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Sample records for catalytic membranes operated

  1. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  2. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  3. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  4. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Hryn, John N.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity.

  5. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  6. High temperature catalytic membrane reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

  7. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will focus on the development and application of nonporous high gas flux perfluoro membranes with high temperature rating and excellent chemical resistance.

  8. Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

  9. Enzyme catalytic membrane based on a hybrid mesoporous membrane.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wensheng; Yamaguchi, Akira; Kaneda, Hideaki; Teramae, Norio

    2008-02-21

    Immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOD) within a hybrid mesoporous membrane with 12 nm pore diameter was successfully achieved, resulting in catalytically high efficiency during flow of a glucose solution across the membrane.

  10. Catalytic membranes for fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2011-04-19

    A fuel cell of the present invention comprises a cathode and an anode, one or both of the anode and the cathode including a catalyst comprising a bundle of longitudinally aligned graphitic carbon nanotubes including a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally and atomically distributed throughout the graphitic carbon walls of said nanotubes. The nanotubes also include nitrogen atoms and/or ions chemically bonded to the graphitic carbon and to the transition metal. Preferably, the transition metal comprises at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, and Cr.

  11. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large scale capture and

  12. Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

  13. Dense ceramic catalytic membranes and membrane reactors for energy and environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xueliang; Jin, Wanqin; Xu, Nanping; Li, Kang

    2011-10-21

    Catalytic membrane reactors which carry out separation and reaction in a single unit are expected to be a promising approach to achieve green and sustainable chemistry with less energy consumption and lower pollution. This article presents a review of the recent progress of dense ceramic catalytic membranes and membrane reactors, and their potential applications in energy and environmental areas. A basic knowledge of catalytic membranes and membrane reactors is first introduced briefly, followed by a short discussion on the membrane materials including their structures, composition and strategies for material development. The configuration of catalytic membranes, the design of membrane reaction processes and the high temperature sealing are also discussed. The performance of catalytic membrane reactors for energy and environmental applications are summarized and typical catalytic membrane reaction processes are presented and discussed. Finally, current challenges and difficulties related to the industrialization of dense ceramic membrane reactors are addressed and possible future research is also outlined.

  14. Catalytic membrane program novation: High temperature catalytic membrane reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, R.N.

    1998-08-28

    The original objective was to develop an energy-efficient hydrocarbon dehydrogenation process based on catalytic membrane reactors. Golden Technologies determined that the goals of this contract would be best served by novating the contract to an end user or other interested party which is better informed on the economic justification aspects of petrochemical refining processes to carry out the remaining work. In light of the Chevron results, the program objective was broadened to include development of inorganic membranes for applications in the chemical industry. The proposed membrane technologies shall offer the potential to improve chemical production processes via conversion increase and energy savings. The objective of this subcontract is to seek a party that would serve as a prime contractor to carry out the remaining tasks on the agreement and bring the agreement to a successful conclusion. Four tasks were defined to select the prime contractor. They were (1) prepare a request for proposal, (2) solicit companies as potential prime contractors as well as team members, (3) discuss modifications requested by the potential prime contractors, and (4) obtain, review and rank the proposals. The accomplishments on the tasks is described in detail in the following sections.

  15. Lipase immobilized catalytically active membrane for synthesis of lauryl stearate in a pervaporation membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weidong; Qing, Weihua; Ren, Zhongqi; Li, Wei; Chen, Jiangrong

    2014-11-01

    A composite catalytically active membrane immobilized with Candida rugosa lipase has been prepared by immersion phase inversion technique for enzymatic synthesis of lauryl stearate in a pervaporation membrane reactor. SEM images showed that a "sandwich-like" membrane structure with a porous lipase-PVA catalytic layer uniformly coated on a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/polyethersulfone (PES) bilayer was obtained. Optimum conditions for lipase immobilization in the catalytic layer were determined. The membrane was proved to exhibit superior thermal stability, pH stability and reusability than free lipase under similar conditions. In the case of pervaporation coupled synthesis of lauryl stearate, benefited from in-situ water removal by the membrane, a conversion enhancement of approximately 40% was achieved in comparison to the equilibrium conversion obtained in batch reactors. In addition to conversion enhancement, it was also found that excess water removal by the catalytically active membrane appears to improve activity of the lipase immobilized.

  16. Polymer and Membrane Design for Low Temperature Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco; Xie, Yihui; Nunes, Suzana Pereira; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2016-04-01

    Catalytically active asymmetric membranes have been developed with high loadings of palladium nanoparticles located solely in the membrane's ultrathin skin layer. The manufacturing of these membranes requires polymers with functional groups, which can form insoluble complexes with palladium ions. Three polymers have been synthesized for this purpose and a complexation/nonsolvent induced phase separation followed by a palladium reduction step is carried out to prepare such membranes. Parameters to optimize the skin layer thickness and porosity, the palladium loading in this layer, and the palladium nanoparticles size are determined. The catalytic activity of the membranes is verified with the reduction of a nitro-compound and with a liquid phase Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction. Very low reaction times are observed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Solid state oxygen anion and electron mediating membrane and catalytic membrane reactors containing them

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Michael; White, James H.; Sammels, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to gas-impermeable, solid state materials fabricated into membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactors. This invention particularly relates to solid state oxygen anion- and electron-mediating membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactors for promoting partial or full oxidation of different chemical species, for decomposition of oxygen-containing species, and for separation of oxygen from other gases. Solid state materials for use in the membranes of this invention include mixed metal oxide compounds having the brownmillerite crystal structure.

  18. Solid state oxygen anion and electron mediating membrane and catalytic membrane reactors containing them

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Michael; White, James H.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2005-09-27

    This invention relates to gas-impermeable, solid state materials fabricated into membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactors. This invention particularly relates to solid state oxygen anion- and electron-mediating membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactors for promoting partial or full oxidation of different chemical species, for decomposition of oxygen-containing species, and for separation of oxygen from other gases. Solid state materials for use in the membranes of this invention include mixed metal oxide compounds having the brownmillerite crystal structure.

  19. Thin film porous membranes for catalytic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.; Boyle, T.J.; Gardner, T.J.

    1997-06-01

    This paper reports on new and surprising experimental data for catalytic film gas sensing resistors coated with nanoporous sol-gel films to impart selectivity and durability to the sensor structure. This work is the result of attempts to build selectivity and reactivity to the surface of a sensor by modifying it with a series of sol-gel layers. The initial sol-gel SiO{sub 2} layer applied to the sensor surprisingly showed enhanced O{sub 2} interaction with H{sub 2} and reduced susceptibility to poisons such as H{sub 2}S.

  20. Catalytic membrane reactor for conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Khassin, A.A.

    2005-07-01

    Plug-through catalytically-active contractor membranes can combine high permeability ({gt} 20 m Darcy), high mechanical strength ({gt} 20 kg cm{sup -2}) and high heat-conductivity ({gt} 4 W(mK){sup -1}). Therefore, it provides isothermicity and low pressure drop. The intense mass-transfer within transport pores, high specific area of these pores and small distances between two adjacent transport pores weaken the mass-transfer constraints. Using the PCM one can achieve high space time yield of hydrocarbons and high selectivity towards heavy hydrocarbons and olefins. These advantages allow supposing the effective usage of the PCM catalytic membrane reactors in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Also the same approach could be efficient for some other multiphase catalytic processes, like hydrogenation of the unsaturated fatty acids. 5 figs.

  1. Study on surface properties of gamma-alumina catalytic membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mengchenu Lu; Guoxing Xiong; Bauser, H.

    1994-12-31

    In recent years, preparation and separation applications of gamma-alumina membranes have been extensively studied. In catalysis research field, this membrane can be used not only as a separating medium but also as a catalyst or catalyst support. In this paper, a gamma-alumina catalytic membrane was prepared by a sol-gel technique, then special attention was paid to its surface properties related to catalysis, its surface acidity, hydroxyl, microstructure and pore properties was studied by IR with pyridine adsorption, XRD and N{sub 2} adsorption at low temperature, 1-butanol dehydration as a probe reaction was used to study its reaction property.

  2. Catalytic membrane reactor for water and wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Samuel

    A double membrane reactor was fabricated and assessed for continuous treatment of water containing organic contaminants by ozonation. This innovative reactor consisted of a zeolite membrane prepared on the inner surface of a porous a-alumina support, which served as water selective extractor and active contactor, and a porous stainless membrane which was the ozone gas diffuser. The coupling of membrane separation and chemical oxidation was found to be highly beneficial to both processes. The total organic carbon (TOC) removal rate at the retentate was enhanced by up to 2.2 times, as compared to membrane ozonation. Simultaneously, clean water (< 2 mg C.L-1 ) was consistently produced on the permeate side, using a feed solution containing up to 1000 mg C.L-1, while the retentate was concentrated and treated. Most significantly, the addition of an adsorbing material, as a bed or a coated layer, onto the pores of the membrane support, was shown to further enhance TOC degradation, permeated TOC concentration, permeate flux, and moreover, ozone yield. The achievements of this project included: (1) The development of a novel low-temperature zeolite membrane activation method that generates consistently high quality membranes (i.e. high reproducibility and fewer defects). (2) The demonstration that gamma-alumina and gamma-alumina supported catalysts do not have significant activity and that the TOC removal enhancement usually observed during catalytic ozonation was due primarily to the contribution of adsorption and metal leaching. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and elemental analysis (EA) of the spent catalyst showed that, during catalytic ozonation, oxygenated by-products of increased adsorbability were concentrated onto the gamma-alumina contactor, and were subsequently degraded. (3) The development of a method for coating high surface area gamma-alumina layers onto the grains of zeolite membrane support used as the active membrane contactor.

  3. Catalytic polyelectrolyte multilayers at the bipolar membrane interface.

    PubMed

    Abdu, Said; Sricharoen, Kittikun; Wong, John E; Muljadi, Eko S; Melin, Thomas; Wessling, Matthias

    2013-11-13

    Bipolar membranes are laminated anion and cation exchange membranes that split water at their interface very efficiently upon application of an electric field. This paper investigates the layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of polyelectrolyte multilayers, as a tool to introduce molecularly thin catalyst groups at this interface of bipolar membranes. The bipolar membranes were prepared by first modifying an anion exchange membrane by consecutive dipping LbL assembly, then casting a thin highly charged intermediate layer followed by casting a cation exchange layer. The results reveal that polyelectrolytes of higher charge density coated on the anion exchange layer yield better performance. Several parameters of the LbL interface deposition were varied. Out of the investigated LbL assembly parameters, ionic strength and number of layers have shown the largest influence on catalytic activity as well as ionic selectivity. The membrane with two bilayers of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI), where the PEI was prepared in 0.5 M NaCl, gave rise to the best performance. Surprisingly, detailed data analysis at low electrical potential suggests that the interface layers of a bipolar membrane play a major role in its permselectivity. Previously, only the bulk thickness of the anion and cation exchange membrane was assumed to influence the bipolar membrane selectivity.

  4. A hybrid process combining homogeneous catalytic ozonation and membrane distillation for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Peng; Li, Jie; Hou, Deyin; Wang, Jun; Liu, Huijuan

    2016-10-01

    A novel catalytic ozonation membrane reactor (COMR) coupling homogeneous catalytic ozonation and direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) was developed for refractory saline organic pollutant treatment from wastewater. An ozonation process took place in the reactor to degrade organic pollutants, whilst the DCMD process was used to recover ionic catalysts and produce clean water. It was found that 98.6% total organic carbon (TOC) and almost 100% salt were removed and almost 100% metal ion catalyst was recovered. TOC in the permeate water was less than 16 mg/L after 5 h operation, which was considered satisfactory as the TOC in the potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) feed water was as high as 1000 mg/L. Meanwhile, the membrane distillation flux in the COMR process was 49.8% higher than that in DCMD process alone after 60 h operation. Further, scanning electron microscope images showed less amount and smaller size of contaminants on the membrane surface, which indicated the mitigation of membrane fouling. The tensile strength and FT-IR spectra tests did not reveal obvious changes for the polyvinylidene fluoride membrane after 60 h operation, which indicated the good durability. This novel COMR hybrid process exhibited promising application prospects for saline organic wastewater treatment.

  5. Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Repasky, John Michael

    2012-10-16

    A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

  6. One-Step Synthesis of Zeolite Membranes Containing Catalytic Metal Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Jhin; Tan, Shuai; Taborga Claure, Micaela; Briones Gil, Laura; More, Karren L; Liu, Yujun; Moore, Jason S; Dixit, Ravindra S; Pendergast, John G; Sholl, David S; Jones, Christopher W; Nair, Sankar

    2016-09-21

    Metal-loaded zeolitic membranes are promising candidates as catalytic membrane reactors. We report a one-step synthesis method to synthesize zeolite membranes containing metal nanoclusters, that has advantages in comparison to multistep methods such as impregnation and ion exchange. Pure-silica MFI zeolite-Pt hybrid membranes were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis with addition of 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPS) and a platinum precursor. Composition analysis and mapping by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) reveal that Pt ions/clusters are uniformly distributed along the membrane cross-section. High-magnification scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis shows that Pt metal clusters in the hybrid zeolite membrane have a diameter distribution in the range of 0.5-2.0 nm. In contrast, a pure-silica MFI membrane synthesized from an MPS-free solution shows negligible incorporation of Pt metal clusters. To characterize the properties of the hybrid (zeolite/metal) membrane, it was used as a catalytic membrane reactor (CMR) for high-temperature propane dehydrogenation (PDH) at 600 °C and 1 atm. The results indicate that Pt metal clusters formed within the MFI zeolite membrane can serve as effective catalysts for high-temperature PDH reaction along with H2 removal via membrane permeation, thereby increasing both conversion and selectivity in relation to a conventional membrane reactor containing an equivalent amount of packed Pt catalyst in contact with an MFI membrane. The hybrid zeolite-Pt CMR also showed stable conversion and selectivity upon extended high-temperature operation (12 h), indicating that encapsulation in the zeolite allowed thermal stabilization of the Pt nanoclusters and reduced catalyst deactivation.

  7. Catalytic molecularly imprinted polymer membranes: development of the biomimetic sensor for phenols detection.

    PubMed

    Sergeyeva, T A; Slinchenko, O A; Gorbach, L A; Matyushov, V F; Brovko, O O; Piletsky, S A; Sergeeva, L M; Elska, G V

    2010-02-05

    Portable biomimetic sensor devices for the express control of phenols content in water were developed. The synthetic binding sites mimicking active site of the enzyme tyrosinase were formed in the structure of free-standing molecularly imprinted polymer membranes. Molecularly imprinted polymer membranes with the catalytic activity were obtained by co-polymerization of the complex Cu(II)-catechol-urocanic acid ethyl ester with (tri)ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate, and oligourethaneacrylate. Addition of the elastic component oligourethaneacrylate provided formation of the highly cross-linked polymer with the catalytic activity in a form of thin, flexible, and mechanically stable membrane. High accessibility of the artificial catalytic sites for the interaction with the analyzed phenol molecules was achieved due to addition of linear polymer (polyethyleneglycol Mw 20,000) to the initial monomer mixture before the polymerization. As a result, typical semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs) were formed. The cross-linked component of the semi-IPN was represented by the highly cross-linked catalytic molecularly imprinted polymer, while the linear one was represented by polyethyleneglycol Mw 20,000. Extraction of the linear polymer from the fully formed semi-IPN resulted in formation of large pores in the membranes' structure. Concentration of phenols in the analyzed samples was detected using universal portable device oxymeter with the oxygen electrode in a close contact with the catalytic molecularly imprinted polymer membrane as a transducer. The detection limit of phenols detection using the developed sensor system based on polymers-biomimics with the optimized composition comprised 0.063 mM, while the linear range of the sensor comprised 0.063-1 mM. The working characteristics of the portable sensor devices were investigated. Storage stability of sensor systems at room temperature comprised 12 months (87%). As compared to traditional methods of phenols

  8. Development of hollow fiber catalytic membrane reactors for high temperature gas cleanup. Final report, September 1989--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yi Hua; Moser, W.R.; Pien, S.; Shelekhin, A.B.

    1994-07-01

    The objective of this project was to develop economically and technically viable catalytic membrane reactors for high temperature, high pressure gaseous contaminant control in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. These catalytic membrane reactors decompose H{sub 2}S and separate the reaction products. The reactors were designed to operate in the hostile process environment of the IGCC systems, and at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1000{degrees}C. Severe conditions encountered in the IGCC process (e.g., 900{degrees}C, containing of H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) make it impossible to use polymeric membranes in the process. A list of inorganic membranes that can be employed in the membrane reactor includes Pd metallic membranes, molecular-sieve glass membranes (PPG Industries), porous Vycor glass membranes and porous sol-gel derived membranes such as alumina, zirconia. Alumina and zirconia membranes, however, cannot withstand for a long time at high temperatures in the presence of water vapors. Palladium membranes are a very promising class of inorganic membranes for gas separations that is currently under development. In this project two different types of membranes were used in the design of the membrane reactor -- molecular-sieve glass membrane and Vycor glass porous membrane.

  9. Development of hollow fiber catalytic membrane reactors for high temperature gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.H.; Moser, W.R.; Pien, S.; Shelekhin, A.B.

    1994-10-01

    The technology employed in the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) permits burning coals with a wide range of sulfur concentrations. Emissions from the process should be reduced by an order of magnitude below stringent federal air quality regulations for coal-fired plants. The maximum thermal efficiency of this type of process can be achieved by removing sulfur and particulates from the high temperature gas. The objective of this project was to develop economically and technically viable catalytic membrane reactors for high temperature, high pressure gaseous contaminant control in IGCC systems. These catalytic membrane reactors were used to decompose H{sub 2}S and separate the reaction products. The reactors were designed to operate in the hostile process environment of the IGCC systems, and at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1,000. Feasibility of the membrane reactor process for decomposition of hydrogen sulfide was demonstrated; permeability and selectivity of molecular-sieve and Vycor glass membranes were studied at temperatures up to 1,000 C; experimental study of hydrogen sulfide in the membrane reactor was completed; and a generalized mathematical model was developed for the simulation of the high temperature membrane reactor.

  10. [Influence of UV-light on erythrocyte membrane structure and catalytic behaviour of membrane acetylcholine esterase].

    PubMed

    Volotovskiĭ, I D; Sheĭko, L M; Konev, S V

    1976-01-01

    UV-light is shown to induce the structural transitions in the erythrocyte membrane described by S-shape curves in plots of the structural response versus the irradiation dose. In contrast to the free acetylcholine esterase (AChE) UV-light acts on the membrane enzyme as a mixed inhibitor (simultaneous change in Vmax and Km). The modification of the environment structure of residual enzyme is suggested to be the main reason of this phenomenon. The effect is under the control of membrane integrity and disappears after its desintegration. Membrane AChE treated ultrasonically both prior to and after irradiation is inactivated without a Km change. The data obtained show the influence of erythrocyte membrane structure on the catalytic behaviour of membrane-bound AChE.

  11. Solid state proton and electron mediating membrane and use in catalytic membrane reactors

    DOEpatents

    White, James H.; Schwartz, Michael; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    Mixed electron- and proton-conducting metal oxide materials are provided. These materials are useful in fabrication of membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactions, particularly for promoting dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons, oligomerization of hydrocarbons and for the decomposition of hydrogen-containing gases. Membrane materials are perovskite compounds of the formula: AB.sub.1-x B'.sub.x O.sub.3-y where A=Ca, Sr, or Ba; B=Ce, Tb, Pr or Th; B'=Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni or Cu; 0.2

  12. [Nitric Oxide Removal with a Fe-TiO₂/PSF Hybrid Catalytic Membrane Bioreactor].

    PubMed

    Li, Bao-ren; Chen, Zhou-yang; Wang, Jian-bin; Zhang, Zai-li; Fan, Qing-juan; Wei, Zai-shan

    2016-03-15

    The Fe-doped titanium dioxide (Fe-TiO₂) was prepared by the sol-gel method and was loaded on polysulfone (PSF) hollow fiber membrane. A novel Fe-TiO₂/PSF hybrid catalytic membrane biofilm reactor (HCMBfR) was investigated for nitric oxide removal, to further improve the elimination capacity. HCMBfR exhibited a good stability in the 180-day operation period, the NO removal efficiency was up to 93.2% and the maximum elimination capacity reached 167.1 g · (m³ · h)⁻1. The additional use of the biofilm to wet Fe-TiO₂/PSF membrane catalysis reactor led to the enhancement of NO removal efficiency from 59. 5% to 66% . The NO removal efficiency in the intimate coupling of Fe-TiO₂/PSF hybrid catalytic membrane and biofilm reactor ( HCMBfR) increased from 1.4% to 13% as compared to that of the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) only. The optimal illumination intensity, gas residence time, pH and nC/nN were 670 lx, 9 a, 6.8-7.2 and 3.7, respectively.

  13. Catalytic Membrane Reactor Immobilized with Alloy Nanoparticle-Loaded Protein Fibrils for Continuous Reduction of 4-Nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renliang; Zhu, Hongxiu; Su, Rongxin; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2016-10-18

    A catalytic membrane reactor, which contains a membrane matrix and a catalytic film of alloy nanoparticle-loaded β-lactoglobulin fibrils (NPs@β-LGF), was developed for the continuous-flow reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). The Cu-Ag and Cu-Ag-Au alloy NPs were synthesized using β-LGF as a scaffold and stabilizing agent. In this process, the Cu nanoclusters were formed in the initial stage and were able to promote the synthesis of Ag(0), which acts as a reducing agent for the rapid formation of Au(0). Furthermore, a catalytic membrane reactor was constructed by depositing the NPs@β-LGFs on a membrane matrix. The catalytic activity of the Cu-Ag-Au alloy NPs was higher than that of the Cu-Ag alloy NPs, using the reduction of 4-NP to 4-AP as a model reaction. The observed rate constant in the continuous-flow system is also higher than that in the batch system. In addition, these catalytic membrane reactors had good operating stability and antibacterial activity.

  14. Method for recovering catalytic elements from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Shore, Lawrence [Edison, NJ; Matlin, Ramail [Berkeley Heights, NJ; Heinz, Robert [Ludwigshafen, DE

    2012-06-26

    A method for recovering catalytic elements from a fuel cell membrane electrode assembly is provided. The method includes converting the membrane electrode assembly into a particulate material, wetting the particulate material, forming a slurry comprising the wetted particulate material and an acid leachate adapted to dissolve at least one of the catalytic elements into a soluble catalytic element salt, separating the slurry into a depleted particulate material and a supernatant containing the catalytic element salt, and washing the depleted particulate material to remove any catalytic element salt retained within pores in the depleted particulate material.

  15. Solid state proton and electron mediating membrane and use in catalytic membrane reactors

    DOEpatents

    White, James H.; Schwartz, Michael; Sammells, Anthony F.

    1998-01-01

    This invention provides catalytic proton and electron mediating membranes useful in catalytic reactors. The membranes have an oxidation and a reduction surface and comprise a single-phase mixed metal oxide material of the formula: AB.sub.1-x B'.sub.x O.sub.3-y wherein A is selected from Ca, Sr or Ba ions; B is selected from Ce, Tb, Pr, or Th ions; B' is selected from Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Al, Ga, or In ions, or combinations thereof; and x is greater than or equal to 0.02 and less than or equal to 0.5. The membranes can further comprise a catalyst on either the oxidation or reduction surface, or both. Membranes include those which are fabricated-by combining powders of metal oxides or metal carbonates of metal A ion, metal B ion and metal B' ion such that the stoichiometric ratio A:B:B' is 1:1-x:x where 0.2.ltoreq..times.0.5, repeatedly calcining and milling the combined powders until a single-phase material is obtained and pressing and sintering the singlephase material to obtain a membrane.

  16. Solid state proton and electron mediating membrane and use in catalytic membrane reactors

    DOEpatents

    White, J.H.; Schwartz, M.; Sammells, A.F.

    1998-10-13

    This invention provides catalytic proton and electron mediating membranes useful in catalytic reactors. The membranes have an oxidation and a reduction surface and comprise a single-phase mixed metal oxide material of the formula: AB{sub 1{minus}x}B{prime}{sub x}O{sub 3{minus}y} wherein A is selected from Ca, Sr or Ba ions; B is selected from Ce, Tb, Pr, or Th ions; B{prime} is selected from Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Al, Ga, or In ions, or combinations thereof; and x is greater than or equal to 0.02 and less than or equal to 0.5. The membranes can further comprise a catalyst on either the oxidation or reduction surface, or both. Membranes include those which are fabricated by combining powders of metal oxides or metal carbonates of metal A ion, metal B ion and metal B{prime} ion such that the stoichiometric ratio A:B:B{prime} is 1:1{minus}x:x where 0.2{<=}{times}0.5, repeatedly calcining and milling the combined powders until a single-phase material is obtained and pressing and sintering the single phase material to obtain a membrane. 6 figs.

  17. Solid state proton and electron mediating membrane and use in catalytic membrane reactors

    DOEpatents

    White, James H.; Schwartz, Michael; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2001-01-01

    Mixed electron- and proton-conducting metal oxide materials are provided. These materials are useful in fabrication of membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactions, particularly for promoting dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons, oligomerization of hydrocarbons and for the decomposition of hydrogen-containing gases. Membrane materials are perovskite compounds of the formula: AB.sub.1-x B'.sub.x O.sub.3-y where A=Ca, Sr, or Ba; B=Ce, Tb, Pr or Th; B'=Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni or Cu; 0.2.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, and y is a number sufficient to neutralize the charge in the mixed metal oxide material.

  18. Catalytic bubble-free hydrogenation reduction of azo dye by porous membranes loaded with palladium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhiqian; Sun, Huijie; Du, Zhenxia; Lei, Zhigang

    2014-02-01

    Catalytic bubble-free hydrogenation reduction of azo dye by porous membranes loaded with palladium (Pd) nanoparticles was studied for the first time. The effects of Pd loading, dye concentration and reuse repetitions of membranes were investigated. In reduction, the dye concentration decreased whereas the pH rose gradually. An optimal Pd loading was found. The catalytic membranes were able to be reused more than 3 times.

  19. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  20. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  1. Surface-Enhanced Separation of Water from Hydrocarbons: Potential Dewatering Membranes for the Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Pine Biomass

    DOE PAGES

    Engtrakul, Dr. Chaiwat; Hu, Michael Z.; Bischoff, Brian L; ...

    2016-01-01

    The impact of surface-selective coatings on water permeation through a membrane when exposed to catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) vapor products was studied by tailoring the surface properties of the membrane coating from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic. Our approach utilized high-performance architectured surface-selective (HiPAS) membranes that were inserted after a CFP reactor. At this insertion point, the inner wall surface of a tubular membrane was exposed to a mixture of water and upgraded product vapors, including light gases and deoxygenated hydrocarbons. Under proper membrane operating conditions, a high selectivity for water over 1-ring upgraded biomass pyrolysis hydrocarbons was observed due to amore » surface-enhanced capillary condensation process. Owing to this surface-enhanced effect, HiPAS membranes have the potential to enable high flux separations suggesting that water can be selectively removed from the CFP product vapors.« less

  2. Surface-Enhanced Separation of Water from Hydrocarbons: Potential Dewatering Membranes for the Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Pine Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Engtrakul, Dr. Chaiwat; Hu, Michael Z.; Bischoff, Brian L; Jang, Gyoung Gug

    2016-01-01

    The impact of surface-selective coatings on water permeation through a membrane when exposed to catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) vapor products was studied by tailoring the surface properties of the membrane coating from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic. Our approach utilized high-performance architectured surface-selective (HiPAS) membranes that were inserted after a CFP reactor. At this insertion point, the inner wall surface of a tubular membrane was exposed to a mixture of water and upgraded product vapors, including light gases and deoxygenated hydrocarbons. Under proper membrane operating conditions, a high selectivity for water over 1-ring upgraded biomass pyrolysis hydrocarbons was observed due to a surface-enhanced capillary condensation process. Owing to this surface-enhanced effect, HiPAS membranes have the potential to enable high flux separations suggesting that water can be selectively removed from the CFP product vapors.

  3. Surface-Enhanced Separation of Water from Hydrocarbons: Potential Dewatering Membranes for the Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Pine Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Hu, Michael Z.; Bischoff, Brian L.; Jang, Gyoung G.

    2016-10-20

    The impact of surface-selective coatings on water permeation through a membrane when exposed to catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) vapor products was studied by tailoring the surface properties of the membrane coating from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic. Our approach used high-performance architectured surface-selective (HiPAS) membranes that were inserted after a CFP reactor. At this insertion point, the inner wall surface of a tubular membrane was exposed to a mixture of water and upgraded product vapors, including light gases and deoxygenated hydrocarbons. Under proper membrane operating conditions, a high selectivity for water over one-ring upgraded biomass pyrolysis hydrocarbons was observed as a result of a surface-enhanced capillary condensation process. Owing to this surface-enhanced effect, HiPAS membranes have the potential to enable high flux separations, suggesting that water can be selectively removed from the CFP product vapors.

  4. Liberated PKA Catalytic Subunits Associate with the Membrane via Myristoylation to Preferentially Phosphorylate Membrane Substrates.

    PubMed

    Tillo, Shane E; Xiong, Wei-Hong; Takahashi, Maho; Miao, Sheng; Andrade, Adriana L; Fortin, Dale A; Yang, Guang; Qin, Maozhen; Smoody, Barbara F; Stork, Philip J S; Zhong, Haining

    2017-04-18

    Protein kinase A (PKA) has diverse functions in neurons. At rest, the subcellular localization of PKA is controlled by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). However, the dynamics of PKA upon activation remain poorly understood. Here, we report that elevation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in neuronal dendrites causes a significant percentage of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKA-C) molecules to be released from the regulatory subunit (PKA-R). Liberated PKA-C becomes associated with the membrane via N-terminal myristoylation. This membrane association does not require the interaction between PKA-R and AKAPs. It slows the mobility of PKA-C and enriches kinase activity on the membrane. Membrane-residing PKA substrates are preferentially phosphorylated compared to cytosolic substrates. Finally, the myristoylation of PKA-C is critical for normal synaptic function and plasticity. We propose that activation-dependent association of PKA-C renders the membrane a unique PKA-signaling compartment. Constrained mobility of PKA-C may synergize with AKAP anchoring to determine specific PKA function in neurons. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ceramic membranes for catalytic membrane reactors with high ionic conductivities and low expansion properties

    DOEpatents

    Mackay, Richard; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    Ceramics of the composition: Ln.sub.x Sr.sub.2-x-y Ca.sub.y B.sub.z M.sub.2-z O.sub.5+.delta. where Ln is an element selected from the fblock lanthanide elements and yttrium or mixtures thereof; B is an element selected from Al, Ga, In or mixtures thereof; M is a d-block transition element of mixtures thereof; 0.01.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0; 0.01.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.0.7; 0.01.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.1.0 and .delta. is a number that varies to maintain charge neutrality are provided. These ceramics are useful in ceramic membranes and exhibit high ionic conductivity, high chemical stability under catalytic membrane reactor conditions and low coefficients of expansion. The materials of the invention are particularly useful in producing synthesis gas.

  6. A mesoporous catalytic membrane architecture for lithium-oxygen battery systems.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S; Schwab, Mark; Goh, Tenghooi; Taylor, André D

    2015-01-14

    Controlling the mesoscale geometric configuration of catalysts on the oxygen electrode is an effective strategy to achieve high reversibility and efficiency in Li-O2 batteries. Here we introduce a new Li-O2 cell architecture that employs a catalytic polymer-based membrane between the oxygen electrode and the separator. The catalytic membrane was prepared by immobilization of Pd nanoparticles on a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber membrane and is adjacent to a carbon nanotube electrode loaded with Ru nanoparticles. During oxide product formation, the insulating PAN polymer scaffold restricts direct electron transfer to the Pd catalyst particles and prevents the direct blockage of Pd catalytic sites. The modified Li-O2 battery with a catalytic membrane showed a stable cyclability for 60 cycles with a capacity of 1000 mAh/g and a reduced degree of polarization (∼ 0.3 V) compared to cells without a catalytic membrane. We demonstrate the effects of a catalytic membrane on the reaction characteristics associated with morphological and structural features of the discharge products via detailed ex situ characterization.

  7. Preparation of amino-functionalized regenerated cellulose membranes with high catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Bai, Qian; Liang, Tao; Bai, Huiyu; Liu, Xiaoya

    2017-09-01

    The modification of regenerated cellulose (RC) membranes was carried out by using silane coupling agents presenting primary and secondary amino-groups. The grafting of the amino groups onto the modified cellulose molecule was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analyses. The crystallinity of the cellulose membranes (CM) decreased after chemical modification as indicated by the X-ray diffraction results. Moreover, a denser structure was observed at the surface and cross section of the modified membranes by SEM images. The contact angle measurements showed that the silane coupling treatment enhanced the hydrophobicity of the obtained materials. Then the catalytic properties of two types of modified membranes were studied in a batch process by evaluating their catalytic performance in a Knoevenagel condensation. The results indicated that the cellulose membrane grafted with many secondary amines exhibited a better catalytic activity compared to the one grafted only by primary amines. In addition, the compact structure of the modified membranes permitted their application in a pervaporation catalytic membrane reactor. Therefore, functional CM that prepared in this paper represented a promising material in the field of industrial catalysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Esterification of acidified oil with methanol by SPES/PES catalytic membrane.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenying; He, Benqiao; Li, Jianxin

    2011-05-01

    A sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES)/polyethersulfone (PES) blend catalytic membrane was prepared and used as a heterogeneous catalyst in the esterification of the acidified oil (acid value 153 mg KOH/g) with methanol for producing biodiesel. The results showed that the free fatty acids conversion reached 97.6% using SPES/PES catalytic membrane under the optimal esterification conditions. Meanwhile, the SPES/PES membrane with 20.3% degree of sulfonation showed a good catalytic stability. A pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model was established. The results indicated that the reaction rate constant increased with increasing methanol/acidified oil molar ratio, the loading of catalytic membrane and reaction temperature. The reaction order was 2 and the activation energy decreased from 74.65 to 21.07 kJ/mol with increasing catalytic membrane loading from 0 to 0.135 meq/g(oil). It implies that the esterification is not diffusively controlled but kinetically controlled. The predicted results were in good agreement with the experimental data. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A conceptual design of catalytic gasification fuel cell hybrid power plant with oxygen transfer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wangying; Han, Minfang

    2017-09-01

    A hybrid power generation system integrating catalytic gasification, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), oxygen transfer membrane (OTM) and gas turbine (GT) is established and system energy analysis is performed. In this work, the catalytic gasifier uses steam, recycled anode off-gas and pure oxygen from OTM system to gasify coal, and heated by hot cathode off-gas at the same time. A zero-dimension SOFC model is applied and verified by fitting experimental data. Thermodynamic analysis is performed to investigate the integrated system performance, and system sensitivities on anode off-gas back flow ratio, SOFC fuel utilization, temperature and pressure are discussed. Main conclusions are as follows: (1) System overall electricity efficiency reaches 60.7%(HHV) while the gasifier operates at 700 °C and SOFC at 850 °C with system pressure at 3.04 bar; (2) oxygen enriched combustion simplify the carbon-dioxide capture process, which derives CO2 of 99.2% purity, but results in a penalty of 6.7% on system electricity efficiency; (3) with SOFC fuel utilization or temperature increasing, the power output of SOFC increases while GT power output decreases, and increasing system pressure can improve both the performance of SOFC and GT.

  10. Catalytic membranes for CO oxidation in fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Sandi-Tapia, Giselle; Carrado Gregar, Kathleen; Kizilel, Riza

    2010-06-08

    A hydrogen permeable membrane, which includes a polymer stable at temperatures of about 200 C having clay impregnated with Pt or Au or Ru or Pd particles or mixtures thereof with average diameters of less than about 10 nanometers (nms) is disclosed. The membranes are useful in fuel cells or any device which requires hydrogen to be separated from carbon monoxide.

  11. Development of hollow-fiber catalytic-membrane reactors for high-temperature gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yi H.; Moser, M.R.; Pien, S.M.

    1992-12-01

    The project consist of the following main activities: (1) Design of catalytic hollow fiber membrane reactors. Single and multiple hollow-fiber membranes were studied in reactor/permeation cells made from stainless steel or quartz tubes. Modification of the hollow fiber membrane with catalysts was performed by aqueous impregnation, vapor deposition, and utilization of packed-bed reactors. (2) Investigation of gas separations and catalytic reactions in membrane reactors. Permeation of pure gases and gas mixtures was studied as a function of temperature. Pure component catalytic studies on the decomposition of H{sub 2}S was typically studied using 10% H{sub 2}S diluted in He. The H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2} concentrations were measured in both the tube and shell sides of the membrane reactor to determine the degree of chemical equilibrium shift. (3) Process development of the cleanup system using a simulated gas stream with a composition similar to that from an IGCC system. Catalytic studies using the IGCC gas composition will be performed according to the procedure used in the H{sub 2}S experiments. The conditions for optimum conversion in a gas mixture will be investigated.

  12. Development of hollow-fiber catalytic-membrane reactors for high-temperature gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yi H.; Moser, M.R.; Pien, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    The project consist of the following main activities: (1) Design of catalytic hollow fiber membrane reactors. Single and multiple hollow-fiber membranes were studied in reactor/permeation cells made from stainless steel or quartz tubes. Modification of the hollow fiber membrane with catalysts was performed by aqueous impregnation, vapor deposition, and utilization of packed-bed reactors. (2) Investigation of gas separations and catalytic reactions in membrane reactors. Permeation of pure gases and gas mixtures was studied as a function of temperature. Pure component catalytic studies on the decomposition of H[sub 2]S was typically studied using 10% H[sub 2]S diluted in He. The H[sub 2]S and H[sub 2] concentrations were measured in both the tube and shell sides of the membrane reactor to determine the degree of chemical equilibrium shift. (3) Process development of the cleanup system using a simulated gas stream with a composition similar to that from an IGCC system. Catalytic studies using the IGCC gas composition will be performed according to the procedure used in the H[sub 2]S experiments. The conditions for optimum conversion in a gas mixture will be investigated.

  13. Catalytic photoinduced electron transport across a lipid bilayer mediated by a membrane-soluble electron relay.

    PubMed

    Limburg, B; Bouwman, E; Bonnet, S

    2015-12-14

    Unidirectional photocatalytic electron transfer from a hydrophilic electron donor encapsulated in the interior of a liposome, to a hydrophilic electron acceptor on the other side of the membrane, has been achieved using the simple membrane-soluble electron relay 1-methoxy-N-methylphenazinium (MMP(+)). The total amount of photoproduct (>140 nmol) exceeds the number of moles of MMP(+) present (125 nmol), thus showing that the transport of electrons is catalytic.

  14. Mn oxide coated catalytic membranes for a hybrid ozonation-membrane filtration: comparison of Ti, Fe and Mn oxide coated membranes for water quality.

    PubMed

    Byun, S; Davies, S H; Alpatova, A L; Corneal, L M; Baumann, M J; Tarabara, V V; Masten, S J

    2011-01-01

    In this study the performance of catalytic membranes in a hybrid ozonation-ceramic membrane filtration system was investigated. The catalytic membranes were produced by coating commercial ceramic ultrafiltration membranes with manganese or iron oxide nanoparticles using a layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. A commercial membrane with a titanium oxide filtration layer was also evaluated. The performance of the coated and uncoated membranes was evaluated using water from a borderline eutrophic lake. The permeate flux and removal of the organic matter was found to depend on the type of the metal oxide present on the membrane surface. The performance of the manganese oxide coated membrane was superior to that of the other membranes tested, showing the fastest recovery in permeate flux when ozone was applied and the greatest reduction in the total organic carbon (TOC) in the permeate. The removal of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) precursors using the membrane coated 20 times with manganese oxide nanoparticles was significantly better than that for the membranes coated with 30 or 40 times with manganese oxide nanoparticles or 40 times with iron oxide nanoparticles. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Long life catalytic membrane reactors for spontaneous conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M., White, J., Deych, S., Millard, J., Myers, M., Sammells, A.

    1997-10-01

    This program is focusing on the development of mixed ionic and electronic conducting materials based on the brown millerite structure for use in catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs). These CMRs are being evaluated for promoting the spontaneous and highly selective oxidative reforming of carbon dioxide / natural gas mixtures to synthesis gas.

  16. Catalytic partial oxidation and membrane separation to optimize the conversion of natural gas to syngas and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Capoferri, Daniela; Cucchiella, Barbara; Iaquaniello, Gaetano; Mangiapane, Alessia; Abate, Salvatore; Centi, Gabriele

    2011-12-16

    The multistep integration of hydrogen-selective membranes into catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) technology to convert natural gas into syngas and hydrogen is reported. An open architecture for the membrane reactor is presented, in which coupling of the reaction and hydrogen separation is achieved independently and the required feed conversion is reached through a set of three CPO reactors working at 750, 750 and 920 °C, compared to 1030 °C for conventional CPO technology. Obtaining the same feed conversion at milder operating conditions translates into less natural gas consumption (and CO(2) emissions) and a reduction of variable operative costs of around 10 %. It is also discussed how this energy-efficient process architecture, which is suited particularly to small-to-medium applications, may improve the sustainability of other endothermic, reversible reactions to form hydrogen. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Modification of tubular ceramic membranes with carbon nanotubes using catalytic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duc Trung; Thieffry, Guillemette; Jacob, Matthieu; Batiot-Dupeyrat, Catherine; Teychene, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were successfully grown on tubular ceramic membranes using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method. CNTs were synthesized at 650°C for 3-6 h under a 120 mL min(-1) flow of C2H6 on ceramic membranes impregnated with iron salt. The synthesis procedure was beforehand optimized in terms of catalyst amount, impregnation duration and reaction temperature, using small pieces of tubular ceramic membranes. The yield, size and structure of the CNTs produced were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis and microscopic imaging techniques. Afterwards, preliminary filtration tests with alginate and phenol were performed on two modified tubular membranes. The results indicate that the addition of CNTs on the membrane material increased the permeability of ceramic membrane and its ability to reject alginate and adsorb phenol, yet decreased its fouling resistance.

  18. Production of an ion-exchange membrane-catalytic electrode bonded material for electrolytic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takenaka, H.; Torikai, E.

    1986-01-01

    A good bond is achieved by placing a metal salt in solution on one side of a membrane and a reducing agent on the other side so that the reducing agent penetrates the membrane and reduces the metal. Thus, a solution containing Pt, Rh, etc., is placed on one side of the membrane and a reducing agent such as NaBH, is placed on the other side. The bonded metal layer obtained is superior in catalytic activity and is suitable as an electrode in a cell such as for solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis.

  19. Catalytic partial oxidation coupled with membrane purification to improve resource and energy efficiency in syngas production.

    PubMed

    Iaquaniello, G; Salladini, A; Palo, E; Centi, G

    2015-02-01

    Catalytic partial oxidation coupled with membrane purification is a new process scheme to improve resource and energy efficiency in a well-established and large scale-process like syngas production. Experimentation in a semi industrial-scale unit (20 Nm(3)  h(-1) production) shows that a novel syngas production scheme based on a pre-reforming stage followed by a membrane for hydrogen separation, a catalytic partial oxidation step, and a further step of syngas purification by membrane allows the oxygen-to-carbon ratio to be decreased while maintaining levels of feed conversion. For a total feed conversion of 40 %, for example, the integrated novel architecture reduces oxygen consumption by over 50 %, with thus a corresponding improvement in resource efficiency and an improved energy efficiency and economics, these factors largely depending on the air separation stage used to produce pure oxygen.

  20. Block copolymer hollow fiber membranes with catalytic activity and pH-response.

    PubMed

    Hilke, Roland; Pradeep, Neelakanda; Madhavan, Poornima; Vainio, Ulla; Behzad, Ali Reza; Sougrat, Rachid; Nunes, Suzana P; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2013-08-14

    We fabricated block copolymer hollow fiber membranes with self-assembled, shell-side, uniform pore structures. The fibers in these membranes combined pores able to respond to pH and acting as chemical gates that opened above pH 4, and catalytic activity, achieved by the incorporation of gold nanoparticles. We used a dry/wet spinning process to produce the asymmetric hollow fibers and determined the conditions under which the hollow fibers were optimized to create the desired pore morphology and the necessary mechanical stability. To induce ordered micelle assembly in the doped solution, we identified an ideal solvent mixture as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering. We then reduced p-nitrophenol with a gold-loaded fiber to confirm the catalytic performance of the membranes.

  1. Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem operational improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehner, G. F.; Winkler, H. E.; Reysa, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    A three-man preprototype Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) has been developed to provide high quality water recovery from waste fluids on extended duration space flights. In the most recent effort, a number of improvements have been made to simplify subsystem operation and increase performance. These modifications include changes to the hollow fiber membrane evaporator, the condensing section of the thermoelectric heat pump, and the electronic controller logic and display. This paper describes the results of the test program that was conducted to evaluate the implemented improvements. In addition, an advanced design concept is discussed that will provide lower electrical power consumption, greater water production capacity, lower weight, and a smaller package than the present subsystem configuration.

  2. Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem operational improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehner, G. F.; Winkler, H. E.; Reysa, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    A three-man preprototype Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) has been developed to provide high quality water recovery from waste fluids on extended duration space flights. In the most recent effort, a number of improvements have been made to simplify subsystem operation and increase performance. These modifications include changes to the hollow fiber membrane evaporator, the condensing section of the thermoelectric heat pump, and the electronic controller logic and display. This paper describes the results of the test program that was conducted to evaluate the implemented improvements. In addition, an advanced design concept is discussed that will provide lower electrical power consumption, greater water production capacity, lower weight, and a smaller package than the present subsystem configuration.

  3. A self-catalytic mixed-conducting membrane reactor for effective production of hydrogen from methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xueliang; Liu, Zhengkun; Jin, Wanqin; Xu, Nanping

    A supported mixed-conducting LNCO membrane with a pore-gradient structure LNO support was successfully prepared via a dry pressing and co-sintering route. The match of sintering behaviors between membrane and support was realized by the preparation of an ABB‧B‧‧B‧BA-type membrane. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) test demonstrated that the surface of the supported membrane was dense and crack-free and the pore-gradient structure of the support can be observed clearly. The oxygen flux of the supported membrane was about 5.6 times that of the symmetric LNCO membrane. A self-catalytic mixed-conducting membrane reactor was constructed using the prepared membrane for hydrogen production from methane. It was found that this membrane reactor exhibited high performance and good stability for hydrogen production. At 1123 K, the CH 4 conversion, hydrogen selectivity and hydrogen production remained at about 60%, 89% and 8.0 ml(STP) cm -2 min -1, respectively, for more than 120 h.

  4. Processes of particle deposition in membrane operation and fabrication.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, M R; Tarabara, V; Cortalezzi, M

    2005-01-01

    The processes that control particle deposition on surfaces that are of interest in understanding operational aspects of membrane filtration, also hold significance in controlling the morphology of particle deposits as intermediate steps in membrane fabrication. This paper summarizes processes controlling particle deposit morphology. The implications of these processes for understanding membrane fouling by particles and in fabricating membranes are then considered.

  5. Conversion of elemental mercury with a novel membrane catalytic system at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongfu; Yan, Naiqiang; Yang, Shijian; Liu, Ping; Wang, Juan; Qu, Zan; Jia, Jinping

    2012-04-30

    A unique assembly, which integrated membrane delivery for oxidants with catalytic oxidation (MDCOs), was employed to convert elemental mercury (Hg(0)) to its oxidized form at low temperature (around 150 °C). MnO(x) was used as the main catalytic component in MDCOs with Mo and/or Ru to improve the catalytic activity. The MDCOs was proved to be very effective for the conversion of Hg(0) compared with the traditional catalytic oxidation mode (TCO). The analysis of speciation for Hg after catalytic oxidation showed that there was mainly mercury (II) chloride. The addition of transition metals of Mo and Ru obviously improved the conversion of Hg(0) to Hg(2+) and enhanced the activity of the MDCOs at low temperature, and the conversion efficiency of Hg(0) reached 95% with Mo-Ru-Mn catalyst and 8 ppmv HCl. The inhibition of SO(2) to Hg(0) conversion in the MDCOs was insignificant. The Hg(0) removal exceeded 80% even if the concentration of SO(2) reached 1000 ppmv. The results also indicated that the Deacon reaction with the yield of Cl(2) were significantly improved after modified, and MDCOs with Mo-Ru-Mn catalyst can work efficiently at low temperature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ag Nanoparticle/Polydopamine-Coated Inverse Opals as Highly Efficient Catalytic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Gwan H; Rhee, Do Kyung; Park, A Reum; Oh, Min Jun; Hong, Sunghwan; Richardson, Joseph J; Guo, Junling; Caruso, Frank; Yoo, Pil J

    2016-02-10

    Polymeric three-dimensional inverse-opal (IO) structures provide unique structural properties useful for various applications ranging from optics to separation technologies. Despite vast needs for IO functionalization to impart additional chemical properties, this task has been seriously challenged by the intrinsic limitation of polymeric porous materials that do not allow for the easy penetration of waterborne moieties or precursors. To overcome this restriction, we present a robust and straightforward method of employing a dipping-based surface modification with polydopamine (PDA) inside the IO structures, and demonstrate their application to catalytic membranes via synthetic incorporation of Ag nanoparticles. The PDA coating offers simultaneous advantages of achieving the improved hydrophilicity required for the facilitated infiltration of aqueous precursors and successful creation of nucleation sites for a reduction of growth of the Ag nanoparticles. The resulting Ag nanoparticle-incorporated IO structures are utilized as catalytic membranes for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to its amino derivatives in the presence of NaBH4. Synergistically combined characteristics of high reactivity of Ag nanoparticles along with a greatly enhanced internal surface area of IO structures enable the implementation of remarkably improved catalytic performance, exhibiting a good conversion efficiency greater than 99% while minimizing loss in the membrane permeability.

  7. Hollow microgel based ultrathin thermoresponsive membranes for separation, synthesis, and catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Bijay Prakash; Dubey, Nidhi Chandrama; Stamm, Manfred

    2014-10-22

    Thermoresponsive core-shell microgels with degradable core are synthesized via surfactant based free radical polymerization using N,N'-(1,2-dihydroxy-ethylene)bis(acrylamide) (DHEA) as a cross-linker for core preparation. The 1,2-glycol bond present in DHEA is susceptible to NaIO4 solution, and thus, the structure can be cleaved off resulting in hollow microgel. Ultrathin membranes are prepared by suction filtration of a dilute suspension of core-shell microgels over a sacrificial layer of Cd(OH)2 nanostrand coated on track etched membrane. After removal of the degraded cores from microgels, the membranes are cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and the nanostrands are removed by passing a 10 mM HCl solution. The prepared membranes are thoroughly characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and dynamic contact angle for morphology, thermoresponsive, and hydrophilic properties, respectively. The prepared membranes showed thermoresponsive permeation behavior and remarkable separation performance for low molecular weight dyes and lysozyme protein. These membranes are also used to synthesize gold nanoparticles and immobilize lactate dehydrogenase enzyme for catalytic and biocatalytic application. The results for water permeation, solute rejection, and ability to immobilize gold nanoparticles and enzymes showed its wide range of applicability. Furthermore, the synthesis of hollow microgel is simple and environmentally friendly, and the membrane preparation is easy, scalable, and other microgel systems can also be used. These responsive membranes constitute a significant contribution to advanced separation technology.

  8. Metal nanoparticles in catalytic polymer membranes and ion-exchange systems for advanced purification of water from molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V. V.; Kravchenko, T. A.; Roldughin, Vyacheslav I.

    2013-05-01

    Methods of synthesis of metal nanoparticles and metal/polymer nanocomposites including ion-exchange materials are considered. The effect of the composition and size of nanoparticles on their catalytic activity is analyzed. Attention is focused on the composites used in catalytic processes, namely, catalytic membranes and ion-exchange systems. The problems associated with the removal of dissolved oxygen from water by means of such composites are discussed. The bibliography includes 225 references.

  9. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 2 Table 2 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(a)(2), you shall meet each operating limit in the...

  10. Quantitative Immobilization of Phthalocyanine onto Bacterial Cellulose for Construction of a High-Performance Catalytic Membrane Reactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiliang; Teng, Qiaoling

    2017-07-24

    We report the fabrication of a tetra-amino cobalt (II) phthalocyanine (CoPc)-immobilized bacterial cellulose (BC) functional nanocomposite, CoPc@BC, by quantitative immobilization of CoPc onto a BC membrane. Lab-cultured BC was oxidized by NaIO₄ to generate aldehyde groups on BC for the subsequent CoPc immobilization, the processing conditions were optimized by monitoring both the generated aldehyde content and the resulting CoPc loading. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to characterize the change of the element bonding environment during the functionalization processes. The CoPc@BC functional nanocomposite was utilized for the treatment of reactive red X-3B dye wastewater. The CoPc molecules in the CoPc@BC nanocomposite can function as an "antenna" to adsorb the target anionic dye molecules, the adsorption takes place both on the surface and in the interior of CoPc@BC. A catalytic membrane reactor (CMR) was assembled with the CoPc@BC nanocomposite, the performance of CMR was evaluated based on the catalytic oxidation behavior of reactive red X-3B, with H₂O₂ as an oxidant. Highly-reactive hydroxyl radical (OH) was involved in the catalytic oxidation process, as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Under optimal operating conditions of a flow rate of 6 mL/min, a reaction temperature of 50 °C, and an H₂O₂ concentration of 10 mmol/L, the decoloration rate of CMR was as high as 50 μmol⋅min(-1)⋅g(-1).

  11. Conversion of elemental mercury with a novel membrane delivery catalytic oxidation system (MDCOs).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongfu; Yan, Naiqiang; Yang, Shijian; Qu, Zan; Wu, Zhongbiao; Liu, Yue; Liu, Ping; Jia, Jinping

    2011-01-15

    In order to overcome the shortcomings of the traditional catalytic oxidation (TCO) mode for the conversion of the trace level of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) in flue gas, we put forward a novel and unique assembly that integrated membrane delivery with catalytic oxidation systems (MDCOs), which combined the controlled delivery of oxidants with the catalytic oxidation of Hg(0). The results show that the demanded HCl for Hg(0) conversion in the MDCOs was less than 5% of that in the TCO mode, and over 90% of Hg(0) removal efficiency can be obtained in the MDCOs with less than 0.5 mg m(-3) of HCl escaped. Meanwhile, the inhibition of SO(2) to Hg(0) catalytic conversion in the MDCOs was also less significant than in the TCO. The MDCOs have high retainability for HCl, which is quite favorable to Hg(0) conversion and HCl utilization. The reaction mechanism on mercury conversion in the MDCOs is discussed. The MDCOs appear to be a promising method for emission control of elemental mercury.

  12. Ethylene production by ODHE in catalytically modified Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-δ) membrane reactors.

    PubMed

    Lobera, M Pilar; Escolástico, Sonia; Garcia-Fayos, Julio; Serra, José M

    2012-08-01

    Process intensification by the integration of membranes and high-temperature reactors offers several advantages with regard to conventional process schemes, that is, energy saving, safe operation, reduced plant/unit size, and higher process performance, for example, higher productivity, catalytic activity, selectivity, or stability. We present the study of oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane at 850 °C on a catalytic membrane reactor based on a mixed ionic-electronic conducting membrane. The surface of the membrane made of Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-δ) has been activated by using different porous catalytic layers based on perovskites. The layer was deposited by screen printing, and the porosity and thickness was studied for the catalyst composition. The different catalyst formulations are based on partial substitution of A- and B-site atoms of doped strontium ferrite/cobaltites (A(0.6)Sr(0.4)Co(0.5)Fe(0.5)O(3-δ) and Ba(0.6)Sr(0.4)BO(3-δ)) and were synthesized by an ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-citrate complexation route. The use of a disk-shaped membrane in the reactor enabled the direct contact of gaseous oxygen and hydrocarbons to be avoided, and thus, the ethylene content increased. High ethylene yields (up to ≈81 %) were obtained by using a catalytic coating based on Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-δ), which included macropores produced by the addition of graphite platelets into the screen-printing ink. The promising catalytic results obtained with this catalytically modified membrane reactor are attributed to the combination of 1) the high activity, as a result of the high temperature and oxygen species diffusing through the membrane; 2) the control of oxygen dosing and the low concentration of molecules in the gas phase; and 3) suitable fluid dynamics, which enables appropriate feed contact with the membrane and the rapid removal of products. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Evidence that the catalytic activity of prokaryote leader peptidase depends upon the operation of a serine-lysine catalytic dyad.

