Science.gov

Sample records for catalytic reaction studies

  1. Model studies of heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation reactions with gold.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ming; Brush, Adrian J; Pozun, Zachary D; Ham, Hyung Chul; Yu, Wen-Yueh; Henkelman, Graeme; Hwang, Gyeong S; Mullins, C Buddie

    2013-06-21

    Supported gold nanoparticles have recently been shown to possess intriguing catalytic activity for hydrogenation reactions, particularly for selective hydrogenation reactions. However, fundamental studies that can provide insight into the reaction mechanisms responsible for this activity have been largely lacking. In this tutorial review, we highlight several recent model experiments and theoretical calculations on a well-structured gold surface that provide some insights. In addition to the behavior of hydrogen on a model gold surface, we review the reactivity of hydrogen on a model gold surface in regards to NO2 reduction, chemoselective C=O bond hydrogenation, ether formation, and O-H bond dissociation in water and alcohols. Those studies indicate that atomic hydrogen has a weak interaction with gold surfaces which likely plays a key role in the unique hydrogenative chemistry of classical gold catalysts.

  2. Catalytic reactions of titanium alkoxides with Grignard reagents and imines: a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Akshai; Samuelson, Ashoka G

    2010-08-02

    The reactivity of Grignard reagents towards imines in the presence of catalytic and stoichiometric amounts of titanium alkoxides is reported. Alkylation, reduction, and coupling of imines take place. Whereas reductive coupling is the major reaction in stoichiometric reactions, alkylation is favored in catalytic reactions. Mechanistic studies clearly indicate that intermediates involved in the two reactions are different. Catalytic reactions involve a metal-alkyl complex. This has been confirmed by reactions of deuterium-labeled substrates and different alkylating agents. Under the stoichiometric conditions, however, titanium olefin complexes are formed through reductive elimination, probably through a multinuclear intermediate.

  3. Study of the kinetics and mechanism of heterogeneous catalytic reactions by the relaxation method

    SciTech Connect

    Bal`zhinimaev, B.S.; Pinaeva, L.G.

    1995-01-01

    The main results of studying reaction mechanisms by relaxation methods are presented for SO{sub 2} oxidation, o-xylene oxidation, and ethylene epoxidation. It is shown that reaction mechanisms can be efficiently investigated, and qualitative correlations between the characteristics of catalytic activity and the composition and structure of the adsorption layer can be found by combining kinetic methods with physical methods.

  4. Oscillatory three-phase flow reactor for studies of bi-phasic catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Abolhasani, Milad; Bruno, Nicholas C; Jensen, Klavs F

    2015-05-28

    A multi-phase flow strategy, based on oscillatory motion of a bi-phasic slug within a fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tubular reactor, under inert atmosphere, is designed and developed to address mixing and mass transfer limitations associated with continuous slug flow chemistry platforms for studies of bi-phasic catalytic reactions. The technique is exemplified with C-C and C-N Pd catalyzed coupling reactions.

  5. Kinetic and Spectroscopic Studies of Heterogeneous Catalytic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Todd E.

    1990-01-01

    The selective oxidation of ethylene was studied on a high surface area colloidal silver catalyst. In 0.1 to 1 torr of 20% ethylene in oxygen, the catalyst produced ethylene oxide with a selectivity of 20 to 30% at temperatures between 473 and 573 K. Surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectra exhibited a distinct feature at 995 cm^ {-1}. This band was also observed for catalysts exposed to just oxygen, and it shifted to 980 cm^{-1} after heating the catalyst to 873 K in ^{18} O_2. No isotopic shift was observed with ^{18}O _2 at temperatures below 573 K. Similar spectral results were obtained at atmospheric pressure. For silver catalysts that contain adsorbed chlorine, SER bands were observed at 240, 1015, and 1045 cm^ {-1} in oxygen-containing atmospheres; the 995 cm^{-1} band was not evident. The extension of SERS to other metals that do not exhibit the surface-enhanced effect was examined by electrodepositing thin layers (2 to 3 monolayers) of platinum, rhodium, and ruthenium on a roughened gold substrate. At atmospheric pressure and temperatures between 298 and 473 K, metal-oxygen features were observed at 500 cm ^{-1}, and 490 and 600 cm ^{-1} in SER spectra of rhodium and ruthenium surfaces exposed to oxygen, respectively. Bands attributed to adsorbed carbon monoxide were observed in SER spectra of platinum (470, 2060, 390, and 1890 cm ^{-1}) and rhodium (465 and 2040 cm^{-1}) surfaces exposed to carbon monoxide and oxygen mixtures. The temporal replacement of adsorbed carbon monoxide by nitric oxide as well as temperature-induced changes in the surface composition were studied on a seconds timescale with a spectrograph -charge coupled device detector arrangement. The adsorption and oxidation of sulfur dioxide was also studied. A band assigned to the S-O stretch of molecularly adsorbed sulfur dioxide was observed at 1130 cm^{-1} on unmodified gold and platinum-coated gold surfaces exposed to sulfur dioxide at 298 K. Dissociative chemisorption of sulfur dioxide on

  6. Scanning electrochemical microscopy #54. Application to the study of heterogeneous catalytic reactions-hydrogen peroxide decomposition.

    PubMed

    Fernández, José L; Hurth, Cedric; Bard, Allen J

    2005-05-19

    A scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) approach for the analysis of heterogeneous catalytic reactions at solid-liquid interfaces is described and applied. In this scheme, reactant, generated at a tip, undergoes a reaction (e.g., disproportionation) at the substrate. The theoretical background for this study, performed by digital simulations using a finite difference method, considers a chemical reaction at the substrate with general stoichiometry. In this case, the fraction of regenerated mediator (nu(S)) may differ with respect to a substrate reaction that is the reverse of the tip reaction, resulting in an asymmetric mediator loop. Simulated tip current transients and approach curves at different values of the kinetic rate constant for reactions where nu(S) < 1 were used to analyze this new SECM situation. This approach was used to study the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (HO2- --> 1/2O2 + OH-), where nu(S) = 0.5, on supported catalysts. A gold-mercury amalgam tip was used to quantitatively reduce dissolved O2 (mediator) to HO2-, which was decomposed back to oxygen at the catalyst substrate. Rate constants for the decomposition reaction on immobilized catalase and Pt particles were measured at different pH values by the correlation of experimental approach curves with the theoretical dependencies.

  7. An experimental study of catalytic and non-catalytic reaction in heat recirculating reactors and applications to power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jeongmin

    An experimental study of the performance of a Swiss roll heat exchanger and reactor was conducted, with emphasis on the extinction limits and comparison of results with and without Pt catalyst. At Re<40, the catalyst was required to sustain reaction; with the catalyst self-sustaining reaction could be obtained at Re less than 1. Both lean and rich extinction limits were extended with the catalyst, though rich limits were extended much further. At low Re, the lean extinction limit was rich of stoichiometric and rich limit had equivalence ratios 80 in some cases. Non-catalytic reaction generally occurred in a flameless mode near the center of the reactor. With or without catalyst, for sufficiently robust conditions, a visible flame would propagate out of the center, but this flame could only be re-centered with catalyst. Gas chromatography indicated that at low Re, CO and non-C3 H8 hydrocarbons did not form. For higher Re, catalytic limits were slightly broader but had much lower limit temperatures. At sufficiently high Re, catalytic and gas-phase limits merged. Experiments with titanium Swiss rolls have demonstrated reducing wall thermal conductivity and thickness leads to lower heat losses and therefore increases operating temperatures and extends flammability limits. By use of Pt catalysts, reaction of propane-air mixtures at temperatures 54°C was sustained. Such low temperatures suggest that polymers may be employed as a reactor material. A polyimide reactor was built and survived prolonged testing at temperatures up to 500°C. Polymer reactors may prove more practical for microscale devices due to their lower thermal conductivity and ease of manufacturing. Since the ultimate goal of current efforts is to develop combustion driven power generation devices at MEMS like scales, a thermally self-sustaining miniature power generation device was developed utilizing a single-chamber solid-oxide-fuel-cell (SOFC) placed in a Swiss roll. With the single-chamber design

  8. Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Diesel Carbon Soot Combustion under Simulated Catalytic-Reaction Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohsuke; Watanabe, Keitaro; Sato, Takeshi; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2015-05-18

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) is used to monitor the catalytic combustion of diesel carbon soot upon exposure to molecular oxygen at elevated temperatures by using a gas-injection specimen heating holder. The reaction conditions simulated in the ETEM experiments reconstruct real conditions effectively. This study demonstrated for the first time that soot combustion occurs at the soot-catalyst interface for both Ag/CeO2 and Cu/BaO/La2 O3 catalysts.

  9. Predicting gold-mediated catalytic oxidative-coupling reactions from single crystal studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2014-03-18

    Though metallic gold is chemically inert under ambient conditions, its surface is extremely reactive and selective for many key oxidative chemical transformations when activated by atomic oxygen. A molecular-level understanding of the mechanism of these processes could allow researchers to design "green" catalytic processes mediated by gold-based materials. This Account focuses on the mechanistic framework for oxidative-coupling reactions established by fundamental studies on oxygen-activated Au(111) and the application of these principles to steady-state catalytic conditions. We also discuss the importance of the paradigms discovered both for predicting new oxidative-coupling reactions and for understanding existing literature. The mechanistic framework for the oxidative coupling of alcohols on gold surfaces predicts that new oxidative-coupling reactions should occur between amines and aldehydes and amines and alcohols as well as through alcohol carbonylation. Adsorbed atomic oxygen on the gold surface facilitates the activation of the substrates, and nucleophilic attack and β-H elimination are the two fundamental reactions that propagate the versatile chemistry that ensues. In the self-coupling of primary alcohols, adsorbed atomic oxygen first activates the O-H bond in the hydroxyl group at ∼150 K, which forms the corresponding adsorbed alkoxy groups. The rate-limiting step of the self-coupling reaction is the β-H elimination reaction of alkoxy groups to form the corresponding aldehydes and occurs with an activation barrier of approximately 12 kcal/mol. The remaining alkoxy groups nucleophilically attack the electron-deficient aldehyde carbonyl carbon to yield the adsorbed "hemiacetal". This intermediate undergoes facile β-H elimination to produce the final coupling products, esters with twice the number of carbon atoms as the starting alcohols. This mechanistic insight suggests that cross-coupling occurs between alcohols and aldehydes, based on the logic

  10. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  11. Study of Catalytic Reaction at Electrode-Electrolyte Interfaces by a CV-XAFS Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusano, Shogo; Matsumura, Daiju; Asazawa, Koichiro; Kishi, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Tomokazu; Yamaguchi, Susumu; Tanaka, Hirohisa; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro

    2017-06-01

    A method combining cyclic voltammetry (CV) with x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, viz. CV-XAFS, has been developed to enable in situ real-time investigation of atomic and electronic structures related to electrochemical reactions. We use this method to study the reaction of a Pt/C cathode catalyst in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an alkaline electrolyte, using x-ray energies near the Pt LIII edge for XAFS measurements. It was found that the current induced by the ORR was first observed at approximately 0.08 V versus Hg/HgO, although the Pt valence, which is reflected in the oxidation states, remained almost unchanged. The electronic structure of the catalytic surface in the ORR was observed to be different in the negative and positive scan directions of CV measurements. Hydrogen adsorption is also discussed on the basis of the observation of this spectral change. We have demonstrated that CV-XAFS provides dynamical structural and electronic information related to electrochemical reactions and can be used for in situ real-time measurements of a catalyst.

  12. Study of Catalytic Reaction at Electrode-Electrolyte Interfaces by a CV-XAFS Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusano, Shogo; Matsumura, Daiju; Asazawa, Koichiro; Kishi, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Tomokazu; Yamaguchi, Susumu; Tanaka, Hirohisa; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro

    2017-01-01

    A method combining cyclic voltammetry (CV) with x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, viz. CV-XAFS, has been developed to enable in situ real-time investigation of atomic and electronic structures related to electrochemical reactions. We use this method to study the reaction of a Pt/C cathode catalyst in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an alkaline electrolyte, using x-ray energies near the Pt LIII edge for XAFS measurements. It was found that the current induced by the ORR was first observed at approximately 0.08 V versus Hg/HgO, although the Pt valence, which is reflected in the oxidation states, remained almost unchanged. The electronic structure of the catalytic surface in the ORR was observed to be different in the negative and positive scan directions of CV measurements. Hydrogen adsorption is also discussed on the basis of the observation of this spectral change. We have demonstrated that CV-XAFS provides dynamical structural and electronic information related to electrochemical reactions and can be used for in situ real-time measurements of a catalyst.

  13. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System

    PubMed Central

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-01

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi’s azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  14. Adsorbate structures and catalytic reactions studied in the torrpressure range by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Kevin Shao-Lin

    2003-01-01

    High-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (HPHTSTM) was used to study adsorbate structures and reactions on single crystal model catalytic systems. Studies of the automobile catalytic converter reaction [CO + NO → 1/2 N2 + CO2] on Rh(111) and ethylene hydrogenation [C2H4 + H2 → C2H6] on Rh(111) and Pt(111) elucidated information on adsorbate structures in equilibrium with high-pressure gas and the relationship of atomic and molecular mobility to chemistry. STM studies of NO on Rh(111) showed that adsorbed NO forms two high-pressure structures, with the phase transformation from the (2 x 2) structure to the (3 x 3) structure occurring at 0.03 Torr. The (3 x 3) structure only exists when the surface is in equilibrium with the gas phase. The heat of adsorption of this new structure was determined by measuring the pressures and temperatures at which both (2 x 2) and (3 x 3) structures coexisted. The energy barrier between the two structures was calculated by observing the time necessary for the phase transformation to take place. High-pressure STM studies of the coadsorption of CO and NO on Rh(111) showed that CO and NO form a mixed (2 x 2) structure at low NO partial pressures. By comparing surface and gas compositions, the adsorption energy difference between topsite CO and NO was calculated. Occasionally there is exchange between top-site CO and NO, for which we have described a mechanism for. At high NO partial pressures, NO segregates into islands, where the phase transformation to the (3 x 3) structure occurs. The reaction of CO and NO on Rh(111) was monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) and HPHTSTM. From MS studies the apparent activation energy of the catalytic converter reaction was calculated and compared to theory. STM showed that under high-temperature reaction conditions, surface metal atoms become mobile. Ethylene hydrogenation and its poisoning by CO was

  15. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  16. DFT study of the 1-octene metathesis reaction mechanism with WCl6/C catalytic system.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Dilek; Düz, Bülent; Sevin, Fatma

    2008-05-22

    A catalytic system consisting of tungsten carbene generated from WCl(6) and an atomic carbon is investigated theoretically for the metathesis of 1-octene at B3LYP/extended LANL2DZ level of DFT. The ground-state geometries and charge distributions of the structures belonging to the reaction mechanism are located. Energetics for the complete set of reactions, involving the formation of the tungsten carbene precatalyst, Cl(4)WCCl(2), the formation of tungsten methylidene and tungsten heptylidene with this precatalyst, and finally productive and degenerative metathesis steps with these alkylidene species are calculated in terms of total electronic energy and thermal energies. The free-energy (ΔG(298)) surfaces of the structures involved in the related reactions are constructed. In addition, solvent effects on the single point energies of the structures are investigated for two different solvents, namely, cyclohexane and chloroform. The results indicate that the formation of the catalytically active heptylidene is energetically favored in comparison to the formation of methylidene, while the degenerative and productive metathesis steps are competitive. In the catalytic cycle, the formation of ethylene is exothermic, while the formation of 7-tetradecene is endothermic. As expected, solvent effects on the metathesis reactions are minor and solvation does not cause any change in the directions of the overall metathesis reactions.

  17. A Pt-cluster-based heterogeneous catalyst for homogeneous catalytic reactions: X-ray absorption spectroscopy and reaction kinetic studies of their activity and stability against leaching.

    PubMed

    Li, Yimin; Liu, Jack Hung-Chang; Witham, Cole A; Huang, Wenyu; Marcus, Matthew A; Fakra, Sirine C; Alayoglu, Pinar; Zhu, Zhongwei; Thompson, Christopher M; Arjun, Arpana; Lee, Kihong; Gross, Elad; Toste, F Dean; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2011-08-31

    The design and development of metal-cluster-based heterogeneous catalysts with high activity, selectivity, and stability under solution-phase reaction conditions will enable their applications as recyclable catalysts in large-scale fine chemicals production. To achieve these required catalytic properties, a heterogeneous catalyst must contain specific catalytically active species in high concentration, and the active species must be stabilized on a solid catalyst support under solution-phase reaction conditions. These requirements pose a great challenge for catalysis research to design metal-cluster-based catalysts for solution-phase catalytic processes. Here, we focus on a silica-supported, polymer-encapsulated Pt catalyst for an electrophilic hydroalkoxylation reaction in toluene, which exhibits superior selectivity and stability against leaching under mild reaction conditions. We unveil the key factors leading to the observed superior catalytic performance by combining X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and reaction kinetic studies. On the basis of the mechanistic understandings obtained in this work, we also provide useful guidelines for designing metal-cluster-based catalyst for a broader range of reactions in the solution phase.

  18. Advanced Solution Methods for Microkinetic Models of Catalytic Reactions: A Methanol Synthesis Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rubert-Nason, Patricia; Mavrikakis, Manos; Maravelias, Christos T.; Grabow, Lars C.; Biegler, Lorenz T.

    2014-04-01

    Microkinetic models, combined with experimentally measured reaction rates and orders, play a key role in elucidating detailed reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysis and have typically been solved as systems of ordinary differential equations. In this work, we demonstrate a new approach to fitting those models to experimental data. For the specific example treated here, by reformulating a typical microkinetic model for a continuous stirred tank reactor to a system of nonlinear equations, we achieved a 1000-fold increase in solution speed. The reduced computational cost allows a more systematic search of the parameter space, leading to better fits to the available experimental data. We applied this approach to the problem of methanol synthesis by CO/CO2 hydrogenation over a supported-Cu catalyst, an important catalytic reaction with a large industrial interest and potential for large-scale CO2 chemical fixation.

  19. The effect of subsurface layer on the phase diagram of CO-O 2 catalytic reaction: a computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, K. M.; Yaldram, K.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of the subsurface layer in monomer-dimer surface catalytic reaction is studied by computer simulation. This reaction system has been studied on the surface and subsurface of a body-centred cubic structure, which extends to only two layers in the z-direction. The presence of a subsurface adds several extra reaction steps to the usual three in the ZGB model. It is shown that under certain conditions, the usual second-order phase transition of the ZGB model can be eliminated, and the reactive window width can be increased. This situation is close to the experimental situation.

  20. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-10-26

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi's azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.

  1. Mechanisms and Kinetics of Catalytic Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    CHEMICAL RESEARCH, r- DEVELOPMENT 5 N ENGINEERING CRDE-R-084 "" CENTER CENER(GC-TR-1728-008) ’ 04 N MECHANISMS AND KINETICS OF CATALYTIC REACTIONS Q...and Kinetics of Catalytic Reactions &AUTHOR(S) Garlick, Stephanie M. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS(ES) . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Tables........................87 vi MECHANISMS AND KINETICS OF CATALYTIC REACTIONS 1. INTRODUCTION The hydrolysis of phosphate esters in microemulsion

  2. Scanning mass spectrometer for quantitative reaction studies on catalytically active microstructures.

    PubMed

    Roos, M; Kielbassa, S; Schirling, C; Häring, T; Bansmann, J; Behm, R J

    2007-08-01

    We describe an apparatus for spatially resolving scanning mass spectrometry which is able to measure the gas composition above catalytically active microstructures or arrays of these microstructures with a lateral resolution of better than 100 mum under reaction conditions and which allows us to quantitatively determine reaction rates on individual microstructures. Measurements of the three-dimensional gas composition at different vertical distances and separations between active structures allow the evaluation of gas phase mass transport effects. The system is based on a piezoelectrically driven positioning substage for controlled lateral and vertical positioning of the sample under a rigidly mounted capillary probe connecting to a mass spectrometer. Measurements can be performed at pressures in the range of <10(-2)-10 mbars and temperatures between room temperature and 450 degrees C. The performance of the setup is demonstrated using the CO oxidation reaction on Pt microstructures on Si with sizes between 100 and 300 mum and distances in the same order of magnitude, evaluating CO(2) formation and CO consumption above the microstructures. The rapidly decaying lateral resolution with increasing distance between sample and probe underlines the effects of (lateral) gas transport in the room between sample and probe. The reaction rates and apparent activation energy obtained from such measurements agree with previous data on extended surfaces, demonstrating the feasibility of determining absolute reaction rates on individual microstructures.

  3. Scanning mass spectrometer for quantitative reaction studies on catalytically active microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, M.; Kielbassa, S.; Schirling, C.; Haering, T.; Bansmann, J.; Behm, R. J.

    2007-08-15

    We describe an apparatus for spatially resolving scanning mass spectrometry which is able to measure the gas composition above catalytically active microstructures or arrays of these microstructures with a lateral resolution of better than 100 {mu}m under reaction conditions and which allows us to quantitatively determine reaction rates on individual microstructures. Measurements of the three-dimensional gas composition at different vertical distances and separations between active structures allow the evaluation of gas phase mass transport effects. The system is based on a piezoelectrically driven positioning substage for controlled lateral and vertical positioning of the sample under a rigidly mounted capillary probe connecting to a mass spectrometer. Measurements can be performed at pressures in the range of <10{sup -2}-10 mbars and temperatures between room temperature and 450 deg. C. The performance of the setup is demonstrated using the CO oxidation reaction on Pt microstructures on Si with sizes between 100 and 300 {mu}m and distances in the same order of magnitude, evaluating CO{sub 2} formation and CO consumption above the microstructures. The rapidly decaying lateral resolution with increasing distance between sample and probe underlines the effects of (lateral) gas transport in the room between sample and probe. The reaction rates and apparent activation energy obtained from such measurements agree with previous data on extended surfaces, demonstrating the feasibility of determining absolute reaction rates on individual microstructures.

  4. Molecular studies of model surfaces of metals from single crystals to nanoparticles under catalytic reaction conditions. Evolution from prenatal and postmortem studies of catalysts.

    PubMed

    Somorjai, Gabor A; Aliaga, Cesar

    2010-11-02

    Molecular level studies of metal crystal and nanoparticle surfaces under catalytic reaction conditions at ambient pressures during turnover were made possible by the use of instruments developed at the University of California at Berkeley. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFGVS), owing to its surface specificity and sensitivity, is able to identify the vibrational features of adsorbed monolayers of molecules. We identified reaction intermediates, different from reactants and products, under reaction conditions and for multipath reactions on metal single crystals and nanoparticles of varying size and shape. The high-pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HP-STM) revealed the dynamics of a catalytically active metallic surface by detecting the mobility of the adsorbed species during catalytic turnover. It also demonstrated the reversible and adsorbate-driven surface restructuring of platinum when exposed to molecules such as CO and ethylene. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) detected the reversible changes of surface composition in rhodium-palladium, platinum-palladium, and other bimetallic nanoparticles as the reactant atmosphere changed from oxidizing to reducing. It was found that metal nanoparticles of less than 2 nm in size are present in higher oxidation states, which alters and enhances their catalytic activity. The catalytic nanodiode (CND) confirmed that a catalytic reaction-induced current flow exists at oxide-metal interfaces, which correlates well with the reaction turnover.

  5. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Zhiqi

    2016-01-01

    This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines. PMID:28144327

  6. Study of liquid-solid catalytic reaction of epichlorohydrin with sodium butyrate in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiang; Meng, Qingyi; Ban, Chunlan; Zhang, Rui; Gao, Yingyu

    2016-08-01

    The liquid-solid catalytic reaction of epichlorohydrin and sodium butyrate with tetrabutylammonium bromide as a phase transfer catalyst was studied in this paper. The shrinking core model was applied. The analysis of the reaction based on the kinetic model showed a reaction-controlled regime at temperatures varying from 90 to 100°C. The exterior diffusivity was removed between 300 and 400 rpm. The internal diffusivity was removed when the particle size was 2 × 10-4 m. Reaction rate constants were calculated at different temperatures. The correlation was obtained when the proposed kinetic model was applied to all the experimental data for predictive evaluations and the activation energy was 37.01 kJ mol-1.

  7. Study on Reaction Products in Plasma-Assisted Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Hayato; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi; Uchida, Satoshi; Watanabe, Tsuneo

    Since the gas discharge plasma easily converts NO to NO2, which can be reduced more actively in selective catalytic reduction with hydrocarbons (HC-SCR), the plasma-assisted HC-SCR is an effective method for NOx reduction from diesel engine exhaust gases. In this work, the relation between NOx removal and reaction products is investigated in plasma-assisted HC-SCR in simulated flue gas as parameters of gas composition, plasma specific energy and catalyst temperature. C2H4 is used as a hydrocarbon and commercially available Al2O3 is used as a catalyst. After the plasma treatment of simulated flue gas, HCHO and HCOOH were generated as by-products, while NO was effectively converted to NO2. These by-products were confirmed to be reactive at lower catalyst temperature than C2H4 in HC-SCR. The relation between NOx removal and reaction products suggests that HCHO and HCOOH contribute the effective NOx reduction at low catalyst temperature in plasma-assisted HC-SCR.

  8. Catalytic Radical Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sebren, Leanne J; Devery, James J; Stephenson, Corey R J

    2014-02-07

    Catalytic radical-based domino reactions represent important advances in synthetic organic chemistry. Their development benefits synthesis by providing atom- and step-economical methods to complex molecules. Intricate combinations of radical, cationic, anionic, oxidative/reductive, and transition metal mechanistic steps result in cyclizations, additions, fragmentations, ring-expansions, and rearrangements. This Perspective summarizes recent developments in the field of catalytic domino processes.

  9. Catalytic gasification: Isotopic labeling and transient reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Saber, J.M.; Falconer, J.L.; Brown, L.F.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature-programmed reaction was used with labeled isotopes (/sup 13/C and /sup 18/O) to study interactions between carbon black and potassium carbonate in pure He and 10% CO/sub 2//90% He atmospheres. Catalytic gasification precursor complexes were observed. Carbon and oxygen-bearing carbon surface groups interacted with the carbonate above 500 K to form surface complexes. Between 500 K and 950 K, and in the presence of gaseous carbon dioxide, the complexes promoted carbon and oxygen exchange between the gas-phase CO/sub 2/ and the surface. Oxygen exchanged between the surface complexes; but carbon did not exchange between the carbonate and the carbon black. As the temperature rose, the complexes decomposed to produce carbon dioxide, and catalytic gasification then began. Elemental potassium formed, and the active catalyst appears to alternate between potassium metal and a potassium-oxygen-carbon complex.

  10. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    DOEpatents

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  11. Preparative and Mechanistic Studies Toward the Rational Development of Catalytic, Enantioselective Selenoetherification Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E.; Kalyani, Dipannita; Collins, William R.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic investigation into the Lewis base catalyzed, asymmetric, intramolecular selenoetherification of olefins is described. A critical challenge for the development of this process was the identification and suppression of racemization pathways available to arylseleniranium ion intermediates. Toward this end, this report details a thorough study of the influences of the steric and electronic modulation of the arylselenenyl group on the configurational stability of enantioenriched seleniranium ions. These studies show that the 2-nitrophenyl group attached to the selenium atom significantly attenuates the racemization of seleniranium ions. A variety of achiral Lewis bases catalyze the intramolecular selenoetherification of alkenes using N-(2-nitrophenylselenenyl)succinimide as the electrophile along with a Brønsted acid. Preliminary mechanistic studies suggest the intermediacy of ionic Lewis base-selenium(II) adducts. Most importantly, a broad survey of chiral Lewis bases revealed that BINAM derived thiophosphoramides catalyze the cyclization of unsaturated alcohols in the presence of N-(2-nitrophenylselenenylsuccinimide and methanesulfonic acid. A variety of cyclic seleno ethers were produced in good chemical yields and in moderate to good enantioselectivities which constitutes the first, catalytic, enantioselective selenofunctionalization of unactivated olefins. PMID:20961070

  12. The Direct Catalytic Asymmetric Aldol Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Brindle, Cheyenne S.

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric aldol reactions are a powerful method for the construction of carbon-carbon bonds in an enantioselective fashion. Historically this reaction has been performed in a stoichiometric fashion to control the various aspects of chemo-, diastereo-, regio- and enantioselectivity, however, a more atom economical approach would unite high selectivity with the use of only a catalytic amount of a chiral promoter. This critical review documents the development of direct catalytic asymmetric aldol methodologies, including organocatalytic and metal-based strategies. New methods have improved the reactivity, selectivity and substrate scope of the direct aldol reaction and enabled the synthesis of complex molecular targets PMID:20419212

  13. The Synthesis, Characterization and Catalytic Reaction Studies of Monodisperse Platinum Nanoparticles in Mesoporous Oxide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rioux, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    A catalyst design program was implemented in which Pt nanoparticles, either of monodisperse size and/or shape were synthesized, characterized and studied in a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions. The novel preparation of these materials enables exquisite control over their physical and chemical properties that could be controlled (and therefore rationally tuned) during synthesis. The ability to synthesize rather than prepare catalysts followed by thorough characterization enable accurate structure-function relationships to be elucidated. This thesis emphasizes all three aspects of catalyst design: synthesis, characterization and reactivity studies. The precise control of metal nanoparticle size, surface structure and composition may enable the development of highly active and selective heterogeneous catalysts.

  14. A study on the reaction characteristics of vanadium-impregnated natural manganese oxide in ammonia selective catalytic reduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Su; Lee, Sang Moon; Park, Kwang Hee; Kwon, Dong Wook; Hong, Sung Chang

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of adding vanadium (V) to natural manganese oxide (NMO) in ammonia (NH3) selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The addition of V to NMO decreased the catalytic activity at low temperatures by blocking the active site. However, the enhancement of catalytic activity was achieved by controlling NH3 oxidation at high temperatures. From the NH3 temperature programmed desorption and oxygen on/off test, it was confirmed that the amount of Lewis acid site and active lattice oxygen of the catalyst affects the catalytic performance at low temperature.

  15. Electric Field-Enhanced Catalytic Conversion of Methane: AN Experimental Study on the Effects of Corona Discharge on Methane Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafee, Abdulathim M. J.

    The oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) is currently being actively studied for the production of higher hydrocarbons from natural gas. The present study concentrates on the oxidative conversion of methane in a high-pressure (one atmosphere), nonthermal plasma formed by corona discharge. Here, methyl radicals are formed by the reaction of methane with negatively-charged oxygen species created in the corona discharge. The results of methane conversion in the presence of both AC and DC corona discharges revealed that ethane and ethylene product selectivity is affected by electrode polarity, frequency, and oxygen partial pressure in the feed. Higher C_2 yields were obtained with the AC corona. All of the AC corona discharges specified here were initiated at room temperature (i.e., no oven or other heat source used), with temperature increases from 300 to 500^circC due to the exothermic gas discharge and exothermic reaction. A reaction mechanism is presented to explain the observed phenomena. The results suggest that AC and/or DC gas discharge techniques should be further studied for improved economics of methane conversion. The oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane in DC corona discharges was investigated. The atomic oxygen radicals initiated by corona discharges are thought to be active for the OXD of ethane. The selectivity to ethylene is affected by the reaction temperature, the DC applied voltage, voltage polarity, and the C_2H _6/O_2 ratio. The results of this study suggest the corona discharge process to be very efficient and selective in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane. The effects of DC corona discharge were examined in the presence of a typical OCM catalyst, Sr/La _2O_3. Experimental investigations have correspondingly been conducted, in which all reactive gases passed through a catalyst bed situated within the corona-induced plasma zone. The methane conversion and C_2 yield increased (with O_2 partial pressure) during the corona-enhanced catalytic

  16. 2-methylpentane catalytic reactions on Pt(3%wt)-HNaβ-zeolite. Kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siffert, S.; Garin, F.

    1998-03-01

    The system Pt(2.9 wt%)-HNaβ zeolite is an interesting catalyst for hydrocarbon reforming. Kinetic studies of 2-methylpentane reaction on this catalyst were performed. Apparent activation energies and reaction orders versus respectively temperature and partial pressures of hydrogen and hydrocarbon allowed us to explain the bifunctional behavior of this catalyst and to determine the respective function of the platinum and of the support. The reaction orders versus hydrocarbon do not vary with reaction temperature and are positive (+0.6± 0.1), but the reaction orders versus hydrogen increases when the temperature increases from 0.3 at 160°C to 0 at 200°C. There are two groups of apparent activation energy values differing by about 10 Kcal/mol. The superior values are obtained for higher partial pressures of hydrogen or hydrocarbon (25± 2 Kcal/mol) and the lower ones for lower partial pressures of hydrogen or hydrocarbon 16± 2 (Kcal/mol). The reaction process would be at the metal-support interface. The adsorption step of 2-methylpentane would be a reactive (associative) adsorption step followed by a dissociative step of dehydrogenation leading to the most abundant surface intermediate (MASI). This kinetic process explains the experimental values. Le système Pt(2,9 % en masse)-HNa zéolithe β est un catalyseur intéressant pour le reformage des hydrocarbures. Nous avons effectué des études cinétiques de la réaction du 2-méthylpentane sur ce catalyseur. Les énergies d'activation et les ordres de réaction en fonction respectivement de la température et des pressions partielles d'hydrogène et d'hydrocarbure nous ont permis d'expliquer le caractère bifonctionnel et de déterminer respectivement la fonction du métal et du support. Les ordres de réaction par rapport à l'hydrocarbure ne varient pas avec la température de réaction et sont positifs (+0.6± 0.1), mais les ordres de réaction par rapport à l'hydrogène augmentent quand la température cro

  17. Surface-subsurface model for a dimer-dimer catalytic reaction: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, K. M.; Albano, E. V.

    2002-02-01

    The surface-subsurface model for a dimer-dimer reaction of the type A2 + 2B2→2AB2 has been studied through Monte Carlo simulation via a model based on the lattice gas non-thermal Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, which involves the precursor motion of the B2 molecule. The motion of precursors is considered on the surface as well as in the subsurface. The most interesting feature of this model is that it yields a steady reactive window, which is separated by continuous and discontinuous irreversible phase transitions. The phase diagram is qualitatively similar to the well known Ziff, Gulari and Barshad (ZGB) model. The width of the window depends upon the mobility of precursors. The continuous transition disappears when the mobility of the surface precursors is extended to the third-nearest neighbourhood. The dependence of production rate on partial pressure of B2 dimer is predicted by simple mathematical equations in our model.

  18. Biodiesel Production from Citrillus colocynthis Oil using based Catalytic Reaction and Characterization Studies.

    PubMed

    Nehdi, Imededdine A; Sbihi, Hassen M; El Blidi, Lahssen; Rashid, Umer; Al-Resayes, Saud I

    2017-02-23

    In this investigation, an enzyme catalyzed process was optimized to prepare methyl esters from crude Citrullus colocynthis oil (CCO). Novozym 435 was used to synthesize biodiesel by transesterification of CCO with methanol. Use of tert-butanol as a reaction medium eliminated negative effects caused by excess methanol and formation of glycerol byproduct. Several variables affecting the Citrullus colocynthis methyl ester (CCME) yield including lipase quantity, water content, methanol/oil mole ratio, reaction temperature, reaction medium composition, and reaction time were optimized. A CCME yield of 97.8% was achieved using enzyme catalyzed transesterification of CCO under optimal conditions. CCME also exhibited long-term storage stability and fuel properties within biodiesel standards.

  19. Study of the dynamics of the MoO2-Mo2C system for catalytic partial oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuba Torres, Christian Martin

    On a global scale, the energy demand is largely supplied by the combustion of non-renewable fossil fuels. However, their rapid depletion coupled with environmental and sustainability concerns are the main drivers to seek for alternative energetic strategies. To this end, the sustainable generation of hydrogen from renewable resources such as biodiesel would represent an attractive alternative solution to fossil fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen's lower environmental impact and greater independence from foreign control make it a strong contender for solving this global problem. Among a wide variety of methods for hydrogen production, the catalytic partial oxidation offers numerous advantages for compact and mobile fuel processing systems. For this reaction, the present work explores the versatility of the Mo--O--C catalytic system under different synthesis methods and reforming conditions using methyl oleate as a surrogate biodiesel. MoO2 exhibits good catalytic activity and exhibits high coke-resistance even under reforming conditions where long-chain oxygenated compounds are prone to form coke. Moreover, the lattice oxygen present in MoO2 promotes the Mars-Van Krevelen mechanism. Also, it is introduced a novel beta-Mo2C synthesis by the in-situ formation method that does not utilize external H2 inputs. Herein, the MoO 2/Mo2C system maintains high catalytic activity for partial oxidation while the lattice oxygen serves as a carbon buffer for preventing coke formation. This unique feature allows for longer operation reforming times despite slightly lower catalytic activity compared to the catalysts prepared by the traditional temperature-programmed reaction method. Moreover, it is demonstrated by a pulse reaction technique that during the phase transformation of MoO2 to beta-Mo2C, the formation of Mo metal as an intermediate is not responsible for the sintering of the material wrongly assumed by the temperature-programmed method.

  20. Catalytic Upgrading of Biomass-Derived Compounds via C-C Coupling Reactions. Computational and Experimental Studies of Acetaldehyde and Furan Reactions in HZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cong; Evans, Tabitha J.; Cheng, Lei; Nimlos, Mark R.; Mukarakate, Calvin; Robichaud, David J.; Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2015-10-02

    These catalytic C–C coupling and deoxygenation reactions are essential for upgrading of biomass-derived oxygenates to fuel-range hydrocarbons. Detailed understanding of mechanistic and energetic aspects of these reactions is crucial to enabling and improving the catalytic upgrading of small oxygenates to useful chemicals and fuels. Using periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have investigated the reactions of furan and acetaldehyde in an HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, a representative system associated with the catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis vapors. Comprehensive energy profiles were computed for self-reactions (i.e., acetaldehyde coupling and furan coupling) and cross-reactions (i.e., acetaldehyde + furan) of this representative mixture. Major products proposed from the computations are further confirmed using temperature controlled mass spectra measurements. Moreover, the computational results show that furan interacts with acetaldehyde in HZSM-5 via an alkylation mechanism, which is more favorable than the self-reactions, indicating that mixing furans with aldehydes could be a promising approach to maximize effective C–C coupling and dehydration while reducing the catalyst deactivation (e.g., coke formation) from aldehyde condensation.

  1. Crystallographic and Catalytic Studies of the Peroxide-Shunt Reaction in a Diiron Hydroxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Lucas J.; Fox, Brian G.

    2009-10-23

    A diiron hydroxylase reaction typically begins by combination of O{sub 2} with a diferrous center to form reactive intermediates capable of hydrocarbon hydroxylation. In this natural cycle, reducing equivalents are provided by specific interactions with electron transfer proteins. The biological process can be bypassed by combining H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with a diferric center, i.e., peroxide-shunt catalysis. Here we show that toluene 4-monooxygenase has a peroxide-shunt reaction that is {approx}600-fold slower than catalysis driven by biological electron transfer. However, the toluene 4-monooxygenase hydroxylase-effector protein complex was stable in the presence of 300 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, suggesting overall benign effects of the exogenous oxidant on active site structure and function. The X-ray structure of the toluene 4-monooxygenase hydroxylase-effector protein complex determined from crystals soaked in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} revealed a bound diatomic molecule, assigned to a cis-{mu}-1,2-peroxo bridge. This peroxo species resides in an active site position adjacent to the hydrogen-bonding substructure established by effector protein binding and faces into the distal cavity where substrate must bind during regiospecific aromatic ring hydroxylation catalysis. These results provide a new structural benchmark for how activated intermediates may be formed and dispatched during diiron hydroxylase catalysis.

  2. Catalytic Conia-ene and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Hack, Daniel; Blümel, Marcus; Chauhan, Pankaj; Philipps, Arne R; Enders, Dieter

    2015-10-07

    Since its initial inception, the Conia-ene reaction, known as the intramolecular addition of enols to alkynes or alkenes, has experienced a tremendous development and appealing catalytic protocols have emerged. This review fathoms the underlying mechanistic principles rationalizing how substrate design, substrate activation, and the nature of the catalyst work hand in hand for the efficient synthesis of carbocycles and heterocycles at mild reaction conditions. Nowadays, Conia-ene reactions can be found as part of tandem reactions, and the road for asymmetric versions has already been paved. Based on their broad applicability, Conia-ene reactions have turned into a highly appreciated synthetic tool with impressive examples in natural product synthesis reported in recent years.

  3. Catalytic reaction processes revealed by scanning probe microscopy. [corrected].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Bao, Xinhe; Salmeron, Miquel

    2015-05-19

    at the atomic level. Then the dynamic processes, including surface reconstruction, roughening, sintering, and phase separation, studied by SPM will be discussed. Furthermore, SPM provides valuable insights toward identifying the active sites and understanding the reaction mechanisms. We also illustrate here how both ultrahigh vacuum STM and high pressure STM provide valuable information, expanding the understanding provided by traditional surface science. We conclude with highlighting remarkable recent progress in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS), and their impact on single-chemical-bond level characterization for catalytic reaction processes in the future.

  4. Reaction of Formic Acid over Amorphous Manganese Oxide Catalytic Systems: An In Situ Study

    SciTech Connect

    J Durand; S Senanayake; S Suib; D Mullins

    2011-12-31

    The interaction of formic acid with amorphous manganese oxide (AMO) is investigated using in situ photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy techniques. Soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and in situ FTIR illustrate two possible modes of formate bound species at the AMO surface. Two peaks in the IR region from 1340-1390 cm{sup -1} are indicative of formate species bound to the surface in a bidentate configuration. However, a 224 cm{sup -1} band gap between v{sub s}OCO and v{sub as}OCO suggests formate is bound in a bridging configuration. Temperature-programmed desorption studies confirm the formate bound species desorbs as carbon dioxide from the surface at multiple binding sites. At temperatures above 700 K, the presence of K{sup +} {hor_ellipsis} OC complex suggests the bound species interacts at vacant sites related to framework oxygen and cation mobility.

  5. Reaction of Formic Acid over Amorphous Manganese Oxide Catalytic Systems: An In Situ Study

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, Jason; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Mullins, David R; Suib, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of formic acid with amorphous manganese oxide (AMO) is investigated using in situ photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy techniques. Soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and in situ FTIR illustrate two possible modes of formate bound species at the AMO surface. Two peaks in the IR region from 1340-1390 cm{sup -1} are indicative of formate species bound to the surface in a bidentate configuration. However, a 224 cm{sup -1} band gap between v{sub s}OCO and v{sub as}OCO suggests formate is bound in a bridging configuration. Temperature-programmed desorption studies confirm the formate bound species desorbs as carbon dioxide from the surface at multiple binding sites. At temperatures above 700 K, the presence of K{sup +} {hor_ellipsis} OC complex suggests the bound species interacts at vacant sites related to framework oxygen and cation mobility.

  6. [Study on determination of trace nitrite and reaction mechanism by two-wavelength negative absorption-catalytic spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Zi, Yan-qin; Lu, Hao-miao

    2006-01-01

    A new method was proposed for the determination of trace nitrite by two wavelength negative absorption catalytic spectrophotometry based on the catalysis of nitrite on the oxidation fading reaction of acridine orange by potassium bromate in phosphoricacid medium. The additive value of negative absorbances at two wavelengths was linear to the nitrite concentration in the range of 1.0 x 10(-5)-5.0 x 10(-7) mol x L(1). The method has been used to the determination of nitrite in environment water sample with satisfactory

  7. Study of the Oxygen Evolution Reaction Catalytic Behavior of CoxNi1-xFe2O4 in Alkaline Medium.

    PubMed

    Maruthapandian, Viruthasalam; Mathankumar, Mahendran; Saraswathy, Velu; Subramanian, Balasubramanian; Muralidharan, Srinivasan

    2017-04-04

    Catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) play an important role in the conversion of solar energy to fuel of earth-abundant water into H2 and O2 through splitting/electrolysis. Heterogeneous electrocatalysts for hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions (HER and OER) exhibit catalytic activity that depends on the electronic properties, oxidation states, and local surface structure. Spinel ferrites (MFe2O4; M = Ni and Co) based materials have been attractive for the catalytic water oxidation due to their well-known stability in alkaline medium, easy synthesis, existence of metal cations with various oxidation states, low cost, and tunable properties by the desired metal substitution. To understand the better catalytic activity of MFe2O4 in detail the role of Ni and Co was studied through MxNi1-xFe2O4 (M = Co; 0 < x < 1), which was prepared by the sol-gel method. The results showed that bare NiFe2O4 has better catalytic activity (η = 381 mV at 10 mA cm(-2) and Tafel slope of 46.4 mV dec(-1)) compared to Co-containing MxNi1-xFe2O4 (η = 450-470 mV at 10 mA cm(-2) and Tafel slope of 50-73 mV dec(-1)) in alkaline medium, and the substitution of Co is found to suppress the catalytic activity of NiFe2O4. The degradation of catalytic activity with an increase in Co content was accounted for in further detailed investigations.

  8. The nature of hot electrons generated by exothermic catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedrygailov, Ievgen I.; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-02-01

    We review recent progress in studies of the nature of hot electrons generated in metal nanoparticles and thin films on oxide supports and their role in heterogeneous catalysis. We show that the creation of hot electrons and their transport across the metal-oxide interface is an inherent component of energy dissipation accompanying catalytic and photocatalytic surface reactions. The intensity of hot electron flow is well correlated with turnover rates of corresponding reactions. We also show that controlling the flow of hot electrons crossing the interface can lead to the control of chemical reaction rates. Finally, we discuss perspectives of hot-electron-mediated surface chemistry that promise the capability to drive catalytic reactions with enhanced efficiency and selectivity through electron-mediated, non-thermal processes.

  9. An Analytical Framework for Studying Small-Number Effects in Catalytic Reaction Networks: A Probability Generating Function Approach to Chemical Master Equations

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Masaki; Togashi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Cell activities primarily depend on chemical reactions, especially those mediated by enzymes, and this has led to these activities being modeled as catalytic reaction networks. Although deterministic ordinary differential equations of concentrations (rate equations) have been widely used for modeling purposes in the field of systems biology, it has been pointed out that these catalytic reaction networks may behave in a way that is qualitatively different from such deterministic representation when the number of molecules for certain chemical species in the system is small. Apart from this, representing these phenomena by simple binary (on/off) systems that omit the quantities would also not be feasible. As recent experiments have revealed the existence of rare chemical species in cells, the importance of being able to model potential small-number phenomena is being recognized. However, most preceding studies were based on numerical simulations, and theoretical frameworks to analyze these phenomena have not been sufficiently developed. Motivated by the small-number issue, this work aimed to develop an analytical framework for the chemical master equation describing the distributional behavior of catalytic reaction networks. For simplicity, we considered networks consisting of two-body catalytic reactions. We used the probability generating function method to obtain the steady-state solutions of the chemical master equation without specifying the parameters. We obtained the time evolution equations of the first- and second-order moments of concentrations, and the steady-state analytical solution of the chemical master equation under certain conditions. These results led to the rank conservation law, the connecting state to the winner-takes-all state, and analysis of 2-molecules M-species systems. A possible interpretation of the theoretical conclusion for actual biochemical pathways is also discussed. PMID:27047384

  10. An Analytical Framework for Studying Small-Number Effects in Catalytic Reaction Networks: A Probability Generating Function Approach to Chemical Master Equations.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaki; Togashi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Cell activities primarily depend on chemical reactions, especially those mediated by enzymes, and this has led to these activities being modeled as catalytic reaction networks. Although deterministic ordinary differential equations of concentrations (rate equations) have been widely used for modeling purposes in the field of systems biology, it has been pointed out that these catalytic reaction networks may behave in a way that is qualitatively different from such deterministic representation when the number of molecules for certain chemical species in the system is small. Apart from this, representing these phenomena by simple binary (on/off) systems that omit the quantities would also not be feasible. As recent experiments have revealed the existence of rare chemical species in cells, the importance of being able to model potential small-number phenomena is being recognized. However, most preceding studies were based on numerical simulations, and theoretical frameworks to analyze these phenomena have not been sufficiently developed. Motivated by the small-number issue, this work aimed to develop an analytical framework for the chemical master equation describing the distributional behavior of catalytic reaction networks. For simplicity, we considered networks consisting of two-body catalytic reactions. We used the probability generating function method to obtain the steady-state solutions of the chemical master equation without specifying the parameters. We obtained the time evolution equations of the first- and second-order moments of concentrations, and the steady-state analytical solution of the chemical master equation under certain conditions. These results led to the rank conservation law, the connecting state to the winner-takes-all state, and analysis of 2-molecules M-species systems. A possible interpretation of the theoretical conclusion for actual biochemical pathways is also discussed.

  11. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-04-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  12. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  13. The doping effect on the catalytic activity of graphene for oxygen evolution reaction in a lithium-air battery: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaodong; Wang, Beizhou; Zhu, Jinzhen; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2015-06-14

    A lithium-air battery as an energy storage technology can be used in electric vehicles due to its large energy density. However, its poor rate capability, low power density and large overpotential problems limit its practical usage. In this paper, the first-principles thermodynamic calculations were performed to study the catalytic activity of X-doped graphene (X = B, N, Al, Si, and P) materials as potential cathodes to enhance charge reactions in a lithium-air battery. Among these materials, P-doped graphene exhibits the highest catalytic activity in reducing the charge voltage by 0.25 V, while B-doped graphene has the highest catalytic activity in decreasing the oxygen evolution barrier by 0.12 eV. By combining these two catalytic effects, B,P-codoped graphene was demonstrated to have an enhanced catalytic activity in reducing the O2 evolution barrier by 0.70 eV and the charge voltage by 0.13 V. B-doped graphene interacts with Li2O2 by Li-sited adsorption in which the electron-withdrawing center can enhance charge transfer from Li2O2 to the substrate, facilitating reduction of O2 evolution barrier. In contrast, X-doped graphene (X = N, Al, Si, and P) prefers O-sited adsorption toward Li2O2, forming a X-O2(2-)···Li(+) interface structure between X-O2(2-) and the rich Li(+) layer. The active structure of X-O2(2-) can weaken the surrounding Li-O2 bonds and significantly reduce Li(+) desorption energy at the interface. Our investigation is helpful in developing a novel catalyst to enhance oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in Li-air batteries.

  14. Interface-confined oxide nanostructures for catalytic oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Yang, Fan; Bao, Xinhe

    2013-08-20

    review our recent progress on oxide-on-metal inverse catalysts, mainly the TMO-on-Pt (TM = Fe, Co, and Ni) systems and discuss the interface-confinement effect, an important factor in the behavior of these catalytic systems. We have studied both model catalyst systems and real supported nanocatalysts. Surface science studies and density functional theory calculations in model systems illustrate the importance of the oxide-metal interfaces in the creation and stabilization of surface active centers, and reveal the reaction mechanism at these active sites. In real catalysts, we describe facile preparation processes for fabricating the oxide-on-metal nanostructures. We have demonstrated excellent performance of the inverse catalysts in oxidation reactions such as CO oxidation. We believe that the interface confinement effect can be employed to design highly efficient novel catalysts and that the inverse oxide-on-metal catalysts may find wide applications in heterogeneous catalysis.

  15. Atmospheric pressure microwave assisted heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Chemat-Djenni, Zoubida; Hamada, Boudjema; Chemat, Farid

    2007-07-11

    The purpose of the study was to investigate microwave selective heating phenomena and their impact on heterogeneous chemical reactions. We also present a tool which will help microwave chemists to answer to such questions as "My reaction yields 90% after 7 days at reflux; is it possible to obtain the same yield after a few minutes under microwaves?" and to have an approximation of their reactions when conducted under microwaves with different heterogeneous procedures. This model predicting reaction kinetics and yields under microwave heating is based on the Arrhenius equation, in agreement with experimental data and procedures.

  16. Visible Light Mediated Photoredox Catalytic Arylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrajit; Marzo, Leyre; Das, Amrita; Shaikh, Rizwan; König, Burkhard

    2016-08-16

    anion of the organic dye perylenediimide is excited by a second photon allowing the one electron reduction of acceptor substituted aryl chlorides. The radical anion of the aryl halide fragments under the loss of a halide ion and the aryl radical undergoes C-H arylation with biologically important pyrrole derivatives or adds to a double bond. Rhodamine 6G as an organic photocatalyst allows an even higher degree of control of the reaction. The dye is photoreduced in the presence of an amine donor under irradiation with green light (e.g., 530 nm), yielding its radical anion, which is a mild reducing reagent. The hypsochromic shift of the absorption of the rhodamine 6G radical anion toward blue region of the visible light spectrum allows its selective excitation using blue light (e.g., 455 nm). The excited radical anion is highly reducing and able to activate even bromoanisole for C-H arylation reactions, although only in moderate yield. Photoredox catalytic C-H arylation reactions are valuable alternatives to metal catalyzed reactions. They have an excellent functional group tolerance, could potentially avoid metal containing catalysts, and use visible light as a traceless reagent for the activation of arylating reagents.

  17. Exploring the catalytic activity of pristine T6[100] surface for oxygen reduction reaction: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Paramita; Chakrabarty, Soubhik; Thapa, Ranjit; Das, G. P.

    2017-10-01

    The electrocatalytic activity of T6[100] surface containing both sp3 (C1) and sp2 (C2) hybridized carbon atoms is explored using first-principles density functional theory based approach. The top layered C1 atom of the surface is found to be more active towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), as compared to that of C2 atom. This is attributed to the presence of dangling σ bond in the corresponding C1 atom, leading to the high electron density near the Ferrmi level. Whereas, the π electron in the top layered C2 atom forms a weak out of plane network. As estimated from free energy profile, the overpotential is much lower when C1 is considered as the active site and the final step i.e desorption of final OH- ion is found to be the potential determining step. We have also reported the effect of Si dopant on the catalytic activity of T6[100] surface and explained the origin of high overpotential value in this case. Thus in this report, we propose a new metal-free catalyst i.e T6[100] surface, having both sp2 (maintains the high metallicity needed to reduce ohmic loss) and sp3 (helps in capturing the upcoming molecules) hybridized carbon atoms, as a potential candidate for ORR.

  18. [In situ diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy study of the selective catalytic reduction reaction of NO over Ag/SAPO-34 catalysis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Le-fu; Xu, Jian-chang

    2003-02-01

    An in situ diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) study of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with propene in the presence of excess O2 was carried out over Ag/SAPO-34 catalyst. The SCR reaction was investigated at temperatures from 573 to 773 K, and the role of oxygen in the NO reduction process was determined by comparing experiments using an initial reaction mixture containing oxygen and without oxygen. The results show that both NO and propene are easily activated in oxygen. Furthermore, the presence of oxygen is necessary to form organo-NOx adsorbed species. Based on these experiments, a reaction mechanism is proposed that NO, propene and oxygen react to form organo-nitro and organo-nitrito adsorbed species as key intermediates, and then these intermediates decompose to nitrogen.

  19. Influence of chlorine coordination number on the catalytic mechanism of ruthenium chloride catalysts in the acetylene hydrochlorination reaction: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Han, You; Sun, Mengxia; Li, Wei; Zhang, Jinli

    2015-03-28

    The catalytic mechanism of Ru-based catalysts in the acetylene hydrochlorination reaction has been investigated via the density functional theory (DFT) method. To study the effect of the chlorine coordination number on the catalytic mechanism, Ru3Cl9, Ru3Cl7, Ru5Cl7, Ru3Cl3 and Ru3 clusters were chosen as the catalytic models. Our results show that the energy barrier for acetylene hydrochlorination on Ru3Cl9 was as high as 1.51 eV at 458 K. When the chlorine coordination number decreased, the energy barriers on Ru3Cl7, Ru5Cl7, Ru3Cl3 and Ru3 were 1.29, 0.89, 1.01 and 1.42 eV, respectively. On Ru3Cl9, the H and Cl atoms of HCl were simultaneously added to C2H2 to form C2H3Cl, while the reaction was divided into two steps on Ru3Cl7, Ru3Cl3 and Ru3 clusters. The first step was the addition of H atom of HCl to C2H2 to form C2H3˙, and the second step was the addition of Cl atom to C2H3˙ to form C2H3Cl. The step involving the addition of Cl was the rate-controlling step during the whole reaction. On Ru5Cl7 cluster, there was an additional step before the steps involving the addition of H and Cl: the transfer of H atom from HCl to Ru atom. This step was the rate-controlling step during the reaction of acetylene hydrochlorination on Ru5Cl7 and its energy barrier was the lowest among all the above-mentioned catalytic models. Therefore, the Ru5Cl7 cluster played the most predominant role in acetylene hydrochlorination with the largest reaction rate constant kTST of 10(3).

  20. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical study of catalytic mechanism and role of key residues in methylation reactions catalyzed by dimethylxanthine methyltransferase in caffeine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yufei; Guo, Hong

    2014-02-24

    The caffeine biosynthetic pathway is of considerable importance for the beverage and pharmaceutical industries which produces two blockbuster products: theobromine and caffeine. The major biochemistry in caffeine biosynthesis starts from the initial substrate of xanthosine and ends with the final product caffeine, with theobromine serving as an intermediate. The key enzyme, S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) dependent 3,7-dimethyl-xanthine methyltransferase (DXMT), catalyzes two important methyl transfer steps in caffeine biosynthesis: (1) methylation of N3 of 7-methylxanthine (7mX) to form theobromine (Tb); (2) methylation of N1 of theobromine to form caffeine (Cf). Although DXMT has been structurally characterized recently, our understanding of the detailed catalytic mechanism and role of key catalytic residues is still lacking. In this work, the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) MD and free energy simulations are performed to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme-catalyzed reactions and to explain experimental observations concerning the activity of this enzyme. The roles of certain active-site residues are studied, and the results of computer simulation seem to suggest that a histidine residue (His160) at the active site of DXMT may act as a general base/acid catalyst during the methyl transfer process.

  1. Theory and Modeling of Asymmetric Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lam, Yu-Hong; Grayson, Matthew N; Holland, Mareike C; Simon, Adam; Houk, K N

    2016-04-19

    Modern density functional theory and powerful contemporary computers have made it possible to explore complex reactions of value in organic synthesis. We describe recent explorations of mechanisms and origins of stereoselectivities with density functional theory calculations. The specific functionals and basis sets that are routinely used in computational studies of stereoselectivities of organic and organometallic reactions in our group are described, followed by our recent studies that uncovered the origins of stereocontrol in reactions catalyzed by (1) vicinal diamines, including cinchona alkaloid-derived primary amines, (2) vicinal amidophosphines, and (3) organo-transition-metal complexes. Two common cyclic models account for the stereoselectivity of aldol reactions of metal enolates (Zimmerman-Traxler) or those catalyzed by the organocatalyst proline (Houk-List). Three other models were derived from computational studies described in this Account. Cinchona alkaloid-derived primary amines and other vicinal diamines are venerable asymmetric organocatalysts. For α-fluorinations and a variety of aldol reactions, vicinal diamines form enamines at one terminal amine and activate electrophilically with NH(+) or NF(+) at the other. We found that the stereocontrolling transition states are cyclic and that their conformational preferences are responsible for the observed stereoselectivity. In fluorinations, the chair seven-membered cyclic transition states is highly favored, just as the Zimmerman-Traxler chair six-membered aldol transition state controls stereoselectivity. In aldol reactions with vicinal diamine catalysts, the crown transition states are favored, both in the prototype and in an experimental example, shown in the graphic. We found that low-energy conformations of cyclic transition states occur and control stereoselectivities in these reactions. Another class of bifunctional organocatalysts, the vicinal amidophosphines, catalyzes the (3 + 2) annulation

  2. Studies on Anion Promoted Titania.1: Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity toward Alcohol and Cumene Conversion Reactions of Phosphated Titania.

    PubMed

    Parida; Acharya; Samantaray; Mishra

    1999-09-15

    Phosphate impregnated titania samples with varying amount of phosphate have been prepared by solid-solid kneading as well as aqueous impregnation method. All the samples are characterized by XRD, TG-DTA, and N(2) adsorption-desorption isotherm. Surface area is found to increase with the increase in phosphate content up to 7.5 wt% loading and thereafter decreases. The average pore diameter and crystallite size of titania decreases with the addition of phosphate. However, total acidity (determined by base adsorption method) and the catalytic activity increases with the increase in phosphate content up to 10 wt%. Phosphated samples prepared using phosphoric acid as the source of phosphate exhibit higher acidity compared to the samples prepared using (NH(4))(3)PO(4). However, the sample prepared from (NH(4))(3)PO(4) shows the presence of both acid and basic sites. Though from the cumene conversion study it is understood that phosphated samples contain both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites, the latter predominates over the former. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. Some aspects of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Golodets, G.I.; Il`chenko, N.I.; Dolgikh, L.Yu.

    1995-01-01

    An approach to developing a chemical kinetic model for heterogeneous catalytic reactions was elaborated for the case when in the course of the catalytic interaction of various gases, the adsorption of one of them (an electron donor) is promoted under the action of the other (an electron acceptor). This phenomenon is referred to as the effect of stimulating induced surface heterogeneity.

  4. A non-thermal lattice gas model for a dimer trimer reaction on a catalytic surface: A computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Waqar; Parvez, M.; Baloach, Musa Kaleem; Qaisrani, A. U.; Khalid, M.

    2006-11-01

    The kinetics of an irreversible dimer-trimer reaction of the type 3A 2 + 2B 3 → 6AB have been studied using a non-thermal (precursor mechanism) model on a square as well as on a hexagonal lattice surface by Monte Carlo simulation. When the range of the precursors (A atoms) is increased, the model gives production rates (reactive window widths) that are quite large as compared with those for thermal (Langmuir-Hanshelwood mechanism) model. The phase diagrams qualitatively resemble with the standard ZGB model except that the continuous transition point is eliminated when the range of the precursors is extended up to the third nearest neighbourhood. The diffusion of A atoms on the surface as well as their desorption from the surface with a certain probability is also considered to see their effects on the reaction mechanism.

  5. Determination of Catalytic Coefficient for a First-Order Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraga, E. R.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate physical chemistry experiment in which the acid catalyzed hydrolysis of sucrose is used to determine the catalytic coefficient of the hydronium ion, the catalyst in this reaction. (MLH)

  6. Catalytic Asymmetric 1,4-Addition Reactions of Simple Alkylnitriles.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Sato, Io; Suzuki, Hirotsugu; Kobayashi, Shū

    2015-10-01

    The development of catalytic asymmetric carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions of alkylnitriles that do not have an activating group at the α-position, under proton-transfer conditions, is a challenging research topic. Here, we report catalytic asymmetric direct-type 1,4-addition reactions of alkylnitriles with α,β-unsaturated amides by using a catalytic amount of potassium hexamethyldisilazide (KHMDS) with a chiral macro crown ether. The desired reactions proceeded in high yields with good diastereo- and enantioselectivities. To our knowledge, this is the first example of catalytic asymmetric direct-type 1,4-addition reaction of alkylnitriles without any activating group at the α-position.

  7. Determination of Catalytic Coefficient for a First-Order Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraga, E. R.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate physical chemistry experiment in which the acid catalyzed hydrolysis of sucrose is used to determine the catalytic coefficient of the hydronium ion, the catalyst in this reaction. (MLH)

  8. Heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation reactions in continuous-flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Irfan, Muhammad; Glasnov, Toma N; Kappe, C Oliver

    2011-03-21

    Microreactor technology and continuous flow processing in general are key features in making organic synthesis both more economical and environmentally friendly. Heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation reactions under continuous flow conditions offer significant benefits compared to batch processes which are related to the unique gas-liquid-solid triphasic reaction conditions present in these transformations. In this review article recent developments in continuous flow heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation reactions using molecular hydrogen are summarized. Available flow hydrogenation techniques, reactors, commonly used catalysts and examples of synthetic applications with an emphasis on laboratory-scale flow hydrogenation reactions are presented. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Catalytic reactions in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Tomášik, B.

    2012-06-01

    We discuss a new type of reactions of a ϕ-meson production on hyperons, πY → ϕY and antikaons -KN → ϕY. These reactions are not suppressed according to Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule and can be a new efficient source of ϕ mesons in a nucleus-nucleus collision. We discuss how these reactions can affect the centrality dependence and the rapidity distributions of the ϕ yield.

