Science.gov

Sample records for catchment network perspective

  1. Collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macleod, Christopher Kit

    2015-04-01

    There is a need to improve the production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge of catchment systems through networks of researchers, policy makers and practitioners. This requires greater levels of systems based integrative research. In parallel to the growing realization that greater levels of collaborative knowledge in scientific research networks are required, a digital revolution has been taking place. This has been driven primarily by the emergence of distributed networks of computers and standards-based interoperability. The objective of this paper is to present the status and research needs for greater levels of systems based integrative research for the production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks. To enable increased levels of integrative research depends on development and application of digital technologies to improve collection, use and sharing of data and devise new knowledge infrastructures. This paper focuses on the requirements for catchment observatories that integrate existing and novel physical, social and digital networks of knowledge infrastructures. To support this focus, I present three leading international examples of collaborative networks of catchment researchers and their development of catchment observatories. In particular, the digital infrastructures they have developed to support collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks. These examples are from North America (NSF funded CUAHSI HIS) and from Europe (UK NERC funded EVOp and the German Helmholtz Association Centers funded TERENO/TEODOOR). These exemplars all supported advancing collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks through the development of catchment observatories. I will conclude by discussing the future research directions required for greater levels of production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks based on catchment systems science.

  2. Creating a catchment perspective for river restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, L.; Miller, D.; Barquín, J.

    2011-03-01

    One of the major challenges in river restoration is to identify the natural fluvial landscape in catchments with a long history of river control. Intensive land use on valley floors often predates the earliest remote sensing: levees, dikes, dams, and other structures alter valley-floor morphology, river channels and flow regimes. Consequently, morphological patterns indicative of the fluvial landscape including multiple channels, extensive floodplains, wetlands, and fluvial-riparian and tributary-confluence dynamics can be obscured, and information to develop appropriate and cost effective river restoration strategies can be unavailable. This is the case in the Pas River catchment in northern Spain (650 km2), in which land use and development have obscured the natural fluvial landscape in many parts of the basin. To address this issue we coupled general principles of hydro-geomorphic processes with computer tools to characterize the fluvial landscape. Using a 5-m digital elevation model, valley-floor surfaces were mapped according to elevation above the channel and proximity to key geomorphic processes. The predicted fluvial landscape is patchily distributed according to topography, valley morphology, river network structure, and fan and terrace landforms. The vast majority of the fluvial landscape in the main segments of the Pas River catchment is presently masked by human infrastructure, with only 15% not impacted by river control structures and development. The reconstructed fluvial landscape provides a catchment scale context to support restoration planning, in which areas of potential ecological productivity and diversity could be targeted for in-channel, floodplain and riparian restoration projects.

  3. Catchments network on badlands around Mediterranean area (RESOBAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copard, Yoann; Lebouteiller, Caroline; Regues-Munoz, David; Latron, Jerome; Solé-Benet, Albert; Canton, Yolanda; Nadal-Romero, Estela; Della Seta, Marta; Rossi, Mauro; Capolongo, Domenico; Maquaire, Olivier; Forey, Estelle; Di-Giovanni, Christian; Gallart, Francesc; Delmonte, Maurizio; Vergari, Francesca; Massei, Nicolas; Torri, Dino

    2016-04-01

    Between 2013 and 2014, a network funded by MISTRALS-ENVIMED institution, was born around some instrumented catchments developing a badland-type morphology. This network has grouped 3 countries (France, Spain and Italy) with 12 scientific labs. RESOBAM has concerned two sites in France (Draix-Bléone and Vaches Noires), three in Spain (Vallcebre, Araguas and El Cautivo) and some sites in Italy (Tuscany, Basilicata). Main goal of this network was to federate the research around badlands at the European scale, by proposing some scientific topics as: sediment and water transports / budget, (bio)geochemical cycles, agricultural (farming), education, restoration, cultural heritage, soil conservation / biodiversity, climatic change etc. Other main interests were also to propose some common scientific projects and the development of students exchanges. This communication presents the synthesis of our four meetings held at Draix, Zaragoza, Almeriá and Rouen and some perspectives to continue this network.

  4. A new perspective on catchment storage gained from a nested catchment experiment in Luxembourg (Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Laurent; Klaus, Julian; Hissler, Christophe; François Iffly, Jean; Gourdol, Laurent; Martinez-Carreras, Nuria; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2014-05-01

    Recent hydrological process research focussed on how much water a catchment can store and how these catchments store and release water. Storage can be a valuable metric for catchment description, inter-comparison, and classification. Further storage controls catchment mixing, non-linearities in rainfall-runoff transformation and eco-hydrological processes. Various methods exist to determine catchment storage (e.g. natural tracer, soil moisture and groundwater data, hydrological models). Today it remains unclear what parts of the catchment storage are measured with the different models. Here we present a new hydrometric approach to answer the question how much water a catchment can store. We tested our approach in a dense hydro-climatological monitoring network that encompasses 16 recording streamgauges and 21 pluviographs in the Alzette River basin in Luxembourg (Europe). Catchment scales are ranging from 0.47 to 285 km2 and they have clean- and mixed combinations of distinct geologies ranging from schists to marls, sandstone, dolomite and limestone. Previous investigations in the area of interest have shown that geology largely controls winter runoff coefficients. Here, we focus at how catchment geology is ultimately affecting catchment storage. We used the approach of Sayama et al. (2011) to compute catchment dynamic storage changes for each winter season over the period 2002-2012 (based on precipitation as input; discharge and evapotranspiration as output). We determined dynamic storage changes for each winter semester (October to March) in all 16 catchments over the period 2002-2012. At the beginning of each hydrological winter season, all catchments showed similar trends in storage change. A few weeks into the winter season, catchments with lowest permeability (e.g. marls) started to plateau. The highest storage values were reached several months later in the season in catchments dominated by permeable substrate (e.g. sandstone). For most catchments, we found

  5. A perspective on stream-catchment connections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bencala, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological study of the hyporheic zone is leading to recognition of a need for additional hydrologic understanding. Some of this understanding can be obtained by viewing the hyporheic zone as a succession of isolated boxes adjacent to the stream. Further understanding, particularly relevant to catchment-scale ecology, may come from studies focussed on the fluid mechanics of the flow-path connections between streams and their catchments.

  6. Creating a catchment scale perspective for river restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, L.; Miller, D.; Barquín, J.

    2011-09-01

    One of the major challenges in river restoration is to identify the natural fluvial landscape in catchments with a long history of river control. Intensive land use on valley floors often predates the earliest remote sensing: levees, dikes, dams, and other structures alter valley-floor morphology, river channels and flow regimes. Consequently, morphological patterns indicative of the fluvial landscape including multiple channels, extensive floodplains, wetlands, and fluvial-riparian and tributary-confluence dynamics can be obscured, and information to develop appropriate and cost effective river restoration strategies can be unavailable. This is the case in the Pas River catchment in northern Spain (650 km2), in which land use and development have obscured the natural fluvial landscape in many parts of the basin. To address this issue we used computer tools to examine the spatial patterns of fluvial landscapes that are associated with five domains of hydro-geomorphic processes and landforms. Using a 5-m digital elevation model, valley-floor surfaces were mapped according to elevation above the channel and proximity to key geomorphic processes. The predicted fluvial landscape is patchily distributed according to hillslope and valley topography, river network structure, and channel elevation profiles. The vast majority of the fluvial landscape in the main segments of the Pas River catchment is presently masked by human infrastructure, with only 15% not impacted by river control structures and development. The reconstructed fluvial landscape provides a catchment scale context to support restoration planning, in which areas of potential ecological productivity and diversity could be targeted for in-channel, floodplain and riparian restoration projects.

  7. Collaborative Catchment-Scale Water Quality Management using Integrated Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Huma; Harris, Nick; Merrett, Geoff

    2013-04-01

    collaborative information sharing can have a direct influence on agricultural practice. We apply a nutrient management scheme to a model of an example catchment with several individual networks. The networks are able to correlate catchment events to events within their zone of influence, allowing them to adapt their monitoring and control strategy in light of wider changes across the catchment. Results indicate that this can lead to significant reductions in nutrient losses (up to 50%) and better reutilization of nutrients amongst farms, having a positive impact on catchment scale water quality and fertilizer costs. 1. EC, E.C., Directive 2000/60/EC establishing a framework for Community action in the field of water policy, 2000. 2. Rivers, M., K. Smettem, and P. Davies. Estimating future scenarios for farm-watershed nutrient fluxes using dynamic simulation modelling-Can on-farm BMPs really do the job at the watershed scale? in Proc.29th Int.Conf System Dynamics Society, 2011. 2010. Washington 3. Liu, C., et al., On-farm evaluation of winter wheat yield response to residual soil nitrate-N in North China Plain. Agronomy Journal, 2008. 100(6): p. 1527-1534. 4. Kotamäki, N., et al., Wireless in-situ sensor network for agriculture and water monitoring on a river basin scale in Southern Finland: Evaluation from a data user's perspective. Sensors, 2009. 9(4): p. 2862-2883.

  8. Controls of catchments` sub-storage contributions to dynamic water quality patterns in the stream network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Maike Hegenauer, Anja

    2016-04-01

    Water quality is usually observed either continuously at a few stations within a catchment or with few snapshot sampling campaigns throughout the whole stream network. Although we know that the depletion of catchment sub-storages can vary throughout the stream network according to their actual water content (spatial variability of actual storage conditions can be caused amongst others by unevenly distributed rainfall, storage size or spatial differences in soil characteristics and land use), we know little about the impact of this process on spatial water quality patterns. For summer low flow recession periods, when stream water composition can be crucial for aquatic ecosystem conditions and the exceedance of water quality thresholds, knowledge on the controls of the dynamic interplay of catchment storages and stream water composition might improve water quality management and the implementation of corresponding mitigation measures. We studied this process throughout the stream network of a first-order agricultural headwater catchment in south-western Germany during two summer low flow recession periods. The underlying geology of the study area is a deep layer of aeolian loess, whilst the dominating soil is a silty calcaric regosol with gleizations in the colluvium. The land use in the catchment is dominated by viniculture (63 %) and arable crops (18 %). Due to the dense drainpipe network within the catchment we could identify 12 sub-catchments contributing during summer low flow recession periods to total stream discharge. We continuously observed discharge, electrical conductivity and water temperatures for 8 of the sub-catchments and at the catchment outlet. This data set was accomplished by 10 snapshot campaigns where we sampled for water temperatures, electrical conductivity, major ions, pH and O2 throughout the stream network. Using either discharge concentration relationships or time dependent functions, we derived continuous export rates for all measures in

  9. Connectivity of overland flow by drainage network expansion in a rain forest catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Beate; Zimmermann, Alexander; Turner, Benjamin L.; Francke, Till; Elsenbeer, Helmut

    2014-02-01

    Soils in various places of the Panama Canal Watershed feature a low saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) at shallow depth, which promotes overland-flow generation and associated flashy catchment responses. In undisturbed forests of these areas, overland flow is concentrated in flow lines that extend the channel network and provide hydrological connectivity between hillslopes and streams. To understand the dynamics of overland-flow connectivity, as well as the impact of connectivity on catchment response, we studied an undisturbed headwater catchment by monitoring overland-flow occurrence in all flow lines and discharge, suspended sediment, and total phosphorus at the catchment outlet. We find that connectivity is strongly influenced by seasonal variation in antecedent wetness and can develop even under light rainfall conditions. Connectivity increased rapidly as rainfall frequency increased, eventually leading to full connectivity and surficial drainage of entire hillslopes. Connectivity was nonlinearly related to catchment response. However, additional information on factors such as overland-flow volume would be required to constrain relationships between connectivity, stormflow, and the export of suspended sediment and phosphorus. The effort to monitor those factors would be substantial, so we advocate applying the established links between rain event characteristics, drainage network expansion by flow lines, and catchment response for predictive modeling and catchment classification in forests of the Panama Canal Watershed and in similar regions elsewhere.

  10. Establishment of a hydrological monitoring network in a tropical African catchment: An integrated participatory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomani, M. C.; Dietrich, O.; Lischeid, G.; Mahoo, H.; Mahay, F.; Mbilinyi, B.; Sarmett, J.

    Sound decision making for water resources management has to be based on good knowledge of the dominant hydrological processes of a catchment. This information can only be obtained through establishing suitable hydrological monitoring networks. Research catchments are typically established without involving the key stakeholders, which results in instruments being installed at inappropriate places as well as at high risk of theft and vandalism. This paper presents an integrated participatory approach for establishing a hydrological monitoring network. We propose a framework with six steps beginning with (i) inception of idea; (ii) stakeholder identification; (iii) defining the scope of the network; (iv) installation; (v) monitoring; and (vi) feedback mechanism integrated within the participatory framework. The approach is illustrated using an example of the Ngerengere catchment in Tanzania. In applying the approach, the concept of establishing the Ngerengere catchment monitoring network was initiated in 2008 within the Resilient Agro-landscapes to Climate Change in Tanzania (ReACCT) research program. The main stakeholders included: local communities; Sokoine University of Agriculture; Wami Ruvu Basin Water Office and the ReACCT Research team. The scope of the network was based on expert experience in similar projects and lessons learnt from literature review of similar projects from elsewhere integrated with local expert knowledge. The installations involved reconnaissance surveys, detailed surveys, and expert consultations to identify best sites. First, a Digital Elevation Model, land use, and soil maps were used to identify potential monitoring sites. Local and expert knowledge was collected on flow regimes, indicators of shallow groundwater plant species, precipitation pattern, vegetation, and soil types. This information was integrated and used to select sites for installation of an automatic weather station, automatic rain gauges, river flow gauging stations

  11. Predictive optimal control of sewer networks using CORAL tool: application to Riera Blanca catchment in Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Puig, V; Cembrano, G; Romera, J; Quevedo, J; Aznar, B; Ramón, G; Cabot, J

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the global control of the Riera Blanca catchment in the Barcelona sewer network using a predictive optimal control approach. This catchment has been modelled using a conceptual modelling approach based on decomposing the catchments in subcatchments and representing them as virtual tanks. This conceptual modelling approach allows real-time model calibration and control of the sewer network. The global control problem of the Riera Blanca catchment is solved using a optimal/predictive control algorithm. To implement the predictive optimal control of the Riera Blanca catchment, a software tool named CORAL is used. The on-line control is simulated by interfacing CORAL with a high fidelity simulator of sewer networks (MOUSE). CORAL interchanges readings from the limnimeters and gate commands with MOUSE as if it was connected with the real SCADA system. Finally, the global control results obtained using the predictive optimal control are presented and compared against the results obtained using current local control system. The results obtained using the global control are very satisfactory compared to those obtained using the local control.

  12. Complex networks, community structure, and catchment classification in a large-scale river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Koren; Sivakumar, Bellie; Woldemeskel, Fitsum M.

    2017-02-01

    This study introduces the concepts of complex networks, especially community structure, to classify catchments in large-scale river basins. The Mississippi River basin (MRB) is considered as a representative large-scale basin, and daily streamflow from a network of 1663 stations are analyzed. Six community structure methods are employed: edge betweenness, greedy algorithm, multilevel modularity optimization, leading eigenvector, label propagation, and walktrap. The influence of correlation threshold (i.e. spatial correlation in flow between stations) on classification (i.e. community formation) is examined. The consistency among the methods in classifying catchments is assessed, using a normalized mutual information (NMI) index. An attempt is also made to explain the community formation in terms of river network/branching and some important catchment/flow properties. The results indicate that the correlation threshold has a notable influence on the number and size of communities identified and that there is a high level of consistency in the performance among the methods (except for the leading eigenvector method at lower thresholds). The results also reveal that only a few communities combine to represent a majority of the catchments, with the 10 largest communities (roughly 4% of the total number of communities) representing almost two-thirds of the catchments. Community formation is found to be influenced not only by geographic proximity but also, more importantly, by the organization of the river network (i.e. main stem and subsequent branching). Some communities are found to exhibit a greater variability in catchment/flow properties within themselves when compared to that of the whole network, thus indicating that such characteristics are unlikely to be a significant influence on community grouping.

  13. Multicriteria design of rain gauge networks for flash flood prediction in semiarid catchments with complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkmann, Till H. M.; Lyon, Steve W.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Troch, Peter A.

    2010-11-01

    Despite the availability of weather radar data at high spatial (1 km2) and temporal (5-15 min) resolution, ground-based rain gauges continue to be necessary for accurate estimation of storm rainfall input to catchments during flash flood events, especially in mountainous catchments. Given economical considerations, a long-standing problem in catchment hydrology is to establish optimal placement of a small number of rain gauges to acquire data on both rainfall depth and spatiotemporal variability of intensity during extreme storm events. Using weather radar observations and a dense network of 40 tipping bucket rain gauges, this study examines whether it is possible to determine a reliable "best" set of rain gauge locations for the Sabino Canyon catchment near Tucson, Arizona, USA, given its complex topography and dominant storm track pattern. High-quality rainfall data are used to evaluate all possible configurations of a "practical" network having from one to four rain gauges. A multicriteria design strategy is used to guide rain gauge placement, by simultaneously minimizing the residual percent bias and maximizing the coefficient of correlation between the estimated and true mean areal rainfall and minimizing the normalized spatial mean squared error between the estimated and true spatiotemporal rainfall distribution. The performance of the optimized rain gauge network was then compared against randomly designed network ensembles by evaluating the quality of streamflows predicted using the Kinematic Runoff and Erosion (KINEROS2) event-based rainfall-runoff model. Our results indicate that the multicriteria strategy provided a robust design by which a sparse but accurate network of rain gauges could be implemented for semiarid basins such as the one studied.

  14. Modeling water flow in a tile drainage network in glacial clayey tills in an agricultural catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Schepper, G.; Therrien, R.; Refsgaard, J.

    2013-12-01

    Tile drainage is a widespread water management practice applied to poorly drained production fields to increase crop productivity and reduce flooding risks. A challenge associated with water resources management in agricultural catchments is to properly understand and quantify the role of tile drainage for the catchment water balance. Only a few studies have been presented where different numerical modeling approaches were tested to simulate tile drainage at the field or catchment scale. These studies suggest that challenges still remainto represent correctly subsurface drainage networks in numerical models while accounting for their influence on water flow and transport. To investigate the impact of tile drains, a variably-saturated flow model has been applied to the Lillebaek agricultural catchment, Denmark. The Lillebaek catchment covers 5 ha and is underlain by about 30 m of Quaternary deposits that consist of a local sandy aquifer with upper and lower clayey till units. A tile drainage network is located in the upper clay till. Water table elevations are recorded daily in a network of piezometers within the catchment, as well as drainage and stream discharge. The control volume finite element HydroGeoSphere model is used to simulate 3D variably-saturated flow in the catchment, coupled with 1D open-channel flow in tile drains and 2D overland flow. That approach requires that the tile drainage network be represented explicitly in the model with 1D elements. The 3D field-scale hydrogeological model was first generated from a national-scale geological model for Denmark combined with available local borehole data. A reference model was then generated for 3D variably-saturated subsurface flow coupled with 2D overland flow. That reference model also incorporates discrete 1D elements to represent the entire drainage network, with a critical depth boundary condition applied to the outlet of the drainage networks. A series of simulation were performed to test the

  15. Catchment sediment flux: a lake sediment perspective on the onset of the Anthropocene?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiverrell, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Definitions of the Anthropocene are varied but from a geomorphological perspective broadly can be described as the interval of recent Earth history during which 'humans have had an 'overwhelming' effect on the Earth system' (Brown et al., 2013). Identifying the switch to a human-dominated geomorphic process regime is actually a challenging process, with in the 'Old World' ramping up of human populations and impacts on earth surface processes since the Neolithic/Mesolithic transition and the onset of agriculture. In the terrestrial realm lakes offer a unique window on changes in human forcing of earth surface processes from a sedimentary flux perspective, because unlike alluvial and hill-slope systems sedimentation is broadly continuous and uninterrupted. Dearing and Jones (2003) showed for a global dataset of lakes a 5-10 fold increase in sediment delivery comparing pre- and post-anthropogenic disturbance. Here sediment records from several lakes in lowland agricultural landscapes are presented to examine the changes in the flux and composition of materials delivered from their catchments. By definition the lakes record the switch to a human dominated system, but not necessary in accelerated sediment accumulation rates with changes in sediment composition equally important. Data from Crose, Hatch and Peckforton Meres, in lowland northwest England are interrogated producing quantitative land-cover reconstructions from pollen spectra calculated using the REVEALS model (Sugita, 2007), geochemical evidence for changes sediment provenance and flux, and 14C and stable Pb pollutant based chronological models detecting changes in sediment accumulation rate. The lake sediment geochemistry points to several phases of heightened human impact within these small agricultural catchments. Following small-in-scale forest cover reductions and limited impacts in terms of sediment flux during the Neolithic, the Bronze to Iron Age saw the first substantial reductions in forest cover

  16. Estimation of regional recharge in the HOBE catchment using data from a distributed soil moisture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasen, M.; Andreasen, L. A.; Bircher, S.; Sonnenborg, T.; Jensen, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    The regional variation of recharge of ground water is dependent on a larger number of variables and conditions and is therefore difficult to quantify. In this study we have estimated regional recharge using data from a distributed network of soil moisture stations within the HOBE catchment. The network has been designed in an arrangement of three clusters along a long-term precipitation gradient and the stations have been distributed according to respective fractions of classes combining the prevailing land use, top- and subsoil conditions. At each of the 30 stations water content has been measured at three depths (0-5cm, 20-25cm and 50-55cm) for the period 2009-2011 at a temporal resolution of 30 minutes. The 1D soil-plant-atmosphere system model DAISY has been applied to each of the field locations to simulate the water balance of the root zone and the associated components of evapotranspiration and recharge. The 30 models have been formulated and parameterized using specific information on local climate, soil texture, land use and management. Each model was calibrated to the measured soil water content from the distributed network using the PEST (Parameter ESTimation) software. The calibrated parameters were saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks and van Genuchten parameter n as they were found most sensitive. The 30 sets of results were averaged to represent the mean conditions of the catchment. An effective parameterization was also determined by calibration against mean soil moisture and compared to the results obtained by using effective parameters using various averaging methods. The regional variation in groundwater recharge, actual evapotranspiration and soil water content in the catchment was dependent on land use. The simulated results showed that the largest recharge was found at the agricultural sites (554 mm/yr) and the lowest at the forested sites (257 mm/yr). Correspondingly, the highest actual evapotranspiration was found at the forested sites (614

  17. Influence of catchment vegetation on mercury accumulation in lake sediments from a long-term perspective.

    PubMed

    Rydberg, Johan; Rösch, Manfred; Heinz, Emanuel; Biester, Harald

    2015-12-15

    Organic matter (OM) cycling has a large impact on the cycling of mercury (Hg) in the environment. Hence, it is important to have a thorough understanding on how changes in, e.g., catchment vegetation - through its effect on OM cycling - affect the behavior of Hg. To test whether shifts in vegetation had an effect on Hg-transport to lakes we investigated a sediment record from Herrenwieser See (Southern Germany). This lake has a well-defined Holocene vegetation history: at ~8700years BP Corylus avellana (hazel) was replaced by Quercus robur (oak), which was replaced by Abies alba (fir) and Fagus sylvatica (beech) ~5700years BP). We were particularly interested in testing if coniferous vegetation leads to a larger export of Hg to aquatic systems than deciduous vegetation. When hazel was replaced by oak, reduced soil erosion and increased transport of DOM-bound mercury from the catchment resulted in increases in both Hg-concentrations and accumulation rates (61ngg(-1) and 5.5ngcm(-2)yr.(-)(1) to 118ngg(-1) and 8.5ngcm(-2)yr.(-)(1)). However, even if Hg-concentrations increased also in association with the introduction of fir and beech (173ngg(-1)), as a result of higher Hg:C, there was no increase in Hg-accumulation rates (7.6ngcm(-2)yr.(-)(1)), because of a decreased input of OM. At around 2500years BP Hg-accumulation rates and Hg-concentration indicated an additional input of Hg to the sediment (316ngg(-1) and 10.3ngcm(-2)yr.(-)(1)), which might be due to increased human activities in the area, e.g., forest burning or mining. Our results contrast those of several paired-catchment studies that suggest a higher release of Hg from coniferous than deciduous forest, and there is a need for studies with a long-term perspective to increase our understanding of the effects of slow and gradual processes on mercury cycling.

  18. Effects of a network of sand-storage dams on the hydrology on catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertsen, Maurits; Strohschein, Paul; Onencan, Abby; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Water conservation is a high priority in the drier areas of sub-Saharan Africa. Storage of water from the rainy season to the dry season, or even from wet years to dry years is highly important. Small multi-purpose sub-surface water reservoirs recharged through infiltration are used to provide water for humans, livestock and crops in the Kitui region in Kenya. The groundwater dams obstruct the natural flow of water in wet seasons or periods, and provide storage of water during dry seasons or periods. This paper links the hydrology of the sand-storage dams to human agency. When is a dam a success in hydrological terms? When it provides water every year? Every two years? How many months? What happens in very dry years? Obviously, water use will decrease the water volume and thus the water level upstream of the dam, but to what extent typically depends on the amounts used compared to the size of the dam and the water use itself. Longer-term effects on groundwater levels to be expected depend strongly on the way the water is used. Household water use and river banks infiltration increasing seasonal storage can go hand in hand. However, when water in dams is used for higher water demanding activities such as (motorized) irrigation, the infiltration effect into banks may be minimal. A dam can also be "too effective" and decrease water availability for water users further downstream. It is unlikely, however, that an individual farmer will effect on the downstream users of the resources he/she is tapping, but a network of dams as in Kitui may have considerable effect. Measurements indicate that only about 2% to 3% of the total yearly runoff within the catchment directly associated with a single dam is stored in its reservoir. Therefore only this small percentage of the total flow of a seasonal river with dams is blocked. The paper will detail these general concepts with a case study of the Kiindu catchment. The hydrology of the Kiindu catchment is dependent on different

  19. Regionalization of land-use impacts on streamflow using a network of paired catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa-Tocachi, Boris F.; Buytaert, Wouter; De Bièvre, Bert

    2016-09-01

    Quantifying the impact of land use and cover (LUC) change on catchment hydrological response is essential for land-use planning and management. Yet hydrologists are often not able to present consistent and reliable evidence to support such decision-making. The issue tends to be twofold: a scarcity of relevant observations, and the difficulty of regionalizing any existing observations. This study explores the potential of a paired catchment monitoring network to provide statistically robust, regionalized predictions of LUC change impact in an environment of high hydrological variability. We test the importance of LUC variables to explain hydrological responses and to improve regionalized predictions using 24 catchments distributed along the Tropical Andes. For this, we calculate first 50 physical catchment properties, and then select a subset based on correlation analysis. The reduced set is subsequently used to regionalize a selection of hydrological indices using multiple linear regression. Contrary to earlier studies, we find that incorporating LUC variables in the regional model structures increases significantly regression performance and predictive capacity for 66% of the indices. For the runoff ratio, baseflow index, and slope of the flow duration curve, the mean absolute error reduces by 53% and the variance of the residuals by 79%, on average. We attribute the explanatory capacity of LUC in the regional model to the pairwise monitoring setup, which increases the contrast of the land-use signal in the data set. As such, it may be a useful strategy to optimize data collection to support watershed management practices and improve decision-making in data-scarce regions.

  20. Applying the Fuzzy ARTMAP neural network for mapping erosive status in the Ria Formosa catchment (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granja Martins, F. M.; Neto Paixão, H. M.; Jordán, A.; Zavala, L. M.; Bellinfante, N.

    2012-04-01

    The study of the soil erosion risk is the starting point for development and sustainable land management. The intensity of soil erosion risk is conditioned by soil erodibility, slope, land use and vegetation cover. The objective of this work is mapping the erosive status of the Ria Formosa catchment using "Fuzzy ARTMAP" neural network. The study area is the catchment of Ria Formosa, which includes a shallow coastal lagoon with an area of about 16000 ha located in Algarve (southern Portugal). It is protected by EU and national laws, and is classified as a wetland of international importance under the RAMSAR convention. Previously to the construction of the artificial neuronal network model, it was necessary to establish the training areas (< 1% of total study area) in order to get information about lithofacies, land use, slope and the percentage of vegetation cover. These variables were assessed by supervised classification. Five classes of erosive status were obtained by the artificial neuronal network. These classes were compared with the map of erosive status elaborated with the methodology proposed by the Priority Action Plan/Regional Activity Centre (PAP/RAC, 1997). The differences between both methods were about 1% of the total area. Both maps were validated with field observations and analysis of aerial photographs.

  1. Why Network? Theoretical Perspectives on Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muijs, Daniel; West, Mel; Ainscow, Mel

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, networking and collaboration have become increasingly popular in education. However, there is at present a lack of attention to the theoretical basis of networking, which could illuminate when and when not to network and under what conditions networks are likely to be successful. In this paper, we will attempt to sketch the…

  2. On the non-stationarity of hydrological response in anthropogenically unaffected catchments: an Australian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajami, Hoori; Sharma, Ashish; Band, Lawrence E.; Evans, Jason P.; Tuteja, Narendra K.; Amirthanathan, Gnanathikkam E.; Bari, Mohammed A.

    2017-01-01

    Increases in greenhouse gas concentrations are expected to impact the terrestrial hydrologic cycle through changes in radiative forcings and plant physiological and structural responses. Here, we investigate the nature and frequency of non-stationary hydrological response as evidenced through water balance studies over 166 anthropogenically unaffected catchments in Australia. Non-stationarity of hydrologic response is investigated through analysis of long-term trend in annual runoff ratio (1984-2005). Results indicate that a significant trend (p < 0.01) in runoff ratio is evident in 20 catchments located in three main ecoregions of the continent. Runoff ratio decreased across the catchments with non-stationary hydrologic response with the exception of one catchment in northern Australia. Annual runoff ratio sensitivity to annual fractional vegetation cover was similar to or greater than sensitivity to annual precipitation in most of the catchments with non-stationary hydrologic response indicating vegetation impacts on streamflow. We use precipitation-productivity relationships as the first-order control for ecohydrologic catchment classification. A total of 12 out of 20 catchments present a positive precipitation-productivity relationship possibly enhanced by CO2 fertilization effect. In the remaining catchments, biogeochemical and edaphic factors may be impacting productivity. Results suggest vegetation dynamics should be considered in exploring causes of non-stationary hydrologic response.

  3. Estimation of snow covered area for an urban catchment using image processing and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Matheussen, B V; Thorolfsson, S T

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a method to estimate the snow covered area (SCA) for small urban catchments. The method uses images taken with a digital camera positioned on top of a tall building. The camera is stationary and takes overview images of the same area every fifteen minutes throughout the winter season. The images were read into an image-processing program and a three-layered feed-forward perceptron artificial neural network (ANN) was used to calculate fractional snow cover within three different land cover types (road, park and roofs). The SCA was estimated from the number of pixels with snow cover relative to the total number of pixels. The method was tested for a small urban catchment, Risvollan in Trondheim, Norway. A time series of images taken during spring of 2001 and the 2001-2002 winter season was used to generate a time series of SCA. Snow covered area was also estimated from aerial photos. The results showed a strong correlation between SCA estimated from the digital camera and the aerial photos. The time series of SCA can be used for verification of urban snowmelt models.

  4. Catchment organisation, free energy dynamics and network control on critical zone water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehe, E.; Ehret, U.; Kleidon, A.; Jackisch, C.; Scherer, U.; Blume, T.

    2012-04-01

    From a functional point of view the catchment system is compiled by patterns of permeable and less permeable textural elements - soils and mother rock. Theses textural elements provide a mechanical stabile matrix for growth of terrestrial biota and soil formation. They furthermore organize subsurface storage of water against gravity, dissolved nutrients and heat. Storage against gravity is only possible because water acts as wetting fluid and is thus attracted by capillary forces in the pores space. Capillarity increases non-linearly with decreasing pore size and is zero at local saturation. The pore size distribution of a soil is thus characteristic of its capability to store water against losses such as drainage, evaporation and root extraction and at the same time a fingerprint of the work that has been performed by physical, chemical and biological processes to weather solid mother rock and form a soil. A strong spatial covariance of soil hydraulic properties within the same soil type is due to a fingerprint of strong spatial organization at small scales. Spatial organization at the hillslope scale implies the existence of a typical soil catena i.e. that hillslopes exhibit the same/ downslope sequence of different soils types. Textural storage elements are separated by strikingly self-similar network like structures, we name them flow structures. These flow structures are created in a self-reinforcing manner by work performed either by biota like earth worms and plant roots or by dissipative processes such as soil cracking and water/fluvial erosion. Regardless of their different origin connected flow structures exhibit a highly similar functioning and similar characteristics: they allow for high mass flows at small driving potential gradients because specific flow resistance along the network is continuously very small. This implies temporal stability even during small extremes, due to the small amount of local momentum dissipation per unit mass flow, as well

  5. Design of rain gauge networks for flash flood prediction: assessment based on spatial moments of catchment rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, F.; Zoccatelli, D.

    2012-04-01

    Despite the availability of weather radar data at high spatial (1 km2) and temporal (5-15 min) resolution, ground-based rain gauges continue to be necessary for accurate estimation of storm rainfall input to catchments during flash flood events, especially in terrain characterized by complex orography. A long-standing problem in catchment hydrology is to establish optimal placement and density of a rain gauge network to acquire data on both rainfall depth and spatiotemporal variability of intensity during extreme storm events. Using weather radar observations and a dense network of rain gauges, this study examines whether it is possible to determine a reliable "best" set of rain gauge locations for a number of catchments subject to flash floods observed in Europe. High-quality rainfall data are used to evaluate several configurations of a raingauge network with variable spatial densities. A methodology is used for the selection of raingauge sites, given a certain spatial density, which is based on the use of the spatial moments of catchment rainfall. This set of statistics quantifies the dependence existing between spatial rainfall organisation, basin morphology and runoff response. These statistics describe the spatial rainfall organisation in terms of position and dispersion as a function of the distance measured along the flow routing coordinate. Rainfall estimates obtained from the 'optimised' raingauge network are used as input for a distributed hydrological model. Results from these simulations are compared with those obtained by using the measured rainfall and with those obtained by estimating rainfall from randomly designed network ensembles. Our results show that indications from the optimization of the spatial moments of catchment rainfall may help to provide a robust design for rain gauge network design.

  6. Psychology and social networks: a dynamic network theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Westaby, James D; Pfaff, Danielle L; Redding, Nicholas

    2014-04-01

    Research on social networks has grown exponentially in recent years. However, despite its relevance, the field of psychology has been relatively slow to explain the underlying goal pursuit and resistance processes influencing social networks in the first place. In this vein, this article aims to demonstrate how a dynamic network theory perspective explains the way in which social networks influence these processes and related outcomes, such as goal achievement, performance, learning, and emotional contagion at the interpersonal level of analysis. The theory integrates goal pursuit, motivation, and conflict conceptualizations from psychology with social network concepts from sociology and organizational science to provide a taxonomy of social network role behaviors, such as goal striving, system supporting, goal preventing, system negating, and observing. This theoretical perspective provides psychologists with new tools to map social networks (e.g., dynamic network charts), which can help inform the development of change interventions. Implications for social, industrial-organizational, and counseling psychology as well as conflict resolution are discussed, and new opportunities for research are highlighted, such as those related to dynamic network intelligence (also known as cognitive accuracy), levels of analysis, methodological/ethical issues, and the need to theoretically broaden the study of social networking and social media behavior. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Analysis of spatiotemporal soil moisture patterns at the catchment scale using a wireless sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogena, Heye R.; Huisman, Johan A.; Rosenbaum, Ulrike; Weuthen, Ansgar; Vereecken, Harry

    2010-05-01

    Soil water content plays a key role in partitioning water and energy fluxes and controlling the pattern of groundwater recharge. Despite the importance of soil water content, it is not yet measured in an operational way at larger scales. The aim of this paper is to present the potential of real-time monitoring for the analysis of soil moisture patterns at the catchment scale using the recently developed wireless sensor network SoilNet [1], [2]. SoilNet is designed to measure soil moisture, salinity and temperature in several depths (e.g. 5, 20 and 50 cm). Recently, a small forest catchment Wüstebach (~27 ha) has been instrumented with 150 sensor nodes and more than 1200 soil sensors in the framework of the Transregio32 and the Helmholtz initiative TERENO (Terrestrial Environmental Observatories). From August to November 2009, more than 6 million soil moisture measurements have been performed. We will present first results from a statistical and geostatistical analysis of the data. The observed spatial variability of soil moisture corresponds well with the 800-m scale variability described in [3]. The very low scattering of the standard deviation versus mean soil moisture plots indicates that sensor network data shows less artificial soil moisture variations than soil moisture data originated from measurement campaigns. The variograms showed more or less the same nugget effect, which indicates that the sum of the sub-scale variability and the measurement error is rather time-invariant. Wet situations showed smaller spatial variability, which is attributed to saturated soil water content, which poses an upper limit and is typically not strongly variable in headwater catchments with relatively homogeneous soil. The spatiotemporal variability in soil moisture at 50 cm depth was significantly lower than at 5 and 20 cm. This finding indicates that the considerable variability of the top soil is buffered deeper in the soil due to lateral and vertical water fluxes

  8. Network Enabled Operations: A Canadian Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-13

    Decisive: US Naval Institute Proceedings. ** VERDON , J. (2004) Transformation in the CF - People Implications of Effects-Based and Network-Enabled...Operations: A Canadian Perspective (U) 4. AUTHORS (First name, middle initial and last name. If military, show rank, e.g. Maj. John E. Doe.) Michael H

  9. What makes catchment management groups "tick"?

    PubMed

    Oliver, P

    2001-01-01

    The work of catchment management groups throughout Australia represents a significant economic and social investment in natural resource management. Institutional structures and policies, the role of on-ground coordinators, facilitation processes, citizen participation and social capital are critical factors influencing the success of catchment management groups. From a participant-researcher viewpoint, this paper signposts research directions and themes that are being pursued from the participant/coordinator, catchment group, and lead government/non-government agency perspective on the influence of these factors on the success of a catchment management group in the Pumicestone Region of Southeast Queensland, Australia. Research directions, themes and discussion/reflection points for practitioners include--the importance of understanding milieu; motivation; success; having fun; "networking networks"; involvement of "nontraditional" stakeholders; development of stakeholder/participant partnerships; learning from other practitioners; methods of stakeholder/participant representation; evaluation; the need for guiding principles or philosophy; the equivalence of planning, implementation, evaluation, and resourcing; catchments as fundamental units of Nature; continuity of support for groups; recognising a new role for government; working with existing networks; and the need for an eclectic approach to natural resource management.

  10. Explaining lake and catchment change using sediment derived and written histories: an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Tibby, John

    2003-07-01

    Palaeolimnological records can be powerfully combined with documentary data to explain the impact of modern industry and agriculture on lake systems and their catchments. Such an approach is highly appropriate in Australia since modern society was imposed on a continent until recently populated solely by hunter-gatherers and because there is a wealth of historical data to draw upon. Confounding factors such as the influence of climate change, depopulation of the indigenous community and non-linear responses to human impact must be considered in analysis of the relative importance of various land use changes upon lake pollution.

  11. Use of spatially distributed time-integrated sediment sampling networks and distributed fine sediment modelling to inform catchment management.

    PubMed

    Perks, M T; Warburton, J; Bracken, L J; Reaney, S M; Emery, S B; Hirst, S

    2017-02-06

    Under the EU Water Framework Directive, suspended sediment is omitted from environmental quality standards and compliance targets. This omission is partly explained by difficulties in assessing the complex dose-response of ecological communities. But equally, it is hindered by a lack of spatially distributed estimates of suspended sediment variability across catchments. In this paper, we demonstrate the inability of traditional, discrete sampling campaigns for assessing exposure to fine sediment. Sampling frequencies based on Environmental Quality Standard protocols, whilst reflecting typical manual sampling constraints, are unable to determine the magnitude of sediment exposure with an acceptable level of precision. Deviations from actual concentrations range between -35 and +20% based on the interquartile range of simulations. As an alternative, we assess the value of low-cost, suspended sediment sampling networks for quantifying suspended sediment transfer (SST). In this study of the 362 km(2) upland Esk catchment we observe that spatial patterns of sediment flux are consistent over the two year monitoring period across a network of 17 monitoring sites. This enables the key contributing sub-catchments of Butter Beck (SST: 1141 t km(2) yr(-1)) and Glaisdale Beck (SST: 841 t km(2) yr(-1)) to be identified. The time-integrated samplers offer a feasible alternative to traditional infrequent and discrete sampling approaches for assessing spatio-temporal changes in contamination. In conjunction with a spatially distributed diffuse pollution model (SCIMAP), time-integrated sediment sampling is an effective means of identifying critical sediment source areas in the catchment, which can better inform sediment management strategies for pollution prevention and control.

  12. Optimizing embedded sensor network design for catchment-scale snow-depth estimation using LiDAR and machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oroza, Carlos A.; Zheng, Zeshi; Glaser, Steven D.; Tuia, Devis; Bales, Roger C.

    2016-10-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of a machine-learning algorithm that uses LiDAR data to optimize ground-based sensor placements for catchment-scale snow measurements. Sampling locations that best represent catchment physiographic variables are identified with the Expectation Maximization algorithm for a Gaussian mixture model. A Gaussian process is then used to model the snow depth in a 1 km2 area surrounding the network, and additional sensors are placed to minimize the model uncertainty. The aim of the study is to determine the distribution of sensors that minimizes the bias and RMSE of the model. We compare the accuracy of the snow-depth model using the proposed placements to an existing sensor network at the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory. Each model is validated with a 1 m2 LiDAR-derived snow-depth raster from 14 March 2010. The proposed algorithm exhibits higher accuracy with fewer sensors (8 sensors, RMSE 38.3 cm, bias = 3.49 cm) than the existing network (23 sensors, RMSE 53.0 cm, bias = 15.5 cm) and randomized placements (8 sensors, RMSE 63.7 cm, bias = 24.7 cm). We then evaluate the spatial and temporal transferability of the method using 14 LiDAR scenes from two catchments within the JPL Airborne Snow Observatory. In each region, the optimized sensor placements are determined using the first available snow raster for the year. The accuracy in the remaining LiDAR surveys is then compared to 100 configurations of sensors selected at random. We find the error statistics (bias and RMSE) to be more consistent across the additional surveys than the average random configuration.

  13. On the Derivation of Pan-European River Networks and Catchment Boundaries from a 250m DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, R.; Vogt, J. V.; Soille, P.; Paracchini, M. L.; de Jager, A. L.

    2003-04-01

    Mapping and characterisation of catchments and river courses for the European continent is of relevant interest to support the environmental monitoring activities of the European Environmental Agency (EEA) and for the implementation of the Water Framework Directive (WFD). At continental or global scale the river networks and associated catchments are generally derived from a set of standard DEM processing techniques, including pit filling, stream burning, and the calculation of flow direction and flow accumulation grids. The continental final river networks are generally detected by imposing a constant critical contributing area threshold, independently of widely varying landscape conditions. If the same critical area for all environments is assumed, the resulting drainage density does not reflect the real degree of dissection and the produced river map may be unrealistic. To overcome this limitation, we propose a classification of the landscape and we present a new approach to derive river networks and catchments over extended heterogeneous areas from medium resolution digital elevation data (250 m grid cell size) and environmental characteristics,. We show that the implementation of a European landscape characterisation, coupled with the analysis of the local slope versus contributing area represents a viable way for mapping the spatial variability of the river networks. Such landscape classification has been realised using a parametric model that keeps into account a set of five variables [annual rainfall (P), local relief (R), vegetation cover (V), soil transmissivity (T), and bedrock erodibility (E)] that quantify the environmental factors governing drainage density. The critical contributing area was derived for each landscape drainage density class by analysing the log-log plot of local slope contributing area relationships derived from the digital elevation data. The scaling break corresponding to the main valley networks was defined as the last inflection

  14. Malaria transmission modelling: a network perspective.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiming; Yang, Bo; Cheung, William K; Yang, Guojing

    2012-11-01

    Malaria transmission can be affected by multiple or even hidden factors, making it difficult to timely and accurately predict the impact of elimination and eradication programs that have been undertaken and the potential resurgence and spread that may continue to emerge. One approach at the moment is to develop and deploy surveillance systems in an attempt to identify them as timely as possible and thus to enable policy makers to modify and implement strategies for further preventing the transmission. Most of the surveillance data will be of temporal and spatial nature. From an interdisciplinary point of view, it would be interesting to ask the following important as well as challenging question: Based on the available surveillance data in temporal and spatial forms, how can we build a more effective surveillance mechanism for monitoring and early detecting the relative prevalence and transmission patterns of malaria? What we can note from the existing clustering-based surveillance software systems is that they do not infer the underlying transmission networks of malaria. However, such networks can be quite informative and insightful as they characterize how malaria transmits from one place to another. They can also in turn allow public health policy makers and researchers to uncover the hidden and interacting factors such as environment, genetics and ecology and to discover/predict malaria transmission patterns/trends. The network perspective further extends the present approaches to modelling malaria transmission based on a set of chosen factors. In this article, we survey the related work on transmission network inference, discuss how such an approach can be utilized in developing an effective computational means for inferring malaria transmission networks based on partial surveillance data, and what methodological steps and issues may be involved in its formulation and validation.

  15. The Changing Nature of Suicide Attacks: A Social Network Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedahzur, Ami; Perliger, Arie

    2006-01-01

    To comprehend the developments underlying the suicide attacks of recent years, we suggest that the organizational approach, which until recently was used to explain this phenomenon, should be complemented with a social network perspective. By employing a social network analysis of Palestinian suicide networks, the authors found that, in contrast…

  16. Neoformation of clay in lateral root catchments of mallee eucalypts: a chemical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Verboom, William H.; Pate, John S.; Aspandiar, Mehrooz

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims A previous paper (Annals of Botany 103: 673–685) described formation of clayey pavements in lateral root catchments of eucalypts colonizing a recently formed sand dune in south-west Western Australia. Here chemical and morphological aspects of their formation at the site are studied. Methods Chemical and physical examinations of soil cores through pavements and sand under adjacent heath assessed build-up of salts, clay and pH changes in or below pavements. Relationships of root morphology to clay deposition were examined and deposits subjected to scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Xylem transport of mineral elements in eucalypt and non-eucalypt species was studied by analysis of xylem (tracheal) sap from lateral roots. Key Results The columns of which pavements are composed develop exclusively on lower-tier lateral roots. Such sites show intimate associations of fine roots, fungal filaments, microbiota and clay deposits rich in Si, Al and Fe. Time scales for construction of pavements by eucalypts were assessed. Cores through columns of pavemented profiles showed gross elevations of bulk density, Al, Fe and Si in columns and related increases in pH, Mg and Ca status in lower profiles. A cutting through the dune exhibited pronounced alkalinity (pH 7–10) under mallee woodland versus acidity (pH 5–6·5) under proteaceous heath. Xylem sap analyses showed unusually high concentrations of Al, Fe, Mg and Si in dry-season samples from column-bearing roots. Conclusions Deposition of Al–Fe–Si-rich clay is pivotal to pavement construction by eucalypts and leads to profound chemical and physical changes in relevant soil profiles. Microbial associates of roots are likely to be involved in clay genesis, with parent eucalypts supplying the required key mineral elements and carbon sources. Acquisition of the Al and Fe incorporated into clay derives principally from hydraulic uplift from ground water via deeply

  17. The logic of participation: critical perspectives on the 'participatory turn' in river and catchment management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Stuart

    2014-05-01

    Both academic research and catchment management practice have now placed considerable emphasis upon the ways in which participation might be used with the objective of improving water management. It is often predicated upon the observation that, historically, water management decisions have been dominated by those who hold certain kinds of expertise, to the detriment of the expertise of others. Participation, then, is a means of opening up decision-making to capture a greater range of those implicated in water management. Scholars of Science Technology Studies have traditionally advocated participation as involving a diversified set of ideals and approaches, ones that are sensitive to the context within which they are practiced and the logics that surround them. But, STS scholars have also argued that as soon as participation, notably participation in a particular form, becomes proscribed, it loses its very raison d'être, that is as a space within which slightly different understandings of a problem may form, grow and take on meaning oustide of the institutional systems of decision-making that all to often dominate our lives. Here I argue that this implies a need to think through what can be called a 'logic of participation' in water management, that is why certain individuals or institutions advocate it, and under what conditions, for whom and with what end. In short, we need a political science analysis of who participation in water management might serve. This paper is motivated by one element of such an analysis linked to the observation that many models of how participation in water management might be done have developed without sufficient attention to the sometimes sophisticated and advanced levels of participation that already exist in many water management systems. Interventions to improve participation in such cases may be as much about displacing and replacing existing participatory systems, whether: intentional, because of concerns held by authorities

  18. Web-based modelling of energy, water and matter fluxes to support decision making in mesoscale catchments??the integrative perspective of GLOWA-Danube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, R.; Mauser, W.; Niemeyer, S.; Colgan, A.; Stolz, R.; Escher-Vetter, H.; Kuhn, M.; Reichstein, M.; Tenhunen, J.; Kraus, A.; Ludwig, M.; Barth, M.; Hennicker, R.

    The GLOWA-initiative (Global Change of the water cycle), funded by the German Ministry of Research and Education (BMBF), has been established to address the manifold consequences of Global Change on regional water resources in a variety of catchment areas with different natural and cultural characteristics. Within this framework, the GLOWA-Danube project is dealing with the Upper Danube watershed as a representative mesoscale test site (∼75.000 km 2) for mountain-foreland regions in the temperate mid-latitudes. The principle objective is to identify, examine and develop new techniques of coupled distributed modelling for the integration of natural and socio-economic sciences. The transdisciplinary research in GLOWA-Danube develops an integrated decision support system, called DANUBIA, to investigate the sustainability of future water use. GLOWA-Danube, which is scheduled for a total run-time of eight years to operationally implement and establish DANUBIA, comprises a university-based network of experts with water-related competence in the fields of engineering, natural and social sciences. Co-operation with a network of stakeholders in water resources management of the Upper Danube catchment ensures that practical issues and future problems in the water sector of the region can be addressed. In order to synthesize a common understanding between the project partners, a standardized notation of parameters and functions and a platform-independent structure of computational methods and interfaces has been established, by making use of the unified modelling language, an industry standard for the structuring and co-ordination of large projects in software development [Booch et al., The Unified Modelling Language User Guide, Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1999]. DANUBIA is object-oriented, spatially distributed and raster-based at its core. It applies the concept of “proxels” (process pixels) as its basic objects, which have different dimensions depending on the viewing

  19. Integration of Volterra model with artificial neural networks for rainfall-runoff simulation in forested catchment of northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, Mahsa H.; Ghorbani, Mohammad Ali; Dinpashoh, Yagob; Shahmorad, Sedaghat

    2016-09-01

    Rainfall-runoff simulation is an important task in water resources management. In this study, an integrated Volterra model with artificial neural networks (IVANN) was presented to simulate the rainfall-runoff process. The proposed integrated model includes the semi-distributed forms of the Volterra and ANN models which can explore spatial variation in rainfall-runoff process without requiring physical characteristic parameters of the catchments, while taking advantage of the potential of Volterra and ANNs models in nonlinear mapping. The IVANN model was developed using hourly rainfall and runoff data pertaining to thirteen storms to study short-term responses of a forest catchment in northern Iran; and its performance was compared with that of semi-distributed integrated ANN (IANN) model and lumped Volterra model. The Volterra model was applied as a nonlinear model (second-order Volterra (SOV) model) and solved using the ordinary least square (OLS) method. The models performance were evaluated and compared using five performance criteria namely coefficient of efficiency, root mean square error, error of total volume, relative error of peak discharge and error of time for peak to arrive. Results showed that the IVANN model performs well than the other semi-distributed and lumped models to simulate the rainfall-runoff process. Comparing to the integrated models, the lumped SOV model has lower precision to simulate the rainfall-runoff process.

  20. An integrated approach for catchment delineation and conduit-network modeling in karst aquifers: application to a site in the Swiss tabular Jura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malard, Arnauld; Jeannin, Pierre-Yves; Vouillamoz, Jonathan; Weber, Eric

    2015-11-01

    An essential issue in karst hydrology is the characterization of the hydrogeological flow systems, i.e., the delineation of catchment areas and the organization of the main flow paths (conduit network) feeding one or several outlets. The proposed approach provides an explicit way to sketch catchment areas, and to generate karst conduits on the basis of a three-dimensional (3D) conceptual model of the aquifer (KARSYS approach). The approach follows three main principles: (1) conduits develop according to the hydraulic gradient, which depends on the aquifer zonation, (2) conduits are guided by preferential guidance features (or inception horizons) prevailing in the unsaturated and saturated zones of the aquifer, and (3) conduits initiate on a regular basis below the autogenic zone of the catchment area. This approach was applied to a site in the Swiss Jura as a base for the assessment of flood-hazard risks. The resulting model proposes a new delineation of the system catchment area and appears fairer regarding hydrological measurements than previous interpretations, which under-estimated the catchment area by about 20 %. Furthermore, the proposed conduit network for the whole aquifer is also consistent with local cave surveys and dye-tracing observations. These interesting results demonstrate that the combination of this approach with the KARSYS 3D model provides an integrated and effective way for the characterization of karst-flow systems.