    PubMed Central

    Black, M T

    1993-01-01

    Leader peptidase (LP) is the enzyme responsible for proteolytic cleavage of the amino acid leader sequence from bacterial preproteins. Recent data indicate that LP may be an unusual serine proteinase which operates without involvement of a histidine residue (M. T. Black, J. G. R. Munn, and A. E. Allsop, Biochem. J. 282:539-543, 1992; M. Sung and R. E. Dalbey, J. Biol. Chem. 267:13154-13159, 1992) and that, therefore, one or more alternative residues must perform the function of a catalytic base. With the aid of sequence alignments, site-specific mutagenesis of the gene encoding LP (lepB) from Escherichia coli has been employed to investigate the mechanism of action of the enzyme. Various mutant forms of plasmid-borne LP were tested for their abilities to complement the temperature-sensitive activity of LP in E. coli IT41. Data are presented which indicate that the only conserved amino acid residue possessing a side chain with the potential to ionize, and therefore with the potential to transfer protons, which cannot be substituted with a neutral side chain is lysine at position 145. The data suggest that the catalytic activity of LP is dependent on the operation of a serine-lysine catalytic dyad. Images PMID:8394311

  14. The catalytic function of cytochrome P450 is entwined with its membrane-bound nature.

    PubMed

    Barnaba, Carlo; Gentry, Katherine; Sumangala, Nirupama; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2017-01-01

    Cytochrome P450, a family of monooxygenase enzymes, is organized as a catalytic metabolon, which requires enzymatic partners as well as environmental factors that tune its complex dynamic. P450 and its reducing counterparts-cytochrome P450-reductase and cytochrome b 5 -are membrane-bound proteins located in the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum. They are believed to dynamically associate to form functional complexes. Increasing experimental evidence signifies the role(s) played by both protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in P450 catalytic function and efficiency. However, the biophysical challenges posed by their membrane-bound nature have severely limited high-resolution understanding of the molecular interfaces of these interactions. In this article, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on cytochrome P450, highlighting the environmental factors that are entwined with its metabolic function. Recent advances in structural biophysics are also discussed, setting up the bases for a new paradigm in the study of this important class of membrane-bound enzymes.

  15. Catalytic membranes prepared using layer-by-layer adsorption of polyelectrolyte/metal nanoparticle films in porous supports.

    PubMed

    Dotzauer, David M; Dai, Jinhua; Sun, Lei; Bruening, Merlin L

    2006-10-01

    Layer-by-layer adsorption of polyelectrolytes and gold nanoparticles within porous supports provides a convenient method for forming catalytic membranes. The polyelectrolyte film effectively immobilizes the gold nanoparticles without inhibiting access to catalytic sites, as shown by the similar rate constants for nanoparticle-catalyzed 4-nitrophenol reduction in solution and in membranes. Modified alumina membranes reduce >99% of 0.4 mM 4-nitrophenol at linear flow rates of 0.98 cm/s, and the modification process is also applicable to track-etched polycarbonate supports.

  16. Improving carbon tolerance of Ni-YSZ catalytic porous membrane by palladium addition for low temperature steam methane reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Moon; Won, Jong Min; Kim, Geo Jong; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Sung Su; Hong, Sung Chang

    2017-10-01

    Palladium was added on the Ni-YSZ catalytic porous membrane by wet impregnation and electroless plating methods. Its surface morphology characteristics and carbon deposition properties for the low temperature steam methane reforming were investigated. The addition of palladium could obviously be enhanced the catalytic activity as well as carbon tolerance of the Ni-YSZ porous membrane. The porous membranes were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR), CH4 temperature-programmed reduction (CH4-TPR), and O2 temperature-programmed oxidation (O2-TPO). It was found that the Pd-Ni-YSZ catalytic porous membrane showed the superior stability as well as the deposition of carbon on the surface during carbon dissociation adsorption at 650 °C was also suppressed.

  17. Methane steam reforming analysis in a palladium-based catalytic membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, G.; Violante, V.; Maio, F.P. di; Criscuoli, A.; Drioli, E. |

    1997-08-01

    The methane steam reforming in a catalytic membrane reactor has been studied. A previous theoretical study of this reaction has been carried out. In the model a global kinetic rate as a function of three reactions over nickel catalyst as proposed by Xu and Froment has been considered. It has been shown that the counterflow configuration has, at high temperature (500 C), a marginal advantage on parallel flow and, also, that the space velocity cannot be considered a design variable for membrane reactors. A laboratory plant was realized utilizing membranes of Pd and Pd/Ag supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The Pd membranes utilized have been prepared using the co-condensation technique and the electroless plating method. A comparison of the overall membrane performance has also been carried out. The experiments were aimed to study the effects of several parameters such as temperature, feed flow rate, and feed molar ratio on the methane conversion. The experimental results have been compared with the data predicted by the previously developed theoretical model.

  18. Instantaneous Click Chemistry by a Copper-Containing Polymeric-Membrane-Installed Microflow Catalytic Reactor.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoichi M A; Ohno, Aya; Sato, Takuma; Uozumi, Yasuhiro

    2015-11-23

    The copper(I)-catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition (azide-alkyne cycloaddition) is an important reaction in click chemistry that ideally proceeds instantaneously. An instantaneous Huisgen cycloaddition has been developed that uses a novel catalytic dinuclear copper complex-containing polymeric membrane-installed microflow device. A polymeric membranous copper catalyst was prepared from poly(4-vinylpyridine), copper(II) sulfate, sodium chloride, and sodium ascorbate at the interface of two laminar flows inside microchannels. Elucidation of the structure by XANES, EXAFS, and elemental analysis, as well as second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations assigned the local structure near Cu as a μ-chloro dinuclear Cu(I) complex. The microflow device promotes the instantaneous click reaction of a variety of alkynes and organic azides to afford the corresponding triazoles in quantitative yield.

  19. Simple fabrication of a Pd-P film on a polymer membrane and its catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Young-Woo

    2011-08-01

    Composites were prepared by a surface activation by aerosol deposition of Pd nanoparticles (Pd nano seeds) on a poly(tetrafluoroethylene) membrane and subsequent Pd-P film formation by electroless deposition. Activation of the membrane processed by an ambient Pd spark discharge and subsequent fixation of the spark produced Pd nano seeds. Characterizations for electroless Pd-P films indicated that P entered into the crystal lattice of Pd and formed an alloy. The fabricated composites were applied to catalytic applications of formic acid oxidation (FAO) and toluene conversion (TC). The composite catalysts from the simple activation had more stable performances of FAO and TC than those from the conventional Sn-Pd activation, and their better performances might have originated from better purity due to the simple activation that only introduced pure Pd nano seeds.

  20. Comparative catalytic activity of PET track-etched membranes with embedded silver and gold nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashentseva, Anastassiya; Borgekov, Daryn; Kislitsin, Sergey; Zdorovets, Maxim; Migunova, Anastassiya

    2015-12-01

    Irradiated by heavy ions nanoporous polyethylene terephthalate track-etched membranes (PET TeMs) after +15Kr84 ions bombardment (1.75 MeV/nucl with the ion fluency of 1 × 109 cm-2) and sequential etching was applied in this research as a template for development of composites with catalytically enriched properties. A highly ordered silver and gold nanotubes arrays were embedded in 100 nm pores of PET TeMs via electroless deposition technique at 4 °C during 1 h. All ;as-prepared; composites were examined for catalytic activity using reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) by sodium borohydride as a common reaction to test metallic nanostructures catalysts. The effect of temperature on the catalytic activity was investigated in range of 292-313 K and activation energy were calculated. Kapp of Ag/PET composites linearly increase with an increase of the temperature thus normal Arrhenius behavior have been seen and the activation energy was calculated to be 42.13 kJ/mol. Au/PET composites exhibit not only more powerful catalytic activity but also non-linear dependence of rate constant from temperature. Kapp increased with increasing temperature throughout the 292-308 K temperature range; the reaction had an activation energy 65.32 kJ/mol. In range 311-313 K rate constant dramatically decreased and the apparent activation energy at this temperature rang was -91.44 kJ/mol due some structural changes, i.e. agglomeration of Au nanoparticles on the surface of composite.

  1. Characteristics of membrane fouling in submerged membrane bioreactor under sub-critical flux operation.

    PubMed

    Su, Y C; Huang, C P; Pan, Jill R; Lee, H C

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the membrane bioreactor (MBR) process has become one of the novel technologies to enhance the performance of biological treatment of wastewater. Membrane bioreactor process uses the membrane unit to replace a sediment tank, and this can greatly enhance treatment performance. However, membrane fouling in MBR restricts its widespread application because it leads to permeate flux decline, making more frequent membrane cleaning and replacement necessary, which then increases operating and maintenance costs. This study investigated the sludge characteristics in membrane fouling under sub-critical flux operation and also assessed the effect of shear stress on membrane fouling. Membrane fouling was slow under sub-critical flux operation. However, as filamentous microbes became dominant in the reactor, membrane fouling increased dramatically due to the increased viscosity and polysaccharides. A close link was found between membrane fouling and the amount of polysaccharides in soluble EPS. The predominant resistance was the cake resistance which could be minimized by increasing the shear stress. However, the resistance of colloids and solutes was not apparently reduced by increasing shear stress. Therefore, smaller particles such as macromolecules (e.g. polysaccharides) may play an important role in membrane fouling under sub-critical flux operation.

  2. Synthesis and Catalytic Performance of Hierarchically Porous MIL-100(Fe)@polyHIPE Hybrid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kovačič, Sebastijan; Mazaj, Matjaž; Ješelnik, Marjan; Pahovnik, David; Žagar, Ema; Slugovc, Christian; Logar, Nataša Zabukovec

    2015-09-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) nanoparticles in combination with a nonionic surfactant (Pluronic L-121) are used to stabilize dicyclopentadiene (DCPD)-in-water high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs). The resulting HIPEs containing the MIL-100(Fe) nanoparticles (MIL: Materials of Institut Lavoisier) at the interface between the oil- and the water-phases are then cured, and 100 μm thick, fully open, hierarchically porous hybrid membranes are obtained. The properties of the MIL-100(Fe)@pDCPD polyHIPE membranes are characterized and it is found that up to 14 wt% of the MIL-100(Fe) nanoparticles are incorporated in the hybrid material resulting in an increase of the microporosity up to 130 m(2) g(-1). Hybrid membranes show an appealing catalytic activity in Friedel-Crafts alkylation in a batch mode as well as in a flow-through mode, thereby demonstrating the preserved accessibility of Lewis acidic sites in the MOF nanostructures. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Removal of Perchlorate from Water and Wastewater by Catalytic Hydrogen Gas Membrane Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    ClO2 -) and chlorate (ClO3-) appeared. The total chlorine concentration, i.e.,, the sum of all chlorine-containing species, decreased with reaction...catalytic membrane can be described by: )C(rJ dt dC d −= , Time (hr) 0 2 4 6 8 C on ce nt ra tio n (p pb ) 0 200 400 600 800 1000 ClO2 - Cl- ClO3...H H H H O O- Cl O H H H H H H ClO3- H2O H H H H H H ClO2 - HOH H2O H2O H H H H H H O Cl- 2HOH H H H H H H O Cl- O H2O H H H H H H O Cl- H H H

  4. Operating envelope of a short contact time fuel reformer for propane catalytic partial oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Michael G.; Walluk, Mark R.; Trabold, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Fuel cell technology has yet to realize widespread deployment, in part because of the hydrogen fuel infrastructure required for proton exchange membrane systems. One option to overcome this barrier is to produce hydrogen by reforming propane, which has existing widespread infrastructure, is widely used by the general public, easily transported, and has a high energy density. The present work combines thermodynamic modeling of propane catalytic partial oxidation (cPOx) and experimental performance of a Precision Combustion Inc. (PCI) Microlith® reactor with real-time soot measurement. Much of the reforming research using Microlith-based reactors has focused on fuels such as natural gas, JP-8, diesel, and gasoline, but little research on propane reforming with Microlith-based catalysts can be found in literature. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal operating parameters for the reformer that maximizes efficiency and minimizes solid carbon formation. The primary parameters evaluated were reformate composition, carbon concentration in the effluent, and reforming efficiency as a function of catalyst temperature and O2/C ratio. Including the lower heating values for product hydrogen and carbon monoxide, efficiency of 84% was achieved at an O2/C ratio of 0.53 and a catalyst temperature of 940 °C, resulting in near equilibrium performance. Significant solid carbon formation was observed at much lower catalyst temperatures, and carbon concentration in the effluent was determined to have a negative linear relationship at T < 750 °C. The Microlith reactor displayed good stability during more than 80 experiments with temperature cycling from 360 to 1050 °C.

  5. Membrane Guanylate Cyclase catalytic Subdomain: Structure and Linkage with Calcium Sensors and Bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Sarangan; Duda, Teresa; Pertzev, Alexandre; Sharma, Rameshwar K

    2017-01-01

    Membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC) is a ubiquitous multi-switching cyclic GMP generating signaling machine linked with countless physiological processes. In mammals it is encoded by seven distinct homologous genes. It is a single transmembrane spanning multi-modular protein; composed of integrated blocks and existing in homo-dimeric form. Its core catalytic domain (CCD) module is a common transduction center where all incoming signals are translated into the production of cyclic GMP, a cellular signal second messenger. Crystal structure of the MGC's CCD does not exist and its precise identity is ill-defined. Here, we define it at a sub-molecular level for the phototransduction-linked MGC, the rod outer segment guanylate cyclase type 1, ROS-GC1. (1) The CCD is a conserved 145-residue structural unit, represented by the segment V(820)-P(964). (2) It exists as a homo-dimer and contains seven conserved catalytic elements (CEs) wedged into seven conserved motifs. (3) It also contains a conserved 21-residue neurocalcin δ-modulated structural domain, V(836)-L(857). (4) Site-directed mutagenesis documents that each of the seven CEs governs the cyclase's catalytic activity. (5) In contrast to the soluble and the bacterium MGC which use Mn(2+)-GTP substrate for catalysis, MGC CCD uses the natural Mg(2+)-GTP substrate. (6) Strikingly, the MGC CCD requires anchoring by the Transmembrane Domain (TMD) to exhibit its major (∼92%) catalytic activity; in isolated form the activity is only marginal. This feature is not linked with any unique sequence of the TMD; there is minimal conservation in TMD. Finally, (7) the seven CEs control each of four phototransduction pathways- -two Ca(2+)-sensor GCAPs-, one Ca(2+)-sensor, S100B-, and one bicarbonate-modulated. The findings disclose that the CCD of ROS-GC1 has built-in regulatory elements that control its signal translational activity. Due to conservation of these regulatory elements, it is proposed that these elements also control the

  6. Membrane Guanylate Cyclase catalytic Subdomain: Structure and Linkage with Calcium Sensors and Bicarbonate

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Sarangan; Duda, Teresa; Pertzev, Alexandre; Sharma, Rameshwar K.

    2017-01-01

    Membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC) is a ubiquitous multi-switching cyclic GMP generating signaling machine linked with countless physiological processes. In mammals it is encoded by seven distinct homologous genes. It is a single transmembrane spanning multi-modular protein; composed of integrated blocks and existing in homo-dimeric form. Its core catalytic domain (CCD) module is a common transduction center where all incoming signals are translated into the production of cyclic GMP, a cellular signal second messenger. Crystal structure of the MGC’s CCD does not exist and its precise identity is ill-defined. Here, we define it at a sub-molecular level for the phototransduction-linked MGC, the rod outer segment guanylate cyclase type 1, ROS-GC1. (1) The CCD is a conserved 145-residue structural unit, represented by the segment V820-P964. (2) It exists as a homo-dimer and contains seven conserved catalytic elements (CEs) wedged into seven conserved motifs. (3) It also contains a conserved 21-residue neurocalcin δ-modulated structural domain, V836-L857. (4) Site-directed mutagenesis documents that each of the seven CEs governs the cyclase’s catalytic activity. (5) In contrast to the soluble and the bacterium MGC which use Mn2+-GTP substrate for catalysis, MGC CCD uses the natural Mg2+-GTP substrate. (6) Strikingly, the MGC CCD requires anchoring by the Transmembrane Domain (TMD) to exhibit its major (∼92%) catalytic activity; in isolated form the activity is only marginal. This feature is not linked with any unique sequence of the TMD; there is minimal conservation in TMD. Finally, (7) the seven CEs control each of four phototransduction pathways- -two Ca2+-sensor GCAPs-, one Ca2+-sensor, S100B-, and one bicarbonate-modulated. The findings disclose that the CCD of ROS-GC1 has built-in regulatory elements that control its signal translational activity. Due to conservation of these regulatory elements, it is proposed that these elements also control the

  7. Membrane properties induced by anionic phospholipids and phosphatidylethanolamine are critical for the membrane binding and catalytic activity of human cytochrome P450 3A4.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keon-Hee; Ahn, Taeho; Yun, Chul-Ho

    2003-12-30

    Human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, a membrane anchoring protein, is the major CYP enzyme present in both liver and small intestine. The enzyme plays a major role in the metabolism of many drugs and procarcinogens. The roles of individual phospholipids and membrane properties in the catalytic activity, membrane binding, and insertion into the membrane of CYP3A4 are poorly understood. Here we report that the catalytic activity of testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation, membrane binding, and membrane insertion of CYP3A4 increase as a function of anionic phospholipid concentration in the order phosphatidic acid (PA) > phosphatidylserine (PS) in a binary system of phosphatidylcholine (PC)/anionic phospholipid and as a function of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) content in ternary systems of PC/PE/PA or PC/PE/PS having a fixed concentration of anionic phospholipids. These results suggest that PA and PE might help the binding of CYP3A4 to the membrane and the interaction with NPR. Cytochrome b(5) (b(5)) and apolipoprotein b(5) further enhanced the testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation activities of CYP3A4 in all tested phospholipids vesicles with various compositions. Phospholipid-dependent changes of the CYP3A4 conformation were also revealed by altered Trp fluorescence and CD spectra. We also found that PE induced the formation of anionic phospholipid-enriched domains in ternary systems using extrinsic fluorescent probes incorporated into lipid bilayers. Taken together, it can be suggested that the chemical and physical properties of membranes induced by anionic phospholipids and PE are critical for the membrane binding and catalytic activity of CYP3A4.

  8. Metal nanoparticle/ionic liquid/cellulose: new catalytically active membrane materials for hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Gelesky, Marcos A; Scheeren, Carla W; Foppa, Lucas; Pavan, Flavio A; Dias, Silvio L P; Dupont, Jairton

    2009-07-13

    Transition metal-containing membrane films of 10, 20, and 40 μm thickness were obtained by the combination of irregularly shaped nanoparticles with monomodal size distributions of 4.8 ± 1.1 nm (Rh(0)) and 3.0 ± 0.4 nm (Pt(0)) dispersed in the ionic liquid (IL) 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (BMI·(NTf)(2)) with a syrup of cellulose acetate (CA) in acetone. The Rh(0) and Pt(0) metal concentration increased proportionally with increases in film thickness up to 20 μm, and then the material became metal saturated. The presence of small and stable Rh(0) or Pt(0) nanoparticles induced an augmentation in the CA/IL film surface areas. The augmentation of the IL content resulted in an increase of elasticity and decrease in tenacity and toughness, whereas the stress at break was not influenced. The introduction of IL probably causes an increase in the separation between the cellulose macromolecules that results in a higher flexibility, lower viscosity, and better formability of the cellulose material. The nanoparticle/IL/CA combinations exhibit an excellent synergistic effect that enhances the activity and durability of the catalyst for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene. The nanoparticle/IL/cellulose acetate film membranes display higher catalytic activity (up to 7353 h(-1) for the 20 μm film of CA/IL/Pt(0)) and stability than the nanoparticles dispersed only in the IL.

  9. Architecture of a single membrane spanning cytochrome P450 suggests constraints that orient the catalytic domain relative to a bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Brian C.; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Huschmann, Franziska U.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; O’Connell, Joseph D.; Cannon, Richard D.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Rodriguez, Andrew; Finer-Moore, Janet S.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Bitopic integral membrane proteins with a single transmembrane helix play diverse roles in catalysis, cell signaling, and morphogenesis. Complete monospanning protein structures are needed to show how interaction between the transmembrane helix and catalytic domain might influence association with the membrane and function. We report crystal structures of full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase, a membrane monospanning cytochrome P450 of the CYP51 family that catalyzes the first postcyclization step in ergosterol biosynthesis and is inhibited by triazole drugs. The structures reveal a well-ordered N-terminal amphipathic helix preceding a putative transmembrane helix that would constrain the catalytic domain orientation to lie partly in the lipid bilayer. The structures locate the substrate lanosterol, identify putative substrate and product channels, and reveal constrained interactions with triazole antifungal drugs that are important for drug design and understanding drug resistance. PMID:24613931

  10. Hierarchical structured MnO2@SiO2 nanofibrous membranes with superb flexibility and enhanced catalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqin; Dou, Lvye; Yang, Liu; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2017-02-15

    Constructing nanostructured catalyst-embedded ceramic fibrous membranes would facilitate the remediation or preliminary treatment of dyeing wastewater, however, most of such membranes are brittle with low deformation resistance, thus, restricting their widely applications. Herein, the flexible and hierarchical nanostructured MnO2-immobilized SiO2 nanofibrous membranes (MnO2@SiO2 NFM) were fabricated by combining the electrospinning technique with hydrothermal method. The morphologies of membranes could be regulated from nanowires and nanoflower to mace-like structure via varying concentration of reactants. The resultant MnO2@SiO2 NFM could cooperate with hydrogen peroxide to form a Fenton-like reagent for the degradation of methylene blue (MB). The resultant membrane exhibited prominent catalytic performance towards MB, including high degradation degree of 95% within 40min, fast degradation rate of 0.0865min(-1), and excellent reusability in 5 cycles. Moreover, the membranes could be used in a wide pH range of 0 to 14 and the degradation degree reached 76% during dynamic filtration process with a flux of 490,000Lm(-2)h(-1). The successful fabricating of such membrane with extraordinary catalytic performance would provide a platform for preparing high-performance catalysts for remediation of dyeing wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Membrane treatment of liquid wastes from radiological decontamination operations.

    PubMed

    Svittsov, A A; Khubetsov, S B; Volchek, K

    2011-01-01

    The paper focuses on the evaluation of membrane filtration for the treatment of liquid radioactive streams generated in area decontamination operations. In this work, semi-permeable membranes were demonstrated to be effective reducing the volume of wastewater containing cesium and cobalt by two orders of a magnitude. The efficiency of membrane separation was enhanced by employing additives that enlarged the size of target radionuclide species and improved their rejection by the membranes. This was achieved by chelation with synthetic water-soluble polymers and by adsorption on micro particles of adsorbent coupled with micelle formation. The effect of wastewater composition and that of the radionuclide-binding additives on the volume reduction was investigated. Membrane treatment is expected to help simplify further processing and decrease disposal costs.

  12. Modular operation of membrane bioreactors for higher hydraulic capacity utilisation.

    PubMed

    Veltmann, K; Palmowski, L M; Pinnekamp, J

    2011-01-01

    Using data from 6 full-scale municipal membrane bioreactors (MBR) in Germany the hydraulic capacity utilisation and specific energy consumption were studied and their connexion shown. The average hydraulic capacity utilisation lies between 14% and 45%. These low values are justified by the necessity to deal with intense rain events and cater for future flow increases. However, this low hydraulic capacity utilisation leads to high specific energy consumption. The optimisation of MBR operation requires a better utilisation of MBR hydraulic capacity, particularly under consideration of the energy-intensive membrane aeration. A first approach to respond to large influent flow fluctuations consists in adjusting the number of operating modules. This is practised by most MBR operators but so far mostly with variable flux and constant membrane aeration. A second approach is the real-time adjustment of membrane aeration in line with flux variations. This adjustment is not permitted under current manufacturers' warranty conditions. A further opportunity is a discontinuous operation, in which filtration takes place over short periods at high flux and energy for membrane aeration is saved during filtration pauses. The integration of a buffer volume is thereby indispensable. Overall a modular design with small units, which can be activated/ inactivated according to the influent flow and always operate under optimum conditions, enables a better utilisation of MBR hydraulic capacity and forms a solid base to reduce MBR energy demand.

  13. Characterization of the catalytic activity of the membrane-anchored metalloproteinase ADAM15 in cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Maretzky, Thorsten; Yang, Guangli; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Overall, Christopher M; Worpenberg, Susanne; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Eder, Joerg; Blobel, Carl P

    2009-04-28

    ADAM15 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 15) is a membrane-anchored metalloproteinase, which is overexpressed in several human cancers and has been implicated in pathological neovascularization and prostate cancer metastasis. Yet, little is known about the catalytic properties of ADAM15. Here, we purified soluble recombinant ADAM15 to test for its ability to cleave a library of peptide substrates. However, we found no processing of any of the peptide substrates tested here, and therefore turned to cell-based assays to characterize the catalytic properties of ADAM15. Overexpression of full-length membrane-anchored ADAM15 or the catalytically inactive ADAM15E-->A together with various membrane proteins resulted in increased release of the extracellular domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2iiib (FGFR2iiib) by ADAM15, but not ADAM15E-->A. This provided a robust assay for a characterization of the catalytic properties of ADAM15 in intact cells. We found that increased expression of ADAM15 resulted in increased FGFR2iiib shedding, but that ADAM15 was not stimulated by phorbol esters or calcium ionophores, two commonly used activators of ectodomain shedding. Moreover, ADAM15-dependent processing of FGFR2iiib was inhibited by the hydroxamate-based metalloproteinase inhibitors marimastat, TAPI-2 and GM6001, and by 50 nM TIMP-3 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3), but not by 100 nM TIMP-1, and only weakly by 100 nM TIMP-2. These results define key catalytic properties of ADAM15 in cells and its response to stimulators and inhibitors of ectodomain shedding. A cell-based assay for the catalytic activity of ADAM15 could aid in identifying compounds, which could be used to block the function of ADAM15 in pathological neovascularization and cancer.

  14. Final Report - Membranes and MEA's for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrock, Steven J

    2011-06-30

    The focus of this program was to develop a new Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) which can operate under hotter, dryer conditions than the state of the art membranes today and integrate it into a Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA). These MEA's should meet the performance and durability requirements outlined in the solicitation, operating under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20ºC to 120ºC, to meet 2010 DOE technical targets for membranes. This membrane should operate under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20ºC to 120ºC in order to meet DOE HFCIT 2010 commercialization targets for automotive fuel cells. Membranes developed in this program may also have improved durability and performance characteristics making them useful in stationary fuel cell applications. The new membranes, and the MEA's comprising them, should be manufacturable at high volumes and at costs which can meet industry and DOE targets. This work included: A) Studies to better understand factors controlling proton transport within the electrolyte membrane, mechanisms of polymer degradation (in situ and ex situ) and membrane durability in an MEA; B) Development of new polymers with increased proton conductivity over the range of temperatures from -20ºC to 120ºC and at lower levels of humidification and with improved chemical and mechanical stability; C) Development of new membrane additives for increased durability and conductivity under these dry conditions; D) Integration of these new materials into membranes and membranes into MEA's, including catalyst and gas diffusion layer selection and integration; E) Verification that these materials can be made using processes which are scalable to commercial volumes using cost effective methods; F) MEA testing in single cells using realistic automotive testing protocols. This project addresses technical barriers A (Durability) and C (Performance) from the Fuel Cells section of the 2005 Hydrogen

  15. Removal of selected nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds in biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater (BPCGW) using the catalytic ozonation process combined with the two-stage membrane bioreactor (MBR).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Han, Yuxing; Ma, Wencheng; Han, Hongjun; Ma, Weiwei

    2017-09-06

    Three identical anoxic-aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs) were operated in parallel for 300 consecutive days for raw (R1), ozonated (R2) and catalytic ozonated (R3) biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater (BPCGW) treatment. The results demonstrated that catalytic ozonation process (COP) applied asa pretreatment remarkably improved the performance of the unsatisfactory single MBR. The overall removal efficiencies of COD, NH3-N and TN in R3 were 92.7%, 95.6% and 80.6%, respectively. In addition, typical nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds (NHCs) of quinoline, pyridine and indole were completely removed in the integrated process. Moreover, COP could alter sludge properties and reshape microbial community structure, thus delaying the occurrence of membrane fouling. Finally, the total cost for this integrated process was estimated to be lower than that of single MBR. The results of this study suggest that COP is a good option to enhance pollutants removal and alleviate membrane fouling in the MBR for BPCGW treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling and simulation of ammonia removal from purge gases of ammonia plants using a catalytic Pd-Ag membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, M R; Asgari, A

    2008-05-01

    In this work, the removal of ammonia from synthesis purge gas of an ammonia plant has been investigated. Since the ammonia decomposition is thermodynamically limited, a membrane reactor is used for complete decomposition. A double pipe catalytic membrane reactor is used to remove ammonia from purge gas. The purge gas is flowing in the reaction side and is converted to hydrogen and nitrogen over nickel-alumina catalyst. The hydrogen is transferred through the Pd-Ag membrane of tube side to the shell side. A mathematical model including conservation of mass in the tube and shell side of reactor is proposed. The proposed model was solved numerically and the effects of different parameters on the rector performance were investigated. The effects of pressure, temperature, flow rate (sweep ratio), membrane thickness and reactor diameter have been investigated in the present study. Increasing ammonia conversion was observed by raising the temperature, sweep ratio and reducing membrane thickness. When the pressure increases, the decomposition is gone toward completion but, at low pressure the ammonia conversion in the outset of reactor is higher than other pressures, but complete destruction of the ammonia cannot be achieved. The proposed model can be used for design of an industrial catalytic membrane reactor for removal of ammonia from ammonia plant and reducing NO(x) emissions.

  17. Development of catalytically active and highly stable catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekeun; Xie, Tianyuan; Jung, Wonsuk; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Ganesan, Prabhu; Popov, Branko N.

    2015-01-01

    Novel procedures are developed for the synthesis of highly stable carbon composite catalyst supports (CCCS-800 °C and CCCS-1100 °C) and an activated carbon composite catalyst support (A-CCCS). These supports are synthesized through: (i) surface modification with acids and inclusion of oxygen groups, (ii) metal-catalyzed pyrolysis, and (iii) chemical leaching to remove excess metal used to dope the support. The procedure results in increasing carbon graphitization and inclusion of non-metallic active sites on the support surface. Catalytic activity of CCCS indicates an onset potential of 0.86 V for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with well-defined kinetic and mass-transfer regions and ∼2.5% H2O2 production in rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) studies. Support stability studies at 1.2 V constant potential holding for 400 h indicate high stability for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS catalyst with a cell potential loss of 27 mV at 800 mA cm-2 under H2-air, 32% mass activity loss, and 30% ECSA loss. Performance evaluation in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell shows power densities (rated) of 0.18 and 0.23 gPt kW-1 for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS and 30% Pt/CCCS-800 °C catalysts, respectively. The stabilities of various supports developed in this study are compared with those of a commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  18. Hybrid membrane operations in water desalination and industrial process rationalisation.

    PubMed

    Drioli, E; Di Profio, G; Curcio, E

    2005-01-01

    Membrane science and technology are recognized today as powerful tools in resolving some important global problems, and developing newer industrial processes, needed from the imperative of sustainable industrial growth. In seawater desalination, for resolving the dramatic increase of freshwater demand in many regions of the world, membrane unitary operations or the combination of some of them in integrated systems are already a real means for producing water from the sea, at lower costs and minimum environmental impact, with a very interesting prospective in particular for poor economy countries. However, membranes are used or are becoming used in some important industrial fields, for developing more efficient productive cycles, with reduced waste of raw-material, reducing the polluting charge by controlling byproduct generation, and reducing overall costs. In the present paper, other than for seawater desalination applications, some industrial applications where membrane technology has led already to match the goal of process intensification are discussed.

  19. [Elimination of Schneider's membrane defects arising during sinus lifting operation].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S Iu; Iarmukova, N F; Muraev, A A; Migura, S A

    2010-01-01

    During the operation of sinus lifting and occurrence of Schneider's membrane defect in the size no more than 3 mm the technique of its elimination is offered. Anatomic features of structure of maxilla sinus and error of surgical technics can lead to intraoperative rupture of a Schneider's membrane. At the size of defect no more than 3 mm are recommended to separate a membrane on all perimeter of the bottom third of sinus and then to lift it up until edges of the damaged mucous membrane will block, against each other forming a fold, thereby closing defect. The offered method allows to spend successfully sinus lifting as with delayed (in 6 months), and with direct implantation.

  20. Sustainable operation of submerged Anammox membrane bioreactor with recycling biogas sparging for alleviating membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziyin; Xu, Xindi; Xu, Xiaochen; Yang, FengLin; Zhang, ShuShen

    2015-12-01

    A submerged anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (Anammox) membrane bioreactor with recycling biogas sparging for alleviating membrane fouling has been successfully operated for 100d. Based on the batch tests, a recycling biogas sparging rate at 0.2m(3)h(-1) was fixed as an ultimate value for the sustainable operation. The mixed liquor volatile suspended solid (VSS) of the inoculum for the long operation was around 3000mgL(-1). With recycling biogas sparging rate increasing stepwise from 0 to 0.2m(3)h(-1), the reactor reached an influent total nitrogen (TN) up to 1.7gL(-1), a stable TN removal efficiency of 83% and a maximum specific Anammox activity (SAA) of 0.56kg TNkg(-1) VSSd(-1). With recycling biogas sparging rate at 0.2 m(3) h(-1) (corresponding to an aeration intensity of 118m(3)m(-2)h(-1)), the membrane operation circle could prolong by around 20 times compared to that without gas sparging. Furthermore, mechanism of membrane fouling was proposed. And with recycling biogas sparging, the VSS and EPS content increasing rate in cake layer were far less than the ones without biogas sparging. The TN removal performance and sustainable membrane operation of this system showed the appealing potential of the submerged Anammox MBR with recycling biogas sparging in treating high-strength nitrogen-containing wastewaters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Microwave assisted esterification of acidified oil from waste cooking oil by CERP/PES catalytic membrane for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Honglei; Ding, Jincheng; Zhao, Zengdian

    2012-11-01

    The traditional heating and microwave assisted method for biodiesel production using cation ion-exchange resin particles (CERP)/PES catalytic membrane were comparatively studied to achieve economic and effective method for utilization of free fatty acids (FFAs) from waste cooking oil (WCO). The optimal esterification conditions of the two methods were investigated and the experimental results showed that microwave irradiation exhibited a remarkable enhanced effect for esterification compared with that of traditional heating method. The FFAs conversion of microwave assisted esterification reached 97.4% under the optimal conditions of reaction temperature 60°C, methanol/acidified oil mass ratio 2.0:1, catalytic membrane (annealed at 120°C) loading 3g, microwave power 360W and reaction time 90min. The study results showed that it is a fast, easy and green way to produce biodiesel applying microwave irradiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. 40 CFR Table 14 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in §...

  3. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 7 Table 7 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... With Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(c)(1...

  4. 40 CFR Table 21 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 21 Table 21 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63...

  5. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 7 Table 7 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... With Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(c)(1...

  6. Effect of activated sludge properties and membrane operation conditions on fouling characteristics in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeok; Zhang, Kai; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Oerther, Daniel B; Sorial, George A

    2006-06-01

    Biofouling control is considered to be a major challenge in operating membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for the treatment of wastewater. This study examined the impact of biological, chemical, and physical properties of activated sludge on membrane filtration performance in laboratory-scale MBRs. Sludges with different microbial communities were produced using pseudo-continuous stirred-tank reactors and pseudo-plug flow reactors treating a synthetic paper mill wastewater. Various filtration resistances were used to investigate membrane fouling characteristics, and molecular biology tools targeting 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequences were used to identify predominant bacterial populations in the sludges or attached to the fouled membranes. Filtration experiments using axenic cultures of Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and Gordonia amarae were also performed to better understand the initiation and development of biofouling. The results showed that the tendency of membranes to biofoul depended upon membrane operating conditions as well as the properties of the activated sludge in the MBR systems. Specific bacterial populations, which were not dominant in the activated sludges, were selectively accumulated on the membrane surface leading to the development of irreversible biofouling.

  7. Influence of lysophospholipid hydrolysis by the catalytic domain of neuropathy target esterase on the fluidity of bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Aaron J; Richardson, Rudy J; Worden, R Mark; Ofoli, Robert Y

    2010-08-01

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) is an integral membrane protein localized in the endoplasmic reticulum in neurons. Irreversible inhibition of NTE by certain organophosphorus compounds produces a paralysis known as organophosphorus compound-induced delayed neuropathy. In vitro, NTE has phospholipase/lysophospholipase activity that hydrolyses exogenously added single-chain lysophospholipids in preference to dual-chain phospholipids, and NTE mutations have been associated with motor neuron disease. NTE's physiological role is not well understood, although recent studies suggest that it may control the cytotoxic accumulation of lysophospholipids in membranes. We used the NTE catalytic domain (NEST) to hydrolyze palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (p-lysoPC) to palmitic acid in bilayer membranes comprising 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and the fluorophore 1-oleoyl-2-[12-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]dodecanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (NBD-PC). Translational diffusion coefficients (D(L)) in supported bilayer membranes were measured by fluorescence recovery after pattern photobleaching (FRAPP). The average D(L) for DOPC/p-lysoPC membranes without NEST was 2.44 microm(2)s(-1)+/-0.09; the D(L) for DOPC/p-lysoPC membranes containing NEST and diisopropylphosphorofluoridate, an inhibitor, was nearly identical at 2.45+/-0.08. By contrast, the D(L) for membranes comprising NEST, DOPC, and p-lysoPC was 2.28+/-0.07, significantly different from the system with inhibited NEST, due to NEST hydrolysis. Likewise, a system without NEST containing the amount of palmitic acid that would have been produced by NEST hydrolysis of p-lysoPC was identical at 2.26+/-0.06. These results indicate that NTE's catalytic activity can alter membrane fluidity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The development of manganese oxide coated ceramic membranes for combined catalytic ozonation and ultrafiltration of drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corneal, Lindsay Marie

    A novel method for the preparation of hydrated MnO2 by the ozonation of MnCl2 in water is described. The hydrated MnO 2 was used to coat titania water filtration membranes using a layer-by-layer technique. The coated membranes were then sintered in air at 500°C for 45 minutes. Upon sintering, the MnO2 is converted to alpha-Mn 2O3 (as characterized by x-ray and electron diffraction). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging showed no significant change in the roughness or height of the surface features of coated membranes, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed an increase in grain size with increasing number of coating layers. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping and line scans revealed manganese present throughout the membrane, indicating that manganese dispersed into the porous membrane during the coating process and diffused into the titania grains during sintering. Selected area diffraction (SAD) of the coated and sintered membrane was used to index the surface layer as alpha-Mn2O3. The surface layer was uneven, although there was a trend of increasing thickness with increasing coating layers. The coating acts as a catalyst for the oxidation of organic matter when coated membranes are used in a hybrid ozonation-membrane filtration system. A trend of decreasing total organic carbon (TOC) in the permeate water was observed with increasing number of coating layers. The catalytic activity also manifests itself as improved recovery of the water flux due to oxidation of foulants on the membrane surface. Ceramic nanoparticle coatings on ceramic water filtration membranes must undergo high temperature sintering. However, this means that the underlying membrane, which has been engineered for a given molecular weight cut-off (MWCO), also undergoes a high temperature heat treatment that serves to increase pore size that have resulted in increases in permeability of titania membranes. Coating the titania membrane with manganese oxide followed

  9. Driven chemical kinetics: Optimalization of catalytic action of membrane proteins by rectangular alternating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuliński, Andrzej

    1992-03-01

    The chemical kinetics driven by external force in the form of a train of alternating rectangular impulses is discussed. The model of the conformational transition of a membrane protein exposed to an ac electric field, proposed by R. D. Astumian and B. Robertson [J. Chem. Phys. 91, 4891 (1989)], is reconsidered. On the example of this model we show that the use of the driving field in the form of rectangular impulses has two distinct advantages over the usual sinusoidal driving. The first one is that the use of a rectangular driving field makes it possible to obtain the exact solution of the basic kinetic equation of the system. This in turn enables one to write down the simple and very good approximate solution for any form of the driving field, better than the harmonic expansion used by Astumian and Robertson. A more important advantage is the greater flexibility of the rectangular driving, which makes possible the better optimalization of the process of interest. Astumian and Robertson demonstrated that the movement of charge within the catalytic cycle provides a mechanism for the enzyme to absorb energy from an ac electric field and to use that energy to enhance the catalyzed process. In this paper we show that the use of the driving ac field in the form of alternating rectangular impulses of variable duration and amplitude (instead of the usual sinusoidal modulation) leads to further optimalization of the process. The efficiency of the energy transduction, for example, can be increased from about 25% for sinusoidal driving to about 37% for suitably chosen alternating rectangular pulses.

  10. Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    George W. Huber; Upadhye, Aniruddha A.; Ford, David M.; Bhatia, Surita R.; Badger, Phillip C.

    2012-10-19

    with model AFBO excluding guaiacol were also conducted. NF membranes showed retention factors of glucose greater than 80% and of acetic acid less than 15% when operated at transmembrane pressures near 60 bar. Task 3.0 Acid Removal by Catalytic Processing It was found that the TAN reduction in bio-oil was very difficult using low temperature hydrogenation in flow and batch reactors. Acetic acid is very resilient to hydrogenation and we could only achieve about 16% conversion for acetic acid. Although it was observed that acetic acid was not responsible for instability of aqueous fraction of bio-oil during ageing studies (described in task 5). The bimetallic catalyst PtRe/ceria-zirconia was found to be best catalyst because its ability to convert the acid functionality with low conversion to gas phase carbon. Hydrogenation of the whole bio-oil was carried out at 125°C, 1450 psi over Ru/C catalyst in a flow reactor. Again, negligible acetic acid conversion was obtained in low temperature hydrogenation. Hydrogenation experiments with whole bio-oil were difficult to perform because of difficulty to pumping the high viscosity oil and reactor clogging. Task 4.0 Acid Removal using Ion Exchange Resins DOWEX M43 resin was used to carry out the neutralization of bio-oil using a packed bed column. The pH of the bio-oil increased from 2.43 to 3.7. The GC analysis of the samples showed that acetic acid was removed from the bio-oil during the neutralization and recovered in the methanol washing. But it was concluded that process would not be economical at large scale as it is extremely difficult to regenerate the resin once the bio-oil is passed over it. Task 5.0 Characterization of Upgraded Bio-oils We investigated the viscosity, microstructure, and chemical composition of bio-oils prepared by a fast pyrolysis approach, upon aging these fuels at 90ºC for periods of several days. Our results suggest that the viscosity increase is not correlated with the acids or char present in the

  11. Catalytic membrane program. Quarterly report for the period August 1999--October 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Paul K.T.

    1999-11-12

    For both power generation and pipeline-quality gas applications, the projected performance of the membrane currently under development is economically attractive. Aspects of membrane development include hollow fiber substrate production, reproducibility of membrane synthesis, chemical vapor deposition as a post treatment technique, and testing of membrane thermal and hydrothermal stability.

  12. Catalytic Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Little, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Don Little's Catalytic Reforming deals exclusively with reforming. With the increasing need for unleaded gasoline, the importance of this volume has escalated since it combines various related aspects of reforming technology into a single publication. For those with no practical knowledge of catalytic reforming, the chemical reactions, flow schemes and how the cat reformer fits into the overall refinery process will be of interest. Contents include: Catalytic reforming in refinery processing: How catalytic reformers work - chemical reactions; Process design; The catalyst, process variables and unit operation; Commercial processes; BTX operation; Feed preparation; naphtha hydrotreating and catalytic reforming; Index.

  13. Characteristics of Subfreezing Operation of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishler, Jeffrey Harris

    Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells are capable of high efficiency operation, and are free of NOx, SOx, and CO2 emissions when using hydrogen fuel, and ideally suited for use in transportation applications due to their high power density and low operating temperatures. However, under subfreezing conditions which may be encountered during winter seasons in some areas, product water will freeze within the membrane, cathode side catalyst layer and gas diffusion media, leading to voltage loss and operation failure. Experiments were undertaken in order to characterize the amount and location of water during fuel cell operation. First, in-situ neutron radiography was undertaken on the fuel cells at a normal operating temperature for various operating current densities, inlet relative humidities, and diffusion media hydrophobicities. It was found that more hydrophobic cathode microporous layer (MPL) or hydrophilic anode MPL may result in a larger amount of water transporting back to the anode. The water profiles along the channels were measured and the point of liquid water emergence, where two phase flow begins, was compared to previous models. Secondly, under subfreezing temperatures, neutron imaging showed that water ice product accumulates because of lack of a water removal mechanism. Water was observed under both the lands and channels, and increased almost linearly with time. It is found that most ice exists in the cathode side. With evidence from experimental observation, a cold start model was developed and explained, following existing approaches in the literature. Three stages of cold start are explained: membrane saturation, ice storage in catalyst layer pores, and then ice melting. The voltage losses due to temperature change, increased transport resistance, and reduced electrochemical surface area. The ionic conductivity of the membrane at subfreezing temperatures was modeled. Voltage evolution over time for isothermal cold starts was predicted and

  14. Operation of passive membrane systems for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Oka, P A; Khadem, N; Bérubé, P R

    2017-05-15

    The widespread adoption of submerged hollow fibre ultrafiltration (UF) for drinking water treatment is currently hindered by the complexity and cost of these membrane systems, especially in small/remote communities. Most of the complexity is associated with auxiliary fouling control measures, which include backwashing, air sparging and chemical cleaning. Recent studies have demonstrated that sustained operation without fouling control measures is possible, but little is known regarding the conditions under which extended operation can be sustained with minimal to no fouling control measures. The present study investigated the contribution of different auxiliary fouling control measures to the permeability that can be sustained, with the intent of minimizing the mechanical and operational complexity of submerged hollow fiber UF membrane systems while maximizing their throughput capacity. Sustained conditions could be achieved without backwashing, air sparging or chemical cleaning (i.e. passive operation), indicating that these fouling control measures can be eliminated, substantially simplifying the mechanical and operational complexity of submerged hollow fiber UF systems. The adoption of hydrostatic pressure (i.e. gravity) to provide the driving force for permeation further reduced the system complexity. Approximately 50% of the organic material in the raw water was removed during treatment. The sustained passive operation and effective removal of organic material was likely due to the microbial community that established itself on the membrane surface. The permeability that could be sustained was however only approximately 20% of that which can be maintained with fouling control measures. Retaining a small amount of air sparging (i.e. a few minutes daily) and incorporating a daily 1-h relaxation (i.e. permeate flux interruption) period prior to sparging more than doubled the permeability that could be sustained. Neither the approach used to interrupt the permeate

  15. Performance of a catalytic reactor at simulated gas turbine combustor operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.; Mroz, T. S.

    1975-01-01

    The performance of a catalytic reactor 12 cm in diameter and 17 cm long was evaluated at simulated gas turbine combustor operating conditions using premixed propane and air. Inlet temperatures of 600 and 800 K, pressures of 3 and 6 atm, and reference velocities of 9 to 30 m/s were tested. Data were taken for equivalence ratios as high as 0.43. The operating range was limited on the low-temperature side by very poor efficiency; the minimum exit temperature for good performance ranged from 1400 to 1600 K depending on inlet conditions. As exit temperatures were raised above this minimum, emissions of unburned hydrocarbons decreased, carbon monoxide emissions became generally less than 1 g CO/kg fuel, and nitrogen oxides were less than about 0.1 g NO2/kg fuel.

  16. Solid support membrane-aerated catalytic biofilm reactor for the continuous synthesis of (S)-styrene oxide at gram scale.

    PubMed

    Halan, Babu; Letzel, Thomas; Schmid, Andreas; Buehler, Katja

    2014-10-01

    Catalytic biofilms minimize reactant toxicity and maximize biocatalyst stability in selective transformations of chemicals to value-added products in continuous processes. The scaling up of such catalytic biofilm processes is challenging, due to fluidic and biological parameters affording a special reactor design affecting process performance. A solid support membrane-aerated biofilm reactor was optimized and scaled-up to yield gram amounts of (S)-styrene oxide, a toxic and instable high value chemical synthon. A sintered stainless steel membrane unit was identified as an optimal choice as biofilm substratum and for high oxygen mass transfer. A stable expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membrane was best suited for in situ substrate delivery and product extraction. For the verification of scalability, catalytic biofilms of Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120ΔC produced (S)-styrene oxide to an average concentration of 390 mM in the organic phase per day (equivalent to 24.4 g Laq (-1) day(-1) ). This productivity was gained by efficiently using the catalyst with an excellent product yield on biomass of 13.6 gproduct gbiomass (-1) . This product yield on biomass is in the order of magnitude reported for other continuous systems based on artificially immobilized biocatalysts and is fulfilling the minimum requirements for industrial biocatalytic processes. Overall, 46 g of (S)-styrene oxide were produced and isolated (purity: 99%; enantiomeric excess [ee]: >99.8%. yield: 30%). The productivity is in a similar range as in comparable small-scale biofilm reactors highlighting the large potential of this methodology for continuous bioprocessing of bulk chemicals and biofuels. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Osmotic membrane bioreactor for phenol biodegradation under continuous operation.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Prashant; Loh, Kai-Chee

    2016-03-15

    Continuous phenol biodegradation was accomplished in a two-phase partitioning osmotic membrane bioreactor (TPPOMBR) system, using extractant impregnated membranes (EIM) as the partitioning phase. The EIMs alleviated substrate inhibition during prolonged operation at influent phenol concentrations of 600-2000mg/L, and also at spiked concentrations of 2500mg/L phenol restricted to 2 days. Filtration of the effluent through forward osmosis maintained high biomass concentration in the bioreactor and improved effluent quality. Steady state was reached in 5-6 days at removal rates varying between 2000 and 5500mg/L-day under various conditions. Due to biofouling and salt accumulation, the permeate flux varied from 1.2-7.2 LMH during 54 days of operation, while maintaining an average hydraulic retention time of 7.4h. A washing cycle, comprising 1h osmotic backwashing using 0.5M NaCl and 2h washing with water, facilitated biofilm removal from the membranes. Characterization of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) through FTIR showed peaks between 1700 and 1500cm(-1), 1450-1450cm(-1) and 1200-1000cm(-1), indicating the presence of proteins, phenols and polysaccharides, respectively. The carbohydrate to protein ratio in the EPS was estimated to be 0.3. These results indicate that TPPOMBR can be promising in continuous treatment of phenolic wastewater.

  18. One-year operation of single household membrane bioreactor plant.

    PubMed

    Matulova, Z; Hlavinek, P; Drtil, M

    2010-01-01

    This paper evaluates the results from a 12-month study of a single-household wastewater treatment plant with submerged membrane module (household MBR plant) that was monitored from winter to winter season. The samples were collected at least twice a week (an intensive research study at real conditions). The household MBR (membrane bioreactor) plant was linked to a family house with 4 residents. In this study the treatment plant was fed by real domestic wastewater. In contrast to most other experiments with small-scale WWTPs (wastewater treatment plants) carried out in laboratories and facilities of large municipal WWTPs (polygons) which guarantee stable and flexible operation but the characteristics of wastewater and activated sludge in these studies usually differ from those that occur in real small-scale/single-household WWTPs. One of the main goals of this research was to test the response of membrane and activated sludge to different conditions during real operation of the household MBR plant, such as a long period of zero influent/load, or vice versa the presence of a large amount of concentrated wastewater (e.g. during the weekend), very low winter temperatures (water temperature below 5-6 degrees C), high pH values, and the presence of domestic detergents.

  19. Advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater by a novel integration of three-dimensional catalytic electro-Fenton and membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shengyong; Han, Hongjun; Hou, Baolin; Zhuang, Haifeng

    2015-12-01

    Laboratorial scale experiments were conducted to investigate a novel system three-dimensional catalytic electro-Fenton (3DCEF, catalyst of sewage sludge based activated carbon which loaded Fe3O4) integrating with membrane bioreactor (3DCEF-MBR) on advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater. The results indicated that 3DCEF-MBR represented high efficiencies in eliminating COD and total organic carbon, giving the maximum removal efficiencies of 80% and 75%, respectively. The integrated 3DCEF-MBR system significantly reduced the transmembrane pressure, giving 35% lower than conventional MBR after 30 days operation. The enhanced hydroxyl radical oxidation and bacteria self repair function were the mechanisms for 3DCEF-MBR performance. Therefore, the integrated 3DCEF-MBR was expected to be the promising technology for advanced treatment in engineering applications.

  20. Kinetics of esterification of acidified oil with different alcohols by a cation ion-exchange resin/polyethersulfone hybrid catalytic membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Honglei; Ding, Jincheng; Qiu, Yanli; Zhao, Zengdian

    2012-05-01

    Hybrid catalytic membranes consisting of cation ion-exchange resin particles (CERP) and polyethersulfone (PES) were prepared by immersion phase inversion and used as heterogeneous catalysts for the esterification of acidified oil with methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol. The membranes were characterized by ion exchange capacity and swelling degree tests. The membranes were annealed at different temperatures to improve catalytic activity and membranes annealed at 393 K had the highest catalytic activity. Butanol allowed the highest free fatty acids (FFAs) conversion of 95.28% since it has better miscibility than the other alcohols which strengthened mass and heat transfer. Furthermore, pseudo-homogeneous kinetic models of the esterification of acidified oil with the four alcohols were established according to the experimental data. The kinetic models can well predict the FFA conversion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic...

  2. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic...

  3. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment..., Subpt. UUU, Table 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions...

  4. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic...

  5. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic...

  6. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic...

  7. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic...

  8. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment..., Subpt. UUU, Table 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions...

  9. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 2 Table 2 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Metal...

  10. Recent operational experiences of FILMTEC NF270 membrane in Europe.

    PubMed

    Majamaa, Katariina; Warczok, Justyna; Lehtinen, Martti

    2011-01-01

    Nanofiltration (NF) is an attractive technology for potable and industrial water treatment because NF operates between ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. NF is designed to remove a high percentage of organic contaminants (humic acids, pesticides, color bodies) while passing a medium to high percentage of salt. Compared to UF membranes, the NF product water quality is significantly better; compared to comparable RO treatment systems NF systems require lower operating pressures. Due to these features, NF is increasingly used in a broad range of water treatment applications. The general applications include softening, as well as color, organics and micro-organism removal. DOW FILMTEC NF270-400 is one the most frequently used elements in water treatment and this paper presents examples of three recent NF270-400 installations in Europe. The first two plants, Eupen and Stembert, are located in Belgium and produce potable water from surface water. The third one is a Scandinavian plant which purifies groundwater for a brewery and soft drink production. The presented operation results prove NF to be a highly competitive technique for low cost water treatment.

  11. Catalytic water dissociation using hyperbranched aliphatic polyester (Boltorn series) as the interface of a bipolar membrane.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yanhong; Xu, Tongwen; Fu, Rongqiang; Cheng, Yiyun; Yang, Weihua

    2007-12-15

    The effect of hyperbranched aliphatic polyester (Boltorn series) on the water dissociation in bipolar membranes was firstly investigated in this paper. The bipolar membranes were prepared by immersing the anion exchange layer in a hyperbranched aliphatic polyester solution and then coating on the layer a polyphenylene oxide (SPPO) solution. The SEM observations proved the existence of hyperbranched aliphatic polyester at the membrane intermediate layer. The adsorption amount was evaluated by the oxygen content via XPS. The junction thickness of the prepared bipolar membrane was determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and the membrane performances were evaluated by current-voltage curves. The results showed that the amount and generation of Boltorn series, and temperature all affected I-V behaviors of the fabricated bipolar membranes, and the former two played the critical role. These effects were explained on the basis of the water dissociation theory and the characteristics of hyperbranched aliphatic polyester.

  12. Identification of a region that assists membrane insertion and translocation of the catalytic domain of Bordetella pertussis CyaA toxin.

    PubMed

    Karst, Johanna C; Barker, Robert; Devi, Usha; Swann, Marcus J; Davi, Marilyne; Roser, Stephen J; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2012-03-16

    The adenylate cyclase (CyaA) toxin, one of the virulence factors secreted by Bordetella pertussis, the pathogenic bacteria responsible for whooping cough, plays a critical role in the early stages of respiratory tract colonization by this bacterium. The CyaA toxin is able to invade eukaryotic cells by translocating its N-terminal catalytic domain directly across the plasma membrane of the target cells, where, activated by endogenous calmodulin, it produces supraphysiological levels of cAMP. How the catalytic domain is transferred from the hydrophilic extracellular medium into the hydrophobic environment of the membrane and then to the cell cytoplasm remains an unsolved question. In this report, we have characterized the membrane-interacting properties of the CyaA catalytic domain. We showed that a protein covering the catalytic domain (AC384, encompassing residues 1-384 of CyaA) displayed no membrane association propensity. However, a longer polypeptide (AC489), encompassing residues 1-489 of CyaA, exhibited the intrinsic property to bind to membranes and to induce lipid bilayer destabilization. We further showed that deletion of residues 375-485 within CyaA totally abrogated the toxin's ability to increase intracellular cAMP in target cells. These results indicate that, whereas the calmodulin dependent enzymatic domain is restricted to the amino-terminal residues 1-384 of CyaA, the membrane-interacting, translocation-competent domain extends up to residue 489. This thus suggests an important role of the region adjacent to the catalytic domain of CyaA in promoting its interaction with and its translocation across the plasma membrane of target cells.