  10. Quantum Chemical Study of CH3 + O2 Combustion Reaction System: Catalytic Effects of Additional CO2 Molecule.

    PubMed

    Masunov, Artëm E; Wait, Elizabeth; Vasu, Subith S

    2017-08-03

    The supercritical carbon dioxide diluent is used to control the temperature and to increase the efficiency in oxycombustion fossil fuel energy technology. It may affect the rates of combustion by altering mechanisms of chemical reactions, compared to the ones at low CO2 concentrations. Here, we investigate potential energy surfaces of the four elementary reactions in the CH3 + O2 reactive system in the presence of one CO2 molecule. In the case of reaction CH3 + O2 → CH2O + OH (R1 channel), van der Waals (vdW) complex formation stabilizes the transition state and reduces the activation barrier by ∼2.2 kcal/mol. Alternatively, covalently bonded CO2 may form a six-membered ring transition state and reduce the activation barrier by ∼0.6 kcal/mol. In case of reaction CH3 + O2 → CH3O + O (R2 channel), covalent participation of CO2 lowers the barrier for the rate limiting step by 3.9 kcal/mol. This is expected to accelerate the R2 process, important for the branching step of the radical chain reaction mechanism. For the reaction CH3 + O2 → CHO + H2O (R3 channel) with covalent participation of CO2, the activation barrier is lowered by 0.5 kcal/mol. The reaction CH2O + OH → CHO + H2O (R4 channel) involves hydrogen abstraction from formaldehyde by OH radical. Its barrier is reduced from 7.1 to 0.8 kcal/mol by formation of vdW complex with spectator CO2. These new findings are expected to improve the kinetic reaction mechanism describing combustion processes in supercritical CO2 medium.

  11. Catalytic direct asymmetric Michael reactions: taming naked aldehyde donors.

    PubMed

    Betancort, J M; Barbas, C F

    2001-11-15

    [reaction--see text] Direct catalytic enantio- and diastereoselective Michael addition reactions of unmodified aldehydes to nitro olefins using (S)-2-(morpholinomethyl)pyrrolidine as a catalyst are described. The reactions proceed in good yield (up to 96%) in a highly syn-selective manner (up to 98:2) with enantioselectivities approaching 80%. The resulting gamma-formyl nitro compounds are readily converted to chiral, nonracemic 3,4-disubstituted pyrrolidines.

  12. Reaction Current Phenomenon in Bifunctional Catalytic Metal-Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemian, Mohammad Amin

    Energy transfer processes accompany every elementary step of catalytic chemical processes on material surface including molecular adsorption and dissociation on atoms, interactions between intermediates, and desorption of reaction products from the catalyst surface. Therefore, detailed understanding of these processes on the molecular level is of great fundamental and practical interest in energy-related applications of nanomaterials. Two main mechanisms of energy transfer from adsorbed particles to a surface are known: (i) adiabatic via excitation of quantized lattice vibrations (phonons) and (ii) non-adiabatic via electronic excitations (electron/hole pairs). Electronic excitations play a key role in nanocatalysis, and it was recently shown that they can be efficiently detected and studied using Schottky-type catalytic nanostructures in the form of measureable electrical currents (chemicurrents) in an external electrical circuit. These nanostructures typically contain an electrically continuous nanocathode layers made of a catalytic metal deposited on a semiconductor substrate. The goal of this research is to study the direct observations of hot electron currents (chemicurrents) in catalytic Schottky structures, using a continuous mesh-like Pt nanofilm grown onto a mesoporous TiO2 substrate. Such devices showed qualitatively different and more diverse signal properties, compared to the earlier devices using smooth substrates, which could only be explained on the basis of bifunctionality. In particular, it was necessary to suggest that different stages of the reaction are occurring on both phases of the catalytic structure. Analysis of the signal behavior also led to discovery of a formerly unknown (very slow) mode of the oxyhydrogen reaction on the Pt/TiO2(por) system occurring at room temperature. This slow mode was producing surprisingly large stationary chemicurrents in the range 10--50 microA/cm2. Results of the chemicurrent measurements for the bifunctional

  13. Catalytic asymmetric umpolung reactions of imines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yongwei; Hu, Lin; Li, Zhe; Deng, Li

    2015-07-01

    The carbon-nitrogen double bonds in imines are fundamentally important functional groups in organic chemistry. This is largely due to the fact that imines act as electrophiles towards carbon nucleophiles in reactions that form carbon-carbon bonds, thereby serving as one of the most widely used precursors for the formation of amines in both synthetic and biosynthetic settings. If the carbon atom of the imine could be rendered electron-rich, the imine could react as a nucleophile instead of as an electrophile. Such a reversal in the electronic characteristics of the imine functionality would facilitate the development of new chemical transformations that convert imines into amines via carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions with carbon electrophiles, thereby creating new opportunities for the efficient synthesis of amines. The development of asymmetric umpolung reactions of imines (in which the imines act as nucleophiles) remains uncharted territory, in spite of the far-reaching impact such reactions would have in organic synthesis. Here we report the discovery and development of new chiral phase-transfer catalysts that promote the highly efficient asymmetric umpolung reactions of imines with the carbon electrophile enals. These catalysts mediate the deprotonation of imines and direct the 2-azaallyl anions thus formed to react with enals in a highly chemoselective, regioselective, diastereoselective and enantioselective fashion. The reaction tolerates a broad range of imines and enals, and can be carried out in high yield with as little as 0.01 mole per cent catalyst with a moisture- and air-tolerant operational protocol. These umpolung reactions provide a conceptually new and practical approach to chiral amino compounds.

  14. Catalytic asymmetric umpolung reactions of imines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongwei; Hu, Lin; Li, Zhe; Deng, Li

    2015-07-23

    The carbon-nitrogen double bonds in imines are fundamentally important functional groups in organic chemistry. This is largely due to the fact that imines act as electrophiles towards carbon nucleophiles in reactions that form carbon-carbon bonds, thereby serving as one of the most widely used precursors for the formation of amines in both synthetic and biosynthetic settings. If the carbon atom of the imine could be rendered electron-rich, the imine could react as a nucleophile instead of as an electrophile. Such a reversal in the electronic characteristics of the imine functionality would facilitate the development of new chemical transformations that convert imines into amines via carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions with carbon electrophiles, thereby creating new opportunities for the efficient synthesis of amines. The development of asymmetric umpolung reactions of imines (in which the imines act as nucleophiles) remains uncharted territory, in spite of the far-reaching impact such reactions would have in organic synthesis. Here we report the discovery and development of new chiral phase-transfer catalysts that promote the highly efficient asymmetric umpolung reactions of imines with the carbon electrophile enals. These catalysts mediate the deprotonation of imines and direct the 2-azaallyl anions thus formed to react with enals in a highly chemoselective, regioselective, diastereoselective and enantioselective fashion. The reaction tolerates a broad range of imines and enals, and can be carried out in high yield with as little as 0.01 mole per cent catalyst with a moisture- and air-tolerant operational protocol. These umpolung reactions provide a conceptually new and practical approach to chiral amino compounds.

  15. X-ray, NMR, and Mutational Studies of the Catalytic Cycle of the GDP-Mannose Mannosyl Hydrolase Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gabelli,S.; Azurmendi, H.; Bianchet, M.; Amzel, L.; Mildva, A.

    2006-01-01

    GDP-mannose hydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis with inversion of GDP-{alpha}-D-hexose to GDP and {beta}-D-hexose by nucleophilic substitution by water at C1 of the sugar. Two new crystal structures (free enzyme and enzyme-substrate complex), NMR, and site-directed mutagenesis data, combined with the structure of the enzyme-product complex reported earlier, suggest a four-stage catalytic cycle. An important loop (L6, residues 119-125) contains a ligand to the essential Mg{sup 2+} (Gln-123), the catalytic base (His-124), and three anionic residues. This loop is not ordered in the X-ray structure of the free enzyme due to dynamic disorder, as indicated by the two-dimensional 1H-15N HMQC spectrum, which shows selective exchange broadening of the imidazole nitrogen resonances of His-124 (k{sub ex} = 6.6 x 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}). The structure of the enzyme-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP-mannose substrate complex of the less active Y103F mutant shows loop L6 in an open conformation, while the structure of the enzyme-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP product complex showed loop L6 in a closed, 'active' conformation. 1H-15N HMQC spectra show the imidazole N of His-124 to be unprotonated, appropriate for general base catalysis. Substituting Mg{sup 2+} with the more electrophilic metal ions Mn{sup 2+} or Co{sup 2+} decreases the pK{sub a} in the pH versus k{sub cat} rate profiles, showing that deprotonation of a metal-bound water is partially rate-limiting. The H124Q mutation, which decreases k{sub cat} 103.4-fold and largely abolishes its pH dependence, is rescued by the Y103F mutation, which increases k{sub cat} 23-fold and restores its pH dependence. The structural basis of the rescue is the fact that the Y103F mutation shifts the conformational equilibrium to the open form moving loop L6 out of the active site, thus permitting direct access of the specific base hydroxide from the solvent. In the proposed dissociative transition state, which occurs in the closed, active conformation of the enzyme, the

  16. Kinetics of combined heterogeneous catalytic reactions with a common reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Pyatnitskii, Yu.I.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of combined catalytic reactions with a common reagent (competitive reactions) is analyzed assuming that no changes in the reaction mechanisms occur under their conjugation. A simplified approach is advanced for determining the relative rates of competitive reactions characterized by a similar mechanism of the initial stage for the interaction between the competitive reactants and catalyst. This includes the complex reactions, in which one of the reaction product serves as a competitive agent. The effects of nontrivial mutual influence of the competitive catalytic reactions are discussed. One type of this mutual influence manifests itself as a drastic inhibition of one reaction by another; this is not due to the catalyst surface blocking. This effect is inherent to the reactions involving the reversible dissociation of a heteroatomic reagent. The other type of the mutual influence is revealed in the promotion of one reaction by another when at least one of the reaction follows the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism and the adsorption of a common reagent is far from the equilibrium.

  17. Triangular Diagrams Teach Steady and Dynamic Behaviour of Catalytic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klusacek, K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates how triangular diagrams can aid in presenting some of the rather complex transient interactions that occur among gas and surface species during heterogeneous catalytic reactions. The basic equations and numerical examples are described. Classroom use of the triangular diagram is discussed. Several diagrams and graphs are provided. (YP)

  18. Catalytic asymmetric dearomatization (CADA) reactions of phenol and aniline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Ting; Zhang, Liming; You, Shu-Li

    2016-03-21

    Phenols are widely used as starting materials in both industrial and academic society. Dearomatization reactions of phenols provide an efficient way to construct highly functionalized cyclohexadienones. The main challenge to make them asymmetric by catalytic methods is to control the selectivity while overcoming the loss of aromaticity. In this tutorial review, an up to date summary of recent progress in CADA reactions of phenol and aniline derivatives is presented.

  19. Catalytic imine-imine cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masatoshi; Harada, Masashi; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Shū

    2014-11-07

    We report here efficient catalytic imine-imine cross-coupling reactions based on an umpolung strategy; an imine bearing a 9-fluorenyl moiety on its nitrogen atom, which acted as a nucleophile, reacted with another imine to afford an imine-imine cross-coupling adduct in high yield. Furthermore, a chiral guanidine acted as a chiral catalyst for these coupling reactions, and optically active 1,2-diamines were obtained in high yields with high enantioselectivities.

  20. New insights in understanding plasma-catalysis reaction pathways: study of the catalytic ozonation of an acetaldehyde saturated Ag/TiO2/SiO2 catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauce, Sonia; Vega-González, Arlette; Jia, Zixian; Touchard, Sylvain; Hassouni, Khaled; Kanaev, Andrei; Duten, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    This paper is a preliminary study intended to straighten out the role of reactive oxygen species in the activation mechanisms occurring in a plasma driven catalysis process for acetaldehyde decomposition. For this purpose, the interaction between the surface, the pollutant and one of the main oxidative species generated by non-thermal plasma, namely ozone, was studied. Acetaldehyde catalytic ozonation over a nanostructured Ag/TiO2/SiO2 catalyst is carried out at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, and followed by diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). For this, the catalyst is firstly saturated with acetaldehyde. At the end of the saturation, acetaldehyde and crotonaldehyde, its condensation product, are identified as the major adsorbed species. In a second step, the surface ozonation is carried out and three additional intermediates are identified, namely, acetone, formic acid and acetic acid. Gaseous CO, CO2, methyl formate and methyl acetate are detected at the DRIFTS outlet, evidencing the partial mineralization of the adsorbed species. A global reaction scheme is proposed for explaining the formation of those adsorbed intermediates and gaseous products. This proposed heterogeneous ozone induced chemistry has to be taken into account when associating non-thermal plasma in air to a catalyst. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  1. Fuel-rich, catalytic reaction experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollbuhler, R. James

    1991-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine combustion requirements call for operating at very high inlet temperatures, pressures, and large temperature rises. At the same time, the combustion process is to have minimum pollution effects on the environment. Aircraft gas turbine engines utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels which are difficult to uniformly atomize and mix with combustion air. An approach for minimizing fuel related problems is to transform the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the completion of the combustion process. Experimentally obtained results are presented for vaporizing and partially oxidizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into burnable gaseous components. The presented experimental data show that 1200 to 1300 K reaction product gas, rich in hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and light-end hydrocarbons, is formed when flowing 0.3 to 0.6 fuel to air mixes through a catalyst reactor. The reaction temperatures are kept low enough that nitrogen oxides and carbon particles (soot) do not form. Results are reported for tests using different catalyst types and configurations, mass flowrates, input temperatures, and fuel to air ratios.

  2. Expression studies of catalytic antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, H.D.; Patten, P.A.; Yang, P.L.

    1995-12-05

    We have examined the positive influence of human constant regions on the folding and bacterial expression of active soluble mouse immunoglobulin variable domains derived form a number of catalytic antibodies. Expression yields of eight hybridoma-and myeloma-derived chimeric Fab fragments are compared in both shake flasks and high-density fermentation. In addition the usefulness of this system for the generation of in vivo expression libraries is examined by constructing and expressing combinations of heavy and light chain variable regions that were not selected as a pair during an immune response. A mutagenesis study of one of the recombinant catalytic Fab fragments reveals that single amino acid substitutions can have dramatic effects on the expression yield. This system should be generally applicable to the production of Fab fragments of catalytic and other hybridoma-derived antibodies for crystallographic and structure-function studies. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. A combined experimental and computational study of the catalytic dehydration of glycerol on microporous zeolites: an investigation of the reaction mechanism and acrolein selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xufeng; Lv, Yanhong; Qu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Guodong; Xi, Yanyan; Phillips, David L; Liu, Chenguang

    2013-12-14

    The catalytic activity and the acrolein selectivity for liquid phase glycerol dehydration on β zeolites (HNa-β-k) were found to be dependent on the reaction temperature as well as on the amount of acid sites on the zeolites. An increase in the reaction temperature favors the acrolein selectivity. The acrolein selectivity increases with the Na(+)/H(+) ratio and the glycerol conversion decreases with it so that a maximum acrolein yield is obtained when a certain amount of acidic sites are replaced by non-active Na(+) sites. The computational results indicate that 3-hydoxylpropanal (HPA) is an important intermediate that determines the final product selectivity. The relative rates of the different reaction pathways for HAP can be affected by the amount of water molecules involved in its homogeneous reaction. Based on the reaction mechanism proposed, it was hypothesized that smaller pores reduce activity but increase selectivity to acrolein, and results of the H-MFI zeolite were consistent with this hypothesis. Our work provides important insight into the overall landscape of the reaction mechanism and can be used to help design reaction systems that have good acrolein selectivity for the liquid phase glycerol dehydration reactions.

  4. Catalytic ignition model in a monolithic reactor with in-depth reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, Ta-Ching; Tien, James S.

    1990-01-01

    Two transient models have been developed to study the catalytic ignition in a monolithic catalytic reactor. The special feature in these models is the inclusion of thermal and species structures in the porous catalytic layer. There are many time scales involved in the catalytic ignition problem, and these two models are developed with different time scales. In the full transient model, the equations are non-dimensionalized by the shortest time scale (mass diffusion across the catalytic layer). It is therefore accurate but is computationally costly. In the energy-integral model, only the slowest process (solid heat-up) is taken as nonsteady. It is approximate but computationally efficient. In the computations performed, the catalyst is platinum and the reactants are rich mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen. One-step global chemical reaction rates are used for both gas-phase homogeneous reaction and catalytic heterogeneous reaction. The computed results reveal the transient ignition processes in detail, including the structure variation with time in the reactive catalytic layer. An ignition map using reactor length and catalyst loading is constructed. The comparison of computed results between the two transient models verifies the applicability of the energy-integral model when the time is greater than the second largest time scale of the system. It also suggests that a proper combined use of the two models can catch all the transient phenomena while minimizing the computational cost.

  5. Manual control of catalytic reactions: Reactions by an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Enzymes play a vital role in catalysing almost all chemical reactions that occur in biological systems. Some enzymes must form complexes with non-protein molecules called cofactors to express catalytic activities. Although the control of catalytic reactions via apoenzyme-cofactor complexes has attracted significant attention, the reports have been limited to the microscale. Here, we report a system to express catalytic activity by adhesion of an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel. The apoenzyme and cofactor gels act as catalysts when they form a gel assembly, but they lose catalytic ability upon manual dissociation. We successfully construct a system with switchable catalytic activity via adhesion and separation of the apoenzyme gel with the cofactor gel. We expect that this methodology can be applied to regulate the functional activities of enzymes that bear cofactors in their active sites, such as the oxygen transport of haemoglobin or myoglobin and the electron transport of cytochromes.

  6. Manual control of catalytic reactions: Reactions by an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes play a vital role in catalysing almost all chemical reactions that occur in biological systems. Some enzymes must form complexes with non-protein molecules called cofactors to express catalytic activities. Although the control of catalytic reactions via apoenzyme–cofactor complexes has attracted significant attention, the reports have been limited to the microscale. Here, we report a system to express catalytic activity by adhesion of an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel. The apoenzyme and cofactor gels act as catalysts when they form a gel assembly, but they lose catalytic ability upon manual dissociation. We successfully construct a system with switchable catalytic activity via adhesion and separation of the apoenzyme gel with the cofactor gel. We expect that this methodology can be applied to regulate the functional activities of enzymes that bear cofactors in their active sites, such as the oxygen transport of haemoglobin or myoglobin and the electron transport of cytochromes. PMID:26537172

  7. Acid-base bifunctional catalytic surfaces for nucleophilic addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-09-01

    This article illustrates the modification of oxide surfaces with organic amine functional groups to create acid-base bifunctional catalysts, summarizing our previous reports and also presenting new data. Immobilization of organic amines as bases on inorganic solid-acid surfaces afforded highly active acid-base bifunctional catalysts, which enabled various organic transformations including C--C coupling reactions, though these reactions did not proceed with either the homogeneous amine precursors or the acidic supports alone. Spectroscopic characterization, such as by solid-state MAS NMR and FTIR, revealed not only the interactions between acidic and basic sites but also bifunctional catalytic reaction mechanisms.

  8. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in Monolith Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Miller, Fletcher J.; T'ien, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, this work demonstrates a concept called back-end ignition for lighting-off and pre-heating a catalytic monolith in a power generation system. In this concept, a downstream heat source (e.g. a flame) or resistive heating in the downstream portion of the monolith initiates a localized catalytic reaction which subsequently propagates upstream and heats the entire monolith. The simulations used a transient numerical model of a single catalytic channel which characterizes the behavior of the entire monolith. The model treats both the gas and solid phases and includes detailed homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. An important parameter in the model for back-end ignition is upstream heat conduction along the solid. The simulations used both dry and wet CO chemistry as a model fuel for the proof-of-concept calculations; the presence of water vapor can trigger homogenous reactions, provided that gas-phase temperatures are adequately high and there is sufficient fuel remaining after surface reactions. With sufficiently high inlet equivalence ratio, back-end ignition occurs using the thermophysical properties of both a ceramic and metal monolith (coated with platinum in both cases), with the heat-up times significantly faster for the metal monolith. For lower equivalence ratios, back-end ignition occurs without upstream propagation. Once light-off and propagation occur, the inlet equivalence ratio could be reduced significantly while still maintaining an ignited monolith as demonstrated by calculations using complete monolith heating.

  9. Size- and shape-dependent catalytic performances of oxidation and reduction reactions on nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shaowen; Tao, Franklin Feng; Tang, Yu; Li, Yuting; Yu, Jiaguo

    2016-08-22

    Heterogeneous catalysis is one of the most important chemical processes of various industries performed on catalyst nanoparticles with different sizes or/and shapes. In the past two decades, the catalytic performances of different catalytic reactions on nanoparticles of metals and oxides with well controlled sizes or shapes have been extensively studied thanks to the spectacular advances in syntheses of nanomaterials of metals and oxides. This review discussed the size and shape effects of catalyst particles on catalytic activity and selectivity of reactions performed at solid-gas or solid-liquid interfaces with a purpose of establishing correlations of size- and shape-dependent chemical and structural factors of surface of a catalyst with the corresponding catalytic performances toward understanding of catalysis at a molecular level.

  10. Polymer and Membrane Design for Low Temperature Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco; Xie, Yihui; Nunes, Suzana Pereira; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2016-04-01

    Catalytically active asymmetric membranes have been developed with high loadings of palladium nanoparticles located solely in the membrane's ultrathin skin layer. The manufacturing of these membranes requires polymers with functional groups, which can form insoluble complexes with palladium ions. Three polymers have been synthesized for this purpose and a complexation/nonsolvent induced phase separation followed by a palladium reduction step is carried out to prepare such membranes. Parameters to optimize the skin layer thickness and porosity, the palladium loading in this layer, and the palladium nanoparticles size are determined. The catalytic activity of the membranes is verified with the reduction of a nitro-compound and with a liquid phase Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction. Very low reaction times are observed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in a Platinum Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, P. M.; Dietrich, D. L.; Mellish, B. P.; Miller, F. J.; T'ien, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    A challenge for catalytic combustion in monolithic reactors at elevated temperatures is the start-up or "light-off" from a cold initial condition. In this work, we demonstrate a concept called "back-end catalytic ignition that potentially can be utilized in the light-off of catalytic monoliths. An external downstream flame or Joule heating raises the temperature of a small portion of the catalyst near the outlet initiating a localized catalytic reaction that propagates upstream heating the entire channel. This work uses a transient numerical model to demonstrate "back-end" ignition within a single channel which can characterize the overall performance of a monolith. The paper presents comparisons to an experiment using a single non-adiabatic channel but the concept can be extended to the adiabatic monolith case. In the model, the time scales associated with solid heat-up are typically several orders of magnitude larger than the gas-phase and chemical kinetic time-scales. Therefore, the model assumes a quasi-steady gas-phase with respect to a transient solid. The gas phase is one-dimensional. Appropriate correlations, however, account for heat and mass transfer in a direction perpendicular to the flow. The thermally-thin solid includes axial conduction. The gas phase, however, does not include axial conduction due to the high Peclet number flows. The model includes both detailed gas-phase and catalytic surface reactions. The experiment utilizes a pure platinum circular channel oriented horizontally though which a CO/O2 mixture (equivalence ratios ranging from 0.6 to 0.9) flows at 2 m/s.

  12. Direct catalytic enantio- and diastereoselective aldol reaction of thioamides.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Mitsutaka; Yazaki, Ryo; Chen, I-Hon; Sureshkumar, Devarajulu; Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2011-04-13

    A direct catalytic asymmetric aldol reaction of thioamides using a soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base cooperative catalyst comprising (R,R)-Ph-BPE/[Cu(CH(3)CN)(4)]PF(6)/LiOAr is described. Exclusive enolate generation from thioacetamides through a soft-soft interaction with the soft Lewis acid allowed for a direct aldol reaction to α-nonbranched aliphatic aldehydes, which are usually susceptible to self-condensation under conventional basic conditions. A hard Lewis basic phosphine oxide has emerged as an effective additive to constitute a highly active ternary soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base/hard Lewis base cooperative catalyst, enabling a direct enantio- and diastereoselective aldol reaction of thiopropionamides. Strict control of the amount of the hard Lewis base was essential to drive the catalytic cycle efficiently with a minimized retro-aldol pathway, affording syn-aldol products with high stereoselectivity. Divergent transformation of the thioamide functionality is an obvious merit of the present aldol methodology, allowing for a facile transformation of the aldol product into the corresponding aldehyde, ketone, amide, amine, and ketoester. An aldehyde derived from the direct aldol reaction was subjected to a second direct aldol reaction, which proceeded in a catalyst-controlled manner to provide 1,3-diols with high stereoselectivity. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Growth states of catalytic reaction networks exhibiting energy metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yohei; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-07-01

    All cells derive nutrition by absorbing some chemical and energy resources from the environment; these resources are used by the cells to reproduce the chemicals within them, which in turn leads to an increase in their volume. In this study we introduce a protocell model exhibiting catalytic reaction dynamics, energy metabolism, and cell growth. Results of extensive simulations of this model show the existence of four phases with regard to the rates of both the influx of resources and cell growth. These phases include an active phase with high influx and high growth rates, an inefficient phase with high influx but low growth rates, a quasistatic phase with low influx and low growth rates, and a death phase with negative growth rate. A mean field model well explains the transition among these phases as bifurcations. The statistical distribution of the active phase is characterized by a power law, and that of the inefficient phase is characterized by a nearly equilibrium distribution. We also discuss the relevance of the results of this study to distinct states in the existing cells.

  14. Elementary steps of the catalytic NO{sub x} reduction with NH{sub 3}: Cluster studies on reaction paths and energetics at vanadium oxide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, M.; Hermann, K.

    2013-12-28

    We consider different reaction scenarios of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO in the presence of ammonia at perfect as well as reduced vanadium oxide surfaces modeled by V{sub 2}O{sub 5}(010) without and with oxygen vacancies. Geometric and energetic details as well as reaction paths are evaluated using extended cluster models together with density-functional theory. Based on earlier work of adsorption, diffusion, and reaction of the different surface species participating in the SCR we confirm that at Brønsted acid sites (i.e., OH groups) of the perfect oxide surface nitrosamide, NH{sub 2}NO, forms a stable intermediate. Here adsorption of NH{sub 3} results in NH{sub 4} surface species which reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. Nitrosamide is also found as intermediate of the SCR near Lewis acid sites of the reduced oxide surface (i.e., near oxygen vacancies). However, here the adsorbed NH{sub 3} species is dehydrogenated to surface NH{sub 2} before it reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. The calculations suggest that reaction barriers for the SCR are overall higher near Brønsted acid sites of the perfect surface compared with Lewis acid sites of the reduced surface, examined for the first time in this work. The theoretical results are consistent with experimental findings and confirm the importance of surface reduction for the SCR process.

  15. Elementary steps of the catalytic NOx reduction with NH3: Cluster studies on reaction paths and energetics at vanadium oxide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, M.; Hermann, K.

    2013-12-01

    We consider different reaction scenarios of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO in the presence of ammonia at perfect as well as reduced vanadium oxide surfaces modeled by V2O5(010) without and with oxygen vacancies. Geometric and energetic details as well as reaction paths are evaluated using extended cluster models together with density-functional theory. Based on earlier work of adsorption, diffusion, and reaction of the different surface species participating in the SCR we confirm that at Brønsted acid sites (i.e., OH groups) of the perfect oxide surface nitrosamide, NH2NO, forms a stable intermediate. Here adsorption of NH3 results in NH4 surface species which reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. Nitrosamide is also found as intermediate of the SCR near Lewis acid sites of the reduced oxide surface (i.e., near oxygen vacancies). However, here the adsorbed NH3 species is dehydrogenated to surface NH2 before it reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. The calculations suggest that reaction barriers for the SCR are overall higher near Brønsted acid sites of the perfect surface compared with Lewis acid sites of the reduced surface, examined for the first time in this work. The theoretical results are consistent with experimental findings and confirm the importance of surface reduction for the SCR process.

  16. A density functional study on the effect of the zeolite cavity on its catalytic activity: The dehydrogenation and cracking reactions of isobutane over HZSM-5 and HY zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milas, Ivan; Chaer Nascimento, Marco Antonio

    2006-02-01

    The dehydrogenation and cracking reactions of isobutane over HZMS-5 and HY were studied at the DFT level of calculation to verify the influence of the cavity on the energetics and mechanism of the reactions. The zeolites were represented by the 20T and 32T clusters, respectively. The results indicate that the reactions follow the same mechanism in both zeolites but the activation energies are reduced by ˜10 kcal/mol relative to the values with smaller clusters. Activation energies for the dehydrogenation reactions were similar in both zeolites, but for the cracking reaction in HY, the activation energy is ˜5 kcal/mol higher than in HZSM-5.

  17. Thermodynamics behind carbon nanotube growth via endothermic catalytic decomposition reaction.

    PubMed

    Harutyunyan, Avetik R; Kuznetsov, Oleg A; Brooks, Christopher J; Mora, Elena; Chen, Gugang

    2009-02-24

    Carbon filaments can be grown using hydrocarbons with either exothermic or endothermic catalytic decomposition enthalpies. By in situ monitoring the evolution of the reaction enthalpy during nanotube synthesis via methane gas, we found that although the decomposition reaction of methane is endothermic an exothermic process is superimposed which accompanies the nanotube growth. Analysis shows that the main contributor in this liberated heat is the radiative heat transfer from the surroundings, along with dehydrogenation reaction of in situ formed secondary hydrocarbons on the catalyst surface and the carbon hydrogenation/oxidation processes. This finding implies that nanotube growth process enthalpy is exothermic, and particularly, it extends the commonly accepted temperature gradient driven growth mechanism to the growth via hydrocarbons with endothermic decomposition enthalpy.

  18. Catalytic reactions on neutral Rh oxide clusters more efficient than on neutral Rh clusters.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Akira; Miyajima, Ken; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2012-03-28

    Gas phase catalytic reactions involving the reduction of N(2)O and oxidation of CO were observed at the molecular level on isolated neutral rhodium clusters, Rh(n) (n = 10-28), using mass spectrometry. Sequential oxygen transfer reactions, Rh(n)O(m-1) + N(2)O → Rh(n)O(m) + N(2) (m = 1, 2, 3,…), were monitored and the rate constant for each reaction step was determined as a function of the cluster size. Oxygen extraction reactions by a CO molecule, Rh(n)O(m) + CO → Rh(n)O(m-1) + CO(2) (m = 1, 2, 3,…), were also observed when a small amount of CO was mixed with the reactant N(2)O gas. The rate constants of the oxygen extraction reactions by CO for m ≥ 4 were found to be two or three orders of magnitude higher than the rate constants for m ≤ 3, which indicates that the catalytic reaction proceeds more efficiently when the reaction cycles turn over around Rh(n)O(m) (m ≥ 4) than around bare Rh(n). Rhodium clusters operate as more efficient catalysts when they are oxidized than non- or less-oxidized rhodium clusters, which is consistent with theoretical and experimental studies on the catalytic CO oxidation reaction on a rhodium surface.

  19. Reaction-driven surface restructuring and selectivity control in allylic alcohol catalytic aerobic oxidation over Pd.

    PubMed

    Lee, Adam F; Ellis, Christine V; Naughton, James N; Newton, Mark A; Parlett, Christopher M A; Wilson, Karen

    2011-04-20

    Synchronous, time-resolved DRIFTS/MS/XAS cycling studies of the vapor-phase selective aerobic oxidation of crotyl alcohol over nanoparticulate Pd have revealed surface oxide as the desired catalytically active phase, with dynamic, reaction-induced Pd redox processes controlling selective versus combustion pathways.

  20. The Influence of Elastic Strain on Catalytic Activity in the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kai; Maark, Tuhina Adit; Khorshidi, Alireza; Sethuraman, Vijay A; Peterson, Andrew A; Guduru, Pradeep R

    2016-05-17

    Understanding the role of elastic strain in modifying catalytic reaction rates is crucial for catalyst design, but experimentally, this effect is often coupled with a ligand effect. To isolate the strain effect, we have investigated the influence of externally applied elastic strain on the catalytic activity of metal films in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We show that elastic strain tunes the catalytic activity in a controlled and predictable way. Both theory and experiment show strain controls reactivity in a controlled manner consistent with the qualitative predictions of the HER volcano plot and the d-band theory: Ni and Pt's activities were accelerated by compression, while Cu's activity was accelerated by tension. By isolating the elastic strain effect from the ligand effect, this study provides a greater insight into the role of elastic strain in controlling electrocatalytic activity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. On the role of DNA in DNA-based catalytic enantioselective conjugate addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Dijk, Ewold W; Boersma, Arnold J; Feringa, Ben L; Roelfes, Gerard

    2010-09-07

    A kinetic study of DNA-based catalytic enantioselective Friedel-Crafts alkylation and Michael addition reactions showed that DNA affects the rate of these reactions significantly. Whereas in the presence of DNA, a large acceleration was found for the Friedel-Crafts alkylation and a modest acceleration in the Michael addition of dimethyl malonate, a deceleration was observed when using nitromethane as nucleophile. Also, the enantioselectivities proved to be dependent on the DNA sequence. In comparison with the previously reported Diels-Alder reaction, the results presented here suggest that DNA plays a similar role in both cycloaddition and conjugate addition reactions.

  2. Hydrogen production from methane through catalytic partial oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freni, S.; Calogero, G.; Cavallaro, S.

    This paper reviews recent developments in syn-gas production processes used for partial methane oxidation with and/or without steam. In particular, we examined different process charts (fixed bed, fluidised bed, membrane, etc.), kinds of catalysts (powders, foams, monoliths, etc.) and catalytically active phases (Ni, Pt, Rh, etc.). The explanation of the various suggested technical solutions accounted for the reaction mechanism that may selectively lead to calibrated mixtures of CO and H 2 or to the unwanted formation of products of total oxidation (CO 2 and H 2O) and pyrolysis (coke). Moreover, the new classes of catalysts allow the use of small reactors to treat large amounts of methane (monoliths) or separate hydrogen in situ from the other reaction products (membrane). This leads to higher conversions and selectivity than could have been expected thermodynamically. Although catalysts based on Rh are extremely expensive, they can be used to minimise H 2O formation by maximising H 2 yield.

  3. Catalytic test reactions for the evaluation of hierarchical zeolites.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Martin; Machoke, Albert Gonche; Schwieger, Wilhelm

    2016-06-13

    Hierarchical zeolites have received increasing attention in the last decade due to their outstanding catalytic performance. Several types of hierarchical zeolites can be prepared by a large number of different techniques. Hierarchical zeolites combine the intrinsic catalytic properties of conventional zeolites and the facilitated access and transport in the additional meso- or macropore system. In this tutorial review, we discuss several test reactions that have been explored to show the benefit of the hierarchical pore system with respect to their suitability to prove the positive effects of hierarchical porous zeolites. It is important to note that positive effects on activity, stability and less frequently selectivity observed for hierarchically structured catalysts not necessarily are only a consequence of the additional meso- or macropores but also the number, strength and location of active sites as well as defects and impurities. With regard to these aspects, the test reaction has to be chosen carefully and potential changes in the chemistry of the catalyst have to be considered as well. In addition to the determination of conversion, yield and selectivity, we will show that the calculation of the activation energy and the determination of the Thiele modulus and the effectiveness factor are good indicators of the presence or absence of diffusion limitations in hierarchical zeolites compared to their parent materials.

  4. Catalytic Transfer Hydogenation Reactions for Undergraduate Practical Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, R. W.

    1997-04-01

    A brief review of catalytic transfer hydrogenation (CTH) reactions is given. Attention is drawn, particularly, to the utility of ammonium formate as the hydrogen donor in this type of reaction. The reduction of aryl carbonyl compounds to the corresponding methylene derivatives by ammonium formate in the presence of 10% Pd/C at 110°C is compared to their reductive ammonation which occurs at higher temperatures in the absence of the catalyst (the Leuckart reaction). It is suggested that the low cost and simplicity of CTH reactions using ammonium formate as the hydrogen donor, together with the high yields obtained in many cases, make them excellent candidates for inclusion in undergraduate practical programmes. Laboratory instructions are given for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline (isolated as benzanilide), benzophenone to diphenylmethanol and fluorenone to fluorene, in all cases using ammonium formate as the hydrogen donor and 10% Pd/C as the catalyst. Thin layer chromatography shows that in each case the product is homogeneous; the yields are essentially quantitative.

  5. Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol with functionalized carbon materials as catalysts: reaction mechanism and pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbing; Fu, Wantao; He, Xuwen; Yang, Shaoxia; Zhu, Wanpeng

    2014-08-01

    The development of highly active carbon material catalysts in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) has attracted a great deal of attention. In this study different carbon material catalysts (multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon fibers and graphite) were developed to enhance the CWAO of phenol in aqueous solution. The functionalized carbon materials exhibited excellent catalytic activity in the CWAO of phenol. After 60 min reaction, the removal of phenol was nearly 100% over the functionalized multi-walled carbon, while it was only 14% over the purified multi-walled carbon under the same reaction conditions. Carboxylic acid groups introduced on the surface of the functionalized carbon materials play an important role in the catalytic activity in CWAO. They can promote the production of free radicals, which act as strong oxidants in CWAO. Based on the analysis of the intermediates produced in the CWAO reactions, a new reaction pathway for the CWAO of phenol was proposed in this study. There are some differences between the proposed reaction pathway and that reported in the literature. First, maleic acid is transformed directly into malonic acid. Second, acetic acid is oxidized into an unknown intermediate, which is then oxidized into CO2 and H2O. Finally, formic acid and oxalic acid can mutually interconvert when conditions are favorable.

  6. Fundamental studies of catalytic gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1991-03-01

    Studies of the catalytic steam gasification of carbon solids continued. A considerable number of important findings have been made. Recently limited experimentation has been carried out on the production of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons from methane in the presence of Ca/K/Ni oxide catalysts and of oxygen, carbon and water. The main finding thus far has been that C{sub 2} yields of 10--13% can be obtained at about 600{degrees}C or 150{degrees} lower temperature than described in the literature for similar yields. Yields of 7--10% C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at 99+% selectivity have been obtained. The presence of water and small amounts of oxygen is essential. Yields of this magnitude may be attractive since there is no loss of methane to valueless by-products, no purification of the recycle steam is required and no oxygen is used to burn methane. Further improvement in yields by catalyst and operating conditions modification will be investigated. It is also intended to clarify the chemistry which inhibits burning of methane to carbon oxides. Work is discussed on gasification of petroleum cokes and oxidative methane coupling. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. A study of stratospheric gases catalytically reacting on alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, J. L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A vacuum system developed to study stratospheric gases reacting on Al2O3. Special attention was given to the reactions of HCl, SO2, and O3. Efforts were made to detect atoms and/or molecules produced by catalytic action of Al2O3 with mass spectrometer.

  8. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Hua; Li, Zhihu; Xu, Yanhui

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm{sup −2} for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm{sup −2} (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −6} cm s{sup −1}. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER.

  9. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs.

  10. Study of the oxidative half-reaction catalyzed by a non-heme ferrous catalytic center by means of structural and computational methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicero, Giancarlo; Carbonera, Chiara; Valegård, Karin; Hajdu, Janos; Andersson, Inger; Ranghino, Graziella

    Deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase (DAOCS) is a mononuclear ferrous enzyme that catalyzes the expansion of the five-membered thiazolidine ring of the penicillin nucleus into the six-membered dihydrothiazine ring of the cephalosporins. In the first half-reaction with dioxygen and 2-oxoglutarate, a reactive iron-oxygen species is produced that can subsequently react with the penicillin substrate to yield the cephalosporin. We describe quantum mechanical calculations of the first part of the reaction based on the high-resolution structures of the active site of DAOCS and its complexes with ligands. These studies are aimed at understanding how the reactive species can be produced and contained in the active site of the enzyme. The results demonstrate the priming of the active site by the co-substrate for oxygen binding and hint to the presence of a stable iron-peroxo intermediate in equilibrium with a more reactive ferryl species and the formation of CO2 as a leaving group by decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate. A conclusion from these studies is that substitution of CO2 by the penicillin substrate triggers the oxidation reaction in a booby-trap-like mechanism.

  11. New advances in the use of infrared absorption spectroscopy for the characterization of heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Zaera, Francisco

    2014-11-21

    Infrared absorption spectroscopy has proven to be one of the most powerful spectroscopic techniques available for the characterization of catalytic systems. Although the history of IR absorption spectroscopy in catalysis is long, the technique continues to provide key fundamental information about a variety of catalysts and catalytic reactions, and to also offer novel options for the acquisition of new information on both reaction mechanisms and the nature of the solids used as catalysts. In this review, an overview is provided of the main contributions that have been derived from IR absorption spectroscopy studies of catalytic systems, and a discussion is included on new trends and new potential directions of research involving IR in catalysis. We start by briefly describing the power of Fourier-transform IR (FTIR) instruments and the main experimental IR setups available, namely, transmission (TIR), diffuse reflectance (DRIFTS), attenuated total reflection (ATR-IR), and reflection-absorption (RAIRS), for advancing research in catalysis. We then discuss the different environments under which IR characterization of catalysts is carried out, including in situ and operando studies of typical catalytic processes in gas-phase, research with model catalysts in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) and so-called high-pressure cell instruments, and work involving liquid/solid interfaces. A presentation of the type of information extracted from IR data follows in terms of the identification of adsorbed intermediates, the characterization of the surfaces of the catalysts themselves, the quantitation of IR intensities to extract surface coverages, and the use of probe molecules to identify and titrate specific catalytic sites. Finally, the different options for carrying out kinetic studies with temporal resolution such as rapid-scan FTIR, step-scan FTIR, and the use of tunable lasers or synchrotron sources, and to obtain spatially resolved spectra, by sample rastering or by 2D imaging, are

  12. Relaxation, multiplicity of steady states, and autooscillations in kinetics of catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kol`tsov, N.I.; Fedotov, V.Kh.; Alekseev, B.V.

    1995-01-01

    A review of the authors` recent findings of researche into steady-state and non-steady-state catalytic reactions is given. The method for the estimation of relaxation times for particular reaction classes is generalized. Basic critical phenomena, such as the multiplicity of steady states, are discussed in terms of the structures of reaction schemes. Mechanisms of simplest catalytic oscillators are systematized. The results outlined in this paper are shown to reflect close relations between relaxation characteristics and complex critical phenomena, which are peculiar to catalytic reactions. The discussion is held within the framework of the mass action law.

  13. Catalytic Reaction Synthesis for the Partial Oxidation of Methane to Formaldehyde.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas-Galindo, Maria-Guadalupe

    Catalytic reaction synthesis for the partial oxidation of methane to formaldehyde has been studied by combining microkinetic analysis with molecular orbital calculations. This strategy is used to establish microscopic correlations between the structure and composition of the active site and the kinetic parameters of the reaction mechanism. Using atom clusters to represent the active site of transition metal oxide catalysts, the relationship was probed between coordination number, oxidation state, and ionization potential of the active cation and the reaction steps of methane activation and surface reactions leading to formaldehyde formation. The analysis suggests that in transition metal oxide catalysts, the d-band orbitals of the metal cation should be empty, since otherwise CO_2 formation from CO oxidation will be excessive. Furthermore, the transition metal oxide d-band must be located at sufficiently low energy that it may accept electrons during methane activation. Oxygen O- species, representing vacancies in the 2p cluster band, will favor methane activation. However, clusters with fully occupied 2p bands (O^ {2-}^ecies) will favor formaldehyde production. Such inferences illustrate how experimental and theoretical information already incorporated into an existing microkinetic model for the reaction over V _2O_5 and MoO _3 catalysts can be extended to describe the reaction over new materials in the search for more active and selective catalysts. Using parameters estimated from the molecular orbital calculations, microkinetic reaction simulations were also shown to be useful to identify reactor operating conditions that may favor the production of formaldehyde. The simulation can be used to identify key experiments necessary to test the performance of postulated catalytic materials. The economic evaluation of the process design sets important target goals for methane conversion and formaldehyde selectivity that a catalytic material must satisfy to create a new

  14. Effects of copper catalytic reactions on the development of supersonic hydrogen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Berry, G.F.

    1992-10-01

    Copper species are present in hydrogen flames in arc heated supersonic ramjet testing facilities. Homogeneous and heterogeneous copper catalytic reactions may affect the flame development by enhancing the recombination of hydrogen atoms. Computer simulation is used to investigate the effects of the catalytic reactions on the reaction and ignition times of the flames. The simulation uses a modified general chemical kinetics computer program to simulate the development of copper-contaminated hydrogen flames under scramjet testing conditions. Reaction times of hydrogen flames are found to be reduced due to the copper catalytic effects, but ignition times are much less sensitive to such effects. The reduction of reaction time depends on copper concentration, particle size (if copper is in the condensed phase), and Mach number (or initial temperature and pressure). As copper concentration increases or the particle size decreases, reaction time decreases. As Mach number increases (or pressure and temperature decrease), the copper catalytic effects are greater.

  15. Bench- and Pilot-Scale Studies of Reaction and Regeneration of Ni-Mg-K/Al2O3 for Catalytic Conditioning of Biomass-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Jablonski, W. S.; Parent, Y. O.; Yung, M. M.

    2012-05-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is collaborating with both industrial and academic partners to develop technologies to help enable commercialization of biofuels produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The focus of this paper is to report how various operating processes, utilized in-house and by collaborators, influence the catalytic activity during conditioning of biomass-derived syngas. Efficient cleaning and conditioning of biomass-derived syngas for use in fuel synthesis continues to be a significant technical barrier to commercialization. Multifunctional, fluidizable catalysts are being developed to reform undesired tars and light hydrocarbons, especially methane, to additional syngas, which can improve utilization of biomass carbon. This approach also eliminates both the need for downstream methane reforming and the production of an aqueous waste stream from tar scrubbing. This work was conducted with NiMgK/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. These catalysts were assessed for methane reforming performance in (i) fixed-bed, bench-scale tests with model syngas simulating that produced by oak gasification, and in pilot-scale, (ii) fluidized tests with actual oak-derived syngas, and (iii) recirculating/regenerating tests using model syngas. Bench-scale tests showed that the catalyst could be completely regenerated over several reforming reaction cycles. Pilot-scale tests using raw syngas showed that the catalyst lost activity from cycle to cycle when it was regenerated, though it was shown that bench-scale regeneration by steam oxidation and H{sub 2} reduction did not cause this deactivation. Characterization by TPR indicates that the loss of a low temperature nickel oxide reduction feature is related to the catalyst deactivation, which is ascribed to nickel being incorporated into a spinel nickel aluminate that is not reduced with the given activation protocol. Results for 100 h time-on-stream using a recirculating/regenerating reactor suggest

  16. Cantilever-based chemical sensors for detecting catalytically produced reactions and motility forces generated via electrokinetic phenomena.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Shyamala; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2007-11-01

    This paper reports the fabrication, characterization, and modeling of a chemical sensor constructed from a microfabricated silicon cantilever, coated with gold, which is modified using photolithography techniques to contain a silver feature on the free-standing edge. When immersed in a fuel solution such as hydrogen peroxide, catalytic reactions occurring at the bimetallic silver-gold junction cause a catalytic force to act on the cantilever. The catalytic reaction is detected by measuring change in resonance frequency of the cantilever using a position-sensitive split photodiode and atomic force microscopy instrument. A model based on the Cleveland method is developed to quantify the forces produced and to study the effect of change of hydrogen peroxide concentration on the magnitude of the force. The force is observed to increase linearly for lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and level off at higher concentrations. The chemical sensor offers a possible method for using catalytically produced forces in microelectromechanical systems and microfluidic devices.

  17. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  18. Cyclosophorohexadecaose and succinoglycan monomers as catalytic carbohydrates for the Strecker reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghoo; Cho, Eunae; Kwon, Chanho; Jung, Seunho

    2007-12-10

    Some microbial carbohydrates have been used as catalysts for the multicomponent Strecker reaction using trimethylsilyl cyanide (TMSCN). Alpha-Cyclosophorohexadecaose (alpha-C16) derived from Xanthomonas species and succinoglycan monomers derived from Rhizobium species acted as catalytic carbohydrates in the mixture solutions of methanol and water. Malonaldehyde bis(phenylimine) as a substrate was completely converted (yield: 100%) into its product to 100% by both alpha-C16 and the succinoglycan monomer (M2), having acetyl, pyruvyl, and succinyl groups as substituents after 1h. The catalytic abilities of the carbohydrates were dependent on the inherent structures of the substrates used in this study, where substrate 1 having a symmetrical structure rather than the others was favorably reacted with the alpha-C16 and M2. Through this study, we suggest that the microbial carbohydrates used in this study could be expected to be environmentally-benign catalysts for the synthesis of alpha-aminonitriles.

  19. Heterogeneous Molecular Catalysis of Electrochemical Reactions: Volcano Plots and Catalytic Tafel Plots.

    PubMed

    Costentin, Cyrille; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2017-06-14

    We analyze here, in the framework of heterogeneous molecular catalysis, the reasons for the occurrence or nonoccurrence of volcanoes upon plotting the kinetics of the catalytic reaction versus the stabilization free energy of the primary intermediate of the catalytic process. As in the case of homogeneous molecular catalysis or catalysis by surface-active metallic sites, a strong motivation of such studies relates to modern energy challenges, particularly those involving small molecules, such as water, hydrogen, oxygen, proton, and carbon dioxide. This motivation is particularly pertinent for what concerns heterogeneous molecular catalysis, since it is commonly preferred to homogeneous molecular catalysis by the same molecules if only for chemical separation purposes and electrolytic cell architecture. As with the two other catalysis modes, the main drawback of the volcano plot approach is the basic assumption that the kinetic responses depend on a single descriptor, viz., the stabilization free energy of the primary intermediate. More comprehensive approaches, investigating the responses to the maximal number of experimental factors, and conveniently expressed as catalytic Tafel plots, should clearly be preferred. This is more so in the case of heterogeneous molecular catalysis in that additional transport factors in the supporting film may additionally affect the current-potential responses. This is attested by the noteworthy presence of maxima in catalytic Tafel plots as well as their dependence upon the cyclic voltammetric scan rate.

  20. Study on the Catalytic Activity of Noble Metal Nanoparticles on Reduced Graphene Oxide for Oxygen Evolution Reactions in Lithium-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yo Sub; Park, Jin-Bum; Jung, Hun-Gi; Kim, Jooho; Luo, Xiangyi; Lu, Jun; Curtiss, Larry; Amine, Khalil; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Lee, Yun Jung

    2015-07-08

    Among many challenges present in Li-air batteries, one of the main reasons of low efficiency is the high charge overpotential due to the slow oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Here, we present systematic evaluation of Pt, Pd, and Ru nanoparticles supported on rGO as OER electrocatalysts in Li-air cell cathodes with LiCF3SO3-tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (TEGDME) salt-electrolyte system. All of the noble metals explored could lower the charge overpotentials, and among them, Ru-rGO hybrids exhibited the most stable cycling performance and the lowest charge overpotentials. Role of Ru nanoparticles in boosting oxidation kinetics of the discharge products were investigated. Apparent behavior of Ru nanoparticles was different from the conventional electrocatalysts that lower activation barrier through electron transfer, because the major contribution of Ru nanoparticles in lowering charge overpotential is to control the nature of the discharge products. Ru nanoparticles facilitated thin film-like or nanoparticulate Li2O2 formation during oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which decomposes at lower potentials during charge, although the conventional role as electrocatalysts during OER cannot be ruled out. Pt-and Pd-rGO hybrids showed fluctuating potential profiles during the cycling. Although Pt- and Pd-rGO decomposed the electrolyte after electrochemical cycling, no electrolyte instability was observed with Ru-rGO hybrids. This study provides the possibility of screening selective electrocatalysts for Li-air cells while maintaining electrolyte stability.

  1. Automated Prediction of Catalytic Mechanism and Rate Law Using Graph-Based Reaction Path Sampling.

    PubMed

    Habershon, Scott

    2016-04-12

    In a recent article [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 143 , 094106 ], we introduced a novel graph-based sampling scheme which can be used to generate chemical reaction paths in many-atom systems in an efficient and highly automated manner. The main goal of this work is to demonstrate how this approach, when combined with direct kinetic modeling, can be used to determine the mechanism and phenomenological rate law of a complex catalytic cycle, namely cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation of ethene. Our graph-based sampling scheme generates 31 unique chemical products and 32 unique chemical reaction pathways; these sampled structures and reaction paths enable automated construction of a kinetic network model of the catalytic system when combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations of free energies and resultant transition-state theory rate constants. Direct simulations of this kinetic network across a range of initial reactant concentrations enables determination of both the reaction mechanism and the associated rate law in an automated fashion, without the need for either presupposing a mechanism or making steady-state approximations in kinetic analysis. Most importantly, we find that the reaction mechanism which emerges from these simulations is exactly that originally proposed by Heck and Breslow; furthermore, the simulated rate law is also consistent with previous experimental and computational studies, exhibiting a complex dependence on carbon monoxide pressure. While the inherent errors of using DFT simulations to model chemical reactivity limit the quantitative accuracy of our calculated rates, this work confirms that our automated simulation strategy enables direct analysis of catalytic mechanisms from first principles.

  2. (1R)-(+)-camphor and acetone derived alpha'-hydroxy enones in asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction: catalytic activation by Lewis and Brønsted acids, substrate scope, applications in syntheses, and mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Patricia; García, Jesús M; Gómez-Bengoa, Enrique; Herrero, Ada; Odriozola, José M; Oiarbide, Mikel; Palomo, Claudio; Razkin, Jesús

    2010-03-05

    The Diels-Alder reaction constitutes one of the most powerful and convergent C-C bond-forming transformations and continues to be the privileged route to access cyclohexene substructures, which are widespread within natural products and bioactive constituents. Over the recent years, asymmetric catalytic Diels-Alder methodologies have experienced a tremendous advance, but still inherently difficult diene-dienophile combinations prevail, such as those involving dienes less reactive than cyclopentadiene or dienophiles like beta-substituted acrylates and equivalents. Here the main features of alpha'-hydroxy enones as reaction partners of the Diels-Alder reaction are shown, with especial focus on their potentials and limitations in solving the above difficult cases. Alpha'-hydroxy enones are able to bind reversibly to both Lewis acids and Brønsted acids, forming 1,4-coordinated species that are shown to efficiently engage in these inherently difficult Diels-Alder reactions. On these bases, a convenient control of the reaction stereocontrol can be achieved using a camphor-derived chiral alpha'-hydroxy enone model (substrate-controlled asymmetric induction) and either Lewis acid or Brønsted acid catalysis. Complementing this approach, highly enantio- and diastereoselective Diels-Alder reactions can also be carried out by using simple achiral alpha'-hydroxy enones in combination with Evans' chiral Cu(II)-BOX complexes (catalyst-controlled asymmetric induction). Of importance, alpha'-hydroxy enones showed improved reactivity profiles and levels of stereoselectivity (endo/exo and facial selectivity) as compared with other prototypical dienophiles in the reactions involving dienes less reactive than cyclopentadiene. A rationale of some of these results is provided based on both kinetic experiments and quantum calculations. Thus, kinetic measurements of Brønsted acid promoted Diels-Alder reactions of alpha'-hydroxy enones show a first-order rate with respect to both enone

  3. Reaction kinetics of waste sulfuric acid using H2O2 catalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiade; Hong, Binxun; Tong, Xinyang; Qiu, Shufeng

    2016-12-01

    The process of recovering waste sulfuric acids using H2O2 catalytic oxidation is studied in this paper. Activated carbon was used as catalyst. Main operating parameters, such as temperature, feed rate of H2O2, and catalyst dosage, have effects on the removal of impurities from waste sulfuric acids. The reaction kinetics of H2O2 catalytic oxidation on impurities are discussed. At a temperature of 90°C, H2O2 feeding rate of 50 g (kg waste acid)(-1) per hour, and catalyst dosage of 0.2 wt% (waste acid weight), the removal efficiencies of COD and chrominance were both more than 99%, the recovery ratio of sulfuric acid was more than 95%, and the utilization ratio of H2O2 was 88.57%. Waste sulfuric acid is a big environmental problem in China. The amount of waste sulfuric acid is huge every year. Many small and medium-sized businesses produced lots of waste acids, but they don't have an appropriate method to treat and recover them. H2O2 catalytic oxidation has been used to treat and recover waste sulfuric acid and activated carbon is the catalyst here. Main parameters, such as temperature, feed rate of H2O2, and catalyst dosage, have been investigated. The reaction kinetics are discussed. This method can be economical and feasible for most small and medium-sized businesses.

  4. Catalytic reactor for promoting a chemical reaction on a fluid passing therethrough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Pfefferle, William C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic reactor with an auxiliary heating structure for raising the temperature of a fluid passing therethrough whereby the catalytic reaction is promoted. The invention is a apparatus employing multiple electrical heating elements electrically isolated from one another by insulators that are an integral part of the flow path. The invention provides step heating of a fluid as the fluid passes through the reactor.

  5. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  6. Catalytic enantioselective Friedel-Crafts/Michael addition reactions of indoles to ethenetricarboxylates.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shoko; Iwata, Yuko

    2006-01-20

    [reaction: see text] The Friedel-Crafts reaction is an important reaction for the formation of new C-C bonds. Recently, catalytic enantioselective Friedel-Crafts reaction of alkylidene malonates has been reported. However, the substituents in alkylidene malonates are limited. To explore new substituents such as carboxyl and carbonyl groups, catalytic enantioselective Friedel-Crafts reactions of reactive ethenetricarboxylates and acyl-substituted methylenemalonates 1 were investigated. The reaction of 1 with indoles in the presence of catalytic amounts of chiral bisoxazoline copper(II) complex (10%) in THF at room temperature gave alkylated products in high yields and up to 95% ee. The enantioselectivity can be explained by the secondary orbital interaction on approach of indole to the less hindered side of the 1-Cu(II)-ligand complex.

  7. Electrical polymerization of a tetrazole polymer-modified electrode and its catalytic reaction toward dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Mu-Tao; Whang, Thou-Jen

    2017-02-01

    A conducting polymer-modified electrode was proposed in this article, which was fabricated by electropolymerization of 5-amino-1H-tetrazole (ATet) on a glassy carbon electrode. Electrochemical studies such as differential pulse voltammetry and chronoamperometry were performed for the evaluation of the rate constant of the catalytic reaction, the diffusion coefficient of the analyte dopamine, and the linear dynamic range of the analyte determination. The film modified electrode has superior resolving power in quantitative determination from the mixture of analytes and it was found to be an efficient functionalized electrode for its sensitivity and selectivity toward the analyte of interest.

  8. Study on surface properties of gamma-alumina catalytic membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mengchenu Lu; Guoxing Xiong; Bauser, H.

    1994-12-31

    In recent years, preparation and separation applications of gamma-alumina membranes have been extensively studied. In catalysis research field, this membrane can be used not only as a separating medium but also as a catalyst or catalyst support. In this paper, a gamma-alumina catalytic membrane was prepared by a sol-gel technique, then special attention was paid to its surface properties related to catalysis, its surface acidity, hydroxyl, microstructure and pore properties was studied by IR with pyridine adsorption, XRD and N{sub 2} adsorption at low temperature, 1-butanol dehydration as a probe reaction was used to study its reaction property.

  9. Catalytic reaction of cytokinin dehydrogenase: preference for quinones as electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Fraaije, Marco W; Galuszka, Petr; Sebela, Marek; Pec, Pavel; Hrbác, Jan; Novák, Ondrej; Bilyeu, Kristin D; English, James T; Frébort, Ivo

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic reaction of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.99.12) was studied in detail using the recombinant flavoenzyme from maize. Determination of the redox potential of the covalently linked flavin cofactor revealed a relatively high potential dictating the type of electron acceptor that can be used by the enzyme. Using 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol, 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone or 1,4-naphthoquinone as electron acceptor, turnover rates with N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine of approx. 150 s(-1) could be obtained. This suggests that the natural electron acceptor of the enzyme is quite probably a p-quinone or similar compound. By using the stopped-flow technique, it was found that the enzyme is rapidly reduced by N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine (k(red)=950 s(-1)). Re-oxidation of the reduced enzyme by molecular oxygen is too slow to be of physiological relevance, confirming its classification as a dehydrogenase. Furthermore, it was established for the first time that the enzyme is capable of degrading aromatic cytokinins, although at low reaction rates. As a result, the enzyme displays a dual catalytic mode for oxidative degradation of cytokinins: a low-rate and low-substrate specificity reaction with oxygen as the electron acceptor, and high activity and strict specificity for isopentenyladenine and analogous cytokinins with some specific electron acceptors. PMID:14965342

  10. (Gold core)@(ceria shell) nanostructures for plasmon-enhanced catalytic reactions under visible light.

    PubMed

    Li, Benxia; Gu, Ting; Ming, Tian; Wang, Junxin; Wang, Peng; Wang, Jianfang; Yu, Jimmy C

    2014-08-26

    Driving catalytic reactions with sunlight is an excellent example of sustainable chemistry. A prerequisite of solar-driven catalytic reactions is the development of photocatalysts with high solar-harvesting efficiencies and catalytic activities. Herein, we describe a general approach for uniformly coating ceria on monometallic and bimetallic nanocrystals through heterogeneous nucleation and growth. The method allows for control of the shape, size, and type of the metal core as well as the thickness of the ceria shell. The plasmon shifts of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures resulting from the switching between Ce(IV) and Ce(III) are observed. The selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde, one of the fundamental reactions for organic synthesis, performed under both broad-band and monochromatic light, demonstrates the visible-light-driven catalytic activity and reveals the synergistic effect on the enhanced catalysis of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures.

  11. A computational study of detoxification of lewisite warfare agents by British anti-lewisite: catalytic effects of water and ammonia on reaction mechanism and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Chandan; Pakhira, Srimanta; Sen, Kaushik; Das, Abhijit K

    2013-04-25

    trans-2-Chlorovinyldichloroarsine (lewisite, L agent, Lew-I) acts as a blistering agents. British anti-lewisite (BAL, 2,3-dimercaptopropanol) has long been used as an L-agent antidote. The main reaction channels for the detoxification proceed via breaking of As-Cl bonds and formation of As-S bonds, producing stable, nontoxic ring product [(2-methyl-1,3,2-dithiarsolan-4-yl)methanol]. M06-2X/GENECP calculations have been carried out to establish the enhanced rate of detoxification mechanism in the presence of NH3 and H2O catalysts in both gas and solvent phases, which has been modeled by use of the polarized continuum model (PCM). In addition, natural bond orbital (NBO) and atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis have been performed to characterize the intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the transition states. Transition-state theory (TST) calculation establishes that the rates of NH3-catalyzed (2.88 × 10(-11) s(-1)) and H2O-catalyzed (2.42 × 10(-11) s(-1)) reactions are reasonably faster than the uncatalyzed detoxification (5.44 × 10(-13) s(-1)). The results obtained by these techniques give new insight into the mechanism of the detoxification process, identification and thermodynamic characterization of the relevant stationary species, the proposal of alternative paths on modeled potential energy surfaces for uncatalyzed reaction, and the rationalization of the mechanistic role played by catalysts and solvents.

  12. First principles molecular dynamics study of catalytic reactions of biological macromolecular systems: toward analyses with QM/MM hybrid molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Boero, Mauro; Park, Jung Mee; Hagiwara, Yohsuke; Tateno, Masaru

    2007-09-12

    First principles molecular dynamics simulations performed on a fully solvated RNA model structure allowed us to investigate the mechanism for enzymatic cleavage reactions, in vitro, of RNA enzymes (ribozymes). The concerted action of two metal catalysts turns out to be the most efficient way to promote, on the one hand, the proton abstraction from 2(')-OH that triggers the nucleophilic attack and, on the other hand, the cleavage of the P-O(5(')) bond. In fact, the elimination of one of the two metal cations leads to an increase in the activation energy of the reaction. The simulated pathway shows that an OH(-) in the coordination shell of the Mg(2+) close to O(2(')) promotes the initial proton abstraction and prevents its transfer to the ribozyme. This suggests that, in a real ribozyme, the double-metal-ion reaction mechanism is preferred with respect to single-metal-ion mechanisms either in the presence or in absence of the OH(-) anion. Finally, an insight into the importance of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) schemes is discussed in view of the modelling of a realistic system carrying all the features of a true ribozyme.