  1. Theoretical perspectives of terrorist enemies as networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Spulak, Robert George, Jr.; Glicken, Jessica

    2005-08-01

    This perspective of terrorist enemies as networks by two distinguished associate fellows of the Joint Special Operations University (JSOU) follows as a result of its recent initiative to support USSOCOM strategic planning for the Global War on Terrorism. The paper is a manifestation of JSOU's goals for contributing products that will advance SOF strategic art and generating strategic outreach to the military, civilian, and academic communities to enrich those products. Dr. Robert Spulak and Dr. Jessica Glicken Turnley presented the findings of this paper to assembled strategic planners from USSOCOM, other combatant commands, and interagency players at the Center for Special Operations plan development conference, September 2005, in Tampa, Florida. At that meeting, the authors put forward a number of helpful planning concepts based on their professional studies in science and the humanities and their experiences in government and business. The JSOU Strategic Studies Department is pleased to facilitate the association of USSOCOM strategic planners with civilian expertise and insights that can broaden military thought and encourage planning decisions directly relevant to the changing global environment. Through JSOU's strategic outreach initiative, experts in many professional disciplines have signaled their willingness to support the Nation's counterterrorism efforts. In that spirit, JSOU is proud to commend this paper to SOF readers and appreciates the support of Dr. Spulak and Dr. Turnley.

  2. The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and the river network downstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Heyden, Constantin J.; New, Mark G.

    Dambos are shallow, seasonally inundated wetlands and are a widespread landform in Central and Southern Africa. Owing to their importance in local agriculture and as a water resource, the hydrology of dambos is of considerable interest: varied, and sometimes contradictory, hydrological characteristics have been described in the literature. The issues in contention focus on the role of the dambo in (i) the catchment evapotranspiration (ET) budget, (ii) flood flow retardation and attenuation, and (iii) sustaining dry season flow to the river down-stream. In addition, both rainfall and groundwater have been identified as the dominant source of water to the dambo and various hydrogeological models have been proposed to describe the hydrological functions of the landform. In this paper, hydrological and geochemical data collected over a full hydrological year are used to investigate and describe the hydrological functions of a dambo in north-western Zambia. The Penman estimate of wetland ET was less than the ET from the miombo-wooded interfluve and the wetland has been shown to have little effect on flood flow retardation or attenuation. Discharge of water stored within the wetland contributed little to the dry season flow from the dambo, which was sustained primarily by groundwater discharge. Flow in a perched aquifer within the catchment soils contributed a large portion of baseflow during the rains and early dry season. This source ceased by the mid dry season, implying that the sustained middle to late dry season streamflow from the wetland is through discharge of a deeper aquifer within the underlying regolith or bedrock. This hypothesis is tested through an analysis of groundwater and wetland geochemistry. Various physical parameters, PHREEQC model results and end member mixing analysis (EMMA) suggest strongly that the deep Upper Roan dolomite aquifer is the source of sustained discharge from the wetland.

  3. Water level and response time of rivers during flash floods derived from a nested network in the Claduègne Mediterranean catchment (43 km2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Sosa, Enrique; Braud, Isabelle; Molinié, Gilles; Nord, Guillaume; Vandervaere, Jean-Pierre; Uber, Magdalana

    2016-04-01

    Flash floods are natural hazards that affect the Mediterranean region. They are caused by intense rainfall events but catchments characteristics are also influential on the hydrological response. In order to study the respective roles of rainfall, land use, geology and soil moisture on this hydrological response at various scales, a high space-time resolution hydrometeorological experimental monitoring system was set in the Mediterranean Claduègne catchment (43 km2), located in the Ardèche catchment, south-east France between 2011 and 2014 (Braud et al., 2014; Nord et al., in prep). Rainfall was monitored using a high resolution rainfall network (Hpiconet) composed of 21 rain gauges with 1 min time step covering an area of about 100 km2. The monitoring of surface hydrology include water level measurements at the outlet of 10 subcatchments ranging from 0.2 to 2.2 km2 and hydrometric measurements (water level, discharge) at the outlet of 3 catchments (Gazel: 3.4 km², SJ1: 12 km² and Claduègne: 43 km²). The 10 subcatchments as well as the Gazel and SJ1 catchments are all embedded within the Claduègne catchments. The location of the 10 subcatchments was chosen to sample different combinations of geology, land use and pedology within the Claduègne catchment. In particular, 4 of these subcathments are located within the Gazel catchment and 2 are located within the SJ1 catchment. Soil moisture data with a 20 minutes time step at depths 10cm, 20-25 and 30-50 cm is also available at nine locations, sampling different combinations of land use and geology. Catchment rainfall was computed from the Hpiconet data for each sub-catchment and all rainfall events using the Thiessen polygons method. The corresponding hydrological response was extracted for the whole data sets. For each event, rainfall characteristics describing rainfall amount and intensity, antecedent rainfall (and thus initial soil moisture) were computed. When a hydrological response was observed, reaction

  4. A mountain environmental virtual observatory (Mountain-EVO) to support participatory monitoring in a network of Andean catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buytaert, Wouter; Ochoa Tocachi, Boris; De Bievre, Bert; Zulkafli, Zed

    2015-04-01

    The tropical Andes are a hotspot of environmental change. The combination of dramatic land-use change with global climate change, demographic growth, and increasing water demand is causing extreme pressures on water resources. This is of particular concern to rural upland communities. They are facing a double challenge of maintaining their own livelihoods with dwindling natural resources, and at the same time supporting downstream ecosystem services such as a well buffered stream flow and good water quality. This challenge is complicated further by the acute lack of data on the hydrological functioning of Andean catchments. The factors controlling their hydrological response are extremely variable in space and time, including meteorological forcing, land cover types, soil properties and geology. This makes it very difficult to predict accurately the impact of human activities such as land use, ecosystem management, and watershed investments. Such predictions are essential for policy-making and sustainable ecosystem management. To tackle the issue of hydrological data scarcity in the tropical Andes, an initiative was set up to implement a network of hydrological monitoring of upland catchments in a pairwise fashion. Using a trading-space-for-time approach, the initiative intends to use these data to improve predictions about the impact of land-use changes and other ecosystem management practices on the hydrological response. Currently, over 25 catchments are being monitored for precipitation and streamflow in 9 sites located in Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, and Venezuela. The sites are supported by local stakeholders and communities in a participatory monitoring scheme that otherwise would be impractical or prohibitively expensive. To overcome the technical challenges of monitoring hydrological variables in remote mountain areas, the initiative has set up a web-based infrastructure to support local technicians and stakeholders. Additionally, using open data standards such

  5. Consciousness, cognition and brain networks: New perspectives.

    PubMed

    Aldana, E M; Valverde, J L; Fábregas, N

    2016-10-01

    A detailed analysis of the literature on consciousness and cognition mechanisms based on the neural networks theory is presented. The immune and inflammatory response to the anesthetic-surgical procedure induces modulation of neuronal plasticity by influencing higher cognitive functions. Anesthetic drugs can cause unconsciousness, producing a functional disruption of cortical and thalamic cortical integration complex. The external and internal perceptions are processed through an intricate network of neural connections, involving the higher nervous activity centers, especially the cerebral cortex. This requires an integrated model, formed by neural networks and their interactions with highly specialized regions, through large-scale networks, which are distributed throughout the brain collecting information flow of these perceptions. Functional and effective connectivity between large-scale networks, are essential for consciousness, unconsciousness and cognition. It is what is called the "human connectome" or map neural networks.

  6. Neural Network Research: A Personal Perspective,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    These vision preprocessor and ART autonomous classifier examples are just two of the many neural network architectures now being developed by...computational theories with natural realizations as real-time adaptive neural network architectures with promising properties for tackling some of the

  7. "Promotores'" Perspectives on a Male-to-Male Peer Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macia, Laura; Ruiz, Hector Camilo; Boyzo, Roberto; Documet, Patricia Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Little documentation exists about male community health workers ("promotores") networks. The experiences of "promotores" can provide input on how to attract, train, supervise and maintain male "promotores" in CHW programs. We present the experience and perspectives of "promotores" who participated in a male…

  8. Comparative analyses of factors determining soil erosion rates based on network of Mediterranean monitored catchments for the innovative, adaptive and resilient agriculture of the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smetanová, Anna; Le Bissonnais, Yves; Raclot, Damien; Perdo Nunes, João; Licciardello, Feliciana; Mathys, Nicolle; Latron, Jérôme; Rodríguez Caballero, Emilio; Le Bouteiller, Caroline; Klotz, Sébastien; Mekki, Insaf; Gallart, Francesc; Solé Benet, Albert; Pérez Gallego, Nuria; Andrieux, Patrick; Jantzi, Hugo; Moussa, Roger; Planchon, Olivier; Marisa Santos, Juliana

    2015-04-01

    In order to project the soil erosion response to climate change in the fragile Mediterranean region it is inevitable to understand its existing patterns. Soil erosion monitoring on a catchment scale enables to analyse temporal and spatial variability of soil erosion and sediment delivery, while the integrating study of different catchments is often undertaken to depicther the general patterns. In this study, eight small catchments (with area up to 1,32 km2), representative for the western part of the Mediterranean region (according to climate, bedrock, soils and main type of land use) were compared. These catchments, grouped in the R-OS Med Network were situated in France (3), Spain (2), Portugal (1), Italy (1) and Tunisia (1). The average precipitation ranged between 236 to 1303 mm·a-1 and mean annual sediment yield varied 7.5 to 6900 Mg·km-2·a-1. The complex databes was based on more than 120 years of hydrological and sediment data, with series between 3 and 29 years long. The variability of sediment data was described on annual and monthly basis. The relationship between the sediment yield and more than 35 factors influencing the sediment yield including the characteristics of climate, topography, rainfall, runoff, land use, vegetation and soil cover, connectivity and dominant geomorphic processes, was studied. The preliminary results confirmed the differences in rainfall, runoff and sediment response, and revealed both the similarities and differences in soil erosion responses of the catchments. They are further dependent on the variability of factors themselves, with important contribution of the state of soil properties, vegetation cover and land use. Anna Smetanová has received the support of the European Union, in the framework of the Marie-Curie FP7 COFUND People Programme, through the award of an AgreenSkills' fellowship (under grant agreement n° 267196)

  9. Federal Information in the Networked Environment: A Perspective from the Coalition for Networked Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheverie, Joan F.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the development of strategies for providing access to and services for U.S. federal government information in higher education using the global information infrastructure, from the perspective of the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI). Discusses the preservation of electronic information and networked information discovery and…

  10. CO2 dynamics in nested catchments: a longitudinal perspective from soil to 1st and 2nd order streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. S.; Lehmann, J.; Riha, S. J.; Couto, E. G.

    2005-12-01

    Fluxes of CO2 from terrestrial to aquatic environments were investigated in a nested catchment study in the seasonally-dry southern Amazon. Dissolved CO2 concentrations in groundwater springs, four 1st order streams and one 2nd order stream were determined via routine sampling and in-situ monitoring. CO2 concentrations were monitored in the soil atmosphere to 8m. Belowground, the seasonal trend in soil CO2 concentrations at depth lagged that of seasonal water table dynamics, with peak concentrations (8.7% CO2 vol/vol at 4m) occurring one month after maximum water table height, indicating a shift in root respiration and plant water uptake to deeper soil layers during the dry season. Peak dissolved CO2 concentrations in springs and streams lagged the soil CO2 maximum by an additional month. During storm events, streamflow CO2 concentrations were found to decrease initially, reflecting the initial contribution of low-CO2 direct precipitation and surface runoff. Streamwater CO2 then increased as the contribution of pre-event water to storm flow increased. Dissolved CO2 in springs was also found to increase during storm events. Diurnal fluctuations in dissolved CO2 of springs were also observed, indicating the connectivity of the biosphere, pedosphere and hydrosphere for headwater catchments. The dissolved CO2 concentration within 1st order streams decreases rapidly downstream from stream sources, with spring CO2 concentration 3.3 times that at headwater catchment outlets. This initial outgassing of CO2 within 1st order streams was found to be accompanied by a corresponding increase in the pH of stream water. However, dissolved CO2 concentrations were not found to be significantly different between 1st and 2nd order streams. This suggests a discontinuity between some processes at the terrestrial-aquatic interface in headwater catchments and those of larger-order watersheds.

  11. Animal welfare: a social networks perspective.

    PubMed

    Kleinhappel, Tanja K; John, Elizabeth A; Pike, Thomas W; Wilkinson, Anna; Burman, Oliver H P

    2016-01-01

    Social network theory provides a useful tool to study complex social relationships in animals. The possibility to look beyond dyadic interactions by considering whole networks of social relationships allows researchers the opportunity to study social groups in more natural ways. As such, network-based analyses provide an informative way to investigate the factors influencing the social environment of group-living animals, and so has direct application to animal welfare. For example, animal groups in captivity are frequently disrupted by separations, reintroductions and/or mixing with unfamiliar individuals and this can lead to social stress and associated aggression. Social network analysis ofanimal groups can help identify the underlying causes of these socially-derived animal welfare concerns. In this review we discuss how this approach can be applied, and how it could be used to identify potential interventions and solutions in the area of animal welfare.

  12. A Network of Networks Perspective on Global Trade.

    PubMed

    Maluck, Julian; Donner, Reik V

    2015-01-01

    Mutually intertwined supply chains in contemporary economy result in a complex network of trade relationships with a highly non-trivial topology that varies with time. In order to understand the complex interrelationships among different countries and economic sectors, as well as their dynamics, a holistic view on the underlying structural properties of this network is necessary. This study employs multi-regional input-output data to decompose 186 national economies into 26 industry sectors and utilizes the approach of interdependent networks to analyze the substructure of the resulting international trade network for the years 1990-2011. The partition of the network into national economies is observed to be compatible with the notion of communities in the sense of complex network theory. By studying internal versus cross-subgraph contributions to established complex network metrics, new insights into the architecture of global trade are obtained, which allow to identify key elements of global economy. Specifically, financial services and business activities dominate domestic trade whereas electrical and machinery industries dominate foreign trade. In order to further specify each national sector's role individually, (cross-)clustering coefficients and cross-betweenness are obtained for different pairs of subgraphs. The corresponding analysis reveals that specific industrial sectors tend to favor distinct directionality patterns and that the cross-clustering coefficient for geographically close country pairs is remarkably high, indicating that spatial factors are still of paramount importance for the organization of trade patterns in modern economy. Regarding the evolution of the trade network's substructure, globalization is well-expressed by trends of several structural characteristics (e.g., link density and node strength) in the interacting network framework. Extreme events, such as the financial crisis 2008/2009, are manifested as anomalies superimposed to

  13. The influence of drainage networks on patterns of soil respiration in a desert catchment.

    PubMed

    Sponseller, Ryan A; Fisher, Stuart G

    2008-04-01

    Hydrologic flow and connectivity act as important determinants of ecological pattern and process in heterogeneous landscapes. Here we examine how the routing of water through the drainage network of an upper Sonoran Desert basin influences landscape patterns of soil respiration (SR) at both seasonal and event-based timescales. At seasonal timescales, SR varied up to 13-fold with downstream position in the drainage network, and annual estimates of CO2 efflux ranged from 185 g C x m(-2) x yr(-1) to 1190 g C x m(-2) x yr(-1) for sites arrayed along the same flow path. Spatial patterns of SR were unrelated to the carbon and water content of surface soils, but rather tracked changes in plant size and productivity, which in turn reflect downstream increases in groundwater availability. The relative importance of precipitation and temperature as drivers of SR also changed with landscape position, with the latter becoming more important in downstream locations. At the scale of individual precipitation events, SR increased up to 30-fold upon rewetting but typically returned to background levels within 24 h, even when soil moisture remained elevated. Unlike patterns observed at seasonal scales, event-based losses of CO2 varied across the landscape as a function of the organic-matter content in surface soils. Results from labile carbon amendments confirm that CO2 losses following precipitation pulses are initially constrained by substrate availability, not soil drying. By mediating spatial patterns of vegetation structure and soil resource availability, drainage networks represent an important physical template upon which belowground processes are organized in desert basins.

  14. A complex-network perspective on Alexander's wholeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin

    2016-12-01

    The wholeness, conceived and developed by Christopher Alexander, is what exists to some degree or other in space and matter, and can be described by precise mathematical language. However, it remains somehow mysterious and elusive, and therefore hard to grasp. This paper develops a complex network perspective on the wholeness to better understand the nature of order or beauty for sustainable design. I bring together a set of complexity-science subjects such as complex networks, fractal geometry, and in particular underlying scaling hierarchy derived by head/tail breaks - a classification scheme and a visualization tool for data with a heavy-tailed distribution, in order to make Alexander's profound thoughts more accessible to design practitioners and complexity-science researchers. Through several case studies (some of which Alexander studied), I demonstrate that the complex-network perspective helps reduce the mystery of wholeness and brings new insights to Alexander's thoughts on the concept of wholeness or objective beauty that exists in fine and deep structure. The complex-network perspective enables us to see things in their wholeness, and to better understand how the kind of structural beauty emerges from local actions guided by the 15 fundamental properties, and in particular by differentiation and adaptation processes. The wholeness goes beyond current complex network theory towards design or creation of living structures.

  15. Evaporation over a Heterogeneous Mixed Savanna-Agricultural Catchment using a Distributed Wireless Sensor Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceperley, N. C.; Mande, T.; Barrenetxea, G.; Vetterli, M.; Yacouba, H.; Repetti, A.; Parlange, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    Small scale rain fed agriculture is the primary livelihood for a large part of the population of Burkina Faso. Regional climate change means that this population is becoming increasingly vulnerable. Additionally, as natural savanna is converted for agriculture, hydrological systems are observed to become less stable as infiltration is decreased and rapid runoff is increased to the detriment of crop productivity, downstream populations and local water sources. The majority of the Singou River Basin, located in South East Burkina Faso is managed by hunting reserves, geared to maintaining high populations of wild game; however, residents surrounding the protected areas have been forced to intensify agriculture that has resulted in soil degradation as well as increases in the frequency and severity of flooding and droughts. Agroforestry, or planting trees in cultivated fields, has been proposed as a solution to help buffer these negative consequences, however the specific hydrologic behavior of the watershed land cover is unknown. We have installed a distributed sensor network of 17 Sensorscope wireless meteorological stations. These stations are dispersed across cultivated rice and millet fields, natural savanna, fallow fields, and around agroforestry fields. Sensorscope routes data through the network of stations to be delivered by a GPRS connection to a main server. This multi hop network allows data to be gathered over a large area and quickly adapts to changes in station performance. Data are available in real time via a website that can be accessed by a mobile phone. The stations are powered autonomously by small photovoltaic panels. This deployment is the first time that these meteorological stations have been used on the African continent. Initial calibration with measures from 2 eddy covariance stations allows us to calculate the energy balance at each of the Sensorscope stations. Thus, we can observe variation in evaporation over the various land cover in the

  16. Modelling dendritic ecological networks in space: anintegrated network perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Erin E.; Ver Hoef, Jay M.; Isaak, Dan J.; Falke, Jeffrey A.; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Jordon, Chris E.; McNyset, Kristina; Monestiez, Pascal; Ruesch, Aaron S.; Sengupta, Aritra; Som, Nicholas; Steel, E. Ashley; Theobald, David M.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Wenger, Seth J.

    2013-01-01

    the context of stream ecology. Within this context, we summarise the key innovations of a new family of spatial statistical models that describe spatial relationships in DENs. Finally, we discuss how different network analyses may be combined to address more complex and novel research questions. While our main focus is streams, the taxonomy of network analyses is also relevant anywhere spatial patterns in both network and 2-D space can be used to explore the influence of multi-scale processes on biota and their habitat (e.g. plant morphology and pest infestation, or preferential migration along stream or road corridors).

  17. A Topological Perspective of Neural Network Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizemore, Ann; Giusti, Chad; Cieslak, Matthew; Grafton, Scott; Bassett, Danielle

    The wiring patterns of white matter tracts between brain regions inform functional capabilities of the neural network. Indeed, densely connected and cyclically arranged cognitive systems may communicate and thus perform distinctly. However, previously employed graph theoretical statistics are local in nature and thus insensitive to such global structure. Here we present an investigation of the structural neural network in eight healthy individuals using persistent homology. An extension of homology to weighted networks, persistent homology records both circuits and cliques (all-to-all connected subgraphs) through a repetitive thresholding process, thus perceiving structural motifs. We report structural features found across patients and discuss brain regions responsible for these patterns, finally considering the implications of such motifs in relation to cognitive function.

  18. A Network of Networks Perspective on Global Trade

    PubMed Central

    Maluck, Julian; Donner, Reik V.

    2015-01-01

    Mutually intertwined supply chains in contemporary economy result in a complex network of trade relationships with a highly non-trivial topology that varies with time. In order to understand the complex interrelationships among different countries and economic sectors, as well as their dynamics, a holistic view on the underlying structural properties of this network is necessary. This study employs multi-regional input-output data to decompose 186 national economies into 26 industry sectors and utilizes the approach of interdependent networks to analyze the substructure of the resulting international trade network for the years 1990–2011. The partition of the network into national economies is observed to be compatible with the notion of communities in the sense of complex network theory. By studying internal versus cross-subgraph contributions to established complex network metrics, new insights into the architecture of global trade are obtained, which allow to identify key elements of global economy. Specifically, financial services and business activities dominate domestic trade whereas electrical and machinery industries dominate foreign trade. In order to further specify each national sector’s role individually, (cross-)clustering coefficients and cross-betweenness are obtained for different pairs of subgraphs. The corresponding analysis reveals that specific industrial sectors tend to favor distinct directionality patterns and that the cross-clustering coefficient for geographically close country pairs is remarkably high, indicating that spatial factors are still of paramount importance for the organization of trade patterns in modern economy. Regarding the evolution of the trade network’s substructure, globalization is well-expressed by trends of several structural characteristics (e.g., link density and node strength) in the interacting network framework. Extreme events, such as the financial crisis 2008/2009, are manifested as anomalies superimposed

  19. Mapping storm velocity over catchments: Distribution and scale dependence for flash flood-inducing storms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, E. I.; Zoccatelli, D.; Anagnostou, E. N.

    2012-04-01

    The concept of catchment-scale storm velocity permits examination of storm motion and velocity from the perspective of a distance metric imposed by the drainage network structure of a catchment. This paper aims to examine the distribution and scale-dependency of catchment scale storm velocity values for major flash flood-inducing storms. Eight extreme flash flood-inducing storms occurred in Europe in the period 1999 to 2008 are examined. Analyses are carried out for a set of basins that range in area from 7 to 982 km2. It is shown that the distribution of catchment-scale storm velocity depends on basin-averaged rain rate and catchment size. Hourly velocity values corresponding to maximal rain rates during the flood producing period exhibit a non linear dependence on basin scale and may attain values as high as 2 m s-1. Integration of velocity over the catchment response time leads to a reduction of maximal velocities. Response-time integrated maximal storm velocity shows a peak for catchment scales in the range of 20-100 km2, with values up to 1 m s-1.

  20. Hospital network performance: a survey of hospital stakeholders' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bravi, F; Gibertoni, D; Marcon, A; Sicotte, C; Minvielle, E; Rucci, P; Angelastro, A; Carradori, T; Fantini, M P

    2013-02-01

    Hospital networks are an emerging organizational form designed to face the new challenges of public health systems. Although the benefits introduced by network models in terms of rationalization of resources are known, evidence about stakeholders' perspectives on hospital network performance from the literature is scanty. Using the Competing Values Framework of organizational effectiveness and its subsequent adaptation by Minvielle et al., we conducted in 2009 a survey in five hospitals of an Italian network for oncological care to examine and compare the views on hospital network performance of internal stakeholders (physicians, nurses and the administrative staff). 329 questionnaires exploring stakeholders' perspectives were completed, with a response rate of 65.8%. Using exploratory factor analysis of the 66 items of the questionnaire, we identified 4 factors, i.e. Centrality of relationships, Quality of care, Attractiveness/Reputation and Staff empowerment and Protection of workers' rights. 42 items were retained in the analysis. Factor scores proved to be high (mean score>8 on a 10-item scale), except for Attractiveness/Reputation (mean score 6.79), indicating that stakeholders attach a higher importance to relational and health care aspects. Comparison of factor scores among stakeholders did not reveal significant differences, suggesting a broadly shared view on hospital network performance.

  1. Perspective: network-guided pattern formation of neural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; Kaiser, Marcus; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2014-10-05

    The understanding of neural activity patterns is fundamentally linked to an understanding of how the brain's network architecture shapes dynamical processes. Established approaches rely mostly on deviations of a given network from certain classes of random graphs. Hypotheses about the supposed role of prominent topological features (for instance, the roles of modularity, network motifs or hierarchical network organization) are derived from these deviations. An alternative strategy could be to study deviations of network architectures from regular graphs (rings and lattices) and consider the implications of such deviations for self-organized dynamic patterns on the network. Following this strategy, we draw on the theory of spatio-temporal pattern formation and propose a novel perspective for analysing dynamics on networks, by evaluating how the self-organized dynamics are confined by network architecture to a small set of permissible collective states. In particular, we discuss the role of prominent topological features of brain connectivity, such as hubs, modules and hierarchy, in shaping activity patterns. We illustrate the notion of network-guided pattern formation with numerical simulations and outline how it can facilitate the understanding of neural dynamics.

  2. Small-world networks in neuronal populations: a computational perspective.

    PubMed

    Zippo, Antonio G; Gelsomino, Giuliana; Van Duin, Pieter; Nencini, Sara; Caramenti, Gian Carlo; Valente, Maurizio; Biella, Gabriele E M

    2013-08-01

    The analysis of the brain in terms of integrated neural networks may offer insights on the reciprocal relation between structure and information processing. Even with inherent technical limits, many studies acknowledge neuron spatial arrangements and communication modes as key factors. In this perspective, we investigated the functional organization of neuronal networks by explicitly assuming a specific functional topology, the small-world network. We developed two different computational approaches. Firstly, we asked whether neuronal populations actually express small-world properties during a definite task, such as a learning task. For this purpose we developed the Inductive Conceptual Network (ICN), which is a hierarchical bio-inspired spiking network, capable of learning invariant patterns by using variable-order Markov models implemented in its nodes. As a result, we actually observed small-world topologies during learning in the ICN. Speculating that the expression of small-world networks is not solely related to learning tasks, we then built a de facto network assuming that the information processing in the brain may occur through functional small-world topologies. In this de facto network, synchronous spikes reflected functional small-world network dependencies. In order to verify the consistency of the assumption, we tested the null-hypothesis by replacing the small-world networks with random networks. As a result, only small world networks exhibited functional biomimetic characteristics such as timing and rate codes, conventional coding strategies and neuronal avalanches, which are cascades of bursting activities with a power-law distribution. Our results suggest that small-world functional configurations are liable to underpin brain information processing at neuronal level.

  3. Edge anisotropy and the geometric perspective on flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molkenthin, Nora; Kutza, Hannes; Tupikina, Liubov; Marwan, Norbert; Donges, Jonathan F.; Feudel, Ulrike; Kurths, Jürgen; Donner, Reik V.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial networks have recently attracted great interest in various fields of research. While the traditional network-theoretic viewpoint is commonly restricted to their topological characteristics (often disregarding the existing spatial constraints), this work takes a geometric perspective, which considers vertices and edges as objects in a metric space and quantifies the corresponding spatial distribution and alignment. For this purpose, we introduce the concept of edge anisotropy and define a class of measures characterizing the spatial directedness of connections. Specifically, we demonstrate that the local anisotropy of edges incident to a given vertex provides useful information about the local geometry of geophysical flows based on networks constructed from spatio-temporal data, which is complementary to topological characteristics of the same flow networks. Taken both structural and geometric viewpoints together can thus assist the identification of underlying flow structures from observations of scalar variables.

  4. Perspectives for parasitology and parasitology networks in Europe.

    PubMed

    Dupouy-Camet, Jean; Olesen, Ole F; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Loiseau, Philippe M; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2009-07-01

    This article describes networks of parasitologists in Europe. Some research networks are supported by the European Commission within highly diverse framework programs. The European Federation of Parasitologists aims to promote the exchange of knowledge and the coordination of research in the fields of basic, veterinary and medical parasitology, particularly via meetings (e.g. the European Multicolloquium of Parasitology) that offer an unparalleled opportunity to assess the development of the discipline on the continent. The present situation is discussed here and some perspectives are proposed.

  5. Network analysis of sediment cascades derived from a digital geomorphological map - an example from the Gradenbach catchment (Schober Mountains, Austrian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Joachim; Heckmann, Tobias; Schrott, Lothar

    2013-04-01

    A detailed geomorphological map of the Gradenbach catchment (32 km², Schober Mountains, Austrian Alps) is presented that focuses on the sediment transfer system. Data were acquired in the field and by the interpretation of orthophotos, LIDAR data and derivatives (slope, curvature, aspect, shaded relief). The resulting digital geomorphological map contains polygon representations of landforms together with their morphometric parameters and an assessment of recent geomorphic activity. Special attention was paid to landform coupling, i.e. an additional table was constructed that indicates recently observable coupling between specific landforms (based on their ID in the database). From these data, we can obtain sediment cascades as a succession of coupled landforms along which sediment transfer occurs through the activity of various geomorphic processes. Based on this digital landform inventory the sediment transfer system is analysed using graph theory. As a rather new approach in geomorphology (already established within several disciplines; e.g. hydrology, biogeography), graph theory provides a promising framework for connectivity analysis in geomorphologic systems and powerful tools to visualise and analyse catchment-wide sediment transfer networks. Since the concept is arbitrarily scalable it can be applied to discrete land surface units (e.g. mapped landforms) or to continuous surface data (e.g. grid cells). In combination with geomorphological mapping, the concept allows for the (abstracted) visualisation of complex coupling relationships between multiple sediment storage landforms. Graph networks can be analysed at the level of nodes (e.g. the number of incoming and/or outgoing edges and their character as sediment source, sink or link), edges (e.g. importance within the network as conveyors of sediment from different sources), pathways (e.g. edge sequences leading to the catchment outlet or to storage landforms; these can be termed sediment cascades), or the

  6. A groundwater recharge perspective on locating tree plantations within low-rainfall catchments to limit water resource losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, J. F.; Webb, J. A.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Chisari, R.; Dresel, P. E.

    2015-02-01

    Despite the many studies that consider the impacts of plantation forestry on groundwater recharge, and others that explore the spatial heterogeneity of recharge in low-rainfall regions, there is little marriage of the two subjects in forestry management guidelines and legislation. Here we carry out an in-depth analysis of the impact of reforestation on groundwater recharge in a low-rainfall (< 700 mm annually), high-evapotranspiration paired catchment characterized by ephemeral streams. Water table fluctuation (WTF) estimates of modern recharge indicate that little groundwater recharge occurs along the topographic highs of the catchments (average 18 mm yr-1); instead the steeper slopes in these areas direct runoff downslope to the lowland areas, where most recharge occurs (average 78 mm yr-1). Recharge estimates using the chloride mass balance (CMB) method were corrected by replacing the rainfall input Cl- value with that for streamflow, because most recharge occurs from infiltration of runoff through the streambed and adjacent low gradient slopes. The calculated CMB recharge values (average 10 mm yr-1) are lower than the WTF recharge values (average 47 mm yr-1), because they are representative of groundwater that was mostly recharged prior to European land clearance (> BP 200 years). The tree plantation has caused a progressive drawdown in groundwater levels due to tree water use; the decline is less in the upland areas. The results of this study show that spatial variations in recharge are important considerations for locating tree plantations. To conserve water resources for downstream users in low-rainfall, high-evapotranspiration regions, tree planting should be avoided in the dominant zone of recharge, i.e. the topographically low areas and along the drainage lines, and should be concentrated on the upper slopes, although this may negatively impact the economic viability of the plantation.

  7. Incorporating community and multiple perspectives in the development of acceptable drinking water source protection policy in catchments facing recreation demands.

    PubMed

    Syme, Geoffrey J; Nancarrow, Blair E

    2013-11-15

    The protection of catchment areas for drinking water quality has become an increasingly disputed issue in Australia and internationally. This is particularly the case in regard to the growing demand for nature based and rural recreation. Currently the policy for the protection of drinking water in Western Australia is to enforce a 2 km exclusion zone with a much larger surrounding area with limited and prescribed access to recreators. The debate between recreators and water management agencies has been lively, culminating in a recent state government enquiry. This paper describes the second phase of a three phase study to develop a methodology for defensible policy formulation which accounts for the points of view of all stakeholders. We examine general community, active recreators and professionals' views on the current policy of catchment protection and five proposed alternatives using a social judgement theory approach. Key attitudinal determinants of the preferences for policies were identified. Overall the recreators did not support the current policy despite strong support from both the general community and the professional group. Nevertheless, it was evident that there was some support by the community for policies that would enable a slight relaxation of current recreational exclusion. It was also evident that there was a significant proportion of the general community who were dissatisfied with current recreational opportunities and that, in future, it may be less easy to police exclusion zones even if current policy is maintained. The potential for future integration of recreational and water source protection is discussed as well as the benefits of community research in understanding policy preferences in this regard.

  8. Collective arrangements and social networks: Coping strategies for the poor households in the Great Ruaha Catchment in Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadigi, Reuben M. J.; Mdoe, N. S. Y.; Ashimogo, G. C.

    Access to water and land resources underpins the socio-economic fabric of many societies in the Southern Africa region, which is characterized broadly as underdeveloped with widespread food insecurity, exacerbated by persistent droughts, erratic rainfalls and increasing human populations. The availability of land and water resources is increasingly diminishing and becoming a stumbling block to the development of the agrarian societies in the region. The poor households have in turn adopted new livelihood coping mechanisms but little research has been done to assess the effectiveness of these ‘instruments’. Consequently, the concepts of sustainable water resources management and agricultural development have remained elusive and poorly understood by policy makers as well as by water resources planners and managers. Recognizing this, a study was conducted between 2002 and 2005 under the RIPARWIN (Raising Irrigation Productivity and Releasing Water for Intersectoral Needs) project to assess the spatial dynamics of livelihood capital, vulnerability and coping strategies for the poor agrarian households in the Upper Great Ruaha River Catchment (GRRC) in Tanzania. The results of analysis showed an array of livelihood platforms and institutional contexts that act to shape the existing livelihood typologies in the GRRC. In addition, the results showed a gradual increase in household vulnerability from upstream to downstream, particularly in terms of access to physical and natural assets. Vulnerability was found to be directly associated with the number of dependants. The female-headed households were relatively more likely to be vulnerable than the male-headed households (cf. probabilities of 27% and 21%, respectively). The value of collective arrangements and drawing on social networks crosscut all social strata and ranked as the most common livelihood strategy. This suggests that the scope for reducing vulnerability among the poor households in the GRRC critically

  9. Inter-generational Contact From a Network Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Marcum, Christopher Steven; Koehly, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Pathways for resource—or other—exchanges within families have long been known to be dependent on the structure of relations between generations (Silverstein, 2011; Fuller-Thomson et al., 1997; Agree et al., 2005; Treas and Marcum, 2011). Much life course research has theorized models of inter-generational exchange— including, the ‘sandwich generation’ (Miller, 1981) and the ‘skipped generation’ pathways (Chalfie, 1994)—but there is little work relating these theories to relevant network mechanisms such as liaison brokerage (Gould and Fernandez, 1989) and other triadic configurations (Davis and Leinhardt, 1972; Wasserman and Faust, 1994). To address this, a survey of models of resource allocation between members of inter-generational households from a network perspective is introduced in this paper. Exemplary data come from health discussion networks among Mexican-origin multi-generational households. PMID:26047986

  10. A new perspective on soil erosion: exploring a thermodynamic approach in a small area of the River Inn catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Lucas; Scherer, Ulrike; Zehe, Erwin

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion modeling has always struggled with compensating for the difference in time and spatial scale between model, data and the actual processes involved. This is especially the case with non-event based long-term models based on the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE), yet USLE based soil erosion models are among the most common and widely used for they have rather low data requirements and can be applied to large areas. But the majority of mass from soil erosion is eroded within short periods of times during heavy rain events, often within minutes or hours. Advancements of the USLE (eg. the Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation, MUSLE) allow for a daily time step, but still apply the same empirical methods derived from the USLE. And to improve the actual quantification of sediment input into rivers soil erosion models are often combined with a Sediment Delivery Ratio (SDR) to get results within the range of measurements. This is still a viable approach for many applications, yet it leaves much to be desired in terms of understanding and reproducing the processes behind soil erosion and sediment input into rivers. That's why, instead of refining and retuning the existing methods, we explore a more comprehensive, physically consistent description on soil erosion. The idea is to describe soil erosion as a dissipative process (Kleidon et al., 2013) and test it in a small sub-basin of the River Inn catchment area in the pre-Alpine foothills. We then compare the results to sediment load measurements from the sub-basin and discuss the advantages and issues with the application of such an approach.

  11. Storage as a Metric of Catchment Comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, J.P.; Tetzlaff, D.; Bishop, K.; Soulsby, C.; Seyfried, M.; Peters, N.E.; Aulenbach, Brent T.; Hooper, R.

    2011-01-01

    The volume of water stored within a catchment, and its partitioning among groundwater, soil moisture, snowpack, vegetation, and surface water are the variables that ultimately characterize the state of the hydrologic system. Accordingly, storage may provide useful metrics for catchment comparison. Unfortunately, measuring and predicting the amount of water present in a catchment is seldom done; tracking the dynamics of these stores is even rarer. Storage moderates fluxes and exerts critical controls on a wide range of hydrologic and biologic functions of a catchment. While understanding runoff generation and other processes by which catchments release water will always be central to hydrologic science, it is equally essential to understand how catchments retain water. We have initiated a catchment comparison exercise to begin assessing the value of viewing catchments from the storage perspective. The exercise is based on existing data from five watersheds, no common experimental design, and no integrated modelling efforts. Rather, storage was estimated independently for each site. This briefing presents some initial results of the exercise, poses questions about the definitions and importance of storage and the storage perspective, and suggests future directions for ongoing activities. ?? 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Catchment-flowline network and selected model inputs for an enhanced and updated spatially referenced statistical assessment of dissolved-solids load sources and transport in streams of the Upper Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buto, Susan G.; Spangler, Lawrence E.; Flint, Alan L.; Flint, Lorraine E.

    2017-01-01

    This USGS data release consists of the synthetic stream network and associated catchments used to develop spatially referenced regressions on watershed attributes (SPARROW) model of dissolved-solids sources and transport in the Upper Colorado River Basin as well as geology and selected Basin Characterization Model (BCM) data used as input to the model.

  13. Virtual water trade and country vulnerability: A network perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Martina; Schiavo, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    This work investigates the relationship between countries' participation in virtual water trade and their vulnerability to external shocks from a network perspective. In particular, we investigate whether (i) possible sources of local national crises may interact with the system, propagating through the network and affecting the other countries involved; (ii) the topological characteristics of the international agricultural trade network, translated into virtual water-equivalent flows, may favor countries' vulnerability to external crises. Our work contributes to the debate on the potential merits and risks associated with openness to trade in agricultural and food products. On the one hand, trade helps to ensure that even countries with limited water (and other relevant) resources have access to sufficient food and contribute to the global saving of water. On the other hand, there are fears that openness may increase the vulnerability to external shocks and thus make countries worse off. Here we abstract from political considerations about food sovereignty and independence from imports and focus instead on investigating whether the increased participation in global trade that the world has witnessed in the last 30 years has made the system more susceptible to large shocks. Our analysis reveals that: (i) the probability of larger supply shocks has not increased over time; (ii) the topological characteristics of the VW network are not such as to favor the systemic risk associated with shock propagation; and (iii) higher-order interconnections may reveal further important information about the structure of a network. Regarding the first result, fluctuations in output volumes, among the sources of shock analyzed here, are more likely to generate some instability. The first implication is that, on one side, past national or regional economic crises were not necessarily brought about or strengthened by global trade. The second, more remarkable, implication is that, on

  14. Community, Collective or Movement? Evaluating Theoretical Perspectives on Network Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, W.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2007, the New England Aquarium has led a national effort to increase the capacity of informal science venues to effectively communicate about climate change. We are now leading the NSF-funded National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI), partnering with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, FrameWorks Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Monterey Bay Aquarium, and National Aquarium, with evaluation conducted by the New Knowledge Organization, Pennsylvania State University, and Ohio State University. NNOCCI enables teams of informal science interpreters across the country to serve as "communication strategists" - beyond merely conveying information they can influence public perceptions, given their high level of commitment, knowledge, public trust, social networks, and visitor contact. We provide in-depth training as well as an alumni network for ongoing learning, implementation support, leadership development, and coalition building. Our goals are to achieve a systemic national impact, embed our work within multiple ongoing regional and national climate change education networks, and leave an enduring legacy. What is the most useful theoretical model for conceptualizing the work of the NNOCCI community? This presentation will examine the pros and cons of three perspectives -- community of practice, collective impact, and social movements. The community of practice approach emphasizes use of common tools, support for practice, social learning, and organic development of leadership. A collective impact model focuses on defining common outcomes, aligning activities toward a common goal, structured collaboration. A social movement emphasizes building group identity and creating a sense of group efficacy. This presentation will address how these models compare in terms of their utility in program planning and evaluation, their fit with the unique characteristics of the NNOCCI community, and their relevance to our program goals.

  15. Integrated observation and modelling of runoff and sediments across different compartments of semi-arid catchments and channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronstert, Axel; Ramon, Batalla; Araújo José C., De; da Costa Alexandre, Cunha; Till, Francke; Andreas, Güntner; Jose, Lopez-Tarazon; George, Mamede; Müller Eva, N.

    2010-05-01

    About one-third of the global population currently lives in countries which experience conditions of water stress. Such regions, often located within dryland ecosystems, are exposed to the hazard that the available freshwater resources fail to meet the water demand in domestic, agricultural and industrial sectors. Water availability often relies on the retention of river runoff in artificial lakes and reservoirs. However, the water storage in reservoirs is often adversely affected by sedimentation as a result of soil erosion. Erosion of the land surface due to natural or anthropogenic reasons and deposition of the eroded material in reservoirs threatens the reliability of reservoirs as a source of water supply. To sustain future water supply, a quantification of the sediment export from large dryland catchments becomes indispensable. A comprehensive modelling framework for water and sediment transport at the meso-scale, with a particular focus on dryland regions, has been developed from a German, Catalonian and Brazilian team during the last decade. It includes novel components for erosion from erosion-prone hillslopes, sediment transfer, retention and re-mobilization through the river system and sediment distribution, trapping and transfer through a reservoir. The parameterisation for pilot catchments is based on field monitoring campaigns of water and sediment fluxes, the analysis of land-use patterns, and the identification of the sediment hot spots through remotely sensed data. We present results of erosion-prone landscape units, the role of sediment transport in the river system, and the sedimentation processes in reservoirs. The modelling studies demonstrate the wide range of environmental problems where the model may be employed to develop sustainable management strategies for land and water resources. Evaluation of scenarios (land use, climate change) combined with an integrated assessment of options in reservoir management opens the opportunity to address

  16. Parkinson’s disease dementia: a neural networks perspective

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshahi, Marjan; Foltynie, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In the long-term, with progression of the illness, Parkinson’s disease dementia affects up to 90% of patients with Parkinson’s disease. With increasing life expectancy in western countries, Parkinson’s disease dementia is set to become even more prevalent in the future. However, current treatments only give modest symptomatic benefit at best. New treatments are slow in development because unlike the pathological processes underlying the motor deficits of Parkinson’s disease, the neural mechanisms underlying the dementing process and its associated cognitive deficits are still poorly understood. Recent insights from neuroscience research have begun to unravel the heterogeneous involvement of several distinct neural networks underlying the cognitive deficits in Parkinson’s disease dementia, and their modulation by both dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic transmitter systems in the brain. In this review we collate emerging evidence regarding these distinct brain networks to give a novel perspective on the pathological mechanisms underlying Parkinson’s disease dementia, and discuss how this may offer new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25888551

  17. The effect of social networks and social support on mental health services use, following a life event, among the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area cohort.

    PubMed

    Maulik, Pallab K; Eaton, William W; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2011-01-01

    The study examined the association between life events and mental health services use, accounting for social networks and social support. Main and stress-buffering effects were estimated using longitudinal data from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area cohort (1,920 participants in 1993-1996, of whom 1,071 were re-interviewed in 2004-2005). Following a life event, the odds of using general medical services were increased by almost 50% when there was increased social support from spouse/partner (referral function). The odds of using mental health services within general health setup were reduced by 60% when there was increased support from relatives (stress-reduction function). Increased social support from friends and relatives was associated with a 40-60% decreased odds of using specialty psychiatric services after experiencing different life events (stress-reduction function). Overall, social support rather than social networks were more strongly associated with increased mental health service use following a life event. The implications for service delivery and program development are discussed.

  18. Toward next-generation optical networks: a network operator perspective based on experimental tests and economic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiaojun; Du, Chunsheng; Zhou, Rongsheng

    2004-04-01

    As a result of data traffic"s exponential growth, network is currently evolving from fixed circuit switched services to dynamic packet switched services, which has brought unprecedented changes to the existing transport infrastructure. It is generally agreed that automatic switched optical network (ASON) is one of the promising solutions for the next generation optical networks. In this paper, we present the results of our experimental tests and economic analysis on ASON. The intention of this paper is to present our perspective, in terms of evolution strategy toward ASON, on next generation optical networks. It is shown through experimental tests that the performance of current Pre-standard ASON enabled equipments satisfies the basic requirements of network operators and is ready for initial deployment. The results of the economic analysis show that network operators can be benefit from the deployment of ASON from three sides. Firstly, ASON can reduce the CAPEX for network expanding by integrating multiple ADM & DCS into one box. Secondly, ASON can reduce the OPEX for network operation by introducing automatic resource control scheme. Finally, ASON can increase margin revenue by providing new optical network services such as Bandwidth on Demand, optical VPN etc. Finally, the evolution strategy is proposed as our perspective toward next generation optical networks. We hope the evolution strategy introduced may be helpful for the network operators to gracefully migrate their fixed ring based legacy networks to next generation dynamic mesh based network.

  19. Let's put this in perspective: using dynamic simulation modelling to assess the impacts of farm-scale land management change on catchment-scale water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, Mark; Clarendon, Simon; Coles, Neil

    2013-04-01

    Natural Resource Management and Agri-industry development groups in Australia have invested considerable resources into the investigation of the economic, social and, particularly, environmental impacts of varying farming activities in a "catchment context". This research has resulted in the development of a much-improved understanding of the likely impacts of changed management practices at the farm-scale as well as the development of a number of conceptual models which place farming within this broader catchment context. The project discussed in this paper transformed a conceptual model of dairy farm phosphorus (P) management and transport processes into a more temporally and spatially dynamic model. This was then loaded with catchment-specific data and used as a "policy support tool" to allow the Australian dairy industry to examine the potential farm and catchment-scale impacts of varying dairy farm management practices within some key dairy farming regions. Models were developed, validated and calibrated using "STELLA©" dynamic modelling software for three catchments in which dairy is perceived as a significant land use. The models describe P movement and cycling within and through dairy farms in great detail and also estimate P transport through major source, sink and flow sectors of the catchments. A series of scenarios were executed for all three catchments which examined three main "groups" of tests: changes to farm P input rates; implementation of perceived environmental "Best Management Practices" (BMPs), and; changes to land use mosaics. Modifications to actual P input rates into dairy farms (not surprisingly) had a major effect on nutrient transport within and from the farms with a significant rise in nutrient loss rates at all scales with increasing fertiliser use. More surprisingly, however, even extensive environmental BMP implementation did not have marked effects on off-farm nutrient loss rates. On and off-farm riparian management implemented

  20. Using Mesoscale Atmospheric Models for Glacio-Hydrological Studies at the Catchment Scale: Examples from High Asia and Perspectives for Future Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maussion, F.; Collier, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, a new method has been developed to address the lack of in situ observations in remote, high-altitude glaciated catchments. With increases in computational resources and improvements in mesoscale atmospheric models, a small number of studies have shown that it is possible to simulate meteorological variables with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution for use as direct forcing for glacio-hydrological models at the catchment scale. Based on the application of this method for atmospheric, glaciological and hydrological studies in High-Asian catchments, we present recommendations for key areas of uncertainty in the atmospheric modelling strategy. We also identify a number of future research priorities based on several open questions related to model resolution, feedbacks in the model chain, and quantifying uncertainty where observations are absent.

  1. Origin of the Valley Networks On Mars: A Hydrological Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.

    2000-01-01

    The geomorphology of the Martian valley networks is examined from a hydrological perspective for their compatibility with an origin by rainfall, globally higher heat flow, and localized hydrothermal systems. Comparison of morphology and spatial distribution of valleys on geologic surfaces with terrestrial fluvial valleys suggests that most Martian valleys are probably not indicative of a rainfall origin, nor are they indicative of formation by an early global uniformly higher heat flow. In general, valleys are not uniformly distributed within geologic surface units as are terrestrial fluvial valleys. Valleys tend to form either as isolated systems or in clusters on a geologic surface unit leaving large expanses of the unit virtually untouched by erosion. With the exception of fluvial valleys on some volcanoes, most Martian valleys exhibit a sapping morphology and do not appear to have formed along with those that exhibit a runoff morphology. In contrast, terrestrial sapping valleys form from and along with runoff valleys. The isolated or clustered distribution of valleys suggests localized water sources were important in drainage development. Persistent ground-water outflow driven by localized, but vigorous hydrothermal circulation associated with magmatism, volcanism, impacts, or tectonism is, however, consistent with valley morphology and distribution. Snowfall from sublimating ice-covered lakes or seas may have provided an atmospheric water source for the formation of some valleys in regions where the surface is easily eroded and where localized geothermal/hydrothermal activity is sufficient to melt accumulated snowpacks.

  2. The Immatsiak network of groundwater wells in a small catchment basin in the discontinuous permafrost zone of Northern Quebec, Canada: A unique opportunity for monitoring the impacts of climate change on groundwater (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortier, R.; Lemieux, J.; Molson, J. W.; Therrien, R.; Ouellet, M.; Bart, J.

    2013-12-01

    During a summer drilling campaign in 2012, a network of nine groundwater monitoring wells was installed in a small catchment basin in a zone of discontinuous permafrost near the Inuit community of Umiujaq in Northern Quebec, Canada. This network, named Immatsiak, is part of a provincial network of groundwater monitoring wells to monitor the impacts of climate change on groundwater resources. It provides a unique opportunity to study cold region groundwater dynamics in permafrost environments and to assess the impacts of permafrost degradation on groundwater quality and availability as a potential source of drinking water. Using the borehole logs from the drilling campaign and other information from previous investigations, an interpretative cryo-hydrogeological cross-section of the catchment basin was produced which identified the Quaternary deposit thickness and extent, the depth to bedrock, the location of permafrost, one superficial aquifer located in a sand deposit, and another deep aquifer in fluvio-glacial sediments and till. In the summer of 2013, data were recovered from water level and barometric loggers which were installed in the wells in August 2012. Although the wells were drilled in unfrozen zones, the groundwater temperature is very low, near 0.4 °C, with an annual variability of a few tenths of a degree Celsius at a depth of 35 m. The hydraulic head in the wells varied as much as 6 m over the last year. Pumping tests performed in the wells showed a very high hydraulic conductivity of the deep aquifer. Groundwater in the wells and surface water in small thermokarst lakes and at the catchment outlet were sampled for geochemical analysis (inorganic parameters, stable isotopes of oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δ2H), and radioactive isotopes of carbon (δ14C), hydrogen (tritium δ3H) and helium (δ3He)) to assess groundwater quality and origin. Preliminary results show that the signature of melt water from permafrost thawing is observed in the

  3. On Radar Rainfall, Catchment Runoff and the Response Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, E.; Goodrich, D. C.; Gao, X.; Sorooshian, S.

    2001-12-01

    The general research hypothesis is that: "a rainfall event, extreme at a specific scale, has the potential to generate an extreme runoff event in a catchment, which characterized by this response scale". In the presented study, which is a first step in testing this hypothesis, we examine if catchments have a stable response scale in the above context. For that purpose, we compare maximum storm rainfall intensities at different time and space scales with runoff peak discharges in order to determine at what scale these two variables are best related to each other. Three types of rainfall variable are tested: 1) gage rainfall intensity, 2) radar rainfall intensity, and 3) radar reflectivity. Initial results are available for the Walnut Gulch Experimental Catchment, a 150-km2 semi-arid catchment, located in southern Arizona. The catchment is well equipped with dense networks of rainfall and runoff gages. Radar data are also available for the catchment from the Tucson NEXRAD system. Preliminary results indicate a response scale in the order of 6-km and 2-hours for the 150-km2 catchment and for the 126- and 94-km2 sub-catchments. The response scale of a 25-km2 sub-catchment is reduced to 1-km and 20-minutes. The three types of rainfall variable tested point to the same response scale. As mentioned, the above results are initial and based on a limited number of events. We are investigating this hypothesis on a larger number of events as well as additional catchments.

  4. Collective Learning: Theoretical Perspectives and Ways To Support Networked Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Laat, Maarten; Simons, Robert-Jan

    2002-01-01

    Reviews three types of collective learning networks, teams, and communities. Advocates learning communities as a powerful way to stimulate shared learning. Warns that, although technology enables networked learning, group dynamics are crucial and must be considered. Describes progressive inquiry and team roles as ways to support collective…

  5. Broadcast Networks and the Outsiders: Legal Responsibility from Two Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deming, Caren J.