  13. Identification of a Region That Assists Membrane Insertion and Translocation of the Catalytic Domain of Bordetella pertussis CyaA Toxin*

    PubMed Central

    Karst, Johanna C.; Barker, Robert; Devi, Usha; Swann, Marcus J.; Davi, Marilyne; Roser, Stephen J.; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    The adenylate cyclase (CyaA) toxin, one of the virulence factors secreted by Bordetella pertussis, the pathogenic bacteria responsible for whooping cough, plays a critical role in the early stages of respiratory tract colonization by this bacterium. The CyaA toxin is able to invade eukaryotic cells by translocating its N-terminal catalytic domain directly across the plasma membrane of the target cells, where, activated by endogenous calmodulin, it produces supraphysiological levels of cAMP. How the catalytic domain is transferred from the hydrophilic extracellular medium into the hydrophobic environment of the membrane and then to the cell cytoplasm remains an unsolved question. In this report, we have characterized the membrane-interacting properties of the CyaA catalytic domain. We showed that a protein covering the catalytic domain (AC384, encompassing residues 1–384 of CyaA) displayed no membrane association propensity. However, a longer polypeptide (AC489), encompassing residues 1–489 of CyaA, exhibited the intrinsic property to bind to membranes and to induce lipid bilayer destabilization. We further showed that deletion of residues 375–485 within CyaA totally abrogated the toxin's ability to increase intracellular cAMP in target cells. These results indicate that, whereas the calmodulin dependent enzymatic domain is restricted to the amino-terminal residues 1–384 of CyaA, the membrane-interacting, translocation-competent domain extends up to residue 489. This thus suggests an important role of the region adjacent to the catalytic domain of CyaA in promoting its interaction with and its translocation across the plasma membrane of target cells. PMID:22241477

  14. Characterization of the catalytic properties of the membrane-anchored metalloproteinase ADAM9 in cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Maretzky, Thorsten; Swendeman, Steven; Mogollon, Elin; Weskamp, Gisela; Sahin, Umut; Reiss, Karina; Blobel, Carl P

    2017-04-13

    ADAM9 (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 9) is a membrane-anchored metalloproteinase that has been implicated in pathological retinal neovascularization and in tumor progression. ADAM9 has constitutive catalytic activity in both biochemical and cell-based assays and can cleave several membrane proteins, including epidermal growth factor and Ephrin receptor B4; yet little is currently known about the catalytic properties of ADAM9 and its post-translational regulation and inhibitor profile in cell-based assays. To address this question, we monitored processing of the membrane-anchored Ephrin receptor B4 (EphB4) by co-expressing ADAM9, with the catalytically inactive ADAM9 E > A mutant serving as a negative control. We found that ADAM9-dependent shedding of EphB4 was not stimulated by three commonly employed activators of ADAM-dependent ectodomain shedding: phorbol esters, pervanadate or calcium ionophores. With respect to the inhibitor profile, we found that ADAM9 was inhibited by the hydroxamate-based metalloprotease inhibitors marimastat, TAPI-2, BB94, GM6001 and GW280264X, and by 10 nM of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-3, but not by up to 20 nM of TIMP-1 or -2. Additionally, we screened a non-hydroxamate small-molecule library for novel ADAM9 inhibitors and identified four compounds that selectively inhibited ADAM9-dependent proteolysis over ADAM10- or ADAM17-dependent processing. Taken together, the present study provides new information about the molecular fingerprint of ADAM9 in cell-based assays by showing that it is not stimulated by strong activators of ectodomain shedding and by defining a characteristic inhibitor profile. The identification of novel non-hydroxamate inhibitors of ADAM9 could provide the basis for designing more selective compounds that block the contribution of ADAM9 to pathological neovascularization and cancer. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification.

    PubMed

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-09-19

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H₂ to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H₂, CO and CO₂. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H₂O, CO₂ and H₂. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H₂ and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H₂ and compressed CO₂ ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H₂ permeance and purity, high CH₄ conversion levels and reduced CO yields.

  16. X-ray structure of a CDP-alcohol phosphatidyltransferase membrane enzyme and insights into its catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Nogly, Przemyslaw; Gushchin, Ivan; Remeeva, Alina; Esteves, Ana M; Borges, Nuno; Ma, Pikyee; Ishchenko, Andrii; Grudinin, Sergei; Round, Ekaterina; Moraes, Isabel; Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Santos, Helena; Gordeliy, Valentin; Archer, Margarida

    2014-06-19

    Phospholipids have major roles in the structure and function of all cell membranes. Most integral membrane proteins from the large CDP-alcohol phosphatidyltransferase family are involved in phospholipid biosynthesis across the three domains of life. They share a conserved sequence pattern and catalyse the displacement of CMP from a CDP-alcohol by a second alcohol. Here we report the crystal structure of a bifunctional enzyme comprising a cytoplasmic nucleotidyltransferase domain (IPCT) fused with a membrane CDP-alcohol phosphotransferase domain (DIPPS) at 2.65 Å resolution. The bifunctional protein dimerizes through the DIPPS domains, each comprising six transmembrane α-helices. The active site cavity is hydrophilic and widely open to the cytoplasm with a magnesium ion surrounded by four highly conserved aspartate residues from helices TM2 and TM3. We show that magnesium is essential for the enzymatic activity and is involved in catalysis. Substrates docking is validated by mutagenesis studies, and a structure-based catalytic mechanism is proposed.

  17. Advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater by a novel integration of catalytic ultrasound oxidation and membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shengyong; Han, Hongjun; Zhuang, Haifeng; Xu, Peng; Hou, Baolin

    2015-01-01

    Laboratorial scale experiments were conducted to investigate a novel system integrating catalytic ultrasound oxidation (CUO) with membrane bioreactor (CUO-MBR) on advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater. Results indicated that CUO with catalyst of FeOx/SBAC (sewage sludge based activated carbon (SBAC) which loaded Fe oxides) represented high efficiencies in eliminating TOC as well as improving the biodegradability. The integrated CUO-MBR system with low energy intensity and high frequency was more effective in eliminating COD, BOD5, TOC and reducing transmembrane pressure than either conventional MBR or ultrasound oxidation integrated MBR. The enhanced hydroxyl radical oxidation, facilitation of substrate diffusion and improvement of cell enzyme secretion were the mechanisms for CUO-MBR performance. Therefore, the integrated CUO-MBR was the promising technology for advanced treatment in engineering applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells with dry feeds: Design and operating strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogarth, Warren H. J.; Benziger, Jay B.

    The operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with dry feeds has been examined with different fuel cell flow channel designs as functions of pressure, temperature and flow rate. Auto-humidified (or self-humidifying) PEMFC operation is improved at higher pressures and low gas velocities where axial dispersion enhances "back-mixing" of the product water with the dry feed. We demonstrate auto-humidified operation of the channel-less, self-draining fuel cell, based on a stirred tank reactor; data is presented showing auto-humidified operation from 25 to 115 °C at 1 and 3 atm. Design and operating requirements are derived for the auto-humidified operation of the channel-less, self-draining fuel cell. The auto-humidified self-draining fuel cell outperforms a fully humidified serpentine flow channel fuel cell at high current densities. The new design offers substantial benefits for simplicity of operation and control including: the ability to self-drain reducing flooding, the ability to uniformly disperse water removing current gradients and the ability to operate on dry feeds eliminating the need for humidifiers. Additionally, the design lends itself well to a modular design concept.

  19. Enhanced catalytic stability of lipase immobilized on oxidized and disulfide-rich eggshell membrane for esters hydrolysis and transesterification.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chenyu; Cheng, Chuanchuan; Hao, Mei; Wang, Hongbin; Wang, Ziying; Shen, Cai; Cheong, Ling-Zhi

    2017-07-30

    Eggshell membrane (ESM) is an industrial waste that is available in abundance from food industry. Present study investigated the physicochemical properties of oxidized ESM and compared the efficiency of ESM and oxidized ESM as carrier for Burkholderia cepacia lipase (BCL) used in esters hydrolysis and transesterification. Following oxidation treatment, FTIR analysis and Ellman's assay showed amino acid cysteine in ESM was oxidized to form disulfide bond-containing cystine. In addition, AFM analysis showed ESM which exhibited a highly porous filamentous structure appeared to be coalesce following oxidation treatment. Oxidized ESM also showed reduced porosity (38.67%) in comparison to native ESM (51.65%). BCL were successfully immobilized on oxidized ESM through carrier activation method (enzyme loading of 5.01mg protein/g oxidized ESM). These immobilized lipase demonstrated significantly (P<0.05) enhanced catalytic stability with close to 100% of initial hydrolysis (12.03±0.29mmol/min/g) activity; and more than 85% of its initial transesterification (7.83±0.05) activity for at least 10 consecutive runs. Enhanced catalytic stability of BCL immobilized on oxidized ESM might be due to stabilization of the protein structure in oxidized ESM by disulfide bonds which helped formation of a stable bonding with BCL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression, purification and crystallization of a membrane-associated, catalytically active type I signal peptidase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ting, Yi Tian; Batot, Gaëlle; Baker, Edward N; Young, Paul G

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat as they rapidly develop resistance to existing antibiotics. Bacterial type I signal peptidases are membrane-associated, cell-surface serine proteases with a unique catalytic mechanism that differs from that of eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum signal peptidases. They are thus potential antimicrobial targets. S. aureus has a catalytically active type I signal peptidase, SpsB, that is essential for cell viability. To elucidate its structure, the spsB gene from S. aureus Newman strain was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. After exploring many different protein-modification constructs, SpsB was expressed as a fusion protein with maltose-binding protein and crystallized by hanging-drop vapour diffusion. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2(1) and diffracted to 2.05 Å resolution. The crystal structure of SpsB is anticipated to provide structural insight into Gram-positive signal peptidases and to aid in the development of antibacterial agents that target type I signal peptidases.

  1. Spatially resolved characterization of catalyst-coated membranes by distance-controlled scanning mass spectrometry utilizing catalytic methanol oxidation as gas-solid probe reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Assmann, Jens; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Muhler, Martin

    2007-08-01

    The spatially resolved catalytic activity of a catalyst-coated membrane (CCM), which is the essential part of PEM fuel cells, was visualized rapidly without any damage by a distance-controlled scanning mass spectrometer with an improved resolution of 250 microm. Methanol oxidation was identified as a suitable gas-solid probe reaction for the characterization of local catalytic activity. In addition, defects were manually generated in the CCM to simulate inhomogeneous coating and pinholes. The measurements successfully demonstrated that catalytically active and less active regions can be clearly distinguished. Simultaneously, the local topography was recorded, providing additional information on the location of the scratches and pinholes. The catalytic results were highly reproducible due to the constant-distance feedback loop rendering scanning mass spectrometry a promising tool for the quantitative quality control of CCMs.

  2. Catalytic and electrochemical behaviour of solid oxide fuel cell operated with simulated-biogas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang-Long, T.; Quang-Tuyen, T.; Shiratori, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Being produced from organic matters of wastes (bio-wastes) through a fermentation process, biogas mainly composed of CH4 and CO2 and can be considered as a secondary energy carrier derived from solar energy. To generate electricity from biogas through the electrochemical process in fuel cells is a state-of-the-art technology possessing higher energy conversion efficiency without harmful emissions compared to combustion process in heat engines. Getting benefits from high operating temperature such as direct internal reforming ability and activation of electrochemical reactions to increase overall system efficiency, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system operated with biogas becomes a promising candidate for distributed power generator for rural applications leading to reductions of environmental issues caused by greenhouse effects and bio-wastes. CO2 reforming of CH4 and electrochemical oxidation of the produced syngas (H2-CO mixture) are two main reaction processes within porous anode material of SOFC. Here catalytic and electrochemical behavior of Ni-ScSZ (scandia stabilized-zirconia) anode in the feed of CH4-CO2 mixtures as simulated-biogas at 800 °C were evaluated. The results showed that CO2 had strong influences on both reaction processes. The increase in CO2 partial pressure resulted in the decrease in anode overvoltage, although open-circuit voltage was dropped. Besides that, the simulation result based on a power-law model for equimolar CH4-CO2 mixture revealed that coking hazard could be suppressed along the fuel flow channel in both open-circuit and closed-circuit conditions.

  3. Catalytic and electrochemical behaviour of solid oxide fuel cell operated with simulated-biogas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Dang-Long, T.; Quang-Tuyen, T.; Shiratori, Y.

    2016-06-03

    Being produced from organic matters of wastes (bio-wastes) through a fermentation process, biogas mainly composed of CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} and can be considered as a secondary energy carrier derived from solar energy. To generate electricity from biogas through the electrochemical process in fuel cells is a state-of-the-art technology possessing higher energy conversion efficiency without harmful emissions compared to combustion process in heat engines. Getting benefits from high operating temperature such as direct internal reforming ability and activation of electrochemical reactions to increase overall system efficiency, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system operated with biogas becomes a promising candidate for distributed power generator for rural applications leading to reductions of environmental issues caused by greenhouse effects and bio-wastes. CO{sub 2} reforming of CH{sub 4} and electrochemical oxidation of the produced syngas (H{sub 2}–CO mixture) are two main reaction processes within porous anode material of SOFC. Here catalytic and electrochemical behavior of Ni-ScSZ (scandia stabilized-zirconia) anode in the feed of CH{sub 4}–CO{sub 2} mixtures as simulated-biogas at 800 °C were evaluated. The results showed that CO{sub 2} had strong influences on both reaction processes. The increase in CO{sub 2} partial pressure resulted in the decrease in anode overvoltage, although open-circuit voltage was dropped. Besides that, the simulation result based on a power-law model for equimolar CH{sub 4}−CO{sub 2} mixture revealed that coking hazard could be suppressed along the fuel flow channel in both open-circuit and closed-circuit conditions.

  4. Removal of diatrizoate with catalytically active membranes incorporating microbially produced palladium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hennebel, Tom; De Corte, Simon; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Vanherck, Katrien; Forrez, Ilse; De Gusseme, Bart; Verhagen, Pieter; Verbeken, Kim; Van der Bruggen, Bart; Vankelecom, Ivo; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2010-03-01

    There is an increasing concern about the fate of iodinated contrast media (ICM) in the environment. Limited removal efficiencies of currently applied techniques such as advanced oxidation processes require more performant strategies. The aim of this study was to establish an innovative degradation process for diatrizoate, a highly recalcitrant ICM, by using biogenic Pd nanoparticles as free suspension or immobilized in polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and polysulfone (PSf) membranes. As measured by HPLC-UV, the removal of 20mg L(-1) diatrizoate by a 10mg L(-1) Pd suspension was completed after 4h at a pH of 10. LC-MS analysis provided evidence for the sequential hydrodeiodination of diatrizoate. Pd did not lose its activity after incorporation in the PVDF and PSf matrix and the highest activity (k(cat)=30.0+/-0.4h(-1) L g(-1) Pd) was obtained with a casting solution of 10% PSf and 500mg L(-1) Pd. Subsequently, water containing 20mg L(-1) diatrizoate was treated in a membrane contactor, in which the water was supplied at one side of the membrane while hydrogen was provided at the other side. In a fed batch configuration, a removal efficiency of 77% after a time period of 48h was obtained. This work showed that membrane contactors with encapsulated biogenic nanoparticles can be instrumental for treatment of water contaminated with diatrizoate.

  5. Continuous esterification to produce biodiesel by SPES/PES/NWF composite catalytic membrane in flow-through membrane reactor: experimental and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenying; He, Benqiao; Cao, Yuping; Li, Jianxin; Yan, Feng; Cui, Zhenyu; Zou, Zhiqun; Guo, Shiwei; Qian, Xiaomin

    2013-02-01

    A novel composite catalytic membrane (CCM) was prepared from sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) and polyethersulfone (PES) blend supported by non-woven fabrics, as a heterogeneous catalyst to produce biodiesel from continuous esterification of oleic acid with methanol in a flow-through mode. A kinetic model of esterification was established based on a plug-flow assumption. The effects of the CCM structure (thickness, area, porosity, etc.), reaction temperature and the external and internal mass transfer resistances on esterification were investigated. The results showed that the CCM structure had a significant effect on the acid conversion. The external mass transfer resistance could be neglected when the flow rate was over 1.2 ml min(-1). The internal mass transfer resistance impacted on the conversion when membrane thickness was over 1.779 mm. An oleic acid conversion kept over 98.0% for 500 h of continuous running. The conversions obtained from the model are in good agreement with the experimental data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Direct conversion of methane to aromatics in a catalytic co-ionic membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Morejudo, S H; Zanón, R; Escolástico, S; Yuste-Tirados, I; Malerød-Fjeld, H; Vestre, P K; Coors, W G; Martínez, A; Norby, T; Serra, J M; Kjølseth, C

    2016-08-05

    Nonoxidative methane dehydroaromatization (MDA: 6CH4 ↔ C6H6 + 9H2) using shape-selective Mo/zeolite catalysts is a key technology for exploitation of stranded natural gas reserves by direct conversion into transportable liquids. However, this reaction faces two major issues: The one-pass conversion is limited by thermodynamics, and the catalyst deactivates quickly through kinetically favored formation of coke. We show that integration of an electrochemical BaZrO3-based membrane exhibiting both proton and oxide ion conductivity into an MDA reactor gives rise to high aromatic yields and improved catalyst stability. These effects originate from the simultaneous extraction of hydrogen and distributed injection of oxide ions along the reactor length. Further, we demonstrate that the electrochemical co-ionic membrane reactor enables high carbon efficiencies (up to 80%) that improve the technoeconomic process viability. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Porous Au-Ag Alloy Particles Inlaid AgCl Membranes As Versatile Plasmonic Catalytic Interfaces with Simultaneous, in Situ SERS Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qi; Yuan, Kaiping; Liu, Qinghe; Liang, Chongyun; Wang, Xiang; Cheng, Yi-Feng; Li, Qingqing; Wang, Min; Che, Renchao

    2015-08-26

    We present a novel porous Au-Ag alloy particles inlaid AgCl membrane as plasmonic catalytic interfaces with real-time, in situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) monitoring. The Au-Ag alloy particles inlaid AgCl membranes were obtained via a facile two-step, air-exposed, and room-temperature immersion reaction with appropriate annealing process. Owing to the designed integration of semiconductor component AgCl and noble metal Au-Ag particles, both the catalytic reduction and visible-light-driven photocatalytic activities toward organic contaminants were attained. Specifically, the efficiencies of about 94% of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP, 5 × 10(-5) M) reduction after 8 min of reaction, and degradation of rhodamine 6G (R6G, 10(-5) M) after 12 min of visible light irradiation were demonstrated. Moreover, efficiencies of above 85% of conversion of 4-NP to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) and 90% of R6G degradation were achieved as well after 6 cycles of reactions, by which robust recyclability was confirmed. Further, with distinct SERS signals generated simultaneously from the surfaces of Au-Ag particles under laser excitation, in situ SERS monitoring of the process of catalytic reactions with superior sensitivity and linearity has been realized. Overall, the capability of the Au-Ag particles inlaid AgCl membranes to provide SERS monitored catalytic and visible-light-driven photocatalytic conversion of organic pollutants, along with their mild and cost-effective fabrication method, would make sense for in-depth understanding of the mechanisms of (photo)catalytic reactions, and also future development of potable, multifunctional and integrated catalytic and sensing devices.

  8. Development of a Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Heterogeneous Catalysis in Supercritical CO2

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Nazrul M.; Chatterjee, Maya; Ikushima, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Toshiro; Kawanami, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of high-pressure membrane reactor has been developed for hydrogenation in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). The main objectives of the design of the reactor are the separate feeding of hydrogen and substrate in scCO2 for safe reactions in a continuous flow process, and to reduce the reaction time. By using this new reactor, hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde into hydrocinnamaldehyde has been successfully carried out with 100% selectivity at 50 °C in 10 MPa (H2: 1 MPa, CO2: 9 MPa) with a flow rate of substrate ranging from 0.05 to 1.0 mL/min. PMID:20162008

  9. Development of a novel catalytic membrane reactor for heterogeneous catalysis in supercritical CO₂.

    PubMed

    Islam, Nazrul M; Chatterjee, Maya; Ikushima, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Toshiro; Kawanami, Hajime

    2010-01-13

    A novel type of high-pressure membrane reactor has been developed for hydrogenation in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)). The main objectives of the design of the reactor are the separate feeding of hydrogen and substrate in scCO(2) for safe reactions in a continuous flow process, and to reduce the reaction time. By using this new reactor, hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde into hydrocinnamaldehyde has been successfully carried out with 100% selectivity at 50 degrees C in 10 MPa (H(2): 1 MPa, CO(2): 9 MPa) with a flow rate of substrate ranging from 0.05 to 1.0 mL/min.

  10. 40 CFR Table 14 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As...

  11. 40 CFR Table 14 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As...

  12. Impact of operations and cleaning on membrane fouling at a wastewater reclamation facility.

    PubMed

    Kasi, Murthy; Simsek, Halis; Ahlschlager, Steve; Ritterman, Kent; Hausauer, Jim; Hoff, Jeff; Khan, Eakalak

    2017-05-15

    Effects of operational changes on membrane fouling were evaluated for a wastewater reclamation facility. The focuses were on addition of a coagulant (ferric chloride) versus no addition and an accidental high chlorine (sodium hypochlorite) dose. Two membrane modules with different service ages, 3 years versus 9 months, were compared. Fouling rates ranged between 2 and 3 times higher during no ferric chloride addition. Chemical cleaning frequency was reduced by approximately 5 times during ferric chloride addition for older membranes, while it did not change for newer membranes. High chlorine dose had slightly improved membrane permeability for newer membrane, and reduced the transmembrane pressure (TMP) for both older and newer membranes. Chemical wash with enzymatic detergents substantially improved membrane permeability and reduced TMP for both older and newer membranes. Fouling index values indicated that coagulant addition had greater impact on performance recovery for older membranes than newer membranes. Successful and economical operation of membranes depends on fouling rate, which in this study was found to be a function of flux, membrane age, pretreatment, and cleaning type and frequency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sustainable membrane operation design for the treatment of the synthetic coke wastewater in SMBR.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Xu, Zhen-Liang; Munib, Shahda; Chen, Gui-e; Lu, Qiong

    2009-01-01

    Membrane fouling in the membrane bioreactor (MBR) is typically caused by the interaction of microbial characteristics, hydrodynamic behavior, operation environment, wastewater characteristics and membrane properties, which result in the deterioration of performance and increasing energy consumption and cost of membrane replacement. The effect of the crucial MBR parameters (the microbial loading and characteristics, dissolved oxygen (DO), hydraulic retention time (HRT), backwashing conditions and membrane characteristics) on membrane fouling was investigated in a submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) during the long term treatment of synthetic coke wastewater. Also the optimum operation strategies were further utilized in order to satisfy the minimal membrane fouling operation through a long-term evaluation of the MBR performance. It has been demonstrated that with application of these optimal designed conditions, significant membrane fouling improvements were achieved over a long operating time, so it was possible to perform in sustainable operation for MBR. In this study, the upper limit of the sustainable flux is found to be as much as 18.6 L/m(2) h and the optimum sustainable flux value should be 50 approximately 75% of critical flux to satisfy the desired sustainable operation period.

  14. Degradative inactivation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase by a membranal proteinase is restricted to the free catalytic subunit in its native conformation.

    PubMed Central

    Alhanaty, E; Patinkin, J; Tauber-Finkelstein, M; Shaltiel, S

    1981-01-01

    A membranal proteinase from brush-border epithelial cells of the rat small intestine was shown to bring about a restricted and limited degradation of the free catalytic subunit (C) of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (ATP:protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37) with concomitant inactivation of the kinase. This membranal proteinase exhibits a remarkable specificity. (i) It degrades C in its native conformation, but not after it has been heat-denatured. (ii) The degradation of C (Mr 40,000) does not proceed further, once a distinct clipped product (Mr 34,000) is formed. (iii) The undissociated ("stored") form of the enzyme (R2C2) is not attacked by the membranal proteinase, preserving both its potential catalytic activity and its molecular integrity. Only upon addition of cyclic AMP to release free C does the proteinase attack it. (iv) The membranal proteinase does not degrade the regulatory subunit (R), released by cyclic AMP from R2C2, although R is quite susceptible to degradation by other proteolytic enzymes. None of these features of the membranal proteinase could be reproduced with trypsin, chymotrypsin, clostripain, or papain. The specific, restricted, and limited action of this membranal enzyme raises the possibility that it may have a distinct physiological assignment associated with the bioregulation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Images PMID:6267595

  15. Degradative inactivation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase by a membranal proteinase is restricted to the free catalytic subunit in its native conformation.

    PubMed

    Alhanaty, E; Patinkin, J; Tauber-Finkelstein, M; Shaltiel, S

    1981-06-01

    A membranal proteinase from brush-border epithelial cells of the rat small intestine was shown to bring about a restricted and limited degradation of the free catalytic subunit (C) of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (ATP:protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37) with concomitant inactivation of the kinase. This membranal proteinase exhibits a remarkable specificity. (i) It degrades C in its native conformation, but not after it has been heat-denatured. (ii) The degradation of C (Mr 40,000) does not proceed further, once a distinct clipped product (Mr 34,000) is formed. (iii) The undissociated ("stored") form of the enzyme (R2C2) is not attacked by the membranal proteinase, preserving both its potential catalytic activity and its molecular integrity. Only upon addition of cyclic AMP to release free C does the proteinase attack it. (iv) The membranal proteinase does not degrade the regulatory subunit (R), released by cyclic AMP from R2C2, although R is quite susceptible to degradation by other proteolytic enzymes. None of these features of the membranal proteinase could be reproduced with trypsin, chymotrypsin, clostripain, or papain. The specific, restricted, and limited action of this membranal enzyme raises the possibility that it may have a distinct physiological assignment associated with the bioregulation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

  16. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P.; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G.; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K.; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-01-01

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H2 to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H2, CO and CO2. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H2O, CO2 and H2. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H2 and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H2 and compressed CO2 ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H2 permeance and purity, high CH4 conversion levels and reduced CO yields. PMID:27657143

  17. Facile in situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles on procyanidin-grafted eggshell membrane and their catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Liang, Miao; Su, Rongxin; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; Yu, Yanjun; Wang, Libing; He, Zhimin

    2014-04-09

    Facile, efficient, and robust immobilization of metal nanostructures on porous bioscaffolds is an interesting topic in materials chemistry and heterogeneous catalysis. This study reports a facile in situ method for the synthesis and immobilization of small silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) at room temperature on natural eggshell membrane (ESM), which presents interwoven fibrous structure and can be used as a unique protein-based biotemplate. Procyanidin (Pro), a typical plant polyphenol extracted from grape seeds and skins, was first grafted onto ESM fibers to serve as both reductant and stabilizer during the synthesis process. As a result, the AgNPs were facilely synthesized and robustly immobilized on the ESM fibers without additional chemical reductant or physical treatments. The morphology and microstructure of the as-prepared AgNPs@Pro-ESM composites were characterized by combined microscopy and spectroscopy technologies. The results indicate that small AgNPs with mean diameter of 2.46 nm were successfully prepared on the Pro-ESM biotemplate. The composites exhibited good catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). More importantly, these composite catalysts can be easily recovered and reused for more than eight cycles because of their high stability.

  18. Development of glow discharge plasma-catalytic reactors operated under atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Y.; Itoyama, K.; Tanabe, S.; Matsumoto, H.

    1997-12-31

    Two kinds of glow discharge plasma-catalytic reactors, zone discharge tube plasma reactor and rotating electrode ring plasma reactor, have been developed and evaluated in various chemical reactions under atmospheric condition. In the former glow discharge occurs between two electrodes through a dielectric material (Pyrex or quartz tube) and in the latter between a rotating (rotor) and a fixed electrode (stator) to make large volumes of the plasma zone under atmospheric pressure. Each electrode is, furthermore, coated with catalytically active metals, such as Pt, Pd, Rh, Cu or Ni. Various kinds of decomposition reactions of chemically stable compounds have been examined in order to evaluate the performance of these reactors, such as decompositions of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NO, CH{sub 4} and Freon into simple molecules. Different characteristic capabilities were observed between these reactors. The conversions of various reactants depend on the input power (voltage, current and frequency), the catalytic metal employed, carrier gas with different metastable level and the flow rate of reactant. In most of the reactions investigated, generally speaking, both reactors showed excellent results in comparison with conventional catalytic reactors.

  19. Tunable catalytic tubular micro-pumps operating at low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Solovev, Alexander A; Sanchez, Samuel; Mei, Yongfeng; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2011-06-07

    Catalytic micropumps consisting of Ti/Cr/Pt microtubes with diameters of 5-10 μm and tunable lengths in the range of 20-1000 μm are reported. Micropumps were fabricated by rolling up metallic nanomembranes into microtubes with an inner platinum layer. When immersed into a solution of hydrogen peroxide, the micropumps are activated by the catalytic decomposition of peroxide into oxygen microbubbles and water. Fluid pumping is demonstrated by the movement of polystyrene particles with a diameter of 1 μm through the catalytic microtubes. Concentrations from 0.009 to 11% H(2)O(2) were employed to study the catalytic generation of microbubbles in micropumps with different lengths. A minimum concentration of 0.06% fuel was determined to be sufficient to actuate the micropumps. Such devices based on rolled-up nanomembranes hold great promise for the integration into Lab-on-a-chip systems for sensing, sorting of particles and drug delivery.

  20. Membrane Bioreactor/Ultra Low Energy Reverse Osmosis Membrane Process for Forward Operating Base Wastewater Reuse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    of a) new ZW-10 module; b) fouled ZW-10 module; and c) recovered module following sodium hypochlorite and citric acid cleanings...hypochlorite; and d) recovered membranes following sodium hypochlorite and citric acid cleaning. ..... 75 Figure 60: SEM images of fouled ZW-10 hollow fiber...membrane was removed and replaced with a new module and the experiments were continued. Membrane cleanings using citric acid and sodium

  1. Shape-dependent plasma-catalytic activity of ZnO nanomaterials coated on porous ceramic membrane for oxidation of butane.

    PubMed

    Sanjeeva Gandhi, M; Mok, Young Sun

    2014-12-01

    In order to explore the effects of the shape of ZnO nanomaterials on the plasma-catalytic decomposition of butane and the distribution of byproducts, three types of ZnO nanomaterials (nanoparticles (NPs), nanorods (NRs) and nanowires (NWs)) were prepared and coated on multi-channel porous alumina ceramic membrane. The structures and morphologies of the nanomaterials were confirmed by X-ray diffraction method and scanning electron microscopy. The observed catalytic activity of ZnO in the oxidative decomposition of butane was strongly shape-dependent. It was found that the ZnO NWs exhibited higher catalytic activity than the other nanomaterials and could completely oxidize butane into carbon oxides (COx). When using the bare or ZnO NPs-coated ceramic membrane, several unwanted partial oxidation and decomposition products like acetaldehyde, acetylene, methane and propane were identified during the decomposition of butane. When the ZnO NWs- or ZnO NRs-coated membrane was used, however, the formation of such unwanted byproducts except methane was completely avoided, and full conversion into COx was achieved. Better carbon balance and COx selectivity were obtained with the ZnO NWs and NRs than with the NPs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A triple fouling layers perspective on evaluation of membrane fouling under different scenarios of membrane bioreactor operation.

    PubMed

    Pourabdollah, Mehdi; Torkian, Ayoob; Hashemian, Seyed Jamalodin; Bakhshi, Bita

    2014-01-01

    One of the main factors affecting membrane fouling in MBRs is operational conditions. In this study the influence of aeration rate, filtration mode, and SRT on hollow fiber membrane fouling was investigated using a triple fouling layers perspective. The sludge microbial population distribution was also determined by PCR method. Through various applied operational scenarios the optimal conditions were: aeration rate of 15 LPM; relaxation mode with 40s duration and 8 min. interval; and SRT of 30 days. The similarity between SMP variations in triple fouling layers with its corresponding hydraulic resistance confirmed the effect of SMP on membrane fouling. Among three fouling fractions, the upper (rinsed) layer found to have the most effect on membrane fouling which implies the critical role of aeration, but as for multilateral effects of aeration, the optimal aeration rate should be determined more precisely. Relaxation interval was more effective than its duration for fouling control. SRT variations in addition to influencing the amount of SMP, also affect on the structure of these material. At longer SRTs (20, 30 days) a greater percentage of SMP could penetrate into the membrane pores and for shorter SRTs they accumulate more on membrane surface. Results showed that there is a very good correlation between total hydraulic resistance (Log R) and protein to carbohydrate ratio at the rinsed layer (P1/C1). Considering significant effects of aeration and SRT conditions on this ratio (according to data), it is very determinative to apply the optimal aeration and SRT conditions.

  3. Stabilized composite membranes and membrane electrode assemblies for high temperature/low relative humidity polymer electrolyte fuel cell operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, Vijay Krishna

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have a variety of applications in the stationary power, mobile power and automotive power sectors. Existing membrane technology presently permits fuel cell operation at temperatures less than 100°C under fully saturated conditions. However, several advantages such as easier heat rejection rates and improved impurities tolerance by the anode electrocatalyst result by operating a PEMFC at elevated temperatures (above 100°C) and lower relative humidities. In an attempt to extend the operating range of the polymer electrolyte membrane, perfluorosulfonic acid (NafionRTM) based organic/inorganic (heteropolyacid) composite membranes were investigated in terms of thermal and electrochemical stability, additive stability and conductivity. Tungsten based heteropolyacids (HPAs) were found to be electrochemically stable as opposed to molybdenum based additives. The stability of the inorganic heteropolyacid additive in aqueous environments was enhanced by ion exchanging the protons of the HPAs with larger counter ions. An additional stabilization technique developed involved improving the interaction of HPA with NafionRTM by linking the particles to the sulfonic acid clusters via a sol-gel induced metal oxide linkage. The proton conductivity of the composite membranes was found to depend on the particle size of the HPA additive. A two order of magnitude change in additive particle size was attained by modification of the membrane preparation technique. This modification resulted in a nearly 50% increase in conductivity. The membranes prepared were characterized by thermal analysis, spectroscopy and microscopy. A technique was developed to incorporate existing MEA preparation and HPA stabilization techniques to the composite membranes with small HPA particles. All MEAs prepared were evaluated at high temperatures (120°C) and low relative humidities (35%) in an operating fuel cell, with membrane resistance and hence conductivity

  4. Performance comparison of long and short-side chain perfluorosulfonic membranes for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassi, A.; Gatto, I.; Passalacqua, E.; Antonucci, V.; Arico, A. S.; Merlo, L.; Oldani, C.; Pagano, E.

    A new Aquivion™ E79-03S short-side chain perfluorosulfonic membrane with a thickness of 30 μm (dry form) and an equivalent weight (EW) of 790 g/equiv recently developed by Solvay-Solexis for high-temperature operation was tested in a pressurised (3 bar abs.) polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) single cell at a temperature of 130 °C. For comparison, a standard Nafion™ membrane (EW 1100 g/equiv) of similar thickness (50 μm) was investigated under similar operating conditions. Both membranes were tested for high temperature operation in conjunction with an in-house prepared carbon supported Pt electrocatalyst. The electrocatalyst consisted of nanosized Pt particles (particle size ∼2 nm) dispersed on a high surface area carbon black. The electrochemical tests showed better performance for the Aquivion™ membrane as compared to Nafion™ with promising properties for high temperature PEM fuel cell applications. Beside the higher open circuit voltage and lower ohmic constraints, a higher electrocatalytic activity was observed at high temperature for the electrocatalyst-Aquivion™ ionomer interface indicating a better catalyst utilization.

  5. Membrane Operational Impedance Spectra in Chara corallina Estimated by Laplace Transforms Analysis 1

    PubMed Central

    Homblé, Fabrice; Jenard, André

    1986-01-01

    The membrane operational impedance spectrum of Chara corallina Klein ex Willd. (R. Brown) cells is investigated using Laplace transform analysis. The spectrum changes with both amplitude and sign of the electrical stimulation when time- and voltage-dependent K+ channels contribute to the membrane conductance. We compare the advantages and disadvantage of this technique for studying membrane impedance with those of the alternating current method and the white noise method. PMID:16664925

  6. High performance RO membranes for desalination and wastewater reclamation and their operation results.

    PubMed

    Henmi, M; Fusaoka, Y; Tomioka, H; Kurihara, M

    2010-01-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane is one of the most powerful tools for solving the global water crisis, and is used in a variety of water treatment scenes such as drinking water purification, waste-water treatment, boiler feed water production, ultra pure water production for semiconductor industry, etc. The desired performance of RO membrane varies according to quality of feed water being treated, and Toray has been developing RO membranes with suitable characteristic for each operating condition. RO membranes for seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation are especially regarded as most promising targets. Recently, high boron removal and energy saving RO membrane for seawater desalination and low fouling RO membrane for wastewater reclamation have been developed. In this paper, the prospect of attaining these renovative RO membrane, and furthermore, job references will be discussed.

  7. Influence of electrolytes and membranes on cell operation for syn-gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Eric J. Dufek; Tedd E. Lister; Michael E. McIlwain

    2012-02-01

    The impact of membrane type and electrolyte composition for the electrochemical generation of synthesis gas (CO + H2) using a Ag gas diffusion electrode are presented. Changing from a cation exchange membrane to an anion exchange membrane (AEM) extended the cell operational time at low Ecell values (up to 4x) without impacting product composition. The use of KOH as the catholyte decreased the Ecell and resulted in a minimum electrolyte cost reduction of 39%. The prime factor in determining operational time at low Ecell values was the ability to maintain a sufficiently high anolyte pH.

  8. Catalytic hydrogen/oxygen reaction assisted the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) startup at subzero temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shucheng; Yu, Hongmei; Hou, Junbo; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian; Ming, Pingwen; Hou, Zhongjun

    Fuel cells for automobile application need to operate in a wide temperature range including freezing temperature. However, the rapid startup of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) at subfreezing temperature, e.g., -20 °C, is very difficult. A cold-start procedure was developed, which made hydrogen and oxygen react to heat the fuel cell considering that the FC flow channel was the characteristic of microchannel reactor. The effect of hydrogen and oxygen reaction on fuel cell performance at ambient temperature was also investigated. The electrochemical characterizations such as I- V plot and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were performed. The heat generated rate for either the single cell or the stack was calculated. The results showed that the heat generated rate was proportional to the gas flow rate when H 2 concentration and the active area were constant. The fuel cell temperature rose rapidly and steadily by controlling gas flow rate.

  9. A triple fouling layers perspective on evaluation of membrane fouling under different scenarios of membrane bioreactor operation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    One of the main factors affecting membrane fouling in MBRs is operational conditions. In this study the influence of aeration rate, filtration mode, and SRT on hollow fiber membrane fouling was investigated using a triple fouling layers perspective. The sludge microbial population distribution was also determined by PCR method. Through various applied operational scenarios the optimal conditions were: aeration rate of 15 LPM; relaxation mode with 40s duration and 8 min. interval; and SRT of 30 days. The similarity between SMP variations in triple fouling layers with its corresponding hydraulic resistance confirmed the effect of SMP on membrane fouling. Among three fouling fractions, the upper (rinsed) layer found to have the most effect on membrane fouling which implies the critical role of aeration, but as for multilateral effects of aeration, the optimal aeration rate should be determined more precisely. Relaxation interval was more effective than its duration for fouling control. SRT variations in addition to influencing the amount of SMP, also affect on the structure of these material. At longer SRTs (20, 30 days) a greater percentage of SMP could penetrate into the membrane pores and for shorter SRTs they accumulate more on membrane surface. Results showed that there is a very good correlation between total hydraulic resistance (Log R) and protein to carbohydrate ratio at the rinsed layer (P1/C1). Considering significant effects of aeration and SRT conditions on this ratio (according to data), it is very determinative to apply the optimal aeration and SRT conditions. PMID:25002969

  10. Hybrid membrane with TiO2 based bio-catalytic nanoparticle suspension system for the degradation of bisphenol-A.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jingwei; Dong, Guangxi; Luu, Belinda; Sengpiel, Robert G; Ye, Yun; Wessling, Matthias; Chen, Vicki

    2014-10-01

    The removal of micropollutant in wastewater treatment has become a key environmental challenge for many industrialized countries. One approach is to use enzymes such as laccase for the degradation of micropollutants such as bisphenol-A. In this work, laccase was covalently immobilized on APTES modified TiO2 nanoparticles, and the effects of particle modification on the bio-catalytic performance were examined and optimized. These bio-catalytic particles were then suspended in a hybrid membrane reactor for BPA removal with good BPA degradation efficiency observed. Substantial improvement in laccase stability was achieved in the hybrid system compared with free laccase under simulated harsh industrial wastewater treatment conditions (such as a wide range of pH and presence of inhibitors). Kinetic study provided insight of the effect of immobilization on the bio-degradation reaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Purge gas recovery of ammonia synthesis plant by integrated configuration of catalytic hydrogen-permselective membrane reactor and solid oxide fuel cell as a novel technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siavashi, Fakhteh; Saidi, Majid; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza

    2014-12-01

    The purge gas emission of ammonia synthesis plant which contains hazardous components is one of the major sources of environmental pollution. Using integrated configuration of catalytic hydrogen-permselective membrane reactor and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system is a new approach which has a great impact to reduce the pollutant emission. By application of this method, not only emission of ammonia and methane in the atmosphere is prevented, hydrogen is produced through the methane steam reforming and ammonia decomposition reactions that take place simultaneously in a catalytic membrane reactor. The pure generated hydrogen by recovery of the purge gas in the Pd-Ag membrane reactor is used as a feed of SOFC. Since water is the only byproduct of the electrochemical reaction in the SOFC, it is recycled to the reactor for providing the required water of the reforming reaction. Performance investigation of the reactor represents that the rate of hydrogen permeation increases with enhancing the reactor temperature and pressure. Also modeling results indicate that the SOFC performance improves with increasing the temperature and fuel utilization ratio. The generated power by recovery of the purging gas stream of ammonia synthesis plant in the Razi petrochemical complex is about 8 MW.

  12. Ultrasonic irradiation for ultrafiltration membrane cleaning in MBR systems: operational conditions and consequences.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, L M; Perez, J I; Gómez, A; Letona, A; Gómez, M A

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic irradiation is one of the most promising membrane cleaning techniques for membrane bioreactors (MBRs) because of several advantages such as high flux-recovery capacity and in situ application without interrupting the filtration process. However, significant contradictions may be found and, consequently, this method has not yet been widely developed. In this paper, four MBRs equipped with hollow-fibre polyvinylidene fluoride ultrafiltration membranes were operated continuously. The cleaning method applied consisted of sonication at low power (15 W) with different frequencies (20, 25, 30, and 40 kHz) for each module and aerated backwashing. The different MBRs were analysed comparatively between them and with a conventional MBR in order to check the effects of the irradiated waves on membrane integrity, effluent quality and process performance. Effluent turbidity and chemical oxygen demand, total and volatile suspended solid concentration and activated sludge viscosity were affected by biomass fragmentation or membrane cake removal, mainly at lower frequencies. The best transmembrane pressure control was achieved at the frequency of 20 kHz without a significant effect on membrane integrity. The results showed that under these operational conditions, no negative effects on effluent quality or membrane integrity were found, suggesting that this method was suitable for this type of membrane.

  13. Modified by air plasma polymer tack membranes as drainage material for antiglaucomatous operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazantseva, T. V.; Kravets, L. I.; Elinson, V. M.

    2014-06-01

    The morphological and clinical studies of poly(ethylene terephthalate) track membranes modified by air plasma as drainage materials for antiglaucomatous operations were performed. It was demonstrated their compatibility with eye tissues. Moreover, it was shown that a new drainage has a good lasting hypotensive effect and can be used as operation for refractory glaucoma surgery.

  14. Highly enantioselective cross-aldol reactions of acetaldehyde mediated by a dual catalytic system operating under site isolation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinyuan; Rodríguez-Escrich, Carles; Wang, Shoulei; Sayalero, Sonia; Pericàs, Miquel A

    2014-10-06

    Polystyrene-supported (PS) diarylprolinol catalysts 1 a (Ar = phenyl) and 1 b (Ar = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl) have been developed. Operating under site-isolation conditions, PS-1 a/1 b worked compatibly with PS-bound sulfonic acid catalyst 2 to promote deoligomerization of paraldehyde and subsequent cross-aldol reactions of the resulting acetaldehyde in one pot, affording aldol products in high yields with excellent enantioselectivities. The effect of water on the performance of the catalytic system has been studied and its optimal amount (0.5 equiv) has been determined. The dual catalytic system (1/2) allows repeated recycling and reuse (10 cycles). The potential of this methodology is demonstrated by a two-step synthesis of a phenoperidine analogue (68% overall yield; 98% ee) and by the preparation of highly enantioenriched 1,3-diols 4 and 3-methylamino-1-arylpropanols 5, key intermediates in the synthesis of a variety of druglike structures. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in a membrane bioreactor: assessment of operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Lu, Jianren; Cui, Zhanfeng

    2011-06-01

    The optimization of operating conditions for cellulose hydrolysis was systemically undertaken using an ultra-scaled down membrane bioreactor based on the parameter scanning ultrafiltration apparatus. The bioconversion of cellulose saccharification was carried out with freely suspended cellulase from Aspergillus niger as the biocatalyst. The polyethersulfone ultrafiltration membranes with a molecular weight cutoff of 10 kDa were used to construct the enzymatic membrane bioreactor, with the membrane showing a complete retaining of cellulase and cellobiase. The influence of solution pH, temperature, salt (NaCl) concentration, presence of cellobiase, cellulose-to-enzyme ratio and stirring speed on reducing sugar production was examined. The results showed that the addition of an appropriate amount of NaCl or cellobiase had a positive effect on reducing sugar formation. Under the identified optimal conditions, cellulose hydrolysis in the enzymatic membrane bioreactor was tested for a long period of time up to 75 h, and both enzymes and operation conditions demonstrated good stability. Also, the activation energy (E(a)) of the enzymatic hydrolysis, with a value of 34.11 ± 1.03 kJ mol(-1), was estimated in this study. The operational and physicochemical conditions identified can help guide the design and operation of enzymatic membrane bioreactors at the industrial scale for cellulose hydrolysis.

  16. Selective catalytic reduction operation with heavy fuel oil: NOx, NH3, and particle emissions.

    PubMed

    Lehtoranta, Kati; Vesala, Hannu; Koponen, Päivi; Korhonen, Satu

    2015-04-07

    To meet stringent NOx emission limits, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is increasingly utilized in ships, likely also in combination with low-priced higher sulfur level fuels. In this study, the performance of SCR was studied by utilizing NOx, NH3, and particle measurements. Urea decomposition was studied with ammonia and isocyanic acid measurements and was found to be more effective with heavy fuel oil (HFO) than with light fuel oil. This is suggested to be explained by the metals found in HFO contributing to metal oxide particles catalyzing the hydrolysis reaction prior to SCR. At the exhaust temperature of 340 °C NOx reduction was 85-90%, while at lower temperatures the efficiency decreased. By increasing the catalyst loading, the low temperature behavior of the SCR was enhanced. The drawback of this, however, was the tendency of particle emissions (sulfate) to increase at higher temperatures with higher loaded catalysts. The particle size distribution results showed high amounts of nanoparticles (in 25-30 nm size), the formation of which SCR either increased or decreased. The findings of this work provide a better understanding of the usage of SCR in combination with a higher sulfur level fuel and also of ship particle emissions, which are a growing concern.

  17. Upgrading naphtha in a multiple riser fluid catalytic cracking operation employing a catalyst mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, J.A.; Owen, H.; Schipper, P.H.

    1989-05-16

    A process is described for producing gasoline comprising contacting a hydrocarbon feed having an initial boiling-point of at least 400/sup 0/F., a 50% boiling of at least 500/sup 0/F. and an end boiling point of at least 600/sup 0/F., in a first riser, with a two component catalyst under fluid catalytic cracking conditions. At least one component of the catalyst is stripped in a stripping unit to remove entrained hydrocarbons, and regenerated wherein the two component catalyst comprises a first catalyst component selected from the group consisting of an amorphous cracking catalyst and a large pore cracking catalyst, whereby a product comprising olefins and naphtha is produced. Ethylene introduced together with the two component catalyst to a second riser, for contacting ethylene with a second catalyst component which is a shape selective medium pore crystalline silicate zeolite to produce products heavier than ethylene and to increase the temperature of the catalyst to an optimum temperature for upgrading naphtha; and naphtha is introduced to the second riser, down stream of the point of ethylene introduction, for contact with the catalyst at the optimum temperature and the naphtha is upgraded to gasoline product.

  18. Oxygen-selective immobilized liquid membranes for operation of lithium-air batteries in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Xu, Wu; Liu, Wei

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, nonaqueous-electrolyte-based Li-air batteries with O2-selective immobilized liquid membranes have been developed and operated in ambient air with 20~30% relative humidity(RH). Continuous anhydrous O2 can be supplied from the ambient through a membrane barrier layer at interface of the cathode and ambient air. The membranes allow O2 permeate through while blocking moisture. These membranes were prepared by loading O2-selective liquid fluids such as silicone oils into porous supports such as porous metal sheets and Teflon (PTFE) films. It was found that silicone oil of high viscosity shows better performance. The membrane performance was not affected by the oil loading temperature. The immobilized silicone oil (viscosity 100,000cst) membrane in porous PTFE film enabled the Li-air batteries with Ketjen black carbon air electrodes to operate in ambient air (with 20% RH) for 16.3 days with a specific capacity of 789 mAh/g carbon and a specific energy of 2182 Wh/kg carbon. Its performance is much better than reference battery assembled with the same battery material but by use of a commercial, porous PTFE diffusion membranes as the moisture barrier layer on the cathode, which only had a discharge time of 5.5 days corresponding to a specific capacity of 267 mAh/g carbon and a specific energy of 704 Wh/kg carbon. The Li-air battery with the present selective membrane barrier layer even showed better performance in ambient air operation (20% RH) than the reference battery tested in the dry air box (< 1% RH).

  19. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas Jd; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-03

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia.

  20. Biodiesel production from waste chicken fat with low free fatty acids by an integrated catalytic process of composite membrane and sodium methoxide.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenying; Li, Jianxin; He, Benqiao; Yan, Feng; Cui, Zhenyu; Wu, Kaiwei; Lin, Ligang; Qian, Xiaomin; Cheng, Yu

    2013-07-01

    An integrated process of catalytic composite membranes (CCMs) and sodium methoxide was developed to produce biodiesel from waste chicken fat. The free fatty acids (FFAs) in the chicken oil were converted to methyl esters by esterification with methanol using a novel sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES)/PES/non-woven fabric (NWF) CCMs in a flow-through catalytic membrane reactor. The CCM is that the NWF fibers were fully embedded in SPES/PES with a homogeneous and microporous structure. The oil obtained after esterification was carried out by transesterification of sodium methoxide. The results showed that the FFAs conversion obtained by CCMs with the acid capacity of 25.28 mmol (H(+)) was 92.8% at the residence time 258s. The CCMs present a good stability during the continuous running of 500 h. The conversion of transesterification was 98.1% under the optimum conditions. The quality of the biodiesel met the international standards. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Influencing factors for operational performance of a biofilm reactor with microbubble aeration using SPG membrane].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Jun-Liang

    2014-08-01

    The microbubble-aerated biofilm reactor provides a feasibility to apply microbubble aeration in aerobic wastewater treatment processes. In this study, Shirasu porous glass (SPG) membranes were used for microbubble aeration in a fixed bed biofilm reactor treating synthetic municipal wastewater. The influencing factors for operational performance of the bioreactor were investigated, including operating parameters, SPG membrane fouling and its structural changes. The results indicated that there was no significant influences of air flux, organic loading rate and packed bed on COD removal and an average COD removal efficiency of 80% -90% could be achieved under different operating conditions. On the other hand, the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations decreased significantly along with reducing air flux or increasing organic loading rate. As a result, the ammonia removal deteriorated gradually and the average ammonia removal efficiency decreased from 80% -90% to 20% -30% At the same time, the total nitrogen (TN) removal achieved in the simultaneous nitrification and denitrification process was also reduced from 30% -40% to about 20% , due to nitrification inhibition. Higher available porosity could be obtained when ring packing was used in the fixed bed, resulting in improvement of contaminant removal performance. An oxygen utilization efficiency of close to 100% could be achieved at low air fluxes or high organic loading rates during microbubble aeration. Both biofilm growth and organic foulant accumulation on SPC, membrane surface contributed to membrane fouling after long-term operation. The average pore size and porosity of SPG membrane increased significantly due to the chemical corrosion caused by alkali NaClO solution used for online cleaning. Then the air permeation of SPG membrane was affected by membrane fouling and destroyed pore structure.

  2. Expression of rat heme oxygenase in Escherichia coli as a catalytically active, full-length form that binds to bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, K; Sato, M; Yoshida, T

    1991-11-15

    A plasmid, pKK-RHO, was constructed by incorporating the coding sequence of a cDNA for rat heme oxygenase into the expression vector pKK233-2. Escherichia coli strain XL1-blue transformed with pKK-RHO produced a catalytically active, full-length heme oxygenase. The 32-kDa native enzyme expressed, was localized in the bacterial membranes, possibly due to the spontaneous membrane-binding properties of a hydrophobic segment in its C-terminal region. During cultivation, a few degraded forms of heme oxygenase that had lost their membrane-associative properties appeared. Probably, some bacterial proteases cut the native heme oxygenase at sites near its C-terminus and so release hydrophilic peptides of heme oxygenase from the membranes. A 30-kDa polypeptide, one of the degraded forms of heme oxygenase, retained ability to accept electrons from NADPH--cytochrome P450 reductase and also activity for catalyzing breakdown of heme to biliverdin. The cultured cells were pale green. From them we extracted green pigment(s), of which the absorption spectrum closely resembled that of biliverdin, suggesting that a large amount of the endogenous heme of E. coli was actually degraded to biliverdin by the expressed heme oxygenase.

  3. Catalytic unit-independent phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of type II regulatory subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase in rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Z; Luo, Y; Vereb, G

    1986-01-01

    Rat liver plasma membranes contain a 55 kDa protein which proved to be identical with type II regulatory subunit (RII) of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (kinase A) by several criteria (gel electrophoretic behaviour, peptide map, position of the autophosphorylated site). Analysis of phosphopeptide maps revealed that the membrane-bound RII was phosphorylated by a kinase which is unrelated to the catalytic unit (C) of kinase A. Dephosphorylation of the membrane-bound RII by an endogenous phosphatase was stimulated by both cyclic AMP and fluoride. Addition of C did not stimulate dephosphorylation even in the presence of ADP; moreover, protein inhibitor of C did not modify the effects of cyclic AMP or fluoride. The effects of both cyclic AMP and fluoride were, however, inhibited by C. Results indicate that rat liver plasma membranes contain a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation system for which RII is a relatively specific substrate. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3010951

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of water content across the Nafion membrane in an operational PEM fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ziheng; Martin, Jonathan; Wu, Jinfeng; Wang, Haijiang; Promislow, Keith; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2008-08-01

    Water management is critical to optimize the operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. At present, numerical models are employed to guide water management in such fuel cells. Accurate measurements of water content variation in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells are required to validate these models and to optimize fuel cell behavior. We report a direct water content measurement across the Nafion membrane in an operational polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, employing double half k-space spin echo single point imaging techniques. The MRI measurements with T2 mapping were undertaken with a parallel plate resonator to avoid the effects of RF screening. The parallel plate resonator employs the electrodes inherent to the fuel cell to create a resonant circuit at RF frequencies for MR excitation and detection, while still operating as a conventional fuel cell at DC. Three stages of fuel cell operation were investigated: activation, operation and dehydration. Each profile was acquired in 6 min, with 6 μm nominal resolution and a SNR of better than 15.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of water content across the Nafion membrane in an operational PEM fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziheng; Martin, Jonathan; Wu, Jinfeng; Wang, Haijiang; Promislow, Keith; Balcom, Bruce J

    2008-08-01

    Water management is critical to optimize the operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. At present, numerical models are employed to guide water management in such fuel cells. Accurate measurements of water content variation in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells are required to validate these models and to optimize fuel cell behavior. We report a direct water content measurement across the Nafion membrane in an operational polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, employing double half k-space spin echo single point imaging techniques. The MRI measurements with T2 mapping were undertaken with a parallel plate resonator to avoid the effects of RF screening. The parallel plate resonator employs the electrodes inherent to the fuel cell to create a resonant circuit at RF frequencies for MR excitation and detection, while still operating as a conventional fuel cell at DC. Three stages of fuel cell operation were investigated: activation, operation and dehydration. Each profile was acquired in 6 min, with 6 microm nominal resolution and a SNR of better than 15.