  13. Stoichiometric Reactions of Acylnickel(II) Complexes with Electrophiles and the Catalytic Synthesis of Ketones

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Acylnickel(II) complexes feature prominently in cross-electrophile coupling (XEC) reactions that form ketones, yet their reactivity has not been systematically investigated. We present here our studies on the reactivity of acylnickel(II) complexes with a series of carbon electrophiles. Bromobenzene, α-chloroethylbenzene, bromooctane, and iodooctane were reacted with (dtbbpy)NiII(C(O)C5H11)(Br) (1b) and (dtbbpy)NiII(C(O)tolyl)(Br) (1c) to form a variety of organic products. While reactions with bromobenzene formed complex mixtures of ketones, reactions with α-chloroethylbenzene were highly selective for the cross-ketone product. Reactions with iodooctane and bromooctane also produced the cross-ketone product, but in intermediate yield and selectivity. In most cases the presence or absence of a chemical reductant (zinc) had only a small effect on the selectivity of the reaction. The coupling of 1c with iodooctane (60% yield) was translated into a catalytic reaction, the carbonylative coupling of bromoarenes with primary bromoalkanes (six examples, 60% average yield). PMID:25364092

  14. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.

  15. Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction Snapshots in Crystals: INSIGHTS INTO THE MECHANISM OF PROTEIN KINASE A CATALYTIC SUBUNIT.

    PubMed

    Gerlits, Oksana; Tian, Jianhui; Das, Amit; Langan, Paul; Heller, William T; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca(2+) ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca(2+) cations with Mg(2+) ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. The present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.

  16. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; ...

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, themore » thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.« less

  17. Fundamental studies of the mechanism of catalytic reactions with catalysts effective in the gasification of carbon solids and the oxidative coupling of methane. Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesia, E.; Perry, D.L.; Heinemann, H.

    1994-06-01

    Catalytic gasification work has been completed and no other work is planned in the general area of catalytic gasification of coals and chars has operated without a post-doctoral fellow because of budget limitations during the first two quarters of FY1994. Dr. S. Sundararajan joined the group in April 1994 and will be assigned to the project throughout the remaining of the fiscal year. Results published by Hamakawa, et al. in The Journal of the Electrochemical Society have confirmed the concept of methane coupling via a membrane reactor. These findings confirm our previous conclusion that thinner membranes and increased surface activity for C-H bond activation at low temperatures are required in order to reach commercially attractive rates of reaction. The initial analysis of a theoretical model comparing the membrane and cyclic processes has been completed. The results indicate that perovskite membranes on the order of 50 microns will be needed for the membrane operation to be superior to a cyclic one. Two techniques, laser ablation and spin-coating/sol-gel chemistry are being tried to prepare the thin membranes described above. Studies of the magnetochemical properties of the calcium-nickel-potassium oxide powdered catalysts have been concluded and a manuscript describing the work has been completed. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe data for calcium-nickel-potassium films have been analyzed and an abstract of the results has been submitted for presentation at the Fall Meeting of the Materials Research Society. Initial films of strontium-zirconium oxide, using yttria-stabilized zirconia as a buffer layer, have been fabricated using pulsed laser deposition. X-ray diffraction data have been obtained for several of the strontium-zirconium-yttrium oxide films.

  18. Basic character of rare earth metal alkoxides. Utilization in catalytic C-C bond-forming reactions and catalytic asymmetric nitroaldol reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sasai, H.; Suzuki, T.; Arai, S.

    1992-05-20

    In a recent paper, the authors reported that Zr(O-t-Bu){sub 4} was an efficient and convenient basic reagent in organic synthesis. However, all reactions examined were performed with stoichiometric quantities of the reagent. The authors envisioned that rare earth metal alkoxides would be stronger bases than group 4 metal alkoxides due to the lower ionization potential (ca. 5.4-6.4 eV) and the lower electronegativity (1.1-1.3) of rare earth elements; thus, the catalytic use of rare earth metal alkoxides in organic synthesis was expected. Although a variety of rare earth metal alkoxides have been prepared for the last three decades, to the authors knowledge, there have been few reports concerning the basicity of rare earth metal alkoxides. Herein, the authors report several carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions catalyzed by rare earth metal alkoxides and their application to a catalytic asymmetric nitroaldol reaction.

  19. Sequential reactions directed by core/shell catalytic reactors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yanhu; Soh, Siowling; Apodaca, Mario M; Kim, Jiwon; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2010-04-09

    Millimeter-sized reactor particles made of permeable polymer doped with catalysts arranged in a core/shell fashion direct sequences of chemical reactions (e.g., alkyne coupling followed by hydrogenation or hydrosilylation followed by hydrogenation). Spatial compartmentalization of catalysts coupled with the diffusion of substrates controls reaction order and avoids formation of byproducts. The experimentally observed yields of reaction sequences are reproduced by a theoretical model, which accounts for the reaction kinetics and the diffusion of the species involved.

  20. The Catalytic Mechanism of Histone Acetyltransferase p300: From the Proton Transfer to Acetylation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinlei; Ouyang, Sisheng; Kong, Xiangqian; Liang, Zhongjie; Lu, Junyan; Zhu, Kongkai; Zhao, Dan; Zheng, Mingyue; Jiang, Hualiang; Liu, Xin; Marmorstein, Ronen; Luo, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300 acetylates the four core histones and other transcription factors to regulate a plethora of fundamental biological processes including cell growth, development, oncogenesis and apoptosis. Recent structural and biochemical studies on the p300 HAT domain revealed a Theorell-Chance, or “hit-and-run”, catalytic mechanism. Nonetheless, the chemical mechanism of the entire reaction process including the proton transfer (PT) scheme and consequent acetylation reaction route remains unclear. In this study, a combined computational strategy consisting of molecular modeling, molecular dynamic (MD) simulation and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulation was applied to elucidate these important issues. An initial p300/H3/Ac-CoA complex structure was modeled and optimized using a 100 ns MD simulation. Residues that play important roles in substrate binding and the acetylation reaction were comprehensively investigated. For the first time, these studies reveal a plausible PT scheme consisting of Y1394, D1507 and a conserved crystallographic water molecule, with all components of the scheme being stable during the MD simulation and the energy barrier low for PT to occur. The two-dimensional potential energy surface for the nucleophilic attack process was also calculated. The comparison of potential energies for two possible elimination half-reaction mechanisms revealed that Y1467 reprotonates the coenzyme-A leaving group to form product. This study provides new insights into the detailed catalytic mechanism of p300 and has important implications for the discovery of novel small molecule regulators for p300. PMID:24521098

  1. Propagating Surface Plasmon Polaritons: Towards Applications for Remote-Excitation Surface Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenglong; Fang, Yurui; Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Li; Sun, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonics is a well-established field, exploiting the interaction of light and metals at the nanoscale; with the help of surface plasmon polaritons, remote-excitation can also be observed by using silver or gold plasmonic waveguides. Recently, plasmonic catalysis was established as a new exciting platform for heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Recent reports present remote-excitation surface catalytic reactions as a route to enhance the rate of chemical reactions, and offer a pathway to control surface catalytic reactions. In this review, we focus on recent advanced reports on silver plasmonic waveguide for remote-excitation surface catalytic reactions. First, the synthesis methods and characterization techniques of sivelr nanowire plasmonic waveguides are summarized, and the properties and physical mechanisms of plasmonic waveguides are presented in detail. Then, the applications of plasmonic waveguides including remote excitation fluorescence and SERS are introduced, and we focus on the field of remote-excitation surface catalytic reactions. Finally, forecasts are made for possible future applications for the remote-excitation surface catalysis by plasmonic waveguides in living cells.

  2. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Andrés; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Evans, James W.

    2016-05-01

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A →Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Furthermore, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A .

  3. Direct catalytic asymmetric aldol reactions of thioamides: toward a stereocontrolled synthesis of 1,3-polyols.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Mitsutaka; Yazaki, Ryo; Suzuki, Yuta; Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2009-12-30

    A direct catalytic asymmetric aldol reaction of thioamides with a soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base cooperative catalytic system comprising (R,R)-Ph-BPE/[Cu(CH(3)CN)(4)]PF(6)/LiOAr is described. Highly chemoselective deprotonative activation of thioamides allows for a direct aldol reaction of alpha-nonbranched aliphatic aldehydes, which are susceptible to self-condensation. Facile reduction of the thioamide functionality and a catalyst-controlled second aldol reaction provides 1,3-diols in a highly stereoselective manner.

  4. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia, Andres; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; ...

    2016-05-20

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A → Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Hence, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A.

  5. Catalytic effect of magnetic nanoparticles over the H2O2 decomposition reaction.

    PubMed

    Andrade, A L; Souza, D M; Pereira, M C; Fabris, J D; Domingues, R Z

    2009-06-01

    This paper compares the rate of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide when controlled nano-sized magnetite powders are used as catalysts. Two different nano-sized powders and a Fe0/Fe3O4 composite have been used. The nanoparticle samples were synthesized by: (i) a chemical reduction-precipitation method and, (ii) by reduction under H2 atmosphere at 250 degrees C, of a hematite sample previously prepared. The composite, Fe0/Fe3O4, was prepared by thermal controlled reduction of nanoparticles of Fe2O3 obtained from hematite under H2 at 300 degrees C. The samples were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, and Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature, and surface area. The catalytic effect was studied in the decomposition reaction of H2O2 by measuring the formation of gaseous O2. The results showed the presence of pure Fe3O4 for nano magnetite samples and Fe0 and Fe3O4 for the composite sample. The average particle sizes of the magnetite, calculated from reflection 311 by using Scherrer equation were about 33 and 10 nm for the samples obtained by hematite reduction and reduction-precipitation, respectively. Kinetic studies of the decomposition of peroxide showed a higher decomposition rate for the hydrogen peroxide reaction when nanoparticles prepared by reduction-precipitation method were used as catalysts. The high catalytic activity associated to nanoparticles is discussed in terms of the high surface area of these samples.

  6. Pt loaded carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rashmi; Singh, Ashish; Kohli, D. K.; Singh, M. K.; Gupta, P. K.

    2013-06-01

    We report development and characterization of platinum doped carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas. The carbon aerogel with uniformly dispersed platinum nanoparticles was prepared by adding platinum precursor during the sol-gel process. Thereafter colloidal PTFE was mixed with the platinum doped carbon aerogel powder and coated on Dixon rings to obtain hydrophobic catalyst with required mechanical strength. Detailed studies have been carried out to observe the effect of physical characteristics of the catalyst powder (surface area and pore size of aerogels, Pt cluster size and its valence state etc) and the different coating parameters (PTFE to Pt-CA ratio and Pt loading on Dixon ring) on volume transfer rate (Ky.a) for H/D reaction. Ky.a values of ˜0.8 m3 (STP).s-1. m-3 were obtained for Pt loading of 7% and Pt cluster size of 3 nm at atmospheric pressure.

  7. Catalytic effects of silver plasmonic nanoparticles on the redox reaction leading to ABTS˙(+) formation studied using UV-visible and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Leis, A; Jancura, D; Antalik, M; Garcia-Ramos, J V; Sanchez-Cortes, S; Jurasekova, Z

    2016-09-29

    ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) is a compound extensively employed to evaluate the free radical trapping capacity of antioxidant agents and complex mixtures such as biological fluids or foods. This evaluation is usually performed by using a colourimetric experiment, where preformed ABTS radical cation (ABTS˙(+)) molecules are reduced in the presence of an antioxidant causing an intensity decrease of the specific ABTS˙(+) UV-visible absorption bands. In this work we report a strong effect of silver plasmonic nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on ABTS leading to the formation of ABTS˙(+). The reaction of ABTS with Ag NPs has been found to be dependent on the interfacial and plasmonic properties of NPs. Specifically, this reaction is pronounced in the presence of spherical nanoparticles prepared by the reduction of silver nitrate with hydroxylamine (AgH) and in the case of star-shaped silver nanoparticles (AgNS). On the other hand, spherical nanoparticles prepared by the reduction of silver nitrate with citrate apparently do not react with ABTS. Additionally, the formation of ABTS˙(+) is investigated by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and the assignment of the most intense vibrational bands of this compound is performed. The SERS technique enables us to detect this radical cation at very low concentrations of ABTS (∼2 μM). Altogether, these findings allow us to suggest the use of ABTS/Ag NPs-systems as reliable and easy going substrates to test the antioxidant capacity of various compounds, even at concentrations much lower than those usually used in the spectrophotometric assays. Moreover, we have suggested that ABTS could be employed as a suitable agent to investigate the interfacial and plasmonic properties of the metal nanoparticles and, thus, to characterize the nanoparticle metal systems employed for various purposes.

  8. In-situ observations of catalytic surface reactions with soft x-rays under working conditions.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Ryo; Kondoh, Hiroshi

    2015-03-04

    Catalytic chemical reactions proceeding on solid surfaces are an important topic in fundamental science and industrial technologies such as energy conversion, pollution control and chemical synthesis. Complete understanding of the heterogeneous catalysis and improving its efficiency to an ultimate level are the eventual goals for many surface scientists. Soft x-ray is one of the prime probes to observe electronic and structural information of the target materials. Most studies in surface science using soft x-rays have been performed under ultra-high vacuum conditions due to the technical limitation, though the practical catalytic reactions proceed under ambient pressure conditions. However, recent developments of soft x-ray based techniques operating under ambient pressure conditions have opened a door to the in-situ observation of materials under realistic environments. The near-ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) using synchrotron radiation enables us to observe the chemical states of surfaces of condensed matters under the presence of gas(es) at elevated pressures, which has been hardly conducted with the conventional XPS technique. Furthermore, not only the NAP-XPS but also ambient-pressure compatible soft x-ray core-level spectroscopies, such as near-edge absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), have been significantly contributing to the in-situ observations. In this review, first we introduce recent developments of in-situ observations using soft x-ray techniques and current status. Then we present recent new findings on catalytically active surfaces using soft x-ray techniques, particularly focusing on the NAP-XPS technique. Finally we give a perspective on the future direction of this emerging technique.

  9. Rapid-reaction kinetic characterization of the pathway of streptokinase-plasmin catalytic complex formation.

    PubMed

    Verhamme, Ingrid M; Bock, Paul E

    2008-09-19

    Binding of the fibrinolytic proteinase plasmin (Pm) to streptokinase (SK) in a tight stoichiometric complex transforms Pm into a potent proteolytic activator of plasminogen. SK binding to the catalytic domain of Pm, with a dissociation constant of 12 pm, is assisted by SK Lys(414) binding to a Pm kringle, which accounts for a 11-20-fold affinity decrease when Pm lysine binding sites are blocked by 6-aminohexanoic acid (6-AHA) or benzamidine. The pathway of SK.Pm catalytic complex formation was characterized by stopped-flow kinetics of SK and the Lys(414) deletion mutant (SKDeltaK414) binding to Pm labeled at the active site with 5-fluorescein ([5F]FFR-Pm) and the reverse reactions by competitive displacement of [5F]FFR-Pm with active site-blocked Pm. The rate constants for the biexponential fluorescence quenching caused by SK and SKDeltaK414 binding to [5F]FFR-Pm were saturable as a function of SK concentration, reporting encounter complex affinities of 62-110 nm in the absence of lysine analogs and 4900-6500 and 1430-2200 nm in the presence of 6-AHA and benzamidine, respectively. The encounter complex with SKDeltaK414 was approximately 10-fold weaker in the absence of lysine analogs but indistinguishable from that of native SK in the presence of 6-AHA and benzamidine. The studies delineate for the first time the sequence of molecular events in the formation of the SK.Pm catalytic complex and its regulation by kringle ligands. Analysis of the forward and reverse reactions supports a binding mechanism in which SK Lys(414) binding to a Pm kringle accompanies near-diffusion-limited encounter complex formation followed by two slower, tightening conformational changes.

  10. Continuous-flow processes for the catalytic partial hydrogenation reaction of alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Marrodan, Carmen; Liguori, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    The catalytic partial hydrogenation of substituted alkynes to alkenes is a process of high importance in the manufacture of several market chemicals. The present paper shortly reviews the heterogeneous catalytic systems engineered for this reaction under continuous flow and in the liquid phase. The main contributions appeared in the literature from 1997 up to August 2016 are discussed in terms of reactor design. A comparison with batch and industrial processes is provided whenever possible. PMID:28503209

  11. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  12. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  13. Self-organized criticality of a catalytic reaction network under flow.

    PubMed

    Awazu, Akinori; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2009-07-01

    Self-organized critical behavior in a catalytic reaction network system induced by smallness in the molecule number is reported. The system under a flow of chemicals is shown to undergo a transition from a stationary to an intermittent reaction phase when the flow rate is decreased. In the intermittent reaction phase, two temporal regimes with active and halted reactions alternate. The number frequency of reaction events at each active regime and its duration time are shown to obey a universal power law with the exponents 4/3 and 3/2, respectively, independently of the parameters and network structure. These power laws are explained by a one-dimensional random-walk representation of the number of catalytically active chemicals. Possible relevance of the result to reaction dynamics in artificial and biological cells is briefly discussed.

  14. Catalytic conversion of bio-oil to oxygen-containing fuels by simultaneous reactions with 1-butanol and 1-octene over solid acids: Model compound studies and reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Sui, Shu-Juan; Tan, Shun; Wang, Qing-Wen; Pittman, Charles U

    2013-02-01

    Upgrading bio-oil by addition reactions across olefins represents a route to refine bio-oil to combustible and stable oxygen-containing fuels. Development and application of highly active strong solid acid catalysts with good hydrothermal stability has become a key determinant for success, because bio-oil's complexity includes large amounts of water. Temperatures of 120°C or more are needed for satisfactory kinetics. Batch upgrading of a model bio-oil (phenol/water/acetic acid/acetaldehyde/hydroxyacetone/d-glucose/2-hydroxymethylfuran) over five water-tolerant solid acid catalysts (Dowex50WX2, Amberlyst15, Amberlyst36, silica sulfuric acid (SSA) and Cs(2.5)H(0.5)PW(12)O(40) supported on K-10 clay (Cs(2.5)/K-10, 30wt.%)) with 1-octene/1-butanol were studied at 120°C/3h. SSA, , exhibited the highest water tolerance and activity. Upgrading using olefin/1-butanol is complex, involving many simultaneous competing esterification, etherification, olefin hydration, phenol alkylation, aldol condensation, sugar dehydration etc. reactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Catalytic studies on a novel synthesis of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Palekar, V.M.; Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1991-06-28

    Catalytic studies on a new method for methanol synthesis from CO and H{sub 2} in a slurry reactor are described. This reaction proceeds through the carbonylation of methanol to methyl formate in the liquid phase followed by hydrogenolysis of methyl formate to two molecules of methanol; the net result is the reaction of CO with H{sub 2} to give methanol. Moderate temperatures and pressures (100--160{degrees}C, 50--65 atm) are used. Reaction rates using mixed catalysts comprised of an alkali methoxide and Cu-chromite are presented. It seems likely that Cu-chromite maintains the activity of the alkali methoxide catalyst. A mixed catalyst comprised of potassium methoxide and Cu-chromite was found to be the most active under the reaction conditions used. Evidence is provided for an interaction between the alkali methoxide and Cu-chromite. 27 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Catalytic asymmetric direct-type 1,4-addition reactions of simple amides.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirotsugu; Sato, Io; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Shū

    2015-04-08

    The development of catalytic asymmetric direct-type reactions of less acidic carbonyl compounds such as amides and esters has been a challenging theme in organic chemistry for decades. Here we describe the asymmetric direct 1,4-addition reactions of simple amides with α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds using a catalytic amount of a novel chiral catalyst consisting of a potassium base and a macrocyclic chiral crown ether. The desired 1,5-dicarbonyl compounds were obtained in high yields with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities. This is the first example of a highly enantioselective catalytic direct-type reaction of simple amides. In addition, the structure of the chiral potassium catalyst has been investigated by X-ray crystallographic, dynamic (1)H NMR, and MALDI-TOF MS analyses.

  17. A phosphoenzyme mimic, overlapping catalytic sites and reaction coordinate motion for human NAMPT

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, Emmanuel S.; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Almo, Steven C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is highly evolved to capture nicotinamide (NAM) and replenish the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pool during ADP-ribosylation and transferase reactions. ATP-phosphorylation of an active-site histidine causes catalytic activation, increasing NAM affinity by 160,000. Crystal structures of NAMPT with catalytic site ligands identify the phosphorylation site, establish its role in catalysis, demonstrate unique overlapping ATP and phosphoribosyltransferase sites, and establish reaction coordinate motion. NAMPT structures with beryllium fluoride indicate a covalent H247-BeF3− as the phosphohistidine mimic. Activation of NAMPT by H247-phosphorylation causes stabilization of the enzyme-phosphoribosylpyrophosphate complex, permitting efficient capture of NAM. Reactant and product structures establish reaction coordinate motion for NAMPT to be migration of the ribosyl anomeric carbon from the pyrophosphate leaving group to the nicotinamide-N1 while the 5-phosphoryl group, the pyrophosphate moiety, and the nicotinamide ring remain fixed in the catalytic site. PMID:19666527

  18. A Phosphoenzyme Mimic, Overlapping Catalytic Sites and Reaction Coordinate Motion for Human NAMPT

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, E.; Ho, M; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is highly evolved to capture nicotinamide (NAM) and replenish the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pool during ADP-ribosylation and transferase reactions. ATP-phosphorylation of an active-site histidine causes catalytic activation, increasing NAM affinity by 160,000. Crystal structures of NAMPT with catalytic site ligands identify the phosphorylation site, establish its role in catalysis, demonstrate unique overlapping ATP and phosphoribosyltransferase sites, and establish reaction coordinate motion. NAMPT structures with beryllium fluoride indicate a covalent H247-BeF3- as the phosphohistidine mimic. Activation of NAMPT by H247-phosphorylation causes stabilization of the enzyme-phosphoribosylpyrophosphate complex, permitting efficient capture of NAM. Reactant and product structures establish reaction coordinate motion for NAMPT to be migration of the ribosyl anomeric carbon from the pyrophosphate leaving group to the nicotinamide-N1 while the 5-phosphoryl group, the pyrophosphate moiety, and the nicotinamide ring remain fixed in the catalytic site.

  19. Metal Vinylidenes as Catalytic Species in Organic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    McClory, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Organic vinylidene species have found limited use in organic synthesis due to their inaccessibility. In contrast, metal vinylidenes are much more stable, and may be readily accessed through transition metal activation of terminal alkynes. These electrophilic species may be trapped by a number of nucleophiles. Additionally, metal vinylidenes can participate in pericyclic reactions and processes involving migration of a metal ligand to the vinylidene species. This review addresses the reactions and applications of metal vinylidenes in organic synthesis. PMID:18172846

  20. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data. PMID:15909350

  1. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-06-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data.

  2. Eley Rideal model for a monomer trimer catalytic reaction of the type A + B3 rarr AB: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, K. M.; Ahmad, P.; Iqbal, K.; Amin, M.

    2004-01-01

    The phase diagram of the monomer-trimer model has already been studied on the basis of (a thermal) Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism, the details of which can be found in the literature. Here, we have studied the effect of the Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanism on the phase diagram of this system. With the introduction of the ER process, the continuous transition of the LH model has been eliminated, while reactive window width and the production rate have been increased. The production rate can be represented by simple mathematical equations. The effect of monomer diffusion and desorption has also been studied for both models. Results are compared and some interesting observations are reported.

  3. Two-dimensional reaction free energy surfaces of catalytic reaction: effects of protein conformational dynamics on enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Min, Wei; Xie, X Sunney; Bagchi, Biman

    2008-01-17

    We introduce a two-dimensional (2D) multisurface reaction free energy description of the catalytic cycle that explicitly connects the recently observed multi-time-scale conformational dynamics as well as dispersed enzymatic kinetics to the classical Michaelis-Menten equation. A slow conformational motion on a collective enzyme coordinate Q facilitates the catalytic reaction along the intrinsic reaction coordinate X, providing a dynamic realization of Pauling's well-known idea of transition-state stabilization. The catalytic cycle is modeled as transitions between multiple displaced harmonic wells in the XQ space representing different states of the cycle, which is constructed according to the free energy driving force of the cycle. Subsequent to substrate association with the enzyme, the enzyme-substrate complex under strain exhibits a nonequilibrium relaxation toward a new conformation that lowers the activation energy of the reaction, as first proposed by Haldane. The chemical reaction in X is thus enslaved to the down hill slow motion on the Q surface. One consequence of the present theory is that, in spite of the existence of dispersive kinetics, the Michaelis-Menten expression of the catalysis rate remains valid under certain conditions, as observed in recent single-molecule experiments. This dynamic theory builds the relationship between the protein conformational dynamics and the enzymatic reaction kinetics and offers a unified description of enzyme fluctuation-assisted catalysis.

  4. Stochastic surface walking reaction sampling for resolving heterogeneous catalytic reaction network: A revisit to the mechanism of water-gas shift reaction on Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jie; Shang, Cheng; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2017-10-01

    Heterogeneous catalytic reactions on surface and interfaces are renowned for ample intermediate adsorbates and complex reaction networks. The common practice to reveal the reaction mechanism is via theoretical computation, which locates all likely transition states based on the pre-guessed reaction mechanism. Here we develop a new theoretical method, namely, stochastic surface walking (SSW)-Cat method, to resolve the lowest energy reaction pathway of heterogeneous catalytic reactions, which combines our recently developed SSW global structure optimization and SSW reaction sampling. The SSW-Cat is automated and massively parallel, taking a rough reaction pattern as input to guide reaction search. We present the detailed algorithm, discuss the key features, and demonstrate the efficiency in a model catalytic reaction, water-gas shift reaction on Cu(111) (CO + H2O → CO2 + H2). The SSW-Cat simulation shows that water dissociation is the rate-determining step and formic acid (HCOOH) is the kinetically favorable product, instead of the observed final products, CO2 and H2. It implies that CO2 and H2 are secondary products from further decomposition of HCOOH at high temperatures. Being a general purpose tool for reaction prediction, the SSW-Cat may be utilized for rational catalyst design via large-scale computations.

  5. Catalytic activation of carbohydrates as formaldehyde equivalents for Stetter reaction with enones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junmin; Xing, Chong; Tiwari, Bhoopendra; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2013-06-05

    We disclose the first catalytic activation of carbohydrates as formaldehyde equivalents to generate acyl anions as one-carbon nucleophilic units for a Stetter reaction. The activation involves N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-catalyzed C-C bond cleavage of carbohydrates via a retro-benzoin-type process to generate the acyl anion intermediates. This Stetter reaction constitutes the first success in generating formal formaldehyde-derived acyl anions as one-carbon nucleophiles for non-self-benzoin processes. The renewable nature of carbohydrates, accessible from biomass, further highlights the practical potential of this fundamentally interesting catalytic activation.

  6. SpaciMS: spatial and temporal operando resolution of reactions within catalytic monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Sa, Jacinto; Fernandes, Daniel; Aiouache, Farid; Goguet, Alexandre; Hardacdre, Christopher; Lundie, David; Naeem, Wasif; Partridge Jr, William P; Stere, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Monolithic catalysts are widely used as structured catalysts, especially in the abatement of pollutants. Probing what happens inside these monoliths during operation is, therefore, vital for modelling and prediction of the catalyst behavior. SpaciMS is a spatially resolved capillary-inlet mass spectroscopy system allowing for the generation of spatially resolved maps of the reactions within monoliths. In this study SpaciMS results combined with 3D CFD modelling demonstrate that SpaciMS is a highly sensitive and minimally invasive technique that can provide reaction maps as well as catalytic temporal behavior. Herein we illustrate this by examining kinetic oscillations during a CO oxidation reaction over a Pt/Rh on alumina catalyst supported on a cordierite monolith. These oscillations were only observed within the monolith by SpaciMS between 30 and 90% CO conversion. Equivalent experiments performed in a plug-flow reactor using this catalyst in a crushed form over a similar range of reaction conditions did not display any oscillations demonstrating the importance of intra monolith analysis. This work demonstrates that the SpaciMS offers an accurate and comprehensive picture of structured catalysts under operation.

  7. Sum frequency generation and catalytic reaction studies of the removal of the organic capping agents from Pt nanoparticles by UV-ozone treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Aliaga, Cesar; Park, Jeong Y.; Yamada, Yusuke; Lee, Hyun Sook; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-12-10

    We report the structure of the organic capping layers of platinum colloid nanoparticles and their removal by UV-ozone exposure. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFGVS) studies identify the carbon-hydrogen stretching modes on poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and tetradecyl tributylammonium bromide (TTAB)-capped platinum nanoparticles. We found that the UV-ozone treatment technique effectively removes the capping layer on the basis of several analytical measurements including SFGVS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The overall shape of the nanoparticles was preserved after the removal of capping layers, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SFGVS of ethylene hydrogenation on the clean platinum nanoparticles demonstrates the existence of ethylidyne and di-{sigma}-bonded species, indicating the similarity between single-crystal and nanoparticle systems.

  8. "Ab initio" synthesis of zeolites for preestablished catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Eva María; Portilla, M Teresa; Paris, Cecilia; León-Escamilla, Alejandro; Boronat, Mercedes; Moliner, Manuel; Corma, Avelino

    2017-03-10

    Unlike homogeneous catalysts that are often designed for particular reactions, zeolites are heterogeneous catalysts that are explored and optimized in a heuristic fashion. We present a methodology for synthesizing active and selective zeolites by using organic structure-directing agents that mimic the transition state (TS) of preestablished reactions to be catalyzed. In these zeolites, the pores and cavities could be generated approaching a molecular-recognition pattern. For disproportionation of toluene and isomerization of ethylbenzene into xylenes, the TSs are larger than the reaction products. Zeolite ITQ-27 showed high disproportionation activity, and ITQ-64 showed high selectivity for the desired para and ortho isomers. For the case of a product and TS of similar size, we synthesized a catalyst, MIT-1, for the isomerization of endo-dicyclopentane into adamantane.

  9. Facilitating ZnO nanostructure growths by making seeds for self-catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Liang; Yu, Choongho

    2012-03-15

    Long and straight single-crystalline ZnO nanowires were successfully synthesized on ZnCl{sub 2}-coated Zn foils in oxygen environment by using simple thermal annealing processes. With relatively low reaction temperatures (410 and 700 Degree-Sign C), nanowires whose lengths and diameters are up to {approx}50 {mu}m and 10-100 nm were obtained. We found that ZnO seeds created from ZnCl{sub 2} played an important role in facilitating the ZnO nanowire growth via self-catalytic reactions. Systematic studies by altering critical synthesis factors that determine shape, length, diameter, and density of the nanowires were performed in order to unveil the growth mechanisms. We also compared the nanowires synthesized from Zn foils with tetrapod ZnO nanostructures synthesized from Zn powders at various temperatures. - Graphical abstract: (Left panel) ZnO seeds from ZnCl{sub 2} after thermal annealing at 500 Degree-Sign C for 5 min, (right panel) dense ZnO nanowires grown from Zn foils with ZnCl{sub 2} coating after thermal annealing at 700 Degree-Sign C for 60 min. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnCl{sub 2} facilitated ZnO nanowire growth by creating ZnO seeds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO nanowires were synthesized via self-catalytic reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long and straight single-crystalline ZnO nanowires were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Key parameters in thermal annealing processes were identified.

  10. Prediction of Rate Constants for Catalytic Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Ex machina: A computational method for predicting rate constants for reactions within microporous zeolite catalysts with chemical accuracy has recently been reported. A key feature of this method is a stepwise QM/MM approach that allows accuracy to be achieved while using realistic models with accessible computer resources.

  11. Catalytic reduction of CN−, CO and CO2 by nitrogenase cofactors in lanthanide-driven reactions**

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Chung

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogenase cofactors can be extracted into an organic solvent and added in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-free, organic solvent-based reaction medium to catalyze the reduction of cyanide (CN−), carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) when samarium (II) iodide (SmI2) and 2,6-lutidinium triflate (Lut-H) are supplied as a reductant and a proton source, respectively. Driven by SmI2, the cofactors not only catalytically reduce CN− or CO to C1-C4 hydrocarbons, but also catalytically reduce CO2 to CO and C1-C3 hydrocarbons. The observation of C-C coupling from CO2 reveals a unique, Fischer-Tropsch-like reaction with an atypical carbonaceous substrate; whereas the achievement of catalytic turnover of CN−, CO and CO2 by isolated cofactors suggests the possibility to develop nitrogenase-based electrocatalysts for hydrocarbon production from these carbon-containing compounds. PMID:25420957

  12. Phosphinocyclodextrins as confining units for catalytic metal centres. Applications to carbon–carbon bond forming reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; Sémeril, David; Oberhauser, Werner; Toupet, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Summary The capacity of two cavity-shaped ligands, HUGPHOS-1 and HUGPHOS-2, to generate exclusively singly phosphorus-ligated complexes, in which the cyclodextrin cavity tightly wraps around the metal centre, was explored with a number of late transition metal cations. Both cyclodextrin-derived ligands were assessed in palladium-catalysed Mizoroki–Heck coupling reactions between aryl bromides and styrene on one hand, and the rhodium-catalysed asymmetric hydroformylation of styrene on the other hand. The inability of both chiral ligands to form standard bis(phosphine) complexes under catalytic conditions was established by high-pressure NMR studies and shown to have a deep impact on the two carbon–carbon bond forming reactions both in terms of activity and selectivity. For example, when used as ligands in the rhodium-catalysed hydroformylation of styrene, they lead to both high isoselectivity and high enantioselectivity. In the study dealing with the Mizoroki–Heck reactions, comparative tests were carried out with WIDEPHOS, a diphosphine analogue of HUGPHOS-2. PMID:25383109

  13. Catalytic formation of monosaccharides: from the formose reaction towards selective synthesis.

    PubMed

    Delidovich, Irina V; Simonov, Alexandr N; Taran, Oxana P; Parmon, Valentin N

    2014-07-01

    The formose reaction (FR) has been long the focus of intensive investigations as a simple method for synthesis of complex biologically important monosaccharides and other sugar-like molecules from the simplest organic substrate-formaldehyde. The fundamental importance of the FR is predominantly connected with the ascertainment of plausible scenarios of chemical evolution which could have occurred on the prebiotic Earth to produce the very first molecules of carbohydrates, amino- and nucleic acids, as well as other vitally important substances. The practical importance of studies on the FR is the elaboration of catalytic methods for the synthesis of rare and non-natural monosaccharides and polyols. This Minireview considers the FR from the point of view of chemists working in the field of catalysis with emphasis on the mechanisms of numerous parallel and consequent catalytic transformations that take place during the FR. Based on its kinetics, the FR may be considered as a non-radical chain process with degenerate branching. The Minireview also considers different approaches to the control of selectivity of carbohydrate synthesis from formaldehyde and lower monosaccharides. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Thermodynamic criteria for estimating the kinetic parameters of catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrichev, I. I.; Zhensa, A. V.; Kol'tsova, E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic parameters are estimated using two criteria in addition to the traditional criterion that considers the consistency between experimental and modeled conversion data: thermodynamic consistency and the consistency with entropy production (i.e., the absolute rate of the change in entropy due to exchange with the environment is consistent with the rate of entropy production in the steady state). A special procedure is developed and executed on a computer to achieve the thermodynamic consistency of a set of kinetic parameters with respect to both the standard entropy of a reaction and the standard enthalpy of a reaction. A problem of multi-criterion optimization, reduced to a single-criterion problem by summing weighted values of the three criteria listed above, is solved. Using the reaction of NO reduction with CO on a platinum catalyst as an example, it is shown that the set of parameters proposed by D.B. Mantri and P. Aghalayam gives much worse agreement with experimental values than the set obtained on the basis of three criteria: the sum of the squares of deviations for conversion, the thermodynamic consistency, and the consistency with entropy production.

  15. Co-No Catalytic Surface Reaction on Body-Centered Cubic Structure:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, M.; Qaisrani, A. U.; Khan, M. K.

    A Monte Carlo Simulation study of the monomer dimer (CO-NO) heterogeneous catalytic reaction on body-centered cubic structure (BCC) is presented. The effect of Eley-Rideal (ER), diffusion of nitrogen and carbon monoxide on the phase diagram is investigated. The steady reactive state is observed while using Langmuir-Hinsehelwood (LH) mechanism. Whenever the ER mechanism is included in our simulation, the production of CO2 starts as soon as yCO departs from zero, which is consistent with the experimental results. The ER mechanism does not affect the production of N2. The effect of diffusion of CO and N are found very little on the steady state reactive region where the concentration of CO is very high.

  16. Robustness and modularity properties of a non-covalent DNA catalytic reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, David Yu

    2010-01-01

    The biophysics of nucleic acid hybridization and strand displacement have been used for the rational design of a number of nanoscale structures and functions. Recently, molecular amplification methods have been developed in the form of non-covalent DNA catalytic reactions, in which single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules catalyze the release of ssDNA product molecules from multi-stranded complexes. Here, we characterize the robustness and specificity of one such strand displacement-based catalytic reaction. We show that the designed reaction is simultaneously sensitive to sequence mutations in the catalyst and robust to a variety of impurities and molecular noise. These properties facilitate the incorporation of strand displacement-based DNA components in synthetic chemical and biological reaction networks. PMID:20194118

  17. Utilization of the Recycle Reactor in Determining Kinetics of Gas-Solid Catalytic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paspek, Stephen C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a laboratory scale reactor that determines the kinetics of a gas-solid catalytic reaction. The external recycle reactor construction is detailed with accompanying diagrams. Experimental details, application of the reactor to CO oxidation kinetics, interphase gradients, and intraphase gradients are discussed. (CS)

  18. Catalytic Friedel-Crafts Reactions of Highly Electronically Deactivated Benzylic Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Vuković, Vuk D; Richmond, Edward; Wolf, Eléna; Moran, Joseph

    2017-03-06

    Highly electronically deactivated benzylic alcohols, including those with a CF3 group adjacent to the OH-bearing carbon, undergo dehydrative Friedel-Crafts reactions upon exposure to catalytic Brønsted acid in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) solvent. Titration and kinetic experiments support the involvement of higher order solvent/acid clusters in catalysis.

  19. Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering with the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Smeltz, Andrew D.; Zvinevich, Yury; Gounder, Rajamani; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on…

  20. Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering with the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Smeltz, Andrew D.; Zvinevich, Yury; Gounder, Rajamani; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on…

  1. Utilization of the Recycle Reactor in Determining Kinetics of Gas-Solid Catalytic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paspek, Stephen C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a laboratory scale reactor that determines the kinetics of a gas-solid catalytic reaction. The external recycle reactor construction is detailed with accompanying diagrams. Experimental details, application of the reactor to CO oxidation kinetics, interphase gradients, and intraphase gradients are discussed. (CS)

  2. Direct Catalytic Asymmetric Mannich-Type Reaction of Alkylamides.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Fernando Arteaga; Liu, Zijian; Brewitz, Lennart; Chen, Jianyang; Sun, Bo; Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2016-05-20

    Direct enolate formation coupled with subsequent enantioselective C-C bond formation remains a topic of intense interest in asymmetric catalysis. This methodology is achieved even with low acidic amides without an electron-withdrawing group at the α-position in the context of a Mannich-type reaction. Acetate-, propionate-, and butyrate-type 7-azaindoline amides served as enolate precursors to afford the desired Mannich adducts with high stereoselectivity, and ligand-enabled diastereo-divergency provided access to both anti/syn diastereomers. The facile transformation of the amide moiety ensures the synthetic utility of the Mannich adducts.

  3. [The pH-dependent catalytic reaction of penicillin G acylase and its mutants].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Bo; Yang, Sheng; Wu, Xing-Jia; Li, Shi-Yun; Yuan, Zhong-Yi

    2002-11-01

    The pH-dependence in the catalytic reaction of recombinant penicillin G acylase and its mutants from B.megaterium has been studied by using kinetic methods. pK(1) and pK(2)of the residues of the wild type penicillin G a cylase, involved in the catalyzed reaction, were 5.50-5.87 and 10.73, respectively, from the curves of logV(m) and log(V(m)/K(m)) versus pH. Results showed tha t the pK(1) and pK(2) values of these residues of the mutants were similar to that of the wild type. pK(1) of 5.64-5.86 for mutant A and 5.69-6.96 for mutant B were obtained, while pK(2) was 10.61 and 10.48 for mutant A and B, respectively. At the same time, pK values at different temperatures were investigated. The ionization enthalpies(deltaH) were 44.38-59.03 kJ/mol and 147.37 kJ/mol, respectively, from th e curve of pK versus temperature. It was presumed according to the results mentioned above that the ionizing residues, involved in the reaction, wer e histidine and lysine that are localized around the active site.

  4. Fundamental studies of the mechanism of catalytic reactions with catalysts effective in the gasification of carbon solids and the oxidative coupling of methane. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.; Perry, D.L.

    1992-09-01

    Work will continue on the oxidative coupling reaction of methane over ternary oxide catalysts to produce C{sub 2}, C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} hydrocarbons and Particularly Olefins with high selectivity. The work which has shown that close to 100% selectivity can be obtained has received wide attention and has resulted in collaborative efforts with industry (CRADA) towards the development of a commercial process. An immediate purpose of additional work is to increase the conversion without diminishing the extremely high selectivity of the reaction and also to permit operation at higher space velocity to reduce equipment size. The mechanism of this reaction is not understood and much additional work is needed to explain the role of carbon formation and of water as intermediates in the reaction and to investigate whether carbon oxides are intermediates. It has been found that oxides other than calcium-nickel-potassium oxides can be useful catalysts for this reaction in the presence of steam and at relatively low temperatures and long contact times. Better definition of the class of binary metal oxides is required and better catalyst characterization is needed to ensure reproducibility Of catalyst preparation and operational results. Pretreatment of the catalyst should be shortened and higher space velocities must be obtained. Close collaboration with Orion ACT is required to advance the project toward the pilot plant stage. In the area of coal and char catalytic steam gasification, the large volume of data obtained at atmospheric pressure will be extended to operations at higher pressures.

  5. Three Dimensional Hybrids of Vertical Graphene-nanosheet Sandwiched by Ag-nanoparticles for Enhanced Surface Selectively Catalytic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Sun, Mentao; Liu, Zhe; Quan, Baogang; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructure is perfect for the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and also very suitable for surface catalytic reaction, but how to design and fabricate is still a robust task. Here, we show a 3D plasmonic nanohybrid of vertical graphene-nanosheet sandwiched by Ag-nanoparticles on the silicon nanocone array substrate for enhanced surface catalytic reaction. By SERS detection, we find that this hierarchical nanohybrid structure is highly efficient in the enhancement of catalytic reaction, even at a very low concentration of 10−11 M, which is far better than previous reports by four orders of magnitude. A strong electric field enhancement produced in the 3D framework nanohybrids of graphene nanosheet/Ag-nanoparticles is responsible for this great enhancement of catalytic reaction, due to larger electron collective oscillation in the composite system. Especially the oxygen adsorbed on the graphene and Ag nanoparticles can be excited to triplet excited states, and the electrons on the graphene and the nanoparticles can be effectively transferred to the oxygen, which plays very important role in molecular catalytic reactions. Our results demonstrate the contribution of graphene in plasmon-driven catalytic reactions, revealing a co-driven reaction process.This excellent SERS substrate can be used for future plasmon and graphene co-catalytic surface catalytic reactions, graphene-based surface plasmon sensors and so on. PMID:26522142

  6. Nuclear reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ``hot`` nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ``flow`` measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study {sup 40}Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs.

  7. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Single-species reactions on a random catalytic chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshanin, G.; Burlatsky, S. F.

    2002-11-01

    We present an exact solution for a catalytically activated annihilation A + A → 0 reaction taking place on a one-dimensional chain in which some segments (placed at random, with mean concentration p) possess special, catalytic properties. An annihilation reaction takes place as soon as any two A particles land from the reservoir onto two vacant sites at the extremities of the catalytic segment, or when any A particle lands onto a vacant site on a catalytic segment while the site at the other extremity of this segment is already occupied by another A particle. We find that the disorder-average pressure P(quen) per site of such a chain is given by P(quen) = P(Lan) + β-1F, where P(Lan) = β-1 ln(1 + z) is the Langmuir adsorption pressure, (z being the activity and β-1 the temperature), while β-1F is the reaction-induced contribution, which can be expressed, under appropriate change of notation, as the Lyapunov exponent for the product of 2 × 2 random matrices, obtained exactly by Derrida and Hilhorst (1983 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 16 2641). Explicit asymptotic formulae for the particle mean density and the compressibility are also presented.

  8. High-spatial-resolution mapping of catalytic reactions on single particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Yeh; Wolf, William J; Levartovsky, Yehonatan; Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C; Toste, F Dean; Gross, Elad

    2017-01-26

    The critical role in surface reactions and heterogeneous catalysis of metal atoms with low coordination numbers, such as found at atomic steps and surface defects, is firmly established. But despite the growing availability of tools that enable detailed in situ characterization, so far it has not been possible to document this role directly. Surface properties can be mapped with high spatial resolution, and catalytic conversion can be tracked with a clear chemical signature; however, the combination of the two, which would enable high-spatial-resolution detection of reactions on catalytic surfaces, has rarely been achieved. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to image and characterize single turnover sites at catalytic surfaces, but is restricted to reactions that generate highly fluorescing product molecules. Herein the chemical conversion of N-heterocyclic carbene molecules attached to catalytic particles is mapped using synchrotron-radiation-based infrared nanospectroscopy with a spatial resolution of 25 nanometres, which enabled particle regions that differ in reactivity to be distinguished. These observations demonstrate that, compared to the flat regions on top of the particles, the peripheries of the particles-which contain metal atoms with low coordination numbers-are more active in catalysing oxidation and reduction of chemically active groups in surface-anchored N-heterocyclic carbene molecules.

  9. High-spatial-resolution mapping of catalytic reactions on single particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Yeh; Wolf, William J.; Levartovsky, Yehonatan; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; Toste, F. Dean; Gross, Elad

    2017-01-01

    The critical role in surface reactions and heterogeneous catalysis of metal atoms with low coordination numbers, such as found at atomic steps and surface defects, is firmly established. But despite the growing availability of tools that enable detailed in situ characterization, so far it has not been possible to document this role directly. Surface properties can be mapped with high spatial resolution, and catalytic conversion can be tracked with a clear chemical signature; however, the combination of the two, which would enable high-spatial-resolution detection of reactions on catalytic surfaces, has rarely been achieved. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to image and characterize single turnover sites at catalytic surfaces, but is restricted to reactions that generate highly fluorescing product molecules. Herein the chemical conversion of N-heterocyclic carbene molecules attached to catalytic particles is mapped using synchrotron-radiation-based infrared nanospectroscopy with a spatial resolution of 25 nanometres, which enabled particle regions that differ in reactivity to be distinguished. These observations demonstrate that, compared to the flat regions on top of the particles, the peripheries of the particles—which contain metal atoms with low coordination numbers—are more active in catalysing oxidation and reduction of chemically active groups in surface-anchored N-heterocyclic carbene molecules.

  10. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Andres; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Evans, James W.

    2016-05-20

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A → Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Hence, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A.

  11. [The surface adsorption and selective catalytic reaction of NO on Cu-ZSM-5 using in situ DRIFTS].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Le-Fu; Chen, Yong-Heng

    2007-06-01

    The prepared Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst presents higher activity at low temperature during the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO, and the conversion from NO to N2 is 70.6% at 613 K. The in situ diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS) is an important method for studying surface adsorption of catalyst and mechanism of catalytic reaction, and was used to study the surface adsorbed species and the selective catalytic reduction reaction of NO on Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst in the presence of propene as reductant, with excess O2 and at 298-773 K. Based on the in-situ DRIFTS, a reaction mechanism is proposed that on Cu-ZSM-5, NO is first transformed to a series of NO(x) surface adsorbates, then these species react with the activating species of propene (C(x)H(y) or C(x)H(y)O(x)) to form organo-intermediates, including a process from organo-NH to organo-CN again to organo-NO(x) (organo-nitro or organo-nitrito), and finally these key intermediates react to form nitrogen. The role of Cu is to promote NO(x) content. Propene is easily activated on Cu-ZSM-5 with oxygen, and furthermore, the presence of oxygen is necessary to form organo-NO(x) intermediates.

  12. Catalytic asymmetric diels-alder reaction of quinone imine ketals: a site-divergent approach.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Nakatsu, Hiroki; Maruoka, Keiji

    2015-04-07

    The catalytic asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction of quinone imine ketals with diene carbamates catalyzed by axially chiral dicarboxylic acids is reported herein. A variety of primary and secondary alkyl-substituted quinone derivatives which have not been applied in previous asymmetric quinone Diels-Alder reactions could be employed using this method. More importantly, we succeeded in developing a strategy to divert the reaction site in unsymmetrical 3-alkyl quinone imine ketals from the inherently favored unsubstituted C=C bond to the disfavored alkyl-substituted C=C bond. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Conformational Substrate Selection Contributes to the Enzymatic Catalytic Reaction Mechanism of Pin1.

    PubMed

    Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban; Dörner, Ciro

    2016-12-15

    Conformational changes in enzymes and their role in their catalytic activity have been thoroughly addressed experimentally and theoretically. There is a vivid discussion in the field of enzyme catalysis on whether conformational changes of the enzyme are coupled to catalysis, or whether transition state stabilization through the preorganized protein and its electrostatic properties govern the catalysis. In this study, an additional contribution to the catalysis of one specific enzyme, Pin1, is proposed, which arises from its conformational selection of the peptide substrate from aqueous solution with the lowest activation barrier. The most stable conformers of the reactant (cis) and product (trans) peptide were identified through molecular dynamics simulations in combination with metadynamics. The cis-trans isomerization reaction was studied with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory together with the mean reaction force, which allows us to separate structural and electronic contributions to the activation barrier. Our results show that enzyme Pin1 binds the trans isomer in the conformation of the peptide with the smallest activation barrier and reduces the barrier further through specific substrate-enzyme interactions, as we have shown previously. The activation barrier of the cis peptide is independent of the conformer and remains unchanged in the enzyme.

  14. Polyethersulfone hollow fiber modified with poly(styrenesulfonate) and Pd nanoparticles for catalytic reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, C.; Gu, Y.; Remigy, J.-C.; Lahitte, J.-F.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work is the synthesis of polymer-stabilized Pd nanoparticles (PdNP) inside a functionalized polymeric porous membrane in order to develop hybrid catalytic membrane reactors and to test them in model metal-catalyzed organic reactions. For this goal, a polymeric membrane support (Polyethersulfone hollow fiber-shaped) was firstly functionalized with an ionogenic polymer (i.e. poly(styrenesulfonate) capable to retain PdNP precursors using an UV photo-grafting method. PdNP were then generated inside the polymeric matrix by chemical reduction of precursor salts (intermatrix synthesis). The catalytic performance of the PdNP catalytic membranes was evaluated using reduction of nitrophenol by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in water.

  15. The reaction mechanism of catalytic oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and ozone in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Park, J S; Choi, H; Ahn, K H

    2003-01-01

    The sorption and catalytic oxidation of model compounds (pCBA and phenanthrene) and NOM on FeOOH were investigated using hydrogen peroxide and ozone, respectively. After oxidation with ozone, the hydrophobic, transphilic, and hydrophilic NOM fractions were isolated using XAD-8 and -4 resins to analyze the reaction characteristics. The sorption of pCBA was strongly dependent upon the pH, but phenanthrene exhibited a sorption behavior that was independent of the pH. In the case of NOM, the hydrophobic portion showed higher sorption affinity than hydrophilic and transphilic at pH 7.2. The concentrations of model compounds and oxidants were measured during the oxidations and the efficiency was compared for tests done with ozone alone and those using catalytic ozonation. Through the comparison of the sorption and decomposition of the model compounds, along with the effects of bicarbonate addition, mechanisms for catalytic oxidation with hydrogen peroxide or ozone were proposed, respectively.

  16. Chiral N,N'-dioxides: new ligands and organocatalysts for catalytic asymmetric reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, XiaoHua; Lin, LiLi; Feng, XiaoMing

    2011-08-16

    Homochiral catalysts that can effect asymmetric transformations are invaluable in the production of optically active molecules. Researchers are actively pursuing the design of new ligands and organocatalysts by exploiting concepts derived from the application of bifunctional and C(2)-symmetric catalysts. Many homochiral catalysts containing amines, ethers, alcohols, and phosphines as electron-pair donors have been successfully developed. Amine N-oxides are highly polar substances. Despite their pronounced capacity as electron-pair donors, N-oxides have been underutilized in asymmetric reactions; they have only made a visible impact on the field in the preceding decade. Systematic studies have instead largely focused on pyridine- or quinoline-based scaffolds in organosilicon and coordination chemistry. The application of chiral tertiary amine N-oxides has not been widely pursued because of the difficulty of controlling the chirality at the tetrahedral nitrogen of the N-oxide moiety. In this Account, we outline the design of a new family of C(2)-symmetric N,N'-dioxides from readily available chiral amino acids. We then discuss the application of these chiral amine N-oxides as useful metal ligands and organocatalysts for asymmetric reactions. The high nucleophilicity of the oxygen in N-oxides is ideal for organocatalytic reactions that rely on nucleophilic activation of organosilicon reagents. These catalysts have been successfully applied in the asymmetric addition of trimethylsilylcyanide to aldehydes, ketones, aldimines, and ketimines, with good yields and excellent enantioselectivities. Asymmetric organocatalytic chlorination of β-ketoesters with N-chlorosuccinimide has also been achieved through hydrogen bond activation. The molecular framework of these N,N'-dioxides, with their multiple O-donors, also serves as a new tetradentate ligand that can coordinate a range of metal ions, including Cu(I), Cu(II), Ni(II), Mg(II), Fe(II), Co(II), In(III), Sc(III), La

  17. Vanadia/titania catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia. II. Studies of active sites and formulation of catalytic cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Topsoe, N.-Y.; Dumesic, J.A.; Topsoe, H.

    1995-01-01

    The reaction mechanism and catalytic cycle for the selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia over vanadia/titania catalysts has been elucidated by in situ on-line FTIR studies under steady-state conditions. Under all reaction conditions, and large concentration of ammonia is absorbed on both Lewis and Bronsted acid sites, whereas no significant amounts of adsorbed NO are adsorbed. The catalytic activity is found to be related to the ammonia adsorbed on the Bronsted acid site associated with V{sup 5+}-OH. Surface V=O groups are involved in activation of the adsorbed ammonia and are also found to play an important role in the catalytic cycle. The activation involves a transfer or a partial transfer of a hydrogen and reduced V-OH groups are produced. The 5{sup +}=O surface species are regenerated by oxidation. The results, therefore, show that the catalytic cycle consists of both acid-base and redox reactions. The ammonia adsorption is observed to be a fast equilibrated step under all the conditions studied but the other catalytically significant steps may shift depending on the reaction conditions. At high O{sub 2} partial pressures, the rate is mainly determined by the concentration of Bronsted acid sites and the NO partial pressure, whereas at low O{sub 2} partial pressures, surface reoxidation is slow and the rate becomes dependent on the concentration of V{sup 5+}=O groups. 40 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Surface Acidity as Descriptor of Catalytic Activity for Oxygen Evolution Reaction in Li-O2 Battery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinzhen; Wang, Fan; Wang, Beizhou; Wang, Youwei; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2015-10-28

    Unraveling the descriptor of catalytic activity, which is related to physical properties of catalysts, is a major objective of catalysis research. In the present study, the first-principles calculations based on interfacial model were performed to study the oxygen evolution reaction mechanism of Li2O2 supported on active surfaces of transition-metal compounds (TMC: oxides, carbides, and nitrides). Our studies indicate that the O2 evolution and Li(+) desorption energies show linear and volcano relationships with surface acidity of catalysts, respectively. Therefore, the charging voltage and desorption energies of Li(+) and O2 over TMC could correlate with their corresponding surface acidity. It is found that certain materials with an appropriate surface acidity can achieve the high catalytic activity in reducing charging voltage and activation barrier of rate-determinant step. According to this correlation, CoO should have as active catalysis as Co3O4 in reducing charging overpotential, which is further confirmed by our comparative experimental studies. Co3O4, Mo2C, TiC, and TiN are predicted to have a relatively high catalytic activity, which is consistent with the previous experiments. The present study enables the rational design of catalysts with greater activity for charging reactions of Li-O2 battery.

  19. Effect of reaction pressure on octane number and reformate and hydrogen yields in catalytic reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Moljord, K.; Hellenes, H.G.; Hoff, A.; Tanem, I.; Grande, K.; Holmen, A.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of reaction pressure in catalytic reforming was studied in a pilot reactor with a commercial Pt-Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reforming catalyst and a hydrotreated naphtha from a North Sea crude. Reformate and hydrogen yields, research octane numbers (RON), and reformate composition at reactor pressures in the range of 12--25 bar were measured as a function of temperature in the range of 95--105 RON. Reformate and hydrogen yields increased as the pressure range. For the lower reaction pressures the hydrogen yields increased with increasing severity, but for the higher pressures the hydrogen yields started to decline above certain severities. RON was linearly dependent on the concentration of aromatics in the reformate, although the selectivity toward aromatics depends on both pressure and temperature. Less hydro dealkylation of C{sub 8} and heavier aromatics to benzene and toluene resulted in a shift toward xylenes and heavier aromatic components when pressure was lowered. Variations in the degree of paraffin isomerization did not influence RON significantly at those severities.

  20. Methanol conversion to light olefins over SAPO-34. Sorption, diffusion, and catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.; Rebo, H.P.; Moljord, K.; Holmen, A.

    1999-11-01

    The catalytic conversion of methanol to lower olefins (MTO) is a way of converting natural gas and coal to chemicals via methanol. The effects of adsorption and diffusion of the reactants on methanol to olefins (MTO) and propene conversion over SAPO-34 have been studied in an oscillating microbalance reactor. The adsorption parameters of methanol and propene at reaction conditions (698 K) were determined by a pulse method, and the results were identical to the values obtained by extrapolation from low temperatures (323--398 K). Inverse uptake diffusion times were calculated form adsorption data at low temperatures, and these results were dependent on the temperature and the adsorbed amount. The inverse steady-state diffusion times calculated form the inverse uptake diffusion times were independent of the temperature and the adsorbed amount. The influence of diffusion on the reaction rates was estimated on the basis of the inverse steady-state diffusion times, using the Weisz-Prater criterion. The methanol conversion over SAPO-34 was influenced by diffusion of the reactant, while the propene conversion was not. A kinetic study revealed that both the rate constant and the site coverage of propene were much lower than that of methanol at 698 K. The deactivation behavior during the MTO reaction over SAPO-34 was studied by measuring both the adsorbed amount of methanol and the conversion at different coke contents. Catalyst deactivation was proposed to be due to a decreasing number of sites available for adsorption at high coke contents and a lower diffusivity, hence a lower effectiveness factor due to coke deposition.

  1. Catalytic self-assembled monolayers on Au nanoparticles: the source of catalysis of a transphosphorylation reaction.

    PubMed

    Zaupa, Giovanni; Mora, Claudia; Bonomi, Renato; Prins, Leonard J; Scrimin, Paolo

    2011-04-18

    The catalytic activity of a series of Au monolayer protected colloids (Au MPCs) containing different ratios of the catalytic unit triazacyclononane⋅Zn(II) (TACN⋅Zn(II) ) and an inert triethyleneglycol (TEG) unit was measured. The catalytic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are highly efficient in the transphosphorylation of 2-hydroxy propyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNPP), an RNA model substrate, exhibiting maximum values for the Michaelis-Menten parameters k(cat) and K(M) of 6.7×10(-3) s(-1) and 3.1×10(-4) M, respectively, normalized per catalytic unit. Despite the structural simplicity of the catalytic units, this renders these nanoparticles among the most active catalysts known for this substrate. Both k(cat) and K(M) parameters were determined as a function of the mole fraction of catalytic unit (x(1)) in the SAM. Within this nanoparticle (NP) series, k(cat) increases up till x(1) ≈0.4, after which it remains constant and K(M) decreases exponentially over the range studied. A theoretical analysis demonstrated that these trends are an intrinsic property of catalytic SAMs, in which catalysis originates from the cooperative effect between two neighboring catalytic units. The multivalency of the system causes an increase of the number of potential dimeric catalytic sites composed of two catalytic units as a function of the x(1) , which causes an apparent increase in binding affinity (decrease in K(M)). Simultaneously, the k(cat) value is determined by the number of substrate molecules bound at saturation. For values of x(1) >0.4, isolated catalytic units are no longer present and all catalytic units are involved in catalysis at saturation. Importantly, the observed trends are indicative of a random distribution of the thiols in the SAM. As indicated by the theoretical analysis, and confirmed by a control experiment, in case of clustering both k(cat) and K(M) values remain constant over the entire range of x(1) .

  2. Catalytic asymmetric Povarov reaction of isatin-derived 2-azadienes with 3-vinylindoles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Hao; Sun, Xiao-Xue; Liang, Jing; Wang, Yue-Ming; Zhao, Chang-Chun; Shi, Feng

    2014-12-21

    The first catalytic asymmetric Povarov reaction of isatin-derived 2-azadienes with 3-vinylindoles was established in the presence of chiral phosphoric acid, which tolerates a wide range of substrates with generally excellent diastereoselectivity and good enantioselectivity (up to >95 : 5 dr, 89 : 11 er). This approach will greatly enrich the chemistry of the catalytic asymmetric Povarov reaction, in particular ketone-involved transformations. Furthermore, this protocol represents the first diastereo- and enantio-selective construction of a spiro[indolin-3,2'-quinoline] framework bearing an indole moiety. This novel type of spiro-compound not only contains two chiral centers, including one quaternary stereogenic center, but also integrates two biologically important structures of spiro[indolin-3,2'-quinoline] and indole, which may find medicinal applications after bioassay.

  3. [Study on catalytic oxidation of benzene by microwave heating].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-cai; Bo, Long-li; Wang, Xiao-hui; Liu, Hai-nan; Zhang, Hao

    2012-08-01

    The performance in catalytic oxidation of benzene was investigated in two different heating modes, microwave heating and conventional electric furnace heating. The effects of copper (Cu)-manganese (Mn) mass ratio, doping dose of cerium (Ce) and calcination temperature on the catalytic activity of Cu-Mn-Ce/molecular sieve catalyst were also checked in catalytic oxidation of benzene with microwave heating, and the catalysts were subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the catalyst had better catalytic activity for the oxidation of benzene under microwave heating than electric furnace heating, and high oxidation efficiency for benzene was reached due to the "local hot spots" and dipole polarization effect of microwave and stable bed reaction temperature. Under the conditions of Cu, Mn and Ce mass ratio 1:1:0.33 and calcination temperature 500 degrees C, the catalyst had the optimal catalytic activity for benzene oxidation, and its light-off temperature and complete combustion temperature were 165 degrees C and 230 degrees C, respectively. It was indicated by characteristics of XRD and SEM that the presence of copper and manganese oxides and Cu1.5Mn1.5O4 with spinel crystal improved the catalytic activity of the catalyst, and the doping of Ce promoted the dispersion and regularization of active components. High calcination temperature led to the sintering of the catalyst surface and agglomeration of active components, which decreased the catalytic activity of the catalyst in the catalytic oxidation

  4. Manned Evaluation of a Diver Heater for SDV Applications Using Hydrogen Catalytic Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    DIVER HEATER FOR SDV APPLICATIONS USING HYDROGEN CATALYTIC REACTIONS GAS CIRCUIT The basic heater design uses a gas ejector pump to recirculate the gas...entrance of the gas ejector pump. In this manner the hydrogen is mixed inside the pressure vessel with the recirculated gas and the fresh incoming air to...recirculatory flow then passes through a gas-to-water heat exchanger where the heat is removed and some of the water vapor condenses . The recirculatory flow then

  5. Nonequilibrium Relaxation of Conformational Dynamics Facilitates Catalytic Reaction in an Elastic Network Model of T7 DNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziqing W; Xie, X Sunney; Ge, Hao

    2016-03-24

    Nucleotide-induced conformational closing of the finger domain of DNA polymerase is crucial for its catalytic action during DNA replication. Such large-amplitude molecular motion is often not fully accessible to either direct experimental monitoring or molecular dynamics simulations. However, a coarse-grained model can offer an informative alternative, especially for probing the relationship between conformational dynamics and catalysis. Here we investigate the dynamics of T7 DNA polymerase catalysis using a Langevin-type elastic network model incorporating detailed structural information on the open conformation without the substrate bound. Such a single-parameter model remarkably captures the induced conformational dynamics of DNA polymerase upon dNTP binding, and reveals its close coupling to the advancement toward transition state along the coordinate of the target reaction, which contributes to significant lowering of the activation energy barrier. Furthermore, analysis of stochastic catalytic rates suggests that when the activation energy barrier has already been significantly lowered and nonequilibrium relaxation toward the closed form dominates the catalytic rate, one must appeal to a picture of two-dimensional free energy surface in order to account for the full spectrum of catalytic modes. Our semiquantitative study illustrates the general role of conformational dynamics in achieving transition-state stabilization, and suggests that such an elastic network model, albeit simplified, possesses the potential to furnish significant mechanistic insights into the functioning of a variety of enzymatic systems.