    This paper examines the legal responsibility of networks to fairly represent outsiders in network employment and programming. The outsiders--women, racial and ethnic minorities, homosexuals, older people, members of minor political parties--have been using legal avenues provided by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Equal…

  6. Social Network Perspectives Reveal Strength of Academic Developers as Weak Ties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Kelly E.; Crampton, Andrea; Hill, Matthew; Johnson, Elizabeth D.; Sharma, Manjula D.; Varsavsky, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Social network perspectives acknowledge the influence of disciplinary cultures on academics' teaching beliefs and practices with implications for academic developers. The contribution of academic developers in 18 scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) projects situated in the sciences are explored by drawing on data from a two-year national…

  7. The National Research and Education Network (NREN): Research and Policy Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Charles R.; And Others

    This book provides an overview and status report on the progress made in developing the National Research and Education Network (NREN) as of early 1991. It reports on a number of investigations that provide a research and policy perspective on the NREN and computer-mediated communication (CMC), and brings together key source documents that have…

  8. Integrating proteomics profiling data sets: a network perspective.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Akshay; Dakna, Mohammed; Mischak, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Understanding disease mechanisms often requires complex and accurate integration of cellular pathways and molecular networks. Systems biology offers the possibility to provide a comprehensive map of the cell's intricate wiring network, which can ultimately lead to decipher the disease phenotype. Here, we describe what biological pathways are, how they function in normal and abnormal cellular systems, limitations faced by databases for integrating data, and highlight how network models are emerging as a powerful integrative framework to understand and interpret the roles of proteins and peptides in diseases.

  9. Voting procedures from the perspective of theory of neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimenov, Ibragim; Panchenko, Sergey; Gabrielyan, Oleg; Pak, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that voting procedure in any authority can be treated as Hopfield neural network analogue. It was revealed that weight coefficients of neural network which has discrete outputs -1 and 1 can be replaced by coefficients of a discrete set (-1, 0, 1). This gives us the opportunity to qualitatively analyze the voting procedure on the basis of limited data about mutual influence of members. It also proves that result of voting procedure is actually taken by network formed by voting members.

  10. Water Catchment and Storage Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruenig, Michael; Dunbabin, Matt; Moore, Darren

    2010-05-01

    Sensors and Sensor Networks technologies provide the means for comprehensive understanding of natural processes in the environment by radically increasing the availability of empirical data about the natural world. This step change is achieved through a dramatic reduction in the cost of data acquisition and many orders of magnitude increase in the spatial and temporal granularity of measurements. Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) is undertaking a strategic research program developing wireless sensor network technology for environmental monitoring. As part of this research initiative, we are engaging with government agencies to densely monitor water catchments and storages, thereby enhancing understanding of the environmental processes that affect water quality. In the Gold Coast hinterland in Queensland, Australia, we are building sensor networks to monitor restoration of rainforest within the catchment, and to monitor methane flux release and water quality in the water storages. This poster will present our ongoing work in this region of eastern Australia. The Springbrook plateau in the Gold Coast hinterland lies within a World Heritage listed area, has uniquely high rainfall, hosts a wide range of environmental gradients, and forms part of the catchment for Gold Coast's water storages. Parts of the plateau are being restored from agricultural grassland to native rainforest vegetation. Since April 2008, we have had a 10-node, multi-hop sensor network deployed there to monitor microclimate variables. This network will be expanded to 50-nodes in February 2010, and to around 200-nodes and 1000 sensors by mid-2011, spread over an area of approximately 0.8 square kilometers. The extremely dense microclimate sensing will enhance knowledge of the environmental factors that enhance or inhibit the regeneration of native rainforest. The final network will also include nodes with acoustic and image sensing capability for

  11. Evolution after whole-genome duplication: a network perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Lin, Zhenguo; Nakhleh, Luay

    2013-11-06

    Gene duplication plays an important role in the evolution of genomes and interactomes. Elucidating how evolution after gene duplication interplays at the sequence and network level is of great interest. In this work, we analyze a data set of gene pairs that arose through whole-genome duplication (WGD) in yeast. All these pairs have the same duplication time, making them ideal for evolutionary investigation. We investigated the interplay between evolution after WGD at the sequence and network levels and correlated these two levels of divergence with gene expression and fitness data. We find that molecular interactions involving WGD genes evolve at rates that are three orders of magnitude slower than the rates of evolution of the corresponding sequences. Furthermore, we find that divergence of WGD pairs correlates strongly with gene expression and fitness data. Because of the role of gene duplication in determining redundancy in biological systems and particularly at the network level, we investigated the role of interaction networks in elucidating the evolutionary fate of duplicated genes. We find that gene neighborhoods in interaction networks provide a mechanism for inferring these fates, and we developed an algorithm for achieving this task. Further epistasis analysis of WGD pairs categorized by their inferred evolutionary fates demonstrated the utility of these techniques. Finally, we find that WGD pairs and other pairs of paralogous genes of small-scale duplication origin share similar properties, giving good support for generalizing our results from WGD pairs to evolution after gene duplication in general.

  12. Mixed transportation network design under a sustainable development perspective.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jin; Ni, Ling-lin; Shi, Feng

    2013-01-01

    A mixed transportation network design problem considering sustainable development was studied in this paper. Based on the discretization of continuous link-grade decision variables, a bilevel programming model was proposed to describe the problem, in which sustainability factors, including vehicle exhaust emissions, land-use scale, link load, and financial budget, are considered. The objective of the model is to minimize the total amount of resources exploited under the premise of meeting all the construction goals. A heuristic algorithm, which combined the simulated annealing and path-based gradient projection algorithm, was developed to solve the model. The numerical example shows that the transportation network optimized with the method above not only significantly alleviates the congestion on the link, but also reduces vehicle exhaust emissions within the network by up to 41.56%.

  13. A financial network perspective of financial institutions' systemic risk contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Qiang; Zhuang, Xin-Tian; Yao, Shuang; Uryasev, Stan

    2016-08-01

    This study considers the effects of the financial institutions' local topology structure in the financial network on their systemic risk contribution using data from the Chinese stock market. We first measure the systemic risk contribution with the Conditional Value-at-Risk (CoVaR) which is estimated by applying dynamic conditional correlation multivariate GARCH model (DCC-MVGARCH). Financial networks are constructed from dynamic conditional correlations (DCC) with graph filtering method of minimum spanning trees (MSTs). Then we investigate dynamics of systemic risk contributions of financial institution. Also we study dynamics of financial institution's local topology structure in the financial network. Finally, we analyze the quantitative relationships between the local topology structure and systemic risk contribution with panel data regression analysis. We find that financial institutions with greater node strength, larger node betweenness centrality, larger node closeness centrality and larger node clustering coefficient tend to be associated with larger systemic risk contributions.

  14. Characterizing air quality data from complex network perspective.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinghua; Wang, Li; Xu, Huihui; Li, Shasha; Tian, Lixin

    2016-02-01

    Air quality depends mainly on changes in emission of pollutants and their precursors. Understanding its characteristics is the key to predicting and controlling air quality. In this study, complex networks were built to analyze topological characteristics of air quality data by correlation coefficient method. Firstly, PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) indexes of eight monitoring sites in Beijing were selected as samples from January 2013 to December 2014. Secondly, the C-C method was applied to determine the structure of phase space. Points in the reconstructed phase space were considered to be nodes of the network mapped. Then, edges were determined by nodes having the correlation greater than a critical threshold. Three properties of the constructed networks, degree distribution, clustering coefficient, and modularity, were used to determine the optimal value of the critical threshold. Finally, by analyzing and comparing topological properties, we pointed out that similarities and difference in the constructed complex networks revealed influence factors and their different roles on real air quality system.

  15. Evolution of enzymes in metabolism: a network perspective.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rui; Chaleil, Raphael A G; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2002-07-19

    Several models have been proposed to explain the origin and evolution of enzymes in metabolic pathways. Initially, the retro-evolution model proposed that, as enzymes at the end of pathways depleted their substrates in the primordial soup, there was a pressure for earlier enzymes in pathways to be created, using the later ones as initial template, in order to replenish the pools of depleted metabolites. Later, the recruitment model proposed that initial templates from other pathways could be used as long as those enzymes were similar in chemistry or substrate specificity. These two models have dominated recent studies of enzyme evolution. These studies are constrained by either the small scale of the study or the artificial restrictions imposed by pathway definitions. Here, a network approach is used to study enzyme evolution in fully sequenced genomes, thus removing both constraints. We find that homologous pairs of enzymes are roughly twice as likely to have evolved from enzymes that are less than three steps away from each other in the reaction network than pairs of non-homologous enzymes. These results, together with the conservation of the type of chemical reaction catalyzed by evolutionarily related enzymes, suggest that functional blocks of similar chemistry have evolved within metabolic networks. One possible explanation for these observations is that this local evolution phenomenon is likely to cause less global physiological disruptions in metabolism than evolution of enzymes from other enzymes that are distant from them in the metabolic network.

  16. Small-World Human Brain Networks: Perspectives and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xuhong; Vasilakos, Athanasios V; He, Yong

    2017-04-04

    Modelling the human brain as a complex network has provided a powerful mathematical framework to characterize the structural and functional architectures of the brain. In the past decade, the combination of non-invasive neuroimaging techniques and graph theoretical approaches enable us to map human structural and functional connectivity patterns (i.e., connectome) at the macroscopic level. One of the most influential findings is that human brain networks exhibit prominent small-world organization. Such a network architecture in the human brain facilitates efficient information segregation and integration at low wiring and energy costs, which presumably results from natural selection under the pressure of a cost-efficiency balance. Moreover, the small-world organization undergoes continuous changes during normal development and aging and exhibits dramatic alterations in neurological and psychiatric disorders. In this review, we survey recent advances regarding the small-world architecture in human brain networks and highlight the potential implications and applications in multidisciplinary fields, including cognitive neuroscience, medicine and engineering. Finally, we highlight several challenging issues and areas for future research in this rapidly growing field.

  17. Social Networking Tools in a University Setting: A Student's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haytko, Diana L.; Parker, R. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    As Professors, we are challenged to reach ever-changing cohorts of college students as they flow through our classes and our lives. Technological advancements happen daily and we need to decide which, if any, to incorporate into our classrooms. Our students constantly check Facebook, Twitter, MySpace and other online social networks. Should we be…

  18. A Network Perspective on Dropout Prevention in Two Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Rebecca; Gifford, Elizabeth; Bai, Yu; Corra, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This exploratory case study examines how school systems and other local organizations have been working within two major U.S. cities to improve high school graduation rates. Systematically assessing active interorganizational dropout prevention networks may reveal characteristics affecting communities' capacity to support school…

  19. The CE3R Network: current status and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhardt, Wolfgang; Pesaresi, Damiano; Živčić, Mladen; Costa, Giovanni; Kuk, Kresimir; Bondár, István; Duni, Llambro; Spacek, Petr

    2016-04-01

    In order to improve the monitoring of seismic activities in the border regions and to enhance the collaboration between countries and seismological institutions in Central Europe, the Environment Agency of the Slovenian Republic (ARSO), the Italian National Institute for Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics (OGS), the University of Trieste (UniTS) and the Austrian Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) established in 2001 the "South Eastern Alps Transfrontier Seismological Network". In May 2014 ARSO, OGS, UniTS and ZAMG agreed to formalize the transfrontier network, to name it "Central and East European Earthquake Research Network", (CE3RN or CE3R Network) in order to locate it geographically since cross-border networks can be established in other areas of the world and to expand their cooperation, including institutions in other countries. The University of Zagreb (UniZG) joined CE3RN in October 2014. The Kövesligethy Radó Seismological Observatory (KRSZO) of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences joined CE3RN in October 2015. The Institute of Geosciences, Energy, Water and Environment (IGEWE) of the Polytechnic University of Tirana joined CE3RN in November 2015. The Institute of Physics of the Earth (IPE) of the Masaryk University in Brno joined CE3RN in November 2015. CE3RN Parties intend to formalize and possibly extend their ongoing cooperation in the field of seismological data acquisition, exchange and use for seismological and earthquake engineering and civil protection purposes. The purpose of this cooperation is to retain and expand the existing cross-border network, specify the rules of conduct in the network management, improvements, extensions and enlargements, enhance seismological research in the region, and support civil protection activities. Since the formal establishment of CE3RN, several common projects have been completed, like the SeismoSAT project for the seismic data center connection over satellite funded by the Interreg

  20. Catchment scale multi-objective flood management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Steve; Worrall, Peter; Rosolova, Zdenka; Hammond, Gene

    2010-05-01

    Rural land management is known to affect both the generation and propagation of flooding at the local scale, but there is still a general lack of good evidence that this impact is still significant at the larger catchment scale given the complexity of physical interactions and climatic variability taking place at this level. The National Trust, in partnership with the Environment Agency, are managing an innovative project on the Holnicote Estate in south west England to demonstrate the benefits of using good rural land management practices to reduce flood risk at the both the catchment and sub-catchment scales. The Holnicote Estate is owned by the National Trust and comprises about 5,000 hectares of land, from the uplands of Exmoor to the sea, incorporating most of the catchments of the river Horner and Aller Water. There are nearly 100 houses across three villages that are at risk from flooding which could potentially benefit from changes in land management practices in the surrounding catchment providing a more sustainable flood attenuation function. In addition to the contribution being made to flood risk management there are a range of other ecosystems services that will be enhanced through these targeted land management changes. Alterations in land management will create new opportunities for wildlife and habitats and help to improve the local surface water quality. Such improvements will not only create additional wildlife resources locally but also serve the landscape response to climate change effects by creating and enhancing wildlife networks within the region. Land management changes will also restore and sustain landscape heritage resources and provide opportunities for amenity, recreation and tourism. The project delivery team is working with the National Trust from source to sea across the entire Holnicote Estate, to identify and subsequently implement suitable land management techniques to manage local flood risk within the catchments. These

  1. Mechanics of composite actin networks: in vitro and cellular perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2014-03-01

    Actin filaments and associated actin binding proteins play an essential role in governing the mechanical properties of eukaryotic cells. Even though cells have multiple actin binding proteins (ABPs) that exist simultaneously to maintain the structural and mechanical integrity of the cellular cytoskeleton, how these proteins work together to determine the properties of actin networks is not well understood. The ABP, palladin, is essential for the integrity of cell morphology and movement during development. Palladin coexists with alpha-actinin in stress fibers and focal adhesions and binds to both actin and alpha-actinin. To obtain insight into how mutually interacting actin crosslinking proteins modulate the properties of actin networks, we have characterized the micro-structure and mechanics of actin networks crosslinked with palladin and alpha-actinin. Our studies on composite networks of alpha-actinin/palladin/actin show that palladin and alpha-actinin synergistically determine network viscoelasticity. We have further examined the role of palladin in cellular force generation and mechanosensing. Traction force microscopy revealed that TAFs are sensitive to substrate stiffness as they generate larger forces on substrates of increased stiffness. Contrary to expectations, knocking down palladin increased the forces generated by cells, and also inhibited the ability to sense substrate stiffness for very stiff gels. This was accompanied by significant differences in the actin organization and adhesion dynamics of palladin knock down cells. Perturbation experiments also suggest altered myosin activity in palladin KD cells. Our results suggest that the actin crosslinkers such as palladin and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant behavior as in cancer metastasis.

  2. Employment, Social Networks and Undocumented Migrants: The Employer Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Alice; McKay, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on data from qualitative interviews with ethnic enclave and ethnic economy business entrepreneurs from Chinese, Bangladeshi and Turkish-speaking communities in London. Routes into business and worker recruitment practices are explored, demonstrating the centrality of social capital in the form of family and other social networks within these processes. The article investigates what employers consider the desirable characteristics of workers: trust, kinship, gender, social networks, language compatibility and the needs of the business intersect with racialised notions of workers’ strengths and characteristics. Finally, we consider changing practices in relation to the employment of undocumented migrants, in the context of an increasingly punitive legislative regime. The complex and variable impact of policy alongside the ways in which other obligations and positions outweigh the fear and risks of sanctions associated with non-compliance is revealed. PMID:25866421

  3. Employment, Social Networks and Undocumented Migrants: The Employer Perspective.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Alice; McKay, Sonia

    2015-02-01

    This article draws on data from qualitative interviews with ethnic enclave and ethnic economy business entrepreneurs from Chinese, Bangladeshi and Turkish-speaking communities in London. Routes into business and worker recruitment practices are explored, demonstrating the centrality of social capital in the form of family and other social networks within these processes. The article investigates what employers consider the desirable characteristics of workers: trust, kinship, gender, social networks, language compatibility and the needs of the business intersect with racialised notions of workers' strengths and characteristics. Finally, we consider changing practices in relation to the employment of undocumented migrants, in the context of an increasingly punitive legislative regime. The complex and variable impact of policy alongside the ways in which other obligations and positions outweigh the fear and risks of sanctions associated with non-compliance is revealed.

  4. Understanding Crowd-Powered Search Groups: A Social Network Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingpeng; Wang, Fei-Yue; Zeng, Daniel; Wang, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Background Crowd-powered search is a new form of search and problem solving scheme that involves collaboration among a potentially large number of voluntary Web users. Human flesh search (HFS), a particular form of crowd-powered search originated in China, has seen tremendous growth since its inception in 2001. HFS presents a valuable test-bed for scientists to validate existing and new theories in social computing, sociology, behavioral sciences, and so forth. Methodology In this research, we construct an aggregated HFS group, consisting of the participants and their relationships in a comprehensive set of identified HFS episodes. We study the topological properties and the evolution of the aggregated network and different sub-groups in the network. We also identify the key HFS participants according to a variety of measures. Conclusions We found that, as compared with other online social networks, HFS participant network shares the power-law degree distribution and small-world property, but with a looser and more distributed organizational structure, leading to the diversity, decentralization, and independence of HFS participants. In addition, the HFS group has been becoming increasingly decentralized. The comparisons of different HFS sub-groups reveal that HFS participants collaborated more often when they conducted the searches in local platforms or the searches requiring a certain level of professional knowledge background. On the contrary, HFS participants did not collaborate much when they performed the search task in national platforms or the searches with general topics that did not require specific information and learning. We also observed that the key HFS information contributors, carriers, and transmitters came from different groups of HFS participants. PMID:22761888

  5. A physical layer perspective on access network sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Unlike in copper or wireless networks, there is no sharing of resources in fiber access networks yet, other than bit stream access or cable sharing, in which the fibers of a cable are let to one or multiple operators. Sharing optical resources on a single fiber among multiple operators or different services has not yet been applied. While this would allow for a better exploitation of installed infrastructures, there are operational issues which still need to be resolved, before this sharing model can be implemented in networks. Operating multiple optical systems and services over a common fiber plant, autonomously and independently from each other, can result in mutual distortions on the physical layer. These distortions will degrade the performance of the involved systems, unless precautions are taken in the infrastructure hardware to eliminate or to reduce them to an acceptable level. Moreover, the infrastructure needs to be designed such as to support different system technologies and to ensure a guaranteed quality of the end-to-end connections. In this paper, suitable means are proposed to be introduced in fiber access infrastructures that will allow for shared utilization of the fibers while safeguarding the operational needs and business interests of the involved parties.

  6. Characterization of chaotic attractors under noise: A recurrence network perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Rinku; Harikrishnan, K. P.; Misra, R.; Ambika, G.

    2016-12-01

    We undertake a detailed numerical investigation to understand how the addition of white and colored noise to a chaotic time series changes the topology and the structure of the underlying attractor reconstructed from the time series. We use the methods and measures of recurrence plot and recurrence network generated from the time series for this analysis. We explicitly show that the addition of noise obscures the property of recurrence of trajectory points in the phase space which is the hallmark of every dynamical system. However, the structure of the attractor is found to be robust even upto high noise levels of 50%. An advantage of recurrence network measures over the conventional nonlinear measures is that they can be applied on short and non stationary time series data. By using the results obtained from the above analysis, we go on to analyse the light curves from a dominant black hole system and show that the recurrence network measures are capable of identifying the nature of noise contamination in a time series.

  7. Feigenbaum graphs: a complex network perspective of chaos.

    PubMed

    Luque, Bartolo; Lacasa, Lucas; Ballesteros, Fernando J; Robledo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The recently formulated theory of horizontal visibility graphs transforms time series into graphs and allows the possibility of studying dynamical systems through the characterization of their associated networks. This method leads to a natural graph-theoretical description of nonlinear systems with qualities in the spirit of symbolic dynamics. We support our claim via the case study of the period-doubling and band-splitting attractor cascades that characterize unimodal maps. We provide a universal analytical description of this classic scenario in terms of the horizontal visibility graphs associated with the dynamics within the attractors, that we call Feigenbaum graphs, independent of map nonlinearity or other particulars. We derive exact results for their degree distribution and related quantities, recast them in the context of the renormalization group and find that its fixed points coincide with those of network entropy optimization. Furthermore, we show that the network entropy mimics the Lyapunov exponent of the map independently of its sign, hinting at a Pesin-like relation equally valid out of chaos.

  8. The major transitions of life from a network perspective.

    PubMed

    Suki, Béla

    2012-01-01

    Many attempts have been made to understand the origin of life and biological complexity both at the experimental and theoretical levels but neither is fully explained. In an influential work, Maynard Smith and Szathmáry (1995) argued that the majority of the increase in complexity is not gradual, but it is associated with a few so-called major transitions along the way of the evolution of life. For each major transition, they identified specific mechanisms that could account for the change in complexity related to information transmission across generations. In this work, I propose that the sudden and unexpected improvement in the functionality of an organism that followed a major transition was enabled by a phase transition in the network structure associated with that function. The increase in complexity following a major transition is therefore directly linked to the emergence of a novel structure-function relation which altered the course of evolution. As a consequence, emergent phenomena arising from these network phase transitions can serve as a common organizing principle for understanding the major transitions. As specific examples, I analyze the emergence of life, the emergence of the genetic apparatus, the rise of the eukaryotic cells, the evolution of movement and mechanosensitivity, and the emergence of consciousness. Finally, I discuss the implications of network associated phase transitions to issues that bear relevance to the history, the immediate present and perhaps the future, of life.

  9. The Major Transitions of Life from a Network Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Suki, Béla

    2012-01-01

    Many attempts have been made to understand the origin of life and biological complexity both at the experimental and theoretical levels but neither is fully explained. In an influential work, Maynard Smith and Szathmáry (1995) argued that the majority of the increase in complexity is not gradual, but it is associated with a few so-called major transitions along the way of the evolution of life. For each major transition, they identified specific mechanisms that could account for the change in complexity related to information transmission across generations. In this work, I propose that the sudden and unexpected improvement in the functionality of an organism that followed a major transition was enabled by a phase transition in the network structure associated with that function. The increase in complexity following a major transition is therefore directly linked to the emergence of a novel structure–function relation which altered the course of evolution. As a consequence, emergent phenomena arising from these network phase transitions can serve as a common organizing principle for understanding the major transitions. As specific examples, I analyze the emergence of life, the emergence of the genetic apparatus, the rise of the eukaryotic cells, the evolution of movement and mechanosensitivity, and the emergence of consciousness. Finally, I discuss the implications of network associated phase transitions to issues that bear relevance to the history, the immediate present and perhaps the future, of life. PMID:22514542

  10. Feigenbaum Graphs: A Complex Network Perspective of Chaos

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Bartolo; Lacasa, Lucas; Ballesteros, Fernando J.; Robledo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The recently formulated theory of horizontal visibility graphs transforms time series into graphs and allows the possibility of studying dynamical systems through the characterization of their associated networks. This method leads to a natural graph-theoretical description of nonlinear systems with qualities in the spirit of symbolic dynamics. We support our claim via the case study of the period-doubling and band-splitting attractor cascades that characterize unimodal maps. We provide a universal analytical description of this classic scenario in terms of the horizontal visibility graphs associated with the dynamics within the attractors, that we call Feigenbaum graphs, independent of map nonlinearity or other particulars. We derive exact results for their degree distribution and related quantities, recast them in the context of the renormalization group and find that its fixed points coincide with those of network entropy optimization. Furthermore, we show that the network entropy mimics the Lyapunov exponent of the map independently of its sign, hinting at a Pesin-like relation equally valid out of chaos. PMID:21915254

  11. Exploring links between tectonics, catchment morphology and hydrographs across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanmaercke, Matthias; Campforts, Benjamin; Van Ruyskensvelde, Glenn; Poesen, Jean

    2016-04-01

    A growing number of studies show that contemporary catchment sediment yields (SY, [t/km²/y]) are strongly correlated to patterns of seismic activity at regional to continental scales. Nonetheless, the mechanisms explaining these correlations are still poorly understood. Seismicity may increase SY by triggering landslides or weakening the surface lithology. On the other hand seismicity can be considered as a proxy for tectonic movements, while there is a growing consensus that tectonics exert an important influence on catchment morphology. This morphology influences the properties of runoff events (e.g. peak discharge, stream power). Given the large influence of large runoff events on annual SY, it is therefore possible that observed correlations between SY and seismicity are (at least partly) attributable to tectonic influences on catchment morphology. We test this hypothesis by investigating links between runoff hydrographs and patterns in catchment properties at a European scale using numerous catchment indices such as the slope, channel steepness, circularity, drainage length, river network topology, etc. From DEMs with a resolution of ca. 100m we randomly delineated over 5000 catchments across Europe with an area of 90 to 100 km². For each of these catchments, we simulated a runoff hydrograph, using a simple Hortonian runoff model that routes water through the catchment based on previously proposed flow velocity equations. We made abstraction of rainfall patterns, lithology, land use and all factors other than topography. Hence, the hydrographs only reflect the influence of the morphological properties of the catchments and allow for comparisons. First results show that, apart from average catchment slope, there are very few regional patterns in catchment morphological properties that may significantly affect hydrographs. In some tectonically active regions, channel slopes are slightly steeper compared to catchments with the same average catchment slope in

  12. Foundational perspectives on causality in large-scale brain networks.

    PubMed

    Mannino, Michael; Bressler, Steven L

    2015-12-01

    A profusion of recent work in cognitive neuroscience has been concerned with the endeavor to uncover causal influences in large-scale brain networks. However, despite the fact that many papers give a nod to the important theoretical challenges posed by the concept of causality, this explosion of research has generally not been accompanied by a rigorous conceptual analysis of the nature of causality in the brain. This review provides both a descriptive and prescriptive account of the nature of causality as found within and between large-scale brain networks. In short, it seeks to clarify the concept of causality in large-scale brain networks both philosophically and scientifically. This is accomplished by briefly reviewing the rich philosophical history of work on causality, especially focusing on contributions by David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Bertrand Russell, and Christopher Hitchcock. We go on to discuss the impact that various interpretations of modern physics have had on our understanding of causality. Throughout all this, a central focus is the distinction between theories of deterministic causality (DC), whereby causes uniquely determine their effects, and probabilistic causality (PC), whereby causes change the probability of occurrence of their effects. We argue that, given the topological complexity of its large-scale connectivity, the brain should be considered as a complex system and its causal influences treated as probabilistic in nature. We conclude that PC is well suited for explaining causality in the brain for three reasons: (1) brain causality is often mutual; (2) connectional convergence dictates that only rarely is the activity of one neuronal population uniquely determined by another one; and (3) the causal influences exerted between neuronal populations may not have observable effects. A number of different techniques are currently available to characterize causal influence in the brain. Typically, these techniques quantify the statistical

  13. Foundational perspectives on causality in large-scale brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannino, Michael; Bressler, Steven L.

    2015-12-01

    A profusion of recent work in cognitive neuroscience has been concerned with the endeavor to uncover causal influences in large-scale brain networks. However, despite the fact that many papers give a nod to the important theoretical challenges posed by the concept of causality, this explosion of research has generally not been accompanied by a rigorous conceptual analysis of the nature of causality in the brain. This review provides both a descriptive and prescriptive account of the nature of causality as found within and between large-scale brain networks. In short, it seeks to clarify the concept of causality in large-scale brain networks both philosophically and scientifically. This is accomplished by briefly reviewing the rich philosophical history of work on causality, especially focusing on contributions by David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Bertrand Russell, and Christopher Hitchcock. We go on to discuss the impact that various interpretations of modern physics have had on our understanding of causality. Throughout all this, a central focus is the distinction between theories of deterministic causality (DC), whereby causes uniquely determine their effects, and probabilistic causality (PC), whereby causes change the probability of occurrence of their effects. We argue that, given the topological complexity of its large-scale connectivity, the brain should be considered as a complex system and its causal influences treated as probabilistic in nature. We conclude that PC is well suited for explaining causality in the brain for three reasons: (1) brain causality is often mutual; (2) connectional convergence dictates that only rarely is the activity of one neuronal population uniquely determined by another one; and (3) the causal influences exerted between neuronal populations may not have observable effects. A number of different techniques are currently available to characterize causal influence in the brain. Typically, these techniques quantify the statistical

  14. Sensor networks and netcentric perspectives of civil government

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Deirdre R.; Howard, Timothy G.

    2007-09-01

    Observations of weather and climate yield demonstrated societal benefits, and have been officially part of U.S. government activities since Jefferson. Observing sensor networks contribute to real-time warnings of extreme weather, and to long-term analysis of endemic disease. To learn more about netcentric technologies and their role in observing sensor networks, the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) organized a seminar that examined System-of-Systems (SOS), Enterprise Architecture (EA) and Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) concepts, using two NOAA programs, the Global Earth Observation Integrated Data Environment (GEO-IDE) and the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), as examples. Further analysis of the seminar material shows the interrelationship of SOS and EA, with the enabling capability of IPv6 and the framework of a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA), can help NOAA organize sensor systems-of-systems on a global scale in support of the Global Earth Observing System-of-Systems (GEOSS).

  15. A European perspective--the European clinical research infrastructures network.

    PubMed

    Demotes-Mainard, J; Kubiak, C

    2011-11-01

    Evaluating research outcomes requires multinational cooperation in clinical research for optimization of treatment strategies and comparative effectiveness research, leading to evidence-based practice and healthcare cost containment. The European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) is a distributed ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) roadmap pan-European infrastructure designed to support multinational clinical research, making Europe a single area for clinical studies, taking advantage of its population size to access patients, and unlocking latent scientific potential. Servicing multinational trials started during its preparatory phase, and ECRIN will now apply for an ERIC (European Research Infrastructures Consortium) status by 2011. By creating a single area for clinical research in Europe, this achievement will contribute to the implementation of the Europe flagship initiative 2020 'Innovation Union', whose objectives include defragmentation of the research and education capacity, tackling the major societal challenges starting with the area of healthy ageing, and removing barriers to bring ideas to the market.

  16. Operating a global seismic network - perspectives from the USGS GSN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, L. S.; Derr, J. S.; Hutt, C. R.; Bolton, H.; Ford, D.; Gyure, G. S.; Storm, T.; Leith, W.

    2007-05-01

    The Global Seismographic Network (GSN) is a permanent digital network of state-of-the-art seismological and geophysical sensors connected by a global telecommunications network, serving as a multi-use scientific facility used for seismic monitoring for response applications, basic and applied research in solid earthquake geophysics, and earth science education. A joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Science Foundation, and Incorporated Research Institutions in Seismology (IRIS), the GSN provides near- uniform, worldwide monitoring of the Earth through 144 modern, globally distributed seismic stations. The USGS currently operates 90 GSN or GSN-affiliate stations. As a US government program, the USGS GSN is evaluated on several performance measures including data availability, data latency, and cost effectiveness. The USGS-component of the GSN, like the GSN as a whole, is in transition from a period of rapid growth to steady- state operations. The program faces challenges of aging equipment and increased operating costs at the same time that national and international earthquake and tsunami monitoring agencies place an increased reliance on GSN data. Data acquisition of the USGS GSN is based on the Quanterra Q680 datalogger, a workhorse system that is approaching twenty years in the field, often in harsh environments. An IRIS instrumentation committee recently selected the Quanterra Q330 HR as the "next generation" GSN data acquisition system, and the USGS will begin deploying the new equipment in the middle of 2007. These new systems will address many of the issues associated with the ageing Q680 while providing a platform for interoperability across the GSN.. In order to address the challenge of increasing operational costs, the USGS employs several tools. First, the USGS benefits from the contributions of local host institutions. The station operators are the first line of defense when a station experiences problems, changing boards

  17. Aging brain from a network science perspective: something to be positive about?

    PubMed

    Voss, Michelle W; Wong, Chelsea N; Baniqued, Pauline L; Burdette, Jonathan H; Erickson, Kirk I; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; McAuley, Edward; Laurienti, Paul J; Kramer, Arthur F

    2013-01-01

    To better understand age differences in brain function and behavior, the current study applied network science to model functional interactions between brain regions. We observed a shift in network topology whereby for older adults subcortical and cerebellar structures overlapping with the Salience network had more connectivity to the rest of the brain, coupled with fragmentation of large-scale cortical networks such as the Default and Fronto-Parietal networks. Additionally, greater integration of the dorsal medial thalamus and red nucleus in the Salience network was associated with greater satisfaction with life for older adults, which is consistent with theoretical predictions of age-related increases in emotion regulation that are thought to help maintain well-being and life satisfaction in late adulthood. In regard to cognitive abilities, greater ventral medial prefrontal cortex coherence with its topological neighbors in the Default Network was associated with faster processing speed. Results suggest that large-scale organizing properties of the brain differ with normal aging, and this perspective may offer novel insight into understanding age-related differences in cognitive function and well-being.

  18. Which spatial discretization for distributed hydrological models? Proposition of a methodology and illustration for medium to large-scale catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehotin, J.; Braud, I.

    2008-05-01

    Distributed hydrological models are valuable tools to derive distributed estimation of water balance components or to study the impact of land-use or climate change on water resources and water quality. In these models, the choice of an appropriate spatial discretization is a crucial issue. It is obviously linked to the available data, their spatial resolution and the dominant hydrological processes. For a given catchment and a given data set, the "optimal" spatial discretization should be adapted to the modelling objectives, as the latter determine the dominant hydrological processes considered in the modelling. For small catchments, landscape heterogeneity can be represented explicitly, whereas for large catchments such fine representation is not feasible and simplification is needed. The question is thus: is it possible to design a flexible methodology to represent landscape heterogeneity efficiently, according to the problem to be solved? This methodology should allow a controlled and objective trade-off between available data, the scale of the dominant water cycle components and the modelling objectives. In this paper, we propose a general methodology for such catchment discretization. It is based on the use of nested discretizations. The first level of discretization is composed of the sub-catchments, organised by the river network topology. The sub-catchment variability can be described using a second level of discretizations, which is called hydro-landscape units. This level of discretization is only performed if it is consistent with the modelling objectives, the active hydrological processes and data availability. The hydro-landscapes take into account different geophysical factors such as topography, land-use, pedology, but also suitable hydrological discontinuities such as ditches, hedges, dams, etc. For numerical reasons these hydro-landscapes can be further subdivided into smaller elements that will constitute the modelling units (third level of

  19. Characterizing streamflow generation in Alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiogna, Gabriele; Cano Paoli, Karina; Bellin, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Developing effective hydrological models for streamflow generation in Alpine catchments is challenging due to the inherent complexity of the intertwined processes controlling water transfer from hillslopes to streams and along the river network. With water discharge as the sole observational variable it is impossible to differentiate between different streamflow sources, and modelling activity is often limited to simplified phenomenological rainfall-runoff models. This study focuses on quantifying streamflow sources at different temporal scales and the associated uncertainty by using natural tracer data (electrical conductivity, oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes ratios) as observational variables supplementing streamflow measurements. We determine the spatial and temporal hydrological behavior and the mean residence time of water in the Vermigliana catchment, North-Eastern Italy and we separate contributions to streamflow originating from Presena and Presanella glaciers, both exerting a strong control on the hydrologic budget of the study site. Furthermore, we identify a seasonal control on the effect of storm events. The catchment responded rapidly to precipitation events in early autumn, it was unaffected by precipitation events in early spring, while runoff generation was enhanced by snow melting in late autumn. Air temperature is identified as the main controlling parameter, in addition to precipitation. Two-component mixing analysis showed that the relative contribution of new water, which can contribute up to 75% of total streamflow, is very rapid. Only two hours time-lag was observed between the beginning of the precipitation event and the emergence of a significant contribution of new water. These results evidence the relevance of mixing between pre-event and event water in the Vermigliana catchment, and in similar high elevation Alpine catchments. This study provides new insights on the dynamics of streamflow generation in Alpine catchments and a

  20. Using networks to enhance health services delivery: perspectives, paradoxes and propositions.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Timothy R; Casebeer, Ann; Vanderplaat, Madine

    2006-01-01

    There is a growing need to better understand and address the consequences of an increasing reliance on networks used to enhance health services delivery. Networks seem to have emerged as the definitive solution for tackling complex healthcare problems together that we have not been able to adequately address separately. Emphasizing the collective and the collaborative, networks are assumed to address healthcare issues in ways that are superior to previous service-delivery models. While this assumption would appear to be sound theoretically, we have little empirical information available to actually understand what networks are, what they do and whether they achieve their stated goals--truly making a difference in the delivery of care and the maintenance of health. With a diversity of networks within Canada focused on health services delivery, this paper offers a multi-dimensional framework for conceptualizing how these complex inter-organizational relationships generate both challenges and opportunities. We identify six paradoxes that the networks create when used to enhance the delivery of health services and posit several propositions concerning the evaluative work that needs to be done to enhance our understanding of and confidence in this inter-organizational form. Unless these paradoxes are adequately recognized and addressed, the value and costs associated with developing and using networks in healthcare contexts will remain unclear at best. Given the broad interest in and use of networks proliferating in health-related arenas, it is time to amass the evidence and than align the perspectives. Are networks here to stay in healthcare because they make a difference or because we got tired of talking about the need for greater collaboration and so gave it a new name and frame? At the very least, it will be important to build on what we have already learned through research into collaboration in healthcare and related fields, and even more critical to be mindful

  1. Measuring the default risk of sovereign debt from the perspective of network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Hongwei; Ho, Hwai-Chung

    2013-05-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in network research, especially in the fields of biology, computer science, and sociology. It is natural to address complex financial issues such as the European sovereign debt crisis from the perspective of network. In this article, we construct a network model according to the debt-credit relations instead of using the conventional methodology to measure the default risk. Based on the model, a risk index is examined using the quarterly report of consolidated foreign claims from the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) and debt/GDP ratios among these reporting countries. The empirical results show that this index can help the regulators and practitioners not only to determine the status of interconnectivity but also to point out the degree of the sovereign debt default risk. Our approach sheds new light on the investigation of quantifying the systemic risk.

  2. Photonic Network R&D Activities in Japan-Current Activities and Future Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Ken-Ichi; Miki, Tetsuya; Morioka, Toshio; Tsushima, Hideaki; Koga, Masafumi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Araki, Soichiro; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Namiki, Shu; Aoyama, Tomonori

    2005-10-01

    R&D activities on photonic networks in Japan are presented. First, milestones in current ongoing R&D programs supported by Japanese government agencies are introduced, including long-distance and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) fiber transmission, wavelength routing, optical burst switching (OBS), and control-plane technology for IP backbone networks. Their goal was set to evolve a legacy telecommunications network to IP-over-WDM networks by introducing technologies for WDM and wavelength routing. We then discuss the perspectives of so-called PHASE II R&D programs for photonic networks over the next 5 years until 2010, by focusing on the report that has been recently issued by the Photonic Internet Forum (PIF), a consortium that has major carriers, telecom vendors, and Japanese academics as members. The PHASE II R&D programs should serve to establish a photonic platform to provide abundant bandwidth on demand, at any time on a real-time basis, through the customer's initiative to promote bandwidth-rich applications, such as grid computing, real-time digital-cinema streaming, medical and educational applications, and network storage in e-commerce.

  3. The California Integrated Seismic Network:status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CISN,

    2001-12-01

    The California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) is a consortium of federal, state and academic institutions engaged in earthquake monitoring in California. The CISN represents California as a designated region of the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS). The CISN is governed by a Steering Committee representing institutions actively involved in earthquake monitoring in California (currently USGS, CDMG, UCB and Caltech) and the California OES. Current members of the CISN Steering Committee are Barbara Romanowicz (chair) and Lind Gee (both at UCB), David Oppenheimer and Mary-Lou Zoback (both at USGS/Menlo Park), Egill Hauksson and Robert Clayton (both at Caltech), Jim Davis and Tony Shakal (both at CDMG), Lucy Jones (vice-chair) and David Wald (both at USGS/Pasadena), Rich Eisner (OES) and Chris Poland (Degenkolb Engineers; head of the CISN Advisory Committee). A major goal of the CISN is to ensure a more uniform system for earthquake monitoring, through the improvement of seismic infrastructure in northern California and continued maintenance of the TriNet system in southern California. Another major goal is to integrate the earthquake monitoring and reporting efforts in California, utilizing compatible softrware and creating a single catalog. In particular, we will work to improve the robustness of statewide rapid notification and work with the California OES and other emergency responders to maximize the use and benefit of this real time seismic information. In the coming year, with new support from the State of California through the Office of Emergency Services, and from the ANSS program of the USGS, more than 50 new strong-motion stations will be installed, with a focus in the San Francisco Bay Area, in order to improve coverage for ShakeMap and 2 new broadband stations will be deployed in northern California to enhance earthquake reporting. CISN is also contributing to structural monitoring. The CISN is also focusing on data distribution and plans to

  4. Resistance and Security Index of Networks: Structural Information Perspective of Network Security

    PubMed Central

    Li, Angsheng; Hu, Qifu; Liu, Jun; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Li and Pan defined the metric of the K-dimensional structure entropy of a structured noisy dataset G to be the information that controls the formation of the K-dimensional structure of G that is evolved by the rules, order and laws of G, excluding the random variations that occur in G. Here, we propose the notion of resistance of networks based on the one- and two-dimensional structural information of graphs. Given a graph G, we define the resistance of G, written , as the greatest overall number of bits required to determine the code of the module that is accessible via random walks with stationary distribution in G, from which the random walks cannot escape. We show that the resistance of networks follows the resistance law of networks, that is, for a network G, the resistance of G is , where and are the one- and two-dimensional structure entropies of G, respectively. Based on the resistance law, we define the security index of a network G to be the normalised resistance of G, that is, . We show that the resistance and security index are both well-defined measures for the security of the networks. PMID:27255783

  5. Resistance and Security Index of Networks: Structural Information Perspective of Network Security.

    PubMed

    Li, Angsheng; Hu, Qifu; Liu, Jun; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-06-03

    Recently, Li and Pan defined the metric of the K-dimensional structure entropy of a structured noisy dataset G to be the information that controls the formation of the K-dimensional structure of G that is evolved by the rules, order and laws of G, excluding the random variations that occur in G. Here, we propose the notion of resistance of networks based on the one- and two-dimensional structural information of graphs. Given a graph G, we define the resistance of G, written , as the greatest overall number of bits required to determine the code of the module that is accessible via random walks with stationary distribution in G, from which the random walks cannot escape. We show that the resistance of networks follows the resistance law of networks, that is, for a network G, the resistance of G is , where and are the one- and two-dimensional structure entropies of G, respectively. Based on the resistance law, we define the security index of a network G to be the normalised resistance of G, that is, . We show that the resistance and security index are both well-defined measures for the security of the networks.

  6. Catchments of general practice in different countries– a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the current research on catchment areas of private general practices in different developed countries because healthcare reform, including primary health care, has featured prominently as an important political issue in a number of developed countries. The debates around health reform have had a significant health geographic focus. Conceptually, GP catchments describe the distribution, composition and profile of patients who access a general practitioner or a general practice (i.e. a site or facility comprising one or more general practitioners). Therefore, GP catchments provide important information into the geographic variation of access rates, utilisation of services and health outcomes by all of the population or different population groups in a defined area or aggregated area. This review highlights a wide range of diversity in the literature as to how GP catchments can be described, the indicators and measures used to frame the scale of catchments. Patient access to general practice health care services should be considered from a range of locational concepts, and not necessarily constrained by their place of residence. An analysis of catchment patterns of general practitioners should be considered as dynamic and multi-perspective. Geographic information systems provide opportunities to contribute valuable methodologies to study these relationships. However, researchers acknowledge that a conceptual framework for the analysis of GP catchments requires access to real world data. Recent studies have shown promising developments in the use of real world data, especially from studies in the UK. Understanding the catchment profiles of individual GP surgeries is important if governments are serious about patient choice being a key part of proposed primary health reforms. Future health planning should incorporate models of GP catchments as planning tools, at the micro level as well as the macro level, to assist policies on the

  7. Ocean Research - Perspectives from an international Ocean Research Coordination Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Jay; Williams, Albert, III

    2013-04-01

    The need for improved coordination in ocean observations is more urgent now given the issues of climate change, sustainable food sources and increased need for energy. Ocean researchers must work across disciplines to provide policy makers with clear and understandable assessments of the state of the ocean. With advances in technology, not only in observation, but also communication and computer science, we are in a new era where we can answer questions asked over the last 100 years at the time and space scales that are relevant. Programs like GLOBEC moved us forward but we are still challenged by the disciplinary divide. Interdisciplinary problem solving must be addressed not only by the exchange of data between the many sides, but through levels where questions require day-to-day collaboration. A National Science Foundation-funded Research Coordination Network (RCN) is addressing approaches for improving interdisciplinary research capabilities in the ocean sciences. During the last year, the RCN had a working group for Open Data led by John Orcutt, Peter Pissierssens and Albert Williams III. The teams has focused on three areas: 1. Data and Information formats and standards; 2. Data access models (including IPR, business models for open data, data policies,...); 3. Data publishing, data citation. There has been a significant trend toward free and open access to data in the last few years. In 2007, the US announced that Landsat data would be available at no charge. Float data from the US (NDBC), JCOMM and OceanSites offer web-based access. The IODE is developing its Ocean Data Portal giving immediate and free access to ocean data. However, from the aspect of long-term collaborations across communities, this global trend is less robust than might appear at the surface. While there are many standard data formats for data exchange, there is not yet widespread uniformity in their adoption. Use of standard data formats can be encouraged in several ways: sponsors of

  8. Heterogeneity in catchment properties: a case study of Grey and Buller catchments, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, U.; Pearson, C. P.; Nikora, V. I.; Ibbitt, R. P.

    The scaling behaviour of landscape properties, including both morphological and landscape patchiness, is examined using monofractal and multifractal analysis. The study is confined to two neighbouring meso-scale catchments on the west coast of the South Island of New Zealand. The catchments offer a diverse but largely undisturbed landscape with population and development impacts being extremely low. Bulk landscape properties of the catchments (and their sub-basins) are examined and show that scaling of stream networks follow Hack’s empirical rule, with exponents ˜0.6. It is also found that the longitudinal and transverse scaling exponents of stream networks equate to νl ≈0.6 and νw≈ 0.4, indicative of self-affine scaling. Catchment shapes also show self-affine behaviour. Further, scaling of landscape patches show multifractal behaviour and the analysis of these variables yields the characteristic parabolic curves known as multifractal spectra. A novel analytical approach is adopted by using catchments as hydrological cells at various sizes, ranging from first to sixth order, as the unit of measure. This approach is presented as an alternative to the box-counting method as it may be much more representative of hydro-ecological processes at catchment scales. Multifractal spectra are generated for each landscape property and spectral parameters such as the range in α (Holder exponent) values and maximum dimension at α0, (also known as the capacity dimension Dcap), are obtained. Other fractal dimensions (information Dinf and correlation Dcor) are also calculated and compared. The dimensions are connected by the inequality Dcap≥Dinf≥Dcor. Such a relationship strongly suggests that the landscape patches are heterogeneous in nature and that their scaling behaviour can be described as multifractal. The quantitative parameters obtained from the spectra may provide the basis for improved parameterisation of ecological and hydrological models.

  9. Real Time Semantic Interoperability in AD HOC Networks of Geospatial Data Sources: Challenges, Achievements and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafavi, M. A.; Bakillah, M.

    2012-07-01

    Recent advances in geospatial technologies have made available large amount of geospatial data. Meanwhile, new developments in Internet and communication technologies created a shift from isolated geospatial databases to ad hoc networks of geospatial data sources, where data sources can join or leave the network, and form groups to share data and services. However, effective integration and sharing of geospatial data among these data sources and their users are hampered by semantic heterogeneities. These heterogeneities affect the spatial, temporal and thematic aspects of geospatial concepts. There have been many efforts to address semantic interoperability issues in the geospatial domain. These efforts were mainly focused on resolving heterogeneities caused by different and implicit representations of the concepts. However, many approaches have focused on the thematic aspects, leaving aside the explicit representation of spatial and temporal aspects. Also, most semantic interoperability approaches for networks have focused on automating the semantic mapping process. However, the ad hoc network structure is continuously modified by source addition or removal, formation of groups, etc. This dynamic aspect is often neglected in those approaches. This paper proposes a conceptual framework for real time semantic interoperability in ad hoc networks of geospatial data sources. The conceptual framework presents the fundamental elements of real time semantic interoperability through a hierarchy of interrelated semantic states and processes. Then, we use the conceptual framework to set the discussion on the achievements that have already been made, the challenges that remain to be addressed and perspectives with respect to these challenges.

  10. [Opportunity for the integration of the gender perspective in health research and innovation in Europe: COST Network genderSTE].

    PubMed

    Sánchez de Madariaga, Inés; Ruiz Cantero, María Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The European Commission supports several routes for incorporating the gender perspective. The Commission currently supports the new Horizon 2020 program, and also funds projects such as "gendered innovations", which show how gender innovations increase the quality of research and professional practice for health and welfare. One of the policy instruments is the Recommendation on Gender, Science and Innovation. Against this background, the international European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) network genderSTE (Gender, Science, Technology and Environment) was created, which seeks to: 1) promote structural changes in institutions to increase the number of women researchers; 2) identify the gender dimensions relevant to the environment; and 3) improve the integration of a gender perspective in research and technology. COST GenderSTE supports networking and the dissemination of knowledge with a gender perspective. All these tools provide an opportunity to incorporate a gender perspective in research in Europe.

  11. Medicine, religion and ayahuasca in Catalonia. Considering ayahuasca networks from a medical anthropology perspective.

    PubMed

    Apud, Ismael; Romaní, Oriol

    2017-01-01

    Ayahuasca is a psychoactive beverage from the Amazon, traditionally used by indigenous and mestizo populations in the region. Widespread international use of the beverage began in the 1990s in both secular contexts and religious/spiritual networks. This article offers an analysis of these networks as health care systems in general and for the case of Spain and specifically Catalonia, describing the emergence and characteristics of their groups, and the therapeutic itineraries of some participants. The medical anthropology perspective we take enables us to reflect on the relationship between medicine and religion, and problematize the tensions between medicalization and medical pluralism. Closely linked to the process of medicalization, we also analyze prohibitionist drug policies and their tensions and conflicts with the use of ayahuasca in ritual and 'health care' contexts. The paper ends with a reflection on the problem of ayahuasca as 'medicine', since the connection between religion and medicine is a very difficult one to separate.

  12. Understanding Urban Traffic Flow Characteristics from the Network Centrality Perspective at Different Granularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. X.; Zhao, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we analyze urban traffic flow using taxi trajectory data to understand the characteristics of traffic flow from the network centrality perspective at point (intersection), line (road), and area (community) granularities. The entire analysis process comprises three steps. The first step utilizes the taxi trajectory data to evaluate traffic flow at different granularities. Second, the centrality indices are calculated based on research units at different granularities. Third, correlation analysis between the centrality indices and corresponding urban traffic flow is performed. Experimental results indicate that urbaxperimental results indicate that urbaxperimental results indicate that urban traffic flow is relatively influenced by the road network structure. However, urban traffic flow also depends on the research unit size. Traditional centralities and traffic flow exhibit a low correlation at point granularity but exhibit a high correlation at line and area granularities. Furthermore, the conclusions of this study reflect the universality of the modifiable areal unit problem.

  13. A catchment scale water balance model for FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Famiglietti, J. S.; Wood, E. F.; Sivapalan, M.; Thongs, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A catchment scale water balance model is presented and used to predict evaporation from the King's Creek catchment at the First ISLSCP Field Experiment site on the Konza Prairie, Kansas. The model incorporates spatial variability in topography, soils, and precipitation to compute the land surface hydrologic fluxes. A network of 20 rain gages was employed to measure rainfall across the catchment in the summer of 1987. These data were spatially interpolated and used to drive the model during storm periods. During interstorm periods the model was driven by the estimated potential evaporation, which was calculated using net radiation data collected at site 2. Model-computed evaporation is compared to that observed, both at site 2 (grid location 1916-BRS) and the catchment scale, for the simulation period from June 1 to October 9, 1987.