  6. Treatment of municipal landfill leachate by catalytic wet air oxidation: Assessment of the role of operating parameters by factorial design

    SciTech Connect

    Anglada, Angela; Urtiaga, Ane; Ortiz, Inmaculada; Diamadopoulos, Evan

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Landfill leachates can be treated effectively by catalytic wet oxidation. > Addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the presence of transition metals promotes degradation. > Factorial design evaluates the statistically significant operating conditions. > H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, reaction time and temperature are critical in determining performance. - Abstract: The wet air oxidation (WAO) of municipal landfill leachate catalyzed by cupric ions and promoted by hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The effect of operating conditions such as WAO treatment time (15-30 min), temperature (160-200 deg. C), Cu{sup 2+} concentration (250-750 mg L{sup -1}) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration (0-1500 mg L{sup -1}) on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was investigated by factorial design considering a two-stage, sequential process comprising the heating-up of the reactor and the actual WAO. The leachate, at an initial COD of 4920 mg L{sup -1}, was acidified to pH 3 leading to 31% COD decrease presumably due to the coagulation/precipitation of colloidal and other organic matter. During the 45 min long heating-up period of the WAO reactor under an inert atmosphere, COD removal values up to 35% (based on the initial COD value) were recorded as a result of the catalytic decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to reactive hydroxyl radicals. WAO at 2.5 MPa oxygen partial pressure advanced treatment further; for example, 22 min of oxidation at 200 deg. C, 250 mg L{sup -1} Cu{sup 2+} and 0-1500 mg L{sup -1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resulted in an overall (i.e. including acidification and heating-up) COD reduction of 78%. Amongst the operating variables in question, temperature had the strongest influence on both the heating-up and WAO stages, while H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration strongly affected the former and reaction time the latter. Nonetheless, the effects of temperature and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration were found to depend on the concentration levels of catalyst as suggested by the

  7. Impact of operating conditions on the removal of endocrine disrupting chemicals by membrane photocatalytic reactor.

    PubMed

    López Fernández, Raquel; Coleman, Heather M; Le-Clech, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    This study focuses on the performance of a submerged membrane photocatalytic reactor for the removal of 17beta-oestradiol (E2) in the presence of humic acid (HA). In addition to the impact of operating parameters, such as membrane pore size, ultraviolet (UV) intensity and hydraulic retention time (HRT), the influence of long-term operation was also assessed by advanced characterization of the fouling layer formed on the membrane. The tighter (0.04 microm) hollow fibre polyvinylydene fluoride (PVDF) membrane was found to exhibit not only higher HA removal than the (0.2 microm) module (85% and 75%, respectively), but also greater transmembrane pressure (TMP) values and higher irreversible fouling. Long-term operation conditions have been simulated by conducting an ageing catalyst process and demonstrated a decrease in performance obtained with time. The artificially aged TiO2 resulted in higher TMP values and lower HA removals (about 10-20% decrease) compared with the non-aged catalyst. For E2 removal in the presence of HA, the passive adsorption of the oestrogen onto the organic matter was found to be significant (40% of the E2 adsorbed after I h), demonstrating the importance of the nature of the water matrix for this type of treatment process. An increase in the UV light intensity was observed to favour the E2 elimination, leading to more than 90% removal when using 64 W combined with PVDF membrane and an HRT of 3 h.

  8. Reverse osmosis filtration for space mission wastewater: membrane properties and operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Lueptow, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) is a compact process that has potential for the removal of ionic and organic pollutants for recycling space mission wastewater. Seven candidate RO membranes were compared using a batch stirred cell to determine the membrane flux and the solute rejection for synthetic space mission wastewaters. Even though the urea molecule is larger than ions such as Na+, Cl-, and NH4+, the rejection of urea is lower. This indicates that the chemical interaction between solutes and the membrane is more important than the size exclusion effect. Low pressure reverse osmosis (LPRO) membranes appear to be most desirable because of their high permeate flux and rejection. Solute rejection is dependent on the shear rate, indicating the importance of concentration polarization. A simple transport model based on the solution-diffusion model incorporating concentration polarization is used to interpret the experimental results and predict rejection over a range of operating conditions. Grant numbers: NAG 9-1053.

  9. Reverse osmosis filtration for space mission wastewater: membrane properties and operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Lueptow, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) is a compact process that has potential for the removal of ionic and organic pollutants for recycling space mission wastewater. Seven candidate RO membranes were compared using a batch stirred cell to determine the membrane flux and the solute rejection for synthetic space mission wastewaters. Even though the urea molecule is larger than ions such as Na+, Cl-, and NH4+, the rejection of urea is lower. This indicates that the chemical interaction between solutes and the membrane is more important than the size exclusion effect. Low pressure reverse osmosis (LPRO) membranes appear to be most desirable because of their high permeate flux and rejection. Solute rejection is dependent on the shear rate, indicating the importance of concentration polarization. A simple transport model based on the solution-diffusion model incorporating concentration polarization is used to interpret the experimental results and predict rejection over a range of operating conditions. Grant numbers: NAG 9-1053.

  10. Flux-step method for the assessment of operational conditions in a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Ezio; Goffredo, Vito; Campanella, Mariachiara; Falk, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    A flux-step method was used for monitoring the pressure variation in a solids separation membrane at different operating conditions. A submerged membrane bioreactor pilot plant, used during the short-term tests, was used to purify actual restaurant wastewater. The influence of membrane backwash and relaxation on the variation of pressure variation was also evaluated. In order to reduce the deposition of irreversible fouling, the authors modified the literature-supported filtration to backwash cycling with filtration and relaxation cycling. The trials maintained a constant filtration to relaxation ratio that was in line with optimal filtration to backwashing ratios found in the literature. The relaxation cycling between two constant flux-steps effectively counteracted membrane fouling and the excessive decrease in average pressure, and it results in a lower waste of energy and water than a backwashing strategy.

  11. Reverse osmosis filtration for space mission wastewater: membrane properties and operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Lueptow, R M

    2001-02-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) is a compact process that has potential for the removal of ionic and organic pollutants for recycling space mission wastewater. Seven candidate RO membranes were compared using a batch stirred cell to determine the membrane flux and the solute rejection for synthetic space mission wastewaters. Even though the urea molecule is larger than ions such as Na+, Cl-, and NH4+, the rejection of urea is lower. This indicates that the chemical interaction between solutes and the membrane is more important than the size exclusion effect. Low pressure reverse osmosis (LPRO) membranes appear to be most desirable because of their high permeate flux and rejection. Solute rejection is dependent on the shear rate, indicating the importance of concentration polarization. A simple transport model based on the solution-diffusion model incorporating concentration polarization is used to interpret the experimental results and predict rejection over a range of operating conditions. Grant numbers: NAG 9-1053.

  12. The catalytic activity of the endoplasmic reticulum-resident protein microsomal epoxide hydrolase towards carcinogens is retained on inversion of its membrane topology.

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, T; Holler, R; Löllmann, B; Arand, M; Oesch, F

    1996-01-01

    Diol epoxides formed by the sequential action of cytochrome P-450 and the microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represent an important class of ultimate carcinogenic metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The role of the membrane orientation of cytochrome P-450 and mEH relative to each other in this catalytic cascade is not known. Cytochrome P-450 is known to have a type I topology. According to the algorithm of Hartman, Rapoport and Lodish [(1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 5786-5790], which allows the prediction of the membrane topology of proteins, mEH should adopt a type II membrane topology. Experimentally, mEH membrane topology has been disputed. Here we demonstrate that, in contrast with the theoretical prediction, the rat mEH has exclusively a type I membrane topology. Moreover we show that this topology can be inverted without affecting the catalytic activity of mEH. Our conclusions are supported by the observation that two mEH constructs (mEHg1 and mEHg2), containing engineered potential glycosylation sites at two separate locations after the C-terminal site of the membrane anchor, were not glycosylated in fibroblasts. However, changing the net charge at the N-terminus of these engineered mEH proteins by +3 resulted in proteins (++mEHg1 and ++mEHg2) that became glycosylated and consequently had a type II topology. The sensitivity of these glycosylated proteins to endoglycosidase H indicated that, like the native mEH, they are still retained in the ER. The engineered mEH proteins were integrated into membranes as they were resistant to alkaline extraction. Interestingly, an insect mEH with a charge distribution in its N-terminus similar to ++mEHg1 has recently been isolated. This enzyme might well display a type II topology instead of the type I topology of the rat mEH. Importantly, mEHg1, having the natural cytosolic orientation, as well as ++mEHg1, having an artificial huminal orientation, displayed rather

  13. BSM-MBR: a benchmark simulation model to compare control and operational strategies for membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Maere, Thomas; Verrecht, Bart; Moerenhout, Stefanie; Judd, Simon; Nopens, Ingmar

    2011-03-01

    A benchmark simulation model for membrane bioreactors (BSM-MBR) was developed to evaluate operational and control strategies in terms of effluent quality and operational costs. The configuration of the existing BSM1 for conventional wastewater treatment plants was adapted using reactor volumes, pumped sludge flows and membrane filtration for the water-sludge separation. The BSM1 performance criteria were extended for an MBR taking into account additional pumping requirements for permeate production and aeration requirements for membrane fouling prevention. To incorporate the effects of elevated sludge concentrations on aeration efficiency and costs a dedicated aeration model was adopted. Steady-state and dynamic simulations revealed BSM-MBR, as expected, to out-perform BSM1 for effluent quality, mainly due to complete retention of solids and improved ammonium removal from extensive aeration combined with higher biomass levels. However, this was at the expense of significantly higher operational costs. A comparison with three large-scale MBRs showed BSM-MBR energy costs to be realistic. The membrane aeration costs for the open loop simulations were rather high, attributed to non-optimization of BSM-MBR. As proof of concept two closed loop simulations were run to demonstrate the usefulness of BSM-MBR for identifying control strategies to lower operational costs without compromising effluent quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term testing of a high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell short stack operated with improved polybenzimidazole-based composite membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinar, F. Javier; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.; Úbeda, Diego; Lobato, Justo

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the feasibility of a 150 cm2 high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) stack operated with modified proton exchange membranes is demonstrated. The short fuel cell stack was manufactured using a total of three 50 cm2 membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The PEM technology is based on a polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The obtained results were compared with those obtained using a HT-PEMFC stack with unmodified membranes. The membranes were cast from a PBI polymer synthesized in the laboratory, and the modified membranes contained 2 wt.% micro-sized TiO2 as a filler. Long-term tests were performed in both constant and dynamic loading modes. The fuel cell stack with 2 wt.% TiO2 composite PBI membranes exhibited an irreversible voltage loss of less than 2% after 1100 h of operation. In addition, the acid loss was reduced from 2% for the fuel cell stack with unmodified membranes to 0.6% for the fuel cell stack with modified membranes. The results demonstrate that introducing filler into the membranes enhances the durability and stability of this type of fuel cell technology. Moreover, the fuel cell stack system also exhibits very rapid and stable power and voltage output responses under dynamic load regimes.

  15. Role of PSD95 in membrane association and catalytic activity of nNOSalpha in nitrergic varicosities in mice gut.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Arun; He, Xue-Dao; Goyal, Raj K

    2009-10-01

    We have recently shown that membrane association of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-alpha (nNOSalpha) is critical in the regulation of synthesis of NO during nitrergic neurotransmission. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the synapse-associated proteins (SAPs) in membrane association of nNOSalpha. Varicosities (swellings on terminal axons) were isolated from mice gastrointestinal tract and examined for nNOSalpha, postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), and membrane interactions by coimmunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE. Our results show that PSD95 protein was present in the membrane fraction of the nerve varicosity, whereas both PSD95 and SAP97 were present in the cytosol. nNOSalpha was associated with PSD95 but not SAP97. nNOSalpha-PSD95 complex was bound to the membrane via palmitoylation of PSD95. Depalmitoylation of PSD95 with 2-bromopalmitate dislocates nNOSalpha and PSD95 from the varicosity membrane and abolishes NO production. These studies show that palmitoylation of PSD95 anchors nNOSalpha to the varicosity membrane and that it is obligatory for NO production by the enzyme. Palmitoylation of PSD95 may provide a novel target for regulation of nitrergic neurotransmission.

  16. New nanosized catalytic membrane reactors for hydrogenation with stored hydrogen: Prerequisites and the experimental basis for their creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. P.; Tsodikov, M. V.; Parenago, O. P.; Teplyakov, V. V.

    2010-12-01

    The prerequisites and prospects for creating a new generation of nanosized membrane reactors are considered. For the first time, hydrogenation reactions take place in ceramic membrane pores with hydrogen adsorbed beforehand in mono- and multilayered oriented carbon nanotubes with graphene walls (OCNTGs) formed on the internal pore surface. It is shown for Trumem microfiltration membranes with D avg ˜130 nm that oxidation reactions of CO on a Cu0.03Ti0.97O2 ± δ catalyst and the oxidative conversion of methane into synthesis gas and light hydrocarbons on La + Ce/MgO are considerably enhanced when they occur in membranes. Regularities of hydrogen adsorption, storage, and desorption in nanosized membrane reactors are investigated through OCNTG formation in Trumem ultrafiltration membrane pores with D avg = 50 and 90 nm and their saturation with hydrogen at a pressure of 10-13 MPa. It is shown that the amount of adsorbed hydrogen reaches 14.0% of OCNTG mass. Using thermogravimetric analysis in combination with mass-spectrometric analysis, hydrogen adsorption in OCNTG is first determined and its desorption is found to proceed at atmospheric pressure at a temperature of ˜175°C. It is shown that adsorbed hydrogen affects the transport properties of the membranes, reducing their efficiency with respect to liquids by 4-26 times. This is indirect confirmation of its high activity, due apparently the dissociative mechanism of adsorption.

  17. Enzymatic cleaning of biofouled thin-film composite reverse osmosis (RO) membrane operated in a biofilm membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohiuddin; Danielsen, Steffen; Johansen, Katja; Lorenz, Lindsey; Nelson, Sara; Camper, Anne

    2014-02-01

    Application of environmentally friendly enzymes to remove thin-film composite (TFC) reverse osmosis (RO) membrane biofoulants without changing the physico-chemical properties of the RO surface is a challenging and new concept. Eight enzymes from Novozyme A/S were tested using a commercially available biofouling-resistant TFC polyamide RO membrane (BW30, FilmTech Corporation, Dow Chemical Co.) without filtration in a rotating disk reactor system operated for 58 days. At the end of the operation, the accumulated biofoulants on the TFC RO surfaces were treated with the three best enzymes, Subtilisin protease and lipase; dextranase; and polygalacturonase (PG) based enzymes, at neutral pH (~7) and doses of 50, 100, and 150 ppm. Contact times were 18 and 36 h. Live/dead staining, epifluorescence microscopy measurements, and 5 μm thick cryo-sections of enzyme and physically treated biofouled membranes revealed that Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzymes at 100 ppm and 18 h contact time were optimal for removing most of the cells and proteins from the RO surface. Culturable cells inside the biofilm declined by more than five logs even at the lower dose (50 ppm) and shorter incubation period (18 h). Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzyme cleaning at 100 ppm and for 18 h contact time restored the hydrophobicity of the TFC RO surface to its virgin condition while physical cleaning alone resulted in a 50° increase in hydrophobicity. Moreover, at this optimum working condition, the Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzyme treatment of biofouled RO surface also restored the surface roughness measured with atomic force microscopy and the mass percentage of the chemical compositions on the TFC surface estimated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to its virgin condition. This novel study will encourage the further development and application of enzymes to remove biofoulants on the RO surface without changing its surface properties.

  18. Tympanic membrane perforation and hearing loss from blast overpressure in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom wounded.

    PubMed

    Ritenour, Amber E; Wickley, Aaron; Ritenour, Joshua S; Kriete, Brian R; Blackbourne, Lorne H; Holcomb, John B; Wade, Charles E

    2008-02-01

    Tympanic membrane perforation is the most common primary blast injury in the current conflicts and occurs in approximately one tenth of service members wounded by combat explosions. We wanted to determine the severity of perforation and its effect on hearing and combat readiness. This analysis is a retrospective study of US service members injured in combat explosions in Afghanistan or Iraq and treated at our institution between March 2003 and July 2006. Data captured included location and grade of perforation, symptoms, healing rates, audiogram results, need for hearing aids, and loss of eligibility for military service. Of 436 explosion-wounded patients admitted to our facility, 65 (15%) patients had tympanic membrane perforation diagnosed by the otolaryngology service. A total of 97 tympanic membrane perforations occurred among 65 patients. The average surface area involved was 41% +/- 32% (right) and 35% +/- 34% (left). More than one third of perforations were grade 4. The most common locations were central and anterior-inferior. Most (83%) patients reported symptoms, most commonly diminished hearing (77%) and tinnitus (50%). Outcome data were available for 77% of perforations. Spontaneous healing occurred in 48%. The remainder (52%) had surgical intervention. The most common audiogram abnormality was mild high frequency hearing loss. Ultimately, three patients (5%) required hearing aids and one discharge from military service. Tympanic membrane perforation occurs in 16% of explosion-injured patients. Most patients are symptomatic and many have large perforations requiring operative intervention. Long-term hearing loss is uncommon but does impact ability to continue military service.

  19. The effects of operating parameters on spiramycin removal by nanofiltration membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changwei; Fan, Weihong; Wang, Tao; Hou, Deyin; Luan, Zhaokun

    2013-01-01

    Spiramycin removal from wastewater using four nanofiltration (NF) membranes (NF270, NF90, ESNA1-K1 and ESNA1-LF2-LD) was studied. The effects of operating pressure, feed temperature, feed concentration, cation and anion ions on the permeate flux rate and spiramycin rejection were investigated. The results show that increasing operating pressure resulted in the increase of both permeate flux and spiramycin rejection. The flux rate increased almost linearly with temperature, while the spiramycin rejection decreased. The permeate flux rate declined relatively with increasing feed concentration of spiramycin for NF270 and ESNA1-LF2-LD membranes compared with NF90 and ESNA1-K membranes. The presence of cations reduced spiramycin rejection, with the strength of influence for the NF270 NF membrane following the order Mg(2+)>Ca(2+)>K(+). The presence of anions also resulted in decreased spiramycin rejection, the strength of the effect following the order NO(3)(-)>Cl(-)>SO(4)(2-) for the NF270 membrane.

  20. Optimising the operation of a MBR pilot plant by quantitative analysis of the membrane fouling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jiang, T; Kennedy, M D; Guinzbourg, B F; Vanrolleghem, P A; Schippers, J C

    2005-01-01

    In order to optimize some operational conditions of MBR systems, a MBR pilot plant equipped with a submerged hollow fibre membrane module was employed in this study. The pilot MBR was fed with real municipal wastewater and the filtration flux, backwashing interval, aeration frequency and temperature were varied. A filtration flux below 25 I/m2h is generally recommended, at below this flux, the MBR operated at sub-critical flux conditions, the filter cake was minimized and membrane fouling was mainly attributed to the membrane pore blocking. Moreover, the membrane fouling, at below 25 I/m2h, was more reversible to backwashing; above this value, backwashing became less efficient to clean the membrane. Less frequent backwashing (e.g. 600 s filtration/45 s backwashing) decreased the amount of fouling irreversible to backwashing and its performance was superior to that of frequent backwashing (e.g. 200 s filtration/15 s backwashing). The MBR suffered more fouling at low temperature conditions (e.g. at 13-14 degrees C) than at high temperature conditions (e.g. at 17-18 degrees C). A conceptual model was built up and successfully interpreted this temperature effect.

  1. Novel membranes for proton exchange membrane fuel cell operation above 120°C. Final report for period October 1, 1998 to December 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Lee, Seung-Jae; Costamagna, Paola; Yang, Christopher; Adjemian, Kevork; Bocarsly, Andrew; Ogden, Joan M.; Benziger, Jay

    2000-05-01

    In this project we investigated the experimental performance of three new classes of membranes, composites of perfluorosulfonic acid polymers with heteropolyacides, hydrated oxides and fast proton conducting glasses, which are promising candidates as electrolytes for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), capable of operation at temperatures above 120°C. The motivations for PEMFC's operation at this temperature are to: 1) minimize the CO poisoning problem (adsorption of CO onto the platinum catalyst is greatly reduced at these temperatures), 2) find better solutions for the water and thermal management problems in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, 3) find potentially lower cost materials for proton exchange membranes. We prepared and characterized a variety of novel membrane materials. The most promising of these have been evaluated for performance in a single, small area (5cm2) fuel cell run on hydrogen and oxygen. Our results establish the technical feasibility of PEMFC operation above 120°C.

  2. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Araye, Anne; Goudet, Amélie; Barbier, Julien; Pichard, Sylvain; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pérez, Javier; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Chenal, Alexandre; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC), a translocation domain (HN) and a receptor-binding domain (HC). Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC. PMID:27070312

  3. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Araye, Anne; Goudet, Amélie; Barbier, Julien; Pichard, Sylvain; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pérez, Javier; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Chenal, Alexandre; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC), a translocation domain (HN) and a receptor-binding domain (HC). Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC.

  4. Correct manipulation method of MBR operating parameters in membrane fouling studies.

    PubMed

    Kayaalp, N; Kinaci, C

    2013-01-01

    In this study, various parameter manipulation methods, variable sludge retention time (SRT)-variable mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration, constant SRT-variable MLSS concentration and variable SRT-constant MLSS concentration, were compared based on the interrelationships among the following membrane bioreactor operating parameters: SRT, food to microorganisms (biomass) (F/M) ratio, MLSS concentration, volumetric organic loading rate (OLR) and membrane flux. Although it is the most applied method, concurrent change of SRT (or F/M ratio) and MLSS concentration is not a good parameter manipulation method because it causes unnecessary changes in many other parameters such as viscosity, oxygen transfer efficiency and oxygen utilization rate. The method of constant SRT-variable MLSS concentration has similar disadvantages to the method of variable SRT-variable MLSS concentration. The best alternative parameter manipulation method to study membrane fouling is the method of variable SRT-constant MLSS concentration because this method eliminates unnecessary changes in other parameters. In addition, while changing OLR or hydraulic retention time (HRT), contrary to the common application, membrane flux should be kept constant because any change in flux overrides changes in other parameters. Accordingly, required changes in OLR or HRT should be made by adjusting membrane area rather than membrane flux.

  5. Pressure retarded osmosis for energy production: membrane materials and operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Choi, J-S; Lee, S

    2012-01-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is a novel membrane process to produce energy. PRO has the potential to convert the osmotic pressure difference between fresh water (i.e. river water) and seawater to electricity. Moreover, it can recover energy from highly concentrated brine in seawater desalination. Nevertheless, relatively little research has been undertaken for fundamental understanding of the PRO process. In this study, the characteristics of the PRO process were examined using a proof-of-concept device. Forward osmosis (FO), reverse osmosis (RO), and nanofiltration (NF) membranes were compared in terms of flux rate and concentration polarization ratio. The results indicated that the theoretical energy production by PRO depends on the membrane type as well as operating conditions (i.e. back pressure). The FO membrane had the highest energy efficiency while the NF membrane had the lowest efficiency. However, the energy production rate was low due to high internal concentration polarization (ICP) in the PRO membrane. This finding suggests that the control of the ICP is essential for practical application of PRO for energy production.

  6. The intra-operative radius joystick test to diagnose complete disruption of the interosseous membrane.

    PubMed

    Soubeyrand, M; Ciais, G; Wassermann, V; Kalouche, I; Biau, D; Dumontier, C; Gagey, O

    2011-10-01

    Disruption of the interosseous membrane is easily missed in patients with Essex-Lopresti syndrome. None of the imaging techniques available for diagnosing disruption of the interosseous membrane are completely dependable. We undertook an investigation to identify whether a simple intra-operative test could be used to diagnose disruption of the interosseous membrane during surgery for fracture of the radial head and to see if the test was reproducible. We studied 20 cadaveric forearms after excision of the radial head, ten with and ten without disruption of the interosseous membrane. On each forearm, we performed the radius joystick test: moderate lateral traction was applied to the radial neck with the forearm in maximal pronation, to look for lateral displacement of the proximal radius indicating that the interosseous membrane had been disrupted. Each of six surgeons (three junior and three senior) performed the test on two consecutive days. Intra-observer agreement was 77% (95% confidence interval (CI) 67 to 85) and interobserver agreement was 97% (95% CI 92 to 100). Sensitivity was 100% (95% CI 97 to 100), specificity 88% (95% CI 81 to 93), positive predictive value 90% (95% CI 83 to 94), and negative predictive value 100%). This cadaveric study suggests that the radius joystick test may be useful for detecting disruption of the interosseous membrane in patients undergoing open surgery for fracture of the radial head and is reproducible. A confirmatory study in vivo is now required.

  7. Durability of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Operated at Subfreezing Temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Macauley, Natalia; Lujan, Roger W.; Spernjak, Dusan; ...

    2016-09-15

    The structure, composition, and interfaces of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) and gas-diffusion layers (GDLs) have a significant effect on the performance of single-proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells operated isothermally at subfreezing temperatures. During isothermal constant-current operation at subfreezing temperatures, water forming at the cathode initially hydrates the membrane, then forms ice in the catalyst layer and/or GDL. This ice formation results in a gradual decay in voltage. High-frequency resistance initially decreases due to an increase in membrane water content and then increases over time as the contact resistance increases. The water/ice holding capacity of a fuel cell decreases with decreasing subfreezingmore » temperature (-10°C vs. -20°C vs. -30°C) and increasing current density (0.02 A cm-2 vs. 0.04 A cm-2). Ice formation monitored using in-situ high-resolution neutron radiography indicated that the ice was concentrated near the cathode catalyst layer at low operating temperatures (≈-20°C) and high current densities (0.04 A cm-2). Significant ice formation was also observed in the GDLs at higher subfreezing temperatures (≈-10°C) and lower current densities (0.02 A cm-2). These results are in good agreement with the long-term durability observations that show more severe degradation at lower temperatures (-20°C and -30°C).« less

  8. The effect of intermittent operation on a wind-powered membrane system for brackish water desalination.

    PubMed

    Park, G L; Schäfer, A I; Richards, B S

    2012-01-01

    Renewable energy powered membrane systems that are directly-connected must take account of both the inherent fluctuations and the intermittency of the energy resource. In order to determine the effect of intermittent operation, a membrane system was tested with variables of (i) amplitude from 60 to 300 W and (ii) length of time with no power from 0.5 to 3 min. This was performed over one hour periods with six on/off cycles to simulate the system operating under intermittent operation for short periods of time when directly-connected to a small wind turbine. The setup used a Filmtec BW30-4040 brackish water reverse osmosis membrane with feed waters of 2,750 mg/L and 5,500 mg/L NaCl. The results showed that the membrane system produced potable water under the majority of intermittency experiments performed. There was a relatively large increase in the average salt concentration of the permeate, especially when the system was off for shorter periods of time (0.5-1 min). Longer periods of no power (1-3 min) did not have as significant an effect on the average water quality. This is important when the need for energy buffering or short term storage is considered for these systems as it shows the potential for improving the overall flux and water quality using temporary energy storage.

  9. Evaluation of ceramic and membrane diffusers under operating conditions with the dynamic offgas method.

    PubMed

    Libra, J A; Sahlmann, C; Schuchardt, A; Handschag, J; Wiesmann, U; Gnirss, R

    2005-01-01

    The aeration systems of two full-scale, activated-sludge basins were compared during a period of three years, under the same operating conditions, using dynamic offgas testing. Only the material of the diffuser was different (membrane versus ceramic-tube diffusers). The investigation has shown that, although the membrane diffusers have higher initial standard-oxygen-transfer efficiency (alphaSOTE) and standard-aeration efficiency (alphaSAE), these decreased over time, while the alphaSAE of the ceramic diffusers started lower, but increased slightly over the whole period. A cost comparison makes clear how important it is to evaluate the aeration system under process conditions. The operating costs were the dominant factor (approximately 10x higher than capital costs), and operating costs were approximately 20% higher for membrane versus ceramic diffusers. The poor performance of the membrane-tube diffusers under process conditions could be explained on the basis of the actual alphaAE values in the basin, not the standardized values.

  10. Near-infrared imaging of water in a polymer electrolyte membrane during a fuel cell operation.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shigeaki; Jojima, Yuki; Miyata, Yasushi; Kitagawa, Kuniyuki

    2010-11-15

    A novel technique of spectroscopic imaging using a near-infrared (NIR) laser sheet beam was developed for visualization of liquid water in a proton-exchange membrane (PEM) sandwiched between two opaque electrodes set in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). In-plane two-dimensional distribution of water in the thin membrane was clearly visualized during the fuel cell operation. Under the condition of fuel feeding into the PEFC without humidification, water was generated by the fuel cell reaction in the whole electrode area. In contrast, under the condition of fuel feeding with humidification, the PEM got wet in the vicinity of a gas flow field locally.

  11. Treatment of municipal landfill leachate by catalytic wet air oxidation: Assessment of the role of operating parameters by factorial design.

    PubMed

    Anglada, Angela; Urtiaga, Ane; Ortiz, Inmaculada; Mantzavinos, Dionissios; Diamadopoulos, Evan

    2011-08-01

    The wet air oxidation (WAO) of municipal landfill leachate catalyzed by cupric ions and promoted by hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The effect of operating conditions such as WAO treatment time (15-30min), temperature (160-200°C), Cu(2+) concentration (250-750mgL(-1)) and H(2)O(2) concentration (0-1500mgL(-1)) on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was investigated by factorial design considering a two-stage, sequential process comprising the heating-up of the reactor and the actual WAO. The leachate, at an initial COD of 4920mgL(-1), was acidified to pH 3 leading to 31% COD decrease presumably due to the coagulation/precipitation of colloidal and other organic matter. During the 45min long heating-up period of the WAO reactor under an inert atmosphere, COD removal values up to 35% (based on the initial COD value) were recorded as a result of the catalytic decomposition of H(2)O(2) to reactive hydroxyl radicals. WAO at 2.5MPa oxygen partial pressure advanced treatment further; for example, 22min of oxidation at 200°C, 250mgL(-1) Cu(2+) and 0-1500mgL(-1) H(2)O(2) resulted in an overall (i.e. including acidification and heating-up) COD reduction of 78%. Amongst the operating variables in question, temperature had the strongest influence on both the heating-up and WAO stages, while H(2)O(2) concentration strongly affected the former and reaction time the latter. Nonetheless, the effects of temperature and H(2)O(2) concentration were found to depend on the concentration levels of catalyst as suggested by the significance of their 3rd order interaction term.

  12. Influence of operating conditions on ceramic ultrafiltration membrane performance when treating textile effluents.

    PubMed

    Barredo-Damas, S; Alcaina-Miranda, M I; Gemma, M; Iborra-Clar, M I; Mendoza-Roca, J A

    2011-01-01

    This work studies the performance of three commercial ceramic ultrafiltration membranes (ZrO(2)-TiO(2)) treating raw effluent from a textile industry. The effect of crossflow velocity at 3, 4 and 5 m s(-1) as well as membrane characteristics, such as molecular weight cut-off (30, 50 and 150 kDa), on process performance were studied. Experiments were carried out in concentration mode in order to observe the effect of volume reduction factor simultaneously. Results showed a combined influence of both crossflow velocity and molecular weight cut-off on flux performance. TOC and COD removals up to 70% and 84% respectively were reached. On the other hand, almost complete color (>97%) and turbidity (>99%) removals were achieved for all the membranes and operating conditions.

  13. Recent Operational Experience with the Internal Thermal Control System Dual-Membrane Gas Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Lukens, Clark; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2004-01-01

    A dual-membrane gas trap is currently used to remove gas bubbles from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station. The gas trap consists of concentric tube membrane pairs, comprised of outer hydrophilic tubes and inner hydrophobic fibers. Liquid coolant passes through the outer hydrophilic membrane, which traps the gas bubbles. The inner hydrophobic fiber allows the trapped gas bubbles to pass through and vent to the ambient atmosphere in the cabin. The gas removal performance and operational lifetime of the gas trap have been affected by contamination in the ITCS coolant. However, the gas trap has performed flawlessly with regard to its purpose of preventing gas bubbles from causing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. This paper discusses on-orbit events over the course of the last year related to the performance and functioning of the gas trap.

  14. The impact of different operating conditions on membrane fouling and EPS production.

    PubMed

    Dvořák, Lukáš; Gómez, Marcel; Dvořáková, Markéta; Růžičková, Iveta; Wanner, Jiří

    2011-07-01

    The main goal of this research was to investigate how different factors influence membrane fouling. The impact of the different concentrations of activated sludge and the amount of extracellular polymer substances (EPS) were monitored. Two pilot plants with submerged membrane modules (hollow fiber and flat sheet) were operated and the raw wastewater was used. Humic substances were identified as the major components of EPS in the activated sludge (more than 34%) in both pilot plants. As the basic constituent in permeate, humic substances were identified as the most dominant components in the effluent (61%) in both pilot plants. Conversely, proteins were mostly analyzed in permeate and supernatant below the detection limit. The total amount of EPS [mgg(-1) (VSS)] was similar for concentrations of activated sludge 6, 10 and 14 g L(-1). Carbohydrates were identified as the component of EPS which tends most to clog membranes.

  15. Use of silicone membranes to enhance gas transfer during microbial fuel cell operation on carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Hussain, A; Tartakovsky, B; Guiot, S R; Raghavan, V

    2011-12-01

    Electricity generation in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) using carbon monoxide (CO) or synthesis gas (syngas) as a carbon source has been demonstrated recently. A major challenge associated with CO or syngas utilization is the mass transfer limitation of these sparingly soluble gases in the aqueous phase. This study evaluated the applicability of a dense polymer silicone membrane and thin wall silicone tubing for CO mass transfer in MFCs. Replacing the sparger used in our previous study with the membrane systems for CO delivery resulted in improved MFC performance and CO transformation efficiency. A power output and CO transformation efficiency of up to 18 mW LR(-1) (normalized to anode compartment volume) and 98%, respectively, was obtained. The use of membrane systems offers the advantage of improved mass transfer and reduced reactor volume, thus increasing the volumetric power output of MFCs operating on a gaseous substrate such as CO.

  16. Nafion-porous cerium oxide nanotubes composite membrane for polymer electrolyte fuel cells operated under dry conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketpang, Kriangsak; Oh, Kwangjin; Lim, Sung-Chul; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2016-10-01

    A composite membrane operated in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) under low relative humidity (RH) is developed by incorporating cerium oxide nanotubes (CeNT) into a perfluorosulfonic acid (Nafion®) membrane. Porous CeNT is synthesized by direct heating a precursor impregnated polymer fibers at 500 °C under an air atmosphere. Compared to recast Nafion and commercial Nafion (NRE-212) membranes, the Nafion-CeNT composite membrane generates 1.1 times higher power density at 0.6 V, operated at 80 °C under 100% RH. Compared to Nafion-cerium oxide nanoparticles (Nafion-CeNP) membrane, the Nafion-CeNT provides 1.2 and 1.7 times higher PEFC performance at 0.6 V when operated at 80 °C under 100% and 18% RH, respectively. Additionally, the Nafion-CeNT composite membrane exhibits a good fuel cell operation under 18% RH at 80 °C. Specifically, the fluoride emission rate of Nafion-CeNT composite membrane is 20 times lower than that of the commercial NRE-212 membrane when operated under 18% RH at 80 °C for 96 h. The outstanding PEFC performance and durability operated under dry conditions is mainly attributed to the facile water diffusion capability as well as the effective hydroxyl radical scavenging property of the CeNT filler, resulting in significantly mitigating both the ohmic resistance and Nafion membrane degradation.

  17. P-glycoprotein senses its substrates and the lateral membrane packing density: consequences for the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Aänismaa, Päivi; Gatlik-Landwojtowicz, Ewa; Seelig, Anna

    2008-09-23

    P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) prevents absorption (e.g., blood-brain barrier) or enhances excretion (e.g., kidney) by moving substrates from the cytosolic to the extracellular membrane leaflet at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. It translocates various drugs and functions in membranes exhibiting different lateral packing densities. To gain more functional insight, we measured the temperature dependence of the P-glycoprotein ATPase activity in NIH-MDR1-G185 cell membranes in the absence and presence of three drugs (promazine, verapamil, and PSC833), exhibiting significantly different transporter affinities. Activation enthalpies (Delta H(++)) and entropies ( TDelta S(++)) were derived from Eyring plots. In the absence of drugs, the activation enthalpy and the free energy of activation for P-glycoprotein ATPase activity was determined as Delta H(++) = 92.6 +/- 4.2 kJ/mol and Delta G(++) = 73.1 +/- 7.2 kJ/mol, respectively. Increasing the drug concentration reduced the activation enthalpy, whereby the drug with the highest transporter affinity had the strongest effect (DeltaDelta H(++) = -21%). The free energy of activation decreased for activating (DeltaDelta G(++) = approximately -3.8%) and increased for inhibitory compounds (DeltaDelta G(++) = approximately +0.7%). The drug-specific changes of the free energy of activation are thus barely above thermal energy. A comparison with literature data revealed that a decrease of the lateral membrane packing density reduces the enthalpic and the entropic contribution to the free energy of activation. Although the P-glycoprotein ATPase activity increases only slightly with decreasing lateral membrane packing density, the mode of action changes from strongly entropy-driven at high, to essentially enthalpy-driven at low packing densities. This suggests that the transporter and the membrane form a functional entity.

  18. Homology modeling of the three membrane proteins of the dhurrin metabolon: catalytic sites, membrane surface association and protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kenneth; Osmani, Sarah Anne; Hamann, Thomas; Naur, Peter; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2011-12-01

    Formation of metabolons (macromolecular enzyme complexes) facilitates the channelling of substrates in biosynthetic pathways. Metabolon formation is a dynamic process in which transient structures mediated by weak protein-protein interactions are formed. In Sorghum, the cyanogenic glucoside dhurrin is derived from l-tyrosine in a pathway involving the two cytochromes P450 (CYPs) CYP79A1 and CYP71E1, a glucosyltransferase (UGT85B1), and the redox partner NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Experimental evidence suggests that the enzymes of this pathway form a metabolon. Homology modeling of the three membrane bound proteins was carried out using the Sybyl software and available relevant crystal structures. Residues involved in tight positioning of the substrates and intermediates in the active sites of CYP79A1 and CYP71E1 were identified. In both CYPs, hydrophobic surface domains close to the N-terminal trans-membrane anchor and between the F' and G helices were identified as involved in membrane anchoring. The proximal surface of both CYPs showed positively charged patches complementary to a negatively charged bulge on CPR carrying the FMN domain. A patch of surface exposed, positively charged amino acid residues positioned on the opposite face of the membrane anchor was identified in CYP71E1 and might be involved in binding UGT85B1 via a hypervariable negatively charged loop in this protein. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Colloidal Fouling of Nanofiltration Membranes: Development of a Standard Operating Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Al Mamun, Md Abdullaha; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Pernitsky, David; Sadrzadeh, Mohtada

    2017-01-01

    Fouling of nanofiltration (NF) membranes is the most significant obstacle to the development of a sustainable and energy-efficient NF process. Colloidal fouling and performance decline in NF processes is complex due to the combination of cake formation and salt concentration polarization effects, which are influenced by the properties of the colloids and the membrane, the operating conditions of the test, and the solution chemistry. Although numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the influence of these parameters on the performance of the NF process, the importance of membrane preconditioning (e.g., compaction and equilibrating with salt water), as well as the determination of key parameters (e.g., critical flux and trans-membrane osmotic pressure) before the fouling experiment have not been reported in detail. The aim of this paper is to present a standard experimental and data analysis protocol for NF colloidal fouling experiments. The developed methodology covers preparation and characterization of water samples and colloidal particles, pre-test membrane compaction and critical flux determination, measurement of experimental data during the fouling test, and the analysis of that data to determine the relative importance of various fouling mechanisms. The standard protocol is illustrated with data from a series of flat sheet, bench-scale experiments. PMID:28106775

  20. Colloidal Fouling of Nanofiltration Membranes: Development of a Standard Operating Procedure.

    PubMed

    Al Mamun, Md Abdullaha; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Pernitsky, David; Sadrzadeh, Mohtada

    2017-01-18

    Fouling of nanofiltration (NF) membranes is the most significant obstacle to the development of a sustainable and energy-efficient NF process. Colloidal fouling and performance decline in NF processes is complex due to the combination of cake formation and salt concentration polarization effects, which are influenced by the properties of the colloids and the membrane, the operating conditions of the test, and the solution chemistry. Although numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the influence of these parameters on the performance of the NF process, the importance of membrane preconditioning (e.g., compaction and equilibrating with salt water), as well as the determination of key parameters (e.g., critical flux and trans-membrane osmotic pressure) before the fouling experiment have not been reported in detail. The aim of this paper is to present a standard experimental and data analysis protocol for NF colloidal fouling experiments. The developed methodology covers preparation and characterization of water samples and colloidal particles, pre-test membrane compaction and critical flux determination, measurement of experimental data during the fouling test, and the analysis of that data to determine the relative importance of various fouling mechanisms. The standard protocol is illustrated with data from a series of flat sheet, bench-scale experiments.

  1. Operational Experience with the Internal Thermal Control System Dual-Membrane Gas Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Lukens, Clark; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2003-01-01

    A dual-membrane gas trap is currently used to remove non-condensed gases (NCG) from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station. The gas trap consists of concentric tube membrane pairs, comprised of outer hydrophilic tubes and inner hydrophobic fibers. Liquid coolant passes through the outer hydrophilic membrane, which traps the NCG. The inner hydrophobic fiber allows the trapped NCG to pass through and vent to the ambient atmosphere in the cabin. The purpose of the gas trap is to prevent gas bubbles from causing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump, and the current gas trap has performed flawlessly in this regard. However, because of actual operational conditions on-orbit, its gas removal performance and operational lifetime have been affected. This paper discusses experiences with several of these dual- membrane gas traps, including on-orbit gas venting rate, effects due to the presence of nickel in the ITCS coolant, and subsequent refurbishing to remove the nickel from the gas trap.

  2. Optimal operating policy of the ultrafiltration membrane bioreactor for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, SeungGoo; Kim, HakSung . Dept. of Biotechnology)

    1993-09-05

    The dilution rate of an ultrafiltration membrane bioreactor in the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was optimized using the kinetic model developed by Fan and Lee.' The sequence of optimal dilution rates was found to generally consist of an initial period of a minimal value (batch period), a subsequent period of maximum dilution rate, a period of a second batch, and a final period of a singular dilution rate. The effects of operating conditions, such as [beta]-glucosidase activity, operating time, maximum dilution rate, substrate feeding rate, and enzyme-to-substrate ratio on both the conversion yield and the sequence of optimal dilution rates were investigated. To evaluate the validity of kinetic model employed in this work, enzymatic hydrolysis was carried out using -cellulose as a substrate in the ultrafiltration membrane bioreactor. The experimental data were well consistent with the simulation results.

  3. Removals of pharmaceutical compounds from hospital wastewater in membrane bioreactor operated under short hydraulic retention time.

    PubMed

    Prasertkulsak, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Itonaga, T; Yamamoto, K

    2016-05-01

    Pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) was operated at a short hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3 h for the treatment of hospital wastewater. The removals of eleven pharmaceutical compounds in MBR operated at different mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) level were investigated during which nitrification degree was differed. The results experiments revealed the importance of immediate adsorption onto the colloidal particles in supernatant of MBR sludge and subsequently removed by membrane filtration for the recalcitrant pharmaceutical compounds. Nevertheless, the removals through biodegradation during short HRT were also found significant for some compounds. DGGE profile revealed the development of pharmaceutical degrading microorganisms in MBR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fuel cell using novel electrolyte membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, A.J.; Beuhler, A.J.

    1986-06-10

    An apparatus is described for producing electricity from a fuel gas having a gaseous component which is capable, in the presence of a catalytic agent, of dissociating to yield hydrogen ions comprising: (a) a thin film organic-inorganic membrane which comprises a single phase blend from about 1% to about 70% by weight of a heteropoly acid and salts; (b) a membrane housing comprising a fuel gas chamber and an oxidant gas chamber separated by a substantially imporous partition comprising the membrane defined in element (a), the membrane having a first surface in communication with the fuel gas chamber and a second surface in communication with the oxidant gas chamber; (c) two separate portions of catalytic agent effective to promote dissociation and combination, one portion in contact with the first surface of the membrane and one portion in contact with the second surface of the membrane; and, (d) means for forming electrical connection in operative contact with the catalytic agent in contact with the first surface of the membrane and in operative contact with the catalytic agent in contact with the second surface of the membrane.

  5. Durability of Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) in PEM Fuel Cells Operated on Pure Hydrogen and Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanic, Vesna; Braun, James; Hoberecht, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are energy sources that have the potential to replace alkaline fuel cells for space programs. Broad power ranges, high peak-to-nominal power capabilities, low maintenance costs, and the promise of increased life are the major advantages of PEM technology in comparison to alkaline technology. The probability of PEM fuel cells replacing alkaline fuel cells for space applications will increase if the promise of increased life is verified by achieving a minimum of 10,000 hours of operating life. Durability plays an important role in the process of evaluation and selection of MEAs for Teledyne s Phase I contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center entitled Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel cell (PEMFC) Power Plant Technology Development for 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs). For this contract, MEAs that are typically used for H2/air operation were selected as potential candidates for H2/O2 PEM fuel cells because their catalysts have properties suitable for O2 operation. They were purchased from several well-established MEA manufacturers who are world leaders in the manufacturing of diverse products and have committed extensive resources in an attempt to develop and fully commercialize MEA technology. A total of twelve MEAs used in H2/air operation were initially identified from these manufacturers. Based on the manufacturers specifications, nine of these were selected for evaluation. Since 10,000 hours is almost equivalent to 14 months, it was not possible to perform continuous testing with each MEA selected during Phase I of the contract. Because of the lack of time, a screening test on each MEA was performed for 400 hours under accelerated test conditions. The major criterion for an MEA pass or fail of the screening test was the gas crossover rate. If the gas crossover rate was higher than the membrane intrinsic permeability after 400 hours of testing, it was considered that the MEA had failed the test. Three types of

  6. Self-humidified proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Operation of larger cells and fuel cell stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Dhar, H.P.; Lee, J.H.; Lewinski, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    The PEM fuel cell is promising as the power source for use in mobile and stationary applications primarily because of its high power density, all solid components, and simplicity of operation. For wide acceptability of this power source, its cost has to be competitive with the presently available energy sources. The fuel cell requires continuous humidification during operation as a power source. The humidification unit however, increases fuel cell volume, weight, and therefore decreases its overall power density. Great advantages in terms of further fuel cell simplification can be achieved if the humidification process can be eliminated or minimized. In addition, cost reductions are associated with the case of manufacturing and operation. At BCS Technology we have developed a technology of self-humidified operation of PEM fuel cells based on the mass balance of the reactants and products and the ability of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) to retain water necessary for humidification under the cell operating conditions. The reactants enter the fuel cell chambers without carrying any form of water, whether in liquid or vapor form. Basic principles of self-humidified operation of fuel cells as practiced by BCS Technology, Inc. have been presented previously in literature. Here, we report the operation of larger self-humidified single cells and fuel cell stacks. Fuel cells of areas Up to 100 cm{sup 2} have been operated. We also show the self-humidified operation of fuel cell stacks of 50 and 100 cm{sup 2} electrode areas.

  7. Effect of dynamic operation on chemical degradation of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Minjae; Williams, Keith A.

    2011-03-01

    Dynamic operation is known as one of the factors for accelerating chemical degradation of the polymer electrolyte membrane in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). However, little effort has been made dealing with the quantification of the degradation process. In this investigation, cyclic current operation is carried out on a fuel cell system, and the frequency effect of cyclic operation on chemical degradation is investigated. The dynamic behavior of a fuel cell system is analyzed first with the modified Randles model, where the charge double layer is modeled by three components; a charge transfer resistance (Rct), and two RC cells for the Warburg impedance. After calculating each parameter value through exponential curve fitting, the dynamic behaviors of the three components are simulated using MATLAB Simulink®. Fluoride release as a function of the frequency of cyclic operation is evaluated by measuring the concentration of fluoride ion in effluent from a fuel cell exhaust. The frequency effect on chemical degradation is explained by comparing the simulated results and the fluoride release results. Two possible reasons for the accelerated degradation at cyclic operation are also suggested.

  8. CO{sub 2} Capture by Sub-ambient Membrane Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, S.; Hasse, D.; Sanders, E.; Chaubey, T.

    2012-11-30

    The main objective of the project was to develop a CO{sub 2} capture process based on sub-ambient temperature operation of a hollow fiber membrane. The program aims to reach the eventual DOE program goal of > 90% CO{sub 2} capture from existing PC fired power plants with < 35% increase in the cost of electricity. The project involves closed-loop testing of commercial fiber bundles under simulated process conditions to test the mechanical integrity and operability of membrane module structural component under sub ambient temperature. A commercial MEDAL 12” bundle exhibited excellent mechanical integrity for 2 months. However, selectivity was ~25% lower than expected at sub-ambient conditions. This could be attributed to a small feed to permeate leak or bundle non-ideality. To investigate further, and due to compressor flow limitations, the 12” bundle was replaced with a 6” bundle to conduct tests with lower permeate/feed ratios, as originally planned. The commercial 6” bundle was used for both parametric testing as well as long-term stability testing at sub-ambient conditions. Parametric studies were carried out both near the start and end of the long-term test. The parametric studies characterized membrane performance over a broad range of feed conditions: temperature (-25°C to -45°C), pressure (160 psig to 200 psig), and CO{sub 2} feed concentration (18% to 12%). Performance of the membrane bundle was markedly better at lower temperature (-45ºC), higher pressure (200 psig) and higher CO{sub 2} feed concentration (18%). The long-term test was conducted at these experimentally determined “optimum” feed conditions. Membrane performance was stable over 8 months at sub-ambient temperature operation. The experimentally measured high performance of the membrane bundle at sub-ambient operating conditions provides justification for interest in sub-ambient membrane processing of flue gas. In a parallel activity, the impact of contaminants (100 ppm SOx and NOx

  9. Investigation of high temperature operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjemian, Kevork Tro

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have garnered much attention in the media over the past years as they can provide a clean, environmentally friendly alternative to internal combustion engines. PEMFCs also have the flexibility to operate on many different types of fuels, thereby diminishing our reliance on foreign oil. PEMFCs, however, suffer from many drawbacks which need to be overcome before mass production becomes viable. One drawback is the expense of the fuel cell system, costing several times more than existing technologies. Another problem is that if the fuel cell is running on reformed fuels, trace amounts of carbon monoxide (10 ppm) in the hydrogen gas stream will completely poison the anode electrocatalyst, killing the PEMFC. Also, as a lot of waste heat is generated, a very elaborate cooling system needs to be used, making the overall system more expensive and complex. A possible solution to both the carbon monoxide poisoning and thermal management of a PEMFC is to elevate its operating temperature above 100°C. Unfortunately, current state-of-the-art electrolytes used in PEMFCs, i.e. Nafion 115, rely on water for the conduction of protons and by elevating the temperature, water loss occurs due to evaporation resulting in inadequate PEMFC performance. This thesis delves into the modification of Nafion and similar electrolytes to permit PEMFC operation above 100°C. This was accomplished by impregnating the pores of the Nafion with hydrophilic inorganic materials-silicon oxide via sol-gel processing and various inorganic particles. By performing these modifications to the various electrolytes, several composite membranes performed exceptionally well at an operating temperature of 130°C and demonstrated carbon monoxide tolerance of up to 500 ppm. In addition, a theory on how these materials help improve the water management characteristics of Nafion was developed, laying the foundation for the development of a completely novel membrane to

  10. Durability of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Operated at Subfreezing Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Macauley, Natalia; Lujan, Roger W.; Spernjak, Dusan; Hussey, Daniel S.; Jacobson, David L.; More, Karren; Borup, Rodney L.; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2016-09-15

    The structure, composition, and interfaces of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) and gas-diffusion layers (GDLs) have a significant effect on the performance of single-proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells operated isothermally at subfreezing temperatures. During isothermal constant-current operation at subfreezing temperatures, water forming at the cathode initially hydrates the membrane, then forms ice in the catalyst layer and/or GDL. This ice formation results in a gradual decay in voltage. High-frequency resistance initially decreases due to an increase in membrane water content and then increases over time as the contact resistance increases. The water/ice holding capacity of a fuel cell decreases with decreasing subfreezing temperature (-10°C vs. -20°C vs. -30°C) and increasing current density (0.02 A cm-2 vs. 0.04 A cm-2). Ice formation monitored using in-situ high-resolution neutron radiography indicated that the ice was concentrated near the cathode catalyst layer at low operating temperatures (≈-20°C) and high current densities (0.04 A cm-2). Significant ice formation was also observed in the GDLs at higher subfreezing temperatures (≈-10°C) and lower current densities (0.02 A cm-2). These results are in good agreement with the long-term durability observations that show more severe degradation at lower temperatures (-20°C and -30°C).

  11. Use of hyperdry amniotic membrane in operations for cleft palate: a study in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuno, Hiroaki; Noguchi, Makoto; Okabe, Motonori; Tomihara, Kei; Yoshida, Toshiko; Nikaido, Toshio

    2015-04-01

    The growth of maxillary bone and the development of dentition are often impaired in patients who have had pushback operations for repair of a cleft palate. There has been considerable discussion about the most suitable technique or material used in such repairs to resolve the problem. Hyperdry amniotic membrane, a new preservable material derived from human amnion, has recently been introduced in several procedures. We have evaluated its use during pushback surgery in animal studies to try to correct the inhibition of growth and development of the maxilla. Mucosal defects were created in 3-week-old rats, and then covered with hyperdry amniotic membrane or not. Healing was assessed by histological and morphological examination at 1 week and 7 weeks postoperatively. In the group treated with hyperdry amniotic membrane, submucosal tissue was reconstructed successfully during the early postoperative period. Lateral palatal growth was not inhibited as much, and medial inclination of the teeth was less, after a period of growth using this material. The results suggest that hyperdry amniotic membrane is a suitable new dressing material for use in the treatment of cleft palate. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Norbin Stimulates the Catalytic Activity and Plasma Membrane Localization of the Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor P-Rex1*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dingxin; Barber, Mark A.; Hornigold, Kirsti; Baker, Martin J.; Toth, Judit M.; Oxley, David; Welch, Heidi C. E.

    2016-01-01

    P-Rex1 is a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that activates the small G protein (GTPase) Rac1 to control Rac1-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics, and thus cell morphology. Three mechanisms of P-Rex1 regulation are currently known: (i) binding of the phosphoinositide second messenger PIP3, (ii) binding of the Gβγ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, and (iii) phosphorylation of various serine residues. Using recombinant P-Rex1 protein to search for new binding partners, we isolated the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-adaptor protein Norbin (Neurochondrin, NCDN) from mouse brain fractions. Coimmunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between overexpressed P-Rex1 and Norbin in COS-7 cells, as well as between endogenous P-Rex1 and Norbin in HEK-293 cells. Binding assays with purified recombinant proteins showed that their interaction is direct, and mutational analysis revealed that the pleckstrin homology domain of P-Rex1 is required. Rac-GEF activity assays with purified recombinant proteins showed that direct interaction with Norbin increases the basal, PIP3- and Gβγ-stimulated Rac-GEF activity of P-Rex1. Pak-CRIB pulldown assays demonstrated that Norbin promotes the P-Rex1-mediated activation of endogenous Rac1 upon stimulation of HEK-293 cells with lysophosphatidic acid. Finally, immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation showed that coexpression of P-Rex1 and Norbin induces a robust translocation of both proteins from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, as well as promoting cell spreading, lamellipodia formation, and membrane ruffling, cell morphologies generated by active Rac1. In summary, we have identified a novel mechanism of P-Rex1 regulation through the GPCR-adaptor protein Norbin, a direct P-Rex1 interacting protein that promotes the Rac-GEF activity and membrane localization of P-Rex1. PMID:26792863

  13. Nonlinear dynamics analysis of a membrane Stirling engine: Starting and stable operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formosa, Fabien

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the work devoted to the study of the operation of a miniaturized membrane Stirling engine. Indeed, such an engine relies on the dynamic coupling of the motion of two membranes to achieve a prime mover Stirling thermodynamic cycle. The modelling of the system introduces the large vibration amplitudes of the membrane as well as the nonlinear dissipative effects associated to the fluid flow within the engine. The nonlinearities are expressed as polynomial functions with quadratic and cubic terms. This paper displays the stability analysis to predict the starting of the engine and the instability problem which leads to the steady-state behaviour. The centre manifold-normal form theory is used to obtain the simplest expression for the limit cycle amplitudes. The approach allows the reduction of the number of equations of the original system in order to obtain a simplified system, without loosing the dynamics of the original system as well as the contributions of nonlinear terms. The model intends to be used as a semi-analytical design tool for the optimization of miniaturized Stirling machines from the starting to the steady operation.

