the resin did not change after generation of the Pd clusters via mild ethanol reduction, and thus showed very high ion-exchange selectivity and capacity toward ClO4(-). After the resin was saturated with ClO4(-) in an adsorption mode, it was possible to fully decompose the adsorbed ClO4(-) into nontoxic Cl(-) by the catalytic function of the Pd catalysts under H2 atmosphere. It was demonstrated that prewetting the ion-exchange resin with ethanol significantly accelerate the decomposition of ClO4(-) due to the weaker association of ClO4(-) with the ion-exchange sites of the resin, which allows more facile access of ClO4(-) to the catalytically active Pd-resin interface. In the presence of ethanol, >90% of the adsorbed ClO4(-) could be decomposed within 24 h at 10 bar H2 and 373 K. The ClO4(-) adsorption-catalytic decomposition cycle could be repeated up to five times without loss of ClO4(-) adsorption capacity and selectivity.

  14. Vapor-phase catalytic oxidesulfurization (ODS) of organosulfur compounds over supported metal oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sukwon

    Sulfur in transportation fuels remains a leading source of SOx emissions from vehicle engines and is a major source of air pollution. The very low levels of sulfur globally mandated for transportation fuels in the near future cannot be achieved by current practices of hydrodesulfurization (HDS) for sulfur removal, which operate under severe conditions (high T, P) and use valuable H2. Novel vapor-phase catalytic oxidesulfurization (ODS) processes of selectively oxidizing various organosulfur compounds (carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), thiophene, 2,5-dimenthylthiophene) typically found in various industrial streams (e.g., petroleum refining, pulp and paper) into valuable chemical intermediates (H 2CO, CO, H2, maleic anhydride and concentrated SO2) has been extensively studied. This research has primarily focused on establishing the fundamental kinetics and mechanisms of these selective oxidation reactions over well-defined supported metal oxide catalysts. The selective oxidation reactions of COS + O2 → CO + SO2; 2CS2 + 5O2 → 2CO + 4SO2; CH3SH + 2O 2 → H2CO + SO2 + H2O; C4 H4S + 3O2 → C4H2O 3 + H2O + SO2; were studied. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the supported metal oxide phases were 100% dispersed on the oxide substrate. All the catalysts were highly active and selective for the oxidesulfurization of carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, methanethiol, and thiophene between 290--330°C, 230--270°C, 350--400°C, and 250--400°C, respectively and did not deactivate. The TOFs (turnover frequency, normalized activity per active catalytic site) for all ODS reactions over supported vanadia catalysts, only containing molecularly dispersed surface vanadia species, varied within one order of magnitude and revealed the V-O-Support bridging bond was involved in the critical rate-determining kinetic steps. The surface reaction mechanism for each reaction was revealed by in situ IR (infrared) and

  15. Pt loaded carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rashmi; Singh, Ashish; Kohli, D. K.; Singh, M. K.; Gupta, P. K.

    2013-06-01

    We report development and characterization of platinum doped carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas. The carbon aerogel with uniformly dispersed platinum nanoparticles was prepared by adding platinum precursor during the sol-gel process. Thereafter colloidal PTFE was mixed with the platinum doped carbon aerogel powder and coated on Dixon rings to obtain hydrophobic catalyst with required mechanical strength. Detailed studies have been carried out to observe the effect of physical characteristics of the catalyst powder (surface area and pore size of aerogels, Pt cluster size and its valence state etc) and the different coating parameters (PTFE to Pt-CA ratio and Pt loading on Dixon ring) on volume transfer rate (Ky.a) for H/D reaction. Ky.a values of ˜0.8 m3 (STP).s-1. m-3 were obtained for Pt loading of 7% and Pt cluster size of 3 nm at atmospheric pressure.

  16. A non-catalytic N-terminal domain negatively influences the nucleotide exchange activity of translation elongation factor 1Bα.

    PubMed

    Trosiuk, Tetiana V; Shalak, Vyacheslav F; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Negrutskii, Boris S; El'skaya, Anna V

    2016-02-01

    Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bα (eEF1Bα) is a functional homolog of the bacterial factor EF-Ts, and is a component of the macromolecular eEF1B complex. eEF1Bα functions as a catalyst of guanine nucleotide exchange on translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A). The C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα is necessary and sufficient for its catalytic activity, whereas the N-terminal domain interacts with eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bγ (eEF1Bγ) to form a tight complex. However, eEF1Bγ has been shown to enhance the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα attributed to the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα. This suggests that the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may in some way influence the guanine nucleotide exchange process. We have shown that full-length recombinant eEF1Bα and its truncated forms are non-globular proteins with elongated shapes. Truncation of the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα, which is dispensable for catalytic activity, resulted in acceleration of the rate of guanine nucleotide exchange on eEF1A compared to full-length eEF1Bα. A similar effect on the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα was observed after its interaction with eEF1Bγ. We suggest that the non-catalytic N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may interfere with eEF1A binding to the C-terminal catalytic domain, resulting in a decrease in the overall rate of the guanine nucleotide exchange reaction. Formation of a tight complex between the eEF1Bγ and eEF1Bα N-terminal domains abolishes this inhibitory effect.

  17. The purification of ITER project technology water from tritium in catalytic isotope exchange column using hydrophobic catalyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, M.I.; Sakharovskij, Y.A.; Rozenkevich, M.B.

    1994-12-31

    The new universal technological scheme for purification of ITER project tritium containing waste water has been proposed. The purification process as a whole has two technological parts. The starting concentrate of tritium up to about 100-300 Cu/l by the method of catalytic isotope exchange between hydrogen and liquid water and the final concentrate of tritium up to practically pure tritium by the isotope exchange in the system hydrogen-palladium. This report contains the experimental data about the effectiveness of the column for the isotope exchange between hydrogen and water.

  18. Water Detritiation: Better SCK-CEN Catalysts for Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Bruggeman, Aime; Braet, Johan; Vanderbiesen, Sven

    2005-07-15

    A technically and economically sound technology for water detritiation is mandatory for the future of fusion. This technology is expected to be based on water electrolysis and Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE). LPCE requires an efficient hydrophobic catalyst. SCK-CEN invented and developed such a catalyst in the past, which is prepared by depositing platinum on an activated charcoal carrier and mixing it with polytetrafluorethylene as a hydrophobic material. In combination with an appropriate wettable packing, different batches of this catalyst performed very well during years of extensive testing, allowing us to develop the ELEX process for water detritiation at inland reprocessing plants. Recently we succeeded in reproducing this catalyst and preparing a slightly different but clearly ameliorated type. By extrapolation these new results would allow us to obtain, at 40 deg. C and under typical but conservative operating conditions, a decontamination factor of 10000 with a column of less than 3 meters long. Such performances would make this catalyst an excellent candidate for application at JET or ITER. To confirm the performances of our improved catalyst for a longer period of time and in a longer column, we are now starting experiments in a newly built installation and we are collaborating with ICSI, Romania.

  19. Synthesis of ultrasmall Li-Mn spinel oxides exhibiting unusual ion exchange, electrochemical, and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yumi; Kuroda, Yoshiyuki; Uematsu, Tsubasa; Oshikawa, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Suzuki, Kosuke; Hibino, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2015-10-12

    The efficient surface reaction and rapid ion diffusion of nanocrystalline metal oxides have prompted considerable research interest for the development of high functional materials. Herein, we present a novel low-temperature method to synthesize ultrasmall nanocrystalline spinel oxides by controlling the hydration of coexisting metal cations in an organic solvent. This method selectively led to Li-Mn spinel oxides by tuning the hydration of Li(+) ions under mild reaction conditions (i.e., low temperature and short reaction time). These particles exhibited an ultrasmall crystallite size of 2.3 nm and a large specific surface area of 371 ± 15 m(2) g(-1). They exhibited unique properties such as unusual topotactic Li(+)/H(+) ion exchange, high-rate discharge ability, and high catalytic performance for several aerobic oxidation reactions, by creating surface phenomena throughout the particles. These properties differed significantly from those of Li-Mn spinel oxides obtained by conventional solid-state methods.

  20. Synthesis of ultrasmall Li–Mn spinel oxides exhibiting unusual ion exchange, electrochemical, and catalytic properties

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Yumi; Kuroda, Yoshiyuki; Uematsu, Tsubasa; Oshikawa, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Suzuki, Kosuke; Hibino, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2015-01-01

    The efficient surface reaction and rapid ion diffusion of nanocrystalline metal oxides have prompted considerable research interest for the development of high functional materials. Herein, we present a novel low-temperature method to synthesize ultrasmall nanocrystalline spinel oxides by controlling the hydration of coexisting metal cations in an organic solvent. This method selectively led to Li–Mn spinel oxides by tuning the hydration of Li+ ions under mild reaction conditions (i.e., low temperature and short reaction time). These particles exhibited an ultrasmall crystallite size of 2.3 nm and a large specific surface area of 371 ± 15 m2 g−1. They exhibited unique properties such as unusual topotactic Li+/H+ ion exchange, high-rate discharge ability, and high catalytic performance for several aerobic oxidation reactions, by creating surface phenomena throughout the particles. These properties differed significantly from those of Li–Mn spinel oxides obtained by conventional solid-state methods. PMID:26456216

  1. Importance of ligand exchanges in Pd(II)-Brønsted acid cooperative catalytic approach to spirocyclic rings.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Garima; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2014-11-12

    Increasing number of reports in the most recent literature convey the use of palladium and Brønsted acids as cooperative catalytic partners. However, the mechanistic understanding of several such cooperative catalytic reactions and the origin of cooperativity continue to remain limited. In transition metal catalysis, it is typically assumed that the native ligands, such as the acetates in palladium acetate, are retained throughout the catalytic cycle. Herein, we convey the significance of invoking ligand exchanges in transition metal catalysis by using the mechanism of a representative cooperative dual-catalytic reaction. Density functional theory (M06 and B3LYP) computations have been employed to decipher the mechanism of Pd(II)-Brønsted acid catalyzed migratory ring expansion reaction of an indenyl cyclobutanol to a spirocyclic indene bearing a quaternary carbon. The molecular role of water, benzoquinone and phosphoric acid has been probed by computing the energetics using several combinations of all these as ligands on palladium. Of the two key mechanistic possibilities examined, a Wacker-type pathway (involving a semipinacol ring expansion of cyclobutanol followed by a reductive elimination) is found to be energetically more preferred over an allylic pathway wherein the ring expansion in a Pd-π-allyl intermediate occurs subsequent to the initial allylic C-H activation. The Gibbs free energies of the transition states with the native palladium acetate are much higher than a Pd-bis-phosphate species generated through ligand exchanges.

  2. Catalytic turnover triggers exchange of subunits of the magnesium chelatase AAA+ motor unit.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Joakim; Braumann, Ilka; Kurowska, Marzena; Müller, André H; Hansson, Mats

    2013-08-16

    The ATP-dependent insertion of Mg(2+) into protoporphyrin IX is the first committed step in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The reaction is catalyzed by magnesium chelatase, which consists of three gene products: BchI, BchD, and BchH. The BchI and BchD subunits belong to the family of AAA+ proteins (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) and form a two-ring complex with six BchI subunits in one layer and six BchD subunits in the other layer. This BchID complex is a two-layered trimer of dimers with the ATP binding site located at the interface between two neighboring BchI subunits. ATP hydrolysis by the BchID motor unit fuels the insertion of Mg(2+) into the porphyrin by the BchH subunit. In the present study, we explored mutations that were originally identified in semidominant barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) mutants. The resulting recombinant BchI proteins have marginal ATPase activity and cannot contribute to magnesium chelatase activity although they apparently form structurally correct complexes with BchD. Mixing experiments with modified and wild-type BchI in various combinations showed that an exchange of BchI subunits in magnesium chelatase occurs during the catalytic cycle, which indicates that dissociation of the complex may be part of the reaction mechanism related to product release. Mixing experiments also showed that more than three functional interfaces in the BchI ring structure are required for magnesium chelatase activity.

  3. High catalytic activity of palladium(II)-exchanged mesoporous sodalite and NaA zeolite for bulky aryl coupling reactions: reusability under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minkee; Lee, Dong-Hwan; Na, Kyungsu; Yu, Byung-Woo; Ryoo, Ryong

    2009-01-01

    Exchange for the better: Mesoporous sodalite and NaA zeolite exchanged with Pd(2+) exhibit remarkably high activity and reusability in C-C coupling reactions under aerobic atmosphere. It is proposed that the catalytic reactions are mediated by a molecular Pd(0) species generated in situ within the pores (see picture), which is oxidized back to Pd(2+) by O(2), preventing the formation of catalytically inactive Pd(0) agglomerates.

  4. Synthesis and Evaluation of Cu-SAPO-34 Catalysts for Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction. 1. Aqueous Solution Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Washton, Nancy M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-09-06

    SAPO-34 molecular sieves are synthesized using various structure directing agents (SDAs). Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts are prepared via aqueous solution ion exchange. Catalysts are characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Catalytic properties are examined using standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) and ammonia oxidation reactions. During solution ion exchange, different SAPO-34 samples undergo different extent of structural damage via irreversible hydrolysis. Si content within the samples (i.e., Al-O-Si bond density) and framework stress are key factors that affect irreversible hydrolysis. Even using very dilute Cu acetate solutions, it is not possible to generate Cu-SAPO-34 samples with only isolated Cu2+ ions. Small amounts of CuOx species always coexist with isolated Cu2+ ions. Highly active and selective Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts for NH3-SCR are readily generated using this synthesis protocol, even for SAPO-34 samples that degrade substantially during solution ion exchange. High-temperature aging is found to improve the catalytic performance. This is likely due to reduction of intracrystalline mass-transfer limitations via formation of additional porosity in the highly defective SAPO-34 particles formed after ion exchange. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract number DE-AC05-76RL01830.

  5. Investigation of holdup and axial dispersion of liquid phase in a catalytic exchange column using radiotracer technique.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Pant, H J; Goswami, Sunil; Sharma, V K; Dash, A; Mishra, S; Bhanja, K; Mohan, Sadhana; Mahajani, S M

    2017-03-01

    Holdup and axial dispersion of liquid phase in a catalytic exchange column were investigated by measuring residence time distributions (RTD) using a radiotracer technique. RTD experiments were independently carried out with two different types of packings i.e. hydrophobic water-repellent supported platinum catalyst and a mixture (50% (v/v)) of hydrophobic catalyst and a hydrophillic wettable packing were used in the column. Mean residence times and hold-ups of the liquid phase were estimated at different operating conditions. Axial dispersion model (ADM) and axial dispersion with exchange model (ADEM) were used to simulate the measured RTD data. Both the models were found equally suitable to describe the measured data. The degree of axial mixing was estimated in terms of Peclet number (Pe) and Bodenstein number (Bo). Based on the obtained parameters of the ADM, correlations for total liquid hold-up (HT) and axial mixing in terms of Bo were proposed for design and scale up of the full-scale catalytic exchange column.

  6. Using the water signal to detect invisible exchanging protons in the catalytic triad of a serine protease

    PubMed Central

    Lauzon, Carolyn B.; van Zijl, Peter; Stivers, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) is an MRI approach that can indirectly detect exchange broadened protons that are invisible in traditional NMR spectra. We modified the CEST pulse sequence for use on high-resolution spectrometers and developed a quantitative approach for measuring exchange rates based upon CEST spectra. This new methodology was applied to the rapidly exchanging Hδ1 and Hε2 protons of His57 in the catalytic triad of bovine chymotrypsinogen-A (bCT-A). CEST enabled observation of Hε2 at neutral pH values, and also allowed measurement of solvent exchange rates for His57-Hδ1 and His57-Hε2 across a wide pH range (3–10). Hδ1 exchange was only dependent upon the charge state of the His57 (kex,Im+ = 470 s−1, kex,Im = 50 s−1), while Hε2 exchange was found to be catalyzed by hydroxide ion and phosphate base (kOH− = 1.7 × 1010 M−1s−1, kHPO42−=1.7×106M−1s−1), reflecting its greater exposure to solute catalysts. Concomitant with the disappearance of the Hε2 signal as the pH was increased above its pKa, was the appearance of a novel signal (δ = 12 ppm), which we assigned to Hγ of the nearby Ser195 nucleophile, that is hydrogen bonded to Nε2 of neutral His57. The chemical shift of Hγ is about 7 ppm downfield from a typical hydroxyl proton, suggesting a highly polarized O-Hγ bond. The significant alkoxide character of Oγ indicates that Ser195 is preactivated for nucleophilic attack before substrate binding. CEST should be generally useful for mechanistic investigations of many enzymes with labile protons involved in active site chemistry. PMID:21809183

  7. Postassembly Transformation of a Catalytically Active Composite Material, Pt@ZIF-8, via Solvent-Assisted Linker Exchange.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Casey J; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2016-02-15

    2-Methylimidazolate linkers of Pt@ZIF-8 are exchanged with imidazolate using solvent-assisted linker exchange (SALE) to expand the apertures of the parent material and create Pt@SALEM-2. Characterization of the material before and after SALE was performed. Both materials are active as catalysts for the hydrogenation of 1-octene, whereas the hydrogenation of cis-cyclohexene occurred only with Pt@SALEM-2, consistent with larger apertures for the daughter material. The largest substrate, β-pinene, proved to be unreactive with H2 when either material was employed as a candidate catalyst, supporting the contention that substrate molecules, for both composites, must traverse the metal-organic framework component in order to reach the catalytic nanoparticles.

  8. Catalytic activity for decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by metal complexes of water-soluble thiacalix[4]arenetetrasulfonate on the modified anion-exchangers.

    PubMed

    Odo, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Hanae; Ohsaki, Hirotaka; Ohmura, Noriyoshi

    2004-02-01

    The catalytic activity for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by anion-exchangers modified with metal complexes of thiacalix[4]arenetetrasulfonate (Me(n+)-TCAS[4], Me(n+)=Mn(3+), Mn(2+), Fe(3+), Co(3+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Ni(2+)) was investigated. As a reference, calix[4]arenetetrasulfonate, calix[6]arenehexasulfonate and calix[8]areneoctasulfonate were also examined. Mn(3+)- and Fe(3+)-TCAS[4] on the modified anion-exchangers showed high catalytic activity in alkaline buffer solutions among metal complexes tested. Mn(3+)- and Fe(3+)-TCAS[4] on the modified anion-exchangers exhibited high and constant levels of catalytic activity even after having been used 5 times, and showed catalytic activity in the presence of an excess of H(2)O(2) over Mn(3+)- and Fe(3+)-TCAS[4] on the modified anion-exchangers. Only Mn(3+)-TCAS[4] on the modified anion-exchangers exhibited high catalytic activity at around a neutral pH.

  9. CATALYTIC PROMOTION OF THE ADSORPTION OF VANADIUM ON AN ANIONIC EXCHANGE RESIN

    DOEpatents

    Bailes, R.H.; Ellis, D.A.

    1958-08-26

    An improvement in the process for the recovery of vanadium from acidic phosphatic solutions is presented. In this process the vanadium is first oxidized to the pentavaleat state, and is then separated by contacting such solutions with an anion exchange resin whereby adsorption of the complexed pentavalent vanadium is effected. The improvement lies in the fact that adsorp tion of the vanadium complex by the anion exchange resin is promoted and improved by providing fiuoride ions in solution to be contacted.

  10. Production of an ion-exchange membrane-catalytic electrode bonded material for electrolytic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takenaka, H.; Torikai, E.

    1986-01-01

    A good bond is achieved by placing a metal salt in solution on one side of a membrane and a reducing agent on the other side so that the reducing agent penetrates the membrane and reduces the metal. Thus, a solution containing Pt, Rh, etc., is placed on one side of the membrane and a reducing agent such as NaBH, is placed on the other side. The bonded metal layer obtained is superior in catalytic activity and is suitable as an electrode in a cell such as for solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis.

  11. Slow reactant-water exchange and high catalytic performance of water-tolerant Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Koito, Yusuke; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Hasegawa, Ryota; Kitano, Masaaki; Hara, Michikazu

    2014-06-23

    (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic measurement with trimethylphosphine oxide (TMPO) was applied to evaluate the Lewis acid catalysis of various metal triflates in water. The original (31)P NMR chemical shift and line width of TMPO is changed by the direct interaction of TMPO molecules with the Lewis acid sites of metal triflates. [Sc(OTf)3] and [In(OTf)3] had larger changes in (31)P chemical shift and line width by formation of the Lewis acid-TMPO complex than other metal triflates. It originates from the strong interaction between the Lewis acid and TMPO, which results in higher stability of [Sc(OTf)3TMPO] and [In(OTf)3TMPO] complexes than other metal triflate-TMPO complexes. The catalytic activities of [Sc(OTf)3] and [In(OTf)3] for Lewis acid-catalyzed reactions with carbonyl compounds in water were far superior to the other metal triflates, which indicates that the high stability of metal triflate-carbonyl compound complexes cause high catalytic performance for these reactions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation suggests that low LUMO levels of [Sc(OTf)3] and [In(OTf)3] would be responsible for the formation of stable coordination intermediate with nucleophilic reactant in water.

  12. Kinetics of esterification of acidified oil with different alcohols by a cation ion-exchange resin/polyethersulfone hybrid catalytic membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Honglei; Ding, Jincheng; Qiu, Yanli; Zhao, Zengdian

    2012-05-01

    Hybrid catalytic membranes consisting of cation ion-exchange resin particles (CERP) and polyethersulfone (PES) were prepared by immersion phase inversion and used as heterogeneous catalysts for the esterification of acidified oil with methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol. The membranes were characterized by ion exchange capacity and swelling degree tests. The membranes were annealed at different temperatures to improve catalytic activity and membranes annealed at 393 K had the highest catalytic activity. Butanol allowed the highest free fatty acids (FFAs) conversion of 95.28% since it has better miscibility than the other alcohols which strengthened mass and heat transfer. Furthermore, pseudo-homogeneous kinetic models of the esterification of acidified oil with the four alcohols were established according to the experimental data. The kinetic models can well predict the FFA conversion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Interplay of light transmission and catalytic exchange current in photoelectrochemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fountaine, Katherine T.; Lewerenz, Hans J.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2014-10-27

    We develop an analytic current-voltage expression for a variable junction photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell and use it to investigate and illustrate the influence of the optical and electrical properties of catalysts on the optoelectronic performance of PEC devices. Specifically, the model enables a simple, yet accurate accounting of nanostructured catalyst optical and electrical properties through incorporation of an optical transmission factor and active catalytic area factor. We demonstrate the utility of this model via the output power characteristics of an exemplary dual tandem solar cell with indium gallium phosphide and indium gallium arsenide absorbers with varying rhodium catalyst nanoparticle loading. The approach highlights the importance of considering interactions between independently optimized components for optimal PEC device design.

  14. Catalytic hydrodechlorination of triclosan using a new class of anion-exchange-resin supported palladium catalysts.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Liu, Wen; Li, Jingwen; Wang, Jin; Zhao, Dongye; Xu, Rui; Lin, Zhang

    2017-09-01

    We prepared a new class of anion-exchange-resin supported Pd catalysts for efficient hydrodechlorination of triclosan in water. The catalysts were prepared through an initial ion-exchange uptake of PdCl4(2-) and subsequent reduction of Pd(II) to Pd(0) nanoparticles at ambient temperature. Two standard strong-base anion exchange resins (IRA-900 and IRA-958) with different matrices (polystyrene and polyacrylic) were chosen as the supports. SEM and TEM images showed that Pd(0) nanoparticles were evenly attached on the resin surface with a mean size of 3-5 nm. The resin supported Pd catalysts (Pd@IRA-900 and Pd@IRA-958) were able to facilitate rapid and complete hydrodechlorination of triclosan. At a Pd loading of 2.0 wt.%, the observed pseudo first-order rate constant (kobs) was 1.25 ± 0.06 and 1.6 ± 0.1 L/g/min for Pd@IRA-900 and Pd@IRA-958, respectively. The catalysts were more resistant to Cl(-) poisoning and natural organic matter fouling than other supported-Pd catalysts. The presence of 10 mM NaCl suppressed the kobs value by 31% and 23% for Pd@IRA-900 and Pd@IRA-958, whereas the presence of humic acid at 30 mg/L as TOC lowered the rates by 28% and 27%, respectively. The better performance of Pd@IRA-958 was attributed to the polymeric matrix properties (i.e., hydrophobicity, pore size, and surface area) as well as Pd particle size. GC/MS analyses indicated that very low concentrations of chlorinated intermediates were detected in the early stage of the hydrodechlorination process, with 2-phenoxyphenol being the main byproduct. The catalysts can be repeatedly used in multiple operations without significant bleeding. The catalysts eliminate the need for calcination in preparing conventional supported catalysts, and the resin supports conveniently facilitate control of Pd loading and material properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Catalytic activity of thiacalix[4]arenetetrasulfonate metal complexes on modified anion-exchangers for ascorbic acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Odo, Junichi; Hirashima, Tomomi; Hayashida, Tomoko; Miyauchi, Asuka; Minemoto, Mami; Iuchi, Masato; Inoguchi, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    The catalysis of ascorbic acid (AsA) oxidation by anion-exchangers modified with metal complexes of thiacalix[4]arenetetrasulfonate (Me-TCAS[4]A-500, Me=Mn(3+), Fe(3+), Co(3+), Ce(4+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Ni(2+), and H2) were investigated. Me-TCAS[4]A-500 (Me=Mn(3+), Fe(3+), Ce(4+), and Cu(2+)) all exhibited the ability to catalyze the oxidative reaction of AsA to dehydroascorbic acid. However, in the presence of high concentrations of AsA, only Cu(2+)-TCAS[4]A-500 was capable of complete oxidation of the acid. Moreover, after six repeat uses, Cu(2+)-TCAS[4]A-500 maintained high and relatively constant catalytic activity. Prior treatment of glucose solutions with Cu(2+)-TCAS[4]A-500, even in the presence of high AsA concentrations, enabled the satisfactory determination of glucose without interference by AsA. Cu(2+)-TCAS[4]A-500 will therefore be applicable as an artificial substitute for ascorbate oxidase, and may be useful as a means to eliminate AsA interference during the analysis of vital compounds such as glucose and uric acid.

  16. Performance and life cycle environmental benefits of recycling spent ion exchange brines by catalytic treatment of nitrate.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jong Kwon; Bergquist, Allison M; Jeong, Sangjo; Guest, Jeremy S; Werth, Charles J; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2015-09-01

    Salt used to make brines for regeneration of ion exchange (IX) resins is the dominant economic and environmental liability of IX treatment systems for nitrate-contaminated drinking water sources. To reduce salt usage, the applicability and environmental benefits of using a catalytic reduction technology to treat nitrate in spent IX brines and enable their reuse for IX resin regeneration were evaluated. Hybrid IX/catalyst systems were designed and life cycle assessment of process consumables are used to set performance targets for the catalyst reactor. Nitrate reduction was measured in a typical spent brine (i.e., 5000 mg/L NO3(-) and 70,000 mg/L NaCl) using bimetallic Pd-In hydrogenation catalysts with variable Pd (0.2-2.5 wt%) and In (0.0125-0.25 wt%) loadings on pelletized activated carbon support (Pd-In/C). The highest activity of 50 mgNO3(-)/(min - g(Pd)) was obtained with a 0.5 wt%Pd-0.1 wt%In/C catalyst. Catalyst longevity was demonstrated by observing no decrease in catalyst activity over more than 60 days in a packed-bed reactor. Based on catalyst activity measured in batch and packed-bed reactors, environmental impacts of hybrid IX/catalyst systems were evaluated for both sequencing-batch and continuous-flow packed-bed reactor designs and environmental impacts of the sequencing-batch hybrid system were found to be 38-81% of those of conventional IX. Major environmental impact contributors other than salt consumption include Pd metal, hydrogen (electron donor), and carbon dioxide (pH buffer). Sensitivity of environmental impacts of the sequencing-batch hybrid reactor system to sulfate and bicarbonate anions indicate the hybrid system is more sustainable than conventional IX when influent water contains <80 mg/L sulfate (at any bicarbonate level up to 100 mg/L) or <20 mg/L bicarbonate (at any sulfate level up to 100 mg/L) assuming 15 brine reuse cycles. The study showed that hybrid IX/catalyst reactor systems have potential to reduce resource consumption and

  17. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  18. Role of potassium exchange in catalytic pyrolysis of biomass over ZSM-5: Formation of alkyl phenols and furans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass with ZSM-5 type zeolites is a commonly considered in situ upgrading technique for the production of partially deoxygenated bio-oils. The acidity and structure of ZSM-5 catalysts favor the production of aromatic hydrocarbons from oxygenates present in the pyrolysis...

  19. Enhanced catalytic performance of copper-exchanged SAPO-34 molecular sieve in methanol-to-olefin reaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Jung; Park, Ji Won; Lee, Kwang Young; Seo, Gon; Song, Mee Kyung; Jeong, Soon-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Methanol-to-olefin (MTO) reaction over copper-exchanged SAPO-34 catalysts was investigated in order to extend their catalyst life. The exchange of copper ions into the cages of an SAPO-34 molecular sieve was confirmed by ESR, XPS, and 129Xe NMR techniques. Copper ions located in its cages considerably reduced its deactivation rate in the MTO reaction, while those dispersed on the external surface of the SAPO-34 molecular sieve accelerated the deactivation due to the limited mass transfer through the pore entrances. The 13C NMR and UV-VIS spectroscopy investigations of the materials occluded on the copper-exchanged SAPO-34 catalysts during the MTO reaction clearly showed that the copper ions exchanged in the cages suppressed the further condensation of alkyl aromatics to large, fused polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Theoretical calculations for the SAPO-34 and copper-exchanged SAPO-34 molecular sieves supported this observation because copper ions located in the cages stabilized the alkyl aromatics. Therefore, the exchange of copper ions into the SAPO-34 molecular sieve stabilized the reactive intermediates, alkyl aromatics, of the MTO reaction and suppressed their further condensation to PAHs, thereby slowing the deactivation.

  20. The stereospecificity and catalytic efficiency of the tryptophan synthase-catalysed exchange of the α-protons of amino acids

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    13C-NMR has been used to follow the tryptophan synthase (EC 4.2.1.20) catalysed hydrogen–deuterium exchange of the pro-2R and pro-2S protons of [2-13C]glycine at pH 7.8. 1H-NMR has also been used to follow the tryptophan-synthase-catalysed hydrogen–deuterium exchange of the α-protons of a range of L- and D-amino acids at pH 7.8. The pKa values of the α-protons of these amino acids have been estimated and we have determined whether or not their exchange rates can be predicted from their pKa values. With the exception of tryptophan and norleucine, the stereospecificities of the first-order α-proton exchange rates are independent of the size and electronegativity of the amino acid R-group. Similar results are obtained with the second-order α-proton exchange rates, except that both L-tryptophan and L-serine have much higher stereospecificities than all the other amino acids studied. PMID:15107013

  1. Role of associated defects in oxygen ion conduction and surface exchange reaction for epitaxial samaria-doped ceria thin films as catalytic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Nan; Shi, Yanuo; Schweiger, Sebastian; Strelcov, Evgheni; Foglietti, Vittorio; Orgiani, Pasquale; Balestrino, Giuseppe; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jennifer L. M. Rupp; Aruta, Carmela; Belianinov, Alex

    2016-05-18

    Samaria-doped ceria (SDC) thin films are particularly important for energy and electronic applications such as micro-solid oxide fuel cells, electrolysers, sensors and memristors. In this paper we report a comparative study investigating ionic conductivity and surface reactions for well-grown epitaxial SDC films varying the samaria doping concentration. With increasing doping above 20 mol% of samaria, an enhancement in the defect association was observed by Raman spectroscopy. The role of such defect associates on the films` oxygen ion transport and exchange was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). The measurements reveal that the ionic transport has a sharp maximum in ionic conductivity and drop in its activation energy down to 0.6 eV for 20 mol% doping. Increasing the doping concentration further up to 40 mol%, raises the activation energy substantially by a factor of two. We ascribe the sluggish transport kinetics to the "bulk" ionic-near ordering in case of the heavily doped epitaxial films. Analysis of the ESM first order reversal curve measurements indicate that these associated defects may have a beneficial role by lowering the activation of the oxygen exchange "surface" reaction for heavily doped 40 mol% of samaria. We reveal in a model experiment through a solid solution series of samaria doped ceria epitaxial films that the occurrence of associate defects in the bulk affects the surface charging state of the films to increase the exchange rates. Lastly, the implication of these findings are the design of coatings with tuned oxygen surface exchange by control of bulk associate clusters for future electro-catalytic applications.

  2. Role of associated defects in oxygen ion conduction and surface exchange reaction for epitaxial samaria-doped ceria thin films as catalytic coatings

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Nan; Shi, Yanuo; Schweiger, Sebastian; ...

    2016-05-18

    Samaria-doped ceria (SDC) thin films are particularly important for energy and electronic applications such as micro-solid oxide fuel cells, electrolysers, sensors and memristors. In this paper we report a comparative study investigating ionic conductivity and surface reactions for well-grown epitaxial SDC films varying the samaria doping concentration. With increasing doping above 20 mol% of samaria, an enhancement in the defect association was observed by Raman spectroscopy. The role of such defect associates on the films` oxygen ion transport and exchange was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). The measurements reveal that the ionic transport has amore » sharp maximum in ionic conductivity and drop in its activation energy down to 0.6 eV for 20 mol% doping. Increasing the doping concentration further up to 40 mol%, raises the activation energy substantially by a factor of two. We ascribe the sluggish transport kinetics to the "bulk" ionic-near ordering in case of the heavily doped epitaxial films. Analysis of the ESM first order reversal curve measurements indicate that these associated defects may have a beneficial role by lowering the activation of the oxygen exchange "surface" reaction for heavily doped 40 mol% of samaria. We reveal in a model experiment through a solid solution series of samaria doped ceria epitaxial films that the occurrence of associate defects in the bulk affects the surface charging state of the films to increase the exchange rates. Lastly, the implication of these findings are the design of coatings with tuned oxygen surface exchange by control of bulk associate clusters for future electro-catalytic applications.« less

  3. Role of associated defects in oxygen ion conduction and surface exchange reaction for epitaxial samaria-doped ceria thin films as catalytic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Nan; Shi, Yanuo; Schweiger, Sebastian; Strelcov, Evgheni; Foglietti, Vittorio; Orgiani, Pasquale; Balestrino, Giuseppe; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jennifer L. M. Rupp; Aruta, Carmela; Belianinov, Alex

    2016-05-18

    Samaria-doped ceria (SDC) thin films are particularly important for energy and electronic applications such as micro-solid oxide fuel cells, electrolysers, sensors and memristors. In this paper we report a comparative study investigating ionic conductivity and surface reactions for well-grown epitaxial SDC films varying the samaria doping concentration. With increasing doping above 20 mol% of samaria, an enhancement in the defect association was observed by Raman spectroscopy. The role of such defect associates on the films` oxygen ion transport and exchange was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). The measurements reveal that the ionic transport has a sharp maximum in ionic conductivity and drop in its activation energy down to 0.6 eV for 20 mol% doping. Increasing the doping concentration further up to 40 mol%, raises the activation energy substantially by a factor of two. We ascribe the sluggish transport kinetics to the "bulk" ionic-near ordering in case of the heavily doped epitaxial films. Analysis of the ESM first order reversal curve measurements indicate that these associated defects may have a beneficial role by lowering the activation of the oxygen exchange "surface" reaction for heavily doped 40 mol% of samaria. We reveal in a model experiment through a solid solution series of samaria doped ceria epitaxial films that the occurrence of associate defects in the bulk affects the surface charging state of the films to increase the exchange rates. Lastly, the implication of these findings are the design of coatings with tuned oxygen surface exchange by control of bulk associate clusters for future electro-catalytic applications.

  4. Assembling Porphyrins into Extended Network Structures by Employing Aromatic Dicarboxylates: Synthesis, Metal Exchange, and Heterogeneous Catalytic Studies.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Gargi; Jana, Ajay Kumar; Natarajan, Srinivasan

    2017-07-03

    Three new metal-organic porphyrinic framework compounds of zinc and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin (TPyP) have been synthesized under solvothermal conditions. The compounds [Zn5 (C40 H24 N8 )(C8 H4 O4 )2 (NO3 )6 (DMA)2 ] (DMA)3 (H2 O)8 (1; DMA=dimethylacetamide), [Zn3 (C40 H24 N8 )(C8 H4 O4 )2 (DMF)](DMF)5 (H2 O)12 (2), and [Zn3 (C40 H24 N8 )(C12 H6 O4 )2 (DMA)2 ](H2 O)7 (3) have two (1) and three dimensionally (2 and 3) extended structures. All the three structures contain porphyrinic units connected through the carboxylate linkers. The nitrates bind the metal centers and are not hydrogen bonded. The different binding modes of nitrate in the structure of 1 are observed for the first time in a porphyrin-based MOF. The openness of the structure allowed us to explore metal exchange through a room-temperature metathetic route. Compound 2 undergoes 100 % exchange with copper, whereas compound 3 exchanges 70 % with copper. The copper-exchanged compounds Cu∈2 and Cu∈3 were observed to be good heterogeneous catalysts for many important organic reactions. The chemo and regioselective enamination of β-ketoesters, preparation of propargylamine derivatives as well as regioselective cycloadditions of alkyne and azide (click reactions) have been carried out with good yields and selectivity. All the compounds have been characterized by PXRD, IR, UV/Vis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (for Cu exchange). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. How does the exchange of one oxygen atom with sulfur affect the catalytic cycle of carbonic anhydrase?

    PubMed

    Schenk, Stephan; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Anders, Ernst

    2004-06-21

    We have extended our investigations of the carbonic anhydrase (CA) cycle with the model system [(H(3)N)(3)ZnOH](+) and CO(2) by studying further heterocumulenes and catalysts. We investigated the hydration of COS, an atmospheric trace gas. This reaction plays an important role in the global COS cycle since biological consumption, that is, uptake by higher plants, algae, lichens, and soil, represents the dominant terrestrial sink for this gas. In this context, CA has been identified by a member of our group as the key enzyme for the consumption of COS by conversion into CO(2) and H(2)S. We investigated the hydration mechanism of COS by using density functional theory to elucidate the details of the catalytic cycle. Calculations were first performed for the uncatalyzed gas phase reaction. The rate-determining step for direct reaction of COS with H(2)O has an energy barrier of deltaG=53.2 kcal mol(-1). We then employed the CA model system [(H(3)N)(3)ZnOH](+) (1) and studied the effect on the catalytic hydration mechanism of replacing an oxygen atom with sulfur. When COS enters the carbonic anhydrase cycle, the sulfur atom is incorporated into the catalyst to yield [(H(3)N)(3)ZnSH](+) (27) and CO(2). The activation energy of the nucleophilic attack on COS, which is the rate-determining step, is somewhat higher (20.1 kcal mol(-1) in the gas phase) than that previously reported for CO(2). The sulfur-containing model 27 is also capable of catalyzing the reaction of CO(2) to produce thiocarbonic acid. A larger barrier has to be overcome for the reaction of 27 with CO(2) compared to that for the reaction of 1 with CO(2). At a well-defined stage of this cycle, a different reaction path can emerge: a water molecule helps to regenerate the original catalyst 1 from 27, a process accompanied by the formation of thiocarbonic acid. We finally demonstrate that nature selected a surprisingly elegant and efficient group of reactants, the [L(3)ZnOH](+)/CO(2)/H(2)O system, that helps

  6. Catalytic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  7. Dye house wastewater treatment through advanced oxidation process using Cu-exchanged Y zeolite: a heterogeneous catalytic approach.

    PubMed

    Fathima, Nishtar Nishad; Aravindhan, Rathinam; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2008-01-01

    Catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation of an anionic dye has been explored in this study. Copper(II) complex of NN'-ethylene bis(salicylidene-aminato) (salenH2) has been encapsulated in super cages of zeolite-Y by flexible ligand method. The catalyst has been characterized by Fourier transforms infra red spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffractograms, Thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analysis and nitrogen adsorption studies. The effects of various parameters such as pH, catalyst and hydrogen peroxide concentration on the oxidation of dye were studied. The results indicate that complete removal of color has been obtained after a period of less than 1h at 60 degrees C, 0.175M H2O2 and 0.3g l(-1) catalyst. More than 95% dye removal has been achieved using this catalyst for commercial effluent. These studies indicate that copper salen complex encapsulated in zeolite framework is a potential heterogeneous catalyst for removal of color from wastewaters.

  8. Catalytic hydrogen/oxygen reaction assisted the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) startup at subzero temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shucheng; Yu, Hongmei; Hou, Junbo; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian; Ming, Pingwen; Hou, Zhongjun

    Fuel cells for automobile application need to operate in a wide temperature range including freezing temperature. However, the rapid startup of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) at subfreezing temperature, e.g., -20 °C, is very difficult. A cold-start procedure was developed, which made hydrogen and oxygen react to heat the fuel cell considering that the FC flow channel was the characteristic of microchannel reactor. The effect of hydrogen and oxygen reaction on fuel cell performance at ambient temperature was also investigated. The electrochemical characterizations such as I- V plot and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were performed. The heat generated rate for either the single cell or the stack was calculated. The results showed that the heat generated rate was proportional to the gas flow rate when H 2 concentration and the active area were constant. The fuel cell temperature rose rapidly and steadily by controlling gas flow rate.