  14. Linking catchment structure to hydrologic function: Implications of catchment topography for patterns of landscape hydrologic connectivity and stream flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jencso, K. G.; McGlynn, B. L.; Marshall, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    The relationship between catchment structure (topography and topology), stream network hydrologic connectivity, and runoff response remains poorly understood. Hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) water table connectivity serves as the hydrologic linkage between a catchment’s uplands and the channel network and facilitates the transmission of water and solutes to streams. While there has been tremendous interest in the concept of hydrological connectivity to characterize catchments, there are relatively few studies that have quantified hydrologic connectivity at the stream network and catchment scales. Here, we examine how catchment topography influenced patterns of stream network HRS connectivity and resultant runoff dynamics across 11 nested headwater catchments in the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (TCEF), MT. This study extends the empirical findings of Jencso et al. (2009) who found a strong linear relationship (r2 = 0.92) between the upslope accumulated area (UAA) and annual duration of shallow ground water table connectivity observed across 24 HRS transects (146 groundwater recording wells) within the TCEF. We applied this relationship to the entire stream network to quantify the frequency distribution of stream network connectivity through time (as a function of UAA) and ascertain its relationship to catchment-scale runoff dynamics. Each catchment’s estimated connectivity duration curve (CDC) was highly related to its flow duration curve (FDC); albeit the rate of change of runoff with respect to stream network connectedness varied significantly across catchments. To ascertain potential reasons for these differences we compared the slope of each catchment’s CDC-FDC relationship (annual, peak, transition and baseflow periods) in multiple linear models against median values of common terrain indices and land cover-vegetation characteristics. Significant predictors (p<0.05) included the flow path distance to the creek (DFC), the flow path gradient to the

  15. The Roles of Groundwater Flowpaths and Stream Network Expansion in Landscape Connectivity and Resulting Runoff and Solute Dynamics in an Ephemeral Piedmont Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, M. A.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Much catchment hydrology has been conducted in steep, perennial stream watersheds with shallow soil. In contrast, we investigated an ephemeral stream watershed with deep, highly weathered soils, gentle relief, and the dynamic hydro-climatology of the Piedmont region of the United States. We seek to gain new understanding about increasingly recognized challenges in the hydrological sciences, including influences of shallow and deep flowpath connectivity and the role of ephemeral streams in hydrologically connecting distal portions of landscapes. We investigated how overland, shallow soil, and deep subsurface flow across landscape positions and antecedent conditions manifest in observed baseflow and stormflow generation and the dynamics of dissolved organic carbon, electrical conductivity, and a suite of cations and anions. Extensive channel expansion and contraction coupled with spatially and temporally variable shallow and deep groundwater flowpaths led to both clockwise and counter-clockwise hysteresis in the relationship between runoff and solute concentrations as a function of antecedent moisture conditions. This suggests that vertical and horizontal hillslope connectivity to the aquatic system is variable across seasons and storms and influences biogeochemical expression at the watershed scale. Our research in Duke Forest, North Carolina has begun to elucidate the interrelationships between the space-time dynamics of runoff generation processes and observed biogeochemical behavior in this deeply weathered, low relief landscape, to provide new insight into processes widely active but less easily identified and quantified elsewhere.

  16. Constructing networks from a dynamical system perspective for multivariate nonlinear time series.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomomichi; Tanizawa, Toshihiro; Small, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We describe a method for constructing networks for multivariate nonlinear time series. We approach the interaction between the various scalar time series from a deterministic dynamical system perspective and provide a generic and algorithmic test for whether the interaction between two measured time series is statistically significant. The method can be applied even when the data exhibit no obvious qualitative similarity: a situation in which the naive method utilizing the cross correlation function directly cannot correctly identify connectivity. To establish the connectivity between nodes we apply the previously proposed small-shuffle surrogate (SSS) method, which can investigate whether there are correlation structures in short-term variabilities (irregular fluctuations) between two data sets from the viewpoint of deterministic dynamical systems. The procedure to construct networks based on this idea is composed of three steps: (i) each time series is considered as a basic node of a network, (ii) the SSS method is applied to verify the connectivity between each pair of time series taken from the whole multivariate time series, and (iii) the pair of nodes is connected with an undirected edge when the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. The network constructed by the proposed method indicates the intrinsic (essential) connectivity of the elements included in the system or the underlying (assumed) system. The method is demonstrated for numerical data sets generated by known systems and applied to several experimental time series.

  17. Understanding Online Health Groups for Depression: Social Network and Linguistic Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Mental health problems have become increasingly prevalent in the past decade. With the advance of Web 2.0 technologies, social media present a novel platform for Web users to form online health groups. Members of online health groups discuss health-related issues and mutually help one another by anonymously revealing their mental conditions, sharing personal experiences, exchanging health information, and providing suggestions and support. The conversations in online health groups contain valuable information to facilitate the understanding of their mutual help behaviors and their mental health problems. Objective We aimed to characterize the conversations in a major online health group for major depressive disorder (MDD) patients in a popular Chinese social media platform. In particular, we intended to explain how Web users discuss depression-related issues from the perspective of the social networks and linguistic patterns revealed by the members’ conversations. Methods Social network analysis and linguistic analysis were employed to characterize the social structure and linguistic patterns, respectively. Furthermore, we integrated both perspectives to exploit the hidden relations between them. Results We found an intensive use of self-focus words and negative affect words. In general, group members used a higher proportion of negative affect words than positive affect words. The social network of the MDD group for depression possessed small-world and scale-free properties, with a much higher reciprocity ratio and clustering coefficient value as compared to the networks of other social media platforms and classic network models. We observed a number of interesting relationships, either strong correlations or convergent trends, between the topological properties and linguistic properties of the MDD group members. Conclusions (1) The MDD group members have the characteristics of self-preoccupation and negative thought content, according to Beck

  18. Moments of catchment storm area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.; Wang, Q.

    1985-01-01

    The portion of a catchment covered by a stationary rainstorm is modeled by the common area of two overlapping circles. Given that rain occurs within the catchment and conditioned by fixed storm and catchment sizes, the first two moments of the distribution of the common area are derived from purely geometrical considerations. The variance of the wetted fraction is shown to peak when the catchment size is equal to the size of the predominant storm. The conditioning on storm size is removed by assuming a probability distribution based upon the observed fractal behavior of cloud and rainstorm areas.

  19. What determines social capital in a social-ecological system? Insights from a network perspective.

    PubMed

    Barnes-Mauthe, Michele; Gray, Steven Allen; Arita, Shawn; Lynham, John; Leung, PingSun

    2015-02-01

    Social capital is an important resource that can be mobilized for purposive action or competitive gain. The distribution of social capital in social-ecological systems can determine who is more productive at extracting ecological resources and who emerges as influential in guiding their management, thereby empowering some while disempowering others. Despite its importance, the factors that contribute to variation in social capital among individuals have not been widely studied. We adopt a network perspective to examine what determines social capital among individuals in social-ecological systems. We begin by identifying network measures of social capital relevant for individuals in this context, and review existing evidence concerning their determinants. Using a complete social network dataset from Hawaii's longline fishery, we employ social network analysis and other statistical methods to empirically estimate these measures and determine the extent to which individual stakeholder attributes explain variation within them. We find that ethnicity is the strongest predictor of social capital. Measures of human capital (i.e., education, experience), years living in the community, and information-sharing attitudes are also important. Surprisingly, we find that when controlling for other factors, industry leaders and formal fishery representatives are generally not well connected. Our results offer new quantitative insights on the relationship between stakeholder diversity, social networks, and social capital in a coupled social-ecological system, which can aid in identifying barriers and opportunities for action to overcome resource management problems. Our results also have implications for achieving resource governance that is not only ecologically and economically sustainable, but also equitable.

  20. What Determines Social Capital in a Social-Ecological System? Insights from a Network Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes-Mauthe, Michele; Gray, Steven Allen; Arita, Shawn; Lynham, John; Leung, PingSun

    2015-02-01

    Social capital is an important resource that can be mobilized for purposive action or competitive gain. The distribution of social capital in social-ecological systems can determine who is more productive at extracting ecological resources and who emerges as influential in guiding their management, thereby empowering some while disempowering others. Despite its importance, the factors that contribute to variation in social capital among individuals have not been widely studied. We adopt a network perspective to examine what determines social capital among individuals in social-ecological systems. We begin by identifying network measures of social capital relevant for individuals in this context, and review existing evidence concerning their determinants. Using a complete social network dataset from Hawaii's longline fishery, we employ social network analysis and other statistical methods to empirically estimate these measures and determine the extent to which individual stakeholder attributes explain variation within them. We find that ethnicity is the strongest predictor of social capital. Measures of human capital (i.e., education, experience), years living in the community, and information-sharing attitudes are also important. Surprisingly, we find that when controlling for other factors, industry leaders and formal fishery representatives are generally not well connected. Our results offer new quantitative insights on the relationship between stakeholder diversity, social networks, and social capital in a coupled social-ecological system, which can aid in identifying barriers and opportunities for action to overcome resource management problems. Our results also have implications for achieving resource governance that is not only ecologically and economically sustainable, but also equitable.

  1. Hydrological Catchment Similarity Assessment in Geum River Catchments, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Ara; Park, Kisoon; Lee, Hyosang

    2013-04-01

    Similarity measure of catchments is essential for regionalization studies, which provide in depth analysis in hydrological response and flood estimations at ungauged catchments. However, this similarity measure is often biased to the selected catchments and is notclearly explained in hydrological sense. This study applied a type of hydrological similarity distance measure-Flood Estimation Handbook to 25 Geum river catchments, Korea. Three Catchment Characteristics, Area (A)-Annual precipitation (SAAR)-SCS Curve Number (CN), are used in Euclidian distance measures. Furthermore, six index of Flow Duration Curve (ILow:Q275/Q185, IDrought:Q355/Q185, IFlood:Qmax/Q185, IAbundant:Q95/Q185, IFloodDuration:Q10/Q355 and IRiverRegime:Qmax/Qmin) are applied to clustering analysis of SPSS. The catchments' grouping of hydrological similarity measures suggests three groups: H1 (Cheongseong, Gidae, Bukil, Oksan, Seockhwa, Habgang and Sangyeogyo), H2 (Cheongju, Guryong, Ugon, Boksu, Useong and Seokdong) and H3 (Muju, Yangganggyo and YongdamDam). The four catchments (Cheoncheon, Donghyang, DaecheongDam and Indong) are not grouped in this study. The clustering analysis of FDC provides four Groups; CFDC1 (Muju, YongdamDam, Yangganggyo, DaecheongDam, Cheongseong, Gidae, Seokhwa, Bukil, Habgang, Cheongju, Oksan, Yuseong and Guryong), CFDC2 (Cheoncheon, Donghyang, Boksu, Indong, Nonsan, Seokdong, Ugon, Simcheon, Useong and Sangyeogyo), CFDC3 (Songcheon) and CFDC4 (Tanbu). The six catchments (out of seven) of H1 are grouped in CFDC1, while Sangyeogyo is grouped in CFDC2. The four catchments (out of six) of H2 are also grouped in CFDC2, while Cheongju and Guryong are grouped in CFDC1. The catchments of H3 are categorized in CFDC1. The authors examine the results (H1, H2 and H3) of similarity measure based on catchment physical descriptors with results (CFDC1 and CFDC2) of clustering based on catchment hydrological response. The results of hydrological similarity measures are supported by

  2. Research on International Student Flows from a Macro Perspective: A Network Analysis of 1985, 1989 and 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Tse-Mei; Barnett, George A.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of 64 countries representing the largest number of international student exchanges examines student flows from a macro perspective. Findings indicate that the international student exchange network is relatively stable; the United States and Western industrialized nations are at the center; East European and Asian countries have become…

  3. An approach for aggregating upstream catchment information to support research and management of fluvial systems across large landscapes.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Yin-Phan; Wieferich, Daniel; Fung, Kuolin; Infante, Dana M; Cooper, Arthur R

    2014-01-01

    The growing quality and availability of spatial map layers (e.g., climate, geology, and land use) allow stream studies, which historically have occurred over small areas like a single watershed or stream reach, to increasingly explore questions from a landscape perspective. This large-scale perspective for fluvial studies depends on the ability to characterize influences on streams resulting from throughout entire upstream networks or catchments. While acquiring upstream information for a single reach is relatively straight-forward, this process becomes demanding when attempting to obtain summaries for all streams throughout a stream network and across large basins. Additionally, the complex nature of stream networks, including braided streams, adds to the challenge of accurately generating upstream summaries. This paper outlines an approach to solve these challenges by building a database and applying an algorithm to gather upstream landscape information for digitized stream networks. This approach avoids the need to directly use spatial data files in computation, and efficiently and accurately acquires various types of upstream summaries of landscape information across large regions using tabular processing. In particular, this approach is not limited to the use of any specific database software or programming language, and its flexibility allows it to be adapted to any digitized stream network as long as it meets a few minimum requirements. This efficient approach facilitates the growing demand of acquiring upstream summaries at large geographic scales and helps to support the use of landscape information in assisting management and decision-making across large regions.

  4. Alteration and Reorganization of Functional Networks: A New Perspective in Brain Injury Study

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Nazareth P.; Bajo, Ricardo; Cuesta, Pablo; Villacorta-Atienza, José Antonio; Paúl, Nuria; Garcia-Prieto, Juan; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestú, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity is the mechanism underlying the brain’s potential capability to compensate injury. Recently several studies have shown how functional connections among the brain areas are severely altered by brain injury and plasticity leading to a reorganization of the networks. This new approach studies the impact of brain injury by means of alteration of functional interactions. The concept of functional connectivity refers to the statistical interdependencies between physiological time series simultaneously recorded in various areas of the brain and it could be an essential tool for brain functional studies, being its deviation from healthy reference an indicator for damage. In this article, we review studies investigating functional connectivity changes after brain injury and subsequent recovery, providing an accessible introduction to common mathematical methods to infer functional connectivity, exploring their capabilities, future perspectives, and clinical uses in brain injury studies. PMID:21960965

  5. Object recognition using neural networks and high-order perspective-invariant relational descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenyon R.; Gilmore, John F.

    1992-02-01

    The task of 3-D object recognition can be viewed as consisting of four modules: extraction of structural descriptions, hypothesis generation, pose estimation, and hypothesis verification. The recognition time is determined by the efficiency of each of the four modules, but particularly on the hypothesis generation module which determines how many pose estimates and verifications must be done to recognize the object. In this paper, a set of high-order perspective-invariant relations are defined which can be used with a neural network algorithm to obtain a high-quality set of model-image matches between a model and image of a robot workstation. Using these matches, the number of hypotheses which must be generated to find a correct pose is greatly reduced.

  6. Groundwater recharge from point to catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leterme, Bertrand; Di Ciacca, Antoine; Laloy, Eric; Jacques, Diederik

    2016-04-01

    Accurate estimation of groundwater recharge is a challenging task as only a few devices (if any) can measure it directly. In this study, we discuss how groundwater recharge can be calculated at different temporal and spatial scales in the Kleine Nete catchment (Belgium). A small monitoring network is being installed, that is aimed to monitor the changes in dominant processes and to address data availability as one goes from the point to the catchment scale. At the point scale, groundwater recharge is estimated using inversion of soil moisture and/or water potential data and stable isotope concentrations (Koeniger et al. 2015). At the plot scale, it is proposed to monitor the discharge of a small drainage ditch in order to calculate the field groundwater recharge. Electrical conductivity measurements are necessary to separate shallow from deeper groundwater contribution to the ditch discharge (see Di Ciacca et al. poster in session HS8.3.4). At this scale, two or three-dimensional process-based vadose zone models will be used to model subsurface flow. At the catchment scale though, using a mechanistic, process-based model to estimate groundwater recharge is debatable (because of, e.g., the presence of numerous drainage ditches, mixed land use pixels, etc.). We therefore investigate to which extent various types of surrogate models can be used to make the necessary upscaling from the plot scale to the scale of the whole Kleine Nete catchment. Ref. Koeniger P, Gaj M, Beyer M, Himmelsbach T (2015) Review on soil water isotope based groundwater recharge estimations. Hydrological Processes, DOI: 10.1002/hyp.10775

  7. Environmental care in agricultural catchments: Toward the communicative catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter

    1991-11-01

    Substantial land degradation of agricultural catchments in Australia has resulted from the importation of European farming methods and the large-scale clearing of land. Rural communities are now being encouraged by government to take responsibility for environmental care. The importance of community involvement is supported by the view that environmental problems are a function of interactions between people and their environment. It is suggested that the commonly held view that community groups cannot care for their resources is due to inappropriate social institutions rather that any inherent disability in people. The communicative catchment is developed as a vision for environmental care into the future. This concept emerges from a critique of resource management through the catchment metaphors of the reduced, mechanical, and the complex, evolving catchment, which reflect the development of systemic and people-centered approaches to environmental care. The communicative catchment is one where both community and resource managers participate collaboratively in environmental care. A methodology based on action research and systemic thinking (systemic action research) is proposed as a way of moving towards the communicative catchment of the future. Action research is a way of taking action in organizations and communities that is participative and informed by theory, while systemic thinking takes into account the interconnections and relationships between social and natural worlds. The proposed vision, methodology, and practical operating principles stem from involvement in an action research project looking at extension strategies for the implementation of total catchment management in the Hunter Valley, New South Wales.

  8. Temporal and Spatial Patterns of Preferential Flow Occurrence in the Shale Hills Catchment: From the Hillslope to the Catchment Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Lin, H.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding temporal and spatial patterns of preferential flow (PF) occurrence is important in revealing hillslope and catchment hydrologic and biogeochemical processes. Quantitative assessment of the frequency and control of PF occurrence in the field, however, has been limited, especially at the landscape scale of hillslope and catchment. By using 5.5-years' (2007-2012) real-time soil moisture at 10 sites response to 323 precipitation events, we tested the temporal consistency of PF occurrence at the hillslope scale in the forested Shale Hills Catchment; and by using 25 additional sites with at least 1-year data (2011-2012), we evaluated the spatial patterns of PF occurrence across the catchment. To explore the potential effects of PF occurrence on catchment hydrology, wavelet analysis was performed on the recorded time series of hydrological signals (i.e., precipitation, soil moisture, catchment discharge). Considerable temporal consistence was observed in both the frequency and the main controls of PF occurrence at the hillslope scale, which was attributed largely to the statistical stability of precipitation pattern over the monitoring period and the relatively stable subsurface preferential pathways. Preferential flow tended to occur more often in response to intense rainfall events, and favored the conditions at dry hilltop or wet valley floor sites. When upscaling to the entire catchment, topographic control on the PF occurrence was amplified remarkably, leading to the identification of a subsurface PF network in the catchment. Higher frequency of PF occurrence was observed at the valley floor (average 48%), hilltop (average 46%), and swales/hillslopes near the stream (average 40%), while the hillslopes in the eastern part of the catchment were least likely to experience PF (0-20%). No clear relationship, however, was observed between terrain attributes and PF occurrence, because the initiation and persistency of PF in this catchment was controlled

  9. State of the Art of Network Security Perspectives in Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tae Hwan; Lim, Shinyoung; Choi, Young B.; Park, Kwang-Roh; Lee, Heejo; Choi, Hyunsang

    Cloud computing is now regarded as one of social phenomenon that satisfy customers' needs. It is possible that the customers' needs and the primary principle of economy - gain maximum benefits from minimum investment - reflects realization of cloud computing. We are living in the connected society with flood of information and without connected computers to the Internet, our activities and work of daily living will be impossible. Cloud computing is able to provide customers with custom-tailored features of application software and user's environment based on the customer's needs by adopting on-demand outsourcing of computing resources through the Internet. It also provides cloud computing users with high-end computing power and expensive application software package, and accordingly the users will access their data and the application software where they are located at the remote system. As the cloud computing system is connected to the Internet, network security issues of cloud computing are considered as mandatory prior to real world service. In this paper, survey and issues on the network security in cloud computing are discussed from the perspective of real world service environments.

  10. Dynamic processes in the mountain catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonova, Tatiana; Arakelian, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    The process of the river cftchment foundation and the mechanisms being in the basis of its development are not clear at present. Principal phenomena determining the dynamics of formation of the river catchment are under our study in this paper for the case of the mountain basin as an example. The methodology of this monitoring includes the space image recognition and computer data processing of the images for the Maliy Caucasus Mountains. Mountain river catchment formation on the slope of the ridge can be considered as a self-organizing staged process of its evolution passing through several non-equilibrium but steady-state conditions. We consider a system of tributaries in the mountain river catchment as a system of cracks, which are formed on the slope of the mountain massif. In other words, the formation of river networks should be the result of development of several processes, among of which the mechanisms of crack development should play a dominant role. The principal results, discussed in the present report, can be formulated as follow. (1) The mountain catchment (litho-watershed) formation takes place under conditions of the confined states of a mountain massif: on the one hand it is bounded by the surface of the slope; but on the other hand, - by a primary cracks density occurrence (as a spatial distribution 3D-crack net). (2) The development in time of the river catchment takes place by several stages. Each stage specifies a definite energetic state of the system in the mountain massif. (3) The overhead river streams arise not only due to surface water, but and namely due to rising of water from underground water horizons over the watercourse cracks penetrating deeply into the underground. (4) The 3D-river catchment structure results in concept in behavior of the unit as an open nonlinear dynamic system with a spatially distributed feedback. The energetic (endogen) processes of formation, rising and bifurcation for cracks are the consequence of relaxation

  11. The catchment based approach using catchment system engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonczyk, Jennine; Quinn, Paul; Barber, Nicholas; Wilkinson, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The catchment based approach (CaBa) has been championed as a potential mechanism for delivery of environmental directives such as the Water Framework Directive in the UK. However, since its launch in 2013, there has been only limited progress towards achieving sustainable, holistic management, with only a few of examples of good practice ( e.g. from the Tyne Rivers trust). Common issues with developing catchment plans over a national scale include limited data and resources to identify issues and source of those issues, how to systematically identify suitable locations for measures or suites of measures that will have the biggest downstream impact and how to overcome barriers for implementing solutions. Catchment System Engineering (CSE) is an interventionist approach to altering the catchment scale runoff regime through the manipulation of hydrological flow pathways throughout the catchment. A significant component of the runoff generation can be managed by targeting hydrological flow pathways at source, such as overland flow, field drain and ditch function, greatly reducing erosive soil losses. Coupled with management of farm nutrients at source, many runoff attenuation features or measures can be co-located to achieve benefits for water quality and biodiversity. A catchment, community-led mitigation measures plan using the CSE approach will be presented from a catchment in Northumberland, Northern England that demonstrate a generic framework for identification of multi-purpose features that slow, store and filter runoff at strategic locations in the landscape. Measures include within-field barriers, edge of field traps and within-ditch measures. Progress on the implementation of measures will be reported alongside potential impacts on the runoff regime at both local and catchment scale and costs.

  12. Geographical impacts on social networks from perspectives of space and place: an empirical study using mobile phone data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Li; Wu, Lun; Chi, Guanghua; Liu, Yu

    2016-10-01

    Space and place are two fundamental concepts in geography. Geographical factors have long been known as drivers of many aspects of people's social networks. But whether and how space and place affect social networks differently are still unclear. The widespread use of location-aware devices provides a novel source for distinguishing the mechanisms of their impacts on social networks. Using mobile phone data, this paper explores the effects of space and place on social networks. From the perspective of space, we confirm the distance decay effect in social networks, based on a comparison between synthetic social ties generated by a null model and actual social ties derived from real-world data. From the perspective of place, we introduce several measures to evaluate interactions between individuals and inspect the trio relationship including distance, spatio-temporal co-occurrence, and social ties. We found that people's interaction is a more important factor than spatial proximity, indicating that the spatial factor has a stronger impact on social networks in place compared to that in space. Furthermore, we verify the hypothesis that interactions play an important role in strengthening friendships.

  13. Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarone, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    The topic of this "Perspectives" column is "Requiring a Proficiency Level as a Requirement for U.S. K-12 Teacher Licensure." In 1998, the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) began to work with the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), which accredits teacher education programs…

  14. Vulnerability of European freshwater catchments to climate change.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Danijela; Carrizo, Savrina F; Kärcher, Oskar; Walz, Ariane; David, Jonathan N W

    2017-02-10

    Climate change is expected to exacerbate the current threats to freshwater ecosystems, yet multifaceted studies on the potential impacts of climate change on freshwater biodiversity at scales that inform management planning are lacking. The aim of this study was to fill this void through the development of a novel framework for assessing climate change vulnerability tailored to freshwater ecosystems. The three dimensions of climate change vulnerability are as follows: (i) exposure to climate change, (ii) sensitivity to altered environmental conditions and (iii) resilience potential. Our vulnerability framework includes 1685 freshwater species of plants, fishes, molluscs, odonates, amphibians, crayfish and turtles alongside key features within and between catchments, such as topography and connectivity. Several methodologies were used to combine these dimensions across a variety of future climate change models and scenarios. The resulting indices were overlaid to assess the vulnerability of European freshwater ecosystems at the catchment scale (18 783 catchments). The Balkan Lakes Ohrid and Prespa and Mediterranean islands emerge as most vulnerable to climate change. For the 2030s, we showed a consensus among the applied methods whereby up to 573 lake and river catchments are highly vulnerable to climate change. The anthropogenic disruption of hydrological habitat connectivity by dams is the major factor reducing climate change resilience. A gap analysis demonstrated that the current European protected area network covers <25% of the most vulnerable catchments. Practical steps need to be taken to ensure the persistence of freshwater biodiversity under climate change. Priority should be placed on enhancing stakeholder cooperation at the major basin scale towards preventing further degradation of freshwater ecosystems and maintaining connectivity among catchments. The catchments identified as most vulnerable to climate change provide preliminary targets for

  15. Carbon redistribution by erosion processes in an intensively disturbed catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Martínez-Mena, María; Pérez Cutillas, Pedro; de Vente, Joris; Barberá, Gonzalo G.; Mosch, Wouter; Navarro Cano, Jose Antonio; Gaspar, Leticia; Navas, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Understanding how organic carbon moves with sediments along the fluvial system is crucial to close catchment scale carbon budgets. Especially challenging is the analysis of organic carbon dynamics during fluvial transport in heterogeneous, fragile and disturbed environments with ephemeral and intense hydrological pulses, typical of Mediterranean conditions. This paper explores the catchment scale organic carbon redistribution by lateral flows in extreme Mediterranean environmental conditions from a geomorphological perspective. The study area is a catchment (Cárcavo) in SE Spain with a semiarid climate, erodible lithologies, shallow soils, and highly disturbed by agricultural terraces, land levelling, reforestations and construction of check-dams. To increase understanding of erosion induced catchment scale organic carbon redistribution, we studied the subcatchments of 8 check-dams distributed along the catchment main channel in detail. We determined 137Cs, physicochemical characteristics and organic carbon pools of soils and sediments deposited behind each check-dam, performed spatial analysis of properties of the catchment and buffer areas around check-dams, and carried out geomorphological analysis of the slope-channel connections. Soils showed very low Total Organic Carbon (TOC) values oscillating between 15.2 and 4.4 g Kg-1 for forest and agricultural soils, respectively. Sediments mobilized by erosion were poor in TOC compared to the eroded (forest) soils (6.6±0.7 g Kg-1), and the redistribution of organic carbon through the catchment, especially of the Mineral Associated Organic Carbon (MAC) pool, showed the same pattern as clay particles and 137Cs. The TOC erosion rates (0.031±0.03 Mg ha-1 y-1) were comparable to others reported for subhumid Mediterranean catchments and to those modelled worldwide for pasture land. Those lateral fluxes were equivalent to 10.4 % of the TOC stock from the topsoil at the moment of the check-dam construction and

  16. Colorectal cancer prevention: Perspectives of key players from social networks in a low-income rural US region

    PubMed Central

    Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Eddens, Kathryn; Jonas, Adam; Snell-Rood, Claire; Studts, Christina R.; Broder-Oldach, Benjamin; Katz, Mira L.

    2016-01-01

    Social networks influence health behavior and health status. Within social networks, “key players” often influence those around them, particularly in traditionally underserved areas like the Appalachian region in the USA. From a total sample of 787 Appalachian residents, we identified and interviewed 10 key players in complex networks, asking them what comprises a key player, their role in their network and community, and ideas to overcome and increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Key players emphasized their communication skills, resourcefulness, and special occupational and educational status in the community. Barriers to CRC screening included negative perceptions of the colonoscopy screening procedure, discomfort with the medical system, and misinformed perspectives on screening. Ideas to improve screening focused on increasing awareness of women's susceptibility to CRC, providing information on different screening tests, improving access, and the key role of health-care providers and key players themselves. We provide recommendations to leverage these vital community resources. PMID:26905402

  17. Colorectal cancer prevention: Perspectives of key players from social networks in a low-income rural US region.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Nancy E; Eddens, Kathryn; Jonas, Adam; Snell-Rood, Claire; Studts, Christina R; Broder-Oldach, Benjamin; Katz, Mira L

    2016-01-01

    Social networks influence health behavior and health status. Within social networks, "key players" often influence those around them, particularly in traditionally underserved areas like the Appalachian region in the USA. From a total sample of 787 Appalachian residents, we identified and interviewed 10 key players in complex networks, asking them what comprises a key player, their role in their network and community, and ideas to overcome and increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Key players emphasized their communication skills, resourcefulness, and special occupational and educational status in the community. Barriers to CRC screening included negative perceptions of the colonoscopy screening procedure, discomfort with the medical system, and misinformed perspectives on screening. Ideas to improve screening focused on increasing awareness of women's susceptibility to CRC, providing information on different screening tests, improving access, and the key role of health-care providers and key players themselves. We provide recommendations to leverage these vital community resources.

  18. Characterizing Runoff and Water Yield from Headwater Catchments in the Southern Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safeeq, M.; Hunsaker, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    In a mediterranean climate where much of the annual precipitation falls during winter, the snow-capped Sierra Nevada serves as the primary source of dry season runoff that supports agriculture, industries, urban, and other ecosystems. Increased warming has led to significant reductions in mountain snowpack accumulation and earlier snowmelt throughout the western United States where most of the snow accumulates at temperatures near the freezing point. As a result, declines in dry season runoff magnitude, earlier runoff timing, and altered flood risk have been reported across the region. An important question in this context is, how to best manage forested catchments for water and other ecosystem services? We depict the differences in hydrologic response of ten catchments in the Kings River Experimental Watersheds (KREW) research project using continuous precipitation, snow, and runoff data during 2004-2014. The size of these catchments ranges from 50 to 475 ha, and they span a 600-m elevation range in the rain snow transitional zone. In terms of soil, Shaver and Gerle-Cagwin dominate the lower elevation Providence catchments, and Cagwin soils dominate the higher elevation Bull catchments. The majority of these catchments have southwest aspect, moderate average slope (i.e. <25%), and a well-developed drainage network with drainage density ranging from 4.6 to 10.1 km/km2. Bull catchments, on average, have higher runoff than the Providence catchments across all hydrologic signatures extracted from daily hydrographs. Mean annual runoff ranges between 281 to 408 mm in Providence and 436 to 656 mm in Bull catchments despite no significant difference in precipitation among KREW's four meteorological stations. However, high elevation Bull catchments receive significantly more precipitation as snow than the low elevation Providence catchments. The average runoff ratio ranges from 18% to as high as 43% among different catchments, indicating that the catchment

  19. Is the subarctic landscape still a carbon sink? Evidence from a detailed catchment balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Erik J.; Klaminder, Jonatan; Giesler, Reiner; Persson, Andreas; Olefeldt, David; Heliasz, Michal; Christensen, Torben R.; Karlsson, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Climate warming raises the question whether high-latitude landscape still function as net carbon (C) sinks. By compiling an integrated C balance for an intensely studied subarctic catchment, we show that this catchment's C balance is not likely to be a strong current sink of C, a commonly held assumption. In fact, it is more plausible (71% probability) that the studied catchment functions as a C source (-11 ± 20 g C m-2 yr-1). Analyses of individual fluxes indicate that soil and aquatic C losses offset C sequestering in other landscape components (e.g., peatlands and aboveground forest biomass). Our results stress the importance of fully integrated catchment C balance estimates and highlight the importance of upland soils and their interaction with the aquatic network for the catchment C balance.

  20. Investigation of rotated PCA from the perspective of network communities applied to climate data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, David; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Vejmelka, Martin; Palus, Milan

    2013-04-01

    , seasonality, and persistence of low-frequency atmospheric circulation patterns. Monthly Weather Review 115:1083-1126. Feldstein, SB (2000) The timescale, power spectra, and climate noise properties of teleconnection patterns. Journal of Climate 13(24), 4430-4440. Fortunato, S (2010) Community detection in graphs. Physics Report-Review Section of Physics Letters 486(3-5), 75-174. Kistler, R and Coauthors (2001) The NCEP-NCAR 50-Year Reanalysis: Monthly means CD-ROM and documentation. Bulletin of American Meteorological Society 82, 247-267. Hlinka J, Hartman D, Vejmelka M, Novotna D and Palus M. Non-linear dependence and teleconnections in climate data: sources, relevance, nonstationarity. Submitted preprint, available at arXiv:1211.6688. Girvan, M ; Newman, MEJ (2002) Community structure in social and biological networks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United State of America 99(12), 7821-7826. Newman, MEJ and Girvan N (2004) Finding and evaluating community structure in networks. Physical Review E 69(2), 026113. Tsonis, AA; Swanson, KL (2012) On the origins of decadal climate variability: a network perspective. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics 19(5), 559-568. Tsonis, AA; Wang, G; Swanson, KL ; Rodrigues, FA; Costa, LD (2011) Community structure and dynamics in climate networks. Climate Dynamics 37(5-6), 933-940.

  1. Urban Poverty and Neighborhood Effects on Crime: Incorporating Spatial and Network Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Graif, Corina; Gladfelter, Andrew S.; Matthews, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Research on neighborhoods and crime is on a remarkable growth trajectory. In this article, we survey important recent developments in the scholarship on neighborhood effects and the spatial stratification of poverty and urban crime. We advance the case that, in understanding the impact of neighborhoods and poverty on crime, sociological and criminological research would benefit from expanding the analytical focus from residential neighborhoods to the network of neighborhoods individuals are exposed to during their daily routine activities. This perspective is supported by reemerging scholarship on activity spaces and macro-level research on inter-neighborhood connections. We highlight work indicating that non-residential contexts add variation in criminogenic exposure, which in turn influence offending behavior and victimization risk. Also, we draw on recent insights from research on gang violence, social and institutional connections, and spatial mismatch, and call for advancements in the scholarship on urban poverty that investigates the salience of inter-neighborhood connections in evaluating the spatial stratification of criminogenic risk for individuals and communities. PMID:27375773

  2. Field Study of all GSM and WiFi Networks in Amman City from Geospatial Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawarey, Mosab; Alibrahim, Mustafa; Jetto, Hamza; Salah Mahmoud, Firas

    2016-04-01

    A thorough field study over multiple months has been conducted in the streets of Amman, the capital city of Jordan, in order to collect massive amounts of GSM and WiFi data and analyze them from geospatial perspective. Some interesting realities have been detected; e.g. the North and West of Amman are much better served by GSM operators than the East, South, and Center. Also, the security measures taken to protect WiFi networks in the North and West are much better than those in the East, South, and Center. This has led to the recognition of an interesting pattern that groups the North and West together, while the East, South, and Center constitute another group. Extremely interesting finding was found; the GSM signals are so strong at certain locations that they constitute direct lethal threat to human health; it is scientifically documented that such strengths would lead to certain human cell mutations and cancer. The exact locations and contributors of such hazards will be disclosed in this paper for the first time. Many tabular and graphical presentations of the data will be presented.

  3. Urban Poverty and Neighborhood Effects on Crime: Incorporating Spatial and Network Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Graif, Corina; Gladfelter, Andrew S; Matthews, Stephen A

    2014-09-01

    Research on neighborhoods and crime is on a remarkable growth trajectory. In this article, we survey important recent developments in the scholarship on neighborhood effects and the spatial stratification of poverty and urban crime. We advance the case that, in understanding the impact of neighborhoods and poverty on crime, sociological and criminological research would benefit from expanding the analytical focus from residential neighborhoods to the network of neighborhoods individuals are exposed to during their daily routine activities. This perspective is supported by reemerging scholarship on activity spaces and macro-level research on inter-neighborhood connections. We highlight work indicating that non-residential contexts add variation in criminogenic exposure, which in turn influence offending behavior and victimization risk. Also, we draw on recent insights from research on gang violence, social and institutional connections, and spatial mismatch, and call for advancements in the scholarship on urban poverty that investigates the salience of inter-neighborhood connections in evaluating the spatial stratification of criminogenic risk for individuals and communities.

  4. Spatial organisation in hydrological model structure for New Zealand catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Hilary; Woods, Ross; Clark, Martyn

    2013-04-01

    Hydrologists increasingly agree that a single hydrological model structure is unlikely to be suitable for all catchments: instead, models should be selected according to characteristics of the catchment. Our challenge is to determine how to select the most appropriate model structure. This complex question requires that we use observed data to infer dominant runoff generation processes, and translate this process knowledge into model structure choices. We can then ask questions such as: over what scales do recommended model structures change? How much data is needed to select model structure? How can we generalise model structure choices to catchments where data is scarce? In this presentation we address these questions, using the New Zealand landscape as our 'virtual laboratory'. New Zealand is an excellent location to test hypotheses relating to model structure, due to its rich diversity of hydrological landscapes. Landscape types range from temperate rainforest with steep, bedrock gorges, through rolling pasture, to alluvial plains with braided rivers. Our method is to apply diagnostic signatures, which use a range of hydrological data types, to target specific aspects of model structure choice. We bring together results from national hydrometric networks, and in-depth studies in experimental catchments, to explore organisation, similarity and diversity in recommended model structures across the New Zealand landscape. To identify model structures which are consistent with measured data, we use a range of diagnostic signatures tailored to the data types available. At the national scale, networks of rain and flow gauges are used to investigate runoff ratio, recession characteristics and threshold responses to precipitation and soil moisture. At the experimental Mahurangi catchments, dense networks of 13 rain, 27 flow and 36 soil moisture gauges within a 50 km2 area enable us to evaluate small-scale patterns and diversities of model structure. In contrast, the

  5. Deriving N-year discharges in small catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvinka, Ondrej; Bohac, Milon

    2016-04-01

    Maximum discharges with the return period of 100 years (Q100) belong to basic hydrological data that are derived and provided for any profile of the river network by the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (CHMI). However, as regards small catchments, the determination of these characteristics is largely subjective and thus it is rather performed by comparing the results of several methods. The first approach is to extrapolate the three parameters of maximum peak discharges (average Qmax, coefficient of variation Cvmax, Q100) from water-gauging stations to selected unobserved profiles (using regression relationships and regularities at the confluence points). For this purpose, the so-called program Budsez is utilized. During this process, the physical-geographical (PG) features, rainfall data and other information about catchments are considered, based on which the parameters of theoretical distributions of N-year discharges are optimized. For smaller catchments the relationships between the 100-year specific runoff q100 and the catchment area and other PG characteristics are used that are determined in a GIS environment with the extension AGPosudek. In this innovative method, besides many other PG characteristics, especially the average value of CN and N-year maximum daily precipitation are taken into account when computing Q100. In the older methodologies, Q100 is based on the average slope of the stream and the average slope of the catchment. The values of Q100 are then corrected according to the percentage of forested areas and the catchment shape. Hydrologists compare the values of Q100 coming from different approaches in a logarithmic graph (q100 against area) for the particular catchment or its analogon. The final value is determined with respect to experience and previously issued values. The remaining N-year discharges are usually assessed through the ratio QN/Q100 from the nearest water-gauging station or the closest profile where these ratios were

  6. Catchment power and the joint distribution of elevation and travel distance to the outlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklar, Leonard S.; Riebe, Clifford S.; Lukens, Claire E.; Bellugi, Dino

    2016-10-01

    The delivery of water, sediment, and solutes by catchments is influenced by the distribution of source elevations and their travel distances to the outlet. For example, elevation affects the magnitude and phase of precipitation, as well as the climatic factors that govern rock weathering, which influence the production rate and initial particle size of sediments. Travel distance, in turn, affects the timing of flood peaks at the outlet and the degree of sediment size reduction by wear, which affects particle size distributions at the outlet. The distributions of elevation and travel distance have been studied extensively but separately, as the hypsometric curve and width function. Yet a catchment can be considered as a collection of points, each with paired values of elevation and travel distance. For every point, the ratio of elevation to travel distance defines the mean slope for transport of mass to the outlet. Recognizing that mean slope is proportional to the average rate of loss of potential energy by water and sediment during transport to the outlet, we use the joint distribution of elevation and travel distance to define two new metrics for catchment geometry: "source-area power", and the corresponding catchment-wide integral "catchment power". We explore patterns in source-area and catchment power across three study catchments spanning a range of relief and drainage area. We then develop an empirical algorithm for generating synthetic source-area power distributions, which can be parameterized with data from natural catchments. This new way of quantifying the three-dimensional geometry of catchments can be used to explore the effects of topography on the distribution on fluxes of water, sediment, isotopes, and other landscape products passing through catchment outlets, and may provide a fresh perspective on problems of both practical and theoretical interest.

  7. Proximate and ultimate controls on carbon and nutrient dynamics of small agricultural catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Zahra; Abbott, Benjamin W.; Troccaz, Olivier; Baudry, Jacques; Pinay, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    catchment buffering capacity and the probability of human disturbance provides a useful perspective for evaluating vulnerability of aquatic ecosystems and for managing systems to maintain agricultural production while minimizing leakage of nutrients.

  8. Towards Estimating the Nutrient Balance of the Hydrologic Open Air Laboratory (HOAL) Catchment, Lower Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exner-Kittridge, Michael; Zessner, Matthias; Broer, Martine; Eder, Alexander; Strauss, Peter; Blöschl, Günter

    2010-05-01

    The fate of nutrients introduced by human activities have significant impacts on both nature and our civilization. Excessive nutrients can contaminate our drinking water as well as promote algae blooms that deplete the surrounding waters of oxygen for aquatic life. It is estimated that agriculture in Austria contributes approximately 60% to the total discharge of nitrogen and 40% to the total discharge of phosphorus. Understanding the specific pathways and sources of nitrogen and phosphorus from agriculture land could greatly improve our ability to mitigate for excessive discharges if the problems can be targeted more precisely. The objective of our research is to determine the complete nitrogen and phosphorous balance within a 66.7 hectare catchment in Lower Austria. The Hydrologic Open Air Laboratory (HOAL) catchment is located in Lower Austria approximately 100 km west of Vienna. The HOAL catchment was established in 2009 through funding by the Austrian Science Foundation to be used for multidisciplinary hydrologic research for understanding water flow and transport processes in catchments. The catchment land cover is characterized as 90% agriculture, 5% impermeable surface, and 3% forest. The predominant soil type is a clayey silt loam and a section of the catchment contain a subsurface tile drainage network that extend approximately 5.5 km. Nitrogen and phosphorus are the two primary nutrients assessed in this study. To accomplish the nutrient balance, the research is divided into three different scales: Field Scale, Subcatchment Scale, and Catchment Scale. The Catchment scale encompasses the entirety of the catchment, the subcatchment scale encompasses a 6.4 hectare area within the catchment that is completely underlain by the tile drainage network, and the field scale studies are performed on several square meter plots within the subcatchment. Each scale attempts to determine different parts of the total nutrient budget. The initial phase of the research

  9. Influence of Rainfall Data Resolution and Catchment Subdivision on Runoff Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttaraksa Mapiam, Punpim; Chauysuk, Suttiched

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation and catchment characteristics are significant factors for runoff modelling. This study demonstrates the relative benefits offered by the application of alternate rainfall products to several scales of catchment subdivision for simulation of the runoff hydrograph in the upper Ping river basin, northern Thailand. Two point locations at the runoff stations in the upper Ping river basin were selected for model calibration over the period of 2004-2005. Rain gauge and radar rainfall products were specified as inputs to the semi-distributed hydrological URBS model at each runoff station with five catchment subdivision schemes for runoff simulation. Point rainfall from the sparse rain gauge network and estimated radar rainfall at each radar pixel were spatially averaged over each sub-catchment using Thiessen polygons and arithmetic averaging approaches, respectively. Results for using high resolution of radar rainfall input appear that the accuracy of runoff estimates is affected appreciably by a number of sub-catchments, and the accuracy of runoff estimates tends to obviously increase with an increase of the number of sub-catchments. On the other hand, there is no significant improvement with an increasing number of sub-catchments while the coarse resolution of rain gauge rainfall input is used. The comparison on runoff accuracy among different scenarios indicates that the use of radar rainfall together with the largest number of sub-catchments gives the highest accuracy of runoff estimates.

  10. Safeguarding the provision of ecosystem services in catchment systems.

    PubMed

    Everard, Mark

    2013-04-01

    A narrow technocentric focus on a few favored ecosystem services (generally provisioning services) has led to ecosystem degradation globally, including catchment systems and their capacities to support human well-being. Increasing recognition of the multiple benefits provided by ecosystems is slowly being translated into policy and some areas of practice, although there remains a significant shortfall in the incorporation of a systemic perspective into operation management and decision-making tools. Nevertheless, a range of ecosystem-based solutions to issues as diverse as flooding and green space provision in the urban environment offers hope for improving habitat and optimization of beneficial services. The value of catchment ecosystem processes and their associated services is also being increasingly recognized and internalized by the water industry, improving water quality and quantity through catchment land management rather than at greater expense in the treatment costs of contaminated water abstracted lower in catchments. Parallel recognition of the value of working with natural processes, rather than "defending" built assets when catchment hydrology is adversely affected by unsympathetic upstream development, is being progressively incorporated into flood risk management policy. This focus on wider catchment processes also yields a range of cobenefits for fishery, wildlife, amenity, flood risk, and other interests, which may be optimized if multiple stakeholders and their diverse value systems are included in decision-making processes. Ecosystem services, particularly implemented as a central element of the ecosystem approach, provide an integrated framework for building in these different perspectives and values, many of them formerly excluded, into commercial and resource management decision-making processes, thereby making tractable the integrative aspirations of sustainable development. This can help redress deeply entrenched inherited assumptions

  11. Algorithmic Perspectives of Network Transitive Reduction Problems and their Applications to Synthesis and Analysis of Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Aditya, Satabdi; DasGupta, Bhaskar; Karpinski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    In this survey paper, we will present a number of core algorithmic questions concerning several transitive reduction problems on network that have applications in network synthesis and analysis involving cellular processes. Our starting point will be the so-called minimum equivalent digraph problem, a classic computational problem in combinatorial algorithms. We will subsequently consider a few non-trivial extensions or generalizations of this problem motivated by applications in systems biology. We will then discuss the applications of these algorithmic methodologies in the context of three major biological research questions: synthesizing and simplifying signal transduction networks, analyzing disease networks, and measuring redundancy of biological networks. PMID:24833332

  12. Catchment systems science and management: from evidence to resilient landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Paul

    2014-05-01

    There is an urgent need to reassess both the scientific understanding and the policy making approaches taken to manage flooding, water scarcity and pollution in intensively utilised catchments. Many European catchments have been heavily modified and natural systems have largely disappeared. However, working with natural processes must still be at the core of any future management strategy. Many catchments have greatly reduced infiltration rates and buffering capacity and this process needs to be reversed. An interventionist and holistic approach to managing water quantity and quality at the catchment scale is urgently required through the active manipulation of natural flow processes. Both quantitative (field experiments and modelling) and qualitative evidence (local knowledge) is required to demonstrate that catchment have become 'unhealthy'. For example, dense networks of low cost instrumentation could provide this multiscale evidence and, coupled with stakeholder knowledge, build a comprehensive understanding of whole system function. Proactive Catchment System Management is an interventionist approach to altering the catchment scale runoff regime through the manipulation of landscape scale hydrological flow pathways. Many of the changes to hydrological processes cannot be detected at the catchment scale as the primary causes of flooding and pollution. Evidence shows it is the land cover and the soil that are paramount to any change. Local evidence shows us that intense agricultural practices reduce the infiltration capacity through soil degradation. The intrinsic buffering capacity has also been lost across the landscape. The emerging hydrological process is one in which the whole system responds too quickly (driven by near surface and overland flow processes). The bulk of the soil matrix is bypassed during storm events and there is little or no buffering capacity in the riparian areas or in headwater catchments. The prospect of lower intensity farming rates is

  13. Biogeochemical Dynamics of Zero-Order Arctic Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, T.; Godsey, S.; Jones, J.; Risser, R. R.; Rushlow, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    A significant fraction of arctic catchments underlain by permafrost may be drained by linear flowpaths constituting zero-order channels, which are termed water tracks. Hydrology and biogeochemistry of arctic hillslopes are subject to rapid changes caused by thawing permafrost, changing precipitation regime, and altered vegetation patterns. We investigated coupling of hydrologic and biogeochemical cycles at six water tracks that drain to the Kuparuk River to understand the role of zero-order catchments in delivering solutes to stream networks, and better predict how solute fluxes will respond to changing climate. Peak concentrations of organic solutes occurred during snowmelt, and snowmelt-derived water remained in catchments until mid-summer, indicating that changes in snowpack or timing of melt will induce strong changes in delivery of solutes to stream networks. Further, temporal coherence in solute chemistry between water tracks and the Kuparuk river suggests that water tracks are important contributors of solutes to downstream ecosystems. Solute dynamics during storms follow a flush and dilution pattern indicative of source-limited solute transport. However, the relative difference between minimum and maximum concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and ammonium decreased during successive storms, suggesting decreased availability of these solutes as flowpaths deepen throughout the season. Despite these broad patterns, individual water tracks vary significantly in solute concentrations and storm responses, suggesting that site-level characteristics including sources of water contributing to flow, rates of solute uptake, contributing area, and depth of thaw influence the delivery of solutes from arctic hillslopes to stream networks. Hydrologic and biogeochemical signals potentially propagate from these zero-order catchments to stream networks and coasts, and may contribute to observed long-term changes in solute and freshwater fluxes in arctic river networks.

  14. New Perspectives on Spontaneous Brain Activity: Dynamic Networks and Energy Matter

    PubMed Central

    Tozzi, Arturo; Zare, Marzieh; Benasich, April A.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous brain activity has received increasing attention as demonstrated by the exponential rise in the number of published article on this topic over the last 30 years. Such “intrinsic” brain activity, generated in the absence of an explicit task, is frequently associated with resting-state or default-mode networks (DMN)s. The focus on characterizing spontaneous brain activity promises to shed new light on questions concerning the structural and functional architecture of the brain and how they are related to “mind”. However, many critical questions have yet to be addressed. In this review, we focus on a scarcely explored area, specifically the energetic requirements and constraints of spontaneous activity, taking into account both thermodynamical and informational perspectives. We argue that the “classical” definitions of spontaneous activity do not take into account an important feature, that is, the critical thermodynamic energetic differences between spontaneous and evoked brain activity. Spontaneous brain activity is associated with slower oscillations compared with evoked, task-related activity, hence it exhibits lower levels of enthalpy and “free-energy” (i.e., the energy that can be converted to do work), thus supporting noteworthy thermodynamic energetic differences between spontaneous and evoked brain activity. Increased spike frequency during evoked activity has a significant metabolic cost, consequently, brain functions traditionally associated with spontaneous activity, such as mind wandering, require less energy that other nervous activities. We also review recent empirical observations in neuroscience, in order to capture how spontaneous brain dynamics and mental function can be embedded in a non-linear dynamical framework, which considers nervous activity in terms of phase spaces, particle trajectories, random walks, attractors and/or paths at the edge of the chaos. This takes us from the thermodynamic free-energy, to the realm

  15. Added-value from a multi-criteria selection of donor catchments in the prediction of continuous streamflow series at ungauged pollution control-sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drogue, Gilles; Ben Khediri, Wiem; Conan, Céline

    2016-05-01

    We explore the potential of a multi-criteria selection of donor catchments in the prediction of continuous streamflow series by the spatial proximity method. Three criteria have been used: (1) spatial proximity; (2) physical similarity; (3) stream gauging network topology. An extensive assessment of our spatial proximity method variant is made on a 149 catchment-data set located in the Rhine-Meuse catchment. The competitiveness of the method is evaluated against spatial interpolation of catchment model parameters with ordinary kriging. We found that the spatial proximity approach is more efficient than ordinary kriging. When distance to upstream/downstream stream gauge stations is considered as a second order criterion in the selection of donor catchments, an unprecedented level of efficiency is reached for nested catchments. Nevertheless, the spatial proximity method does not take advantage from physical similarity between donor catchments and receiver catchments because catchments that are the most hydrologically similar to each catchment poorly match with the catchments that are the most physically similar to each catchment.

  16. Human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN): a systems biology perspective on topology, stability and functionality of the network.

    PubMed

    Podder, Avijit; Jatana, Nidhi; Latha, N

    2014-09-21

    Dopamine receptors (DR) are one of the major neurotransmitter receptors present in human brain. Malfunctioning of these receptors is well established to trigger many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Taking into consideration that proteins function collectively in a network for most of the biological processes, the present study is aimed to depict the interactions between all dopamine receptors following a systems biology approach. To capture comprehensive interactions of candidate proteins associated with human dopamine receptors, we performed a protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) analysis of all five receptors and their protein partners by mapping them into human interactome and constructed a human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN). We explored the topology of dopamine receptors as molecular network, revealing their characteristics and the role of central network elements. More to the point, a sub-network analysis was done to determine major functional clusters in human DRIN that govern key neurological pathways. Besides, interacting proteins in a pathway were characterized and prioritized based on their affinity for utmost drug molecules. The vulnerability of different networks to the dysfunction of diverse combination of components was estimated under random and direct attack scenarios. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is unique to put all five dopamine receptors together in a common interaction network and to understand the functionality of interacting proteins collectively. Our study pinpointed distinctive topological and functional properties of human dopamine receptors that have helped in identifying potential therapeutic drug targets in the dopamine interaction network.