  14. Numerical simulation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells at high operating temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jie; Lee, Seung Jae

    A three-dimensional, single-phase, non-isothermal numerical model for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell at high operating temperature (T ≥ 393 K) was developed and implemented into a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code. The model accounts for convective and diffusive transport and allows predicting the concentration of species. The heat generated from electrochemical reactions, entropic heat and ohmic heat arising from the electrolyte ionic resistance were considered. The heat transport model was coupled with the electrochemical and mass transport models. The product water was assumed to be vaporous and treated as ideal gas. Water transportation across the membrane was ignored because of its low water electro-osmosis drag force in the polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The results show that the thermal effects strongly affect the fuel cell performance. The current density increases with the increasing of operating temperature. In addition, numerical prediction reveals that the width and distribution of gas channel and current collector land area are key optimization parameters for the cell performance improvement.

  15. Molecular cloning and catalytic activity of a membrane-bound prenyl diphosphate phosphatase from Croton stellatopilosus Ohba.

    PubMed

    Nualkaew, Natsajee; Guennewich, Nils; Springob, Karin; Klamrak, Anuwatchakit; De-Eknamkul, Wanchai; Kutchan, Toni M

    2013-07-01

    Geranylgeraniol (GGOH), a bioactive acyclic diterpene with apoptotic induction activity, is the immediate precursor of the commercial anti-peptic, plaunotol (18-hydroxy geranylgeraniol), which is found in Croton stellatopilosus (Ohba). From this plant, a cDNA encoding a prenyl diphosphate phosphatase (CsPDP), which catalyses the dephosphorylation of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to GGOH, was isolated using a PCR approach. The full-length cDNA contained 888bp and encoded a 33.6 kDa protein (295 amino acids) that was phylogenetically grouped into the phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) enzyme family. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 6 hydrophobic transmembrane regions with 57-85% homology to the sequences of other plant PAPs. The recombinant CsPDP and its 4 truncated constructs exhibited decreasing dephosphorylation activities relative to the lengths of the N-terminal deletions. While the full-length CsPDP successfully performed the two sequential monodephosphorylation steps on GGPP to form GGOH, the larger N-terminal deletion in the truncated enzymes appeared to specifically decrease the catalytic efficiency of the second monodephosphorylation step. The information presented here on the CsPDP cDNA and factors affecting the dephosphorylation activity of its recombinant protein may eventually lead to the discovery of the specific GGPP phosphatase gene and enzyme that are involved in the formation of GGOH in the biosynthetic pathway of plaunotol in C. stellatopilosus.

  16. R&D on an Ultra-Thin Composite Membrane for High-Temperature Operation in PEMFC. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.-Y.

    2003-10-06

    FuelCell Energy developed a novel high-temperature proton exchange membrane for PEM fuel cells for building applications. The laboratory PEM fuel cell successfully operated at 100-400{supdegree}C and low relative humidity to improve CO tolerance, mitigate water and thermal management challenges, and reduce membrane cost. The developed high-temperature membrane has successfully completed 500h 120C endurance testing.

  17. Catalytic Conversion of Lipophilic Substrates by Phase constrained Enzymes in the Aqueous or in the Membrane Phase

    PubMed Central

    Cebula, Marcus; Turan, Ilke Simsek; Sjödin, Birgitta; Thulasingam, Madhuranayaki; Brock, Joseph; Chmyrov, Volodymyr; Widengren, Jerker; Abe, Hiroshi; Mannervik, Bengt; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes; Akkaya, Engin U.; Morgenstern, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Both soluble and membrane-bound enzymes can catalyze the conversion of lipophilic substrates. The precise substrate access path, with regard to phase, has however, until now relied on conjecture from enzyme structural data only (certainly giving credible and valuable hypotheses). Alternative methods have been missing. To obtain the first experimental evidence directly determining the access paths (of lipophilic substrates) to phase constrained enzymes we here describe the application of a BODIPY-derived substrate (PS1). Using this tool, which is not accessible to cytosolic enzymes in the presence of detergent and, by contrast, not accessible to membrane embedded enzymes in the absence of detergent, we demonstrate that cytosolic and microsomal glutathione transferases (GSTs), both catalyzing the activation of PS1, do so only within their respective phases. This approach can serve as a guideline to experimentally validate substrate access paths, a fundamental property of phase restricted enzymes. Examples of other enzyme classes with members in both phases are xenobiotic-metabolizing sulphotransferases/UDP-glucuronosyl transferases or epoxide hydrolases. Since specific GSTs have been suggested to contribute to tumor drug resistance, PS1 can also be utilized as a tool to discriminate between phase constrained members of these enzymes by analyzing samples in the absence and presence of Triton X-100. PMID:27917951

  18. Effect of the catalytic ink preparation method on the performance of high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, J.; Rodrigo, M. A.; Linares, J. J.; Scott, K.

    Two methods of preparation of the membrane-electrode-assemblies based on polybenzimidazole membranes have been studied for high temperatures PEMFCs. One is called the "colloidal method" (using acetone as solvent), and the other is the "solution method" (using dimethylacetamide as solvent). Physical property studies (SEM micrographs and pore size distribution) and electrochemical analyses in half-cell (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Polarization Curves for Oxygen Reduction and Cyclic Voltammetry) were carried out to characterise the structural and electrochemical behaviour of both methods. Finally, a cell performance investigation, using electrodes prepared by both methods was carried out at three different temperatures (125, 150, and 175 °C), in a single PEMFC setup. A better behaviour was obtained for the "solution method" at the two highest temperatures at intermediate current densities, whereas at 125 °C the best results were obtained with the "colloidal method" in all the current densities ranges. A discussion of the behaviours observed with the different characterisation techniques is made.

  19. Membrane reactor for water detritiation: a parametric study on operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarade, J.; Liger, K.; Troulay, M.; Perrais, C.

    2015-03-15

    This paper presents the results of a parametric study done on a single stage finger-type packed-bed membrane reactor (PBMR) used for heavy water vapor de-deuteration. Parametric studies have been done on 3 operating parameters which are: the membrane temperature, the total feed flow rate and the feed composition through D{sub 2}O content variations. Thanks to mass spectrometer analysis of streams leaving the PBMR, speciation of deuterated species was achieved. Measurement of the amounts of each molecular component allowed the calculation of reaction quotient at the packed-bed outlet. While temperature variation mainly influences permeation efficiency, feed flow rate perturbation reveals dependence of conversion and permeation properties to contact time between catalyst and reacting mixture. The study shows that isotopic exchange reactions occurring on the catalyst particles surface are not thermodynamically balanced. Moreover, the variation of the heavy water content in the feed exhibits competition between permeation and conversion kinetics.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the catalytic domain of membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Hideaki; Decaneto, Elena; Grossman, Moran; Havenith, Martina; Sagi, Irit; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Knipp, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) belongs to the large family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases termed MMPs that are located in the extracellular matrix. MT1-MMP was crystallized at 277 K using the vapour-diffusion method with PEG as a precipitating agent. Data sets for MT1-MMP were collected to 2.24 Å resolution at 100 K. The crystals belonged to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.99, c = 122.60 Å. The crystal contained one molecule per asymmetric unit, with a Matthews coefficient (V M) of 2.90 Å3 Da−1; the solvent content is estimated to be 57.6%. PMID:24637763

  1. Catalyst Residence Time Distributions in Riser Reactors for Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis. Part 2: Pilot-Scale Simulations and Operational Parameter Study

    DOE PAGES

    Foust, Thomas D.; Ziegler, Jack L.; Pannala, Sreekanth; ...

    2017-02-21

    Here, wsing the validated simulation model developed in part one of this study for biomass catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP), we assess the functional utility of using this validated model to assist in the development of CFP processes in fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) reactors to a commercially viable state. Specifically, we examine the effects of mass flow rates, boundary conditions (BCs), pyrolysis vapor molecular weight variation, and the impact of the chemical cracking kinetics on the catalyst residence times. The factors that had the largest impact on the catalyst residence time included the feed stock molecular weight and the degree ofmore » chemical cracking as controlled by the catalyst activity. Lastly, because FCC reactors have primarily been developed and utilized for petroleum cracking, we perform a comparison analysis of CFP with petroleum and show the operating regimes are fundamentally different.« less

  2. 40 CFR Table 23 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emission Limitations for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... established during the performance test. 2. Internal scrubbing system or no control device (e.g., hot regen... scrubbing liquid) exiting the internal scrubbing system must not fall below the limit established during the... existing catalytic reforming unit with this type of control device . . . You shall meet this...

  3. Operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells without external humidification of the reactant gases

    SciTech Connect

    Buechi, F.N.; Srinivasan, S.

    1997-08-01

    Operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) without external humidification of the reactant gases is advantageous for the PEMFC system, because it eliminates the need for a gas-humidification subsystem. The gas-humidification subsystem is a burden in the fuel cell system with respect to weight, complexity, cost, and parasitic power. A model for the operation of PEMFC with internal humidification of the gases is presented and the range of operating conditions for a PEMFC using dry H{sub 2}/air was investigated. The model predicts that dry air, entering at the cathode, can be fully internally humidified by the water produced by the electrochemical reaction at temperatures up to 70 C. This model was experimentally verified for cell temperatures up to 60 C by long-term operation of a PEMFC with dry gases for up to 1,800 h. The current densities, obtained at 0.6 V, were 20 to 40% lower than those measured when both gases were humidified. The water distribution in the cell, while operating with dry gases, was investigated by measuring the amount of product water on the anode and cathode sides. It was found that the back-diffusion of product water to the anode is the dominant process for water management in the cell over a wide range of operating conditions. The dominating water back-diffusion also allows internal humidification of the hydrogen reactant and prevents drying out of the anode.

  4. The optimum operational condition of membrane bioreactor (MBR): cost estimation of aeration and sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seong-Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Soo; Yeom, Ik-Tae

    2004-01-01

    A methodology to obtain the most economical operational condition of membrane bioreactor (MBR) is developed. In order to achieve the optimum design parameters of MBR with which operational costs are minimized, aeration and sludge treatment costs were estimated for various operational conditions. Generally sludge treatment cost and aeration cost were inversely proportional to each other, which means sludge treatment cost is minimized when aeration cost is maximized and vice versa. Therefore, there might exist an optimum point between the two extreme cases. However, sludge treatment cost turned out to overwhelm the aeration cost over the reasonable operational conditions. Therefore, sludge minimization was considered to be a key for the economical operation of MBR. In the case of typical municipal wastewater of which COD was 400mgL(-1), steady-state MLSS was expected to increase from 11,000 to 15,000mg/L without sludge removal when HRT was decreasing from 16 to 12h. For the range of operational conditions considered in this study, economically optimum HRT and target MLSS were turned out to be 16h and 11,000mg/L, respectively. Under this condition, aeration for the biodegradation of organic matters would be 13.3m(3) air/min when influent was 1000m(3)/day.

  5. Permeability recovery of fouled forward osmosis membranes by chemical cleaning during a long-term operation of anaerobic osmotic membrane bioreactors treating low-strength wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhua; Hu, Taozhan; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Xiufen; Ren, Yueping

    2017-10-15

    Anaerobic osmotic membrane bioreactor (AnOMBR) has gained increasing interests in wastewater treatment owing to its simultaneous recovery of biogas and water. However, the forward osmosis (FO) membrane fouling was severe during a long-term operation of AnOMBRs. Here, we aim to recover the permeability of fouled FO membranes by chemical cleaning. Specifically speaking, an optimal chemical cleaning procedure was searched for fouled thin film composite polyamide FO (TFC-FO) membranes in a novel microfiltration (MF) assisted AnOMBR (AnMF-OMBR). The results indicated that citric acid, disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA-2Na), hydrochloric acid (HCl), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) had a low cleaning efficiency of less than 15%, while hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) could effectively remove foulants from the TFC-FO membrane surface (almost 100%) through oxidizing the functional group of the organic foulants and disintegrating the colloids and microbe flocs into fine particles. Nevertheless, the damage of H2O2 to the TFC-FO membrane was observed when a high cleaning concentration and a long duration were applied. In this case, the optimal cleaning conditions including cleaning concentration and time for fouled TFC-FO membranes were selected through confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and the flux recovery rate. The results suggested that the optimal cleaning procedure for fouled TFC-FO membranes was use of 0.5% H2O2 at 25 °C for 6 h, and after that, the cleaned TFC-FO membrane had the same performance as a virgin one including water flux and rejection for organic matters and phosphorus during the operation of AnMF-OMBR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Performance evaluation of microbial electrochemical systems operated with Nafion and supported ionic liquid membranes.

    PubMed

    Koók, László; Nemestóthy, Nándor; Bakonyi, Péter; Zhen, Guangyin; Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Lu, Xueqin; Su, Lianghu; Saratale, Ganesh Dattatraya; Kim, Sang-Hyoun; Gubicza, László

    2017-05-01

    In this work, the performance of dual-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) constructed either with commonly used Nafion(®) proton exchange membrane or supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) was assessed. The behavior of MFCs was followed and analyzed by taking the polarization curves and besides, their efficiency was characterized by measuring the electricity generation using various substrates such as acetate and glucose. By using the SILMs containing either [C6mim][PF6] or [Bmim][NTf2] ionic liquids, the energy production of these MFCs from glucose was comparable to that obtained with the MFC employing polymeric Nafion(®) and the same substrate. Furthermore, the MFC operated with [Bmim][NTf2]-based SILM demonstrated higher energy yield in case of low acetate loading (80.1 J g(-1) CODin m(-2) h(-1)) than the one with the polymeric Nafion(®) N115 (59 J g(-1) CODin m(-2) h(-1)). Significant difference was observed between the two SILM-MFCs, however, the characteristics of the system was similar based on the cell polarization measurements. The results suggest that membrane-engineering applying ionic liquids can be an interesting subject field for bioelectrochemical system research.

  7. Assessment of energy-saving strategies and operational costs in full-scale membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Gabarrón, S; Ferrero, G; Dalmau, M; Comas, J; Rodriguez-Roda, I

    2014-02-15

    The energy-saving strategies and operational costs of stand-alone, hybrid, and dual stream full-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) with capacities ranging from 1100 to 35,000 m(3) day(-1) have been assessed for seven municipal facilities located in Northeast Spain. Although hydraulic load was found to be the main determinant factor for the energy consumption rates, several optimisation strategies have shown to be effective in terms of energy reduction as well as fouling phenomenon minimization or preservation. Specifically, modifications of the biological process (installation of control systems for biological aeration) and of the filtration process (reduction of the flux or mixed liquor suspended solids concentration and installation of control systems for membrane air scouring) were applied in two stand-alone MBRs. After implementing these strategies, the yearly specific energy demand (SED) in flat-sheet (FS) and hollow-fibre (HF) stand-alone MBRs was reduced from 1.12 to 0.71 and from 1.54 to 1.12 kW h(-1) m(-3), respectively, regardless of their similar yearly averaged hydraulic loads. The strategies applied in the hybrid MBR, namely, buffering the influent flow and optimisation of both biological aeration and membrane air-scouring, reduced the SED values by 14%. These results illustrate that it is possible to apply energy-saving strategies to significantly reduce MBR operational costs, highlighting the need to optimise MBR facilities to reconsider them as an energy-competitive option.

  8. Advanced treatment of municipal wastewater by nanofiltration: Operational optimization and membrane fouling analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Wang, Jianxing; Liu, Jibao; Wei, Yuansong; Chen, Meixue

    2016-05-01

    Municipal sewage from an oxidation ditch was treated for reuse by nanofiltration (NF) in this study. The NF performance was optimized, and its fouling characteristics after different operational durations (i.e., 48 and 169hr) were analyzed to investigate the applicability of nanofiltration for water reuse. The optimum performance was achieved when transmembrane pressure=12bar, pH=4 and flow rate=8L/min using a GE membrane. The permeate water quality could satisfy the requirements of water reclamation for different uses and local standards for water reuse in Beijing. Flux decline in the fouling experiments could be divided into a rapid flux decline and a quasi-steady state. The boundary flux theory was used to predict the evolution of permeate flux. The expected operational duration based on the 169-hr experiment was 392.6hr which is 175% longer than that of the 48-hr one. High molecular weight (MW) protein-like substances were suggested to be the dominant foulants after an extended period based on the MW distribution and the fluorescence characteristics. The analyses of infrared spectra and extracellular polymeric substances revealed that the roles of both humic- and polysaccharide-like substances were diminished, while that of protein-like substances were strengthened in the contribution of membrane fouling with time prolonged. Inorganic salts were found to have marginally influence on membrane fouling. Additionally, alkali washing was more efficient at removing organic foulants in the long term, and a combination of water flushing and alkali washing was appropriate for NF fouling control in municipal sewage treatment.

  9. Operational experience and evaluation of a dual-element stretched-membrane heliostat

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.W.; Van Der Geest, J.

    1994-01-01

    A dual-element, stretched-membrane central receiver heliostat was designed and manufactured in 1989, by a private US company engaged in the development of commercial central receiver solar technology. The two-module collector, with a collection area of 97.5 m{sup 2}, extends stretched-membrane mirror technology on several fronts with face-down stow capability and a digital controller that integrates tracking and focusing control on a single programmable control board. The solar collector was installed at Sandia`s National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico and evaluated over a three-and-a-half year period which ended in September 1993. The measured performance and the operational and maintenance characteristics of this commercial prototype are the subject of this report. The results of beam quality measurements, tracking repeatability tests, measurements of beam movement in elevated winds, performance tests of the focusing system, and all-day beam quality and tracking tests are presented, and the authors offer a detailed discussion of the knowledge gained through operation and maintenance and of the improvements made or suggested to the heliostat`s design.

  10. Evaluation of a long-term operation of a submerged nanofiltration membrane bioreactor (NF MBR) for advanced wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Choi, J H; Fukushi, K; Ng, H Y; Yamamoto, K

    2006-01-01

    Nanofiltration (NF) is considered as one of the most promising separation technologies to obtain a very good-quality permeate in water and wastewater treatment. A submerged NF membrane bioreactor (NF MBR) using polyamide membranes was tested for a long-term operation and the performance of the NF MBR was compared with that of a microfiltration MBR (MF MBR). Total organic carbon (TOC) concentration in the permeate of the NF MBR ranged from 0.5 to 2.0 mg/L, whereas that of the MF MBR showed an average of 5 mg/L. This could be explained by the tightness of the NF membrane. Although the concentration of organic matter in the supernatant of the NF MBR was higher than that in the permeate due to high rejection by the NF membrane, the NF MBR showed excellent treatment efficiency and satisfactory operational stability for a long-term operation.

  11. Evaluation of the importance of various operating and sludge property parameters to the fouling of membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Sun, F Y; Li, X Y

    2011-01-01

    A single-fibre microfiltration system was employed to investigate the importance of various operating and sludge property parameters to the membrane fouling during sludge filtration. The sludge was obtained from a submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR). A series of comparative and correlative filtration and fouling tests were conducted on the influence of the operating variables, sludge properties and the liquid-phase organic substances on the membrane fouling development. The test results were analysed statistically with Pearson's correlation coefficients and the stepwise multivariable linear regression. According to the statistical evaluation, the membrane fouling rate has a positive correlation with the biopolymer cluster (BPC) concentration, sludge concentration (mixed liquor suspended solids, MLSS), filtration flux and viscosity, a negative correlation with the cross-flow velocity, and a weak correlation with the extracellular polymeric substances and soluble microbial products. BPC appear to be the most important factor to membrane fouling development during the sludge filtration, followed by the filtration flux and MLSS concentration. The cross-flow rate also is important to the fouling control. It is argued that, during membrane filtration of SMBR sludge, BPC interact with sludge flocs at the membrane surface to facilitate the deposition of the sludge cake layer, leading to serious membrane fouling.

  12. Effect of filtration flux on the development and operation of a dynamic membrane for anaerobic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mubashir; Alibardi, Luca; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Cossu, Raffaello; Spagni, Alessandro

    2016-09-15

    Dynamic membrane represents a cost effective alternative to conventional membranes by employing fouling as a means of solid-liquid separation. This study evaluated the effects of initial flux on both development rate of dynamic membrane and bioreactor performance during two consecutive experiments. The dynamic membrane was developed over a 200 μm mesh and the reactor was operated under anaerobic conditions. It was found that the effect of an initial higher applied flux on dynamic membrane development was more pronounced than mixed liquor suspended solid concentration inside the bioreactor. The development of the dynamic membrane was therefore positively associated with the applied flux. The rapid development of the dynamic membrane during the second experimental run at high initial fluxes and lower MLSS concentrations also affected the performance of the bioreactor in terms of more efficient COD removal and biogas production. A major shortcoming of applying higher initial applied flux was the formation of a denser and robust dynamic membrane layer that was resistant to applied hydraulic shear to control desired permeability and thus represented an obstacle in maintaining a long term operation with sustainable flux at lower transmembrane pressure (TMP).

  13. Tube-side mass transfer for hollow fibre membrane contactors operated in the low Graetz range.

    PubMed

    Wang, C Y; Mercer, E; Kamranvand, F; Williams, L; Kolios, A; Parker, A; Tyrrel, S; Cartmell, E; McAdam, E J

    2017-02-01

    Transformation of the tube-side mass transfer coefficient derived in hollow fibre membrane contactors (HFMC) of different characteristic length scales (equivalent diameter and fibre length) has been studied when operated in the low Graetz range (Gz<10). Within the low Gz range, mass transfer is generally described by the Graetz problem (Sh=3.67) which assumes that the concentration profile comprises a constant shape over the fibre radius. In this study, it is experimentally evidenced that this assumption over predicts mass transfer within the low Graetz range. Furthermore, within the low Gz range (below 2), a proportional relationship between the experimentally determined mass transfer coefficient (Kov ) and the Graetz number has been identified. For Gz numbers below 2, the experimental Sh number approached unity, which suggests that mass transfer is strongly dependent upon diffusion. However, within this diffusion controlled region of mass transfer, tube-side fluid velocity remained important. For Gz numbers above 2, Sh could be satisfactorily described by extension to the Lévêque solution, which can be ascribed to the constrained growth of the concentration boundary layer adjacent to the fibre wall. Importantly this study demonstrates that whilst mass transfer in the low Graetz range does not explicitly conform to either the Graetz problem or classical Lévêque solution, it is possible to transform the experimentally derived overall mass transfer coefficient (Kov ) between characteristic length scales (dh and L). T h is was corroborated by comparison of the empirical relationship determined in this study (Sh=0.36Gz) with previously published studies operated in the low Gz range. This analysis provides important insight for process design when slow tube-side flows, or low Schmidt numbers (coincident with gases) constrain operation of hollow fibre membrane contactors to the low Gz range.

  14. Catalytic oxidation for treatment of ECLSS and PMMS waste streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Jolly, Clifford D.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that catalytic oxidation is an effective technique for the removal of trace organic contaminants in a multifiltration potable processor's effluent. Essential elements of this technology are devices that deliver oxygen to the influent, and remove gaseous reaction byproducts from the effluent, via hollow-tube, gas-permeable membranes. Iodine, which poisons existing catalysis, is removed by a small deiodination bed prior to catalytic reactor entrance. The catalyst used is a mixture of Pt and Ru deposited on carbon, operating at 125-160 C and 39-90 psi pressures.

  15. Catalytic oxidation for treatment of ECLSS and PMMS waste streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Jolly, Clifford D.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that catalytic oxidation is an effective technique for the removal of trace organic contaminants in a multifiltration potable processor's effluent. Essential elements of this technology are devices that deliver oxygen to the influent, and remove gaseous reaction byproducts from the effluent, via hollow-tube, gas-permeable membranes. Iodine, which poisons existing catalysis, is removed by a small deiodination bed prior to catalytic reactor entrance. The catalyst used is a mixture of Pt and Ru deposited on carbon, operating at 125-160 C and 39-90 psi pressures.

  16. Effect of operating conditions on the performances of multichannel ceramic UF membranes for textile mercerization wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zebić Avdičević, Maja; Košutić, Krešimir; Dobrović, Slaven

    2017-01-01

    Textile wastewaters are rated as one of the most polluting in all industrial sectors, and membrane separation is the most promising technology for their treatment and reuse of auxiliary chemicals. This study evaluates the performance of three types of tubular ceramic ultrafiltration membranes differing by mean pore size (1, 2 and 500 kDa) treating textile mercerization wastewater from a textile mill at different operating conditions: cross-flow velocity (CFV) and temperature. Acceptable results were obtained with 1 kDa ceramic membrane, with rejection efficiencies 92% for suspended solids, 98% for turbidity, 98% for color and 53% for total organic carbon at 20°C and 3 m s(-1) CFV. Highest fouling effect was observed for 500 kDa membrane and lowest CFV. According to the observed results, 1 kDa membrane could be used for the treatment of wastewater from the textile mercerization process in terms of permeate quality.

  17. The effect of porous support composition and operating parameters on the performance of supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Takigawa, D.Y.

    1991-02-01

    Factors, such as porous support composition and operating parameters, that influence the performance of supported liquid membranes (SLMs) were investigated. SLMs of varying porous support compositions and structures were studied for the transport of metal ions. A microporous polybenzimidazole support was synthesized and prepared in the form of an SLM. This SLM containing the selective extractant di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid was evaluated for the transport of copper and neodymium. Dramatically improved performance over that of commercially available membranes was found in tests for removing the metal ions from solution. Metal ion transport reaches near completion in less than 3 hours, whereas Celgard-polypropylene and Nuclepore-polycarbonate reaches only 50% completion even after 15 hours. The transport driving force for acidic extractants is a pH gradient between the feed and strip solutions. Polybenzimidazole, an acid- and radiation-resistant polymer, has two protonatable tertiary nitrogens per repeat unit that may help sustain the pH driving force. Another factor may be the ability of the polybenzimidazole to hydrogen bond with the extractant. Transport through the flat-sheet SLMs were tested using a unique cell design. Countercurrent flow of the feed and strip solutions was established through machined channels in half-cell faceplates that are in a spiral, mirror-image pattern with respect to each other, with the flat-sheet SLM interposed between the two channeled solutions. 7 refs., 14 figs.

  18. Performance Analysis of Air Breathing Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack (PEMFCS) At Different Operating Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, V.; Venkata siva, G.; Yoganjaneyulu, G.; Ravikumar, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    The answer for an emission free power source in future is in the form of fuel cells which combine hydrogen and oxygen producing electricity and a harmless by product-water. A proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is ideal for automotive applications. A single cell cannot supply the essential power for any application. Hence PEM fuel cell stacks are used. The effect of different operating parameters namely: type of convection, type of draught, hydrogen flow rate, hydrogen inlet pressure, ambient temperature and humidity, hydrogen humidity, cell orientation on the performance of air breathing PEM fuel cell stack was analyzed using a computerized fuel cell test station. Then, the fuel cell stack was subjected to different load conditions. It was found that the stack performs very poorly at full capacity (runs only for 30 min. but runs for 3 hours at 50% capacity). Hence, a detailed study was undertaken to maximize the duration of the stack’s performance at peak load.

  19. Calcium-modulated ciliary membrane guanylate cyclase transduction machinery: constitution and operational principles.

    PubMed

    Duda, Teresa; Fik-Rymarkiewicz, Ewa; Venkataraman, Venkateswar; Krishnan, Anuradha; Sharma, Rameshwar K

    2004-12-01

    Odorant transduction is a biochemical process by which the odorant signal generates the electric signal. The cilia of the olfactory neuroepithelium are the sites of this process. This study documents the detailed biochemical, structural and functional description of an odorant-responsive Ca2+ -modulated membrane guanylate cyclase transduction machinery in the cilia. Myristoylated (myr)-neurocalcin delta is the Ca2+ -sensor component and the cyclase, ONE-GC, the transduction component of the machinery. Myr-neurocalcin delta senses increments in free Ca2+, binds to a defined domain of ONE-GC and stimulates the cyclase. The findings enable the formulation of an odorant transduction model in which three pivotal signaling components--Ca2+, myr-neurocalcin delta and ONE-GC--of the transduction machinery are locked. A glaring feature of the model is that its Ca2+ -dependent operational principle is opposite to the phototransduction model.

  20. Catalytic hydropyrolysis of microalgae: influence of operating variables on the formation and composition of bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhoufan; Duan, Peigao; Xu, Yuping

    2015-05-01

    Catalytic hydropyrolysis of microalgae has been studied by using a batch reactor. Nine different heterogenous catalysts of Pd/C, Pt/C, Ru/C, Rh/C, CoMo/γ-Al2O3, Mo2C, MoS2, and activated carbon were screened. Mo2C was identified as the most suitable catalyst. With Mo2C catalyst, influence of reaction conditions on the yield and properties of the hydropyrolysis oil (HPO) was examined. Temperature was the most influential factor affecting the yield and quality of the HPO. Higher temperature will produce HPO with higher C and H content and lower N and O content but at the cost of lowering the yield of HPO. Mo2C promoted the in situ deoxygenation and desulfurization of the HPO which has a HHVs varying between 35.3 and 39.3 MJ/kg. The highest energy recovery of 87.5% was achieved. Thus, this work shows that the catalytic hydropyrolysis is an effective way to produce high quality bio-oil from microalgae.

  1. Single-ion polymer electrolyte membranes enable lithium-ion batteries with a broad operating temperature range.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weiwei; Zhang, Yunfeng; Li, Jing; Sun, Yubao; Cheng, Hansong

    2014-04-01

    Conductive processes involving lithium ions are analyzed in detail from a mechanistic perspective, and demonstrate that single ion polymeric electrolyte (SIPE) membranes can be used in lithium-ion batteries with a wide operating temperature range (25-80 °C) through systematic optimization of electrodes and electrode/electrolyte interfaces, in sharp contrast to other batteries equipped with SIPE membranes that display appreciable operability only at elevated temperatures (>60 °C). The performance is comparable to that of batteries using liquid electrolyte of inorganic salt, and the batteries exhibit excellent cycle life and rate performance. This significant widening of battery operation temperatures coupled with the inherent flexibility and robustness of the SIPE membranes makes it possible to develop thin and flexible Li-ion batteries for a broad range of applications.

  2. Dual-Phase Oxygen Transport Membranes for Stable Operation in Environments Containing Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fayos, Julio; Balaguer, María; Serra, José M

    2015-12-21

    Dual-phase membranes are appealing candidates for oxygen transport membranes owing to their unique combination of ambipolar electron-ion transport and endurance. However, O2 separation in industrial environments demands very high stability and effectiveness in the presence of CO2- and SO2-bearing process gases. Here, the composition of dual-phase membranes based on NiFe2O4-Ce(0.8) Tb(0.2)O(2-δ) (NFO-CTO) was optimized and the effective performance of catalytically-activated membranes was assessed in presence of CO2 and SO2. Further insight into the limiting mechanisms in the permeation was gained through electrical conductivity studies, permeation testing in several conditions and impedance spectroscopy analysis. The dual-phase membranes were prepared by one-pot sol-gel method and their permeability increases with increasing fluorite content. An O2 flux of 0.25 (ml min(-1)  cm(-2)) mm at 1000 °C was obtained for a thick self-standing membrane with 40:60 NFO/CTO composition. An in-depth study mimicking typical harsh conditions encountered in oxyfuel flue gases was performed on a 50:50 NFO/CTO membrane. CO2 content as well as SO2 presence in the sweep gas stream were evaluated in terms of O2 permeation. O2 fluxes of 0.13 and 0.09 mL min(-1)  cm(-2) at 850 °C were obtained for a 0.59 mm thick membrane under CO2 and 250 ppm SO2 in CO2 sweep conditions, respectively. Extended periods at work under CO2- and SO2-containing atmospheres revealed good permeation stability over time. Additionally, XRD, backscattered electrons detector (BSD)-SEM, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of the spent membrane confirmed material stability upon prolonged exposure to SO2.

  3. Unraveling micro- and nanoscale degradation processes during operation of high-temperature polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengge, K.; Heinzl, C.; Perchthaler, M.; Varley, D.; Lochner, T.; Scheu, C.

    2017-10-01

    The work in hand presents an electron microscopy based in-depth study of micro- and nanoscale degradation processes that take place during the operation of high-temperature polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs). Carbon supported Pt particles were used as cathodic catalyst material and the bimetallic, carbon supported Pt/Ru system was applied as anode. As membrane, cross-linked polybenzimidazole was used. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of cross-sections of as-prepared and long-term operated membrane-electrode-assemblies revealed insight into micrometer scale degradation processes: operation-caused catalyst redistribution and thinning of the membrane and electrodes. Transmission electron microscopy investigations were performed to unravel the nanometer scale phenomena: a band of Pt and Pt/Ru nanoparticles was detected in the membrane adjacent to the cathode catalyst layer. Quantification of the elemental composition of several individual nanoparticles and the overall band area revealed that they stem from both anode and cathode catalyst layers. The results presented do not demonstrate any catastrophic failure but rather intermediate states during fuel cell operation and indications to proceed with targeted HT-PEMFC optimization.

  4. Scale-up of osmotic membrane bioreactors by modeling salt accumulation and draw solution dilution using hollow-fiber membrane characteristics and operation conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suhan

    2014-08-01

    A full-scale osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) model was developed to simulate salt accumulation, draw solution (DS) dilution, and water flux over the hollow-fiber membrane length. The model uses the OMBR design parameters, DS properties, and forward osmosis (FO) membrane characteristics obtained from lab-scale tests. The modeling results revealed a tremendous water flux decline (10→0.82LMH) and short solids retention time (SRT: 5days) due to salt accumulation and DS dilution when OMBR is scaled up using commercially available DS and FO membrane. Simulated water flux is a result of interplay among reverse salt flux, internal and external concentration polarization (ICP and ECP). ECP adversely impacts water flux considerably in full-scale OMBR although it is often ignored in previous works. The OMBR model makes it possible to select better DS properties (higher flow rate and salt concentration) and FO membranes with higher water flux propensity in full-scale operation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. POLYMER ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANE ELECTROLYZER OPERATION WITH VARYING INLET WATER FEED CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, E

    2008-09-12

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) electrolysis is a potential alternative technology to crack water in specialty applications where a dry gas stream is needed, such as isotope production. One design proposal is to feed the cathode of the electrolyzer with vapor phase water. This feed configuration would allow isotopic water to be isolated on the cathode side of the electrolyzer and the isotope recovery system could be operated in a closed loop. Tests were performed to characterize the difference in the current-voltage behavior between a PEM electrolyzer operated with a cathode water vapor feed and with an anode liquid water feed. The cathode water vapor feed cell had a maximum limiting current density of 100 mA/cm2 at 70 C compared to a current density of 800 mA/cm2 for the anode liquid feed cell at 70 C. The limiting current densities for the cathode water vapor feed cell were approximately 3 times lower than predicted by a water mass transfer model. It is estimated that a cathode water vapor feed electrolyzer system will need to be between 8-14 times larger in active area or number of cells than an anode liquid feed system.

  6. Membrane-mirror-based autostereoscopic display for tele-operation and teleprescence applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Stuart; Mair, Gordon M.; Mason, Steven; Revie, Kenneth

    2000-05-01

    An autostereoscopic display for telepresence and tele- operation applications has been developed at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland. The research is a collaborative effort between the Imaging Group and the Transparent Telepresence Research Group, both based at Strathclyde. A key component of the display is the directional screen; a 1.2-m diameter Stretchable Membrane Mirror is currently used. This patented technology enables large diameter, small f No., mirrors to be produced at a fraction of the cost of conventional optics. Another key element of the present system is an anthropomorphic and anthropometric stereo camera sensor platform. Thus, in addition to mirror development, research areas include sensor platform design focused on sight, hearing, research areas include sensor platform design focused on sight, hearing, and smell, telecommunications, display systems for all visual, aural and other senses, tele-operation, and augmented reality. The sensor platform is located at the remote site and transmits live video to the home location. Applications for this technology are as diverse as they are numerous, ranging from bomb disposal and other hazardous environment applications to tele-conferencing, sales, education and entertainment.

  7. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... control device . . . You shall meet this operating limit during initial catalyst depressuring and purging... catalyst purging conditions that must be met prior to allowing uncontrolled purge releases....

  8. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... control device . . . You shall meet this operating limit during initial catalyst depressuring and purging... catalyst purging conditions that must be met prior to allowing uncontrolled purge releases....

  9. Virus removal retention challenge tests performed at lab scale and pilot scale during operation of membrane units.

    PubMed

    Humbert, H; Machinal, C; Labaye, Ivan; Schrotter, J C

    2011-01-01

    The determination of the virus retention capabilities of UF units during operation is essential for the operators of drinking water treatment facilities in order to guarantee an efficient and stable removal of viruses through time. In previous studies, an effective method (MS2-phage challenge tests) was developed by the Water Research Center of Veolia Environnement for the measurement of the virus retention rates (Log Removal Rate, LRV) of commercially available hollow fiber membranes at lab scale. In the present work, the protocol for monitoring membrane performance was transferred from lab scale to pilot scale. Membrane performances were evaluated during pilot trial and compared to the results obtained at lab scale with fibers taken from the pilot plant modules. PFU culture method was compared to RT-PCR method for the calculation of LRV in both cases. Preliminary tests at lab scale showed that both methods can be used interchangeably. For tests conducted on virgin membrane, a good consistency was observed between lab and pilot scale results with the two analytical methods used. This work intends to show that a reliable determination of the membranes performances based on RT-PCR analytical method can be achieved during the operation of the UF units.

  10. Replacing cardiopulmonary bypass with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in lung transplantation operations.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Hartmuth B; Binner, Christian; Lehmann, Sven; Kuntze, Thomas; Rastan, Ardawan; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2007-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) support is required in some lung transplantation (LTX) operations. CPB support and full-dose heparin increases the risks of bleeding and early graft dysfunction. We report our experiences of replacing CPB with heparin-bonded low-dose heparin extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support in LTX surgery. From 2003 to 2005 forty-seven patients were transplanted. Thirty-seven LTX patients were retrospectively evaluated for this study (10 patients were excluded due to heart-lung-, lung-kidney transplantation, LTX with bypass grafting, and ASD closure or emergency CPB support). Extracorporeal circulation support was necessary in 40% of the 37 LTX patients due to severe primary or secondary pulmonary hypertension (P or SPHTN), right heart dysfunction, or hemodynamic instability. There were seven LTX procedures with CPB and eight implantations with ECMO support. CPB (high-dose heparin) and ECMO support (ACT 160-220 s) was always set up through femoral veno-arterial canulation. All patients had limited access thoracotomies without transsection of the sternum. Normothermia was maintained in all patients. CPB patients: PPH 15%, COPD 15%, IPF with mean PAP>40 mmHg 70%. ECMO patients: PPH 13%, COPD 13%, IPF with severe PAP pressure elevation 74%. In patients undergoing LTX for PPH, the ECMO support was directly extended into the post-operative period. Packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion requirements during the operation and the first 24h were 13.25+/-1.6 PRBC units versus 5.1+/-2.8 PRBC units on CBP (p=0.02). Operative time was longer (p=0.11) in the ECMO LTX (451 min+/-76 vs 346+/-140). The increased 90-day mortality rate of the ECMO patients showed a trend toward significance (p=0.056), which was related to infectious complications (3 vs 1 patient). Severe graft ischemia/reperfusion injury occurred in 9% in the CPB versus 13% in the ECMO group. The 1-year survival was significantly reduced in ECMO patients (p=0.004, log-rank test). The

  11. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  12. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  13. 40 CFR Table 23 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emission Limitations for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meet this operating limit during coke burn-off and catalyst rejuvenation . . . 1. Wet scrubber The... concentration in the catalyst regenerator exhaust gas must not exceed the limit established during the...

  14. Purification and properties of a shortened form of cytochrome P-450 2E1: deletion of the NH2-terminal membrane-insertion signal peptide does not alter the catalytic activities.

    PubMed Central

    Larson, J R; Coon, M J; Porter, T D

    1991-01-01

    As reported previously, alcohol-inducible cytochrome P-450 2E1 lacking the hydrophobic NH2-terminal segment is located primarily in the inner cell membrane when expressed in Escherichia coli and is active with a typical substrate. To study the catalytic properties in detail, we have purified the truncated P-450 lacking residues 3-29 to electrophoretic homogeneity from the solubilized bacterial membrane fraction in the presence of 4-methylpyrazole as a stabilizing agent. The resulting heme protein with a specific content of 15.8 nmol of P-450 per mg of protein has a reduced CO difference spectrum identical to that of the full-length enzyme, with a Soret maximum at 452 nm. The rates of catalysis of four reactions in the reconstituted enzyme system, including the oxygenation of ethanol to give acetaldehyde, the oxidative dealkylation of N-nitrosodiethylamine to give ethylene and acetaldehyde, and the ring hydroxylation of aniline and p-nitrophenol, are the same with the shortened and full-length enzymes. The apparent Km of p-nitrophenol is also the same, as is that for NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase and for cytochrome b5, which stimulates p-nitrocatechol formation about 3-fold. Moreover, the requirement for phosphatidylcholine for full catalytic activity is unchanged despite the absence of the NH2-terminal segment. Although this highly hydrophobic segment is believed to play a role in the intact cell as a membrane-insertion signal sequence, we conclude that it has no function in the catalytic activity of the cytochrome as an oxygenase, including interactions with the other components of the enzyme system. Images PMID:1656462

  15. Functional Status and Quality of Life in Survivors of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation After the Norwood Operation.

    PubMed

    Friedland-Little, Joshua M; Uzark, Karen; Yu, Sunkyung; Lowery, Ray; Aiyagari, Ranjit; Hirsch-Romano, Jennifer C

    2017-06-01

    Infants who require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support after a Norwood operation are at increased risk for early and late death compared with patients who do not require ECMO post-Norwood. Little is known about the effect that ECMO post-Norwood has on functional status and quality of life among long-term survivors. We prospectively evaluated functional status and health-related quality of life in 12 surviving patients (cases) and 19 corresponding patients (controls) from a previous retrospective case-control assessment of long-term survival in patients requiring ECMO post-Norwood. Functional status was assessed with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale-II, and health-related quality of life was assessed with the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) core and cardiac modules. There were no differences in demographics, extracardiac or genetic anomalies, or age at follow-up assessment between ECMO cases and non-ECMO controls. The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale-II scores were comparable between groups, with both groups demonstrating function in the normal range in all four domains tested. The only difference in PedsQL scores between cases and controls was perceived physical appearance, which was lower among ECMO survivors by both patient and proxy report. PedsQL scores of both groups were comparable to published scores for patients with single-ventricle congenital heart disease but generally lower than scores for the healthy population. The requirement for ECMO support after a Norwood operation does not appear to significantly affect functional status or quality of life among the subset of patients who achieve long-term survival. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Linking operation parameters and environmental variables to population dynamics of Mycolata in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Maza-Márquez, P; Gómez-Silván, C; Gómez, M A; González-López, J; Martínez-Toledo, M V; Rodelas, B

    2015-03-01

    The community structure and population dynamics of Mycolata were monitored in a full-scale membrane bioreactor during four experimental phases under changing operating and environmental conditions, by means of temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis of partial 16S-rRNA genes amplified from community DNA and RNA templates (total and active populations). Non-metric multidimensional scaling and BIO-ENV analyses demonstrated that population dynamics were mostly explained (30-32%) by changes in the input of nutrients in the influent water and the accumulation of biomass in the bioreactors, while the influence of hydraulic and solid retention times, temperature and F/M ratio was minor. Significant correlations were observed between particular Mycolata phylotypes and one or more variables, contributing information for the prediction of their abundance and activity under changing conditions. Fingerprinting and multivariate analyses demonstrated that two foaming episodes, recorded at temperatures <20°C, were connected to the increase of the relative abundance of Mycolata unrelated to Gordonia amarae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Alternate anoxic/aerobic operation for nitrogen removal in a membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, G; Andreottola, G

    2011-01-01

    A large pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a conventional denitrification/nitrification scheme for municipal wastewater treatment has been run for one year under two different aeration strategies in the oxidation/nitrification compartment. During the first five months air supply was provided according to the dissolved-oxygen set-point and the system run as a conventional predenitrification MBR; then, an intermittent aeration strategy based on effluent ammonia nitrogen was adopted in the aerobic compartment in order to assess the impact on process performances in terms of N and P removal, energy consumption and sludge reduction. The experimental inferences show a significant improvement of the effluent quality as COD and total nitrogen, both due to a better utilization of the denitrification potential which is a function of the available electron donor (biodegradable COD) and electron acceptor (nitric nitrogen); particularly, nitrogen removal increased from 67% to 75%. At the same time, a more effective biological phosphorus removal was observed as a consequence of better selection of denitrifying phosphorus accumulating organisms (dPAO). The longer duration of anoxic phases also reflected in a lower excess sludge production (12% decrease) compared with the standard pre-denitrification operation and in a decrease of energy consumption for oxygen supply (about 50%).

  18. Continuous operation of membrane capacitive deionization cells assembled with dissimilar potential of zero charge electrode pairs.

    PubMed

    Omosebi, Ayokunle; Gao, Xin; Rentschler, Jeffery; Landon, James; Liu, Kunlei

    2015-05-15

    The performance of single stack membrane assisted capacitive deionization cells configured with pristine and nitric acid oxidized Zorflex (ZX) electrode pairs was evaluated. The potentials of zero charge for the pristine and oxidized electrodes were respectively -0.2V and 0.2V vs. SCE. Four cell combinations of the electrodes including a pristine anode-pristine cathode, oxidized anode-pristine cathode, pristine anode-oxidized cathode, and oxidized anode-oxidized cathode were investigated. When the PZC was located within the polarization window of the electrode, diminished performance was observed. The cells were operated at 1.2 V and based on potential distribution results, the effective working potentials were ∼0.9, 0.8, 1.2, and 1.1 V for the pristine anode-pristine cathode, oxidized anode-pristine cathode, pristine anode-oxidized cathode, and oxidized anode-oxidized cathode cells, respectively. The highest electrosorption capacity of 17 mg NaCl/g ZX was observed for the pristine anode-oxidized cathode cell, where both PZCs were outside of the polarization window. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Long term operation of high concentration powdered activated carbon membrane bio-reactor for advanced water treatment.

    PubMed

    Seo, G T; Moon, C D; Chang, S W; Lee, S H

    2004-01-01

    A pilot scale experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance of a membrane bioreactor filled with high concentration powdered activated carbon. This hybrid system has great potential to substitute for existing GAC or O3/BAC processes in the drinking water treatment train. The system was installed at a water treatment plant located downstream of the Nakdong river basin, Korea. Effluent of rapid sand filter was used as influent of the system which consists of PAC bio-reactor, submerged MF membrane module and air supply facility. PAC concentration of 20 g/L was maintained at the beginning of the experiment and it was increased to 40 g/L. The PAC has not been changed during the operational periods. The membrane was a hollow fiber type with pore sizes of 0.1 and 0.4 microm. It was apparent that the high PAC concentration could prevent membrane fouling. 40 g/L PAC was more effective to reduce the filtration resistance than 20 g/L. At the flux of 0.36 m/d, TMP was maintained less than 40 kPa for about 3 months by intermittent suction type operation (12 min suction/3 min idling). Adsorption was the dominant role to remove DOC at the initial operational period. However the biological effect was gradually increased after around 3 months operation. Constant DOC removal could be maintained at about 40% without any trouble and then a tremendous reduction of DBPs (HAA5 and THM) higher than 85% was achieved. Full nitrification was observed at the controlled influent ammonia nitrogen concentration of 3 and 7 mg/L. pH was an important parameter to keep stable ammonia oxidation. From almost two years of operation, it is clear that the PAC membrane bioreactor is highly applicable for advanced water treatment under the recent situation of more stringent DBPs regulation in Korea.

  20. A flexible all-inorganic fuel cell membrane with conductivity above Nafion, and durable operation at 150 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Y.; Tucker, T. G.; Huang, W.; Klein, I. S.; Lee, S.-Y.; Yarger, J. L.; Angell, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    The search for fuel cell membranes has focused on carbon backbone polymers, among which Nafion seems to best survive the most severe of the degradation mechanisms - attack by peroxide radicals. Less attention has been given to inorganic membranes because of their generally inflexible nature and lower conductivity, though some SiO2-Nafion composites have shown improved properties. Nafion dominates, despite needing hydration, which then restricts operation to below 100 °C (so CO poisoning problems persist). Described herein is a low cost, flexible, and all-inorganic fiberglass reinforced gel membrane with conductivity exceeding that of Nafion at any temperature above 60 °C. Using Teflon fuel cells, maximum currents > 1 Acm-2 and OCV of 1.03 V at 150 °C are demonstrated. No detectable loss of cell potential was observed over 24 h during 50 mAcm-2 constant current operation at 120 °C while, at 150 °C and maximum power, the degradation rate is intermediate among other high conductivity H3PO4-PBI type membranes. The structure of the membrane is deduced, mainly from 29Si solid state-NMR. The -115 ppm resonance, which is extreme for Q4 Si(O) structures, identifies a zeolite-like SiO2 network, which is "floppy". 31P and 1H NMR establish nano-permeating H3PO4 as the source of the exceptional conductivity.

  1. The significance of abrupt transitions in Lineweaver-Burk plots with particular reference to glutamate dehydrogenase. Negative and positive co-operativity in catalytic rate constants.

    PubMed

    Engel, P C; Ferdinand, W

    1973-01-01

    1. Lineweaver-Burk plots for glutamate dehydrogenase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and several other enzymes show one or more abrupt transitions between apparently linear sections. These transitions correspond to abrupt increases in the apparent K(m) and V(max.) with increasing concentration of the varied substrate. 2. The generalized reciprocal initial-rate equation for a multi-site enzyme requires several restrictions to be put on it in order to generate such plots. These mathematical conditions are explored. 3. It is shown that the effective omission of a term in the denominator of the reciprocal initial-rate equation represents a minimal requirement for generation of abrupt transitions. This corresponds in physical terms to negative co-operativity followed by positive co-operativity affecting the catalytic rate constant for the reaction. 4. Previous models for glutamate dehydrogenase cannot adequately account for the results. On the other hand, the model based on both negative and positive co-operativity gives a good fit to the experimental points. 5. The conclusions are discussed in relation to current knowledge of the structure and mechanism of glutamate dehydrogenase.

  2. Stable Closure of the Cytoplasmic Half-Channel Is Required for Efficient Proton Transport at Physiological Membrane Potentials in the Bacteriorhodopsin Catalytic Cycle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The bacteriorhodopsin (BR) Asp96Gly/Phe171Cys/Phe219Leu triple mutant has been shown to translocate protons 66% as efficiently as the wild-type protein. Light-dependent ATP synthesis in haloarchaeal cells expressing the triple mutant is 85% that of the wild-type BR expressing cells. Therefore, the functional activity of BR seems to be largely preserved in the triple mutant despite the observations that its ground-state structure resembles that of the wild-type M state (i.e., the so-called cytoplasmically open state) and that the mutant shows no significant structural changes during its photocycle, in sharp contrast to what occurs in the wild-type protein in which a large structural opening and closing occurs on the cytoplasmic side. To resolve the contradiction between the apparent functional robustness of the triple mutant and the presumed importance of the opening and closing that occurs in the wild-type protein, we conducted additional experiments to compare the behavior of wild-type and mutant proteins under different operational loads. Specifically, we characterized the ability of the two proteins to generate light-driven proton currents against a range of membrane potentials. The wild-type protein showed maximal conductance between −150 and −50 mV, whereas the mutant showed maximal conductance at membrane potentials >+50 mV. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the triple mutant were also conducted to characterize structural changes in the protein and in solvent accessibility that might help to functionally contextualize the current–voltage data. These simulations revealed that the cytoplasmic half-channel of the triple mutant is constitutively open and dynamically exchanges water with the bulk. Collectively, the data and simulations help to explain why this mutant BR does not mediate photosynthetic growth of haloarchaeal cells, and they suggest that the structural closing observed in the wild-type protein likely plays a key role in minimizing

  3. Stable closure of the cytoplasmic half-channel is required for efficient proton transport at physiological membrane potentials in the bacteriorhodopsin catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Oppawsky, Christoph; Duan, Yong; Tittor, Jörg; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Facciotti, Marc T

    2014-04-15

    The bacteriorhodopsin (BR) Asp96Gly/Phe171Cys/Phe219Leu triple mutant has been shown to translocate protons 66% as efficiently as the wild-type protein. Light-dependent ATP synthesis in haloarchaeal cells expressing the triple mutant is 85% that of the wild-type BR expressing cells. Therefore, the functional activity of BR seems to be largely preserved in the triple mutant despite the observations that its ground-state structure resembles that of the wild-type M state (i.e., the so-called cytoplasmically open state) and that the mutant shows no significant structural changes during its photocycle, in sharp contrast to what occurs in the wild-type protein in which a large structural opening and closing occurs on the cytoplasmic side. To resolve the contradiction between the apparent functional robustness of the triple mutant and the presumed importance of the opening and closing that occurs in the wild-type protein, we conducted additional experiments to compare the behavior of wild-type and mutant proteins under different operational loads. Specifically, we characterized the ability of the two proteins to generate light-driven proton currents against a range of membrane potentials. The wild-type protein showed maximal conductance between -150 and -50 mV, whereas the mutant showed maximal conductance at membrane potentials >+50 mV. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the triple mutant were also conducted to characterize structural changes in the protein and in solvent accessibility that might help to functionally contextualize the current-voltage data. These simulations revealed that the cytoplasmic half-channel of the triple mutant is constitutively open and dynamically exchanges water with the bulk. Collectively, the data and simulations help to explain why this mutant BR does not mediate photosynthetic growth of haloarchaeal cells, and they suggest that the structural closing observed in the wild-type protein likely plays a key role in minimizing substrate

  4. Tympanic Membrane Perforation and Hearing Loss From Blast Overpressure in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom Wounded

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    peripheral location of the defect have both been associated with lower rates of spontaneous healing.10 Most patients, in previous studies, were...5 19 Otorrhea 10 25 Tinnitus 21 50 Vertigo 3 8 Table 3 Grade of Tympanic Membrane Perforation, Size of Perforation, and Spontaneous Healing Rate Grade

  5. Hydraulic performance and fouling characteristics of a membrane sequencing batch reactor (MSBR) for landfill leachate treatment under various operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Gkotsis, Petros; Tsilogeorgis, Jason; Zouboulis, Anastasios

    2017-09-13

    This study investigates the hydraulic performance and the fouling characteristics of a bench-scale membrane sequencing batch reactor (MSBR), treating mature landfill leachate under various time-based operating conditions. The MSBR system operated initially under a high-flux condition (Period 1) which resulted in a rapid trans-membrane pressure (TMP) rise due to intense fouling. Following the characterization of Period 1 as super-critical, the system was subsequently operated under a near-critical condition (Period 2). The overall filtration resistance analysis showed that cake layer formation was the dominant fouling mechanism during Period 1, contributing to 85.5% of the total resistance. However, regarding the MSBR operation during Period 2, adsorption was found to also be a dominant fouling mechanism (Days 1 to 47), contributing to 29.1% of the total resistance. Additionally, the irregular total resistance variation, which was observed during the subsequent operation (Days 48 to 75), and the respective filtration resistance analysis suggested also the formation of an initial sludge cake layer on the membrane surface, contributing to the 47.7% of the total resistance.

  6. 40 CFR 60.105a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) and fluid coking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) of this section. (A) As an alternative to pressure drop, the owner or operator of a jet ejector type... system must be equipped with an alarm system that will sound when the system detects an increase in... cells and frequency of visual inspections of the baghouse interior and baghouse components such as...

  7. 40 CFR 60.105a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) and fluid coking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) of this section. (A) As an alternative to pressure drop, the owner or operator of a jet ejector type... system must be equipped with an alarm system that will sound when the system detects an increase in... cells and frequency of visual inspections of the baghouse interior and baghouse components such as...

  8. 40 CFR Table 23 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emission Limitations for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 23 Table 23 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits... recommended limit (1.35 weight percent for the Chlorsorb TM System); and the weekly average chloride level on... limit (1.8 weight percent for the Chlorsorb TM System)....

  9. 40 CFR Table 28 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... HCl concentration below the applicable operating limit. 3. Internal scrubbing system meeting percent... exceed the design or manufacturer's recommended limit (1.35 weight percent for the Clorsorb TM Collecting... chloride concentration below the design or manufacturer's recommended limit (1.8 weight percent...

  10. A comparison of low-pressure and supercharged operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell systems for aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C.; Preiß, G.; Gores, F.; Griebenow, M.; Heitmann, S.