  6. Visible-light-enhanced catalytic oxidation reactions on plasmonic silver nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Phillip; Xin, Hongliang; Linic, Suljo

    2011-06-01

    Catalysis plays a critical role in chemical conversion, energy production and pollution mitigation. High activation barriers associated with rate-limiting elementary steps require most commercial heterogeneous catalytic reactions to be run at relatively high temperatures, which compromises energy efficiency and the long-term stability of the catalyst. Here we show that plasmonic nanostructures of silver can concurrently use low-intensity visible light (on the order of solar intensity) and thermal energy to drive catalytic oxidation reactions--such as ethylene epoxidation, CO oxidation, and NH₃ oxidation--at lower temperatures than their conventional counterparts that use only thermal stimulus. Based on kinetic isotope experiments and density functional calculations, we postulate that excited plasmons on the silver surface act to populate O₂ antibonding orbitals and so form a transient negative-ion state, which thereby facilitates the rate-limiting O₂-dissociation reaction. The results could assist the design of catalytic processes that are more energy efficient and robust than current processes.

  7. Catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of hydrazones by oxidative deprotonation electron transfer and TEMPO mediation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Qiang; Qi, Xiaotian; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Quan-Qing; Wei, Qiang; Lan, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the popularity of various C-centred radicals, the N-centred radicals remain largely unexplored in catalytic radical cascade reactions because of a lack of convenient methods for their generation. Known methods for their generation typically require the use of N-functionalized precursors or various toxic, potentially explosive or unstable radical initiators. Recently, visible-light photocatalysis has emerged as an attractive tool for the catalytic formation of N-centred radicals, but the pre-incorporation of a photolabile groups at the nitrogen atom largely limited the reaction scope. Here, we present a visible-light photocatalytic oxidative deprotonation electron transfer/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediation strategy for catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of unsaturated hydrazones. This mild protocol provides a broadly applicable synthesis of 1,6-dihydropyradazines with complete regioselectivity and good yields. The 1,6-dihydropyradazines can be easily transformed into diazinium salts that showed promising in vitro antifungal activities against fungal pathogens. DFT calculations are conducted to explain the mechanism. PMID:27048886

  8. Synthesis of 3-Indolylglycine Derivatives via Dinuclear Zinc Catalytic Asymmetric Friedel-Crafts Alkylation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Wei; Hua, Yuan-Zhao; Wang, Min-Can

    2016-10-07

    A direct asymmetric Friedel-Crafts (F-C) alkylation reaction between a wide range of indoles and ethyl 2-(4-methoxyphenylimino)acetate catalyzed by Trost's dinuclear complex is reported. A series of 3-indolylglycine derivatives were synthesized in enantioselectivity of up to >99% enantiomeric excess (ee) using 10 mol% catalyst loading under mild conditions. This atom economic reaction could be run on a gram scale without impacting its enantioselectivity. The absolute stereochemistry of catalytic products was determined by correlation with a known configuration compound. A possible mechanism was proposed for the asymmetric induction.

  9. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Norani Muti; Ahmad, Pervaiz; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif

    2014-10-01

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor.

  10. Electron flow generated by gas phase exothermic catalytic reactions using a platinum-gallium nitride nanodiode.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaozhong; Zuppero, Anthony; Gidwani, Jawahar M; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2005-04-27

    We report steady-state conversion of chemical reaction energy into hot electrons by ballistic injection into a platinum-gallium nitride (Pt/GaN) nanodiode during the platinum-catalyzed oxidation of carbon monoxide. Surface catalytic reactions of molecules from the gas phase generated continuous steady-state hot electron currents with energies at least that of Schottky barrier energy ( approximately 1 eV). These hot electron currents were observed on two different nanodiodes (Pt/TiO2 and Pt/GaN) and represent a new method of chemical energy conversion.

  11. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Norani Muti E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Ahmad, Pervaiz E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my

    2014-10-24

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor.

  12. A palladium-nanoparticle and silicon-nanowire-array hybrid: a platform for catalytic heterogeneous reactions.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoichi M A; Yuyama, Yoshinari; Sato, Takuma; Fujikawa, Shigenori; Uozumi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-03

    We report the development of a silicon nanowire array-stabilized palladium nanoparticle catalyst, SiNA-Pd. Its use in the palladium-catalyzed Mizoroki-Heck reaction, the hydrogenation of an alkene, the hydrogenolysis of nitrobenzene, the hydrosilylation of an α,β-unsaturated ketone, and the C-H bond functionalization reactions of thiophenes and indoles achieved a quantitative production with high reusability. The catalytic activity reached several hundred-mol ppb of palladium, reaching a TON of 2 000 000.

  13. Theoretical study of catalytic efficiency of a Diels-Alderase catalytic antibody: an indirect effect produced during the maturation process.

    PubMed

    Martí, Sergio; Andrés, Juan; Moliner, Vicent; Silla, Estanislao; Tuñón, Iñaki; Bertrán, Juan

    2008-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is one of the most important and versatile transformations available to organic chemists for the construction of complex natural products, therapeutics agents, and synthetic materials. Given the lack of efficient enzymes capable of catalyzing this kind of reaction, it is of interest to ask whether a biological catalyst could be designed from an antibody-combining site. In the present work, a theoretical study of the different behavior of a germline catalytic antibody (CA) and its matured form, 39 A-11, that catalyze a Diels-Alder reaction has been carried out. A free-energy perturbation technique based on a hybrid quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics scheme, together with internal energy minimizations, has allowed free-energy profiles to be obtained for both CAs. The profiles show a smaller barrier for the matured form, which is in agreement with the experimental observation. Free-energy profiles were obtained with this methodology, thereby avoiding the much more demanding two-dimensional calculations of the energy surfaces that are normally required to study this kind of reaction. Structural analysis and energy evaluations of substrate-protein interactions have been performed from averaged structures, which allows understanding of how the single mutations carried out during the maturation process can be responsible for the observed fourfold enhancement of the catalytic rate constant. The conclusion is that the mutation effect in this studied germline CA produces a complex indirect effect through coupled movements of the backbone of the protein and the substrate.

  14. Study of catalytic upgrading of biomass tars using Indonesian iron ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicakso, Doni Rahmat; Sutijan, Rochmadi, Budiman, Arief

    2017-03-01

    Catalytic decomposition is a promising way for chemical upgrading process of low quality oil such as biomass tars. In this experiment, catalytic decomposition of biomass tars was performed over Indonesian low grade iron ore catalyst. This process is carried out in a fixed bedreactor which is equipped with preheater to convert the tars into vapor form. The reaction was studied at the temperature range of 500 - 700°C. The kinetic study of catalytic decomposition of biomass tars is represented using first order reaction. The results show that value of constant of chemical reaction is in range 0.2514 - 0.9642 cm3.gr-1.min-1 with value of the frequency factor (A) and the activation energy (E) are 48.98 min-1 and 5724.94 cal.mol-1, respectively.

  15. Gaseous Heterogeneous Catalytic Reactions over Mn-Based Oxides for Environmental Applications: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haomiao; Yan, Naiqiang; Qu, Zan; Liu, Wei; Mei, Jian; Huang, Wenjun; Zhao, Songjian

    2017-08-15

    Manganese oxide has been recognized as one of the most promising gaseous heterogeneous catalysts due to its low cost, environmental friendliness, and high catalytic oxidation performance. Mn-based oxides can be classified into four types: (1) single manganese oxide (MnOx), (2) supported manganese oxide (MnOx/support), (3) composite manganese oxides (MnOx-X), and (4) special crystalline manganese oxides (S-MnOx). These Mn-based oxides have been widely used as catalysts for the elimination of gaseous pollutants. This review aims to describe the environmental applications of these manganese oxides and provide perspectives. It gives detailed descriptions of environmental applications of the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3, the catalytic combustion of volatile organic compounds, Hg(0) oxidation and adsorption, and soot oxidation, in addition to some other environmental applications. Furthermore, this review mainly focuses on the effects of structure, morphology, and modified elements and on the role of catalyst supports in gaseous heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Finally, future research directions for developing manganese oxide catalysts are proposed.

  16. Accelerated Catalytic Fenton Reaction with Traces of Iron: An Fe-Pd-Multicatalysis Approach.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Anett; Velasco Polo, Miriam; Crincoli, Klara; Mackenzie, Katrin; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter

    2016-06-07

    An accelerated catalytic Fenton (ACF) reaction was developed based upon a multicatalysis approach, facilitating efficient contaminant oxidation at trace levels of dissolved iron. Beside the Fe(II)/H2O2 catalyst/oxidant pair for production of OH-radicals, the ACF system contains Pd/H2 as catalyst/reductant pair for fast reduction of Fe(III) back to Fe(II) which accelerates the Fenton cycle and leads to faster contaminant degradation. By this means, the concentration of the dissolved iron catalyst can be reduced to trace levels (1 mg L(-1)) below common discharge limits, thus eliminating the need for iron sludge removal, which is one of the major drawbacks of conventional Fenton processes. ACF provides fast degradation of the model contaminant methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE, C0 = 0.17 mM) with a half-life of 11 min with 1 mg L(-1) dissolved iron, 500 mg L(-1) H2O2, 5 mg L(-1) Pd (as suspended Pd/Al2O3 catalyst) and 0.1 MPa H2, pH 3. The effects of pH, H2 partial pressure and H2O2 concentration on MTBE degradation rates were studied. Results on kinetic deuterium isotope effect and quenching studies are in conformity with OH-radicals as main oxidant. The heterogeneous Pd/Al2O3 catalyst was reused within six cycles without significant loss in activity.

  17. Monodisperse metal nanoparticle catalysts on silica mesoporous supports: synthesis, characterizations, and catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-09-14

    The design of high performance catalyst achieving near 100% product selectivity at maximum activity is one of the most important goals in the modern catalytic science research. To this end, the preparation of model catalysts whose catalytic performances can be predicted in a systematic and rational manner is of significant importance, which thereby allows understanding of the molecular ingredients affecting the catalytic performances. We have designed novel 3-dimensional (3D) high surface area model catalysts by the integration of colloidal metal nanoparticles and mesoporous silica supports. Monodisperse colloidal metal NPs with controllable size and shape were synthesized using dendrimers, polymers, or surfactants as the surface stabilizers. The size of Pt, and Rh nanoparticles can be varied from sub 1 nm to 15 nm, while the shape of Pt can be controlled to cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron. The 3D model catalysts were generated by the incorporation of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica supports via two methods: capillary inclusion (CI) and nanoparticle encapsulation (NE). The former method relies on the sonication-induced inclusion of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica, whereas the latter is performed by the encapsulation of metal nanoparticles during the hydrothermal synthesis of mesoporous silica. The 3D model catalysts were comprehensively characterized by a variety of physical and chemical methods. These catalysts were found to show structure sensitivity in hydrocarbon conversion reactions. The Pt NPs supported on mesoporous SBA-15 silica (Pt/SBA-15) displayed significant particle size sensitivity in ethane hydrogenolysis over the size range of 1-7 nm. The Pt/SBA-15 catalysts also exhibited particle size dependent product selectivity in cyclohexene hydrogenation, crotonaldehyde hydrogenation, and pyrrole hydrogenation. The Rh loaded SBA-15 silica catalyst showed structure sensitivity in CO oxidation reaction. In

  18. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for the role of hydrogen in catalytic reactions of furfural on Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Wenhua; Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Jentoft, Friederike; Resasco, Daniel; Wang, Sanwu

    2014-03-01

    In the study of catalytic reactions of biomass, furfural conversion over metal catalysts with the presence of hydrogen has attracted wide attention. We report ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for furfural and hydrogen on the Pd(111) surface at finite temperatures. The simulations demonstrate that the presence of hydrogen is important in promoting furfural conversion. In particular, hydrogen molecules dissociate rapidly on the Pd(111) surface. As a result of such dissociation, atomic hydrogen participates in the reactions with furfural. The simulations also provide detailed information about the possible reactions of hydrogen with furfural. Supported by DOE (DE-SC0004600). This research used the supercomputer resources of the XSEDE, the NERSC Center, and the Tandy Supercomputing Center.

  19. “Metal-free” catalytic oxygen reduction reaction on heteroatom- doped graphene is caused by trace metal impurities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2013-12-16

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of high industrial importance. There is a large body of literature showing that metal-based catalytic nanoparticles (e.g. Co, Mn, Fe or hybrid Mn/Co-based nanoparticles) supported on graphene act as efficient catalysts for the ORR. A significant research effort is also directed to the so-called “metal-free” oxygen reduction reaction on heteroatom-doped graphene surfaces. While such studies of the ORR on nonmetallic heteroatom-doped graphene are advertised as “metal-free” there is typically no sufficient effort to characterize the doped materials to verify that they are indeed free of any trace metal. Here we argue that the claimed “metal-free” electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction on heteroatom-doped graphene is caused by metallic impurities present within the graphene materials.

  20. Catalytic asymmetric allylation reactions using BITIP catalysis and 2-substituted allylstannanes as surrogates for beta-keto ester dianions.

    PubMed

    Keck, G E; Yu, T

    1999-07-29

    [formula: see text] Catalytic asymmetric allylation (CAA) reactions using the indicated allylstannane and the BITIP catalysts previously described by us give high yields and enantioselectivities in additions to aldehydes. The products are convertible to beta-keto esters by oxidative cleavage of the olefin. These reactions thus provide a useful catalytic enantioselective method for chain extension with introduction of a versatile four-carbon unit.

  1. Catalytic mechanism of transition-metal compounds on Mg hydrogen sorption reaction.

    PubMed

    Barkhordarian, Gagik; Klassen, Thomas; Bormann, Rüdiger

    2006-06-08

    The catalytic mechanisms of transition-metal compounds during the hydrogen sorption reaction of magnesium-based hydrides were investigated through relevant experiments. Catalytic activity was found to be influenced by four distinct physico-thermodynamic properties of the transition-metal compound: a high number of structural defects, a low stability of the compound, which however has to be high enough to avoid complete reduction of the transition metal under operating conditions, a high valence state of the transition-metal ion within the compound, and a high affinity of the transition-metal ion to hydrogen. On the basis of these results, further optimization of the selection of catalysts for improving sorption properties of magnesium-based hydrides is possible. In addition, utilization of transition-metal compounds as catalysts for other hydrogen storage materials is considered.

  2. Catalytic reaction of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol with alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoryan, S.G.; Avetisyan, K.G.; Matnishyan, A.A.

    1987-01-10

    The cyclic ketal 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-bis(3-phenyl-2-propynyloxy)-1,4-dioxane was obtained by the reaction of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1=ol with propargyl alcohol in the presence of the HgO-BF/sub 3/ O(C/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/ catalytic system. The transformation of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol and its ethers in methanol and ethanol by the action of the above-mentioned catalytic system leads to 1-phenyl-3-alkoxy-1-propanone, 1-phenyl-1,1,3-trialkoxypropane, and 1-phenyl-2-propen-1-one. The intermediate organomercury compound, which is the product from regioselective addition of mercuric oxide and the saturated alcohol at the triple bond, was isolated. Its protodemercuration led to the above-mentioned linear products. The formation of the cyclic ketal is presumably due to the preferred formation of mercury bis-hydroxypropargylide.

  3. A catalytic reactor for the trapping of free radicals from gas phase oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Marco; Wilson, Karen; Chechik, Victor

    2010-10-01

    A catalytic reactor for the trapping of free radicals originating from gas phase catalytic reactions is described and discussed. Radical trapping and identification were initially carried out using a known radical generator such as dicumyl peroxide. The trapping of radicals was further demonstrated by investigating genuine radical oxidation processes, e.g., benzaldehyde oxidation over manganese and cobalt salts. The efficiency of the reactor was finally proven by the partial oxidation of cyclohexane over MoO3, Cr2O3, and WO3, which allowed the identification of all the radical intermediates responsible for the formation of the products cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone. Assignment of the trapped radicals was carried out using spin trapping technique and X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  4. The catalytic reactions in the Cu-Li-Mg-H high capacity hydrogen storage system.

    PubMed

    Braga, M H; El-Azab, A

    2014-11-14

    A family of hydrides, including the high capacity MgH2 and LiH, is reported. The disadvantages these hydrides normally display (high absorption/desorption temperatures and poor kinetics) are mitigated by Cu-hydride catalysis. This paper reports on the synthesis of novel CuLi0.08Mg1.42H4 and CuLi0.08Mg1.92H5 hydrides, which are structurally and thermodynamically characterized for the first time. The CuLi0.08Mg1.42H4 hydride structure in nanotubes is able to hold molecular H2, increasing the gravimetric and volumetric capacity of this compound. The catalytic effect these compounds show on hydride formation and decomposition of CuMg2 and Cu2Mg/MgH2, Li and LiH, Mg and MgH2 is analyzed. The Gibbs energy, decomposition temperature, and gravimetric capacity of the reactions occurring within the Cu-Li-Mg-H system are presented for the first time. First principles and phonon calculations are compared with experiments, including neutron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the most advantageous sample contains CuLi0.08Mg1.92 and (Li) ∼ Li2Mg3; it desorbs/absorbs hydrogen according to the reaction, 2CuLi0.08Mg1.42H4 + 2Li + 4MgH2 ↔ 2CuLi0.08Mg1.92 + Li2Mg3 + 8H2 at 114 °C (5.0 wt%) - 1 atm, falling within the proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications window. Finally the reaction 2CuLi0.08Mg1.42H4 + MgH2 ↔ 2CuLi0.08Mg1.92 + 5H2 at 15 °C (4.4 wt%) - 1 atm is found to be the main reaction of the samples containing CuLi0.08Mg1.92 that were analyzed in this study.

  5. The Incorporation of Added Metal Atoms into Structures of Reaction Intermediates on Catalytic Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ling; Madix, Robert J.

    In this chapter, we review the dynamic nature of catalytic metal surfaces and the effects of metal incorporation into surface reaction intermediates on their reactivity. Scanning tunneling microscopy allows the direct observation of surface reconstruction and dynamic reorganization of surfaces during adsorption, desorption, and surface reaction, and therefore, provides a powerful tool to relate the surface structures of adsorbed layers to reactivity when combined with quantitative temperature-programmed reaction spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and other tools. The incorporation of added metal atoms to the structure of adsorbates and reaction intermediates is a general surface phenomenon not restricted to more open, higher free energy single crystal planes, but also occurring on close-packed surfaces of low free energy. Metal atom incorporation into the surface oxide appears to be a guide to the possibility of incorporation of metal atoms into the structure of other intermediates. Added metal atoms can stabilize the structures of reaction intermediates and play an important role in their surface reactions. These observations dictate that the participation of added metal atoms be considered as a paradigm in metal catalyzed reactions, significantly affecting the theoretical treatment of these processes.

  6. Mechanistic insight into the hydrazine decomposition on Rh(111): effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhigang; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wen, Zengqiang; Wei, Shuxian; Liu, Yunjie; Fu, Dianling; Zhao, Lianming; Guo, Wenyue

    2013-10-14

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to systematically investigate the effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity for hydrazine (N2H4) decomposition on Rh(111). Reaction mechanisms via intramolecular and NH2-assisted N2H4 decompositions are comparatively analyzed, including adsorption configuration, reaction energy and barrier of elementary step, and reaction network. Our results show that the most favorable N2H4 decomposition pathway starts with the initial N-N bond scission to the NH2 intermediate, followed by stepwise H stripping from adsorbed N2Hx (x = 1-4) species, and finally forms the N2 and NH3 products. Comparatively, the stepwise intramolecular dehydrogenation via N2H4→ N2H3→ N2H2→ N2H → N2, and N2H4→ NH2→ NH → N with or without NH2 promotion effect, are unfavorable due to higher energy barriers encountered. Energy barrier analysis, reaction rate constants, and electronic structures are used to identify the crucial competitive route. The promotion effect of the NH2 intermediate is structurally reflected in the weakening of the N-H bond and strengthening of the N-N bond in N2Hx in the coadsorption system; it results intrinsically from the less structural deformation of the adsorbate, and weakening of the interaction between dehydrogenated fragment and departing H in transition state. Our results highlight the crucial effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity and provide a theoretical approach to analyze the effect.

  7. Biogenic synthesis of palladium nanoparticles using Pulicaria glutinosa extract and their catalytic activity towards the Suzuki coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mujeeb; Khan, Merajuddin; Kuniyil, Mufsir; Adil, Syed Farooq; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Alkhathlan, Hamad Z; Tremel, Wolfgang; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H

    2014-06-28

    Green synthesis of nanomaterials finds the edge over chemical methods due to its environmental compatibility. Herein, we report a facile and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) using an aqueous solution of Pulicaria glutinosa, a plant widely found in a large region of Saudi Arabia, as a bioreductant. The as-prepared Pd NPs were characterized using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The hydroxyl groups of the plant extract (PE) molecules were found mainly responsible for the reduction and growth of Pd NPs. FT-IR analysis confirmed the dual role of the PE, both as a bioreductant as well as a capping ligand, which stabilizes the surface of Pd NPs. The crystalline nature of the Pd NPs was identified using XRD analysis which confirmed the formation of a face-centered cubic structure (JCPDS: 87-0641, space group: Fm3m (225)). Furthermore, the as-synthesized Pd NPs demonstrated excellent catalytic activity towards the Suzuki coupling reaction under aqueous and aerobic conditions. Kinetic studies of the catalytic reaction monitored using GC confirmed that the reaction completes in less than 5 minutes.

  8. Metal-Organic Frameworks derivatives for improving the catalytic activity of CO oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenlan; Xu, Zhiling; Liu, Pengfei; Zhang, Suoying; Zhou, Weiqiang; Li, Hongfeng; Zhang, Tao; Li, Linjie; Lu, Xiaohua; Wu, Jiansheng; Zhang, Weina; Huo, Fengwei

    2017-03-15

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) based derivatives have attracted an increasing interest in various research fields. However, most of reported papers mainly focused on the pristine MOFs-based derivatives, and researches on the functional MOFs-based derivatives composites are rare. Here, a simple strategy was reported to design the functional MOFs based derivatives composites by the encapsulation of the metal nanoparticles (MNPs) in MOFs matrixes (MNPs@MOFs) and the high-temperature calcination of MNPs@MOFs composites. The as-prepared MNPs@metal oxide composites with the hierarchical pore structure exhibited excellent catalytic activity and high stability for CO oxidation reaction.

  9. Convective stability in the presence of a catalytic chemical reaction. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wankat, P. C.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    A linear analysis of hydrodynamic stability has been applied to a problem in which a fluid mixture is contained between two horizontal planes. One species diffuses to the lower plane where it is destroyed by a rapid exothermic or endothermic catalytic reaction. Results show that important coupling takes place between thermal and concentration fields. This coupling gives rise to unusual stabilizing or destabilizing effects, depending upon the value of Lewis number. Several examples are discussed. It is also shown how the results can be applied to other problems involving heat and mass transfer.

  10. Catalytic Asymmetric Inverse-Electron-Demand Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingsheng; Lin, Lili; Feng, Xiaoming

    2017-05-16

    In this review, the recent developments in catalytic asymmetric inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder reaction, which is recognized as one of the most powerful routes to construct highly functionalized and enantioenriched six-membered heterocycles, are described. The article is organized on the basis of different kinds of electron-deficient heterodienes, including α,β-unsaturated ketones/aldehydes, o-benzoquinones, α,β-unsaturated imines, N-aryl imines, o-benzoqinone imides, and other aza-olefins. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Synthesis of Functionalized Furans via Chemoselective Reduction/Wittig Reaction Using Catalytic Triethylamine and Phosphine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Jui; Chang, Tzu-Hsiu; Yu, Jhen-Kuei; Madhusudhan Reddy, Ganapuram; Hsiao, Ming-Yu; Lin, Wenwei

    2016-08-05

    An efficient protocol for the synthesis of highly functionalized furans via intramolecular Wittig reaction has been developed using catalytic amounts of phosphine and triethylamine. Silyl chloride served as the initial promoter to activate the phosphine oxide. Reduction of the activated phosphine oxide by hydrosilane resulted in generation of phosphine, while decomposition of Et3N·HCl resulted in regeneration of base, which mediated formation of phosphorus ylide. Remarkably, the in situ generated byproduct, Et3N·HCl, also catalyzes reduction of phosphine oxide.

  12. Convective stability in the presence of a catalytic chemical reaction. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wankat, P. C.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    A linear analysis of hydrodynamic stability has been applied to a problem in which a fluid mixture is contained between two horizontal planes. One species diffuses to the lower plane where it is destroyed by a rapid exothermic or endothermic catalytic reaction. Results show that important coupling takes place between thermal and concentration fields. This coupling gives rise to unusual stabilizing or destabilizing effects, depending upon the value of Lewis number. Several examples are discussed. It is also shown how the results can be applied to other problems involving heat and mass transfer.

  13. Contributions of phase, sulfur vacancies, and edges to the hydrogen evolution reaction catalytic activity of porous molybdenum disulfide nanosheets

    DOE PAGES

    Yin, Ying; Han, Jiecai; Zhang, Yumin; ...

    2016-06-07

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a promising nonprecious catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) that has been extensively studied due to its excellent performance, but the lack of understanding of the factors that impact its catalytic activity hinders further design and enhancement of MoS2-based electrocatalysts. Here, by using novel porous (holey) metallic 1T phase MoS2 nanosheets synthesized by a liquid-ammonia-assisted lithiation route, we systematically investigated the contributions of crystal structure (phase), edges, and sulfur vacancies (S-vacancies) to the catalytic activity toward HER from five representative MoS2 nanosheet samples, including 2H and 1T phase, porous 2H and 1T phase, and sulfur-compensatedmore » porous 2H phase. Superior HER catalytic activity was achieved in the porous 1T phase MoS2 nanosheets that have even more edges and S-vacancies than conventional 1T phase MoS2. A comparative study revealed that the phase serves as the key role in determining the HER performance, as 1T phase MoS2 always outperforms the corresponding 2H phase MoS2 samples, and that both edges and S-vacancies also contribute significantly to the catalytic activity in porous MoS2 samples. Then, using combined defect characterization techniques of electron spin resonance spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to quantify the S-vacancies, the contributions of each factor were individually elucidated. Furthermore, this study presents new insights and opens up new avenues for designing electrocatalysts based on MoS2 or other layered materials with enhanced HER performance.« less

  14. Overcoming the incompatibility challenge in chemo-enzymatic and multi-catalytic cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Kourist, Robert; Schmidt, Sandy; Castiglione, Kathrin

    2017-09-06

    Multi-catalytic cascade reactions bear a great potential to minimize downstream and purification steps, leading to a drastic reduction of the produced waste. In many examples, the compatibility of chemo- and biocatalytic steps could be easily achieved. Problems associated to the incompatibility of the catalysts and their reactions, however, are very frequent. Cascade-like reactions can hardly occur in this way. One possible solution to combine in principle incompatible chemo- and biocatalytic reactions is the defined control of the microenvironment by compartmentalisation or scaffolding. Current methods for the control of the microenvironment of biocatalysts go far beyond classical enzyme immobilization and are thus believed to be very promising tools to overcome incompatibility issues and to facilitate the synthetic application of cascade reactions. In this mini-review we will summarize recent synthetic examples of (chemo-)enzymatic cascade reactions and outline promising methods for their spatial control either by using bio-derived or synthetic systems. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Catalytic characteristics of AgCu bimetallic nanoparticles in the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kihyun; Kim, Da Hye; Lee, Hyuck Mo

    2013-06-01

    Intensive research on oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts has been undertaken to find a Pt substitute or reduce the amount of Pt. Ag nanoparticles are potential Pt substitutes; however, the weak oxygen adsorption energy of Ag prompted investigation of other catalysts. Herein, we prepared AgCu bimetallic nanoparticle (NP) systems to improve the catalytic performance and compared the catalytic performance of Ag, Cu, AgCu (core-shell), and AgCu (alloy) NP systems as new catalyst by investigating the adsorption energy of oxygen and the activation energy of oxygen dissociation, which is known to be the rate-determining step of ORR. By analyzing HOMO-level isosurfaces of metal NPs and oxygen, we found that the adsorption sites and the oxygen adsorption energies varied with different configurations of NPs. We then plotted the oxygen adsorption energies against the energy barrier of oxygen dissociation to determine the catalytic performance. AgCu (alloy) and Cu NPs exhibited strong adsorption energies and low activation-energy barriers. However, the overly strong oxygen adsorption energy of Cu NPs hindered the ORR. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Impact of active phase chemical composition and dispersity on catalytic behavior in PROX reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z.; Paneva, D.; Todorova, S.; Kolev, H.; Shopska, M.; Yordanova, I.; Mitov, I.

    2014-04-01

    Iron and iron-platinum catalysts supported on activated carbon have been successfully synthesized by wet impregnation method and low-temperature treatment in inert atmosphere. The content of the supported phases corresponds to 10 wt % Fe and 0.5 wt % Pt. Four catalytic samples were synthesized: Sample A—activated carbon impregnated with Fe nitrate; Sample B—activated carbon impregnated with Pt salt; Sample C—activated carbon impregnated consequently with Fe and Pt salts; Sample D—activated carbon impregnated simultaneously with Fe and Pt salts. The as-prepared materials were characterized by Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The spectra show that the activated carbon support and the preparation procedure give rise to the synthesis of isolated metal Pt ions and ultradispersed Fe and Pt oxide species. Probably the presence of different functional groups of activated carbon gives rise to registered very high dispersion of loaded species on support. The catalytic tests were carried out in PROX reaction. A lower activity of bimetallic Pt-Fe samples was explained with the increase in surface oxygen species as a result of predomination of iron oxide on the support leading to the increase in selectivity to the H2 oxidation. Partial agglomeration of supported iron oxide phase was registered after catalytic tests.

  17. Spatially Heterogeneous Nature of Self-Catalytic Reaction in Hetero-Double Helix Formation of Helicene Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Kushida, Yo; Sawato, Tsukasa; Saito, Nozomi; Shigeno, Masanori; Satozono, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Masahiko

    2016-10-18

    A 1:1 mixture of pseudoenantiomeric aminomethylenehelicene oligomers, (P)-tetramer and (M)-pentamer, in fluorobenzene show a self-catalytic phenomenon in the formation of hetero-double helices from random coils. This study visualizes the spatially heterogeneous nature of the self-catalytic reaction in dilute solution. UV/Vis imaging analysis of the mixture at 70 °C, containing random coils, exhibits a homogeneous bright area. When the solution is cooled from 70 to 30 °C and held at that temperature, dark domains of approximately 1 mm in size appear, which move approximately at a rate of 1 mm min(-1) . The dark domains indicate that weaker UV/Vis absorption results from the formation of hetero-double helices, which is supported by circular dichroism (CD) imaging experiments. Then a homogeneous mixture is regenerated upon heating to 55 °C, as shown by CD imaging. Under self-catalytic conditions, a homogeneous solution spontaneously changed to a heterogeneous solution in the process of hetero-double-helix formation. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Joint catalytic activation of CO/sub 2/ and NH/sub 3/ in reaction with butadiene under the action of palladium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhemilev, U.M.; Kunakova, R.V.; Sidorova, V.V.

    1987-08-20

    In a continuation of the study of catalytic reactions in which small molecules participate they have examined the reaction of butadiene simultaneously with CO/sub 2/ and NH/sub 3/ in the presence of homogeneous Pd-containing catalyst complexes with the object of developing a single-step method for the synthesis of unsaturated higher formamides. The possibility of joint catalytic activation of small molecules (CO/sub 2/ and NH/sub 3/) has been demonstrated in their reaction with butadiene with the participation of palladium complexes, the products being mono- and bis-(2,7-octadienyl)formamides. It has been found that 2-pyrrolidone can take part in a telomerization reaction with butadiene in solutions containing palladium complexes, ammonia and carbon dioxide with the formation of N-2,7-octadienylpyrrolidone.

  19. Asphaltene cracking in catalytic hydrotreating of heavy oils. 2. study of changes in asphaltene structure during catalytic hydroprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Sachio, A.; Chisato, T.; Shinichi, N.; Yoshimi, S.

    1983-04-01

    Characteristics in catalytic conversion of asphaltenes in petroleum heavy residues were studied in the hydrotreating process. A Boscan crude, an Athabasca bitumen, and a Khafji vacuum residue were tested as typical feedstocks. Various analyses were made to obtain the properties of asphaltenes before and after the reaction, e.g., changes of heteroatoms such as sulfur and metals, and decreases of molecular weight. The characteristic changes of asphaltene molecules were also investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) and X-ray analyses. The association and coordination of vanadyl in asphaltenes were studied by the temperature dependence on the ESR spectra, and the sizes of the stacked crystallites and the aggregated asphaltene micelles were measured with X-ray diffraction and small-angle scattering. In the asphaltene cracking mechanism, it was clarified that the main reactions were the destruction of asphaltene micelles caused by vanadium removal and the depolymerization of asphaltene molecules by removal of heteroatoms such as sulfur.

  20. Hydrodynamics and catalytic reactions in the riser of a FCC plant

    SciTech Connect

    Derouin, C.; van Landeghem, F.; Turlier, P.; Bernard, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    The hydrodynamic characteristics of the riser of a FCC plants are investigated in a cold pilot plant. The results are checked and completed with measurements made in real operating FCC units. In both cases, tracing of the gas, velocity probes and {gamma}-tomography were used. The gas and solid velocity profiles are described by using a plug flow model with radial dispersion. The gas velocity profile is formally represented by an Ostwald - de Waele type equation; the radial and axial solid concentration profile is fitted to data obtained in the real plant. The kinetics of the reactions occurring during catalytic cracking are investigated in a MAT equipment and are represented by a 19 lumps model including deactivation by coking of the catalyst. A combination of this reaction model with the hydrodynamic model is able to predict with a satisfactory precision the yields of the different product families obtained in an industrial FCC unit. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. Tunable catalytic activity of solid solution metal-organic frameworks in one-pot multicomponent reactions.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Gándara, Felipe; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles

    2015-05-20

    The aim of this research is to establish how metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) composed of more than one metal in equivalent crystallographic sites (solid solution MOFs) exhibit catalytic activity, which is tunable by virtue of the metal ions ratio. New MOFs with general formula [InxGa1-x(O2C2H4)0.5(hfipbb)] were prepared by the combination of Ga and In. They are isostructural with their monometal counterparts, synthesized with Al, Ga, and In. Differences in their behavior as heterogeneous catalysts in the three-component, one pot Strecker reaction illustrate the potential of solid solution MOFs to provide the ability to address the various stages involved in the reaction mechanism.

  2. Synergy among manganese, nitrogen and carbon to improve the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Wang, Hui; Ji, Shan; Key, Julian; Wang, Rongfang

    2014-04-01

    A highly active electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction, manganese modified glycine derivative-carbon (Mn-CNx), is synthesized by a two-step carbonizing process. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to characterize structure and morphology of the catalysts. Electrochemical tests show that Mn-CNx has higher catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction than CNx derived glycine and Mn modified Vulcan carbon. Moreover, the half-wave potential of Mn-CNx is only 12 mV lower than that of commercial Pt/C. Mn-CNx also has excellent durability to methanol crossover in alkaline solution, and thus provides a promising low cost, non-precious metal cathode catalyst for fuel cells.

  3. Strong counteranion effects on the catalytic activity of cationic silicon Lewis acids in Mukaiyama aldol and Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kenji; Akiyama, Ryuto; Sawamura, Masaya

    2005-12-08

    [chemical reaction: see text]. A toluene-coordinated silyl borate, [Et3Si(toluene)]B(C6F5)4, demonstrated catalytic activities significantly higher than those of Me3SiOTf and Me3SiNTf2 in Mukaiyama aldol and Diels-Alder reactions.

  4. Intramolecular catalytic Friedel-Crafts reactions with allenyl cations for the synthesis of quinolines and their analogues.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Teruhiko; Manabe, Shinobu; Aikawa, Toshiaki; Kudo, Takayuki; Saito, Seiki

    2004-07-08

    [reaction: see text] This paper describes a novel method to synthesize a quinoline backbone by incorporating allenyl cations into a catalytic intramolecular Friedel-Crafts reaction. The initial products were isomerized and aromatized upon treatment with acid and base, respectively, to give quinolines. The basic concept also proved to be promising for 1-benzazepine, 1-benzazocine, or isoquinoline synthesis.

  5. A mutagenesis study of a catalytic antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.Y.; Prudent, J.R.; Baldwin, E.P.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have generated seven site-specific mutations in the genes encoding the variable region of the heavy chain domain (V{sub H}) of the phosphocholine-binding antibody S107.S107 is a member of a family of well-characterized highly homologous antibodies that bind phosphorylcholine mono- and diesters. Two of these antibodies, MOPC-167 and T15, have previously been shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl N-trimethylammonioethyl carbonate. Two conserved heavy-chain residues, Tyr-33 and Arg-52, were postulated to be involved in binding and hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenylcholine carbonate esters. To more precisely define the catalytic roles of these residues, three Arg-52 mutants (R52K, R52Q, R52C) and four Tyr-33 mutants (Y33H, Y33F, Y33E, Y33D) of antibody S107 were generated. The genes encoding the V{sub H} binding domain of S107 were inserted into plasmid pUC-fl, and in vitro mutagenesis was performed. These results not only demonstrate the importance of electrostatic interactions in catalysis by antibody S107 but also show that catalytic side chains can be introduced into antibodies to enhance their catalytic efficiency.

  6. Experimental and Mechanistic Understanding of Aldehyde Hydrogenation Using Au25 Nanoclusters with Lewis Acids: Unique Sites for Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Gao; Abroshan, Hadi; Chen, Yuxiang; Jin, Rongchao; Kim, Hyung J

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic activity of Au25(SR)18 nanoclusters (R = C2H4Ph) for the aldehyde hydrogenation reaction in the presence of a base, e.g., ammonia or pyridine, and transition-metal ions M(z+), such as Cu(+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Co(2+), as a Lewis acid is studied. The addition of a Lewis acid is found to significantly promote the catalytic activity of Au25(SR)18/CeO2 in the hydrogenation of benzaldehyde and a number of its derivatives. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry in conjunction with UV-vis spectroscopy confirm the generation of new species, Au25-n(SR)18-n (n = 1-4), in the presence of a Lewis acid. The pathways for the speciation of Au24(SR)17 from its parent Au25(SR)18 nanocluster as well as its structure are investigated via the density functional theory (DFT) method. The adsorption of M(z+) onto a thiolate ligand "-SR-" of Au25(SR)18, followed by a stepwise detachment of "-SR-" and a gold atom bonded to "-SR-" (thus an "Au-SR" unit) is found to be the most likely mechanism for the Au24(SR)17 generation. This in turn exposes the Au13-core of Au24(SR)17 to reactants, providing an active site for the catalytic hydrogenation. DFT calculations indicate that M(z+) is also capable of adsorbing onto the Au13-core surface, producing a possible active metal site of a different kind to catalyze the aldehyde hydrogenation reaction. This study suggests, for the first time, that species with an open metal site like adducts [nanoparticle-M]((z-1)+) or fragments Au25-n(SR)18-n function as the catalysts rather than the intact Au25(SR)18.

  7. Site-specific growth of Au-Pd alloy horns on Au nanorods: a platform for highly sensitive monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhancement Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianfeng; Zhu, Yihan; Lin, Ming; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhao, Lan; Yang, Yang; Yao, Ke Xin; Han, Yu

    2013-06-12

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a highly sensitive probe for molecular detection. The aim of this study was to develop an efficient platform for investigating the kinetics of catalytic reactions with SERS. To achieve this, we synthesized a novel Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructure (HIF-AuNR@AuPd) through site-specific epitaxial growth of Au-Pd alloy horns as catalytic sites at the ends of Au nanorods. Using high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography, we successfully reconstructed the complex three-dimensional morphology of HIF-AuNR@AuPd and identified that the horns are bound with high-index {11l} (0.25 < l < 0.43) facets. With an electron beam probe, we visualized the distribution of surface plasmon over the HIF-AuNR@AuPd nanorods, finding that strong longitudinal surface plasmon resonance concentrated at the rod ends. This unique crystal morphology led to the coupling of high catalytic activity with a strong SERS effect at the rod ends, making HIF-AuNR@AuPd an excellent bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of surface catalytic reactions. Using the hydrogenation of 4-nitrothiophenol as a model reaction, we demonstrated that its first-order reaction kinetics could be accurately determined from this platform. Moreover, we clearly identified the superior catalytic activity of the rod ends relative to that of the rod bodies, owing to the different SERS activities at the two positions. In comparison with other reported Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructures, HIF-AuNR@AuPd offered both higher catalytic activity and greater detection sensitivity.

  8. Asymmetric catalytic cascade reactions for constructing diverse scaffolds and complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Lu, Hong; Xu, Peng-Fei

    2015-07-21

    With the increasing concerns about chemical pollution and sustainability of resources, among the significant challenges facing synthetic chemists are the development and application of elegant and efficient methods that enable the concise synthesis of natural products, drugs, and related compounds in a step-, atom- and redox-economic manner. One of the most effective ways to reach this goal is to implement reaction cascades that allow multiple bond-forming events to occur in a single vessel. This Account documents our progress on the rational design and strategic application of asymmetric catalytic cascade reactions in constructing diverse scaffolds and synthesizing complex chiral molecules. Our research is aimed at developing robust cascade reactions for the systematic synthesis of a range of interesting molecules that contain structural motifs prevalent in natural products, pharmaceuticals, and biological probes. The strategies employed to achieve this goal can be classified into three categories: bifunctional base/Brønsted acid catalysis, covalent aminocatalysis/N-heterocyclic carbene catalysis, and asymmetric organocatalytic relay cascades. By the use of rationally designed substrates with properly reactive sites, chiral oxindole, chroman, tetrahydroquinoline, tetrahydrothiophene, and cyclohexane scaffolds were successfully assembled under bifunctional base/Brønsted acid catalysis from simple and readily available substances such as imines and nitroolefins. We found that some of these reactions are highly efficient since catalyst loadings as low as 1 mol % can promote the multistep sequences affording complex architectures with high stereoselectivities and yields. Furthermore, one of the bifunctional base/Brønsted acid-catalyzed cascade reactions for the synthesis of chiral cyclohexanes has been used as a key step in the construction of the tetracyclic core of lycorine-type alkaloids and the formal synthesis of α-lycorane. Guided by the principles of

  9. Group IV organometallic compounds based on dianionic "pincer" ligands: synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in intramolecular hydroamination reactions.

    PubMed

    Luconi, Lapo; Rossin, Andrea; Motta, Alessandro; Tuci, Giulia; Giambastiani, Giuliano

    2013-04-08

    Neutral Zr(IV) and Hf(IV) diamido complexes stabilized by unsymmetrical dianionic N,C,N' pincer ligands have been prepared through the simplest and convenient direct metal-induced Caryl-H bond activation. Simple ligand modification has contributed to highlight the non-innocent role played by the donor atom set in the control of the cyclometallation kinetics. The as-prepared bis-amido catalysts were found to be good candidates for the intramolecular hydroamination/cyclization of primary aminoalkenes. The ability of these compounds to promote such a catalytic transformation efficiently (by providing, in some cases, fast and complete substrate conversion at room temperature) constitutes a remarkable step forward toward catalytic systems that can operate at relatively low catalyst loading and under milder reaction conditions. Kinetic studies and substrate-scope investigations, in conjunction with preliminary DFT calculations on the real systems, were used to elucidate the effects of the substrate substitution on the catalyst performance and to support the most reliable mechanistic path operative in the hydroamination reaction.

  10. Thermal behavior and kinetic study for catalytic co-pyrolysis of biomass with plastics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuesong; Lei, Hanwu; Zhu, Lei; Zhu, Xiaolu; Qian, Moriko; Yadavalli, Gayatri; Wu, Joan; Chen, Shulin

    2016-11-01

    The present study aims to investigate the thermal decomposition behaviors and kinetics of biomass (cellulose/Douglas fir sawdust) and plastics (LDPE) in a non-catalytic and catalytic co-pyrolysis over ZSM-5 catalyst by using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). It was found that there was a positive synergistic interaction between biomass and plastics according to the difference of weight loss (ΔW), which could decrease the formation of solid residue at the end of the experiment. The first order reaction model well fitted for both non-catalytic and catalytic co-pyrolysis of biomass with plastics. The activation energy (E) of Cellulose-LDPE-Catalyst and DF-LDPE-Catalyst are only 89.51 and 54.51kJ/mol, respectively. The kinetics analysis showed that adding catalyst doesn't change the decomposition mechanism. As a result, the kinetic study on catalytic co-pyrolysis of biomass with plastics was suggested that the catalytic co-pyrolysis is a promising technique that can significantly reduce the energy input. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Click on silica: systematic immobilization of Co(II) Schiff bases to the mesoporous silica via click reaction and their catalytic activity for aerobic oxidation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Rana, Bharat S; Jain, Suman L; Singh, Bhawan; Bhaumik, Asim; Sain, Bir; Sinha, Anil K

    2010-09-07

    The systematic immobilization of cobalt(II) Schiff base complexes on SBA-15 mesoporous silica via copper catalyzed [3 + 2] azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click reaction" involving either step-wise synthesis of silica-bound Schiff base ligand followed by its subsequent complexation with cobalt ions, or by the direct immobilization of preformed Co(II) Schiff base complex to the silica support is described. The catalytic activity of the prepared complexes was studied for the oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds using molecular oxygen as oxidant. The immobilized complexes were recycled for several runs without loss in catalytic activity and no leaching was observed during this course.

  12. Pyrazolate-based cobalt(II)-containing metal-organic frameworks in heterogeneous catalytic oxidation reactions: elucidating the role of entatic states for biomimetic oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Tonigold, Markus; Lu, Ying; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Puls, Angela; Staudt, Reiner; Möllmer, Jens; Sauer, Joachim; Volkmer, Dirk

    2011-07-25

    Crystal structures of two metal-organic frameworks (MFU-1 and MFU-2) are presented, both of which contain redox-active Co(II) centres coordinated by linear 1,4-bis[(3,5-dimethyl)pyrazol-4-yl] ligands. In contrast to many MOFs reported previously, these compounds show excellent stability against hydrolytic decomposition. Catalytic turnover is achieved in oxidation reactions by employing tert-butyl hydroperoxide and the solid catalysts are easily recovered from the reaction mixture. Whereas heterogeneous catalysis is unambiguously demonstrated for MFU-1, MFU-2 shows catalytic activity due to slow metal leaching, emphasising the need for a deeper understanding of structure-reactivity relationships in the future design of redox-active metal-organic frameworks. Mechanistic details for oxidation reactions employing tert-butyl hydroperoxide are studied by UV/Vis and IR spectroscopy and XRPD measurements. The catalytic process accompanying changes of redox states and structural changes were investigated by means of cobalt K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. To probe the putative binding modes of molecular oxygen, the isosteric heats of adsorption of O(2) were determined and compared with models from DFT calculations. The stabilities of the frameworks in an oxygen atmosphere as a reactive gas were examined by temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO). Solution impregnation of MFU-1 with a co-catalyst (N-hydroxyphthalimide) led to NHPI@MFU-1, which oxidised a range of organic substrates under ambient conditions by employing molecular oxygen from air. The catalytic reaction involved a biomimetic reaction cascade based on free radicals. The concept of an entatic state of the cobalt centres is proposed and its relevance for sustained catalytic activity is briefly discussed. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A General Approach to Catalytic Alkene Anti-Markovnikov Hydrofunctionalization Reactions via Acridinium Photoredox Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Margrey, Kaila A; Nicewicz, David A

    2016-09-20

    the anti-Markovnikov addition of mineral acids to olefins using lutidinium halide salts as convenient reagents to deliver the mineral acids. Acids including HCl, HF, H3PO4, and MeSO3H all participate in the hydrofunctionalization reactions, even with alkenes that are highly prone to polymerization. A combination of transient and steady-state absorption spectroscopy tools were employed to observe alkene cation radicals and the resultant acridine radical, lending support for an electron transfer mechanism. The origin of the anti-Markovnikov selectivity in these reactions is likely the result of a reversible addition of the nucleophile to the alkene cation radical resulting in a greater population of the more stable radical. Loss of a proton followed by reaction of the radical intermediate with the hydrogen atom donor completes the transformations. Again, by means of transient absorption spectroscopy, oxidative turnover of the acridine radical was observed to complete the dual catalytic cycle mechanistic picture.

  14. Physicochemical and catalytic properties of Ga and In pentasils in the reaction of propane aromatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosmerikova, L. N.; Volynkina, A. N.; Zaikovskii, V. I.; Vosmerikov, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    Ga and In ZSM-5 zeolites are obtained via hydrothermal crystallization from alkali aluminosilicate gels. Their physicochemical and catalytic properties during conversion of propane into aromatic hydrocarbons are studied. These catalysts exhibit different activity and selectivity in propane aromatization process due to their specific physicochemical properties and the localization of promoter atoms in different sites of the zeolite structure. A zeolite containing 1.85 wt % of gallium oxide is the most effective catalyst for propane aromatization.

  15. In situ generation of electron acceptor for photoelectrochemical biosensing via hemin-mediated catalytic reaction.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yang; Lei, Jianping; Zhang, Lei; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-12-16

    A novel photoelectrochemical sensing strategy is designed for DNA detection on the basis of in situ generation of an electron acceptor via the catalytic reaction of hemin toward H2O2. The photoelectrochemical platform was established by sequential assembly of near-infrared CdTe quantum dots, capture DNA, and a hemin-labeled DNA probe to form a triple-helix molecular beacon (THMB) structure on an indium tin oxide electrode. According to the highly catalytic capacity of hemin toward H2O2, a photoelectrochemical mechanism was then proposed, in which the electron acceptor of O2 was in situ-generated on the electrode surface, leading to the enhancement of the photocurrent response. The utilization of CdTe QDs can extend the absorption edge to the near-infrared band, resulting in an increase in the light-to-electricity efficiency. After introducing target DNA, the THMB structure is disassembled and releases hemin and, thus, quenches the photocurrent. Under optimized conditions, this biosensor shows high sensitivity with a linear range from 1 to 1000 pM and detection limit of 0.8 pM. Moreover, it exhibits good performance of excellent selectivity, high stability, and acceptable fabrication reproducibility. This present strategy opens an alternative avenue for photoelectrochemical signal transduction and expands the applications of hemin-based materials in photoelectrochemical biosensing and clinical diagnosis.

  16. Quantitative Comparison of Catalytic Mechanisms and Overall Reactions in Convergently Evolved Enzymes: Implications for Classification of Enzyme Function

    PubMed Central

    Almonacid, Daniel E.; Yera, Emmanuel R.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Babbitt, Patricia C.

    2010-01-01

    Functionally analogous enzymes are those that catalyze similar reactions on similar substrates but do not share common ancestry, providing a window on the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve required catalysts. Identification and use of this information to improve reaction classification and computational annotation of enzymes newly discovered in the genome projects would benefit from systematic determination of reaction similarities. Here, we quantified similarity in bond changes for overall reactions and catalytic mechanisms for 95 pairs of functionally analogous enzymes (non-homologous enzymes with identical first three numbers of their EC codes) from the MACiE database. Similarity of overall reactions was computed by comparing the sets of bond changes in the transformations from substrates to products. For similarity of mechanisms, sets of bond changes occurring in each mechanistic step were compared; these similarities were then used to guide global and local alignments of mechanistic steps. Using this metric, only 44% of pairs of functionally analogous enzymes in the dataset had significantly similar overall reactions. For these enzymes, convergence to the same mechanism occurred in 33% of cases, with most pairs having at least one identical mechanistic step. Using our metric, overall reaction similarity serves as an upper bound for mechanistic similarity in functional analogs. For example, the four carbon-oxygen lyases acting on phosphates (EC 4.2.3) show neither significant overall reaction similarity nor significant mechanistic similarity. By contrast, the three carboxylic-ester hydrolases (EC 3.1.1) catalyze overall reactions with identical bond changes and have converged to almost identical mechanisms. The large proportion of enzyme pairs that do not show significant overall reaction similarity (56%) suggests that at least for the functionally analogous enzymes studied here, more stringent criteria could be used to refine

  17. Quantitative comparison of catalytic mechanisms and overall reactions in convergently evolved enzymes: implications for classification of enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Daniel E; Yera, Emmanuel R; Mitchell, John B O; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2010-03-12

    Functionally analogous enzymes are those that catalyze similar reactions on similar substrates but do not share common ancestry, providing a window on the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve required catalysts. Identification and use of this information to improve reaction classification and computational annotation of enzymes newly discovered in the genome projects would benefit from systematic determination of reaction similarities. Here, we quantified similarity in bond changes for overall reactions and catalytic mechanisms for 95 pairs of functionally analogous enzymes (non-homologous enzymes with identical first three numbers of their EC codes) from the MACiE database. Similarity of overall reactions was computed by comparing the sets of bond changes in the transformations from substrates to products. For similarity of mechanisms, sets of bond changes occurring in each mechanistic step were compared; these similarities were then used to guide global and local alignments of mechanistic steps. Using this metric, only 44% of pairs of functionally analogous enzymes in the dataset had significantly similar overall reactions. For these enzymes, convergence to the same mechanism occurred in 33% of cases, with most pairs having at least one identical mechanistic step. Using our metric, overall reaction similarity serves as an upper bound for mechanistic similarity in functional analogs. For example, the four carbon-oxygen lyases acting on phosphates (EC 4.2.3) show neither significant overall reaction similarity nor significant mechanistic similarity. By contrast, the three carboxylic-ester hydrolases (EC 3.1.1) catalyze overall reactions with identical bond changes and have converged to almost identical mechanisms. The large proportion of enzyme pairs that do not show significant overall reaction similarity (56%) suggests that at least for the functionally analogous enzymes studied here, more stringent criteria could be used to refine

  18. Effects of Finite Reaction Rates on the Kinetic Phase Transitions in the Catalytic Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Carreño, L. D.

    Oxidation of carbon monoxide is one of the most extensively studied heterogeneous catalysis reactions, being important among other applications in automobile-emission control. Catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide on platinum (111) surface was simulated by the Monte Carlo technique following an extended version of the model proposed by Ziff, Gulari and Barshad (ZGB). In the simulation, a simple square two-dimensional lattice of active sites replaces the surface of the catalyst. Finite reaction rates for (i) diffusion of the reactive species on the surface, (ii) reaction of a CO molecule with an oxygen atom in a nearest neighbor site, and (iii) desorption of unreacted CO molecules, have been taken into account. The produced CO2 desorbs instantly. The average coverage of O, CO and the CO2 production rate for a steady state configuration, as a function of the normalized CO partial pressure (PCO), shows two kinetic phase transitions. In the ZGB model these transitions occur at PCO ~ 0.39 and PCO ~ 0.53. For 0.39 < PCO > 0.53 a reactive (CO2 production) steady state is found. Outside of the interval, the only steady state is a poisoned catalyst of pure CO or pure O. Our results show that finite reaction rates shift the values in which these phase transitions occur.

  19. Enhancing the free corrosion dealloying rate with a catalytically driven reaction.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ziling; Detsi, Eric

    2017-08-24

    Despite its high popularity, chemical dealloying that is widely used for the fabrication of nanoporous metals is a relatively slow process: dealloying a few milligrams of bulk material may take from several hours up to a few days, depending on the material system. Raising the temperature of the corroding medium is a common approach to speed up the dealloying process. However, high temperatures cause undesired ligament growth in dealloyed materials. Here we report for the first time the use of a catalytically driven reaction to speed up the dealloying process at ambient temperature and pressure. To demonstrate the concept, we show that the free corrosion dealloying of a silver-aluminum alloy is significantly faster with the help of a platinum catalyst. More importantly, the corresponding characteristic nanostructured size is much smaller than that without a catalyst. Our finding is expected to play a central role in scaling up the dealloying process from the laboratory to the industrial scale.

  20. Ammonia-treated Ordered Mesoporous Carbons as Catalytic Materials for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiqing; Lee, Je Seung; Zhu, Qing; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Dai, Sheng

    2010-04-13

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have been considered as promising alternative power sources for many mobile and stationary applications. Compared to the fast hydrogen oxidation at the anode, the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode requires high-performance catalysts. Currently, platium (Pt) nanoparticles supported on high surface area carbons remain the best catalysts for ORR. However, both instability and high cost of Pt-based catalysts represent two main obstacles limiting the commercial applications of PEMFCs. The instability of supported Pt catalysts is mainly due to the corrosion of carbon support under operation conditions and the agglomation and detachment of Pt particles, leading to a decrease in catalytic surface areas. Development of corrosion resistant supports and enhancement of the interactions between Pt and supports are two strategies to improve the cathode long-term activity.

  1. Spatially orthogonal chemical functionalization of a hierarchical pore network for catalytic cascade reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlett, Christopher M. A.; Isaacs, Mark A.; Beaumont, Simon K.; Bingham, Laura M.; Hondow, Nicole S.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.

    2016-02-01

    The chemical functionality within porous architectures dictates their performance as heterogeneous catalysts; however, synthetic routes to control the spatial distribution of individual functions within porous solids are limited. Here we report the fabrication of spatially orthogonal bifunctional porous catalysts, through the stepwise template removal and chemical functionalization of an interconnected silica framework. Selective removal of polystyrene nanosphere templates from a lyotropic liquid crystal-templated silica sol-gel matrix, followed by extraction of the liquid crystal template, affords a hierarchical macroporous-mesoporous architecture. Decoupling of the individual template extractions allows independent functionalization of macropore and mesopore networks on the basis of chemical and/or size specificity. Spatial compartmentalization of, and directed molecular transport between, chemical functionalities affords control over the reaction sequence in catalytic cascades; herein illustrated by the Pd/Pt-catalysed oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol to cinnamic acid. We anticipate that our methodology will prompt further design of multifunctional materials comprising spatially compartmentalized functions.

  2. Peroxidyme-Amplified Radical Chain Reaction (PARCR): Visible Detection of a Catalytic Reporter.

    PubMed

    Goertz, John P; White, Ian M

    2017-08-29

    Peroxidyme Amplified Radical Chain Reaction (PARCR), a novel enzyme-free system that achieves exponential amplification of a visible signal, is presented. Typical enzyme-free amplification systems that produce a visible readout suffer from long reaction times, low sensitivity, and narrow dynamic range. PARCR employs photocatalyzed nonlinear signal generation, enabling unprecedented one-pot, naked-eye detection of a catalytic reporter from 1 μm down to 100 pm. In this reaction, hemin-binding peroxidase-mimicking DNAzymes ("peroxidymes") mediate the NADH-driven oxidation of a colorless, nonfluorescent phenoxazine dye (Amplex Red) to a brightly colored, strongly fluorescent product (resorufin); illumination with green light initiates multiple radical-forming positive-feedback loops, rapidly producing visible levels of resorufin. Collectively, these results demonstrate the potential of PARCR as an easy-to-use readout for a range of detection schemes, including aptamer labels, hybridization assays, and nucleic acid amplification. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Solar photo-thermal catalytic reactions to produce high value chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Prengle, Jr, H W; Wentworth, W E

    1992-04-01

    This report presents a summary of the research work accomplished to date on the utilization of solar photo-thermal energy to convert low cost chemical feedstocks into high $-value chemical products. The rationale is that the solar IR-VIS-UV spectrum is unique, supplying endothermic reaction energy as well as VIS-UV for photochemical activation. Chemical market analysis and product price distribution focused attention on speciality chemicals with prices >$1.00/lb, and a synthesis sequence of n-paraffins to aromatics to partial oxidized products. The experimental work has demonstrated that enhanced reaction effects result from VIS-UV irradiation of catalytically active V2O5/SiO2. Experiments of the past year have been on dehydrogenation and dehydrocyclization of n-paraffins to olefins and aromatics with preference for the latter. Recent results using n-hexane produced 95% conversion with 56% benzene; it is speculated that aromatic yield should reach {approximately}70% by further optimization. Pilot- and commercial-scale reactor configurations have been examined; the odds-on-favorite being a shallow fluid-bed of catalyst with incident radiation from the top. Sequencing for maximum cost effectiveness would be day-time endothermic followed by night-time exothermic reactions to produce the products.

  4. Solar photo-thermal catalytic reactions to produce high value chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Prengle, H.W. Jr.; Wentworth, W.E. )

    1992-04-01

    This report presents a summary of the research work accomplished to date on the utilization of solar photo-thermal energy to convert low cost chemical feedstocks into high $-value chemical products. The rationale is that the solar IR-VIS-UV spectrum is unique, supplying endothermic reaction energy as well as VIS-UV for photochemical activation. Chemical market analysis and product price distribution focused attention on speciality chemicals with prices >$1.00/lb, and a synthesis sequence of n-paraffins to aromatics to partial oxidized products. The experimental work has demonstrated that enhanced reaction effects result from VIS-UV irradiation of catalytically active V2O5/SiO2. Experiments of the past year have been on dehydrogenation and dehydrocyclization of n-paraffins to olefins and aromatics with preference for the latter. Recent results using n-hexane produced 95% conversion with 56% benzene; it is speculated that aromatic yield should reach {approximately}70% by further optimization. Pilot- and commercial-scale reactor configurations have been examined; the odds-on-favorite being a shallow fluid-bed of catalyst with incident radiation from the top. Sequencing for maximum cost effectiveness would be day-time endothermic followed by night-time exothermic reactions to produce the products.

  5. All electron quantum chemical calculation of the entire enzyme system confirms a collective catalytic device in the chorismate mutase reaction.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Toyokazu; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo

    2006-01-26

    To elucidate the catalytic power of enzymes, we analyzed the reaction profile of Claisen rearrangement of Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase (BsCM) by all electron quantum chemical calculations using the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of ab initio-based quantum chemical calculations of the entire enzyme system, where we provide a detailed analysis of the catalytic factors that accomplish transition-state stabilization (TSS). FMO calculations deliver an ab initio-level estimate of the intermolecular interaction between the substrate and the amino acid residues of the enzyme. To clarify the catalytic role of Arg90, we calculated the reaction profile of the wild-type BsCM as well as Lys90 and Cit90 mutant BsCMs. Structural refinement and the reaction path determination were performed at the ab initio QM/MM level, and FMO calculations were applied to the QM/MM refined structures. Comparison between three types of reactions established two collective catalytic factors in the BsCM reaction: (1) the hydrogen bonds connecting the Glu78-Arg90-substrate cooperatively control the stability of TS relative to the ES complex and (2) the positive charge on Arg90 polarizes the substrate in the TS region to gain more electrostatic stabilization.

  6. Eco-friendly synthesis of silver nanoparticles using green algae (Caulerpa serrulata): reaction optimization, catalytic and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Aboelfetoh, Eman F; El-Shenody, Rania A; Ghobara, Mohamed M

    2017-07-01

    Stable colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized using Caulerpa serrulata (green marine algae) aqueous extract as an efficient reducing and stabilizing agent. This method is considered to be a sustainable alternate to the more complicated chemical procedures. To achieve the optimization synthesis of AgNPs, several effects such as extract concentration, contact time, pH values, and temperature were examined. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR, XRD, and HR-TEM. The synthesized AgNPs showed an intense surface plasmon resonance band at 412 nm at the optimal conditions (20% (v/v) extract and 95 °C). TEM reveal that higher extract concentration and higher temperature leading to the formation of spherical AgNPs with an average particle size of 10 ± 2 nm. The synthesized AgNPs showed excellent catalytic reduction activity of Congo red (CR) dye from aqueous solutions. The degradation percentage of CR with AgNPs accelerated by increasing either NaBH4 concentration or catalytic dosage. The AgNPs synthesized at higher temperature (e.g., 10Ag-95) exhibited the highest catalytic activity. The reaction kinetics was found to be pseudo first order with respect to the dye concentration. Moreover, the AgNPs displayed antibacterial activity at lower concentration against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella sp., Salmonella typhi, and Escherichia coli and may be a good alternative therapeutic approach. The outcomes of the current study confirmed that the synthesized AgNPs had an awesome guarantee for application in catalysis and wastewater treatment.