  9. Recent Advances in Solid Catalysts Obtained by Metalloporphyrins Immobilization on Layered Anionic Exchangers: A Short Review and Some New Catalytic Results.

    PubMed

    Nakagaki, Shirley; Mantovani, Karen Mary; Machado, Guilherme Sippel; Castro, Kelly Aparecida Dias de Freitas; Wypych, Fernando

    2016-02-29

    Layered materials are a very interesting class of compounds obtained by stacking of two-dimensional layers along the basal axis. A remarkable property of these materials is their capacity to interact with a variety of chemical species, irrespective of their charge (neutral, cationic or anionic). These species can be grafted onto the surface of the layered materials or intercalated between the layers, to expand or contract the interlayer distance. Metalloporphyrins, which are typically soluble oxidation catalysts, are examples of molecules that can interact with layered materials. This work presents a short review of the studies involving metalloporphyrin immobilization on two different anionic exchangers, Layered Double Hydroxides (LDHs) and Layered Hydroxide Salts (LHSs), published over the past year. After immobilization of anionic porphyrins, the resulting solids behave as reusable catalysts for heterogeneous oxidation processes. Although a large number of publications involving metalloporphyrin immobilization on LDHs exist, only a few papers have dealt with LHSs as supports, so metalloporphyrins immobilized on LHSs represent a new and promising research field. This work also describes new results on an anionic manganese porphyrin (MnP) immobilized on Mg/Al-LDH solids with different nominal Mg/Al molar ratios (2:1, 3:1 and 4:1) and intercalated with different anions (CO₃(2-) or NO₃(-)). The influence of the support composition on the MnP immobilization rates and the catalytic performance of the resulting solid in cyclooctene oxidation reactions will be reported.

  10. Norbin Stimulates the Catalytic Activity and Plasma Membrane Localization of the Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor P-Rex1*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dingxin; Barber, Mark A.; Hornigold, Kirsti; Baker, Martin J.; Toth, Judit M.; Oxley, David; Welch, Heidi C. E.

    2016-01-01

    P-Rex1 is a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that activates the small G protein (GTPase) Rac1 to control Rac1-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics, and thus cell morphology. Three mechanisms of P-Rex1 regulation are currently known: (i) binding of the phosphoinositide second messenger PIP3, (ii) binding of the Gβγ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, and (iii) phosphorylation of various serine residues. Using recombinant P-Rex1 protein to search for new binding partners, we isolated the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-adaptor protein Norbin (Neurochondrin, NCDN) from mouse brain fractions. Coimmunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between overexpressed P-Rex1 and Norbin in COS-7 cells, as well as between endogenous P-Rex1 and Norbin in HEK-293 cells. Binding assays with purified recombinant proteins showed that their interaction is direct, and mutational analysis revealed that the pleckstrin homology domain of P-Rex1 is required. Rac-GEF activity assays with purified recombinant proteins showed that direct interaction with Norbin increases the basal, PIP3- and Gβγ-stimulated Rac-GEF activity of P-Rex1. Pak-CRIB pulldown assays demonstrated that Norbin promotes the P-Rex1-mediated activation of endogenous Rac1 upon stimulation of HEK-293 cells with lysophosphatidic acid. Finally, immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation showed that coexpression of P-Rex1 and Norbin induces a robust translocation of both proteins from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, as well as promoting cell spreading, lamellipodia formation, and membrane ruffling, cell morphologies generated by active Rac1. In summary, we have identified a novel mechanism of P-Rex1 regulation through the GPCR-adaptor protein Norbin, a direct P-Rex1 interacting protein that promotes the Rac-GEF activity and membrane localization of P-Rex1. PMID:26792863

  11. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  12. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  13. Catalytic Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Little, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Don Little's Catalytic Reforming deals exclusively with reforming. With the increasing need for unleaded gasoline, the importance of this volume has escalated since it combines various related aspects of reforming technology into a single publication. For those with no practical knowledge of catalytic reforming, the chemical reactions, flow schemes and how the cat reformer fits into the overall refinery process will be of interest. Contents include: Catalytic reforming in refinery processing: How catalytic reformers work - chemical reactions; Process design; The catalyst, process variables and unit operation; Commercial processes; BTX operation; Feed preparation; naphtha hydrotreating and catalytic reforming; Index.

  14. Selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 over a Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst prepared by a solid state ion exchange method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Di; Gao, Feng; Peden, Charles HF; Li, Junhui; Kamasamudram, Krishna; Epling, William S.

    2014-06-01

    A novel solid state method was developed to synthesize Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts with excellent NH3-SCR performance and durable hydrothermal stability. After the solid state ion exchange (SSIE) process, the SSZ framework structure and surface area was maintained. In-situ DRIFTS and NH3-TPD experiments provide evidence that isolated Cu ions were successfully exchanged into the pores, which are the active centers for the NH3-SCR reaction.

  15. Role of Associated Defects in Oxygen Ion Conduction and Surface Exchange Reaction for Epitaxial Samaria-Doped Ceria Thin Films as Catalytic Coatings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Shi, Yanuo; Schweiger, Sebastian; Strelcov, Evgheni; Belianinov, Alex; Foglietti, Vittorio; Orgiani, Pasquale; Balestrino, Giuseppe; Kalinin, Sergei V; Rupp, Jennifer L M; Aruta, Carmela

    2016-06-15

    Samaria-doped ceria (SDC) thin films are particularly important for energy and electronic applications such as microsolid oxide fuel cells, electrolyzers, sensors, and memristors. In this paper, we report a comparative study investigating ionic conductivity and surface reactions for well-grown epitaxial SDC films varying the samaria doping concentration. With increasing doping above 20 mol % of samaria, an enhancement in the defect association is observed by Raman spectroscopy. The role of such associated defects on the films̀ oxygen ion transport and exchange is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). The measurements reveal that the ionic transport has a sharp maximum in ionic conductivity and drops in its activation energy down to 0.6 eV for 20 mol % doping. Increasing the doping concentration further up to 40 mol %, it raises the activation energy substantially by a factor of 2. We ascribe the sluggish transport kinetics to the "bulk" ionic-near ordering in case of the heavily doped epitaxial films. Analysis of the ESM first-order reversal curve measurements indicates that these associated defects may have a beneficial role by lowering the activation of the oxygen exchange "surface" reaction for heavily doped 40 mol % of samaria. In a model experiment, through a solid solution series of samaria doped ceria epitaxial films, we reveal that the occurrence of associated defects in the bulk affects the surface charging state of the SDC films to increase the exchange rates. The implication of these findings is the design of coatings with tuned oxygen surface exchange by controlling the bulk associated clusters for future electrocatalytic applications.

  16. Study on methane conversion to syngas over nano Pt-CeO2-ZrO2/MgO catalysts: Structure and catalytic behavior of catalysts prepared by using ion exchange resin method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Guo, Haijun; Li, Yansheng; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Le

    2011-06-01

    Nano Pt-Ce02-Zr02/MgO catalysts with 0.8 wt.% Pt, 3.0 wt.% Ce02 and 3.0 wt.% Zr02 were prepared by wet impregnation mothod. Support MgO was obtained using ion exchange resin method or using commercial MgO. SBET, XRD, TEM and C02-TPD were used to characterize the supports and catalysts. CH4-C02 reforming to synthesis gas was performed to test the catalytic behavior of the catalysts. The catalysts prepared using ion exchange resin exhibited more regular structure, more basic sites and higher stability of Pt and MgO than prepared from commercial MgO. At 1073 K, atmospheric pressure, and at high gas hourly space velocity of 36,000 mL/(g-hr) with a stoichiometric feed of CH4 and C02, the catalyst supported on the MOH(GD)-IE showed a higher and more stable activity for CH4-C02 reforming reaction than the catalyst prepared using commercial MgO. The characterisation results demonstrated that the high activity and stability of the catalyst stem from the high dispersion of Pt, the stable structure and the high resistance to carbon deposition on the catalyst.

  17. Economical way to synthesize SSZ-13 with abundant ion-exchanged Cu+ for an extraordinary performance in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by ammonia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biaohua; Xu, Ruinian; Zhang, Runduo; Liu, Ning

    2014-12-02

    In this study, an economical way for SSZ-13 preparation with the essentially cheap choline chloride as template has been attempted. The as-synthesized SSZ-13 zeolite after ion exchange by copper nitrate solution exhibited a superior SCR performance (over 95% NOx conversion across a broad range from 150 to 400 °C) to the traditional zeolite-based catalysts of Cu-Beta and Cu-ZSM-5. Furthermore, the opportune size of pore opening (∼3.8 Å) made Cu-SSZ-13 exhibiting the best selectivity to N2 as well as satisfactory tolerance toward SO2 and C3H6 poisonings. The characterization (XRD, XPS, XRF, and H2-TPR) of samples confirmed that Cu-SSZ-13 possessed the most abundant Cu cations among three investigated Cu-zeolites; furthermore, either on the surface or in the bulk the ratio of Cu(+)/Cu(2+) ions for Cu-SSZ-13 is also the highest. New finding was announced that CHA-type topology is in favor of the formation of copper cations, especially generating much more Cu(+) ions than the others, rather than CuO. The activity test of Cu(CuCl)-ZSM-5 (prepared by a solid-state ion-exchange method) clearly indicated that Cu(+) ions could make a major contribution to the low-temperature deNOx activity. The activity of protonic zeolites (H-SSZ-13, H-Beta, H-ZSM-5) revealed the topology effect on SCR performances.

  18. The Kinetics of Isotopic Exchange Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the kinetic interactions of these chemical processes and the determination of the actual order of such reactions. Included are multiple exchange, catalytic exchange with deuterium, and depletion of the original substrate. (CW)

  19. The Kinetics of Isotopic Exchange Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the kinetic interactions of these chemical processes and the determination of the actual order of such reactions. Included are multiple exchange, catalytic exchange with deuterium, and depletion of the original substrate. (CW)

  20. Physicochemical and catalytic characteristics of La-H-ZSM-5 zeolite in converting dimethyl ether to the mixtures of gasoline hydrocarbons: Effect of ion exchange conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaev, L. E.; Bukina, Z. M.; Yushchenko, V. V.; Ionin, D. A.; Kolesnichenko, N. V.; Khadzhiev, S. N.

    2014-03-01

    The effect of the manner and conditions of introducing lanthanum cations into NH4-ZSM-5 zeolite on the properties of catalysts for the conversion of dimethyl ether into the mixtures of gasoline hydrocarbons is studied. The physicochemical properties of synthesized catalysts are studied by means of temperature-programmed ammonia desorption, the adsorption of benzene, atomic absorption spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetry. It is shown that the degree to which lanthanum cations are replaced by ammonium cations both depends on the conditions of ion exchange in the zeolite and affects its acidity spectrum and the selectivity of the formation of paraffin hydrocarbons with isostructure. It is concluded that an increase in the amount of introduced lanthanum leads to an increase in the content of iso-paraffins from 69 to 76 wt % and a decrease in the content of aromatic hydrocarbons from 10.5 to 5.5 wt % and that of durene from 1.5 to 0.2 wt % in the products.

  1. Clean hydrogen generation through the electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol in a Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolysis Cell (PEMEC): Effect of the nature and structure of the catalytic anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, Claude; Jaubert, Thomas; Baranton, Stève; Coutanceau, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol was investigated in a Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolysis Cell (PEMEC) working at low temperature (20°C) on several Pt-based catalysts (Pt/C, PtSn/C, PtSnRu/C) in order to produce very clean hydrogen by electrolysis of a biomass compound. The electrocatalytic activity was determined by cyclic voltammetry and the rate of hydrogen evolution was measured for each catalyst at different current densities. The cell voltages UEtOH were recorded as a function of time for each current density. At 100 mA cm-2, i.e. 0.5 A with the 5 cm2 surface area PEMEC used, the cell voltage did not exceed 0.9 V for an evolution rate of about 220 cm3 of hydrogen per hour and the electrical energy consumed was less than 2.3 kWh (Nm3)-1, i.e. less than one half of the energy needed for water electrolysis (4.7 kWh (Nm3)-1 at UH2O = 2 V). This result is valid for the decomposition of any organic compound, particularly those originated from biomass resource, provided that their electro-oxidation rate is sufficient (>100 mA cm-2) at a relatively low cell voltage (Ucell < 1 V) which necessitates the development of efficient electrocatalysts for the electrochemical decomposition of this compound.

  2. Heterogeneous catalytic degradation of phenolic substrates: catalysts activity.

    PubMed

    Liotta, L F; Gruttadauria, M; Di Carlo, G; Perrini, G; Librando, V

    2009-03-15

    This review article explored the catalytic degradation of phenol and some phenols derivates by means of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Among them, only the heterogeneous catalyzed processes based on catalytic wet peroxide oxidation, catalytic ozonation and catalytic wet oxidation were reviewed. Also selected recent examples about heterogeneous photocatalytic AOPs will be presented. In details, the present review contains: (i) data concerning catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenolic compounds over metal-exchanged zeolites, hydrotalcites, metal-exchanged clays and resins. (ii) Use of cobalt-based catalysts, hydrotalcite-like compounds, active carbons in the catalytic ozonation process. (iii) Activity of transition metal oxides, active carbons and supported noble metals catalysts in the catalytic wet oxidation of phenol and acetic acid. The most relevant results in terms of catalytic activity for each class of catalysts were reported.

  3. Catalytic reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Aldag, A.W. Jr.

    1986-01-28

    This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains at least one reformable organic compound. The process consists of contacting the feedstock under suitable reforming conditions with a catalyst composition selected from the group consisting of a catalyst. The catalyst essentially consists of zinc oxide and a spinel structure alumina. Another catalyst consists essentially of a physical mixture of zinc titanate and a spinel structure alumina in the presence of sufficient added hydrogen to substantially prevent the formation of coke. Insufficient zinc is present in the catalyst composition for the formation of a bulk zinc aluminate.

  4. Si-H bond activation at {(NHC)₂Ni⁰} leading to hydrido silyl and bis(silyl) complexes: a versatile tool for catalytic Si-H/D exchange, acceptorless dehydrogenative coupling of hydrosilanes, and hydrogenation of disilanes to hydrosilanes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, David; Zell, Thomas; Schaub, Thomas; Radius, Udo

    2014-07-28

    The unique reactivity of the nickel(0) complex [Ni2(iPr2Im)4(COD)] (1) (iPr2Im = 1,3-di-isopropyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene) towards hydrosilanes in stoichiometric and catalytic reactions is reported. A series of nickel hydrido silyl complexes cis-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(H)(SiH(n-1)R(4-n))] (n = 1, 2) and nickel bis(silyl) complexes cis-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(SiH(n-1)R(4-n))2] (n = 1, 2, 3) were synthesized by stoichiometric reactions of 1 with hydrosilanes H(n)SiR(4-n), and fully characterized by X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic methods. These hydrido silyl complexes are examples where the full oxidative addition step is hindered. They have, as a result of the remaining Si-H interactions, remarkably short Si-H distances and feature a unique dynamic behavior in solution. Cis-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(H)(SiMePh2)] (cis-5) shows in solution at room temperature a dynamic site exchange of the NHC ligands, H-D exchange with C6D6 to give the deuteride complex cis-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(D)(SiMePh2)] (cis-5-D), and at elevated temperatures an irreversible isomerization to trans-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(D)(SiMePh2)] (trans-5-D). Reactions with sterically less demanding silanes give cis-configured bis(silyl) complexes accompanied by the release of dihydrogen. These complexes display, similarly to the hydrido silyl complexes, interestingly short Si-Si distances. Complex 1 reacts with 4 eq. HSi(OEt)3, in contrast to all the other silanes used in this study, to give the trans-configured bis(silyl) complex trans-[Ni(iPr2Im)2Ni(Si(OEt)3)2] (trans-12). The addition of two equivalents of Ph2SiH2 to 1 results, at elevated temperatures, in the formation of the dinuclear complex [{(iPr2Im)Ni-μ(2)-(HSiPh2)}2] (6). This diamagnetic, formal Ni(I) complex exhibits a long Ni-Ni bond in the solid state, as established by X-ray diffraction. The capability of the electron rich {Ni(iPr2Im)2} complex fragment to activate Si-H bonds was applied catalytically in the deuteration of Et3Si-H to Et3Si-D employing C6D6 as a convenient deuterium source

  5. FTIR and kinetic studies of the mechanism of Fe{sup 3+}-exchanged TiO{sub 2}-pillared clay catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Long, R.Q.; Yang, R.T.

    2000-02-15

    A series of FTIR spectroscopic and kinetic studies of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide by ammonia were conducted on Fe{sup 3+}-exchanged TiO{sub 2}-pillared clay (Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC) catalyst. It was found that No molecules were absorbed on the fresh Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalyst and then oxidized by O{sub 2} to adsorbed NO{sub 2} and nitrate species. These NO{sub x} adspecies could be reduced by NH{sub 3} at high temperatures. NH{sub 3} molecules could also be adsorbed on the Broensted acid and Lewis acid sites on the Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalyst to generate, respectively, NH{sup +}{sub 4} ions and coordinated NH{sub 3} species. These NH{sub 3} adspecies were active in reacting with NO, NO + O{sub 2} and NO{sub 2}, but the reaction rates of NH{sub 3} + NO + O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} + NO{sub 2} were much higher than that of NNO + NH{sub 3}. However, under reaction conditions, the surface of Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC was mainly covered by NH{sup +}{sub 4} ions and coordinated NH{sub 3}, and no NO{sub x} adspecies were detected. This is in agreement with the zero-order for the SCR reaction with respect to NH{sub 3}. A possible reaction scheme for the SCR reaction on Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC was proposed. NO reduction initially involved the reaction between NO{sub 2} and pairs of NH{sub 3} adspecies to form an active intermediate, which finally reacted with gaseous or weakly adsorbed NO to produce N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O.

  6. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  7. Computer model of catalytic combustion/Stirling engine heater head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, E. K.; Chang, R. L.; Tong, H.

    1981-01-01

    The basic Acurex HET code was modified to analyze specific problems for Stirling engine heater head applications. Specifically, the code can model: an adiabatic catalytic monolith reactor, an externally cooled catalytic cylindrical reactor/flat plate reactor, a coannular tube radiatively cooled reactor, and a monolithic reactor radiating to upstream and downstream heat exchangers.

  8. Preparation of catalysts via ion-exchangeable coatings on supports

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.

    1986-04-09

    Disclosed are: new catalytic compositions which comprise an inert support coated with a hydrous alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, or quaternary ammonium titanate, niobate, zirconate, or tantalate, in which the alkali or alkaline earth metal or quaternary ammonium cations have been exchanged for a catalytically effective quantity of a catalytically effective metal.

  9. Catalytic gasification: Isotopic labeling and transient reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Saber, J.M.; Falconer, J.L.; Brown, L.F.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature-programmed reaction was used with labeled isotopes (/sup 13/C and /sup 18/O) to study interactions between carbon black and potassium carbonate in pure He and 10% CO/sub 2//90% He atmospheres. Catalytic gasification precursor complexes were observed. Carbon and oxygen-bearing carbon surface groups interacted with the carbonate above 500 K to form surface complexes. Between 500 K and 950 K, and in the presence of gaseous carbon dioxide, the complexes promoted carbon and oxygen exchange between the gas-phase CO/sub 2/ and the surface. Oxygen exchanged between the surface complexes; but carbon did not exchange between the carbonate and the carbon black. As the temperature rose, the complexes decomposed to produce carbon dioxide, and catalytic gasification then began. Elemental potassium formed, and the active catalyst appears to alternate between potassium metal and a potassium-oxygen-carbon complex.

  10. Hydrous oxide ion-exchange compound catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.

    1990-01-01

    A catalytic material of improved activity which comprises a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal or quaternary ammonium titanate, zirconate, niobate, or tantalate, in which the metal or ammonium cations have been exchange with a catalytically effective quantity of a catalyst metal, and which has been subsequently treated with a solution of a Bronsted acid.

  11. Evaluation of Catalytic and Thermal Cracking in a JP-8 Fueled Pulsed Detonation Engine (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Additionally, a zeolite catalytic coating is applied to the heat-exchanger surfaces to stimulate further cracking of the fuel and reduce coke deposition. To...concentric-counter-flow heat exchangers to elevate the fuel temperature levels sufficiently to induce thermal cracking. Additionally, a zeolite catalytic ...to elevate the fuel temperatures sufficiently to crack the fuel thermally with the assistance of a zeolite catalytic coating. II. Background

  12. Switchable catalytic DNA catenanes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianzhe; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2015-03-11

    Two-ring interlocked DNA catenanes are synthesized and characterized. The supramolecular catenanes show switchable cyclic catalytic properties. In one system, the catenane structure is switched between a hemin/G-quadruplex catalytic structure and a catalytically inactive state. In the second catenane structure the catenane is switched between a catalytically active Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme-containing catenane and an inactive catenane state. In the third system, the interlocked catenane structure is switched between two distinct catalytic structures that include the Mg(2+)- and the Zn(2+)-dependent DNAzymes.

  13. Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each

  14. Rich catalytic injection

    SciTech Connect

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  15. Two stage catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Inventor); Bachovchin, Dennis (Inventor); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Inventor); Lippert, Thomas E. (Inventor); Bruck, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A catalytic combustor (14) includes a first catalytic stage (30), a second catalytic stage (40), and an oxidation completion stage (49). The first catalytic stage receives an oxidizer (e.g., 20) and a fuel (26) and discharges a partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture (36). The second catalytic stage receives the partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture and further oxidizes the mixture. The second catalytic stage may include a passageway (47) for conducting a bypass portion (46) of the mixture past a catalyst (e.g., 41) disposed therein. The second catalytic stage may have an outlet temperature elevated sufficiently to complete oxidation of the mixture without using a separate ignition source. The oxidation completion stage is disposed downstream of the second catalytic stage and may recombine the bypass portion with a catalyst exposed portion (48) of the mixture and complete oxidation of the mixture. The second catalytic stage may also include a reticulated foam support (50), a honeycomb support, a tube support or a plate support.

  16. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  17. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  18. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  19. Basicity, Catalytic and Adsorptive Properties of Hydrotalcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, Francois

    Solid bases have numerous potential applications, not only as catalyst for the manufacture of fine chemicals, in refining and petrochemistry, but also for adsorption and anion exchange. The present processes use liquid bases, typically alcoholic potash, and require neutralisation of the reaction medium at the end of the reaction, with production of salts. The substitution of these liquid bases by solids would provide cleaner and safer processes, due to the reduction of salts, and facilitate separation of the products and recycling of the catalyst. This chapter reviews the recent ideas on the modification of the basic properties of hydrotalcites by anion exchange and on the catalytic properties of solid bases as catalysts. Many examples of successful applications are given, with emphasis to industrial processes recently presented such as isomerisation of olefins. The basic properties of hydrotalcites can also be used to carry the exchange of toxic anions, humic acids or dyes, and have driven recent developments proposing HDT as drug carriers.

  20. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  1. Clean catalytic combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstedt, E. E.; Lyon, T. F.; Sabla, P. E.; Dodds, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A combustor program was conducted to evolve and to identify the technology needed for, and to establish the credibility of, using combustors with catalytic reactors in modern high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines. Two selected catalytic combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The combustors were sized for use in the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine (E3). One of the combustor designs was a basic parallel-staged double-annular combustor. The second design was also a parallel-staged combustor but employed reverse flow cannular catalytic reactors. Subcomponent tests of fuel injection systems and of catalytic reactors for use in the combustion system were also conducted. Very low-level pollutant emissions and excellent combustor performance were achieved. However, it was obvious from these tests that extensive development of fuel/air preparation systems and considerable advancement in the steady-state operating temperature capability of catalytic reactor materials will be required prior to the consideration of catalytic combustion systems for use in high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines.

  2. Identification of plant and animal glues in museum objects by GC-MS, after catalytic hydrolysis of the proteins by the use of a cation exchanger, with simultaneous separation from the carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Schneider, U; Kenndler, E

    2001-09-01

    A method is described which enables the group-separation of proteinaceous binding media from vegetable glues (carbohydrates), and simultaneous hydrolysis of the proteins in mixtures of both. The mixtures of the binders are suspended in aqueous-ethanolic solvent with the H+ form of a strong cation exchanger and treated at elevated temperature in sealed vials. The polypeptides are cleaved by H+-catalysed hydrolysis. On abstraction the amino acids are transformed into the ammonium ions by the protons, and the cations are adsorbed by the exchanger resin. The amino acids are removed from solution in this way, thus suppressing interfering reactions with other binders, e.g. humin formation with carbohydrates. Clear and colourless solutions were obtained with all mixtures of vegetable and animal glues. Two fractions can be obtained after separation of the solid resin from the liquid supernatant - the resin fraction with the adsorbed amino acids, and the aqueous-ethanolic solution with the carbohydrates. In each of these fractions the two classes of binder can be identified separately by GC-MS; this avoids the occurrence of unresolved GC peaks and superimposed mass spectra. The method has been used to identify the binder found between fabric layers of a Burgundian liturgical vestment of the Order of the Golden Fleece from the first half of the 15th century, the Cope of the Virgin Mary. With the aid of the GC pattern obtained, and the mass spectra of the main peaks, which were identified as glucopyranose anomers, the binding medium was identified as starch.

  3. Strain Engineering Defect Concentrations in Reduced Ceria for Improved Electro-Catalytic Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-30

    oxygen surface exchange coefficient ( ), equilibrium oxygen vacancy concentration ( ), and catalytic activity ( ), of gadolinium doped ceria (GDC...by producing gadolinium doped ceria thick films and then measuring them under low atmospheres (where ceria becomes reduced). Unfortunately as shown

  4. Performance characterization of a hydrogen catalytic heater.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the performance of a high efficiency, compact heater that uses the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to provide heat to the GM Hydrogen Storage Demonstration System. The heater was designed to transfer up to 30 kW of heat from the catalytic reaction to a circulating heat transfer fluid. The fluid then transfers the heat to one or more of the four hydrogen storage modules that make up the Demonstration System to drive off the chemically bound hydrogen. The heater consists of three main parts: (1) the reactor, (2) the gas heat recuperator, and (3) oil and gas flow distribution manifolds. The reactor and recuperator are integrated, compact, finned-plate heat exchangers to maximize heat transfer efficiency and minimize mass and volume. Detailed, three-dimensional, multi-physics computational models were used to design and optimize the system. At full power the heater was able to catalytically combust a 10% hydrogen/air mixture flowing at over 80 cubic feet per minute and transfer 30 kW of heat to a 30 gallon per minute flow of oil over a temperature range from 100 C to 220 C. The total efficiency of the catalytic heater, defined as the heat transferred to the oil divided by the inlet hydrogen chemical energy, was characterized and methods for improvement were investigated.

  5. Temperature-induced conformational change at the catalytic site of Sulfolobus solfataricus alcohol dehydrogenase highlighted by Asn249Tyr substitution. A hydrogen/deuterium exchange, kinetic, and fluorescence quenching study.

    PubMed

    Secundo, Francesco; Russo, Consiglia; Giordano, Antonietta; Carrea, Giacomo; Rossi, Mosè; Raia, Carlo A

    2005-08-23

    A combination of hydrogen/deuterium exchange, fluorescence quenching, and kinetic studies was used to acquire experimental evidence for the crystallographically hypothesized increase in local flexibility which occurs in thermophilic NAD(+)-dependent Sulfolobus solfataricus alcohol dehydrogenase (SsADH) upon substitution Asn249Tyr. The substitution, located at the adenine-binding site, proved to decrease the affinity for both coenzyme and substrate, rendering the mutant enzyme 6-fold more active when compared to the wild-type enzyme [Esposito et al. (2003) FEBS Lett. 539, 14-18]. The amide H/D exchange data show that the wild-type and mutant enzymes have similar global flexibility at 22 and 60 degrees C. However, the temperature dependence of the Stern-Volmer constant determined by acrylamide quenching shows that the increase in temperature affects the local flexibility differently, since the K(SV) increment is significantly higher for the wild-type than for the mutant enzyme over the range 18-45 degrees C. Interestingly, the corresponding van't Hoff plot (log K(SV) vs 1/T) proves nonlinear for the apo and holo wild-type and apo mutant enzymes, with a break at approximately 45 degrees C in all three cases due to a conformational change affecting the tryptophan microenvironment experienced by the quencher molecules. The Arrhenius and van't Hoff plots derived from the k(cat) and K(M) thermodependence measured with cyclohexanol and NAD(+) at different temperatures display an abrupt change of slope at 45-50 degrees C. This proves more pronounced in the case of the mutant enzyme compared to the wild-type enzyme due to a conformational change in the structure rather than to an overlapping of two or more rate-limiting reaction steps with different temperature dependencies of their rate constants. Three-dimensional analysis indicates that the observed conformational change induced by temperature is associated with the flexible loops directly involved in the substrate and

  6. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  7. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  8. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-05-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  9. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  10. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  11. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  12. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  13. Nanocarbons for Catalytic Desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qingqing; Lin, Yangming; Heumann, Saskia; Su, Dangsheng

    2017-08-24

    Nanocarbon catalysts are green and sustainable alternatives to the metal-based catalysts for numerous catalytic transformations. The application of nanocarbons for environmental catalysis is an emerging research discipline and has undergone rapid development in recent years. In this focus review, we provide a critical analysis on the state-of-the-art nanocarbon catalysts for three different catalytic desulfurization processes. And the focus is on the advantage and limitation as well as the reaction mechanism of the nanocarbon catalysts at molecular level. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Aufdembrink, B.A.; Degnan, T.F.; Kresge, C.T.

    1990-01-23

    This patent describes a process for catalytically cracking a petroleum fraction to lighter hydrocarbons. The process comprises providing a feedstock containing a petroleum fraction and then contacting the feedstock with a catalyst under catalytic cracking conditions. The catalyst composition includes a titanometallate layered metal oxide material comprising a layered metal oxide material comprising a layered metal oxide and pillars of a chalcogenide of at least one element selected from Groups IB, IIB, IIIA, IIIB, IVB, VA, VB, VIA, VIIA and VIIIA of the Periodic Table of Elements separating the layers of the metal oxides.

  15. Transport in a Microfluidic Catalytic Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H G; Chung, J; Grigoropoulos, C P; Greif, R; Havstad, M; Morse, J D

    2003-04-30

    A study of the heat and mass transfer, flow, and thermodynamics of the reacting flow in a catalytic microreactor is presented. Methanol reforming is utilized in the fuel processing system driving a micro-scale proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Understanding the flow and thermal transport phenomena as well as the reaction mechanisms is essential for improving the efficiency of the reforming process as well as the quality of the processed fuel. Numerical studies have been carried out to characterize the transport in a silicon microfabricated reactor system. On the basis of these results, optimized conditions for fuel processing are determined.

  16. Catalytic efficiency of designed catalytic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Korendovych, Ivan V; DeGrado, William F

    2014-01-01

    The de novo design of catalysts that mimic the affinity and specificity of natural enzymes remains one of the Holy Grails of chemistry. Despite decades of concerted effort we are still unable to design catalysts as efficient as enzymes. Here we critically evaluate approaches to (re)design of novel catalytic function in proteins using two test cases: Kemp elimination and ester hydrolysis. We show that the degree of success thus far has been modest when the rate enhancements seen for the designed proteins are compared with the rate enhancements by small molecule catalysts in solvents with properties similar to the active site. Nevertheless, there are reasons for optimism: the design methods are ever improving and the resulting catalyst can be efficiently improved using directed evolution. PMID:25048695

  17. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  18. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Sunder, Swaminathan

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  19. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System

    PubMed Central

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-01

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi’s azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  20. Evidence for hydrophobic catalysis of DNA strand exchange.

    PubMed

    Feng, B; Westerlund, F; Nordén, B

    2015-04-30

    The catalytic role of hydrophobic co-solutes in DNA strand exchange is demonstrated by FRET kinetics. Two mechanisms that contribute to this are base stacking destabilisation and nucleation-promoted DNA strand invasion. We propose that hydrophobic catalysis is involved in the strand-exchange activity of recombination enzymes.

  1. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  2. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  3. Radiation exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H. )

    1990-01-01

    This book deals with radiation laws, the phenomena of radiation exchange, the quantification of radiation, and the mechanisms whereby radiation is attenuated in passing through the earth's atmosphere. Applications of radiation exchange are discussed, such as the measurement of the effective radiating temperature of the ozonosphere. Also presented is the development of the concept of atmospheric windows and atmospheric transmittance. Radiation exchange experiments between Earth and space are presented and their interpretations given. The book fives detailed, step-by-step procedures for carrying out the radiometric calibration of an infrared prism spectrometer and a radiation thermopile.

  4. Catalytic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

    1980-12-09

    An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

  5. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Hryn, John N.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity.

  6. Quenched catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Krambeck, F.J.; Penick, J.E.; Schipper, P.H.

    1990-12-18

    This paper describes improvement in a fluidized catalytic cracking process wherein a fluidizable catalyst cracking catalyst and a hydrocarbon feed are charged to a reactor riser at catalytic riser cracking conditions to form catalytically cracked vapor product and spent catalyst which are discharged into a reactor vessel having a volume via a riser reactor outlet equipped with a separation means to produce a catalyst lean phase. It comprises: a majority of the cracked product, and a catalyst rich phase comprising a majority of the spend catalyst. The the catalyst rich phase is discharged into a dense bed of catalyst maintained below the riser outlet and the catalyst lean phase is discharged into the vessel for a time, and at a temperature, which cause unselective thermal cracking of the cracked product in the reactor volume before product is withdrawn from the vessel via a vessel outlet. The improvement comprises: addition, after riser cracking is completed, and after separation of cracked products from catalyst, of a quenching stream into the vessel above the dense bed of catalyst, via a quench stream addition point which allows the quench stream to contact at least a majority of the volume of the vessel above the dense bed.

  7. Exchange Network

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Information Exchange Network (EIEN) is an Internet-based system used by state, tribal and territorial partners to securely share environmental and health information with one another and EPA.

  8. Catalytic pyrolysis of waste rice husk over mesoporous materials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis of waste rice husk was carried out using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry [Py-GC/MS]. Meso-MFI zeolite [Meso-MFI] was used as the catalyst. In addition, a 0.5-wt.% platinum [Pt] was ion-exchanged into Meso-MFI to examine the effect of Pt addition. Using a catalytic upgrading method, the activities of the catalysts were evaluated in terms of product composition and deoxygenation. The structure and acid site characteristics of the catalysts were analyzed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption analysis. Catalytic upgrading reduced the amount of oxygenates in the product vapor due to the cracking reaction of the catalysts. Levoglucosan, a polymeric oxygenate species, was completely decomposed without being detected. While the amount of heavy phenols was reduced by catalytic upgrading, the amount of light phenols was increased because of the catalytic cracking of heavy phenols into light phenols and aromatics. The amount of aromatics increased remarkably as a result of catalytic upgrading, which is attributed to the strong Brönsted acid sites and the shape selectivity of the Meso-MFI catalyst. The addition of Pt made the Meso-MFI catalyst even more active in deoxygenation and in the production of aromatics. PMID:22221540

  9. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  10. Samarium Ion Exchanged Montmorillonite for High Temperature Cumene Cracking Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binitha, N. N.; Silija, P. P.; Suraj, V.; Yaakob, Z.; Sugunan, S.

    2011-02-01

    Montmorillonite clay is cation exchanged with samarium and its catalytic influence in cumene cracking reaction is investigated. Effect of exchange with sodium ions on further exchange with samarium ions is also noted. Acidity measurements are done using Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) of ammonia. The retention of basic structure is proved from FTIR spectra and XRD patterns. Elemental analysis result shows that samarium exchange has occurred, which is responsible for the higher catalytic activity. Surface area and pore volume remains more or less unaffected upon exchange. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates the enhanced thermal stability on exchanging. Cumene cracking reaction is carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed bed glass reactor at 673 K. The predominance of Brønsted acidity is confirmed from high selectivity to benzene.

  11. Catalytic reforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, R.P.; Huss, A. Jr.; McHale, W.D.; Partridge, R.D.

    1989-06-13

    This patent describes a catalytic reforming process which comprises contacting a naphtha range feed with a low acidity extrudate comprising an intermediate and/or a large pore acidic zeolite bound with a low acidity refractory oxide under reforming conditions to provide a reaction product of increased aromatic content, the extrudate having been prepared with at least an extrusion-facilitating amount of a low acidity refractory oxide in colloidal form and containing at least one metal species selected from the platinum group metals.

  12. Catalytic reforming methods

    DOEpatents

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  13. [Determination of trace molybdenum by extraction catalytic kinetic spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing-ren; Sun, Deng-ming; Li, Hai-yan

    2002-02-01

    A new extraction catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace molybdenum is studied. The method is based on the molybdenum (VI) catalytic oxidation of o-aminophenol by hydrogen peroxide in week acidic medium at pH 5.5. The reaction is carried out at room temperature. The reaction time, concentration of o-aminophenol in aqueous phase and degree of reaction are controlled by extraction equilibrium. The absorbance of organic phase is measured at 424 nm. Under the optimum experiment conditions, the linear range of the determination is 0.0050-2.0 mg.L-1, the detection limit is 2.0 x 10(-6) g.L-1. Combining with separation of ionic exchange, the method has been applied to the determination of trace molybdenum in bean samples with satisfactory results. The kinetic equation of extraction catalytic reaction is discussed.

  14. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  15. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-10-26

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi's azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.

  16. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, Walter

    1976-01-06

    A heat exchanger of the straight tube type in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration.

  17. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  18. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  19. ``OPTICAL Catalytic Nanomotors''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosary-Oyong, Se, Glory

    D. Kagan, et.al, 2009:'' a motion-based chemical sensing involving fuel-driven nanomotors is demonstrated. The new protocol relies on the use of an optical microscope for tracking charge in the speed of nanowire motors in the presence of target analyte''. Synthetic nanomotors are propelled by catalytic decomposition of .. they do not require external electric, magnetic or optical fields as energy... Accompanying Fig 2.6(a) of optical micrograph of a partial monolayer of silica microbeads [J.Gibbs, 2011 ] retrieves WF Paxton:''rods were characterized by transmission electron & dark-field optical microscopy..'' & LF Valadares:''dimer due to the limited resolution of optical microscopy, however the result..'. Acknowledged to HE. Mr. Prof. SEDIONO M.P. TJONDRONEGORO.

  20. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  1. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  2. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, R.P.L.; Bowes, E.; Green, G.J.; Marler, D.O.; Shihabi, D.S.; Socha, R.F.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes an improvement in a catalytic cracking process in which a hydrocarbon feed is cracked in a cracking zone in the absence of added hydrogen and in the presence of a circulating inventory of solid acidic cracking a catalyst which acquires a deposit of coke that contains chemically bound nitrogen while the cracking catalyst is in the cracking zone, the coke catalyst being circulated to t regeneration zone to convert the coke catalyst to a regenerated catalyst with the formation of a flue gas comprising nitrogen oxides: the improvement comprises incorporating into the circulating catalyst inventory an amount of additive particles comprising a synthetic porous crystalline material containing copper metal or cations, to reduce the content of nitrogen oxides in the flue gas.

  3. Evolution of random catalytic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, S.M.; Reidys, C.M. |

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of populations of sequences on a random catalytic network. Sequences are mapped into structures, between which are catalytic interactions that determine their instantaneous fitness. The catalytic network is constructed as a random directed graph. They prove that at certain parameter values, the probability of some relevant subgraphs of this graph, for example cycles without outgoing edges, is maximized. Populations evolving under point mutations realize a comparatively small induced subgraph of the complete catalytic network. They present results which show that populations reliably discover and persist on directed cycles in the catalytic graph, though these may be lost because of stochastic effects, and study the effect of population size on this behavior.

  4. Catalytic bromine recovery from HBr waste

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, P.F.; Beatty, R.D.; Mahajan, S.

    1993-12-31

    Waste HBr is formed during the bromination of many organic molecules, such as flame retardants, pharmaceuticals, and agricultural chemicals. For over 50 years attempts to recover the bromine from waste HBr by catalytic oxidation have been unsuccessful due to low catalyst activity and stability. The discovery of a new high-activity catalysts with excellent long-term stability and life capable of high HBr conversion below 300{degrees}C has made catalytic oxidation of waste HBr commercially feasible. The oxidation of anhydrous HBr using oxygen is highly exothermic, giving an adiabatic temperature rise of 2000{degrees}C. Use of 48 wt% HBr in the oxidation reduces the adiabatic temperature rise to only 300{degrees}C. A multitubular heat exchanger type of reactor can then be used to manage the heat. A 5,000 kg/yr pilot plant was built to verify the performance of the catalyst, the suitability of the reactor materials of construction, and the multibular reactor concept. The pilot unit has a single full-scale reactor tube 4 m long and 2.54 cm in diameter with a hot oil jacket for heat management. Excellent catalyst stability was observed during a 600 h catalyst-life test. HBr conversion of 99% was maintained throughout the run, and over 360 kg of bromine was produced. The temperature at a localized hot spot near the reactor inlet was only 15-20{degrees}C above the reactor inlet temperature, indicating efficient heat management.