    2016-08-01

    Multifunctional fuel cell systems are competitive solutions aboard future generations of civil aircraft concerning energy consumption, environmental issues, and safety reasons. The present study compares low-pressure and supercharged operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells with respect to performance and efficiency criteria. This is motivated by the challenge of pressure-dependent fuel cell operation aboard aircraft with cabin pressure varying with operating altitude. Experimental investigations of low-pressure fuel cell operation use model-based design of experiments and are complemented by numerical investigations concerning supercharged fuel cell operation. It is demonstrated that a low-pressure operation is feasible with the fuel cell device under test, but that its range of stable operation changes between both operating modes. Including an external compressor, it can be shown that the power demand for supercharging the fuel cell is about the same as the loss in power output of the fuel cell due to low-pressure operation. Furthermore, the supercharged fuel cell operation appears to be more sensitive with respect to variations in the considered independent operating parameters load requirement, cathode stoichiometric ratio, and cooling temperature. The results indicate that a pressure-dependent self-humidification control might be able to exploit the potential of low-pressure fuel cell operation for aircraft applications to the best advantage.

  11. Clean catalytic combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstedt, E. E.; Lyon, T. F.; Sabla, P. E.; Dodds, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A combustor program was conducted to evolve and to identify the technology needed for, and to establish the credibility of, using combustors with catalytic reactors in modern high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines. Two selected catalytic combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The combustors were sized for use in the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine (E3). One of the combustor designs was a basic parallel-staged double-annular combustor. The second design was also a parallel-staged combustor but employed reverse flow cannular catalytic reactors. Subcomponent tests of fuel injection systems and of catalytic reactors for use in the combustion system were also conducted. Very low-level pollutant emissions and excellent combustor performance were achieved. However, it was obvious from these tests that extensive development of fuel/air preparation systems and considerable advancement in the steady-state operating temperature capability of catalytic reactor materials will be required prior to the consideration of catalytic combustion systems for use in high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines.

  12. Effects of ozone pretreatment and operating conditions on membrane fouling behaviors of an anoxic-aerobic membrane bioreactor for oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) treatment.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jinkai; Zhang, Yanyan; Liu, Yang; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2016-11-15

    Two identical anoxic-aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs) were operated in parallel for 742 consecutive days for raw and ozonated oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) treatment. The MBRs not only substantially degraded OSPW classical and oxidized NAs, but also demonstrated outstanding membrane fouling control performance (the MBR receiving raw OSPW experienced its first severe fouling with a transmembrane pressure (TMP) of -35 kPa on Day 433). The mild ozonation (30 mg O3/L) pretreatment of OSPW remarkably enhanced OSPW NA degradation, and improved the MBR's fouling control in terms of prolonged long-term slow TMP growth phase and reduced TMP jump frequency. Ozonation substantially altered the feed water organic composition, reshaped the microbial community (e.g., reduced growth of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) producers and biofilm formation facilitators), and lowered EPS production and EPS protein/polysaccharides (PN/PS) ratio, consequently leading to the better fouling control. Examination on fouling behaviors at different HRTs of the raw OSPW MBR indicates that HRT also played a role in determining the dominating fouling mechanism during the sharp TMP rise phase. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that the low-dose ozone pretreatment is a good option to enhance organic contaminant degradation and alleviate membrane fouling in the MBR for OSPW treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In situ combination of fermentation and electrodialysis with bipolar membranes for the production of lactic acid: operational compatibility and uniformity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Wang, Yaoming; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Tongwen

    2012-12-01

    An in situ combination of fermentation and electrodialysis with bipolar membranes was customized for the production of lactic acid to achieve their operational compatibility and uniformity. Primarily, fermentation experiments for lactic acid production were conducted by Lactobacillus plantarum with an average lactate productivity of 1.76 g/(Lh) and yield coefficient of 56.77%. Subsequently, an electrodialysis with bipolar membranes (EDBMs) stack was established with the fermented lactate mixtures as a feed. Effect of operating current density on the production of lactic acid and alkali liquor was investigated. Results indicated that only the current density of no less than 50 mA/cm(2) can produce enough alkali liquor to meet the need for fermentation. Ultimately, a combination of fermentation and EDBM process was carried out and the integration can achieve a lactic acid recovery ratio of 86.05% at the current density 60 mA/cm(2). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of the effectiveness of a water lift system in the sinus membrane-lifting operation as a sinus surgical instrument.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Y; Itoh, Yusaku; Kang, Tae H

    2012-08-01

    The effectiveness of a Water Lift System in the sinus membrane-lifting operation was examined. This investigation focused on the capability of this equipment to reduce the risk of Schneiderian membrane perforation. A preliminary clinical study on the use of the Water Lift System in sinus membrane elevation to place implants through the sinus floor was conducted. A total of 70 sinus membrane-lifting operations were performed on patients with various bone heights ranging from 1.2 to 9.9 mm (most commonly in the range of 4-6 mm) through the lateral approach (four cases) or the crestal approach (66 cases). In all of the cases performed using the lateral approach, sinus membrane perforation did not occur. In the 66 cases performed using the crestal approach, Schneiderian membrane tearing occurred in two cases. The membrane tearing occurred during elevation of the Schneiderian membrane but not when a hole was drilled to access the Schneiderian membrane. One case of membrane tearing resulted from previous inflammation in the maxillary sinus, and the other case of membrane tearing was caused by application of excessive hydraulic pressure. In addition, similar outcomes were obtained and no microbial infections were observed in a total of 68 successful cases. In this study, the Water Lift System was confirmed to effectively reduce the risk of Schneiderian membrane perforation during the sinus membrane-lifting operation. We conclude that the Water Lift System deserves to be considered as a sinus surgical instrument, which ensures safety in the sinus membrane-lifting operation. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Model-based analysis of the effect of different operating conditions on fouling mechanisms in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sabia, Gianpaolo; Ferraris, Marco; Spagni, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a model-based evaluation of the effect of different operating conditions with and without pre-denitrification treatment and applying three different solids retention times on the fouling mechanisms involved in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). A total of 11 fouling models obtained from literature were used to fit the transmembrane pressure variations measured in a pilot-scale MBR treating real wastewater for more than 1 year. The results showed that all the models represent reasonable descriptions of the fouling processes in the MBR tested. The model-based analysis confirmed that membrane fouling started by pore blocking (complete blocking model) and by a reduction of the pore diameter (standard blocking) while cake filtration became the dominant fouling mechanism over long-term operation. However, the different fouling mechanisms occurred almost simultaneously making it rather difficult to identify each one. The membrane "history" (i.e. age, lifespan, etc.) seems the most important factor affecting the fouling mechanism more than the applied operating conditions. Nonlinear regression of the most complex models (combined models) evaluated in this study sometimes demonstrated unreliable parameter estimates suggesting that the four basic fouling models (complete, standard, intermediate blocking and cake filtration) contain enough details to represent a reasonable description of the main fouling processes occurring in MBRs.

  16. Effect of operation parameters on the flux stabilization of gravity-driven membrane (GDM) filtration system for decentralized water supply.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaobin; Ding, An; Qu, Fangshu; Jia, Ruibao; Chang, Haiqing; Cheng, Xiaoxiang; Liu, Bin; Li, Guibai; Liang, Heng

    2016-08-01

    A pilot-scale gravity-driven membrane (GDM) filtration system under low gravitational pressure without any pre-treatment, backwash, flushing, or chemical cleaning was carried out to investigate the effect of operation parameters (including operation pressure, aeration mode, and intermittent filtration) on the effluent quality and permeability development. The results revealed that GDM system exhibited an efficient performance for the removal of suspended substances and organic compounds. The stabilization of flux occurred and the average values of stable flux were 6.6, 8.1, and 8.6 Lm(-2) h(-1) for pressures of 65, 120, and 200 mbar, respectively. In contrast, flux stabilization was not observed under continuous and intermittent aeration conditions. However, aeration (especially continuous aeration) was effective to improve flux and alleviate membrane fouling during 1-month operation. Moreover, intermittent filtration would influence the stabilization of permeate flux, resulting in a higher stable flux (ranging from 6 to 13 Lm(-2) h(-1)). The stable flux significantly improved with the increase of intermittent period. Additionally, GDM systems exhibited an efficient recovery of flux after simple physical cleaning and the analyses of resistance reversibility demonstrated that most of the total resistance was hydraulic reversible resistance (50-75 %). Therefore, it is expected that the results of this study can develop strategies to increase membrane permeability and reduce energy consumption in GDM systems for decentralized water supply.

  17. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  18. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-05-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  19. Influences of operating conditions on continuous lactulose synthesis in an enzymatic membrane reactor system: A basis prior to long-term operation.

    PubMed

    Sitanggang, Azis Boing; Drews, Anja; Kraume, Matthias

    2015-06-10

    Lactulose synthesis was performed in a continuous stirred enzymatic membrane reactor. Each investigated operating condition (agitation, pH, feed molar ratio of lactose to fructose (mL/mF ratio), hydraulic residence time (HRT)) had an influence on reaction performances, in terms of lactulose concentration, productivity and selectivity. Lactulose concentration was maximum at an mL/mF ratio of 1/2. Higher than this ratio, synthesis of galactooligosaccharides was promoted rather than lactulose. At mL/mF ratios lower than 1/2, enzyme inhibition was pronounced to the detriment of lactulose production. At 7 or 9h HRT, higher lactulose concentrations were obtained than at shorter HRTs. Applying an mL/mF ratio of 1/2 and an HRT of 9h in a long-term operation, nearly constant lactulose concentration was reached after 23h and lasted up to 32h with a mean concentration of 14.51±0.07g/L and a reaction selectivity of 0.075-0.080mollactulose/molcons.lactose. After 7d, lactulose concentration reduced by 31%. A continuous synthesis of lactulose at lab-scale was shown to be amenable using a membrane reactor process. Moreover, for process evaluation, this study can bridge the gap between batch laboratory scale and continuous full-scale operation regarding lactulose synthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The installation and operation of a production scale membrane filtration system to treat and reuse waste water from a dyehouse

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.A.

    1997-11-01

    The waste water from the dyeing of cotton and poly-cotton blends is characterized by high levels of salts and color. The discharged salts are felt to contribute to effluent toxicity and the color is aesthetically unacceptable in the receiving streams. The system of selective membrane filtration offers a method to address both of these problems. By treating only the waste water having the most color and salt concentration, the expensive membrane equipment can be considerably downsized. The volume of the color to be removed is drastically reduced as filtrate material. At these low volumes of color more economical means of removal can be employed. The membranes are designed so that the color and other pollutant materials are rejected but the salt solution is allowed to pass through the membrane. This produces clean water containing the recovered salt suitable for reuse, greatly reducing the salt content of the effluent. After the successful completion of a small pilot scale system, the installation and operation of a production sized system was desired prior to the full incorporation of this technology.

  1. A simple, analytic model of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell anode recirculation at operating power including nitrogen crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promislow, Keith; St-Pierre, Jean; Wetton, Brian

    A simple, analytic model is presented that describes the steady state profile of anode nitrogen concentration in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operated with anode recirculation. The model is appropriate for fuel cells with straight gas channels and includes the effect of nitrogen crossover from cathode to anode through the membrane. The key analytic simplification in the model is that this crossover rate, when scaled to the gas flows in the channels, is small. This is a good approximation when the device is used at operating power levels. The model shows that the characteristic times for the anode nitrogen profiles to reach steady state are of the order of minutes and that the dilution effect of anode nitrogen is severe for pure recirculation. The model shows additionally that a small anode outlet bleed can significantly reduce the nitrogen dilution effect. Within the framework of the model, the energy efficiency of pure recirculation can be compared to hydrogen venting or partial anode bleeding. An optimal bleed rate is identified. The model and optimization analysis can be adapted to other fuel cell designs and operating conditions. Along with operating conditions, only two key parameters are needed: a nitrogen crossover coefficient and the marginal efficiency loss to compressors for increased anode stoichiometric gas flow.

  2. Degradation of a model azo dye in submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR) operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC).

    PubMed

    Baêta, B E L; Luna, H J; Sanson, A L; Silva, S Q; Aquino, S F

    2013-10-15

    This work investigated the anaerobic degradation of the model azo dye Remazol Yellow Gold RNL in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) and two submerged anaerobic membrane (SAMBR) bioreactors, one of which (SAMBR-1) was operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC) in its interior. The reactors were operated at 35 °C with a hydraulic retention time of 24 h in three operational phases, aimed to assess the effect of external sources of carbon (glucose) or redox mediator (yeast extract) on the removal or color and organic matter. The results showed that removal efficiencies of COD (73-94%) and color (90-94%) were higher for SAMBR-1 when compared to SAMBR-2 (operated without PAC) and UASB reactors. In addition, the presence of PAC in SAMBR-1 increased reactor stability, thereby leading to a lower accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFA). The microfiltration membrane was responsible for an additional removal of ~50% of soluble residual COD in the form of VFA, thus improving permeate quality. On its turn, PAC exhibited the ability to adsorb byproducts (aromatic amines) of azo dye degradation as well as to act as source of immobilized redox mediator (quinone groups on its surface), thereby enhancing color removal.

  3. Dry gas operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with parallel channels: Non-porous versus porous plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litster, Shawn; Santiago, Juan G.

    We present a study of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells with parallel channel flow fields for the cathode, dry inlet gases, and ambient pressure at the outlets. The study compares the performance of two designs: a standard, non-porous graphite cathode plate design and a porous hydrophilic carbon plate version. The experimental study of the non-porous plate is a control case and highlights the significant challenges of operation with dry gases and non-porous, parallel channel cathodes. These challenges include significant transients in power density and severe performance loss due to flooding and electrolyte dry-out. Our experimental study shows that the porous plate yields significant improvements in performance and robustness of operation. We hypothesize that the porous plate distributes water throughout the cell area by capillary action; including pumping water upstream to normally dry inlet regions. The porous plate reduces membrane resistance and air pressure drop. Further, IR-free polarization curves confirm operation free of flooding. With an air stoichiometric ratio of 1.3, we obtain a maximum power density of 0.40 W cm -2, which is 3.5 times greater than that achieved with the non-porous plate at the same operating condition.

  4. Assemblies of protective anion exchange membrane on air electrode for its efficient operation in aqueous alkaline electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolotti, Bruno; Chikh, Linda; Vancaeyzeele, Cédric; Alfonsi, Séverine; Fichet, Odile

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous alkaline metal-air batteries represent promising energy storage devices when supplied with atmospheric air. However, under this condition, the air electrode shows a very short life time (i.e. 50 h of operation in 5 M LiOH at -10 mA cm-2), mainly due to the precipitation of carbonates inside the electrode porosity. The air electrode can then be protected by an anion exchange membrane on the electrolyte side. In this paper, we demonstrate that the efficiency of this protective membrane depends on the assembly method on the electrode. When a modified poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH) network is synthesized directly on the electrode, the polymer seeps inside the electrode porosity, and a suitable interface inducing negligible additional polarization in comparison with classical pressure-assembled membranes is obtained. This protected electrode shows improved stability of up to 160 h of operation in 5 M LiOH. This performance is improved to 350 h by adjusting the conductivity and the ionic exchange capacity. Finally, the interest of interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) architecture compared to a single network is confirmed. Indeed, an electrode protected with a PECH/poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) IPN is stable for 650 h in 5 M LiOH. In addition, degradation process becomes reversible since the assembly can be regenerated, which is not possible for the bare electrode.

  5. FEA modeling of CMUT with membrane stand-off structures to enable selectable frequency-mode operation.

    PubMed

    Eames, Matthew D C; Reck, Theodore J; Kilroy, Joseph P; Hossack, John A

    2011-12-01

    A selectable, dual-frequency, capacitive micro- machined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) designed for both high-frequency imaging and low-frequency therapeutic effect is presented. A validated finite element analysis (FEA) CMUT model was used to examine the performance of the proposed dual-frequency transducer. CMUT device simulations were used to design a hybrid device incorporating stand-off structures that divide a large, low-frequency membrane into smaller, high-frequency sub-membranes when the membrane is partially collapsed so that the stand-offs contact the substrate. In low-frequency operation, simulations indicated that the peak negative pressure achieved by the hybrid device, when biased by 30.0 VDC and excited by a 2-MHz signal with 30.0 V amplitude, exceeded 190 kPa, which is sufficient for microbubble rupture. Low-frequency mode bandwidth was 93% at a center frequency of 2.1 MHz. In the high-frequency mode of operation, the device was excited by 175 Vdc and 87.5 Vac, which generated a peak negative pressure of 247 kPa. Device center frequency was 44.1 MHz with a - 6-dB fractional bandwidth of 42%.

  6. Influence of membrane structure on the operating current densities of non-aqueous redox flow batteries: Organic-inorganic composite membranes based on a semi-interpenetrating polymer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sung-Hee; Kim, Yekyung; Yun, Sung-Hyun; Maurya, Sandip; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2015-11-01

    We develop three types of organic-inorganic composite membranes based on a semi-interpenetrating polymer network (SIPN) to explore the effects of membrane structure on the possible operating current densities of a non-aqueous redox flow battery (RFB) system. Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVdF) is selected as a supporting polymer matrix for improving the chemical and thermal stability of the organic-inorganic composite membranes. We also introduce silica nanoparticles (5 wt% of PVdF) into the membranes to ensure the low crossover of active species. The fabrication of SIPN through the addition of glycidyl methacrylate, 4-vinylpyridine, or N-vinylcarbazole enables control of the membrane structure. Depending on monomer type, the membrane structure is determined to be either aliphatic or aromatic in terms of chemical properties and either dense or porous in terms of physical properties. These chemical and physical structures affect the electrochemical properties that correspond to charge/discharge performance and to the range of possible operating current densities. An important requirement is to examine charge/discharge performance at the possible range of operating current densities by using various membrane structures. This requirement is discussed in relation to a proposed design strategy for non-aqueous RFB membranes.

  7. A large-signal model for CMUT arrays with arbitrary membrane geometry operating in non-collapsed mode.

    PubMed

    Satir, Sarp; Zahorian, Jaime; Degertekin, F Levent

    2013-11-01

    A large-signal, transient model has been developed to predict the output characteristics of a CMUT array operated in the non-collapse mode. The model is based on separation of the nonlinear electrostatic voltage-to-force relation and the linear acoustic array response. For modeling of linear acoustic radiation and crosstalk effects, the boundary element method is used. The stiffness matrix in the vibroacoustics calculations is obtained using static finite element analysis of a single membrane which can have arbitrary geometry and boundary conditions. A lumped modeling approach is used to reduce the order of the system for modeling the transient nonlinear electrostatic actuation. To accurately capture the dynamics of the non-uniform electrostatic force distribution over the CMUT electrode during large deflections, the membrane electrode is divided into patches shaped to match higher order membrane modes, each introducing a variable to the system model. This reduced order nonlinear lumped model is solved in the time domain using commercial software. The model has two linear blocks to calculate the displacement profile of the electrode patches and the output pressure for a given force distribution over the array. The force-to-array-displacement block uses the linear acoustic model, and the Rayleigh integral is evaluated to calculate the pressure at any field point. Using the model, the time-domain transmitted pressure can be simulated for different large drive signal configurations. The acoustic model is verified by comparison to harmonic FEA in vacuum and fluid for high- and low-aspect-ratio membranes as well as mass-loaded membranes. The overall software model is verified by comparison to transient 3-D finite element analysis and experimental results for different large drive signals, and an example for a phased array simulation is given.

  8. A Large Signal Model for CMUT Arrays with Arbitrary Membrane Geometries Operating in Non-Collapsed Mode

    PubMed Central

    Satir, Sarp; Zahorian, Jaime; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2014-01-01

    A large signal, transient model has been developed to predict the output characteristics of a CMUT array operated in the non-collapse mode. The model is based on separation of the nonlinear electrostatic voltage-to-force relation and the linear acoustic array response. For linear acoustic radiation and crosstalk effects, the boundary element method is used. The stiffness matrix in the vibroacoustics calculations is obtained using static finite element analysis of a single membrane which can have arbitrary geometry and boundary conditions. A lumped modeling approach is used to reduce the order of the system for modeling the transient nonlinear electrostatic actuation. To accurately capture the dynamics of the non-uniform electrostatic force distribution over the CMUT electrode during large deflections, the membrane electrode is divided into patches shaped to match higher order membrane modes, each introducing a variable to the system model. This reduced order nonlinear lumped model is solved in the time domain using Simulink. The model has two linear blocks to calculate the displacement profile of the electrode patches and the output pressure for a given force distribution over the array, respectively. The force to array displacement block uses the linear acoustic model, and the Rayleigh integral is evaluated to calculate the pressure at any field point. Using the model, the transient transmitted pressure can be simulated for different large signal drive signal configurations. The acoustic model is verified by comparison to harmonic FEA in vacuum and fluid for high and low aspect ratio membranes as well as mass-loaded membranes. The overall Simulink model is verified by comparison to transient 3D FEA and experimental results for different large drive signals; and an example for a phased array simulation is given. PMID:24158297

  9. Zeolite membrane cascade for tritium extraction and recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Borisevich, O.; Demange, D.; Lefebvre, X.; Kind, M.

    2015-03-15

    Membrane separation by zeolite membranes has been proposed as a pre-concentration stage for the tritium extraction from the purge helium of the breeding blanket combined with a final recovery by the catalytic membrane reactor PERMCAT. This fully continuous operation improves the tritium management in fusion machines, minimizing the tritium inventory. For the first time, the permeation measurements for H{sub 2} - He mixtures through a MFI-alumina hollow fibre membrane has been measured for different compositions (0.1 - 20% H{sub 2}) and temperatures. Such a highly permeable membrane, although it shows a limited selectivity, appears attractive for tritium recovery in the blanket. This will imply its operation in a membrane cascade, for which simulation work is ongoing. Mathematically the process is modeled using mass balance equations that can be transformed into the matrix form and solved iteratively assuming a permeate concentration on the first step of iteration, until the separation requirements are fulfilled.

  10. Effects of proton-exchange membrane fuel-cell operating conditions on charge transfer resistances measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Doug S; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2008-01-01

    Proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are highly dependent on operating conditions, such as humidity and temperature. This study employs electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to measure the effects of operating parameters on internal proton and electron transport resistance mechanisms in the PEMFC. Current-density experiments have been performed to measure the power production in a 25 cm{sup 2} Nafion 117 PEMFC at varying operating conditions. These experiments have shown that low humidity and low temperature contribute to decreased power production. EIS is currently employed to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in power production by calculating the specific resistances at various regions in the PEMFC. Experiments are performed at temperatures ranging from 30 to 50 C, feed humidities from 20 to 98%, and air stoichiometric ratios from 1.33 to 2.67. In all experiments, the hydrogen feed stoichiometric ratio was approximately 4.0. EIS is used to identify which transport steps limit the power production of the PEMFC over these ranges of conditions. The experimental data are analyzed via comparison to equivalent circuit models (ECMs), a technique that uses an electrical circuit to represent the electrochemical and transport properties of the PEMFC. These studies will aid in designing fuel cells that are more tolerant to wide-ranging operating conditions. In addition, optimal operating conditions for PEMFC operation can be identified.

  11. Mesoporous catalysts, supports and catalytic membranes based on MCM-41. Final report for the period January 15,2000 - January 14, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Gary L.

    2001-07-01

    The research had two objectives: to understand the effect of pore size on the chemistry and activity of active sites, and to investigate both the pore size and anchoring effect of Me-MCM-41 on Pt clusters (where Me is a metal incorporated in silica-based MCM-41). The focus is not on the effect of pore size on transport of reactants and products, but on how the local radius of curvature might affect the properties of a foreign ion embedded in a silicon wall that acts as a catalytic site or anchor for the catalytic site. The mesoporous molecular sieve, MCM-41, allows the variation of pore size with constant composition and pore geometry so these new materials allow this scientific question to be addressed for the first time. For the anchoring effect, concentration was on Sn-MCM-41 to prepare Pt/Sn-MCM-41 catalysts, by characterizing these and by testing them with probe reforming reactions (dehydrogenation, isomerization and aromatization). Although this is a final report on activity January 15, 2000 - January 14, 2001, this was a continuation of work initiated in the three-year grant period January 15, 1997 - January 14, 2000, so the summary of progress for these three years is appended for completeness.

  12. Operation of a breadboard liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor system for removing carbon dioxide and water vapor from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Scott B.; Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Millard, Douglas L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Foerg, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Processes to remove and recover carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor from air are essential for successful long-duration space missions. This paper presents results of a developmental program focused on the use of a liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor (LSMC) system for removal of CO2 and water vapor from air. In this system, air from the spacecraft cabin atmosphere is circulated through one side of a hollow-fiber membrane contactor. On the other side of the membrane contactor is flowed a liquid sorbent, which absorbs the CO2 and water vapor from the feed air. The liquid sorbent is then heated to desorb the CO2 and water vapor. The CO2 is subsequently removed from the system as a concentrated gas stream, whereas the water vapor is condensed, producing a water stream. A breadboard system based on this technology was designed and constructed. Tests showed that the LSMC breadboard system can produce a CO2 stream and a liquid-water stream. Details are presented on the operation of the system, as well as the effects on performance of variations in feed conditions.

  13. Store-operated Ca2+ entry is sensitive to the extracellular Ca2+ concentration through plasma membrane STIM1.

    PubMed

    Jardín, Isaac; López, José J; Redondo, Pedro C; Salido, Ginés M; Rosado, Juan A

    2009-10-01

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is a major mechanism for Ca(2+) influx in platelets and other cells activated by a reduction in Ca(2+) concentration in the intracellular stores. SOCE has been reported to be regulated by extracellular Ca(2+), although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we have examined the involvement of plasma membrane-located STIM1 (PM-STIM1) in the regulation of SOCE by extracellular Ca(2+). Treatment of platelets with the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) induced Mn(2+) entry, which was inhibited by extracellular Ca(2+) in a concentration-dependent manner. Incubation of platelets with a specific antibody, which recognizes the extracellular amino acid sequence 25-139 of PM-STIM1 that contains the Ca(2+)-binding domain, prevented the inactivation of Ca(2+) entry induced by extracellular Ca(2+). TG induced translocation of STIM1 to the plasma membrane (PM), an event that was found to be Ca(2+)-dependent. In addition, TG stimulated association of PM-STIM1 with Orai1, an event that was not prevented by stabilization of the membrane cytoskeleton using jasplakinolide. These findings suggest that PM-STIM1 is important for the inactivation of SOCE by extracellular Ca(2+), an event that is likely to be mediated by interaction with Orai1.

  14. Operation of a breadboard liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor system for removing carbon dioxide and water vapor from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Scott B.; Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Millard, Douglas L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Foerg, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Processes to remove and recover carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor from air are essential for successful long-duration space missions. This paper presents results of a developmental program focused on the use of a liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor (LSMC) system for removal of CO2 and water vapor from air. In this system, air from the spacecraft cabin atmosphere is circulated through one side of a hollow-fiber membrane contactor. On the other side of the membrane contactor is flowed a liquid sorbent, which absorbs the CO2 and water vapor from the feed air. The liquid sorbent is then heated to desorb the CO2 and water vapor. The CO2 is subsequently removed from the system as a concentrated gas stream, whereas the water vapor is condensed, producing a water stream. A breadboard system based on this technology was designed and constructed. Tests showed that the LSMC breadboard system can produce a CO2 stream and a liquid-water stream. Details are presented on the operation of the system, as well as the effects on performance of variations in feed conditions.

  15. Impact of Nanostructure on Mechanical Properties of Norbornene-based Block Copolymers under Simulated Operating Conditions for Biobutanol Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Changhuai; Takigawa, Tamami; Burtovvy, Oleksandr Sasha; Langsdorf, Leah; Jablonski, Dane; Bell, Andrew; Vogt, Bryan D

    2015-06-10

    The structure and mechanical properties of a novel block copolymer (BCP) system with T(g)'s for both segments exceeding 300 °C, poly(butylnorbornene)-block-poly(hydroxyhexafluoroisopropyl norbornene) (BuNB-b-HFANB), are investigated as a function of processing conditions used for solvent vapor annealing (SVA). Solvent selection impacts long-range order markedly, but unexpectedly vertical orientation of cylinders are preferred over a wide range of solubility parameters, as determined by atomic force microscopy and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. The mechanical properties (elastic modulus, fracture strength, and onset fracture strain) are dependent upon the long-range order induced during SVA and determined using the combination of surface wrinkling and cracking. The modulus and fracture strength of the films increase from 1.44 GPa and 12.1 MPa to 1.77 GPa and 17.5 MPa, respectively, whereas the onset fracture strain decreases from 1.6% to approximately 0.6% as the ordering is improved. The polarity difference in the segments of the BCP is attractive for membrane separations, especially butanol-water. For biobutanol recovery, the titers are typically <3 wt % butanol; exposure of the BCP membrane to aqueous 1 wt % butanol decreases the elastic modulus to approximately 0.90 GPa, irrespective of the morphology, despite the high T(g) of both segments and limited swelling (5.0 wt %). Correspondingly, the onset fracture strain of these swollen films is estimated to increase significantly to 6-7%. These results indicate that operating conditions impact the mechanical performance of BCP membranes more than their morphology despite the high T(g) of the neat copolymer. Wrinkling and cracking provide a facile route to test the mechanical properties of membranes under simulated operando conditions.

  16. Ceramic oxygen transport membrane array reactor and reforming method

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Robinson, Charles; Wilson, Jamie R.; Gonzalez, Javier E.; Doraswami, Uttam R.

    2016-11-08

    The invention relates to a commercially viable modular ceramic oxygen transport membrane reforming reactor configured using repeating assemblies of oxygen transport membrane tubes and catalytic reforming reactors.

  17. Favorable effect of in-situ generated platinum in the membrane on fuel cell membrane durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macauley, Natalia; Wong, Ka Hung; Watson, Mark; Kjeang, Erik

    2015-12-01

    The overall lifetime of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is often determined by the membrane durability. Platinum, which may dissolve from the catalyst layers during fuel cell operation and deposit in the membrane, has been shown to have both positive and negative effects on membrane stability. In the present work, we analyze what specific conditions are required in order to reach a favorable, membrane stabilizing effect with the controlled use of platinum in the membrane. Using accelerated membrane durability testing, field operated membrane samples, and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that a high platinum concentration with specific particle shapes and sizes is essential for enhanced membrane stability. Specifically, star shaped and dendritic particles with high particle density and high surface area are shown to be preferable. These particles contain high levels of Pt(111) and are expected to have high catalytic activity toward peroxide quenching and crossover gas consumption, thereby mitigating chemical membrane degradation. On the other hand, small, dispersed cubic particles are found to have no effect or the opposite, negative effect on membrane stability.

  18. Removal of organic micro-pollutants from solid waste landfill leachate in membrane bioreactor operated without excess sludge discharge.

    PubMed

    Boonyaroj, V; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Yamamoto, K

    2012-01-01

    Two-stage membrane bioreactor (MBR) system was applied to the treatment of landfill leachate from a solid waste disposal site in Thailand. The first stage anoxic reactor was equipped with an inclined tube module for sludge separation. It was followed by an aerobic stage with a hollow fiber membrane module for solid liquid separation. Mixed liquor sludge from the aerobic reactor was re-circulated back to anoxic reactor in order to maintain constant mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration in the aerobic reactor. The removal of micro-pollutants from landfill leachate along the treatment period of 300 days was monitored. The results indicated that two-stage MBRs could remove biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and NH(4)(+) by 97, 87 and 91% at steady operating condition. Meanwhile organic micro-pollutant removals were 50-76%. The removal efficiencies varied according to the hydrophobic characteristic of compounds but they were improved during long-term MBR operation without sludge discharge.

  19. The Kemp elimination in membrane mimetic reaction media. Probing catalytic properties of cationic vesicles formed from a double-tailed amphiphile and linear long-tailed alcohols or alkyl pyranosides.

    PubMed

    Klijn, Jaap E; Engberts, Jan B F N

    2004-06-21

    Vesicles formed from synthetic, double-tailed amphiphiles are often used as mimics for biological membranes. However, biological membranes are a complex mixture of various compounds. In the present paper we describe a first attempt to study the importance of additives on vesicular catalysis. The rate-determining deprotonation of 5-nitrobenzisoxazole (Kemp elimination) by hydroxide ion is efficiently catalysed by vesicles formed from dimethyldi-n-octadecylammonium chloride (C(18)C(18)(+)) as a result of (partial) dehydration of the reactants (especially the hydroxide ion) at the vesicular binding sites. Gradual addition of linear alcohols, such as n-decanol (C(10)OH), n-octadecanol (C(18)OH) and batyl alcohol (C(18)GlyOH) leads to a decrease in the observed catalysis. By contrast, gradual addition of oleyl alcohol, n-dodecyl-beta-glucoside (C(12)Glu) and n-dodecyl-beta-maltoside (C(12)Mal) leads to an increase in the observed catalysis. A detailed kinetic analysis, taking into account substrate binding site polarities, counterion binding percentages and binding affinity of the kinetic probe, suggests that the catalytic changes depend strongly on subtle changes in the structure of the additive. Whereas the C(12)Glu-induced effect can be explained by an increase in the vesicular rate constant, the effect of C(12)Mal can only be explained by an increase in the binding constant of the kinetic probe. However, for these pyranoside-containing vesicles others factors, such as a more extensive dehydration of the hydroxide ion, and micelle formation have to be considered. For the linear alcohols, besides a decrease in the counterion binding, changes in the vesicular rate constant and the binding constant should be taken into account. These two parameters change to a different extent for the different alcohols. The kinetic analysis is supported by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), E(T)(30) absorbance data and Nile Red, Laurdan, ANS and pyrene fluorescence measurements

  20. Identification of the aspartic proteinases from human erythrocyte membranes and gastric mucosa (slow-moving proteinase) as catalytically equivalent to cathepsin E.

    PubMed Central

    Jupp, R A; Richards, A D; Kay, J; Dunn, B M; Wyckoff, J B; Samloff, I M; Yamamoto, K

    1988-01-01

    Three aspartic proteinases with similar Mr values (approx. 80,000) but from distinct sources (human gastric mucosa, human erythrocyte membranes and rat spleen) were shown to have immunological cross-reactivity and comparable mobilities when subjected to polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions. Kinetic parameters (kcat, Km and Ki) were determined for the interactions of the three enzymes with two synthetic chromogenic substrates and five inhibitors (naturally occurring and synthetic). On this basis it would appear that all of the enzymes should be considered equivalent to cathepsin E. pH-activity measurements indicated that the aspartic proteinase that originated from the erythrocyte membranes retained activity at a higher pH value than either of its readily soluble counterparts. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3058118

  1. Carbogenic molecular sieves for reaction and separation by design: A novel approach to shape selective super base, super acid and catalytic membranes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Henry C.

    2002-03-18

    This report details the findings of three years of research plus one year of a no-cost extension. Primary results are the work with supported nanoporous carbon membranes for separation and reaction as well as with cesium-nanoporous carbon catalysts. The work resulted in 17 plus 2 papers (2 are in progress) and partial or full support for five Ph.D. students. Two patents were filed based on this research.

  2. Association with the Plasma Membrane Is Sufficient for Potentiating Catalytic Activity of Regulators of G Protein Signaling (RGS) Proteins of the R7 Subfamily.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Brian S; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2016-03-25

    Regulators of G protein Signaling (RGS) promote deactivation of heterotrimeric G proteins thus controlling the magnitude and kinetics of responses mediated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). In the nervous system, RGS7 and RGS9-2 play essential role in vision, reward processing, and movement control. Both RGS7 and RGS9-2 belong to the R7 subfamily of RGS proteins that form macromolecular complexes with R7-binding protein (R7BP). R7BP targets RGS proteins to the plasma membrane and augments their GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP) activity, ultimately accelerating deactivation of G protein signaling. However, it remains unclear if R7BP serves exclusively as a membrane anchoring subunit or further modulates RGS proteins to increase their GAP activity. To directly answer this question, we utilized a rapidly reversible chemically induced protein dimerization system that enabled us to control RGS localization independent from R7BP in living cells. To monitor kinetics of Gα deactivation, we coupled this strategy with measuring changes in the GAP activity by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay in a cellular system containing μ-opioid receptor. This approach was used to correlate changes in RGS localization and activity in the presence or absence of R7BP. Strikingly, we observed that RGS activity is augmented by membrane recruitment, in an orientation independent manner with no additional contributions provided by R7BP. These findings argue that the association of R7 RGS proteins with the membrane environment provides a major direct contribution to modulation of their GAP activity.

  3. Research on degradation product and reaction kinetics of membrane electro-bioreactor (MEBR) with catalytic electrodes for high concentration phenol wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Zhao, Huanping; Wang, Hui; Liu, Botan; Li, Chunqing

    2016-07-01

    The membrane electro-bioreactor (MEBR) is a novel technology, it treats wastewater by combining membrane filtration, electrokinetic phenomena, and biological processes in one reactor. This paper aims to deal with hard biodegradation and high concentration phenol wastewater. Investigating the influence factors such as initial concentration, voltage, pH value, temperature and mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) toward phenol degradation process in electrocatalytic process and membrane bioreactor (MBR), and then apply the optimum conditions in the MEBR system. Results of continuous flow experiments demonstrated that MEBR increased the quality of the treated wastewater than conventional MBR. The above technics followed the zero-order reaction kinetics. The removal efficiency of MEBR was about 11.1% higher for phenol than the sum of the two individual processes. With the help of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), this qualitative analysis looks at the degradation products of phenol generated in MEBR, through which 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone was confirmed as the main degradation product. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Catalytic reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Aldag, A.W. Jr.

    1986-01-28

    This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains at least one reformable organic compound. The process consists of contacting the feedstock under suitable reforming conditions with a catalyst composition selected from the group consisting of a catalyst. The catalyst essentially consists of zinc oxide and a spinel structure alumina. Another catalyst consists essentially of a physical mixture of zinc titanate and a spinel structure alumina in the presence of sufficient added hydrogen to substantially prevent the formation of coke. Insufficient zinc is present in the catalyst composition for the formation of a bulk zinc aluminate.

  5. DNA-Cu(II) poly(amine) complex membrane as novel catalytic layer for highly sensitive amperometric determination of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tingting; Hasebe, Yasushi

    2006-05-15

    A novel hydrogen peroxide biosensor was fabricated by using a DNA-Cu(II) complex as a novel electrocatalyst for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). A polyion complex (PIC) membrane composed of DNA and poly(allylamine) (PAA) functioned as a support matrix for immobilization of electrocatalytic element-copper ion. The circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of the DNA-Cu(II)/PAA membrane in wet state showed that the DNA exists in B-like form within the membrane. Electrochemical measurements of the DNA-Cu(II)/PAA membrane-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode revealed that the copper ion embedded in the DNA/PAA layer exhibits good electrochemical behaviors, and the electrochemical rate constant between the immobilized copper ion and the GC electrode surface was estimated to be 26.4 s(-1). The resulting DNA-Cu(II)/PAA/GC electrode showed an excellent electrocatalytic activity for the H2O2 reduction. The sensitivity of the sensor for the determination of H2O2 was affected by the amount of each component, such as copper ion, DNA and PAA in the DNA-Cu(II)/PAA membrane. Effects of applied potential, pH, temperature, ionic strength and buffer concentrations upon the response currents of the sensor were also investigated for an optimum analytical performance. Even in the presence of dissolved oxygen, the sensor exhibited highly sensitive and rapid (response time, less than 5 s) response to H2O2. The steady-state cathodic current responses of the sensor obtained at -0.2 V versus Ag/AgCl in air-saturated 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 5.0) increased linearly up to 135 microM with the detection limit of 50 nM. Interference by ascorbic acid and uric acid due to the reduction of Cu(II) was effectively cancelled by further modification of outermost layer of polyion complex film. In addition, the sensor exhibited good reproducibility and stability.

  6. Chemogenetic E-MAP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Identification of Membrane Transporters Operating Lipid Flip Flop

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Hector M.; Vionnet, Christine; Roubaty, Carole; Mallela, Shamroop k.; Schneiter, Roger; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    While most yeast enzymes for the biosynthesis of glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and ergosterol are known, genes for several postulated transporters allowing the flopping of biosynthetic intermediates and newly made lipids from the cytosolic to the lumenal side of the membrane are still not identified. An E-MAP measuring the growth of 142'108 double mutants generated by systematically crossing 543 hypomorphic or deletion alleles in genes encoding multispan membrane proteins, both on media with or without an inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis, was generated. Flc proteins, represented by 4 homologous genes encoding presumed FAD or calcium transporters of the ER, have a severe depression of sphingolipid biosynthesis and elevated detergent sensitivity of the ER. FLC1, FLC2 and FLC3 are redundant in granting a common function, which remains essential even when the severe cell wall defect of flc mutants is compensated by osmotic support. Biochemical characterization of some other genetic interactions shows that Cst26 is the enzyme mainly responsible for the introduction of saturated very long chain fatty acids into phosphatidylinositol and that the GPI lipid remodelase Cwh43, responsible for introducing ceramides into GPI anchors having a C26:0 fatty acid in sn-2 of the glycerol moiety can also use lyso-GPI protein anchors and various base resistant lipids as substrates. Furthermore, we observe that adjacent deletions in several chromosomal regions show strong negative genetic interactions with a single gene on another chromosome suggesting the presence of undeclared suppressor mutations in certain chromosomal regions that need to be identified in order to yield meaningful E-map data. PMID:27462707

  7. IN SITU DESTRUCTION OF CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON COMPOUNDS IN GROUNDWATER USING CATALYTIC REDUCTIVE REDUCTIVE DEHALOGENATION IN A REACTIVE WELL: TESTING AND OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCES. (R825421)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A groundwater treatment technology based on catalytic reductive
    dehalogenation has been developed to efficiently destroy chlorinated
    hydrocarbons in situ using a reactive well approach. The treatment process
    utilizes dissolved H2 as an electron donor, in...

  8. Effects of operating conditions on durability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell Pt cathode catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohyagi, Shinsuke; Matsuda, Toshihiko; Iseki, Yohei; Sasaki, Tatsuyoshi; Kaito, Chihiro

    In this study, we investigated the effects of humidity and oxygen reduction on the degradation of the catalyst of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) in a voltage cycling test. To elucidate the effect of humidity on the voltage cycling corrosion of a carbon-supported Pt catalyst with 3 nm Pt particles, voltage cycling tests based on 10,000 cycles were conducted using 100% relative humidity (RH) hydrogen as anode gas and nitrogen of varying humidities as cathode gas. The degradation rate of an electrochemical surface area (ECSA) was almost 50% under 189% RH nitrogen atmosphere and the Pt average particle diameter after 10,000 cycles under these conditions was about 2.3 times that of a particle of fresh catalyst because of the agglomeration of Pt particles. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) that facilitated Pt catalyst agglomeration when oxygen was employed as the cathode gas also demonstrated that Pt agglomeration was prominent in higher concentrations of oxygen. The ECSA degradation figure in 100% RH oxygen was similar to that in 189% RH nitrogen. It was concluded that liquid water, which was dropped under a supersaturated condition or generated by ORR, accelerated Pt agglomeration. In this paper, we suggest that the Pt agglomeration degradation occurs in a flooding area in a cell plane.

  9. Acoustic emission: Towards a real-time diagnosis technique for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legros, B.; Thivel, P.-X.; Bultel, Y.; Boinet, M.; Nogueira, R. P.

    This paper deals with one of the needs for PEMFC to be economically reliable: diagnosis tool for water management. This issue is actually a key parameter for both performance and durability improvement. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was employed to survey PEM single cell under various operating conditions. AE events coming from different sources have thus been identified, classified and finally ascribed to different phenomena induced by MEA water uptake and/or biphasic flow in the gas channel thanks to a statistical post-treatment of the acoustic data. Results, although qualitative, seems trusty enough to unravel hidden correlations between AE hits and physicochemical phenomena taking place during the cell operation and open up the way for an innovative and non-invasive online diagnosis tool.

  10. A novel membrane-based process to isolate peroxidase from horseradish roots: optimization of operating parameters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Yang, Bo; Chen, Changzhen

    2013-02-01

    The optimization of operating parameters for the isolation of peroxidase from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) roots with ultrafiltration (UF) technology was systemically studied. The effects of UF operating conditions on the transmission of proteins were quantified using the parameter scanning UF. These conditions included solution pH, ionic strength, stirring speed and permeate flux. Under optimized conditions, the purity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) obtained was greater than 84 % after a two-stage UF process and the recovery of HRP from the feedstock was close to 90 %. The resulting peroxidase product was then analysed by isoelectric focusing, SDS-PAGE and circular dichroism, to confirm its isoelectric point, molecular weight and molecular secondary structure. The effects of calcium ion on HRP specific activities were also experimentally determined.

  11. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalyst are presented.

  12. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalysts are presented.

  13. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalysts are presented.

  14. Catalytic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  15. Effect of anoxic decay process on simultaneous nitrification denitrification in a membrane bioreactor operated without an anoxic tank.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, M; Insel, G; Artan, N; Orhon, D

    2010-01-01

    This study was focused on evaluating the role and the effect of anoxic decay on the extent of simultaneous nitrification-denitrification (SNdN) process sustained in a single membrane bioreactor. The membrane bioreactor was fed with relatively strong domestic sewage and operated at steady state at a sludge age of 36 days at a corresponding suspended solids level maintained in the range of 17,500-21,000 mg/L. The SNdN could be sustained due to diffusion limitation of oxygen into the flocs. The evaluation identified an MLSS threshold level of around 17,000-18,000 mg/L below which nitrogen removal was essentially controlled by denitrification and above, the rate limiting mechanism shifted to nitrification maintaining total nitrogen removal efficiency of 85-95% for a typical domestic sewage. The contribution of anoxic decay process to the overall denitrification potential was evaluated as 60%, substantially higher than the remaining 40% associated with the anoxic growth during the SNdN process.

  16. Interlinkages between bacterial populations dynamics and the operational parameters in a moving bed membrane bioreactor treating urban sewage.

    PubMed

    Reboleiro-Rivas, P; Martín-Pascual, J; Morillo, J A; Juárez-Jiménez, B; Poyatos, J M; Rodelas, B; González-López, J

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are key players in biological wastewater treatments (WWTs), thus a firm knowledge of the bacterial population dynamics is crucial to understand environmental/operational factors affecting the efficiency and stability of the biological depuration process. Unfortunately, little is known about the microbial ecology of the advanced biological WWTs combining suspended biomass (SB) and attached biofilms (AB). This study explored in depth the bacterial community structure and population dynamics in each biomass fraction from a pilot-scale moving bed membrane bioreactor (MBMBR) treating municipal sewage, by means of temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) and 454-pyrosequencing. Eight experimental phases were conducted, combining different carrier filling ratios, hydraulic retention times and concentrations of mixed liquor total suspended solids. The bacterial community, dominated by Proteobacteria (20.9-53.8%) and Actinobacteria (20.6-57.6%), was very similar in both biomass fractions and able to maintain its functional stability under all the operating conditions, ensuring a successful and steady depuration process. Multivariate statistical analysis demonstrated that solids concentration, carrier filling ratio, temperature and organic matter concentration in the influent were the significant factors explaining population dynamics. Bacterial diversity increased as carrier filling ratio increased (from 20% to 35%, v/v), and solids concentration was the main factor triggering the shifts of the community structure. These findings provide new insights on the influence of operational parameters on the biology of the innovative MBMBRs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  18. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  19. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will also be investigated.

  20. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell reversible performance loss induced by carbon monoxide produced during operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decoopman, B.; Vincent, R.; Rosini, S.; Paganelli, G.; Thivel, P.-X.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic voltammetry measurements at the anode have been carried out and reveal the presence of carbon monoxide in steady-state operation, with pure hydrogen. Experiments have been performed both in single cell and in stack to find out its origin. The contamination of the anode catalyst is partly due the reverse-water gas shift (RWGS) with carbon dioxide from the cathode. However, this study shows a temperature-activated and time-related corrosion mechanism which appears under humidified hydrogen. Due to this degradation mechanism, a reversible 25 mV-loss of performances is observed and can be recovered by oxidizing carbon monoxide on the anode.

  1. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Roobol, S. B.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Bergman, M.; Spronsen, M. A. van; Onderwaater, W. G.; Tuijn, P. C. van der; Koehler, R.; Frenken, J. W. M.; Ofitserov, A.; Baarle, G. J. C. van

    2015-03-15

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  2. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roobol, S. B.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Bergman, M.; van Spronsen, M. A.; Onderwaater, W. G.; van der Tuijn, P. C.; Koehler, R.; Ofitserov, A.; van Baarle, G. J. C.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2015-03-01

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  3. The ReactorAFM: non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions.

    PubMed

    Roobol, S B; Cañas-Ventura, M E; Bergman, M; van Spronsen, M A; Onderwaater, W G; van der Tuijn, P C; Koehler, R; Ofitserov, A; van Baarle, G J C; Frenken, J W M

    2015-03-01

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  4. Intracellular calcium affects prestin's voltage operating point indirectly via turgor-induced membrane tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Lei; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Recent identification of a calmodulin binding site within prestin's C-terminus indicates that calcium can significantly alter prestin's operating voltage range as gauged by the Boltzmann parameter Vh (Keller et al., J. Neuroscience, 2014). We reasoned that those experiments may have identified the molecular substrate for the protein's tension sensitivity. In an effort to understand how this may happen, we evaluated the effects of turgor pressure on such shifts produced by calcium. We find that the shifts are induced by calcium's ability to reduce turgor pressure during whole cell voltage clamp recording. Clamping turgor pressure to 1kPa, the cell's normal intracellular pressure, completely counters the calcium effect. Furthermore, following unrestrained shifts, collapsing the cells abolishes induced shifts. We conclude that calcium does not work by direct action on prestin's conformational state. The possibility remains that calcium interaction with prestin alters water movements within the cell, possibly via its anion transport function.

  5. Definition and validation of operating equations for poly(vinyl alcohol)-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microfiltration membrane-scaffold bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Shipley, RJ; Waters, SL; Ellis, MJ

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide operating data for biodegradable hollow fiber membrane bioreactors. The physicochemical cell culture environment can be controlled with the permeate flowrate, so this aim necessitates the provision of operating equations that enable end-users to set the pressures and feed flowrates to obtain their desired culture environment. In this paper, theoretical expressions for the pure water retentate and permeate flowrates, derived using lubrication theory, are compared against experimental data for a single fiber poly(vinyl alcohol)–poly(lactide-co-glycolide) crossflow module to give values for the membrane permeability and slip. Analysis of the width of the boundary layer region where slip effects are important, together with the sensitivity of the retentate and permeate equations to the slip parameter, show that slip is insignificant for these membranes, which have a mean pore diameter of 1.1 µm. The experimental data is used to determine a membrane permeability, of k = 1.86 × 10−16 m2, and to validate the model. It was concluded that the operating equation that relates the permeate to feed ratio, c, lumen inlet flowrate, Ql,in, lumen outlet pressure, P1, and ECS outlet pressure, P0, is1 where A and B are constants that depend on the membrane permeability and geometry (and are given explicitly). Finally, two worked examples are presented to demonstrate how a tissue engineer can use Equation 1 to specify operating conditions for their bioreactor. PMID:20641054

  6. Clean hydrogen generation through the electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol in a Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolysis Cell (PEMEC): Effect of the nature and structure of the catalytic anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, Claude; Jaubert, Thomas; Baranton, Stève; Coutanceau, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol was investigated in a Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolysis Cell (PEMEC) working at low temperature (20°C) on several Pt-based catalysts (Pt/C, PtSn/C, PtSnRu/C) in order to produce very clean hydrogen by electrolysis of a biomass compound. The electrocatalytic activity was determined by cyclic voltammetry and the rate of hydrogen evolution was measured for each catalyst at different current densities. The cell voltages UEtOH were recorded as a function of time for each current density. At 100 mA cm-2, i.e. 0.5 A with the 5 cm2 surface area PEMEC used, the cell voltage did not exceed 0.9 V for an evolution rate of about 220 cm3 of hydrogen per hour and the electrical energy consumed was less than 2.3 kWh (Nm3)-1, i.e. less than one half of the energy needed for water electrolysis (4.7 kWh (Nm3)-1 at UH2O = 2 V). This result is valid for the decomposition of any organic compound, particularly those originated from biomass resource, provided that their electro-oxidation rate is sufficient (>100 mA cm-2) at a relatively low cell voltage (Ucell < 1 V) which necessitates the development of efficient electrocatalysts for the electrochemical decomposition of this compound.

  7. Process feasibility, operational parameters and modeling of reverse osmosis membrane systems for the separation and concentration of hazardous, complex industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) was applied successfully to the renovation of complex and hazardous industrial wastewaters. Few others have had success in applying RO to the treatment of these high-strength wastewaters, including industrial landfill leachates. Because of the nature of these hazardous waste streams, difficulties are encountered if the RO treatment scheme is not designed or operated for the immediate purpose. The RO system consists of tubular cellulose acetate membranes that can operate in several process modes. The more functional process concentrates the feed, allowing the membrane to separate increments of

  8. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen/oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.; Zurawski, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a unique monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant inlet temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of a catalytic igniter. The test results showed that the gaseous hydrogen/oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using both the granular and monolithic catalysts are presented. The capabilities of a facility constructed to conduct the igniter testing and the advantages of a catalytic igniter over other ignition systems for gaseous hydrogen and oxygen are also discussed.

  9. In-situ combination of fermentation and electrodialysis with bipolar membranes for the production of lactic acid: continuous operation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Wang, Yaoming; Zhang, Xu; Feng, Hongyan; Xu, Tongwen

    2013-11-01

    An experimental study was carried out to achieve a continuous integrated operation of fermentation and electrodialysis with bipolar membranes (EDBM). There need three steps to accomplish this experiment: (1) individual continuous fermentation; (2) individual continuous EDBM; (3) integrated operation of fermentation and EDBM under continuous condition. The results indicate that the maximum feed rate (fermenter can afford) is 0.24 L/h, which is also equal to the feed rate of the subsequent individual continuous EDBM. During continuous EDBM, the recovery ratio of lactate from the fermentation broth can reach 69.5% under a current density of 40 mA/cm(2). The net end concentration and total molar quantity for lactic acid can reach 1.46 mol/L and 2.18 mol, and for OH(-) are 1.32 mol/L and 1.70 mol, respectively. The integration can be achieved only under an initial alkali concentration of no less than 1 mol/L and a current density of no less than 30 mA/cm(2). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    In this project we intend to study a novel process concept, i.e, the use of ceramic membranes reactors in upgrading of coal derived liquids. Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. They have, furthermore, the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step. Thus they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, as those typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sol-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  11. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    In this project we intend to study a novel process concept, i.e.,the use of ceramic membranes reactors in upgrading of coal derived liquids. Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. They have, furthermore, the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step. Thus they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, as those typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we wig evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  12. Retinal degeneration 3 (RD3) protein inhibits catalytic activity of retinal membrane guanylyl cyclase (RetGC) and its stimulation by activating proteins.

    PubMed

    Peshenko, Igor V; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Azadi, Seifollah; Molday, Laurie L; Molday, Robert S; Dizhoor, Alexander M

    2011-11-08

    Retinal membrane guanylyl cyclase (RetGC) in the outer segments of vertebrate photoreceptors is controlled by guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs), responding to light-dependent changes of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. We present evidence that a different RetGC binding protein, retinal degeneration 3 protein (RD3), is a high-affinity allosteric modulator of the cyclase which inhibits RetGC activity at submicromolar concentrations. It suppresses the basal activity of RetGC in the absence of GCAPs in a noncompetitive manner, and it inhibits the GCAP-stimulated RetGC at low intracellular Ca(2+) levels. RD3 opposes the allosteric activation of the cyclase by GCAP but does not significantly change Ca(2+) sensitivity of the GCAP-dependent regulation. We have tested a number of mutations in RD3 implicated in human retinal degenerative disorders and have found that several mutations prevent the stable expression of RD3 in HEK293 cells and decrease the affinity of RD3 for RetGC1. The RD3 mutant lacking the carboxy-terminal half of the protein and associated with Leber congenital amaurosis type 12 (LCA12) is unable to suppress the activity of the RetGC1/GCAP complex. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of the G57V mutant implicated in cone-rod degeneration is strongly reduced. Our results suggest that inhibition of RetGC by RD3 may be utilized by photoreceptors to block RetGC activity during its maturation and/or incorporation into the photoreceptor outer segment rather than participate in dynamic regulation of the cyclase by Ca(2+) and GCAPs.

  13. Catalytic oxidizers and Title V requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Uberoi, M.; Rach, S.E.

    1999-07-01

    Catalytic oxidizers have been used to reduce VOC emissions from various industries including printing, chemical, paint, coatings, etc. A catalytic oxidizer uses a catalyst to reduce the operating temperature for combustion to approximately 600 F, which is substantially lower than thermal oxidation unit. Title V requirements have renewed the debate on the best methods to assure compliance of catalytic oxidizers, with some suggesting the need for continuous emission monitoring equipment. This paper will discuss the various aspects of catalytic oxidation and consider options such as monitoring inlet/outlet temperatures, delta T across the catalyst, periodic laboratory testing of catalyst samples, and preventive maintenance procedures as means of assuring continuous compliance.