  17. Using social networks to understand and prevent substance use: a transdisciplinary perspective.

    PubMed

    Valente, Thomas W; Gallaher, Peggy; Mouttapa, Michele

    2004-01-01

    We review findings from research on smoking, alcohol, and other drug use, which show that the network approaCh is instructive for understanding social influences on substance use. A hypothetical network is used throughout to illustrate different network findings and provide a short glossary of terms. We then describe how network analysis can be used to design more effective prevention programs and to monitor and evaluate these programs. The article closes with a discussion of the inherent transdisciplinarity of social network analysis.

  18. Sediment connectivity evolution on an alpine catchment undergoing glacier retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldin, Beatrice; Rudaz, Benjamin; Bardou, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Climate changes can result in a wide range of variations of natural environment including retreating glaciers. Melting from glaciers will have a significant impact on the sediment transport characteristics of glacierized alpine catchments that can affect downstream channel network. Sediment connectivity assessment, i.e. the degree of connections that controls sediment fluxes between different segments of a landscape, can be useful in order to address management activity on sediment fluxes changes of alpine streams. Through the spatial characterization of the connectivity patterns of a catchment and its potential evolution it is possible to both define sediment transport pathways and estimate different contributions of the sub-catchment as sediment sources. In this study, a topography based index (Cavalli et al., 2013) has been applied to assess spatial sediment connectivity in the Navisence catchment (35 km2), an alpine basin located in the southern Walliser Alps (Switzerland) characterized by a complex glacier system with well-developed lateral moraines on glacier margins already crossed by several lateral channels. Glacier retreat of the main glacial edifice will provide a new connectivity pattern. At present the glacier disconnects lateral slopes from the main talweg: it is expected that its retreat will experience an increased connectivity. In order to study this evolution, two high resolution (2 m) digital terrain models (DTMs) describing respectively the terrain before and after glacier retreat have been analyzed. The current DTM was obtained from high resolution photogrammetry (2 m resolution). The future DTM was derived from application of the sloping local base level (SLBL) routine (Jaboyedoff et al., 2004) on the current glacier system, allowing to remove the ice body by reconstituting a U-shaped polynomial bedrock surface. From this new surface a coherent river network was drawn and slight random noise was added. Finally the river network was burned into

  19. Catchments of general practice in different countries--a literature review.

    PubMed

    Allan, Donald P

    2014-08-29

    The purpose of this paper is to review the current research on catchment areas of private general practices in different developed countries because healthcare reform, including primary health care, has featured prominently as an important political issue in a number of developed countries. The debates around health reform have had a significant health geographic focus. Conceptually, GP catchments describe the distribution, composition and profile of patients who access a general practitioner or a general practice (i.e. a site or facility comprising one or more general practitioners). Therefore, GP catchments provide important information into the geographic variation of access rates, utilisation of services and health outcomes by all of the population or different population groups in a defined area or aggregated area.This review highlights a wide range of diversity in the literature as to how GP catchments can be described, the indicators and measures used to frame the scale of catchments. Patient access to general practice health care services should be considered from a range of locational concepts, and not necessarily constrained by their place of residence. An analysis of catchment patterns of general practitioners should be considered as dynamic and multi-perspective. Geographic information systems provide opportunities to contribute valuable methodologies to study these relationships. However, researchers acknowledge that a conceptual framework for the analysis of GP catchments requires access to real world data. Recent studies have shown promising developments in the use of real world data, especially from studies in the UK. Understanding the catchment profiles of individual GP surgeries is important if governments are serious about patient choice being a key part of proposed primary health reforms. Future health planning should incorporate models of GP catchments as planning tools, at the micro level as well as the macro level, to assist policies on the

  20. Crossing thresholds: Analysis of hazardous tipping points in alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutzmann, Silke; Sass, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Steep mountain channels or torrents in small alpine catchments are characterized by high geomorphic activity with sediment dynamics being inherently nonlinear and threshold-mediated. Localized, high intensity rainstorms can drive torrential systems past a tipping point resulting in a sudden onset of hazardous events like (flash-) flooding, heavy bedload transport or debris flows. Such responses exhibit an abrupt switch in the fluvial system's mode (e.g. transport / supply limited). Changes in functional connectivity may persist beyond the tipping point. Torrential hazards cause costly damage in the densely populated Alpine Region. Thus, there is a rising interest in potential effects of climate change on torrential sediment dynamics. Understanding critical conditions close to tipping points is important to reduce uncertainty in predicting sediment fluxes. In this study we aim at (i) establishing threshold precipitation characteristics for the Eastern Alps of Austria. Precipitation is hypothesized to be the main forcing factor of torrential events. (ii) How do thresholds vary in space and time? (iii) The effect of external triggers is strongly mediated by the internal disposition of catchments to respond. Which internal conditions are critical for susceptibility? (iv) Is there a change in magnitude or frequency in the recent past and what can be expected for the future? The 71 km2 catchment of the river Schöttlbach in the East Alpine Region of Styria (Austria) is monitored since a heavy precipitation event resulted in a catastrophic flood in July 2011. Sediment mobilization from slopes as well as within-channel storage and bedload transport are regularly measured using photogrammetric methods and sediment impact sensors. Thus, detailed knowledge exists on magnitude and spatial propagation of sediment waves through the catchment. The associated hydro-meteorological (pre-) conditions can be inferred from a dense station network. Changing bedload transport rates and

  1. Reverse engineering and verification of gene networks: principles, assumptions, and limitations of present methods and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Balling, Rudi; Zeng, An-Ping

    2009-11-01

    Reverse engineering of gene networks aims at revealing the structure of the gene regulation network in a biological system by reasoning backward directly from experimental data. Many methods have recently been proposed for reverse engineering of gene networks by using gene transcript expression data measured by microarray. Whereas the potentials of the methods have been well demonstrated, the assumptions and limitations behind them are often not clearly stated or not well understood. In this review, we first briefly explain the principles of the major methods, identify the assumptions behind them and pinpoint the limitations and possible pitfalls in applying them to real biological questions. With regard to applications, we then discuss challenges in the experimental verification of gene networks generated from reverse engineering methods. We further propose an optimal experimental design for allocating sampling schedule and possible strategies for reducing the limitations of some of the current reverse engineering methods. Finally, we examine the perspectives for the development of reverse engineering and urge the need to move from revealing network structure to the dynamics of biological systems.

  2. What causes similarity in catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, Hubert

    2014-05-01

    One of the biggest issues in hydrology is how to handle the heterogeneity of catchment properties at different scales. But is this really such a big issue? Is this problem not merely the consequence of how we conceptualise and how we model catchments? Is there not far more similarity than we observe. Maybe we are not looking at the right things or at the right scale to see the similarity. The identity of catchments is largely determined by: the landscape, the ecosystem living on the landscape, and the geology, in that order. Soils, which are often seen as a crucial aspect of hydrological behaviour, are far less important, as will be demonstrated. The main determinants of hydrological behaviour are: the landscape composition, the rooting depth and the phenology. These determinants are a consequence of landscape and ecosystem evolution, which, in turn, are the manifestations of entropy production. There are striking similarities between catchments. The different runoff processes from hillslopes are linked and similar in different environments (McDonnell, 2013). Wetlands behave similarly all over the world. The key is to classify landscapes and to link the ecosystems living on them to climate. The ecosystem then is the main controller of hydrological behaviour. Besides phenology, the rooting depth is key in determining runoff behaviour. Both are strongly linked to climate and much less to soil properties. An example is given of how rooting depth is determined by climate, and how rooting depth can be predicted without calibration, providing a strong constraints on the prediction of rainfall partitioning and catchment runoff.

  3. Understanding the relationship between sediment connectivity and spatio-temporal landscape changes in two small catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuseppina Persichillo, Maria; Meisina, Claudia; Cavalli, Marco; Crema, Stefano; Bordoni, Massimiliano

    2016-04-01

    The degree of linkage between the sediments sources and downstream areas (i.e., sediment connectivity) is one of the most important properties controlling landscape evolution. Many factors have been found to affect sediment connectivity, especially at the catchment scale. In particular, the degree of linkage between different areas within a catchment depends largely on the morphological complexity of the catchment (relief, terrain roughness, stream network density and catchment shape) and the combined effects of vegetation, such as land use changes and land abandonment. Moreover, the analysis of the spatial distribution of sediment connectivity and its temporal evolution can be also useful for the characterization of sediment source areas. Specifically, these areas represent sites of instability and their connectivity influences the probability that a local on-site effect could propagate within a multiple-events feedback system. Within this framework, the aim of this study is to apply a geomorphometric approach to analyze the linkage between landscape complexity and the sediment connectivity at the catchment scale. Moreover, to assess sediment delivery, the index of connectivity (IC) proposed by Cavalli et al. (2013) was used to evaluate the potential connection of sediment source areas with the main channel network. To better understand the relationship between morphological complexity of the catchment's landscape and the sediment spatial distribution and mobilization, two catchments with different size and geomorphological and land use characteristics were analysed: the Rio Frate and Versa catchments (Oltrepo Pavese, Southern Lombardy, Italy). Several shallow landslides, which represents the main sediment source area type in the catchments, were triggered especially in the period from 2009 to 2013. Moreover, relevant modification of land use and drainage system during last decades, especially related to land abandonment, have conditioned the sediment connectivity

  4. Establishing the Medication Safety Research Network of Indiana (Rx-SafeNet): Perspectives of Community Pharmacy Employees.

    PubMed

    Seel, Lindsey V; Hultgren, Kyle E; Snyder, Margie E

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional survey was to determine community pharmacy employee research project priorities and assess interest levels, barriers, and facilitators to joining a new community pharmacy practice-based research network (PBRN) and use this information in subsequent PBRN development. One hundred forty pharmacists and 40 support staff responded. The majority (72%) of respondents were somewhat interested or needed more information to determine their level of interest in joining a PBRN; 15% were very interested. While all research topics were regarded as important, dispensing errors were rated as the most important. Time constraints were considered the greatest barrier to participation. Greater knowledge of medication safety, enrichment of patient care, and improved patient and provider relationships were considered important reasons for joining a PBRN. Responses indicated favorable interest levels and project support from potential network members, though education and awareness campaigns are needed to enhance community pharmacy employee understanding of and involvement in research and PBRNs, specifically the Medication Safety Research Network of Indiana (Rx-SafeNet), a new network administered by the Purdue University College of Pharmacy. While the generalizability of survey results is limited, they were useful in determining policies and procedures of the new network. Surveying all employees involved in the future PBRN during the network development process is a unique approach to developing these types of networks in the U.S. Understanding support staff perspectives is important considering the critical role they play in project implementation and operations. Emerging PBRNs from any discipline may benefit from considering adding this step to their development.

  5. Unraveling the phosphoproteome dynamics in mammal mitochondria from a network perspective.

    PubMed

    Padrão, Ana Isabel; Vitorino, Rui; Duarte, José Alberto; Ferreira, Rita; Amado, Francisco

    2013-10-04

    With mitochondrion garnering more attention for its inextricable involvement in pathophysiological conditions, it seems imperative to understand the means by which the molecular pathways harbored in this organelle are regulated. Protein phosphorylation has been considered a central event in cellular signaling and, more recently, in the modulation of mitochondrial activity. Efforts have been made to understand the molecular mechanisms by which protein phosphorylation regulates mitochondrial signaling. With the advances in mass-spectrometry-based proteomics, there is a substantial hope and expectation in the increased knowledge of protein phosphorylation profile and its mode of regulation. On the basis of phosphorylation profiles, attempts have been made to disclose the kinases involved and how they control the molecular processes in mitochondria and, consequently, the cellular outcomes. Still, few studies have focused on mitochondrial phosphoproteome profiling, particularly in diseases. The present study reviews current data on protein phosphorylation profiling in mitochondria, the potential kinases involved and how pathophysiological conditions modulate the mitochondrial phosphoproteome. To integrate data from distinct research papers, we performed network analysis, with bioinformatic tools like Cytoscape, String, and PANTHER taking into consideration variables such as tissue specificity, biological processes, molecular functions, and pathophysiological conditions. For instance, data retrieved from these analyses evidence some homology in the mitochondrial phosphoproteome among liver and heart, with proteins from transport and oxidative phosphorylation clusters particularly susceptible to phosphorylation. A distinct profile was noticed for adipocytes, with proteins form metabolic processes, namely, triglycerides metabolism, as the main targets of phosphorylation. Regarding disease conditions, more phosphorylated proteins were observed in diabetics with some

  6. Coevolution of volcanic catchments in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takeo; Troch, Peter A.

    2016-03-01

    Present-day landscapes have evolved over time through interactions between the prevailing climates and geological settings. Understanding the linkage between spatial patterns of landforms, soils, and vegetation in landscapes and their hydrological response is critical to make quantitative predictions in ungaged basins. Catchment coevolution is a theoretical framework that seeks to formulate hypotheses about the mechanisms and conditions that determine the historical development of catchments and how such evolution affects their hydrological response. In this study, we selected 14 volcanic catchments of different ages (from 0.225 to 82.2 Ma) in Japan. We derived indices of landscape properties (drainage density and slope-area relationship) as well as hydrological response (annual water balance, baseflow index, and flow-duration curves) and examined their relation with catchment age and climate (through the aridity index). We found a significant correlation between drainage density and baseflow index with age, but not with climate. The intra-annual flow variability was also significantly related to catchments age. Younger catchments tended to have lower peak flows and higher low flows, while older catchments exhibited more flashy runoff. The decrease in baseflow with catchment age is consistent with the existing hypothesis that in volcanic landscapes the major flow pathways change over time from deep groundwater flow to shallow subsurface flow. The drainage density of our catchments decreased with age, contrary to previous findings in a set of similar, but younger volcanic catchments in the Oregon Cascades, in which drainage density increased with age. In that case, older catchments were thought to show more landscape incision due to increasing near-surface lateral flow paths. Our results suggests two competing hypotheses on the evolution of drainage density in mature catchments. One is that as catchments continue to age, the hydrologically active channels retreat

  7. The application of GEOtop for catchment scale hydrology in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, C.; Xu, X.; Albertson, J.; Kiely, G.

    2009-04-01

    GEOtop represents the new generation of distributed hydrological model driven by geospatial data (e.g. topography, soils, vegetation, land cover). It estimates rainfall-runoff, evapotranspiration and provides spatially distributed outputs as well as routing water and sediment flows through stream and river networks. The original version of GEOtop designed in Italy, includes a rigorous treatment of the core hydrological processes (e.g. unsaturated and saturated flow and transport, surface energy balances, and streamflow generation/routing). Recently GEOtop was extended to include treatment of shallow landslides. The GEOtop model is built on an open-source programming framework, which makes it well suited for adaptation and extension. GEOtop has been run very successfully in a number of alpine catchments (such as Brenta) but has not been used on Irish catchments before. The cell size used for the spatially distributed inputs varies from catchment to catchment. In smaller catchments (less than 2000ha) 50 by 50m cells have been used and 200 by 200 for larger catchments. Smaller cell sizes have been found to significantly increase the computational time so a larger cell size is used providing it does not significantly affect the performance of the model. Digital elevation model, drainage direction, landuse and soil type maps are the minimum spatial requirements with precipitation, radiation, temperature, atmospheric pressure and wind speed been the minimum meteorological requirements for a successful run. The soil type maps must also contain information regarding texture and hydraulic conductivity. The first trial of GEOtop in Ireland was on a small 1524 ha catchment in the south of Ireland. The catchment ranges from 50 to just over 200m, the land use is predominately agricultural grassland and it receives on average 1400mm of rain per year. Within this catchment there is a meteorological tower which provides the meteorological inputs, soil moisture is also recorded at

  8. Patient Partnerships Transforming Sleep Medicine Research and Clinical Care: Perspectives from the Sleep Apnea Patient-Centered Outcomes Network

    PubMed Central

    Redline, Susan; Baker-Goodwin, Si; Bakker, Jessie P.; Epstein, Matthew; Hanes, Sherry; Hanson, Mark; Harrington, Zinta; Johnston, James C.; Kapur, Vishesh K.; Keepnews, David; Kontos, Emily; Lowe, Andy; Owens, Judith; Page, Kathy; Rothstein, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Due to an ongoing recent evolution in practice, sleep medicine as a discipline has been compelled to respond to the converging pressures to reduce costs, improve outcomes, and demonstrate value. Patient “researchers” are uniquely placed to participate in initiatives that address the specific needs and priorities of patients and facilitate the identification of interventions with high likelihood of acceptance by the “customer.” To date, however, the “patient voice” largely has been lacking in processes affecting relevant policies and practice guidelines. In this Special Report, patient and research leaders of the Sleep Apnea Patient-Centered Outcomes Network (SAPCON), a national collaborative group of patients, researchers and clinicians working together to promote patient-centered comparative effectiveness research, discuss these interrelated challenges in the context of sleep apnea, and the role patients and patient-centered networks may play in informing evidence-based research designed to meet patient's needs. We first briefly discuss the challenges facing sleep medicine associated with costs, outcomes, and value. We then discuss the key role patients and patient-centered networks can play in efforts to design research to guide better sleep health care, and national support for such initiatives. Finally, we summarize some of the challenges in moving to a new paradigm of patient-researcher-clinician partnerships. By forging strong partnerships among patients, clinicians and researchers, networks such as SAPCON can serve as a living demonstration of how to achieve value in health care. Citation: Redline S, Baker-Goodwin S, Bakker JP, Epstein M, Hanes S, Hanson M, Harrington Z, Johnston JC, Kapur VK, Keepnews D, Kontos E, Lowe A, Owens J, Page K, Rothstein N, Sleep Apnea Patient-Centered Outcomes Network. Patient partnerships transforming sleep medicine research and clinical care: perspectives from the Sleep Apnea Patient-Centered Outcomes Network. J

  9. A water and sediment budget for a Mediterranean mountainous catchment (Southern Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuset, Jordi; Vericat, Damià; Batalla, Ramon J.

    2016-04-01

    Sediment transport in Mediterranean mountainous catchments is highly variable influenced principally by sediment availability, which in turn is controlled by the temporal and spatial variability of rainfall, runoff and land uses. In this paper we present the water and sediment budget of the Ribera Salada, a Mediterranean forest catchment located in the Catalan Pre-Pyrenees (NE Iberian Peninsula). The river drains an area of 224 km2. The data acquisition design is composed by five nested experimental sub-catchments. Each monitoring station registers discharge and suspended sediment transport continuously. Here we present the data obtained between 2012 and 2013, two contrasted hydrological years. These data allows to analyse the contribution of each sub-catchment to the total water and suspended sediment yield of the catchment at multiple temporal scales. Annual water yield in the catchment outlet varied between 15 and 31 hm3 y-1. Maximum peak flow in the outlet of the basin was 60.9 m3 s-1; equivalent to a specific discharge of 0.28 m3 s-1 km2. Results indicate that, hydrologically, the catchment can divided in two areas with contrasted regimes. The upper part of catchment is the wettest zone, where the water yield of each sub-catchment is in directly and positive correlated to its area. In contrast, the bottom of the valley has an ephemeral hydrological regime that only supplies water during important rainfall events. Annual suspended sediment load at the catchment outlet oscillated between 615 and 3415 t y-1, with an average value of 2015 t y-1 (i.e. 9.3 t km-2 y-1). In contrast to the water yield, most of the suspended sediment load (i.e. 80%) is supplied from the driest part of the catchment where sediment availability is greater and there is a greater connectivity between sediment sources and the channel network. The humid part of the catchment only yielded the 20% of the sediment load, where, as in the case of the water yield, sediment yield is directly and

  10. Geomorphometric assessment of spatial sediment connectivity in small Alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalli, Marco; Trevisani, Sebastiano; Comiti, Francesco; Marchi, Lorenzo

    2013-04-01

    Complex and rugged topography induces large variations in erosion and sediment delivery in the headwaters of alpine catchments. An effective connection of hillslopes with the channel network results in highly efficient sediment transfer processes, such as debris flows. In contrast, morphological conditions producing decoupling of hillslopes from channels (e.g. glacial cirques) may exclude large areas of the catchment from sediment delivery to its lower parts. Moreover, an efficient connection between hillslopes and channel network does not always ensure an effective downstream transfer of sediment. Low-slope channel reaches (e.g. in hanging valleys) cause sediment deposition, which often results in changes of the sediment transport processes, typically from debris flow to streamflow with low bedload and suspended load rates. The availability of high-resolution digital terrain models, such as those derived from aerial LiDAR, improves our capability to quantify the topographic controls on sediment connectivity. A geomorphometric index, based on the approach by Borselli et al. (2008), was developed and applied to assess spatial sediment connectivity in two small catchments of the Italian Alps featuring contrasting morphological characteristics. The results of the geomorphometric analysis were checked against field evidences, showing good performance and thus potential usefulness of the index.

  11. Does human migration affect international trade? A complex-network perspective.

    PubMed

    Fagiolo, Giorgio; Mastrorillo, Marina

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships between international human migration and merchandise trade, using a complex-network approach. We firstly compare the topological structure of worldwide networks of human migration and bilateral trade over the period 1960-2000. Next, we ask whether the position of any pair of countries in the migration network affects their bilateral trade flows. We show that: (i) both weighted and binary versions of the networks of international migration and trade are strongly correlated; (ii) such correlations can be mostly explained by country economic/demographic size and geographical distance; and (iii) pairs of countries that are more central in the international-migration network trade more. Our findings suggest that bilateral trade between any two countries is not only affected by the presence of migrants from either countries but also by their relative embeddedness in the complex web of corridors making up the network of international human migration.

  12. CAOS: the nested catchment soil-vegetation-atmosphere observation platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Markus; Blume, Theresa

    2016-04-01

    Most catchment based observations linking hydrometeorology, ecohydrology, soil hydrology and hydrogeology are typically not integrated with each other and lack a consistent and appropriate spatial-temporal resolution. Within the research network CAOS (Catchments As Organized Systems), we have initiated and developed a novel and integrated observation platform in several catchments in Luxembourg. In 20 nested catchments covering three distinct geologies the subscale processes at the bedrock-soil-vegetation-atmosphere interface are being monitored at 46 sensor cluster locations. Each sensor cluster is designed to observe a variety of different fluxes and state variables above and below ground, in the saturated and unsaturated zone. The numbers of sensors are chosen to capture the spatial variability as well the average dynamics. At each of these sensor clusters three soil moisture profiles with sensors at different depths, four soil temperature profiles as well as matric potential, air temperature, relative humidity, global radiation, rainfall/throughfall, sapflow and shallow groundwater and stream water levels are measured continuously. In addition, most sensors also measure temperature (water, soil, atmosphere) and electrical conductivity. This setup allows us to determine the local water and energy balance at each of these sites. The discharge gauging sites in the nested catchments are also equipped with automatic water samplers to monitor water quality and water stable isotopes continuously. Furthermore, water temperature and electrical conductivity observations are extended to over 120 locations distributed across the entire stream network to capture the energy exchange between the groundwater, stream water and atmosphere. The measurements at the sensor clusters are complemented by hydrometeorological observations (rain radar, network of distrometers and dense network of precipitation gauges) and linked with high resolution meteorological models. In this

  13. The organization of the microbial biodegradation network from a systems-biology perspective

    PubMed Central

    Pazos, Florencio; Valencia, Alfonso; De Lorenzo, Víctor

    2003-01-01

    Microbial biodegradation of environmental pollutants is a field of growing importance because of its potential use in bioremediation and biocatalysis. We have studied the characteristics of the global biodegradation network that is brought about by all the known chemical reactions that are implicated in this process, regardless of their microbial hosts. This combination produces an efficient and integrated suprametabolism, with properties similar to those that define metabolic networks in single organisms. The characteristics of this network support an evolutionary scenario in which the reactions evolved outwards from the central metabolism. The properties of the global biodegradation network have implications for predicting the fate of current and future environmental pollutants. PMID:12973298

  14. How tritium illuminates catchment structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, M.; Morgenstern, U.; McDonnell, J.

    2012-04-01

    Streams contain water which has taken widely-varying times to pass through catchments, and the distribution of ages is likely to change with the flow. Part of the water has 'runoff' straight to the stream with little delay, other parts are more delayed and some has taken years (in some cases decades) to traverse the deeper regolith or bedrock of the catchment. This work aims to establish the significance of the last component, which is important because it can cause catchments to have long memories of contaminant inputs (e.g. nitrate). Results of tritium studies on streams world-wide were accessed from the scientific literature. Most of the studies assumed that there were just two age-components present in the streams (i.e. young and old). The mean ages and proportions of the components were found by fitting simulations to tritium data. It was found that the old component in streams was substantial (average was 50% of the annual runoff) and had considerable age (average mean age was 10 years) (Stewart et al., 2010). Use of oxygen-18 or chloride variations to estimate streamflow mean age usually does not reveal the age or size of this old component, because these methods cannot detect water older than about four years. Consequently, the use of tritium has shown that substantial parts of streamflow in headwater catchments are older than expected, and that deep groundwater plays an active and sometimes even a dominant role in runoff generation. Difficulties with interpretation of tritium in streams in recent years due to interference from tritium due to nuclear weapons testing are becoming less serious, because very accurate tritium measurements can be made and there is now little bomb-tritium remaining in the atmosphere. Mean ages can often be estimated from single tritium measurements in the Southern Hemisphere, because there was much less bomb-tritium in the atmosphere. This may also be possible for some locations in the Northern Hemisphere. Age determination on

  15. A physically-based Distributed Hydrologic Model for Tropical Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abebe, N. A.; Ogden, F. L.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrological models are mathematical formulations intended to represent observed hydrological processes in a watershed. Simulated watersheds in turn vary in their nature based on their geographic location, altitude, climatic variables and geology and soil formation. Due to these variations, available hydrologic models vary in process formulation, spatial and temporal resolution and data demand. Many tropical watersheds are characterized by extensive and persistent biological activity and a large amount of rain. The Agua Salud catchments located within the Panama Canal Watershed, Panama, are such catchments identified by steep rolling topography, deep soils derived from weathered bedrock, and limited exposed bedrock. Tropical soils are highly affected by soil cracks, decayed tree roots and earthworm burrows forming a network of preferential flow paths that drain to a perched water table, which forms at a depth where the vertical hydraulic conductivity is significantly reduced near the bottom of the bioturbation layer. We have developed a physics-based, spatially distributed, multi-layered hydrologic model to simulate the dominant processes in these tropical watersheds. The model incorporates the major flow processes including overland flow, channel flow, matrix and non-Richards film flow infiltration, lateral downslope saturated matrix and non-Darcian pipe flow in the bioturbation layer, and deep saturated groundwater flow. Emphasis is given to the modeling of subsurface unsaturated zone soil moisture dynamics and the saturated preferential lateral flow from the network of macrospores. Preliminary results indicate that the model has the capability to simulate the complex hydrological processes in the catchment and will be a useful tool in the ongoing comprehensive ecohydrological studies in tropical catchments, and help improve our understanding of the hydrological effects of deforestation and aforestation.

  16. Geomorphic coupling and sediment connectivity in an alpine catchment — Exploring sediment cascades using graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckmann, Tobias; Schwanghart, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Through their relevance for sediment budgets and the sensitivity of geomorphic systems, geomorphic coupling and (sediment) connectivity represent important topics in geomorphology. Since the introduction of the systems perspective to physical geography by Chorley and Kennedy (1971), a catchment has been perceived as consisting of landscape elements (e.g. landforms, subcatchments) that are coupled by geomorphic processes through sediment transport. In this study, we present a novel application of mathematical graph theory to explore the network structure of coarse sediment pathways in a central alpine catchment. Numerical simulation models for rockfall, debris flows, and (hillslope and channel) fluvial processes are used to establish a spatially explicit graph model of sediment sources, pathways and sinks. The raster cells of a digital elevation model form the nodes of this graph, and simulated sediment trajectories represent the corresponding edges. Model results are validated by visual comparison with the field situation and aerial photos. The interaction of sediment pathways, i.e. where the deposits of a geomorphic process form the sources of another process, forms sediment cascades, represented by paths (a succession of edges) in the graph model. We show how this graph can be used to explore upslope (contributing area) and downslope (source to sink) functional connectivity by analysing its nodes, edges and paths. The analysis of the spatial distribution, composition and frequency of sediment cascades yields information on the relative importance of geomorphic processes and their interaction (however regardless of their transport capacity). In the study area, the analysis stresses the importance of mass movements and their interaction, e.g. the linkage of large rockfall source areas to debris flows that potentially enter the channel network. Moreover, it is shown that only a small percentage of the study area is coupled to the channel network which itself is

  17. The STIN in the Tale: A Socio-Technical Interaction Perspective on Networked Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Steve; Creanor, Linda

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we go beyond what have been described as "mechanistic" accounts of e-learning to explore the complexity of relationships between people and technology as encountered in cases of networked learning. We introduce from the social informatics literature the concept of sociotechnical interaction networks which focus on the…

  18. Productive Tensions in a Cross-Cultural Peer Mentoring Women's Network: A Social Capital Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esnard, Talia; Cobb-Roberts, Deirdre; Agosto, Vonzell; Karanxha, Zorka; Beck, Makini; Wu, Ke; Unterreiner, Ann

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of researchers documents the unique barriers women face in their academic career progression and the significance of mentoring networks for advancement of their academic trajectories as faculty. However, few researchers explore the embedded tensions and conflicts in the social processes and relations of mentoring networks, and the…

  19. Emerging Trends in the Development of School Networking Initiatives. Perspectives on Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Vis, Ed.; Ramzy, Heba, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This collection of research and case studies provides snapshots of developments in school networking in seven regions of the world, and focuses on the variety of school networking models that have emerged in different regions and the resulting trends and issues that need to be considered in terms of supporting the learning, teaching, management…

  20. A Social Network Perspective on Teacher Collaboration in Schools: Theory, Methodology, and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moolenaar, Nienke M.

    2012-01-01

    An emerging trend in educational research is the use of social network theory and methodology to understand how teacher collaboration can support or constrain teaching, learning, and educational change. This article provides a critical synthesis of educational literature on school social networks among educators to advance our understanding of the…

  1. Efficacy of Online Social Networks on Language Teaching: A Bangladeshi Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shams, Shaila

    2014-01-01

    It is now an established fact that the use of technology facilitates teaching and learning in language classrooms. With the advancement of technology, social networking websites have emerged too. Social networking sites have been quite popular among various age group users particularly the young users since their invention. Also, they are…

  2. Research on spatial economic structure for different economic sectors from a perspective of a complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Sen; Yang, Hualei; Cai, Boliang; Yang, Chunxia

    2013-09-01

    The economy system is a complex system, and the complex network is a powerful tool to study its complexity. Here we calculate the economic distance matrices based on annual GDP of nine economic sectors from 1995-2010 in 31 Chinese provinces and autonomous regions,1 then build several spatial economic networks through the threshold method and the Minimal Spanning Tree method. After the analysis on the structure of the networks and the influence of geographic distance, some conclusions are drawn. First, connectivity distribution of a spatial economic network does not follow the power law. Second, according to the network structure, nine economic sectors could be divided into two groups, and there is significant discrepancy of network structure between these two groups. Moreover, the influence of the geographic distance plays an important role on the structure of a spatial economic network, network parameters are changed with the influence of the geographic distance. At last, 2000 km is the critical value for geographic distance: for real estate and finance, the spearman’s rho with l<2000 is bigger than that with l>2000, and the case is opposite for other economic sectors.

  3. The Geography Discipline Network Guides to Good Teaching, Learning and Assessment Practice: A Southern African Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nel, Etienne

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the series of books, "The Geography Discipline Network Guides on Teaching, Learning, and Assessment," produced by the Geography Discipline Network. Reveals two strengths of the series: (1) it provides practical guidelines on improving traditional teaching strategies; and (2) it promotes active learning. Considers the potential…

  4. Repetitive Behaviors in Autism and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: New Perspectives from a Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzzano, Laura; Borsboom, Denny; Geurts, Hilde M.

    2015-01-01

    The association between autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) seems largely dependent upon observed similarities in the repetitive behaviors that manifest in both disorders. The aim of this study was to use a network approach to explore the interactions between these behaviors. We constructed a network based on clinician's…

  5. Home-Based Peer Social Networks of Young Children with Down Syndrome: A Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Michael J.; Connor, Robert T.; Johnson, L. Clark

    2009-01-01

    Numerous dimensions of the peer social networks of children with Down syndrome were examined within a developmental framework. Results revealed that for many key measures, particularly involvement in play, linkages to other settings, and control of play, children with Down syndrome have less well-developed peer networks even in comparison to a…

  6. Biological robustness and the role of microRNAs: a network perspective.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Nicolás; Carthew, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, microRNA molecules have emerged as critical regulators in the expression and function of animal genomes. This review discusses the relationship between microRNA-mediated regulation and the robustness of biochemical networks that contain microRNAs. Most biochemical networks are robust; they are relatively insensitive to the precise values of reaction constants and concentrations of molecules acting within the network. MicroRNAs involved in network robustness may appear to be nonessential under favourable uniform conditions used in conventional laboratory experiments. However, the function of these molecules can be revealed under environmental and genetic perturbations. Recent advances have revealed unexpected features of microRNA organization in networks that help explain their promotion of robustness.

  7. The importance of social networks on smoking: perspectives of women who quit smoking during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Stephanie N; Von Kohorn, Isabelle; Schulman-Green, Dena; Colson, Eve R

    2012-08-01

    While up to 45% of women quit smoking during pregnancy, nearly 80% return to smoking within a year after delivery. Interventions to prevent relapse have had limited success. The study objective was to understand what influences return to smoking after pregnancy among women who quit smoking during pregnancy, with a focus on the role of social networks. We conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews during the postpartum hospital stay with women who quit smoking while pregnant. Over 300 pages of transcripts were analyzed using qualitative methods to identify common themes. Respondents [n = 24] were predominately white (63%), had at least some college education (54%) and a mean age of 26 years (range = 18-36). When reflecting on the experience of being a smoker who quit smoking during pregnancy, all participants emphasized the importance of their relationships with other smokers and the changes in these relationships that ensued once they quit smoking. Three common themes were: (1) being enmeshed in social networks with prominent smoking norms (2) being tempted to smoke by members of their social networks, and (3) changing relationships with the smokers in their social networks as a result of their non-smoking status. We found that women who quit smoking during pregnancy found themselves confronted by a change in their social network since most of those in their social network were smokers. For this reason, smoking cessation interventions may be most successful if they help women consider restructuring or reframing their social network.

  8. Interagency networking in energy-impacted rural areas: the social service perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Delewski, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    This study focused on the viability of organizational networking by social service administrators as a strategy to lessen the negative social effects of rapid population change. The objectives of the study were to determine the (a) composition of social service directors' networks and (b) interaction characteristics between directors and network members associated with effective mitigation management. A corollary objective was to ascertain the reliability of participant self-records in network analysis. Results indicated several differences between the areas studied: the size of the director's network, job classification, and formality of the interaction. The reliability of self-reports in network analysis indicated that individuals were able to recall basic information about their interactions, but were unable to recall more detailed information. In addition, a prediction model for contact usefulness between model included: agreement on social service operation, discussion of policy planning, discussion of direct services to clients, agreement on community issues, gender, education, and two interaction variables. It was concluded that planning through interagency networking is one strategy to mitigate the ill effects brought about by rapid population change.

  9. Catchment classification by means of hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellebrand, Hugo; Ley, Rita; Casper, Markus

    2013-04-01

    An important hydrological objective is catchment classification that will serve as a basis for the regionalisation of discharge parameters or model parameters. The main task of this study is the development and assessment of two classification approaches with respect to their efficiency in catchment classification. The study area in western Germany comprises about 80 catchments that range in size from 8 km2 up to 1500 km2, covering a wide range of geological substrata, soils, landscapes and mean annual precipitation. In a first approach Self Organising Maps (SOMs) use discharge characteristics or catchment characteristics to classify the catchments of the study area. Next, a reference hydrological model calibrates the catchments of the study area and tests the possibilities of parameter transfer. Compared to the transfer of parameters outside a class, for most catchments the model performance improves when parameters within a class are transferred. Thus, it should be possible to distinguish catchment classes by means of a hydrological model. The classification results of the SOM are compared to the classification results of the reference hydrological model in order to determine the latter validity. The second approach builds on the first approach in such a way that it uses the Superflex Modelling Framework instead of only one reference model. Within this framework multiple conceptual model structures can be calibrated and adapted. Input data for each calibration of a catchment are hourly time series of runoff, precipitation and evaporation for at least eight years. The calibration of multiple models for each catchment and their comparison allows for the assessment of the influence of different model structures on model performance. Learning loops analyse model performance and adapt model structures accordingly with a view to performance improvement. The result of the modelling exercise is a best performing model structure for each catchment that serves as a basis

  10. Research on the tourism resource development from the perspective of network capability-Taking Wuxi Huishan Ancient Town as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yanli; Hua, Hefeng

    2017-03-01

    Network capability is the enterprise's capability to set up, manage, maintain and use a variety of relations between enterprises, and to obtain resources for improving competitiveness. Tourism in China is in a transformation period from sightseeing to leisure and vacation. Scenic spots as well as tourist enterprises can learn from some other enterprises in the process of resource development, and build up its own network relations in order to get resources for their survival and development. Through the effective management of network relations, the performance of resource development will be improved. By analyzing literature on network capability and the case analysis of Wuxi Huishan Ancient Town, the role of network capacity in the tourism resource development is explored and resource development path is built from the perspective of network capability. Finally, the tourism resource development process model based on network capacity is proposed. This model mainly includes setting up network vision, resource identification, resource acquisition, resource utilization and tourism project development. In these steps, network construction, network management and improving network center status are key points.

  11. Distributed Recurrent Neural Networks for Cooperative Control of Manipulators: A Game-Theoretic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; He, Jinbo; Li, Yangming; Rafique, Muhammad Usman

    2017-02-01

    This paper considers cooperative kinematic control of multiple manipulators using distributed recurrent neural networks and provides a tractable way to extend existing results on individual manipulator control using recurrent neural networks to the scenario with the coordination of multiple manipulators. The problem is formulated as a constrained game, where energy consumptions for each manipulator, saturations of control input, and the topological constraints imposed by the communication graph are considered. An implicit form of the Nash equilibrium for the game is obtained by converting the problem into its dual space. Then, a distributed dynamic controller based on recurrent neural networks is devised to drive the system toward the desired Nash equilibrium to seek the optimal solution of the cooperative control. Global stability and solution optimality of the proposed neural networks are proved in the theory. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Modeling epidemics on adaptively evolving networks: A data-mining perspective.

    PubMed

    Kattis, Assimakis A; Holiday, Alexander; Stoica, Ana-Andreea; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of epidemic dynamics on dynamically evolving ("adaptive") networks poses nontrivial challenges to the modeler, such as the determination of a small number of informative statistics of the detailed network state (that is, a few "good observables") that usefully summarize the overall (macroscopic, systems-level) behavior. Obtaining reduced, small size accurate models in terms of these few statistical observables--that is, trying to coarse-grain the full network epidemic model to a small but useful macroscopic one--is even more daunting. Here we describe a data-based approach to solving the first challenge: the detection of a few informative collective observables of the detailed epidemic dynamics. This is accomplished through Diffusion Maps (DMAPS), a recently developed data-mining technique. We illustrate the approach through simulations of a simple mathematical model of epidemics on a network: a model known to exhibit complex temporal dynamics. We discuss potential extensions of the approach, as well as possible shortcomings.

  13. The Global Special Operations Forces Network from a Partner-Nation Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    as an integrator of interagency efforts, see Michael E . Gates, “Creating SOF Networks: The Role of NATO Special Operations as a Testing Ground for SOF...diss. University of Oslo, Faculty of Social Sciences and Department of Psychology. February 2012. Gates, Michael E . “Creating SOF Networks: The Role...9  3.  Relational Analysis of the Overall GSN .............................................9  E

  14. Architecture and biological applications of artificial neural networks: a tuberculosis perspective.

    PubMed

    Darsey, Jerry A; Griffin, William O; Joginipelli, Sravanthi; Melapu, Venkata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Advancement of science and technology has prompted researchers to develop new intelligent systems that can solve a variety of problems such as pattern recognition, prediction, and optimization. The ability of the human brain to learn in a fashion that tolerates noise and error has attracted many researchers and provided the starting point for the development of artificial neural networks: the intelligent systems. Intelligent systems can acclimatize to the environment or data and can maximize the chances of success or improve the efficiency of a search. Due to massive parallelism with large numbers of interconnected processers and their ability to learn from the data, neural networks can solve a variety of challenging computational problems. Neural networks have the ability to derive meaning from complicated and imprecise data; they are used in detecting patterns, and trends that are too complex for humans, or other computer systems. Solutions to the toughest problems will not be found through one narrow specialization; therefore we need to combine interdisciplinary approaches to discover the solutions to a variety of problems. Many researchers in different disciplines such as medicine, bioinformatics, molecular biology, and pharmacology have successfully applied artificial neural networks. This chapter helps the reader in understanding the basics of artificial neural networks, their applications, and methodology; it also outlines the network learning process and architecture. We present a brief outline of the application of neural networks to medical diagnosis, drug discovery, gene identification, and protein structure prediction. We conclude with a summary of the results from our study on tuberculosis data using neural networks, in diagnosing active tuberculosis, and predicting chronic vs. infiltrative forms of tuberculosis.

  15. Hydrologic connectivity between landscapes and streams: Transferring reach- and plot-scale understanding to the catchment scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jencso, K.G.; McGlynn, B.L.; Gooseff, M.N.; Wondzell, S.M.; Bencala, K.E.; Marshall, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between catchment structure and runoff characteristics is poorly understood. In steep headwater catchments with shallow soils the accumulation of hillslope area (upslope accumulated area (UAA)) is a hypothesized first-order control on the distribution of soil water and groundwater. Hillslope-riparian water table connectivity represents the linkage between the dominant catchment landscape elements (hillslopes and riparian zones) and the channel network. Hydrologic connectivity between hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) landscape elements is heterogeneous in space and often temporally transient. We sought to test the relationship between UAA and the existence and longevity of HRS shallow groundwater connectivity. We quantified water table connectivity based on 84 recording wells distributed across 24 HRS transects within the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (U.S. Forest Service), northern Rocky Mountains, Montana. Correlations were observed between the longevity of HRS water table connectivity and the size of each transect's UAA (r2 = 0.91). We applied this relationship to the entire stream network to quantify landscape-scale connectivity through time and ascertain its relationship to catchment-scale runoff dynamics. We found that the shape of the estimated annual landscape connectivity duration curve was highly related to the catchment flow duration curve (r2 = 0.95). This research suggests internal catchment landscape structure (topography and topology) as a first-order control on runoff source area and whole catchment response characteristics. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. How people make friends in social networking sites—A microscopic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haibo; Wang, Xiaofan

    2012-02-01

    We study the detailed growth of a social networking site with full temporal information by examining the creation process of each friendship relation that can collectively lead to the macroscopic properties of the network. We first study the reciprocal behavior of users, and find that link requests are quickly responded to and that the distribution of reciprocation intervals decays in an exponential form. The degrees of inviters/accepters are slightly negatively correlative with reciprocation time. In addition, the temporal feature of the online community shows that the distributions of intervals of user behaviors, such as sending or accepting link requests, follow a power law with a universal exponent, and peaks emerge for intervals of an integral day. We finally study the preferential selection and linking phenomena of the social networking site and find that, for the former, a linear preference holds for preferential sending and reception, and for the latter, a linear preference also holds for preferential acceptance, creation, and attachment. Based on the linearly preferential linking, we put forward an analyzable network model which can reproduce the degree distribution of the network. The research framework presented in the paper could provide a potential insight into how the micro-motives of users lead to the global structure of online social networks.

  17. Map correlation method: Selection of a reference streamgage to estimate daily streamflow at ungaged catchments.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Vogel, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Daily streamflow time series are critical to a very broad range of hydrologic problems. Whereas daily streamflow time series are readily obtained from gaged catchments, streamflow information is commonly needed at catchments for which no measured streamflow information exists. At ungaged catchments, methods to estimate daily streamflow time series typically require the use of a reference streamgage, which transfers properties of the streamflow time series at a reference streamgage to the ungaged catchment. Therefore, the selection of a reference streamgage is one of the central challenges associated with estimation of daily streamflow at ungaged basins. The reference streamgage is typically selected by choosing the nearest streamgage; however, this paper shows that selection of the nearest streamgage does not provide a consistent selection criterion. We introduce a new method, termed the map-correlation method, which selects the reference streamgage whose daily streamflows are most correlated with an ungaged catchment. When applied to the estimation of daily streamflow at 28 streamgages across southern New England, daily streamflows estimated by a reference streamgage selected using the map-correlation method generally provides improved estimates of daily streamflow time series over streamflows estimated by the selection and use of the nearest streamgage. The map correlation method could have potential for many other applications including identifying redundancy and uniqueness in a streamgage network, calibration of rainfall runoff models at ungaged sites, as well as for use in catchment classification.

  18. Trend analysis of nutrient loadings in the South Saskatchewan River catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Marin, L. A.; Chun, K. P.; Wheater, H. S.; Lindenschmidt, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient loadings in river catchments have increased in the past years as a consequence of rapid expansion of agricultural areas, new urban developments and industries, and population growth. Nutrient enrichment of water bodies has intensified eutrophication conditions that degrade water quality and ecosystem health. In large-scale catchments, the assessment of temporal and spatial variability of nutrient loads imply challenges due to climate, land use and geology heterogeneity, and to anthropogenic changes. In this study we carried out a trend analysis of total phosphorus and total nitrogen loads in the South Saskatchewan River (SSR) catchment. This catchment is located in the Canadian Prairie Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. The eastern and central areas of the catchment consist mostly of croplands, pasture lands and livestock farms, whereas the western parts are located on the Rocky Mountains that are the source of most of the catchment's streamflows. The trend analysis was performed applying a novel approach to analyse nutrient time series recorded at long-term water quality stations along the main stems of the SSR river network. Since water quality is taken infrequently, in the proposed approach the time series were complemented using regression analysis methods based on streamflow data recorded at the nearest gauge stations. The time series were subsequently pre-whitened in order to remove the autocorrelation, and then subjected to non-parametric statistical test to detect trends. Seasonal analysis of trends at each of the water quality stations were performed in order to determine the relationships between annual flow regimes and nutrient loads in the catchment, in particular, the influence of the high spring runoff on nutrient export. Decadal analysis was also performed to determine the long-tern relationships of nutrients with anthropogenic changes in the catchment. In particular, the capacity of reservoirs to trap nutrients and the effects of the

  19. Runoff generation in a Mediterranean semi-arid landscape: Thresholds, scale, rainfall and catchment characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Fabian; Schmidt, Sebastian; Sauter, Martin; Lange, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Surface runoff acts as an integrated response of catchment characteristics and hydrological processes. In the Eastern Mediterranean region, a lack of runoff data has hindered a better understanding of runoff generation processes on the catchment scale, despite the importance of surface runoff as a water resource or flood hazard. Our main aim was to identify and explain differences in catchment runoff reactions across a variety of scales. Over a period of five years, we observed runoff in ephemeral streams of seven watersheds with sizes between 3 and 129 km2. Landuse and surface cover types (share of vegetation, bare soil and rock outcrops) were derived from aerial images by objective classification techniques. Using data from a dense rainfall network we analysed the effects of scale, catchment properties and aridity on runoff generation. Thereby we extracted rainfall and corresponding runoff events from our time-series to calculate event based rainfall characteristics and catchment runoff coefficients. Soil moisture observations provided additional information on antecedent moisture conditions, infiltration characteristics and the evolution of saturated areas. In contrast to the prevailing opinion that the proportion of Hortonian overland flow increases with aridity, we found that in our area the largest share (> 95 %) of runoff is generated by saturation excess overland flow in response to long lasting, rainfall events of high amount. This was supported by a strong correlation between event runoff and precipitation totals. Similar rainfall thresholds (50 mm) for runoff generation were observed in all investigated catchments. No scale effects on runoff coefficients were found; instead we identified up to three-fold runoff coefficients in catchments with larger extension of arid areas, higher percentage of rock outcrops and urbanization. Comparing two headwater catchments with noticeable differences in extent of olive orchards, no difference in runoff generation was

  20. Global Spatio-Temporal Patterns in Human Migration: A Complex Network Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Kyle F.; D'Odorico, Paolo; Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Migration is a powerful adaptive strategy for humans to navigate hardship and pursue a better quality of life. As a universal vehicle facilitating exchanges of ideas, culture, money and goods, international migration is a major contributor to globalization. Consisting of countries linked by multiple connections of human movements, global migration constitutes a network. Despite the important role of human migration in connecting various communities in different parts of the world, the topology and behavior of the international migration network and its changes through time remain poorly understood. Here we show that the global human migration network became more interconnected during the latter half of the twentieth century and that migrant destination choice partly reflects colonial and postcolonial histories, language, religion, and distances. From 1960 to 2000 we found a steady increase in network transitivity (i.e. connectivity between nodes connected to the same node), a decrease in average path length and an upward shift in degree distribution, all of which strengthened the ‘small-world’ behavior of the migration network. Furthermore, we found that distinct groups of countries preferentially interact to form migration communities based largely on historical, cultural and economic factors. PMID:23372664

  1. Shareholding relationships in the Euro Area banking market: A network perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecora, Nicolò; Spelta, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we analyze the topological properties of the network of the Euro Area banking market network, with the primary aim of assessing the importance of a bank in the financial system with respect to ownership and control of other credit institutions. The network displays power law distributions in both binary and weighted degree metrics indicating a robust yet fragile structure and a direct link between an increase of control diversification and a rise in the market power. Therefore while in good time the network is seemingly robust, in bad times many banks can simultaneously go into distress. This behavior paves the way for Central bank's actions. In particular we investigate whether the Single Supervisory Mechanism introduced by the European Central Banks and based on banks' total asset is a good proxy to quantify their systemic importance. Results indicate that not all the financial institutions with high valued total assets are systemically important but only few of them. Moreover the network structure reveals that control is highly concentrated, with few important shareholders approximately controlling a separate subset of banks.

  2. Restoring Landform Geodiversity in Modified Rivers and Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ben; Clifford, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    also undertaken to show landform position within catchments and the wider river network. We conclude that river restoration could play an important role in the assessment and improvement of geodiversity within heavily-modified European catchments

  3. Catchment Very-High Frequency Hydrochemistry: the Critex Chemical House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floury, P.; Gaillardet, J.; Tallec, G.; Blanchouin, A.; Ansart, P.

    2015-12-01

    Exploring the variations of river quality at very high frequency is still a big challenge that has fundamental implications both for understanding catchment ecosystems and for water quality monitoring. Within the French Critical Zone program CRITEX, we have proposed to develop a prototype called "Chemical House", applying the "lab on field" concept to one of the stream of the Orgeval Critical Zone Observatory. The Orgeval catchment (45 km2) is part of the Critical Zone RBV ("Réseau des bassins versants") network. It is a typical temperate agricultural catchment that has been intensively monitored for the last 50 years for hydrology and nutrient chemistry. Agricultural inputs and land use are also finely monitored making Orgeval an ideal basin to test the response of the Critical Zone to agricultural forcing. Geology consists of a typical sedimentary basin of Cenozoic age with horizontal layers of limestones, silcrete and marls, covered by a thin loamy layer. Two main aquifers are present within the catchment: the Brie and the Champigny aquifers. Mean runoff is 780 mm/yr. The Chemical House is a fully automated lab and installed directly along the river, which performs measurement of all major dissolved elements such as Na, Cl, Mg, Ca, NO3, SO4 and K every half hour. It also records all physical parameters (Temperature, pH, conductivity, O2 dissolved, Turbidity) of the water every minute. Orgeval Chemical House started to measure river chemistry on June 12, 2015 and has successfully now recorded several months of data. We will present the architecture of the Chemical House and the first reproducibility and accuracy tests made during the summer drought 2015 period. Preliminary results show that the chemical house is recoding significant nychtemeral (day/night) cycles for each element. We also observe that each element has its own behaviour along a day. First results open great prospects.

  4. A dynamic evolutionary clustering perspective: Community detection in signed networks by reconstructing neighbor sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianrui; Wang, Hua; Wang, Lina; Liu, Weiwei

    2016-04-01

    Community detection in social networks has been intensively studied in recent years. In this paper, a novel similarity measurement is defined according to social balance theory for signed networks. Inter-community positive links are found and deleted due to their low similarity. The positive neighbor sets are reconstructed by this method. Then, differential equations are proposed to imitate the constantly changing states of nodes. Each node will update its state based on the difference between its state and average state of its positive neighbors. Nodes in the same community will evolve together with time and nodes in the different communities will evolve far away. Communities are detected ultimately when states of nodes are stable. Experiments on real world and synthetic networks are implemented to verify detection performance. The thorough comparisons demonstrate the presented method is more efficient than two acknowledged better algorithms.