  5. Thermal performance of a catalytic/oxidizer for the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedel, R. K.; Djordjevic, N.; Faulkner, F.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal analysis and testing have been performed for the High Temperature Catalytic/Oxidizer (HTCO) for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Trace Contaminant Control Subassembly (TCCS). The HTCO consists of a counterflow, plate-fin heat exchanger, a resistance heater, and a charcoal catalytic oxidizer bed. The unit removes various inorganics and hydrocarbons from the SSF cabin air. A thermal model of the unit was developed which was used to design the HEX and catalytic bed. The model has been used to predict both steady state and transient results. Accurate predictions of ground test data have led to confidence in proper operation of the unit in the SSF.

  6. Thermal performance of a catalytic/oxidizer for the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedel, R. K.; Djordjevic, N.; Faulkner, F.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal analysis and testing have been performed for the High Temperature Catalytic/Oxidizer (HTCO) for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Trace Contaminant Control Subassembly (TCCS). The HTCO consists of a counterflow, plate-fin heat exchanger, a resistance heater, and a charcoal catalytic oxidizer bed. The unit removes various inorganics and hydrocarbons from the SSF cabin air. A thermal model of the unit was developed which was used to design the HEX and catalytic bed. The model has been used to predict both steady state and transient results. Accurate predictions of ground test data have led to confidence in proper operation of the unit in the SSF.

  7. A universal rule for organic ligand exchange.

    PubMed

    You, Hongjun; Wang, Wenjin; Yang, Shengchun

    2014-11-12

    Most synthetic routes to high-quality nanocrystals with tunable morphologies predominantly employ long hydro-carbon molecules as ligands, which are detrimental for electronic and catalytic applications. Here, a rule is found that the adsorption energy of an organic ligand is related to its carbon-chain length. Using the density functional theory method, the adsorption energies of some commonly used ligand molecules with different carbon-chain lengths are calculated, including carboxylate, hydroxyl, and amine molecules adsorbed on metal or metal oxide crystal surface. The results indicate that the adsorption energy of the ligand molecule with a long carbon chain is weaker than that of a smaller molecule with same functional group. This rule provides a theoretical support for a new kind of ligand exchange method in which large organic ligand molecules can be exchanged by small molecules with same functional group to improve the catalytic properties.

  8. Catalytic gasification of biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertus, R. J.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, L. J., Jr.; Mitchell, D. H.; Weber, S. L.

    1981-12-01

    Methane and methanol synthesis gas can be produced by steam gasification of biomass in the presence of appropriate catalysts. This concept is to use catalysts in a fluidized bed reactor which is heated indirectly. The objective is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the concept. Technically the concept has been demonstrated on a 50 lb per hr scale. Potential advantages over conventional processes include: no oxygen plant is needed, little tar is produced so gas and water treatment are simplified, and yields and efficiencies are greater than obtained by conventional gasification. Economic studies for a plant processing 2000 T/per day dry wood show that the cost of methanol from wood by catalytic gasification is competitive with the current price of methanol. Similar studies show the cost of methane from wood is competitive with projected future costs of synthetic natural gas. When the plant capacity is decreased to 200 T per day dry wood, neither product is very attractive in today's market.

  9. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  10. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, R.L.; Perigard, R.G.; Rabo, J.A.

    1989-08-08

    This patent describes a process for catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon feedstocks. It comprises contacting the hydrocarbon feedstock under conditions effective to crack the feedstock with a catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by a process comprising the following step: contacting a fluid mixture of a large pore zeolite having a SiO/sub 2/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ ratio of about 3.5 to less than about 20 and an inorganic oxide matrix, with a fluoro salt of the formula A/sub (n-m)/(MF/sub n/)/sub z/. Wherein A is an organic or inorganic ionic moiety; (MF/sub n/)/sub z/ is a fluoroanion moiety comprising the element M; M is an element selected from the group of elements for Groups VB, VIB, VII, IIIA, IVA and VA of the Periodic Table of Elements; n is the coordination number of M; m is the valence of M and z is the valence or charge associated with A, at an effective pH value greater than about 3, at effective conditions of temperature and time to produce a catalyst product, whereby the cracking activity of the zeolite is enhanced.

  11. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  12. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.; Stohl, Frances V.

    1985-01-01

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  13. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbury, Phillip J.

    1986-04-01

    A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

  14. Catalytic reforming of naphtha fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, K.C.; Vorhis, F.H.

    1980-09-16

    Production of motor gasoline and a btx-enriched reformate by fractionating a naphtha feedstock into a mid-boiling btxprecursor fraction, a relatively high-boiling fraction and a relatively low-boiling fraction; catalytically reforming the btxprecursor fraction in a first reforming zone; combining the relatively high-boiling and low-boiling fractions and catalytically reforming the combined fractions in a second reforming zone.

  15. Radiation/Catalytic Augmented Combustion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    VUV wavelengths 157 nm (F2) and 193 nm (ArF). Radiative ignitions were achieved with the fluorine laser and not with the argon fluoride laser, even...enhanced combustion processes, utilizing pulsed and continuous VUV light-serces. Similarly, the catalytic technique has provided efficient combustion...ignited fuel-air mixtures, and has enhanced combustion processes, utilizing pulsed and continuous VUV light sources. Similarly, the catalytic technique has

  16. Segmented heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  17. Catalytic Hydroxylation of Polyethylenes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Polyolefins account for 60% of global plastic consumption, but many potential applications of polyolefins require that their properties, such as compatibility with polar polymers, adhesion, gas permeability, and surface wetting, be improved. A strategy to overcome these deficiencies would involve the introduction of polar functionalities onto the polymer chain. Here, we describe the Ni-catalyzed hydroxylation of polyethylenes (LDPE, HDPE, and LLDPE) in the presence of mCPBA as an oxidant. Studies with cycloalkanes and pure, long-chain alkanes were conducted to assess precisely the selectivity of the reaction and the degree to which potential C–C bond cleavage of a radical intermediate occurs. Among the nickel catalysts we tested, [Ni(Me4Phen)3](BPh4)2 (Me4Phen = 3,4,7,8,-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) reacted with the highest turnover number (TON) for hydroxylation of cyclohexane and the highest selectivity for the formation of cyclohexanol over cyclohexanone (TON, 5560; cyclohexanol/(cyclohexanone + ε-caprolactone) ratio, 10.5). The oxidation of n-octadecane occurred at the secondary C–H bonds with 15.5:1 selectivity for formation of an alcohol over a ketone and 660 TON. Consistent with these data, the hydroxylation of various polyethylene materials by the combination of [Ni(Me4Phen)3](BPh4)2 and mCPBA led to the introduction of 2.0 to 5.5 functional groups (alcohol, ketone, alkyl chloride) per 100 monomer units with up to 88% selectivity for formation of alcohols over ketones or chloride. In contrast to more classical radical functionalizations of polyethylene, this catalytic process occurred without significant modification of the molecular weight of the polymer that would result from chain cleavage or cross-linking. Thus, the resulting materials are new compositions in which hydroxyl groups are located along the main chain of commercial, high molecular weight LDPE, HDPE, and LLDPE materials. These hydroxylated polyethylenes have improved wetting

  18. Direct catalytic decomposition of nitric oxide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.; Zhang, Yanping

    1995-06-15

    This project investigated a suitable catalyst system for the direct NO decomposition for post-combustion NO{sub x} control. The studied process does not use a reductant, such as ammonia in the case of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) process for catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} to nitrogen. This is a simplified process basically involving passing the flue gas through a catalytic converter, thus avoiding problems generally associated with the commercial SCR process, namely high operating cost, ammonia slip, and potential N{sub 2}O emissions. The main results from this research project are summarized in the following: Cu-ZSM-5 and M/Cu-ZSM-5 were synthesized by incorporating metal cations into ZSM-5 zeolite supports by optimized ion exchange procedures. It was found that (1) the catalytic activity of Cu-ZSM-5 only increased with copper loading when the Cu-ZSM-5 was prepared in an aqueous copper acetate solution with pH lower than 5.74; (2) high pH of the solution led not only to ion-exchanged Cu{sup 2+}, but also copper deposition on the zeolite surface forming inactive CuO particles as identified by STEM/EDX and XRD; (3) the sequence of metal ion exchange first, followed by copper ion exchange to synthesize M/Cu-ZSM-5, where M represents any metal ion but copper, was important for the cocation to show promotion effects; and (4) air-calcination of M-ZSM was effective in keeping M cations in the zeolite during subsequent copper ion exchange. Positive alkaline and rare earth metal cocation effects on the Cu-ZSM-5 were identified in oxygen-containing gas mixtures in the high temperature region (450--600C). Cerium ion promoted the Cu-ZSM-5 activity in the low temperature range (< 450C) in oxygen-free gas mixture, while alkaline earth and transition metal cocations improved the NO conversion to N{sub 2} in high temperature region.

  19. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  20. Selective dehydrogenation of propane over novel catalytic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G.; Boespflug, E.P.; Martino, A.; Kawola, J.S.

    1998-02-01

    The conversion of small alkanes into alkenes represents an important chemical processing area; ethylene and propylene are the two most important organic chemicals manufactured in the U.S. These chemicals are currently manufactured by steam cracking of ethane and propane, an extremely energy intensive, nonselective process. The development of catalytic technologies (e.g., selective dehydrogenation) that can be used to produce ethylene and propylene from ethane and propane with greater selectivity and lower energy consumption than steam cracking will have a major impact on the chemical processing industry. This report details a study of two novel catalytic materials for the selective dehydrogenation of propane: Cr supported on hydrous titanium oxide ion-exchangers, and Pt nanoparticles encapsulated in silica and alumina aerogel and xerogel matrices.

  1. Direct catalytic cross-coupling of organolithium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannerini, Massimo; Fañanás-Mastral, Martín; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-08-01

    Catalytic carbon-carbon bond formation based on cross-coupling reactions plays a central role in the production of natural products, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. Coupling reactions of a variety of organometallic reagents and organic halides have changed the face of modern synthetic chemistry. However, the high reactivity and poor selectivity of common organolithium reagents have largely prohibited their use as a viable partner in direct catalytic cross-coupling. Here we report that in the presence of a Pd-phosphine catalyst, a wide range of alkyl-, aryl- and heteroaryl-lithium reagents undergo selective cross-coupling with aryl- and alkenyl-bromides. The process proceeds quickly under mild conditions (room temperature) and avoids the notorious lithium halogen exchange and homocoupling. The preparation of key alkyl-, aryl- and heterobiaryl intermediates reported here highlights the potential of these cross-coupling reactions for medicinal chemistry and material science.

  2. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  3. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of white oak wood in-situ using a bubbling fluidized bed reactor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis was performed on white oak wood using two zeolite-type catalysts as bed material in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor. The two catalysts chosen, based on a previous screening study, were Ca2+ exchanged Y54 (Ca-Y54) and a proprietary ß-zeolite type catalyst (catalyst M) both ...

  4. Production of aromatic hydrocarbons via catalytic pyrolysis of biomass over fe-modified HZSM-5 zeolites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Iron modified HZSM-5 catalysts were prepared by partial ion exchange of NH4ZSM-5 with Fe (II) at three different loadings (1.4, 2.8 and 4.2 wt%), and their effectiveness for producing aromatic hydrocarbons from cellulose, cellobiose, lignin and switchgrass by catalytic pyrolysis were screened using ...

  5. Educator Exchange Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Cris; Rodriguez, Victor

    This resource guide was developed for teachers and administrators interested in participating in intercultural and international exchange programs or starting an exchange program. An analysis of an exchange program's critical elements discusses exchange activities; orientation sessions; duration of exchange; criteria for participation; travel,…

  6. Expression studies of catalytic antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, H.D.; Patten, P.A.; Yang, P.L.

    1995-12-05

    We have examined the positive influence of human constant regions on the folding and bacterial expression of active soluble mouse immunoglobulin variable domains derived form a number of catalytic antibodies. Expression yields of eight hybridoma-and myeloma-derived chimeric Fab fragments are compared in both shake flasks and high-density fermentation. In addition the usefulness of this system for the generation of in vivo expression libraries is examined by constructing and expressing combinations of heavy and light chain variable regions that were not selected as a pair during an immune response. A mutagenesis study of one of the recombinant catalytic Fab fragments reveals that single amino acid substitutions can have dramatic effects on the expression yield. This system should be generally applicable to the production of Fab fragments of catalytic and other hybridoma-derived antibodies for crystallographic and structure-function studies. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  8. Perfluoropolyalkylether decomposition on catalytic aluminas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    1994-01-01

    The decomposition of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyalkylether liquid lubricant, was studied using the Penn State Micro-oxidation Test, and a thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry unit. The micro-oxidation test was conducted using 440C stainless steel and pure iron metal catalyst specimens, whereas the thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry tests were conducted using catalytic alumina pellets. Analysis of the thermal data, high pressure liquid chromatography data, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support evidence that there are two different decomposition mechanisms for Fomblin Z25, and that reductive sites on the catalytic surfaces are responsible for the decomposition of Fomblin Z25.

  9. Catalytic polyelectrolyte multilayers at the bipolar membrane interface.

    PubMed

    Abdu, Said; Sricharoen, Kittikun; Wong, John E; Muljadi, Eko S; Melin, Thomas; Wessling, Matthias

    2013-11-13

    Bipolar membranes are laminated anion and cation exchange membranes that split water at their interface very efficiently upon application of an electric field. This paper investigates the layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of polyelectrolyte multilayers, as a tool to introduce molecularly thin catalyst groups at this interface of bipolar membranes. The bipolar membranes were prepared by first modifying an anion exchange membrane by consecutive dipping LbL assembly, then casting a thin highly charged intermediate layer followed by casting a cation exchange layer. The results reveal that polyelectrolytes of higher charge density coated on the anion exchange layer yield better performance. Several parameters of the LbL interface deposition were varied. Out of the investigated LbL assembly parameters, ionic strength and number of layers have shown the largest influence on catalytic activity as well as ionic selectivity. The membrane with two bilayers of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI), where the PEI was prepared in 0.5 M NaCl, gave rise to the best performance. Surprisingly, detailed data analysis at low electrical potential suggests that the interface layers of a bipolar membrane play a major role in its permselectivity. Previously, only the bulk thickness of the anion and cation exchange membrane was assumed to influence the bipolar membrane selectivity.

  10. Handbook on heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhan, Pavel I.; Kanevets, Georgii E.; Seliverstov, Vladimir M.

    Essential data on heat exchange equipment used in ship, locomotive, automotive, and aircraft powerplants are presented in a systematic manner. The data cover the principal types and technical and performance characteristics of heat exchangers, fundamentals of the theory of heat exchange, calculation of heat transfer coefficients for different types of heat exchange apparatus, optimization of heat exchangers, computer-aided design of heat exchange equipment, testing techniques, and test result processing.

  11. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  12. Method for low temperature catalytic production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2003-07-22

    The invention provides a process for the catalytic production of a hydrogen feed by exposing a hydrogen feed to a catalyst which promotes a base-catalyzed water-gas-shift reaction in a liquid phase. The hydrogen feed can be provided by any process known in the art of making hydrogen gas. It is preferably provided by a process that can produce a hydrogen feed for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The step of exposing the hydrogen feed takes place preferably from about 80.degree. C. to about 150.degree. C.

  13. Catalytically enhanced packed tower scrubbing

    SciTech Connect

    Stitt, E.H.; Taylor, F.J.; Kelly, K.

    1996-12-31

    An enhanced wet scrubbing process for the treatment of gas streams containing odours and low level VOC`s is presented. It comprises essentially a single scrubbing column and a fixed bed catalytic reactor through which the dilute alkaline bleach scrubbing liquor is recirculated. The process has significant cost advantages over conventional chemical scrubbing technology, and copes well with peaks in odour levels. Traditional bleach scrubbing, and the improvements in process chemistry and the flowsheet afforded by inclusion of the catalyst, are discussed. The catalyst enables many of the well known problems associated with bleach scrubbing to be overcome, and facilitates odour removal efficiencies of greater than 99% in a single column. Pilot plant data from trials on sewage treatment works are presented. These show clearly the ability of the catalytically enhanced process to achieve sulphide and odour removals in excess of 99% in the single column. Case studies of some of the existing commercial installations are given, indicating the wide range of applications, industries and scale of the installed units. Comparative data are presented, measured on a commercial unit for the conventional operation of a bleach scrubber, and with the retrofitted catalyst in use. These data show clearly the benefits of the catalytic process in terms of removal efficiencies; and hence by inference also in equipment size and costs. The catalytic process is also shown to achieve very high removal efficiencies of organo-sulphides in a single column. 8 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. High temperature catalytic membrane reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

  15. Catalytic oxidation of waste materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Aqueous stream of human waste is mixed with soluble ruthenium salts and is introduced into reactor at temperature where ruthenium black catalyst forms on internal surfaces of reactor. This provides catalytically active surface to convert oxidizable wastes into breakdown products such as water and carbon dioxide.

  16. Simple, Chemoselective, Catalytic Olefin Isomerization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic amounts of Co(SaltBu,tBu)Cl and organosilane irreversibly isomerize terminal alkenes by one position. The same catalysts effect cycloisomerization of dienes and retrocycloisomerization of strained rings. Strong Lewis bases like amines and imidazoles, and labile functionalities like epoxides, are tolerated. PMID:25398144

  17. Catalytic Asymmetric Bromocyclization of Polyenes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Ramesh C; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2017-02-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric bromonium ion-induced polyene cyclization has been achieved by using a chiral BINOL-derived thiophosphoramide catalyst and 1,3-dibromo-5,5-dimethylhydantoin as an electrophilic bromine source. Bromocyclization products are obtained in high yields, with good enantiomeric ratios and high diastereoselectivity, and are abundantly found as scaffolds in natural products.

  18. Carbon Cloth Supports Catalytic Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, W. T. P.; Ammon, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon cloth is starting material for promising new catalytic electrodes. Carbon-cloth electrodes are more efficient than sintered-carbon configuration previously used. Are also chemically stable and require less catalyst--an important economic advantage when catalyst is metal such as platinum.

  19. Heterogeneous catalytic alcoholysis of benzonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Kagarlitskii, A.D.; Dmumakaev, K.Kh.; Bekova, N.S.

    1986-04-01

    The authors investigate the possibility of the direct heterogeneous catalytic synthesis of ethylbenzoate from benzonitrile. The catalysts tested were oxides of aluminium, titanium, and vanadium. The main conversion product detected chromatographically was ethylbenzoate; benzaldehyde, benzamide, and benzanilide were also identified. Aluminium oxide was found to be the most effective catalyst.

  20. Kinetic study of trichloroethylene combustion on exchanged zeolites catalysts.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C I; Borgna, A; Monzón, A; Garetto, T F

    2011-06-15

    In this paper is presented a kinetic study of the catalytic combustion of trichloroethylene (TCE) over Y-zeolites exchanged with several cations. The catalysts, based on zeolite, were prepared by ion exchange and characterized by means of physico-chemical techniques and then tested under kinetic conditions. The kinetic results obtained were interpreted using kinetic models of power-law type and Eley-Rideal. The results obtained indicate that catalyst Y-Cr is more active than Y-Co catalyst. The greater activity of catalyst exchanged with Cr can be attributed to the higher acidity that presented these catalysts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Process for Coating Substrates with Catalytic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klelin, Ric J. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for forming catalysts by coating substrates with two or more catalytic components, which comprises the following sequence of steps. First, the substrate is infused with an adequate amount of solution having a starting material comprising a catalytic component precursor, wherein the thermal decomposition product of the catalytic component precursor is a catalytic component. Second, the excess of the solution is removed from the substrate. thereby leaving a coating of the catalytic component precursor on the surface of the substrate. Third, the coating of the catalytic component precursor is converted to the catalytic component by thermal decomposition. Finally, the coated substance is etched to increase the surface area. The list three steps are then repeated for at least a second catalytic component. This process is ideally suited for application in producing efficient low temperature oxidation catalysts.

  2. Exchange frequency in replica exchange molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindhikara, Daniel; Meng, Yilin; Roitberg, Adrian E.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the exchange-attempt frequency on sampling efficiency is studied in replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD). We show that sampling efficiency increases with increasing exchange-attempt frequency. This conclusion is contrary to a commonly expressed view in REMD. Five peptides (1-21 residues long) are studied with a spectrum of exchange-attempt rates. Convergence rates are gauged by comparing ensemble properties between fixed length test REMD simulations and longer reference simulations. To show the fundamental correlation between exchange frequency and convergence time, a simple model is designed and studied, displaying the same basic behavior of much more complex systems.

  3. Shape control of multi-material heterostructures for catalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habas, Susan Ellen

    Shape control of nanomaterials has become increasingly important, as many of their physical and chemical properties are highly dependent on morphology. A tremendous amount of effort has been spent in attempt to control these properties through manipulation of size, composition, and shape. Nanocrystal shape control for both single- and multiple-material systems, however, remains largely empirical and still presents a major challenge. In this dissertation, new methods are described for the rational synthetic design of heterostructures with controlled morphology which is essential for tailoring the catalytic properties of these multi-material systems. Catalytic activity and selectivity are governed by the nature of the catalyst surface, making shaped nanocrystals ideal substrates for understanding the influence of surface structure on heterogeneous catalysis at the nanoscale. First, synthetic methods were developed to produce catalytically active platinum nanocrystals with control over their shape and surface chemistry. Initially, the focus was on the removal of strongly-bound surface stabilizing molecules by ligand exchange to give catalytically clean surfaces. However, the presence of foreign ions used as a shape control agent to produce cubic, cuboctahedral, and octahedrally shaped nanocrystals was found to inhibit catalytic activity. In response, a method was developed for the shape control of uniform platinum nanoparticles stabilized by weakly interacting alkylammonium ions in the absence of foreign metal ions, which showed improved activity for ethylene hydrogenation. The next section describes the application of these highly-faceted platinum nanocrystals as nucleation centers for overgrowth of a secondary metal to obtain shape-controlled heterostructures. Seeded growth allows for the use of the surface structure and corresponding chemical identity of a well-defined seed to control nucleation and growth of another material. Cubic platinum seeds can direct the

  4. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R.

    1987-01-01

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  5. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R.

    1987-05-05

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  6. Catalytic conversion of methane to methanol using Cu-zeolites.

    PubMed

    Alayon, Evalyn Mae C; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Ranocchiari, Marco; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of methane to value-added liquid chemicals is a promising answer to the imminent demand for fuels and chemical synthesis materials in the advent of a dwindling petroleum supply. Current technology requires high energy input for the synthesis gas production, and is characterized by low overall selectivity, which calls for alternative reaction routes. The limitation to achieve high selectivity is the high C-H bond strength of methane. High-temperature reaction systems favor gas-phase radical reactions and total oxidation. This suggests that the catalysts for methane activation should be active at low temperatures. The enzymatic-inspired metal-exchanged zeolite systems apparently fulfill this need, however, methanol yield is low and a catalytic process cannot yet be established. Homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic systems have been described which stabilize the intermediate formed after the first C-H activation. The understanding of the reaction mechanism and the determination of the active metal sites are important for formulating strategies for the upgrade of methane conversion catalytic technologies.

  7. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, R.R.

    1984-07-16

    This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  8. Catalytic combustion of residual fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested using two grades of petroleum derived residual fuels at specified inlet air temperatures, pressures, and reference velocities. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were obtained. Steady state operation of the catalytic reactor required inlet air temperatures of at least 800 K. At lower inlet air temperatures, upstream burning in the premixing zone occurred which was probably caused by fuel deposition and accumulation on the premixing zone walls. Increasing the inlet air temperature prevented this occurrence. Both residual fuels contained about 0.5 percent nitrogen by weight. NO sub x emissions ranged from 50 to 110 ppm by volume at 15 percent excess O2. Conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x ranged from 25 to 50 percent.

  9. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  10. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  11. Catalytic σ-Bond Metathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznichenko, Alexander L.; Hultzsch, Kai C.

    This account summarizes information on recently reported applications of organo-rare-earth metal complexes in various catalytic transformations of small molecules. The σ-bond metathesis at d0rare-earth metal centers plays a pivotal role in carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond forming processes. Relevant mechanistic details are discussed and the focus of the review lies in practical applications of organo-rare-earth metal complexes.

  12. Thermodynamics of catalytic nanoparticle morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Sharma, Renu; Lin, Pin Ann

    Metallic nanoparticles are an important class of industrial catalysts. The variability of their properties and the environment in which they act, from their chemical nature & surface modification to their dispersion and support, allows their performance to be optimized for many chemical processes useful in, e.g., energy applications and other areas. Their large surface area to volume ratio, as well as varying sizes and faceting, in particular, makes them an efficient source for catalytically active sites. These characteristics of nanoparticles - i.e., their morphology - can often display intriguing behavior as a catalytic process progresses. We develop a thermodynamic model of nanoparticle morphology, one that captures the competition of surface energy with other interactions, to predict structural changes during catalytic processes. Comparing the model to environmental transmission electron microscope images of nickel nanoparticles during carbon nanotube (and other product) growth demonstrates that nickel deformation in response to the nanotube growth is due to a favorable interaction with carbon. Moreover, this deformation is halted due to insufficient volume of the particles. We will discuss the factors that influence morphology and also how the model can be used to extract interaction strengths from experimental observations.

  13. Development of novel catalytically active polymer-metal-nanocomposites based on activated foams and textile fibers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report the intermatrix synthesis of Ag nanoparticles in different polymeric matrices such as polyurethane foams and polyacrylonitrile or polyamide fibers. To apply this technique, the polymer must bear functional groups able to bind and retain the nanoparticle ion precursors while ions should diffuse through the matrix. Taking into account the nature of some of the chosen matrices, it was essential to try to activate the support material to obtain an acceptable value of ion exchange capacity. To evaluate the catalytic activity of the developed nanocomposites, a model catalytic reaction was carried out in batch experiments: the reduction of p-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride. PMID:23680063

  14. Development of novel catalytically active polymer-metal-nanocomposites based on activated foams and textile fibers.

    PubMed

    Domènech, Berta; Ziegler, Kharla K; Carrillo, Fernando; Muñoz, Maria; Muraviev, Dimitri N; Macanás, Jorge

    2013-05-16

    In this paper, we report the intermatrix synthesis of Ag nanoparticles in different polymeric matrices such as polyurethane foams and polyacrylonitrile or polyamide fibers. To apply this technique, the polymer must bear functional groups able to bind and retain the nanoparticle ion precursors while ions should diffuse through the matrix. Taking into account the nature of some of the chosen matrices, it was essential to try to activate the support material to obtain an acceptable value of ion exchange capacity. To evaluate the catalytic activity of the developed nanocomposites, a model catalytic reaction was carried out in batch experiments: the reduction of p-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride.

  15. Development of novel catalytically active polymer-metal-nanocomposites based on activated foams and textile fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domènech, Berta; Ziegler, Kharla K.; Carrillo, Fernando; Muñoz, Maria; Muraviev, Dimitri N.; Macanás, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we report the intermatrix synthesis of Ag nanoparticles in different polymeric matrices such as polyurethane foams and polyacrylonitrile or polyamide fibers. To apply this technique, the polymer must bear functional groups able to bind and retain the nanoparticle ion precursors while ions should diffuse through the matrix. Taking into account the nature of some of the chosen matrices, it was essential to try to activate the support material to obtain an acceptable value of ion exchange capacity. To evaluate the catalytic activity of the developed nanocomposites, a model catalytic reaction was carried out in batch experiments: the reduction of p-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride.

  16. Dynamic Responsive Systems for Catalytic Function.

    PubMed

    Vlatković, Matea; Collins, Beatrice S L; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-11-21

    Responsive systems have recently gained much interest in the scientific community in attempts to mimic dynamic functions in biological systems. One of the fascinating potential applications of responsive systems lies in catalysis. Inspired by nature, novel responsive catalytic systems have been built that show analogy with allosteric regulation of enzymes. The design of responsive catalytic systems allows control of catalytic activity and selectivity. In this Review, advances in the field over the last four decades are discussed and a comparison is made amongst the dynamic responsive systems based on the principles underlying their catalytic mechanisms. The catalyst systems are sorted according to the triggers used to achieve control of the catalytic activity and the distinct catalytic reactions illustrated. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Indiana Health Information Exchange

    Cancer.gov

    The Indiana Health Information Exchange is comprised of various Indiana health care institutions, established to help improve patient safety and is recognized as a best practice for health information exchange.

  18. An update on catalytic reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, D.H.; Moser, M.D.; Haizmann, R.S.

    1996-10-01

    The UOP Platforming process is a catalytic reforming process in widespread use throughout the petroleum and petrochemical industries. Since the first unit went onstream in 1949, the process has become a standard feature in refineries worldwide. Over the years, significant improvements have been made in process catalysts and process design. The most recent improvement is the combination of a catalyst called R-72 with a new patented flow scheme, R-72 staged loading, which gives significantly higher yields and provides increased catalyst stability. In this article, the authors describe two types of Platforming processes and the new R-72 staged loading scheme.

  19. Catalytic membranes for fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2011-04-19

    A fuel cell of the present invention comprises a cathode and an anode, one or both of the anode and the cathode including a catalyst comprising a bundle of longitudinally aligned graphitic carbon nanotubes including a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally and atomically distributed throughout the graphitic carbon walls of said nanotubes. The nanotubes also include nitrogen atoms and/or ions chemically bonded to the graphitic carbon and to the transition metal. Preferably, the transition metal comprises at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, and Cr.

  20. Catalytic Decoupling of Quantum Information.

    PubMed

    Majenz, Christian; Berta, Mario; Dupuis, Frédéric; Renner, Renato; Christandl, Matthias

    2017-02-24

    The decoupling technique is a fundamental tool in quantum information theory with applications ranging from thermodynamics to many-body physics and black hole radiation whereby a quantum system is decoupled from another one by discarding an appropriately chosen part of it. Here, we introduce catalytic decoupling, i.e., decoupling with the help of an independent system. Thereby, we remove a restriction on the standard decoupling notion and present a tight characterization in terms of the max-mutual information. The novel notion unifies various tasks and leads to a resource theory of decoupling.

  1. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  2. Catalytic cracking of heavy oils

    SciTech Connect

    Otterstedt, J.E.; Gevert, B.; Sterte, J. )

    1987-08-01

    Of the many factors which influence product yields in a fluid catalytic cracker, the feed stock quality and the catalyst composition are of particular interest as they can be controlled only to a limited extent by the refiner. In the past decade there has been a trend towards using heavier feedstocks in the FCC-unit, which is expected to continue in the foreseeable future. It is therefore important to study how molecular types, characteristic not only of heavy petroleum oil but also of e.g. coal liquid, shale oil and biomass oil, respond to cracking over catalysts of different compositions.

  3. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  4. A sustainable catalytic pyrrole synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlik, Stefan; Kempe, Rhett

    2013-02-01

    The pyrrole heterocycle is a prominent chemical motif and is found widely in natural products, drugs, catalysts and advanced materials. Here we introduce a sustainable iridium-catalysed pyrrole synthesis in which secondary alcohols and amino alcohols are deoxygenated and linked selectively via the formation of C-N and C-C bonds. Two equivalents of hydrogen gas are eliminated in the course of the reaction, and alcohols based entirely on renewable resources can be used as starting materials. The catalytic synthesis protocol tolerates a large variety of functional groups, which includes olefins, chlorides, bromides, organometallic moieties, amines and hydroxyl groups. We have developed a catalyst that operates efficiently under mild conditions.

  5. Industrial heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A.J.; Liang, W.W.; Richlen, S.L.; Tabb, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on the use of heat exchangers in the industrial plants. Topics considered include the US DOE and GRI research programs, advanced fixed boundary heat exchanger technology, commercial heat exchanger applications, thermo-hydraulic performance of heat-transfer equipment, field tests, the corrosion of heat exchanger materials, economics, cost benefit analysis, payback, and advanced assembly and materials.

  6. Platinum-gold cluster catalysts for D{sub 2}(gas)/H{sub 2}O(liquid) isotope exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Aubart, M.A.; Dor Koch, J.F.; Pignolet, L.H.

    1994-08-31

    The authors developed a homogeneous catalytic system for exchange of deuterium onto water. Platinum-gold phosphine cations catylze this exchange in pyridine. The authors probed these reactions kinetically and studied the catalysts by NMR allowing them to propose a reaction mechanism.

  7. Mechanisms and Kinetics of Catalytic Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    CHEMICAL RESEARCH, r- DEVELOPMENT 5 N ENGINEERING CRDE-R-084 "" CENTER CENER(GC-TR-1728-008) ’ 04 N MECHANISMS AND KINETICS OF CATALYTIC REACTIONS Q...and Kinetics of Catalytic Reactions &AUTHOR(S) Garlick, Stephanie M. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS(ES) . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Tables........................87 vi MECHANISMS AND KINETICS OF CATALYTIC REACTIONS 1. INTRODUCTION The hydrolysis of phosphate esters in microemulsion

  8. Charge exchange system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  9. Catalytic microrotor driven by geometrical asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingcheng; Ripoll, Marisol; Chen, Ke

    2015-02-07

    An asymmetric gear with homogeneous surface properties is, here, presented as a prototype to fabricate catalytic microrotors. The driving torque arises from the diffusiophoretic effect induced by the concentration gradients generated by catalytic chemical reactions at the gear surface. This torque produces a spontaneous and unidirectional rotation of the asymmetric gear. By means of mesoscopic simulations, we prove and characterize this scenario. The gear rotational velocity is determined by the gear-solvent interactions, the gear geometry, the solvent viscosity, and the catalytic reaction ratio. Our work presents a simple way to design self-propelled microrotors, alternative to existing catalytic bi-component, or thermophoretic ones.

  10. Catalytic microrotor driven by geometrical asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingcheng; Ripoll, Marisol; Chen, Ke

    2015-02-01

    An asymmetric gear with homogeneous surface properties is, here, presented as a prototype to fabricate catalytic microrotors. The driving torque arises from the diffusiophoretic effect induced by the concentration gradients generated by catalytic chemical reactions at the gear surface. This torque produces a spontaneous and unidirectional rotation of the asymmetric gear. By means of mesoscopic simulations, we prove and characterize this scenario. The gear rotational velocity is determined by the gear-solvent interactions, the gear geometry, the solvent viscosity, and the catalytic reaction ratio. Our work presents a simple way to design self-propelled microrotors, alternative to existing catalytic bi-component, or thermophoretic ones.

  11. Catalytic oxidizers and Title V requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Uberoi, M.; Rach, S.E.

    1999-07-01

    Catalytic oxidizers have been used to reduce VOC emissions from various industries including printing, chemical, paint, coatings, etc. A catalytic oxidizer uses a catalyst to reduce the operating temperature for combustion to approximately 600 F, which is substantially lower than thermal oxidation unit. Title V requirements have renewed the debate on the best methods to assure compliance of catalytic oxidizers, with some suggesting the need for continuous emission monitoring equipment. This paper will discuss the various aspects of catalytic oxidation and consider options such as monitoring inlet/outlet temperatures, delta T across the catalyst, periodic laboratory testing of catalyst samples, and preventive maintenance procedures as means of assuring continuous compliance.

  12. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  13. Evolution of a Catalytic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rauwerdink, Alissa; Lunzer, Mark; Devamani, Titu; Jones, Bryan; Mooney, Joanna; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Xu, Jian-He; Kazlauskas, Romas J.; Dean, Antony M.

    2016-01-01

    The means by which superfamilies of specialized enzymes arise by gene duplication and functional divergence are poorly understood. The escape from adaptive conflict hypothesis, which posits multiple copies of a gene encoding a primitive inefficient and highly promiscuous generalist ancestor, receives support from experiments showing that resurrected ancestral enzymes are indeed more substrate-promiscuous than their modern descendants. Here, we provide evidence in support of an alternative model, the innovation–amplification–divergence hypothesis, which posits a single-copied ancestor as efficient and specific as any modern enzyme. We argue that the catalytic mechanisms of plant esterases and descendent acetone cyanohydrin lyases are incompatible with each other (e.g., the reactive substrate carbonyl must bind in opposite orientations in the active site). We then show that resurrected ancestral plant esterases are as catalytically specific as modern esterases, that the ancestor of modern acetone cyanohydrin lyases was itself only very weakly promiscuous, and that improvements in lyase activity came at the expense of esterase activity. These observations support the innovation–amplification–divergence hypothesis, in which an ancestor gains a weak promiscuous activity that is improved by selection at the expense of the ancestral activity, and not the escape from adaptive conflict in which an inefficient generalist ancestral enzyme steadily loses promiscuity throughout the transition to a highly active specialized modern enzyme. PMID:26681154

  14. Ion exchange and adsorption on low rank coals for liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vorres, K.S.

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of this program are to study the application of catalysts and the catalysis of liquefaction of low rank coals. Ion exchange and adsorption techniques are being used or modified to incorporate catalytically active metals (Fe, Co, Ni and Mo) in relatively small (100-2000 ppM) quantities into coal samples. Relative oil yields are being determined by PETC and Auburn University workers as collaborators to establish the effectiveness of the catalyst incorporation techniques. It is hoped that these techniques will provide highly active forms of the catalyst in low concentrations to minimize the need for metals recovery. A two step preparation of the coal is used to (1) remove material which both limits oil conversion and prepares for the addition of exchangeable catalyst, and (2) add catalytically active material which enhances the conversion of the coal matter to the oil fraction in the processing.

  15. Approximate strip exchanging.

    PubMed

    Roy, Swapnoneel; Thakur, Ashok Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Genome rearrangements have been modelled by a variety of primitives such as reversals, transpositions, block moves and block interchanges. We consider such a genome rearrangement primitive Strip Exchanges. Given a permutation, the challenge is to sort it by using minimum number of strip exchanges. A strip exchanging move interchanges the positions of two chosen strips so that they merge with other strips. The strip exchange problem is to sort a permutation using minimum number of strip exchanges. We present here the first non-trivial 2-approximation algorithm to this problem. We also observe that sorting by strip-exchanges is fixed-parameter-tractable. Lastly we discuss the application of strip exchanges in a different area Optical Character Recognition (OCR) with an example.

  16. Nitrene Metathesis and Catalytic Nitrene Transfer Promoted by Niobium Bis(imido) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Benjamin M; Bergman, Robert G; Arnold, John

    2016-01-13

    We report a metathesis reaction in which a nitrene fragment from an isocyanide ligand is exchanged with a nitrene fragment of an imido ligand in a series of niobium bis(imido) complexes. One of these bis(imido) complexes also promotes nitrene transfer to catalytically generate asymmetric dialkylcarbodiimides from azides and isocyanides in a process involving the Nb(V)/Nb(III) redox couple.

  17. Manned Evaluation of a Diver Heater for SDV Applications Using Hydrogen Catalytic Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    DIVER HEATER FOR SDV APPLICATIONS USING HYDROGEN CATALYTIC REACTIONS GAS CIRCUIT The basic heater design uses a gas ejector pump to recirculate the gas...entrance of the gas ejector pump. In this manner the hydrogen is mixed inside the pressure vessel with the recirculated gas and the fresh incoming air to...recirculatory flow then passes through a gas-to-water heat exchanger where the heat is removed and some of the water vapor condenses . The recirculatory flow then

  18. Formation of a Metalloporphyrin-Based Nanoreactor by Postsynthetic Metal-Ion Exchange of a Polyhedral-Cage Containing a Metal-Metalloporphyrin Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xi-Sen; Chrzanowski, Matthew; Wojtas, Lukasz; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Ma, Shengqian

    2013-03-19

    A change for the better: Exchange of CdII in the catalytically inactive framework MMPF-5 (see scheme) with CoII afforded a metalloporphyrin-based nanoreactor, MMPF-5(Co). This framework, consisting of small cubicuboctahedral cages, demonstrated interesting performances in the catalytic epoxidation of trans-stilbene with tBuOOH.

  19. Ion exchange and adsorption on low rank coals for liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vorres, K.S.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this program involve the study of the catalysis of liquefaction of low rank coals. Ion exchange and adsorption techniques are being used or modified to incorporate catalytically active metals into coal samples. Relative oil yields will be determined by Sandia National Laboratory and PETC collaborators to establish the effectiveness of the catalyst incorporation techniques. This report describes work done over the past 12 months of an on-going project.

  20. Catalytic Leadership: Strategies for an Interconnected World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Jeffrey S.