  14. Long-term operation of oxygen-limiting membrane bioreactor (MBR) for the development of simultaneous partial nitrification, anammox and denitrification (SNAD) process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuanqi; Wang, Gang; Xu, Xiaochen; Yang, Yuesuo; Yang, Fenglin

    2017-07-18

    In this study, an oxygen-limiting membrane bioreactor (MBR) with recirculation of biogas for relieving membrane fouling was successfully operated to realize the simultaneous partial nitrification, anammox and denitrification (SNAD) process. The MBR operation was considered effective in the long-term test with total nitrogen (TN) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies of 94.86% and 98.91%, respectively. Membrane fouling was significantly alleviated due to the recirculation of biogas and the membrane had been cleaned four times with a normal filtration period of 52 days. The co-existence of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), anammox and denitrifying bacteria in MBR was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH) analysis. Furthermore, AOB were found close to the granule surface, while denitrifying bacteria and anammox were in the deeper layer of granules. Potential in excellent TN and COD removal, operational stability and sustainability, as well as in alleviating membrane fouling is expected by using this oxygen-limiting MBR.

  15. Membrane-lipid therapy in operation: the HSP co-inducer BGP-15 activates stress signal transduction pathways by remodeling plasma membrane rafts.

    PubMed

    Gombos, Imre; Crul, Tim; Piotto, Stefano; Güngör, Burcin; Török, Zsolt; Balogh, Gábor; Péter, Mária; Slotte, J Peter; Campana, Federica; Pilbat, Ana-Maria; Hunya, Akos; Tóth, Noémi; Literati-Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Vígh, László; Glatz, Attila; Brameshuber, Mario; Schütz, Gerhard J; Hevener, Andrea; Febbraio, Mark A; Horváth, Ibolya; Vígh, László

    2011-01-01

    Aging and pathophysiological conditions are linked to membrane changes which modulate membrane-controlled molecular switches, causing dysregulated heat shock protein (HSP) expression. HSP co-inducer hydroxylamines such as BGP-15 provide advanced therapeutic candidates for many diseases since they preferentially affect stressed cells and are unlikely have major side effects. In the present study in vitro molecular dynamic simulation, experiments with lipid monolayers and in vivo ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy showed that BGP-15 alters the organization of cholesterol-rich membrane domains. Imaging of nanoscopic long-lived platforms using the raft marker glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric green fluorescent protein diffusing in the live Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell plasma membrane demonstrated that BGP-15 prevents the transient structural disintegration of rafts induced by fever-type heat stress. Moreover, BGP-15 was able to remodel cholesterol-enriched lipid platforms reminiscent of those observed earlier following non-lethal heat priming or membrane stress, and were shown to be obligate for the generation and transmission of stress signals. BGP-15 activation of HSP expression in B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells involves the Rac1 signaling cascade in accordance with the previous observation that cholesterol affects the targeting of Rac1 to membranes. Finally, in a human embryonic kidney cell line we demonstrate that BGP-15 is able to inhibit the rapid heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) acetylation monitored during the early phase of heat stress, thereby promoting a prolonged duration of HSF1 binding to heat shock elements. Taken together, our results indicate that BGP-15 has the potential to become a new class of pharmaceuticals for use in 'membrane-lipid therapy' to combat many various protein-misfolding diseases associated with aging.

  16. Membrane-Lipid Therapy in Operation: The HSP Co-Inducer BGP-15 Activates Stress Signal Transduction Pathways by Remodeling Plasma Membrane Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Piotto, Stefano; Güngör, Burcin; Török, Zsolt; Balogh, Gábor; Péter, Mária; Slotte, J. Peter; Campana, Federica; Pilbat, Ana-Maria; Hunya, Ákos; Tóth, Noémi; Literati-Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Vígh, László; Glatz, Attila; Brameshuber, Mario; Schütz, Gerhard J.; Hevener, Andrea; Febbraio, Mark A.; Horváth, Ibolya; Vígh, László

    2011-01-01

    Aging and pathophysiological conditions are linked to membrane changes which modulate membrane-controlled molecular switches, causing dysregulated heat shock protein (HSP) expression. HSP co-inducer hydroxylamines such as BGP-15 provide advanced therapeutic candidates for many diseases since they preferentially affect stressed cells and are unlikely have major side effects. In the present study in vitro molecular dynamic simulation, experiments with lipid monolayers and in vivo ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy showed that BGP-15 alters the organization of cholesterol-rich membrane domains. Imaging of nanoscopic long-lived platforms using the raft marker glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric green fluorescent protein diffusing in the live Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell plasma membrane demonstrated that BGP-15 prevents the transient structural disintegration of rafts induced by fever-type heat stress. Moreover, BGP-15 was able to remodel cholesterol-enriched lipid platforms reminiscent of those observed earlier following non-lethal heat priming or membrane stress, and were shown to be obligate for the generation and transmission of stress signals. BGP-15 activation of HSP expression in B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells involves the Rac1 signaling cascade in accordance with the previous observation that cholesterol affects the targeting of Rac1 to membranes. Finally, in a human embryonic kidney cell line we demonstrate that BGP-15 is able to inhibit the rapid heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) acetylation monitored during the early phase of heat stress, thereby promoting a prolonged duration of HSF1 binding to heat shock elements. Taken together, our results indicate that BGP-15 has the potential to become a new class of pharmaceuticals for use in ‘membrane-lipid therapy’ to combat many various protein-misfolding diseases associated with aging. PMID:22174906

  17. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  18. Bacterial community shift along with the changes in operational conditions in a membrane-aerated biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hai-Long; Zhao, Jie-Yu; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Li, Bao-An; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2015-04-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) is a promising wastewater treatment process. Although bacteria inhabiting the MABR biofilm are important in wastewater treatment, the community composition and its correlation with operating conditions were less clear. A laboratory-scale MABR was designed to investigate the shift of bacterial community through a complete operational process by pyrosequencing the bacterial 16S rRNA genes. From around 19,000 sequences, 175 bacterial genera were retrieved, mainly belonging to Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. A large number of unclassified bacterial sequences were also detected in the biofilm, suggesting a wide variety of uncharacterized species in MABR. Redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that influent chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH4-N, and NaHCO3 concentrations could exert distinct influences on the composition of the bacterial community. The influent COD and NaHCO3 concentrations stimulated proliferation of denitrification-related species such as Dokdonella, Azospira, Hydrogenophaga, Rhodocyclaceae, and Thauera, while inhibiting the growth of Acidovorax and Sinobacteraceae. Some denitrifying Thermomonas spp. tended to survive in NH4-N-rich environments, while Flavobacterium preferred to inhabit NH4-N-poor or COD-rich environments. Conversely, the influent NH4-N and NaHCO3, to some extent, appeared to be the growth-promoting factors for nitrifying bacteria. Furthermore, the presence of potential aerobic denitrifiers such as Comamonas, Enterobacter, and Aeromonas indicated that MABR could have the capability of simultaneous aerobic and anoxic denitrification particularly during treatment of low-ammonia nitrogen sewage.

  19. Membrane bioreactor (MBR) sludge inoculation in a hybrid process scheme concept to assist overloaded conventional activated sludge (CAS) process operations.

    PubMed

    Fenu, A; Roels, J; Van Damme, S; Wambecq, T; Weemaes, M; Thoeye, C; De Gueldre, G; Van De Steene, B

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the effect of inoculating membrane bioreactor (MBR) sludge in a parallel-operated overloaded conventional activated sludge (CAS) system. Modelling studies that showed the beneficial effect of this inoculation were confirmed though full scale tests. Total nitrogen (TN) removal in the CAS increased and higher nitrate formation rates were achieved. During MBR sludge inoculation, the TN removal in the CAS was proven to be dependent on MBR sludge loading. Special attention was given to the effect of inoculation on sludge quality. The MBR flocs, grown without selection pressure, were clearly distinct from the more compact flocs in the CAS system and also contained more filamentous bacteria. After inoculation the MBR flocs did not evolve into good-settling compact flocs, resulting in a decreasing sludge quality. During high flow conditions the effluent CAS contained more suspended solids. Sludge volume index, however, did not increase. Laboratory tests were held to determine the threshold volume of MBR sludge to be seeded into the CAS reactor. Above 16-30%, supernatant turbidity and scum formation increased markedly.

  20. Investigation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell internal behaviour during long term operation and its use in prognostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Lei; Jackson, Lisa; Jackson, Tom

    2017-09-01

    This paper investigates the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell internal behaviour variation at different operating condition, with characterization test data taken at predefined inspection times, and uses the determined internal behaviour evolution to predict the future PEM fuel cell performance. For this purpose, a PEM fuel cell behaviour model is used, which can be related to various fuel cell losses. By matching the model to the collected polarization curves from the PEM fuel cell system, the variation of fuel cell internal behaviour can be obtained through the determined model parameters. From the results, the source of PEM fuel cell degradation during its lifetime at different conditions can be better understood. Moreover, with determined fuel cell internal behaviour, the future fuel cell performance can be obtained by predicting the future model parameters. By comparing with prognostic results using adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), the proposed prognostic analysis can provide better predictions for PEM fuel cell performance at dynamic condition, and with the understanding of variation in PEM fuel cell internal behaviour, mitigation strategies can be designed to extend the fuel cell performance.

  1. Magnetic Membrane System

    DOEpatents

    McElfresh, Michael W.; ; Lucas, Matthew S.

    2004-12-30

    The present invention provides a membrane with magnetic particles. In one embodiment the membrane is created by mixing particles in a non-magnetic base. The membrane may act as an actuator, a sensor, a pump, a valve, or other device. A magnet is operatively connected to the membrane. The magnet acts on and changes the shape of the membrane.

  2. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF GROUNDWATER STRIPPING EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reviews the applicability of catalytic oxidation to control ground-water air stripping gaseous effluents, with special attention to system designs and case histories. The variety of contaminants and catalyst poisons encountered in stripping operations are also reviewed....

  3. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF GROUNDWATER STRIPPING EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reviews the applicability of catalytic oxidation to control ground-water air stripping gaseous effluents, with special attention to system designs and case histories. The variety of contaminants and catalyst poisons encountered in stripping operations are also reviewed....

  4. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  5. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. Having the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step, they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, such as these typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. This project will evaluate the performance of Sol-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. Development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  6. Performance of able-bodied subjects on a text-typing task using a head-operated device and expanded membrane cursor keys.

    PubMed

    Capilouto, Gilson J; McClenaghan, Bruce; Williams, Harriet G; Dickerson, John; Hussey, James R

    2004-02-01

    Children and adults with disabilities frequently rely on computers to complete written tasks. Those with significant motor limitations typically use alternative computer-input devices since the traditional keyboard and mouse are insufficient to accommodate their abilities. For persons unable to isolate their fingers, input devices controlled by movements of the head or whole hand or arm movements may be among the options considered. This study investigated the performance of a head-operated device and expanded membrane cursor keys for text entry. Data from 24 young adults indicated the head-operated device performed significantly faster given reduced cognitive demands for device operation, increased stimulus-response compatibility, and simplicity of movement. Use of the expanded membrane cursor keys resulted in significantly lower error rates. No significant differences in comfort or ease of use were reported for the two devices. The relative performance of device options for users sharing similar motor challenges provides rehabilitation specialists with important clinical information.

  7. Definition and validation of operating equations for poly(vinyl alcohol)-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microfiltration membrane-scaffold bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Shipley, R J; Waters, S L; Ellis, M J

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this work is to provide operating data for biodegradable hollow fiber membrane bioreactors. The physicochemical cell culture environment can be controlled with the permeate flowrate, so this aim necessitates the provision of operating equations that enable end-users to set the pressures and feed flowrates to obtain their desired culture environment. In this paper, theoretical expressions for the pure water retentate and permeate flowrates, derived using lubrication theory, are compared against experimental data for a single fiber poly(vinyl alcohol)-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) crossflow module to give values for the membrane permeability and slip. Analysis of the width of the boundary layer region where slip effects are important, together with the sensitivity of the retentate and permeate equations to the slip parameter, show that slip is insignificant for these membranes, which have a mean pore diameter of 1.1 microm. The experimental data is used to determine a membrane permeability, of k = 1.86 x 10(-16) m(2), and to validate the model. It was concluded that the operating equation that relates the permeate to feed ratio, c, lumen inlet flowrate, Q (l,in), lumen outlet pressure, P (1), and ECS outlet pressure, P (0), is P(1) - P(0) = Q(l),in (Ac + B) where A and B are constants that depend on the membrane permeability and geometry (and are given explicitly). Finally, two worked examples are presented to demonstrate how a tissue engineer can use Equation (1) to specify operating conditions for their bioreactor.

  8. Loss of autoinhibition of the plasma membrane Ca(2+) pump by substitution of aspartic 170 by asparagin. A ctivation of plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4 without disruption of the interaction between the catalytic core and the C-terminal regulatory domain.

    PubMed

    Bredeston, Luis M; Adamo, Hugo P

    2004-10-01

    The plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) actively transports Ca(2+) from the cytosol to the extra cellular space. The C-terminal segment of the PMCA functions as an inhibitory domain by interacting with the catalytic core. Ca(2+)-calmodulin binds to the C-terminal segment and stops inhibition. Here we showed that residue Asp(170), in the putative "A" domain of human PMCA isoform 4xb, plays a critical role in autoinhibition. In the absence of calmodulin a PMCA containing a site-specific mutation of D170N had 80% of the maximum activity of the calmodulin-activated PMCA and a similar high affinity for Ca(2+). The mutation did not change the activation of the PMCA by ATP. Deletion of the C-terminal segment further downstream of the calmodulin-binding site led to an additional increase in the maximal activity of the mutant, which suggests that the mutation did not affect the inhibition because of this portion of the C-terminal segment. The calmodulin-activated PMCA was more sensitive to vanadate inhibition than the autoinhibited enzyme. In contrast, inhibition of the D170N mutant required higher concentrations of vanadate and was not affected by calmodulin. Despite its higher basal activity, the mutant had an apparent affinity for calmodulin similar to that of the wild type enzyme, and its rate of proteolysis at the C-terminal segment was still calmodulin-dependent. Altogether these results suggest that activation by mutation D170N does not involve the displacement of the calmodulin-binding autoinhibitory domain from the catalytic core and may arise directly from changes in the accessibility to the calcium-binding residues of the pump.

  9. Towards neat methanol operation of direct methanol fuel cells: a novel self-assembled proton exchange membrane.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Cai, Weiwei; Ma, Liying; Zhang, Yunfeng; Chen, Zhangxian; Cheng, Hansong

    2015-04-18

    We report here a novel proton exchange membrane with remarkably high methanol-permeation resistivity and excellent proton conductivity enabled by carefully designed self-assembled ionic conductive channels. A direct methanol fuel cell utilizing the membrane performs well with a 20 M methanol solution, very close to the concentration of neat methanol.

  10. Membranes from monopole operators in ABJM theory: Large angular momentum and M-theoretic AdS4/CFT3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, Stefano; Sato, Yuki; Shimada, Hidehiko

    2014-09-01

    We study the duality between M-theory in AdS_4 × S^7/{Z}_k and the ABJM {N}=6 Chern-Simons-matter theory with gauge group U(N) × {U}(N) and level k, taking N large and k of order 1. In this M-theoretic regime the lack of an explicit formulation of M-theory in AdS_4 × S^7/{Z}_k makes the gravity side difficult, while the CFT is strongly coupled and the planar approximation is not applicable. We focus on states on the gravity side with large angular momentum J≫ 1 associated with a single plane of rotation in S^7 and identify their dual operators in the CFT. We show that natural approximation schemes arise on both sides thanks to the presence of the small parameter 1/J. On the AdS side, we use the matrix model of M-theory on the maximally supersymmetric pp-wave background with matrices of size J/k. A perturbative treatment of this matrix model provides a good approximation to M-theory in AdS_4 × S^7/{Z}_k when N^{1/3}≪ J≪ N^{1/2}. On the CFT side, we study the theory on S^2× {R} with magnetic flux J/k. A Born-Oppenheimer-type expansion arises naturally for large J in spite of the theory being strongly coupled. The energy spectra on the two sides agree at leading order. This provides a non-trivial test of the AdS_4/CFT_3 correspondence including near-BPS observables associated with membrane degrees of freedom, thus verifying the duality beyond the previously studied sectors corresponding to either BPS observables or the type IIA string regime.

  11. Characterization and optimization of membrane inlets for a miniature ion trap mass spectrometer operating at a high background pressure of humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janfelt, Christian; Graesboll, Rune; Lauritsen, Frants R.

    2008-09-01

    A 10-kg handheld ion trap mass spectrometer, the Mini10, operating at a high background pressure (10-4 Torr range) of humid air was characterized and optimized with respect to the use of membrane inlets. Both flat sheet and tubular membrane inlet configurations in different dimensions were tested using aqueous solutions and inlet temperatures ranging from 25 to 90 °C. The results show that both the absolute ion abundances and the relative abundance of ions in the recorded spectra of volatile organic compounds were highly influenced by the pressure in the vacuum chamber. At elevated pressures the signal intensities dropped, and a shift from primarily electron ionization to primarily chemical ionization was observed. For some chemicals unexpected high-intensity water adduct ions were observed, as confirmed by MS/MS experiments. The pressure effects were found to be correlated with the ionization potential of the analytes, the higher the ionization potential the stronger the effects. Since the pressure in the vacuum chamber is determined by both the membrane dimensions and the temperature of the inlet, the optimization of the membrane inlet is a matter of balancing membrane dimensions and inlet temperature such that both a maximal intensity and an acceptable short response time are achieved simultaneously. In contrast to what is observed for benchtop instruments, elevated inlet temperatures may lead to reduced signal intensity, and the use of a thicker membrane may increase signal intensity. Under all circumstances we found that a linear relationship between signal intensity and sample concentration was observed over at least two orders of magnitude as long as the operational conditions of the system was kept constant. The pressure effects described here are likely to be general for all miniature ion trap mass spectrometers using low performance vacuum pumps.

  12. The Membrane-anchoring Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligands Dictates Their Ability to Operate in Juxtacrine Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jianying; Opresko, Lee; Chrisler, William B.; Orr, Galya; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Wiley, H S.

    2005-06-01

    All ligands of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are synthesized as membrane-anchored precursors. Previous work has suggested that some ligands, such as EGF, must be proteolytically released to be active, whereas others, such as heparin binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) can function while still anchored to the membrane (i.e., juxtacrine signaling). To explore the structural basis for these differences in ligand activity, we engineered a series of membrane-anchored ligands in which the core, receptor-binding domain of EGF was combined with different domains of both EGF and HB-EGF. We found that ligands having the N-terminal extension of EGF could not bind to the EGFR, even when released from the membrane. Ligands lacking an N-terminal extension, but possessing the membrane-anchoring domain of EGF still required proteolytic release for activity, whereas ligands with the membrane anchoring domain of HB-EGF could elicit full biological activity while still membrane anchored. Ligands containing the HB-EGF membrane anchor, but lacking an N-terminal extension, activated EGFR during their transit through the Golgi apparatus . However, cell-mixing experiments and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies showed that juxtacrine signaling typically occurred in trans at the cell surface, at points of cell-cell contact. Our data suggest that the membrane-anchoring domain of ligands selectively controls their ability to participate in juxtacrine signaling and thus, only a subclass of EGFR ligands can act in a juxtacrine mode.

  13. Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Jesse L. M.; Norton, Anderson; Boyce, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has documented schemes and operations that undergird students' understanding of fractions. This prior research was based, in large part, on small-group teaching experiments. However, written assessments are needed in order for teachers and researchers to assess students' ways of operating on a whole-class scale. In this study,…

  14. Diesel engine catalytic combustor system. [aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ream, L. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low compression turbocharged diesel engine is provided in which the turbocharger can be operated independently of the engine to power auxiliary equipment. Fuel and air are burned in a catalytic combustor to drive the turbine wheel of turbine section which is initially caused to rotate by starter motor. By opening a flapper value, compressed air from the blower section is directed to catalytic combustor when it is heated and expanded, serving to drive the turbine wheel and also to heat the catalytic element. To start, engine valve is closed, combustion is terminated in catalytic combustor, and the valve is then opened to utilize air from the blower for the air driven motor. When the engine starts, the constituents in its exhaust gas react in the catalytic element and the heat generated provides additional energy for the turbine section.

  15. Membrane position control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A membrane structure includes at least one electroactive bending actuator fixed to a supporting base. Each electroactive bending actuator is operatively connected to the membrane for controlling membrane position. Any displacement of each electroactive bending actuator effects displacement of the membrane. More specifically, the operative connection is provided by a guiding wheel assembly and a track, wherein displacement of the bending actuator effects translation of the wheel assembly along the track, thereby imparting movement to the membrane.

  16. Dual-Electrode CMUT With Non-Uniform Membranes for High Electromechanical Coupling Coefficient and High Bandwidth Operation

    PubMed Central

    Guldiken, Rasim O.; Zahorian, Jaime; Yamaner, F. Y.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we report measurement results on dual-electrode CMUT demonstrating electromechanical coupling coefficient (k2) of 0.82 at 90% of collapse voltage as well as 136% 3 dB one-way fractional bandwidth at the transducer surface around the design frequency of 8 MHz. These results are within 5% of the predictions of the finite element simulations. The large bandwidth is achieved mainly by utilizing a non-uniform membrane, introducing center mass to the design, whereas the dual-electrode structure provides high coupling coefficient in a large dc bias range without collapsing the membrane. In addition, the non-uniform membrane structure improves the transmit sensitivity of the dual-electrode CMUT by about 2dB as compared with a dual electrode CMUT with uniform membrane. PMID:19574135

  17. Dual-electrode CMUT with non-uniform membranes for high electromechanical coupling coefficient and high bandwidth operation.

    PubMed

    Guldiken, Rasim O; Zahorian, Jaime; Yamaner, F Y; Degertekin, F Levent

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we report measurement results on dual-electrode CMUT demonstrating electromechanical coupling coefficient (k(2)) of 0.82 at 90% of collapse voltage as well as 136% 3 dB one-way fractional bandwidth at the transducer surface around the design frequency of 8 MHz. These results are within 5% of the predictions of the finite element simulations. The large bandwidth is achieved mainly by utilizing a non-uniform membrane, introducing center mass to the design, whereas the dual-electrode structure provides high coupling coefficient in a large dc bias range without collapsing the membrane. In addition, the non-uniform membrane structure improves the transmit sensitivity of the dual-electrode CMUT by about 2dB as compared with a dual electrode CMUT with uniform membrane.

  18. Switchable catalytic DNA catenanes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianzhe; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2015-03-11

    Two-ring interlocked DNA catenanes are synthesized and characterized. The supramolecular catenanes show switchable cyclic catalytic properties. In one system, the catenane structure is switched between a hemin/G-quadruplex catalytic structure and a catalytically inactive state. In the second catenane structure the catenane is switched between a catalytically active Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme-containing catenane and an inactive catenane state. In the third system, the interlocked catenane structure is switched between two distinct catalytic structures that include the Mg(2+)- and the Zn(2+)-dependent DNAzymes.

  19. Electrostatic interactions in catalytic centers of F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnaya, Alexandra F.; Romanovsky, Yury M.; Tikhonov, Alexander N.

    2003-10-01

    F1-ATPase is one of the most important enzymes of membrane bioenergetics. F1-ATPase is the constituent complex that provides the ATP formation from ADP and inorganic phosphate (Pi) at the expense of energy of electrochemical gradient of hydrogen ions generated across the energy transducing mitochondrial, chloroplast or bacterial membrane. F1-ATPase is a reversible molecular machine that can work as a proton pump due to energy released in the course of ATP hydrolysis (ATPase reaction). The unusual feature of this enzyme is that it operates as a rotary molecular motor. Recently, using the fluorescence microscopy method for the real time visualization of molecular mobility of individual molecules, it was demonstrated directly that the ATP hydrolysis by F1-ATPase is accompanied by unidirectional rotations of mobile subunits (rotor) of F1F0-ATP synthase. In this work, we calculated the contribution of electrostatic interactions between charged groups of a substrate (MgATP), products molecules (MgADP and Pi), and charged amino acid residuals of ATPase molecule to the energy changes associated with the substrate binding and their chemical transformations in the catalytic centers located at the interface of α and β subunits of the enzyme (oligomer complex α3β3γ of bovine mitochondria ATPase). A catalytic cycle of ATP hydrolysis considered in our work includes conformational changes of α and β subunits caused by unidirectional rotations of an eccentric γ subunit. The knowledge of energy characteristics and force field in catalytic center of an enzyme in different conformational states may be important for further simulation dynamic properties of ATP synthase complex.

  20. 40 CFR 63.1567 - What are my requirements for inorganic HAP emissions from catalytic reforming units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... demonstrate continuous compliance with the percent reduction operating limit, calculate the HCl operating... permissible HCl concentration for the percent reduction operating limit, ppmv; %HCl ReductionLimit = Minimum... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur...

  1. 40 CFR 63.1567 - What are my requirements for inorganic HAP emissions from catalytic reforming units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... demonstrate continuous compliance with the percent reduction operating limit, calculate the HCl operating... permissible HCl concentration for the percent reduction operating limit, ppmv; %HCl ReductionLimit = Minimum... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur...

  2. Membrane gas absorbers for H2S removal--design, operation and technology integration into existing odour treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, B; Nazareno, C; Georgaki, S; Gostelow, P; Stuetz, R M; Longhurst, P; Robinson, T

    2005-07-01

    A hollow fibre (HF) polypropylene membrane gas absorber was investigated for the removal of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) from gas streams. Gas concentrations between 25-2010 ppmV were fed into the shell side of a membrane module whilst water-NaOH solutions flowed counter-currently in the fibre lumens. The process was effective at removing the H2S (96% at G:L ratios up to 50 and pH 13) from the gas phase in a single pass through the membrane at all the concentrations of HaS investigated. Analysis of the mass transfer process revealed the rate of transfer to be controlled by the gas phase transfer coefficient with a value between 1 and 25 x 10(-4) m.s(-1). The possible integration of a membrane absorber system into existing odour treatment strategies was assessed by comparing the membrane system, based on the experimentally determined mass transfer coefficient, with existing full scale biofiltration plants. The membrane system became economically favourable at gas flow rates lower than 1630 m(3) x h(-1).

  3. The polybasic lysine-rich domain of plasma membrane-resident STIM1 is essential for the modulation of store-operated divalent cation entry by extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Isaac; Dionisio, Natalia; Frischauf, Irene; Berna-Erro, Alejandro; Woodard, Geoffrey E; López, José J; Salido, Ginés M; Rosado, Juan A

    2013-05-01

    STIM1 acts as an endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) sensor that communicates the filling state of the intracellular stores to the store-operated channels. In addition, STIM1 is expressed in the plasma membrane, with the Ca(2+) binding EF-hand motif facing the extracellular medium; however, its role sensing extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), as well as the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we report that divalent cation entry stimulated by thapsigargin (TG) is attenuated by extracellular Ca(2+) in a concentration-dependent manner. Expression of the Ca(2+)-binding defective STIM1(D76A) mutant did not alter the surface expression of STIM1 but abolishes the regulation of divalent cation entry by extracellular Ca(2+). Orai1 and TRPC1 have been shown to play a major role in SOCE. Expression of the STIM1(D76A) mutant did not alter Orai1 phosphoserine content. TRPC1 silencing significantly attenuated TG-induced Mn(2+) entry. Expression of the STIM1(K684,685E) mutant impaired the association of plasma membrane STIM1 with TRPC1, as well as the regulation of TG-induced divalent cation entry by extracellular Ca(2+), which suggests that TRPC1 might be involved in the regulation of divalent cation entry by extracellular Ca(2+) mediated by plasma membrane-resident STIM1. Expression of the STIM1(D76A) or STIM1(K684,685E) mutants reduced store-operated divalent cation entry and resulted in loss of dependence on the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration, providing evidence for a functional role of plasma membrane-resident STIM1 in the regulation of store-operated divalent cation entry, which at least involves the EF-hand motif and the C-terminal polybasic lysine-rich domain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative study of the active cadmium efflux systems operating at the plasma membrane and tonoplast of cucumber root cells.

    PubMed

    Migocka, Magdalena; Papierniak, Anna; Kosatka, Ewelina; Klobus, Grazyna

    2011-10-01

    The strategies developed by plants to avoid the toxicity of cadmium (Cd) and other heavy metals involve active sequestration of metals into the apoplast and vacuoles. The protein systems excluding heavy metals from the cell cytosol localize to the plasma membrane and tonoplast and are energized either by ATP or by the electrochemical gradient generated by H(+)-ATPase or by V-ATPase and pyrophosphatase (PPase), respectively. In this work, a comparative study on the contribution of both the plasma membrane and tonoplast in the active detoxification of plant cells after treatment with Cd was performed. The studies using plants treated and untreated with Cd reveal that both, H(+)-coupled and MgATP-driven efflux of Cd across plasma membranes and tonoplast is markedly stimulated in the presence of Cd in the environment. Previous studies on plasma-membrane localized H(+)-coupled Cd efflux together with the present data demonstrating tonoplast H(+)/Cd(2+) antiport activity suggest that H(+)-coupled secondary transport of Cd displays a lower affinity for Cd when compared with Cd primary pumps driven by MgATP. In addition, it is shown that MgATP-energized Cd efflux across both membranes is significantly enhanced by cysteine, dithiothreitol, and glutathione. These results suggest that Cd is excluded from the cytosol through an energy-dependent system as a free ion as well as a complexed form. Although both membranes contribute in the active exclusion of ionized and complexed Cd from the cytosol, the overall calculation of Cd accumulation in the everted plasma membranes and vacuolar vesicles suggests that the tonoplast and vacuole have a major function in Cd efflux from the cytosol in the roots of cucumber subjected to Cd stress.

  5. Catalytically enhanced packed tower scrubbing

    SciTech Connect

    Stitt, E.H.; Taylor, F.J.; Kelly, K.

    1996-12-31

    An enhanced wet scrubbing process for the treatment of gas streams containing odours and low level VOC`s is presented. It comprises essentially a single scrubbing column and a fixed bed catalytic reactor through which the dilute alkaline bleach scrubbing liquor is recirculated. The process has significant cost advantages over conventional chemical scrubbing technology, and copes well with peaks in odour levels. Traditional bleach scrubbing, and the improvements in process chemistry and the flowsheet afforded by inclusion of the catalyst, are discussed. The catalyst enables many of the well known problems associated with bleach scrubbing to be overcome, and facilitates odour removal efficiencies of greater than 99% in a single column. Pilot plant data from trials on sewage treatment works are presented. These show clearly the ability of the catalytically enhanced process to achieve sulphide and odour removals in excess of 99% in the single column. Case studies of some of the existing commercial installations are given, indicating the wide range of applications, industries and scale of the installed units. Comparative data are presented, measured on a commercial unit for the conventional operation of a bleach scrubber, and with the retrofitted catalyst in use. These data show clearly the benefits of the catalytic process in terms of removal efficiencies; and hence by inference also in equipment size and costs. The catalytic process is also shown to achieve very high removal efficiencies of organo-sulphides in a single column. 8 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Main problems in the theory of modeling of catalytic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarenko, V.N.

    1994-09-01

    This paper formulates the main problems in the theory of modeling of catalytic processes yet to be solved and describes the stages of modeling. Fundamental problems of model construction for the physico-chemical phenomena and processes taking place in a catalytic reactor are considered. New methods for determining the mechanism of a catalytic reaction and selecting a kinetic model for it are analyzed. The use of the results of specially controlled experiments for the construction of models of a catalyst grain and a catalytic reactor is discussed. Algorithms are presented for determining the muliplicity of stationary states in the operation of a catalyst grain and a catalytic reactor.

  7. Development of Batch and Flow Immobilized Catalytic Systems with High Catalytic Activity and Reusability.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoichi M A

    2017-01-01

    My mission in catalysis research is to develop highly active and reusable supported catalytic systems in terms of fundamental chemistry and industrial application. For this purpose, I developed three types of highly active and reusable supported catalytic systems. The first type involves polymeric base-supported metal catalysts: Novel polymeric imidazole-Pd and Cu complexes were developed that worked at the mol ppm level for a variety of organic transformations. The second involves catalytic membrane-installed microflow reactors: Membranous polymeric palladium and copper complex/nanoparticle catalysts were installed at the center of a microtube to produce novel catalytic membrane-immobilized flow microreactor devices. These catalytic devices mediated a variety of organic transformations to afford the corresponding products in high yield within 1-38 s. The third is a silicon nanowire array-immobilized palladium nanoparticle catalyst. This device promoted a variety of organic transformations as a heterogeneous catalyst. The Mizoroki-Heck reaction proceeded with 280 mol ppb (0.000028 mol%) of the catalyst, affording the corresponding products in high yield.

  8. VOC Destruction by Catalytic Combustion Microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Barton

    2009-03-10

    This project concerned the application of a catalytic combustion system that has been married to a micro-turbine device. The catalytic combustion system decomposes the VOC's and transmits these gases to the gas turbine. The turbine has been altered to operate on very low-level BTU fuels equivalent to 1.5% methane in air. The performance of the micro-turbine for VOC elimination has some flexibility with respect to operating conditions, and the system is adaptable to multiple industrial applications. The VOC source that was been chosen for examination was the emissions from coal upgrading operations. The overall goal of the project was to examine the effectiveness of a catalytic combustion based system for elimination of VOCs while simultaneously producing electrical power for local consumption. Project specific objectives included assessment of the feasibility for using a Flex-Microturbine that generates power from natural gas while it consumes VOCs generated from site operations; development of an engineering plan for installation of the Flex-Microturbine system; operation of the micro-turbine through various changes in site and operation conditions; measurement of the VOC destruction quantitatively; and determination of the required improvements for further studies. The micro-turbine with the catalytic bed worked effectively to produce power on levels of fuel much lower than the original turbine design. The ability of the device to add or subtract supplemental fuel to augment the amount of VOC's in the inlet air flow made the device an effective replacement for a traditional flare. Concerns about particulates in the inlet flow and the presence of high sulfur concentrations with the VOC mixtures was identified as a drawback with the current catalytic design. A new microturbine design was developed based on this research that incorporates a thermal oxidizer in place of the catalytic bed for applications where particulates or contamination would limit the lifetime of

  9. Navigating environmental, economic, and technological trade-offs in the design and operation of submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs).

    PubMed

    Pretel, R; Shoener, B D; Ferrer, J; Guest, J S

    2015-12-15

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) enable energy recovery from wastewater while simultaneously achieving high levels of treatment. The objective of this study was to elucidate how detailed design and operational decisions of submerged AnMBRs influence the technological, environmental, and economic sustainability of the system across its life cycle. Specific design and operational decisions evaluated included: solids retention time (SRT), mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration, sludge recycling ratio (r), flux (J), and specific gas demand per membrane area (SGD). The possibility of methane recovery (both as biogas and as soluble methane in reactor effluent) and bioenergy production, nutrient recovery, and final destination of the sludge (land application, landfill, or incineration) were also evaluated. The implications of these design and operational decisions were characterized by leveraging a quantitative sustainable design (QSD) framework which integrated steady-state performance modeling across seasonal temperatures (using pilot-scale experimental data and the simulating software DESASS), life cycle cost (LCC) analysis, and life cycle assessment (LCA). Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were used to characterize the relative importance of individual design decisions, and to navigate trade-offs across environmental, economic, and technological criteria. Based on this analysis, there are design and operational conditions under which submerged AnMBRs could be net energy positive and contribute to the pursuit of carbon negative wastewater treatment.

  10. Effects of FeCl3 addition on the operation of a staged anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (SAF-MBR).

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunseok; McCarty, Perry L; Kim, Jeonghwan; Bae, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    The effects on sulfur removal and membrane fouling resulting from FeCl(3) addition to an anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (AFMBR) in a staged AFMBR (SAF-MBR) was investigated. Total sulfur removal in the SAF-MBR was 42-59% without FeCl(3) addition, but increased to 87-95% with FeCl(3) addition. Sulfide removal in the AFMBR increased to 90% with addition of FeCl(3) at a molar Fe(3+)/S ratio of 0.54 and to 95% when the ratio was increased to 0.95. Effluent sulfide concentration then decreased to 0.3-0.6 mg/L. Phosphate removals were only 19 and 37% with the above added FeCl(3) ratios, indicating that iron removed sulfide more readily than phosphate. Neither chemical oxygen demand nor biochemical oxygen demand removal efficiencies were affected by the addition of FeCl(3). When the AFMBR permeate became exposed to air, light brown particles were formed from effluent Fe(2+) oxidation to Fe(3+). FeCl(3) addition, while beneficial for sulfide removal, did increase the membrane fouling rate due to the deposition of inorganic precipitates in the membrane pores.

  11. Rich catalytic injection

    SciTech Connect

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  12. Enhanced treatment performance of coking wastewater and reduced membrane fouling using a novel EMBR.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bei; Du, Cong; Shi, Shengnan; Tan, Liang; Li, Meidi; Liu, Jiaxin; Xue, Lanlan; Ji, Xiangyu

    2017-04-01

    A novel EMBR (electric field applied in MBR) by placing stainless steel mesh cathode inside a flat membrane module and stainless steel mesh anode outside the module was built and operated to enhance the treatment performance of coking wastewater containing phenol, pyridine and quinoline and reduce the membrane fouling. The degradation rates of COD, phenol, pyridine and quinoline in EMBR with electric field (reactor A) were significantly higher than the sum of EMBR without electric field (reactor B) and only electro-catalytic degradation during the long-term treatment, confirming that a coupling effect was existed between biodegradation and electro-catalytic degradation process. Illumina sequencing data revealed that bacterial community was richer and more diverse in reactor A. Comamonas strain JB as the inoculums was the most dominant genus in each reactor and electric field applied in reactor A further improved the abundance of strain JB. The membrane fouling in reactor A was reduced.

  13. Two stage catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Inventor); Bachovchin, Dennis (Inventor); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Inventor); Lippert, Thomas E. (Inventor); Bruck, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A catalytic combustor (14) includes a first catalytic stage (30), a second catalytic stage (40), and an oxidation completion stage (49). The first catalytic stage receives an oxidizer (e.g., 20) and a fuel (26) and discharges a partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture (36). The second catalytic stage receives the partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture and further oxidizes the mixture. The second catalytic stage may include a passageway (47) for conducting a bypass portion (46) of the mixture past a catalyst (e.g., 41) disposed therein. The second catalytic stage may have an outlet temperature elevated sufficiently to complete oxidation of the mixture without using a separate ignition source. The oxidation completion stage is disposed downstream of the second catalytic stage and may recombine the bypass portion with a catalyst exposed portion (48) of the mixture and complete oxidation of the mixture. The second catalytic stage may also include a reticulated foam support (50), a honeycomb support, a tube support or a plate support.

  14. Improvement of methane content in a hydrogenotrophic anaerobic digester via the proper operation of membrane module integrated into an external-loop.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Felipe; Bakonyi, Péter; Buitrón, Germán

    2017-09-01

    This work assessed the feasibility of a hydrogenotrophic biogas process integrated with a membrane module in the external-loop design. The major scope was to conduct the investigation from the perspective of the membrane unit and reveal how the operating strategy influences the efficiency of biogas formation. It was observed that the fermenter worked with an improved efficacy, indicated by the higher concentration of methane in the headspace (80-90%) when the gas loading intensity, defined as the ratio of inlet gas permeation rate and the circulation rate of the liquid phase, was adjusted to lower values (3-5.3×10(-3)). Such results are implying that the mass transfer of H2 into the reactor is dependent on this critical parameter. Moreover, attention should be paid to the fouling of the module under longer-term experiments to keep its performance at a sufficient level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Supported ionic liquid membrane in membrane reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.; Wenten, I. G.

    2017-01-01

    Membrane reactor is a device that integrates membrane based separation and (catalytic) chemical reaction vessel in a single device. Ionic liquids, considered to be a relatively recent magical chemical due to their unique properties, have a large variety of applications in all areas of chemical industries. Moreover, the ionic liquid can be used as membrane separation layer and/or catalytically active site. This paper will review utilization of ionic liquid in membrane reactor related applications especially Fischer-Tropsch, hydrogenation, and dehydrogenation reaction. This paper also reviews about the capability of ionic liquid in equilibrium reaction that produces CO2 product so that the reaction will move towards the product. Water gas shift reaction in ammonia production also direct Dimethyl Ether (DME) synthesis that produces CO2 product will be discussed. Based on a review of numerous articles on supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) indicate that ionic liquids have the potential to support the process of chemical reaction and separation in a membrane reactor.

  16. Catalytic combustion of residual fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested using two grades of petroleum derived residual fuels at specified inlet air temperatures, pressures, and reference velocities. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were obtained. Steady state operation of the catalytic reactor required inlet air temperatures of at least 800 K. At lower inlet air temperatures, upstream burning in the premixing zone occurred which was probably caused by fuel deposition and accumulation on the premixing zone walls. Increasing the inlet air temperature prevented this occurrence. Both residual fuels contained about 0.5 percent nitrogen by weight. NO sub x emissions ranged from 50 to 110 ppm by volume at 15 percent excess O2. Conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x ranged from 25 to 50 percent.

  17. Design, operation, and modeling of a membrane photobioreactor to study the growth of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis in space conditions.

    PubMed

    Cogne, Guillaume; Cornet, Jean-François; Gros, Jean-Bernard

    2005-01-01

    A membrane photobioreactor was designed, implemented and used to grow the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005 in batch mode. Growth was followed directly by monitoring optical density and indirectly by measuring pressure increase due to the oxygen produced and separated from the liquid phase by diffusion through a hydrophobic membrane, and pH increase due to carbon consumption. When the pressure attained an upper limit, valves opened automatically, and the oxygen in the gas chamber was flushed out with nitrogen. As expected, two growth phases were observed, a short exponential phase followed by a linear phase, indicating limitation by light transfer. Growth rate during the second phase was measured easily and accurately, and consistency of optical density, pressure and pH data values was checked using a model of the system. Pressure measurement was found best suited to monitoring and measuring growth rate in space in terms of accuracy, precision and reliability.

  18. Local potential evolutions during proton exchange membrane fuel cell operation with dead-ended anode - Part II: Aging mitigation strategies based on water management and nitrogen crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbou, S.; Dillet, J.; Maranzana, G.; Didierjean, S.; Lottin, O.

    2017-02-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells operate with dead-ended anode in order to reduce system cost and complexity when compared with hydrogen re-circulation systems. In the first part of this work, we showed that localized fuel starvation events may occur, because of water and nitrogen accumulation in the anode side, which could be particularly damaging to the cell performance. To prevent these degradations, the anode compartment must be purged which may lead to an overall system efficiency decrease because of significant hydrogen waste. In the second part, we present several purge strategies in order to minimize both hydrogen waste and membrane-electrode assembly degradations during dead-ended anode operation. A linear segmented cell with reference electrodes was used to monitor simultaneously the current density distribution along the gas channel and the time evolution of local anode and cathode potentials. To asses MEA damages, Platinum ElectroChemical Surface Area (ECSA) and cell performance were periodically measured. The results showed that dead-end mode operation with an anode plate maintained at a temperature 5 °C hotter than the cathode plate limits water accumulation in the anode side, reducing significantly purge frequency (and thus hydrogen losses) as well as MEA damages. As nitrogen contribution to hydrogen starvation is predominant in this thermal configuration, we also tested a microleakage solution to discharge continuously most the nitrogen accumulating in the anode side while ensuring low hydrogen losses and minimum ECSA losses provided the right microleakage flow rate is chosen.

  19. Influence of operational parameters (sludge retention time and hydraulic residence time) on the removal of estrogens by membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Arriaga, Edson B; Mijaylova, Petia N

    2011-08-01

    This paper deals with the removal of two natural estrogens, estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2) and a synthetic one 17α ethinylestradiol (EE2) from wastewater in a laboratory-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR). The effects of both solid retention time (SRT) and hydraulic residence time (HRT) were studied using synthetic wastewater in the MBR. At 35, 45, 60, 75, and 95 days, SRT was studied. The HRT was varied in the range of 7-12 h. The results showed that the increases in HRT and SRT enhanced the biodegradation process after adaptation to microorganisms. At HRT of 12 h, the estrogen removals were close to 100% in the MBR. The highest estrogen removals were obtained at SRT of 60 days. Continuous tests showed a linear relationship between nitrification and estrogen removal rates. The most biodegradable compound was the E2. The membrane fouling rates increased with the decreased of SRT and HRT. Optimal process conditions in this work was obtained at the SRT and HRT of 60 days and 12 h, respectively, with high efficient of estrogen removal, nitrification efficiencies, as well as a minimum membrane fouling rate.

  20. Local potential evolutions during proton exchange membrane fuel cell operation with dead-ended anode - Part I: Impact of water diffusion and nitrogen crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbou, S.; Dillet, J.; Maranzana, G.; Didierjean, S.; Lottin, O.

    2017-02-01

    Operating a PEMFC with a dead-ended anode may lead to local fuel-starvation because of water and possibly nitrogen accumulation in the anode compartment. In previous works, we used a segmented linear cell with reference electrodes to monitor simultaneously the local potentials and current densities during dead-ended anode operation. The results indicated that water transport as well as nitrogen crossover through the membrane were most probably the two key factors governing fuel starvation. In this first from a set of two papers, we evaluated with more details the contributions of nitrogen crossover and water transport to hydrogen starvation. To assess nitrogen contribution, the fuel cell cathode compartment was first supplied with pure oxygen instead of air. The results showed that in the absence of nitrogen (in the cathode side) the fuel starvation was much slower than with air, suggesting that nitrogen contribution cannot be neglected. On the other hand, the contribution of water flooding to hydrogen starvation was investigated by using different cooling temperature on the cathode and anode sides in order to drive water toward the colder plate. The results showed that with a colder anode side, fuel starvation was faster. In the opposite case of a hotter anode plate, water accumulation in the anode compartment was limited, nitrogen crossover through the membrane was the main reason for hydrogen starvation in this case. To fully assess the impact of the thermal configurations on membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) degradation, aging protocols with a dead-ended anode and a fixed closing time were also performed. The results showed that operation with a hotter anode could help to limit significantly cathode ElectroChemical Surface Area (ECSA) losses along the cell area and performance degradation induced by hydrogen starvation.

  1. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  2. Development of membrane electrode assembly for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell by catalyst coating membrane method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Huagen; Su, Huaneng; Pollet, Bruno G.; Pasupathi, Sivakumar

    2015-08-01

    Membrane electrode assembly (MEA), which contains cathode and anode catalytic layer, gas diffusion layers (GDL) and electrolyte membrane, is the key unit of a PEMFC. An attempt to develop MEA for ABPBI membrane based high temperature (HT) PEMFC is conducted in this work by catalyst coating membrane (CCM) method. The structure and performance of the MEA are examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and I-V curve. Effects of the CCM preparation method, Pt loading and binder type are investigated for the optimization of the single cell performance. Under 160 °C and atmospheric pressure, the peak power density of the MEA, with Pt loading of 0.5 mg cm-2 and 0.3 mg cm-2 for the cathode and the anode, can reach 277 mW cm-2, while a current density of 620 A cm-2 is delivered at the working voltage of 0.4 V. The MEA prepared by CCM method shows good stability operating in a short term durability test: the cell voltage maintained at ∼0.45 V without obvious drop when operated at a constant current density of 300 mA cm-2 and 160 °C under ambient pressure for 140 h.

  3. Performance of a novel baffled osmotic membrane bioreactor-microfiltration hybrid system under continuous operation for simultaneous nutrient removal and mitigation of brine discharge.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Nirenkumar; Chekli, Laura; Wang, Jin; Kim, Youngjin; Phuntsho, Sherub; Li, Sheng; Ghaffour, Noreddine; Leiknes, TorOve; Shon, Hokyong

    2017-03-14

    The present study investigated the performance of an integrated osmotic and microfiltration membrane bioreactor system for wastewater treatment employing baffles in the reactor. Thus, this reactor design enables both aerobic and anoxic processes in an attempt to reduce the process footprint and energy costs associated with continuous aeration. The process performance was evaluated in terms of water flux, salinity build up in the bioreactor, organic and nutrient removal and microbial activity using synthetic reverse osmosis (RO) brine as draw solution (DS). The incorporation of MF membrane was effective in maintaining a reasonable salinity level (612-1434mg/L) in the reactor which resulted in a much lower flux decline (i.e. 11.48-6.98LMH) as compared to previous studies. The stable operation of the osmotic membrane bioreactor-forward osmosis (OMBR-FO) process resulted in an effective removal of both organic matter (97.84%) and nutrient (phosphate 87.36% and total nitrogen 94.28%), respectively.

  4. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data. PMID:15909350

  5. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-06-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data.

  6. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 2, December 21, 1989--March 20, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  7. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 8, June 21, 1991--September 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will also be investigated.

  8. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 7, March 21, 1991--June 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  9. Degradation effects in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stacks by sub-zero operation-An in situ and ex situ analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alink, R.; Gerteisen, D.; Oszcipok, M.

    The effect of low temperatures down to -40 °C on the performance and component properties of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack was investigated. By analyzing the temperature-dependent high-frequency resistance, the mechanism of ice formation within the stack was investigated during freeze/thaw (F/T) cycling while the stack was not operating and during a cold start-up. A step-like change in conductivity at 0 °C indicates that the membranes are dehydrated at sub-zero temperatures due to a change in capillary pressure at the interface membrane/catalyst. Furthermore, it was found that the stack shows little degradation when it is dried out before cooling down. Freezing in a wet state and additional cold start-ups resulted in performance degradation which was mainly attributed to changes in wetting properties. Ex situ environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) investigations showed distinct damage and increasing porosity of the electrode in the wet frozen stack, which was most likely the reason for the change in wetting properties. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectroscopy showed distinct concentrations of platinum in the exhaust gas of the dry cycled stack, but no additional platinum was found when the stack was cycled in a wet state. Additional ex situ F/T investigations of gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) within an ESEM confirmed the results, found by in situ investigations of the fuel cell stacks. Serious detachment of electrode material was found without the compressive force applied to an assembly.

  10. Investigations on transfer of water and vanadium ions across Nafion membrane in an operating vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chenxi; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Huamin; Han, Xi; Luo, Qingtao

    Diffusion coefficients of the vanadium ions across Nafion 115 (Dupont) in a vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) are measured and found to be in the order of V 2+ > VO 2+ > VO 2 + > V 3+. It is found that both in self-discharge process and charge-discharge cycles, the concentration difference of vanadium ions between the positive electrolyte (+ve) and negative electrolyte (-ve) is the main reason causing the transfer of vanadium ions across the membrane. In self-discharge process, the transfer of water includes the transfer of vanadium ions with the bound water and the corresponding transfer of protons with the dragged water to balance the charges, and the transfer of water driven by osmosis. In this case, about 75% of the net transfer of water is caused by osmosis. In charge-discharge cycles, except those as mentioned in the case of self-discharge, the transfer of protons with the dragged water across the membrane during the electrode reaction for the formation of internal electric circuit plays the key role in the water transfer. But in the long-term cycles of charge-discharge, the net transfer of water towards +ve is caused by the transfer of vanadium ions with the bound water and the transfer of water driven by osmosis.

  11. Dual gas-diffusion membrane- and mediatorless dihydrogen/air-breathing biofuel cell operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hong-qi; So, Keisei; Kitazumi, Yuki; Shirai, Osamu; Nishikawa, Koji; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Kano, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    A membraneless direct electron transfer (DET)-type dihydrogen (H2)/air-breathing biofuel cell without any mediator was constructed wherein bilirubin oxidase from Myrothecium verrucaria (BOD) and membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F (MBH) were used as biocatalysts for the cathode and the anode, respectively, and Ketjen black-modified water proof carbon paper (KB/WPCC) was used as an electrode material. The KB/WPCC surface was modified with 2-aminobenzoic acid and p-phenylenediamine, respectively, to face the positively charged electron-accepting site of BOD and the negatively charged electron-donating site of MBH to the electrode surface. A gas-diffusion system was employed for the electrodes to realize high-speed substrate supply. As result, great improvement in the current density of O2 reduction with BOD and H2 reduction with MBH were realized at negatively and postively charged surfaces, respectively. Gas diffusion system also suppressed the oxidative inactivation of MBH at high electrode potentials. Finally, based on the improved bioanode and biocathode, a dual gas-diffusion membrane- and mediatorless H2/air-breathing biofuel cell was constructed. The maximum power density reached 6.1 mW cm-2 (at 0.72 V), and the open circuit voltage was 1.12 V using 1 atm of H2 gas as a fuel at room temperature and under passive and quiescent conditions.

  12. Optimum structural properties for an anode current collector used in a polymer electrolyte membrane water electrolyzer operated at the boiling point of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakajima, Hironori; Inada, Akiko; Ito, Kohei

    2016-11-01

    This study attempts to optimize the properties of the anode current collector of a polymer electrolyte membrane water electrolyzer at high temperatures, particularly at the boiling point of water. Different titanium meshes (4 commercial ones and 4 modified ones) with various properties are experimentally examined by operating a cell with each mesh under different conditions. The average pore diameter, thickness, and contact angle of the anode current collector are controlled in the ranges of 10-35 μm, 0.2-0.3 mm, and 0-120°, respectively. These results showed that increasing the temperature from the conventional temperature of 80 °C to the boiling point could reduce both the open circuit voltage and the overvoltages to a large extent without notable dehydration of the membrane. These results also showed that decreasing the contact angle and the thickness suppresses the electrolysis overvoltage largely by decreasing the concentration overvoltage. The effect of the average pore diameter was not evident until the temperature reached the boiling point. Using operating conditions of 100 °C and 2 A/cm2, the electrolysis voltage is minimized to 1.69 V with a hydrophilic titanium mesh with an average pore diameter of 21 μm and a thickness of 0.2 mm.

  13. Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each

  14. Bioelectricity generation in an integrated system combining microbial fuel cell and tubular membrane reactor: effects of operation parameters performing a microbial fuel cell-based biosensor for tubular membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Zheng, Yawen; Jia, Hui; Zhang, Hongwei

    2014-10-01

    A bio-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) with tubular membrane was integrated to construct a microbial fuel cell-tubular membrane bioreactor (MFC-TMBR) system, in which the bio-cathode MFC was developed as a biosensor for COD real-time monitoring in TMBR and the performance was analyzed in terms of its current variation caused by operation parameters. With a constant anode potential, the effect of HRT demonstrated that higher rate of mass transport increased the response of the system. The system was further explored an inverse relationship between TMP and current peak by using EPS concentration under the different MLSS concentration. The sensor output had a linear relationship with COD up to 1000mg/L (regression coefficient, R(2)=0.97) and MLSS (regression coefficient, R(2)=0.94). The simple and compact bio-cathode MFC biosensor for TMBR using MFC-TMBR integrated system showed promising potential for direct and economical COD online monitoring, and provided an opportunity to widen the application of MFC-based biosensor.

  15. A sustainable catalytic pyrrole synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlik, Stefan; Kempe, Rhett

    2013-02-01

    The pyrrole heterocycle is a prominent chemical motif and is found widely in natural products, drugs, catalysts and advanced materials. Here we introduce a sustainable iridium-catalysed pyrrole synthesis in which secondary alcohols and amino alcohols are deoxygenated and linked selectively via the formation of C-N and C-C bonds. Two equivalents of hydrogen gas are eliminated in the course of the reaction, and alcohols based entirely on renewable resources can be used as starting materials. The catalytic synthesis protocol tolerates a large variety of functional groups, which includes olefins, chlorides, bromides, organometallic moieties, amines and hydroxyl groups. We have developed a catalyst that operates efficiently under mild conditions.

  16. Preparation of Pd-Loaded Hierarchical FAU Membranes and Testing in Acetophenone Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Raffaele; Lavorato, Cristina; Mastropietro, Teresa F; Argurio, Pietro; Drioli, Enrico; Poerio, Teresa

    2016-03-22

    Pd-loaded hierarchical FAU (Pd-FAU) membranes, containing an intrinsic secondary non-zeolitic (meso)porosity, were prepared and tested in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation of acetophenone (AP) to produce phenylethanol (PE), an industrially relevant product. The best operating conditions were preliminarily identified by testing different solvents and organic hydrogen donors in a batch hydrogenation process where micron-sized FAU seeds were employed as catalyst support. Water as solvent and formic acid as hydrogen source resulted to be the best choice in terms of conversion for the catalytic hydrogenation of AP, providing the basis for the design of a green and sustainable process. The best experimental conditions were selected and applied to the Pd-loaded FAU membrane finding enhanced catalytic performance such as a five-fold higher productivity than with the unsupported Pd-FAU crystals (11.0 vs. 2.2 mgproduct gcat(-1)·h(-1)). The catalytic performance of the membrane on the alumina support was also tested in a tangential flow system obtaining a productivity higher than that of the batch system (22.0 vs. 11.0 mgproduct gcat(-1)·h(-1)).