  5. Climate change impacts on urban wildfire and flooding policy in Idaho: a comparative policy network perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, E.; Pierce, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous frameworks and models exist for understanding the dynamics of the public policy process. A policy network approach considers how and why stakeholders and interests pay attention to and engage in policy problems, such as flood control or developing resilient and fire resistant landscapes. Variables considered in this approach include what the relationships are between these stakeholders, how they influence the process and outcomes, communication patterns within and between policy networks, and how networks change as a result of new information, science, or public interest and involvement with the problem. This approach is useful in understanding the creation of natural hazards policy as new information or situations, such as projected climate change impacts, influence and disrupt the policy process and networks. Two significant natural hazard policy networks exist in the semi-arid Treasure Valley region of Southwest Idaho, which includes the capitol city of Boise and the surrounding metropolitan area. Boise is situated along the Boise River and adjacent to steep foothills; this physiographic setting makes Boise vulnerable to both wildfires at the wildland-urban interface (WUI) and flooding. Both of these natural hazards have devastated the community in the past and floods and fires are projected to occur with more frequency in the future as a result of projected climate change impacts in the region. While both hazards are fairly well defined problems, there are stark differences lending themselves to comparisons across their respective networks. The WUI wildfire network is large and well developed, includes stakeholders from all levels of government, the private sector and property owner organizations, has well defined objectives, and conducts promotional and educational activities as part of its interaction with the public in order to increase awareness and garner support for its policies. The flood control policy network, however, is less defined

  6. Striking the balance: Challenges and perspectives for the protected areas network in northeastern European Russia.

    PubMed

    Degteva, Svetlana V; Ponomarev, Vasily I; Eisenman, Sasha W; Dushenkov, Vyacheslav

    2015-10-01

    Increasing anthropogenic pressure on the largest remaining tracts of old-growth boreal forest in Europe necessitates additional conservation of ecosystems and biodiversity in northeastern European Russia. In a regional network comprising 8 % of the Nenets Autonomous District and 13.5 % of the Komi Republic, 248 areas have varying protected statuses as state nature reserves (zapovedniks), national parks, reserves/sanctuaries (zakazniks), or natural monuments. Due to increased natural resource extraction in this relatively pristine area, designation of additional protected areas is critical for the protection of key ecological sites. The history of ecological preservation in these regions is herein described, and recent recommendations for incorporating additional ecologically representative areas into the regional network are presented. If the protected area network can be expanded, the overall environmental stability in these globally significant ecosystems may remain intact, and can help Russia meet the 2020 Aichi conservation targets, as set forth by the Convention of Biological Diversity.

  7. [Health system sustainability from a network perspective: a proposal to optimize healthy habits and social support].

    PubMed

    Marqués Sánchez, Pilar; Fernández Peña, Rosario; Cabrera León, Andrés; Muñoz Doyague, María F; Llopis Cañameras, Jaime; Arias Ramos, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    The search of new health management formulas focused to give wide services is one of the priorities of our present health policies. Those formulas examine the optimization of the links between the main actors involved in public health, ie, users, professionals, local socio-political and corporate agents. This paper is aimed to introduce the Social Network Analysis as a method for analyzing, measuring and interpreting those connections. The knowledge of people's relationships (what is called social networks) in the field of public health is becoming increasingly important at an international level. In fact, countries such as UK, Netherlands, Italy, Australia and U.S. are looking formulas to apply this knowledge to their health departments. With this work we show the utility of the ARS on topics related to sustainability of the health system, particularly those related with health habits and social support, topics included in the 2020 health strategies that underline the importance of the collaborative aspects in networks.

  8. Dominant controls on catchment hydrological functions: what can we learn from biological and isotopic tracers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, L.; Klaus, J.; Wetzel, C. E.; Stewart, M. K.; McDonnell, J.; Martinez Carreras, N.

    2014-12-01

    One emerging and important control on catchment hydrological functions of water storage, mixing and release is bedrock geology. Until today, catchment-based work has been limited by small ranges of rock types in adjacent basins. Moreover, conventional hydrological tracer approaches suffer from limitations inherent to the large storages related to certain bedrock types (e.g. the damping of stable isotope tracer signatures in deep storage catchments and obliteration of output signals at larger spatial scales). Here, we show how a multi-tracer approach, based on terrestrial diatoms and different stable and radioactive isotopic tracers can help refining our understanding of the dominant controls on catchment hydrological functions, especially the role of bedrock geology. We present new data and results from a nested catchment set-up, located in the Alzette River basin in Luxembourg (Europe). These 16 catchments (with sizes ranging from 0.47 to 285 km2) are characterized by clean and mixed assemblages of geology and land use. We have monitored these systems since 2002, including meteorological variables (precipitation, air temperature, etc.), as well as 15 minute discharge. Additional parameters have been monitored bi-weekly and at the event time scale, including geochemical and isotopic (3H, D, 18O) tracers, as well as terrestrial diatom communities in streamwater. Our results show that water balance derived dynamic storage significantly differs across the 16 catchments and scales. Catchment mixing potential inferred from standard deviations in stream baseflow ∂D (as a proxy for the damping of isotopic signatures in precipitation), as well as tritium-derived baseflow transit times, both exhibit a significant spatial variability, but strong correlation to bedrock pemeability. Terrestrial diatom assemblages in streamwater, as a proxy for rapid flow pathway connectedness to the stream network, are highly variable across the study catchments but also show strong

  9. Comparing runoff on 11 poorly-gauged headwater catchments using a soft monitoring approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, F.; Crabit, A.; Moussa, R.

    2012-04-01

    used to compare the runoff of 11 small catchments with ephemeral streams (0,1-0,6 km2) with the given uncertainty at both the event and the annual scale (Crabit et al., in Hydrological Processes 25 (18), 2011). The results indicate significant variability between the catchment's responses. This variability allows for classification in spite of all the uncertainty associated with runoff estimation. This study highlights the potential of using a network of poorly gauged catchments. From almost no catchment understanding the proposed methodology allows to compare poorly gauged catchments and highlights similarity/dissimilarity between catchment responses.

  10. Hydrological characterisation of pesticide loads using hydrograph separation at different scales in a German catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, K.; Deurer, M.; Hartmann, H.; Bach, M.; Spiteller, M.; Frede, H.-G.

    2003-03-01

    Pesticide pollution of surface waters was studied in a 49.7 km 2 catchment in Germany. The loads were differentiated into point source (PSP) and non-point source pollution (NPSP). The contribution of runoff, interflow, groundwater, drainage and spray drift to river contamination was defined as NPSP. Pesticides discharged into the river via wastewater treatment plants and sewer overflows were considered as PSP. Hydrology and pesticide loads were studied on the scale of the entire catchment and in two sub-catchments not influenced by PSP. River discharges and concentrations of 19 pesticides were measured at four locations over 447 days. The total load detected in the entire catchment amounted to 3249 g active ingredient (a.i.). The stream flow data were separated into base and direct flow applying a non-linear reservoir separation algorithm. Single rainfall events leading to runoff and interflow dominated NPSP in the sub-catchments. For the sub-catchment Rossberg 87% and for Leidenhofen 71% of the pesticide load could be attributed to direct flow. This corresponded to 14 and 34% time of peak flow events for Rossberg and Leidenhofen, respectively. For the entire catchment only 15% of the NPSP was transported with direct flow with 49% attributed to base flow. The difference between the entire and the sub-catchment contribution was attributed to dilution, hysteresis and merging effects. Applying a digital recursive filter technique for hydrograph separation confirmed the results of the non-linear reservoir separation algorithm. The impact of the hydrograph separation technique on the hydrological characterisation of pesticide loads was insignificant. The results emphasise the dynamic nature of pesticide transport and its complex interaction between size and position of source areas along a stream flow network. The measured loads in the sub-catchments were scaled up to the entire catchment as an estimate for the total NPSP. The fraction of the area treated with a

  11. Catchment-scale biogeography of riverine bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Read, Daniel S; Gweon, Hyun S; Bowes, Michael J; Newbold, Lindsay K; Field, Dawn; Bailey, Mark J; Griffiths, Robert I

    2015-02-01

    Lotic ecosystems such as rivers and streams are unique in that they represent a continuum of both space and time during the transition from headwaters to the river mouth. As microbes have very different controls over their ecology, distribution and dispersion compared with macrobiota, we wished to explore biogeographical patterns within a river catchment and uncover the major drivers structuring bacterioplankton communities. Water samples collected across the River Thames Basin, UK, covering the transition from headwater tributaries to the lower reaches of the main river channel were characterised using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. This approach revealed an ecological succession in the bacterial community composition along the river continuum, moving from a community dominated by Bacteroidetes in the headwaters to Actinobacteria-dominated downstream. Location of the sampling point in the river network (measured as the cumulative water channel distance upstream) was found to be the most predictive spatial feature; inferring that ecological processes pertaining to temporal community succession are of prime importance in driving the assemblages of riverine bacterioplankton communities. A decrease in bacterial activity rates and an increase in the abundance of low nucleic acid bacteria relative to high nucleic acid bacteria were found to correspond with these downstream changes in community structure, suggesting corresponding functional changes. Our findings show that bacterial communities across the Thames basin exhibit an ecological succession along the river continuum, and that this is primarily driven by water residence time rather than the physico-chemical status of the river.

  12. Catchment-scale biogeography of riverine bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Read, Daniel S; Gweon, Hyun S; Bowes, Michael J; Newbold, Lindsay K; Field, Dawn; Bailey, Mark J; Griffiths, Robert I

    2015-01-01

    Lotic ecosystems such as rivers and streams are unique in that they represent a continuum of both space and time during the transition from headwaters to the river mouth. As microbes have very different controls over their ecology, distribution and dispersion compared with macrobiota, we wished to explore biogeographical patterns within a river catchment and uncover the major drivers structuring bacterioplankton communities. Water samples collected across the River Thames Basin, UK, covering the transition from headwater tributaries to the lower reaches of the main river channel were characterised using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. This approach revealed an ecological succession in the bacterial community composition along the river continuum, moving from a community dominated by Bacteroidetes in the headwaters to Actinobacteria-dominated downstream. Location of the sampling point in the river network (measured as the cumulative water channel distance upstream) was found to be the most predictive spatial feature; inferring that ecological processes pertaining to temporal community succession are of prime importance in driving the assemblages of riverine bacterioplankton communities. A decrease in bacterial activity rates and an increase in the abundance of low nucleic acid bacteria relative to high nucleic acid bacteria were found to correspond with these downstream changes in community structure, suggesting corresponding functional changes. Our findings show that bacterial communities across the Thames basin exhibit an ecological succession along the river continuum, and that this is primarily driven by water residence time rather than the physico-chemical status of the river. PMID:25238398

  13. Beyond the dyadic perspective: 10 Reasons for using social network analysis in intergroup contact research.

    PubMed

    Wölfer, Ralf; Hewstone, Miles

    2017-03-23

    This article presents 10 reasons why social network analysis, a novel but still surprisingly underused approach in social psychology, can advance the analysis of intergroup contact. Although intergroup contact has been shown to improve intergroup relations, conventional methods leave some questions unanswered regarding the underlying social mechanisms that facilitate social cohesion between different groups in increasingly diverse societies. We will therefore explain the largely unknown conceptual and methodological advantages of social network analysis for studying intergroup contact in naturally existing groups, which are likely to help contact researchers to gain a better understanding of intergroup relations and guide attempts to overcome segregation, prejudice, discrimination, and intergroup conflict.

  14. Instrumenting Wildlife Water Developments to Measure Precipitation and Estimate Runoff in Remote Catchments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Nevada, available data on precipitation and runoff in remote catchments are extremely limited. The National Weather Service’s Cooperative Observer Network (COOP) includes 178 weather stations, most of which collect precipitation data and qualitative weather observations. Most of these stations ar...

  15. Using Wildlife Water Developments to Measure Precipitation and Estimate Runoff in Remote Catchments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Nevada, available data on precipitation and runoff in remote catchments is extremely limited. The National Weather Service’s Cooperative Observer Network (COOP) includes 178 weather stations, most of which collect precipitation data and qualitative weather observations. Most of these stations a...

  16. The hidden universal distribution of amino acid biosynthetic networks: a genomic perspective on their origins and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Montes, Georgina; Díaz-Mejía, J Javier; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Segovia, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Background Twenty amino acids comprise the universal building blocks of proteins. However, their biosynthetic routes do not appear to be universal from an Escherichia coli-centric perspective. Nevertheless, it is necessary to understand their origin and evolution in a global context, that is, to include more 'model' species and alternative routes in order to do so. We use a comparative genomics approach to assess the origins and evolution of alternative amino acid biosynthetic network branches. Results By tracking the taxonomic distribution of amino acid biosynthetic enzymes, we predicted a core of widely distributed network branches biosynthesizing at least 16 out of the 20 standard amino acids, suggesting that this core occurred in ancient cells, before the separation of the three cellular domains of life. Additionally, we detail the distribution of two types of alternative branches to this core: analogs, enzymes that catalyze the same reaction (using the same metabolites) and belong to different superfamilies; and 'alternologs', herein defined as branches that, proceeding via different metabolites, converge to the same end product. We suggest that the origin of alternative branches is closely related to different environmental metabolite sources and life-styles among species. Conclusion The multi-organismal seed strategy employed in this work improves the precision of dating and determining evolutionary relationships among amino acid biosynthetic branches. This strategy could be extended to diverse metabolic routes and even other biological processes. Additionally, we introduce the concept of 'alternolog', which not only plays an important role in the relationships between structure and function in biological networks, but also, as shown here, has strong implications for their evolution, almost equal to paralogy and analogy. PMID:18541022

  17. Virtual war, military revolutions, and networks: a guide through the concepts from an Australian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowley, Dean K.; Gaertner, Paul S.

    2003-07-01

    In this paper the argument is made that the offensive fire support organisation and doctrine, born of the "indirect fire revolution" of the first world war, is the start point for distributed sensors, shooters and deciders that may be transferred to a joint force; that the culture of directive control and mission orders developed by the German Army in 1918 and then adopted by most western armies is the start point for the culture required to achieve "self synchronisation" and that the network developed for the air defence of carrier battle groups is the start point for developing a networked ground manoeuvre force. We discuss the strategic expectations of network centric warfare, a "virtual war" scenario and the inherent vulnerabilities. The current level of understanding and implementation in specific areas is analysed and lessons for general application are developed and the potential payoff identified. Three broad operational domains are investigated, networked platform versus platform warfare between states, guerrilla/counter-insurfence operations and the emerging domain of "netwars" (terror organisations and criminal gangs).

  18. Creativity of Student Information System Projects: From the Perspective of Network Embeddedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Heng-Li; Cheng, Hsiu-Hua

    2010-01-01

    Many companies have pursued innovation to obtain a competitive edge. Thus, educational reform focuses mainly on training creative students. This study adopted the concept of an affiliated network of projects to investigate how project embeddedness influences project team creativity. This work surveys 60 projects in a Management Information Systems…

  19. Foregrounding the Role of Relationships in Reform: A Social Network Perspective on Leadership and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Yi-Hwa; Daly, Alan J.; Brown, Chris; del Fresno, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The role of relationships in the process of leadership and change is central, yet the social aspect of the work of reform is often background in favor of more technical approaches to improvement. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to argue that social network theory and analysis provides a useful theory and set of tools to unpack the…

  20. Culture, Role and Group Work: A Social Network Analysis Perspective on an Online Collaborative Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepanyan, Karen; Mather, Richard; Dalrymple, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the patterns of network dynamics within a multicultural online collaborative learning environment. It analyses the interaction of participants (both students and facilitators) within a discussion board that was established as part of a 3-month online collaborative course. The study employs longitudinal probabilistic social…

  1. Principal Perspectives on Social Networking and the Disruptive Effects of Cyberbullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welker, Heidi Stevenson

    2010-01-01

    Cyberbullying on social networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook has had negative effects on children at school. Cyberbullying disruption during the school day adds to the complexity of maintaining school operations, safety, and academic achievement. With the advancement of technology, there is a gap in the literature on the disruption in…

  2. Social Networking in an Intensive English Program Classroom: A Language Socialization Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Jonathon; Zander, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    This ongoing project seeks to investigate the impact, inside and outside of class, of instruction focused on developing learner awareness of social-networking site (SNS) use in an American Intensive English Program (IEP). With language socialization as an interpretative framework (Duff, in press; Ochs, 1988; Watson-Gegeo, 2004), the project uses a…

  3. Tutorial on neural network applications in high energy physics: A 1992 perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Denby, B.

    1992-04-01

    Feed forward and recurrent neural networks are introduced and related to standard data analysis tools. Tips are given on applications of neural nets to various areas of high energy physics. A review of applications within high energy physics and a summary of neural net hardware status are given.

  4. Magnets and Seekers: A Network Perspective on Academic Integration inside Two Residential Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    Residential learning communities aim to foster increased academic and social integration, ideally leading to greater student success. However, the concept of academic integration is often conceptualized and measured at the individual level, rather than the theoretically more consistent community level. Network analysis provides a paradigm and…

  5. Japanese Language Proficiency, Social Networking, and Language Use during Study Abroad: Learners' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewey, Dan P.; Bown, Jennifer; Eggett, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the self-perceived speaking proficiency development of 204 learners of Japanese who studied abroad in Japan and analyzes connections between self-reported social network development, language use, and speaking development. Learners perceived that they gained the most in areas associated with the intermediate and advanced levels…

  6. Getting Ideas into Action: Building Networked Improvement Communities in Education. Carnegie Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryk, Anthony S.; Gomez, Louis M.; Grunow, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    In this Carnegie essay by Anthony Bryk, Louis Gomez and Alicia Grunow, the authors argue that the social organization of the research enterprise is badly broken and a very different alternative is needed. They instead support a science of improvement research and introduce the idea of a networked improvement community that creates the purposeful…

  7. A diffusion perspective on temporal networks: A case study on a supermarket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shiguo; Qiu, Lu; Yang, Yue; Yang, Huijie

    2016-01-01

    From a large amount of records, one can extract behavioral characteristics of a social system at different scales. Theoretically, it can help us to know how the global behavior of a social system is formed from individual activities. Practically, it can be used to optimize and even to control the social system. Complicated relationships between the individuals form a network, which evolves with time. The behavior of the system can be accordingly understood in the framework of temporal network. In the present paper, instead of focusing on microscopic structures, we develop a framework to investigate temporal networks from the viewpoint of diffusion process, in which each snapshot network is divided into groups and the ID number of the group a node belongs to is used to measure its state. By this way trajectories of the nodes form an ensemble of realizations of a stochastic process. As an illustration, we investigate the diffusion behavior of a supermarket. One can find that with the increase of time the customers cluster and separate into different groups. Meanwhile, the system evolves in a significant order way, instead of a complete random one.

  8. Infotainment and road safety service support in vehicular networking: From a communication perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ho Ting; Shan, Hangguan; Zhuang, Weihua

    2011-08-01

    Vehicular ad hoc networking is an emerging technology for future on-the-road communications. Due to the virtue of vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications, vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) are expected to enable a plethora of communication-based automotive applications including diverse in-vehicle infotainment applications and road safety services. Even though vehicles are organized mostly in an ad hoc manner in the network topology, directly applying the existing communication approaches designed for traditional mobile ad hoc networks to large-scale VANETs with fast-moving vehicles can be ineffective and inefficient. To achieve success in a vehicular environment, VANET-specific communication solutions are imperative. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive overview of various radio channel access protocols and resource management approaches, and discuss their suitability for infotainment and safety service support in VANETs. Further, we present recent research activities and related projects on vehicular communications. Potential challenges and open research issues are also discussed.

  9. Social Networks and Workplace Risk: Classroom Scenarios from a U.S. and EU Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Perry; Mansfield, Nancy R.

    2013-01-01

    The explosion of social networks and the growing concern over privacy in the digital age--both in the United States and Europe--have provided an opportunity to introduce students to the legal risks of using social media in the workplace. This article builds on the authors' classroom experiences and provides social media scenarios and projects that…

  10. The Key Roles in the Informal Organization: A Network Analysis Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Toni, Alberto F.; Nonino, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the key roles embedded in the informal organizational structure (informal networks) and to outline their contribution in the companies' performance. A major objective of the research is to find and characterize a new key informal role that synthesises problem solving, expertise, and accessibility…

  11. Monitoring Scientific Developments from a Dynamic Perspective: Self-Organized Structuring To Map Neural Network Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noyons, E. C. M.; van Raan, A. F. J.

    1998-01-01

    Using bibliometric mapping techniques, authors developed a methodology of self-organized structuring of scientific fields which was applied to neural network research. Explores the evolution of a data generated field structure by monitoring the interrelationships between subfields, the internal structure of subfields, and the dynamic features of…

  12. The Flow of International Students from a Macro Perspective: A Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, George A.; Lee, Moosung; Jiang, Ke; Park, Han Woo

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a network analysis of the international flow of students among 210 countries and the factors determining the structure of this flow. Among these factors, bilateral hyperlink connections between countries and the number of telephone minutes (communication variables) are the most important predictors of the flow's structure,…

  13. Morphometric properties of the trans-Himalayan river catchments: Clues towards a relative chronology of orogen-wide drainage integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Sinha, Sayan; Misra, Arindam

    2015-03-01

    The geomorphological evolution of the Himalayan mountain belt both in terms of crustal deformation and concomitant erosion by surface processes has been suggested to have a profound influence on a number of earth system processes and has been extensively researched through a number of different techniques. The huge catchments of the trans-Himalayan rivers are the product of long-term fluvial erosion of the landscape. This work attempts to understand their evolution through a study of drainage network, morphology, and internal organization of the smaller watersheds nested within each catchment. Using morphometric techniques applied to an orogen-wide digital elevation data grid, we characterized the drainage network structure and catchment of all the 18 trans-Himalayan rivers situated between the exits of the Indus and Brahmaputra rivers and constructed rectangular approximations of the catchment geometries. With the help of catchment dimensions measured transverse and parallel to the strike of the orogen, and by analyzing the dimension and spatial dispositions of the rectangular approximations, we demonstrate that the trans-Himalayan catchment shapes cannot be explained only as a product of the headward enlargement of drainage networks on a topographic slope, or orogenic taper. Within individual catchments we identified the existence of drainage components (watersheds) that are organized in a systematic manner with respect to the first-order physiographic features of the Himalayas, formed at different periods of geological time. Each of them shows distinct morphometric characteristics that are indicative of differences in processes and / or time scale involved in their formation. The hypsometric properties of the watersheds occupying the upper part of the catchments suggest that they are the remnants of pre-orogenic drainage that became confined to the leeward side of the Himalayas before the advent of monsoon circulation. The shape and organization of the

  14. China’s landscape in oncology drug research: perspectives from research collaboration networks

    PubMed Central

    You, Han; Ni, Jingyun; Barber, Michael; Scherngell, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective Better understanding of China’s landscape in oncology drug research is of great significance for discovering anti-cancer drugs in future. This article differs from previous studies by focusing on Chinese oncology drug research communities in co-publication networks at the institutional level. Moreover, this research aims to explore structures and behaviors of relevant research units by thematic community analysis and to address policy recommendations. Methods This research used social network analysis to define an institutions network and to identify a community network which is characterized by thematic content. Results A total of 675 sample articles from 2008 through 2012 were retrieved from the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) database of Web of Science, and top institutions and institutional pairs are highlighted for further discussion. Meanwhile, this study revealed that institutions based in the Chinese mainland are located in a relatively central position, Taiwan’s institutions are closely assembled on the side, and Hong Kong’s units located in the middle of the Chinese mainland’s and Taiwan’s. Spatial division and institutional hierarchy are still critical barriers to research collaboration in the field of anti-cancer drugs in China. In addition, the communities focusing on hot research areas show the higher nodal degree, whereas communities giving more attention to rare research subjects are relatively marginalized to the periphery of network. Conclusions This paper offers policy recommendations to accelerate cross-regional cooperation, such as through developing information technology and increasing investment. The brokers should focus more on outreach to other institutions. Finally, participation in topics of common interest is conducive to improved efficiency in research and development (R&D) resource allocation. PMID:25937775

  15. Wireless in-situ Sensor Network for Agriculture and Water Monitoring on a River Basin Scale in Southern Finland: Evaluation from a Data User’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kotamäki, Niina; Thessler, Sirpa; Koskiaho, Jari; Hannukkala, Asko O.; Huitu, Hanna; Huttula, Timo; Havento, Jukka; Järvenpää, Markku

    2009-01-01

    Sensor networks are increasingly being implemented for environmental monitoring and agriculture to provide spatially accurate and continuous environmental information and (near) real-time applications. These networks provide a large amount of data which poses challenges for ensuring data quality and extracting relevant information. In the present paper we describe a river basin scale wireless sensor network for agriculture and water monitoring. The network, called SoilWeather, is unique and the first of this type in Finland. The performance of the network is assessed from the user and maintainer perspectives, concentrating on data quality, network maintenance and applications. The results showed that the SoilWeather network has been functioning in a relatively reliable way, but also that the maintenance and data quality assurance by automatic algorithms and calibration samples requires a lot of effort, especially in continuous water monitoring over large areas. We see great benefits on sensor networks enabling continuous, real-time monitoring, while data quality control and maintenance efforts highlight the need for tight collaboration between sensor and sensor network owners to decrease costs and increase the quality of the sensor data in large scale applications. PMID:22574050

  16. Does the simple dynamical systems approach provide useful information about catchment hydrological functioning in a Mediterranean context? Application to the Ardèche catchment (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovic, M.; Braud, I.; Branger, F.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2014-09-01

    This study explores how catchment heterogeneity and variability can be summarized in simplified models, representing the dominant hydrological processes. It focuses on Mediterranean catchments, characterized by heterogeneous geology, pedology, and land use, as well as steep topography and a rainfall regime in which summer droughts contrast with high-rainfall periods in autumn. The Ardèche catchment (south-east France), typical of this environment, is chosen to explore the following questions: (1) can such a Mediterranean catchment be adequately characterized by simple dynamical systems approach and what are the limits of the method under such conditions? (2) What information about dominant predictors of hydrological variability can be retrieved from this analysis in such catchments? In this work we apply the data-driven approach of Kirchner (WRR, 2009) to estimate discharge sensitivity functions that summarize the behavior of four sub-catchments of the Ardèche, using non-vegetation periods (November-March) from 9 years of data (2000-2008) from operational networks. The relevance of the inferred sensitivity function is assessed through hydrograph simulations, and through estimating precipitation rates from discharge fluctuations. We find that the discharge-sensitivity function is downward-curving in double-logarithmic space, thus allowing further simulation of discharge and non-divergence of the model, only during non-vegetation periods. The analysis is complemented by a Monte-Carlo sensitivity analysis showing how the parameters summarizing the discharge sensitivity function impact the simulated hydrographs. The resulting discharge simulation results are good for granite catchments, found to be predominantly characterized by saturation excess runoff and sub-surface flow processes. The simple dynamical system hypothesis works especially well in wet conditions (peaks and recessions are well modeled). On the other hand, poor model performance is associated with

  17. Home-Based Peer Social Networks of Young Children With Down Syndrome: A Developmental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Guralnick, Michael J.; Connor, Robert T.; Johnson, L. Clark

    2010-01-01

    Numerous dimensions of the peer social networks of children with Down syndrome were examined within a developmental framework. Results revealed that for many key measures, particularly involvement in play, linkages to other settings, and control of play, children with Down syndrome have less well-developed peer networks even in comparison to a mental age matched group of typically developing children. This suggests both an absence of any social advantage in the peer context for children with Down syndrome and the existence of unusual difficulties that may be traced to underlying problems in peer-related social competence. The need for future observational studies of peer interactions for this group of children was emphasized. PMID:19928016

  18. Data governance requirements for distributed clinical research networks: triangulating perspectives of diverse stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Kim, Katherine K; Browe, Dennis K; Logan, Holly C; Holm, Roberta; Hack, Lori; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2014-01-01

    There is currently limited information on best practices for the development of governance requirements for distributed research networks (DRNs), an emerging model that promotes clinical data reuse and improves timeliness of comparative effectiveness research. Much of the existing information is based on a single type of stakeholder such as researchers or administrators. This paper reports on a triangulated approach to developing DRN data governance requirements based on a combination of policy analysis with experts, interviews with institutional leaders, and patient focus groups. This approach is illustrated with an example from the Scalable National Network for Effectiveness Research, which resulted in 91 requirements. These requirements were analyzed against the Fair Information Practice Principles (FIPPs) and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) protected versus non-protected health information. The requirements addressed all FIPPs, showing how a DRN's technical infrastructure is able to fulfill HIPAA regulations, protect privacy, and provide a trustworthy platform for research.

  19. Interprofessional Student Perspectives of Online Social Networks in Health and Business Education.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Glynda; Jones, Cyri; Currie, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    The education sector is experiencing unprecedented change with the increasing use by students of mobile devices, social networks and e-portfolios as they prepare for future positions in the workforce. The purpose of this study was to examine student's preferences around these technologies. A mixed methods research strategy was used with an initial online survey using 29 Likert scale style questions to students from the School of Health Sciences and the School of Business at the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT). Descriptive statistics and ANOVAs were performed to examine if there were any differences between groups regarding their overall responses to the survey questions. Content analysis was used for qualitative focus group data. Overall, students (n = 260) were enthusiastic about technology but wary of cost, lack of choice, increased workload and faculty involvement in their online social networks. Of note, students see significant value in face-to-face classroom time.

  20. Data governance requirements for distributed clinical research networks: triangulating perspectives of diverse stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Katherine K; Browe, Dennis K; Logan, Holly C; Holm, Roberta; Hack, Lori; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2014-01-01

    There is currently limited information on best practices for the development of governance requirements for distributed research networks (DRNs), an emerging model that promotes clinical data reuse and improves timeliness of comparative effectiveness research. Much of the existing information is based on a single type of stakeholder such as researchers or administrators. This paper reports on a triangulated approach to developing DRN data governance requirements based on a combination of policy analysis with experts, interviews with institutional leaders, and patient focus groups. This approach is illustrated with an example from the Scalable National Network for Effectiveness Research, which resulted in 91 requirements. These requirements were analyzed against the Fair Information Practice Principles (FIPPs) and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) protected versus non-protected health information. The requirements addressed all FIPPs, showing how a DRN's technical infrastructure is able to fulfill HIPAA regulations, protect privacy, and provide a trustworthy platform for research. PMID:24302285

  1. The impact of information technology and networks: new perspectives for scientific, technical and medical (STM) publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Kemp, Arnoud

    This contribution is a strongly abbreviated notation of a much longer presentation at the Workshop on Strategies and Techniques of Information for Astronomy, organized by the European Science Foundation in Strasbourg on 21/22 June 1996. The process of publishing will undergo dramatic changes due to the influences of information technology and networks. The publishing business as a whole will shift from traditional print- and paper-based organisations to a fully digital workflow from author to end-user. Electronic publishing has moved from pre-print activities to digital preprints on a variety of servers, but still most scientific documentation is printed and not only for archival purposes. In this short contribution, a plea is made for new rules in scientific communication that authors, editors, publishers, societies, libraries and users can recognize. In addition, in the electronic age we need more security for copyright, transactions over networks and against misuse in general.

  2. Anthropogenic impacts on tropical forest biodiversity: a network structure and ecosystem functioning perspective.

    PubMed

    Morris, Rebecca J

    2010-11-27

    Huge areas of diverse tropical forest are lost or degraded every year with dramatic consequences for biodiversity. Deforestation and fragmentation, over-exploitation, invasive species and climate change are the main drivers of tropical forest biodiversity loss. Most studies investigating these threats have focused on changes in species richness or species diversity. However, if we are to understand the absolute and long-term effects of anthropogenic impacts on tropical forests, we should also consider the interactions between species, how those species are organized in networks, and the function that those species perform. I discuss our current knowledge of network structure and ecosystem functioning, highlighting empirical examples of their response to anthropogenic impacts. I consider the future prospects for tropical forest biodiversity, focusing on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in secondary forest. Finally, I propose directions for future research to help us better understand the effects of anthropogenic impacts on tropical forest biodiversity.

  3. Anthropogenic impacts on tropical forest biodiversity: a network structure and ecosystem functioning perspective

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Rebecca J.

    2010-01-01

    Huge areas of diverse tropical forest are lost or degraded every year with dramatic consequences for biodiversity. Deforestation and fragmentation, over-exploitation, invasive species and climate change are the main drivers of tropical forest biodiversity loss. Most studies investigating these threats have focused on changes in species richness or species diversity. However, if we are to understand the absolute and long-term effects of anthropogenic impacts on tropical forests, we should also consider the interactions between species, how those species are organized in networks, and the function that those species perform. I discuss our current knowledge of network structure and ecosystem functioning, highlighting empirical examples of their response to anthropogenic impacts. I consider the future prospects for tropical forest biodiversity, focusing on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in secondary forest. Finally, I propose directions for future research to help us better understand the effects of anthropogenic impacts on tropical forest biodiversity. PMID:20980318

  4. Home-based peer social networks of young children with Down syndrome: a developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Guralnick, Michael J; Connor, Robert T; Johnson, L Clark

    2009-09-01

    Numerous dimensions of the peer social networks of children with Down syndrome were examined within a developmental framework. Results revealed that for many key measures, particularly involvement in play, linkages to other settings, and control of play, children with Down syndrome have less well-developed peer networks even in comparison to a mental age matched group of typically developing children. This suggests both an absence of any social advantage in the peer context for children with Down syndrome and the existence of unusual difficulties that may be traced to underlying problems in peer-related social competence. The need for future observational studies of peer interactions for this group of children was emphasized.

  5. Resolving protein structure-function-binding site relationships from a binding site similarity network perspective.

    PubMed

    Mudgal, Richa; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2017-03-25

    Functional annotation is seldom straightforward with complexities arising due to functional divergence in protein families or functional convergence between non-homologous protein families, leading to mis-annotations. An enzyme may contain multiple domains and not all domains may be involved in a given function, adding to the complexity in function annotation. To address this, we use binding site information from bound cognate ligands and catalytic residues, since it can help in resolving fold-function relationships at a finer level and with higher confidence. A comprehensive database of 2,020 fold-function-binding site relationships has been systematically generated. A network-based approach is employed to capture the complexity in these relationships, from which different types of associations are deciphered, that identify versatile protein folds performing diverse functions, same function associated with multiple folds and one-to-one relationships. Binding site similarity networks integrated with fold, function and ligand similarity information are generated to understand the depth of these relationships. Apart from the observed continuity in the functional site space, network properties of these revealed versatile families with topologically different or dissimilar binding sites and structural families that perform very similar functions. As a case study, subtle changes in the active site of a set of evolutionarily related superfamilies are studied using these networks. Tracing of such similarities in evolutionarily related proteins provide clues into the transition and evolution of protein functions. Insights from this study will be helpful in accurate and reliable functional annotations of uncharacterized proteins, poly-pharmacology and designing enzymes with new functional capabilities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Teams, strategies and networks: developments in nutritional support; a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Powell-Tuck, J

    2009-08-01

    Chris Pennington was an archetypal team player, strategist and networker. Clinical nutritional support has progressed remarkably since the 1970s and it has been a privilege to work in this field over this period during which teamwork, strategy development and networking have been crucial. British experience has been characterised by groups of individuals of differing professions and specialties coming together to enable progress to be made. This approach was initially in the form of nutrition support teams orientated to patient-centred ward-based care, then as hospital strategic committees and the concept of the 'patient journey'. Indeed, the formation of the British Association for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (now known as BAPEN) in 1992 required the statesmanlike burying of jealousies as societies came together into a multiprofessional association. With the understanding that disease-related malnutrition was highly prevalent it became apparent that it must be managed on a broad and organised clinical front. In the Organisation of Food and Nutritional Support in Hospitals a group of professionals developed for BAPEN concepts of hospital-wide organisation to tackle malnutrition that were based on previous reports, both national and international, and were made easily accessible from the BAPEN website, especially the 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool' and the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence nutrition guidelines. The coming together of six national clinical societies to develop evidence-based consensus guidelines for intravenous saline therapy (also on the BAPEN website) has shown that BAPEN can catalyse opinion well beyond its own nutritional constituency. In England Chris Pennington's Scottish lead is being followed by developing a patient-centred strategic framework for a managed home parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure national network. In research, education or clinical practice the engines of progress have been teams

  7. European Competence Network on Mastocytosis (ECNM): 10-year jubilee, update, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Arock, Michel; Bonadonna, Patrizia; Brockow, Knut; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Escribano, Luis; Gleixner, Karoline V; Grattan, Clive; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Hägglund, Hans; Hermine, Olivier; Horny, Hans-Peter; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C; Maurer, Marcus; Niedoszytko, Marek; Nedoszytko, Boguslaw; Nilsson, Gunnar; Oude-Elberink, Hanneke N G; Orfao, Alberto; Radia, Deepti; Reiter, Andreas; Siebenhaar, Frank; Sotlar, Karl; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Triggiani, Massimo; VanDoormaal, Jaap J; Várkonyi, Judit; Yavuz, Selim; Hartmann, Karin

    2012-12-01

    The European Competence Network on Mastocytosis (ECNM) was initiated in 2002 as a multidisciplinary and multinational cooperative approach to increase awareness and to improve diagnosis and therapy of mastocytosis. The network is composed of local centers, physicians, and scientists who have dedicated their work to patients with mastocytosis. A strategic goal of the ECNM is to provide the best available information about the disease to patients and physicians. During the past 10 years, the ECNM has expanded to various countries and contributed successfully to the development of markers, definitions, and standards in the field of mastocytosis. Members of the ECNM organized Annual Meetings in Europe and two Working Conferences on Mastocytosis in Vienna (in 2005 and 2010), and initiated and supported several preclinical and clinical trials. In all these activities, representatives of the ECNM cooperate closely with their US colleagues, with patient-organizations in Europe and in the USA, and with other scientific networks. The ECNM also launched a mastocytosis registry that has been activated in 2012. Using the central database of this registry, cooperative multicenter studies, which should include sufficient numbers of patients and robust evaluations, will be conducted. These studies will increase our knowledge about optimal management and therapy of patients with mastocytosis in the future.

  8. Trade integration and trade imbalances in the European Union: a network perspective.

    PubMed

    Krings, Gautier M; Carpantier, Jean-François; Delvenne, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    We study the ever more integrated and ever more unbalanced trade relationships between European countries. To better capture the complexity of economic networks, we propose two global measures that assess the trade integration and the trade imbalances of the European countries. These measures are the network (or indirect) counterparts to traditional (or direct) measures such as the trade-to-GDP (Gross Domestic Product) and trade deficit-to-GDP ratios. Our indirect tools account for the European inter-country trade structure and follow (i) a decomposition of the global trade flow into elementary flows that highlight the long-range dependencies between exporting and importing economies and (ii) the commute-time distance for trade integration, which measures the impact of a perturbation in the economy of a country on another country, possibly through intermediate partners by domino effect. Our application addresses the impact of the launch of the Euro. We find that the indirect imbalance measures better identify the countries ultimately bearing deficits and surpluses, by neutralizing the impact of trade transit countries, such as the Netherlands. Among others, we find that ultimate surpluses of Germany are quite concentrated in only three partners. We also show that for some countries, the direct and indirect measures of trade integration diverge, thereby revealing that these countries (e.g. Greece and Portugal) trade to a smaller extent with countries considered as central in the European Union network.

  9. Trade Integration and Trade Imbalances in the European Union: A Network Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Krings, Gautier M.; Carpantier, Jean-François; Delvenne, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    We study the ever more integrated and ever more unbalanced trade relationships between European countries. To better capture the complexity of economic networks, we propose two global measures that assess the trade integration and the trade imbalances of the European countries. These measures are the network (or indirect) counterparts to traditional (or direct) measures such as the trade-to-GDP (Gross Domestic Product) and trade deficit-to-GDP ratios. Our indirect tools account for the European inter-country trade structure and follow (i) a decomposition of the global trade flow into elementary flows that highlight the long-range dependencies between exporting and importing economies and (ii) the commute-time distance for trade integration, which measures the impact of a perturbation in the economy of a country on another country, possibly through intermediate partners by domino effect. Our application addresses the impact of the launch of the Euro. We find that the indirect imbalance measures better identify the countries ultimately bearing deficits and surpluses, by neutralizing the impact of trade transit countries, such as the Netherlands. Among others, we find that ultimate surpluses of Germany are quite concentrated in only three partners. We also show that for some countries, the direct and indirect measures of trade integration diverge, thereby revealing that these countries (e.g. Greece and Portugal) trade to a smaller extent with countries considered as central in the European Union network. PMID:24465381

  10. Words Analysis of Online Chinese News Headlines about Trending Events: A Complex Network Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huajiao; Fang, Wei; An, Haizhong; Huang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Because the volume of information available online is growing at breakneck speed, keeping up with meaning and information communicated by the media and netizens is a new challenge both for scholars and for companies who must address public relations crises. Most current theories and tools are directed at identifying one website or one piece of online news and do not attempt to develop a rapid understanding of all websites and all news covering one topic. This paper represents an effort to integrate statistics, word segmentation, complex networks and visualization to analyze headlines’ keywords and words relationships in online Chinese news using two samples: the 2011 Bohai Bay oil spill and the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. We gathered all the news headlines concerning the two trending events in the search results from Baidu, the most popular Chinese search engine. We used Simple Chinese Word Segmentation to segment all the headlines into words and then took words as nodes and considered adjacent relations as edges to construct word networks both using the whole sample and at the monthly level. Finally, we develop an integrated mechanism to analyze the features of words’ networks based on news headlines that can account for all the keywords in the news about a particular event and therefore track the evolution of news deeply and rapidly. PMID:25807376

  11. Words analysis of online Chinese news headlines about trending events: a complex network perspective.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajiao; Fang, Wei; An, Haizhong; Huang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Because the volume of information available online is growing at breakneck speed, keeping up with meaning and information communicated by the media and netizens is a new challenge both for scholars and for companies who must address public relations crises. Most current theories and tools are directed at identifying one website or one piece of online news and do not attempt to develop a rapid understanding of all websites and all news covering one topic. This paper represents an effort to integrate statistics, word segmentation, complex networks and visualization to analyze headlines' keywords and words relationships in online Chinese news using two samples: the 2011 Bohai Bay oil spill and the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. We gathered all the news headlines concerning the two trending events in the search results from Baidu, the most popular Chinese search engine. We used Simple Chinese Word Segmentation to segment all the headlines into words and then took words as nodes and considered adjacent relations as edges to construct word networks both using the whole sample and at the monthly level. Finally, we develop an integrated mechanism to analyze the features of words' networks based on news headlines that can account for all the keywords in the news about a particular event and therefore track the evolution of news deeply and rapidly.

  12. Perspectives of probabilistic inferences: Reinforcement learning and an adaptive network compared.

    PubMed

    Rieskamp, Jörg

    2006-11-01

    The assumption that people possess a strategy repertoire for inferences has been raised repeatedly. The strategy selection learning theory specifies how people select strategies from this repertoire. The theory assumes that individuals select strategies proportional to their subjective expectations of how well the strategies solve particular problems; such expectations are assumed to be updated by reinforcement learning. The theory is compared with an adaptive network model that assumes people make inferences by integrating information according to a connectionist network. The network's weights are modified by error correction learning. The theories were tested against each other in 2 experimental studies. Study 1 showed that people substantially improved their inferences through feedback, which was appropriately predicted by the strategy selection learning theory. Study 2 examined a dynamic environment in which the strategies' performances changed. In this situation a quick adaptation to the new situation was not observed; rather, individuals got stuck on the strategy they had successfully applied previously. This "inertia effect" was most strongly predicted by the strategy selection learning theory.

  13. [Science, charity, and social networks: Hospício de Pedro II from different perspectives].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniele Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of an effort to compile the analyses made for my master's dissertation from 2012. It contains new perspectives on Hospício de Pedro II (Pedro II Hospice) between 1883 and 1889, drawing on research of admissions records and files of patients staying at the institution, founded in 1852 in Rio de Janeiro. The involvement of different players and the interplay of different interests and demands with regard to the hospice are highlighted. It is important to expand the debate concerning the institution beyond medical and scientific aspects, considering its importance both as a charity and for its key role in the political and social relations of the empire.

  14. The Role of Geoethics in Geohazards Mitigation: A YES Network Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    wang, Meng; Barich, Amel; Peppoloni, Silvia

    2013-04-01

    The YES Network is an international group of early career geoscientists from universities, geosciences organizations and companies, with over 3000 members from 121 countries. It has been founded in 2008 during the International Year of Planet Earth with the vision of "Promoting the Geosciences for Society". Until now, 42 National Chapters have been set up. The YES Network aims to build communication bridges between geologists, Policy makers, and Society in order to develop Geological Projects for sustainable development, international scientific collaborations, to bridge the ages between the geoscientists' generations, promote equity in the professional development of young and early career earth-scientists, etc. Concerning the Geoethics field, recently introduced into the Geosciences domain, the YES Network would like to raise the following ideas: The L'Aquila trial is a case for geoscientists to think about their freedom on research, their responsibility toward the society and their relationship with the public policy and medias. These points are crucial for the professional development of the young and early-career earth-scientists around the world. The YES Network is, therefore, setting up an open forum to collect ideas from all young and early-career scientists around the world on this topic in order to spread awareness among this growing part of the scientific community and help them act like an efficient part of it. There have been for a long time many debates about natural hazards both at regional and global level. It is the duty of the scientific community with the collaboration of policy makers to help mitigate the consequences of the natural disasters around the world. The YES Network is currently developing projects about these issues notably about in coastal Countries including geological mapping, Geohazards Reduction Scenarios, teaching programs for local populations. Earth sciences Education is slowing down in developed countries and growing very

  15. Catchments as heterogeneous and multi-species reactors: An integral approach for identifying biogeochemical hot-spots at the catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyer, Christina; Peiffer, Stefan; Schulze, Kerstin; Borken, Werner; Lischeid, Gunnar

    2014-11-01

    From a biogeochemical perspective, catchments can be regarded as reactors that transform the input of various substances via precipitation or deposition as they pass through soils and aquifers towards draining streams. Understanding and modeling the variability of solute concentrations in catchment waters require the identification of the prevailing processes, determining their respective contribution to the observed transformation of substances, and the localization of "hot spots", that is, the most reactive areas of catchments. For this study, we applied a non-linear variant of the Principle Component Analysis, the Isometric Feature Mapping (Isomap), to a data set composed of 1686 soil solution, groundwater and stream water samples and 16 variables (Al, Ca, Cl, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, NH4, NO3, SO4, total S, Si, DOC, electric conductivity and pH values) from the Lehstenbach catchment in Germany. The aim was (i) to assess the contribution of the prevailing biogeochemical processes to the variability of solute concentrations in water samples taken from soils, in groundwater and in stream water in a catchment and (ii) to identify hot spots at the catchment scale with respect to 16 solutes along different flow paths. The first three dimensions of the Isomap analysis explained 48%, 30% and 11%, respectively, i.e. 89% of the variance in the data set. Scores of the first three dimensions could be ascribed to three predominating bundles of biogeochemical processes: (i) redox processes, (ii) acid-induced podzolization, and (iii) weathering processes. In general, the upper 1 m topsoil layer could be considered as hot spots along flow paths from upslope soils and in the wetland, although with varying extents for the different prevailing biogeochemical processes. Nearly 67% and 97% of the variance with respect to redox processes and acid induced podzolization could be traced back to hot spots, respectively, representing less than 2% of the total spatial volume of the catchment

  16. Improved understanding and prediction of the hydrologic response of highly urbanized catchments through development of the Illinois Urban Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantone, Joshua; Schmidt, Arthur

    2011-08-01

    What happens to the rain in highly urbanized catchments? That is the question that urban hydrologists must ask themselves when trying to integrate the hydrologic and hydraulic processes that affect the hydrologic response of urban catchments. The Illinois Urban Hydrologic Model (IUHM) has been developed to help answer this question and improve understanding and prediction of hydrologic response in highly urbanized catchments. Urban catchments are significantly different than natural watersheds, but there are similarities that allow features of the pioneering geomorphologic instantaneous unit hydrograph concept developed for natural watersheds to be adapted to the urban setting. This probabilistically based approach is a marked departure from the traditional deterministic models used to design and simulate urban sewer systems and does not have the burdensome input data requirements that detailed deterministic models possess. Application of IUHM to the CDS-51 catchment located in the village of Dolton, Illinois, highlights the model's ability to predict the hydrologic response of the catchment as well as the widely accepted SWMM model and is in accordance with observed data recorded by the United States Geological Survey. In addition, the unique structure and organization of urban sewer networks make it possible to characterize a set of ratios for urban catchments that allow IUHM to be applied when detailed input data are not available.

  17. The reorganization of motor network in hemidystonia from the perspective of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Victoria; Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Cif, Laura; van Dokkum, Liesjet E H; Laffont, Isabelle; Bonafé, Alain; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Zanca, Michel; Coubes, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Hemidystonia is usually 'secondary' to structural lesions within the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic or the cerebello-thalamo-cortical loops. Globus pallidus internus Deep Brain Stimulation (GPi DBS) is a validated technique in the treatment of primary dystonia and still under assessment for secondary dystonia. Results of DBS in hemidystonia are limited and heterogeneous. Further knowledge concerning motor network organization after focal brain lesions might contribute to the understanding of this mitigated response to DBS and to the refinement of DBS indications and techniques in secondary dystonia. This study aimed to identify movement-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation patterns in a group of hemidystonic patients in comparison to healthy controls (HC). Further analysis assessed recruitment pattern in different patient subgroups defined according to clinical and radiological criteria relevant to GPi DBS eligibility (hyperkinetic/hypokinetic and prepallidal/postpallidal). Eleven patients and nine HC underwent fMRI with a block-design alternating active and rest conditions. The motor paradigm consisted of self-paced elbow flexion-extension movements. The main results were as follows: single-subject studies revealed several activation patterns involving motor-related network regions; both ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres showed abnormal patterns of activity; compared with HC, hemidystonic patients showed decreased brain activity in ipsilesional thalamus, pallidal and temporal areas during affected arm task execution; 'hypokinetic' subgroup was commonly related to widespread bilateral overactivity. This study provides additional arguments for case-by-case assessment of DBS surgery indication and target selection in hemidystonia. Single-lead approach might be unable to modulate a highly disorganized network activity in certain patients with this clinical syndrome.

  18. Auxin crosstalk to plant immune networks: a plant-pathogen interaction perspective.

    PubMed

    Naseem, Muhammad; Srivastava, Mugdha; Tehseen, Muhammad; Ahmed, Nazeer

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin regulates a whole repertoire of plant growth and development. Many plant-associated microorganisms, by virtue of their auxin production capability, mediate phytostimulation effects on plants. Recent studies, however, demonstrate diverse mechanisms whereby plant pathogens manipulate auxin biosynthesis, signaling and transport pathways to promote host susceptibility. Auxin responses have been coupled to their antagonistic and synergistic interactions with salicylic acid and jasmonate mediated defenses, respectively. Here, we discuss that a better understanding of auxin crosstalk to plant immune networks would enable us to engineer crop plants with higher protection and low unintended yield losses.

  19. Plot and Catchment Scale Hydrological Impacts of Agricultural Field Boundary Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Victoria; Pattison, Ian

    2015-04-01

    Natural flood management aims to reduce downstream flow levels by delaying the movement of water through a catchment and increasing the amount of soil infiltration. Field boundary features such as hedgerows and dry stone walls are common features in the rural landscape. It is hypothesised that there presence could reduce runoff connectivity and change the soil moisture levels by altering the soil structure and porosity. The use of larger agricultural machinery has resulted in the removal of field boundaries and the subsequent increase in field sizes over the 20th Century. This change in the rural landscape is likely to have changed the partitioning of rainfall into runoff and the hydrological pathways throughout the catchment. However, the link between field boundaries and catchment scale flood risk has not yet been proven. We aim to address this need for evidence to support natural flood management by focussing on these widespread features in the rural landscape. Firstly, we quantify the change in the density of field boundaries over the past 120 years for the Skell catchment, Northern England using historical OS maps. The analysis has shown that field size has approximately doubled in the Skell catchment since 1892, due to the removal of field boundaries. Secondly, we assess the effect of field boundaries on local soil characteristics and hydrological processes through plot scale continuous monitoring of the hydrological processes along a 20m transect through the linear boundary features. For the summer period results show that soil moisture levels are lower immediately next to the hedgerow compared to distances greater than 1m from the hedgerow. Finally, we use this data to parameterise and validate a catchment scale hydrological model. The model is then applied to test the impact of a network of field boundaries on river flow extremes at the catchment scale.

  20. Relict rock glaciers as groundwater storage in alpine catchments - the example of the Seckauer Tauern Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Thomas; Pauritsch, Marcus; Winkler, Gerfried

    2015-04-01

    Debris accumulations like relict rock glaciers (RRG) might act as groundwater storages in alpine catchments influencing the discharge dynamics of mountain streams. The degree of influence is related to the hydrometeorological conditions and changes seasonally. Especially during drought and flood events, the storage/buffer abilities of RRGs have an impact on the downstream river network. Stream flow could be assured during low flow periods and peak flows might be dampened during storm events. The assessment of the impact is investigated in the Seckauer Tauern Range, the easternmost subunit of the Niedere Tauern Range. In more detail, the discharge of a spring (Schöneben spring) emerging at the front of a RRG draining a catchment of 0.67 km² and discharges at gauging stations Finsterliesing and Unterwald further downstream with areal extents of 7.26 and 44.10 km² respectively are used as input for a lumped-parameter rainfall-runoff model, a modified version of the GR4J (Perrin et al., 2003). The Schöneben spring is 100% influenced by the RRG groundwater storage, as the whole catchment drains through the RRG. The flow dynamics of the other catchments are influenced only partially by RRGs with 15 and 12% as only headwater sections of it are drained by RRGs. The areal extend of the RRG (sub-) catchments, vegetation, debris in general and bare rock are compared to the storage parameters (routing and production store) of the rainfall-runoff model. As such, the influence of RRGs can be identified even in the overall catchment. It can be concluded that RRGs, due to their storage and buffer capabilities and abundance in the Seckauer Tauern Range are important for stream basin management and as a water resource for the sensitive ecosystem in alpine catchments. References: Perrin, C., Michel, C., Andréassian, V. (2003): Improvement of a parsimonious model for streamflow simulation. Journal of Hydrology 279, 275-289.