    A catalytic leader brings together diverse individuals from multiple agencies to address intractable public problems. Strategies for promoting catalytic leadership are explored. The book opens with a review of the problems facing public leaders, emphasizing the complexity and interconnectedness of problems in the public sphere. The book highlights…

  1. Catalytic Leadership: Strategies for an Interconnected World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Jeffrey S.

    A catalytic leader brings together diverse individuals from multiple agencies to address intractable public problems. Strategies for promoting catalytic leadership are explored. The book opens with a review of the problems facing public leaders, emphasizing the complexity and interconnectedness of problems in the public sphere. The book highlights…

  2. Catalytic Radical Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sebren, Leanne J; Devery, James J; Stephenson, Corey R J

    2014-02-07

    Catalytic radical-based domino reactions represent important advances in synthetic organic chemistry. Their development benefits synthesis by providing atom- and step-economical methods to complex molecules. Intricate combinations of radical, cationic, anionic, oxidative/reductive, and transition metal mechanistic steps result in cyclizations, additions, fragmentations, ring-expansions, and rearrangements. This Perspective summarizes recent developments in the field of catalytic domino processes.

  3. Catalytic reactor with improved burner

    DOEpatents

    Faitani, Joseph J.; Austin, George W.; Chase, Terry J.; Suljak, George T.; Misage, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    To more uniformly distribute heat to the plurality of catalyst tubes in a catalytic reaction furnace, the burner disposed in the furnace above the tops of the tubes includes concentric primary and secondary annular fuel and air outlets. The fuel-air mixture from the primary outlet is directed towards the tubes adjacent the furnace wall, and the burning secondary fuel-air mixture is directed horizontally from the secondary outlet and a portion thereof is deflected downwardly by a slotted baffle toward the tubes in the center of the furnace while the remaining portion passes through the slotted baffle to another baffle disposed radially outwardly therefrom which deflects it downwardly in the vicinity of the tubes between those in the center and those near the wall of the furnace.

  4. APPARATUS FOR CATALYTICALLY COMBINING GASES

    DOEpatents

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    A convection type recombiner is described for catalytically recombining hydrogen and oxygen which have been radiolytically decomposed in an aqueous homogeneous nuclear reactor. The device is so designed that the energy of recombination is used to circulate the gas mixture over the catalyst. The device consists of a vertical cylinder having baffles at its lower enda above these coarse screens having platinum and alumina pellets cemented thereon, and an annular passage for the return of recombined, condensed water to the reactor moderator system. This devicea having no moving parts, provides a simple and efficient means of removing the danger of accumulated hot radioactive, explosive gases, and restoring them to the moderator system for reuse.

  5. Catalytic cartridge SO3 decomposer

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, T.R.

    1982-05-25

    A catalytic cartridge surrounding a heat pipe driven by a heat source is utilized as a SO3 decomposer for thermochemical hydrogen production. The cartridge has two embodiments, a crossflow cartridge and an axial flow cartridge. In the cross-flow cartridge, SO3 gas is flowed through a chamber and incident normally to a catalyst coated tube extending through the chamber, the catalyst coated tube surrounding the heat pipe. In the axialflow cartridge, so3 gas is flowed through the annular space between concentric inner and outer cylindrical walls, the inner cylindrical wall being coated by a catalyst and surrounding the heat pipe. The modular cartridge decomposer provides high thermal efficiency, high conversion efficiency, and increased safety.

  6. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  7. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  8. Catalytic hydrocracking of heavy oils

    SciTech Connect

    Khulbe, C.P.; Patmore, D.J.; Pruden, B.B.; Ranganathan, R.

    1983-01-25

    An improved process is described for the hydrocracking of heavy hydrocarbon oil, such as oils extracted from tar sands. The charge oil in the presence of an excess of hydrogen is passed through a tubular hydrocracking zone, and the effluent emerging from the top of the zone is separated into a gaseous stream containing a wide boiling range material and a liquid stream containing heavy hydrocarbons. According to the novel feature, the hydrocracking process is carried out in the presence of a catalyst consisting of finely divided coal or other carbonaceous material carrying catalytically active metals from group via and group viii of the periodic table of elements, E.G. Cobalt and molybdenum. The catalyst is slurried with the charge stock and has been found to greatly reduce coke precursors and thereby prevent the formation of carbonaceous deposits in the reaction zone while also being effective in reducing the sulfur concentration of the product.

  9. Method of fabricating a catalytic structure

    DOEpatents

    Rollins, Harry W [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID; Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-22

    A precursor to a catalytic structure comprising zinc oxide and copper oxide. The zinc oxide has a sheet-like morphology or a spherical morphology and the copper oxide comprises particles of copper oxide. The copper oxide is reduced to copper, producing the catalytic structure. The catalytic structure is fabricated by a hydrothermal process. A reaction mixture comprising a zinc salt, a copper salt, a hydroxyl ion source, and a structure-directing agent is formed. The reaction mixture is heated under confined volume conditions to produce the precursor. The copper oxide in the precursor is reduced to copper. A method of hydrogenating a carbon oxide using the catalytic structure is also disclosed, as is a system that includes the catalytic structure.

  10. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen/oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.; Zurawski, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a unique monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant inlet temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of a catalytic igniter. The test results showed that the gaseous hydrogen/oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using both the granular and monolithic catalysts are presented. The capabilities of a facility constructed to conduct the igniter testing and the advantages of a catalytic igniter over other ignition systems for gaseous hydrogen and oxygen are also discussed.

  11. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalyst are presented.

  12. Diesel engine catalytic combustor system. [aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ream, L. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low compression turbocharged diesel engine is provided in which the turbocharger can be operated independently of the engine to power auxiliary equipment. Fuel and air are burned in a catalytic combustor to drive the turbine wheel of turbine section which is initially caused to rotate by starter motor. By opening a flapper value, compressed air from the blower section is directed to catalytic combustor when it is heated and expanded, serving to drive the turbine wheel and also to heat the catalytic element. To start, engine valve is closed, combustion is terminated in catalytic combustor, and the valve is then opened to utilize air from the blower for the air driven motor. When the engine starts, the constituents in its exhaust gas react in the catalytic element and the heat generated provides additional energy for the turbine section.

  13. Silver nanocluster catalytic microreactors for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, B.; Habibi, M.; Ognier, S.; Schelcher, G.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Khalesifard, H. R. M.; Tatoulian, M.; Bonn, D.

    2016-07-01

    A new method for the elaboration of a novel type of catalytic microsystem with a high specific area catalyst is developed. A silver nanocluster catalytic microreactor was elaborated by doping a soda-lime glass with a silver salt. By applying a high power laser beam to the glass, silver nanoclusters are obtained at one of the surfaces which were characterized by BET measurements and AFM. A microfluidic chip was obtained by sealing the silver coated glass with a NOA 81 microchannel. The catalytic activity of the silver nanoclusters was then tested for the efficiency of water purification by using catalytic ozonation to oxidize an organic pollutant. The silver nanoclusters were found to be very stable in the microreactor and efficiently oxidized the pollutant, in spite of the very short residence times in the microchannel. This opens the way to study catalytic reactions in microchannels without the need of introducing the catalyst as a powder or manufacturing complex packed bed microreactors.

  14. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalysts are presented.

  15. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalysts are presented.

  16. Catalytic converter with thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The unique design of an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) and the inclusion of an ECO valve in the exhaust of an internal combustion engine will meet the strict new emission requirements, especially at vehicle cold start, adopted by several states in this country as well as in Europe and Japan. The catalytic converter (CC) has been a most useful tool in pollution abatement for the automobile. But the emission requirements are becoming more stringent and, along with other improvements, the CC must be improved to meet these new standards. Coupled with the ECO valve, the EHC can meet these new emission limits. In an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV), approximately 80% of the energy consumed leaves the vehicle as waste heat: out the tail pipe, through the radiator, or convected/radiated off the engine. Included with the waste heat out the tail pipe are the products of combustion which must meet strict emission requirements. The design of a new CC is presented here. This is an automobile CC that has the capability of producing electrical power and reducing the quantity of emissions at vehicle cold start, the Thermoelectric Catalytic Power Generator. The CC utilizes the energy of the exothermic reactions that take place in the catalysis substrate to produce electrical energy with a thermoelectric generator. On vehicle cold start, the thermoelectric generator is used as a heat pump to heat the catalyst substrate to reduce the time to catalyst light-off. Thus an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) will be used to augment the abatement of tail pipe emissions. Included with the EHC in the exhaust stream of the automobile is the ECO valve. This valve restricts the flow of pollutants out the tail pipe of the vehicle for a specified amount of time until the EHC comes up to operating temperature. Then the ECO valve opens and allows the full exhaust, now treated by the EHC, to leave the vehicle.

  17. Experimental Investigation in Order to Determine Catalytic Package Performances in Case of Tritium Transfer from Water to Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bornea, Anisia; Peculea, M.; Zamfirache, M.; Varlam, Carmen

    2005-07-15

    The processes for hydrogen isotope's separation are very important for nuclear technology. One of the most important processes for tritium separation, is the catalyst isotope exchange water-hydrogen.Our catalytic package consists of Romanian patented catalysts with platinum on charcoal and polytetrafluoretylene (Pt/C/PTFE) and the ordered Romanian patented package B7 type. The catalytic package was tested in an isotope exchange facility for water detritiation at the Experimental Pilot Plant from ICIT Rm.Valcea.In a column of isotope exchange tritium is transferred from liquid phase (tritiated heavy water) in gaseous phase (hydrogen). In the experimental set-up, which was used, the column of catalytic isotope exchange is filled with successive layers of catalyst and ordered package. The catalyst consists of 95.5 wt.% of PTFE, 4.1 wt. % of carbon and 0.40 wt. % of platinum and was of Raschig rings 10 x 10 x 2 mm. The ordered package was B7 type consists of wire mesh phosphor bronze 4 x 1 wire and the mesh dimension is 0.18 x 0.48 mm.We analyzed the transfer phenomena of tritium from liquid to gaseous phase, in this system.The mass transfer coefficient which characterized the isotopic exchange on the package, were determined as function of experimental parameters.

  18. Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure by combusting the

  19. Catalytically active single-atom niobium in graphitic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Guo, Junjie; Guan, Pengfei; Liu, Chunjing; Huang, Hao; Xue, Fanghong; Dong, Xinglong; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2013-05-01

    Carbides of groups IV through VI (Ti, V and Cr groups) have long been proposed as substitutes for noble metal-based electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. However, their catalytic activity has been extremely limited because of the low density and stability of catalytically active sites. Here we report the excellent performance of a niobium-carbon structure for catalysing the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. A large number of single niobium atoms and ultra small clusters trapped in graphitic layers are directly identified using state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. This structure not only enhances the overall conductivity for accelerating the exchange of ions and electrons, but it suppresses the chemical/thermal coarsening of the active particles. Experimental results coupled with theory calculations reveal that the single niobium atoms incorporated within the graphitic layers produce a redistribution of d-band electrons and become surprisingly active for O2 adsorption and dissociation, and also exhibit high stability.

  20. Studies on the catalytic mechanism of pig purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Wynne, C J; Hamilton, S E; Dionysius, D A; Beck, J L; de Jersey, J

    1995-05-10

    Several independent experiments failed to reveal any evidence in support of the involvement of a phosphoryl-enzyme intermediate in the catalytic mechanism of pig allantoic fluid purple acid phosphatase: (i) attempts to label enzyme with phosphate derived from [32P]p-nitrophenyl phosphate were unsuccessful; (ii) values of kcat for a series of phosphate derivative varied over a wide range, with the enzyme showing a marked preference for activated ester and anhydride substrates over those with a stable leaving group; (iii) burst titrations revealed a "burst" of p-nitrophenol from p-nitrophenyl phosphate only when the enzyme was added after the substrate, suggesting that this result was an artifact of the order of addition of reagents; (iv) transphosphorylation from p-nitrophenyl phosphate to acceptor alcohols could not be detected, even under conditions where a transphosphorylation to hydrolysis ratio as low as 0.015 could have been measured; (v) enzyme-catalyzed exchange of 180 between phosphate and water was demonstrated, although at a rate much slower than that observed for other phosphatases where the involvement of a phosphoryl-enzyme intermediate in the mechanism has been clearly established. The present results are compared with those obtained in similar studies on other phosphatases, particularly the highly homologous beef spleen purple acid phosphatase, and their implications for the catalytic mechanism of the purple acid phosphatases are discussed.

  1. Nonsurvivable momentum exchange system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell (Inventor); Ahronovich, Eliezer (Inventor); Davis, III, Milton C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A demiseable momentum exchange system includes a base and a flywheel rotatably supported on the base. The flywheel includes a web portion defining a plurality of web openings and a rim portion. The momentum exchange system further includes a motor for driving the flywheel and a cover for engaging the base to substantially enclose the flywheel. The system may also include components having a melting temperature below 1500 degrees Celsius. The momentum exchange system is configured to demise on reentry.

  2. Laser Processed Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Scott

    2017-01-01

    The Laser Processed Heat Exchanger project will investigate the use of laser processed surfaces to reduce mass and volume in liquid/liquid heat exchangers as well as the replacement of the harmful and problematic coatings of the Condensing Heat Exchangers (CHX). For this project, two scale unit test articles will be designed, manufactured, and tested. These two units are a high efficiency liquid/liquid HX and a high reliability CHX.

  3. Text Exchange System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. V.; Hanson, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Text Exchange System (TES) exchanges and maintains organized textual information including source code, documentation, data, and listings. System consists of two computer programs and definition of format for information storage. Comprehensive program used to create, read, and maintain TES files. TES developed to meet three goals: First, easy and efficient exchange of programs and other textual data between similar and dissimilar computer systems via magnetic tape. Second, provide transportable management system for textual information. Third, provide common user interface, over wide variety of computing systems, for all activities associated with text exchange.

  4. Topological entropy of catalytic sets: Hypercycles revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardanyés, Josep; Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of catalytic networks have been widely studied over the last decades because of their implications in several fields like prebiotic evolution, virology, neural networks, immunology or ecology. One of the most studied mathematical bodies for catalytic networks was initially formulated in the context of prebiotic evolution, by means of the hypercycle theory. The hypercycle is a set of self-replicating species able to catalyze other replicator species within a cyclic architecture. Hypercyclic organization might arise from a quasispecies as a way to increase the informational containt surpassing the so-called error threshold. The catalytic coupling between replicators makes all the species to behave like a single and coherent evolutionary multimolecular unit. The inherent nonlinearities of catalytic interactions are responsible for the emergence of several types of dynamics, among them, chaos. In this article we begin with a brief review of the hypercycle theory focusing on its evolutionary implications as well as on different dynamics associated to different types of small catalytic networks. Then we study the properties of chaotic hypercycles with error-prone replication with symbolic dynamics theory, characterizing, by means of the theory of topological Markov chains, the topological entropy and the periods of the orbits of unimodal-like iterated maps obtained from the strange attractor. We will focus our study on some key parameters responsible for the structure of the catalytic network: mutation rates, autocatalytic and cross-catalytic interactions.

  5. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    DOEpatents

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  6. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Zhiqi

    2016-01-01

    This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines. PMID:28144327

  7. The world of catalytic nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Luc

    2001-08-01

    The finding by Tom Cech and Sydney Altman that RNA can be both informational and catalytic is the pillar on which the RNA world hypothesis stands. This hypothesis relies on the premise that RNA can catalyze its own replication, can synthesize proteins and can chemically sustain a primitive metabolism. This paper presents an overview of the catalytic potential of nucleic acids that have been uncovered the past 10 years by in vitro evolution techniques. Besides the fact that new catalytic nucleic acids uphold the prevalence of RNA at an early stage of life, they can have interesting applications in therapeutics, biotechnology and nanotechnology.

  8. Direct catalytic decomposition of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.; Zhang, Yanping

    1993-07-01

    This project investigates a suitable catalyst system for the direct NO decomposition in post-combustion gas. streams. The process does not use a reductant, such as the ammonia used in Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} to nitrogen. Therefore, it is a greatly simplified process basically involving passing the flue gas through a catalytic converter. Catalysts are prepared by incorporating metal cations into zeolite supports according to ion exchange procedures widely used in preparation of metal/zeolite catalysts. The catalysts of primary interest include copper, palladium, silver, and nickel exchanged ZSM-5 catalysts. Particular emphasis is given in this work on promoted Cu-exchanged zeolites, especially the catalyst system Mg/Cu-ZSM-5 and a few others, which are promising for NO conversion to nitrogen at typical flue gas 0{sub 2} and NO levels and over the temperature range of 723-873K. Effects of zeolite modification, copper exchange level and catalyst preparation conditions on the catalyst activity are studied in a packed-bed microreactor. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reduction (TPR) experiments will be carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a single-particle electrodynamic balance (EDB). Kinetic studies of NO and 0{sub 2} interaction with catalysts over a wide temperature range as well as catalyst structural investigations are planned.

  9. Characterization of nicotinamidases: steady state kinetic parameters, classwide inhibition by nicotinaldehydes, and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    French, Jarrod B; Cen, Yana; Vrablik, Tracy L; Xu, Ping; Allen, Eleanor; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Sauve, Anthony A

    2010-12-14

    Nicotinamidases are metabolic enzymes that hydrolyze nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are widely distributed across biology, with examples found encoded in the genomes of Mycobacteria, Archaea, Eubacteria, Protozoa, yeast, and invertebrates, but there are none found in mammals. Although recent structural work has improved our understanding of these enzymes, their catalytic mechanism is still not well understood. Recent data show that nicotinamidases are required for the growth and virulence of several pathogenic microbes. The enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Caenorhabditis elegans regulate life span in their respective organisms, consistent with proposed roles in the regulation of NAD(+) metabolism and organismal aging. In this work, the steady state kinetic parameters of nicotinamidase enzymes from C. elegans, Sa. cerevisiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae (a pathogen responsible for human pneumonia), Borrelia burgdorferi (the pathogen that causes Lyme disease), and Plasmodium falciparum (responsible for most human malaria) are reported. Nicotinamidases are generally efficient catalysts with steady state k(cat) values typically exceeding 1 s(-1). The K(m) values for nicotinamide are low and in the range of 2 -110 μM. Nicotinaldehyde was determined to be a potent competitive inhibitor of these enzymes, binding in the low micromolar to low nanomolar range for all nicotinamidases tested. A variety of nicotinaldehyde derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors in kinetic assays. Inhibitions are consistent with reaction of the universally conserved catalytic Cys on each enzyme with the aldehyde carbonyl carbon to form a thiohemiacetal complex that is stabilized by a conserved oxyanion hole. The S. pneumoniae nicotinamidase can catalyze exchange of (18)O into the carboxy oxygens of nicotinic acid with H(2)(18)O. The collected data, along with kinetic analysis of several mutants, allowed us to propose a catalytic

  10. PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    R. Q. LONG; R.T. YANG

    1998-09-30

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} by hydrocarbons was investigated on Pt doped MCM-41 and copper ion and/or cerium ion-exchanged Al-MCM-41 in the presence of excess oxygen. It was found that Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts reported in the literature, such as Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pt/ZSM-5. For different hydrocarbons, the catalytic activity decreased according to the sequence of C{sub 3}H{sub 6} {approx} C{sub 2}H{sub 4} >> C{sub 3}H{sub 8} > CH{sub 4}. This catalyst was also stable in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. Cu exchanged Al-MCM-41 and cerium promoted Cu-Al-MCM-41 (i.e., Ce-Cu-Al-MCM-41) were also found to be active in this reaction. Higher NO{sub x} conversions to N2 were obtained on the Ce-Cu-Al-MCM-41 as compared with Cu-Al-MCM-41. The activity of Ce-Cu-Al-MCM-41 was approximately the same as that of Cu-ZSM-5; but the former had a wider temperature window. TPR results indicated that only isolated Cu{sup 2+} and Cu{sup +} ions were detected in the Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged Al-MCM-41 samples, which may play an important role in the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. After some cerium ions were introduced into Cu-Al-MCM-41, Cu{sup 2+} in the molecular sieve became more easily reducible by H{sub 2}. This may be related to the increase of catalytic activity of NO{sub x} reduction by ethylene.

  11. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.; Root, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  12. Building Relationships through Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primavera, Angi; Hall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    From the moment of birth, children form and develop relationships with others in their world based on exchange. Children recognize that engaging in such encounters offers them the opportunity to enter into a relationship with another individual and to nurture that relationship through the exchange of messages and gifts, items and ideas. At Boulder…

  13. Higher Education Exchange, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape…

  14. Building Relationships through Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primavera, Angi; Hall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    From the moment of birth, children form and develop relationships with others in their world based on exchange. Children recognize that engaging in such encounters offers them the opportunity to enter into a relationship with another individual and to nurture that relationship through the exchange of messages and gifts, items and ideas. At Boulder…

  15. Higher Education Exchange, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape…

  16. Higher Education Exchange, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  17. The Children's Art Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Nancy

    1989-01-01

    Describes Vermont's Art Exchange Program and its goal of sensitizing Soviet and U.S. children to the common humanity they share. Discusses this program's attempts to break down barriers of fear and stereotyping by promoting the exchange of art and writing between children. (KO)

  18. Higher Education Exchange, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape…

  19. Higher Education Exchange, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" discuss the concept of growing public scholars; each contribution incorporates a student component. Articles…

  20. Money and Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walstad, William B.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    This teaching guide begins with an explanation of the role of money in the economy, focusing on its circulation or exchange. The use of money as a unit of account, a store of value, and a medium of exchange are explained. Three brief teaching units are included. The grade K-2 unit, "Money Counts," provides games and activities which develop the…

  1. Higher Education Exchange, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The Higher Education Exchange is part of a movement to strengthen higher education's democratic mission and foster a more democratic culture throughout American society. Working in this tradition, the Higher Education Exchange publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic…

  2. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Catton

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics )pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger disign.

  3. Halogen Chemistry on Catalytic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moser, Maximilian; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Halogens are key building blocks for the manufacture of high-value products such as chemicals, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. The catalytic oxidation of HCl and HBr is an attractive route to recover chlorine and bromine in order to ensure the sustainability of the production processes. Very few materials withstand the high corrosiveness and the strong exothermicity of the reactions and among them RuO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have been successfully applied in HCl oxidation. The search for efficient systems for HBr oxidation was initiated by extrapolating the results of HCl oxidation based on the chemical similarity of these reactions. Interestingly, despite its inactivity in HCl oxidation, TiO2 was found to be an outstanding HBr oxidation catalyst, which highlighted that the latter reaction is more complex than previously assumed. Herein, we discuss the results of recent comparative studies of HCl and HBr oxidation on both rutile-type (RuO2, IrO2, and TiO2) and ceria-based catalysts using a combination of advanced experimental and theoretical methods to provide deeper molecular-level understanding of the reactions. This knowledge aids the design of the next-generation catalysts for halogen recycling.

  4. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  5. Fundamental studies of catalytic gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1991-03-01

    Studies of the catalytic steam gasification of carbon solids continued. A considerable number of important findings have been made. Recently limited experimentation has been carried out on the production of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons from methane in the presence of Ca/K/Ni oxide catalysts and of oxygen, carbon and water. The main finding thus far has been that C{sub 2} yields of 10--13% can be obtained at about 600{degrees}C or 150{degrees} lower temperature than described in the literature for similar yields. Yields of 7--10% C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at 99+% selectivity have been obtained. The presence of water and small amounts of oxygen is essential. Yields of this magnitude may be attractive since there is no loss of methane to valueless by-products, no purification of the recycle steam is required and no oxygen is used to burn methane. Further improvement in yields by catalyst and operating conditions modification will be investigated. It is also intended to clarify the chemistry which inhibits burning of methane to carbon oxides. Work is discussed on gasification of petroleum cokes and oxidative methane coupling. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Catalytic Chemistry on Oxide Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Asthagiri, Aravind; Dixon, David A.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.; Rodriquez, Jose A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Stacchiola, Dario; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-05-29

    Metal oxides represent one of the most important and widely employed materials in catalysis. Extreme variability of their chemistry provides a unique opportunity to tune their properties and to utilize them for the design of highly active and selective catalysts. For bulk oxides, this can be achieved by varying their stoichiometry, phase, exposed surface facets, defect, dopant densities and numerous other ways. Further, distinct properties from those of bulk oxides can be attained by restricting the oxide dimensionality and preparing them in the form of ultrathin films and nanoclusters as discussed throughout this book. In this chapter we focus on demonstrating such unique catalytic properties brought by the oxide nanoscaling. In the highlighted studies planar models are carefully designed to achieve minimal dispersion of structural motifs and to attain detailed mechanistic understanding of targeted chemical transformations. Detailed level of morphological and structural characterization necessary to achieve this goal is accomplished by employing both high-resolution imaging via scanning probe methods and ensemble-averaged surface sensitive spectroscopic methods. Three prototypical examples illustrating different properties of nanoscaled oxides in different classes of reactions are selected.

  7. Catalytic Reduction of Noble Metal Salts by Sodium Hypophosphite Promoted by the Film Poly-(p-Allyl Ether Benzenesulfonic Acid)

    PubMed Central

    Costa, M. I. C. F.; Steter, J. R.; Purgato, F. L. S.; Romero, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    Glassy carbon electrodes were coated with the film poly-(p-allyl ether benzenesulfonic acid) by an anodic procedure. Nickel, platinum, and palladium ions were introduced into the film by ion exchange of H+ with the corresponding salts. These ions were catalytically reduced to their corresponding metals using the known electroless reducing agent sodium hypophosphite. Scanning electron microcopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were carried out to demonstrate the occurrence of the catalytic process. To compare this method with another one carried out in our laboratory, the electrocatalytic reduction of H+ was studied using the same modified electrodes. A suggested mechanism for the catalysis is proposed. PMID:24052832

  8. Catalytic Science Center Opens at Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Described is a catalytic science center designed to incorporate academic and industrial concerns. The center combines educational and research opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, as well as for the chemical professional. (MA)

  9. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF GROUNDWATER STRIPPING EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reviews the applicability of catalytic oxidation to control ground-water air stripping gaseous effluents, with special attention to system designs and case histories. The variety of contaminants and catalyst poisons encountered in stripping operations are also reviewed....

  10. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF GROUNDWATER STRIPPING EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reviews the applicability of catalytic oxidation to control ground-water air stripping gaseous effluents, with special attention to system designs and case histories. The variety of contaminants and catalyst poisons encountered in stripping operations are also reviewed....

  11. Monitoring by Control Technique - Catalytic Oxidizer

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about catalytic oxidizer control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  12. A review of tin oxide-based catalytic systems: Preparation, characterization and catalytic behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflund, Gar B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the important aspects of the preparation, characterization and catalytic behavior of tin oxide-based catalytic systems including doped tin oxide, mixed oxides which contain tin oxide, Pt supported on tin oxide and Pt/Sn supported on alumina. These systems have a broad range of applications and are continually increasing in importance. However, due to their complex nature, much remains to be understood concerning how they function catalytically.

  13. An Iron Reservoir to the Catalytic Metal

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fange; Geng, Jiafeng; Gumpper, Ryan H.; Barman, Arghya; Davis, Ian; Ozarowski, Andrew; Hamelberg, Donald; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    The rubredoxin motif is present in over 74,000 protein sequences and 2,000 structures, but few have known functions. A secondary, non-catalytic, rubredoxin-like iron site is conserved in 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase (HAO), from single cellular sources but not multicellular sources. Through the population of the two metal binding sites with various metals in bacterial HAO, the structural and functional relationship of the rubredoxin-like site was investigated using kinetic, spectroscopic, crystallographic, and computational approaches. It is shown that the first metal presented preferentially binds to the catalytic site rather than the rubredoxin-like site, which selectively binds iron when the catalytic site is occupied. Furthermore, an iron ion bound to the rubredoxin-like site is readily delivered to an empty catalytic site of metal-free HAO via an intermolecular transfer mechanism. Through the use of metal analysis and catalytic activity measurements, we show that a downstream metabolic intermediate can selectively remove the catalytic iron. As the prokaryotic HAO is often crucial for cell survival, there is a need for ensuring its activity. These results suggest that the rubredoxin-like site is a possible auxiliary iron source to the catalytic center when it is lost during catalysis in a pathway with metabolic intermediates of metal-chelating properties. A spare tire concept is proposed based on this biochemical study, and this concept opens up a potentially new functional paradigm for iron-sulfur centers in iron-dependent enzymes as transient iron binding and shuttling sites to ensure full metal loading of the catalytic site. PMID:25918158

  14. Chemical and catalytic properties of elemental carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.G.; Brodzinsky, R.; Gundel, L.A.; Novakov, T.

    1980-10-01

    Elemental carbon particles resulting from incomplete combustion of fossil fuel are one of the major constituents of airborne particulate matter. These particles are a chemically and catalytically active material and can be an effective carrier for other toxic air pollutants through their adsorptive capability. The chemical, adsorptive, and catalytic behaviors of carbon particles depend very much on their crystalline structure, surface composition, and electronic properties. This paper discusses these properties and examines their relevance to atmospheric chemistry.

  15. Correlation of Catalytic Rates With Solubility Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Daniel D.; England, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    Catalyst maximizes activity when its solubility parameter equals that of reactive species. Catalytic activities of some binary metal alloys at maximum when alloy compositions correspond to Hildebrand solubility parameters equal to those of reactive atomic species on catalyst. If this suggestive correlation proves to be general, applied to formulation of other mixed-metal catalysts. Also used to identify reactive species in certain catalytic reactions.

  16. Dual Studies on a Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange of Resorcinol and the Subsequent Kinetic Isotope Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Richard; Kim, Iris; Chao, Weyjuin Eric; Moore, Jennifer; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    An efficient laboratory experiment has been developed for undergraduate students to conduct hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange of resorcinol by electrophilic aromatic substitution using D[subscript 2]O and a catalytic amount of H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4]. The resulting labeled product is characterized by [superscript 1]H NMR. Students also…

  17. Dual Studies on a Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange of Resorcinol and the Subsequent Kinetic Isotope Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Richard; Kim, Iris; Chao, Weyjuin Eric; Moore, Jennifer; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    An efficient laboratory experiment has been developed for undergraduate students to conduct hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange of resorcinol by electrophilic aromatic substitution using D[subscript 2]O and a catalytic amount of H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4]. The resulting labeled product is characterized by [superscript 1]H NMR. Students also…

  18. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  19. 75 FR 34186 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; EDGX Exchange, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ...; New York Stock Exchange LLC; NYSE Amex LLC; NYSE Arca, Inc.; The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc.; National Stock Exchange, Inc.; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Order... (``ISE''),\\1\\ New York Stock Exchange LLC (``NYSE''), NYSE Amex LLC (``NYSEAmex''), NYSE Arca,...

  20. Anion exchange membrane

    DOEpatents

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  1. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  2. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Lowenstein, Andrew [Princeton, NJ; Sibilia, Marc J [Princeton, NJ; Miller, Jeffrey A [Hopewell, NJ; Tonon, Thomas [Princeton, NJ

    2011-06-28

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  3. Cryptographic Securities Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Christopher; Parkes, David C.

    While transparency in financial markets should enhance liquidity, its exploitation by unethical and parasitic traders discourages others from fully embracing disclosure of their own information. Traders exploit both the private information in upstairs markets used to trade large orders outside traditional exchanges and the public information present in exchanges' quoted limit order books. Using homomorphic cryptographic protocols, market designers can create "partially transparent" markets in which every matched trade is provably correct and only beneficial information is revealed. In a cryptographic securities exchange, market operators can hide information to prevent its exploitation, and still prove facts about the hidden information such as bid/ask spread or market depth.

  4. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1991-10-16

    This progress report is for the September--October 1991 quarter. We have demonstrated feasibility of higher specific conductance by a factor of five than any other work in high-temperature gas-to-gas exchangers. These laminar-flow, microtube exchangers exhibit extremely low pressure drop compared to alternative compact designs under similar conditions because of their much shorter flow length and larger total flow area for lower flow velocities. The design appears to be amenable to mass production techniques, but considerable process development remains. The reduction in materials usage and the improved heat exchanger performance promise to be of enormous significance in advanced engine designs and in cryogenics.

  5. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  6. Greywater heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Holmberg, D.

    1983-11-21

    A kilowatt meter and water meter were installed to monitor pregreywater usage. The design considerations, the heat exchanger construction and installation, and the monitoring of usage levels are described.

  7. Exchange donor renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Myoung Soo; Park, Kiil

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 20 years of experience at Severance Hospital has shown that utilizing exchange donors increases the donor pool safely, with outcomes comparable to living related donor grafts. The exchange donor program is invaluable for incompatible donor-recipient pairs to consecutively proceed to transplantation. Recently, newer desensitization protocols have been devised to approach incompatible donor-recipient pairs, but not without risks. These desensitization protocols may be an alternative when confronting the limitations in the exchange program. Therefore, the exchange program and the desensitization protocols should be complementary, not competing strategies and centers should weigh the merits and limitations of each protocol in each incompatible donor-recipient pair to select the optimal method for a safe and successful transplantation.

  8. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  9. VOC Destruction by Catalytic Combustion Microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Barton

    2009-03-10

    This project concerned the application of a catalytic combustion system that has been married to a micro-turbine device. The catalytic combustion system decomposes the VOC's and transmits these gases to the gas turbine. The turbine has been altered to operate on very low-level BTU fuels equivalent to 1.5% methane in air. The performance of the micro-turbine for VOC elimination has some flexibility with respect to operating conditions, and the system is adaptable to multiple industrial applications. The VOC source that was been chosen for examination was the emissions from coal upgrading operations. The overall goal of the project was to examine the effectiveness of a catalytic combustion based system for elimination of VOCs while simultaneously producing electrical power for local consumption. Project specific objectives included assessment of the feasibility for using a Flex-Microturbine that generates power from natural gas while it consumes VOCs generated from site operations; development of an engineering plan for installation of the Flex-Microturbine system; operation of the micro-turbine through various changes in site and operation conditions; measurement of the VOC destruction quantitatively; and determination of the required improvements for further studies. The micro-turbine with the catalytic bed worked effectively to produce power on levels of fuel much lower than the original turbine design. The ability of the device to add or subtract supplemental fuel to augment the amount of VOC's in the inlet air flow made the device an effective replacement for a traditional flare. Concerns about particulates in the inlet flow and the presence of high sulfur concentrations with the VOC mixtures was identified as a drawback with the current catalytic design. A new microturbine design was developed based on this research that incorporates a thermal oxidizer in place of the catalytic bed for applications where particulates or contamination would limit the lifetime of

  10. SOFC system with integrated catalytic fuel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnerty, Caine; Tompsett, Geoff. A.; Kendall, Kevin; Ormerod, R. Mark

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the development of solid oxide fuel cell technology operating directly on hydrocarbon fuels. The development of a catalytic fuel processing system, which is integrated with the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power source is outlined here. The catalytic device utilises a novel three-way catalytic system consisting of an in situ pre-reformer catalyst, the fuel cell anode catalyst and a platinum-based combustion catalyst. The three individual catalytic stages have been tested in a model catalytic microreactor. Both temperature-programmed and isothermal reaction techniques have been applied. Results from these experiments were used to design the demonstration SOFC unit. The apparatus used for catalytic characterisation can also perform in situ electrochemical measurements as described in previous papers [C.M. Finnerty, R.H. Cunningham, K. Kendall, R.M. Ormerod, Chem. Commun. (1998) 915-916; C.M. Finnerty, N.J. Coe, R.H. Cunningham, R.M. Ormerod, Catal. Today 46 (1998) 137-145]. This enabled the performance of the SOFC to be determined at a range of temperatures and reaction conditions, with current output of 290 mA cm -2 at 0.5 V, being recorded. Methane and butane have been evaluated as fuels. Thus, optimisation of the in situ partial oxidation pre-reforming catalyst was essential, with catalysts producing high H 2/CO ratios at reaction temperatures between 873 K and 1173 K being chosen. These included Ru and Ni/Mo-based catalysts. Hydrocarbon fuels were directly injected into the catalytic SOFC system. Microreactor measurements revealed the reaction mechanisms as the fuel was transported through the three-catalyst device. The demonstration system showed that the fuel processing could be successfully integrated with the SOFC stack.

  11. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1992-07-09

    The purpose of this contract has been to explore the limits of miniaturization of heat exchangers with the goals of (1) improving the theoretical understanding of laminar heat exchangers, (2) evaluating various manufacturing difficulties, and (3) identifying major applications for the technology. A low-cost, ultra-compact heat exchanger could have an enormous impact on industry in the areas of cryocoolers and energy conversion. Compact cryocoolers based on the reverse Brayton cycle (RBC) would become practical with the availability of compact heat exchangers. Many experts believe that hardware advances in personal computer technology will rapidly slow down in four to six years unless lowcost, portable cryocoolers suitable for the desktop supercomputer can be developed. Compact refrigeration systems would permit dramatic advances in high-performance computer work stations with conventional'' microprocessors operating at 150 K, and especially with low-cost cryocoolers below 77 K. NASA has also expressed strong interest in our MTS exchanger for space-based RBC cryocoolers for sensor cooling. We have demonstrated feasibility of higher specific conductance by a factor of five than any other work in high-temperature gas-to-gas exchangers. These laminar-flow, microtube exchangers exhibit extremely low pressure drop compared to alternative compact designs under similar conditions because of their much shorter flow length and larger total flow area for lower flow velocities. The design appears to be amenable to mass production techniques, but considerable process development remains. The reduction in materials usage and the improved heat exchanger performance promise to be of enormous significance in advanced engine designs and in cryogenics.

  12. Compact, super heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, A.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Heat exchanger uses porous media to enhance heat transfer through walls of cooling channels, thereby lowering wall temperature. Porous media within cooling channel increases internal surface area from which heat can be transferred to coolant. Comparison data shows wall has lower temperature and coolant has higher temperature when porous medium is used within heat exchanger. Media can be sintered powedered metal, metal fibers, woven wire layers, or any porous metal having desired permeability and porosity.

  13. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, F. D.

    1990-12-01

    Doty Scientific (DSI) believes their microtube-strip heat exchanger will contribute significantly to the following: (1) the closed Brayton cycles being pursued at MIT, NASA, and elsewhere; (2) reverse Brayton cycle cryocoolers, currently being investigated by NASA for space missions, being applied to MRI superconducting magnets; and (3) high-efficiency cryogenic gas separation schemes for CO2 removal from exhaust stacks. The goal of this current study is to show the potential for substantial progress in high-effectiveness, low-cost, gas-to-gas heat exchangers for diverse applications at temperatures from below 100 K to above 1000 K. To date, the highest effectiveness measured is about 98 percent and relative pressure drops below 0.1 percent with a specific conductance of about 45 W/kgK are reported. During the pre-award period DSI built and tested a 3-module heat exchanger bank using 103-tube microtube strip (MTS) modules. To add to their analytical capabilities, DSI has acquired computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This report describes the pre-award work and the status of the ten tasks of the current project, which are: analyze flow distribution and thermal stresses within individual modules; design a heat exchanger bank of ten modules with 400 microtube per module; obtain production quality tubestrip die and AISI 304 tubestrips; obtain production quality microtubing; construct revised MTS heat exchanger; construct dies and fixtures for prototype heat exchanger; construct 100 MTS modules; assemble 8 to 10 prototype MTS heat exchangers; test prototype MTS heat exchanger; and verify test through independent means.

  14. Hibernation and gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Milsom, William K; Jackson, Donald C

    2011-01-01

    Hibernation in endotherms and ectotherms is characterized by an energy-conserving metabolic depression due to low body temperatures and poorly understood temperature-independent mechanisms. Rates of gas exchange are correspondly reduced. In hibernating mammals, ventilation falls even more than metabolic rate leading to a relative respiratory acidosis that may contribute to metabolic depression. Breathing in some mammals becomes episodic and in some small mammals significant apneic gas exchange may occur by passive diffusion via airways or skin. In ectothermic vertebrates, extrapulmonary gas exchange predominates and in reptiles and amphibians hibernating underwater accounts for all gas exchange. In aerated water diffusive exchange permits amphibians and many species of turtles to remain fully aerobic, but hypoxic conditions can challenge many of these animals. Oxygen uptake into blood in both endotherms and ectotherms is enhanced by increased affinity of hemoglobin for O₂ at low temperature. Regulation of gas exchange in hibernating mammals is predominately linked to CO₂/pH, and in episodic breathers, control is principally directed at the duration of the apneic period. Control in submerged hibernating ectotherms is poorly understood, although skin-diffusing capacity may increase under hypoxic conditions. In aerated water blood pH of frogs and turtles either adheres to alphastat regulation (pH ∼8.0) or may even exhibit respiratory alkalosis. Arousal in hibernating mammals leads to restoration of euthermic temperature, metabolic rate, and gas exchange and occurs periodically even as ambient temperatures remain low, whereas body temperature, metabolic rate, and gas exchange of hibernating ectotherms are tightly linked to ambient temperature.