  7. Simultaneous determination of trace iron and aluminum by catalytic spectrophotometry based on a novel oxidation reaction of xylene cyanol FF.

    PubMed

    Cai, Longfei; Xu, Chunxiu

    2008-06-01

    A new, simple, sensitive and selective method for the simultaneous determination of trace iron and aluminum by catalytic spectrophotometry was presented, based on the catalytic effects of iron and aluminum on the discoloring reaction of xylene cyanol FF proceeded by hydrogen peroxide and potassium periodate in weak nitric acid medium. No catalytic effect was obtained in the presence of hydrogen peroxide or potassium periodate only. With the conditional rate constants determined in reaction systems catalyzed by Al or Fe only, the concentrations of Fe and Al in the samples can be calculated. The method was applied to the simultaneous determination of trace Fe and Al in tap water, lake water, river water and tea leaves without separation and preconcentration.

  8. Catalytic Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Little, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Don Little's Catalytic Reforming deals exclusively with reforming. With the increasing need for unleaded gasoline, the importance of this volume has escalated since it combines various related aspects of reforming technology into a single publication. For those with no practical knowledge of catalytic reforming, the chemical reactions, flow schemes and how the cat reformer fits into the overall refinery process will be of interest. Contents include: Catalytic reforming in refinery processing: How catalytic reformers work - chemical reactions; Process design; The catalyst, process variables and unit operation; Commercial processes; BTX operation; Feed preparation; naphtha hydrotreating and catalytic reforming; Index.

  9. Highly enantioselective cross-aldol reactions of acetaldehyde mediated by a dual catalytic system operating under site isolation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinyuan; Rodríguez-Escrich, Carles; Wang, Shoulei; Sayalero, Sonia; Pericàs, Miquel A

    2014-10-06

    Polystyrene-supported (PS) diarylprolinol catalysts 1 a (Ar = phenyl) and 1 b (Ar = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl) have been developed. Operating under site-isolation conditions, PS-1 a/1 b worked compatibly with PS-bound sulfonic acid catalyst 2 to promote deoligomerization of paraldehyde and subsequent cross-aldol reactions of the resulting acetaldehyde in one pot, affording aldol products in high yields with excellent enantioselectivities. The effect of water on the performance of the catalytic system has been studied and its optimal amount (0.5 equiv) has been determined. The dual catalytic system (1/2) allows repeated recycling and reuse (10 cycles). The potential of this methodology is demonstrated by a two-step synthesis of a phenoperidine analogue (68% overall yield; 98% ee) and by the preparation of highly enantioenriched 1,3-diols 4 and 3-methylamino-1-arylpropanols 5, key intermediates in the synthesis of a variety of druglike structures. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of clofibric acid using Ce/MCM-48: Preparation, reaction mechanism, comparison with Ce/MCM-41.

    PubMed

    Li, Shangyi; Tang, Yiming; Chen, Weirui; Hu, Zhe; Li, Xukai; Li, Laisheng

    2017-10-15

    Three-dimensional mesoporous MCM-48 and Ce loaded MCM-48 (Ce/MCM-48) were synthesized by hydrothermal and impregnating methods, respectively. They were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, EDS, XPS, N2 adsorption-desorption techniques, and the results showed that Ce/MCM-48 still retained a highly ordered cubic structure. A series of experiments were conducted to study the catalytic activity of Ce/MCM-48 and Ce/MCM-41 for ozonation of clofibric acid in aqueous solution. Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal efficiency in Ce/MCM-48/O3 can be improved to 64% at 120min reaction time, 54% by Ce/MCM-41/O3, only 24% by MCM-48/O3, 23% by single ozonation. Ce/MCM-48 did not show any adsorption capacity for CA. Effect of initial pH revealed that active sites were surface protonated hydroxyl groups. The restraint of phosphate and sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO3) on the mineralization of CA illustrated more hydroxyl radicals were generated by Ce/MCM-48 catalysts than Ce/MCM-41. The degradation pathway of CA was investigated by the alterations of pH under different conditions. Recycle tests of catalysts demonstrated that compared with Ce/MCM-41, Ce/MCM-48 exhibited more excellent catalytic efficiency and stability because of its unique pore systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Iles, Gail N. Reinhart, Guillaume; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F. Hansen, Thomas C.

    2014-07-21

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni{sub 2}Al{sub 3} and NiAl{sub 3} continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials.

  12. The Catalytic Activity of Proline Racemase: a QM/MM Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenta, Marco; Calvaresi, Matteo; Altoè, Piero; Spinelli, Domenico; Garavelli, Marco; Bottoni, Andrea

    2007-12-01

    The catalytic activity of an interesting enzyme (involved in the life cycle of the Trypanosoma Cruzi eucariotic parasite) has been elucidated by mean of a QM/MM study. The reaction mechanism of the stereo-inversion of the substrate has been studied by characterizing the associated PES. The nature of the found critical point has been checked by means of numerical frequencies calculations. The role of the various residues in the catalysis has been pointed out.

  13. Kinetics of the catalytic reaction of 2,2-di-(chloromethyl)-1,3-propanediol with thionyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotov, A.A.; V'yunov, K.A.

    1989-01-10

    The aim of this work was to determine the partial rate constants for the catalytic formation of 4,4-di(chloromethyl)trimethylene sulfite and to establish the controlling stage of the complex process. The choice of DMFA as catalyst during investigation of the quantitative relationships governing the substitution of the hydroxyl group by the chlorine atom was based on the fact that the reaction with triethylamine and pyridine takes place in a more complicated manner; the initially formed triethylamine and pyridine hydrochlorides accelerate substitution, i.e., autocatalysts by the reaction products is observed. The slowest stage of the complex catalytic process in the reaction of 2,2-di(chloromethyl)-1,3-propanediol with thionyl chloride in the presence of dimethylformamide is the reaction of the alcohol-catalyst donor-acceptor complex with the thionyl chloride.

  14. Pyranone natural products as inspirations for catalytic reaction discovery and development.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Benjamin R; Scheidt, Karl A

    2015-04-21

    Natural products continue to provide a wealth of opportunities in the areas of chemical and therapeutic development. These structures are effective measuring sticks for the current state of chemical synthesis as a field and constantly inspire new approaches and strategies. Tetrahydropryans and tetrahydropyran-4-ones are found in numerous bioactive marine natural products and medicinal compounds. Our interest in exploring the therapeutic potential of natural products containing these motifs provided the impetus to explore new methods to access highly functionalized, chiral pyran molecules in the most direct and rapid fashion possible. This goal led to exploration and development of a Lewis acid-mediated Prins reaction between a chiral β-hydroxy-dioxinone and aldehyde to produce a pyran-dioxinone fused product that can be processed in a single pot operation to the desired tetrahydropyran-4-ones in excellent yield and stereoselectivity. Although the Prins reaction is a commonly employed approach toward pyrans, this method uniquely provides a 3-carboxy-trisubstituted pyran and utilizes dioxinones in a manner that was underexplored at the time. The 3-carboxy substituent served as a key synthetic handhold when this method was applied to the synthesis of highly functionalized pyrans within the macrocyclic natural products neopeltolide, okilactiomycin, and exiguolide. When employed in challenging macrocyclizations, this tetrahydropyranone forming reaction proved highly stereoselective and robust. Another major thrust in our lab has been the synthesis of benzopyranone natural products, specifically flavonoids, because this broad and diverse family of compounds possesses an equally broad range of biological and medicinal applications. With the goal of developing a broad platform toward the synthesis of enantioenriched flavonoid analogs and natural products, a biomimetic, asymmetric catalytic approach toward the synthesis of 2-aryl benzopyranones was developed. A

  15. Catalytic Mechanisms for Cofactor-Free Oxidase-Catalyzed Reactions: Reaction Pathways of Uricase-Catalyzed Oxidation and Hydration of Uric Acid.

    PubMed

    Wei, Donghui; Huang, Xiaoqin; Qiao, Yan; Rao, Jingjing; Wang, Lu; Liao, Fei; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2017-07-07

    First-principles quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM)-free energy calculations have been performed to uncover how uricase catalyzes metabolic reactions of uric acid (UA), demonstrating that the entire reaction process of UA in uricase consists of two stages-oxidation followed by hydration. The oxidation consists of four steps: (1) chemical transformation from 8-hydroxyxythine to an anionic radical via a proton transfer along with an electron transfer, which is different from the previously proposed electron-transfer mechanism that involves a dianion intermediate (UA(2-)) during the catalytic reaction process; (2) proton transfer to the O2(-) anion (radical); (3) diradical recombination to form a peroxo intermediate; (4) dissociation of H2O2 to generate the dehydrourate. Hydration, for the most favorable pathway, is initiated by the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule on dehydrourate, along with a concerted proton transfer through residue Thr69 in the catalytic site. According to the calculated free energy profile, the hydration is the rate-determining step, and the corresponding free energy barrier of 16.2 kcal/mol is consistent with that derived from experimental kinetic data, suggesting that the computational insights into the catalytic mechanisms are reasonable. The mechanistic insights not only provide a mechanistic base for future rational design of uricase mutants with improved catalytic activity against uric acid as an improved enzyme therapy, but also are valuable for understanding a variety of other cofactor-free oxidase-catalyzed reactions involving an oxygen molecule.

  16. QUICK REACTION STUDIES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The functional requirements of mission planning of space missions are documented. A discussion of the current applicable computer programs to some part of the mission planning process is included. In particular the Mission Analysis and Trajectory Simulation (MATS) system is described. The applicability of current programs to the demands of mission planning in a Quick Reaction

  17. Catalytically active polymers obtained by molecular imprinting and their application in chemical reaction engineering.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, O

    2001-08-01

    Molecular imprinting is a way of creating polymers bearing artificial receptors. It allows the fabrication of highly selective plastics by polymerizing monomers in the presence of a template. This technique primarily had been developed for the generation of biomimetic materials to be used in chromatographic separation, in extraction approaches and in sensors and assays. Beyond these applications, in the past few years molecular imprinting has become a tool for producing new kinds of catalysts. For catalytic applications, the template must be chosen, so that it is structurally comparable with the transition state (a transition state analogue, TSA) of a reaction, or with the product or substrate. The advantage of using these polymeric catalysts is obvious: the backbone withstands more aggressive conditions than a bio material could ever survive. Results are presented showing the applicability of a molecularly imprinted catalyst in different kinds of chemical reactors. It is demonstrated that the catalysts can be utilized not only in batch but also in continuously driven reactors and that their performance can be improved by means of chemical reaction engineering.

  18. Highly enantioselective and anti-diastereoselective catalytic intermolecular glyoxylate-ene reactions: effect of the geometrical isomers of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Min; Ding, Ran; Xu, Yun-He; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2015-06-05

    An efficient method for the synthesis of homoallylic alcohols with high enantioselectivities and anti-diastereoselectivities via an In(III)-catalyzed intermolecular glyoxylate-ene reaction has been developed. The geometrical isomers of alkenes were shown to have different reactivities. Only the isomers of the alkenes having a proton β-cis to the substituent reacted in this catalytic system.

  19. Conjugate-base-stabilized Brønsted acids: catalytic enantioselective Pictet-Spengler reactions with unmodified tryptamine.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Nisha; Sun, Diana X; Seidel, Daniel

    2014-02-07

    A conjugate-base-stabilized Brønsted acid facilitates catalytic enantioselective Pictet-Spengler reactions with unmodified tryptamine. The chiral carboxylic acid catalyst is readily assembled in just two steps and enables the formation of β-carbolines with up to 92% ee. Achiral acid additives or in situ Boc-protection facilitate catalyst turnover.

  20. Applicability of fiber-optic-based Raman probes for on-line reaction monitoring of high-pressure catalytic hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Hamminga, Gerben M; Mul, Guido; Moulijn, Jacob A

    2007-05-01

    This study evaluates the applicability of fiber-optic-based Raman probes for on-line reaction monitoring of high-pressure catalytic hydrogenation reactions in batch autoclaves. First, based on trends in the strong intensity of the 945 cm(-1) C-O-C vibration of 1,3-dioxolane, the effect of various experimental parameters on sensitivity was evaluated and can be summarized as follows: (1) above 500 rpm a linear increase in stirring speed induces a linear decrease in Raman intensity; (2) a linear increase in hydrogen pressure also leads to a linear decrease of the Raman signal; (3) linear temperature elevation exponentially decreases the Raman intensity; and (4) increasing the catalyst particle concentration results in a steep nonlinear decrease of the Raman signal. Light scattering by gas bubbles, or combined scattering and absorption by (black) catalyst particles, reducing the amount of light collected by the optical fiber probe, explain the observed experimental trends. Second, the sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy was directly compared with attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR) spectroscopy in the analysis of three different hydrogenation reactions over a Cu-ZnO catalyst. From the applied target molecules, diethyl maleate hydrogenation could be very well analyzed by Raman spectroscopy due to the high Raman scattering efficiency of the C=C bond, while for analysis of the hydrogenation of gamma-butyrolactone or 1-butanal, ATR-FT-IR is the technique of choice.

  1. Aluminosilicates as controlled molecular environments for selective photochemical and catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    This dissertation concerns research that involves photochemical, catalytic and spectroscopic studies of clays, pillared clays and zeolites. Incorporation of uranyl ions into hectorite, montmorillonite, bentonite and vermiculite clays was monitored by XRD and luminescence methods. Excitation and emission characteristics were studied in order to understand the behavior of uranyl ions in clays after various thermal treatments. Luminescence lifetime measurements elucidated the number of uranyl sites. Uranyl-exchanged clays were found to absorb light at lower energies (445-455nm) than analogous uranyl-exchanged zeolites (425nm). Each uranyl-exchanged clay was tested as a catalyst for the photoassisted oxidation of isopropyl alcohol. Energy transfer (ET) between uranyl and Eu(III) ions in different zeolite framework systems was examined. The efficiency of ET (eta/sub t/) was found to be affected by the type of framework present. Pillared bentonites were examined in the hydrocracking of decane. A catalytically and spectroscopically active dopant ion, Cr(III), was introduced into the clays in both pillared and unpillared forms depending upon synthetic conditions. EPR and DRS were employed to monitor the environment of Cr(III) for determination of its location - whether in the micropore structure or associated with alumina pillars. Catalytic behavior based upon this variability of location was examined. Incorporation of Cr(III) ions into an alumina pillar was found to increase the stability and activity with respect to an alumina PILC catalyst. The results of these studies suggest that selective, efficient catalysts can be designed around inorganic ions in aluminosilicate supports.

  2. Molybdenum triamidoamine systems. Reactions involving dihydrogen relevant to catalytic reduction of dinitrogen.

    PubMed

    Hetterscheid, Dennis G H; Hanna, Brian S; Schrock, Richard R

    2009-09-07

    [HIPTN(3)N]Mo(N(2)) (MoN(2)) ([HIPTN(3)N](3-) = [(HIPTNCH(2)CH(2))(3)N](3-) where HIPT = 3,5-(2,4,6-i-Pr(3)C(6)H(2))(2)C(6)H(3)) reacts with dihydrogen slowly (days) at 22 degrees C to yield [HIPTN(3)N]MoH(2) (MoH(2)), a compound whose properties are most consistent with it being a dihydrogen complex of Mo(III). The intermediate in the slow reaction between MoN(2) and H(2) is proposed to be [HIPTN(3)N]Mo (Mo). In contrast, MoN(2), MoNH(3), and MoH(2) are interconverted rapidly in the presence of H(2), N(2), and NH(3), and MoH(2) is the lowest energy of the three Mo compounds. Catalytic runs with MoH(2) as a catalyst suggest that it is competent for reduction of N(2) with protons and electrons under standard conditions. [HIPTN(3)N]MoH(2) reacts rapidly with HD to yield a mixture of [HIPTN(3)N]MoH(2), [HIPTN(3)N]MoD(2), and [HIPTN(3)N]MoHD, and rapidly catalyzes H/D exchange between H(2) and D(2). MoH(2) reacts readily with ethylene, PMe(3), and CO to yield monoadducts. Reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia in the presence of 32 equiv of added hydrogen (vs Mo) is not catalytic, consistent with dihydrogen being an inhibitor of dinitrogen reduction.

  3. Molybdenum Triamidoamine Systems. Reactions Involving Dihydrogen Relevant to Catalytic Reduction of Dinitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Hetterscheid, Dennis G. H.; Hanna, Brian S.; Schrock, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    [HIPTN3N]Mo(N2) (MoN2) ([HIPTN3N]3− = [(HIPTNCH2CH2)3N]3− where HIPT = 3,5-(2,4,6-i-Pr3C6H2)2C6H3) reacts with dihydrogen slowly (days) at 22 °C to yield [HIPTN3N]MoH2 (MoH2), a compound whose properties are most consistent with it being a dihydrogen complex of Mo(III). The intermediate in the slow reaction between MoN2 and H2 is proposed to be [HIPTN3N]Mo (Mo). In contrast, MoN2, MoNH3, and MoH2 are interconverted rapidly in the presence of H2, N2, and NH3, and MoH2 is the lowest energy of the three Mo compounds. Catalytic runs with MoH2 as a catalyst suggest that it is competent for reduction of N2 with protons and electrons under standard conditions. [HIPTN3N]MoH2 reacts rapidly with HD to yield a mixture of [HIPTN3N]MoH2, [HIPTN3N]MoD2, and [HIPTN3N]MoHD, and rapidly catalyzes H/D exchange between H2 and D2. MoH2 reacts readily with ethylene, PMe3, and CO to yield monoadducts. Reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia in the presence of 32 equivalents of added hydrogen (vs. Mo) is not catalytic, consistent with dihydrogen being an inhibitor of dinitrogen reduction. PMID:19639973

  4. A Mesoporous Indium Metal-Organic Framework: Remarkable Advances in Catalytic Activity for Strecker Reaction of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Reinares-Fisac, Daniel; Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles; Gándara, Felipe

    2016-07-27

    With the aim of developing new highly porous, heterogeneous Lewis acid catalysts for multicomponent reactions, a new mesoporous metal-organic framework, InPF-110 ([In3O(btb)2(HCOO)(L)], (H3btb = 1,3,5-tris(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene acid, L = methanol, water, or ethanol), has been prepared with indium as the metal center. It exhibits a Langmuir surface area of 1470 m(2) g(-1), and its structure consists of hexagonal pores with a 2.8 nm aperture, which allows the diffusion of multiple substrates. This material presents a large density of active metal sites resulting in outstanding catalytic activity in the formation of substituted α-aminonitriles through the one-pot Strecker reaction of ketones. In this respect, InPF-110 stands out compared to other catalysts for this reaction due to the small catalyst loadings required, and without the need for heat or solvents. Furthermore, X-ray single crystal diffraction studies clearly show the framework-substrate interaction through coordination to the accessible indium sites.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in Suzuki coupling and catalase-like reactions of new chitosan supported Pd catalyst.

    PubMed

    Baran, Talat; Inanan, Tülden; Menteş, Ayfer

    2016-07-10

    The aim of this study is to analyze the synthesis of a new chitosan supported Pd catalyst and examination of its catalytic activity in: Pd catalyst was synthesized using chitosan as a biomaterial and characterized with FTIR, TG/DTG, XRD, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, SEM-EDAX, ICP-OES, Uv-vis spectroscopies, and magnetic moment, along with molar conductivity analysis. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst indicated high activity and long life time as well as excellent turnover number (TON) and turnover frequency (TOF) values in Suzuki reaction. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst catalyzed H2O2 decomposition reaction with considerable high activity using comparatively small loading catalyst (10mg). Redox potential of biomaterial supported Pd catalyst was still high without negligible loss (13% decrease) after 10 cycles in reusability tests. As a consequence, eco-friendly biomaterial supported Pd catalyst has superior properties such as high thermal stability, long life time, easy removal from reaction mixture and durability to air, moisture and high temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of external magnetic fields on the catalytic activity of Pd nanoparticles in Suzuki cross-coupling reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Changlai; Li, Ren; Li, Ran; Chen, Qianwang

    2016-04-01

    Pd nanoparticles supported on Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles (marked as Pd@Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles) were prepared as catalysts for the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction under external magnetic fields (MFs). It is shown that a weak external MF can increase the rate of the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction at room temperature, and with the increase of the strength of external MFs the reaction rate also increased. At 30 °C, the yield was increased by nearly 50% under a 0.5 T external MF after 24 hours compared to that without a MF applied. Theoretical calculations revealed that the adsorption energy changed from -1.07 to -1.12 eV in the presence of MFs, which increased by 5% compared with the absence of MFs, leading to a lower total energy of the adsorption system, which is beneficial to the reaction. From the analysis of the partial density states, it could be seen that the 2p orbital of the carbon atom in bromobenzene and the 4d orbital of the Pd atom overlap more closely in the presence of MFs, which is beneficial for the electron transfer from the Pd substrate to the bromobenzene molecule. This study is helpful in understanding the interaction between MFs and catalysts and regulating the process of catalytic reactions via MFs.Pd nanoparticles supported on Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles (marked as Pd@Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles) were prepared as catalysts for the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction under external magnetic fields (MFs). It is shown that a weak external MF can increase the rate of the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction at room temperature, and with the increase of the strength of external MFs the reaction rate also increased. At 30 °C, the yield was increased by nearly 50% under a 0.5 T external MF after 24 hours compared to that without a MF applied. Theoretical calculations revealed that the adsorption energy changed from -1.07 to -1.12 eV in the presence of MFs, which increased by 5% compared with the absence of MFs, leading to a lower total energy of the

  7. Classical Keggin Intercalated into Layered Double Hydroxides: Facile Preparation and Catalytic Efficiency in Knoevenagel Condensation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yueqing; Fang, Yanjun; Zhang, Yingkui; Miras, Haralampos N; Song, Yu-Fei

    2015-10-12

    The family of polyoxometalate (POM) intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH) composite materials has shown great promise for the design of functional materials with numerous applications. It is known that intercalation of the classical Keggin polyoxometalate (POM) of [PW12 O40 ](3-) (PW12 ) into layered double hydroxides (LDHs) is very unlikely to take place by conventional ion exchange methods due to spatial and geometrical restrictions. In this paper, such an intercalated compound of Mg0.73 Al0.22 (OH)2 [PW12 O40 ]0.04 ⋅0.98 H2 O (Mg3 Al-PW12 ) has been successfully obtained by applying a spontaneous flocculation method. The Mg3 Al-PW12 has been fully characterized by using a wide range of methods (XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, EDX, XPS, FT-IR, NMR, BET). XRD patterns of Mg3 Al-PW12 exhibit no impurity phase usually observed next to the (003) diffraction peak. Subsequent application of the Mg3 Al-PW12 as catalyst in Knoevenagel condensation reactions of various aldehydes and ketones with Z-CH2 -Z' type substrates (ethyl cyanoacetate and malononitrile) at 60 °C in mixed solvents (V2-propanol :Vwater =2:1) demonstrated highly efficient catalytic activity. The synergistic effect between the acidic and basic sites of the Mg3 Al-PW12 composite proved to be crucial for the efficiency of the condensation reactions. Additionally, the Mg3 Al-PW12 -catalyzed Knoevenagel condensation of benzaldehyde with ethyl cyanoacetate demonstrated the highest turnover number (TON) of 47 980 reported so far for this reaction.

  8. Ultrafast Dynamics of Plasmon-Exciton Interaction of Ag Nanowire- Graphene Hybrids for Surface Catalytic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qianqian; Shi, Ying; Chen, Maodu; Li, Hui; Yang, Xianzhong; Qu, Yingqi; Liang, Wenjie; Sun, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Using the ultrafast pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy, the femtosecond-resolved plasmon-exciton interaction of graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids is experimentally investigated, in the VIS-NIR region. The plasmonic lifetime of Ag nanowire is about 150 ± 7 femtosecond (fs). For a single layer of graphene, the fast dynamic process at 275 ± 77 fs is due to the excitation of graphene excitons, and the slow process at 1.4 ± 0.3 picosecond (ps) is due to the plasmonic hot electron interaction with phonons of graphene. For the graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids, the time scale of the plasmon-induced hot electron transferring to graphene is 534 ± 108 fs, and the metal plasmon enhanced graphene plasmon is about 3.2 ± 0.8 ps in the VIS region. The graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids can be used for plasmon-driven chemical reactions. This graphene-mediated surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate significantly increases the probability and efficiency of surface catalytic reactions co-driven by graphene-Ag nanowire hybridization, in comparison with reactions individually driven by monolayer graphene or single Ag nanowire. This implies that the graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids can not only lead to a significant accumulation of high-density hot electrons, but also significantly increase the plasmon-to-electron conversion efficiency, due to strong plasmon-exciton coupling. PMID:27601199

  9. Ultrafast Dynamics of Plasmon-Exciton Interaction of Ag Nanowire- Graphene Hybrids for Surface Catalytic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Qianqian; Shi, Ying; Chen, Maodu; Li, Hui; Yang, Xianzhong; Qu, Yingqi; Liang, Wenjie; Sun, Mengtao

    2016-09-01

    Using the ultrafast pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy, the femtosecond-resolved plasmon-exciton interaction of graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids is experimentally investigated, in the VIS-NIR region. The plasmonic lifetime of Ag nanowire is about 150 ± 7 femtosecond (fs). For a single layer of graphene, the fast dynamic process at 275 ± 77 fs is due to the excitation of graphene excitons, and the slow process at 1.4 ± 0.3 picosecond (ps) is due to the plasmonic hot electron interaction with phonons of graphene. For the graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids, the time scale of the plasmon-induced hot electron transferring to graphene is 534 ± 108 fs, and the metal plasmon enhanced graphene plasmon is about 3.2 ± 0.8 ps in the VIS region. The graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids can be used for plasmon-driven chemical reactions. This graphene-mediated surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate significantly increases the probability and efficiency of surface catalytic reactions co-driven by graphene-Ag nanowire hybridization, in comparison with reactions individually driven by monolayer graphene or single Ag nanowire. This implies that the graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids can not only lead to a significant accumulation of high-density hot electrons, but also significantly increase the plasmon-to-electron conversion efficiency, due to strong plasmon-exciton coupling.

  10. Effect of competition between catalytic particles C on the rate of the reversible diffusion-controlled reaction A+C⇌B+C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felderhof, B. U.; Jones, R. B.

    1999-11-01

    The effect of competition between catalytic particles C on the rate of the reversible diffusion-controlled reaction A+C⇌B+C is studied in a self-consistent approximation. The C-particles are assumed static with random configuration. The A- and B-particles diffuse in a fluid or solid background medium. Frequency-dependent effective rate coefficients are calculated as a function of the volume fraction of C-particles.

  11. Exposing the hidden complexity of stoichiometric and catalytic metathesis reactions by elucidation of Mg-Zn hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Hevia, Eva; Chua, Jonathan Z.; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Kennedy, Alan R.; McCall, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    Studying seemingly simple metathesis reactions between ZnCl2 and tBuMgCl has, surprisingly, revealed a much more complex chemistry involving mixed magnesium-zinc compounds that could be regarded as Mg-Zn hybrids. Thus, the reaction of equimolar amounts of ZnCl2 and tBuMgCl reveals the formation of the unprecedented mixed Mg-Zn complex [(THF)4Mg(μ-Cl)2Zn(tBu)(Cl)] (1), as a result of the co-complexation of the two anticipated exchange products of the metathesis. This magnesium zincate adopts a contacted ion-pair structure, closely related to Knochel’s pioneering “Turbo” Grignard reagents. Furthermore, a second coproduct identified in this reaction is the solvent-separated mixed magnesium-zinc chloride complex [{Mg(THF)6}2+{Zn2Cl6}2-] (3) that critically diminishes the amount of ZnCl2 available for the intended metathesis reaction to take place. In another surprising result, when the reaction is carried out by using an excess of 3 M equivalents of the Grignard reagent (closer to the catalytic conditions employed by synthetic chemists), solvent-separated magnesium trialkyl zincate [{Mg2Cl3(THF)6}+{Zn(tBu)3}-] (4) is obtained that can be viewed as a model for the active species involved in the increasingly important organic transformations of Grignard reagents catalysed by ZnCl2. Furthermore, preliminary reactivity studies reveal that complex 4 can be used as an effective new reagent for direct Zn-I exchange reactions that allow the preparation and structural identification of the magnesium tris(aryl) zincate [{Mg2Cl3(THF)6}+{Zn(p-Tol)3}-] (5) that represents the first example of complete 3-fold activation of a zincate in a Zn-I exchange reaction which, in turn, can efficiently be used as a precursor for Negishi cross-coupling reactions. PMID:20212145

  12. Catalytic biorefining of plant biomass to non-pyrolytic lignin bio-oil and carbohydrates through hydrogen transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Ferrini, Paola; Rinaldi, Roberto

    2014-08-11

    Through catalytic hydrogen transfer reactions, a new biorefining method results in the isolation of depolymerized lignin--a non-pyrolytic lignin bio-oil--in addition to pulps that are amenable to enzymatic hydrolysis. Compared with organosolv lignin, the lignin bio-oil is highly susceptible to further hydrodeoxygenation under low-severity conditions and therefore establishes a unique platform for lignin valorization by heterogeneous catalysis. Overall, the potential of a catalytic biorefining method designed from the perspective of lignin utilization is reported. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The catalytic nanodiode: detecting continuous electron flow at oxide-metal interfaces generated by a gas-phase exothermic reaction.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Young; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2006-07-17

    Continuous flow of ballistic charge carriers is generated by an exothermic chemical reaction and detected using the catalytic metal-semiconductor Schottky diode. We obtained a hot electron current for several hours using two types of catalytic nanodiodes, Pt/TiO2 or Pt/GaN, during carbon monoxide oxidation at pressures of 100 Torr of O2 and 40 Torr of CO at 413-573 K. This result reveals that the chemical energy of an exothermic catalytic reaction is directly converted into hot electrons flux in the catalytic nanodiode. By heating the nanodiodes in He, we could measure the thermoelectric current which is in the opposite direction to the flow of the hot electron current. The chemicurrent is well correlated with the turnover rate of CO oxidation, which is separately measured with gas chromatography. The influence of the flow of hot charge carriers on the chemistry at the oxide-metal interface, and the turnover rate in the chemical reaction are discussed.

  14. The Catalytic Nanodiode: Detecting Continous Electron Flow atOxide-Metal Interfaces Generated by a Gas-Phase Exothermic Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong Young; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2006-10-31

    Continuous flow of ballistic charge carriers is generated by an exothermic chemical reaction and detected using the catalytic metal-semiconductor Schottky diode. We obtained a hot electron current for several hours using two types of catalytic nanodiodes, Pt/TiO2 or Pt/GaN, during carbon monoxide oxidation at pressures of 100 Torr of O2 and 40 Torr of CO at 413-573 K. This result reveals that the chemical energy of an exothermic catalytic reaction is directly converted into hot electrons flux in the catalytic nanodiode. By heating the nanodiodes in He, we could measure the thermoelectric current which is in the opposite direction to the flow of the hot electron current. The chemicurrent is well correlated with the turnover rate of CO oxidation, which is separately measured with gas chromatography. The influence of the flow of hot charge carriers on the chemistry at the oxide-metal interface, and the turnover rate in the chemical reaction are discussed.

  15. Modeling of catalytically active metal complex species and intermediates in reactions of organic halides electroreduction.

    PubMed

    Lytvynenko, Anton S; Kolotilov, Sergey V; Kiskin, Mikhail A; Eremenko, Igor L; Novotortsev, Vladimir M

    2015-02-28

    The results of quantum chemical modeling of organic and metal-containing intermediates that occur in electrocatalytic dehalogenation reactions of organic chlorides are presented. Modeling of processes that take place in successive steps of the electrochemical reduction of representative C1 and C2 chlorides - CHCl3 and Freon R113 (1,1,2-trifluoro-1,2,2-trichloroethane) - was carried out by density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). It was found that taking solvation into account using an implicit solvent model (conductor-like screening model, COSMO) or considering explicit solvent molecules gave similar results. In addition to modeling of simple non-catalytic dehalogenation, processes with a number of complexes and their reduced forms, some of which were catalytically active, were investigated by DFT. Complexes M(L1)2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, L1H = Schiff base from 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde and the hydrazide of 4-pyridinecarboxylic acid), Ni(L2) (H2L2 is the Schiff base from salicylaldehyde and 1,2-ethylenediamine, known as salen) and Co(L3)2Cl2, representing a fragment of a redox-active coordination polymer [Co(L3)Cl2]n (L3 is the dithioamide of 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid), were considered. Gradual changes in electronic structure in a series of compounds M(L1)2 were observed, and correlations between [M(L1)2](0) spin-up and spin-down LUMO energies and the relative energies of the corresponding high-spin and low-spin reduced forms, as well as the shape of the orbitals, were proposed. These results can be helpful for determination of the nature of redox-processes in similar systems by DFT. No specific covalent interactions between [M(L1)2](-) and the R113 molecule (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Zn) were found, which indicates that M(L1)2 electrocatalysts act rather like electron transfer mediators via outer-shell electron transfer. A relaxed surface scan of the adducts {M(L1)2·R113}(-) (M = Ni or Co) versus the distance between the

  16. Catalytic performance of carbon nanotubes in H2O2 decomposition: experimental and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Voitko, Katerina; Tóth, Ajna; Demianenko, Evgenij; Dobos, Gábor; Berke, Barbara; Bakalinska, Olga; Grebenyuk, Anatolij; Tombácz, Etelka; Kuts, Volodymyr; Tarasenko, Yurij; Kartel, Mykola; László, Krisztina

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic performance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different surface chemistry was studied in the decomposition reaction of H2O2 at various values of pH and temperature. A comparative analysis of experimental and quantum chemical calculation results is given. It has been shown that both the lowest calculated activation energy (∼18.9 kJ/mol) and the highest rate constant correspond to the N-containing CNT. The calculated chemisorption energy values correlate with the operation stability of MWCNTs. Based on the proposed quantum chemical model it was found that the catalytic activity of carbon materials in electron transfer reactions is controlled by their electron donor capability.

  17. Catalytic B-H Bond Insertion Reactions Using Alkynes as Carbene Precursors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Min; Li, Zi-Qi; Li, Mao-Lin; He, Qiao; Zhu, Shou-Fei; Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2017-03-01

    Herein, we report transition-metal-catalyzed B-H bond insertion reactions between borane adducts and alkynes to afford organoboron compounds in excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. This successful use of alkynes as carbene precursors in these reactions constitutes a new route to organoboron compounds. The starting materials are safe and readily available, and the reaction exhibits 100% atom-economy. Moreover, an asymmetric version catalyzed by chiral dirhodium complexes produced chiral boranes with excellent enantioselectivity (up to 96% ee). This is the first report of highly enantioselective heteroatom-hydrogen bond insertion reactions of metal carbenes generated in situ from alkynes. The chiral products of the reaction could be easily transformed to widely used borates and diaryl methanol compounds without loss of optical purity, which demonstrates its potential utility in organic synthesis. A kinetics study indicated that the Cu-catalyzed B-H bond insertion reaction is first order with respect to the catalyst and the alkyne and zero order with respect to the borane adduct, and no kinetic isotopic effect was observed in the reaction of the adduct. These results, along with density functional theory calculations, suggest that the formation of the Cu carbene is the rate-limiting step and that the B-H bond insertion is a fast, concerted process.

  18. Reactions of diborane with ammonia and ammonia borane: catalytic effects for multiple pathways for hydrogen release.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vinh Son; Matus, Myrna H; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Dixon, David A

    2008-10-09

    High-level electronic structure calculations have been used to construct portions of the potential energy surfaces related to the reaction of diborane with ammonia and ammonia borane (B2H6 + NH3 and B2H6 + BH3NH3)to probe the molecular mechanism of H2 release. Geometries of stationary points were optimized at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level. Total energies were computed at the coupled-cluster CCSD(T) theory level with the correlation-consistent basis sets. The results show a wide range of reaction pathways for H2 elimination. The initial interaction of B2H6 + NH3 leads to a weak preassociation complex, from which a B-H-B bridge bond is broken giving rise to a more stable H3BHBH2NH3 adduct. This intermediate, which is also formed from BH3NH3 + BH3, is connected with at least six transition states for H2 release with energies 18-93 kal/mol above the separated reactants. The lowest-lying transition state is a six-member cycle, in which BH3exerts a bifunctional catalytic effect accelerating H2 generation within a B-H-H-N framework. Diborane also induces a catalytic effect for H2 elimination from BH3NH3 via a three-step pathway with cyclic transition states. Following conformational changes, the rate-determining transition state for H2 release is approximately 27 kcal/mol above the B2H6 + BH3NH3 reactants, as compared with an energy barrier of approximately 37 kcal/mol for H2 release from BH3NH3. The behavior of two separated BH3 molecules is more complex and involves multiple reaction pathways. Channels from diborane or borane initially converge to a complex comprising the H3BHBH2NH3adduct plus BH3. The interaction of free BH3 with the BH3 moiety of BH3NH3 via a six-member transition state with diborane type of bonding leads to a lower-energy transition state. The corresponding energy barrier is approximately 8 kcal/mol, relative to the reference point H3BHBH2NH3 adduct + BH3. These transition states are 27-36 kcal/mol above BH3NH3 + B2H6, but 1-9 kcal/mol below the

  19. The Remarkable Amphoteric Nature of Defective UiO‐66 in Catalytic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hajek, Julianna; Bueken, Bart; Waroquier, Michel; De Vos, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Abstract One of the major requirements in solid acid and base catalyzed reactions is that the reactants, intermediates or activated complexes cooperate with several functions of catalyst support. In this work the remarkable bifunctional behavior of the defective UiO‐66(Zr) metal organic framework is shown for acid‐base pair catalysis. The active site relies on the presence of coordinatively unsaturated zirconium sites, which may be tuned by removing framework linkers and by removal of water from the inorganic bricks using a dehydration treatment. To elucidate the amphoteric nature of defective UiO‐66, the Oppenauer oxidation of primary alcohols has been theoretically investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and the periodic approach. The presence of acid and basic centers within molecular distances is shown to be crucial for determining the catalytic activity of the material. Hydrated and dehydrated bricks have a distinct influence on the acidity and basicity of the active sites. In any case both functions need to cooperate in a concerted way to enable the chemical transformation. Experimental results on UiO‐66 materials of different defectivity support the theoretical observations made in this work. PMID:28736581

  20. Quantitative methylene blue decolourisation assays as rapid screening tools for assessing the efficiency of catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Kruid, Jan; Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice Leigh

    2017-05-01

    Identifying the most efficient oxidation process to achieve maximum removal of a target pollutant compound forms the subject of much research. There exists a need to develop rapid screening tools to support research in this area. In this work we report on the development of a quantitative assay as a means for identifying catalysts capable of decolourising methylene blue through the generation of oxidising species from hydrogen peroxide. Here, a previously described methylene blue test strip method was repurposed as a quantitative, aqueous-based spectrophotometric assay. From amongst a selection of metal salts and metallophthalocyanine complexes, monitoring of the decolourisation of the cationic dye methylene blue (via Fenton-like and non-Fenton oxidation reactions) by the assay identified the following to be suitable oxidation catalysts: CuSO4 (a Fenton-like catalyst), iron(II)phthalocyanine (a non-Fenton oxidation catalyst), as well as manganese(II) phthalocyanine. The applicability of the method was examined for the removal of bisphenol A (BPA), as measured by HPLC, during parallel oxidation experiments. The order of catalytic activity was identified as FePc > MnPc > CuSO4 for both BPA and MB. The quantitative MB decolourisation assay may offer a rapid method for screening a wide range of potential catalysts for oxidation processes.

  1. Pt monolayer coating on complex network substrate with high catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Man; Ma, Qiang; Zi, Wei; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhu, Xuejie; Liu, Shengzhong (Frank)

    2015-01-01

    A deposition process has been developed to fabricate a complete-monolayer Pt coating on a large-surface-area three-dimensional (3D) Ni foam substrate using a buffer layer (Ag or Au) strategy. The quartz crystal microbalance, current density analysis, cyclic voltammetry integration, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that the monolayer deposition process accomplishes full coverage on the substrate and the deposition can be controlled to a single atomic layer thickness. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a complete-monolayer Pt coating on a 3D bulk substrate with complex fine structures; all prior literature reported on submonolayer or incomplete-monolayer coating. A thin underlayer of Ag or Au is found to be necessary to cover a very reactive Ni substrate to ensure complete-monolayer Pt coverage; otherwise, only an incomplete monolayer is formed. Moreover, the Pt monolayer is found to work as well as a thick Pt film for catalytic reactions. This development may pave a way to fabricating a high-activity Pt catalyst with minimal Pt usage. PMID:26601247

  2. Substrate Distortion and the Catalytic Reaction Mechanism of 5-Carboxyvanillate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    5-Carboxyvanillate decarboxylase (LigW) catalyzes the conversion of 5-carboxyvanillate to vanillate in the biochemical pathway for the degradation of lignin. This enzyme was shown to require Mn2+ for catalytic activity and the kinetic constants for the decarboxylation of 5-carboxyvanillate by the enzymes from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 (kcat = 2.2 s–1 and kcat/Km = 4.0 × 104 M–1 s–1) and Novosphingobium aromaticivorans (kcat = 27 s–1 and kcat/Km = 1.1 × 105 M–1 s–1) were determined. The three-dimensional structures of both enzymes were determined in the presence and absence of ligands bound in the active site. The structure of LigW from N. aromaticivorans, bound with the substrate analogue, 5-nitrovanillate (Kd = 5.0 nM), was determined to a resolution of 1.07 Å. The structure of this complex shows a remarkable enzyme-induced distortion of the nitro-substituent out of the plane of the phenyl ring by approximately 23°. A chemical reaction mechanism for the decarboxylation of 5-carboxyvanillate by LigW was proposed on the basis of the high resolution X-ray structures determined in the presence ligands bound in the active site, mutation of active site residues, and the magnitude of the product isotope effect determined in a mixture of H2O and D2O. In the proposed reaction mechanism the enzyme facilitates the transfer of a proton to C5 of the substrate prior to the decarboxylation step. PMID:26714575

  3. First-principles quantum mechanical investigations: Catalytic reactions of furfural on Pd(111) and at the water/Pd(111) interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Wenhua

    Bio-oils have drawn more and more attention from scientists as a promising new clean, cheap energy source. One of the most interesting relevant issues is the effect of catalysts on the catalytic reactions that are used for producing bio-oils. Furfural, as a very important intermediate during these reactions, has attracted significant studies. However, the effect of catalysts, including particularly the liquid/solid interface formed by a metal catalyst and liquid water, in the catalytic reactions involving furfural still remains elusive. In this research, we performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles density-functional theory calculations to investigate the atomic-scale mechanisms of catalytic hydrogenation of furfural on the palladium surface and at the liquid/state interface formed by the palladium surface and liquid water. We studied all the possible mechanisms that lead to formation of furfuryl alcohol (FOL), formation of tetrahydrofurfural (THFAL), and formation of tetrahydrofurfurfuryl alcohol (THFOL). We found that liquid water plays a significant role in the hydrogenation reactions. During the reaction in the presence of water and the palladium catalyst, in particular, water directly participates in the hydrogenation of the aldehyde group of furfural and facilitates the formation of FOL by reducing the activation energy. Our calculations show that water provides hydrogen for the hydrogenation of the aldehyde group, and at the same time, a pre-existing hydrogen atom, which is resulted from dissociation of molecular hydrogen (experimentally, molecular hydrogen is always supplied for hydrogenation) on the palladium surface, is bonded to water, making the water molecule intact in structure. In the absence of water, on the other hand, formation of FOL and THFAL on the palladium surface involves almost the same energy barriers, suggesting a comparable selectivity. Overall, as water reduces the activation energy for the formation of FOL

  4. Water-gas shift reaction on CuO-ZnO catalysts: I. Structure and catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kalchev, M.G.; Andreev, A.A.; Zotov, N.S.

    1995-11-01

    The physicochemical properties of CuO-ZnO samples with different CuO contents were investgated by a complex of physical methods: DSC, XPS, EPR, TPR, and XRD. The samples containing {approximately}25 wt % CuO exhibited a maximum catalytic activity in the water-gas shift reaction. The catalytic activity was attributed to copper ions aggregated on the highly dispersed and defective CuO surface and to an anion-modified ZnO surface. Aggregates of copper ions, formed on metal species and probably modified with hydroxyl and carbonate groups, were shown to play a decisive role in the catalytic activity of the samples containing more than 15 wt % CuO.

  5. Mechanical bending induced catalytic activity enhancement of monolayer 1 T'-MoS2 for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenwu; Wang, Zhiguo; Fu, Yong Qing

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, mechanisms behind enhancement of catalytic activity of MoS2 mono-layer (three atomic layers) for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) by mechanically applying bending strain were investigated using density functional theory. Results showed that with the increase of bending strains, the Gibbs free energy for hydrogen adsorption on the MoS2 mono-layer was decreased from 0.18 to -0.04 eV and to 0.13 eV for the bend strains applied along the zigzag and armchair directions, respectively. The mechanism for the enhanced catalytic activity comes from the changes of density of electronic states near the Fermi energy level, which are induced by the changes of the Mo-S and Mo-Mo bonds upon bending. This report provides a new design methodology to improve the catalytic activity of catalysts based on two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides through a simple mechanical bending.

  6. IN SITU INFRARED STUDY OF CATALYTIC DECOMPOSITION OF NO

    SciTech Connect

    KHALID ALMUSAITEER; RAM KRISHNAMURTHY; STEVEN S.C. CHUANG

    1998-08-18

    The growing concerns for the environment and increasingly stringent standards for NO emission have presented a major challenge to control NO emissions from electric utility plants and automobiles. Catalytic decomposition of NO is the most attractive approach for the control of NO emission for its simplicity. Successful development of an effective catalyst for NO decomposition will greatly decrease the equipment and operation cost of NO control. Due to lack of understanding of the mechanism of NO decomposition, efforts on the search of an effective catalyst have been unsuccessful. Scientific development of an effective catalyst requires fundamental understanding of the nature of active site, the rate-limiting step, and an approach to prolong the life of the catalyst. Research is proposed to study the reactivity of adsorbates for the direct NO decomposition and to investigate the feasibility of two novel approaches for improving catalyst activity and resistance to sintering. The first approach is the use of silanation to stabilize metal crystallites and supports for Cu-ZSM-5 and promoted Pt catalysts; the second is utilization of oxygen spillover and desorption to enhance NO decomposition activity. An innovative infrared reactor system will be used to observe and determine the dynamic behavior and the reactivity of adsorbates during NO decomposition, oxygen spillover, and silanation. A series of experiments including X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, temperature programmed reaction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy will be used to characterized the catalysts. The information obtained from this study will provide a scientific basis for developing an effective catalyst for the NO decomposition under practical flue gas conditions.

  7. Catalytic three-component domino reaction for the preparation of trisubstituted oxazoles.

    PubMed

    Wachenfeldt, Henrik v; Röse, Philipp; Paulsen, Filip; Loganathan, Nagarajan; Strand, Daniel

    2013-06-10

    Multicomponent reactions are attractive for assembling functionalized heterocyclic compounds. To this end, an efficient gold-catalyzed three-component domino reaction to form oxazoles directly from imines, alkynes, and acid chlorides is presented. The reaction proceeds in a single synthetic step by using a gold(III)-N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylimine) (salen) catalyst to give trisubstituted oxazoles in up to 96 % yield. The substrate scope, a mechanistic study exploring the role of the gold catalyst, and the synthetic applications of the oxazole products are discussed.

  8. Perturbation theory in the catalytic rate constant of the Henri-Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction.

    PubMed

    Bakalis, Evangelos; Kosmas, Marios; Papamichael, Emmanouel M

    2012-11-01

    The Henry-Michaelis-Menten (HMM) mechanism of enzymatic reaction is studied by means of perturbation theory in the reaction rate constant k (2) of product formation. We present analytical solutions that provide the concentrations of the enzyme (E), the substrate (S), as well as those of the enzyme-substrate complex (C), and the product (P) as functions of time. For k (2) small compared to k (-1), we properly describe the entire enzymatic activity from the beginning of the reaction up to longer times without imposing extra conditions on the initial concentrations E ( o ) and S ( o ), which can be comparable or much different.

  9. Catalytic reaction energetics by single crystal adsorption calorimetry: hydrocarbons on Pt(111).

    PubMed

    Lytken, Ole; Lew, Wanda; Campbell, Charles T

    2008-10-01

    Single crystal adsorption calorimetry provides essential information about the energetics of surface reactions on well-defined surfaces where the adsorbed reaction products can be clearly identified. In this tutorial review, we cover the essentials of that technique, with emphasis on our lab's recent advances in sensitivity and temperature range, and demonstrate what can be achieved through a review of selected example studies concerning adsorption and dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons on Pt(111). A fairly complete reaction enthalpy diagram is presented for the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane to benzene on Pt(111).

  10. A proton-shuttle reaction mechanism for histone deacetylase 8 and the catalytic role of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruibo; Wang, Shenglong; Zhou, Nengjie; Cao, Zexing; Zhang, Yingkai

    2010-07-14

    Zinc-dependent histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) catalyzes the removal of acetyl moieties from histone tails, and is critically involved in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression. The detailed knowledge of its catalytic process is of high importance since it has been established as a most promising target for the development of new antitumor drugs. By employing Born-Oppenheimer ab initio QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations and umbrella sampling, a state-of-the-art approach to simulate enzyme reactions, we have provided further evidence against the originally proposed general acid-base catalytic pair mechanism for Zinc-dependent histone deacetylases. Instead, our results indicated that HDAC8 employs a proton-shuttle catalytic mechanism, in which a neutral His143 first serves as the general base to accept a proton from the zinc-bound water molecule in the initial rate-determining nucleophilic attack step, and then shuttles it to the amide nitrogen atom to facilitate the cleavage of the amide bond. During the deacetylation process, the Zn(2+) ion changes its coordination mode and plays multiple catalytic roles. For the K(+) ion, which is located about 7 A from the catalytic Zn(2+) ion and conserved in class I and II HDACs, our simulations indicated that its removal would lead to the different transition state structure and a higher free energy reaction barrier for the rate-determining step. It is found that the existence of this conserved K(+) ion would enhance the substrate binding, increase the basicity of His143, strengthen the catalytic role of zinc ion, and improve the transition state stabilization by the enzyme environment.

  11. Fundamental studies of the mechanism of catalytic reactions with catalysts effective in the gasification of carbon solids and the oxidative coupling of methane. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.; Perry, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Work on catalytic steam gasification with chars and coals will be extended from atmospheric to elevated pressures using the newly built pressure unit. The novel finding that coking of petroleum in the presence of small amounts of caustic greatly improves the gasification rates and characteristics of the coke will be extended to chars; in the oxidative coupling of methane over ternary catalysts, emphasis will be placed on low temperature coupling and on the oxidative production of syngas from methane at low temperature. Experimental work will continue on the synthesis of the mixed catalyst, and they will be characterized by a number of techniques, including elemental analyses, x-ray diffraction, and surface area determination.

  12. Multiple competing pathways for chemical reaction: drastic reaction shortcut for the self-catalytic double-helix formation of helicene oligomers.

    PubMed

    Kushida, Yo; Saito, Nozomi; Shigeno, Masanori; Yamaguchi, Masahiko

    2017-02-01

    Competition among multiple pathways in a chemical reaction exhibits notable kinetic phenomena, particularly when amplification by self-catalysis is involved. A pseudoenantiomeric 1 : 1 mixture of an aminomethylene helicene (P)-tetramer and an (M)-pentamer formed enantiomeric hetero-double helices B and C in solution when random coil A was cooled. When a solution of A at 70 °C was directly cooled to 25 °C, the A-to-B reaction was predominant, then B was slowly converted to C over 60 h. The slow conversion in the A-to-B-to-C reaction was due to the formation of the hetero-double helix B, which was an off-pathway intermediate, and the slow B-to-C conversion. In contrast, when a solution of A at 70 °C was snap-cooled to -25 °C before then maintaining the solution at 25 °C, the A-to-C reaction predominated, and the formation of C was complete within 4 h. The reactions involve competition between the self-catalytic A-to-B and A-to-C pathways, where B and C catalyze the A-to-B and A-to-C reactions, respectively. Subtle differences in the initial states generated by thermal pretreatment were amplified by the self-catalytic process, which resulted in a drastic reaction shortcut.

  13. Direct catalytic enantioselective vinylogous aldol reaction of α-branched enals with isatins.

    PubMed

    Cassani, Carlo; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2012-11-02

    The direct vinylogous aldol reaction of α-substituted α,β-unsaturated aldehydes with isatins is described. The chemistry provides easy access to valuable 3-substituted 3-hydroxyoxindole derivatives with high stereocontrol and perfect γ-site selectivity. Preliminary mechanistic studies suggest that, depending on the nature of the α-branched enal substituents, two divergent reaction mechanisms can be operating, leading to different products and stereochemical outcomes.

  14. Kinetics and mechanism of the catalytic reaction between alcohols and dimethyl carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koledina, K. F.; Koledin, S. N.; Shchadneva, N. A.; Gubaidullin, I. M.

    2017-03-01

    The mechanism of the reaction between alcohols and dimethyl carbonate, catalyzed by dicobalt octacarbonyl Co2(CO)8, is studied by means of mathematical modeling. Kinetic models for possible schemes of chemical transformations are constructed at different initial concentrations of the catalyst. Based on a comparative analysis of activation energies of possible stages of chemical transformations, possible reaction pathways are determined and an appropriate mechanism is selected.

  15. Catalytic antibody light chain capable of cleaving a chemokine receptor CCR-5 peptide with a high reaction rate constant.

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, Yukie; Hifumi, Emi; Tsuruhata, Kumi; Fujinami, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Uda, Taizo

    2004-04-20

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb), ECL2B-2, was obtained by immunizing a peptide possessing a part of a sequence of a chemokine receptor, CCR-5, which is present as a membrane protein on the macrophage surface, and which plays an important role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. From the DNA and the deduced amino acid sequences of the light and heavy chains of ECL2B-2 MAb, molecular modeling was conducted to calculate the steric conformation of the antibody. Modeling suggested that the structure of ECL2B-2 could possess one or two catalytic triad(s), composed of Asp(1), Ser(27a) (or Ser(27e)), and His(93) (or His(27d)), in the light chain of ECL2B-2. The three amino acid residues, Asp(1), Ser(27a), and His(93), are identical to those of catalytic antibody light chains such as VIPase and i41SL1-2. The light chain of ECL2B-2 MAb degraded the antigenic peptide CCR-5 within about 100 h. Surprisingly, the light chain had a very high catalytic reaction rate constant (k(cat)) of 2.23 min(-1), which is greater by factors of tens to hundreds than those of natural catalytic antibodies obtained previously. The heavy chain of ECL2B-2 MAb, which has no catalytic triad because of a lack of His residue, did not degrade the CCR-5 peptide.

  16. Studies Relevent to Catalytic Activation Co & other small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Peter C

    2005-02-22

    Detailed annual and triannual reports describing the progress accomplished during the tenure of this grant were filed with the Program Manager for Catalysis at the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. To avoid unnecessary duplication, the present report will provide a brief overview of the research areas that were sponsored by this grant and list the resulting publications and theses based on this DOE supported research. The scientific personnel participating in (and trained by) this grant's research are also listed. Research carried out under this DOE grant was largely concerned with the mechanisms of the homogeneous catalytic and photocatalytic activation of small molecules such as carbon monoxide, dihydrogen and various hydrocarbons. Much of the more recent effort has focused on the dynamics and mechanisms of reactions relevant to substrate carbonylations by homogeneous organometallic catalysts. A wide range of modern investigative techniques were employed, including quantitative fast reaction methodologies such as time-resolved optical (TRO) and time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy and stopped flow kinetics. Although somewhat diverse, this research falls within the scope of the long-term objective of applying quantitative techniques to elucidate the dynamics and understand the principles of mechanisms relevant to the selective and efficient catalytic conversions of fundamental feedstocks to higher value materials.

  17. Kinetic method for the determination of traces of thyroxine by its catalytic effect on the Mn(III) metaphosphate-As(III) reaction.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Ferenc T; Milovanović, Gordana A; Todorović, Marija

    2008-02-15

    A new, highly sensitive and simple kinetic method for the determination of thyroxine was proposed. The method was based on the catalytic effect of thyroxine on the oxidation of As(III) by Mn(III) metaphosphate. The kinetics of the reaction was studied in the presence of orthophosphoric acid. The reaction rate was followed spectrophotometrically at 516 nm. It was established that orthophosphoric acid increased the reaction rate and that the extent of the non-catalytic reaction was extremely small. A kinetic equation was postulated and the apparent rate constant was calculated. The dependence of the reaction rate on temperature was investigated and the energy of activation and other kinetic parameters were determined. Thyroxine was determined under the optimal experimental conditions in the range 7.0 x 10(-9) to 3.0 x 10(-8) mol L(-1) with a relative standard deviation up to 6.7% and a detection limit of 2.7 x 10(-9) molL(-1). In the presence of 0.08 mol L(-1) chloride, the detection limit decreased to 6.6 x 10(-10) mol L(-1). The proposed method was applied for the determination of thyroxine in tablets. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by comparison with the HPLC method.

  18. Catalytic asymmetric aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction of methyl acrylate: role of a bifunctional La(O-iPr)3/linked-BINOL complex.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Takafumi; Seelig, Bianca; Xu, Yingjie; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Berkessel, Albrecht; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2010-09-01

    The catalytic asymmetric aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction using unactivated methyl acrylate is described. A simple Lewis acidic metal catalyst, such as La(OTf)(3), was not suitable for the reaction, but rare earth metal alkoxide/linked-BINOL complexes possessing bifunctional Lewis acid and Brønsted base properties efficiently promoted the reaction in combination with an achiral nucleophilic organocatalyst. The combined use of a La(O-iPr)(3)/(S,S)-TMS-linked-BINOL complex with a catalytic amount of DABCO promoted the aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction of a broad range of N-diphenylphosphinoyl imines. Products from aryl, heteroaryl, and alkenyl imines were obtained in 67-99% yield and 81-95% ee. It is noteworthy that isomerizable alkyl imines could be employed as well, giving products in 78-89% yield and 94-98% ee. Initial rate kinetic studies as well as kinetic isotope effect experiments using alpha-deuterio-methyl acrylate support the importance of both the nucleophilicity of La-enolate and the Brønsted basicity of a La-catalyst for promoting the reaction.

  19. Monomer-dimer CO-O 2 catalytic reaction on (0 0 1) surface and subsurface of a simple cubic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, K. M.; Ahmed, N.

    2000-06-01

    The presence of subsurface oxygen has been observed experimentally in monomer-dimer (CO-O 2 and NO-CO) surface reactions. By the use of Monte Carlo simulation the effect of this subsurface oxygen in CO-O 2 catalytic reaction on (0 0 1) surface and subsurface of a simple cubic structure is studied. We have carried out detailed analysis of the effect of increasing the subsurface neighbours on the phase diagram of the CO-O 2 reaction. It is shown that the presence of subsurface completely eliminates the usual second-order phase transition of this reaction. It is also shown that increase in the number of subsurface neighbours shifts the single-transition point towards higher CO concentration value. When first, second and third subsurface nearest-neighbours are considered, the single-transition point is shifted to the stoichiometric ratio of 2/3.

  20. Reduced graphene oxide: firm support for catalytically active palladium nanoparticles and game changer in selective hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Cano, Manuela; Benito, Ana M; Urriolabeitia, Esteban P; Arenal, Raul; Maser, Wolfgang K

    2013-11-07

    Simultaneous decomposition and reduction of a Pd(2+) complex in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) lead to the formation of Pd(0)-nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) with average sizes of 4 nm firmly anchored on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The Pd-NP/RGO hybrids exhibited remarkable catalytic activity and selectivity in mild hydrogenation reactions where the acidic properties of RGO play an active role and may act as an important game-changer.

  1. Ru(II)/Organo Relay Catalytic Three-Component Reaction of 3-Diazooxindoles, Amines, and Nitroalkene: Formal Synthesis of (-)-Psychotrimine.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xiao-Lei; Meng, Jing; Han, Zhi-Yong

    2016-09-02

    A highly enantioselective carbenoid-associated N-H functionalization/Michael addition cascade reaction is developed by virtue of Ru(II)/chiral organo bifunctional catalyst relay catalysis. In this way, a variety of optically pure 3-amino-3-alkyloxindoles can be easily achieved. Moreover, on the basis of this metal/organo relay catalytic three-component protocol, a key intermediate for the formal synthesis of (-)-psychotrimine could be obtained in six steps with 25% overall yield.

  2. Catalytic hetero-ene reactions of 5-methyleneoxazolines: highly enantioselective synthesis of 2,5-disubstituted oxazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Luo, Weiwei; Zhao, Jiannan; Yin, Chengkai; Liu, Xiaohua; Lin, Lili; Feng, Xiaoming

    2014-07-18

    An efficient catalytic asymmetric hetero-ene reaction of 5-methyleneoxazolines with 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds (including α-ketoesters and glyoxal derivatives) was realized using Ni(II)-N,N'-dioxide complexes as the catalysts. It provides a rapid, high yielding (up to 99%) route for the preparation of 2,5-disubstituted oxazole derivatives in a highly enantioenriched form (up to >99% ee) under mild conditions.

  3. Metal–Organic Frameworks Stabilize Mono(phosphine)–Metal Complexes for Broad-Scope Catalytic Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sawano, Takahiro; Lin, Zekai; Boures, Dean; An, Bing; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-10

    Mono(phosphine)–M (M–PR3; M = Rh and Ir) complexes selectively prepared by postsynthetic metalation of a porous triarylphosphine-based metal–organic framework (MOF) exhibited excellent activity in the hydrosilylation of ketones and alkenes, the hydrogenation of alkenes, and the C–H borylation of arenes. The recyclable and reusable MOF catalysts significantly outperformed their homogeneous counterparts, presumably via stabilizing M–PR3 intermediates by preventing deleterious disproportionation reactions/ligand exchanges in the catalytic cycles.

  4. Cage-bell Pt-Pd nanostructures with enhanced catalytic properties and superior methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Precisely tailoring the structure and fully making use of the components of nanoparticles are effective to enhance their catalytic performance for a given reaction. We herein demonstrate the design of cage-bell structured Pt-Pd nanoparticles, where a Pd shell is deliberately selected to enhance the catalytic property and methanol tolerance of Pt for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell Pt@Ag nanoparticles, followed by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shell and Pd2+ ions to form core-shell-shell Pt@Ag@Ag-Pd nanoparticles with a Pt core and double shells composed of Ag at inner and alloy Ag-Pd at outer, respectively. Then, the core-shell-shell templates are agitated with saturated NaCl solution to eliminate the Ag component from the double shells, leading to the formation of bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a porous Pd shell, which show enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction compared with that of the Pt seeds due to the additional catalysis from Pd shell. In addition, owing to the different diffusion behavior of methanol and oxygen molecules in the porous Pd shell, the Pt-Pd cage-bell nanostructures also exhibit superior methanol tolerant property in catalyzing the oxygen reduction. PMID:27079897

  5. Pronounced Size Dependence in Structure and Morphology of Gas-Phase Produced, Partially Oxidized Cobalt Nanoparticles under Catalytic Reaction Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bartling, Stephan; Yin, Chunrong; Barke, Ingo; Oldenburg, Kevin; Hartmann, Hannes; von Oeynhausen, Viola; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Houben, Kelly; Tyo, Eric C.; Seifert, Sönke; Lievens, Peter; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Vajda, Stefan

    2015-06-23

    It is generally accepted that optimal particle sizes are key for efficient nanocatalysis. Much less attention is paid to the role of morphology and atomic arrangement during catalytic reactions. Here we unravel the structural, stoichiometric, and morphological evolution of gas-phase produced cobalt nanoparticles in a broad size range. Particles with diameters between 1.4 nm and 22nm generated in cluster sources are size selected and deposited on amorphous alumina (Al2O3) and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films. A combination of different techniques is employed to monitor particle properties at the stages of production, exposure to ambient conditions, and catalytic reaction, in this case the oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane at elevated temperatures. A pronounced size dependence is found, naturally classifying the particles into three size regimes. While small and intermediate clusters essentially retain their compact morphology, large particles transform into hollow spheres due to the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. Depending on the substrate an isotropic (Al2O3) or anisotropic (UNCD) Kirkendall effect is observed. The latter results in dramatic lateral size changes. Our results shed light on the interplay between chemical reactions and the catalyst's structure and provide an approach to tailor the cobalt oxide phase composition required for specific catalytic schemes.