  1. Applying different spatial distribution and modelling concepts in three nested mesoscale catchments of Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongartz, K.

    Distributed, physically based river basin models are receiving increasing importance in integrated water resources management (IWRM) in Germany and in Europe, especially after the release of the new European Water Framework Directive (WFD). Applications in mesoscale catchments require an appropriate approach to represent the spatial distribution of related catchment properties such as land use, soil physics and topography by utilizing techniques of remote sensing and GIS analyses. The challenge is to delineate scale independent homogeneous modelling entities which, on the one hand may represent the dynamics of the dominant hydrological processes and, on the other hand can be derived from spatially distributed physiographical catchment properties. This scaling problem is tackled in this regional modelling study by applying the concept of hydrological response units (HRUs). In a nested catchment approach three different modelling conceptualisations are used to describe the runoff processes: (i) the topographic stream-segment-based HRU delineation proposed by Leavesley et al. [Precipitation-Runoff-Modelling-System, User’s Manual, Water Resource Investigations Report 83-4238, US Geological Survey, 1983]; (ii) the process based physiographic HRU-concept introduced by Flügel [Hydrol. Process. 9 (1995) 423] and (iii) an advanced HRU-concept adapted from (ii), which included the topographic topology of HRU-areas and the river network developed by Staudenraush [Eco Regio 8 (2000) 121]. The influence of different boundary conditions associated with changing the landuse classes, the temporal data resolution and the landuse scenarios were investigated. The mesoscale catchment of the river Ilm ( A∼895 km 2) in Thuringia, Germany, and the Precipitation-Runoff-Modelling-System (PRMS) were selected for this study. Simulations show that the physiographic based concept is a reliable method for modelling basin dynamics in catchments up to 200 km 2 whereas in larger catchments

  2. Linking the field to the stream: soil erosion and sediment yield in a rural catchment, NW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Blanco, M. L.; Taboada-Castro, M. M.; Palleiro-Suarez, L.; Taboada-Castro, M. T.

    2009-04-01

    Quantifying the linkages between field erosion, fluvial response and catchment sediment yield remains problematic, among other reasons, because of the re-deposition of eroded sediment within the catchment, which is controlled by the spatial organization of the land use and the connectivity between sediment sources and the stream network. This paper presents the results of an integrated study that considered the relationship between erosion and stream sediment yield in an agroforestry catchment (16 km2) in NW Spain. The geology consists of basic metamorphic schist. The relieve of the area is steeper, the mean slope is approximately 19%. Main soil types are classified as Umbrisol and Cambisol. Soils are acidic and rich in organic matter. The soil texture is silt and silt-loam. Land cover consists of a mixture of forest (65%) and agricultural fields (mainly grassland, pasture and maize). The study combined measurements of soil erosion by concentrate flow and sediment deposition at field scale with sediment yield measured at the catchment outlet. The hydrological data and water samples were obtained at the catchment outlet. Stream water level was monitored continuously and converted to discharge using a rating curve. The sampling for suspended sediments was supplemented by an automatic sampler. Suspended sediment load was calculated from the suspended sediment concentrations and discharge data. Eroded volume was calculated from cross-sections (measured at specific points, where the section changed abruptly) and length of the channel segments. The total sediment delivered to stream was determined as the difference between all erosion features (rills and gullies) and the sediment volumes that were deposited on the fields. The results showed that in the catchment during the period winter 2007/08 soil erosion by concentrate flow, i.e. rills and ephemeral gullies, occurred on unprotected crop field. Erosion by concentrate flow was highly discontinuous within the catchment

  3. Hydrogeomorphological and water quality impacts of oil palm conversion and logging in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo: a multi-catchment approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Rory; Nainar, Anand; Bidin, Kawi; Higton, Sam; Annammala, Kogilavani; Blake, William; Luke, Sarah; Murphy, Laura; Perryman, Emily; Wall, Katy; Hanapi, Jamil

    2016-04-01

    The last three decades have seen a combination of logging and land-use change across most of the rainforest tropics. This has involved conversion to oil palm across large parts of SE Asia. Although much is now known about the hydrological and sediment transport impacts of logging, relatively little is known about how impacts of oil palm conversion compare with those of logging. Furthermore little is known about the impacts of both on river morphology and water quality. This paper reports some findings of the first phase of a ten-year large-scale manipulative multi-catchment experiment (part of the SAFE - Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems - Project), based in the upper part of the Brantian Catchment in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo; the project is designed to assess the degree to which adverse impacts of oil palm conversion (on erosion, downstream channel change, water quality and river ecology) might be reduced by retaining buffer zones of riparian forest of varying width from zero to 120 metres. Ten 2 km2 catchments of contrasting land use history have been instrumented since 2011 to record discharge, turbidity, conductivity and water temperature at 5-minute intervals. These comprise 6 repeat-logged catchments being subjected in 2015-16 to conversion to oil palm with varying riparian forest widths; a repeat-logged 'control' catchment; an old regrowth catchment; an oil palm catchment; and a primary forest catchment. In addition, (1) monthly water samples from the catchments have been analysed for nitrates and phosphates, (2) channel cross-sectional change along each stream has been monitored at six-monthly intervals and (3) supplementary surveys have been made of downstream bankfull channel cross-sectional size and water chemistry at a wider range of catchment sites, and (4) sediment cores have been taken and contemporary deposition monitored at a hierarchical network of sites in the large Brantian catchment for geochemical analysis and dating to establish the

  4. Natural flood risk management in flashy headwater catchments: managing runoff peaks, timing, water quality and sediment regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Addy, Steve; Ghimire, Sohan; Kenyon, Wendy; Nicholson, Alex; Quinn, Paul; Stutter, Marc; Watson, Helen

    2013-04-01

    catchments are known for their rapid runoff generation and have downstream local communities at risk of flash flooding. In Bowmont, NFM measures are currently being put in place to restore river bars and to store water more effectively on the flood plains during these flashy events. For example, Apex engineered wood structure in the river channel and riparian zones are designed to trap sediment and log bank protection structures are being installed to stop bank erosion. Tree planting in the catchment is also taking place. In the Belford catchment storage ponds and woody debris have been installed over the past five years to help to reduce the flood risk to the village of Belford. A dense instrumentation network has provided data for analysis and modelling which shows evidence of local scale flood peak reductions along with the collection of large amounts of sediment. A modelling study carried out (using a pond network model) during an intense summer storm showed that 30 small scale pond features used in sequence could reduce the flood peak by ~35% at the local scale. Findings show that managing surface runoff and local ditch flow at local scale headwater catchments is a cost effective way of managing flashy catchment for flood risk and sediment control. Working with catchment stakeholders is vital. Information given by the local community post flooding has been useful in placing NFM measures throughout the catchments. Involving the local communities in these projects and giving them access to the data and model outputs has helped to develop these projects further.

  5. A review of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder from the perspective of brain networks.

    PubMed

    De La Fuente, Angelica; Xia, Shugao; Branch, Craig; Li, Xiaobo

    2013-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorder in childhood, which affects more than 5% of the population worldwide. ADHD is characterized by developmentally inappropriate behaviors of inattention, and/or impulsivity and hyperactivity. These behavioral manifestations contribute to diminished academic, occupational and social functioning, and have neurobiological bases. Neuronal deficits, especially in the attention and executive function processing networks, have been implicated in both children and adults with ADHD by using sophisticated structural and functional neuroimaging approaches. These structural and functional abnormalities in the brain networks have been associated with the impaired cognitive, affective, and motor behaviors seen in the disorder. The goal of this review is to summarize and integrate emerging themes from the existing neuroimaging connectivity studies based on advanced imaging techniques, applied in data of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional MRI (fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging, electroencephalography and event related potential; and to discuss the results of these studies when considering future directions for understanding pathophysiological mechanisms and developmental trajectories of the behavioral manifestations in ADHD. We conclude this review by suggesting that future research should put more effort on understanding the roles of the subcortical structures and their structural/functional pathways in ADHD.

  6. Artificial Neural Networks and risk stratification models in Emergency Departments: The policy maker's perspective.

    PubMed

    Casagranda, Ivo; Costantino, Giorgio; Falavigna, Greta; Furlan, Raffaello; Ippoliti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of Emergency Department (ED) physicians is to discriminate between individuals at low risk, who can be safely discharged, and patients at high risk, who require prompt hospitalization. The problem of correctly classifying patients is an issue involving not only clinical but also managerial aspects, since reducing the rate of admission of patients to EDs could dramatically cut costs. Nevertheless, a trade-off might arise due to the need to find a balance between economic interests and the health conditions of patients. This work considers patients in EDs after a syncope event and presents a comparative analysis between two models: a multivariate logistic regression model, as proposed by the scientific community to stratify the expected risk of severe outcomes in the short and long run, and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), an innovative model. The analysis highlights differences in correct classification of severe outcomes at 10 days (98.30% vs. 94.07%) and 1 year (97.67% vs. 96.40%), pointing to the superiority of Neural Networks. According to the results, there is also a significant superiority of ANNs in terms of false negatives both at 10 days (3.70% vs. 5.93%) and at 1 year (2.33% vs. 10.07%). However, considering the false positives, the adoption of ANNs would cause an increase in hospital costs, highlighting the potential trade-off which policy makers might face.

  7. The dynamics of friendships and victimization in adolescence: a longitudinal social network perspective.

    PubMed

    Sentse, Miranda; Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Salmivalli, Christina; Cillessen, Antonius H N

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the development of relational and physical victimization in adolescent friendship networks over time. Using longitudinal social network analysis (SIENA) it was simultaneously tested whether similarity in victimization contributed to friendship formation (selection effects) and whether victimization of friends contributed to changes in victimization (influence effects). This was done for peer-reported relational and physical victimization separately in two middle schools (total N = 480; N = 220, 47% girls, in School 1; N = 260, 52% girls, in School 2) across three time points (Grades 6 through 8; M ages 11.5-13.5). Gender, ethnicity, and baseline aggression were controlled as individual predictors of victimization. Similarity in physical victimization predicted friendship formation, whereas physical victimization was not influenced by friends' victimization but rather by adolescents' own physical aggression. Peer influence effects existed for relational victimization, in that adolescents with victimized friends were more likely to increase in victimization over time as well, over and above the effect of adolescents' own relational aggression. These selection and influence effects were not further qualified by gender. The results suggested that both selection and influence processes as well as individual characteristics play a role in the co-evolution of friendships and victimization, but that these processes are specific for different types of victimization.

  8. Multi-OMICs and Genome Editing Perspectives on Liver Cancer Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shengda; Yin, Yi A.; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song

    2016-01-01

    The advent of the human genome sequence and the resulting ~20,000 genes provide a crucial framework for a transition from traditional biology to an integrative “OMICs” arena (Lander et al., 2001; Venter et al., 2001; Kitano, 2002). This brings in a revolution for cancer research, which now enters a big data era. In the past decade, with the facilitation by next-generation sequencing, there have been a huge number of large-scale sequencing efforts, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the HapMap, and the 1000 genomes project. As a result, a deluge of genomic information becomes available from patients stricken by a variety of cancer types. The list of cancer-associated genes is ever expanding. New discoveries are made on how frequent and highly penetrant mutations, such as those in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and TP53, function in cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. Most genes with relatively frequent but weakly penetrant cancer mutations still remain to be characterized. In addition, genes that harbor rare but highly penetrant cancer-associated mutations continue to emerge. Here, we review recent advances related to cancer genomics, proteomics, and systems biology and suggest new perspectives in targeted therapy and precision medicine. PMID:27403431

  9. Multi-OMICs and Genome Editing Perspectives on Liver Cancer Signaling Networks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shengda; Yin, Yi A; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song

    2016-01-01

    The advent of the human genome sequence and the resulting ~20,000 genes provide a crucial framework for a transition from traditional biology to an integrative "OMICs" arena (Lander et al., 2001; Venter et al., 2001; Kitano, 2002). This brings in a revolution for cancer research, which now enters a big data era. In the past decade, with the facilitation by next-generation sequencing, there have been a huge number of large-scale sequencing efforts, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the HapMap, and the 1000 genomes project. As a result, a deluge of genomic information becomes available from patients stricken by a variety of cancer types. The list of cancer-associated genes is ever expanding. New discoveries are made on how frequent and highly penetrant mutations, such as those in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and TP53, function in cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. Most genes with relatively frequent but weakly penetrant cancer mutations still remain to be characterized. In addition, genes that harbor rare but highly penetrant cancer-associated mutations continue to emerge. Here, we review recent advances related to cancer genomics, proteomics, and systems biology and suggest new perspectives in targeted therapy and precision medicine.

  10. Topic: Catchment system dynamics: Processes and feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesstra, Saskia

    2015-04-01

    In this meeting we can talk about my main expertise: the focus of my research ocus revolves around understanding catchment system dynamics in a holistic way by incorporating both processes on hillslopes as well as in the river channel. Process knowledge enables explanation of the impact of natural and human drivers on the catchment systems and which consequences these drivers have for water and sediment connectivity. Improved understanding of the catchment sediment and water dynamics will empower sustainable land and river management and mitigate soil threats like erosion and off-side water and sediment accumulation with the help of nature's forces. To be able to understand the system dynamics of a catchment, you need to study the catchment system in a holistic way. In many studies only the hillslopes or even plots are studied; or only the channel. However, these systems are connected and should be evaluated together. When studying a catchment system any intervention to the system will create both on- as well as off sites effects, which should especially be taken into account when transferring science into policy regulations or management decisions.

  11. Multiplicity fluctuation and phase transition in high-energy collision — A chaos-based study with complex network perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaduri, Susmita; Ghosh, Dipak

    2016-12-01

    Multiplicity fluctuation provides enough information concerning the dynamics of particle production process and even signature of phase transition from hadronic to QGP phase expected in ultrarelativistic nuclear collision. Numerous analyses reported on the fluctuation pattern of pions have been studied from theoretical and phenomenological approaches. Also the fractal properties have been explored to characterize quantitative degree of fluctuation. The present work reports a study of pion fluctuation from a radically different perspective, using science of complexity. For this we have taken two different interactions — one hadron-nucleus and other nucleus-nucleus, namely π--AgBr (350 GeV) and 32S-AgBr (200 AGeV). We have analyzed both data in the light of complex network analysis, viz. visibility graph method. The data reveal that power of the scale-freeness in visibility graph (PSVG), a quantitative parameter related to Hurst exponent, may provide information on the degree of fluctuation. Further, in a recent work, it was shown that phase transition can also be studied using the same methodology. Based on the result of the present study we further propose to use this methodology, where critical phenomena are to be assessed — even in case of pion fluctuation, for obtaining the QGP like phase transition.

  12. The role of topography on catchment-scale water residence time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, K.J.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.; Weiler, M.; Kendall, C.; McGlynn, B.L.; Welker, J.M.; Seibert, J.

    2005-01-01

    The age, or residence time, of water is a fundamental descriptor of catchment hydrology, revealing information about the storage, flow pathways, and source of water in a single integrated measure. While there has been tremendous recent interest in residence time estimation to characterize watersheds, there are relatively few studies that have quantified residence time at the watershed scale, and fewer still that have extended those results beyond single catchments to larger landscape scales. We examined-topographic controls on residence time for seven catchments (0.085-62.4 km2) that represent diverse geologic and geomorphic conditions in the western Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Our primary objective was to determine the dominant physical controls on catchment-scale, water residence time and specifically test the hypothesis that residence time is related to the size of the basin. Residence times were estimated by simple convolution models that described the transfer of precipitation isotopic composition to the stream network. We found that base flow mean residence times for exponential distributions ranged from 0.8 to 3.3 years. Mean residence time showed no correlation to basin area (r2 < 0.01) but instead was correlated (r2 =-0:91) to catchment terrain indices representing the flow path distance and flow path gradient to the stream network. These results illustrate that landscape organization (i.e., topography) rather than basin area controls catchment-scale transport. Results from this study may provide a framework for describing scale-invariant transport across climatic and geologic conditions, whereby the internal form and structure of the basin defines the first-order control on base flow residence time. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Intramuscular responses with muscle damaging exercise and the interplay between multiple intracellular networks: a human perspective.

    PubMed

    Kerksick, Chad M; Willoughby, Darryn; Kouretas, Demetrios; Tsatsakis, Aristides

    2013-11-01

    Damaging exercise invokes a series of widespread changes that impact many aspects of skeletal muscle physiology. When examining candidate intramuscular mechanisms, those associated with oxidative stress, inflammation, proteolysis and apoptosis appear to have garnered the most interest in the literature, but many aspects of these pathways remain in question. Due to the vast integrated network of signaling activities as well as the many known areas (and likely many unknown areas) of crosstalk throughout these mechanisms, in vivo research can be challenging. Currently, a relatively small number of studies have examined time-course related changes to blood-based markers of oxidative stress and even fewer have examined intramuscular changes using in vivo models. An equally small number of studies have examined intramuscular changes in apoptotic activity. While changes in other tissues hold importance, intramuscular adaptations and the mechanisms involved are of the highest importance for determining how skeletal muscle adapts and respond to stressful, damaging stimuli.

  14. How does competition structure affect industry merger waves? A network analysis perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Rui; Yang, Jianmei; Yao, Canzhong; McKelvey, Bill

    2015-07-01

    By taking China's beer industry as an example, this paper establishes a series of industrial competition-pressure networks and examines the correlation between competition structure and merger actions. We present a cascade dynamic-merger agent-based computational model driven by competition pressure diffusion to describe the forming process of industry merger wave. The empirical analyses and agent-based computational simulation results show that the competition structure among rivals has a strong effect on the scale, the duration time, and the stability of industry merger wave. We also give explanations on why there are different simulation results between in single market competition environment and in multi-market competition environment, as well as discuss the management implications for the industry-merger policy makers and the merger-tactics decision makers that are involved in merger wave.

  15. Perspectives on Advanced Learning Technologies and Learning Networks and Future Aerospace Workforce Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the advanced learning technologies is given in this presentation along with a brief description of their impact on future aerospace workforce development. The presentation is divided into five parts (see Figure 1). In the first part, a brief historical account of the evolution of learning technologies is given. The second part describes the current learning activities. The third part describes some of the future aerospace systems, as examples of high-tech engineering systems, and lists their enabling technologies. The fourth part focuses on future aerospace research, learning and design environments. The fifth part lists the objectives of the workshop and some of the sources of information on learning technologies and learning networks.

  16. Soft Water Level Sensors for Characterizing the Hydrological Behaviour of Agricultural Catchments

    PubMed Central

    Crabit, Armand; Colin, François; Bailly, Jean Stéphane; Ayroles, Hervé; Garnier, François

    2011-01-01

    An innovative soft water level sensor is proposed to characterize the hydrological behaviour of agricultural catchments by measuring rainfall and stream flows. This sensor works as a capacitor coupled with a capacitance to frequency converter and measures water level at an adjustable time step acquisition. It was designed to be handy, minimally invasive and optimized in terms of energy consumption and low-cost fabrication so as to multiply its use on several catchments under natural conditions. It was used as a stage recorder to measure water level dynamics in a channel during a runoff event and as a rain gauge to measure rainfall amount and intensity. Based on the Manning equation, a method allowed estimation of water discharge with a given uncertainty and hence runoff volume at an event or annual scale. The sensor was tested under controlled conditions in the laboratory and under real conditions in the field. Comparisons of the sensor to reference devices (tipping bucket rain gauge, hydrostatic pressure transmitter limnimeter, Venturi channels…) showed accurate results: rainfall intensities and dynamic responses were accurately reproduced and discharges were estimated with an uncertainty usually acceptable in hydrology. Hence, it was used to monitor eleven small agricultural catchments located in the Mediterranean region. Both catchment reactivity and water budget have been calculated. Dynamic response of the catchments has been studied at the event scale through the rising time determination and at the annual scale by calculating the frequency of occurrence of runoff events. It provided significant insight into catchment hydrological behaviour which could be useful for agricultural management perspectives involving pollutant transport, flooding event and global water balance. PMID:22163868

  17. Prospective systematic review registration: perspective from the Guidelines International Network (G-I-N).

    PubMed

    Van der Wees, Philip; Qaseem, Amir; Kaila, Minna; Ollenschlaeger, Guenter; Rosenfeld, Richard

    2012-02-09

    Clinical practice and public health guidelines are important tools for translating research findings into practice with the aim of assisting health practitioners as well as patients and consumers in health behavior and healthcare decision-making. Numerous programs for guideline development exist around the world, with growing international collaboration to improve their quality. One of the key features in developing trustworthy guidelines is that recommendations should be based on high-quality systematic reviews of the best available evidence. The review process used by guideline developers to identify and grade relevant evidence for developing recommendations should be systematic, transparent and unbiased. In this paper, we provide an overview of current international developments in the field of practice guidelines and methods to develop guidelines, with a specific focus on the role of systematic reviews. The Guidelines International Network (G-I-N) aims to stimulate collaboration between guideline developers and systematic reviewers to optimize the use of available evidence in guideline development and to increase efficiency in the guideline development process. Considering the significant benefit of systematic reviews for the guideline community, the G-I-N Board of Trustees supports the international prospective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO) initiative. G-I-N also recently launched a Data Extraction Resource (GINDER) to present and share data extracted from individual studies in a standardized template. PROSPERO and GINDER are complementary tools to enhance collaboration between guideline developers and systematic reviewers to allow for alignment of activities and a reduction in duplication of effort.

  18. The Human Frontal Lobes and Frontal Network Systems: An Evolutionary, Clinical, and Treatment Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Frontal lobe syndromes, better termed as frontal network systems, are relatively unique in that they may manifest from almost any brain region, due to their widespread connectivity. The understandings of the manifold expressions seen clinically are helped by considering evolutionary origins, the contribution of the state-dependent ascending monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems, and cerebral connectivity. Hence, the so-called networktopathies may be a better term for the syndromes encountered clinically. An increasing array of metric tests are becoming available that complement that long standing history of qualitative bedside assessments pioneered by Alexander Luria, for example. An understanding of the vast panoply of frontal systems' syndromes has been pivotal in understanding and diagnosing the most common dementia syndrome under the age of 60, for example, frontotemporal lobe degeneration. New treatment options are also progressively becoming available, with recent evidence of dopaminergic augmentation, for example, being helpful in traumatic brain injury. The latter include not only psychopharmacological options but also device-based therapies including mirror visual feedback therapy. PMID:23577266

  19. Network environ perspective for urban metabolism and carbon emissions: a case study of Vienna, Austria.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoqing; Chen, Bin

    2012-04-17

    Cities are considered major contributors to global warming, where carbon emissions are highly embedded in the overall urban metabolism. To examine urban metabolic processes and emission trajectories we developed a carbon flux model based on Network Environ Analysis (NEA). The mutual interactions and control situation within the urban ecosystem of Vienna were examined, and the system-level properties of the city's carbon metabolism were assessed. Regulatory strategies to minimize carbon emissions were identified through the tracking of the possible pathways that affect these emission trajectories. Our findings suggest that indirect flows have a strong bearing on the mutual and control relationships between urban sectors. The metabolism of a city is considered self-mutualistic and sustainable only when the local and distal environments are embraced. Energy production and construction were found to be two factors with a major impact on carbon emissions, and whose regulation is only effective via ad-hoc pathways. In comparison with the original life-cycle tracking, the application of NEA was better at revealing details from a mechanistic aspect, which is crucial for informed sustainable urban management.

  20. Multilevel functional genomics data integration as a tool for understanding physiology: a network biology perspective.

    PubMed

    Davidsen, Peter K; Turan, Nil; Egginton, Stuart; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The overall aim of physiological research is to understand how living systems function in an integrative manner. Consequently, the discipline of physiology has since its infancy attempted to link multiple levels of biological organization. Increasingly this has involved mathematical and computational approaches, typically to model a small number of components spanning several levels of biological organization. With the advent of "omics" technologies, which can characterize the molecular state of a cell or tissue (intended as the level of expression and/or activity of its molecular components), the number of molecular components we can quantify has increased exponentially. Paradoxically, the unprecedented amount of experimental data has made it more difficult to derive conceptual models underlying essential mechanisms regulating mammalian physiology. We present an overview of state-of-the-art methods currently used to identifying biological networks underlying genomewide responses. These are based on a data-driven approach that relies on advanced computational methods designed to "learn" biology from observational data. In this review, we illustrate an application of these computational methodologies using a case study integrating an in vivo model representing the transcriptional state of hypoxic skeletal muscle with a clinical study representing muscle wasting in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. The broader application of these approaches to modeling multiple levels of biological data in the context of modern physiology is discussed.

  1. Broadband local service offerings using free-space optical links: a network business perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britz, David M.; Dodley, J. P.; Barnickel, D. J.

    2001-02-01

    12 This paper describes a promising optical wireless broadband technology that will provide low cost broadband services to the local access `last mile' market. This paper examines the application, advantages and limitations of utilizing Free Space Optical Communications (FSOC) systems for broadband access markets. The service markets that would fully utilize FSOC technologies include metropolitan areas, BLECs (multi- tenant dwellings/business apartments), campuses, industrial parks and `pole-to-hole' neighborhood deployments. This paper will identify weather dependent link availability as being the primary consideration in defining and selecting suitable locations for FSOC-based systems. Link availability in turn determines link range, type of service, and the need for transmission diversity. This paper will describe the implications of telecom `five nines' last-mile access availability and its effect on the transparent integration of FSOC technologies into the existing fiber optic networks. This paper will also describe propagation losses and link budget requirements for broadband FSOC-based local service. During adverse weather conditions, stand-alone, FSOC-based optical wireless links typically offer path lengths of less than 200 meters while still meeting the `five nines' availability criteria. This paper will also consider `availability limited' services. These services may prove to be attractive to customers who are willing to accept broadband service on an `as available basis'. The use of availability-enhancing transmission diversity and the use of intelligent `roof-top' routing and optical wireless cross connects between buildings will also be discussed.

  2. The Informatics Challenges Facing Biobanks: A Perspective from a United Kingdom Biobanking Network.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Philip R; Groves, Martin; Jordan, Lee B; Stobart, Hilary; Purdie, Colin A; Thompson, Alastair M

    2015-10-01

    The challenges facing biobanks are changing from simple collections of materials to quality-assured fit-for-purpose clinically annotated samples. As a result, informatics awareness and capabilities of a biobank are now intrinsically related to quality. A biobank may be considered a data repository, in the form of raw data (the unprocessed samples), data surrounding the samples (processing and storage conditions), supplementary data (such as clinical annotations), and an increasing ethical requirement for biobanks to have a mechanism for researchers to return their data. The informatics capabilities of a biobank are no longer simply knowing sample locations; instead the capabilities will become a distinguishing factor in the ability of a biobank to provide appropriate samples. There is an increasing requirement for biobanking systems (whether in-house or commercially sourced) to ensure the informatics systems stay apace with the changes being experienced by the biobanking community. In turn, there is a requirement for the biobanks to have a clear informatics policy and directive that is embedded into the wider decision making process. As an example, the Breast Cancer Campaign Tissue Bank in the UK was a collaboration between four individual and diverse biobanks in the UK, and an informatics platform has been developed to address the challenges of running a distributed network. From developing such a system there are key observations about what can or cannot be achieved by informatics in isolation. This article will highlight some of the lessons learned during this development process.

  3. Reconceptualizing anhedonia: novel perspectives on balancing the pleasure networks in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Rømer Thomsen, Kristine; Whybrow, Peter C; Kringelbach, Morten L

    2015-01-01

    Anhedonia, the lack of pleasure, has been shown to be a critical feature of a range of psychiatric disorders. Yet, it is currently measured primarily through subjective self-reports and as such has been difficult to submit to rigorous scientific analysis. New insights from affective neuroscience hold considerable promise in improving our understanding of anhedonia and for providing useful objective behavioral measures to complement traditional self-report measures, potentially leading to better diagnoses and novel treatments. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of hedonia research and specifically the established mechanisms of wanting, liking, and learning. Based on this framework we propose to conceptualize anhedonia as impairments in some or all of these processes, thereby departing from the longstanding view of anhedonia as solely reduced subjective experience of pleasure. We discuss how deficits in each of the reward components can lead to different expressions, or subtypes, of anhedonia affording novel ways of measurement. Specifically, we review evidence suggesting that patients suffering from depression and schizophrenia show impairments in wanting and learning, while some aspects of conscious liking seem surprisingly intact. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that anhedonia is heterogeneous across psychiatric disorders, depending on which parts of the pleasure networks are most affected. This in turn has implications for diagnosis and treatment of anhedonia.

  4. Reconceptualizing anhedonia: novel perspectives on balancing the pleasure networks in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Rømer Thomsen, Kristine; Whybrow, Peter C.; Kringelbach, Morten L.

    2015-01-01

    Anhedonia, the lack of pleasure, has been shown to be a critical feature of a range of psychiatric disorders. Yet, it is currently measured primarily through subjective self-reports and as such has been difficult to submit to rigorous scientific analysis. New insights from affective neuroscience hold considerable promise in improving our understanding of anhedonia and for providing useful objective behavioral measures to complement traditional self-report measures, potentially leading to better diagnoses and novel treatments. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of hedonia research and specifically the established mechanisms of wanting, liking, and learning. Based on this framework we propose to conceptualize anhedonia as impairments in some or all of these processes, thereby departing from the longstanding view of anhedonia as solely reduced subjective experience of pleasure. We discuss how deficits in each of the reward components can lead to different expressions, or subtypes, of anhedonia affording novel ways of measurement. Specifically, we review evidence suggesting that patients suffering from depression and schizophrenia show impairments in wanting and learning, while some aspects of conscious liking seem surprisingly intact. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that anhedonia is heterogeneous across psychiatric disorders, depending on which parts of the pleasure networks are most affected. This in turn has implications for diagnosis and treatment of anhedonia. PMID:25814941

  5. A large-scale perspective on stress-induced alterations in resting-state networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maron-Katz, Adi; Vaisvaser, Sharon; Lin, Tamar; Hendler, Talma; Shamir, Ron

    2016-02-01

    Stress is known to induce large-scale neural modulations. However, its neural effect once the stressor is removed and how it relates to subjective experience are not fully understood. Here we used a statistically sound data-driven approach to investigate alterations in large-scale resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) induced by acute social stress. We compared rsfMRI profiles of 57 healthy male subjects before and after stress induction. Using a parcellation-based univariate statistical analysis, we identified a large-scale rsFC change, involving 490 parcel-pairs. Aiming to characterize this change, we employed statistical enrichment analysis, identifying anatomic structures that were significantly interconnected by these pairs. This analysis revealed strengthening of thalamo-cortical connectivity and weakening of cross-hemispheral parieto-temporal connectivity. These alterations were further found to be associated with change in subjective stress reports. Integrating report-based information on stress sustainment 20 minutes post induction, revealed a single significant rsFC change between the right amygdala and the precuneus, which inversely correlated with the level of subjective recovery. Our study demonstrates the value of enrichment analysis for exploring large-scale network reorganization patterns, and provides new insight on stress-induced neural modulations and their relation to subjective experience.

  6. The Informatics Challenges Facing Biobanks: A Perspective from a United Kingdom Biobanking Network

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Martin; Jordan, Lee B.; Stobart, Hilary; Purdie, Colin A.; Thompson, Alastair M

    2015-01-01

    The challenges facing biobanks are changing from simple collections of materials to quality-assured fit-for-purpose clinically annotated samples. As a result, informatics awareness and capabilities of a biobank are now intrinsically related to quality. A biobank may be considered a data repository, in the form of raw data (the unprocessed samples), data surrounding the samples (processing and storage conditions), supplementary data (such as clinical annotations), and an increasing ethical requirement for biobanks to have a mechanism for researchers to return their data. The informatics capabilities of a biobank are no longer simply knowing sample locations; instead the capabilities will become a distinguishing factor in the ability of a biobank to provide appropriate samples. There is an increasing requirement for biobanking systems (whether in-house or commercially sourced) to ensure the informatics systems stay apace with the changes being experienced by the biobanking community. In turn, there is a requirement for the biobanks to have a clear informatics policy and directive that is embedded into the wider decision making process. As an example, the Breast Cancer Campaign Tissue Bank in the UK was a collaboration between four individual and diverse biobanks in the UK, and an informatics platform has been developed to address the challenges of running a distributed network. From developing such a system there are key observations about what can or cannot be achieved by informatics in isolation. This article will highlight some of the lessons learned during this development process. PMID:26418270

  7. Shale to Regolith Evolution: The Controls on Catchment Solute Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Pamela; Goddéris, Yves; Shi, Yuning; Singha, Kamini; Clarke, Brian; Schott, Jacques; Duff, Chritopher; Brantley, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the factors that control the formation of regolith and the evolution of pore space within regolith as it is moves upward to the surface is of global importance. Unfortunately, both access and high costs have been prohibitive in gathering information about the bedrock-regolith boundary. Recognizing the need for data at depth, the Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) network initiated the "Drill the Ridge" project. The goal of this project is to investigate fresh bedrock at each CZO and then to perform an array of downhole geophysical survey and geochemical analyses to understand regolith formation. In response to this call, several ridgetop boreholes were drilled at the Susquehanna Shale Hills CZO in 2012 and 2013. Here we present the optical televiewer and gamma logs of these boreholes, along with downcore bulk geochemical analysis to shed light on the geochemical and lithological controls on the evolution of the watershed. Observations of catchment hydrology are also being used with estimates of hydrologic parameters to quantify near-surface geologic evolution and geochemical fluxes associated with weathering at depth. To quantify the contribution of weathering fluxes from the mobile regolith, we then link the meteorological forcing from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS-2), the fully-coupled land-surface Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (Flux-PIHM), and the geochemical box model WITCH. With this cascade of models, solute fluxes for the CZO are being simulated. At depth, the bulk geochemical analysis of ridgetop sediments indicates that pyrite had the deepest depletion front, which was concurrent with the regional water table position. Hydrologic data together with detailed borehole and bulk soil/rock geochemical analysis elucidated an eastern to western progression in lithology across the SSHCZO catchment controls fracture distribution and thus groundwater flow. Where shale and mudstone underlie the eastern portion of

  8. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, George R.; Petitto, Karen R.; McLaughlin, Don

    2001-01-01

    Describes the connectivity features and options of modern campus communication and information system networks, including signal transmission (wire-based and wireless), signal switching, convergence of networks, and network assessment variables, to enable campus leaders to make sound future-oriented decisions. (EV)

  9. Assessing the simple dynamical systems approach in a Mediterranean context: application to the Ardeche catchment (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovic, M.; Braud, I.; Branger, F.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2015-05-01

    This study explores how catchment heterogeneity and variability can be summarized in simplified models, representing the dominant hydrological processes. It focuses on Mediterranean catchments, characterized by heterogeneous geology, pedology and land use, as well as steep topography and a rainfall regime in which summer droughts contrast with high-rainfall periods in autumn. The Ardeche catchment (Southeast France), typical of this environment, is chosen to explore the following questions: (1) can such a Mediterranean catchment be adequately characterized by a simple dynamical systems approach and what are the limits of the method under such conditions? (2) what information about dominant predictors of hydrological variability can be retrieved from this analysis in such catchments? In this work we apply the data-driven approach of Kirchner (2009) to estimate discharge sensitivity functions that summarize the behaviour of four sub-catchments of the Ardeche, using low-vegetation periods (November-March) from 9 years of measurements (2000-2008) from operational networks. The relevance of the inferred sensitivity function is assessed through hydrograph simulations, and through estimating precipitation rates from discharge fluctuations. We find that the discharge sensitivity function is downward-curving in double-logarithmic space, thus allowing further simulation of discharge and non-divergence of the model, only during low-vegetation periods. The analysis is complemented by a Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis showing how the parameters summarizing the discharge sensitivity function impact the simulated hydrographs. The resulting discharge simulation results are good for granite catchments, which are likely to be characterized by shallow subsurface flow at the interface between soil and bedrock. The simple dynamical system hypothesis works especially well in wet conditions (peaks and recessions are well modelled). On the other hand, poor model performance is associated

  10. A European Network of Analytical and Experimental Laboratories for Geosciences: Challenges and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freda, C.; Funiciello, F.; Meredith, P.; Sagnotti, L.; Scarlato, P.; Troll, V. R.; Willingshofer, E.; EPOS-WG6

    2012-04-01

    The EU policy for scientific research in the third millennium is that of a coordinated approach to support and develop continent-scale research infrastructures. The vision is to integrate the existing research infrastructures in order to increase the accessibility and usability of multidisciplinary data, enhancing worldwide interoperability by establishing a leading integrated European infrastructure and services. Integrating Earth Sciences infrastructures in Europe is the mission of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS), a research infrastructure and e-science for data and observatories on earthquakes, volcanoes, surface dynamics and tectonics. Within the existing core elements to be integrated in the EPOS cyber-infrastructure are: geographical distributed observational infrastructures (seismic and geodetic networks), observatories for multidisciplinary local data acquisition (e.g., volcanoes, active fault-zone, geothermal and deep drilling experiments), and analytical facilities for data repositories and integration. The integration of European analytical, experimental, and analogue laboratories plays a key role in this context and is the task of EPOS Working Group 6 (WG6). The Analytical and Experimental LaboratoriesGroup thus aims to link experimental, analytical, and analogue laboratories into a single, but geographically distributed, infrastructure for rock physics, including palaeomagnetism, analytical and experimental petrology and volcanology, and tectonic modeling.The WG6 has set a short term goal that has now been achieved, being a review of operational laboratory facilities in the community and the creation of a database from that information. Currently 12 countries (Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The Netherlands, United Kingdom) are included in the database. As long-term goals, the WG6 aims to create mechanisms and procedures for easy access to laboratory facilities, turning small

  11. Inductive machine learning for improved estimation of catchment-scale snow water equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, David; Skalka, Christian; Bongard, Josh

    2015-05-01

    Infrastructure for the automatic collection of single-point measurements of snow water equivalent (SWE) is well-established. However, because SWE varies significantly over space, the estimation of SWE at the catchment scale based on a single-point measurement is error-prone. We propose low-cost, lightweight methods for near-real-time estimation of mean catchment-wide SWE using existing infrastructure, wireless sensor networks, and machine learning algorithms. Because snowpack distribution is highly nonlinear, we focus on Genetic Programming (GP), a nonlinear, white-box, inductive machine learning algorithm. Because we did not have access to near-real-time catchment-scale SWE data, we used available data as ground truth for machine learning in a set of experiments that are successive approximations of our goal of catchment-wide SWE estimation. First, we used a history of maritime snowpack data collected by manual snow courses. Second, we used distributed snow depth (HS) data collected automatically by wireless sensor networks. We compared the performance of GP against linear regression (LR), binary regression trees (BT), and a widely used basic method (BM) that naively assumes non-variable snowpack. In the first experiment set, GP and LR models predicted SWE with lower error than BM. In the second experiment set, GP had lower error than LR, but outperformed BT only when we applied a technique that specifically mitigated the possibility of over-fitting.

  12. Transport of cyazofamid and kresoxim methyl in runoff at the plot and catchment scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefrancq, Marie; Joaquín García Verdú, Antonio; Maillard, Elodie; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Payraudeau, Sylvain

    2013-04-01

    Surface runoff and erosion during the course of rainfall events represent major processes of pesticides transport from agricultural land to aquatic ecosystem. In general, field and catchment studies on pesticide transfer are carried out separately. A study at both scales may enable to improve the understanding of scale effects on processes involved in pesticides transport and to give clues on the source areas within an agricultural catchment. In this study, the transport in runoff of two widely used fungicides, i.e. kresoxim methyl (KM) and cyazofamid (CY) was assessed in a 43 ha vineyard catchment and the relative contribution of the total fungicides export from one representative plot was evaluated. During an entire period of fungicide application, from May to August 2011, the discharge and loads of dissolved and particle-laden KM and CY were monitored at the plot and catchment scales. The results showed larger export coefficient of KM and CY from catchment (0.064 and 0.041‰ for KM and CY respectively) than from the studied plot (0.009 and 0.023 ‰ for KM and CY respectively). It suggests that the plot margins especially the road network contributed as well to the fungicide loads. This result underlines the impact of fungicide drift on non-target areas. Furthermore, a larger rainfall threshold is necessary at the plot scale to trigger runoff and mobilise pesticides than on the road network. At the plot scale, a rapid dissipation of the both fungicides in the top soil was observed. It highlights that the risky period encompasses the first rainfall events triggering runoff after the applications. At both scales, KM and CY were not detected in suspended solids (i.e. > 0.7 µm). However their partitioning in runoff water differed. 64.1 and 91.8% of the KM load was detected in the dissolved phase (i.e. < 0.22 µm) at the plot and catchment scales respectively, whereas 98.7 and 100% of the CY load was detected in the particulate phase (i.e. between 0.22 and 0.7 µm

  13. Catchment biophysical drivers of streamflow characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trancoso, R.

    2015-12-01

    The characteristics of streamflow reflect the co-evolution of climate, soils, topography and vegetation of catchments. Hydrological metrics or signatures can represent the long-term behaviour and integrate the influence of all the streamflow drivers. Although this sort of relationship has been developed in regional studies exploring prediction of Flow Duration Curves and other streamflow metrics, little is known about the controls of other key streamflow characteristics especially in continent scale. This study aims to understand how catchment biophysical variables control key hydrological metrics such as baseflow index, elasticity of streamflow to rainfall variability and intermittency in continent scale and regionally. We used a set of catchment biophysical variables to model key streamflow signatures using multivariate power-law and beta regressions in 355 catchments located along the eastern Australian seaboard. Streamflow signatures were derived from daily streamflow time series data from 1980 to 2013. We tested 52 catchment biophysical characteristics related to climate, soil, topography, geography, geomorphology, vegetation and land-cover as predictors of the streamflow signatures. The prediction R-squared ranged from 63 to 72% when relationships are built in continent scale, but can be greater than 80% when regressions are regionalised. The interpretation of the modelled relationships offers new insights regarding the controls of flow characteristics.

  14. Global Genome Biodiversity Network: saving a blueprint of the Tree of Life – a botanical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Seberg, O.; Droege, G.; Barker, K.; Coddington, J. A.; Funk, V.; Gostel, M.; Petersen, G.; Smith, P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Genomic research depends upon access to DNA or tissue collected and preserved according to high-quality standards. At present, the collections in most natural history museums do not sufficiently address these standards, making them often hard or impossible to use for whole-genome sequencing or transcriptomics. In response to these challenges, natural history museums, herbaria, botanical gardens and other stakeholders have started to build high-quality biodiversity biobanks. Unfortunately, information about these collections remains fragmented, scattered and largely inaccessible. Without a central registry or even an overview of relevant institutions, it is difficult and time-consuming to locate the needed samples. Scope The Global Genome Biodiversity Network (GGBN) was created to fill this vacuum by establishing a one-stop access point for locating samples meeting quality standards for genome-scale applications, while complying with national and international legislations and conventions. Increased accessibility to genomic samples will further genomic research and development, conserve genetic resources, help train the next generation of genome researchers and raise the visibility of biodiversity collections. Additionally, the availability of a data-sharing platform will facilitate identification of gaps in the collections, thereby empowering targeted sampling efforts, increasing the breadth and depth of preservation of genetic diversity. The GGBN is rapidly growing and currently has 41 members. The GGBN covers all branches of the Tree of Life, except humans, but here the focus is on a pilot project with emphasis on ‘harvesting’ the Tree of Life for vascular plant taxa to enable genome-level studies. Conclusion While current efforts are centred on getting the existing samples of all GGBN members online, a pilot project, GGI-Gardens, has been launched as proof of concept. Over the next 6 years GGI-Gardens aims to add to the GGBN high-quality genetic

  15. In Lieu of the Paired-Catchment Approach - Hydrologic Model Change Detection at the Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegre, N. P.

    2009-05-01

    Knowledge of the effects of forest management on hydrology primarily comes from paired-catchment studies conducted world-wide. While this approach has been useful for discerning changes in small experimental catchments and has contributed fundamental knowledge of the effects of forest and natural resources management on hydrology, results from experimental catchment studies exhibit temporal variability, have limited spatial inference, and lack insight into internal catchment processes. To address these limitations, traditional field experiments can be supplemented with numerical models to isolate the effects of disturbance on catchment behavior. Outlined in this study is an alternative method of change detection for daily time-series streamflow that integrates hydrologic modeling and statistical change detection methods used to discern the effects of contemporary forest management on the hydrology of western Oregon Cascades headwater catchments. In this study, a simple rainfall-runoff model was used to generate virtual reference catchments using attributes that reflect streamflow conditions absent of forest disturbance. Streamflow was simulated under three levels of model uncertainty using GLUE and were used to construct generalized least squares regression models to discern changes in hydrologic behavior. By considering processes within a single experimental catchment rather than the two spatially explicit catchments used in traditional paired experiments, it was possible to reduce unexplained variation and increase the likelihood of correctly detecting hydrologic effects following forest harvesting. In order to evaluate the stability of the hydrologic and statistical models and catchment behavior over time, the change detection method was applied to a contemporary reference catchment. By applying the change detection model to reference catchments, it was possible to eliminate unexpected variation as a cause for detected changes in observed hydrology. Further, it

  16. Quantifying in-stream retention of nitrate at catchment scales using a practical mass balance approach.

    PubMed

    Schwientek, Marc; Selle, Benny

    2016-02-01

    As field data on in-stream nitrate retention is scarce at catchment scales, this study aimed at quantifying net retention of nitrate within the entire river network of a fourth-order stream. For this purpose, a practical mass balance approach combined with a Lagrangian sampling scheme was applied and seasonally repeated to estimate daily in-stream net retention of nitrate for a 17.4 km long, agriculturally influenced, segment of the Steinlach River in southwestern Germany. This river segment represents approximately 70% of the length of the main stem and about 32% of the streambed area of the entire river network. Sampling days in spring and summer were biogeochemically more active than in autumn and winter. Results obtained for the main stem of Steinlach River were subsequently extrapolated to the stream network in the catchment. It was demonstrated that, for baseflow conditions in spring and summer, in-stream nitrate retention could sum up to a relevant term of the catchment's nitrogen balance if the entire stream network was considered.

  17. Informing Hydrological Drought Response in Headwater Catchments Using Water Storage Estimated From GRACE: Storage-Flow Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, R.; Tyler, S. W.; Harpold, A. A.; Volk, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the relationship between subsurface water storage and streamflow is challenging due to heterogeneity of surface-groundwater interactions in space and time. Hence, point measurements of storage from wells are insufficient to characterize the storage across a catchment, especially in mountainous environments with complex geology. Here, we present a novel approach to quantify the storage-flow relationship for catchments in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. For 23 gages in the Hydro-Climatic Data Network, the 7-day average annual minimum flow (drought flow) was computed for years 2003 to 2015. We then aggregated, for each gage, the associated storage time-series dataset from 1o gridded measurements of monthly Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS) derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. Despite the significant mismatch between the spatial scales and temporal resolution, we found a strong empirical correlation between TWS and drought flow. From these relationships, we examined how physical characteristics of each catchment (such as size and geology) impact the observed nonlinear relationship between TWS and drought flow. Furthermore, we show how physical characteristics, such as geology/storage capacity, of catchments affect the sensitivity of decreasing flows to multi-year droughts. This research has the potential to help better quantify the streamflow-storage relationship in small mountainous catchments, as well as, classify catchments that may be more vulnerable to decreasing flows with multi-year droughts.

  18. What can we learn from the hydrological modeling of small-scale catchments for the discharge and water balance modeling of mesoscale catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, Thomas; Diekkrüger, Bernd; Bogena, Heye

    2015-04-01

    The application of 3D hydrological models remains a challenge both in research and application studies because the parameterization not only depends on the amount and quality of data available for calibration and validation but also on the spatial and temporal model resolution. In recent years, the model parameterization has improved with the availability of high resolution data (e.g. eddy-covariance, wireless soil sensor networks). Unfortunately, these high resolution data are typically only available for small scale research test sites. This study aims to upscale the parameterization from a highly equipped, small-scale catchment to a mesoscale catchment in order to reduce the parameterization uncertainty at that scale. The two nested catchments chosen for the study are the 0.38 km² large spruce covered Wüstebach catchment and the 42 km² large Erkensruhr catchment characterized by a mixture of spruce and beech forest and grassland vegetation. The 3D hydrogeological model HydroGeoSphere (HGS) has already been setup for the Wüstebach catchment in a previous study with a focus on the simulation performance of soil water dynamics and patterns. Thus, the parameterization process did not only optimize the water balance components but the catchment's wireless soil sensor network data were utilized to calibrate porosities in order to improve the simulation of soil moisture dynamics. In this study we compared different HGS model realizations for the Erkensruhr catchment with different input data. For the first model realization, the catchment is treated heterogeneous in terms of soil properties and topography but homogeneous with respect to land use, precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. For this case, the spruce forest parameterization and the climate input data were taken directly from the small-scale Wüstebach model realization. Next, the calibrated soil porosity for the Wüstebach catchment is applied to the Erkensruhr. Further model realizations

  19. Seasonalstreamflow Generation At Variousspatial Scales On A Smallmediterranean Vineyard Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marofi, S.; Moussa, R.; Voltz, M.

    The importance of surface hydrological processes, under field and sub-catchment conditions, was examines on a small-cultivated watershed, located in South of France. Hydrological responses at different spatial scales were evaluated during the wetness and drier phases, which included the within-year and the long-term periods. The experimental design involved monitoring of surface runoff, streamflow and groundwaters behaviours, in response to rainfall events, during three hydrological cycles. In addition to the mean outlet of catchment and the two vineyard fields that have different situations, runoff was measured at 8 sub-catchments of site. Rainfall was monitored on continuous basis at 4 sites, and the water tables fluctuations also were recorded in more than 15 locations of catchment. During the experimentation period, more than 175 rainy events were observed. The dates analyse show that the regime of surface water, compound of three principals phases: (i) the phases of great flow circulation, (ii) the recession phases, and (iii) the phase without surface flow. The results also indicate that the annual runoff changes appreciably according to hydrological cycles and the rainfall variability. It varies from 28% to 50% of the total of precipitation. The inter-annual variations of the runoff also recovers that the annual runoff flow is insured for approximately 40% by the instantaneous floods, which occur the moment or a few hours only after precipitation, and about 60% by the recession periods, which take place for the long time after floods. The flood events were classified in three groups, differentiated by the initial water table levels and their occurrence period. The direct runoff and the baseflow calculation show that according to the type of flood, they change respectively from 7% to17% and 0% to 7% of precipitation. Comparing to the field areas, on average, the total runoff and direct runoff of the mean basin respectively are 46% and 35%. The water flow

  20. Before and after integrated catchment management in a headwater catchment: changes in water quality.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Andrew O; Quinn, John M

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have comprehensively measured the effect on water quality of catchment rehabilitation measures in comparison with baseline conditions. Here we have analyzed water clarity and nutrient concentrations and loads for a 13-year period in a headwater catchment within the western Waikato region, New Zealand. For the first 6 years, the entire catchment was used for hill-country cattle and sheep grazing. An integrated catchment management plan was implemented whereby cattle were excluded from riparian areas, the most degraded land was planted in Pinus radiata, channel banks were planted with poplar trees and the beef cattle enterprise was modified. The removal of cattle from riparian areas without additional riparian planting had a positive and rapid effect on stream water clarity. In contrast, the water clarity decreased in those sub-catchments where livestock was excluded but riparian areas were planted with trees and shrubs. We attribute the decrease in water clarity to a reduction in groundcover vegetation that armors stream banks against preparatory erosion processes. Increases in concentrations of forms of P and N were recorded. These increases were attributed to: (i) the reduction of instream nutrient uptake by macrophytes and periphyton due to increased riparian shading; (ii) uncontrolled growth of a nitrogen fixing weed (gorse) in some parts of the catchment, and (iii) the reduction in the nutrient attenuation capacity of seepage wetlands due to the decrease in their areal coverage in response to afforestation. Our findings highlight the complex nature of the water quality response to catchment rehabilitation measures.

  1. Before and After Integrated Catchment Management in a Headwater Catchment: Changes in Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Andrew O.; Quinn, John M.