  15. Compact, super heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, A.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Heat exchanger uses porous media to enhance heat transfer through walls of cooling channels, thereby lowering wall temperature. Porous media within cooling channel increases internal surface area from which heat can be transferred to coolant. Comparison data shows wall has lower temperature and coolant has higher temperature when porous medium is used within heat exchanger. Media can be sintered powedered metal, metal fibers, woven wire layers, or any porous metal having desired permeability and porosity.

  16. Microtube Strip Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1990-12-27

    Doty Scientific (DSI) believes their Microtube-Strip Heat Exchanger will contribute significantly to (a) the closed Brayton cycles being pursued at MIT, NASA, and elsewhere; (b) reverse Brayton cycle cryocoolers, currently being investigated by NASA for space missions, being applied to MRI superconducting magnets; and (c) high-efficiency cryogenic gas separation schemes for CO{sub 2} removal from exhaust stacks. The goal of this current study is to show the potential for substantial progress in high-effectiveness, low-cost, gas-to-gas heat exchangers for diverse applications at temperatures from below 100 K to above 1000 K. To date, the highest effectiveness measured is about 98%, and relative pressure drops below 0.1% with a specific conductance of about 45 W/kgK are reported. During the pre-award period DSI built and tested a 3-module heat exchanger bank using 103-tube microtube strip (MTS) modules. To add to their analytical capabilities, DSI has acquired computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This report describes the pre-award work and the status of the ten tasks of the current project, which are: analyze flow distribution and thermal stresses within individual modules; design a heat exchanger bank of ten modules with 400 microtube per module; obtain production quality tubestrip die and AISI 304 tubestrips; obtain production quality microtubing; construct revised MTS heat exchanger; construct dies and fixtures for prototype heat exchanger; construct 100 MTS modules; assemble 8-10 prototype MTS heat exchangers; test prototype MTS heat exchanger; and verify test through independent means. 7 refs., 9 figs. 1 tab. (CK)

  17. Vacuum powered heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffolo, R.F.

    1986-06-24

    In an internal combustion engine including an oil lubrication system, a liquid cooling system, and an improved air intake system is described. The improved air intake system comprises: a housing including a first opening in one end, which opening is open to the atmosphere and a second opening comprising an air outlet opening in the other end open to the air intake manifold of the engine, a heat exchanger positioned in the first opening. The heat exchanger consists of a series of coils positioned in the flow path of the atmospheric air as it enters the housing, the heat exchanger being fluidly connected to either the engine lubrication system or the cooling system to provide a warm heat source for the incoming air to the housing, acceleration means positioned in the housing downstream of the heat exchanger, the acceleration means comprising a honeycomb structure positioned across the air intake flow path. The honey-comb structure includes a multitude of honey combed mini-venturi cells through which the heated air flows in an accelerated mode, a removable air filter positioned between the heat exchanger and the acceleration means and a single opening provided in the housing through which the air filter can be passed and removed, and additional openings in the housing positioned downstream of the heat exchanger and upstream of the air filter, the additional openings including removable flaps for opening and closing the openings to control the temperature of the air flowing through the housing.

  18. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  19. Cryptographic Combinatorial Securities Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Christopher; Parkes, David C.

    We present a useful new mechanism that facilitates the atomic exchange of many large baskets of securities in a combinatorial exchange. Cryptography prevents information about the securities in the baskets from being exploited, enhancing trust. Our exchange offers institutions who wish to trade large positions a new alternative to existing methods of block trading: they can reduce transaction costs by taking advantage of other institutions’ available liquidity, while third party liquidity providers guarantee execution—preserving their desired portfolio composition at all times. In our exchange, institutions submit encrypted orders which are crossed, leaving a “remainder”. The exchange proves facts about the portfolio risk of this remainder to third party liquidity providers without revealing the securities in the remainder, the knowledge of which could also be exploited. The third parties learn either (depending on the setting) the portfolio risk parameters of the remainder itself, or how their own portfolio risk would change if they were to incorporate the remainder into a portfolio they submit. In one setting, these third parties submit bids on the commission, and the winner supplies necessary liquidity for the entire exchange to clear. This guaranteed clearing, coupled with external price discovery from the primary markets for the securities, sidesteps difficult combinatorial optimization problems. This latter method of proving how taking on the remainder would change risk parameters of one’s own portfolio, without revealing the remainder’s contents or its own risk parameters, is a useful protocol of independent interest.

  20. Private Health Insurance Exchanges

    PubMed Central

    Buttorff, Christine; Nowak, Sarah; Syme, James; Eibner, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Private health insurance exchanges offer employer health insurance, combining online shopping, increased plan choice, benefit administration, and cost-containment strategies. This article examines how private exchanges function, how they may affect employers and employees, and the possible implications for the Affordable Care Act's (ACA's) Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP) Marketplaces. The authors found that private exchanges could encourage employees to select less-generous plans. This could expose employees to higher out-of-pocket costs, but premium contributions would drop substantially, so net spending would decrease. On the other hand, employee spending may increase if, in moving to private exchanges, employers decrease their health insurance contributions. Most employers can avoid the ACA's “Cadillac tax” by reducing the generosity of the plans they offer, regardless of whether they move to a private exchange. There is not yet enough evidence to determine whether the private exchanges will become prominent in the insurance market and how they will affect employers and their employees. PMID:28845340

  1. Atomically Precise Metal Nanoclusters for Catalytic Application

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Rongchao

    2016-11-18

    The central goal of this project is to explore the catalytic application of atomically precise gold nanoclusters. By solving the total structures of ligand-protected nanoclusters, we aim to correlate the catalytic properties of metal nanoclusters with their atomic/electronic structures. Such correlation unravel some fundamental aspects of nanocatalysis, such as the nature of particle size effect, origin of catalytic selectivity, particle-support interactions, the identification of catalytically active centers, etc. The well-defined nanocluster catalysts mediate the knowledge gap between single crystal model catalysts and real-world conventional nanocatalysts. These nanoclusters also hold great promise in catalyzing certain types of reactions with extraordinarily high selectivity. These aims are in line with the overall goals of the catalytic science and technology of DOE and advance the BES mission “to support fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the level of electrons, atoms, and molecules”. Our group has successfully prepared different sized, robust gold nanoclusters protected by thiolates, such as Au25(SR)18, Au28(SR)20, Au38(SR)24, Au99(SR)42, Au144(SR)60, etc. Some of these nanoclusters have been crystallographically characterized through X-ray crystallography. These ultrasmall nanoclusters (< 2 nm diameter) exhibit discrete electronic structures due to quantum size effect, as opposed to quasicontinuous band structure of conventional metal nanoparticles or bulk metals. The available atomic structures (metal core plus surface ligands) of nanoclusters serve as the basis for structure-property correlations. We have investigated the unique catalytic properties of nanoclusters (i.e. not observed in conventional nanogold catalysts) and revealed the structure-selectivity relationships. Highlights of our

  2. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina; P. Szedlacsek

    2006-03-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1-Implementation Plan, Phase 2-Validation Testing and Phase 3-Field Testing. The Phase 1 program has been completed. Phase II was initiated in October 2004. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL{trademark}) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to react part of the fuel, increasing the fuel/air mixture temperature. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the catalytic concept will be demonstrated through subscale testing. Phase III will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  3. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  4. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  5. Catalytic transformation of carbon dioxide and methane into syngas over ruthenium and platinum supported hydroxyapatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rêgo De Vasconcelos, Bruna; Zhao, Lulu; Sharrock, Patrick; Nzihou, Ange; Pham Minh, Doan

    2016-12-01

    This work focused on the catalytic transformation of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) into syngas (mixture of CO and H2). Ruthenium- and platinum-based catalysts were prepared using hydroxyapatite (HAP) as catalyst support. Different methods for metal deposition were used including incipient wetness impregnation (IWI), excess liquid phase impregnation (LIM), and cationic exchange (CEX). Metal particle size varied in large range from less than 1 nm to dozens nm. All catalysts were active at 400-700 °C but only Pt catalyst prepared by IWI method (Pt/HAP IWI) was found stable. The catalytic performance of Pt/HAP IWI could be comparable with the literature data on noble metal-based catalysts, prepared on metal oxide supports. For the first time, water was experimentally quantified as a by-product of the reaction. This helped to correctly buckle the mass balance of the process.

  6. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large scale capture and

  7. The Phenomena of Proton Transfer from Catalytic Oxides.

    PubMed

    Schwarz

    1999-10-01

    Chemical processes that occur at the particle aqueous interface are properly termed colloidal when the particle is a material where one or more of its three dimensions lies within the range of 1-1000 nm. Nanoparticles which include porous materials and nanostructures that meet this requirement have been the subject of investigation from researchers from a variety of disciplines and their studies have been reported in the Journal of Colloid and Interface Science as well as other archival journals for many years. The chemical process of charge development on colloidal particles is, in general, determined by a plethora of complex physico-chemical properties of the particles' surfaces exposed to the surrounding aqueous environment. The existence of surface charge plays an essential role in the dispersity, flocculation properties, ion exchange capacity, dissolution, and deposition of cations and anions of synthetic and natural materials. In particular, recent advances in catalytic science have demonstrated that the "black art" of catalyst preparation does have a scientific basis. The objective of this article is to demonstrate that surface charge development (a consequence of proton transfer) as a function of pH, the so-called master variable, can identify specific domains of charge maxima. It is found that the number and strength of charged sites can be correlated with the catalytic properties of the studied materials, even though the reaction conditions are significantly different from those under which the surface charge was measured. Such findings are essential for the establishment of design and construction protocols and prediction of the performance of catalysts. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  8. Computational Modeling of the Catalytic Cycle of Glutathione Peroxidase Nanomimic.

    PubMed

    Kheirabadi, Ramesh; Izadyar, Mohammad

    2016-12-29

    To elucidate the role of a derivative of ebselen as a mimic of the antioxidant selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase, density functional theory and solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE) were applied to model the reaction mechanism in a catalytic cycle. This mimic plays the role of glutathione peroxidase through a four-step catalytic cycle. The first step is described as the oxidation of 1 in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, while selenoxide is reduced by methanthiol at the second step. In the third step of the reaction, the reduction of selenenylsulfide occurs by methanthiol, and the selenenic acid is dehydrated at the final step. Based on the kinetic parameters, step 4 is the rate-determining step (RDS) of the reaction. The bond strength of the atoms involved in the RDS is discussed with the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Low value of electron density, ρ(r), and positive Laplacian values are the evidence for the covalent nature of the hydrogen bonds rupture (O30-H31, O33-H34). A change in the sign of the Laplacian, L(r), from the positive value in the reactant to a negative character at the transition state indicates the depletion of the charge density, confirming the N5-H10 and O11-Se1 bond breaking. The analysis of electron location function (ELF) and localized orbital locator (LOL) of the Se1-N5 and Se1-O11 bonds have been done by multi-WFN program. High values of ELF and LOL at the transition state regions between the Se, N, and O atoms display the bond formation. Finally, the main donor-acceptor interaction energies were analyzed using the natural bond orbital analysis for investigation of their stabilization effects on the critical bonds at the RDS.

  9. Practical Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Diaryl-, Aryl Heteroaryl- and Diheteroarylmethanols

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Luca; Kim, Jeung Gon; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Enantioenriched diaryl-, aryl heteroaryl- and diheteroarylmethanols exhibit important biological and medicinal properties. One-pot catalytic asymmetric syntheses of these compounds beginning from readily available aryl bromides are introduced. Thus, lithium-bromide exchange with commercially available aryl bromides and n-BuLi was followed by salt metathesis with ZnCl2 to generate ArZnCl. A second equivalent of n-BuLi was added to form the mixed organozinc, ArZnBu. In the presence of enantioenriched amino alcohol-based catalysts, ArZnBu adds to aldehydes to afford essentially racemic diarylmethanols. The low enantioselectivities were attributed to a LiCl-promoted background reaction. To inhibit this background reaction, the chelating diamine TEEDA (tetraethylethylene diamine) was introduced prior to aldehyde addition. Under these conditions, enantioenriched diarylmethanols were obtained with >90% ee. Arylations of enals generated allylic alcohols with 81–90% ee. This procedure was unsuccessful, however, when applied to heteraryl bromides, which was attributed to decomposition of the heteroaryl lithium under the salt metathesis conditions. To avoid this problem, the metathesis was conducted with EtZnCl, which enabled the salt metathesis to proceed at low temperatures. The resulting EtZn(ArHetero) intermediates (ArHetero=2- and 3-thiophenyl, 2-benzothiophenyl, 3-furyl, and 5-indolyl) were successfully added to aldehydes and heteroaryl aldehydes with enantioselectivities between 81–99%. These are the first examples of catalytic and highly enantioselective syntheses of diheteroarylmethanols. In a similar fashion, ferrocenyl bromide was used to generate FcZnEt and the ferrocenyl group added to benzaldehyde and heteroaromatic aldehydes to form ferrocene-based ligand precursors in 86–95% yield with 96–98% ee. It was also found that the arylation and heteroarylation of enals could be followed by diastereoselective epoxidations to provide epoxy alcohols with high

  10. Gene targeting of CK2 catalytic subunits

    PubMed Central

    Lou, David Y.; Toselli, Paul; Landesman-Bollag, Esther; Dominguez, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a highly conserved and ubiquitous serine–threonine kinase. It is a tetrameric enzyme that is made up of two regulatory CK2β subunits and two catalytic subunits, either CK2α/CK2α, CK2α/ CK2α′, or CK2α′/CK2α′. Although the two catalytic subunits diverge in their C termini, their enzymatic activities are similar. To identify the specific function of the two catalytic subunits in development, we have deleted them individually from the mouse genome by homologous recombination. We have previously reported that CK2α′is essential for male germ cell development, and we now demonstrate that CK2α has an essential role in embryogenesis, as mice lacking CK2α die in mid-embryogenesis, with cardiac and neural tube defects. PMID:18594950

  11. Cross-ligation and exchange reactions catalyzed by hairpin ribozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Y; Koizumi, M; Sekiguchi, A; Ohtsuka, E

    1993-01-01

    The negative strand of the satellite RNA of tobacco ringspot virus (sTobRV(-)) contains a hairpin catalytic domain that shows self-cleavage and self-ligation activities in the presence of magnesium ions. We describe here that the minimal catalytic domain can catalyze a cross-ligation reaction between two kinds of substrates in trans. The cross-ligated product increased when the reaction temperature was decreased during the reaction from 37 degrees C to 4 degrees C. A two-stranded hairpin ribozyme, divided into two fragments between G45 and U46 in a hairpin loop, showed higher ligation activity than the nondivided ribozyme. The two stranded ribozyme also catalyzed an exchange reaction of the 3'-portion of the cleavage site. Images PMID:8441626

  12. Porous media for catalytic renewable energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotz, Nico

    2012-05-01

    A novel flow-based method is presented to place catalytic nanoparticles into a reactor by sol-gelation of a porous ceramic consisting of copper-based nanoparticles, silica sand, ceramic binder, and a gelation agent. This method allows for the placement of a liquid precursor containing the catalyst into the final reactor geometry without the need of impregnating or coating of a substrate with the catalytic material. The so generated foam-like porous ceramic shows properties highly appropriate for use as catalytic reactor material, e.g., reasonable pressure drop due to its porosity, high thermal and catalytic stability, and excellent catalytic behavior. The catalytic activity of micro-reactors containing this foam-like ceramic is tested in terms of their ability to convert alcoholic biofuel (e.g. methanol) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture with low concentrations of carbon monoxide (up to 75% hydrogen content and less than 0.2% CO, for the case of methanol). This gas mixture is subsequently used in a low-temperature fuel cell, converting the hydrogen directly to electricity. A low concentration of CO is crucial to avoid poisoning of the fuel cell catalyst. Since conventional Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells require CO concentrations far below 100 ppm and since most methods to reduce the mole fraction of CO (such as Preferential Oxidation or PROX) have CO conversions of up to 99%, the alcohol fuel reformer has to achieve initial CO mole fractions significantly below 1%. The catalyst and the porous ceramic reactor of the present study can successfully fulfill this requirement.

  13. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summarized.

  14. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-02-28

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4kA was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summarized herein.

  15. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summary herein.

  16. A premixed hydrogen/oxygen catalytic igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.

    1989-01-01

    The catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants was studied using a premixing hydrogen/oxygen injector. The premixed injector was designed to eliminate problems associated with catalytic ignition caused by poor propellant mixing in the catalyst bed. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, and propellant inlet temperature were varied parametrically in testing, and a pulse mode life test of the igniter was conducted. The results of the tests showed that the premixed injector eliminated flame flashback in the reactor and increased the life of the igniter significantly. The results of the experimental program and a comparison with data collected in a previous program are given.

  17. The Direct Catalytic Asymmetric Aldol Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Brindle, Cheyenne S.

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric aldol reactions are a powerful method for the construction of carbon-carbon bonds in an enantioselective fashion. Historically this reaction has been performed in a stoichiometric fashion to control the various aspects of chemo-, diastereo-, regio- and enantioselectivity, however, a more atom economical approach would unite high selectivity with the use of only a catalytic amount of a chiral promoter. This critical review documents the development of direct catalytic asymmetric aldol methodologies, including organocatalytic and metal-based strategies. New methods have improved the reactivity, selectivity and substrate scope of the direct aldol reaction and enabled the synthesis of complex molecular targets PMID:20419212

  18. Janus droplet as a catalytic micromotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    Self-propulsion of a Janus droplet in a solution of surfactant, which reacts on a half of a drop surface, is studied theoretically. The droplet acts as a catalytic motor creating a concentration gradient, which generates its surface-tension-driven motion; the self-propulsion speed is rather high, 60 μ \\text{m/s} and more. This catalytic motor has several advantages over other micromotors: simple manufacturing, easily attained neutral buoyancy. In contrast to a single-fluid droplet, which demonstrates a self-propulsion as a result of symmetry breaking instability, for the Janus one no stability threshold exists; hence, the droplet radius can be scaled down to micrometers.

  19. Catalytic Enantioselective Functionalization of Unactivated Terminal Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Coombs, John R; Morken, James P

    2016-02-18

    Terminal alkenes are readily available functional groups which appear in α-olefins produced by the chemical industry, and they appear in the products of many contemporary synthetic reactions. While the organic transformations that apply to alkenes are amongst the most studied reactions in all of chemical synthesis, the number of reactions that apply to nonactivated terminal alkenes in a catalytic enantioselective fashion is small in number. This Minireview highlights the cases where stereocontrol in catalytic reactions of 1-alkenes is high enough to be useful for asymmetric synthesis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Continuous in vitro evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. C.; Joyce, G. F.

    1997-01-01

    A population of RNA molecules that catalyze the template-directed ligation of RNA substrates was made to evolve in a continuous manner in the test tube. A simple serial transfer procedure was used to achieve approximately 300 successive rounds of catalysis and selective amplification in 52 hours. During this time, the population size was maintained against an overall dilution of 3 x 10(298). Both the catalytic rate and amplification rate of the RNAs improved substantially as a consequence of mutations that accumulated during the evolution process. Continuous in vitro evolution makes it possible to maintain laboratory "cultures" of catalytic molecules that can be perpetuated indefinitely.

  1. Continuous in vitro evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. C.; Joyce, G. F.

    1997-01-01

    A population of RNA molecules that catalyze the template-directed ligation of RNA substrates was made to evolve in a continuous manner in the test tube. A simple serial transfer procedure was used to achieve approximately 300 successive rounds of catalysis and selective amplification in 52 hours. During this time, the population size was maintained against an overall dilution of 3 x 10(298). Both the catalytic rate and amplification rate of the RNAs improved substantially as a consequence of mutations that accumulated during the evolution process. Continuous in vitro evolution makes it possible to maintain laboratory "cultures" of catalytic molecules that can be perpetuated indefinitely.

  2. 40 CFR 63.1566 - What are my requirements for organic HAP emissions from catalytic reforming units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1566...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1566 - What are my requirements for organic HAP emissions from catalytic reforming units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1566...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1567 - What are my requirements for inorganic HAP emissions from catalytic reforming units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1567...

  5. Metal–Organic Frameworks Stabilize Mono(phosphine)–Metal Complexes for Broad-Scope Catalytic Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sawano, Takahiro; Lin, Zekai; Boures, Dean; An, Bing; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-10

    Mono(phosphine)–M (M–PR3; M = Rh and Ir) complexes selectively prepared by postsynthetic metalation of a porous triarylphosphine-based metal–organic framework (MOF) exhibited excellent activity in the hydrosilylation of ketones and alkenes, the hydrogenation of alkenes, and the C–H borylation of arenes. The recyclable and reusable MOF catalysts significantly outperformed their homogeneous counterparts, presumably via stabilizing M–PR3 intermediates by preventing deleterious disproportionation reactions/ligand exchanges in the catalytic cycles.

  6. Aluminosilicates as controlled molecular environments for selective photochemical and catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    This dissertation concerns research that involves photochemical, catalytic and spectroscopic studies of clays, pillared clays and zeolites. Incorporation of uranyl ions into hectorite, montmorillonite, bentonite and vermiculite clays was monitored by XRD and luminescence methods. Excitation and emission characteristics were studied in order to understand the behavior of uranyl ions in clays after various thermal treatments. Luminescence lifetime measurements elucidated the number of uranyl sites. Uranyl-exchanged clays were found to absorb light at lower energies (445-455nm) than analogous uranyl-exchanged zeolites (425nm). Each uranyl-exchanged clay was tested as a catalyst for the photoassisted oxidation of isopropyl alcohol. Energy transfer (ET) between uranyl and Eu(III) ions in different zeolite framework systems was examined. The efficiency of ET (eta/sub t/) was found to be affected by the type of framework present. Pillared bentonites were examined in the hydrocracking of decane. A catalytically and spectroscopically active dopant ion, Cr(III), was introduced into the clays in both pillared and unpillared forms depending upon synthetic conditions. EPR and DRS were employed to monitor the environment of Cr(III) for determination of its location - whether in the micropore structure or associated with alumina pillars. Catalytic behavior based upon this variability of location was examined. Incorporation of Cr(III) ions into an alumina pillar was found to increase the stability and activity with respect to an alumina PILC catalyst. The results of these studies suggest that selective, efficient catalysts can be designed around inorganic ions in aluminosilicate supports.

  7. Direct catalytic decomposition of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report No. 10, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, T.

    1994-06-01

    This project investigates a suitable catalyst system for the direct nitric oxide decomposition in post-combustion gas streams. This process does not use a reductant, such as the ammonia used in the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} to nitrogen. Therefore, it is a greatly simplified process basically involving passing the flue gas through a catalytic converter. Catalysts are prepared by incorporating metal cations into zeolite supports according to ion exchange procedures widely used in preparation of metal/zeolite catalysts. Particular emphasis is given in this work on promoted Cu-exchanged zeolites, especially the catalyst systems Mg/Cu-ZSM-5 and Ce/Cu-ZSM-5, which are promising for NO conversion to nitrogen at typical flue gas O{sub 2} and NO levels and over the temperature range of 673--873{degrees}C. The effect of zeolite modification, copper exchange level and catalyst preparation conditions on the catalytic activity are studied in O{sub 2}-free, O{sub 2}-rich gases, as well as wet (2--20% H{sub 2}O) gas streams in a packed-bed microreactor. Characterization of catalysts is performed by XRD, STEM, TEM and ESR. During this quarter it was found that severe steaming (20% H{sub 2}O) of Na-ZSM-5 at temperatures above 600{degrees}C caused partial vitreous glass formation and dealumination. Unpromoted Cu-ZSM-5 catalysts suffer drastic loss of NO decomposition activity in wet gas streams at 500{degrees}C. Activity is partially recovered in dry gas. Copper migration out of the zeolite channels leading to CuO formation has been identified by STEM/EDX. In Ce/Cu-ZSM-5 catalysts the wet gas activity i`s greatly improved. CuO particle formation is less extensive and the dry gas activity is largely recovered upon removal of the water vapor.

  8. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  9. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  10. Pillared clays as superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Second semiannual report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R.T.; Li, W.B.; Sirilumpen, M.; Tharapiwattananon, N.

    1997-08-01

    During the first six months of the program, the work has progressed as planned. We have constructed a reactor system and assembled all laboratory essentials for conducting the three-year project. First, the catalytic activities of the Cu(2+) ion exchanged alumina-pillared clay for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ethylene were measured. The temperature range was 250-500{degrees}C. The activities of this catalyst were substantially higher than the catalyst that has been extensively studied in the literature, Cu-ZSM-5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study the acidity of the catalyst. The second part of the work was an in-depth FTIR study of the NO decomposition mechanism on the catalyst. This was planned as the first and the key step to obtain an understanding of the reaction mechanism. Key surface intermediates were identified from the FTIR spectra, and a redox type Eley-Rideal mechanism was proposed for the NO decomposition on this catalyst. This report will be divided into two parts. In Part One, we report results on the catalytic activities of the Cu-alumina-pillared clay and a direct comparison with other known catalysts. In Part two, we focus on the FTIR study and from the results, we propose a NO decomposition mechanism on this new catalyst. Plans for the next six months include tests of different pillared clays as well as the catalytic mechanism. The micro reactor will continue to be the key equipment for measuring the catalytic activities. FTIR will continue to be the major technique for identifying surface species and hence understanding the reaction mechanism.

  11. Better refrigerant exchanger design

    SciTech Connect

    Starczewski, J.

    1985-04-01

    Design methods are presented for freon refrigerant evaporators of a horizontal tubular heat exchanger type. This article is in two parts. The first part deals with refrigerants on the shell side while the second deals with refrigerants on the tube side. The currently used LMTD to calculate surface area with refrigerants boiling inside (or outside) tubes will be shown to be incorrect. Instead, a new concept of mean average heat flux is introduced. The article also proves that the boiling refrigerant heat transfer coefficient varies considerably along heat exchangers.

  12. Dependable Software Technology Exchange

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Special Report CMU/SEI-93-SR-04 S~Carnegie-Melion University Software Engineering Institute AD-A267 103 DTIC D•epWebleoftware JEL ECT3 E9 Technology ...16590 ___________ lull! !! l1111 U l111 I lil I --\\t• /" Special Report CMU/SEI-93-SR-04 June 1993 Dependable Software Technology Exchange Charles B...93-SR-4 Dependable Software Technology Exchange Abstract: On March 18 and 19, 1993, the Dependable Real-Time Software project hosted a Dependable

  13. Alert Exchange Process Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration of the United States of America (NASA), and the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), acknowledging that NASA, ESA and JAXA have a mutual interest in exchanging Alerts and Alert Status Lists to enhance the information base for each system participant while fortifying the general level of cooperation between the policy agreement subscribers, and each Party will exchange Alert listings on regular basis and detailed Alert information on a need to know basis to the extent permitted by law.

  14. Heat exchanger panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  15. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  16. An experimental study of catalytic and non-catalytic reaction in heat recirculating reactors and applications to power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jeongmin

    An experimental study of the performance of a Swiss roll heat exchanger and reactor was conducted, with emphasis on the extinction limits and comparison of results with and without Pt catalyst. At Re<40, the catalyst was required to sustain reaction; with the catalyst self-sustaining reaction could be obtained at Re less than 1. Both lean and rich extinction limits were extended with the catalyst, though rich limits were extended much further. At low Re, the lean extinction limit was rich of stoichiometric and rich limit had equivalence ratios 80 in some cases. Non-catalytic reaction generally occurred in a flameless mode near the center of the reactor. With or without catalyst, for sufficiently robust conditions, a visible flame would propagate out of the center, but this flame could only be re-centered with catalyst. Gas chromatography indicated that at low Re, CO and non-C3 H8 hydrocarbons did not form. For higher Re, catalytic limits were slightly broader but had much lower limit temperatures. At sufficiently high Re, catalytic and gas-phase limits merged. Experiments with titanium Swiss rolls have demonstrated reducing wall thermal conductivity and thickness leads to lower heat losses and therefore increases operating temperatures and extends flammability limits. By use of Pt catalysts, reaction of propane-air mixtures at temperatures 54°C was sustained. Such low temperatures suggest that polymers may be employed as a reactor material. A polyimide reactor was built and survived prolonged testing at temperatures up to 500°C. Polymer reactors may prove more practical for microscale devices due to their lower thermal conductivity and ease of manufacturing. Since the ultimate goal of current efforts is to develop combustion driven power generation devices at MEMS like scales, a thermally self-sustaining miniature power generation device was developed utilizing a single-chamber solid-oxide-fuel-cell (SOFC) placed in a Swiss roll. With the single-chamber design

  17. 75 FR 52558 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE...; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc.; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; International...

  18. Utilization of fly ash-derived HZSM-5: catalytic pyrolysis of Jatropha wastes in a fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Vichaphund, S; Sricharoenchaikul, V; Atong, D

    2017-07-01

    Fly ash-derived HZSM-5 catalyst was first applied in the catalytic pyrolysis of Jatropha residues in a semi-continuous fixed-bed reactor. The catalytic performance of HZSM-5 catalysts prepared from chemicals including conventional hydrothermal HZSM-5, Ni/HZSM-5 by ion exchange, and commercial HZSM-5 (Si/Al = 30) was evaluated for comparison. Catalytic pyrolysis of Jatropha residues with HZSM-5 catalysts was investigated in terms of product yields and qualities of bio-oil and bio-char. The liquid yield produced from fly ash-derived HZSM-5 was 29.4%, which was comparable to those obtained from chemicals and commercial (30.2-32.2%). Fly ash-derived HZSM-5 had high efficiency in increasing desirable compounds such as aliphatics and phenols as well as decreasing oxygenates and particularly N-containing compounds in bio-oils. The higher heating values and pH value of catalytic bio-oil achieved from fly ash-derived HZSM-5 were comparable to those achieved from HZSM-5 prepared from chemicals and commercial. The bio-char had 48-50 wt% carbon and was classified as mesoporous material. Overall, HZSM-5 derived from fly ash showed potentials to use as a catalyst for catalytic pyrolysis application.

  19. Exchange functionals and potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Ralf; Nobes, Ross H.; Handy, Nicholas C.

    The commonly used exchange-correlation functionals of density functional theory and their potentials are examined numerically following the first such investigation by Perdew. They are also investigated for Ne and Kr. Their behaviour for large gradients of the density and for large distances is not satisfactory. In particular, the correct asymptotic r-1 behaviour is difficult to achieve. Following van Leeuwen and Baerends, this is linked to the energy ɛmax of the highest occupied orbital arising from the Kohn-Sham equations. This deficiency is linked also with the poor prediction of molecular polarizabilities. The Becke-Roussel (BR) exchange functional is examined, which is derived by assuming a hydrogen-like exchange hole at all spatial points, and it has the attraction of being dependent on both the kinetic energy density and the Laplacian of the density and has no adjustable parameters. Becke has presented encouraging results using this functional in a hybrid manner. Fully self-consistent Kohn-Sham calculations are performed using it in combination with Perdew's 1986 correlation functional. The results are very encouraging indeed, so much so that this exchange functional is the best generalized gradient approximation (GGA) yet discovered. In particular, bond lengths of many molecular show a substantial improvement over results from other GGAs. For example, many CH bonds are now within experimental accuracy, instead of being typically 0·02 Å too long. Our ab initio understanding of non-dynamic correlation and dynamic correlation is then linked with density functional theory. It is argued that correlation functionals should pick up the local dynamic correlation, whereas exchange functionals should include non-dynamic correlation effects. For these reasons it is considered that exchange functionals are best modelled on a system for which there is effectively no non-dynamic correlation, for which the optimum example is the Ne atom. Thus, again following Becke and

  20. Purification of reformer streams by catalytic hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Polanek, P.J.; Hooper, H.M.; Mueller, J.; Walter, M.; Emmrich, G.

    1996-12-01

    Catalytic Reforming is one of the most important processes to produce high grade motor gasolines. Feedstocks are mainly gasoline and naphtha streams from the crude oil distillation boiling in the range of 212 F to 350 F. By catalytic reforming the octane number of these gasoline components is increased from 40--60 RON to 95--100 RON. Besides isomerization and dehydrocyclization reactions mainly formation of aromatics by dehydrogenation of naphthenes occur. Thus, catalytic reformers within refineries are an important source of BTX--aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylenes). Frequently, high purity aromatics are recovered from these streams using modern extractive distillation or liquid extraction processes, e.g. the Krupp-Koppers MORPHYLANE{reg_sign} process. Aromatics product specifications, notably bromine index and acid wash color, have obligated producers to utilize clay treatment to remove trace impurities of diolefins and/or olefins. The conventional clay treatment is a multiple vessel batch process which periodically requires disposal of the spent clay in a suitable environmental manner. BASF, in close cooperation with Krupp-Koppers, has developed a continuous Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation Process (SCHP) as an alternative to clay treatment which is very efficient, cost effective and environmentally compatible. In the following the main process aspects including the process scheme catalyst and operating conditions is described.

  1. Toward Facilitative Mentoring and Catalytic Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa K.; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    In TESOL teacher mentoring, giving advice can be conceptualized as a continuum, ranging from directive to facilitative feedback. The goal, over time, is to lead toward the facilitative end of the continuum and specifically to catalytic interventions that encourage self-reflection and autonomous learning. This study begins by examining research on…

  2. Process for catalytically oxidizing cycloolefins, particularly cyclohexene

    DOEpatents

    Mizuno, Noritaka; Lyon, David K.; Finke, Richard G.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a process for catalytically oxidizing cycloolefins, particularly cyclohexenes, to form a variety of oxygenates. The catalyst used in the process is a covalently bonded iridium-heteropolyanion species. The process uses the catalyst in conjunction with a gaseous oxygen containing gas to form 2-cyclohexen-1-ol and also 2-cyclohexen-1-one.

  3. Catalytic formal Homo-Nazarov cyclization.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Filippo; Andrès, Julien; Torosantucci, Riccardo; Waser, Jérôme

    2009-02-19

    The first catalytic method for the cyclization of vinyl-cyclopropyl ketones (formal homo-Nazarov reaction) is reported. Starting from activated cyclopropanes, heterocyclic, and carbocyclic compounds were obtained under mild conditions using Brønsted acid catalysts. Preliminary investigation of the reaction mechanism indicated a stepwise process.

  4. Selectivity of catalytic methods of determination.

    PubMed

    Otto, M; Mueller, H; Werner, G

    1978-03-01

    By means of catalytic analytical methods, extremely low levels can be determined at low cost and with a high sensitivity that is equal to that of physical methods of trace analysis. The selectivity of the catalytic determinations, is, however, usually rather lower than that of other methods of trace analysis. The selectivity can sometimes be improved by modification of the indicator reaction through variation of the reagents and their concentrations, or by use of masking reagents or activators, or by combination with a separation method. Modification of the indicator reaction can be exemplified by the selective determination of osmium and ruthenium by their catalysis of the nitrate oxidation of 1-naphthylamine. By variation of the nitrate concentration and the use of 1,10-phenanthroline and 8-hydroxyquinoline as complexing agents it is possible to determine these two elements simultaneously. An especially significant increase in the selectivity is made possible by use of a preliminary separation step. If the ion to be determined is separated by solvent extraction and then catalytically determined directly in the extract, a very specific determination is possible; this technique has been called "extractive catalytic determination". This method has been used for determination of molybdenum (0.5 ng/ml) in sea-water, iron (5 ng/ml) in heavy metal salts, and copper (3 ng/ml) in the presence of numerous elements.

  5. SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION MERCURY FIELD SAMPLING PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report details an investigation on the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR), selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR), and flue gas conditioning on the speciation and removal of mercury at power plants. If SCR and/or SNCR systems enhance mercury conversion/capture, t...

  6. SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION MERCURY FIELD SAMPLING PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A lack of data still exists as to the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR), selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR), and flue gas conditioning on the speciation and removal of mercury (Hg) at power plants. This project investigates the impact that SCR, SNCR, and flue gas...

  7. Catalytic processes for space station waste conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoonover, M. W.; Madsen, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Catalytic techniques for processing waste products onboard space vehicles were evaluated. The goal of the study was the conversion of waste to carbon, wash water, oxygen and nitrogen. However, the ultimate goal is conversion to plant nutrients and other materials useful in closure of an ecological life support system for extended planetary missions. The resulting process studied involves hydrolysis at 250 C and 600 psia to break down and compact cellulose material, distillation at 100 C to remove water, coking at 450 C and atmospheric pressure, and catalytic oxidation at 450 to 600 C and atmospheric pressure. Tests were conducted with a model waste to characterize the hydrolysis and coking processes. An oxidizer reactor was sized based on automotive catalytic conversion experience. Products obtained from the hydrolysis and coking steps included a solid residue, gases, water condensate streams, and a volatile coker oil. Based on the data obtained, sufficient component sizing was performed to make a preliminary comparison of the catalytic technique with oxidation for processing waste for a six-man spacecraft. Wet oxidation seems to be the preferred technique from the standpoint of both component simplicity and power consumption.

  8. Catalytic Converters Maintain Air Quality in Mines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, engineers developed a tin-oxide based washcoat to prevent oxygen buildup in carbon dioxide lasers used to detect wind shears. Airflow Catalyst Systems Inc. of Rochester, New York, licensed the technology and then adapted the washcoat for use as a catalytic converter to treat the exhaust from diesel mining equipment.

  9. SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION MERCURY FIELD SAMPLING PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A lack of data still exists as to the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR), selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR), and flue gas conditioning on the speciation and removal of mercury (Hg) at power plants. This project investigates the impact that SCR, SNCR, and flue gas...

  10. Rapid Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Richard S. Tuthill

    2004-06-10

    The overall objective of this research under the Turbines Program is the deployment of fuel flexible rich catalytic combustion technology into high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbines. The resulting combustion systems will provide fuel flexibility for gas turbines to burn coal derived synthesis gas or natural gas and achieve NO{sub x} emissions of 2 ppmvd or less (at 15 percent O{sub 2}), cost effectively. This advance will signify a major step towards environmentally friendly electric power generation and coal-based energy independence for the United States. Under Phase 1 of the Program, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) performed a system integration study of rich catalytic combustion in a small high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbine with a silo combustion system that is easily scalable to a larger multi-chamber gas turbine system. An implementation plan for this technology also was studied. The principal achievement of the Phase 1 effort was the sizing of the catalytic module in a manner which allowed a single reactor (rather than multiple reactors) to be used by the combustion system, a conclusion regarding the amount of air that should be allocated to the reaction zone to achieve low emissions, definition of a combustion staging strategy to achieve low emissions, and mechanical integration of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustor liner with the catalytic module.

  11. Toward Facilitative Mentoring and Catalytic Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa K.; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    In TESOL teacher mentoring, giving advice can be conceptualized as a continuum, ranging from directive to facilitative feedback. The goal, over time, is to lead toward the facilitative end of the continuum and specifically to catalytic interventions that encourage self-reflection and autonomous learning. This study begins by examining research on…

  12. Novel Metal Nanomaterials and Their Catalytic Applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaqing; Gu, Hongwei

    2015-09-17

    In the rapidly developing areas of nanotechnology, nano-scale materials as heterogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of organic molecules have gotten more and more attention. In this review, we will summarize the synthesis of several new types of noble metal nanostructures (FePt@Cu nanowires, Pt@Fe₂O₃ nanowires and bimetallic Pt@Ir nanocomplexes; Pt-Au heterostructures, Au-Pt bimetallic nanocomplexes and Pt/Pd bimetallic nanodendrites; Au nanowires, CuO@Ag nanowires and a series of Pd nanocatalysts) and their new catalytic applications in our group, to establish heterogeneous catalytic system in "green" environments. Further study shows that these materials have a higher catalytic activity and selectivity than previously reported nanocrystal catalysts in organic reactions, or show a superior electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol. The whole process might have a great impact to resolve the energy crisis and the environmental crisis that were caused by traditional chemical engineering. Furthermore, we hope that this article will provide a reference point for the noble metal nanomaterials' development that leads to new opportunities in nanocatalysis.

  13. Beneficial Catalytic Immunity to Aβ Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Planque, Stephanie; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We review attempts to treat Alzheimer disease with antibodies that bind amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and the feasibility of developing catalytic antibodies for this purpose. Naturally occurring immunoglobulin M (IgM) class antibodies that hydrolyze Aβ and inhibit Aβ aggregation were identified. The production of these antibodies increases as a function of age, ostensibly reflecting an attempt by the immune system to protect against the deleterious effect of Aβ accumulation in old age. A search for catalytic antibodies in a library of human immunoglobulins variable (IgV) domains yielded catalysts that hydrolyzed Aβ specifically at exceptionally rapid rates. The catalytic IgVs contained the light-chain variable domains within scaffolds that are structurally reminiscent of phylogenetically ancient antibodies. Inclusion of the heavy-chain variable domain in the IgV constructs resulted in reduced catalysis. We present our view that catalytic antibodies are likely to emerge as more efficacious and safer immunotherapy reagents compared to traditional Aβ-binding antibodies. PMID:20370602

  14. Catalytic Amination of Alcohols, Aldehydes, and Ketones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyuev, M. V.; Khidekel', M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Data on the catalytic amination of alcohols and carbonyl compounds are examined, the catalysts for these processes are described, and the problems of their effectiveness, selectivity, and stability are discussed. The possible mechanisms of the reactions indicated are presented. The bibliography includes 266 references.