  6. Cage-bell Pt-Pd nanostructures with enhanced catalytic properties and superior methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Precisely tailoring the structure and fully making use of the components of nanoparticles are effective to enhance their catalytic performance for a given reaction. We herein demonstrate the design of cage-bell structured Pt-Pd nanoparticles, where a Pd shell is deliberately selected to enhance the catalytic property and methanol tolerance of Pt for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell Pt@Ag nanoparticles, followed by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shell and Pd2+ ions to form core-shell-shell Pt@Ag@Ag-Pd nanoparticles with a Pt core and double shells composed of Ag at inner and alloy Ag-Pd at outer, respectively. Then, the core-shell-shell templates are agitated with saturated NaCl solution to eliminate the Ag component from the double shells, leading to the formation of bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a porous Pd shell, which show enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction compared with that of the Pt seeds due to the additional catalysis from Pd shell. In addition, owing to the different diffusion behavior of methanol and oxygen molecules in the porous Pd shell, the Pt-Pd cage-bell nanostructures also exhibit superior methanol tolerant property in catalyzing the oxygen reduction.

  7. On-line Analysis of Catalytic Reaction Products Using a High-Pressure Tandem Micro-reactor GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Kim, Young-Min; Hosaka, Akihiko; Watanabe, Chuichi; Teramae, Norio; Ohtani, Hajime; Kim, Seungdo; Park, Young-Kwon; Wang, Kaige; Freeman, Robert R

    2017-01-01

    When a GC/MS system is coupled with a pressurized reactor, the separation efficiency and the retention time are directly affected by the reactor pressure. To keep the GC column flow rate constant irrespective of the reaction pressure, a restrictor capillary tube and an open split interface are attached between the GC injection port and the head of a GC separation column. The capability of the attached modules is demonstrated for the on-line GC/MS analysis of catalytic reaction products of a bio-oil model sample (guaiacol), produced under a pressure of 1 to 3 MPa.

  8. An empirical study on the preparation of the modified coke and its catalytic oxidation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Jiang, Wenqiang

    2017-05-01

    T As a methyl acrylic ester fungicide, pyraclostrobin has the advantages of high activity, wide sterilization spectrum and high safety level comparing with the traditional fungicide. Due to less toxicity and side effects on human and environment, the use of pyraclostrobin and its mixture in agriculture is increasing. The heavy use of pyraclostrobin will inevitably cause pollution to the biological and abiotic environment. Therefore, it is of great significance to do the research on the degradation of pyraclostrobin. In this study, coke, as matrix, was modified by chemical modification. The modified coke was used as the catalyst and the pyraclostrobin was used as the degradation object. The degradation experiment of pyraclostrobin was carried out by using catalytic oxidation. The catalytic oxidation performance of modified coke was studied. The result showed that in the catalytic oxidation system of using modified coke as catalyst and H2O2 as oxidant, the best reaction condition is as following: The modified coke which is modified by using 70% concentration nitric acid is used as catalyst; The dosage of the catalyst is10g; The dosage of H2O2 is 0.6ml; The reaction time is 6 hours.

  9. Structural and Electronic Noninnocence of α-Diimine Ligands on Niobium for Reductive C-Cl Bond Activation and Catalytic Radical Addition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Haruka; Ikeda, Hideaki; Saito, Teruhiko; Kriegel, Benjamin; Tsurugi, Hayato; Arnold, John; Mashima, Kazushi

    2017-05-10

    A d(0) niobium(V) complex, NbCl3(α-diimine) (1a), supported by a dianionic redox-active N,N'-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-1,4-diaza-2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene (α-diimine) ligand (ene-diamido ligand) served as a catalyst for radical addition reactions of CCl4 to α-olefins and cyclic alkenes, selectively affording 1:1 radical addition products in a regioselective manner. During the catalytic reaction, the α-diimine ligand smoothly released and stored an electron to control the oxidation state of the niobium center by changing between an η(4)-(σ(2),π) coordination mode with a folded MN2C2 metallacycle and a κ(2)-(N,N') coordination mode with a planar MN2C2 metallacycle. Kinetic studies of the catalytic reaction elucidated the reaction order in the catalytic cycle: the radical addition reaction rate obeyed first-order kinetics that were dependent on the concentrations of the catalyst, styrene, and CCl4, while a saturation effect was observed at a high CCl4 concentration. In the presence of excess amounts of styrene, styrene coordinated in an η(2)-olefinic manner to the niobium center to decrease the reaction rate. No observation of oligomers or polymers of styrene and high stereoselectivity for the radical addition reaction of CCl4 to cyclopentene suggested that the C-C bond formation proceeded inside the coordination sphere of niobium, which was in good accordance with the negative entropy value of the radical addition reaction. Furthermore, reaction of 1a with (bromomethyl)cyclopropane confirmed that both the C-Br bond activation and formation proceeded on the α-diimine-coordinated niobium center during transformation of the cyclopropylmethyl radical to a homoallyl radical. With regard to the reaction mechanism, we detected and isolated NbCl4(α-diimine) (6a) as a transient one-electron oxidized species of 1a during reductive cleavage of the C-X bonds; in addition, the monoanionic α-diimine ligand of 6a adopted a monoanionic canonical form with selective one

  10. Comment on ``Surface restructuring, kinetic oscillations, and chaos in heterogeneous catalytic reactions''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzovkov, V. N.; Kortlüke, O.; von Niessen, W.

    2001-02-01

    In a recent article Zhdanov studied the oscillating NO+H2 reaction on the Pt(100) single-crystal surface [V. P. Zhdanov, Phys. Rev. E 59, 6292 (1999)]. We have scrutinized his model and found fundamental errors in the chemical modeling, in the modeling of the surface reconstruction and in the simulation procedure itself.

  11. Heterobimetallic transition metal/rare earth metal bifunctional catalysis: a Cu/Sm/Schiff base complex for syn-selective catalytic asymmetric nitro-Mannich reaction.

    PubMed

    Handa, Shinya; Gnanadesikan, Vijay; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2010-04-07

    The full details of a catalytic asymmetric syn-selective nitro-Mannich reaction promoted by heterobimetallic Cu/Sm/dinucleating Schiff base complexes are described, demonstrating the effectiveness of the heterobimetallic transition metal/rare earth metal bifunctional catalysis. The first-generation system prepared from Cu(OAc)(2)/Sm(O-iPr)(3)/Schiff base 1a = 1:1:1 with an achiral phenol additive was partially successful for achieving the syn-selective catalytic asymmetric nitro-Mannich reaction. The substrate scope and limitations of the first-generation system remained problematic. After mechanistic studies on the catalyst prepared from Sm(O-iPr)(3), we reoptimized the catalyst preparation method, and a catalyst derived from Sm(5)O(O-iPr)(13) showed broader substrate generality as well as higher reactivity and stereoselectivity compared to Sm(O-iPr)(3). The optimal system with Sm(5)O(O-iPr)(13) was applicable to various aromatic, heteroaromatic, and isomerizable aliphatic N-Boc imines, giving products in 66-99% ee and syn/anti = >20:1-13:1. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of nemonapride is also demonstrated using the catalyst derived from Sm(5)O(O-iPr)(13).

  12. Pressure Regulations on the Surface Properties of CeO2 Nanorods and Their Catalytic Activity for CO Oxidation and Nitrile Hydrolysis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Zhiyun; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Sai; Ma, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yongquan

    2016-09-07

    Surface properties of nanoscale CeO2 catalysts in terms of the surface Ce(3+) fraction and concentration of oxygen vacancy can affect their catalytic performance significantly. Continual adjustment on surface properties of CeO2 with the morphological preservation has not been realized by synthetic methods. The revisited studies show that surface properties of CeO2 nanorods can be effectively regulated by synthetic pressures while the rodlike morphology is well-preserved. Such phenomena are ascribed to the contact possibility between Ce(3+) species and dissolved O2, which is balanced by the rapidly increased and gradually saturated dissolution/recrystallization rate of Ce(OH)3 and linearly increased concentration of dissolved O2 with the increase of total air pressure or partial pressure of O2. Surface-property-dependent catalytic activity of CeO2 nanorods synthesized under various pressures was also demonstrated in two benchmark reactions-catalytic oxidation of CO and hydrolysis of nitrile. Such a finding of the pressure regulation on the reducible metal oxides provides an effective approach to rationally design novel catalysts for specific reactions, where ceria are supports, promoters, or actives.

  13. A π-electronic covalent organic framework catalyst: π-walls as catalytic beds for Diels-Alder reactions under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Xu, Hong; Chen, Xiong; Gao, Jia; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-06-25

    We report a strategy for developing π-electronic covalent organic frameworks as heterogeneous catalysts that enable the use of columnar π-walls as catalytic beds to facilitate organic transformations in their one-dimensional open channels. The π-frameworks exhibit outstanding catalytic activity, promote Diels-Alder reactions under ambient conditions and are robust for cycle use.

  14. Fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatched DNA by initial reaction rate of catalytic hairpin assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenxi; Li, Yixin; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Xinyi; Chen, Yang; Yang, Xiaoda; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2014-10-15

    The widely used catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) amplification strategy generally needs several hours to accomplish one measurement based on the prevailingly used maximum intensity detection mode, making it less practical for assays where high throughput or speed is desired. To make the best use of the kinetic specificity of toehold domain for circuit reaction initiation, we developed a mathematical model and proposed an initial reaction rate detection mode to quantitatively differentiate the single-base mismatch. Using the kinetic mode, assay time can be reduced substantially to 10 min for one measurement with the comparable sensitivity and single-base mismatch differentiating ability as were obtained by the maximum intensity detection mode. This initial reaction rate based approach not only provided a fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatch, but also helped in-depth understanding of the CHA system, which will be beneficial to the design of highly sensitive and specific toehold-mediated hybridization reactions.

  15. Bifunctional Molecular Photoswitches Based on Overcrowded Alkenes for Dynamic Control of Catalytic Activity in Michael Addition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Pizzolato, Stefano F; Collins, Beatrice S L; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-11-23

    The emerging field of artificial photoswitchable catalysis has recently shown striking examples of functional light-responsive systems allowing for dynamic control of activity and selectivity in organocatalysis and metal-catalysed transformations. While our group has already disclosed systems featuring first generation molecular motors as the switchable central core, a design based on second generation molecular motors is lacking. Here, the syntheses of two bifunctionalised molecular switches based on a photoresponsive tetrasubstituted alkene core are reported. They feature a thiourea substituent as hydrogen-donor moiety in the upper half and a basic dimethylamine group in the lower half. This combination of functional groups offers the possibility for application of these molecules in photoswitchable catalytic processes. The light-responsive central cores were synthesized by a Barton-Kellogg coupling of the prefunctionalized upper and lower halves. Derivatization using Buchwald-Hartwig amination and subsequent introduction of the thiourea substituent afforded the target compounds. Control of catalytic activity in the Michael addition reaction between (E)-3-bromo-β-nitrostyrene and 2,4-pentanedione is achieved upon irradiation of stable-(E) and stable-(Z) isomers of the bifunctional catalyst 1. Both isomers display a decrease in catalytic activity upon irradiation to the metastable state, providing systems with the potential to be applied as ON/OFF catalytic photoswitches.

  16. Catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction on platinum-based core-shell nanoparticles: all-electron density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jungho; Choi, Jung-Hae; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Inho; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Jeong, Doo Seok

    2015-10-14

    Pt nanoparticles (NPs) in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell as a catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) fairly overbind oxygen and/or hydroxyl to their surfaces, causing a large overpotential and thus low catalytic activity. Realizing Pt-based core-shell NPs (CSNPs) is perhaps a workaround for the weak binding of oxygen and/or hydroxyl without a shortage of sufficient oxygen molecule dissociation on the surface. Towards the end, we theoretically examined the catalytic activity of NPs using density functional theory; each NP consists of one of 12 different 3d-5d transition metal cores (groups 8-11) and a Pt shell. The calculation results evidently suggest the enhancement of catalytic activity of CSNPs in particular when 3d transition metal cores are in use. The revealed trends in activity change upon the core metal were discussed with respect to the thermodynamic and electronic structural aspects of the NPs in comparison with the general d-band model. The disparity between the CSNP and the corresponding bilayer catalyst, which is the so-called size effect, was remarkable; therefore, it perhaps opens up the possibility of size-determined catalytic activity. Finally, the overpotential for all CSNPs was evaluated in an attempt to choose promising combinations of CSNP materials.

  17. Superior catalytic performances of platinum nanoparticles loaded nitrogen-doped graphene toward methanol oxidation and hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Li, Libo; You, Tianyan

    2017-02-01

    The catalysts with excellent catalytic properties and low-cost are still highly desirable in many fields, such as fuel cells. In respect of this challenge, we have synthesized high-quality platinum nanoparticles loaded nitrogen-doped graphene (Pt/NG) by using formic acid as reduction agent and commercial-available nitrogen-doped graphene (N-graphene) as supporting materials. The morphology and component characterization demonstrate that high-loading Pt nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 2.5nm were uniformly dispersed on nitrogen-doped graphene. The resulting Pt/NG exhibit higher catalytic activity toward methanol oxidation and hydrogen evolution reaction compared with commercial Pt/C or self-synthesized platinum nanoparticles-loaded graphene. The superior catalytic performance of Pt/NG are discussed, and ascribed to the well-dispersed Pt nanoparticles and abundant edge plane sites on N-graphene. The resultant Pt/NG with high catalytic properties and cost-effective may emerge as a promising high-performance catalyst for fuel cells.

  18. Reaction pathway investigation on the selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 over Cu/SSZ-13 at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Su, Wenkang; Chang, Huazhen; Peng, Yue; Zhang, Chaozhi; Li, Junhua

    2015-01-06

    The mechanism of the selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 was studied using Cu/SSZ-13. The adspecies of NO and NH3 as well as the active intermediates were investigated using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy and temperature-programmed surface reaction. The results revealed that three reactions were possible between adsorbed NH3 and NOx. NO2(-) could be generated by direct formation or NO3(-) reduction via NO. In a standard selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reaction, NO3(-) was hard to form, because NO2(-) was consumed by ammonia before it could be further oxidized to nitrates. Additionally, adsorbed NH3 on the Lewis acid site was more active than NH4(+). Thus, SCR mainly followed the reaction between Lewis acid site-adsorbed NH3 and directly formed NO2(-). Higher Cu loading could favor the formation of active Cu-NH3, Cu-NO2(-), and Cu-NO3(-), improving the SCR activity at low temperature.

  19. Catalytic thermal cracking of post-consumer waste plastics to fuels. 2. Pilot study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alternative gasoline and diesel fuels were prepared via catalytic and non-catalytic pyrolysis and distillation of waste polyethylene and polypropylene plastics. Reaction conditions were optimized using a bench-scale (2 L) batch reactor and then applied to pilot-scale production of crude plastic oil....

  20. Solid State, Surface and Catalytic Studies of Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. H.

    2004-11-23

    This project investigates the catalytic properties of oxides for the selective oxidative dehydrogenation of light alkanes and for hydrocarbon reduction of NO{sub x}. Various vanadium oxide based catalysts were investigated to elucidate the relationship between the chemical and structural properties of the catalysts and their selectivity for the formation of alkenes. It was found that vanadium oxide units that are less reducible give higher selectivities. For hydrocarbon reduction of NO{sub x}, it was found that alumina-based catalysts can be effective at higher temperatures than the corresponding zeolite-based catalysts. On some catalysts, such as SnO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Ag/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the alumina participates directly in the reaction, making the catalyst bifunctional. These results are useful in research to improve the performance of this stress of catalysts.

  1. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Chatterjee, K.; Cheng, C.; Ettinger, M.; Flores, F.; Jiralerspong, S.; Miyake, M.; Muntean, J.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this research was to convert coal into a soluble substance under mild conditions. The strategy involved two steps, first to breakdown the macromolecular network of coal, and second to add hydrogen catalytically. We investigated different basic reagents that could, in priciple, break down coal`s structure and alkylation strategies that might enhance its solubility. We examined O- and C-alkylation, the importance of the strength of the base, the character of the added alkyl groups and other reaction parameters. This work provided new information concerning the way in which hydrogen bonding, polarization interactions between aromatic structures and covalent bonding could be disrupted and solubility enhanced. The objective of our research was to explore new organochromium chemistry that might be feasible for the hydrogenation of coal under mild conditions.

  2. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Chatterjee, K.; Cheng, C.; Ettinger, M.; Flores, F.; Jiralerspong, S.; Miyake, M.; Muntean, J.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this research was to convert coal into a soluble substance under mild conditions. The strategy involved two steps, first to breakdown the macromolecular network of coal, and second to add hydrogen catalytically. We investigated different basic reagents that could, in priciple, break down coal's structure and alkylation strategies that might enhance its solubility. We examined O- and C-alkylation, the importance of the strength of the base, the character of the added alkyl groups and other reaction parameters. This work provided new information concerning the way in which hydrogen bonding, polarization interactions between aromatic structures and covalent bonding could be disrupted and solubility enhanced. The objective of our research was to explore new organochromium chemistry that might be feasible for the hydrogenation of coal under mild conditions.

  3. Generalized Temporal Acceleration Scheme for Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Surface Catalytic Processes by Scaling the Rates of Fast Reactions.

    PubMed

    Dybeck, Eric Christopher; Plaisance, Craig Patrick; Neurock, Matthew

    2017-02-14

    A novel algorithm has been developed to achieve temporal acceleration during kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of surface catalytic processes. This algorithm allows for the direct simulation of reaction networks containing kinetic processes occurring on vastly disparate timescales which computationally overburden standard KMC methods. Previously developed methods for temporal acceleration in KMC have been designed for specific systems and often require a priori information from the user such as identifying the fast and slow processes. In the approach presented herein, quasi-equilibrated processes are identified automatically based on previous executions of the forward and reverse reactions. Temporal acceleration is achieved by automatically scaling the intrinsic rate constants of the quasi-equilibrated processes, bringing their rates closer to the timescales of the slow kinetically relevant non-equilibrated processes. All reactions are still simulated directly, although with modified rate constants. Abrupt changes in the underlying dynamics of the reaction network are identified during the simulation and the reaction rate constants are rescaled accordingly. The algorithm has been utilized here to model the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reaction over ruthenium nanoparticles. This reaction network has multiple timescale-disparate processes which would be intractable to simulate without the aid of temporal acceleration. The accelerated simulations are found to give reaction rates and selectivities indistinguishable from those calculated by an equivalent mean-field kinetic model. The computational savings of the algorithm can span many orders of magnitude in realistic systems and the computational cost is not limited by the magnitude of the timescale disparity in the system processes. Furthermore, the algorithm has been designed in a generic fashion and can easily be applied to other surface catalytic processes of interest.

  4. Quantum-Mechanical Study on the Catalytic Mechanism of Alkaline Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Borosky, Gabriela L

    2017-02-21

    Alkaline phosphatases (APs) catalyze the hydrolysis and transphosphorylation of phosphate monoesters. The catalytic mechanism was examined by quantum-mechanical calculations using an active-site model based on the X-ray crystal structure of the human placental AP. Free energies of activation and of reaction for the catalytic steps were evaluated for a series of aryl and alkyl phosphate esters, and the computational results were compared with experimental values available in the literature. Mechanistic observations previously reported in experimental works were rationalized by the present theoretical study, particularly regarding the difference in the rate-determining step between aryl and alkyl phosphates. The formation rate of the covalent phosphoserine intermediate followed a linear free energy relationship (LFER) with the pKa of the leaving group. This LFER, which could be experimentally determined only for less reactive alkyl phosphates, was verified by the present calculations to apply for the entire set of aryl and alkyl phosphate substrates.

  5. Catalytic pyrolysis of tobacco rob: kinetic study and fuel gas produced.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Li, Tan; Jin, Shiping; Lin, Yixin; Yang, Haiping

    2011-12-01

    The pyrolysis kinetics of tobacco rob (TR) was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) under inert atmosphere, adding chemicals (dolomite and NiO) as catalysts by catalytic-mixing method. The TGA results showed that mass loss and mass loss rates were affected by catalysts. The conversion rates increased while the activation energy decreased. Moreover, the thermal decomposition behaviors of TR were studied in the fixed-bed reactor using dolomite and NiO/γ-Al2O3 as catalysts by catalyst-bed method. A series of experiments had been performed to explore the effects of catalysts, and reaction temperature on the composition and yield of fuel gas. The experiments demonstrated that the catalysts had a high activity of cracking tar and hydrocarbons, as well as yielding a high fuel gas production. For both methods, dolomite and NiO revealed better catalytic performance as a view of enhancing conversion rates and increasing product gas yield.

  6. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Prosopis juliflora bark extract: reaction optimization, antimicrobial and catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Arya, Geeta; Kumari, R Mankamna; Gupta, Nidhi; Kumar, Ajeet; Chandra, Ramesh; Nimesh, Surendra

    2017-07-18

    In the present study, silver nanoparticles (PJB-AgNPs) have been biosynthesized employing Prosopis juliflora bark extract. The biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles was monitored on UV-vis spectrophotometer. The size, charge and polydispersity index (PDI) of PJB-AgNPs were determined using dynamic light scattering (DLS). Different parameters dictating the size of PJB-AgNPs were explored. Nanoparticles biosynthesis optimization studies suggested efficient synthesis of highly dispersed PJB-AgNPs at 25 °C when 9.5 ml of 1 mM AgNO3 was reduced with 0.5 ml of bark extract for 40 min. Characterization of PJB-AgNPs by SEM showed spherical-shaped nanoparticles with a size range ∼10-50 nm along with a hydrodynamic diameter of ∼55 nm as evaluated by DLS. Further, characterizations were done by FTIR and EDS to evaluate the functional groups and purity of PJB-AgNPs. The antibacterial potential of PJB-AgNPs was tested against E. coli and P. aeruginosa. The PJB-AgNPs remarkably exhibited anticancer activity against A549 cell line as evidenced by Alamar blue assay. The dye degradation activity was also evaluated against 4-nitrophenol that has carcinogenic effect. The results thus obtained suggest application of PJB-AgNPs as antimicrobial, anticancer and catalytic agents.

  7. Understanding the role of gold nanoparticles in enhancing the catalytic activity of manganese oxides in water oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chung-Hao; Li, Weikun; Pahalagedara, Lakshitha; El-Sawy, Abdelhamid M; Kriz, David; Genz, Nina; Guild, Curtis; Ressler, Thorsten; Suib, Steven L; He, Jie

    2015-02-16

    The Earth-abundant and inexpensive manganese oxides (MnOx) have emerged as an intriguing type of catalysts for the water oxidation reaction. However, the overall turnover frequencies of MnOx catalysts are still much lower than that of nanostructured IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts. Herein, we demonstrate that doping MnOx polymorphs with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can result in a strong enhancement of catalytic activity for the water oxidation reaction. It is observed that, for the first time, the catalytic activity of MnOx/AuNPs catalysts correlates strongly with the initial valence of the Mn centers. By promoting the formation of Mn(3+) species, a small amount of AuNPs (<5%) in α-MnO2/AuNP catalysts significantly improved the catalytic activity up to 8.2 times in the photochemical and 6 times in the electrochemical system, compared with the activity of pure α-MnO2.

  8. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic Gif-type oxidation from nuclear inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Asthalter, T.; Rabe, V.; Laschat, S.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) of synchrotron radiation, also known as nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), has been shown to provide valuable insights into metal-centered vibrations at Mössbauer-active nuclei. We present a study of the iron-centered vibrational density of states (VDOS) during the first step of the Gif-type oxidation of cyclohexene with a novel trinuclear Fe3(μ 3-O) complex as catalyst precursor. The experiments were carried out on shock-frozen solutions for different combinations of reactants: Fe3(μ 3-O) in pyridine solution, Fe3(μ 3-O) plus Zn/acetic acid in pyridine without and with addition of either oxygen or cyclohexene, and Fe3(μ 3-O)/Zn/acetic acid/pyridine/cyclohexene (reaction mixture) for reaction times of 1 min, 5 min, and 30 min. The projected VDOS of the Fe atoms was calculated on the basis of pseudopotential density functional calculations. Two possible reaction intermediates were identified as [Fe(III)(C5H5N)2(O2CCH3)2]+ and Fe(II)(C5H5N)4(O2CCH3)2, yielding evidence that NIS (NRVS) allows to identify the presence of iron-centered intermediates also in complex reaction mixtures.

  9. Structure of RNase Sa2 complexes with mononucleotides--new aspects of catalytic reaction and substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Bauerová-Hlinková, Vladena; Dvorský, Radovan; Perecko, Dusan; Povazanec, Frantisek; Sevcík, Jozef

    2009-08-01

    Although the mechanism of RNA cleavage by RNases has been studied for many years, there remain aspects that have not yet been fully clarified. We have solved the crystal structures of RNase Sa2 in the apo form and in complexes with mononucleotides. These structures provide more details about the mechanism of RNA cleavage by RNase Sa2. In addition to Glu56 and His86, which are the principal catalytic residues, an important role in the first reaction step of RNA cleavage also seems to be played by Arg67 and Arg71, which are located in the phosphate-binding site and form hydrogen bonds with the oxygens of the phosphate group of the mononucleotides. Their positive charge very likely causes polarization of the bonds between the oxygens and the phosphorus atom, leading to electron deficiency on the phosphorus atom and facilitating nucleophilic attack by O2' of the ribose on the phosphorus atom, leading to cyclophosphate formation. The negatively charged Glu56 is in position to attract the proton from O2' of the ribose. Extended molecular docking of mononucleotides, dinucleotides and trinucleotides into the active site of the enzyme allowed us to better understand the guanosine specificity of RNase Sa2 and to predict possible binding subsites for the downstream base and ribose of the second and third nucleotides.

  10. Porous magnesium carboxylate framework: synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, gas adsorption property and heterogeneous catalytic aldol condensation reaction.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debraj; Sen, Rupam; Maity, Tanmoy; Koner, Subratanath

    2012-06-28

    A new three-dimensional alkaline-earth metal-organic framework (MOF) compound, [Mg(Pdc)(H(2)O)](n) (1) (H(2)Pdc = pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylic acid), has been synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compound 1 features a 3D porous framework afforded by the Mg(2)-diad centers through formation of interconnected chair like structural motifs. A nitrogen adsorption study confirms the microporosity of compound 1 with a BET surface area of 211 ± 12 m(2) g(-1). Upon dehydration, the BET surface area of 1 is enhanced to a value of 463 ± 36 m(2) g(-1) due to removal of coordinated water molecule. After rehydration, the compound reverts to its original form as evidenced by powder X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopic analysis and N(2) sorption measurement. Compound 1 retains its pore structure with a variable BET surface area in several cycles of dehydration and rehydration processes indicating robustness of the framework in [Mg(Pdc)(H(2)O)](n) (1). Compound 1 catalyzes the aldol condensation reactions of various aromatic aldehydes with acetone and cyclohexanone in heterogeneous conditions. Notably, the catalytic activity of the compound is enhanced upon dehydration. The catalyst can be recycled and reused several times without significant loss of activity.

  11. Kinetics of the phosphotransferase reaction of the catalytic subunit of the tick salivary gland cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, S.D.; Essenberg, R.C.; Sauer, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    The catalytic subunit of the cAMP dependent protein kinase was purified 100-fold from tick salivary glands. The enzyme mechanism of the phosphotransferase reaction catalyzed by this subunit was investigated. Highly purified enzyme did not show ATP-ase activity in the absence of protein substrates. Initial velocities were measured using histone H-1 or a synthetic heptapeptide, Kemptide, as P/sub i/ acceptors and (..gamma..-/sup 32/P) ATP as a phosphodonor. Patterns were consistent with a sequential, but not a ping pong mechanism. At high concentration (>2Km), histone showed substrate inhibition which was noncompetitive versus ATP. Product inhibition by Mg.ADP was competitive versus ATP and noncompetitive with respect to H-1. Phosphohistone on the other hand was noncompetitive with respect to H-1, but gave parabolic competitive inhibition against ATP. Dead-end inhibition by AMP-PNP, an analogue of ATP, was competitive and noncompetitive against ATP and H-1, respectively. The inhibitory of cAMP dependent protein kinase was noncompetitive with ATP and competitive with histone. These studies strongly suggest that the tick salivary gland protein kinase has a sequential mechanism with primarily ordered addition of ATP followed by protein substrate and ordered release of phosphoprotein and ADP, but some random character.

  12. Catalytic effect of gallium chloride in the diels-alder reaction between maleic anhydride and its derivatives and unsubstituted and substituted anthracenes

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, V.D.; Konovalov, A.I.; Shakirov, I.M.

    1985-11-10

    The stability of n, v complexes between gallium chloride and unsubstituted and substituted maleic anhydrides was determined in benzene by a thermochemical method; it was shown that the stability of the complexes decreases in the transition from maleic anhydrides with electron-donating substituents to maleic anhydrides with electron-withdrawing substituents. The reactivity of these dienophiles in the uncatalyzed Diels-Alder reactions with unsubstituted and substituted anthracenes in benzene and in the reactions catalyzed by gallium chloride was studied. The reactivity of the dienophiles varies similarly in the reactions with the investigated dienes, and this rules out treatment of steric hindrances as the reason for the reduced reactivity of the substituted dienophiles. A decrease in the catalytic effect was observed for the unreactive diene-dienophile pairs.

  13. Hot plasmonic electron-driven catalytic reactions on patterned metal-insulator-metal nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Changhwan; Goddeti, Kalyan C; Park, Jeong Young

    2017-08-17

    The smart design of plasmonic nanostructures offers a unique capability for the efficient conversion of solar energy into chemical energy by strong interactions with resonant photons through the excitation of surface plasmon resonance, which increases the prospect of using sunlight in environmental and energy applications. Here, we show that the catalytic activity of CO oxidation can be tuned by using new model systems: two-dimensional (2D) arrays of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) plasmonic nanoislands designed to efficiently shuttle hot plasmonic electrons. Hot plasmonic electrons are generated upon the absorption of photons on noble metals, followed by the injection of these hot electrons into the Pt nanoparticles through tunneling or Schottky emission mechanisms, depending on the energy of the hot electrons. We found that these MIM nanostructures exhibit higher catalytic activity (i.e. by 40-110%) under light irradiation, revealing a significant impact on the catalytic activity for CO oxidation. The thickness dependence of the enhancement of catalytic activity on the oxide layers is consistent with the tunneling mechanism of hot electron flows. The results imply that surface plasmon-induced hot electron flows by light absorption significantly influence the catalytic activity of CO oxidation.

  14. High catalytic activity of palladium(II)-exchanged mesoporous sodalite and NaA zeolite for bulky aryl coupling reactions: reusability under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minkee; Lee, Dong-Hwan; Na, Kyungsu; Yu, Byung-Woo; Ryoo, Ryong

    2009-01-01

    Exchange for the better: Mesoporous sodalite and NaA zeolite exchanged with Pd(2+) exhibit remarkably high activity and reusability in C-C coupling reactions under aerobic atmosphere. It is proposed that the catalytic reactions are mediated by a molecular Pd(0) species generated in situ within the pores (see picture), which is oxidized back to Pd(2+) by O(2), preventing the formation of catalytically inactive Pd(0) agglomerates.

  15. Catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 over Pt- and Ni-doped graphene: A comparative DFT study.

    PubMed

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Sharifi, Fahimeh; Dinparast, Leila

    2017-08-28

    Today, the global greenhouse effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) is a serious environmental problem. Therefore, developing efficient methods for CO2 capturing and conversion to valuable chemicals is a great challenge. The aim of the present study is to investigate the catalytic activity of Pt- or Ni-doped graphene for the hydrogenation of CO2 by a hydrogen molecule. To gain a deeper insight into the catalytic mechanism of this reaction, the reliable density functional theory calculations are performed. The adsorption energies, geometric parameters, reaction barriers, and thermodynamic properties are calculated using the M06-2X density functional. Two reaction mechanisms are proposed for the hydrogenation of CO2. In the bimolecular mechanism, the reaction proceeds in two steps, initiating by the co-adsorption of CO2 and H2 molecules over the surface, followed by the formation of a OCOH intermediate by the transfer of H atom of H2 toward O atom of CO2. In the next step, formic acid is produced as a favorable product with the formation of CH bond. In our proposed termolecular mechanism, however, H2 molecule is directly activated by the two pre-adsorbed CO2 molecules. The predicted activation energy for the formation of the OCOH intermediate in the bimolecular mechanism is 20.8 and 47.9kcalmol(-1) over Pt- and Ni-doped graphene, respectively. On the contrary, the formation of the first formic acid in the termolecular mechanism is found as the rate-determining step over these surfaces, with an activation energy of 28.8 and 45.5kcal/mol. Our findings demonstrate that compared to the Ni-doped graphene, the Pt-doped surface has a relatively higher catalytic activity towards the CO2 reduction. These theoretical results could be useful in practical applications for removal and transformation of CO2 to value-added chemical products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over rhodium catalysts: An experimental, modeling, and simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, M.; Minh, H.D.; Maier, L.; Deutschmann, O.

    2010-09-15

    Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over a rhodium/alumina coated honeycomb monolith is experimentally and numerically studied at short-contact times for varying fuel-to-oxygen ratios. A new experimental set-up with well-defined inlet and boundary conditions is presented. The conversion on the catalyst and in the gas-phase is modeled by detailed reaction mechanisms including 857 gas-phase and 17 adsorbed species. Elementary-step based heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction mechanisms are implemented into two-dimensional flow field description of a single monolith channel. Experiment and simulation provide new insights into the complex reaction network leading to varying product distribution as function of fuel-to-oxygen ratio. At fuel rich conditions, the formation of by-products that can serve as coke precursors is observed and interpreted. (author)

  17. Visible to near-infrared plasmon-enhanced catalytic activity of Pd hexagonal nanoplates for the Suzuki coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, T. Thuy; Sato, Ryota; Sakamoto, Masanori; Fujiyoshi, Yoshifumi; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2015-07-01

    Photocatalytic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy is an efficient process in green chemistry because it facilitates room temperature chemical transformations by generating electronically excited states in photocatalysts. We report here on the robust synthesis, detailed structural characterization, and especially photocatalytic properties of plasmonic Pd hexagonal nanoplates for chemical reactions. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates are twin crystals, and composed of the top and bottom faces enclosed by the {111} planes with stacking faults and the side surfaces bound by mixed six {111} and six {100} planes. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates with well-defined and tunable longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) have enabled the direct harvesting of visible to near-infrared light for catalytic cross coupling reactions. Upon plasmon excitation, the catalytic Suzuki coupling reactions of iodobenzene and phenylboronic acid accelerate by a plasmonic photocatalytic effect of plasmon induced hot electrons. The turnover frequency (TOF) of the Pd hexagonal nanoplates in a reaction illuminated with a λ = 300-1000 nm Xenon lamp at 176 mW cm-2 was 2.5 and 2.7 times higher than that of non-plasmonic {111}-enclosed Pd nanooctahedra and {100}-enclosed Pd nanocubes, respectively, and 1.7 times higher than the TOF obtained when the reaction was thermally heated to the same temperature.Photocatalytic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy is an efficient process in green chemistry because it facilitates room temperature chemical transformations by generating electronically excited states in photocatalysts. We report here on the robust synthesis, detailed structural characterization, and especially photocatalytic properties of plasmonic Pd hexagonal nanoplates for chemical reactions. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates are twin crystals, and composed of the top and bottom faces enclosed by the {111} planes with stacking faults and the side surfaces bound by mixed six {111

  18. Chemical reactions at the graphitic step-edge: changes in product distribution of catalytic reactions as a tool to explore the environment within carbon nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Maria A; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Thomas, Alice; Thomas, Bradley E; Stoppiello, Craig T; Volkova, Evgeniya; Suyetin, Mikhail; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-06-02

    A series of explorative cross-coupling reactions have been developed to investigate the local nanoscale environment around catalytically active Pd(ii)complexes encapsulated within hollow graphitised nanofibers (GNF). Two new fullerene-containing and fullerene-free Pd(ii)Salen catalysts have been synthesised, and their activity and selectivity towards different substrates has been explored in nanoreactors. The catalysts not only show a significant increase in activity and stability upon heterogenisation at the graphitic step-edges inside the GNF channel, but also exhibit a change in selectivity affected by the confinement which alters the distribution of isomeric products of the reaction. Furthermore, the observed selectivity changes reveal unprecedented details regarding the location and orientation of the catalyst molecules inside the GNF nanoreactor, inaccessible by any spectroscopic or microscopic techniques, thus shedding light on the precise reaction environment inside the molecular catalyst-GNF nanoreactor.

  19. Benchmark reaction rates, the stability of biological molecules in water, and the evolution of catalytic power in enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wolfenden, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The rates of enzyme reactions fall within a relatively narrow range. To estimate the rate enhancements produced by enzymes, and their expected affinities for transition state analog inhibitors, it is necessary to measure the rates of the corresponding reactions in water in the absence of a catalyst. This review describes the spontaneous cleavages of C-C, C-H, C-N, C-O, P-O, and S-O bonds in biological molecules, as well as the uncatalyzed reactions that correspond to phosphoryl transfer reactions catalyzed by kinases and to peptidyl transfer in the ribosome. The rates of these reactions, some with half-lives in excess of one million years, span an overall range of 10¹⁹-fold. Moreover, the slowest reactions tend to be most sensitive to temperature, with rates that increase as much as 10⁷-fold when the temperature is raised from 25° to 100°C. That tendency collapses, by many orders of magnitude, the time that would have been required for chemical evolution on a warm earth. If the catalytic effect of primitive enzymes, like that of modern enzymes and many nonenzymatic catalysts, were mainly to reduce a reaction's enthalpy of activation, then the resulting rate enhancement would have increased automatically as the surroundings cooled. By reducing the time required for early chemical evolution in a warm environment, these findings counter the view that not enough time has passed for terrestrial life to have evolved to its present level of complexity.

  20. Fundamental studies of the mechanism of catalytic reactions with catalysts effective in the gasification of carbon solids and the oxidative coupling of methane. Quarterly report, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesia, E.; Perry, D.L.; Heinemann, H.

    1994-09-01

    Research continued on the study of catalysts and membrane materials involved in the oxidative coupling of methane and coal gasification processes. Membranes studied and fabricated included Sr-Zr-Y-O, Sr-Zr-Y, and Sr-Ce-Y-O systems.

  1. Theoretical Studies of Reaction Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    31 Aug 97 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS AASERT93 THEORETICAL STUDIES OF REACTION SURFACES F49620-93-1-0556 3484/XS 6. AUTHOR(S) 61103D DR...DUNCAN AVE ROOM B115 BOLLING AFB DC 20332- 8050 DR MICHAEL R. BERMAN 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12a. DISTRIBUTION i AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved f or pill...reaction14 , and solvation of electrolytes1 5 . The EFP method described in the previous section has one drawback: the repulsive 3 potential relies on

  2. Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) Microspectroscopic System Designed for the In Situ Characterization of the Dehydrogenation Reaction Over Platinum Supported Catalytic Microchannel Reactor.

    PubMed

    Suarnaba, Emee Grace Tabares; Lee, Yi Fuan; Yamada, Hiroshi; Tagawa, Tomohiko

    2016-11-01

    An ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) microspectroscopic system was designed for the in situ characterization of the activity of the silica supported platinum (Pt) catalyst toward the dehydrogenation of 1-methyl-1,4-cyclohexadiene carried out in a custom-designed catalytic microreactor cell. The in situ catalytic microreactor cell (ICMC) with inlet/outlet ports was prepared using quartz cover as the optical window to facilitate UV-Vis observation. A fabricated thermometric stage was adapted to the UV-Vis microspectrophotometer to control the reaction temperature inside the ICMC. The spectra were collected by focusing the UV-Vis beam on a 30 × 30 µm area at the center of ICMC. At 393 K, the sequential measurement of the spectra recorded during the reaction exhibited a broad absorption peak with maximum absorbance at 260 nm that is characteristic for gaseous toluene. This result indicates that the silica supported Pt catalyst is active towards the dehydrogenation of 1-methyl-1,4-cyclohexadiene at the given experimental conditions. The onset of coke formation was also detected based on the appearance of absorption bands at 300 nm. The UV-Vis microspectroscopic system developed can be used further in studying the mechanism of the dehydrogenation reaction.

  3. Theoretical QM/MM studies of enzymatic pericyclic reactions.

    PubMed

    Martí, S; Andrés, J; Moliner, V; Silla, E; Tuñón, I; Bertrán, J

    2010-03-01

    The chorismate to prephenate enzyme catalyzed reaction has been used in this review as the conduit to show different theoretical approaches that have been used over the years in our laboratory to explain its molecular mechanism. This pericyclic reaction has the advantage that other protein scaffolds such as catalytic antibodies or some promiscuous enzymes present certain chorismate mutase activity. The obtained results on all these protein environments, by comparison with the uncatalyzed reaction in solution, have been used to propose, as a general conclusion, that the origin of enzyme catalysis is in the relative electrostatic stabilization of the transition state with respect to the Michaelis complex. This feature implies that reactants of catalyzed reaction were closer to the transition state than those of the non-catalyzed reaction. From this hypothesis, and considering the features of the wild type chorismate mutases as the optimal catalyst for the reaction, some mutations on both kinds of alternative proteins have been proposed which would presumably enhance the rate constant of the chemical step.The studies presented in this paper demonstrate that the improvements and developments of the methods and techniques of theoretical and computational chemistry are now mature enough to model physic-chemical properties of biological systems with good accuracy. The combination of a potent computational protocol with molecular engineering techniques can be a promising methodology to develop novel enzymes with new or more efficient catalytic functions.

  4. Conversion of KCl into KBH4 by Mechano-Chemical Reaction and its Catalytic Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilen, Murat; Gürü, Metin; Çakanyildirim, Çetin

    2017-02-01

    Production of KBH4, in the presence of KCl, B2O3 and MgH2 by means of a mechanical reaction and a dehydrogenation kinetic, constitute the main parts of this study. Operating time and reactant ratio are considered as two parameters for the mechanical reaction to obtain the maximum yield. The production process was carried out in a ball milling reactor, and the product residue was purified with ethylene diamine (EDA) and subsequently characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and x-ray Diffraction (XRD) analyses. Optimum time for mechano-chemical treatment and reactant ratio (MgH2/KCl) were obtained as 1000 min and 1.0, respectively. Synthesized and commercial KBH4 were compared by hydrolysis tests in the presence of Co1-xNix/Al2O3 heterogeneous catalyst. Hydrogen generation rates, activation energy and order of the KBH4 decomposition reaction were obtained as 1578 {mL}_{{{{H}}2 }} min^{ - 1} {g}_{{catalyst}}^{ - 1} , 39.2 kJ mol-1 and zero order, respectively.

  5. Conversion of KCl into KBH4 by Mechano-Chemical Reaction and its Catalytic Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilen, Murat; Gürü, Metin; Çakanyildirim, Çetin

    2017-07-01

    Production of KBH4, in the presence of KCl, B2O3 and MgH2 by means of a mechanical reaction and a dehydrogenation kinetic, constitute the main parts of this study. Operating time and reactant ratio are considered as two parameters for the mechanical reaction to obtain the maximum yield. The production process was carried out in a ball milling reactor, and the product residue was purified with ethylene diamine (EDA) and subsequently characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and x-ray Diffraction (XRD) analyses. Optimum time for mechano-chemical treatment and reactant ratio (MgH2/KCl) were obtained as 1000 min and 1.0, respectively. Synthesized and commercial KBH4 were compared by hydrolysis tests in the presence of Co1-xNix/Al2O3 heterogeneous catalyst. Hydrogen generation rates, activation energy and order of the KBH4 decomposition reaction were obtained as 1578 {mL}_{{{{H}}2 }} \\min^{ - 1} {g}_{{catalyst}}^{ - 1}, 39.2 kJ mol-1 and zero order, respectively.

  6. Palladium N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes: Synthesis from Benzimidazolium Salts and Catalytic Activity in Carbon-carbon Bond-forming Reactions.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ziya; Akkoς, Senem; İlhan, İlhan Özer; Kayser, Veysel

    2017-07-30

    Detailed and generalized protocols are presented for the synthesis and subsequent purification of four palladium N-heterocyclic carbene complexes from benzimidazolium salts. Detailed and generalized protocols are also presented for testing the catalytic activity of such complexes in arylation and Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions. Representative results are shown for the catalytic activity of the four complexes in arylation and Suzuki-Miyaura type reactions. For each of the reactions investigated, at least one of the four complexes successfully catalyzed the reaction, qualifying them as promising candidates for catalysis of many carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. The protocols presented are general enough to be adapted for the synthesis, purification and catalytic activity testing of new palladium N-heterocyclic carbene complexes.

  7. Catalytic Enantioselective [2,3]-Rearrangements of Allylic Ammonium Ylides: A Mechanistic and Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A mechanistic study of the isothiourea-catalyzed enantioselective [2,3]-rearrangement of allylic ammonium ylides is described. Reaction kinetic analyses using 19F NMR and density functional theory computations have elucidated a reaction profile and allowed identification of the catalyst resting state and turnover-rate limiting step. A catalytically relevant catalyst–substrate adduct has been observed, and its constitution elucidated unambiguously by 13C and 15N isotopic labeling. Isotopic entrainment has shown the observed catalyst–substrate adduct to be a genuine intermediate on the productive cycle toward catalysis. The influence of HOBt as an additive upon the reaction, catalyst resting state, and turnover-rate limiting step has been examined. Crossover experiments have probed the reversibility of each of the proposed steps of the catalytic cycle. Computations were also used to elucidate the origins of stereocontrol, with a 1,5-S···O interaction and the catalyst stereodirecting group providing transition structure rigidification and enantioselectivity, while preference for cation−π interactions over C–H···π is responsible for diastereoselectivity. PMID:28230365

  8. Catalytic Enantioselective [2,3]-Rearrangements of Allylic Ammonium Ylides: A Mechanistic and Computational Study.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas H; Walden, Daniel M; Taylor, James E; Brueckner, Alexander C; Johnston, Ryne C; Cheong, Paul Ha-Yeon; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C; Smith, Andrew D

    2017-03-10

    A mechanistic study of the isothiourea-catalyzed enantioselective [2,3]-rearrangement of allylic ammonium ylides is described. Reaction kinetic analyses using (19)F NMR and density functional theory computations have elucidated a reaction profile and allowed identification of the catalyst resting state and turnover-rate limiting step. A catalytically relevant catalyst-substrate adduct has been observed, and its constitution elucidated unambiguously by (13)C and (15)N isotopic labeling. Isotopic entrainment has shown the observed catalyst-substrate adduct to be a genuine intermediate on the productive cycle toward catalysis. The influence of HOBt as an additive upon the reaction, catalyst resting state, and turnover-rate limiting step has been examined. Crossover experiments have probed the reversibility of each of the proposed steps of the catalytic cycle. Computations were also used to elucidate the origins of stereocontrol, with a 1,5-S···O interaction and the catalyst stereodirecting group providing transition structure rigidification and enantioselectivity, while preference for cation-π interactions over C-H···π is responsible for diastereoselectivity.

  9. Development of catalytic asymmetric 1,4-addition and [3 + 2] cycloaddition reactions using chiral calcium complexes.

    PubMed

    Tsubogo, Tetsu; Saito, Susumu; Seki, Kazutaka; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Shu

    2008-10-08

    Catalytic asymmetric 1,4-addition and [3 + 2] cycloaddition reactions using chiral calcium species prepared from calcium isopropoxide and chiral bisoxazoline ligands have been developed. Glycine Schiff bases reacted with acrylic esters to afford 1,4-addition products, glutamic acid derivatives, in high yields with high enantioselectivities. During the investigation of the 1,4-addition reactions, we unexpectedly found that a [3 + 2] cycloaddition occurred in the reactions with crotonate derivatives, affording substituted pyrrolidine derivatives in high yields with high enantioselectivities. On the basis of this finding, we investigated asymmetric [3 + 2] cycloadditions, and it was revealed that several kinds of optically active substituted pyrrolidine derivatives containing contiguous stereogenic tertiary and quaternary carbon centers were obtained with high diastereo- and enantioselectivities. In addition, optically active pyrrolidine cores of hepatitis C virus RNA-dependent polymerase inhibitors and potential effective antiviral agents have been synthesized using this [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction. NMR spectroscopic analysis and observation of nonamplification of enantioselectivity in nonlinear effect experiments suggested that a monomeric calcium species with an anionic ligand was formed as an active catalyst. A stepwise mechanism of the [3 + 2] cycloaddition, consisting of 1,4-addition and successive intramolecular Mannich-type reaction was suggested. Furthermore, modification of the Schiff base structure resulted in a modification of the reaction course from a [3 + 2] cycloaddition to a 1,4-addition, affording 3-substituted glutamic acid derivatives with high diasterero- and enantioselectivities.

  10. Catalytic reaction profile for NADH-dependent reduction of aromatic aldehydes by xylose reductase from Candida tenuis.

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Peter; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    Kinetic substituent effects have been used to examine the catalytic reaction profile of xylose reductase from the yeast Candida tenuis, a representative aldo/keto reductase of primary carbohydrate metabolism. Michaelis-Menten parameters (k(cat) and K(m)) for NADH-dependent enzymic aldehyde reductions have been determined using a homologous series of benzaldehyde derivatives in which substituents in meta and para positions were employed to systematically perturb the properties of the reactive carbonyl group. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) for enzymic reactions with meta-substituted benzaldehydes have been obtained by using NADH (2)H-labelled in the pro-R C4-H position, and equilibrium constants for the conversion of these aldehydes into the corresponding alcohols (K(eq)) have been measured in the presence of NAD(H) and enzyme. Aldehyde dissociation constants (K(d)) and the hydride transfer rate constant (k(7)) have been calculated from steady-state rate and KIE data. Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis was used to factor the observed substituent dependence of k(cat)/K(m) into a major electronic effect and a productive positional effect of the para substituent. k(cat)/K(m) (after correction for substituent position) and K(eq) obeyed log-linear correlations over the substituent parameter, Hammett sigma, giving identical slope values (rho) of +1.4 to +1.7, whereas the same Hammett plot for logK(d) yielded rho=-1.5. This leads to the conclusion that electron-withdrawing substituents facilitate the reaction and increase binding to about the same extent. KIE values for k(cat) (1.8) and k(cat)/K(m) (2.7), and likewise k(7), showed no substituent dependence. Therefore, irrespective of the observed changes in reactivity over the substrate series studied no shift in the character of the rate-limiting transition state of hydride transfer occurred. The signs and magnitudes of rho values suggest this transition state to be product

  11. Pt skin coated hollow Ag-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with high catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tao; Huang, Jianxing; Lai, Shaobo; Zhang, Size; Fang, Jun; Zhao, Jinbao

    2017-10-01

    The catalytic activity and stability of electrocatalyst is critical for the commercialization of fuel cells, and recent reports reveal the great potential of the hollow structures with Pt skin coat for developing high-powered electrocatalysts due to their highly efficient utilization of the Pt atoms. Here, we provide a novel strategy to prepare the Pt skin coated hollow Ag-Pt structure (Ag-Pt@Pt) of ∼8 nm size at room temperature. As loaded on the graphene, the Ag-Pt@Pt exhibits a remarkable mass activity of 0.864 A/mgPt (at 0.9 V, vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which is 5.30 times of the commercial Pt/C catalyst, and the Ag-Pt@Pt also shows a better stability during the ORR catalytic process. The mechanism of this significant enhancement can be attributed to the higher Pt utilization and the unique Pt on Ag-Pt surface structure, which is confirmed by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations and other characterization methods. In conclusion, this original work offers a low-cost and environment-friendly method to prepare a high active electrocatalyst with cheaper price, and this work also discloses the correlation between surface structures and ORR catalytic activity for the hollow structures with Pt skin coat, which can be instructive for designing novel advanced electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  12. Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of 3-Hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl Benzofuranones via Tandem Friedel-Crafts/Lactonization Reaction.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hai; Wang, Pan; Wang, Lijia; Tang, Yong

    2015-10-02

    A highly enantioselective and regioselective chiral Lewis acid catalyzed tandem Friedel-Crafts/lactonization reaction is reported, providing direct access to plenty of 3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl benzofuran-2-ones in up to 94% yields with up to >99% ee. Mechanistic study reveals that the interactions between the phenolic hydroxyl group and trifluoropyruvate are the most likely contributing factor to the high enantio- and regioselectivity. Optically pure (-)-BHFF can be obtained in gram-scale with 0.05 mol % catalyst, demonstrating the potentially utility of this method in medicinal chemistry.

  13. A microfluidic system incorporated with peptide/Pd nanowires for heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, Hyang-Im; Lee, Joon Seok; Park, Chan Beum; Kim, Dong-Pyo

    2011-02-07

    Highly stable diphenylalanine peptide nanowires were selectively self-assembled in the reaction zone of a microfluidic system and applied for microchemical hydrogenation and Suzuki coupling reactions through the hybridization of Pd nanoparticles.

  14. General base catalysis in the urate oxidase reaction: evidence for a novel Thr-Lys catalytic diad.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Rebecca D; Power, Nicholas P; Borrok, M Jack; Tipton, Peter A

    2003-04-15

    Urate oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of urate without the involvement of any cofactors. The gene encoding urate oxidase from Bacillus subtilis has been cloned and expressed, and the enzyme was purified and characterized. Formation of the urate dianion is believed to be a key step in the oxidative reaction. Rapid-mixing chemical quench studies provide evidence that the dianion is indeed an intermediate; at 15 degrees C the dianion forms within the mixing time of the rapid-quench instrument, and it disappears with a rate constant of 8 s(-)(1). Steady-state kinetic studies indicate that an ionizable group on the enzyme with a pK of 6.4 must be unprotonated for catalysis, and it is presumed that the role of this group is to abstract a proton from the substrate. Surprisingly, examination of the active site provided by the previously reported crystal structure does not reveal any obvious candidates to act as the general base. However, Thr 69 is hydrogen-bonded to the ligand at the active site, and Lys 9, which does not contact the ligand, is hydrogen-bonded to Thr 69. The T69A mutant enzyme has a V(max) that is 3% of wild type, and the K9M mutant enzyme has a V(max) that is 0.4% of wild type. The ionization at pH 6.4 that is observed with wild-type enzyme is absent in both of these mutants. It is proposed that these residues form a catalytic diad in which K9 deprotonates T69 to allow it to abstract the proton from the N9 position of the substrate to generate the dianion.

  15. Interfacial Reaction Studies Using ONIOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we focus on the calculations of the energetics and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions for Organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The work described in this report builds upon our own previous thermochemical and chemical kinetics studies. The first of these articles refers to the prediction of thermochemical properties, and the latter one deals with the prediction of rate constants for gaseous homolytic dissociation reactions. The calculations of this investigation are at the microscopic level. The systems chosen consisted of a gallium nitride (GaN) substrate, and molecular nitrogen (N2) and ammonia (NH3) as adsorbants. The energetics for the adsorption and the adsorbant dissociation processes were estimated, and reaction rate constants for the dissociation reactions of free and adsorbed molecules were predicted. The energetics for substrate decomposition was also computed. The ONIOM method, implemented in the Gaussian98 program, was used to perform the calculations. This approach has been selected since it allows dividing the system into two layers that can be treated at different levels of accuracy. The atoms of the substrate were modeled using molecular mechanics6 with universal force fields, whereas the adsorbed molecules were approximated using quantum mechanics, based on density functional theory methods with B3LYP functionals and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. Calculations for the substrate were performed in slabs of several unit cells in each direction. The N2 and NH3 adsorbates were attached to a central location at the Ga-lined surface.

  16. Carbene radicals in cobalt(II)-porphyrin-catalysed carbene carbonylation reactions; a catalytic approach to ketenes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Nanda D; Chirila, Andrei; Lu, Hongjian; Zhang, X Peter; de Bruin, Bas

    2013-09-23

    One-pot radicals: Cobalt(III)-carbene radicals, generated by metallo-radical activation of diazo compounds and N-tosylhydrazone sodium salts with cobalt(II) complexes of porphyrins, readily undergo radical addition to carbon monoxide, allowing the catalytic production of ketenes. These ketenes subsequently react with various amines, alcohols and imines in one-pot tandem transformations to produce differently substituted amides, esters and β-lactams in good isolated yields.

  17. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  18. Catalytic Direct-type 1,4-Addition Reactions of Alkylazaarenes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirotsugu; Igarashi, Ryo; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Shū

    2017-04-10

    1,4-addition reactions of alkylazaarenes catalyzed by strong Brønsted bases have been developed for the first time. The desired reactions with α,β-unsaturated amides proceeded under mild reaction conditions to give the 1,4-adducts in high yields. Both ortho- and para-substituted azaarenes afforded the desired adducts in high yields. Regioselective reactions of di- or trimethylpyridine were found to be possible depending on the acidity of the α-hydrogen atoms. Furthermore, a candidate of allosteric protein kinase modulators was synthesized in two steps. An asymmetric variant of this reaction was also found to be feasible.

  19. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides. Progress report, August 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  20. Computational Design of Enone-Binding Proteins with Catalytic Activity for the Morita-Baylis-Hillman Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Bjelic, Sinisa; Nivon, Lucas G.; Çelebi-Ölçüm, Nihan; Kiss, Gert; Rosewall, Carolyn F.; Lovick, Helena M.; Ingalls, Erica L.; Gallaher, Jasmine Lynn; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Lew, Scott; Montelione, Gaetano Thomas; Hunt, John Francis; Michael, Forrest Edwin; Houk, K. N.; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    The Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction forms a carbon-carbon bond between the alpha carbon of a conjugated carbonyl compound and a carbon electrophile. The reaction mechanism involves Michael addition of a nucleophile catalyst at the carbonyl beta carbon, followed by bond formation with the electrophile and catalyst disassociation to release the product. We used Rosetta to design 48 proteins containing active sites predicted to carry out this mechanism, of which two show catalytic activity by mass spectrometry (MS). Substrate labeling measured by MS and site-directed mutagenesis experiments show that the designed active-site residues are responsible for activity, although rate acceleration over background is modest. To characterize the designed proteins, we developed a fluorescence-based screen for intermediate formation in cell lysates, carried out microsecond molecular dynamics simulations, and solved X-ray crystal structures. These data indicate a partially formed active site, and suggest several clear avenues for designing more active catalysts. PMID:23330600

  1. Catalytic determination of molybdenum by means of the sodium perborate/bromide/ascorbic acid Landolt reaction using potentiometric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Shraydeh, B.F. ) Svehla, G. )

    1992-06-01

    Molybdenum is considered to be an important element in agriculture for its presence in soil is essential for the fixation of nitrogen by certain plants. If the Molybdenum concentration exceeds a certain limit then it can be detrimental and harmful to grazing animals. A new catalytic method for the determination of 0.1-10 ppm molybdenum is described. Molybdenum catalyzes the perborate - bromide ascorbic acid Landolt reaction at pH 3.64. The rate is monitored by potentiometry. A calibration graph is based on the ratio of the reaction times for the blank and the sample, (t(o)/t(c)), plotted against the concentration of molybdenum. Optimal conditions for the determination are discussed. Also the effect of various ions and interferences are described.

  2. Studies on the catalytic mechanism of pig purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Wynne, C J; Hamilton, S E; Dionysius, D A; Beck, J L; de Jersey, J

    1995-05-10

    Several independent experiments failed to reveal any evidence in support of the involvement of a phosphoryl-enzyme intermediate in the catalytic mechanism of pig allantoic fluid purple acid phosphatase: (i) attempts to label enzyme with phosphate derived from [32P]p-nitrophenyl phosphate were unsuccessful; (ii) values of kcat for a series of phosphate derivative varied over a wide range, with the enzyme showing a marked preference for activated ester and anhydride substrates over those with a stable leaving group; (iii) burst titrations revealed a "burst" of p-nitrophenol from p-nitrophenyl phosphate only when the enzyme was added after the substrate, suggesting that this result was an artifact of the order of addition of reagents; (iv) transphosphorylation from p-nitrophenyl phosphate to acceptor alcohols could not be detected, even under conditions where a transphosphorylation to hydrolysis ratio as low as 0.015 could have been measured; (v) enzyme-catalyzed exchange of 180 between phosphate and water was demonstrated, although at a rate much slower than that observed for other phosphatases where the involvement of a phosphoryl-enzyme intermediate in the mechanism has been clearly established. The present results are compared with those obtained in similar studies on other phosphatases, particularly the highly homologous beef spleen purple acid phosphatase, and their implications for the catalytic mechanism of the purple acid phosphatases are discussed.

  3. Catalytic performance of Metal-Organic-Frameworks vs. extra-large pore zeolite UTL in condensation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Shamzhy, Mariya; Opanasenko, Maksym; Shvets, Oleksiy; Čejka, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic behavior of isomorphously substituted B-, Al-, Ga-, and Fe-containing extra-large pore UTL zeolites was investigated in Knoevenagel condensation involving aldehydes, Pechmann condensation of 1-naphthol with ethylacetoacetate, and Prins reaction of β-pinene with formaldehyde and compared with large-pore aluminosilicate zeolite beta and representative Metal-Organic-Frameworks Cu3(BTC)2 and Fe(BTC). The yield of the target product over the investigated catalysts in Knoevenagel condensation increases in the following sequence: (Al)beta < (Al)UTL < (Ga)UTL < (Fe)UTL < Fe(BTC) < (B)UTL < Cu3(BTC)2 being mainly related to the improving selectivity with decreasing strength of active sites of the individual catalysts. The catalytic performance of Fe(BTC), containing the highest concentration of Lewis acid sites of the appropriate strength is superior over large-pore zeolite (Al)beta and B-, Al-, Ga-, Fe-substituted extra-large pore zeolites UTL in Prins reaction of β-pinene with formaldehyde and Pechmann condensation of 1-naphthol with ethylacetoacetate. PMID:24790940

  4. Boosting Chemical Stability, Catalytic Activity, and Enantioselectivity of Metal-Organic Frameworks for Batch and Flow Reactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Jiang, Hong; Hou, Bang; Gong, Wei; Liu, Yan; Cui, Yong

    2017-09-27

    A key challenge in heterogeneous catalysis is the design and synthesis of heterogeneous catalysts featuring high catalytic activity, selectivity, and recyclability. Here we demonstrate that high-performance heterogeneous asymmetric catalysts can be engineered from a metal-organic framework (MOF) platform by using a ligand design strategy. Three porous chiral MOFs with the framework formula [Mn2L(H2O)2] are prepared from enantiopure phosphono-carboxylate ligands of 1,1'-biphenol that are functionalized with 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)-, bismethyl-, and bisfluoro-phenyl substituents at the 3,3'-position. For the first time, we show that not only chemical stability but also catalytic activity and stereoselectivity of the MOFs can be tuned by modifying the ligand structures. Particularly, the MOF incorporated with -CF3 groups on the pore walls exhibits enhanced tolerance to water, weak acid, and base compared with the MOFs with -F and -Me groups. Under both batch and flow reaction systems, the CF3-containing MOF demonstrated excellent reactivity, selectivity, and recyclability, affording high yields and enantioselectivities for alkylations of indoles and pyrrole with a range of ketoesters or nitroalkenes. In contrast, the corresponding homogeneous catalysts gave low enantioselectivity in catalyzing the tested reactions.