  17. Modelling of operation of a lithium-air battery with ambient air and oxygen-selective membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahapatsombut, Ukrit; Cheng, Hua; Scott, Keith

    2014-03-01

    A macro-homogeneous model has been developed to evaluate the impact of replacing pure oxygen with ambient air on the performance of a rechargeable non-aqueous Li-air battery. The model exhibits a significant reduction in discharge capacity, e.g. from 1240 to 226 mAh gcarbon-1 at 0.05 mA cm-2 when using ambient air rather than pure oxygen. The model correlates the relationship between the performance and electrolyte decomposition and formation of discharge products (such as Li2O2 and Li2CO3) under ambient air conditions. The model predicts a great benefit of using an oxygen-selective membrane on increasing capacity. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model.

  18. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  19. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  20. Enzymatic membrane reactor for full saccharification of ionic liquid-pretreated microcrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Pedro; Bernal, Berenice; Jara, Antonio G; Belleville, Marie-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafiltration reactors based on polymeric or ceramic membranes were shown to be suitable catalytic systems for fast enzymatic saccharification of cellulose, allowing the full recovery and reuse of enzymes. By pre-treating cellulose with the IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, the suitability of this substrate for enzymatic saccharification in a reactor based on polymeric ultrafiltration membranes was demonstrated, leading to 95% cellulose hydrolysis in 4h at 50°C. The filtration process gave a clear glucose solution (up to 113 mM) at constant permeate flow (24.7 L h(-1) m(-2)), allowing the enzyme to be reused for 9 operation cycles under semi-continuous operation, without any loss of enzyme activity. Under continuous operation mode and using ceramic ultrafiltration membranes at different residence times, the enzymatic reactor showed constant profiles in both the permeate flow rate and the glucose concentration, demonstrating the excellent suitability of the proposed approach for the saccharification of cellulose.

  1. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  2. Membrane reactor microstructure for polymer grade olefin production and hydrogen cogeneration.

    PubMed

    Ziaka, Zoe D; Navrozidou, Anna; Paraschopoulou, Louisa; Vasileiadis, Savvas P

    2010-09-01

    The current communication describes research work on effective membrane reactor nanostructures and nanoreaction-nanoseparation technology for polymer grade olefin production via catalytic paraffin dehydrogenation reactions. Emphasis is given in systems of permreactors and permeators to perform the described reactive and separative operations. We elaborate on new membrane microstructure designs for paraffin dehydrogenations including the design of experiments, operation, and best parameter selection and optimization of such systems. The described processes are of current significance in the area of new microreactor design and operation including hydrocarbon processing and conversion to valuable fuels and chemicals such as hydrogen, olefins, and polyolefins. These improved results are because of the unique design characteristics of the examined microreactor systems to perform accurate multiphase and heterogeneous functions into one unit operation. A number of membrane reactor configurations were made and tested on stream for the catalytic propane dehydrogenation reaction to propylene with successful results. Some of the results are discussed below which show the better performance of nanostructured membrane reactors for the specific dehydrogenation.

  3. Amorphous Alloy Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, K

    2013-09-30

    At the beginning of this project, thin film amorphous alloy membranes were considered a nascent but promising new technology for industrial-scale hydrogen gas separations from coal- derived syngas. This project used a combination of theoretical modeling, advanced physical vapor deposition fabricating, and laboratory and gasifier testing to develop amorphous alloy membranes that had the potential to meet Department of Energy (DOE) targets in the testing strategies outlined in the NETL Membrane Test Protocol. The project is complete with Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), and Western Research Institute (WRI) having all operated independently and concurrently. GT studied the hydrogen transport properties of several amorphous alloys and found that ZrCu and ZrCuTi were the most promising candidates. GT also evaluated the hydrogen transport properties of V, Nb and Ta membranes coated with different transition-metal carbides (TMCs) (TM = Ti, Hf, Zr) catalytic layers by employing first-principles calculations together with statistical mechanics methods and determined that TiC was the most promising material to provide catalytic hydrogen dissociation. SwRI developed magnetron coating techniques to deposit a range of amorphous alloys onto both porous discs and tubular substrates. Unfortunately none of the amorphous alloys could be deposited without pinhole defects that undermined the selectivity of the membranes. WRI tested the thermal properties of the ZrCu and ZrNi alloys and found that under reducing environments the upper temperature limit of operation without recrystallization is ~250 °C. There were four publications generated from this project with two additional manuscripts in progress and six presentations were made at national and international technical conferences. The combination of the pinhole defects and the lack of high temperature stability make the theoretically identified most promising candidate amorphous alloys

  4. Double-Side Co-Catalytic Activation of Anodic TiO2 Nanotube Membranes with Sputter-Coated Pt for Photocatalytic H2 Generation from Water/Methanol Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Cha, Gihoon; Altomare, Marco; Truong Nguyen, Nhat; Taccardi, Nicola; Lee, Kiyoung; Schmuki, Patrik

    2017-02-01

    Self-standing TiO2 nanotube layers in the form of membranes are fabricated by self-organizing anodization of Ti metal and a potential shock technique. The membranes are then decorated by sputtering different Pt amounts i) only at the top, ii) only at the bottom or iii) at both top and bottom of the tube layers. The Pt-decorated membranes are transferred either in tube top-up or in tube top-down configuration onto FTO slides and are investigated, after crystallization, as photocatalysts for H2 generation using either front or back-side light irradiation. Double-side Pt-decoration of the tube membranes leads to higher H2 generation rates (independently of tube and light-irradiation configuration) compared to membranes decorated at only one side with similar overall Pt amounts. The results suggest that this effect cannot be only ascribed to the overall amount of Pt co-catalyst as such but also to its distribution at both tube extremities. This leads to optimized light absorption and electron diffusion/transfer dynamics: the central part of the membranes acts as light-harvesting zone and electrons therein generated can diffuse towards the Pt/TiO2 active zones (tube extremities) where they can react with the environment and generate H2 . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 12, June 21, 1992--September 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-12-31

    In this project we intend to study a novel process concept, i.e.,the use of ceramic membranes reactors in upgrading of coal derived liquids. Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. They have, furthermore, the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step. Thus they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, as those typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we wig evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  6. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarter report No. 9, September 21, 1991--December 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-07-01

    In this project we intend to study a novel process concept, i.e, the use of ceramic membranes reactors in upgrading of coal derived liquids. Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. They have, furthermore, the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step. Thus they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, as those typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sol-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  7. Membrane technology as a promising alternative in biodiesel production: a review.

    PubMed

    Shuit, Siew Hoong; Ong, Yit Thai; Lee, Keat Teong; Subhash, Bhatia; Tan, Soon Huat

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, environmental problems caused by the use of fossil fuels and the depletion of petroleum reserves have driven the world to adopt biodiesel as an alternative energy source to replace conventional petroleum-derived fuels because of biodiesel's clean and renewable nature. Biodiesel is conventionally produced in homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic catalysed processes, as well as by supercritical technology. All of these processes have their own limitations, such as wastewater generation and high energy consumption. In this context, the membrane reactor appears to be the perfect candidate to produce biodiesel because of its ability to overcome the limitations encountered by conventional production methods. Thus, the aim of this paper is to review the production of biodiesel with a membrane reactor by examining the fundamental concepts of the membrane reactor, its operating principles and the combination of membrane and catalyst in the catalytic membrane. In addition, the potential of functionalised carbon nanotubes to serve as catalysts while being incorporated into the membrane for transesterification is discussed. Furthermore, this paper will also discuss the effects of process parameters for transesterification in a membrane reactor and the advantages offered by membrane reactors for biodiesel production. This discussion is followed by some limitations faced in membrane technology. Nevertheless, based on the findings presented in this review, it is clear that the membrane reactor has the potential to be a breakthrough technology for the biodiesel industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Porous media for catalytic renewable energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotz, Nico

    2012-05-01

    A novel flow-based method is presented to place catalytic nanoparticles into a reactor by sol-gelation of a porous ceramic consisting of copper-based nanoparticles, silica sand, ceramic binder, and a gelation agent. This method allows for the placement of a liquid precursor containing the catalyst into the final reactor geometry without the need of impregnating or coating of a substrate with the catalytic material. The so generated foam-like porous ceramic shows properties highly appropriate for use as catalytic reactor material, e.g., reasonable pressure drop due to its porosity, high thermal and catalytic stability, and excellent catalytic behavior. The catalytic activity of micro-reactors containing this foam-like ceramic is tested in terms of their ability to convert alcoholic biofuel (e.g. methanol) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture with low concentrations of carbon monoxide (up to 75% hydrogen content and less than 0.2% CO, for the case of methanol). This gas mixture is subsequently used in a low-temperature fuel cell, converting the hydrogen directly to electricity. A low concentration of CO is crucial to avoid poisoning of the fuel cell catalyst. Since conventional Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells require CO concentrations far below 100 ppm and since most methods to reduce the mole fraction of CO (such as Preferential Oxidation or PROX) have CO conversions of up to 99%, the alcohol fuel reformer has to achieve initial CO mole fractions significantly below 1%. The catalyst and the porous ceramic reactor of the present study can successfully fulfill this requirement.

  9. Scale-up of Sterilizing-grade Membrane Filters from Discs to Pleated Cartridges: Effects of Operating Parameters and Solution Properties.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Martin, Jerold; Kuriyel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    For direct flow sterilizing-grade filtration, a linear scale-up between the performance of discs and pleated filter cartridges has traditionally been assumed. Linear scale-up assumes that the filtration performances, defined here as filter flux and capacity, scale linearly with the membrane area and remains independent of the selected device formats. However, experimental results show that the later assumption does not hold in all cases. In this article, we investigated the effect of solution properties and operating parameters on scale-up with both fouling and non-fouling feeds. For non-fouling solutions, such as buffers, the flux ratio, defined as α, between pleated filter cartridges and disc filters range from 0.5 to 0.85. For complex fouling feeds, such as protein or cell culture media solutions, the ratio of initial flux between pleated filter cartridges and discs was the same as the flux ratio, α. For fouling solutions, the ratio of filtration capacity between pleated cartridges and discs, referred to as capacity ratio, β, was variable. We found that β was sensitive to the particle size distribution of the challenge solution and the mode of filtration operation (constant pressure or constant flux), whereas it was less sensitive to the magnitude of the operating pressure or flux and concentration of the fouling species. For most conditions tested, β among pleated cartridges and discs was within ±20% variation of unity. At the end, we present a modified standard model that accounts for both variations in flux ratio, α, as well as capacity ratios, β, for estimating the requirement for membrane area at manufacturing scale with proteinacious fouling and non-protein/non-fouling feeds. The data show that for cases where filtration is capacity controlled, flux ratios between the pleated filter and disc are not critical. For such cases, the use of a high-area laid-over pleated cartridge construction allows for reducing the number of 10 inch pleated filter

  10. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells with chromium nitridenanocrystals as electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Hexiang; Chen, Xiaobo; Zhang, Huamin; Wang, Meiri; Mao,Samuel S.

    2007-07-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are energy conversion devices that produce electricity from a supply of fuel, such as hydrogen. One of the major challenges in achieving efficient energy conversion is the development of cost-effective materials that can act as electrocatalysts for PEMFCs. In this letter, we demonstrate that, instead of conventional noble metals, such as platinum, chromium nitride nanocrystals of fcc structure exhibit attractive catalytic activity for PEMFCs. Device testing indicates good stability of nitride nanocrystals in low temperature fuel cell operational environment.

  11. Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.

    1994-01-01

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques.

  12. Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.

    1994-05-03

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

  13. SOFC system with integrated catalytic fuel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnerty, Caine; Tompsett, Geoff. A.; Kendall, Kevin; Ormerod, R. Mark

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the development of solid oxide fuel cell technology operating directly on hydrocarbon fuels. The development of a catalytic fuel processing system, which is integrated with the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power source is outlined here. The catalytic device utilises a novel three-way catalytic system consisting of an in situ pre-reformer catalyst, the fuel cell anode catalyst and a platinum-based combustion catalyst. The three individual catalytic stages have been tested in a model catalytic microreactor. Both temperature-programmed and isothermal reaction techniques have been applied. Results from these experiments were used to design the demonstration SOFC unit. The apparatus used for catalytic characterisation can also perform in situ electrochemical measurements as described in previous papers [C.M. Finnerty, R.H. Cunningham, K. Kendall, R.M. Ormerod, Chem. Commun. (1998) 915-916; C.M. Finnerty, N.J. Coe, R.H. Cunningham, R.M. Ormerod, Catal. Today 46 (1998) 137-145]. This enabled the performance of the SOFC to be determined at a range of temperatures and reaction conditions, with current output of 290 mA cm -2 at 0.5 V, being recorded. Methane and butane have been evaluated as fuels. Thus, optimisation of the in situ partial oxidation pre-reforming catalyst was essential, with catalysts producing high H 2/CO ratios at reaction temperatures between 873 K and 1173 K being chosen. These included Ru and Ni/Mo-based catalysts. Hydrocarbon fuels were directly injected into the catalytic SOFC system. Microreactor measurements revealed the reaction mechanisms as the fuel was transported through the three-catalyst device. The demonstration system showed that the fuel processing could be successfully integrated with the SOFC stack.

  14. Microbial community structure and dynamics in a pilot-scale submerged membrane bioreactor aerobically treating domestic wastewater under real operation conditions.

    PubMed

    Molina-Muñoz, M; Poyatos, J M; Sánchez-Peinado, M; Hontoria, E; González-López, J; Rodelas, B

    2009-06-15

    A pilot scale submerged ultra-filtration membrane bioreactor (MBR) was used for the aerobic treatment of domestic wastewater over 9 months of year 2006 (28th March to 21st December). The MBR was installed at a municipal wastewater facility (EMASAGRA, Granada, Spain) and was fed with real wastewater. The experimental work was divided in 4 stages run under different sets of operation conditions. Operation parameters (total and volatile suspended solids, dissolved oxygen concentration) and environmental variables (temperature, pH, COD and BOD(5) of influent water) were daily monitored. In all the experiments conducted, the MBR generated an effluent of optimal quality complying with the requirements of the European Law (91/271/CEE 1991). A cultivation-independent approach (polymerase chain reaction-temperature gradient gel electrophoresis, PCR-TGGE) was used to analyze changes in the structure of the bacterial communities in the sludge. Cluster analysis of TGGE profiles demonstrated significant differences in community structure related to variations of the operation parameters and environmental factors. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) suggested that temperature, hydraulic retention time and concentration of volatile suspended solids were the factors mostly influencing community structure. 23 prominent TGGE bands were successfully reamplified and sequenced, allowing gaining insight into the identities of predominantly present bacterial populations in the sludge. Retrieved partial 16S-rRNA gene sequences were mostly related to the alpha-Proteobacteria, beta-Proteobacteria and gamma-Proteobacteria classes. The community established in the MBR in each of the four stages of operation significantly differed in species composition and the sludge generated displayed dissimilar rates of mineralization, but these differences did not influence the performance of the bioreactor (quality of the permeate). These data indicate that the flexibility of the bacterial community

  15. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  16. Functional nanofibers and membranes by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formo, Eric Victor

    This research focuses on advances in the fabrication of functional membranes through the process of electrospinning to either alter the arrangement or composition of nanofiber arrays. To control nanofiber arrangement, easily reconfigurable collectors were constructed that could direct the deposition over large areas (>50 cm2) and pattern the membranes into various designs, including parallel, fan-out, and spiral arrays. Subsequently, the composition of electrospun membranes was modified using the sol-gel method to yield fibers composed of TiO2 (anatase and rutile) and ZrO 2 (tetragonal) phases. Implementing the polyol reduction method, these nanofiber surfaces were coated with Pt, Pd, and Rh nanoparticles of 2-5 nm or Pt nanowires with lengths up to 125 nm. Interestingly, by calcining the ZrO2 at a lower temperature, the nanofibers could mediate the growth of Pt nanostars or Pt nanowires by adjusting the Pt precursor concentration in the polyol reduction bath. The anatase membranes could also be modified through the self-assembly of various silanes to give either thiol or amine surface groups. The functionalized membranes were then tested for a number of applications associated with the catalysis field. Specifically, anatase fiber membranes coated with Pt and Pd nanoparticles were used as catalysts in a continuous flow reactor for either hydrogenation or cross-coupling reactions, respectively, which was proven to operate with a high yield, a rapid flow rate, and were readily recyclable. The effects of both the coverage and morphology of the Pt-decorated anatase fibers on the methanol oxidation reaction were then studied. Nanofibers with a submonolayer of Pt nanoparticles or Pt nanowires were found to display improved catalytic durability over commercial Pt/C as determined by chronoamperometry. Further, by utilizing the oxygen reduction reaction, results showed that the Pt nanostars had superior electrochemical properties in comparison to Pt black. Finally, the

  17. Synergize fuel and petrochemical processing plans with catalytic reforming

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Depending on the market, refiner`s plans to produce clean fuels and higher value petrochemicals will weigh heavily on the catalytic reformer`s flexibility. It seems that as soon as a timely article related to catalytic reforming operations is published, a new {open_quotes}boutique{close_quotes} gasoline fuel specification is slapped on to existing fuel standards, affecting reformer operations and processing objectives. Just as importantly, the petrochemical market (such as aromatics) that refiners are targeting, can be very fickle. That`s why process engineers have endeavored to maintain an awareness of the flexibility that technology suppliers are building into modern catalytic reformers.

  18. Efficient process for previous metal recovery from cell membrane electrode assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Shore, Lawrence; Matlin, Ramail; Heinz, Robert

    2010-05-04

    A method is provided for recovering a catalytic element from a fuel cell membrane electrode assembly. The method includes grinding the membrane electrode assembly into a powder, extracting the catalytic element by forming a slurry comprising the powder and an acid leachate adapted to dissolve the catalytic element into a soluble salt, and separating the slurry into a depleted powder and a supernatant containing the catalytic element salt. The depleted powder is washed to remove any catalytic element salt retained within pores in the depleted powder and the catalytic element is purified from the salt.

  19. Evolution of catalytic RNA in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F.

    1992-01-01

    We are interested in the biochemistry of existing RNA enzymes and in the development of RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. The focal point of our research program has been the design and operation of a laboratory system for the controlled evolution of catalytic RNA. This system serves as working model of RNA-based life and can be used to explore the catalytic potential of RNA. Evolution requires the integration of three chemical processes: amplification, mutation, and selection. Amplification results in additional copies of the genetic material. Mutation operates at the level of genotype to introduce variability, this variability in turn being expressed as a range of phenotypes. Selection operates at the level of phenotype to reduce variability by excluding those individuals that do not conform to the prevailing fitness criteria. These three processes must be linked so that only the selected individuals are amplified, subject to mutational error, to produce a progeny distribution of mutant individuals. We devised techniques for the amplification, mutation, and selection of catalytic RNA, all of which can be performed rapidly in vitro within a single reaction vessel. We integrated these techniques in such a way that they can be performed iteratively and routinely. This allowed us to conduct evolution experiments in response to artificially-imposed selection constraints. Our objective was to develop novel RNA enzymes by altering the selection constraints in a controlled manner. In this way we were able to expand the catalytic repertoire of RNA. Our long-range objective is to develop an RNA enzyme with RNA replicase activity. If such an enzyme had the ability to produce additional copies of itself, then RNA evolution would operate autonomously and the origin of life will have been realized in the laboratory.

  20. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  1. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  2. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina; P. Szedlacsek

    2006-03-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1-Implementation Plan, Phase 2-Validation Testing and Phase 3-Field Testing. The Phase 1 program has been completed. Phase II was initiated in October 2004. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL{trademark}) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to react part of the fuel, increasing the fuel/air mixture temperature. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the catalytic concept will be demonstrated through subscale testing. Phase III will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  3. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  4. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  5. Nanocarbons for Catalytic Desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qingqing; Lin, Yangming; Heumann, Saskia; Su, Dangsheng

    2017-08-24

    Nanocarbon catalysts are green and sustainable alternatives to the metal-based catalysts for numerous catalytic transformations. The application of nanocarbons for environmental catalysis is an emerging research discipline and has undergone rapid development in recent years. In this focus review, we provide a critical analysis on the state-of-the-art nanocarbon catalysts for three different catalytic desulfurization processes. And the focus is on the advantage and limitation as well as the reaction mechanism of the nanocarbon catalysts at molecular level. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Aufdembrink, B.A.; Degnan, T.F.; Kresge, C.T.

    1990-01-23

    This patent describes a process for catalytically cracking a petroleum fraction to lighter hydrocarbons. The process comprises providing a feedstock containing a petroleum fraction and then contacting the feedstock with a catalyst under catalytic cracking conditions. The catalyst composition includes a titanometallate layered metal oxide material comprising a layered metal oxide material comprising a layered metal oxide and pillars of a chalcogenide of at least one element selected from Groups IB, IIB, IIIA, IIIB, IVB, VA, VB, VIA, VIIA and VIIIA of the Periodic Table of Elements separating the layers of the metal oxides.

  7. Prevalence of Nitrosomonas cluster 7 populations in the ammonia-oxidizing community of a submerged membrane bioreactor treating urban wastewater under different operation conditions.

    PubMed

    Cerrone, F; Poyatos, J M; Molina-Muñoz, M; Cortés-Lorenzo, C; González-López, J; Rodelas, B

    2013-07-01

    A pilot-scale ultrafiltration membrane bioreactor (MBR) was used for the aerobic treatment of urban wastewater in four experimental stages influenced by seasonal temperature and different sets of operation conditions. The structure of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community was profiled by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE), based on the amplification and separation of partial ammonia-monoxygenase subunit A (amoA) genes. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that temperature, hydraulic retention time and percentage of ammonia removal had a significant effect on the fingerprints of AOB communities. Phylogenetic analysis conducted on amoA/AmoA sequences of reamplified TGGE bands showed, however, that closely related ammonia-oxidizing populations inhabited the sludge of the MBR in all experimental stages. Nitrosomonas cluster 7 populations (N. europaea-N. eutropha cluster) prevailed under all conditions tested, even when the MBR was operated under complete biomass retention or at low temperatures, suggesting that the high ammonia concentrations in the system were determinant to select r-strategist AOB.

  8. Transient analysis of gas transport in anode channel of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell with dead-ended anode under pressure swing operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Yasushi; Oshima, Nobuyuki; Tabuchi, Yuichiro; Ikezoe, Keigo

    2014-12-01

    Further cost reduction is a critical issue for commercialization of fuel-cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) based on polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). The cost of the fuel-cell system is driven by the multiple parts required to maximize stack performance and maintain durability and robustness. The fuel-cell system of the FCEV must be simplified while maintaining functionality. The dead-ended anode is considered as a means of simplification in this study. Generally, if hydrogen is supplied under constant pressure during dead-ended operation, stable power generation is impossible because of accumulation of liquid water produced by power generation and of nitrogen via leakage from the cathode through the membrane. Herein, pressure oscillation is applied to address this issue. Empirical and CFD data are employed to elucidate the mechanism of stable power generation using the pressure swing supply. Simultaneous and time-continuous measurements of the current distribution and gas concentration distribution are also conducted. The results demonstrate that the nitrogen concentration in the anode channel under pressure constant operation differs from that under pressure swing supply conditions. The transient two-dimensional CFD results indicate that oscillatory flow is generated by pressure swing supply, which periodically sweeps out nitrogen from the active area, resulting in stable power generation.

  9. Application of an automation system and a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system for the optimal operation of a membrane adsorption hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Vigneswaran, S; Ngo, H H; Nguyen, H T; Ben-Aim, R

    2006-01-01

    The application of automation and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems to municipal water and wastewater treatment plants is rapidly increasing. However, the application of these systems is less frequent in the research and development phases of emerging treatment technologies used in these industries. This study involved the implementation of automation and a SCADA system to the submerged membrane adsorption hybrid system for use in a semi-pilot scale research project. An incremental approach was used in the development of the automation and SCADA systems, leading to the development of two new control systems. The first system developed involved closed loop control of the backwash initiation, based upon a pressure increase, leading to productivity improvements as the backwash is only activated when required, not at a fixed time. This system resulted in a 40% reduction in the number of backwashes required and also enabled optimised operations under unsteady concentrations of wastewater. The second system developed involved closed loop control of the backwash duration, whereby the backwash was terminated when the pressure reached a steady state. This system resulted in a reduction of the duration of the backwash of up to 25% and enabled optimised operations as the foulant build-up within the reactor increased.

  10. Methane coupling by membrane reactor, Quarterly technical progress report, September 1994--December 24, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yi Hua

    1995-04-14

    Experimental studies presented in this report discuss the performance of porous VYCOR membrane reactors in which the oxidative coupling of methane was carried out in an excess of oxygen. This was accomplished by shortening the porous section of the membrane reactor and operating at lower W/F ratios. Results are also discussed from experiments in which methane gas flow was metered in from the high pressure shell side into the oxygen stream on the tube side of the membrane reactor. These studies indicated that the presence of gas phase oxygen downstream to the catalyst bed was detrimental for the C{sub 2} selectivity in the methane coupling reaction. Dense membrane synthesis and characterization results are presented which describe new approaches to dense membrane synthesis. Modifications to the 40 Angstrom pore diameter gamma alumina membranes to enhance their stability and pore filling of micron size pores on alpha alumina supports are discussed. Sr{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3}, an oxygen conducting perovslcite synthesized in the Microfluidizer showed interesting DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) and TGA (Thermo Gravimetric Analysis) spectra that indicated a change in the crystal structure at relatively moderate temperatures of 150{degrees}C and 350{degrees}C. This report also presents details of the design and experimental set-up of a catalytic membrane reactor in which the porous membrane is doped with the active catalyst and methane coupling occurs as the reactant gases pass through the membrane pores.

  11. Towards Enhanced Gas Sensor Performance with Fluoropolymer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Graunke, Thorsten; Schmitt, Katrin; Raible, Stefan; Wöllenstein, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on how to increase the selectivity of gas sensors by using fluoropolymer membranes. The mass transport of polar and non-polar gases through a polymer membrane matrix was studied by systematic selection of polymers with different degrees of fluorination, as well as polymers whose monomers have ether groups (-O-) in addition to fluorine groups (-F). For the study, a set of application-relevant gases including H2, CO, CO2, NO2, methane, ethanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde as well as various concentrations of relative humidity were used. These gases have different functional groups and polarities, yet have a similar kinetic diameter and are therefore typically difficult to separate. The concentrations of the gases were chosen according to international indicative limit values (TWA, STEL). To measure the concentration in the feed and permeate, we used tin-dioxide-based metal oxide gas sensors with palladium catalyst (SnO2:Pd), catalytic sensors (also SnO2:Pd-based) and thermal conductivity sensors. This allows a close examination of the interdependence of diffusion and physicochemical operating principle of the sensor. Our goal is to increase the selectivity of gas sensors by using inexpensive fluoropolymer membranes. The measurements showed that through membranes with low polarity, preferably non-polar gases are transported. Furthermore, the degree of crystallization influences the permeability and selectivity of a polymer membrane. Basically the polar polymers showed a higher permeability to water vapor and polar substances than non-polar polymer membranes. PMID:27690045

  12. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 11, March 21, 1992--June 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-12-31

    Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. Having the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step, they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, such as these typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. This project will evaluate the performance of Sol-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. Development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  13. Catalytic efficiency of designed catalytic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Korendovych, Ivan V; DeGrado, William F

    2014-01-01

    The de novo design of catalysts that mimic the affinity and specificity of natural enzymes remains one of the Holy Grails of chemistry. Despite decades of concerted effort we are still unable to design catalysts as efficient as enzymes. Here we critically evaluate approaches to (re)design of novel catalytic function in proteins using two test cases: Kemp elimination and ester hydrolysis. We show that the degree of success thus far has been modest when the rate enhancements seen for the designed proteins are compared with the rate enhancements by small molecule catalysts in solvents with properties similar to the active site. Nevertheless, there are reasons for optimism: the design methods are ever improving and the resulting catalyst can be efficiently improved using directed evolution. PMID:25048695

  14. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  15. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Sunder, Swaminathan

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  16. Architecture and function of metallopeptidase catalytic domains

    PubMed Central

    Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Gomis-Rüth, Francesc Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The cleavage of peptide bonds by metallopeptidases (MPs) is essential for life. These ubiquitous enzymes participate in all major physiological processes, and so their deregulation leads to diseases ranging from cancer and metastasis, inflammation, and microbial infection to neurological insults and cardiovascular disorders. MPs cleave their substrates without a covalent intermediate in a single-step reaction involving a solvent molecule, a general base/acid, and a mono-or dinuclear catalytic metal site. Most monometallic MPs comprise a short metal-binding motif (HEXXH), which includes two metal-binding histidines and a general base/acid glutamate, and they are grouped into the zincin tribe of MPs. The latter divides mainly into the gluzincin and metzincin clans. Metzincins consist of globular ∼130–270-residue catalytic domains, which are usually preceded by N-terminal pro-segments, typically required for folding and latency maintenance. The catalytic domains are often followed by C-terminal domains for substrate recognition and other protein–protein interactions, anchoring to membranes, oligomerization, and compartmentalization. Metzincin catalytic domains consist of a structurally conserved N-terminal subdomain spanning a five-stranded β-sheet, a backing helix, and an active-site helix. The latter contains most of the metal-binding motif, which is here characteristically extended to HEXXHXXGXX(H,D). Downstream C-terminal subdomains are generally shorter, differ more among metzincins, and mainly share a conserved loop—the Met-turn—and a C-terminal helix. The accumulated structural data from more than 300 deposited structures of the 12 currently characterized metzincin families reviewed here provide detailed knowledge of the molecular features of their catalytic domains, help in our understanding of their working mechanisms, and form the basis for the design of novel drugs. PMID:24596965

  17. Synthesis of UV-absorbing and fluorescent carrier ampholyte mixtures and their application for the determination of the operational pH values of buffering membranes used in isoelectric trapping separations.

    PubMed

    North, Robert; Hwang, Ann; Lalwani, Sanjiv; Shave, Evan; Vigh, Gyula

    2006-10-20

    Success in isoelectric trapping separations critically depends on the knowledge of the accurate operational pH value of the buffering membranes used. Currently, due to a lack of easy, rapid, accurate methods that can be used for the post-synthesis determination of the operational pH value of a buffering membrane, only nominal pH values calculated from the amounts of the reagents used in the synthesis of the membranes and their acid-base dissociation constants are available. To rectify this problem, UV-absorbing and fluorescent carrier ampholyte mixtures were prepared by alkylating pentaethylenehexamine with a chromophore and a fluorophore, followed by Michael addition of acrylic acid and itaconic acid to the resulting oligoamine. Carrier ampholyte mixtures, with evenly distributed absorbance values across the 3membrane to be characterized. The pI value of the most basic UV-absorbing or fluorescent carrier ampholyte collected in the anodic separation compartment, determined by full-column imaging capillary isoelectric focusing analysis, indicates the operational pH value of the separation membrane.

  18. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System

    PubMed Central

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-01

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi’s azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  19. Transport in a Microfluidic Catalytic Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H G; Chung, J; Grigoropoulos, C P; Greif, R; Havstad, M; Morse, J D

    2003-04-30

    A study of the heat and mass transfer, flow, and thermodynamics of the reacting flow in a catalytic microreactor is presented. Methanol reforming is utilized in the fuel processing system driving a micro-scale proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Understanding the flow and thermal transport phenomena as well as the reaction mechanisms is essential for improving the efficiency of the reforming process as well as the quality of the processed fuel. Numerical studies have been carried out to characterize the transport in a silicon microfabricated reactor system. On the basis of these results, optimized conditions for fuel processing are determined.

  20. Demonstration of catalytic combustion with residual fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to demonstrate catalytic combustion of a residual fuel oil. Three catalytic reactors, including a baseline configuration and two backup configurations based on baseline test results, were operated on No. 6 fuel oil. All reactors were multielement configurations consisting of ceramic honeycomb catalyzed with palladium on stabilized alumina. Stable operation on residual oil was demonstrated with the baseline configuration at a reactor inlet temperature of about 825 K (1025 F). At low inlet temperature, operation was precluded by apparent plugging of the catalytic reactor with residual oil. Reduced plugging tendency was demonstrated in the backup reactors by increasing the size of the catalyst channels at the reactor inlet, but plugging still occurred at inlet temperature below 725 K (845 F). Operation at the original design inlet temperature of 589 K (600 F) could not be demonstrated. Combustion efficiency above 99.5% was obtained with less than 5% reactor pressure drop. Thermally formed NO sub x levels were very low (less than 0.5 g NO2/kg fuel) but nearly 100% conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x was observed.

  1. Reactor vessel using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Zeltner, Walter A.

    1992-08-11

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane.

  2. Possible involvement of membrane lipids peroxidation and oxidation of catalytically essential thiols of the cerebral transmembrane sodium pump as component mechanisms of iron-mediated oxidative stress-linked dysfunction of the pump's activity.

    PubMed

    Omotayo, T I; Akinyemi, G S; Omololu, P A; Ajayi, B O; Akindahunsi, A A; Rocha, J B T; Kade, I J

    2015-01-01

    The precise molecular events defining the complex role of oxidative stress in the inactivation of the cerebral sodium pump in radical-induced neurodegenerative diseases is yet to be fully clarified and thus still open. Herein we investigated the modulation of the activity of the cerebral transmembrane electrogenic enzyme in Fe(2+)-mediated in vitro oxidative stress model. The results show that Fe(2+) inhibited the transmembrane enzyme in a concentration dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by a biphasic generation of aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation. While dithiothreitol prevented both Fe(2+) inhibitory effect on the pump and lipid peroxidation, vitamin E prevented only lipid peroxidation but not inhibition of the pump. Besides, malondialdehyde (MDA) inhibited the pump by a mechanism not related to oxidation of its critical thiols. Apparently, the low activity of the pump in degenerative diseases mediated by Fe(2+) may involve complex multi-component mechanisms which may partly involve an initial oxidation of the critical thiols of the enzyme directly mediated by Fe(2+) and during severe progression of such diseases; aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation such as MDA may further exacerbate this inhibitory effect by a mechanism that is likely not related to the oxidation of the catalytically essential thiols of the ouabain-sensitive cerebral electrogenic pump.

  3. Influence of micro-porous layer and operating conditions on the fluoride release rate and degradation of PEMFC membrane electrode assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sumit; Karan, Kunal; Fowler, Michael; Simon, Leonardo C.; Peppley, Brant; Halliop, Ela

    2008-05-01

    In this study, the influence of micro-porous layers (MPL) on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) durability was investigated. Two fuel cells were built, one with a micro-porous layer on the anode side, and a second cell with MPL on both sides. Experiments were conducted by varying operational parameters such as current density, reactant stoichiometry, and inlet relative humidity. Fuel cell degradation was evaluated by measuring fluoride release rates. The largest factor determining fluoride release rate was found to be the presence of MPL; the cell with MPLs on both sides exhibited significantly reduced fluoride release rates compared to that of cell with one MPL. Increasing the current density also reduced the fluoride release rate for cells with only one MPL whereas there was only a moderate effect on cells with two MPLs. Microscopy analysis showed small but significant changes in ionomer layer thickness. Polarization measurements indicated that there was little change in the performance for both cells over the test period.

  4. The effects on operation conditions of sludge retention time and carbon/nitrogen ratio in an intermittently aerated membrane bioreactor (IAMBR).

    PubMed

    Choi, Changkyoo; Lee, Jaekeun; Lee, Kwangho; Kim, Moonil

    2008-09-01

    An intermittently aerated membrane bioreactor (IAMBR) system has been developed to improve the efficiency of nutrient removal, and for the stable treatment of organic matter which is contained as suspended solid (SS) in the influent. The important operating factors of an intermittently aerated bioreactor (IABR) are sludge retention times (SRTs) and carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios. Because research on IAMBR is young, this paper explores the effect of SRTs and C/N ratios on these systems. For SRTs of 20, 25, 30, and 40 days, there was little difference in the removal of COD, T-N, and T-P. In comparing C/N ratios of 4.5, 7, and 10, the COD concentration in permeate with a C/N ratio of 10 was most stable, although the concentration of organic matter in the influent was high. The removal efficiencies of T-N and T-P in permeate with a C/N ratio of 10 were the highest at 92.9% and 88.9%, respectively. This implies that a C/N ratio above 10 should be maintained for a nutrient removal efficiency of approximately 90%.

  5. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  6. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  7. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    In this project we well evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated. (VC)

  8. Catalytic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

    1980-12-09

    An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

  9. Quenched catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Krambeck, F.J.; Penick, J.E.; Schipper, P.H.

    1990-12-18

    This paper describes improvement in a fluidized catalytic cracking process wherein a fluidizable catalyst cracking catalyst and a hydrocarbon feed are charged to a reactor riser at catalytic riser cracking conditions to form catalytically cracked vapor product and spent catalyst which are discharged into a reactor vessel having a volume via a riser reactor outlet equipped with a separation means to produce a catalyst lean phase. It comprises: a majority of the cracked product, and a catalyst rich phase comprising a majority of the spend catalyst. The the catalyst rich phase is discharged into a dense bed of catalyst maintained below the riser outlet and the catalyst lean phase is discharged into the vessel for a time, and at a temperature, which cause unselective thermal cracking of the cracked product in the reactor volume before product is withdrawn from the vessel via a vessel outlet. The improvement comprises: addition, after riser cracking is completed, and after separation of cracked products from catalyst, of a quenching stream into the vessel above the dense bed of catalyst, via a quench stream addition point which allows the quench stream to contact at least a majority of the volume of the vessel above the dense bed.

  10. Viral membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. PMID:25866377

  11. 40 CFR 63.1564 - What are my requirements for metal HAP emissions from catalytic cracking units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... permissible hourly average Ni operating limit, percent-acfm-ppmw, i.e., your site-specific Ni operating limit....009 Where: Ni operating limit2 = Maximum permissible hourly average Ni operating limit, percent-ppmw... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery...

  12. IFP solutions for revamping catalytic reforming units

    SciTech Connect

    Gendler, J.L.; Domergue, B.; Mank, L.

    1996-12-01

    The decision-making process for the refiner considering a revamp of a catalytic reforming unit comprises many factors. These may be grouped in two broad areas: technical and economic. This paper presents the results of a study performed by IFP that illustrates catalytic reforming unit revamp options. Three IFP processes are described and operating conditions, expected yields, and economic data are presented. The following options are discussed: base case Conventional, fixed-bed, semi-regenerative catalytic reformer; Case 1--revamp using IFP Dualforming technology; Case 2--revamp using IFP Dualforming Plus technology; and Case 3--revamp to IFP Octanizing technology. The study illustrates various options for the refiner to balance unit performance improvements with equipment, site, and economic constraints. The study was performed assuming design feedrate of 98.2 tons/hour (20,000 BPSD) in all cases. Because of the increased need for octane in many refineries, the study assumed that operating severity was set at a design value of 100 research octane number clear (RON). In all of the cases in this study, it was assumed that the existing recycle compressor was reused. Operating pressure differences between the cases is discussed separately. Also, in all cases, a booster compressor was included in order to return export hydrogen pressure to that of the conventional unit.

  13. Purification of reformer streams by catalytic hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Polanek, P.J.; Hooper, H.M.; Mueller, J.; Walter, M.; Emmrich, G.

    1996-12-01

    Catalytic Reforming is one of the most important processes to produce high grade motor gasolines. Feedstocks are mainly gasoline and naphtha streams from the crude oil distillation boiling in the range of 212 F to 350 F. By catalytic reforming the octane number of these gasoline components is increased from 40--60 RON to 95--100 RON. Besides isomerization and dehydrocyclization reactions mainly formation of aromatics by dehydrogenation of naphthenes occur. Thus, catalytic reformers within refineries are an important source of BTX--aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylenes). Frequently, high purity aromatics are recovered from these streams using modern extractive distillation or liquid extraction processes, e.g. the Krupp-Koppers MORPHYLANE{reg_sign} process. Aromatics product specifications, notably bromine index and acid wash color, have obligated producers to utilize clay treatment to remove trace impurities of diolefins and/or olefins. The conventional clay treatment is a multiple vessel batch process which periodically requires disposal of the spent clay in a suitable environmental manner. BASF, in close cooperation with Krupp-Koppers, has developed a continuous Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation Process (SCHP) as an alternative to clay treatment which is very efficient, cost effective and environmentally compatible. In the following the main process aspects including the process scheme catalyst and operating conditions is described.

  14. Catalytic converter with thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The unique design of an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) and the inclusion of an ECO valve in the exhaust of an internal combustion engine will meet the strict new emission requirements, especially at vehicle cold start, adopted by several states in this country as well as in Europe and Japan. The catalytic converter (CC) has been a most useful tool in pollution abatement for the automobile. But the emission requirements are becoming more stringent and, along with other improvements, the CC must be improved to meet these new standards. Coupled with the ECO valve, the EHC can meet these new emission limits. In an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV), approximately 80% of the energy consumed leaves the vehicle as waste heat: out the tail pipe, through the radiator, or convected/radiated off the engine. Included with the waste heat out the tail pipe are the products of combustion which must meet strict emission requirements. The design of a new CC is presented here. This is an automobile CC that has the capability of producing electrical power and reducing the quantity of emissions at vehicle cold start, the Thermoelectric Catalytic Power Generator. The CC utilizes the energy of the exothermic reactions that take place in the catalysis substrate to produce electrical energy with a thermoelectric generator. On vehicle cold start, the thermoelectric generator is used as a heat pump to heat the catalyst substrate to reduce the time to catalyst light-off. Thus an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) will be used to augment the abatement of tail pipe emissions. Included with the EHC in the exhaust stream of the automobile is the ECO valve. This valve restricts the flow of pollutants out the tail pipe of the vehicle for a specified amount of time until the EHC comes up to operating temperature. Then the ECO valve opens and allows the full exhaust, now treated by the EHC, to leave the vehicle.

  15. Highly Selective H2 Separation Zeolite Membranes for Coal Gasification Membrane Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mei Hong; Richard D. Noble; John L. Falconer

    2006-09-24

    Zeolite membranes are thermally, chemically, and mechanically stable. They also have tunable molecular sieving and catalytic ability. These unique properties make zeolite membrane an excellent candidate for use in catalytic membrane reactor applications related to coal conversion and gasification, which need high temperature and high pressure range separation in chemically challenging environment where existing technologies are inefficient or unable to operate. Small pore, good quality, and thin zeolite membranes are needed for highly selective H{sub 2} separation from other light gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO). However, zeolite membranes have not been successful for H{sub 2} separation from light gases because the zeolite pores are either too big or the membranes have a large number of defects. The objective of this study is to develop zeolite membranes that are more suitable for H{sub 2} separation. In an effort to tune the size of zeolite pores and/or to decrease the number of defects, medium-pore zeolite B-ZSM-5 (MFI) membranes were synthesized and silylated. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 crystals reduced MFI-zeolite pore volume, but had little effect on CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 membranes increased H{sub 2} selectivity both in single component and in mixtures with CO{sub 2}CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, or N2. Single gas and binary mixtures of H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} were separated through silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes at feed pressures up to 1.7 MPa and temperatures up to 773 K. For one BZSM-5 membrane after silylation, the H2/CO{sub 2} separation selectivity at 473 K increased from 1.4 to 37, whereas the H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation selectivity increased from 1.6 to 33. Hydrogen permeance through a silylated B-ZSM-5 membrane was activated, but the CO{sub 2} and CH4 permeances decreased slightly with temperature in both single gas and in mixtures. Therefore, the H{sub 2} permeance and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and H{sup 2} /CH{sub 4

  16. Low and medium heating value coal gas catalytic combustor characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic combustion with both low and medium heating value coal gases obtained from an operating gasifier was demonstrated. A practical operating range for efficient operation was determined, and also to identify potential problem areas were identified for consideration during stationary gas turbine engine design. The test rig consists of fuel injectors, a fuel-air premixing section, a catalytic reactor with thermocouple instrumentation and a single point, water cooled sample probe. The test rig included inlet and outlet transition pieces and was designed for installation into an existing test loop.

  17. SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Illias

    2002-06-10

    Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application this new development. We designed and built a membrane reactor to study the reforming reaction. A two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model was developed to study the performance of the membrane reactor parametrically. The important results are presented in this report.

  18. Proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Taro; Nagai, Yuhei; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kimura, Katsuki; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the details of proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) treating real municipal wastewater were investigated. Two separate pilot-scale MBRs were continuously operated under significantly different operating conditions; one MBR was a submerged type whereas the other was a side-stream type. The submerged and side-stream MBRs were operated for 20 and 10 days, respectively. At the end of continuous operation, the foulants were extracted from the fouled membranes. The proteins contained in the extracted foulants were enriched by using the combination of crude concentration with an ultrafiltration membrane and trichloroacetic acid precipitation, and then separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). The N-terminal amino acid sequencing analysis of the proteins which formed intensive spots on the 2D-PAGE gels allowed us to partially identify one protein (OmpA family protein originated from genus Brevundimonas or Riemerella anatipestifer) from the foulant obtained from the submerged MBR, and two proteins (OprD and OprF originated from genus Pseudomonas) from that obtained from the side-stream MBR. Despite the significant difference in operating conditions of the two MBRs, all proteins identified in this study belong to β-barrel protein. These findings strongly suggest the importance of β-barrel proteins in developing membrane fouling in MBRs.

  19. Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A water membrane evaporator (WME) has been conceived and tested as an alternative to the contamination-sensitive and corrosion-prone evaporators currently used for dissipating heat from space vehicles. The WME consists mainly of the following components: An outer stainless-steel screen that provides structural support for the components mentioned next; Inside and in contact with the stainless-steel screen, a hydrophobic membrane that is permeable to water vapor; Inside and in contact with the hydrophobic membrane, a hydrophilic membrane that transports the liquid feedwater to the inner surface of the hydrophobic membrane; Inside and in contact with the hydrophilic membrane, an annular array of tubes through which flows the spacecraft coolant carrying the heat to be dissipated; and An inner exclusion tube that limits the volume of feedwater in the WME. In operation, a pressurized feedwater reservoir is connected to the volume between the exclusion tube and the coolant tubes. Feedwater fills the volume, saturates the hydrophilic membrane, and is retained by the hydrophobic membrane. The outside of the WME is exposed to space vacuum. Heat from the spacecraft coolant is conducted through the tube walls and the water-saturated hydrophilic membrane to the liquid/vapor interface at the hydrophobic membrane, causing water to evaporate to space. Makeup water flows into the hydrophilic membrane through gaps between the coolant tubes.

  20. Catalytic reforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, R.P.; Huss, A. Jr.; McHale, W.D.; Partridge, R.D.

    1989-06-13

    This patent describes a catalytic reforming process which comprises contacting a naphtha range feed with a low acidity extrudate comprising an intermediate and/or a large pore acidic zeolite bound with a low acidity refractory oxide under reforming conditions to provide a reaction product of increased aromatic content, the extrudate having been prepared with at least an extrusion-facilitating amount of a low acidity refractory oxide in colloidal form and containing at least one metal species selected from the platinum group metals.

  1. Catalytic reforming methods

    DOEpatents

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  2. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  3. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  4. Anion exchange membrane

    DOEpatents

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  5. Membrane reactors at Degussa.

    PubMed

    Wöltinger, Jens; Karau, Andreas; Leuchtenberger, Wolfgang; Drauz, Karlheinz

    2005-01-01

    The review covers the development of membrane reactor technologies at Degussa for the synthesis of fine chemicals. The operation of fed-batch or continuous biocatalytic processes in the enzyme membrane reactor (EMR) is well established at Degussa. Degussa has experience of running EMRs from laboratory gram scale up to a production scale of several hundreds of tons per year. The transfer of the enzyme membrane reactor from biocatalysis to chemical catalysis in the chemzyme membrane reactor (CMR) is discussed. Various homogeneous catalysts have been investigated in the CMR, and the scope and limitation of this new technique is discussed.

  6. Ammonia-treated Ordered Mesoporous Carbons as Catalytic Materials for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiqing; Lee, Je Seung; Zhu, Qing; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Dai, Sheng

    2010-04-13

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have been considered as promising alternative power sources for many mobile and stationary applications. Compared to the fast hydrogen oxidation at the anode, the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode requires high-performance catalysts. Currently, platium (Pt) nanoparticles supported on high surface area carbons remain the best catalysts for ORR. However, both instability and high cost of Pt-based catalysts represent two main obstacles limiting the commercial applications of PEMFCs. The instability of supported Pt catalysts is mainly due to the corrosion of carbon support under operation conditions and the agglomation and detachment of Pt particles, leading to a decrease in catalytic surface areas. Development of corrosion resistant supports and enhancement of the interactions between Pt and supports are two strategies to improve the cathode long-term activity.

  7. Polyethersulfone hollow fiber modified with poly(styrenesulfonate) and Pd nanoparticles for catalytic reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, C.; Gu, Y.; Remigy, J.-C.; Lahitte, J.-F.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work is the synthesis of polymer-stabilized Pd nanoparticles (PdNP) inside a functionalized polymeric porous membrane in order to develop hybrid catalytic membrane reactors and to test them in model metal-catalyzed organic reactions. For this goal, a polymeric membrane support (Polyethersulfone hollow fiber-shaped) was firstly functionalized with an ionogenic polymer (i.e. poly(styrenesulfonate) capable to retain PdNP precursors using an UV photo-grafting method. PdNP were then generated inside the polymeric matrix by chemical reduction of precursor salts (intermatrix synthesis). The catalytic performance of the PdNP catalytic membranes was evaluated using reduction of nitrophenol by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in water.

  8. Membrane projection lithography

    DOEpatents

    Burckel, David Bruce; Davids, Paul S; Resnick, Paul J; Draper, Bruce L

    2015-03-17

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a three dimensional manufacturing technique for application with semiconductor technologies. A membrane layer can be formed over a cavity. An opening can be formed in the membrane such that the membrane can act as a mask layer to the underlying wall surfaces and bottom surface of the cavity. A beam to facilitate an operation comprising any of implantation, etching or deposition can be directed through the opening onto the underlying surface, with the opening acting as a mask to control the area of the underlying surfaces on which any of implantation occurs, material is removed, and/or material is deposited. The membrane can be removed, a new membrane placed over the cavity and a new opening formed to facilitate another implantation, etching, or deposition operation. By changing the direction of the beam different wall/bottom surfaces can be utilized to form a plurality of structures.

  9. Zeolite membrane application in hydrocarbon processing

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, H.

    1988-06-01

    Zeolites are of great importance in hydrocarbon processing either as adsorbents or catalysts. This paper presents a research since 1973 about the transformation of zeolite into membrane zeolite, that dramatically contributes to the free world of peace and prosperity. Commercial and organic membranes are of two categories: anisotropic membrane, e.g. cellulose acetate, and composite membrane, e.g. plasma {und in}-{und situ} polymerization on polysulfone support. Zeolite membrane belongs to the latter category, zeolite {und in}-{und situ} hydrothermalization on porous glass. Basically zeolite membrane is consisted of three groups: (1) eight-oxygen ring window, zeolite A, (2) ten-oxygen ring window, Pentasil, and (3) twelve-oxygen ring window, Faujasite. The technology of zeolite membrane synthesis and subsequent treatment is almost transferred from the one applied to powder zeolites. Zeolite membrane is expected to play a major role in the field of hydrocarbon processing, that is, PSA, Distillation/Extraction, and Catalytic Reactions.

  10. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-10-26

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi's azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.

  11. MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR RECOVERY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM REMEDIATION OFF-GASES

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Wijmans

    2003-11-17

    In situ vacuum extraction, air or steam sparging, and vitrification are widely used to remediate soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). All of these processes produce a VOC-laden air stream from which the VOC must be removed before the air can be discharged or recycled to the generating process. Treatment of these off-gases is often a major portion of the cost of the remediation project. Currently, carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration are the most common methods of treating these gas streams. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) proposed an alternative treatment technology based on selective membranes that separate the organic components from the gas stream, producing a VOC-free air stream. This technology can be applied to off-gases produced by various remediation activities and the systems can be skid-mounted and automated for easy transportation and unattended operation. The target performance for the membrane systems is to produce clean air (less than 10 ppmv VOC) for discharge or recycle, dischargeable water (less than 1 ppmw VOC), and a concentrated liquid VOC phase. This report contains the results obtained during Phase II of a two-phase project. In Phase I, laboratory experiments were carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach. In the subsequent Phase II project, a demonstration system was built and operated at the McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, California. The membrane system was fed with off-gas from a Soil Vacuum Extraction (SVE) system. The work performed in Phase II demonstrated that the membrane system can reduce the VOC concentration in remediation off-gas to 10 ppmv, while producing a concentrated VOC phase and dischargeable water containing less than 1 ppmw VOC. However, the tests showed that the presence of 1 to 3% carbon dioxide in the SVE off-gas reduced the treatment capacity of the system by a factor of three to four. In an economic analysis, treatment costs of the membrane

  12. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  13. ``OPTICAL Catalytic Nanomotors''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosary-Oyong, Se, Glory

    D. Kagan, et.al, 2009:'' a motion-based chemical sensing involving fuel-driven nanomotors is demonstrated. The new protocol relies on the use of an optical microscope for tracking charge in the speed of nanowire motors in the presence of target analyte''. Synthetic nanomotors are propelled by catalytic decomposition of .. they do not require external electric, magnetic or optical fields as energy... Accompanying Fig 2.6(a) of optical micrograph of a partial monolayer of silica microbeads [J.Gibbs, 2011 ] retrieves WF Paxton:''rods were characterized by transmission electron & dark-field optical microscopy..'' & LF Valadares:''dimer due to the limited resolution of optical microscopy, however the result..'. Acknowledged to HE. Mr. Prof. SEDIONO M.P. TJONDRONEGORO.

  14. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  15. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  16. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, R.P.L.; Bowes, E.; Green, G.J.; Marler, D.O.; Shihabi, D.S.; Socha, R.F.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes an improvement in a catalytic cracking process in which a hydrocarbon feed is cracked in a cracking zone in the absence of added hydrogen and in the presence of a circulating inventory of solid acidic cracking a catalyst which acquires a deposit of coke that contains chemically bound nitrogen while the cracking catalyst is in the cracking zone, the coke catalyst being circulated to t regeneration zone to convert the coke catalyst to a regenerated catalyst with the formation of a flue gas comprising nitrogen oxides: the improvement comprises incorporating into the circulating catalyst inventory an amount of additive particles comprising a synthetic porous crystalline material containing copper metal or cations, to reduce the content of nitrogen oxides in the flue gas.

  17. Method and apparatus for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reduction device

    DOEpatents

    Schmieg, Steven J; Viola, Michael B; Cheng, Shi-Wai S; Mulawa, Patricia A; Hilden, David L; Sloane, Thompson M; Lee, Jong H

    2014-05-06

    A method for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device of an exhaust aftertreatment system of an internal combustion engine operating lean of stoichiometry includes injecting a reductant into an exhaust gas feedstream upstream of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device at a predetermined mass flowrate of the reductant, and determining a space velocity associated with a predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device. When the space velocity exceeds a predetermined threshold space velocity, a temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is determined, and a threshold temperature as a function of the space velocity and the mass flowrate of the reductant is determined. If the temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is below the threshold temperature, operation of the engine is controlled to regenerate the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device.

  18. Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure by combusting the

  19. Evolution of random catalytic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, S.M.; Reidys, C.M. |

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of populations of sequences on a random catalytic network. Sequences are mapped into structures, between which are catalytic interactions that determine their instantaneous fitness. The catalytic network is constructed as a random directed graph. They prove that at certain parameter values, the probability of some relevant subgraphs of this graph, for example cycles without outgoing edges, is maximized. Populations evolving under point mutations realize a comparatively small induced subgraph of the complete catalytic network. They present results which show that populations reliably discover and persist on directed cycles in the catalytic graph, though these may be lost because of stochastic effects, and study the effect of population size on this behavior.

  20. Fundamental studies of catalytic gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1991-03-01

    Studies of the catalytic steam gasification of carbon solids continued. A considerable number of important findings have been made. Recently limited experimentation has been carried out on the production of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons from methane in the presence of Ca/K/Ni oxide catalysts and of oxygen, carbon and water. The main finding thus far has been that C{sub 2} yields of 10--13% can be obtained at about 600{degrees}C or 150{degrees} lower temperature than described in the literature for similar yields. Yields of 7--10% C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at 99+% selectivity have been obtained. The presence of water and small amounts of oxygen is essential. Yields of this magnitude may be attractive since there is no loss of methane to valueless by-products, no purification of the recycle steam is required and no oxygen is used to burn methane. Further improvement in yields by catalyst and operating conditions modification will be investigated. It is also intended to clarify the chemistry which inhibits burning of methane to carbon oxides. Work is discussed on gasification of petroleum cokes and oxidative methane coupling. 8 figs., 2 tabs.