  15. SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION MERCURY FIELD SAMPLING PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report details an investigation on the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR), selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR), and flue gas conditioning on the speciation and removal of mercury at power plants. If SCR and/or SNCR systems enhance mercury conversion/capture, t...

  16. Catalytic site identification--a web server to identify catalytic site structural matches throughout PDB.

    PubMed

    Kirshner, Daniel A; Nilmeier, Jerome P; Lightstone, Felice C

    2013-07-01

    The catalytic site identification web server provides the innovative capability to find structural matches to a user-specified catalytic site among all Protein Data Bank proteins rapidly (in less than a minute). The server also can examine a user-specified protein structure or model to identify structural matches to a library of catalytic sites. Finally, the server provides a database of pre-calculated matches between all Protein Data Bank proteins and the library of catalytic sites. The database has been used to derive a set of hypothesized novel enzymatic function annotations. In all cases, matches and putative binding sites (protein structure and surfaces) can be visualized interactively online. The website can be accessed at http://catsid.llnl.gov.

  17. Higher Education Exchange, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Kettering's president David Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological…

  18. Higher Education Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological conundrum of "knowledge…

  19. Technology Performance Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    To address the need for accessible, high-quality data, the Department of Energy has developed the Technology Performance Exchange (TPEx). TPEx enables technology suppliers, third-party testing laboratories, and other entities to share product performance data. These data are automatically transformed into a format that technology evaluators can easily use in their energy modeling assessments to inform procurement decisions.

  20. Conquer heat exchanger fouling

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fouling plays a dominant role in heat exchanger performance. It is extremely important to choose the most appropriate type of heat exchanger for a particular application and adopt proper values for fouling resistance. A design practice for shell-and-tube heat exchangers that will limit fouling to a minimum and thus ensure trouble-free operation is essential. Due to the availability of specialized software, the thermal design of heat exchangers has become precise and scientific. The results occasionally have to be tempered with practical experience and engineering judgment, but generally these computer programs are very reliable and authentic. However, the above is true only for determining heat-transfer coefficients and pressure drop. One important area that cannot possibly be addressed by design software is fouling. While a proper selection of fouling resistance is extremely difficult due to the numerous factors involved, a sound design practice will minimize any errors. However, it is important to first understand the phenomenon of fouling. The paper describes what fouling is, types of fouling, factors affecting fouling, providing a fouling allowance, selecting a fouling resistance, and overcoming fouling through better design.

  1. Chimney heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, I.C.

    1981-09-01

    A heat exchanger for installation on the top of a chimney of a building includes a housing having a lower end receiving the top of the chimney and an upper end with openings permitting the escape of effluent from the chimney and a heat exchanger assembly disposed in the housing including a central chamber and a spirally arranged duct network defining an effluent spiral path between the top of the chimney and the central chamber and a fresh air spiral path between an inlet disposed at the lower end of the housing and the central chamber, the effluent and fresh air spiral paths being in heat exchange relationship such that air passing through the fresh air spiral path is heated by hot effluent gases passing upward through the chimney and the effluent spiral path for use in heating the building. A pollution trap can be disposed in the central chamber of the heat exchanger assembly for removing pollutants from the effluent, the pollution trap including a rotating cage carrying pumice stones for absorbing pollutants from the effluent with the surface of the pumice gradually ground off to reveal fresh stone as the cage rotates.

  2. Visiting Scholar Exchange Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Kyna, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides reports of four United States scholars who visited China as part of the Visiting Scholar Exchange Program. The titles of the reports are (1) "China Journey: A Political Scientist's Look at Yan'an," (2) "The Social Consequences of Land Reclamation in Chinese Coastal Ecosystems," (3) "Anthropology Lectures in South…

  3. Organizing Equity Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaper, Torsten

    In the last years equity exchanges have diversified their operations into business areas such as derivatives trading, post-trading services, and software sales. Securities trading and post-trading are subject to economies of scale and scope. The integration of these functions into one institution ensures efficiency by economizing on transactions costs.

  4. Nature's Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the heat-transfer systems of different animals. Systems include heat conduction into the ground, heat transferred by convection, heat exchange in lizards, fish and polar animals, the carotid rete system, electromagnetic radiation from animals and people, and plant and animal fiber optics. (MDH)

  5. Currency Exchange Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Carl R.

    This curriculum unit of the Muncie (Indiana) Southside High School is to simulate the dynamics of foreign currency exchange rates from the perspectives of: (1) a major U.S. corporation, ABB Power T & D Company, Inc., of Muncie, Indiana, a manufacturer of large power transformers for the domestic and foreign markets; and (2) individual…

  6. Higher Education Exchange, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that not only does higher education not see the public; when the public, in turn, looks at higher education, it sees mostly malaise, inefficiencies, expense, and unfulfilled promises. Yet, the contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" tell of bright spots in higher education where experiments in working…

  7. Research Exchange, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Exchange, 2002

    2002-01-01

    These three issues of the "Research Exchange" focus on how better to conduct disability research and disseminate research results. The first issue examines the topic of human subject/human research participant protection, with a focus on research funded through the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). It…

  8. Nature's Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the heat-transfer systems of different animals. Systems include heat conduction into the ground, heat transferred by convection, heat exchange in lizards, fish and polar animals, the carotid rete system, electromagnetic radiation from animals and people, and plant and animal fiber optics. (MDH)

  9. Visiting Scholar Exchange Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Kyna, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides reports of four United States scholars who visited China as part of the Visiting Scholar Exchange Program. The titles of the reports are (1) "China Journey: A Political Scientist's Look at Yan'an," (2) "The Social Consequences of Land Reclamation in Chinese Coastal Ecosystems," (3) "Anthropology Lectures in South…

  10. Higher Education Exchange 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Contributors to this issue of the Higher Education Exchange debate the issues around knowledge production, discuss the acquisition of deliberative skills for democracy, and examine how higher education prepares, or does not prepare, students for citizenship roles. Articles include: (1) "Foreword" (Deborah Witte); (2) "Knowledge,…

  11. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, F. D.

    1991-04-01

    During the last quarter, Doty Scientific, Inc. (DSI) continued to make progress on the microtube strip (MTS) heat exchangers. The team has begun a heat exchanger stress analysis; however, they have been concentrating the bulk of their analytical energies on a computational fluid dynmaics (CFD) model to determine the location and magnitude of shell-side flow maldistribution which decreases heat exchanger effectiveness. DSI received 120 fineblanked tubestrips from Southern Fineblanking (SFB) for manufacturing process development. Both SFB and NIST provided inspection reports of the tubestrips. DSI completed the tooling required to encapsulate a tube array and press tubestrips on the array. Pressing the tubestrips on tube arrays showed design deficiencies both in the tubestrip design and the tooling design. DSI has a number of revisions in process to correct these deficiencies. The research effort has identified a more economical fusible alloy for encapsulating the tube array, and determined the parameters required to successfully encapsulate the tube array with the new alloy. A more compact MTS heat exchanger bank was designed.

  12. Evolution of catalytic RNA in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F.

    1992-01-01

    We are interested in the biochemistry of existing RNA enzymes and in the development of RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. The focal point of our research program has been the design and operation of a laboratory system for the controlled evolution of catalytic RNA. This system serves as working model of RNA-based life and can be used to explore the catalytic potential of RNA. Evolution requires the integration of three chemical processes: amplification, mutation, and selection. Amplification results in additional copies of the genetic material. Mutation operates at the level of genotype to introduce variability, this variability in turn being expressed as a range of phenotypes. Selection operates at the level of phenotype to reduce variability by excluding those individuals that do not conform to the prevailing fitness criteria. These three processes must be linked so that only the selected individuals are amplified, subject to mutational error, to produce a progeny distribution of mutant individuals. We devised techniques for the amplification, mutation, and selection of catalytic RNA, all of which can be performed rapidly in vitro within a single reaction vessel. We integrated these techniques in such a way that they can be performed iteratively and routinely. This allowed us to conduct evolution experiments in response to artificially-imposed selection constraints. Our objective was to develop novel RNA enzymes by altering the selection constraints in a controlled manner. In this way we were able to expand the catalytic repertoire of RNA. Our long-range objective is to develop an RNA enzyme with RNA replicase activity. If such an enzyme had the ability to produce additional copies of itself, then RNA evolution would operate autonomously and the origin of life will have been realized in the laboratory.

  13. Architecture and function of metallopeptidase catalytic domains

    PubMed Central

    Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Gomis-Rüth, Francesc Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The cleavage of peptide bonds by metallopeptidases (MPs) is essential for life. These ubiquitous enzymes participate in all major physiological processes, and so their deregulation leads to diseases ranging from cancer and metastasis, inflammation, and microbial infection to neurological insults and cardiovascular disorders. MPs cleave their substrates without a covalent intermediate in a single-step reaction involving a solvent molecule, a general base/acid, and a mono-or dinuclear catalytic metal site. Most monometallic MPs comprise a short metal-binding motif (HEXXH), which includes two metal-binding histidines and a general base/acid glutamate, and they are grouped into the zincin tribe of MPs. The latter divides mainly into the gluzincin and metzincin clans. Metzincins consist of globular ∼130–270-residue catalytic domains, which are usually preceded by N-terminal pro-segments, typically required for folding and latency maintenance. The catalytic domains are often followed by C-terminal domains for substrate recognition and other protein–protein interactions, anchoring to membranes, oligomerization, and compartmentalization. Metzincin catalytic domains consist of a structurally conserved N-terminal subdomain spanning a five-stranded β-sheet, a backing helix, and an active-site helix. The latter contains most of the metal-binding motif, which is here characteristically extended to HEXXHXXGXX(H,D). Downstream C-terminal subdomains are generally shorter, differ more among metzincins, and mainly share a conserved loop—the Met-turn—and a C-terminal helix. The accumulated structural data from more than 300 deposited structures of the 12 currently characterized metzincin families reviewed here provide detailed knowledge of the molecular features of their catalytic domains, help in our understanding of their working mechanisms, and form the basis for the design of novel drugs. PMID:24596965

  14. Chemical exchange program analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Waffelaert, Pascale

    2007-09-01

    As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of

  15. Counterflow Regolith Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Jonscher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A problem exists in reducing the total heating power required to extract oxygen from lunar regolith. All such processes require heating a great deal of soil, and the heat energy is wasted if it cannot be recycled from processed material back into new material. The counterflow regolith heat exchanger (CoRHE) is a device that transfers heat from hot regolith to cold regolith. The CoRHE is essentially a tube-in-tube heat exchanger with internal and external augers attached to the inner rotating tube to move the regolith. Hot regolith in the outer tube is moved in one direction by a right-hand - ed auger, and the cool regolith in the inner tube is moved in the opposite direction by a left-handed auger attached to the inside of the rotating tube. In this counterflow arrangement, a large fraction of the heat from the expended regolith is transferred to the new regolith. The spent regolith leaves the heat exchanger close to the temperature of the cold new regolith, and the new regolith is pre-heated close to the initial temperature of the spent regolith. Using the CoRHE can reduce the heating requirement of a lunar ISRU system by 80%, reducing the total power consumption by a factor of two. The unique feature of this system is that it allows for counterflow heat exchange to occur between solids, instead of liquids or gases, as is commonly done. In addition, in variants of this concept, the hydrogen reduction can be made to occur within the counterflow heat exchanger itself, enabling a simplified lunar ISRU (in situ resource utilization) system with excellent energy economy and continuous nonbatch mode operation.

  16. Composite ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amarasinghe, S.; Zook, L.; Leddy, J.

    1994-12-31

    Composite ion exchange materials can be formed by sorbing ion exchange polymers on inert, high surface area substrates. In general, the flux of ions and molecules through these composites, as measured electrochemically, increases as the ratio of the surface area of the substrate increases relative to the volume of the ion exchanger. This suggests that fields and gradients established at the interface between the ion exchanger and substrate are important in determining the transport characteristics of the composites. Here, the authors will focus on composites formed with a cation exchange polymer, Nafion, and two different types of microbeads: polystyrene microspheres and polystyrene coated magnetic microbeads. For the polystyrene microbeads, scanning electron micrographs suggest the beads cluster in a self-similar manner, independent of the bead diameter. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through the composites was studied as a function of bead fraction, bead radii, and fixed surface area with mixed bead sizes. Flux was well modeled by surface diffusion along a fractal interface. Magnetic composites were formed with columns of magnetic microbeads normal to the electrode surface. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through these composites increased exponentially with bead fraction. For electrolyses, the difference in the molar magnetic susceptibility of the products and reactants, Dcm, tends to be non-zero. For seven redox reactions, the ratio of the flux through the magnetic composites to the flux through a Nafion film increases monotonically with {vert_bar}Dcm{vert_bar}, with enhancements as large as thirty-fold. For reversible species, the electrolysis potential through the magnetic composites is 35 mV positive of that for the Nafion films.

  17. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion: Quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1994-09-30

    Research work has concentrated on the two general tasks that were described in the original proposal. The first task concerns the development of molecular organometallic homogeneous catalysts that can be used in the hydrogenation of coal liquids. The second task concerns non-metallic organic bases which can activate dihydrogen for arene hydrogenation, and that can be used in the conversion of coal liquids. In this Quarter, the great bulk of the efforts were expended on investigating the organic base-activated reactions of dihydrogen. The authors have proven that the reagents can effect the hydrogenation of two ring and other polycondensed aromatic hydrocarbons. Various strong organic bases were employed as the catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene. Several effective catalyst systems have been found for this purpose. The dependence of the reaction rates on the various factors such as temperature, hydrogen pressure, reaction time, solvents, etc. were thoroughly investigated. The substitution of dideuterium gas for dihydrogen gas in the catalytic reduction of naphthalene and anthracene has been found to provide important information concerning the simultaneous D-H exchange reactions that occur during the course of the reduction reactions. In addition, work on the development of molecular organometallic homogeneous catalysts was also done. The authors have prepared two organometallic compounds: naphthalenemolybdenum tricarbonyl and 1-methylnaphthalenemolybdenum tricarbonyl to extend the work that was begun on organometallic compounds in the last Quarter.

  19. Phosphorylation in the Catalytic Cleft Stabilizes and Attracts Domains of a Phosphohexomutase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia; Lee, Yingying; Beamer, Lesa J.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation can modulate the activities of enzymes. The phosphoryl donor in the catalytic cleft of α-D-phosphohexomutases is transiently dephosphorylated while the reaction intermediate completes a 180° reorientation within the cleft. The phosphorylated form of 52 kDa bacterial phosphomannomutase/phosphoglucomutase is less accessible to dye or protease, more stable to chemical denaturation, and widely stabilized against NMR-detected hydrogen exchange across the core of domain 3 to juxtaposed domain 4 (each by ≥1.3 kcal/mol) and parts of domains 1 and 2. However, phosphorylation accelerates hydrogen exchange in specific regions of domains 1 and 2, including a metal-binding residue in the active site. Electrostatic field lines reveal attraction across the catalytic cleft between phosphorylated Ser-108 and domain 4, but repulsion when Ser-108 is dephosphorylated. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulated the dephosphorylated form to be expanded due to enhanced rotational freedom of domain 4. The contacts and fluctuations of the MD trajectories enabled correct simulation of more than 80% of sites that undergo either protection or deprotection from hydrogen exchange due to phosphorylation. Electrostatic attraction in the phosphorylated enzyme accounts for 1) domain 4 drawing closer to domains 1 and 3; 2) decreased accessibility; and 3) increased stability within these domains. The electrostriction due to phosphorylation may help capture substrate, whereas the opening of the cleft upon transient dephosphorylation allows rotation of the intermediate. The long-range effects of phosphorylation on hydrogen exchange parallel reports on protein kinases, suggesting a conceptual link among these multidomain, phosphoryl transfer enzymes. PMID:25606681

  20. Catalytic effect of transition metals on microwave-induced degradation of atrazine in mineral micropores.

    PubMed

    Hu, Erdan; Cheng, Hefa

    2014-06-15

    With their high catalytic activity for redox reactions, transition metal ions (Cu(2+) and Fe(3+)) were exchanged into the micropores of dealuminated Y zeolites to prepare effective microporous mineral sorbents for sorption and microwave-induced degradation of atrazine. Due to its ability to complex with atrazine, loading of copper greatly increased the sorption of atrazine. Atrazine sorption on iron-exchanged zeolites was also significantly enhanced, which was attributed to the hydrolysis of Fe(3+) polycations in mineral micropores and electrostatic interactions of protonated atrazine molecules with the negatively charged pore wall surface. Copper and iron species in the micropores also significantly accelerated degradation of the sorbed atrazine (and its degradation intermediates) under microwave irradiation. The catalytic effect was attributed to the easy reducibility and high oxidation activity of Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) species stabilized in the micropores of the zeolites. It was postulated that the surface species of transition metals (monomeric Cu(2+), Cu(2+)-O-Cu(2+) complexes, FeO(+), and dinuclear Fe-O-Fe-like species) in the mineral micropores were thermally activated under microwave irradiation, and subsequently formed highly reactive sites catalyzing oxidative degradation of atrazine. The transition metal-exchanged zeolites, particularly the iron-exchanged ones, were relatively stable when leached under acidic conditions, which suggests that they are reusable in sorption and microwave-induced degradation. These findings offer valuable insights on designing of effective mineral sorbents that can selectively uptake atrazine from aqueous solutions and catalyze its degradation under microwave irradiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Staff exchange with Chemical Waste Management. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, B.J.; Barak, D.W.

    1993-12-01

    Original objective was transfer of PNL technology and expertise in computational chemistry and waste flow/treatment modeling to CWM. Identification and characterization of a broader portfolio of PNL`s environmental remediation technologies with high potential for rapid application became the focus of the exchange, which included E-mail exchanges. Of the 14 technologies discussed, the following were identified as being of high interest to CWM: six phase soil heating (in-situ heating), high energy electrical corona, RAAS/ReOpt{trademark} (remedial, expert system), TEES{trademark} (catalytic production of methane from biological wastes), PST (process for treating petroleum sludge). CWM`s reorganization and downsizing reduced the potential benefits to industry, but a proposal for transfer and application of PST to Wheelabrator was made.

  2. Complex Heat Exchangers for Improved Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bran, Gabriela Alejandra

    conduction in the reactor heat exchanger was also investigated, specifically in the gas section. Axial conduction cannot be assumed to be negligible in the reactor heat exchanger because of the iron-based catalytic bed. Results in this section show that axial conduction is detrimental for the system. It was found that for Peclet number greater than 100, axial conduction can be neglected. An alternative solution to address axial conduction was proposed, namely to include a well-insulated non-reacting section (without a catalytic bed) upstream of the reactor. The modified reactor heat exchanger was a novel solution to avoid the negative effect of axial conduction. Results show that by having a non-reacting section, axial conduction becomes unimportant.

  3. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  4. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  5. SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE BY METHANE OVER CERIUM AND SILVER EXCHANGED ZEOLITES. (R825430)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  6. SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE BY METHANE OVER CERIUM AND SILVER EXCHANGED ZEOLITES. (R825430)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. Main problems in the theory of modeling of catalytic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarenko, V.N.

    1994-09-01

    This paper formulates the main problems in the theory of modeling of catalytic processes yet to be solved and describes the stages of modeling. Fundamental problems of model construction for the physico-chemical phenomena and processes taking place in a catalytic reactor are considered. New methods for determining the mechanism of a catalytic reaction and selecting a kinetic model for it are analyzed. The use of the results of specially controlled experiments for the construction of models of a catalyst grain and a catalytic reactor is discussed. Algorithms are presented for determining the muliplicity of stationary states in the operation of a catalyst grain and a catalytic reactor.

  8. Geology Exchange Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Because geology professors cannot bring ore deposits from around the globe into their classrooms, the next best thing is to take their students to the deposits, according to David Norman, an associate professor of geochemistry at New Mexico Tech and Angus Moore of the Royal School of Mines. They organized a new exchange program between the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro, N.M., and the Royal School of Mines in London, England. In May, 14 students from England toured deposits in New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, and Colorado; in the photograph, Norman (on the right) describes a rock from a New Mexico ore deposit to some of the visitors from England. In early June a contingency from New Mexico Tech began studying deposits in England, Spain, and Portugal. Norman and Moore say that the exchange program may be expanded next year.

  9. Characterization of Nicotinamidases: Steady-State Kinetic Parameters, Class-wide Inhibition by Nicotinaldehydes and Catalytic Mechanism†

    PubMed Central

    French, Jarrod B.; Cen, Yana; Vrablik, Tracy L.; Xu, Ping; Allen, Eleanor; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Sauve, Anthony A.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinamidases are metabolic enzymes that hydrolyze nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are widely distributed across biology, with examples found encoded in the genomes of Mycobacteria, Archaea, Eubacteria, Protozoa, yeast and invertebrates but there are none found in mammals. Although recent structural work has improved understanding of these enzymes, their catalytic mechanism is still not well understood. Recent data shows that nicotinamidases are required for growth and virulence of several pathogenic microbes. The enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans regulate lifespan in their respective organisms, consistent with proposed roles in the regulation of NAD+ metabolism and organismal aging. In this manuscript, the steady state kinetic parameters of nicotinamidase enzymes from C. elegans, S. cerevisiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae (a pathogen responsible for human pneumonia), Borrelia burgdorferi (the pathogen that causes Lyme Disease) and Plasmodium falciparum (responsible for most human malaria) are reported. Nicotinamidases are generally efficient catalysts with steady state kcat values typically exceeding 1 s−1. The Km values for nicotinamide are low and are in the range from 2 – 110 µM. Nicotinaldehyde was determined to be a potent competitive inhibitor of these enzymes, binding in the low µM to low nM range for all nicotinamidases tested. A variety of nicotinaldehyde derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors in kinetic assays. Inhibitions are consistent with reaction of the universally conserved catalytic Cys on each enzyme with the aldehyde carbonyl carbon to form a thiohemiacetal complex which is stabilized by a conserved oxyanion hole. The S. pneumoniae nicotinamidase can catalyse exchange of 18O into the carboxy oxygens of nicotinic acid with 18O-water. The collected data, along with kinetic analysis of several mutants, allowed us to propose a catalytic mechanism that explains

  10. The domain architecture of large guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the small GTP-binding protein Arf.

    PubMed

    Mouratou, Barbara; Biou, Valerie; Joubert, Alexandra; Cohen, Jean; Shields, David J; Geldner, Niko; Jürgens, Gerd; Melançon, Paul; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2005-02-17

    Small G proteins, which are essential regulators of multiple cellular functions, are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that stimulate the exchange of the tightly bound GDP nucleotide by GTP. The catalytic domain responsible for nucleotide exchange is in general associated with non-catalytic domains that define the spatio-temporal conditions of activation. In the case of small G proteins of the Arf subfamily, which are major regulators of membrane trafficking, GEFs form a heterogeneous family whose only common characteristic is the well-characterized Sec7 catalytic domain. In contrast, the function of non-catalytic domains and how they regulate/cooperate with the catalytic domain is essentially unknown. Based on Sec7-containing sequences from fully-annotated eukaryotic genomes, including our annotation of these sequences from Paramecium, we have investigated the domain architecture of large ArfGEFs of the BIG and GBF subfamilies, which are involved in Golgi traffic. Multiple sequence alignments combined with the analysis of predicted secondary structures, non-structured regions and splicing patterns, identifies five novel non-catalytic structural domains which are common to both subfamilies, revealing that they share a conserved modular organization. We also report a novel ArfGEF subfamily with a domain organization so far unique to alveolates, which we name TBS (TBC-Sec7). Our analysis unifies the BIG and GBF subfamilies into a higher order subfamily, which, together with their being the only subfamilies common to all eukaryotes, suggests that they descend from a common ancestor from which species-specific ArfGEFs have subsequently evolved. Our identification of a conserved modular architecture provides a background for future functional investigation of non-catalytic domains.

  11. Exchange rate rebounds after foreign exchange market interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshikawa, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the rebounds in the exchange rate after foreign exchange intervention. When intervention is strongly effective, the exchange rate rebounds at next day. The effect of intervention is reduced slightly by the rebound after the intervention. The exchange rate might have been 67.12-77.47 yen to a US dollar without yen-selling/dollar-purchasing intervention of 74,691,100 million yen implemented by the Japanese government since 1991, in comparison to the actual exchange rate was 103.19 yen to the US dollar at the end of March 2014.

  12. Catalytic methods using molecular oxygen for treatment of PMMS and ECLSS waste streams, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.

    1992-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation has proven to be an effective addition to the baseline sorption, ion exchange water reclamation technology which will be used on Space Station Freedom (SSF). Low molecular weight, polar organics such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amides, and thiocarbamides which are poorly removed by the baseline multifiltration (MF) technology can be oxidized to carbon dioxide at low temperature (121 C). The catalytic oxidation process by itself can reduce the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) to below 500 ppb for solutions designed to model these waste waters. Individual challenges by selected contaminants have shown only moderate selectivity towards particular organic species. The combined technology is applicable to the more complex waste water generated in the Process Materials Management System (PMMS) and Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard SSF. During the phase 3 Core Module Integrated Facility (CMIF) water recovery tests at NASA MSFC, real hygiene waste water and humidity condensate were processed to meet potable specifications by the combined technology. A kinetic study of catalytic oxidation demonstrates that the Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate equation for heterogeneous catalysts accurately represent the kinetic behavior. From this relationship, activation energy and rate constants for acetone were determined.

  13. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  14. A microreactor array for spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity for high-throughput catalysis science

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratyuk, Petro; Gumuslu, Gamze; Shukla, Shantanu; Miller, James B; Morreale, Bryan D; Gellman, Andrew J

    2013-04-01

    We describe a 100 channel microreactor array capable of spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity across the surface of a flat substrate. When used in conjunction with a composition spread alloy film (CSAF, e.g. Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y}) across which component concentrations vary smoothly, such measurements permit high-throughput analysis of catalytic activity and selectivity as a function of catalyst composition. In the reported implementation, the system achieves spatial resolution of 1 mm{sup 2} over a 10×10 mm{sup 2} area. During operation, the reactant gases are delivered at constant flow rate to 100 points of differing composition on the CSAF surface by means of a 100-channel microfluidic device. After coming into contact with the CSAF catalyst surface, the product gas mixture from each of the 100 points is withdrawn separately through a set of 100 isolated channels for analysis using a mass spectrometer. We demonstrate the operation of the device on a Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} CSAF catalyzing the H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange reaction at 333 K. In essentially a single experiment, we measured the catalytic activity over a broad swathe of concentrations from the ternary composition space of the Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} alloy.

  15. The mechanism of selective catalytic reduction of NOx on Cu-SSZ-13 - a computational study.

    PubMed

    Crandell, Douglas W; Zhu, Haiyang; Yang, Xiaofan; Hochmuth, John; Baik, Mu-Hyun

    2017-01-03

    The copper-exchanged aluminosilicate zeolite SSZ-13 is a leading catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NO. Density functional theory calculations are used to construct a complete catalytic cycle of this process paying special attention to the coordination geometries and redox states of copper. N2 can be produced in the reduction half-cycle via a nitrosamine intermediate generated from the reaction of the additive reductant NH3 with a NO(+) intermediate stabilized by the zeolite lattice. The decomposition of this nitrosamine species can be assisted by incipient Brønsted acid sites generated during catalysis. Our calculations also suggest that the reoxidation of Cu(i) to Cu(ii) requires the addition of both NO and O2. The production of a second equivalent of N2 during the oxidation half-cycle proceeds through a peroxynitrite intermediate to form a Cu-nitrite intermediate, which may react with an acid, either HNO2 or NH4(+) to close the catalytic cycle. Models of copper neutralized by an external hydroxide ligand are also examined. These calculations form a key basis for understanding the mechanism of NO reduction in Cu-SSZ-13 in order to develop strategies for rationally optimizing the performance in future experiments.

  16. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, A. E.; Nikolaev, P.; Amama, P. B.; Zakharov, D.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Stach, E. A.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. With the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  17. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    DOE PAGES

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; ...

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only inmore » the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.« less

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of a trypsin-resistant catalytic domain of human calcineurin

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lei; Roehrl, Michael H. A.; Xiao, Li; He, Xiuyun; Li, Haibin; Ge, Linhu; Shi, Bingyi

    2012-01-01

    Calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent serine/threonine protein phosphatase, plays a key role in a number of cellular pathways, including T-cell activation, and is an important molecular target of the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporin A and FK506. To understand the structural basis underlying the activation of calcineurin by calmodulin, X-ray crystallography was employed to solve the three-dimensional structure of the free calcineurin catalytic domain (residues 20–347 of the A subunit). To accomplish this, a bacterially expressed glutathione S-­transferase (GST) fusion protein of the human calcineurin catalytic domain was first purified by GST-affinity chromatography. After limited digestion by trypsin, the catalytic domain (Cncat) was purified using anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystallization of Cncat was achieved by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at pH 6.5 using PEG 6000 as precipitant. The diffraction results showed that the Cncat crystal belonged to the orthorhombic space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 161.6, b = 87.4, c = 112.0 Å. There are four Cncat molecules in the asymmetric unit, with 49.5% solvent content. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 2.87 Å resolution and a clear molecular-replacement solution was obtained. The active site of Cncat is open to the solvent channels in the crystal packing. PMID:22691791

  19. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  20. Intergranular exchange coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, M. W.; Indeck, R. S.

    1994-02-01

    We evaluate the exchange interaction between neighboring grains of a polycrystalline magnetic material with uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy, based on the energy of the domain wall formed at the portion of the interface in atomic contact. The analysis suggests that previous work [J.-G. Zhu and H. N. Bertram, in Solid State Physics Vol. 46, edited by H. Ehrenreich and T. Turnbull (Academic, San Diego, 1992)] may underestimate the interaction, and it predicts a different dependence on grain size.

  1. Heat exchange apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2003-08-12

    A heat exchange apparatus comprising a coolant conduit or heat sink having attached to its surface a first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles and a second radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles thermally coupled to a body to be cooled and meshed with, but not contacting the first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles.

  2. Thermoelectric heat exchange element

    DOEpatents

    Callas, James J.; Taher, Mahmoud A.

    2007-08-14

    A thermoelectric heat exchange module includes a first substrate including a heat receptive side and a heat donative side and a series of undulatory pleats. The module may also include a thermoelectric material layer having a ZT value of 1.0 or more disposed on at least one of the heat receptive side and the heat donative side, and an electrical contact may be in electrical communication with the thermoelectric material layer.

  3. Armed Services Exchange Regulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-15

    itemc and brands as approved Remover; nail polish Rouge; including eye makeup Shampoo Shaving accessories and supplies Skin creams and lotions Soap...morale, welfare, and recrea- tion (MWR) activities, military exchanges have the dual mission of providing authorized patrons with articles and services...Further delegating of this authority is prohibited. Deviations shall be authorized only after judicious review and shall he granted primarily on the

  4. Optimizing exchanger design early

    SciTech Connect

    Lacunza, M.; Vaschetti, G.; Campana, H.

    1987-08-01

    It is not practical for process engineers and designers to make a rigorous economic evaluation for each component of a process due to the loss of time and money. But, it's very helpful and useful to have a method for a quick design evaluation of heat exchangers, considering their important contribution to the total fixed investment in a process plant. This article is devoted to this subject, and the authors present a method that has been proved in some design cases. Linking rigorous design procedures with a quick cost-estimation method provides a good technique for obtaining the right heat exchanger. The cost will be appropriate, sometimes not the lowest because of design restrictions, but a good approach to the optimum in an earlier process design stage. The authors intend to show the influence of the design variables in a shell and tube heat exchanger on capital investment, or conversely, taking into account the general limiting factors of the process such as thermodynamics, operability, corrosion, etc., and/or from the mechanical design of the calculated unit. The last is a special consideration for countries with no access to industrial technology or with difficulties in obtaining certain construction materials or equipment.

  5. Scraped surface heat exchangers.

    PubMed

    Rao, Chetan S; Hartel, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    Scraped surface heat exchangers (SSHEs) are commonly used in the food, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries for heat transfer, crystallization, and other continuous processes. They are ideally suited for products that are viscous, sticky, that contain particulate matter, or that need some degree of crystallization. Since these characteristics describe a vast majority of processed foods, SSHEs are especially suited for pumpable food products. During operation, the product is brought in contact with a heat transfer surface that is rapidly and continuously scraped, thereby exposing the surface to the passage of untreated product. In addition to maintaining high and uniform heat exchange, the scraper blades also provide simultaneous mixing and agitation. Heat exchange for sticky and viscous foods such as heavy salad dressings, margarine, chocolate, peanut butter, fondant, ice cream, and shortenings is possible only by using SSHEs. High heat transfer coefficients are achieved because the boundary layer is continuously replaced by fresh material. Moreover, the product is in contact with the heating surface for only a few seconds and high temperature gradients can be used without the danger of causing undesirable reactions. SSHEs are versatile in the use of heat transfer medium and the various unit operations that can be carried out simultaneously. This article critically reviews the current understanding of the operations and applications of SSHEs.

  6. Exchange-driven growth.

    PubMed

    Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2003-09-01

    We study a class of growth processes in which clusters evolve via exchange of particles. We show that depending on the rate of exchange there are three possibilities: (I) Growth-clusters grow indefinitely, (II) gelation-all mass is transformed into an infinite gel in a finite time, and (III) instant gelation. In regimes I and II, the cluster size distribution attains a self-similar form. The large size tail of the scaling distribution is Phi(x) approximately exp(-x(2-nu)), where nu is a homogeneity degree of the rate of exchange. At the borderline case nu=2, the distribution exhibits a generic algebraic tail, Phi(x) approximately x(-5). In regime III, the gel nucleates immediately and consumes the entire system. For finite systems, the gelation time vanishes logarithmically, T approximately [lnN](-(nu-2)), in the large system size limit N--> infinity. The theory is applied to coarsening in the infinite range Ising-Kawasaki model and in electrostatically driven granular layers.

  7. Catalytic properties of the eukaryotic exosome.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, Aleksander; Tomecki, Rafał; López, María Eugenia Gas; Séraphin, Bertrand; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The eukaryotic exosome complex is built around the backbone of a 9-subunit ring similar to phosporolytic ribonucleases such as RNase PH and polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase). Unlike those enzymes, the ring is devoid of any detectable catalytic activities, with the possible exception of the plant version of the complex. Instead, the essential RNA decay capability is supplied by associated hydrolytic ribonucleases belonging to the Dis3 and Rrp6 families. Dis3 proteins are endowed with two different activities: the long known processive 3'-5' exonucleolytic one and the recently discovered endonucleolytic one. Rrp6 proteins are distributive exonucleases. This chapter will review the current knowledge about the catalytic properties of theses nucleases and their interplay within the exosome holocomplex.

  8. A catalytic plasma exhaust purification system

    SciTech Connect

    Penzhorn, R.D.; Rodriguez, R.; Gluglia, M.; Gunther, K.; Yoshida, H.; Konishi, S.

    1988-09-01

    For the plasma exhaust clean-up of a fusion reactor a process concept based on the hydrogen isotope purification through palladium/silver alloy permeators combined with selective catalytic reaction steps is proposed, which avoids intermediate conversion of impurities into water. To recover tritium from tritiated impurities ammonia is decomposed into the elements inside the permeators; water is reduced catalytically by carbon monoxide into carbon dioxide and hydrogen; and hydrocarbons are cracked into carbon and hydrogen on a nickel catalyst. Experimental results on the reactivity, consumption and regeneration of the catalysts are given. The permeation rate of hydrogen through palladium/silver alloy was found to be largely independent of the impurities CO, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O and CH/sub 4/. Technological requirements in view of NET are discussed.

  9. Catalytic combustion of coal-derived liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested with three grades of SRC 2 coal derived liquids, naphtha, middle distillate, and a blend of three parts middle distillate to one part heavy distillate. A petroleum derived number 2 diesel fuel was also tested to provide a direct comparison. The catalytic reactor was tested at inlet temperatures from 600 to 800 K, reference velocities from 10 to 20 m/s, lean fuel air ratios, and a pressure of 3 x 10 to the 5th power Pa. Compared to the diesel, the naphtha gave slightly better combustion efficiency, the middle distillate was almost identical, and the middle heavy blend was slightly poorer. The coal derived liquid fuels contained from 0.58 to 0.95 percent nitrogen by weight. Conversion of fuel nitrogen to NOx was approximately 75 percent for all three grades of the coal derived liquids.

  10. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres, conversions with them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  11. Catalytic combustion of coal-derived liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested with three grades of SRC 2 coal derived liquids, naphtha, middle distillate, and a blend of three parts middle distillate to one part heavy distillate. A petroleum derived number 2 diesel fuel was also tested to provide a direct comparison. The catalytic reactor was tested at inlet temperatures from 600 to 800 K, reference velocities from 10 to 20 m/s, lean fuel air ratios, and a pressure of 3 x 10 to the 5th power Pa. Compared to the diesel, the naphtha gave slightly better combustion efficiency, the middle distillate was almost identical, and the middle heavy blend was slightly poorer. The coal derived liquid fuels contained from 0.58 to 0.95 percent nitrogen by weight. Conversion of fuel nitrogen to NOx was approximately 75 percent for all three grades of the coal derived liquids.

  12. Catalytic Destruction of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    cations and especially Co, preferentially occupy the Si and Si1 sites within the hexagonal prisms and the sodalite cages of the zeolite. With less...than 50 percent exchange of the Y zeolite most of the exchanged cations are usually located in these smaller sodalite cages and hexagonal prisms, with...almost none available in the larger supercages. However, with the Co2+ ions (ionic radius s 0.72 A) located inside the small sodalite cages (pore

  13. Method and apparatus for a catalytic firebox reactor

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Lance L.; Etemad, Shahrokh; Ulkarim, Hasan; Castaldi, Marco J.; Pfefferle, William C.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic firebox reactor employing an exothermic catalytic reaction channel and multiple cooling conduits for creating a partially reacted fuel/oxidant mixture. An oxidation catalyst is deposited on the walls forming the boundary between the multiple cooling conduits and the exothermic catalytic reaction channel, on the side of the walls facing the exothermic catalytic reaction channel. This configuration allows the oxidation catalyst to be backside cooled by any fluid passing through the cooling conduits. The heat of reaction is added to both the fluid in the exothermic catalytic reaction channel and the fluid passing through the cooling conduits. After discharge of the fluids from the exothermic catalytic reaction channel, the fluids mix to create a single combined flow. A further innovation in the reactor incorporates geometric changes in the exothermic catalytic reaction channel to provide streamwise variation of the velocity of the fluids in the reactor.

  14. On the structural context and identification of enzyme catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yu-Tung; Huang, Shao-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The results show that catalytic residues have distinct structural features and context. Their neighboring residues, whether sequence or structure neighbors within specific range, are usually structurally more rigid than those of noncatalytic residues. The structural context feature is combined with support vector machine to identify catalytic residues from enzyme structure. The prediction results are better or comparable to those of recent structure-based prediction methods.

  15. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Yu-Tung; Huang, Shao-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The results show that catalytic residues have distinct structural features and context. Their neighboring residues, whether sequence or structure neighbors within specific range, are usually structurally more rigid than those of noncatalytic residues. The structural context feature is combined with support vector machine to identify catalytic residues from enzyme structure. The prediction results are better or comparable to those of recent structure-based prediction methods. PMID:23484160

  16. Control of a catalytic fluid cracker

    SciTech Connect

    Arbel, A.; Huang, Z.; Rinard, I.; Shinnar, R.

    1993-12-13

    Control offers an important tool for savings in refineries, mainly by integration of process models into on-line control. This paper is part of a research effort to better understand problems of partial control; control of a Fluid Catalytic Cracker (FCC) is used as example. Goal is to understand better the control problems of an FCC in context of model based control of a refinery, and to understand the general problem of designing partial control systems.

  17. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  18. In vitro selection of catalytic RNAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, K. B.; Szostak, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    In vitro selection techniques are poised to allow a rapid expansion of the study of catalysis by RNA enzymes (ribozymes). This truly molecular version of genetics has already been applied to the study of the structures of known ribozymes and to the tailoring of their catalytic activity to meet specific requirements of substrate specificity or reaction conditions. During the past year, in vitro selection has been successfully used to isolate novel RNA catalysts from random sequence pools.

  19. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel-bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating value, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

  20. In vitro selection of catalytic RNAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, K. B.; Szostak, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    In vitro selection techniques are poised to allow a rapid expansion of the study of catalysis by RNA enzymes (ribozymes). This truly molecular version of genetics has already been applied to the study of the structures of known ribozymes and to the tailoring of their catalytic activity to meet specific requirements of substrate specificity or reaction conditions. During the past year, in vitro selection has been successfully used to isolate novel RNA catalysts from random sequence pools.