  5. Catalytic performance of Metal-Organic-Frameworks vs. extra-large pore zeolite UTL in condensation reactions.

    PubMed

    Shamzhy, Mariya; Opanasenko, Maksym; Shvets, Oleksiy; Cejka, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic behavior of isomorphously substituted B-, Al-, Ga-, and Fe-containing extra-large pore UTL zeolites was investigated in Knoevenagel condensation involving aldehydes, Pechmann condensation of 1-naphthol with ethylacetoacetate, and Prins reaction of β-pinene with formaldehyde and compared with large-pore aluminosilicate zeolite beta and representative Metal-Organic-Frameworks Cu3(BTC)2 and Fe(BTC). The yield of the target product over the investigated catalysts in Knoevenagel condensation increases in the following sequence: (Al)beta < (Al)UTL < (Ga)UTL < (Fe)UTL < Fe(BTC) < (B)UTL < Cu3(BTC)2 being mainly related to the improving selectivity with decreasing strength of active sites of the individual catalysts. The catalytic performance of Fe(BTC), containing the highest concentration of Lewis acid sites of the appropriate strength is superior over large-pore zeolite (Al)beta and B-, Al-, Ga-, Fe-substituted extra-large pore zeolites UTL in Prins reaction of β-pinene with formaldehyde and Pechmann condensation of 1-naphthol with ethylacetoacetate.

  6. (Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  7. Study of positive and negative plasma catalytic oxidation of ethylene.

    PubMed

    Van Wesenbeeck, K; Hauchecorne, B; Lenaerts, S

    2016-10-06

    The effect of introducing a photocatalytically active coating inside a plasma unit is investigated. This technique combines the advantages of high product selectivity from catalysis and the fast start-up from plasma technology. In this study, a preselected TiO2 coating is applied on the collector electrode of a DC corona discharge unit as non-thermal plasma reactor, in order to study the oxidation of ethylene. For both positive and negative polarities an enhanced mineralization is observed while the formation of by-products drastically decreases. The plasma catalytic unit gave the best results when using negative polarity at a voltage of 15 kV. This shows the potential of plasma catalysis as indoor air purification technology.

  8. Ni/MgAlO regeneration for catalytic wet air oxidation of an azo-dye in trickle-bed reaction.

    PubMed

    Vallet, Ana; Ovejero, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Araceli; Peres, José A; García, Juan

    2013-01-15

    Active nickel catalysts (7 wt%) supported over Mg-Al mixed oxides have been recently developed and it has also been demonstrated that they are also highly selective in Catalytic Wet air Oxidation (CWAO) of dyes. CWAO of Chromotrope 2R (C2R) has been studied using a trickle bed reactor employing temperatures from 100 to 180 °C, liquid flow rates from 0.1 to 0.7 mL min(-1) and initial dye concentration from 10 to 50 ppm. Total pressure and air flow were 25 bar and 300 mL min(-1), respectively. The catalyst showed a very stable activity up to 24 h on stream with an average TOC conversion of 82% at 150 °C and T(r)=0.098 g(Ni) min mL(-1). After the reaction, a 1.1 wt% C of carbonaceous deposit is formed onto the catalyst and a diminution of 30% of the surface area with respect of the fresh catalyst was observed. An increase in the space time gave higher TOC conversions up to T(r)=0.098 g(Ni) min mL(-1), attaining values of 80% at 180 °C. The performance of TOC and dye removal does not decrease after two regeneration cycles. In total, a 57 h effective reaction has been carried out with no loss of catalytic activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemicals from Lignin by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis, from Product Control to Reaction Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Custodis, Victoria; Hemberger, Patrick; Bährle, Christian; Vogel, Frédéric; Jeschk, Gunnar; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of lignin into renewable and value-added chemicals by thermal processes, especially pyrolysis, receives great attention. The products may serve as feedstock for chemicals and fuels and contribute to the development of a sustainable society. However, the application of lignin conversion is limited by the low selectivity from lignin to the desired products. The opportunities for catalysis to selectively convert lignin into useful chemicals by catalytic fast pyrolysis and our efforts to elucidate the mechanism of lignin pyrolysis are discussed. Possible research directions will be identified.

  10. Reply to ``Comment on `Surface restructuring, kinetic oscillations, and chaos in heterogeneous catalytic reactions' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2001-02-01

    In my numeration, the criticism of my simulations of kinetic oscillations in NO reduction by H2 on Pt(100) [V. P. Zhdanov, Phys. Rev. E 59, 6292 (1999)] by Kuzovkov, Kortlüke, and von Niessen [preceding paper, Phys. Rev. 63, 023101 (2001)] contains 19 comments. I show that four comments are irrelevant. The other 15 comments are wrong, because they either contradict the basic principles of the theory of phase transitions, Monte Carlo simulations, and catalytic chemistry or ignore numerous experimental data on adsorbate-induced restructuring of the Pt(100) surface.

  11. Catalytic gasification studies in a pressurized fluid-bed unit

    SciTech Connect

    Mudge, L.K.; Baker, E.G.; Mitchell, D.H.; Robertus, R.J.; Brown, M.D.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of the project is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gas products via the catalytic gasification of biomass. This report presents the results of research conducted from October 1980 to November 1982. In the laboratory scale studis, active catalysts were developed for generation of synthesis gases from wood by steam gasification. A trimetallic catalyst, Ni-Co-Mo on silica-alumina doped with 2 wt % Na, was found to retain activity indefinitely for generation of a methanol synthesis gas from wood at 1380/sup 0/F (750/sup 0/C) and 1 atm (100 kPa) absolute pressure. Catalysts for generation of a methane-rich gas were deactivated rapidly and could not be regenerated as required for economic application. Sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate were effective as catalysts for conversion of wood to synthesis gases and methane-rich gas and should be economically viable. Catalytic gasification conditions were found to be suitable for processing of alternative feedstocks: bagasse, alfalfa, rice hulls, and almond hulls. The PDU was operated successfully at absolute pressures of up to 10 atm (1000 kPa) and temperatures of up to 1380/sup 0/F (750/sup 0/C). Yields of synthesis gases at elevated pressure were greater than those used for previous economic evaluations. A trimetallic catalyst, Ni-Cu-Mo on silica-alumina, did not display a long life as did the doped trimetallic catalyst used in laboratory studies. A computer program for a Radio Shack TRS-80 Model I microcomputer was developed to evaluate rapidly the economics of producing either methane or methanol from wood. The program is based on economic evaluations reported in previous studies. Improved yields from the PDU studies were found to result in a reduction of about 9 cents/gal in methanol cost.

  12. Investigation of catalysts and reactions in catalytic oxidation. III. Formation of texture of pseudoboehmites in liquid granulation of bead supports for catalytic heat generator catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shepeleva, M.N.; Shkrabina, R.A.; Okkel', L.G.; Zaikovskii, V.I.; Fenelonov, V.B.; Izmagilov, Z.R.

    1988-08-01

    A study has been made of the changes in texture of pseudoboehmite aluminum hydroxides during the stages of peptization and coagulation in liquid forming of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ granules. Precipitates obtained at 291-310 K, with the morphology of freshly precipitated pseudoboehmite and with primarily coagulation-type bonds, are readily deaggregated by acid; therefore, it is possible after coagulation, to obtain granules with a uniform pore structure and high strength. With precipitation temperatures of 368-375 K and the formation of crystallization contacts in the hydroxides, treatment with acid does not result in deaggregation. By varying the ratio of the first and second types of precipitate, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ granules with predetermined structural and mechanical characteristics can be obtained, suitable for supports of exhaustive oxidation catalysts that are used in catalytic heat generators.

  13. Economic feasibility of ethanol production from biomass and waste resources via catalytic reaction.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Sun-Hwa; Shin, Dae-Hyun; Nho, Nam-Sun; Shin, Kyoung-Hee; Jin, Chang-Soo

    2013-04-01

    An economic evaluation of ethanol (EtOH) production from a thermo-chemical process derived from biomass/waste feedstocks was conducted. The influence of feed amounts, catalytic conversions, and EtOH selling prices was examined as these are the major variables for the economic evaluation of biomass/wastes conversion to EtOH. Among the three feedstock systems of biomass, high-moisture municipal solid waste (MSW), and plastic waste, the plastic waste has far better economic feasibility, with a payback period of 2-5 years at maximum CO conversion (40%) from syngas to ethanol, due to its higher heating value in comparison with biomass and high-moisture MSW. The heating value of the feedstock is a key factor in determining the overall economic efficiency in a thermo-chemical EtOH production system. Furthermore, enhancement of the CO conversion (related to catalytic activity) from syngas to EtOH using a low cost catalyst is necessary to retain economic efficiency because the CO conversion and cost consideration of catalyst are crucial factors to reduce the payback period.

  14. Reaction mechanism for the highly efficient catalytic decomposition of peroxynitrite by the amphipolar iron(III) corrole 1-Fe.

    PubMed

    Avidan-Shlomovich, Shlomit; Gross, Zeev

    2015-07-21

    The amphipolar iron(III) corrole 1-Fe is one of the most efficient catalysts for the decomposition of peroxynitrite, the toxin involved in numerous diseases. This research focused on the mechanism of that reaction at physiological pH, where peroxynitrite is in equilibrium with its much more reactive conjugated acid, by focusing on the elementary steps involved in the catalytic cycle. Kinetic investigations uncovered the formation of a reaction intermediate in a process that is complete within a few milliseconds (k1 ∼ 3 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) at 5 °C, about 7 orders of magnitude larger than the first order rate constant for the non-catalyzed process). Multiple evidence points towards iron-catalyzed homolytic O-O bond cleavage to form nitrogen dioxide and hydroxo- or oxo-iron(iv) corrole. The iron(iv) intermediate was found to decay via multiple pathways that proceed at similar rates (k2 about 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)): reaction with nitrogen dioxide to form nitrate, nitration of the corrole macrocyclic, and dimerization to binuclear iron(iv) corrole. Catalysis in the presence of substrates affects the decay of the iron intermediate by either oxidative nitration (phenolic substrates) or reduction (ascorbate). A large enough excess of ascorbate accelerates the catalytic decomposition of PN by 1-Fe by orders of magnitude, prevents other decay routes of the iron intermediate, and eliminates nitration products as well. This suggests that the beneficial effect of the iron corrole under the reducing conditions present in most biological media might be even larger than in the purely chemical system. The acquired mechanistic insight is of prime importance for the design of optimally acting catalysts for the fast and safe decomposition of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

  15. Catalytic, Enantioselective Sulfenofunctionalisation of Alkenes: Mechanistic, Crystallographic, and Computational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E.; Hartmann, Eduard; Kornfilt, David J. P.; Wang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The stereocontrolled introduction of vicinal heteroatomic substituents into organic molecules is one of the most powerful ways of adding value and function. Whereas many methods exist for the introduction of oxygen- and nitrogen-containing substituents, the number stereocontrolled methods for the introduction of sulfur-containing substituents pales by comparison. Previous reports from these laboratories have described the sulfenofunctionalization of alkenes that construct vicinal carbon-sulfur and carbon-oxygen, carbon-nitrogen as well as carbon-carbon bonds with high levels of diastereospecificity and enantioselectivity. This process is enabled by the concept of Lewis base activation of Lewis acids that provides activation of Group 16 electrophiles. To provide a foundation for expansion of substrate scope and improved selectivities, we have undertaken a comprehensive study of the catalytically active species. Insights gleaned from kinetic, crystallographic and computational methods have led to the introduction of a new family of sulfenylating agents that provide significantly enhanced selectivities. PMID:25411883

  16. High temperature chemical kinetic study of the H2-CO-CO2-NO reaction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental study of the kinetics of the H2-CO-CO2-NO reaction system was made behind incident shock waves at temperatures of 2460 and 2950 K. The overall rate of the reaction was measured by monitoring radiation from the CO + O yields CO2 + h upoilon reaction. Correlation of these data with a detailed reaction mechanism showed that the high-temperature rate of the reaction N + OH yields NO + H can be described by the low-temperature (320 K) rate coefficient. Catalytic dissociation of molecular hydrogen was an important reaction under the tests conditions.

  17. Layered materials with coexisting acidic and basic sites for catalytic one-pot reaction sequences.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-06-17

    Acidic montmorillonite-immobilized primary amines (H-mont-NH(2)) were found to be excellent acid-base bifunctional catalysts for one-pot reaction sequences, which are the first materials with coexisting acid and base sites active for acid-base tamdem reactions. For example, tandem deacetalization-Knoevenagel condensation proceeded successfully with the H-mont-NH(2), affording the corresponding condensation product in a quantitative yield. The acidity of the H-mont-NH(2) was strongly influenced by the preparation solvent, and the base-catalyzed reactions were enhanced by interlayer acid sites.

  18. Catalytic solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry for the determination of trace rhamnose based on its condensation reaction with calcein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Lin, Li-Ping; Wang, Hong-Xin; Lin, Shao-Qin; Zhang, Li-Hong; Cai, Wen-Lian; Lin, Xuan; Pan, You-Zhu; Wang, Xin-Xing; Li, Zhi-Ming; Jiao, Li; Cui, Ma-Lin

    2011-12-01

    Calcein (R) could not only emit strong and stable room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on filter paper using I - as perturber, but also could be oxidized by H 2O 2 to form a non-phosphorescence compound (R'), resulting in the quenching of RTP signal of R. Moreover, the ortho-hydrogen of phenolic hydroxyl in R took condensation reaction with rhamnose (Rha) to produce non-phosphorescence compound (R-Rha) causing the RTP signal of R to further quench, and R-Rha was oxidized by H 2O 2 to form R' and Rha, bringing about the sharp RTP signal quenching of R. Thus, a new solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry (SSRTP) for the determination of trace Rha based on its strong catalytic effect on H 2O 2 oxidizing R has been established, with the detection limit (LD) of 7.8 zg spot -1 (corresponding concentration: 2.0 × 10 -17 g ml -1, sample volume: 0.40 μl spot -1). This method has been applied to determine trace Rha in cigarettes and jujubes, with the results coinciding well with those determined by a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The component of R-Rha also was analyzed by means of HPLC, mass spectrometer and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. The mechanism of catalytic SSRTP for the determination of trace Rha was discussed.

  19. Graphene oxide nanoplatforms to enhance catalytic performance of iron phthalocyanine for oxygen reduction reaction in bioelectrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa de Oliveira, Maida Aysla; Mecheri, Barbara; D'Epifanio, Alessandra; Placidi, Ernesto; Arciprete, Fabrizio; Valentini, Federica; Perandini, Alessando; Valentini, Veronica; Licoccia, Silvia

    2017-07-01

    We report the development of electrocatalysts based on iron phthalocyanine (FePc) supported on graphene oxide (GO), obtained by electrochemical oxidation of graphite in aqueous solution of LiCl, LiClO4, and NaClO4. Structure, surface chemistry, morphology, and thermal stability of the prepared materials were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at neutral pH was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. The experimental results demonstrate that the oxidation degree of GO supports affects the overall catalytic activity of FePc/GO, due to a modulation effect of the interaction between FePc and the basal plane of GO. On the basis of electrochemical, spectroscopic, and morphological investigations, FePc/GO_LiCl was selected to be assembled at the cathode side of a microbial fuel cell prototype, demonstrating a good electrochemical performance in terms of voltage and power generation.

  20. Advanced catalytic performance of Au-Pt double-walled nanotubes and their fabrication through galvanic replacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu; Kuai, Long; Yu, Xue; Li, Wenzheng; Geng, Baoyou

    2013-08-26

    Bimetallic tubular nanostructures have been the focus of intensive research as they have very interesting potential applications in various fields including catalysis and electronics. In this paper, we demonstrate a facile method for the fabrication of Au-Pt double-walled nanotubes (Au-Pt DWNTs). The DWNTs are fabricated through the galvanic displacement reaction between Ag nanowires and various metal ions, and the Au-Pt DWNT catalysts exhibit high active catalytic performances toward both methanol electro-oxidation and 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) reduction. First, they have a high electrochemically active surface area of 61.66 m(2)  g(-1), which is close to the value of commercial Pt/C catalysts (64.76 m(2) g(-1)), and the peak current density of Au-Pt DWNTs in methanol oxidation is recorded as 138.25 mA mg(-1), whereas those of Pt nanotubes, Au/Pt nanotubes (simple mixture), and commercial Pt/C are 24.12, 40.95, and 120.65 mA mg(-1), respectively. The Au-Pt DWNTs show a markedly enhanced electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation compared with the other three catalysts. They also show an excellent catalytic performance in comparison with common Au nanotubes for 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) reduction. The attractive performance exhibited by these prepared Au-Pt DWNTs can be attributed to their unique structures, which make them promising candidates as high-performance catalysts.

  1. Catalytic cracking of palm oil for the production of biofuels: optimization studies.

    PubMed

    Tamunaidu, Pramila; Bhatia, Subhash

    2007-12-01

    Oil palm is widely grown in Malaysia. Palm oil has attracted the attention of researchers to develop an 'environmentally friendly' and high quality fuel, free of nitrogen and sulfur. In the present study, the catalytic cracking of palm oil to biofuel was studied over REY catalyst in a transport riser reactor at atmospheric pressure. The effect of reaction temperature (400-500 degrees C), catalyst/palm oil ratio (5-10) and residence time (10-30s) was studied over the yield of bio-gasoline and gas as fuel. Design of experiments was used to study the effect of operating variables over conversion of palm oil and yield of hydrocarbon fuel. The response surface methodology was used to determine the optimum value of the operating variables for maximum yield of bio-gasoline fraction in the liquid product obtained.

  2. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    C-Alkylation has been utilized in the solubilization of various coals. Low rank, high oxygen Illinois No. 6 coal was alkylated with different alkylating agents under different conditions to determine the most suitable reaction conditions. A new method of alkylating coal with n-butyl lithium and potassium tertiary butoxide in refluxing heptane has been studied. The influence of the solvent for alkylation on the pyridine solubility of the product was studied. The pyridine solubility of the products obtained with n-butyl iodide ranged from 39% for the reaction in heptane to 5l% for the reaction in tetrahydropyran. Tetrahydrofuran, in contrast, produced only 33% pyridine soluble product. The reactivity pattern for alkylation was determined by deuterium and carbon NMR spectroscopy of the products that were obtained with deuterium and carbon-13 labelled alkylating agents.

  3. Spectroscopic investigation of the reaction mechanism of CopB-B, the catalytic fragment from an archaeal thermophilic ATP-driven heavy metal transporter.

    PubMed

    Völlmecke, Christian; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus; Lübben, Mathias

    2009-11-01

    The mechanism of ATP hydrolysis of a shortened variant of the heavy metal-translocating P-type ATPase CopB of Sulfolobus solfataricus was studied. The catalytic fragment, named CopB-B, comprises the nucleotide binding and phosphorylation domains. We demonstrated stoichiometric high-affinity binding of one nucleotide to the protein (K(diss) 1-20 microm). Mg is not necessary for nucleotide association but is essential for the phosphatase activity. Binding and hydrolysis of ATP released photolytically from the caged precursor nitrophenylethyl-ATP was measured at 30 degrees C by infrared spectroscopy, demonstrating that phosphate groups are not involved in nucleotide binding. The hydrolytic kinetics was biphasic, and provides evidence for at least one reaction intermediate. Modelling of the forward reaction gave rise to three kinetic states connected by two intrinsic rate constants. The lower kinetic constant (k(1) = 4.7 x 10(-3) s(-1) at 30 degrees C) represents the first and rate-limiting reaction, probably reflecting the transition between the open and closed conformations of the domain pair. The subsequent step has a faster rate (k(2) = 17 x 10(-3) s(-1) at 30 degrees C), leading to product formation. Although the latter appears to be a single step, it probably comprises several reactions with presently unresolved intermediates. Based on these data, we suggest a model of the hydrolytic mechanism.

  4. Insight into the Catalytic Mechanism of Bimetallic Platinum–Copper Core–Shell Nanostructures for Nonaqueous Oxygen Evolution Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Lu; Luo, Xiangyi; Kropf, A. Jeremy; Wen, Jianguo; Wang, Xiaoping; Lee, Sungsik; Myers, Deborah J.; Miller, Dean; Wu, Tianpin; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) plays a critical role in multiple energy conversion and storage applications. However, its sluggish kinetics usually results in large voltage polarization and unnecessary energy loss. Therefore, designing efficient catalysts that could facilitate this process has become an emerging topic. Here, we present a unique Pt–Cu core–shell nanostructure for catalyzing the nonaqueous OER. The catalysts were systematically investigated with comprehensive spectroscopic techniques, and applied in nonaqueous Li–O2 electrochemical cells, which exhibited dramatically reduced charging overpotential (<0.2 V). The superior performance is explained by the robust Cu(I) surface sites stabilized by the Pt core in the nanostructure. The insights into the catalytic mechanism of the unique Pt–Cu core–shell nanostructure gained in this work are expected to serve as a guide for future design of other nanostructured bimetallic OER catalysts.

  5. Spatially orthogonal chemical functionalization of a hierarchical pore network for catalytic cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Parlett, Christopher M A; Isaacs, Mark A; Beaumont, Simon K; Bingham, Laura M; Hondow, Nicole S; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F

    2016-02-01

    The chemical functionality within porous architectures dictates their performance as heterogeneous catalysts; however, synthetic routes to control the spatial distribution of individual functions within porous solids are limited. Here we report the fabrication of spatially orthogonal bifunctional porous catalysts, through the stepwise template removal and chemical functionalization of an interconnected silica framework. Selective removal of polystyrene nanosphere templates from a lyotropic liquid crystal-templated silica sol-gel matrix, followed by extraction of the liquid crystal template, affords a hierarchical macroporous-mesoporous architecture. Decoupling of the individual template extractions allows independent functionalization of macropore and mesopore networks on the basis of chemical and/or size specificity. Spatial compartmentalization of, and directed molecular transport between, chemical functionalities affords control over the reaction sequence in catalytic cascades; herein illustrated by the Pd/Pt-catalysed oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol to cinnamic acid. We anticipate that our methodology will prompt further design of multifunctional materials comprising spatially compartmentalized functions.

  6. A Diode Laser Study of the Catalytic Oxidation Dynamics of Acetaldehyde on Polycrystalline Platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edington, Sean Coleman

    The catalytic oxidation of acetaldehyde on platinum was studied using a flow reactor equipped with a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer and a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Reaction mixtures containing this molecule in varying proportion with oxygen and with argon as a carrier gas were flowed over a polycrystalline platinum mesh, which was resistively heated to different temperatures between 700 and 1000 K. The products of these reactions were monitored using mass spectrometry and the state-resolved spectra of CO 2 produced were collected using high-resolution tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. These data were analyzed to yield information about the dynamics of the reaction. Results indicate that production of CO and CO2 by this reaction proceeds via two distinct pathways. Acetaldehyde adsorbed on the surface decomposes to acetyl, which in turn decomposes CO and CHx. The adsorbed CO so prepared desorbs to yield the bulk of CO generated across all reaction conditions and also yields CO2 with a relatively deactivated asymmetric stretching mode under conditions of high temperature and low oxygen coverage. The acetyl-derived CHx dehydrogenates to yield surface carbon and H adatoms. Total oxidation of this surface carbon is the primary source of CO2 produced under all reaction conditions except those mentioned previously and is found to yield products with a preferentially excited asymmetric stretch. Combination of the CHx-derived H adatoms with surface oxygen drives the production of water by this reaction. During the course of the work described here, two notable improvements were made to our experimental apparatus. The first of these was the modification of the data acquisition process to significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio achievable by our laser spectrometer with no increase in data collection time. The second was the development of data analysis software which significantly improved the efficiency and thoroughness of the process by

  7. Reaction of Cu(I) with dialkyl peroxides: Cu(II)-alkoxides, alkoxy radicals, and catalytic C-H etherification.

    PubMed

    Gephart, Raymond T; McMullin, Claire L; Sapiezynski, Nicholas G; Jang, Eun Sil; Aguila, Mae Joanne B; Cundari, Thomas R; Warren, Timothy H

    2012-10-24

    Kinetic analysis of the reaction of the copper(I) β-diketiminate [Cl(2)NN]Cu ([Cu(I)]) with (t)BuOO(t)Bu to give [Cu(II)]-O(t)Bu (1) reveals first-order behavior in each component implicating the formation of free (t)BuO(•) radicals. Added pyridine mildly inhibits this reaction indicating competition between (t)BuOO(t)Bu and py for coordination at [Cu(I)] prior to peroxide activation. Reaction of [Cu(I)] with dicumyl peroxide leads to [Cu(II)]-OCMe(2)Ph (3) and acetophenone suggesting the intermediacy of the PhMe(2)CO(•) radical. Computational methods provide insight into the activation of (t)BuOO(t)Bu at [Cu(I)]. The novel peroxide adduct [Cu(I)]((t)BuOO(t)Bu) (4) and the square planar [Cu(III)](O(t)Bu)(2) (5) were identified, each unstable toward loss of the (t)BuO(•) radical. Facile generation of the (t)BuO(•) radical is harnessed in the catalytic C-H etherification of cyclohexane with (t)BuOO(t)Bu at rt employing [Cu(I)] (5 mol %) to give the ether Cy-O(t)Bu in 60% yield.

  8. Catalytic actions of alkaline salts in reactions between 1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid and cellulose: II. Esterification.

    PubMed

    Ji, Bolin; Tang, Peixin; Yan, Kelu; Sun, Gang

    2015-11-05

    1,2,3,4-Butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) reacts with cellulose in two steps with catalysis of alkaline salts such as sodium hypophosphite: anhydride formation and esterification of anhydride with cellulose. The alkali metal ions were found effective in catalyzing formation of BTCA anhydride in a previous report. In this work, catalytic functions of the alkaline salts in the esterification reaction between BTCA anhydride and cellulose were investigated. Results revealed that acid anions play an important role in the esterification reaction by assisting removal of protons on intermediates and completion of the esterification between cellulose and BTCA. Besides, alkaline salts with lower pKa1 values of the corresponding acids are more effective ones for the reaction since addition of these salts could lead to lower pH values and higher acid anion concentrations in finishing baths. The mechanism explains the results of FTIR and wrinkle recovery angles of the fabrics cured under different temperatures and times. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of a catalytic base for sugar oxidation in the pyranose 2-oxidase reaction.

    PubMed

    Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2011-11-25

    Pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O) catalyzes the oxidation of aldopyranoses to form 2-keto sugars and H(2)O(2) . In this study, the mechanistic role of the conserved residues His548 and Asn593 in P2O was investigated by using site-directed mutagenesis, transient kinetics, and pH-dependence studies. As single mutants of H548 resulted in mixed populations of noncovalently bound and covalently linked FAD, double mutants containing H167A were constructed, in which the covalent histidyl-FAD linkage was removed in addition to having the H548 mutation. Single mutants H548A, H548N, H548S, H548D and double mutants (with H167A) could not be reduced by D-glucose. For the H167A/H548R mutant, the flavin could be reduced by D-glucose with the reduction rate constant about 220 times lower than that of the H167A mutant. The pH-dependence studies of H167A/H548R indicated that the rate constant of flavin reduction increased about 360-fold upon a pH rise corresponding to pK(a) >10.1, whereas the reactions of the wild-type and H167A mutant enzymes were pH independent. Therefore, the data suggest that a pK(a) value of >10.1 in the mutant enzyme is associated with the Arg548 residue, and that this residue must be unprotonated to efficiently catalyze flavin reduction. The data imply that for the wild-type P2O, the conserved His548 should be unprotonated in the pH range studied. The unprotonated His548 can act as a general base to abstract the 2-hydroxyl proton of D-glucose and initiate hydride transfer from the substrate to the flavin. Studies of the single mutant N593H showed that the flavin reduction rate constant was 114 times lower than that of the wild-type enzyme and was pH independent, while the K(d) for D-glucose binding was 19 times greater. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Kinetic catalytic determination of trace Cu(II) in water samples with the thioglycolic/thiolactic acid-chromate reaction.

    PubMed

    Rustoiu-Csavdari, A; Mihai, D; Bâldea, I

    2005-04-01

    The use of two novel similar indicator reactions as applied to the kinetic determination of Cu(II) in water is investigated. The methods rely on the catalytic effect of the analyte on the oxidation of thioglycolic (TGA) and thiolactic (TLA) acids by chromate in acidic media. The extent of the reactions was followed spectrophotometrically at 345 nm. Pseudo-first-order rate coefficients, k(obsd), were determined as a function of catalyst concentration. Interference of Fe(III) and Pb(II) was suppressed by complexation with pyrophosphate. For the reaction of TGA, a linear regression for k(obsd) versus [Cu(II)] was obtained for the entire concentration range considered. Although the plot corresponding to TLA oxidation exhibits a sharp change of slope at approximately 1.8x10(-5) M Cu(II), it can still be described effectively by two linear regressions with different slopes. The reaction of TGA is more sensitive than that of TLA at low Cu(II) concentration. The opposite is true for higher catalyst contents. The detection limits were 65 microg L(-1) for TGA and of 80 microg L(-1) for TLA oxidation, respectively. The relative standard deviations, of 0.4% for TGA and 1.1% for TLA oxidation, respectively, were obtained for five replicate runs at 1000 microg L(-1). Samples of river and wastewater from the mining region of Baia-Mare, Northern Romania were analyzed using the more sensitive reaction of thioglycolic acid. Results were compared to those obtained by the officially standardized methods. Good agreement was obtained, even for an untreated sample. Measurements did not require prior separation of interfering species.

  11. Multifunctional role of His159in the catalytic reaction of serine palmitoyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Yuka; Ikushiro, Hiroko; Hayashi, Hideyuki

    2009-06-05

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) belongs to the fold type I family of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and forms 3-ketodihydrosphingosine (KDS) from l-serine and palmitoyl-CoA. Like other alpha-oxamine synthase subfamily enzymes, SPT is different from most of the fold type I enzymes in that its re face of the PLP-Lys aldimine is occupied by a His residue (His(159)) instead of an aromatic amino acid residue. His(159) was changed into alanine or aromatic amino acid residues to examine its role during catalysis. All mutant SPTs formed the PLP-l-serine aldimine with dissociation constants several 10-fold higher than that of the wild type SPT and catalyzed the abortive transamination of l-serine. These results indicate that His(159) is not only the anchoring site for l-serine but regulates the alpha-deprotonation of l-serine by fixing the conformation of the PLP-l-serine aldimine to prevent unwanted side reactions. Only H159A SPT retained activity and showed a prominent 505-nm absorption band of the quinonoid species during catalysis. Global analysis of the time-resolved spectra suggested the presence of the two quinonoid intermediates, the first formed from the PLP-l-serine aldimine and the second from the PLP-KDS aldimine. Accumulation of these quinonoid intermediates indicated that His(159) promotes both the Claisen-type condensation as an acid catalyst and the protonation at Calpha of the second quinonoid to form the PLP-KDS aldimine. These results, combined with the previous model building study (Ikushiro, H., Fujii, S., Shiraiwa, Y., and Hayashi, H. (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 7542-7553), lead us to propose a novel mechanism, in which His(159) plays multiple roles by exploiting the stereochemistry of Dunathan's conjecture.

  12. Multifunctional Role of His159in the Catalytic Reaction of Serine Palmitoyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Shiraiwa, Yuka; Ikushiro, Hiroko; Hayashi, Hideyuki

    2009-01-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) belongs to the fold type I family of the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and forms 3-ketodihydrosphingosine (KDS) from l-serine and palmitoyl-CoA. Like other α-oxamine synthase subfamily enzymes, SPT is different from most of the fold type I enzymes in that its re face of the PLP-Lys aldimine is occupied by a His residue (His159) instead of an aromatic amino acid residue. His159 was changed into alanine or aromatic amino acid residues to examine its role during catalysis. All mutant SPTs formed the PLP-l-serine aldimine with dissociation constants several 10-fold higher than that of the wild type SPT and catalyzed the abortive transamination of l-serine. These results indicate that His159 is not only the anchoring site for l-serine but regulates the α-deprotonation of l-serine by fixing the conformation of the PLP-l-serine aldimine to prevent unwanted side reactions. Only H159A SPT retained activity and showed a prominent 505-nm absorption band of the quinonoid species during catalysis. Global analysis of the time-resolved spectra suggested the presence of the two quinonoid intermediates, the first formed from the PLP-l-serine aldimine and the second from the PLP-KDS aldimine. Accumulation of these quinonoid intermediates indicated that His159 promotes both the Claisen-type condensation as an acid catalyst and the protonation at Cα of the second quinonoid to form the PLP-KDS aldimine. These results, combined with the previous model building study (Ikushiro, H., Fujii, S., Shiraiwa, Y., and Hayashi, H. (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 7542–7553), lead us to propose a novel mechanism, in which His159 plays multiple roles by exploiting the stereochemistry of Dunathan's conjecture. PMID:19346561

  13. Catalytic asymmetric aldol addition reactions of 3-fluoro-indolinone derived enolates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Wenzhong; Mei, Haibo; Han, Jianlin; Soloshonok, Vadim A; Pan, Yi

    2017-01-04

    Reported herein is a Cu(i)/bisoxazoline ligand-catalyzed aldol reaction of unprotected tertiary enolates generated in situ from 3-(1,1-dihydroxy-2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-substituted derivatives of 3-fluoro-2-oxindoles. A range of α-fluoro-β-aryl/hetaryl/alkyl-β-hydroxy-indolin-2-ones containing C-F quaternary stereogenic centers of high pharmaceutical importance were furnished in good yields and satisfactory diastereo- and enantioselectivities. The reactions were conducted under operationally convenient conditions and displayed wide substrate/functional group generality including unprotected N-H on the tertiary enolates, and aromatic, hetero-aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes.

  14. Spatially resolved characterization of catalyst-coated membranes by distance-controlled scanning mass spectrometry utilizing catalytic methanol oxidation as gas-solid probe reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Assmann, Jens; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Muhler, Martin

    2007-08-01

    The spatially resolved catalytic activity of a catalyst-coated membrane (CCM), which is the essential part of PEM fuel cells, was visualized rapidly without any damage by a distance-controlled scanning mass spectrometer with an improved resolution of 250 microm. Methanol oxidation was identified as a suitable gas-solid probe reaction for the characterization of local catalytic activity. In addition, defects were manually generated in the CCM to simulate inhomogeneous coating and pinholes. The measurements successfully demonstrated that catalytically active and less active regions can be clearly distinguished. Simultaneously, the local topography was recorded, providing additional information on the location of the scratches and pinholes. The catalytic results were highly reproducible due to the constant-distance feedback loop rendering scanning mass spectrometry a promising tool for the quantitative quality control of CCMs.

  15. Catalytic Effects of Oxide Surfaces on Diels-Alder Cycloaddition between Furan and Methyl Acrylate: A DFT Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavati-Fard, Taha; Jenness, Glen; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Doren, Douglas

    Using density functional theory with periodic boundary conditions, we study the catalytic effects of oxide surfaces such as ZrO_2 and HfO_2 on Diels-Alder reaction between furan and methyl acrylate. The cycloadduct can be dehydrated later to produce methyl benzoic which is an important step toward benzoic acid production. The gas-phase and on-surface reaction mechanisms are studied in detail. The surface hydration effects on the reaction mechanism and energy profile are studied as well. Our calculations show that the oxide surfaces catalyze the reaction significantly through the interaction of metal sites with methyl acrylate. The calculations are interpreted by making use of electronic density of states and band structure of the catalyst.

  16. Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Chiral 2-Vinylindole Scaffolds by Friedel-Crafts Reaction.

    PubMed

    Arai, Takayoshi; Tsuchida, Akiko; Miyazaki, Tomoya; Awata, Atsuko

    2017-02-17

    A chiral bis(imidazolidine)pyridine (PyBidine)-Ni(OTf)2 complex smoothly catalyzed an asymmetric Friedel-Crafts reaction of 2-vinylindoles with nitroalkenes to give chiral indoles in a highly enantioselective manner while maintaining the 2-vinyl functionality. The chiral 2-vinylindoles offer unique chiral scaffolds for diverse transformations.

  17. Investigation of Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Francine; Agblevor, Foster; Klein, Michael; Sheikhi, Reza

    2015-12-31

    A collaborative effort involving experiments, kinetic modeling, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to understand co-gasification of coal-biomass mixtures. The overall goal of the work was to determine the key reactive properties for coal-biomass mixed fuels. Sub-bituminous coal was mixed with biomass feedstocks to determine the fluidization and gasification characteristics of hybrid poplar wood, switchgrass and corn stover. It was found that corn stover and poplar wood were the best feedstocks to use with coal. The novel approach of this project was the use of a red mud catalyst to improve gasification and lower gasification temperatures. An important results was the reduction of agglomeration of the biomass using the catalyst. An outcome of this work was the characterization of the chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms of the co-gasification fuels, and the development of a set of models that can be integrated into other modeling environments. The multiphase flow code, MFIX, was used to simulate and predict the hydrodynamics and co-gasification, and results were validated with the experiments. The reaction kinetics modeling was used to develop a smaller set of reactions for tractable CFD calculations that represented the experiments. Finally, an efficient tool was developed, MCHARS, and coupled with MFIX to efficiently simulate the complex reaction kinetics.

  18. Catalytic activation of copper (II) salts on the reaction of peroxynitrite with propofol in alkaline medium.

    PubMed

    Kohnen, Stephan; Halusiak, Emilie; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Deby, Carol; Hans, Pol; Lamy, Maurice; Noels, Alfred F

    2005-06-01

    We report here on the role of copper (II) salts on the acceleration of peroxynitrite (ONOO-) decomposition and ONOO- reaction with the anaesthetic agent propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) in alkaline medium. We observed a strong acceleration of the ONOO- decomposition in alkaline medium in the presence of copper (I and II) salts. After 18 h of ONOO- reaction with propofol, we observed nitrosated, nitrated, and oxidized (quinone and diphenylquinone) derivatives of propofol, but in the presence of Cu(II) (20% molar vs ONOO-), the yields of quinone and nitrosopropofol strongly increased. We also observed that the temperature and the atmosphere influenced the effects of Cu(II) on ONOO- reactions with propofol: low temperatures promoted nitrosation and high temperatures promoted oxidation; O2 atmosphere increased the general reactivity and the yield of nitrated and oxidized products. We highlighted the influence of Cu(II) salts on the radical character of the reaction by direct EPR technique. The exact mechanism of the Cu(II) catalysis remains unexplained, but we suggest the formation of a copper complex with propofol or, more probably, the oxidation of ONOO- into ONOO. by copper ions promoting the formation of quinone and nitrosopropofol according to a previously reported mechanism [M. Cudic, C. Ducrocq, Transformations of 2,6-diisopropylphenol by NO-derived nitrogen oxides, particularly peroxynitrite, Nitric Oxide 4 (2000) 147-156].

  19. Metal nanoparticle/ionic liquid/cellulose: new catalytically active membrane materials for hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Gelesky, Marcos A; Scheeren, Carla W; Foppa, Lucas; Pavan, Flavio A; Dias, Silvio L P; Dupont, Jairton

    2009-07-13

    Transition metal-containing membrane films of 10, 20, and 40 μm thickness were obtained by the combination of irregularly shaped nanoparticles with monomodal size distributions of 4.8 ± 1.1 nm (Rh(0)) and 3.0 ± 0.4 nm (Pt(0)) dispersed in the ionic liquid (IL) 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (BMI·(NTf)(2)) with a syrup of cellulose acetate (CA) in acetone. The Rh(0) and Pt(0) metal concentration increased proportionally with increases in film thickness up to 20 μm, and then the material became metal saturated. The presence of small and stable Rh(0) or Pt(0) nanoparticles induced an augmentation in the CA/IL film surface areas. The augmentation of the IL content resulted in an increase of elasticity and decrease in tenacity and toughness, whereas the stress at break was not influenced. The introduction of IL probably causes an increase in the separation between the cellulose macromolecules that results in a higher flexibility, lower viscosity, and better formability of the cellulose material. The nanoparticle/IL/CA combinations exhibit an excellent synergistic effect that enhances the activity and durability of the catalyst for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene. The nanoparticle/IL/cellulose acetate film membranes display higher catalytic activity (up to 7353 h(-1) for the 20 μm film of CA/IL/Pt(0)) and stability than the nanoparticles dispersed only in the IL.

  20. Continuous Catalytic Production of Methyl Acrylates from Unsaturated Alcohols by Gold: The Strong Effect of C=C Unsaturation on Reaction Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zugic, Branko; Karakalos, Stavros; Stowers, Kara J.; Biener, Monika M.; Biener, Juergen; Madix, Robert J.; Friend, Cynthia M.

    2016-03-04

    Here we demonstrate the gas-phase catalytic production of methyl acrylates by oxygen-assisted coupling of methanol with the unsaturated alcohols allyl alcohol and methylallyl alcohol over nanoporous gold (npAu) at atmospheric pressure. Analogous investigations on O-activated Au(110) exhibit the same pattern of reactivity and are used to establish that the competition between methoxy and allyloxy (or methallyloxy) reaction intermediates for adsorption sites, mediated by the reactants themselves, determines the selectivity of reaction. Our results clearly show that the C=C bond substantially increases the binding efficacy of the allyloxy (or methallyloxy), thus requiring extremely high methanol mole fractions (>0.99) in order to achieve comparable surface concentrations of methoxy and produce optimum yields of either methacrylate or methyl methacrylate. Allyloxy and methallyloxy were favored by factors of ~100 and ~450, respectively, vs methoxy. These values are more than 1 order of magnitude greater than those measured for competitive binding of ethoxy and 1-butoxy vs methoxy, demonstrating the strong effect of the carbon–carbon bond unsaturation. The 4.5-fold increase due to the addition of the methyl group in methylallyl alcohol vs allyl alcohol indicates the significant effect of the additional van der Waals interactions between the methyl group and the surface. Gas-phase acidity is also shown to be a good qualitative indicator for the relative binding strength of the alkoxides. This work provides insight into the control of reaction selectivity for coupling reactions and demonstrates the value of fundamental studies on single crystals for establishing key principles governing reaction selectivity. Notably, these oxygen-assisted coupling reactions occur without oxidation of the C=C bond.

  1. Catalytic wet oxidation of aqueous methylamine: comparative study on the catalytic performance of platinum-ruthenium, platinum, and ruthenium catalysts supported on titania.

    PubMed

    Song, Aiying; Lu, Gongxuan

    2015-01-01

    Promotion of the dispersion of Ru species supported on TiO2 was achieved by introduction of Pt component and the role of Pt in enhancing the catalytic performances of Pt-Ru was investigated with catalytic wet air oxidation of methylamine used as a probing reaction. It was found that Pt-Ru/TiO2 displayed a much better catalytic performance compared with Pt/TiO2 and Ru/TiO2 catalysts due to having the highest dispersion of active species. Both high total organic carbon conversion and nitrogen selectivity (∼100%) over Pt-Ru/TiO2 catalyst were achieved at low temperature (200 °C). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization indicated that there were strong interactions between metal particles and the support, which may increase the catalytic performance of catalysts.

  2. Computational study of a model system of enzyme-mediated [4+2] cycloaddition reaction.

    PubMed

    Gordeev, Evgeniy G; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2015-01-01

    A possible mechanistic pathway related to an enzyme-catalyzed [4+2] cycloaddition reaction was studied by theoretical calculations at density functional (B3LYP, O3LYP, M062X) and semiempirical levels (PM6-DH2, PM6) performed on a model system. The calculations were carried out for the key [4+2] cycloaddition step considering enzyme-catalyzed biosynthesis of Spinosyn A in a model reaction, where a reliable example of a biological Diels-Alder reaction was reported experimentally. In the present study it was demonstrated that the [4+2] cycloaddition reaction may benefit from moving along the energetically balanced reaction coordinate, which enabled the catalytic rate enhancement of the [4+2] cycloaddition pathway involving a single transition state. Modeling of such a system with coordination of three amino acids indicated a reliable decrease of activation energy by ~18.0 kcal/mol as compared to a non-catalytic transformation.

  3. Catalytic Enantioselective Michael Addition Reactions of Tertiary Enolates Generated by Detrifluoroacetylation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Wenzhong; Mei, Haibo; Han, Jianlin; Soloshonok, Vadim A; Pan, Yi

    2017-08-22

    This work describes, for the first time, Michael addition reactions of tertiary fluoro-enolates in situ generated by detrifluoroacetylation with 1-(1-(phenylsulfonyl) vinylsulfonyl)benzene. Excellent enantioselectivity and chemical yields were achieved with application of catalysts (10 mol %) derived from Cu(OTf)2 and (1S,2S)-1,2-diphenylethane-1,2-diamine. These reactions show a considerable degree of structural generality and allow the preparation of new types of biologically relevant molecules that contain quaternary C-F stereogenic carbon atoms and feature five-, six-, or seven-membered rings as well as heterocyclic 3-fluoro-2,3-dihydrochromen-4-one moieties. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Vanadium and molybdenum peroxides: synthesis and catalytic activity in oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Conte, Valeria; Floris, Barbara

    2011-02-21

    Catalysis by transition metal ions in oxidation reactions with hydrogen peroxide and alkyl hydroperoxides is a leading topic in the pursuit of more sustainable and selective processes, to obtain compounds with high added value. The most recent achievements concerning the synthesis and characterization, as well as the key aspects of reactivity, of V(V) and Mo(VI) peroxo complexes have been collected here.

  5. A Ternary Catalytic System for the Room Temperature Suzuki-Miyaura Reaction in Water

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Aires da Conceição; Senra, Jaqueline Dias; de Souza, Andréa Luzia Ferreira; Brum Malta, Luiz Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The formation of Pd(0) in the absence of any classical reducing agent in a medium containing Mg2+/Al3+ layered double hydroxide (LDH) and N,N-dimethylformamide was evidenced. XRD analysis showed the presence of crystalline phases of palladium in the Pd/LDH composite. Suzuki-Miyaura reactions in aqueous medium were carried out at room temperature, and good yields were obtained with bromoarenes and iodoarenes using the ternary system LDH-Pd-CD (cyclodextrin) as catalyst. PMID:24288484

  6. Catalytic reduction of NO by CO over rhodium catalysts. 2. Effect of oxygen on the nature, population, and reactivity of surface species formed under reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kondarides, D.I.; Chafik, T.; Verykios, X.E.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the nature, population, and reactivity of surface species formed during reduction of NO by CO over Rh/TiO{sub 2} catalysts has been examined employing FTIR and transient MS techniques. It has been found that the activity of Rh is hindered by accumulation of surface oxygen originating from NO decomposition and gas-phase oxygen in the feed. Adsorbed CO and reduced TiO{sub 2{minus}x} species in the vicinity of Rh particles act as oxygen atom scavengers and, under fuel-rich conditions, remove atomic oxygen from the surface and restore the catalytic properties. Results of the present study provide additional evidence that production of N{sub 2} is related to dissociation of adsorbed Rh-NO{sup {minus}} while production of N{sub 2}O is related to the presence of Rh(NO){sub 2}. The presence of reduced RH{sup 0} sites is necessary for the formation of both reduction products. In the absence of oxygen in the feed, surface isocyanate species are also observed under reaction conditions. Their formation requires the presence of adjacent Rh{sup 0}-CO and reduced Rh{sup 0} sites. Although these species are favored under conditions in which NO conversion to reduction products is observed, there is no evidence that they are catalytically active species.

  7. Identifying reaction intermediates and catalytic active sites through in situ characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Andrew J.; Lobo, Raul F

    2010-01-01

    This tutorial review centers on recent advances and applications of experimental techniques that help characterize surface species and catalyst structures under in situ conditions. We start by reviewing recent applications of IR spectroscopy of working catalysis, emphasizing newer approaches such as Sum Frequency Generation and Polarization Modulation-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. This is followed by a section on solid-state NMR spectroscopy for the detection of surface species and reaction intermediates. These two techniques provide information mainly about the concentration and identity of the prevalent surface species. The following sections center on methods that provide structural and chemical information about the catalyst surface. The increasingly important role of high-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in catalyst characterization is evident from the new and interesting information obtained on supported catalysts as presented in recent reports. X-Ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) is used increasingly under reaction conditions to great advantage, although is inherently limited to systems where the bulk of the species in the sample are surface species. However, the ability of X-rays to penetrate the sample has been used cleverly by a number of groups to understand how changing reaction conditions change the structure and composition of surface atoms on supported catalyst.

  8. Hollow spherical La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 perovskite oxide with enhanced catalytic activities for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fanliang; Sui, Jing; Su, Jianmin; Jin, Chao; Shen, Ming; Yang, Ruizhi

    2014-12-01

    A hollow spherical La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 (HS-LSM) perovskite oxide has been prepared using a new carbonate-template route, and characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM. SEM and TEM results show that the pre-prepared oxides consist of porous microspheres composed of submicrometer-sized subunits with a secondary particle diameter of ∼20-50 nm. The catalytic activity of the oxide for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M KOH solution has been studied using a rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE). In the ORR tests, a maximum cathodic current density of 6.4 mA cm-2 at -0.9 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) with 2500 rpm has been obtained, and the ORR mainly favors a direct four-electron pathway. The chronoamperometric test shows that the HS-LSM exhibits excellent stability for the ORR.

  9. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of magnetically recoverable palladium/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites and its catalytic applications in cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wenzhi; Zhang, Zhuqing; Zhuang, Peiyuan; Shen, Jianfeng; Ye, Mingxin

    2017-07-01

    A facile, green, economical approach was designed to deposit palladium nanoparticles on magnetic reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (Pd-Fe3O4/rGO) via a one-pot hydrothermal synthesis method. The prepared Pd-Fe3O4/rGO nanocomposites were thoroughly characterized by Transmission electron microscopy, Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Importantly, the highly efficient catalytic property of the as-obtained Pd-Fe3O4/rGO catalyst was demonstrated for the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction and Mizoroki-Heck coupling reaction. Significantly, the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions could be efficiently performed in an environmentally friendly aqueous solution with no need for further additives. Besides, the nanocomposites could be conveniently separated from reaction system with an external permanent magnet for recycling and the inherent catalytic activity of the nanocomposites did not exacerbate after six repeated applications.

  10. Octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-coated ionic liquid drops: Micro-reactors for homogenous catalytic reactions at designated interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoning; Cai, Yuguang

    2012-01-01

    An ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl) can assemble on prefabricated carboxylic acid-terminated chemical patterns on octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) film. The chemical pattern controls the position, shape and size of the IL on the surface. After the IL assembly - by incubating IL drops assembled on sample surface in an OTS silane vapor - an OTS layer was coated on the IL drop surface which encapsulated the IL drop. The OTS-coated capsule can exist stably under aqueous solution. The OTS coating protected the IL drops from being instantaneously dissolved by other solutions. We found that a homogenous catalyst (FeCl(3)) dissolved in [Bmim]Cl can be assembled together on the chemical patterns and subsequently encapsulated together with [Bmim]Cl by OTS coating. The pinhole defects within the vapor-coated silane layer provide space for the catalyst inside the capsule and reactants outside the capsule to meet and react. When the OTS-coated capsule containing a FeCl(3)/IL mixture was soaked under H(2)O(2) solution, the Fe(3+) ions catalyzed the decomposition reaction of hydrogen peroxide at the vapor-coated OTS-water interface. Since the shape and position of the interface is defined by the underneath chemical pattern, our findings show that the OTS-coated IL drops assembled on chemical patterns can be used as novel micro-reactors. This allows homogenous catalytic reactions to occur at the designated interfaces.

  11. [Studies on photo-electron-chemical catalytic degradation of the malachite green].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-yu; Diao, Zeng-hui; Song, Lin; Wang, Xin-le; Zhang, Yuan-ming

    2010-07-01

    A novel two-compartment photo-electro-chemical catalytic reactor was designed. The TiO2/Ti thin film electrode thermally formed was used as photo-anode, and graphite as cathode and a saturated calomel electrode (SCE) as the reference electrode in the reactor. The anode compartment and cathode compartment were connected with the ionic exchange membrane in this reactor. Effects of initial pH, initial concentration of malachite green and connective modes between the anode compartment and cathode compartment on the decolorization efficiency of malachite green were investigated. The degradation dynamics of malachite green was studied. Based on the change of UV-visible light spectrum, the degradation process of malachite green was discussed. The experimental results showed that, during the time of 120 min, the decolouring ratio of the malachite green was 97.7% when initial concentration of malachite green is 30 mg x L(-1) and initial pH is 3.0. The catalytic degradation of malachite green was a pseudo-first order reaction. In the degradation process of malachite green the azo bond cleavage and the conjugated system of malachite green were attacked by hydroxyl radical. Simultaneity, the aromatic ring was oxidized. Finally, malachite green was degraded into other small molecular compounds.

  12. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of 3,3'-diaryloxindoles as triarylmethanes with a chiral all-carbon quaternary center: phase-transfer-catalyzed S(N)Ar reaction.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Seiji; Koga, Kenta; Tokuda, Takashi; Yamamoto, Kenichiro; Maruoka, Keiji

    2014-06-10

    Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of unsymmetrical triarylmethanes with a chiral all-carbon quaternary center was achieved by using a chiral bifunctional quaternary phosphonium bromide catalyst in the S(N)Ar reaction of 3-aryloxindoles under phase-transfer conditions. The presence of a urea moiety in the chiral phase-transfer catalyst was important for obtaining high enantioselectivity in this reaction. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Asymmetric Catalytic aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman Reaction for the Synthesis of 3-Substituted-3-Aminooxindoles with Chiral Quaternary Carbon Centers

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fang-Le; Wei, Yin; Shi, Min; Pindi, Suresh; Li, Guigen

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric catalytic aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman (aza-MBH) reaction of isatin-derived ketimines with MVK has been established by using chiral amino and phosphino catalysts. The reaction resulted in biomedically important 3-substituted 3-amino-2-oxindoles in good yields (>80% for most cases) and excellent enantioselectivity (90–99%ee). Twenty-eight cases assembled with chiral quaternary stereogenic centers have been examined under convenient systems. PMID:23407608

  14. Asymmetric Ring-Opening Reactions of Aza- and Oxa-bicyclic Alkenes with Boronic Acids Using a Palladium/Zinc Co-catalytic System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jingchao; Zeng, Guangzhi; Yang, Fan; Xu, Jianbin; Sun, Weiqing; Shinde, Madhuri Vikas; Fan, Baomin

    2017-03-03

    The asymmetric ring opening reactions of bicyclic alkenes with boronic acids were accomplished by using a highly active palladium/zinc co-catalytic system that was suitable for both azabenzonorbornadienes and oxabenzonorbornadienes, which were transformed to the corresponding chiral hydronaphthalene products in high yields (up to 99%) and high optical purities (up to 98% ee). The reaction protocol is general and mild and displays good functional group tolerance.

  15. Molecular orbital studies of enzyme activity: catalytic mechanism of serine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Scheiner, S; Lipscomb, W N

    1976-01-01

    The catalytic activity of the serine proteinases is studied using molecular orbital methods on a model of the enzyme-substrate complex. A mechanism is employed in which Ser-195, upon donating a proton to the His-57-Asp-102 dyad, attacks the substrate to form the tetrahedral intermediate. As His-57 then donates a proton to the leaving group, the intermediate decomposes to the acyl enzyme. An analogous process takes place during deacylation, as a water molecule takes the place of Ser-195 as the nucleophile. The motility of the histidine is found to be an important factor in both steps. An attempt is made to include the effects of those atoms not explicitly included in the calculations and to compare the reaction rate of the proposed mechanism with that of the uncatalyzed hydrolysis. This mechanism is found to be in good agreement with structural and kinetic data. PMID:1061145

  16. Fe-complex of a tetraamido macrocyclic ligand: Spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Shane Z.; Ghosh, Anindya; Biris, Alexandru S.; Pulla, Sharon; Brezden, Anna M.; Collom, Samulel L.; Woods, Ross M.; Munshi, Pradip; Schnackenberg, Laura; Pierce, Brad S.; Kannarpady, Ganesh K.

    2010-10-01

    This work presents the spectroscopic characterization and reaction studies of a Fe III-complex (2) of a tetraamido macrocyclic ligand (1, 15,15-dimethyl-5,8,13,17-tetrahydro-5,8,13,17-tetraaza-dibenzo[a,g]cyclotridecene-6,7,14,16-tetraone). 2 was characterized primarily by means of EPR. In agreement with the magnetic moment ( μeff = 3.87 BM), EPR spectroscopy of 2 shows signals consistent with S = 3/2 intermediate-spin ferric-iron. Besides EPR, mass spectrometry, UV/vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used to further characterize 2. 2 is soluble in water and activates hydrogen peroxide under ambient conditions. 2 catalytically bleaches dyes, pulp and paper effluents and oxidizes several amines to their corresponding N-oxides with high turnover number and good yields.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the HIV-1 Integrase Catalytic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Briggs, J. M.; Straatsma, TP; Carlson, Heather A.; Greenwald, Jason; Choe, Senyon; Mccammon, Andy

    1999-06-30

    The HIV-1 integrase, which is essential for viral replication, catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the host chromosome, thereby recruiting host cell machinery into making viral proteins. It represents the third main HIV enzyme target for inhibitor design, the first two being the reverse transcriptase and the protease. Two 1-ns molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out on completely hydrated models of the HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain, one with no metal ions and another with one magnesium ion in the catalytic site. The simulations predict that the region of the active site that is missing in the published crystal structures has (at the time of this work) more secondary structure than previously thought. The flexibility of this region has been discussed with respect to the mechanistic function of the enzyme. The results of these simulations will be used as part of inhibitor design projects directed against the catalytic domain of the enzyme.

  18. Experimental Study of Serpentinization Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Brearley, A. J.; Ganguly, J.; Liermann, H.-P.; Keil, K.

    2004-01-01

    Current carbonaceous chondrite parent-body thermal models [1-3] produce scenarios that are inconsistent with constraints on aqueous alteration conditions based on meteorite mineralogical evidence, such as phase stability relationships within the meteorite matrix minerals [4] and isotope equilibration arguments [5, 6]. This discrepancy arises principally because of the thermal runaway effect produced by silicate hydration reactions (here loosely called serpentinization, as the principal products are serpentine minerals), which are so exothermic as to produce more than enough heat to melt more ice and provide a self-sustaining chain reaction. One possible way to dissipate the heat of reaction is to use a very small parent body [e.g., 2] or possibly a rubble pile model. Another possibility is to release this heat more slowly, which depends on the alteration reaction path and kinetics.

  19. Studies on green and efficient catalytic oxidation of a triazole compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Liu, Y. C.; Huang, K. H.; Chai, T.; Wang, J. H.; Yu, Y. W.; Yuan, J. M.; Chang, S. J.; Guo, J. H.; Zhang, J.

    2016-07-01

    1-Methyl-3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole is an insensitive energetic compound that can be prepared by oxidizing the nitrate salt of 1-methylguanazole. The influence of the reaction time, reaction temperature, reactant ratio, feeding method and catalytic oxidation method on the yield were discussed. The results show that the optimum reaction conditions are as follows: mass ratio of sodium tungstate to nitrate salt to 1-methylguanazole, 4:4.4; time, 5.5h; and temperature, 65-75°C. The yield of this oxidation reaction reached 51.36%.

  20. The effects of exfoliation, organic solvents and anodic activation on the catalytic hydrogen evolution reaction of tungsten disulfide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanglian; Benson, John; Dawson, Craig; Strudwick, Andrew; Raju, Arun Prakash Aranga; Han, Yisong; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2017-09-21

    The rational design of transition metal dichalcogenide electrocatalysts for efficiently catalyzing the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is believed to lead to the generation of a renewable energy carrier. To this end, our work has made three main contributions. At first, we have demonstrated that exfoliation via ionic liquid assisted grinding combined with gradient centrifugation is an efficient method to exfoliate bulk WS2 to nanosheets with a thickness of a few atomic layers and lateral size dimensions in the range of 100 nm to 2 nm. These WS2 nanosheets decorated with scattered nanodots exhibited highly enhanced catalytic performance for HER with an onset potential of -130 mV vs. RHE, an overpotential of 337 mV at 10 mA cm(-2) and a Tafel slope of 80 mV dec(-1) in 0.5 M H2SO4. Secondly, we found a strong aging effect on the electrocatalytic performance of WS2 stored in high boiling point organic solvents such as dimethylformamide (DMF). Importantly, the HER ability could be recovered by removing the organic (DMF) residues, which obstructed the electron transport, with acetone. Thirdly, we established that the HER performance of WS2 nanosheets/nanodots could be significantly enhanced by activating the electrode surface at a positive voltage for a very short time (60 s), decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 80 mV at 10 mA cm(-2). The performance enhancement was found to arise primarily from the ability of a formed proton-intercalated amorphous tungsten trioxide (a-WO3) to provide additional active sites and favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the WS2 catalyst, rendering it more favorable for local proton delivery and/or transport to the active edge site of WS2. Our results provide new insights into the effects of organic solvents and electrochemical activation on the catalytic performance of two-dimensional WS2 for HER.

  1. Structural Basis on the Catalytic Reaction Mechanism of Novel 1,2-Alpha L-Fucosidase (AFCA) From Bifidobacterium Bifidum

    SciTech Connect

    Nagae, M.; Tsuchiya, A.; Katayama, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Wakatsuki, S.; Kato, R.

    2009-06-03

    1,2-alpha-L-fucosidase (AfcA), which hydrolyzes the glycosidic linkage of Fucalpha1-2Gal via an inverting mechanism, was recently isolated from Bifidobacterium bifidum and classified as the first member of the novel glycoside hydrolase family 95. To better understand the molecular mechanism of this enzyme, we determined the x-ray crystal structures of the AfcA catalytic (Fuc) domain in unliganded and complexed forms with deoxyfuconojirimycin (inhibitor), 2'-fucosyllactose (substrate), and L-fucose and lactose (products) at 1.12-2.10 A resolution. The AfcA Fuc domain is composed of four regions, an N-terminal beta region, a helical linker, an (alpha/alpha)6 helical barrel domain, and a C-terminal beta region, and this arrangement is similar to bacterial phosphorylases. In the complex structures, the ligands were buried in the central cavity of the helical barrel domain. Structural analyses in combination with mutational experiments revealed that the highly conserved Glu566 probably acts as a general acid catalyst. However, no carboxylic acid residue is found at the appropriate position for a general base catalyst. Instead, a water molecule stabilized by Asn423 in the substrate-bound complex is suitably located to perform a nucleophilic attack on the C1 atom of L-fucose moiety in 2'-fucosyllactose, and its location is nearly identical near the O1 atom of beta-L-fucose in the products-bound complex. Based on these data, we propose and discuss a novel catalytic reaction mechanism of AfcA.

  2. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification.

    PubMed

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-09-19

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H₂ to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H₂, CO and CO₂. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H₂O, CO₂ and H₂. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H₂ and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H₂ and compressed CO₂ ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H₂ permeance and purity, high CH₄ conversion levels and reduced CO yields.

  3. Fuel-rich, catalytic reaction experimental results. [fuel development for high-speed civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollbuhler, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine combustion requirements call for operating at very high inlet temperatures, pressures, and large temperature rises. At the same time, the combustion process is to have minimum pollution effects on the environment. Aircraft gas turbine engines utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels which are difficult to uniformly atomize and mix with combustion air. An approach for minimizing fuel related problems is to transform the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the completion of the combustion process. Experimentally obtained results are presented for vaporizing and partially oxidizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into burnable gaseous components. The presented experimental data show that 1200 to 1300 K reaction product gas, rich in hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and light-end hydrocarbons, is formed when flowing 0.3 to 0.6 fuel to air mixes through a catalyst reactor. The reaction temperatures are kept low enough that nitrogen oxides and carbon particles (soot) do not form. Results are reported for tests using different catalyst types and configurations, mass flowrates, input temperatures, and fuel to air ratios.

  4. Fuel-rich, catalytic reaction experimental results. [fuel development for high-speed civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollbuhler, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine combustion requirements call for operating at very high inlet temperatures, pressures, and large temperature rises. At the same time, the combustion process is to have minimum pollution effects on the environment. Aircraft gas turbine engines utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels which are difficult to uniformly atomize and mix with combustion air. An approach for minimizing fuel related problems is to transform the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the completion of the combustion process. Experimentally obtained results are presented for vaporizing and partially oxidizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into burnable gaseous components. The presented experimental data show that 1200 to 1300 K reaction product gas, rich in hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and light-end hydrocarbons, is formed when flowing 0.3 to 0.6 fuel to air mixes through a catalyst reactor. The reaction temperatures are kept low enough that nitrogen oxides and carbon particles (soot) do not form. Results are reported for tests using different catalyst types and configurations, mass flowrates, input temperatures, and fuel to air ratios.