  1. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy Q3 carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel—bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating values, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly Q4 limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

  2. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  3. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.; Zeitoon, B.M.

    1995-12-01

    Molten Metal Technology was awarded a contract to demonstrate the applicability of the Catalytic Extraction Process, a proprietary process that could be applied to US DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This paper is a description of that technology, and included within this document are discussions of: (1) Program objectives, (2) Overall technology review, (3) Organic feed conversion to synthetic gas, (4) Metal, halogen, and transuranic recovery, (5) Demonstrations, (6) Design of the prototype facility, and (7) Results.

  4. Catalytically induced electrokinetics for motors and micropumps.

    PubMed

    Paxton, Walter F; Baker, Paul T; Kline, Timothy R; Wang, Yang; Mallouk, Thomas E; Sen, Ayusman

    2006-11-22

    We have explored the role of electrokinetics in the spontaneous motion of platinum-gold nanorods suspended in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solutions that may arise from the bimetallic electrochemical decomposition of H2O2. The electrochemical decomposition pathway was confirmed by measuring the steady-state short-circuit current between platinum and gold interdigitated microelectrodes (IMEs) in the presence of H2O2. The resulting ion flux from platinum to gold implies an electric field in the surrounding solution that can be estimated from Ohm's Law. This catalytically generated electric field could in principle bring about electrokinetic effects that scale with the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski equation. Accordingly, we observed a linear relationship between bimetallic rod speed and the resistivity of the bulk solution. Previous observations relating a decrease in speed to an increase in ethanol concentration can be explained in terms of a decrease in current density caused by the presence of ethanol. Furthermore, we found that the catalytically generated electric field in the solution near a Pt/Au IME in the presence of H2O2 is capable of inducing electroosmotic fluid flow that can be switched on and off externally. We demonstrate that the velocity of the fluid flow in the plane of the IME is a function of the electric field, whether catalytically generated or applied from an external current source. Our findings indicate that the motion of PtAu nanorods in H2O2 is primarily due to a catalytically induced electrokinetic phenomenon and that other mechanisms, such as those related to interfacial tension gradients, play at best a minor role.

  5. Preface: Challenges for Catalytic Exhaust Aftertreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nova, Isabella; Epling, Bill; Peden, Charles HF

    2014-03-31

    This special issue of Catalysis Today continues the tradition established since the 18th NAM in Cancun, 2003, of publishing the highlights coming from these catalytic after-treatment technologies sessions, where this volume contains 18 papers based on oral and poster presentations of the 23rd NAM, 2013. The guest editors would like to thank all of the catalyst scientists and engineers who presented in the "Emission control" sessions, and especially the authors who contributed to this special issue of Catalysis Today.

  6. Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Phosphine Boronates.

    PubMed

    Hornillos, Valentín; Vila, Carlos; Otten, Edwin; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-06-26

    The first catalytic enantioselective synthesis of ambiphilic phosphine boronate esters is presented. The asymmetric boration of α,β-unsaturated phosphine oxides catalyzed by a copper bisphosphine complex affords optically active organoboronate esters that bear a vicinal phosphine oxide group in good yields and high enantiomeric excess. The synthetic utility of the products is demonstrated through stereospecific transformations into multifunctional optically active compounds. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Tungstocobaltate-pillared layered double hydroxides: Preparation, characterization, magnetic and catalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiaocui; Fu Youzhi; Xu Lin Li Fengyan; Bi Bo; Liu Xizheng

    2008-06-15

    A new polyoxometalate anion-pillared layered double hydroxide (LDH) was prepared by aqueous ion exchange of a Mg-Al LDH precursor in nitrate form with the tungstocobaltate anions [CoW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 5-}. The physicochemical properties of the product were characterized by the methods of powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and cyclic voltammetry. It was confirmed that [CoW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 5-} was intercalated between the brucite-type layers of the LDHs without a change in the structure. Magnetic measurement shows the occurrence of antiferromagnetic interactions between the magnetic centers. The investigation of catalytic performance for this sample exhibits high activity for the oxidation of benzaldehyde by hydrogen peroxide. - Graphical abstract: A tungstocobaltate anion [CoW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 5-} pillared layered double hydroxide (LDH) was prepared by aqueous ion exchange with a Mg-Al LDH precursor in nitrate form, demonstrating that [CoW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 5-} was intercalated between the brucite-type layers of the LDHs without change in structure. Magnetic measurement shows the occurrence of antiferromagnetic interactions between the magnetic centers. The investigation of catalytic performance for this sample exhibits high activity for the oxidation of benzaldehyde by hydrogen peroxide.

  8. Enhanced Activity of Nanocrystalline Zeolites for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah C. Larson; Vicki H. Grassian

    2006-12-31

    Nanocrystalline zeolites with discrete crystal sizes of less than 100 nm have different properties relative to zeolites with larger crystal sizes. Nanocrystalline zeolites have improved mass transfer properties and very large internal and external surface areas that can be exploited for many different applications. The additional external surface active sites and the improved mass transfer properties of nanocrystalline zeolites offer significant advantages for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysis with ammonia as a reductant in coal-fired power plants relative to current zeolite based SCR catalysts. Nanocrystalline NaY was synthesized with a crystal size of 15-20 nm and was thoroughly characterized using x-ray diffraction, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Copper ions were exchanged into nanocrystalline NaY to increase the catalytic activity. The reactions of nitrogen dioxides (NO{sub x}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) on nanocrystalline NaY and CuY were investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy. Significant conversion of NO{sub 2} was observed at room temperature in the presence of NH{sub 3} as monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy. Copper-exchanged nanocrystalline NaY was more active for NO{sub 2} reduction with NH{sub 3} relative to nanocrystalline NaY.

  9. Superior acidic catalytic activity and stability of Fe-doped HTaWO6 nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Zhang, Haitao; Fei, Linfeng; Ma, Hongbin; Zhao, Guoying; Mak, CheeLeung; Zhang, Xixiang; Zhang, Suojiang

    2017-08-10

    Fe-doped HTaWO6 (H1-3xFexTaWO6, x = 0.23) nanotubes as highly active solid acid catalysts were prepared via an exfoliation-scrolling-exchange process. The specific surface area and pore volume of undoped nanotubes (20.8 m(2) g(-1), 0.057 cm(3) g(-1)) were remarkably enhanced through Fe(3+) ion-exchange (>100 m(2) g(-1), 0.547 cm(3) g(-1)). Doping Fe ions into the nanotubes endowed them with improved thermal stability due to the stronger interaction between the intercalated Fe(3+) ions and the host layers. This interaction also facilitated the preservation of effective Brønsted acid sites and the generation of new acid sites. The integration of these functional roles resulted in Fe-doped nanotubes with high acidic catalytic activities in the Friedel-Crafts alkylation of anisole and the esterification of acetic acid. Facile accessibility to active sites, generation of effective Brønsted acid sites, high stability of the tubular structure and strong acid sites were found to synergistically contribute to the excellent acidic catalytic efficiency. Additionally, the activity of cycled nanocatalysts can be easily recovered through annealing treatment.

  10. IFP solutions for revamping catalytic reforming units

    SciTech Connect

    Gendler, J.L.; Domergue, B.; Mank, L.

    1996-12-01

    The decision-making process for the refiner considering a revamp of a catalytic reforming unit comprises many factors. These may be grouped in two broad areas: technical and economic. This paper presents the results of a study performed by IFP that illustrates catalytic reforming unit revamp options. Three IFP processes are described and operating conditions, expected yields, and economic data are presented. The following options are discussed: base case Conventional, fixed-bed, semi-regenerative catalytic reformer; Case 1--revamp using IFP Dualforming technology; Case 2--revamp using IFP Dualforming Plus technology; and Case 3--revamp to IFP Octanizing technology. The study illustrates various options for the refiner to balance unit performance improvements with equipment, site, and economic constraints. The study was performed assuming design feedrate of 98.2 tons/hour (20,000 BPSD) in all cases. Because of the increased need for octane in many refineries, the study assumed that operating severity was set at a design value of 100 research octane number clear (RON). In all of the cases in this study, it was assumed that the existing recycle compressor was reused. Operating pressure differences between the cases is discussed separately. Also, in all cases, a booster compressor was included in order to return export hydrogen pressure to that of the conventional unit.

  11. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors.

  12. Demonstration of catalytic combustion with residual fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to demonstrate catalytic combustion of a residual fuel oil. Three catalytic reactors, including a baseline configuration and two backup configurations based on baseline test results, were operated on No. 6 fuel oil. All reactors were multielement configurations consisting of ceramic honeycomb catalyzed with palladium on stabilized alumina. Stable operation on residual oil was demonstrated with the baseline configuration at a reactor inlet temperature of about 825 K (1025 F). At low inlet temperature, operation was precluded by apparent plugging of the catalytic reactor with residual oil. Reduced plugging tendency was demonstrated in the backup reactors by increasing the size of the catalyst channels at the reactor inlet, but plugging still occurred at inlet temperature below 725 K (845 F). Operation at the original design inlet temperature of 589 K (600 F) could not be demonstrated. Combustion efficiency above 99.5% was obtained with less than 5% reactor pressure drop. Thermally formed NO sub x levels were very low (less than 0.5 g NO2/kg fuel) but nearly 100% conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x was observed.

  13. Catalytic pyrolysis of olive mill wastewater sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdellaoui, Hamza

    From 2008 to 2013, an average of 2,821.4 kilotons/year of olive oil were produced around the world. The waste product of the olive mill industry consists of solid residue (pomace) and wastewater (OMW). Annually, around 30 million m3 of OMW are produced in the Mediterranean area, 700,000 m3 year?1 in Tunisia alone. OMW is an aqueous effluent characterized by an offensive smell and high organic matter content, including high molecular weight phenolic compounds and long-chain fatty acids. These compounds are highly toxic to micro-organisms and plants, which makes the OMW a serious threat to the environment if not managed properly. The OMW is disposed of in open air evaporation ponds. After evaporation of most of the water, OMWS is left in the bottom of the ponds. In this thesis, the effort has been made to evaluate the catalytic pyrolysis process as a technology to valorize the OMWS. The first section of this research showed that 41.12 wt. % of the OMWS is mostly lipids, which are a good source of energy. The second section proved that catalytic pyrolysis of the OMWS over red mud and HZSM-5 can produce green diesel, and 450 °C is the optimal reaction temperature to maximize the organic yields. The last section revealed that the HSF was behind the good fuel-like properties of the OMWS catalytic oils, whereas the SR hindered the bio-oil yields and quality.

  14. A mutagenesis study of a catalytic antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.Y.; Prudent, J.R.; Baldwin, E.P.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have generated seven site-specific mutations in the genes encoding the variable region of the heavy chain domain (V{sub H}) of the phosphocholine-binding antibody S107.S107 is a member of a family of well-characterized highly homologous antibodies that bind phosphorylcholine mono- and diesters. Two of these antibodies, MOPC-167 and T15, have previously been shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl N-trimethylammonioethyl carbonate. Two conserved heavy-chain residues, Tyr-33 and Arg-52, were postulated to be involved in binding and hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenylcholine carbonate esters. To more precisely define the catalytic roles of these residues, three Arg-52 mutants (R52K, R52Q, R52C) and four Tyr-33 mutants (Y33H, Y33F, Y33E, Y33D) of antibody S107 were generated. The genes encoding the V{sub H} binding domain of S107 were inserted into plasmid pUC-fl, and in vitro mutagenesis was performed. These results not only demonstrate the importance of electrostatic interactions in catalysis by antibody S107 but also show that catalytic side chains can be introduced into antibodies to enhance their catalytic efficiency.

  15. Kinetic modelling of heterogeneous catalytic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatakis, Michail

    2015-01-01

    The importance of heterogeneous catalysis in modern life is evidenced by the fact that numerous products and technologies routinely used nowadays involve catalysts in their synthesis or function. The discovery of catalytic materials is, however, a non-trivial procedure, requiring tedious trial-and-error experimentation. First-principles-based kinetic modelling methods have recently emerged as a promising way to understand catalytic function and aid in materials discovery. In particular, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation is increasingly becoming more popular, as it can integrate several sources of complexity encountered in catalytic systems, and has already been used to successfully unravel the underlying physics of several systems of interest. After a short discussion of the different scales involved in catalysis, we summarize the theory behind KMC simulation, and present the latest KMC computational implementations in the field. Early achievements that transformed the way we think about catalysts are subsequently reviewed in connection to latest studies of realistic systems, in an attempt to highlight how the field has evolved over the last few decades. Present challenges and future directions and opportunities in computational catalysis are finally discussed.

  16. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors. PMID:26285032

  17. A revolution in micropower : the catalytic nanodiode.

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, Karen Charlene; Heller, Edwin J.; Figiel, Jeffrey James; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Creighton, James Randall; Koleske, Daniel David; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Baucom, Kevin C.

    2010-11-01

    Our ability to field useful, nano-enabled microsystems that capitalize on recent advances in sensor technology is severely limited by the energy density of available power sources. The catalytic nanodiode (reported by Somorjai's group at Berkeley in 2005) was potentially an alternative revolutionary source of micropower. Their first reports claimed that a sizable fraction of the chemical energy may be harvested via hot electrons (a 'chemicurrent') that are created by the catalytic chemical reaction. We fabricated and tested Pt/GaN nanodiodes, which eventually produced currents up to several microamps. Our best reaction yields (electrons/CO{sub 2}) were on the order of 10{sup -3}; well below the 75% values first reported by Somorjai (we note they have also been unable to reproduce their early results). Over the course of this Project we have determined that the whole concept of 'chemicurrent', in fact, may be an illusion. Our results conclusively demonstrate that the current measured from our nanodiodes is derived from a thermoelectric voltage; we have found no credible evidence for true chemicurrent. Unfortunately this means that the catalytic nanodiode has no future as a micropower source.

  18. Development of Batch and Flow Immobilized Catalytic Systems with High Catalytic Activity and Reusability.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoichi M A

    2017-01-01

    My mission in catalysis research is to develop highly active and reusable supported catalytic systems in terms of fundamental chemistry and industrial application. For this purpose, I developed three types of highly active and reusable supported catalytic systems. The first type involves polymeric base-supported metal catalysts: Novel polymeric imidazole-Pd and Cu complexes were developed that worked at the mol ppm level for a variety of organic transformations. The second involves catalytic membrane-installed microflow reactors: Membranous polymeric palladium and copper complex/nanoparticle catalysts were installed at the center of a microtube to produce novel catalytic membrane-immobilized flow microreactor devices. These catalytic devices mediated a variety of organic transformations to afford the corresponding products in high yield within 1-38 s. The third is a silicon nanowire array-immobilized palladium nanoparticle catalyst. This device promoted a variety of organic transformations as a heterogeneous catalyst. The Mizoroki-Heck reaction proceeded with 280 mol ppb (0.000028 mol%) of the catalyst, affording the corresponding products in high yield.

  19. Lightweight Long Life Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    A shuttle orbiter flight configuration aluminum heat exchanger was designed, fabricated, and tested. The heat exchanger utilized aluminum clad titanium composite parting sheets for protection against parting sheet pin hole corrosion. The heat exchanger, which is fully interchangeable with the shuttle condensing heat exchanger, includes slurpers (a means for removing condensed water from the downstream face of the heat exchanger), and both the core air passes and slurpers were hydrophilic coated to enhance wettability. The test program included performance tests which demonstrated the adequacy of the design and confirmed the predicted weight savings.

  20. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Hua; Li, Zhihu; Xu, Yanhui

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm{sup −2} for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm{sup −2} (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −6} cm s{sup −1}. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER.

  1. Polyreactivity of natural antibodies: exchange by HL-fragments.

    PubMed

    Sedykh, M A; Buneva, V N; Nevinsky, G A

    2013-12-01

    The polyreactivity of binding (formation of antibody (AB) complexes not only with specific but also with foreign antigens) is a widespread phenomenon that in some cases can be caused by a conformational lability of the antigen-binding sites of antibodies (which increases upon treatment with various destabilizing agents) and leads to AB binding with very different antigens. Some ABs exist as dimers of the initial ABs and their idiotypes (or anti-idiotypes) capable of producing intramolecular cyclic complexes with features of polyreactants. Another mechanism of binding polyreactivity is an exchange in blood by halves of IgG4 molecules (HL-fragments) against various antigens. Also, for the first time catalytic polyfunctionality of human milk ABs has been detected, which is caused by an exchange by HL-fragments between molecules of λ- and κ-IgG (IgG1-IgG4) and also by λ- and κ-sIgA against different antigens with formation of very different chimeric antibodies. This review considers all possible pathways of formation of polyspecific immunoglobulins and their biological functions described in the literature, as well as mechanisms of binding polyreactivity and catalytic polyfunctionality of natural antibodies.

  2. Complementary structure sensitive and insensitive catalytic relationships.

    PubMed

    Van Santen, Rutger A

    2009-01-20

    The burgeoning field of nanoscience has stimulated an intense interest in properties that depend on particle size. For transition metal particles, one important property that depends on size is catalytic reactivity, in which bonds are broken or formed on the surface of the particles. Decreased particle size may increase, decrease, or have no effect on the reaction rates of a given catalytic system. This Account formulates a molecular theory of the structure sensitivity of catalytic reactions based on the computed activation energies of corresponding elementary reaction steps on transition metal surfaces. Recent progress in computational catalysis, surface science, and nanochemistry has significantly improved our theoretical understanding of particle-dependent reactivity changes in heterogeneous catalytic systems. Reactions that involve the cleavage or formation of molecular pi-bonds, as in CO or N(2), must be distinguished from reactions that involve the activation of sigma-bonds, such as CH bonds in methane. The activation of molecular pi-bonds requires a reaction center with a unique configuration of several metal atoms and step-edge sites, which can physically not be present on transition metal particles less than 2 nm. This is called class I surface sensitivity, and the rate of reaction will sharply decrease when particle size decreases below a critical size. The activation of sigma chemical bonds, in which the activation proceeds at a single metal atom, displays a markedly different size relationship. In this case, the dependence of reaction rate on coordinative unsaturation of reactive surface atoms is large in the forward direction of the reaction, but the activation energy of the reverse recombination reaction will not change. Dissociative adsorption with cleavage of a CH bond is strongly affected by the presence of surface atoms at the particle edges. This is class II surface sensitivity, and the rate will increase with decreasing particle size. Reverse

  3. Peptide-Directed PdAu Nanoscale Surface Segregation: Toward Controlled Bimetallic Architecture for Catalytic Materials.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Nicholas M; Showalter, Allison R; Woehl, Taylor J; Hughes, Zak E; Lee, Sungsik; Reinhart, Benjamin; Ertem, S Piril; Coughlin, E Bryan; Ren, Yang; Walsh, Tiffany R; Bunker, Bruce A

    2016-09-27

    Bimetallic nanoparticles are of immense scientific and technological interest given the synergistic properties observed when two different metallic species are mixed at the nanoscale. This is particularly prevalent in catalysis, where bimetallic nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic activity and durability over their monometallic counterparts. Yet despite intense research efforts, little is understood regarding how to optimize bimetallic surface composition and structure synthetically using rational design principles. Recently, it has been demonstrated that peptide-enabled routes for nanoparticle synthesis result in materials with sequence-dependent catalytic properties, providing an opportunity for rational design through sequence manipulation. In this study, bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles are synthesized with a small set of peptides containing known Pd and Au binding motifs. The resulting nanoparticles were extensively characterized using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis. Structural information obtained from synchrotron radiation methods was then used to generate model nanoparticle configurations using reverse Monte Carlo simulations, which illustrate sequence dependence in both surface structure and surface composition. Replica exchange with solute tempering molecular dynamics simulations were also used to predict the modes of peptide binding on monometallic surfaces, indicating that different sequences bind to the metal interfaces via different mechanisms. As a testbed reaction, electrocatalytic methanol oxidation experiments were performed, wherein differences in catalytic activity are clearly observed in materials with identical bimetallic composition. Taken together, this study indicates that peptides could be used to arrive at bimetallic surfaces with enhanced catalytic properties, which could be leveraged

  4. Degradation of phenylamine by catalytic wet air oxidation using metal catalysts with modified supports.

    PubMed

    Torrellas, Silvia A; Escudero, Gabriel O; Rodriguez, Araceli R; Rodriguez, Juan G

    2015-01-01

    The effect of acid treatments with HCl and HNO3 on the surface area and surface chemistry of three granular activated carbons was studied. These supports were characterized and the hydrochloric acid treatment leads to the best activated carbon support (AC2-C). The catalytic behavior of Pt, Ru and Fe (1 wt.%) supported on granular activated carbon treated with HCl was tested in the phenylamine continuous catalytic wet air oxidation in a three-phase, high-pressure catalytic reactor over a range of reaction temperatures 130-170ºC and total pressure of 1.0-3.0 MPa at LHSV = 0.4-1 h(-1), whereas the phenylamine concentration range and the catalyst loading were 5-16 mol.m(-3) and 0.5-1.5 g, respectively. Activity as well as conversion varied as a function of the metal, the catalyst preparation method and operation conditions. Higher activities were obtained with Pt incorporated on hydrochloric acid -treated activated carbon by the ion exchange method. In steady state, approximately 98% phenylamine conversion, 77% of TOC and 94% of COD removal, was recorded at 150ºC, 11 mol m(-3) of phenylamine concentration and 1.5 g of catalyst, and the selectivity to non-organic compounds was 78%. Several reaction intermediaries were detected. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood model gave an excellent fit of the kinetic data of phenylamine continuous catalytic wet air oxidation over the catalysts of this work.

  5. Peptide-Directed PdAu Nanoscale Surface Segregation: Toward Controlled Bimetallic Architecture for Catalytic Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Bedford, Nicholas M.; Showalter, Allison R.; Woehl, Taylor J.; ...

    2016-09-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles are of immense scientific and technological interest given the synergistic properties observed when mixing two different metallic species at the nanoscale. This is particularly prevalent in catalysis, where bimetallic nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic activity and durability over their monometallic counterparts. Yet despite intense research efforts, little is understood regarding how to optimize bimetallic surface composition and structure synthetically using rational design principles. Recently, it has been demonstrated that peptide-enabled routes for nanoparticle synthesis result in materials with sequence-dependent catalytic properties, providing an opportunity for rational design through sequence manipulation. In this study, bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles are synthesizedmore » with a small set of peptides containing known Pd and Au binding motifs. The resulting nanoparticles were extensively characterized using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis. Structural information obtained from synchrotron radiation methods were then used to generate model nanoparticle configurations using reverse Monte Carlo simulations, which illustrate sequence-dependence in both surface structure and surface composition. Replica exchange solute tempering molecular dynamic simulations were also used to predict the modes of peptide binding on monometallic surfaces, indicating that different sequences bind to the metal interfaces via different mechanisms. As a testbed reaction, electrocatalytic methanol oxidation experiments were performed, wherein differences in catalytic activity are clearly observed in materials with identical bimetallic composition. Finally, taken together, this study indicates that peptides could be used to arrive at bimetallic surfaces with enhanced catalytic properties, which could be

  6. Peptide-Directed PdAu Nanoscale Surface Segregation: Toward Controlled Bimetallic Architecture for Catalytic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, Nicholas M.; Showalter, Allison R.; Woehl, Taylor J.; Hughes, Zak E.; Lee, Sungsik; Reinhart, Benjamin; Ertem, S. Piril; Coughlin, E. Bryan; Ren, Yang; Walsh, Tiffany R.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2016-09-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles are of immense scientific and technological interest given the synergistic properties observed when mixing two different metallic species at the nanoscale. This is particularly prevalent in catalysis, where bimetallic nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic activity and durability over their monometallic counterparts. Yet despite intense research efforts, little is understood regarding how to optimize bimetallic surface composition and structure synthetically using rational design principles. Recently, it has been demonstrated that peptide-enabled routes for nanoparticle synthesis result in materials with sequence-dependent catalytic properties, providing an opportunity for rational design through sequence manipulation. In this study, bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles are synthesized with a small set of peptides containing known Pd and Au binding motifs. The resulting nanoparticles were extensively characterized using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis. Structural information obtained from synchrotron radiation methods were then used to generate model nanoparticle configurations using reverse Monte Carlo simulations, which illustrate sequence-dependence in both surface structure and surface composition. Replica exchange solute tempering molecular dynamic simulations were also used to predict the modes of peptide binding on monometallic surfaces, indicating that different sequences bind to the metal interfaces via different mechanisms. As a testbed reaction, electrocatalytic methanol oxidation experiments were performed, wherein differences in catalytic activity are clearly observed in materials with identical bimetallic composition. Finally, taken together, this study indicates that peptides could be used to arrive at bimetallic surfaces with enhanced catalytic properties, which could be leveraged

  7. The Dynamics of Multilateral Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausken, Kjell; Moxnes, John F.

    The article formulates a dynamic mathematical model where arbitrarily many players produce, consume, exchange, loan, and deposit arbitrarily many goods over time to maximize utility. Consuming goods constitutes a benefit, and producing, exporting, and loaning away goods constitute a cost. Utilities are benefits minus costs, which depend on the exchange ratios and bargaining functions. Three-way exchange occurs when one player acquires, through exchange, one good from another player with the sole purpose of using this good to exchange against the desired good from a third player. Such a triple handshake is not merely a set of double handshakes since the player assigns no interest to the first good in his benefit function. Cognitive and organization costs increase dramatically for higher order exchanges. An exchange theory accounting for media of exchange follows from simple generalization of two-way exchange. The examples of r-way exchange are the triangle trade between Africa, the USA, and England in the 17th and 18th centuries, the hypothetical hypercycle involving RNAs as players and enzymes as goods, and reaction-diffusion processes. The emergence of exchange, and the role of trading agents are discussed. We simulate an example where two-way exchange gives zero production and zero utility, while three-way exchange causes considerable production and positive utility. Maximum utility for each player is reached when exchanges of the same order as the number of players in society are allowed. The article merges micro theory and macro theory within the social, natural, and physical sciences.

  8. Ion exchange and absorption techniques to apply catalysts for liquefaction of lower rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Vorres, K.S.; Cronauer, D.C.; Curtis, C.W.; Brannan, C.J.

    1994-07-01

    Samples of Beulah-zap lignite, Black Thunder and Wyodak subbituminous, and Illinois No. 6 high volatile bituminous coals have been prepared by acid treatment to remove exchangeable cations. Subsequent treatments were made with solutions of catalytic metals including iron or cobalt or nickel to exchange with the acid sites, or with molybdate to adsorb on the surface. Samples were then subjected to liquefaction conditions in microautoclave tubular microreactors and solvent extraction was used to establish total conversion or yields of oils, asphaltenes and preasphaltenes. Results of the liquefaction experiments are compared with the catalyst loadings.

  9. CoMOR zeolite catalyst prepared by buffered ion exchange for effective decomposition of nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyan; Shen, Qun; He, Chi; Wang, Yufei; Cheng, Jie; Hao, Zhengping

    2011-09-15

    Co contained MOR zeolite catalysts with high Co loadings were successfully synthesized by buffered ion exchange at pH 8, and were tested for N(2)O catalytic decomposition. The high exchange level of synthesized CoMOR(x)-BIE catalysts probably benefits from the maximizing hydroxycomplexes Co(OH)(+) ion in the buffered solution, which is more preferred for the ion exchange with the zeolites. It has been found that the novel CoMOR(x)-BIE catalysts exhibit excellent catalytic activities, which is attributed to the large population of isolated Co(2+) ions on ion exchange positions. The most active CoMOR(130)-BIE catalyst shows high resistance to the inhibition of oxygen, NO and water vapor. Furthermore, stability tests indicate that the CoMOR(130)-BIE catalyst has no obvious deactivation under simulated emission conditions after reaction for more than 100 h. This extraordinary durability could be related to its high Co(2+) content and low Brönsted acidity sites in the catalyst, which facilitate the stability of active isolated Co(2+) on ion exchange positions. Thus, the CoMOR(130)-BIE catalyst shows a great potential as a cost-effective catalyst for N(2)O elimination in future applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Turning goals into results: the power of catalytic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Collins, J

    1999-01-01

    Most executives have a big, hairy, audacious goal. They write vision statements, formalize procedures, and develop complicated incentive programs--all in pursuit of that goal. In other words, with the best of intentions, they install layers of stultifying bureaucracy. But it doesn't have to be that way. In this article, Jim Collins introduces the catalytic mechanism, a simple yet powerful managerial tool that helps translate lofty aspirations into concrete reality. Catalytic mechanisms are the crucial link between objectives and performance; they are a galvanizing, nonbureaucratic means to turn one into the other. What's the difference between catalytic mechanisms and most traditional managerial controls? Catalytic mechanisms share five characteristics. First, they produce desired results in unpredictable ways. Second, they distribute power for the benefit of the overall system, often to the discomfort of those who traditionally hold power. Third, catalytic mechanisms have teeth. Fourth, they eject "viruses"--those people who don't share the company's core values. Finally, they produce an ongoing effect. Catalytic mechanisms are just as effective for reaching individual goals as they are for corporate ones. To illustrate how catalytic mechanisms work, the author draws on examples of individuals and organizations that have relied on such mechanisms to achieve their goals. The same catalytic mechanism that works in one organization, however, will not necessarily work in another. Catalytic mechanisms must be tailored to specific goals and situations. To help readers get started, the author offers some general principles that support the process of building catalytic mechanisms effectively.

  11. Heterogeneous allylsilylation of aromatic and aliphatic alkenes catalyzed by proton-exchanged montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Matsunaga, Shigekazu; Miyaji, Akimitsu; Sakamoto, Yasuharu; Baba, Toshihide

    2010-04-02

    Allylsilylation of an alkene is the only known procedure to install both silyl and allyl groups onto a carbon-carbon double bond directly. Proton-exchanged montmorillonite showed excellent catalytic performances for the allylsilylation of alkenes. For example, the reaction of p-chlorostyrene with allyltrimethylsilane proceeded smoothly to afford the corresponding allylsilylated product in 95% yield. We also attempted to isolate the reaction intermediate on the montmorillonite surface to investigate the reaction mechanism.

  12. [Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts with different silica-alumina ratios for N2O, catalytic decomposition].

    PubMed

    Lu, Ren-Jie; Zhang, Xin-Yan; Hao, Zheng-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts were prepared with H-ZSM-5 of different Si/Al ratios by wet ion exchange and chemical vapor deposition. Then the catalysts were investigated by XRD, BET, TEM, UV-vis and NH3-TPD technologies to analyze the iron states in Fe-ZSM-5 zeolites. The results showed that after H-ZSM-5 zeolites were prepared by chemical vapor deposition and heating wet ion exchange, the nano Fe2 O3 particles were uniformly dispersed with the sizes of 8 nm in the Fe-ZSM-5-25 (Si/A1-25). Moreover, there were more oligonuclear Fe3+ Oy clusters in the Fe-ZSM-5-25 catalysts than in Fe-ZSM-5-300 (Si/Al-300). The results of catalytic performance on N2O decomposition showed that Fe-ZSM-5-25 catalysts had higher catalytic activities than Fe-ZSM-5-300 catalysts. The Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts prepared by chemical vapor deposition achieved the best catalytic activity in N2O decomposition among the catalysts prepared by the three methods. Moreover, the presence of O2 only slightly reduced N2O conversion, while NO promoted the N2O decomposition. Finally, after reaction for more than 100 h, Fe-ZSM-5 catalyst showed no obvious deactivation under simulated emission conditions.

  13. The Structure and Function of a Microbial Allantoin Racemase Reveal the Origin and Conservation of a Catalytic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cendron, Laura; Ramazzina, Ileana; Puggioni, Vincenzo; Maccacaro, Eleonora; Liuzzi, Anastasia; Secchi, Andrea; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Percudani, Riccardo

    2016-11-22

    The S enantiomer of allantoin is an intermediate of purine degradation in several organisms and the final product of uricolysis in nonhominoid mammals. Bioinformatics indicated that proteins of the Asp/Glu racemase superfamily could be responsible for the allantoin racemase (AllR) activity originally described in Pseudomonas species. In these proteins, a cysteine of the catalytic dyad is substituted with glycine, yet the recombinant enzyme displayed racemization activity with a similar efficiency (kcat/KM ≈ 5 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) for the R and S enantiomers of allantoin. The protein crystal structure identified a glutamate residue located three residues downstream (E78) that can functionally replace the missing cysteine; the catalytic role of E78 was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. Allantoin can undergo racemization through formation of a bicyclic intermediate (faster) or proton exchange at the chiral center (slower). By monitoring the two alternative mechanisms by (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance, we found that the velocity of the faster reaction is unaffected by the enzyme, whereas the velocity of the slower reaction is increased by 7 orders of magnitude. Protein phylogenies trace the origin of the racemization mechanism in enzymes acting on glutamate, a substrate for which proton exchange is the only viable reaction mechanism. This mechanism was inherited by allantoin racemase through divergent evolution and conserved in spite of the substitution of catalytic residues.

  14. A Threonine Stabilizes the NiC and NiR Catalytic Intermediates of [NiFe]-hydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Hamdan, Abbas; Ceccaldi, Pierre; Lebrette, Hugo; Gutiérrez-Sanz, Oscar; Richaud, Pierre; Cournac, Laurent; Guigliarelli, Bruno; De Lacey, Antonio L.; Léger, Christophe; Volbeda, Anne; Burlat, Bénédicte; Dementin, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The heterodimeric [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans catalyzes the reversible oxidation of H2 into protons and electrons. The catalytic intermediates have been attributed to forms of the active site (NiSI, NiR, and NiC) detected using spectroscopic methods under potentiometric but non-catalytic conditions. Here, we produced variants by replacing the conserved Thr-18 residue in the small subunit with Ser, Val, Gln, Gly, or Asp, and we analyzed the effects of these mutations on the kinetic (H2 oxidation, H2 production, and H/D exchange), spectroscopic (IR, EPR), and structural properties of the enzyme. The mutations disrupt the H-bond network in the crystals and have a strong effect on H2 oxidation and H2 production turnover rates. However, the absence of correlation between activity and rate of H/D exchange in the series of variants suggests that the alcoholic group of Thr-18 is not necessarily a proton relay. Instead, the correlation between H2 oxidation and production activity and the detection of the NiC species in reduced samples confirms that NiC is a catalytic intermediate and suggests that Thr-18 is important to stabilize the local protein structure of the active site ensuring fast NiSI-NiC-NiR interconversions during H2 oxidation/production. PMID:25666617

  15. A threonine stabilizes the NiC and NiR catalytic intermediates of [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hamdan, Abbas; Ceccaldi, Pierre; Lebrette, Hugo; Gutiérrez-Sanz, Oscar; Richaud, Pierre; Cournac, Laurent; Guigliarelli, Bruno; De Lacey, Antonio L; Léger, Christophe; Volbeda, Anne; Burlat, Bénédicte; Dementin, Sébastien

    2015-03-27

    The heterodimeric [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans catalyzes the reversible oxidation of H2 into protons and electrons. The catalytic intermediates have been attributed to forms of the active site (NiSI, NiR, and NiC) detected using spectroscopic methods under potentiometric but non-catalytic conditions. Here, we produced variants by replacing the conserved Thr-18 residue in the small subunit with Ser, Val, Gln, Gly, or Asp, and we analyzed the effects of these mutations on the kinetic (H2 oxidation, H2 production, and H/D exchange), spectroscopic (IR, EPR), and structural properties of the enzyme. The mutations disrupt the H-bond network in the crystals and have a strong effect on H2 oxidation and H2 production turnover rates. However, the absence of correlation between activity and rate of H/D exchange in the series of variants suggests that the alcoholic group of Thr-18 is not necessarily a proton relay. Instead, the correlation between H2 oxidation and production activity and the detection of the NiC species in reduced samples confirms that NiC is a catalytic intermediate and suggests that Thr-18 is important to stabilize the local protein structure of the active site ensuring fast NiSI-NiC-NiR interconversions during H2 oxidation/production.

  16. Gas Exchange of Algae

    PubMed Central

    Ammann, Elizabeth C. B.; Lynch, Victoria H.

    1967-01-01

    The oxygen production of a photosynthetic gas exchanger containing Chlorella pyrenoidosa (1% packed cell volume) was measured when various concentrations of carbon dioxide were present within the culture unit. The internal carbon dioxide concentrations were obtained by manipulating the entrance gas concentration and the flow rate. Carbon dioxide percentages were monitored by means of electrodes placed directly in the nutrient medium. The concentration of carbon dioxide in the nutrient medium which produced maximal photosynthesis was in the range of 1.5 to 2.5% by volume. Results were unaffected by either the level of carbon dioxide in the entrance gas or the rate of gas flow. Entrance gases containing 2% carbon dioxide flowing at 320 ml/min, 3% carbon dioxide at 135 ml/min, and 4% carbon dioxide at 55 ml/min yielded optimal carbon dioxide concentrations in the particular unit studied. By using carbon dioxide electrodes implanted directly in the gas exchanger to optimize the carbon dioxide concentration throughout the culture medium, it should be possible to design more efficient large-scale units. PMID:4382391

  17. High flux heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Edward M.; Mackowski, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    This interim report documents the results of the first two phases of a four-phase program to develop a high flux heat exchanger for cooling future high performance aircraft electronics. Phase 1 defines future needs for high flux heat removal in advanced military electronics systems. The results are sorted by broad application categories: (1) commercial digital systems, (2) military data processors, (3) power processors, and (4) radar and optical systems. For applications expected to be fielded in five to ten years, the outlook is for steady state flux levels of 30-50 W/sq cm for digital processors and several hundred W/sq cm for power control applications. In Phase 1, a trade study was conducted on emerging cooling technologies which could remove a steady state chip heat flux of 100 W/sq cm while holding chip junction temperature to 90 C. Constraints imposed on heat exchanger design, in order to reflect operation in a fighter aircraft environment, included a practical lower limit on coolant supply temperature, the preference for a nontoxic, nonflammable, and nonfreezing coolant, the need to minimize weight and volume, and operation in an accelerating environment. The trade study recommended the Compact High Intensity Cooler (CHIC) for design, fabrication, and test in the final two phases of this program.

  18. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  19. On the nanostructuring and catalytic promotion of intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (IT-SOFC) cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, José M.; Buchkremer, Hans-Peter

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are highly efficient energy converters for both stationary and mobile purposes. However, their market introduction still demands the reduction of manufacture costs and one possible way to reach this goal is the decrease of the operating temperatures, which entails the improvement of the cathode electrocatalytic properties. An ideal cathode material may have mixed ionic and electronic conductivity as well as proper catalytic properties. Nanostructuring and catalytic promotion of mixed conducting perovskites (e.g. La 0.58Sr 0.4Fe 0.8Co 0.2O 3- δ) seem to be promising approaches to overcoming cathode polarization problems and are briefly illustrated here. The preparation of nanostructured cathodes with relatively high surface area and enough thermal stability enables to improve the oxygen exchange rate and therefore the overall SOFC performance. A similar effect was obtained by catalytic promoting the perovskite surface, allowing decoupling the catalytic and ionic-transport properties in the cathode design. Noble metal incorporation may improve the reversibility of the reduction cycles involved in the oxygen reduction. Under the cathode oxidizing conditions, Pd seems to be partially dissolved in the perovskite structure and as a result very well dispersed.

  20. Catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction on platinum-based core-shell nanoparticles: all-electron density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jungho; Choi, Jung-Hae; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Inho; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Jeong, Doo Seok

    2015-10-14

    Pt nanoparticles (NPs) in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell as a catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) fairly overbind oxygen and/or hydroxyl to their surfaces, causing a large overpotential and thus low catalytic activity. Realizing Pt-based core-shell NPs (CSNPs) is perhaps a workaround for the weak binding of oxygen and/or hydroxyl without a shortage of sufficient oxygen molecule dissociation on the surface. Towards the end, we theoretically examined the catalytic activity of NPs using density functional theory; each NP consists of one of 12 different 3d-5d transition metal cores (groups 8-11) and a Pt shell. The calculation results evidently suggest the enhancement of catalytic activity of CSNPs in particular when 3d transition metal cores are in use. The revealed trends in activity change upon the core metal were discussed with respect to the thermodynamic and electronic structural aspects of the NPs in comparison with the general d-band model. The disparity between the CSNP and the corresponding bilayer catalyst, which is the so-called size effect, was remarkable; therefore, it perhaps opens up the possibility of size-determined catalytic activity. Finally, the overpotential for all CSNPs was evaluated in an attempt to choose promising combinations of CSNP materials.