  5. Lewis base activation of Lewis acids: catalytic, enantioselective vinylogous aldol addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R

    2007-07-20

    The generality of Lewis base catalyzed, Lewis acid mediated, enantioselective vinylogous aldol addition reactions has been investigated. The combination of silicon tetrachloride and chiral phosphoramides is a competent catalyst for highly selective additions of a variety of alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone-, 1,3-diketone-, and alpha,beta-unsaturated amide-derived dienolates to aldehydes. These reactions provided high levels of gamma-site selectivity for a variety of substitution patterns on the dienyl unit. Both ketone- and morpholine amide-derived dienol ethers afforded high enantio- and diastereoselectivity in the addition to conjugated aldehydes. Although alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone-derived dienolate did not react with aliphatic aldehydes, alpha,beta-unsaturated amide-derived dienolates underwent addition at reasonable rates affording high yields of vinylogous aldol product. The enantioselectivities achieved with the morpholine derived-dienolate in the addition to aliphatic aldehydes was the highest afforded to date with the silicon tetrachloride-chiral phosphoramide system. Furthermore, the ability to cleanly convert the morpholine amide to a methyl ketone was demonstrated.

  6. Computational Studies on Cinchona Alkaloid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Organic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tanriver, Gamze; Dedeoglu, Burcu; Catak, Saron; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2016-06-21

    Remarkable progress in the area of asymmetric organocatalysis has been achieved in the last decades. Cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives have emerged as powerful organocatalysts owing to their reactivities leading to high enantioselectivities. The widespread usage of cinchona alkaloids has been attributed to their nontoxicity, ease of use, stability, cost effectiveness, recyclability, and practical utilization in industry. The presence of tunable functional groups enables cinchona alkaloids to catalyze a broad range of reactions. Excellent experimental studies have extensively contributed to this field, and highly selective reactions were catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives. Computational modeling has helped elucidate the mechanistic aspects of cinchona alkaloid catalyzed reactions as well as the origins of the selectivity they induce. These studies have complemented experimental work for the design of more efficient catalysts. This Account presents recent computational studies on cinchona alkaloid catalyzed organic reactions and the theoretical rationalizations behind their effectiveness and ability to induce selectivity. Valuable efforts to investigate the mechanisms of reactions catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and the key aspects of the catalytic activity of cinchona alkaloids in reactions ranging from pharmaceutical to industrial applications are summarized. Quantum mechanics, particularly density functional theory (DFT), and molecular mechanics, including ONIOM, were used to rationalize experimental findings by providing mechanistic insights into reaction mechanisms. B3LYP with modest basis sets has been used in most of the studies; nonetheless, the energetics have been corrected with higher basis sets as well as functionals parametrized to include dispersion M05-2X, M06-2X, and M06-L and functionals with dispersion corrections. Since cinchona alkaloids catalyze reactions by forming complexes with substrates via hydrogen bonds and long

  7. Study of nitric oxide catalytic oxidation on manganese oxides-loaded activated carbon at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Fu-Tian; Yu, Guang-Wei; Wang, Yin; Xing, Zhen-Jiao; Liu, Xue-Jiao; Li, Jie

    2017-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an air pollutant that is difficult to remove at low concentration and low temperature. Manganese oxides (MnOx)-loaded activated carbon (MLAC) was prepared by a co-precipitation method and studied as a new catalyst for NO oxidation at low temperature. Characterization of MLAC included X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N2 adsorption/desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Activity tests demonstrated the influence of the amount of MnOx and the test conditions on the reaction. MLAC with 7.5 wt.% MnOx (MLAC003) exhibits the highest NO conversion (38.7%) at 1000 ppm NO, 20 vol.% O2, room temperature and GHSV ca. 16000 h-1. The NO conversion of MLAC003 was elevated by 26% compared with that of activated carbon. The results of the MLAC003 activity test under different test conditions demonstrated that NO conversion is also influenced by inlet NO concentration, inlet O2 concentration, reaction temperature and GHSV. The NO adsorption-desorption process in micropores of activated carbon is fundamental to NO oxidation, which can be controlled by pore structure and reaction temperature. The activity elevation caused by MnOx loading is assumed to be related to Mn4+/Mn3+ ratio. Finally, a mechanism of NO catalytic oxidation on MLAC based on NO adsorption-desorption and MnOx lattice O transfer is proposed.

  8. A biosynthetic thiolase in complex with a reaction intermediate: the crystal structure provides new insights into the catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Modis, Y; Wierenga, R K

    1999-10-15

    Thiolases are ubiquitous and form a large family of dimeric or tetrameric enzymes with a conserved, five-layered alphabetaalphabetaalpha catalytic domain. Thiolases can function either degradatively, in the beta-oxidation pathway of fatty acids, or biosynthetically. Biosynthetic thiolases catalyze the biological Claisen condensation of two molecules of acetyl-CoA to form acetoacetyl-CoA. This is one of the fundamental categories of carbon skeletal assembly patterns in biological systems and is the first step in a wide range of biosynthetic pathways, including those that generate cholesterol, steroid hormones, and various energy-storage molecules. The crystal structure of the tetrameric biosynthetic thiolase from Zoogloea ramigera has been determined at 2.0 A resolution. The structure contains a striking and novel 'cage-like' tetramerization motif, which allows for some hinge motion of the two tight dimers with respect to each other. The protein crystals were flash-frozen after a short soak with the enzyme's substrate, acetoacetyl-CoA. A reaction intermediate was thus trapped: the enzyme tetramer is acetylated at Cys89 and has a CoA molecule bound in each of its active-site pockets. The shape of the substrate-binding pocket reveals the basis for the short-chain substrate specificity of the enzyme. The active-site architecture, and in particular the position of the covalently attached acetyl group, allow a more detailed reaction mechanism to be proposed in which Cys378 is involved in both steps of the reaction. The structure also suggests an important role for the thioester oxygen atom of the acetylated enzyme in catalysis.

  9. The effect of defects on the catalytic activity of single Au atom supported carbon nanotubes and reaction mechanism for CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sajjad; Fu Liu, Tian; Lian, Zan; Li, Bo; Sheng Su, Dang

    2017-08-23

    The mechanism of CO oxidation by O2 on a single Au atom supported on pristine, mono atom vacancy (m), di atom vacancy (di) and the Stone Wales defect (SW) on single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) surface is systematically investigated theoretically using density functional theory. We determine that single Au atoms can be trapped effectively by the defects on SWCNTs. The defects on SWCNTs can enhance both the binding strength and catalytic activity of the supported single Au atom. Fundamental aspects such as adsorption energy and charge transfer are elucidated to analyze the adsorption properties of CO and O2 and co-adsorption of CO and O2 molecules. It is found that CO binds stronger than O2 on Au supported SWCNT. We clearly demonstrate that the defected SWCNT surface promotes electron transfer from the supported single Au atom to O2 molecules. On the other hand, this effect is weaker for pristine SWCNTs. It is observed that the high density of spin-polarized states are localized in the region of the Fermi level due to the strong interactions between Au (5d orbital) and the adjacent carbon (2p orbital) atoms, which influence the catalytic performance. In addition, we elucidate both the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms of CO oxidation by O2. For the LH pathway, the barriers of the rate-limiting step are calculated to be 0.02 eV and 0.05 eV for Au/m-SWCNT and Au/di-SWCNT, respectively. To regenerate the active sites, an ER-like reaction occurs to form a second CO2 molecule. The ER pathway is observed on Au/m-SWCNT, Au/SW-SWCNT and Au/SWCNT in which the Au/m-SWCNT has a smaller barrier. The comparison with a previous study (Lu et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2009, 113, 20156-20160.) indicates that the curvature effect of SWCNTs is important for the catalytic property of the supported single Au. Overall, Au/m-SWCNT is identified as the most active catalyst for CO oxidation compared to pristine SWCNT, SW-SWCNT and di-SWCNT. Our findings give a clear

  10. Electron transfer properties and catalytic competence of cytochrome b5 in the fusion protein Hmwb5-EGFP in reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P450 3A4.

    PubMed

    Yantsevich, A V; Gilep, A A; Usanov, S A

    2009-08-01

    In the present paper we describe studies on molecular mechanisms of protein-protein interactions between cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and cytochrome b(5), the latter being incorporated into the artificial recombinant protein Hmwb(5)-EGFP containing full-length cytochrome b(5) (functional module) and a mutant form of the green fluorescent protein EGFP (signal module) fused into a single polypeptide chain. It is shown that cytochrome b(5) within the fusion protein Hmwb(5)-EGFP can be reduced by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase in the presence of NADPH, the rate of reduction being dependent on solution ionic strength, indicating that the signal module does not prevent the interaction of the flavo- and hemeproteins. Interaction of cytochrome P450 3A4 and Hmwb(5)-EGFP was estimated based on spin equilibrium shift of cytochrome P450 3A4 to high-spin state in the presence of Hmwb(5)-EGFP, as well as based on steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of the EGFP component of the fusion protein in the presence of CYP3A4. The engineering of chimeric protein Hmwb(5)-EGFP gives an independent method to determine dissociation constant for the complex of cytochrome P450 and cytochrome b(5) that is less sensitive to environmental factors compared to spectrophotometric titration used before. Reconstitution of catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 3A4 in the reaction of testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation in the presence of Hmwb(5)-EGFP indicates that cytochrome b(5) in the fusion protein is able to stimulate the hydroxylation reaction. Using other fusion proteins containing either cytochrome b(5) or its hydrophilic domain to reconstitute catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 3A4 showed that the hydrophobic domain of cytochrome b(5) participates not only in hemeprotein interaction, but also in electron transfer from cytochrome b(5) to cytochrome P450.

  11. Trend in the Catalytic Activity of Transition Metals for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Shelton Jr, William Allison; Xu, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the intrinsic activity of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ir, and Ru for the oxygen reduction reaction by Li (Li-ORR) forms a volcano-like trend with respect to the adsorption energy of oxygen, with Pt and Pd being the most active. The trend is based on two mechanisms: the reduction of molecular O{sub 2} on Au and Ag and of atomic O on the remaining metals. Step edges are found to be more active for catalyzing the Li-ORR than close-packed surfaces. Our findings identify important considerations in the design of catalyst-promoted air cathodes for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

  12. Trends in the Catalytic Activity of Transition Metals for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by Lithium.

    PubMed

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Shelton, William A; Xu, Ye

    2012-04-05

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the intrinsic activity of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ir, and Ru for the oxygen reduction reaction by Li (Li-ORR) forms a volcano-like trend with respect to the adsorption energy of oxygen, with Pt and Pd being the most active. The trend is based on two mechanisms: the reduction of molecular O2 on Au and Ag and of atomic O on the remaining metals. Step edges are found to be more active for catalyzing the Li-ORR than close-packed surfaces. Our findings identify important considerations in the design of catalyst-promoted air cathodes for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

  13. Compartmentalization and Cell Division through Molecular Discreteness and Crowding in a Catalytic Reaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Atsushi; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Explanation of the emergence of primitive cellular structures from a set of chemical reactions is necessary to unveil the origin of life and to experimentally synthesize protocells. By simulating a cellular automaton model with a two-species hypercycle, we demonstrate the reproduction of a localized cluster; that is, a protocell with a growth-division process emerges when the replication and degradation speeds of one species are respectively slower than those of the other species, because of overcrowding of molecules as a natural outcome of the replication. The protocell exhibits synchrony between its division process and replication of the minority molecule. We discuss the effects of the crowding molecule on the formation of primitive structures. The generality of this result is demonstrated through the extension of our model to a hypercycle with three molecular species, where a localized layered structure of molecules continues to divide, triggered by the replication of a minority molecule at the center. PMID:25370530

  14. Catalytic Activity of Platinum Monolayer on Iridium and Rhenium Alloy Nanoparticles for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karan, Hiroko I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Kuttiyiel, Kurian; Farberow, Carrie A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2012-05-04

    A new type of electrocatalyst with a core–shell structure that consists of a platinum monolayer shell placed on an iridium–rhenium nanoparticle core or platinum and palladium bilayer shell deposited on that core has been prepared and tested for electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Carbon-supported iridium–rhenium alloy nanoparticles with several different molar ratios of Ir to Re were prepared by reducing metal chlorides dispersed on Vulcan carbon with hydrogen gas at 400 °C for 1 h. These catalysts showed specific electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction comparable to that of platinum. The activities of PtML/PdML/Ir2Re1, PtML/Pd2layers/Ir2Re1, and PtML/Pd2layers/Ir7Re3 catalysts were, in fact, better than that of conventional platinum electrocatalysts, and their mass activities exceeded the 2015 DOE target. Our density functional theory calculations revealed that the molar ratio of Ir to Re affects the binding strength of adsorbed OH and, thereby, the O2 reduction activity of the catalysts. The maximum specific activity was found for an intermediate OH binding energy with the corresponding catalyst on the top of the volcano plot. The monolayer concept facilitates the use of much less platinum than in other approaches. Finally, the results with the PtML/PdML/Ir2Re electrocatalyst indicate that it is a promising alternative to conventional Pt electrocatalysts in low-temperature fuel cells.

  15. Unstable Reaction Intermediates and Hysteresis during the Catalytic Cycle of 5-Aminolevulinate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Stojanovski, Bosko M.; Hunter, Gregory A.; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Ferreira, Gloria C.

    2014-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinate (ALA), an essential metabolite in all heme-synthesizing organisms, results from the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymatic condensation of glycine with succinyl-CoA in non-plant eukaryotes and α-proteobacteria. The predicted chemical mechanism of this ALA synthase (ALAS)-catalyzed reaction includes a short-lived glycine quinonoid intermediate and an unstable 2-amino-3-ketoadipate intermediate. Using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to analyze the products from the reaction of murine erythroid ALAS (mALAS2) with O-methylglycine and succinyl-CoA, we directly identified the chemical nature of the inherently unstable 2-amino-3-ketoadipate intermediate, which predicates the glycine quinonoid species as its precursor. With stopped-flow absorption spectroscopy, we detected and confirmed the formation of the quinonoid intermediate upon reacting glycine with ALAS. Significantly, in the absence of the succinyl-CoA substrate, the external aldimine predominates over the glycine quinonoid intermediate. When instead of glycine, l-serine was reacted with ALAS, a lag phase was observed in the progress curve for the l-serine external aldimine formation, indicating a hysteretic behavior in ALAS. Hysteresis was not detected in the T148A-catalyzed l-serine external aldimine formation. These results with T148A, a mALAS2 variant, which, in contrast to wild-type mALAS2, is active with l-serine, suggest that active site Thr-148 modulates ALAS strict amino acid substrate specificity. The rate of ALA release is also controlled by a hysteretic kinetic mechanism (observed as a lag in the ALA external aldimine formation progress curve), consistent with conformational changes governing the dissociation of ALA from ALAS. PMID:24920668

  16. Molecular beam mass spectrometer equipped with a catalytic wall reactor for in situ studies in high temperature catalysis research

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, R.; Ihmann, K.; Ihmann, J.; Jentoft, F.C.; Geske, M.; Taha, A.; Pelzer, K.; Schloegl, R.

    2006-05-15

    A newly developed apparatus combining a molecular beam mass spectrometer and a catalytic wall reactor is described. The setup has been developed for in situ studies of high temperature catalytic reactions (>1000 deg. C), which involve besides surface reactions also gas phase reactions in their mechanism. The goal is to identify gas phase radicals by threshold ionization. A tubular reactor, made from the catalytic material, is positioned in a vacuum chamber. Expansion of the gas through a 100 {mu}m sampling orifice in the reactor wall into differentially pumped nozzle, skimmer, and collimator chambers leads to the formation of a molecular beam. A quadrupole mass spectrometer with electron impact ion source designed for molecular beam inlet and threshold ionization measurements is used as the analyzer. The sampling time from nozzle to detector is estimated to be less than 10 ms. A detection time resolution of up to 20 ms can be reached. The temperature of the reactor is measured by pyrometry. Besides a detailed description of the setup components and the physical background of the method, this article presents measurements showing the performance of the apparatus. After deriving the shape and width of the energy spread of the ionizing electrons from measurements on N{sub 2} and He we estimated the detection limit in threshold ionization measurements using binary mixtures of CO in N{sub 2} to be in the range of several hundreds of ppm. Mass spectra and threshold ionization measurements recorded during catalytic partial oxidation of methane at 1250 deg. C on a Pt catalyst are presented. The detection of CH{sub 3}{center_dot} radicals is successfully demonstrated.

  17. Molecular beam mass spectrometer equipped with a catalytic wall reactor for in situ studies in high temperature catalysis research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, R.; Ihmann, K.; Ihmann, J.; Jentoft, F. C.; Geske, M.; Taha, A.; Pelzer, K.; Schlögl, R.

    2006-05-01

    A newly developed apparatus combining a molecular beam mass spectrometer and a catalytic wall reactor is described. The setup has been developed for in situ studies of high temperature catalytic reactions (>1000°C), which involve besides surface reactions also gas phase reactions in their mechanism. The goal is to identify gas phase radicals by threshold ionization. A tubular reactor, made from the catalytic material, is positioned in a vacuum chamber. Expansion of the gas through a 100μm sampling orifice in the reactor wall into differentially pumped nozzle, skimmer, and collimator chambers leads to the formation of a molecular beam. A quadrupole mass spectrometer with electron impact ion source designed for molecular beam inlet and threshold ionization measurements is used as the analyzer. The sampling time from nozzle to detector is estimated to be less than 10ms. A detection time resolution of up to 20ms can be reached. The temperature of the reactor is measured by pyrometry. Besides a detailed description of the setup components and the physical background of the method, this article presents measurements showing the performance of the apparatus. After deriving the shape and width of the energy spread of the ionizing electrons from measurements on N2 and He we estimated the detection limit in threshold ionization measurements using binary mixtures of CO in N2 to be in the range of several hundreds of ppm. Mass spectra and threshold ionization measurements recorded during catalytic partial oxidation of methane at 1250°C on a Pt catalyst are presented. The detection of CH3• radicals is successfully demonstrated.

  18. Precisely Controllable Core-Shell Ag@Carbon Dots Nanoparticles: Application to in Situ Super-Sensitive Monitoring of Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Zhu, Shoujun; Song, Yubin; Zhao, Hongyue; Zhang, Zhen; Guo, Yue; Li, Junbo; Song, Wei; Yang, Bai; Zhao, Bing

    2016-10-10

    Carbon dots (CDs) have attracted extensive interest owing to their unparalleled physical and chemical characteristics. CDs based nanocomposites have also drawn increasing attention because the combination of different characteristics could offer additional brilliant properties (such as photocatalysis and Raman scattering). In this work, we developed a fast, facile, and controllable method for fabricating core-shell Ag@CDs nanoparticles (NPs) based on the ability of CDs to directly reduce Ag(+) to Ag NPs without an external photoirradiation process or additional reductants. The as-prepared Ag@CDs NPs caused efficient CDs fluorescence quenching, and the typical bands of carbon species were obtained in the Raman spectrum of CDs. In addition, we found that the Ag@CDs NPs could be utilized as an efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate, showing a discernible detection concentration as low as 10(-8) M by using p-aminothiophenol (PATP) as the probe molecules. The as-prepared Ag@CDs NPs used as the SERS substrate also exhibited excellent peroxidase-like catalytic activity for in situ super-sensitive monitoring of the oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine by H2O2, a plasmon-enhanced driven photocatalytic reaction of p-nitrothiophenol (PNTP) dimerizing into 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene, and catalytic driven reduction of PNTP to PATP in the presence of NaBH4 in real time. Moreover, the determination of H2O2 with a significantly lower discernible detection concentration was obtained. This work demonstrated that the hybrid nanostructures not only exhibited unique SERS properties but also showed excellent catalytic activities, especially as an ultrasensitive SERS substrate for monitoring heterogeneous catalytic reactions in real time. This would make it possible to not only obtain the information about catalytic molecular changes but also conduct quantitative and qualitative analysis, and widen the application of CDs in SERS and catalytic reactions.

  19. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  20. Fundamental mechanisms and reactions in non-catalytic subcritical hydrothermal processes: A review.

    PubMed

    Yousefifar, Azadeh; Baroutian, Saeid; Farid, Mohammed M; Gapes, Daniel J; Young, Brent R

    2017-10-15

    The management and disposal of solid waste is of increasing concern across the globe. Hydrothermal processing of sludge has been suggested as a promising solution to deal with the considerable amounts of sludge produced worldwide. Such a process not only degrades organic compounds and reduces waste volume, but also provides an opportunity to recover valuable substances. Hydrothermal processing comprises two main sub-processes: wet oxidation (WO) and thermal hydrolysis (TH), in which the formation of various free radicals results in the production of different intermediates. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs), especially acetic acid, are usually the main intermediates which remain as a by-product of the process. This paper aims to review the fundamental mechanism for hydrothermal processing of sludge, and the formation of different free radicals and intermediates therein. In addition, the proposed kinetic models for the two processes (WO and TH) from the literature are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of each model are outlined. The effect of mass transfer as a critical component of the design and development of the processes, which has been neglected in most of these proposed models, is also reviewed, and the effect of influencing parameters on the processes' controlling step (reaction or mass transfer) is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. From biodiversity to catalytic diversity: how to control the reaction mechanism by the nature of metallophytes.

    PubMed

    Escande, Vincent; Olszewski, Tomasz K; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Phytoextraction is widely used for the reclamation of degraded sites, particularly to remove trace metals from contaminated soils. Whereas this technique demonstrates several advantages, the biomass resulting from phytoextraction processes is highly enriched in metallic elements and constitutes therefore a problematic waste. We show here that this biomass can be used for the preparation of novel polymetallic extracts, with high potential as catalysts or reagents in organic synthesis. This new concept of ecocatalysis constitutes an innovative recycling of metallic elements whose current known reserves could be exhausted in the coming decades. The ecocatalysts Eco-Zn and Eco-Ni prepared respectively from Zn and Ni hyperaccumulating plants display two distinct chemical reactivities, starting from the same substrates. Eco-Zn led to the formation of esters of commercial interest for the fragrance industry, following a hydro-acyloxy-addition reaction pathway. In contrast, Eco-Ni afforded chlorinated products thank to the hydrochlorination of alkenes. Both ecocatalysts allowed the synthesis of valuable products in high yields through methodologies in line with the spirit of sustainable chemistry.

  2. Study on the NO removal efficiency of the lignite pyrolysis coke catalyst by selective catalytic oxidation method

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xin; Ma, Zhenhua; Zhang, Lei; Sha, Xiangling; He, Huibin; Zeng, Tianyou; Wang, Yusu; Chen, Jihao

    2017-01-01

    Selective catalytic oxidation (SCO) method is commonly used in wet denitration technology; NO after the catalytic oxidation can be removed with SO2 together by wet method. Among the SCO denitration catalysts, pyrolysis coke is favored by the advantages of low cost and high catalytic activity. In this paper, SCO method combined with pyrolysis coke catalyst was used to remove NO from flue gas. The effects of different SCO operating conditions and different pyrolysis coke catalyst made under different process conditions were studied. Besides, the specific surface area of the catalyst and functional groups were analyzed with surface area analyzer and Beohm titration. The results are: (1) The optimum operating conditions of SCO is as follows: the reaction temperature is 150°C and the oxygen content is 6%. (2) The optimum pyrolysis coke catalyst preparation processes are as follows: the pyrolysis final temperature is 750°C, and the heating rate is 44°C / min. (3) The characterization analysis can be obtained: In the denitration reaction, the basic functional groups and the phenolic hydroxyl groups of the catalyst play a major role while the specific surface area not. PMID:28793346

  3. Study on the NO removal efficiency of the lignite pyrolysis coke catalyst by selective catalytic oxidation method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Wen, Xin; Ma, Zhenhua; Zhang, Lei; Sha, Xiangling; He, Huibin; Zeng, Tianyou; Wang, Yusu; Chen, Jihao

    2017-01-01

    Selective catalytic oxidation (SCO) method is commonly used in wet denitration technology; NO after the catalytic oxidation can be removed with SO2 together by wet method. Among the SCO denitration catalysts, pyrolysis coke is favored by the advantages of low cost and high catalytic activity. In this paper, SCO method combined with pyrolysis coke catalyst was used to remove NO from flue gas. The effects of different SCO operating conditions and different pyrolysis coke catalyst made under different process conditions were studied. Besides, the specific surface area of the catalyst and functional groups were analyzed with surface area analyzer and Beohm titration. The results are: (1) The optimum operating conditions of SCO is as follows: the reaction temperature is 150°C and the oxygen content is 6%. (2) The optimum pyrolysis coke catalyst preparation processes are as follows: the pyrolysis final temperature is 750°C, and the heating rate is 44°C / min. (3) The characterization analysis can be obtained: In the denitration reaction, the basic functional groups and the phenolic hydroxyl groups of the catalyst play a major role while the specific surface area not.

  4. Study of flame quenching and near-wall combustion of lean burn fuel-air mixture in a catalytically activated spark-ignited lean burn engine

    SciTech Connect

    Nedunchezhian, N.; Dhandapani, S.

    2006-01-01

    A study of the catalytic activation of charge near the combustion chamber wall and of the flame quenching phenomenon was carried out to identify whether flame quenches due to catalytic activation or due to thermal quenching. It was found that (1) the diffusion rate of fuel into the boundary sublayer limits the catalytic surface reaction rate during combustion; (2) the results of the present flame quench model indicate that the flame quenches due to the heat loss to walls, and the depletion of fuel due to the catalyst coated on the combustion chamber walls does not affect flame quenching; (3) the catalysts coated on the combustion chamber surface do not contribute increased hydrocarbon emissions, but actually reduce them; (4) each catalyst has a specific surface temperature, at which the Damkoehler number for surface reaction is unity.

  5. A dual arylboronic acid--aminothiourea catalytic system for the asymmetric intramolecular hetero-Michael reaction of α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Takumi; Murata, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Takemoto, Yoshiji

    2014-08-15

    A bifunctional aminoboronic acid has been used to facilitate for the first time the intramolecular aza- and oxa-Michael reactions of α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids. The combination of an arylboronic acid with a chiral aminothiourea allowed for these reactions to proceed successfully in an enantioselective manner to afford the desired heterocycles in high yields and ee's (up to 96% ee). The overall utility of this dual catalytic system was demonstrated by a one-pot enantioselective synthesis of (+)-erythrococcamide B, which proceeded via sequential Michael and amidation reactions.

  6. Catalytic enantioselective aza-Diels-Alder reactions of unactivated acyclic 1,3-dienes with aryl-, alkenyl-, and alkyl-substituted imines.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yasuo; Nantaku, Shuuto; Nishimura, Yuhki; Otsuka, Tomoyuki; Sekikaw, Tohru

    2017-08-08

    A catalytic enantioselective aza-Diels-Alder reaction of unactivated acyclic dienes with aryl-, alkenyl-, and alkyl-substituted imines is described. With 5-10 mol% loadings of a new Brønsted acid catalyst, the aza-Diels-Alder reaction of unactivated acyclic dienes proceeded to give the corresponding aza-Diels-Alder adducts in high yields (up to 98%) with excellent enantioselectivity (up to 98% ee). Preliminary DFT calculations suggest that the reaction proceeds through a chiral ion pair intermediate.

  7. Carboxylic acid-grafted mesoporous material and its high catalytic activity in one-pot three-component coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Ruth; Bhaumik, Asim; Dutta, Saikat

    2014-11-01

    A new carboxylic acid functionalized mesoporous organic polymer has been synthesized via in situ radical polymerization of divinylbenzene and acrylic acid using a mesoporous silica as a seed during the polymerization process under solvothermal conditions. The mesoporous material MPDVAA-1 has been thoroughly characterized employing powder XRD, solid state {sup 13}C cross polarization magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance, FT-IR spectroscopy, N{sub 2} sorption, HR-TEM, and NH{sub 3} temperature programmed desorption-thermal conductivity detector (TPD-TCD) analysis to understand its porosity, chemical environment, bonding, and surface properties. The mesoporous polymer was used as a catalyst for a three comp onent Biginelli condensation between various aldehydes, β-keto esters, and urea/thioureas to give 3,4-dihydropyrimidine-2(1H)-ones. The reactions were carried out under conventional heating as well as solvent-free microwave irradiation of solid components, and in both the cases, the mesoporous polymer MPDVAA-1 proved to be a powerful, robust, and reusable catalyst with high catalytic efficiency.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure determination and catalytic activity in epoxidation reaction of two new oxidovanadium(IV) Schiff base complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi, Vida; Grivani, Gholamhossein; Bruno, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    The five coordinated vanadium(IV) Schiff base complexes of VOL1 (1) and VOL2 (2), HL1 = 2-{(E)-[2-bromoethyl)imino]methyl}-2- naphthol, HL2 = 2-{(E)-[2-chloroethyl)imino]methyl}-2- naphthol, have been synthesized and they were characterized by using single-crystal X-ray crystallography, elemental analysis (CHN) and FT-IR spectroscopy. Crystal structure determination of these complexes shows that the Schiff base ligands (L1 and L2) act as bidentate ligands with two phenolato oxygen atoms and two imine nitrogen atoms in the trans geometry. The coordination geometry around the vanadium(IV) is distorted square pyramidal in which vanadium(IV) is coordinated by two nitrogen and two oxygen atoms of two independent ligands in the basal plane and by one oxygen atom in the apical position. The catalytic activity of the Schiff base complexes of 1 and 2 in the epoxidation of alkenes were investigated using different reaction parameters such as solvent effect, oxidant, alkene/oxidant ratio and the catalyst amount. The results showed that in the presence of TBHP as oxidant in 1: 4 and 1:3 ratio of the cyclooctene/oxidant ratio, high epoxide yield was obtained for 1 (76%) and 2 (80%) with TON(= mole of substrate/mole of catalyst) of 27 and 28.5, respectively, in epoxidation of cyclooctene.

  9. Synergistic effect of Nitrogen-doped hierarchical porous carbon/graphene with enhanced catalytic performance for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Dewang; Yuan, Wenjing; Li, Cun; Song, Jiming; Xie, Anjian; Shen, Yuhua

    2017-01-01

    Developing efficient and economical catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is important to promote the commercialization of fuel cells. Here, we report a simple and environmentally friendly method to prepare nitrogen (N) -doped hierarchical porous carbon (HPC)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composites by reusing waste biomass (pomelo peel) coupled with graphene oxide (GO). This method is green, low-cost and without using any acid or alkali activator. The typical sample (N-HPC/RGO-1) contains 5.96 at.% nitrogen and larger BET surface area (1194 m2/g). Electrochemical measurements show that N-HPC/RGO-1 exhibits not only a relatively positive onset potential and high current density, but also considerable methanol tolerance and long-term durability in alkaline media as well as in acidic media. The electron transfer number is close to 4, which means that it is mostly via a four-electron pathway toward ORR. The excellent catalytic performance of N-HPC/RGO-1 is due to the synergistic effect of the inherent interwoven network structure of HPC, the good electrical conductivity of RGO, and the heteroatom doping for the composite. More importantly, this work demonstrates a good example for turning discarded rubbish into valuable functional products and addresses the disposal issue of waste biomass simultaneously for environment clean.

  10. Thermal Shock Resistance of Si3N4/h-BN Composites Prepared via Catalytic Reaction-Bonding Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wanli; Peng, Zhigang; Dai, Lina; Shi, Zhongqi; Jin, Zhihao

    2017-08-01

    Si3N4/h-BN ceramic matrix composites were prepared via a catalytic reaction-bonding route by using ZrO2 as nitridation catalyst, and the water quenching (fast cooling) and molten aluminum quenching tests (fast heating) were carried out to evaluate the thermal shock resistance of the composites. The results showed that the thermal shock resistance was improved obviously with the increase in h-BN content, and the critical thermal shock temperature difference (ΔT c) reaches as high as 780 °C when the h-BN content was 30 wt.%. The improvement of thermal shock resistance of the composites was mainly due to the crack tending to quasi static propagating at weak bonding interface between Si3N4 and h-BN with the increase in h-BN content. For the molten aluminum quenching test, the residual strength showed no obvious decrease compared with water quenching test, which could be caused by the mild stress condition on the surface. In addition, a calculated parameter, volumetric crack density (N f), was presented to quantitative evaluating the thermal shock resistance of the composites in contrast to the conventional R parameter.

  11. Catalytic consequences of open and closed grafted Al(III)-calix[4]arene complexes for hydride and oxo transfer reactions

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Partha; Tang, Wenjie; Okrut, Alexander; Kong, Xueqian; Hwang, Son-Jong; Neurock, Matthew; Katz, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    An approach for the control and understanding of supported molecular catalysts is demonstrated with the design and synthesis of open and closed variants of a grafted Lewis acid active site, consisting of Al(III)-calix[4]arene complexes on the surface of silica. The calixarene acts as a molecular template that enforces open and closed resting-state coordination geometries surrounding the metal active sites, due to its lower-rim substituents as well as site isolation by virtue of its steric bulk. These sites are characterized and used to elucidate mechanistic details and connectivity requirements for reactions involving hydride and oxo transfer. The consequence of controlling open versus closed configurations of the grafted Lewis acid site is demonstrated by the complete lack of observed activity of the closed site for Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley (MPV) reduction; whereas, the open variant of this catalyst has an MPV reduction activity that is virtually identical to previously reported soluble molecular Al(III)-calix[4]arene catalysts. In contrast, for olefin epoxidation using tert-butyl-hydroperoxide as oxidant, the open and closed catalysts exhibit similar activity. This observation suggests that for olefin epoxidation catalysis using Lewis acids as catalyst and organic hydroperoxide as oxidant, covalent binding of the hydroperoxide is not required, and instead dative coordination to the Lewis acid center is sufficient for catalytic oxo transfer. This latter result is supported by density functional theory calculations of the transition state for olefin epoxidation catalysis, using molecular analogs of the open and closed catalysts. PMID:23359705

  12. Carboxylic acid-grafted mesoporous material and its high catalytic activity in one-pot three-component coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Ruth; Dutta, Saikat; Bhaumik, Asim

    2014-11-01

    A new carboxylic acid functionalized mesoporous organic polymer has been synthesized via in situ radical polymerization of divinylbenzene and acrylic acid using a mesoporous silica as a seed during the polymerization process under solvothermal conditions. The mesoporous material MPDVAA-1 has been thoroughly characterized employing powder XRD, solid state 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance, FT-IR spectroscopy, N2 sorption, HR-TEM, and NH3 temperature programmed desorption-thermal conductivity detector (TPD-TCD) analysis to understand its porosity, chemical environment, bonding, and surface properties. The mesoporous polymer was used as a catalyst for a three comp onent Biginelli condensation between various aldehydes, β-keto esters, and urea/thioureas to give 3,4-dihydropyrimidine-2(1H)-ones. The reactions were carried out under conventional heating as well as solvent-free microwave irradiation of solid components, and in both the cases, the mesoporous polymer MPDVAA-1 proved to be a powerful, robust, and reusable catalyst with high catalytic efficiency.

  13. Bifunctional Ag@SiO 2 /Au Nanoparticles for Probing Sequential Catalytic Reactions by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Yiren; Su, Dong; Qin, Dong

    2017-02-22

    Here, we report the synthesis of bifunctional Ag@SiO2/Au nanoparticles with an “islands in the sea” configuration by titrating HAuCl4 solution into an aqueous suspension of Ag@SiO2 core–shell nanocubes in the presence of NaOH, ascorbic acid, and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) at pH 11.9. The NaOH plays an essential role in generating small pores in the SiO2 shell in situ, followed by the epitaxial deposition of Au from the Ag surface through the pores, leading to the formation of Au islands (6–12 nm in size) immersed in a SiO2 sea. Furthermore, by controlling the amount of HAuCl4 titrated into the reaction system, themore » Au islands can be made to pass through and protrude from the SiO2 shell, embracing catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by NaBH4. And while the Ag in the core provides a strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity, the SiO2 sea helps maintain the Au component as compact, isolated, and stabilized islands. The Ag@SiO2/Au nanoparticles can serve as a bifunctional probe to monitor the stepwise Au-catalyzed reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol to 4-aminothiophenol by NaBH4 and Ag-catalyzed oxidation of 4-aminothiophenol to trans-4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene by the O2 from air in the same reaction system.« less

  14. Cobalt-manganese-based spinels as multifunctional materials that unify catalytic water oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Bergmann, Arno; Strasser, Peter; Driess, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in the design and development of affordable and highly efficient oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts that can resolve the pivotal issues that concern solar fuels, fuel cells, and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Here we present the synthesis and application of porous CoMn2 O4 and MnCo2 O4 spinel microspheres as highly efficient multifunctional catalysts that unify the electrochemical OER with oxidant-driven and photocatalytic water oxidation as well as the ORR. The porous materials were prepared by the thermal degradation of the respective carbonate precursors at 400 °C. The as-prepared spinels display excellent performances in electrochemical OER for the cubic MnCo2 O4 phase in comparison to the tetragonal CoMn2 O4 material in an alkaline medium. Moreover, the oxidant-driven and photocatalytic water oxidations were performed and they exhibited a similar trend in activity to that of the electrochemical OER. Remarkably, the situation is reversed in ORR catalysis, that is, the oxygen reduction activity and stability of the tetragonal CoMn2 O4 catalyst outperformed that of cubic MnCo2 O4 and rivals that of benchmark Pt catalysts. The superior catalytic performance and the remarkable stability of the unifying materials are attributed to their unique porous and robust microspherical morphology and the intrinsic structural features of the spinels. Moreover, the facile access to these high-performance materials enables a reliable and cost-effective production on a large scale for industrial applications.

  15. Manganese Triazacyclononane Oxidation Catalysts Grafted under Reaction Conditions on Solid Co-Catalytic Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeldt, Nicholas J.; Ni, Zhenjuan; Korinda, Andrew W.; Meyer, Randall J.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2012-01-23

    Manganese complexes of 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (tmtacn) are highly active and selective alkene oxidation catalysts with aqueous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Here, carboxylic acid-functionalized SiO{sub 2} simultaneously immobilizes and activates these complexes under oxidation reaction conditions. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the functionalized support are both necessary to transform the inactive [(tmtacn)Mn{sup IV}({mu}-O)3Mn{sup IV}(tmtacn)]{sup 2+} into the active, dicarboxylate-bridged [(tmtacn)Mn{sup III}({mu}-O)({mu}-RCOO){sub 2}Mn{sup III}(tmtacn)]{sup 2+}. This transformation is assigned on the basis of comparison of diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectra to known soluble models, assignment of oxidation state by Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy, the dependence of rates on the acid/Mn ratios, and comparison of the surface structures derived from density functional theory with extended X-ray absorption fine structure. Productivity in cis-cyclooctene oxidation to epoxide and cis-diol with 2-10 equiv of solid cocatalytic supports is superior to that obtained with analogous soluble valeric acid cocatalysts, which require 1000-fold excess to reach similar levels at comparable times. Cyclooctene oxidation rates are near first order in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and near zero order in all other species, including H{sub 2}O. These observations are consistent with a mechanism of substrate oxidation following rate-limiting H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation on the hydrated, supported complex. This general mechanism and the observed alkene oxidation activation energy of 38 {+-} 6 kJ/mol are comparable to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation by related soluble catalysts. Undesired decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not a limiting factor for these solid catalysts, and as such, productivity remains high up to 25 C and initial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration of 0.5 M, increasing reactor throughput. These results show that immobilized carboxylic acids can be utilized and understood

  16. Graphene substrate-mediated catalytic performance enhancement of Ru nanoparticles: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Yao, Ke Xin; Meng, Changgong; Han, Yu

    2012-01-28

    The structural, energetic and magnetic properties of Ru nanoparticles deposited on pristine and defective graphene have been thoroughly studied by first-principles based calculations. The calculated binding energy of a Ru(13) nanoparticle on a single vacancy graphene is as high as -7.41 eV, owing to the hybridization between the dsp states of the Ru particles with the sp(2) dangling bonds at the defect sites. Doping the defective graphene with boron would further increase the binding energy to -7.52 eV. The strong interaction results in the averaged d-band center of the deposited Ru nanoparticle being upshifted toward the Fermi level from -1.41 eV to -1.10 eV. Further study reveals that the performance of the nanocomposites against hydrogen, oxygen and carbon monoxide adsorption is correlated to the shift of the d-band center of the nanoparticle. Thus, Ru nanoparticles deposited on defective graphene are expected to exhibit both high stability against sintering and superior catalytic performance in hydrogenation, oxygen reduction reaction and hydrogen evolution reaction.

  17. Reaction of Aldehydes/Ketones with Electron-Deficient 1,3,5-Triazines Leading to Functionalized Pyrimidines as Diels-Alder/Retro-Diels-Alder Reaction Products: Reaction Development and Mechanistic Studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Dang, Qun; Cai, Pei-Jun; Gao, Yang; Yu, Zhi-Xiang; Bai, Xu

    2017-03-03

    Catalytic inverse electron demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) reactions of heterocyclic aza-dienes are rarely reported since highly reactive and electron-rich dienophiles are often found not compatible with strong acids such as Lewis acids. Herein, we disclose that TFA-catalyzed reactions of electron-deficient 1,3,5-triazines and electron-deficient aldehydes/ketones can take place. These reactions led to highly functionalized pyrimidines as products in fair to good yields. The reaction mechanism was carefully studied by the combination of experimental and computational studies. The reactions involve a cascade of stepwise inverse electron demand hetero-Diels-Alder (ihDA) reactions, followed by retro-Diels-Alder (rDA) reactions and elimination of water. An acid was required for both ihDA and rDA reactions. This mechanism was further verified by comparing the relative reactivity of aldehydes/ketones and their corresponding vinyl ethers in the current reaction system.

  18. Study on preparation of NiOOH by a new catalytic electrolysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yanzhi; Pan Junqing Wan Pingyu; Liu Xiaoguang

    2009-04-02

    The present paper reports a new catalytic electrolysis method to prepare NiOOH. KMnO{sub 4} is proposed as a catalyst to play the role of electron-transfer medium in the electrolysis preparation of NiOOH for the first time. Through the self-redox reaction of KMnO{sub 4}, the highly efficient electron-transfer process between the electrolyte and the electrode of the spherical Ni(OH){sub 2} is realized, thus resulting in a high electrolytic efficiency and short electrolysis time. The mechanism of catalytic electrolysis is preliminarily discussed. The experimental results show that the electrode prepared with the NiOOH powders by catalytic electrolysis offers a discharge capacity of 267 mAh g{sup -1} at a current density of 120 mA g{sup -1} and exhibits good cycling performance.

  19. Synthesis of magnetically recyclable ZIF-8@SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} catalysts and their catalytic performance for Knoevenagel reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingyuan; Jiang, Sai; Ji, Shengfu Ammar, Muhammad; Zhang, Qingmin; Yan, Junlei

    2015-03-15

    Novel magnetic ZIF-8@SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} catalysts were synthesized by encapsulating magnetic SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles into ZIF-8 through in situ method. The structures of the catalysts were characterized by TEM, SEM, XRD, FT-IR, VSM, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption and CO{sub 2}-TPD technology. The catalytic activity and recovery properties of the catalysts for the Knoevenagel reaction of p-chlorobenzaldehyde with malononitrile were evaluated. The results showed that the magnetic ZIF-8@SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} catalysts had the larger surface areas, the suitable superparamagnetism, and good catalytic activity for Knoevenagel reaction. The conversion of p-chlorobenzaldehyde can reach ~98% and the selectivity of the production can reach ~99% over35.8%ZIF-8@SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (MZC-5) catalyst under the reaction condition of 25 °C and 4 h. The magnetic ZIF-8@SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} catalysts also had good substrates adaptation. After reaction, the catalyst can be easily separated from the reaction mixture by an external magnet. The recovery catalyst can be reused five times and the conversion of p-chlorobenzaldehyde can be kept over 90%. - Graphical abstract: Novel magnetically recyclable ZIF-8@SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} catalysts were synthesized by encapsulating magnetic SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles into ZIF-8 and the as-synthesized catalysts exhibited a good catalytic activity for the Knoevenagel reaction. - Highlights: • A series of novel magnetic ZIF-8@SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} catalysts were synthesized. • The catalysts had the larger surface areas and the suitable superparamagnetism. • The catalysts exhibited good catalytic activity for the Knoevenagel reaction. • After reaction the catalyst can be easily separated by an external magnet. • The recovery catalyst can be reused five times and can keep its catalytic activity.

  20. Catalytic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  1. Kinetics and mechanism of olefin catalytic hydroalumination by organoaluminum compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koledina, K. F.; Gubaidullin, I. M.

    2016-05-01

    The complex reaction mechanism of α-olefin catalytic hydroalumination by alkylalanes is investigated via mathematical modeling that involves plotting the kinetic models for the individual reactions that make up a complex system and a separate study of their principles. Kinetic parameters of olefin catalytic hydroalumination are estimated. Activation energies of the possible steps of the schemes of complex reaction mechanisms are compared and possible reaction pathways are determined.

  2. Photo-catalytic oxidation of a di-nuclear manganese centre in an engineered bacterioferritin 'reaction centre'.

    PubMed

    Conlan, Brendon; Cox, Nicholas; Su, Ji-Hu; Hillier, Warwick; Messinger, Johannes; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Dutton, P Leslie; Wydrzynski, Tom

    2009-09-01

    Photosynthesis involves the conversion of light into chemical energy through a series of electron transfer reactions within membrane-bound pigment/protein complexes. The Photosystem II (PSII) complex in plants, algae and cyanobacteria catalyse the oxidation of water to molecular O2. The complexity of PSII has thus far limited attempts to chemically replicate its function. Here we introduce a reverse engineering approach to build a simple, light-driven photo-catalyst based on the organization and function of the donor side of the PSII reaction centre. We have used bacterioferritin (BFR) (cytochrome b1) from Escherichia coli as the protein scaffold since it has several, inherently useful design features for engineering light-driven electron transport. Among these are: (i.) a di-iron binding site; (ii.) a potentially redox-active tyrosine residue; and (iii.) the ability to dimerise and form an inter-protein heme binding pocket within electron tunnelling distance of the di-iron binding site. Upon replacing the heme with the photoactive zinc-chlorin e6 (ZnCe6) molecule and the di-iron binding site with two manganese ions, we show that the two Mn ions bind as a weakly coupled di-nuclear Mn2II,II centre, and that ZnCe6 binds in stoichiometric amounts of 1:2 with respect to the dimeric form of BFR. Upon illumination the bound ZnCe6 initiates electron transfer, followed by oxidation of the di-nuclear Mn centre possibly via one of the inherent tyrosine residues in the vicinity of the Mn cluster. The light dependent loss of the MnII EPR signals and the formation of low field parallel mode Mn EPR signals are attributed to the formation of MnIII species. The formation of the MnIII is concomitant with consumption of oxygen. Our model is the first artificial reaction centre developed for the photo-catalytic oxidation of a di-metal site within a protein matrix which potentially mimics water oxidation centre (WOC) photo-assembly.

  3. In situ spectroscopic studies on vapor phase catalytic decomposition of dimethyl oxalate.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shweta; Tharpa, Kalsang; Akuri, Satyanarayana Reddy; K, Rakesh; Kumar, Ajay; Deshpande, Raj; Nair, Sreejit A

    2017-03-15

    Dimethyl Oxalate (DMO) has recently gained prominence as a valuable intermediate for the production of compounds of commercial importance. The stability of DMO is poor and hence this can result in the decomposition of DMO under reaction conditions. The mechanism of DMO decomposition is however not reported and more so on catalytic surfaces. Insights into the mechanism of decomposition would help in designing catalysts for its effective molecular transformation. It is well known that DMO is sensitive to moisture, which can also be a factor contributing to its decomposition. The present work reports the results of decomposition of DMO on various catalytic materials. The materials studied consist of acidic (γ-Al2O3), basic (MgO), weakly acidic (ZnAl2O4) and neutral surfaces such as α-Al2O3 and mesoporous precipitated SiO2. Infrared spectroscopy is used to identify the nature of adsorption of the molecule on the various surfaces. The spectroscopy study is done at a temperature of 200 °C, which is the onset of gas phase decomposition of DMO. The results indicate that the stability of DMO is lower than the corresponding acid, i.e. oxalic acid. It is also one of the products of decomposition. Spectroscopic data suggest that DMO decomposition is related to surface acidity and the extent of decomposition depends on the number of surface hydroxyl groups. Decomposition was also observed on α-Al2O3, which was attributed to the residual surface hydroxyl groups. DMO decomposition to oxalic acid was not observed on the basic surface (MgO).

  4. The role of copper in catalytic performance of a Fe-Cu-Al-O catalyst for water gas shift reaction.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yingchun; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Shiran; Zhu, Yuan; Shan, Junjun; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2013-05-14

    A Fe-Cu-Al-O water gas shift catalyst with a Fe : Cu atomic ratio of 4 : 1 upon pretreatment at 350 °C in H2 exhibits a conversion higher than a physical mixture of Fe-Al-O and Cu-Al-O by ~40% over a temperature range of 300 °C-450 °C. In situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies suggest that the surface region of Fe-Cu-Al-O was restructured into a double-layer structure consisting of a surface layer of Fe3O4 and a metallic Cu layer below it upon pretreatment at 350 °C. The strong metal (Cu)-oxide (Fe3O4) interface effect of this double layer structure enhances the catalytic activity of Fe3O4 in WGS.

  5. Structural study of the X-ray-induced enzymatic reaction of octahaem cytochrome C nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, A A; Polyakov, K M; Lazarenko, V A; Popov, A N; Tikhonova, T V; Tikhonov, A V; Popov, V O

    2015-05-01

    Octahaem cytochrome c nitrite reductase from the bacterium Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens catalyzes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium and of sulfite to sulfide. The reducing properties of X-ray radiation and the high quality of the enzyme crystals allow study of the catalytic reaction of cytochrome c nitrite reductase directly in a crystal of the enzyme, with the reaction being induced by X-rays. Series of diffraction data sets with increasing absorbed dose were collected from crystals of the free form of the enzyme and its complexes with nitrite and sulfite. The corresponding structures revealed gradual changes associated with the reduction of the catalytic haems by X-rays. In the case of the nitrite complex the conversion of the nitrite ions bound in the active sites to NO species was observed, which is the beginning of the catalytic reaction. For the free form, an increase in the distance between the oxygen ligand bound to the catalytic haem and the iron ion of the haem took place. In the case of the sulfite complex no enzymatic reaction was detected, but there were changes in the arrangement of the active-site water molecules that were presumably associated with a change in the protonation state of the sulfite ions.

  6. Physical organic studies of organometallic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, Robert G.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms of reactions of organotransition metal complexes have only begun to be understood in detail during the last ten years. The complementary interaction of techniques and concepts developed earlier in studies of organic reaction mechanisms, with those commonly used in inorganic chetnistry, has played a crucial role in helping to elucidate organor.1etall.ic reaction mechanisms. A few systems in which this interaction has proved especially fruitful are discussed in this article.

  7. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  8. An experimental study for enhancing the catalytic effects of various copper forms on the oxidation of ferrous iron.

    PubMed

    Babak, Manizhe Moradi Shahre; Goharrizi, Ataallah Soltani; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Roayaei, Emad

    2013-01-01

    In this research the catalytic effect of copper compounds (ionic, oxide and oxide nanopowder) on the oxidation of ferrous iron by aeration was studied experimentally. When copper exists in solution, the oxidation rate of iron(II) will increase. The experimental results showed that the oxidation rate increases with an increasing copper concentration. From the experimental data it can be determined that the copper oxide nanopowder is the most effective for the oxidation reaction among the used copper forms. Aeration is the most economical oxidation method when water exhibits a high ferrous iron concentration.

  9. A DFT+U study of the catalytic activity of lanthanum nickelate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Debolina; Kundu, Tarun Kumar

    2017-07-01

    A density functional theory + Hubbard U (DFT+U) method is implemented to investigate the catalytic activity of lanthanum nickelate (LaNiO3) for oxygen reduction reaction. Comparison of the surface energies of different LaNiO3 surfaces shows that {001} surface has the lowest surface energy and hence maximum stability. Two possible terminations of the {001} surface namely LaO and NiO2 are considered to carry out all our DFT calculations. Calculation of bond lengths of the atoms near the surface and adsorption energies for the reaction intermediates revealed that LaO terminated {001} surface is unstable for the process of OOH adsorption and hence not preferred for the oxygen reduction reaction. However, NiO2 terminated {001} surface shows excellent catalytic activity for adsorption of all the reaction intermediates and hence is a favourable surface for reactions to occur. Superiority of the NiO2 terminated {001} surface as catalyst over the LaO terminated one, is also confirmed from the total and partial density of states of the surfaces in presence of the adsorbates, which also shows that the desorption rate of the reaction intermediates is low in case of LaO terminated {001} surface compared to the NiO2 terminated one.

  10. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P.; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G.; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K.; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-01-01

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H2 to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H2, CO and CO2. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H2O, CO2 and H2. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H2 and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H2 and compressed CO2 ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H2 permeance and purity, high CH4 conversion levels and reduced CO yields. PMID:27657143

  11. Isothermal activation of Mo2O5(2+)-ZSM-5 precursors during methane reactions: effects of reaction products on structural evolution and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Lacheen, Howard S; Iglesia, Enrique

    2005-02-07

    The dynamics of carburization of Mo-oxo precursors exchanged onto H-ZSM-5 strongly influence initial induction periods and steady-state rates during catalytic pyrolysis of CH4 to alkenes and arenes at 900-1000 K. The effects of co-reactants and of activating conditions were examined by on-line time-resolved mass spectrometric analysis of effluent streams using rigorous analyses to account for equilibrium effects on measured rates. Ethene co-reactants and the larger hydrocarbons to which it converts on acid sites in H-ZSM-5 led to much faster carburization of exchanged (Mo2O5)(5+) dimers and to shorter induction periods than with pure CH4 reactants, but steady-state pyrolysis rates were unchanged, indicating that CH4 and C2H4 form similar MoCx clusters during carburization of exchanged Mo-oxo precursors. H2 treatment at 973 K before CH4 reactions led to reduction of Mo(6+) species to Mo(4+), which carburize faster than (Mo2O5)(5+) precursors during initial contact with CH4. This H2 pretreatment or the use of CH4-H2 reactant mixtures did not influence steady-state pyrolysis rates, once contributions from reverse reactions were taken into account. With pure CH4 streams, (Mo2O5)(5+)-ZSM-5 converts to active MoCx clusters within zeolite channels via autocatalytic processes, in which higher hydrocarbons, initially formed during initial conversion of MoOx to MoCx structures, lead to faster carburization of downstream catalyst sections. Concurrently, H2O and CO2 formed during this incipient carburization of exchanged (Mo2O5)(5+) and unexchanged MoO3 present in trace amounts inhibit and even prevent carburization and lengthen activation periods. Activation protocols with C2H4 were also successful in the activation of more refractory high-valent metal-oxo species, such as WOx and VOx, exchanged onto H-ZSM-5. The formation of active carbide structures occurred in less than 300 s, instead of 4 ks and 16 ks for VOx and WOx samples, respectively, in pure CH4 reactants. These

  12. The interaction of catalytic metal ions and ionizing groups in equilibrium studies and in transient intermediates of metal-substituted alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Maret, W; Gerber, M; Zeppezauer, M; Dunn, M F

    1985-01-01

    The step of ternary complex interconversion in the reaction catalyzed by horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase has been resolved into five distinct molecular species with the aid of metal-substitution studies in combination with rapid-scanning spectrophotometry. A correlation with electronic absorption spectra at equilibrium provides structural insights into these intermediates. In contrast to NADH, NAD+ only leads to a conformational change of the protein when a negative charge has been created in the vicinity of the catalytic metal ion. This paper presents also a reevaluation of previous assignments of catalytically important groups in the light of some recent results.

  13. Impact of Lewis acids on Diels-Alder reaction reactivity: a conceptual density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yue; Yin, Dulin; Rong, Chunying; Xu, Qiong; Yin, Donghong; Liu, Shubin

    2008-10-09

    Density functional theory (DFT) and conceptual/chemical DFT studies are carried out in this work for the normal electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between isoprene and acrolein to compare chemical reactivity and regioselectivity of the reactants in the absence and presence of Lewis acid (LA) catalysts. A cyclic coplanar structure of acrolein-LA complex has been observed and the natural bond orbital analysis has been employed to interpret the interaction between acrolein and LAs. Reactivity indices from frontier molecular orbital energies are proved to be adequate and efficient to evaluate the catalytic property of LAs. Linear relationships have been discovered among the bond order, bond length, catalytic activation, and chemical reactivity for the systems concerned. The validity and applicability of maximum hardness principle, minimum polarizability principle, and minimum electrophilicity principle are examined and discussed in the prediction of the major regioselective isomer and the preferred reaction pathway for the reactions in the present study.

  14. Enhancing catalytic performance of palladium in gold and palladium alloy nanoparticles for organic synthesis reactions through visible light irradiation at ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sarina, Sarina; Zhu, Huaiyong; Jaatinen, Esa; Xiao, Qi; Liu, Hongwei; Jia, Jianfeng; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Jian

    2013-04-17

    The intrinsic catalytic activity of palladium (Pd) is significantly enhanced in gold (Au)-Pd alloy nanoparticles (NPs) under visible light irradiation at ambient temperatures. The alloy NPs strongly absorb light and efficiently enhance the conversion of several reactions, including Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling, oxidative addition of benzylamine, selective oxidation of aromatic alcohols to corresponding aldehydes and ketones, and phenol oxidation. The Au/Pd molar ratio of the alloy NPs has an important impact on performance of the catalysts since it determines both the electronic heterogeneity and the distribution of Pd sites at the NP surface, with these two factors playing key roles in the catalytic activity. Irradiating with light produces an even more profound enhancement in the catalytic performance of the NPs. For example, the best conversion rate achieved thermally at 30 °C for Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling was 37% at a Au/Pd ratio of 1:1.86, while under light illumination the yield increased to 96% under the same conditions. The catalytic activity of the alloy NPs depends on the intensity and wavelength of incident light. Light absorption due to the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance of gold nanocrystals plays an important role in enhancing catalyst performance. We believe that the conduction electrons of the NPs gain the light absorbed energy producing energetic electrons at the surface Pd sites, which enhances the sites' intrinsic catalytic ability. These findings provide useful guidelines for designing efficient catalysts composed of alloys of a plasmonic metal and a catalytically active transition metal for various organic syntheses driven by sunlight.

  15. Construction of new biopolymer (chitosan)-based pincer-type Pd(II) complex and its catalytic application in Suzuki cross coupling reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Talat; Menteş, Ayfer

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we described the fabrication, characterization and application of a new biopolymer (chitosan)-based pincer-type Pd(II) catalyst in Suzuki cross coupling reactions using a non-toxic, cheap, eco-friendly and practical method. The catalytic activity tests showed remarkable product yields as well as TON (19800) and TOF (330000) values with a small catalyst loading. In addition, the catalyst indicated good recyclability in the Suzuki C-C reaction. This biopolymer supported catalyst can be used with various catalyst systems due to its unique properties, such as being inert, green in nature, low cost and chemically durable.

  16. Synthesis of magnetically recyclable ZIF-8@SiO2@Fe3O4 catalysts and their catalytic performance for Knoevenagel reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingyuan; Jiang, Sai; Ji, Shengfu; Ammar, Muhammad; Zhang, Qingmin; Yan, Junlei

    2015-03-01

    Novel magnetic ZIF-8@SiO2@Fe3O4 catalysts were synthesized by encapsulating magnetic SiO2@Fe3O4 nanoparticles into ZIF-8 through in situ method. The structures of the catalysts were characterized by TEM, SEM, XRD, FT-IR, VSM, N2 adsorption/desorption and CO2-TPD technology. The catalytic activity and recovery properties of the catalysts for the Knoevenagel reaction of p-chlorobenzaldehyde with malononitrile were evaluated. The results showed that the magnetic ZIF-8@SiO2@Fe3O4 catalysts had the larger surface areas, the suitable superparamagnetism, and good catalytic activity for Knoevenagel reaction. The conversion of p-chlorobenzaldehyde can reach ~98% and the selectivity of the production can reach ~99% over35.8%ZIF-8@SiO2@Fe3O4 (MZC-5) catalyst under the reaction condition of 25 °C and 4 h. The magnetic ZIF-8@SiO2@Fe3O4 catalysts also had good substrates adaptation. After reaction, the catalyst can be easily separated from the reaction mixture by an external magnet. The recovery catalyst can be reused five times and the conversion of p-chlorobenzaldehyde can be kept over 90%.

  17. Experimental studies of quasi-fission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.

    1988-01-01

    A large number of recent experimental studies have shown that a substantial fraction of the total reaction cross section in heavy-ion reactions is found in fission-like processes, which do not result from the fission decay of a completely fused system. Following the suggestion of Swiatecki such processes, which represents a complete relaxation of the relative kinetic energy and a substantial amount of net mass transfer between the two fragments, are denoted quasi-fission reactions. They are distinct from compound fission reactions by bypassing the stage of a completely fused-system. This typically means that they are associated with short reaction times, which results in several measurable characteristics such as broken forward-backward symmetries, large anisotropies of the angular distributions and increased widths of the fragment mass distributions. The distinction between quasi-fission and deep inelastic reactions is less stringent and has the character of a gradual evolution from one reaction type to the other, as found also as quasi-elastic reaction evolves into deeply inelastic processes as a function of the total kinetic energy loss. In the present paper some of the experimental data characterizing quasi-fission reactions are reviewed and discussed. 22 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Catalytic Enantioselective Functionalization of Unactivated Terminal Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Coombs, John R; Morken, James P

    2016-02-18

    Terminal alkenes are readily available functional groups which appear in α-olefins produced by the chemical industry, and they appear in the products of many contemporary synthetic reactions. While the organic transformations that apply to alkenes are amongst the most studied reactions in all of chemical synthesis, the number of reactions that apply to nonactivated terminal alkenes in a catalytic enantioselective fashion is small in number. This Minireview highlights the cases where stereocontrol in catalytic reactions of 1-alkenes is high enough to be useful for asymmetric synthesis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Kinetic Studies and Mechanism of Hydrogen Peroxide Catalytic Decomposition by Cu(II) Complexes with Polyelectrolytes Derived from L-Alanine and Glycylglycine

    PubMed Central

    Skounas, Spyridon; Methenitis, Constantinos; Pneumatikakis, George; Morcellet, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by Cu(II) complexes with polymers bearing L-alanine (PAla) and glycylglycine (PGlygly) in their side chain was studied in alkaline aqueous media. The reactions were of pseudo-first order with respect to [H2O2] and [L-Cu(II)] (L stands for PAla or PGlygly) and the reaction rate was increased with pH increase. The energies of activation for the reactions were determined at pH 8.8, in a temperature range of 293–308 K. A suitable mechanism is proposed to account for the kinetic data, which involves the Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox pair, as has been demonstrated by ESR spectroscopy. The trend in catalytic efficiency is in the order PGlygly>PAla, due to differences in modes of complexation and in the conformation of the macromolecular ligands. PMID:20721280

  20. Kinetic Studies and Mechanism of Hydrogen Peroxide Catalytic Decomposition by Cu(II) Complexes with Polyelectrolytes Derived from L-Alanine and Glycylglycine.

    PubMed

    Skounas, Spyridon; Methenitis, Constantinos; Pneumatikakis, George; Morcellet, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by Cu(II) complexes with polymers bearing L-alanine (PAla) and glycylglycine (PGlygly) in their side chain was studied in alkaline aqueous media. The reactions were of pseudo-first order with respect to [H(2)O(2)] and [L-Cu(II)] (L stands for PAla or PGlygly) and the reaction rate was increased with pH increase. The energies of activation for the reactions were determined at pH 8.8, in a temperature range of 293-308 K. A suitable mechanism is proposed to account for the kinetic data, which involves the Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox pair, as has been demonstrated by ESR spectroscopy. The trend in catalytic efficiency is in the order PGlygly>PAla, due to differences in modes of complexation and in the conformation of the macromolecular ligands.