  1. PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    R.Q. Long; N. Tharappiwattananon; W.B. Li; R.T. Yang

    2000-09-01

    Removal of NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}) from exhaust gases is a challenging subject. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based catalysts are commercial catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH{sub 3} for stationary sources. However, for diesel and lean-burn gasoline engines in vehicles, hydrocarbons would be the preferred reducing agents over NH{sub 3} because of the practical problems associated with the use of NH{sub 3} (i.e., handling and slippage through the reactor). The noble-metal three-way catalysts are not effective under these conditions. The first catalyst found to be active for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrocarbons in the presence of excess oxygen was copper exchanged ZSM-5 and other zeolites, reported in 1990 by Iwamoto in Japan and Held et al. in Germany. Although Cu-ZSM-5 is very active and the most intensively studied catalyst, it suffers from severe deactivation in engine tests, mainly due to H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. In this project, we found that ion-exchanged pillared clays and MCM-41 catalysts showed superior SCR activities of NO with hydrocarbon. All Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged pillared clays showed higher SCR activities than Cu-ZSM-5 reported in the literature. In particular, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} only slightly deactivated the SCR activity of Cu-TiO{sub 2}-PILC, whereas severe deactivation was observed for Cu-ZSM-5. Moreover, Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts, i.e., Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/ZSM-5. The Pt/MCM-41 catalyst also showed a good stability in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}.

  2. Catalytic Mechanism of Human Alpha-galactosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Guce, A.; Clark, N; Salgado, E; Ivanen, D; Kulinskaya, A; Brumer, H; Garman, S

    2010-01-01

    The enzyme {alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-GAL, also known as {alpha}-GAL A; E.C. 3.2.1.22) is responsible for the breakdown of {alpha}-galactosides in the lysosome. Defects in human {alpha}-GAL lead to the development of Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the buildup of {alpha}-galactosylated substrates in the tissues. {alpha}-GAL is an active target of clinical research: there are currently two treatment options for Fabry disease, recombinant enzyme replacement therapy (approved in the United States in 2003) and pharmacological chaperone therapy (currently in clinical trials). Previously, we have reported the structure of human {alpha}-GAL, which revealed the overall structure of the enzyme and established the locations of hundreds of mutations that lead to the development of Fabry disease. Here, we describe the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme derived from x-ray crystal structures of each of the four stages of the double displacement reaction mechanism. Use of a difluoro-{alpha}-galactopyranoside allowed trapping of a covalent intermediate. The ensemble of structures reveals distortion of the ligand into a {sup 1}S{sub 3} skew (or twist) boat conformation in the middle of the reaction cycle. The high resolution structures of each step in the catalytic cycle will allow for improved drug design efforts on {alpha}-GAL and other glycoside hydrolase family 27 enzymes by developing ligands that specifically target different states of the catalytic cycle. Additionally, the structures revealed a second ligand-binding site suitable for targeting by novel pharmacological chaperones.

  3. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs.

  4. Catalytic enantioselective synthesis of quaternary carbon stereocentres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quasdorf, Kyle W.; Overman, Larry E.

    2014-12-01

    Quaternary carbon stereocentres--carbon atoms to which four distinct carbon substituents are attached--are common features of molecules found in nature. However, before recent advances in chemical catalysis, there were few methods of constructing single stereoisomers of this important structural motif. Here we discuss the many catalytic enantioselective reactions developed during the past decade for the synthesis of single stereoisomers of such organic molecules. This progress now makes it possible to incorporate quaternary stereocentres selectively in many organic molecules that are useful in medicine, agriculture and potentially other areas such as flavouring, fragrances and materials.

  5. Catalytic Enantioselective Synthesis of Quaternary Carbon Stereocenters

    PubMed Central

    Quasdorf, Kyle W.; Overman, Larry E.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Quaternary carbon stereocenters–carbon atoms to which four distinct carbon substituents are attached–are common features of molecules found in nature. However, prior to recent advances in chemical catalysis, there were few methods available for constructing single stereoisomers of this important structural motif. Here we discuss the many catalytic enantioselective reactions developed during the past decade for synthesizing organic molecules containing such carbon atoms. This progress now makes it possible to selectively incorporate quaternary stereocenters in many high-value organic molecules for use in medicine, agriculture, and other areas. PMID:25503231

  6. Catalytic combustion with incompletely vaporized residual fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosfjord, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Catalytic combustion of fuel lean mixtures of incompletely vaporized residual fuel and air was investigated. The 7.6 cm diameter, graded cell reactor was constructed from zirconia spinel substrate and catalyzed with a noble metal catalyst. Streams of luminous particles exited the rector as a result of fuel deposition and carbonization on the substrate. Similar results were obtained with blends of No. 6 and No. 2 oil. Blends of shale residual oil and No. 2 oil resulted in stable operation. In shale oil blends the combustor performance degraded with a reduced degree of fuel vaporization. In tests performed with No. 2 oil a similar effect was observed.

  7. Transient Numerical Modeling of Catalytic Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Miller, Fletcher J.; T'ien, James S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a transient model of catalytic combustion suitable for isolated channels and monolith reactors. The model is a lumped two-phase (gas and solid) model where the gas phase is quasi-steady relative to the transient solid. Axial diffusion is neglected in the gas phase; lateral diffusion, however, is accounted for using transfer coefficients. The solid phase includes axial heat conduction and external heat loss due to convection and radiation. The combustion process utilizes detailed gas and surface reaction models. The gas-phase model becomes a system of stiff ordinary differential equations while the solid phase reduces, after discretization, into a system of stiff ordinary differential-algebraic equations. The time evolution of the system came from alternating integrations of the quasi-steady gas and transient solid. This work outlines the numerical model and presents some sensitivity studies on important parameters including internal transfer coefficients, catalytic surface site density, and external heat-loss (if applicable). The model is compared to two experiments using CO fuel: (1) steady-state conversion through an isothermal platinum (Pt) tube and (2) transient propagation of a catalytic reaction inside a small Pt tube. The model requires internal mass-transfer resistance to match the experiments at lower residence times. Under mass-transport limited conditions, the model reasonably predicted exit conversion using global mass-transfer coefficients. Near light-off, the model results did not match the experiment precisely even after adjustment of mass-transfer coefficients. Agreement improved for the first case after adjusting the surface kinetics such that the net rate of CO adsorption increased compared to O2. The CO / O2 surface mechanism came from a sub-set of reactions in a popular CH4 / O2 mechanism. For the second case, predictions improved for lean conditions with increased external heat loss or adjustment of the kinetics as in the

  8. Amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea: novel catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Potocki de Montalk, G; Remaud-Simeon, M; Willemot, R M; Sarçabal, P; Planchot, V; Monsan, P

    2000-04-14

    Amylosucrase is a glucosyltransferase that synthesises an insoluble alpha-glucan from sucrose. The catalytic properties of the highly purified amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea were characterised. Contrary to previously published results, it was demonstrated that in the presence of sucrose alone, several reactions are catalysed, in addition to polymer synthesis: sucrose hydrolysis, maltose and maltotriose synthesis by successive transfers of the glucosyl moiety of sucrose onto the released glucose, and finally turanose and trehalulose synthesis - these two sucrose isomers being obtained by glucosyl transfer onto fructose. The effect of initial sucrose concentration on initial activity demonstrated a non-Michaelian profile never previously described.

  9. Thin film porous membranes for catalytic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.; Boyle, T.J.; Gardner, T.J.

    1997-06-01

    This paper reports on new and surprising experimental data for catalytic film gas sensing resistors coated with nanoporous sol-gel films to impart selectivity and durability to the sensor structure. This work is the result of attempts to build selectivity and reactivity to the surface of a sensor by modifying it with a series of sol-gel layers. The initial sol-gel SiO{sub 2} layer applied to the sensor surprisingly showed enhanced O{sub 2} interaction with H{sub 2} and reduced susceptibility to poisons such as H{sub 2}S.

  10. Catalytic cracking of light coker gasoil

    SciTech Connect

    Farkhadova, G.T.; Guseinov, A.M.; Guseinova, S.B.; Maiorova, N.S.; Mkrtychev, A.A.; Rustamonv, M.I.

    1985-09-01

    Results are presented from experiments on the catalytic cracking of light gas-oil produced by delayed coking of a low-sulfur vacuum resid. A proposal is given for the utilization of these products. The physicochemical properties of the light gas-oil are analyzed. Results of the study show that cat cracking of vacuum gas-oil together with light coker gasoil in a two-stage unit gives substantial increases in the resources of cat cracker feed--in the capacity of the unit, and in the output of light products.

  11. Enzymatic Catalytic Beds For Oxidation Of Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.; Schussel, Leonard J.

    1993-01-01

    Modules containing beds of enzymatic material catalyzing oxidation of primary alcohols and some other organic compounds developed for use in wastewater-treatment systems of future spacecraft. Designed to be placed downstream of multifiltration modules, which contain filters and sorbent beds removing most of non-alcoholic contaminants but fail to remove significant amounts of low-molecular-weight, polar, nonionic compounds like alcohols. Catalytic modules also used on Earth to oxidize primary alcohols and other compounds in wastewater streams and industrial process streams.

  12. Highly Concentrated Catalytic Asymmetric Allylation of Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Alfred J.; Kim, Jeung Gon; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    We report the catalytic asymmetric allylation of ketones under highly concentrated reaction conditions with a catalyst generated from titanium tetraisopropoxide and BINOL (1:2 ratio) in the presence of isopropanol. This catalyst promotes the addition of tetraallylstannane to a variety of ketones to produce tertiary homoallylic alcohols in excellent yield (80–99%) with high enantioselectivities (79–95%). The resulting homoallylic alcohols can also be epoxidized in situ using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) to afford cyclic epoxy alcohols in high yield (84–87%). PMID:17249767

  13. Highly concentrated catalytic asymmetric allylation of ketones.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Alfred J; Kim, Jeung Gon; Walsh, Patrick J

    2007-02-01

    [reaction: see text] We report the catalytic asymmetric allylation of ketones under highly concentrated reaction conditions with a catalyst generated from titanium tetraisopropoxide and BINOL (1:2 ratio) in the presence of isopropanol. This catalyst promotes the addition of tetraallylstannane to a variety of ketones to produce tertiary homoallylic alcohols in excellent yield (80-99%) with high enantioselectivities (79-95%). The resulting homoallylic alcohols can also be epoxidized in situ using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) to afford cyclic epoxy alcohols in high yield (84-87%).

  14. Catalytic enantioselective synthesis of quaternary carbon stereocentres.

    PubMed

    Quasdorf, Kyle W; Overman, Larry E

    2014-12-11

    Quaternary carbon stereocentres-carbon atoms to which four distinct carbon substituents are attached-are common features of molecules found in nature. However, before recent advances in chemical catalysis, there were few methods of constructing single stereoisomers of this important structural motif. Here we discuss the many catalytic enantioselective reactions developed during the past decade for the synthesis of single stereoisomers of such organic molecules. This progress now makes it possible to incorporate quaternary stereocentres selectively in many organic molecules that are useful in medicine, agriculture and potentially other areas such as flavouring, fragrances and materials.

  15. Investigating Catalytic Properties of Composite Nanoparticle Assemblies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    Polyaniline films with Pt loading were prepared by electrochemical method as reported by Lamy and co-workers [111]. Briefly, 0.1 M aniline was dissolved...in 0.5 M H2SO 4 solution. The polyaniline film was deposited by cyclic potential sweeping between -200 and +1000 mV at 50 mV/s. Polymerization was...different approach to A incorporate Pt component in the catalytic film. In this approach, we first prepared a B polyaniline thin film that was loaded

  16. Catalytic properties of lamellar compounds of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Yu. N.; Vol'pin, M. E.

    1981-05-01

    In heterogenous catalysis, the supports derived from graphite and carbon-graphite materials constitute a unique and exceptionally attractive group. The lamellar compounds of graphite with various kinds of electron acceptors and donors show catalytic activities on the following reactions: the oxidation of organic compounds with molecular oxygen, many sorts of polymerization, alcohol and formic acid dehydrogenation, hydrogenation and isomerization of olefins and acetylenes, ammonia synthesis from nitrogen and hydrogen, and also CO hydrogenation. Furthermore, the transition metal lamellar compounds of graphite are highly active catalysts in the process of the graphite-to-diamond conversion.

  17. Advanced Catalytic Combustors for Low Pollutant Emissions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    414 -. m 0. Nd 9 co1t 1; F .u13u1 iw : H L OC. co 4) 1 w 4.1 0 O P4 w CV) bo m E- rW 44 en cn p ~ c A 4 5-41 H-4 E- E- t 4 56 The above criterio were...Concepts for a Gas Turbine Catalytic Combustor," NASA TM 73755, 1977. 32. Reneau, L.R., Johnston, J.P., and Kline, .J., "Diffuser Design Manual ," 1

  18. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW's. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  19. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-12-31

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW`s. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  20. (NII) Novel Catalytic, Synthesis Methods for Main Group

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-23

    this hydrodefluorination reaction has been rendered catalytic for fluorobenzene, as well as for 1,2- and 1,3-difluorobenzene, releasing benzene and...hydrodefluorination reaction has been rendered catalytic for fluorobenzene, as well as for 1,2- and 1,3-difluorobenzene, releasing benzene or fluorobenzene...respectively. In the case of the difluorobenzenes, further catalytic hydrodefluorination to benzene occurs, but at a significantly slower rate

  1. Catalytic Antibodies for Prophylaxis/Treatment of Cyanide Poisoning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-09

    administration of both a drug that reacts with cyanide and an enzyme that catalyzes the reaction . The enzyme could be replaced with a catalytic antibody...administered prophylactically as long as the threat existed. The concept of catalytic antibodies is that an antibody to the transition state of a reaction would... Catalytic groups (for example, acid-base catalysts) can also play a role. To develop an antibody against the transition state of a reaction , one must

  2. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data. PMID:15909350

  3. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-06-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data.

  4. Characteristics of model heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolínský, Jan

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper is thermal analysis of model water to water heat exchanger at different mass flow rates. Experimental study deals with determination of total heat transfer - power of the heat exchanger. Furthermore the paper deals with analysis of heat exchanger charakcteristic using a definition of thermal efficiency. It is demonstrated that it is advisable to monitor the dependence of thermal efficiency and flow ratio.

  5. Developing bulk exchange spring magnets

    DOEpatents

    Mccall, Scott K.; Kuntz, Joshua D.

    2017-06-27

    A method of making a bulk exchange spring magnet by providing a magnetically soft material, providing a hard magnetic material, and producing a composite of said magnetically soft material and said hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet. The step of producing a composite of magnetically soft material and hard magnetic material is accomplished by electrophoretic deposition of the magnetically soft material and the hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet.

  6. Ionizable side chains at catalytic active sites of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie; Eisenberg, Bob

    2012-05-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1,072 Å(3). The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes.

  7. Hydrogen-assisted catalytic ignition characteristics of different fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Bei-Jing; Yang, Fan; Yang, Qing-Tao

    2010-10-15

    Hydrogen-assisted catalytic ignition characteristics of methane (CH{sub 4}), n-butane (n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}) and dimethyl ether (DME) were studied experimentally in a Pt-coated monolith catalytic reactor. It is concluded that DME has the lowest catalytic ignition temperature and the least required H{sub 2} flow, while CH{sub 4} has the highest catalytic ignition temperature and the highest required H{sub 2} flow among the three fuels. (author)

  8. Catalytic surface effects experiment on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, D. A.; Rakich, J. V.; Lanfranco, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    A Space Shuttle experiment planned to measure the surface catalytic efficiency of the baseline high-temperature reusable surface insulation (HRSI) during earth entry is described. A spray-on overcoat, with high catalytic efficiency, will be used as a comparative basis for determining the HRSI surface catalytic efficiency through surface temperature measurement. Catalytic efficiency, as well as aerothermal response of the overcoat, was evaluated, using various models made of HRSI material in arc-plasma flow environments. Agreement is obtained between the measured and computed heating rise of the coated surfaces. Computed predictions for the flight case are presented.

  9. Piloted rich-catalytic lean-burn hybrid combustor

    DOEpatents

    Newburry, Donald Maurice

    2002-01-01

    A catalytic combustor assembly which includes, an air source, a fuel delivery means, a catalytic reactor assembly, a mixing chamber, and a means for igniting a fuel/air mixture. The catalytic reactor assembly is in fluid communication with the air source and fuel delivery means and has a fuel/air plenum which is coated with a catalytic material. The fuel/air plenum has cooling air conduits passing therethrough which have an upstream end. The upstream end of the cooling conduits is in fluid communication with the air source but not the fuel delivery means.

  10. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  11. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Yen, S. P. S.; Klein, E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, crosslinked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  12. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  13. LIGHTWEIGHT METAL FOIL HEAT EXCHANGERS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HEAT EXCHANGERS, FOILS(MATERIALS), AEROSPACE CRAFT, HYDROGEN, TEST METHODS, STRUCTURES, HEAT TRANSFER, NIOBIUM, FLUID FLOW, FRICTION, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, ALUMINUM , TITANIUM ALLOYS, RAMJET ENGINES.

  14. Exchange-donor renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Huh, Kyu Ha; Kim, Hyun Jung; Jeon, Kyung Ock; Kiml, Beom Seok; Kim, Yu Seun; Park, Kill

    2009-01-01

    Exchange-donor programs may prevent the current loss of many suitable living donors. Both incompatible donor-recipient pairs--with ABO incompatibility or positive cross-matches--and compatible pairs who wish to locate more suitable donors should be encouraged to participate in exchange-donor programs. Advantages and limitations of exchange-donor programs must be carefully explained to prevent interfamilial conflict. Exchange-donor programs may relieve shortages of donor organs and offer good posttransplant outcomes. Therefore, this program should be widely implemented.

  15. Microwave assisted esterification of acidified oil from waste cooking oil by CERP/PES catalytic membrane for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Honglei; Ding, Jincheng; Zhao, Zengdian

    2012-11-01

    The traditional heating and microwave assisted method for biodiesel production using cation ion-exchange resin particles (CERP)/PES catalytic membrane were comparatively studied to achieve economic and effective method for utilization of free fatty acids (FFAs) from waste cooking oil (WCO). The optimal esterification conditions of the two methods were investigated and the experimental results showed that microwave irradiation exhibited a remarkable enhanced effect for esterification compared with that of traditional heating method. The FFAs conversion of microwave assisted esterification reached 97.4% under the optimal conditions of reaction temperature 60°C, methanol/acidified oil mass ratio 2.0:1, catalytic membrane (annealed at 120°C) loading 3g, microwave power 360W and reaction time 90min. The study results showed that it is a fast, easy and green way to produce biodiesel applying microwave irradiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.B.; Yang, R.T.

    1994-12-31

    During the past quarter, progress was made in three tasks. The poisoning effects of alkali metals (as Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}0 and Cs{sub 2}O) on iron oxide pillared clay (Fe-Bentonite) catalyst for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH{sub 3} were investigated. The effects of sulfur dioxide and water vapor on the performance of the high activity catalyst, that is, Ce-doped Fe-Bentonite pillared clay (Ce-Fe-Bentonite) were examined. In addition, an iron ion-exchanged titania pillared clay (Ti-PILC) was prepared and its catalytic activity for the SCR of NO with NH{sub 3} was studied, which showed a high activity and a high S0{sub 2} and H{sub 2}0 resistance at high temperatures (i.e., above 400{degree}C).

  17. Hybrid Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Jianping Gene; Shih, Wei

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid light-weight heat exchanger concept has been developed that uses high-conductivity carbon-carbon (C-C) composites as the heat-transfer fins and uses conventional high-temperature metals, such as Inconel, nickel, and titanium as the parting sheets to meet leakage and structural requirements. In order to maximize thermal conductivity, the majority of carbon fiber is aligned in the fin direction resulting in 300 W/m.K or higher conductivity in the fin directions. As a result of this fiber orientation, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the C-C composite in both non-fiber directions matches well with the CTE of various high-temperature metal alloys. This allows the joining of fins and parting sheets by using high-temperature braze alloys.

  18. Monogroove liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F. (Inventor); Edelstein, Fred (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid supply control is disclosed for a heat transfer system which transports heat by liquid-vapor phase change of a working fluid. An assembly (10) of monogroove heat pipe legs (15) can be operated automatically as either heat acquisition devices or heat discharge sources. The liquid channels (27) of the heat pipe legs (15) are connected to a reservoir (35) which is filled and drained by respective filling and draining valves (30, 32). Information from liquid level sensors (50, 51) on the reservoir (35) is combined (60) with temperature information (55) from the liquid heat exchanger (12) and temperature information (56) from the assembly vapor conduit (42) to regulate filling and draining of the reservoir (35), so that the reservoir (35) in turn serves the liquid supply/drain needs of the heat pipe legs (15), on demand, by passive capillary action (20, 28).

  19. Cross-Shelf Exchange.

    PubMed

    Brink, K H

    2016-01-01

    Cross-shelf exchange dominates the pathways and rates by which nutrients, biota, and materials on the continental shelf are delivered and removed. This follows because cross-shelf gradients of most properties are usually far greater than those in the alongshore direction. The resulting transports are limited by Earth's rotation, which inhibits flow from crossing isobaths. Thus, cross-shelf flows are generally weak compared with alongshore flows, and this leads to interesting observational issues. Cross-shelf flows are enabled by turbulent mixing processes, nonlinear processes (such as momentum advection), and time dependence. Thus, there is a wide range of possible effects that can allow these critical transports, and different natural settings are often governed by different combinations of processes. This review discusses examples of representative transport mechanisms and explores possible observational and theoretical paths to future progress.

  20. Biological Ion Exchanger Resins

    PubMed Central

    Damadian, Raymond; Goldsmith, Michael; Zaner, K. S.

    1971-01-01

    Biological selectivity is shown to vary with medium osmotic strength and temperature. Selectivity reversals occur at 4°C and at an external osmolality of 0.800 indicating that intracellular hydration and endosolvent (intracellular water) structure are important determinants in selectivity. Magnetic resonance measurements of line width by steady-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicate a difference in the intracellular water signal of 16 Hz between the K form and Na form of Escherichia coli, providing additional evidence that changes in the ionic composition of cells are accompanied by changes in endosolvent structure. The changes were found to be consistent with the thermodynamic and magnetic resonance properties of aqueous electrolyte solutions. Calculation of the dependence of ion-pairing forces on medium dielectric reinforces the role of endosolvent structure in determining ion exchange selectivity. PMID:4943653

  1. South Atlantic interbasin exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen Rich

    1991-01-01

    The exchange of mass and heat between the South Atlantic and the neighboring ocean basins was estimated using hydrographic data and inverse methods, in order to gain information on the links between the deep-water formation processes occurring within the Atlantic and the global thermohaline circulation. Results demonstrate that the global thermohaline cell associated with the formation and export of North Atlantic deep water (NADW) is closed primarily by a 'cold water path' in which deep water leaving the Atlantic ultimately returns as intermediate water entering the basin through Drake Passage. This conclusion conflicts with the suggestion by Gordon (1986) that the global thermohaline circulation associated with the formation of NADW is closed primarily by a 'warm water path', in which the export of NADW is compensated by an inflow of warm Indian Ocean thermocline water south of Africa.

  2. International Cell Exchange, 1994.

    PubMed

    Lau, M; Terasaki, P I; Park, M S

    1994-01-01

    1. We summarize typings of 40 cells for Class I antigens and 20 cultured cell lines for Class II antigens through the International Cell Exchange in 1994. Serologic Class II typings were compared with DNA typings for the same 20 cells. Two hundred eighty-one laboratories participated in the monthly Class I Serum Exchange. One hundred nineteen serology laboratories and 74 DNA laboratories reported Class II specificities on a monthly basis. 2. The average detection levels, as well as the high detection levels, were determined for 16 A-locus and 27 B-locus antigens. Mean detection rates of 95% or greater average detection were obtained for 12 A-locus and 10 B-locus antigens. Lower than 80% agreement was calculated for one A-locus antigen (A74) and 7 B-locus (B46, B48, B61, B67, B73, B75, B77) antigens. 3. We compared discrepancy rates of 10 A-locus and 7 B-locus antigens typed 3 times or more. The false-negative discrepancy rates, i.e. how often the antigen was missed, were greater for more of the B-locus specificities than for the A-locus antigens. B62, having the highest false-positive rate, tended to be overassigned. The discrepancy rates, especially the false-negative rate, for B70 were shown to decrease over a 7-year period. 4. In 1994, 8 laboratories attained records of total no misses for all analyzed antigens. Twelve laboratories had final records of only one discrepancy, and 5 laboratories had impressive perfect records (zero false negatives and false positives) for their yearly antigen reports. 5. Retyping of 12 Class I and 8 Class II reference cells showed improved detection of antigens. Results of a donor typed 4 times over 11 years demonstrated marked improvement, nearly doubling for A33, B38, and B75. Two cells first typed in 1991, then retyped in 1994, showed improved detection for Class II splits by serology and DNA typing. 6. We updated the list of sequenced Class I Exchange cells. Seven new cells were added as well as confirmatory sequence data for A

  3. South Atlantic interbasin exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen Rich

    1991-01-01

    The exchange of mass and heat between the South Atlantic and the neighboring ocean basins was estimated using hydrographic data and inverse methods, in order to gain information on the links between the deep-water formation processes occurring within the Atlantic and the global thermohaline circulation. Results demonstrate that the global thermohaline cell associated with the formation and export of North Atlantic deep water (NADW) is closed primarily by a 'cold water path' in which deep water leaving the Atlantic ultimately returns as intermediate water entering the basin through Drake Passage. This conclusion conflicts with the suggestion by Gordon (1986) that the global thermohaline circulation associated with the formation of NADW is closed primarily by a 'warm water path', in which the export of NADW is compensated by an inflow of warm Indian Ocean thermocline water south of Africa.

  4. Catalytic performance and thermostability of chloroperoxidase in reverse micelle: achievement of a catalytically favorable enzyme conformation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yali; Wu, Jinyue; Ru, Xuejiao; Jiang, Yucheng; Hu, Mancheng; Li, Shuni; Zhai, Quanguo

    2011-06-01

    The catalytic performance of chloroperoxidase (CPO) in peroxidation of 2, 2'-azinobis-(-3 ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfononic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) and oxidation of indole in a reverse micelle composed of surfactant-water-isooctane-pentanol was investigated and optimized in this work. Some positive results were obtained as follows: the peroxidation activity of CPO was enhanced 248% and 263%, while oxidation activity was enhanced 215% and 222% in cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr) reverse micelle medium and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTABr) medium, respectively. Thermostability was also greatly improved in reverse micelle: at 40 °C, CPO essentially lost all its activity after 5 h incubation, while 58-76% catalytic activity was retained for both reactions in the two reverse micelle media. At 50 °C, about 44-75% catalytic activity remained for both reactions in reverse micelle after 2 h compared with no observed activity in pure buffer under the same conditions. The enhancement of CPO activity was dependent mainly on the surfactant concentration and structure, organic solvent ratio (V(pentanol)/V(isooctane)), and water content in the reverse micelle. The obtained kinetic parameters showed that the catalytic turnover frequency (k(cat)) was increased in reverse micelle. Moreover, the lower K(m) and higher k(cat)/K(m) demonstrated that both the affinity and specificity of CPO to substrates were improved in reverse micelle media. Fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis spectra assays indicated that a catalytically favorable conformation of enzyme was achieved in reverse micelle, including the strengthening of the protein α-helix structure, and greater exposure of the heme prosthetic group for easy access of the substrate in bulk solution. These results are promising in view of the industrial applications of this versatile biological catalyst.

  5. Catalytic decomposition of petroleum into natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.; Hightower, J.

    1997-12-01

    Petroleum is believed to be unstable in the earth, decomposing to lighter hydrocarbons at temperatures > 150{degrees}C. Oil and gas deposits support this view: gas/oil ratios and methane concentrations tend to increase with depth above 150{degrees}C. Although oil cracking is suggested and receives wide support, laboratory pyrolysis does not give products resembling natural gas. Moreover, it is doubtful that the light hydrocarbons in wet gas (C{sub 2}-C{sub 4}) could decompose over geologic time to dry gas (>95% methane) without catalytic assistance. We now report the catalytic decomposition of crude oil to a gas indistinguishable from natural gas. Like natural gas in deep basins, it becomes progressively enriched in methane: initially 90% (wet gas) to a final composition of 100% methane (dry gas). To our knowledge, the reaction is unprecedented and unexpectedly robust (conversion of oil to gas is 100% in days, 175{degrees}C) with significant implications regarding the stability of petroleum in sedimentary basins. The existence or nonexistence of oil in the deep subsurface may not depend on the thermal stability of hydrocarbons as currently thought. The critical factor could be the presence of transition metal catalysts which destabilize hydrocarbons and promote their decomposition to natural gas.

  6. Catalytic hydroprocessing of heavy oil feedstocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunev, A. G.; Parkhomchuk, E. V.; Lysikov, A. I.; Parunin, P. D.; Semeikina, V. S.; Parmon, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    A grave problem of modern oil refining industry is continuous deterioration of the produced oil quality, on the one hand, and increase in the demand for motor fuels, on the other hand. This necessitates processing of heavy oil feedstock with high contents of sulfur, nitrogen and metals and the atmospheric residue. This feedstock is converted to light oil products via hydrogenation processes catalyzed by transition metal compounds, first of all, cobalt- or nickel-promoted molybdenum and tungsten compounds. The processing involves desulfurization, denitrogenation and demetallization reactions as well as reactions converting heavy hydrocarbons to lighter fuel components. The review discusses the mechanisms of reactions involved in the heavy feedstock hydroprocessing, the presumed structure and state of the catalytically active components and methods for the formation of supports with the desired texture. Practically used and prospective approaches to catalytic upgrading of heavy oil feedstock as well as examples of industrial processing of bitumen and vacuum residues in the presence of catalysts are briefly discussed. The bibliography includes 140 references.

  7. Cutoff lensing: predicting catalytic sites in enzymes.

    PubMed

    Aubailly, Simon; Piazza, Francesco

    2015-10-08

    Predicting function-related amino acids in proteins with unknown function or unknown allosteric binding sites in drug-targeted proteins is a task of paramount importance in molecular biomedicine. In this paper we introduce a simple, light and computationally inexpensive structure-based method to identify catalytic sites in enzymes. Our method, termed cutoff lensing, is a general procedure consisting in letting the cutoff used to build an elastic network model increase to large values. A validation of our method against a large database of annotated enzymes shows that optimal values of the cutoff exist such that three different structure-based indicators allow one to recover a maximum of the known catalytic sites. Interestingly, we find that the larger the structures the greater the predictive power afforded by our method. Possible ways to combine the three indicators into a single figure of merit and into a specific sequential analysis are suggested and discussed with reference to the classic case of HIV-protease. Our method could be used as a complement to other sequence- and/or structure-based methods to narrow the results of large-scale screenings.

  8. Accessory food factors: understanding the catalytic function.

    PubMed

    Braun, Robyn

    2011-01-01

    Despite the practical knowledge throughout the nineteenth century that citrus fruit cured scurvy, and that rickets and beriberi were diseases caused by poor diet, it was not until 1901 that animal feeding experiments led one investigator to propose the existence of 'accessory food factors,' a lack of which was determined to be the cause of some illnesses (Hopkins, 1949. In Joseph Needham and E. Baldwin (eds.), Hopkins and Biochemistry, 1861-1947: Papers Concerning Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins, O.M., P.R.S., with a Selection of His Addresses and a Bibliography of His Publications. Cambridge: W. Heffer and Sons Ltd). The discovery of vitamins has long been considered as a delayed discovery. This delay has been attributed to the power of the germ theory in physiology at the time. While the germ theory and theories of auto-intoxication certainly played a role in delaying the discovery of vitamins, I argue further that it is important to consider the difference made to physiology by understanding the vitamins' catalytic function. The profound difference made to physiology by the vitamins' catalytic function suggests that a vitamin concept had previously been systematically inaccessible to researchers working within the conceptual framework of Bernardian physiology.

  9. Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Lance; Etemad, Shahrokh; Karim, Hasan; Pfefferle, William C.

    2009-04-21

    An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

  10. Cutoff lensing: predicting catalytic sites in enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubailly, Simon; Piazza, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Predicting function-related amino acids in proteins with unknown function or unknown allosteric binding sites in drug-targeted proteins is a task of paramount importance in molecular biomedicine. In this paper we introduce a simple, light and computationally inexpensive structure-based method to identify catalytic sites in enzymes. Our method, termed cutoff lensing, is a general procedure consisting in letting the cutoff used to build an elastic network model increase to large values. A validation of our method against a large database of annotated enzymes shows that optimal values of the cutoff exist such that three different structure-based indicators allow one to recover a maximum of the known catalytic sites. Interestingly, we find that the larger the structures the greater the predictive power afforded by our method. Possible ways to combine the three indicators into a single figure of merit and into a specific sequential analysis are suggested and discussed with reference to the classic case of HIV-protease. Our method could be used as a complement to other sequence- and/or structure-based methods to narrow the results of large-scale screenings.

  11. Catalytic pyrolysis of automobile shredder residue

    SciTech Connect

    Arzoumanidis, G.G.; McIntosh, M.J.; Steffensen, E.J.

    1995-07-01

    In the United States, approximately 10 million automobiles are scrapped and shredded each year. The mixture of plastics and other materials remaining after recovery of the metals is known as Automobile Shredder Residue (ASR). In 1994, about 3.5 million tons of ASR was produced and disposed of in landfills. However, environmental, legislative, and economic considerations are forcing the industry to search for recycling or other alternatives to disposal. Numerous studies have been done relating the ASR disposal problem to possible recycling treatments such as pyrolysis, gasification, co-liquefaction of ASR with coal, chemical recovery of plastics from ASR, catalytic pyrolysis, reclamation in molten salts, and vacuum pyrolysis. These and other possibilities have been studied intensively, and entire symposia have been devoted to the problem. Product mix, yields, toxicology issues, and projected economics of conceptual plant designs based on experimental results are among the key elements of past studies. Because the kinds of recycling methods that may be developed, along with their ultimate economic value, depend on a very large number of variables, these studies have been open-ended. It is hoped that it may be useful to explore some of these previously studied areas from fresh perspectives. One such approach, currently under development at Argonne National Laboratory, is the catalytic pyrolysis of ASR.

  12. Catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of water hyacinth.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rawel; Balagurumurthy, Bhavya; Prakash, Aditya; Bhaskar, Thallada

    2015-02-01

    Thermal and catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of water hyacinth was performed at temperatures from 250 to 300 °C under various water hyacinth:H2O ratio of 1:3, 1:6 and 1:12. Reactions were also carried out under various residence times (15-60 min) as well as catalytic conditions (KOH and K2CO3). The use of alkaline catalysts significantly increased the bio-oil yield. Maximum bio-oil yield (23 wt%) comprising of bio-oil1 and bio-oil2 as well as conversion (89%) were observed with 1N KOH solution. (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR data showed that both bio-oil1 and bio-oil2 have high aliphatic carbon content. FTIR of bio-residue indicated that the usage of alkaline catalyst resulted in bio-residue samples with lesser oxygen functionality indicating that catalyst has a marked effect on nature of the bio-residue and helps to decompose biomass to a greater extent compared to thermal case. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Catalytic Activity of a Binary Informational Macromolecule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, John S.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules are thought to have played a prominent role in the early history of life on Earth based on their ability both to encode genetic information and to exhibit catalytic function. The modern genetic alphabet relies on two sets of complementary base pairs to store genetic information. However, due to the chemical instability of cytosine, which readily deaminates to uracil, a primitive genetic system composed of the bases A, U, G and C may have been difficult to establish. It has been suggested that the first genetic material instead contained only a single base-pairing unie'. Here we show that binary informational macromolecules, containing only two different nucleotide subunits, can act as catalysts. In vitro evolution was used to obtain ligase ribozymes composed of only 2,6-diaminopurine and uracil nucleotides, which catalyze the template-directed joining of two RNA molecules, one bearing a 5'-triphosphate and the other a 3'-hydroxyl. The active conformation of the fastest isolated ribozyme had a catalytic rate that was about 36,000-fold faster than the uncatalyzed rate of reaction. This ribozyme is specific for the formation of biologically relevant 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages.

  14. Structured materials for catalytic and sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokenek, Selma

    The optical and chemical properties of the materials used in catalytic and sensing applications directly determine the characteristics of the resultant catalyst or sensor. It is well known that a catalyst needs to have high activity, selectivity, and stability to be viable in an industrial setting. The hydrogenation activity of palladium catalysts is known to be excellent, but the industrial applications are limited by the cost of obtaining catalyst in amounts large enough to make their use economical. As a result, alloying palladium with a cheaper, more widely available metal while maintaining the high catalytic activity seen in monometallic catalysts is, therefore, an attractive option. Similarly, the optical properties of nanoscale materials used for sensing must be attuned to their application. By adjusting the shape and composition of nanoparticles used in such applications, very fine changes can be made to the frequency of light that they absorb most efficiently. The design, synthesis, and characterization of (i) size controlled monometallic palladium nanoparticles for catalytic applications, (ii) nickel-palladium bimetallic nanoparticles and (iii) silver-palladium nanoparticles with applications in drug detection and biosensing through surface plasmon resonance, respectively, will be discussed. The composition, size, and shape of the nanoparticles formed were controlled through the use of wet chemistry techniques. After synthesis, the nanoparticles were analyzed using physical and chemical characterization techniques such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy- Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry (STEM-EDX). The Pd and Ni-Pd nanoparticles were then supported on silica for catalytic testing using mass spectrometry. The optical properties of the Ag-Pd nanoparticles in suspension were further investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV-Vis). Monometallic palladium particles have

  15. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of azo dye (Congo red) using modified Y zeolite as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kondru, Arun Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Chand, Shri

    2009-07-15

    The present study explores the degradation of azo dye (Congo red) by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation using Fe exchanged commercial Y zeolite as a catalyst. The effects of various operating parameters like temperature, initial pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration and catalyst loading on the removal of dye, color and COD from an aqueous solution were studied at atmospheric pressure. The percent removals of dye, color and COD at optimum pH(0) 7, 90 degrees C using 0.6 ml H(2)O(2)/350 ml solution and 1g/l catalyst was 97% (in 4h), 100% (in 45 min) and 58% (in 4h), respectively. The % dye removal has been found to be less in comparison to % color removal at all conditions, e.g. dye removal in 45 min and at above conditions was 82%, whereas the color removal was 100%. The results indicate that the Fe exchanged Y zeolite is a promising catalyst for dye removal. Fe exchanged catalyst is characterized using XRD, SEM/EDAX, surface area analyzer and FTIR. Though the dye, color and COD removals were maximum at pH(0) 2 but as the leaching of Fe from the catalyst was more in acidic pH range, pH(0) 7 was taken as operating pH due to almost comparable removals as of pH(0) 2 and no leaching of Fe ions.

  16. Small Molecules that Enhance the Catalytic Efficiency of HLA-DM

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson,M.; Moradi, B.; Seth, N.; Xing, X.; Cuny, G.; Stein, R.; Wucherpfenning, K.

    2006-01-01

    HLA-DM (DM) plays a critical role in Ag presentation to CD4 T cells by catalyzing the exchange of peptides bound to MHC class II molecules. Large lateral surfaces involved in the DM:HLA-DR (DR) interaction have been defined, but the mechanism of catalysis is not understood. In this study, we describe four small molecules that accelerate DM-catalyzed peptide exchange. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that these small molecules substantially enhance the catalytic efficiency of DM, indicating that they make the transition state of the DM:DR/peptide complex energetically more favorable. These compounds fall into two functional classes: two compounds are active only in the presence of DM, and binding data for one show a direct interaction with DM. The remaining two compounds have partial activity in the absence of DM, suggesting that they may act at the interface between DM and DR/peptide. A hydrophobic ridge in the DM{beta}1 domain was implicated in the catalysis of peptide exchange because the activity of three of these enhancers was substantially reduced by point mutations in this area.

  17. Exchange Rates and Old People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, James J.

    1980-01-01

    Extends earlier work on aging as a process of exchange by focusing on the issue of exchange rates and how they are negotiated. Access to power resources declines with age, placing the old person in the position of negotiating from weakness. (Author)

  18. Technology Performance Exchange (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-10-01

    This fact sheet, 'The Technology Performance Exchange' will be presented at the ET Summit, held at the Pasadena Convention Center on October 15-17, 2012. The Technology Performance Exchange will be a centralized, Web-based portal for finding and sharing energy performance data for commercial building technologies.

  19. The Transatlantic Orientation Exchange Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gisevius, Annette; Weber, Robin A.

    2009-01-01

    The Transatlantic Orientation Exchange/Multiplikatorenschulung im transatlan-tischen Austausch is a collaboration between volunteers and staff in both the US and German AFS organizations. The goal of the project is to increase the level of intercultural learning of German and US secondary education exchange participants and their host families.…

  20. Macroreticular chelating ion-exchangers.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, R F; E Gancher, R; Russo, F R

    1970-06-01

    Two macroreticular chelating ion-exchangers have been prepared and characterized. One contains the iminodiacetate group and the second contains the arsonate group as the ion-exchanging site. The macroreticular resins show selectivities among metal ions similar to those of the commercially available naicroreticular chelating resins. Chromatographie separations on the new resins are rapid and sharp.