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have comprehensively measured the effect on water quality of catchment rehabilitation measures in comparison with baseline conditions. Here we have analyzed water clarity and nutrient concentrations and loads for a 13-year period in a headwater catchment within the western Waikato region, New Zealand. For the first 6 years, the entire catchment was used for hill-country cattle and sheep grazing. An integrated catchment management plan was implemented whereby cattle were excluded from riparian areas, the most degraded land was planted in Pinus radiata, channel banks were planted with poplar trees and the beef cattle enterprise was modified. The removal of cattle from riparian areas without additional riparian planting had a positive and rapid effect on stream water clarity. In contrast, the water clarity decreased in those sub-catchments where livestock was excluded but riparian areas were planted with trees and shrubs. We attribute the decrease in water clarity to a reduction in groundcover vegetation that armors stream banks against preparatory erosion processes. Increases in concentrations of forms of P and N were recorded. These increases were attributed to: (i) the reduction of instream nutrient uptake by macrophytes and periphyton due to increased riparian shading; (ii) uncontrolled growth of a nitrogen fixing weed (gorse) in some parts of the catchment, and (iii) the reduction in the nutrient attenuation capacity of seepage wetlands due to the decrease in their areal coverage in response to afforestation. Our findings highlight the complex nature of the water quality response to catchment rehabilitation measures.

  2. How old is upland catchment water?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Harald; Cartwright, Ian; Morgenstern, Uwe; Gilfedder, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the dynamics of water supply catchments is an essential part of water management. Upland catchments provide a continuous, reliable source of high quality water not only for some of the world's biggest cities, but also for agriculture and industry. Headwater streams control river flow in lowland agricultural basins as the majority of river discharge emerges from upland catchments. Many rivers are perennial and flow throughout the year, even during droughts. However, it is still unclear how reliable and continuous upland catchment water resources really are. Despite many efforts in upland catchment research, there is still little known about where the water is stored and how long it takes to travel through upper catchments. Resolving these questions is crucial to ensure that this resource is protected from changing land use and to estimate potential impacts from a changing climate. Previous research in this important area has been limited by existing measurement techniques. Knowledge to date has relied heavily on the use of variation in stable isotope signals to estimate the age and origin of water from upland catchments. The problem with relying on these measures is that as the water residence time increases, the variation in the stable isotope signal decreases. After a maximum period of four years, no variation can be detected This means that to date, the residence time in upland catchments is likely to have been vastly underestimated. Consequently, the proportion of water flow out of upland river catchments to the total river flow is also underestimated. Tritium (3H) combines directly with water molecules and enters the flow paths with the infiltrating water. Its half-life (12.32 years) makes it ideal to describe residence times in upper catchment reservoirs as it can theoretically measure water up to about 150 years old. The bomb pulse peak in the southern hemisphere was several orders of magnitude lower than in the northern hemisphere. Hence the

  3. Contrasting Patterns of Fine Fluvial Sediment Delivery in Two Adjacent Upland Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perks, M.; Bracken, L.; Warburton, J.

    2010-12-01

    Quantifying patterns of fine suspended sediment transfer in UK upland rivers is of vital importance in combating the damaging effects of elevated fluxes of suspended sediment, and sediment associated transport of contaminants, on in-stream biota. In many catchments of the UK there is still a lack of catchment-wide understanding of both the spatial patterns and temporal variation in fine sediment delivery. This poster describes the spatial and temporal distribution of in-stream fine sediment delivery from a network of 44 time-integrated mass flux samplers (TIMs) in two adjacent upland catchments. The two catchments are the Esk (210 km2) and Upper Derwent (236 km2) which drain the North York Moors National Park. Annual suspended sediment loads in the Upper Derwent are 1273 t, whereas in the Esk catchment they are greater at 1778 t. Maximum yields of 22 t km-2 yr -1 were measured in the headwater tributaries of the Rye River (Derwent), whereas peak yields in the Esk are four times greater (98 t km-2 yr-1) on the Butter Beck subcatchment. Analysis of the within-storm sediment dynamics, indicates that the sediment sources within the Upper Derwent catchment are from distal locations possibly mobilised by hillslope runoff processes, whereas in the Esk, sediment sources are more proximal to the channel e.g. within channel stores or bank failures. These estimates of suspended sediment flux are compared with the diffuse pollution potential generated by a risk-based model of sediment transfer (SCIMAP) in order to assess the similarity between the model predictions and observed fluxes.

  4. Validation of Pacific Northwest hydrologic landscapes at the catchment scale

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction between the physical properties of a catchment (form) and climatic forcing of precipitation and energy control how water is partitioned, stored, and conveyed through a catchment (function). Hydrologic Landscapes (HLs) were previously developed across Oregon and de...

  5. Environmental isotope hydrology of salinized experimental catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J. V.; Arad, A.; Johnston, C. D.

    1987-10-01

    Deuterium, oxygen-18, tritium and chloride concentrations were used in three salinized experimental catchments to gain insight into the mechanism of solute concentration and flow processes in the saturated and unsaturated zones. The three experimental catchments were studied because of their location in different rainfall regions, their status with respect to clearing of native vegetation and with respect to secondary salinization. Two uncleared catchments have average annual rainfalls of approximately 820 and 1220 mm, respectively. The third cleared catchment has an annual rainfall of 650-750 mm. This catchment was in an advanced state of secondary salinization and displayed large areas of saline groundwater discharge with halite encrustation at the ground surface. The stable isotope compositions of the solution phase in solute bulge profiles in the unsaturated zone showed a close agreement with the amount-weighted mean isotopic composition of rainfall and only surficial evidence of isotopic enrichment due to evaporation. Evaporation from the soil surface plays a minor role as a mechanism of solute concentration in the unsaturated zone. The dominant process of solute concentration in the unsaturated zone was ion exclusion during uptake of water by tree roots which was evidently a solute but not isotope fractionating process. Tritium analyses of unsaturated zone water and grondwater indicated movement of recent recharge to 7-10 m depth at the low rainfall site but over the full depth of the 15 m unsaturated zone at the higher rainfall site. The variability in δ18O and δ2H values of groundwaters was used in association with chloride concentrations to provide information on mixing characteristics of groundwaters within the catchments.

  6. In-Network Processing for Mission-Critical Wireless Networked Sensing and Control: A Real-Time, Efficiency, and Resiliency Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiang, Qiao

    2014-01-01

    As wireless cyber-physical systems (WCPS) are increasingly being deployed in mission-critical applications, it becomes imperative that we consider application QoS requirements in in-network processing (INP). In this dissertation, we explore the potentials of two INP methods, packet packing and network coding, on improving network performance while…

  7. Picturing and modelling catchments by representative hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loritz, Ralf; Hassler, Sibylle; Jackisch, Conrad; Zehe, Erwin

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological modelling studies often start with a qualitative sketch of the hydrological processes of a catchment. These so-called perceptual models are often pictured as hillslopes and are generalizations displaying only the dominant and relevant processes of a catchment or hillslope. The problem with these models is that they are prone to become too much predetermined by the designer's background and experience. Moreover it is difficult to know if that picture is correct and contains enough complexity to represent the system under study. Nevertheless, because of their qualitative form, perceptual models are easy to understand and can be an excellent tool for multidisciplinary exchange between researchers with different backgrounds, helping to identify the dominant structures and processes in a catchment. In our study we explore whether a perceptual model built upon an intensive field campaign may serve as a blueprint for setting up representative hillslopes in a hydrological model to reproduce the functioning of two distinctly different catchments. We use a physically-based 2D hillslope model which has proven capable to be driven by measured soil-hydrological parameters. A key asset of our approach is that the model structure itself remains a picture of the perceptual model, which is benchmarked against a) geo-physical images of the subsurface and b) observed dynamics of discharge, distributed state variables and fluxes (soil moisture, matric potential and sap flow). Within this approach we are able to set up two behavioral model structures which allow the simulation of the most important hydrological fluxes and state variables in good accordance with available observations within the 19.4 km2 large Colpach catchment and the 4.5 km2 large Wollefsbach catchment in Luxembourg without the necessity of calibration. This corroborates, contrary to the widespread opinion, that a) lower mesoscale catchments may be modelled by representative hillslopes and b) physically

  8. Identification of internal flow dynamics in two experimental catchments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, D.P.; Jakeman, A.J.; Kendall, C.; Weizu, G.

    1997-01-01

    Identification of the internal flow dynamics in catchments is difficult because of the lack of information in precipitation -stream discharge time series alone. Two experimental catchments, Hydrohill and Nandadish, near Nanjing in China, have been set up to monitor internal flows reaching the catchment stream at various depths, from the surface runoff to the bedrock. With analysis of the precipitation against these internal discharges, it is possible to quantify the time constants and volumes associated with various flowpaths in both catchments.

  9. Siting analyses for water quality sampling in a catchment.

    PubMed

    Kao, Jehng-Jung; Li, Pei-Hao; Lin, Chin-Lien; Hu, Wen-Hsin

    2008-04-01

    Pollution loads discharged from upstream development or human activities significantly degrade the water quality of a reservoir. The design of an appropriate water quality sampling network is therefore important for detecting potential pollution events and monitoring pollution trends. However, under a limited budgetary constraint, how to site an appropriate number of sampling stations is a challenging task. A previous study proposed a method applying the simulated annealing algorithm to design the sampling network based on three cost factors including the number of reaches, bank length, and subcatchment area. However, these factors are not directly related to the distribution of possible pollution. Thus, this study modified the method by considering three additional factors, i.e. total phosphorus, nitrogen, and sediment loads. The larger the possible load, the higher the probability of a pollution event may occur. The study area was the Derchi reservoir catchment in Taiwan. Pollution loads were derived from the AGNPS model with rainfall intensity estimated using the Thiessen method. Analyses for a network with various numbers of sampling sites were implemented. The results obtained based on varied cost factors were compared and discussed. With the three additional factors, the chosen sampling network is expected to properly detect pollution events and monitor pollution distribution and temporal trends.

  10. Simulating the Evolution of Functional Brain Networks in Alzheimer’s Disease: Exploring Disease Dynamics from the Perspective of Global Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Wang, Miao; Zhu, Wenzhen; Qin, Yuanyuan; Huang, Yue; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Functional brain connectivity is altered during the pathological processes of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but the specific evolutional rules are insufficiently understood. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging indicates that the functional brain networks of individuals with AD tend to be disrupted in hub-like nodes, shifting from a small world architecture to a random profile. Here, we proposed a novel evolution model based on computational experiments to simulate the transition of functional brain networks from normal to AD. Specifically, we simulated the rearrangement of edges in a pathological process by a high probability of disconnecting edges between hub-like nodes, and by generating edges between random pair of nodes. Subsequently, four topological properties and a nodal distribution were used to evaluate our model. Compared with random evolution as a null model, our model captured well the topological alteration of functional brain networks during the pathological process. Moreover, we implemented two kinds of network attack to imitate the damage incurred by the brain in AD. Topological changes were better explained by ‘hub attacks’ than by ‘random attacks’, indicating the fragility of hubs in individuals with AD. This model clarifies the disruption of functional brain networks in AD, providing a new perspective on topological alterations. PMID:27677360

  11. Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, Betty

    Networking is an information giving and receiving system, a support system, and a means whereby women can get ahead in careers--either in new jobs or in current positions. Networking information can create many opportunities: women can talk about how other women handle situations and tasks, and previously established contacts can be used in…

  12. Parsimonious hydrological modeling of urban sewer and river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutu, Sylvain; Del Giudice, Dario; Rossi, Luca; Barry, D. A.

    2012-09-01

    SummaryA parsimonious model of flow capable of simulating flow in natural/engineered catchments and at WWTP (Wastewater Treatment Plant) inlets was developed. The model considers three interacting, dynamic storages that account for transfer of water within the system. One storage describes the “flashy” response of impervious surfaces, another pervious areas and finally one storage describes subsurface flow. The sewerage pipe network is considered as an impervious surface and is thus included in the impervious surface storage. In addition, the model assumes that water discharged from several CSOs (combined sewer overflows) can be accounted for using a single, characteristic CSO. The model was calibrated on, and validated for, the Vidy Bay WWTP, which receives effluent from Lausanne, Switzerland (population about 200,000), as well as for an overlapping urban river basin. The results indicate that a relatively simple approach is suitable for predicting the responses of interacting engineered and natural hydrosystems.

  13. Spatio-temporal analyses of sediment transport processes in an alpine catchment a scales oriented approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, S.; Habersack, H. M.

    2003-04-01

    Increasing morphological problems are being encountered with water courses in Austria, related to the impacts of sediment regime with lack and surplus of material. River bed degradation and aggradation are enhanced by human intervention. On a scaling perspective the boundary conditions and major processes in a catchment, like the geomorphological setting, are given by longterm developments. On the basis of field mapping these effects are discusssed with respect to sediment availability, being affected e. g. by deep-seated gravitational slope deformations and slope creeping. Within these longterm processes, short-term unsteady sediment supply, erosion, transfer, deposition and remobilisation processes determine catchment sedimentation and management. At the moment the analysis of sediment regime is restricted to specific scales. Measurements of sediment transport are performed at limited spatial scales of a few meters or even individual points. These measurements are often not typical for the whole vertical or the whole cross section. The temporal resolution allows mostly no detailed analysis of e.g. the hysteretic behaviour of a flood wave. Furthermore it is questionable whether these data are characteristic for a longer reach which consists of individual sub-reaches of degradation, aggregation or equilibrium conditions. Finally the catchment wide analysis of sediment regime is restricted by the information given at these smaller scales and it is sensitive to the representativeness of these data with respect to spatial and temporal significance. With the help of a River Scaling Concept we discuss different scales in the alpine catchment Sölk for developing and testing a scale oriented procedure to investigate the catchment wide sediment regime in a spatio-temporal frame. It is shown that this methodology improves the quality of results derived from geometrical properties for the subbasins and gives good ideas for the solution of morphological problems.

  14. Influence of urbanization pattern on stream flow of a peri-urban catchment under Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla S. S.; Walsh, Rory P. D.; Ferreira, António J. D.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Coelho, Celeste A. O.

    2015-04-01

    . Percentage impermeable surface seems to control streamflow particularly during dry periods. Winter runoff was 2-4 times higher than total river flow in the summer dry season in highly urbanized areas, but was 21-fold higher in winter in the least urbanized sub-catchment, denoting greater flow connectivity enhanced by increased soil moisture. Although impermeable surfaces are prone to generate overland flow, the proximity to the stream network is an important parameter determining their hydrological impacts. During the monitoring period, the enlargement of 2% of the urban area at downslope locations in the Covões sub-catchment, led to a 6% increase in the runoff coefficient. In contrast, the urban area increase from 9 to 25% mainly in upslope parts of the Quinta sub-catchment did not increase the peak streamflow due to downslope infiltration and surface retention opportunities. Despite impermeable surfaces enhance overland flow, some urban features (e.g. walls and road embankments) promote surface water retention. The presence of artificial drainage systems, on the other hand, enhances flow connectivity, leading to increasing peak flow and quicker response times (~10 minutes versus 40-50 minutes) as in the Covões sub-catchment. Urbanization impact on streamflow responses may be minimized through planning the land-use mosaic so as to maximize infiltration opportunities. Knowledge of the influence of distinct urban mosaics on flow connectivity and stream discharge is therefore important to landscape managers and should guide urban planning in order to minimize flood hazards.

  15. Integrating structural and functional connectivity to characterize sediment dynamics in a small Alpine catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalli, Marco; Crema, Stefano; Blok, Michiel; Lucía, Ana; Comiti, Francesco; Marchi, Lorenzo; Keesstra, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Sediment connectivity can be regarded as a descriptor of the internal linkages between different landscape components within a catchment. The recent focus of the scientific community on connectivity related topics, both concerning hydrological and sediment connectivity, stresses the importance of understanding the main active pathways for a better estimation of energy and matter transfer at catchment scale. This task can be addressed using topography-based indices that analyse the linkages between landscape units. This approach to characterize connectivity is known as structural connectivity. The main limitation of structural connectivity is that it does not account for the processes driving sediment and energy fluxes (i.e., functional connectivity). In this work the integration between structural and functional approaches is proposed for characterizing sediment connectivity in mountain catchments. The structural approach, based on a topography-based sediment connectivity index, was used for assessing hillslope-to-channel connectivity. Since field data on processes driving sediment transport along the channel network are available, a functional approach has been devised to estimate within-channel connectivity. An index of unit stream power computed from the hydraulic properties of the channel (i.e., discharge, slope and channel width) has been compared with the critical unit stream power computed from incipient motion thresholds derived from field data to identify the cells of the Digital Terrain Model (DTM) in which sediment can be mobilized under near-bankfull conditions. The index expressing the within-channel connectivity is given by the length of the reaches consisting of contiguous cells that exceed the critical unit stream power. During high-magnitude floods, when unit stream power values exceed the threshold for incipient motion, channels experience an increase in both hydrological and sediment connectivity. The proposed index characterizes those sections

  16. Simultaneous occurrences of floods in mesoscale catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bàrdossy, Andràs

    2016-04-01

    Floods in mesoscale catchments are often the result of intense precipitation of varying duration. The spatial extent of precipitation is linked to the extent of flooding. The simultaneous occurrence of floods in different medium size catchments is often the reason for large scale floods. The spatial behavior of extreme precipitation and discharge can be investigated using copulas and extreme indices. The relationship between intense precipitations measured at different locations depends on the large scale meteorological conditions. Depending on the geographic location and the dominating weather pattern certain catchments have frequent simultaneous extremes while others behave in a complementary fashion. The purpose of this work is to investigate the simultaneous and complementary occurrence of floods in catchments using copulas conditioned on atmospheric circulation patterns (CPs). Circulation patterns responsible for simultaneous floods are identified using areal precipitation and/or unusual discharge increases. Patterns are identified using a fuzzy rule based approach based on anomalies of the 700 hPa surfaces. The rules are formed by maximizing the explained variance under the assumption of simultaneous and complementary behavior. The conditional copulas are investigated for extreme behavior. Besides the traditional bivariate investigations higher dimensional dependences are investigated using an entropy based approach.

  17. Ecosystem Services Derived from Headwater Catchments

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used data from the USEPA’s wadeable streams assessment (WSA), US Forest Service’s forest inventory and analysis (FIA), and select USFS experimental forests (EF) to investigate potential ecosystems services derived from headwater catchments. C, N, and P inputs to these catchmen...

  18. Hydrological Modelling of Small Catchments Using Swat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, N.; White, S. M.; Worrall, F.; Groves, S.

    The data from a 142ha catchment in Eastern England(Colworth, Bedfordshire)are be- ing used to investigate the performance of the USDA SWAT software for modelling hydrology of small catchments. Stream flow at the catchment outlet has been mon- itored since October 1999. About 50% of the total catchment is directly controlled within one farm and a rotation of wheat, oil seed rape, grass, linseed, beans and peas is grown. Three years of stream flow and climate data are available. Calibration and validation of stream flow was carried out with both runoff modelling options in the SWAT model (USDA curve number method and the Green and Ampt method). The Nash and Sutcliffe efficiencies for the calibration period were 66% and 63% respec- tively. The performance of SWAT was better in the validation period as a whole, with regard to timing of peaks, baseflow values and Nash and Sutcliffe efficiency. An ef- ficiency of 70% was obtained using the curve number method, which is comparable with the efficiencies obtainable with more complex models. Despite this performance, SWAT is under predicting stream flow peaks. A detailed investigation of important model components, has allowed us to identify some of the reasons for under predic- tion of stream flow peaks.

  19. Catchment scale afforestation for mitigating flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Mhari; Quinn, Paul; Bathurst, James; Birkinshaw, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    After the 2013-14 floods in the UK there were calls to 'forest the uplands' as a solution to reducing flood risk across the nation. At present, 1 in 6 homes in Britain are at risk of flooding and current EU legislation demands a sustainable, 'nature-based solution'. However, the role of forests as a natural flood management technique remains highly controversial, due to a distinct lack of robust evidence into its effectiveness in reducing flood risk during extreme events. SHETRAN, physically-based spatially-distributed hydrological models of the Irthing catchment and Wark forest sub-catchments (northern England) have been developed in order to test the hypothesis of the effect trees have on flood magnitude. The advanced physically-based models have been designed to model scale-related responses from 1, through 10, to 100km2, a first study of the extent to which afforestation and woody debris runoff attenuation features (RAFs) may help to mitigate floods at the full catchment scale (100-1000 km2) and on a national basis. Furthermore, there is a need to analyse the extent to which land management practices, and the installation of nature-based RAFs, such as woody debris dams, in headwater catchments can attenuate flood-wave movement, and potentially reduce downstream flood risk. The impacts of riparian planting and the benefits of adding large woody debris of several designs and on differing sizes of channels has also been simulated using advanced hydrodynamic (HiPIMS) and hydrological modelling (SHETRAN). With the aim of determining the effect forestry may have on flood frequency, 1000 years of generated rainfall data representative of current conditions has been used to determine the difference between current land-cover, different distributions of forest cover and the defining scenarios - complete forest removal and complete afforestation of the catchment. The simulations show the percentage of forestry required to have a significant impact on mitigating

  20. Innovative framework to simulate the fate and transport of nonconservative constituents in urban combined sewer catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, V. M.; Quijano, J. C.; Schmidt, A.; Garcia, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a probabilistic model to simulate the fate and transport of nonconservative constituents in urban watersheds. The approach implemented here extends previous studies that rely on the geomorphological instantaneous unit hydrograph concept to include nonconservative constituents. This is implemented with a factor χ that affects the transfer functions and therefore accounts for the loss (gain) of mass associated with the constituent as it travels through the watershed. Using this framework, we developed an analytical solution for the dynamics of dissolved oxygen (DO) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in urban networks based on the Streeter and Phelps model. This model breaks down the catchment into a discreet number of possible flow paths through the system, requiring less data and implementation effort than well-established deterministic models. Application of the model to one sewer catchment in the Chicago area with available BOD information proved its ability to predict the BOD concentration observed in the measurements. In addition, comparison of the model with a calibrated Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) of another sewer catchment from the Chicago area showed that the model predicted the BOD concentration as well as the widely accepted SWMM. The developed model proved to be a suitable alternative to simulate the fate and transport of constituents in urban catchments with limited and uncertain input data.

  1. Occurrence of metolachlor and trifluralin losses in the Save river agricultural catchment during floods.

    PubMed

    Boithias, Laurie; Sauvage, Sabine; Taghavi, Lobat; Merlina, Georges; Probst, Jean-Luc; Pérez, José Miguel Sánchez

    2011-11-30

    Rising pesticide levels in streams draining intensively managed agricultural land have a detrimental effect on aquatic ecosystems and render water unfit for human consumption. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was applied to simulate daily pesticide transfer at the outlet from an agriculturally intensive catchment of 1110 km(2) (Save river, south-western France). SWAT reliably simulated both dissolved and sorbed metolachlor and trifluralin loads and concentrations at the catchment outlet from 1998 to 2009. On average, 17 kg of metolachlor and 1 kg of trifluralin were exported at outlet each year, with annual rainfall variations considered. Surface runoff was identified as the preferred pathway for pesticide transfer, related to the good correlation between suspended sediment exportation and pesticide, in both soluble and sorbed phases. Pesticide exportation rates at catchment outlet were less than 0.1% of the applied amount. At outlet, SWAT hindcasted that (i) 61% of metolachlor and 52% of trifluralin were exported during high flows and (ii) metolachlor and trifluralin concentrations exceeded European drinking water standards of 0.1 μg L(-1) for individual pesticides during 149 (3.6%) and 17 (0.4%) days of the 1998-2009 period respectively. SWAT was shown to be a promising tool for assessing large catchment river network pesticide contamination in the event of floods but further useful developments of pesticide transfers and partition coefficient processes would need to be investigated.

  2. Variability of rainfall over Lake Kariba catchment area in the Zambezi river basin, Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchuru, Shepherd; Botai, Joel O.; Botai, Christina M.; Landman, Willem A.; Adeola, Abiodun M.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, average monthly and annual rainfall totals recorded for the period 1970 to 2010 from a network of 13 stations across the Lake Kariba catchment area of the Zambezi river basin were analyzed in order to characterize the spatial-temporal variability of rainfall across the catchment area. In the analysis, the data were subjected to intervention and homogeneity analysis using the Cumulative Summation (CUSUM) technique and step change analysis using rank-sum test. Furthermore, rainfall variability was characterized by trend analysis using the non-parametric Mann-Kendall statistic. Additionally, the rainfall series were decomposed and the spectral characteristics derived using Cross Wavelet Transform (CWT) and Wavelet Coherence (WC) analysis. The advantage of using the wavelet-based parameters is that they vary in time and can therefore be used to quantitatively detect time-scale-dependent correlations and phase shifts between rainfall time series at various localized time-frequency scales. The annual and seasonal rainfall series were homogeneous and demonstrated no apparent significant shifts. According to the inhomogeneity classification, the rainfall series recorded across the Lake Kariba catchment area belonged to category A (useful) and B (doubtful), i.e., there were zero to one and two absolute tests rejecting the null hypothesis (at 5 % significance level), respectively. Lastly, the long-term variability of the rainfall series across the Lake Kariba catchment area exhibited non-significant positive and negative trends with coherent oscillatory modes that are constantly locked in phase in the Morlet wavelet space.

  3. Non-linearities in hydrological connectivity and microbiological flux in nested catchments - implications of environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetzlaff, D.; Soulsby, C.; Birkel, C.; Capell, R.; Speed, M.

    2009-12-01

    The non-linearities of catchment hydrological behaviour are strongly influenced by the connectivity of hillslopes and channel networks, particularly where overland flow is an important runoff mechanism. Such surface connectivity also controls the flux of microbiological pollutants (coliform bacteria) from areas of live stock grazing which can have serious health implications for potable water supplies. We report a nested catchment study where hydrological and tracer monitoring over a two year period has been coupled with regular sampling for faecal indicator organisms (FIOs). The study has been based in catchments with mixed landuse where FIOs are derived from livestock (sheep and cows) in agricultural land and wild animals (red deer) on moorlands. At all scales (3-1800km2), high levels of FIO were transient and episodic and strongly correlated with periods of high hydrological connectivity. We show how this non-linearity in connectivity can be captured within a dynamic hydrological model. The model was used, along with climate change predictions, to assess possible scenarios of change in connectivity and microbiological contamination in catchments with different land use.

  4. Assessing the applicability of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) to Irish Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymszewicz, A.; Mockler, E.; O'Sullivan, J.; Bruen, M.; Turner, J.; Conroy, E.; Kelly-Quinn, M.; Harrington, J.; Lawler, D.

    2015-03-01

    Elevated suspended sediment concentrations in fluvial environments have important implications for system ecology and even small concentrations may have serious consequences for sensitive ecosystems or organisms, such as freshwater pearl mussels (Margaritifera margaritifera). Informed decision making is therefore required for land managers to understand and control soil erosion and sediment delivery to the river network. However, given that monitoring of sediment fluxes requires financial and human resources which are often limited at a national scale, sediment mobilisation and delivery models are commonly used for sediment yield estimation and management. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) is the most widely used model for overland flow erosion and can, when combined with a sediment delivery ratio (SDR), provide reasonable sediment load estimations for a catchment. This paper presents RUSLE factors established from extant GIS and rainfall datasets that are incorporated into a flexible catchment modelling approach. We believe that this is the first time that results from a RUSLE application at a national scale are tested against measured sediment yield values available from Ireland. An initial assessment of RUSLE applied to Irish conditions indicates an overestimation of modelled sediment yield values for most of the selected catchments. Improved methods for model and SDR factors estimation are needed to account for Irish conditions and catchment characteristics. Nonetheless, validation and testing of the model in this study using observed values is an important step towards more effective sediment yield modelling tools for nationwide applications.

  5. Inferring the effect of catchment complexity on mesoscale hydrologic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FröHlich, Holger L.; Breuer, Lutz; Vaché, Kellie B.; Frede, Hans-Georg

    2008-09-01

    The effect of catchment complexity on hydrologic and hydrochemical catchment response was characterized in the mesoscale Dill catchment (692 km2), Germany. This analysis was developed using multivariate daily stream concentration and discharge data at the basin outlet, in connection with less frequently sampled catchment-wide end-member chemistries. The link between catchment-wide runoff sources and basin output was observed through a combination of concentration-discharge (C-Q) analysis and multivariate end-member projection. Subsurface stormflow, various groundwater and wastewater sources, as well as urban surface runoff emerged in catchment output chemistry. Despite the identification of multiple sources, several runoff sources observed within the catchment failed to display consistent links with the output chemistry. This failure to associate known source chemistry with outlet chemistry may have resulted from a lack of hydraulic connectivity between sources and basin outlet, from different arrival times of subbasin-scale runoff contributions, and also from an overlap of source chemistries that subsumed discrete runoff sources in catchment output. This combination of catchment heterogeneity and complexity simply suggests that the internal spatial organization of the catchment impeded the application of lumped mixing calculations at the 692 km2 outlet. Given these challenges, we suggest that in mesoscale catchment research, the potential effects of spatial organization should be included in any interpretation of highly integrated response signals, or when using those signals to evaluate numerical rainfall-runoff models.

  6. Social Integration and Suicide-related Ideation from a Social Network Perspective: A Longitudinal Study among Inner-City African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Kuramoto, SJ; Wilcox, HC; Latkin, CA

    2013-01-01

    This study examined if social network density, as measured by the extent to which network members know each other, was associated with suicide-related ideation and plan approximately three years later. Eight hundred nineteen African Americans were interviewed at Wave 1 (1997–1999) and Wave 4 (2001–2003) of the Self-Help In Eliminating Life-Threatening Diseases (SHIELD) study, a HIV preventive intervention study in Baltimore, MD. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to compare risks of suicide-related ideation and plan at Wave 4 by Wave 1 density. Even after adjusting for baseline sociodemographic characteristics and depressive symptoms, individuals with lower level of density were three times more likely to report suicide-related ideation and plan in the past year at Wave 4. The findings reinforce the importance of social integration among inner-city African Americans from a social network perspective. Future research should examine the mechanisms associated with this relationship and other social network constructs. PMID:23530665

  7. Problematization of perspectives on health promotion and empowerment in mental health nursing--within the research network "MeHNuRse" and the Horatio conference, 2012.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Patrik D; Nunstedt, Håkan; Berglund, Inger J; Ahlström, Britt H; Hedelin, Birgitta; Skärsäter, Ingela; Jormfeldt, Henrika

    2014-01-01

    Mental illness is increasing worldwide, while society's response seems to be a trend toward narrower and more specialized mental health care. This development is creating great demands on mental health nurses to include a health promotion perspective in care and support of persons with mental illness. A health promotion perspective emphasizes cooperation and communication with people who suffer from long-term mental illness, focusing on their independence and health. From a health perspective, every human being is an actor in his/her own life, with an inherent ability to make his/her own choices. However, persons who suffer from long-term mental illness are at risk of losing power and control over areas of their lives and their health. Mental health nurses are in a position to support these individuals in promoting health and in maintaining or regaining control over their lives. The emphasis of this paper is to problematize mental health nurses' responsibility to provide health-promoting nursing care in relation to empowerment by means of emancipation, self-efficacy, and self-management. We argue that mental health nurses can work from a health-promoting perspective by using these concepts and that this challenges some of the traditional ideas of health promotion in mental health nursing. The theoretical background discussions in this paper have their origin in the research network "Mental Health Nursing Research in Scandinavia" (MeHNuRse) and from the professional discussions developed during a 2012 workshop that included mental health nurses and researchers at the European Horatio Festival in Stockholm.

  8. Characterizing hot spots throughout the catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welti, N.; Lockington, D.; Jakeman, T.; Hunt, R.

    2012-04-01

    Few catchments in the world are left truly undisturbed. Rather, they are under anthropogenic stress for a variety of reasons ranging from climate forcing to meeting the basic water allocation needs of the population. Reduction in the number of inundation areas has significantly decreased the nutrient and organic matter retention capacity along the river corridor, with major consequences for the both the riverine and coastal ecosystems. Cumulative stress may build up to a "tipping point" which can cause a change or set of changes which could occur non-linearly. In order to mitigate the environmental stress on these ecosystems, management plans are created to balance the needs of the dependent populations and those of ecology. While these catchment-wide plans aim to improve the ecological function of aquatic areas over the large scale, this sledge-hammer approach ignores the inherent heterogeneity in the catchment. Societal (and policy) decisions involve more than abiotic quantification of water storage and flow. A more encompassing ecohydrological view facilitates a more rounded policy framework that has flexibility to accommodate multiple social drivers, and one that can accommodate an "ecosystem improvement" rather than single species improvement. Not every spot in the landscape is equally valuable for specific societal values. Areas of high activity may provide the resilience capacity necessary to prevent catastrophic changes. In times of ecological instability, ecosystem resilience is of paramount importance in maintaining essential ecosystem services. Hot spots of biogeochemical cycling will occur where unique situations arise, such as areas of surface and groundwater interaction, creating spots of localized, high activity. In order to understand the systems' potential to support various habitat niches in the large scale, the identification of specific hot spots or hot moments is necessary. A basal understanding of the concurrent biogeochemical cycles enables

  9. Groundwater Head Control of Catchment Nitrate Export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, A.; Schmidt, C.; Rode, M.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated nutrient fluxes from agricultural catchments affect downstream water resources. A method to assess nutrient fluxes is the evaluation of the export regime. The export regime classifies the relation between concentration and discharge and integrates mobilization as well as retention processes. Solutes can be exported chemostatically (variance of concentration << variance of discharge) or chemodynamically (variance of concentration ≥ variance of discharge). Starting point of this study is the evaluation of export regimes of nitrate in a series of neighboring sub-catchments of the Central German River Bode catchment. We found an accretion pattern of nitrate with increasing concentration when discharge is increasing and thus a chemodynamic export regime. Here we follow a nested approach and have a closer look at the controls of nitrate export in the small (1.4 km2) headwater catchment of the Sauerbach stream. The Sauerbach catchment is dominated by agricultural land use and is characterized by tile drains. We hypothesize that discharge as well as nitrate export is controlled by the groundwater head variability over time. To that end we follow a joint data analysis of discharge, groundwater heads and nitrate concentrations in groundwater, tile drains and surface water. At the gauging station the nitrate export is chemodynamic exhibiting the typical accretion pattern also found at the larger scale. Our data analysis shows that nitrate export regime is in two ways controlled by the depth to groundwater and the groundwater head variability: Discharge increases with increasing groundwater heads due to the activation of tile drains. On the other hand, depth to groundwater and passage through the unsaturated zone is the major control of aquifer nitrate concentration. At wells with larger depth to groundwater nitrate concentrations are significantly lower than at more shallow wells indicating retention processes in the unsaturated zone. Therefore the concentration in

  10. A perspective on the advancement of natural language processing tasks via topological analysis of complex networks. Comment on "Approaching human language with complex networks" by Cong and Liu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amancio, Diego Raphael

    2014-12-01

    Concepts and methods of complex networks have been applied to probe the properties of a myriad of real systems [1]. The finding that written texts modeled as graphs share several properties of other completely different real systems has inspired the study of language as a complex system [2]. Actually, language can be represented as a complex network in its several levels of complexity. As a consequence, morphological, syntactical and semantical properties have been employed in the construction of linguistic networks [3]. Even the character level has been useful to unfold particular patterns [4,5]. In the review by Cong and Liu [6], the authors emphasize the need to use the topological information of complex networks modeling the various spheres of the language to better understand its origins, evolution and organization. In addition, the authors cite the use of networks in applications aiming at holistic typology and stylistic variations. In this context, I will discuss some possible directions that could be followed in future research directed towards the understanding of language via topological characterization of complex linguistic networks. In addition, I will comment the use of network models for language processing applications. Additional prospects for future practical research lines will also be discussed in this comment.

  11. Catchment rehabilitation and hydro-geomorphic characteristics of mountain streams in the western Rift Valley escarpment of Northern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghebreyohannes Asfaha, Tesfaalem; Frankl, Amaury; Haile, Mitiku; Nyssen, Jan

    2013-04-01

    The catchments in the western Rift Valley escarpment of Northern Ethiopia are highly responsive in terms of hydro-geomorphic changes. With rapid deforestation in the first half of the 20th century, dense gully and scar networks developed, exporting huge amounts of runoff and sediment down to the fertile and densely populated Raya Valley. Consequently, threatening the environment and the livelihoods of the people both in the upstream and downstream areas. To reverse this problem, catchment-scale rehabilitation activities were initiated in the mid-1980s. In this study, we examine the hydro-geomorphic response of streams after catchment rehabilitation. Scar density was digitized from Google Earth imagery (2005) in 20 adjacent catchments and was explained in terms of its corresponding Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and slope gradient. This was accompanied by analysis of incidental repeat photographs and field observations. As evidenced by the series of repeat photographs, the vegetation cover of the catchments decreased up to 1975 and rapid reforestation occurred thereafter. A multiple regression analysis (R2=0.53, P<0.01) showed that scar density is negatively correlated with NDVI and positively with average gradient of very steep slopes (>60%). Moreover, due to reduction in discharge and sediment flow from the rehabilitated catchments, stream adjustments were observed in the field: previously braided stream channels have changed to single-thread streams, many lateral bars are stabilized and covered by vegetation, stream channels are incising due to clear water effect and the size of boulder deposits decreases. Therefore, the study shows that, land degradation activities in the upper catchments resulted in changes in hydro-geomorphic characteristics of the streams and reduction in runoff and sediment transport to the Raya Valley. Key words: scar density; NDVI; stream incision; soil and water conservation; stream adjustment; land use change.

  12. Spatial and temporal water quality dynamics during baseflow in an agricultural headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Weiler, Markus; Saroos, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the interaction of time variant source areas and biogeochemical in-stream processes and the determination of resulting spatial and temporal signatures of stream water composition will improve the prediction and management of water quality at the catchment scale. During baseflow periods runoff source areas can change over time depending e.g. on storage depletion rates, actual wetness, groundwater level or local evapotranspiration rates. Due to the resulting space/time variant water fluxes, these effects are also expressed in the physico-chemical composition of surface waters. Unfortunately the resulting signature is often overlain by biogeochemical in-stream processes, which make it difficult to identify physico-chemical signatures of specific runoff source areas. We studied these interactions in a 1.7 km² agricultural headwater catchment. A dense artificial drainage network and a predominantly impervious streambed allowed for detecting distinct locations of groundwater inflow and determining ongoing biogeochemical in-stream processes. The analysis of sub-catchment storage depletion and resulting time variant quantitative and qualitative impacts on stream water composition was based on observations made during 11 catchment wide synoptic sampling campaigns during the summer baseflow period. We measured stream discharges with salt dilution gauging as well as water temperatures (T) and electrical conductivity (EC) upstream, downstream and inside all active drain pipes. During two campaigns we took additional water samples for major ion analysis at all sampling points. Discharges, T and EC stream-network data sets were used to spatially determine groundwater contributions using mixing equations for 2 and 3 components, respectively. Thereby we derived local baseflow recessions in relation to the catchment wide stream discharge. Using a water balance approach we determined active runoff source areas for each drain pipe and identified the dominant land use

  13. Minimizing uncertainty of daily rainfall interpolation over large catchments through realistic sampling of anisotropic correlogram parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyasi-Agyei, Yeboah

    2016-04-01

    It has been established that daily rainfall gauged network density is not adequate for the level of hydrological modelling required of large catchments involving pollutant and sediment transport, such as the catchments draining the coastal regions of Queensland, Australia, to the sensitive Great Barrier Reef. This paper seeks to establish a link between the spatial structure of radar and gauge rainfall for improved interpolation of the limited gauged data over a grid or functional units of catchments in regions with or without radar records. The study area is within Mt. Stapylton weather radar station range, a 128 km square region for calibration and validation, and the Brisbane river catchment for validation only. Two time periods (2000-01-01 to 2008-12-31 and 2009-01-01 to 2015-06-30) were considered, the later period for calibration when radar records were available and both time periods for validation without regard to radar information. Anisotropic correlograms of both the gauged and radar data were developed and used to establish the linkage required for areas without radar records. The maximum daily temperature significantly influenced the distributional parameters of the linkage. While the gauged, radar and sampled correlogram parameters reproduced the mean estimates similarly using leave-one-out cross-validation of Ordinary Kriging, the gauged parameters overestimated the standard deviation (SD) which reflects uncertainty by over 91% of cases compared with the radar or the sampled parameter sets. However, the distribution of the SD generated by the radar and the sampled correlogram parameters could not be distinguished, with a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test p-value of 0.52. For the validation case with the catchment, the percentage overestimation of SD by the gauged parameter sets decreased to 81.2% and 87.1% for the earlier and later time periods, respectively. It is observed that the extreme wet days' parameters and statistics were fairly widely distributed

  14. High-resolution seismic monitoring of geomorphic activity in a catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtin, A.; Hovius, N.; Turowski, J.; McArdell, B.; Vergne, J.

    2012-04-01

    Continuous survey of the surface activity in a river catchment is essential for the understanding of the landscape dynamics. In steep mountain catchments, a detailed spatial and temporal monitoring of geomorphic processes is generally impossible. The classic techniques (imagery and in situ channel approaches) are not adapted to the extreme conditions that occur during strong rainstorms. There is a real need to develop a method and to define the procedures that will allow the study of surface processes without any environmental dependency. Nowadays, more and more studies explore the use of the seismic instruments to survey the catchment activity. Seismometers can be deployed in sheltered area, which allow us to record in continuous the ground vibrations induced by surface processes, like the sediment transport and mass movements. To continue the exploration of this potential, we deployed a dense array of 10 seismometers in the Illgraben, a 10-km2 catchment in the Swiss Alps, during the summer 2011. This catchment is highly prone to hillslope and debris flow activity, so almost every summer convective storms trigger geomorphic events. The network was designed to monitor the spatial and temporal features of every type of surface activity. Thus during rainstorms, the stations located along the main stream well record the channel activity like the passage of sediment flows, while the instruments installed around the catchment reveal the occurrences of many rockfalls. These latter events show a spectral seismic signature at high frequencies (> 1 Hz), whereas the channel activity is dominant between 10 and 30 Hz. For the largest debris flow of the summer, we are able to identify the location of its initiation from the hillslope. Then, we can map the secondary events, which were triggered by the propagation of the debris flow. With these preliminary results, we demonstrate that the use of a dense seismic array is relevant to map in real time the landscape dynamics at the

  15. Effect of Agricultural Practices on Hydrology and Water Chemistry in a Small Irrigated Catchment, Yakima River Basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Johnson, Henry M.

    2009-01-01

    The role of irrigation and artificial drainage in the hydrologic cycle and the transport of solutes in a small agricultural catchment in central Washington's Yakima Valley were explored using hydrologic, chemical, isotopic, age-dating, and mineralogical data from several environmental compartments, including stream water, ground water, overland flow, and streambed pore water. A conceptual understanding of catchment hydrology and solute transport was developed and an inverse end-member mixing analysis was used to further explore the effects of agriculture in this small catchment. The median concentrations of major solutes and nitrates were similar for the single field site and for the catchment outflow site, indicating that the net effects of transport processes for these constituents were similar at both scales. However, concentrations of nutrients were different at the two sites, suggesting that field-scale variations in agricultural practices as well as nearstream and instream biochemical processes are important components of agricultural chemical transformation and transport in this catchment. This work indicates that irrigation coupled with artificial drainage networks may exacerbate the ecological effects of agricultural runoff by increasing direct connectivity between fields and streams and minimizing potentially mitigating effects (denitrification and dilution, for example) of longer subsurface pathways.

  16. Tracking multiple sediment cascades at the river network scale identifies controls and emerging patterns of sediment connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Rafael J. P.; Bizzi, Simone; Castelletti, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Sediment connectivity in fluvial networks results from the transfer of sediment between multiple sources and sinks. Connectivity scales differently between all sources and sinks as a function of distance, source grain size and sediment supply, network topology and topography, and hydrologic forcing. In this paper, we address the challenge of quantifying sediment connectivity and its controls at the network scale. We expand the concept of a single, catchment-scale sediment cascade toward representing sediment transport from each source as a suite of individual cascading processes. We implement this approach in the herein presented CAtchment Sediment Connectivity And DElivery (CASCADE) modeling framework. In CASCADE, each sediment cascade establishes connectivity between a specific source and its multiple sinks. From a source perspective, the fate of sediment is controlled by its detachment and downstream transport capacity, resulting in a specific trajectory of transfer and deposition. From a sink perspective, the assemblage of incoming cascades defines provenance, sorting, and magnitude of sediment deliveries. At the network scale, this information reveals emerging patterns of connectivity and the location of bottlenecks, where disconnectivity occurs. In this paper, we apply CASCADE to quantitatively analyze the sediment connectivity of a major river system in SE Asia. The approach provides a screening model that can support analyses of large, poorly monitored river systems. We test the sensitivity of CASCADE to various parameters and identify the distribution of energy between the multiple, simultaneously active sediment cascades as key control behind network sediment connectivity. To conclude, CASCADE enables a quantitative, spatially explicit analysis of network sediment connectivity with potential applications in both river science and management.

  17. Similarity and scale in catchment storm response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Eric F.; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Beven, Keith

    1993-01-01

    Until recently, very little progress had been made in understanding the relationship between small-scale variability of topography, soil, and rainfalls and the storm response seen at the catchment scale. The work reviewed here represents the first attempt at a systematic theoretical framework for such understanding in the context of surface runoff generation by different processes. The parameterization of hydrological processes over a range of scales is examined, and the concept of the 'representative elementary area' (REA) is introduced. The REA is a fundamental scale for catchment modeling at which continuum assumptions can be applied for the spatially variable controls and parameters, and spatial patterns no longer have to be considered explicitly. The investigation of scale leads into the concept of hydrologic similarity in which the effects of the environmental controls on runoff generation and flood frequency response be investigated independently of catchment scale. The paper reviews the authors' initial results and hopefully will motivate others to also investigate the issues of hydrologic scale and similarity.

  18. Picturing and modeling catchments by representative hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loritz, Ralf; Hassler, Sibylle K.; Jackisch, Conrad; Allroggen, Niklas; van Schaik, Loes; Wienhöfer, Jan; Zehe, Erwin

    2017-03-01

    This study explores the suitability of a single hillslope as a parsimonious representation of a catchment in a physically based model. We test this hypothesis by picturing two distinctly different catchments in perceptual models and translating these pictures into parametric setups of 2-D physically based hillslope models. The model parametrizations are based on a comprehensive field data set, expert knowledge and process-based reasoning. Evaluation against streamflow data highlights that both models predicted the annual pattern of streamflow generation as well as the hydrographs acceptably. However, a look beyond performance measures revealed deficiencies in streamflow simulations during the summer season and during individual rainfall-runoff events as well as a mismatch between observed and simulated soil water dynamics. Some of these shortcomings can be related to our perception of the systems and to the chosen hydrological model, while others point to limitations of the representative hillslope concept itself. Nevertheless, our results confirm that representative hillslope models are a suitable tool to assess the importance of different data sources as well as to challenge our perception of the dominant hydrological processes we want to represent therein. Consequently, these models are a promising step forward in the search for the optimal representation of catchments in physically based models.

  19. Water quality in sugar catchments of Queensland.

    PubMed

    Rayment, G E

    2003-01-01

    Water quality condition and trend are important indicators of the impact of land use on the environment, as degraded water quality causes unwelcome changes to ecosystem composition and health. These concerns extend to the sea, where discharges of nutrients, sediments and toxicants above natural levels are unwelcome, particularly when they drain to the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area and other coastal waters of Queensland. Sugarcane is grown in 26 major river catchments in Queensland, most in environmentally sensitive areas. This puts pressure on the Queensland Sugar Industry to manage the land in ways that have minimum adverse off-site impacts. Sugar researchers including CRC Sugar have been associated with water quality studies in North Queensland. These include investigations and reviews to assess the role of groundwater as a pathway for nitrate loss from canelands in the Herbert Catchment, to find causes of oxygen depletion in water (including irrigation runoff) from Ingham to Mackay, to use residues of superseded pesticides as indicators of sediment loss to the sea, and to assemble information on water quality pressure and status in sugar catchments. Key findings, plus information on input pressures are described in this paper, and areas of concern and opportunities discussed.

  20. Modeling of facade leaching in urban catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutu, S.; Del Giudice, D.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Building facades are protected from microbial attack by incorporation of biocides within them. Flow over facades leaches these biocides and transports them to the urban environment. A parsimonious water quantity/quality model applicable for engineered urban watersheds was developed to compute biocide release from facades and their transport at the urban basin scale. The model couples two lumped submodels applicable at the basin scale, and a local model of biocide leaching at the facade scale. For the facade leaching, an existing model applicable at the individual wall scale was utilized. The two lumped models describe urban hydrodynamics and leachate transport. The integrated model allows prediction of biocide concentrations in urban rivers. It was applied to a 15 km2urban hydrosystem in western Switzerland, the Vuachère river basin, to study three facade biocides (terbutryn, carbendazim, diuron). The water quality simulated by the model matched well most of the pollutographs at the outlet of the Vuachère watershed. The model was then used to estimate possible ecotoxicological impacts of facade leachates. To this end, exceedance probabilities and cumulative pollutant loads from the catchment were estimated. Results showed that the considered biocides rarely exceeded the relevant predicted no-effect concentrations for the riverine system. Despite the heterogeneities and complexity of (engineered) urban catchments, the model application demonstrated that a computationally "light" model can be employed to simulate the hydrograph and pollutograph response within them. It thus allows catchment-scale assessment of the potential ecotoxicological impact of biocides on receiving waters.

  1. Land use control of nitrate export behavior across catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, Andreas; Schmidt, Christian; Selle, Benny; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2014-05-01

    Nutrient exports from catchments and their temporal and spatial variability significantly affect downstream water quality and ecosystem health. There is hence a need to better understand and classify catchment nutrient export dynamics in order to reproduce catchment functions (such as nutrient mobilization and retention) and predict the response of these functions to changing boundary conditions. However, the complexity of catchment structure and the multitude of the processes involved challenge this objective. One approach to meet this challenge is a top-down, data-driven analysis of integrated catchment responses, such as discharge and solute concentration time series. For top-down analysis, different catchments are compared to identify key variables governing catchment response. We conducted a multi-catchment study applying top-down methods to analyze nitrate concentration and discharge time series from streams draining nine catchments in central Germany. The studied catchments, ranging from "pristine" mountains to agriculturally-managed lowlands, span gradients in land use, geology, and climatic conditions. We hypothesized that land use type is the main control on stream nitrate concentrations and catchment export behaviour, with more chemostatic export behaviour occurring in catchments with higher percentages of agricultural land use due to the presence of large nitrate stocks that effectively function as an unlimited nitrate storage. Consistent with this hypothesis we found that median nitrate concentrations were positively correlated with the percentage of agricultural land use in the different catchments despite differences in catchment climatic and geological conditions. Magnitude and direction of concentration-discharge relationship was evaluated using the slope b of the linear regression of log nitrate concentrations vs. log discharge as a metric for export behaviour. All catchments exhibited a positive slope b indicating concentrations increase with

  2. Primary Care Clinicians' Perspectives on Management of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections: An Iowa Research Network Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Jeanette M.; Ely, John W.; Levy, Barcey T.; Smith, Tara C.; Merchant, Mary L.; Bergus, George R.; Jogerst, Gerald J.

    2011-01-01

    An estimated 95,000 people developed methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) infections during 2005 of which 14% were community-associated and 85% were hospital or other health setting associated, and 19,000 Americans died from these infections that year. Purpose: To explore health care providers' perspectives on management…

  3. The RAFT Telemedicine Network: Lessons Learnt and Perspectives from a Decade of Educational and Clinical Services in Low- and Middle-Incomes Countries

    PubMed Central

    Bediang, Georges; Perrin, Caroline; Ruiz de Castañeda, Rafael; Kamga, Yannick; Sawadogo, Alexandre; Bagayoko, Cheick Oumar; Geissbuhler, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Background: The objectives of this paper are to (i) provide an overview of the educational and clinical experiences of the Réseau en Afrique Francophone pour la Télémédecine (RAFT) network, (ii) analyze key challenges and lessons learnt throughout a decade of activity, and (iii) draw a vision and perspectives of its sustainability. Methods: The study was carried out following three main stages: (i) a literature review, (ii) the analysis of key documents, and (iii) discussions with key collaborators of the RAFT. Results: Réseau en Afrique Francophone pour la Télémédecine has been offering an important quantity of educational, clinical, and public health activities during the last decade. The educational activities include the weekly delivery of video-lectures for continuing and post-graduate medical education, the use of virtual patients for training in clinical decision making, research training activities using ICTs and other e-learning activities. The clinical and public health activities include tele-expertise to support health professionals in the management of difficult clinical cases, the implementation of clinical information systems in African hospitals, the deployment of mHealth projects, etc. Since 2010, the RAFT has been extended to the Altiplano in Bolivia and Nepal (in progress). Lessons Learnt and Perspectives: Important lessons have been learnt from the accumulated experiences throughout these years. These lessons concern: social and organization, human resources, technologies and data security, policy and legislation, and economy and financing. Also, given the increase of the activities and the integration of eHealth and telemedicine in the health system of most of the countries, the RAFT network faces many other challenges and perspectives such as learning throughout life, recognition, and valorization of teaching or learning activities, the impact evaluation of interventions, and the scaling up and transferability out of Africa of RAFT

  4. Problems with the interpolation of precipitation amounts in mountainous catchments using traditional techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Sandoval, J. C.; Jacquin, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    Spatial distribution of precipitation is a major source of predictive uncertainty in hydrological modeling, especially in catchments characterized by a complex topography. In this case, traditional methods utilized in hydrology are most probably unable to provide reliable estimations of precipitation amounts corresponding to different elevations. However, the simplicity and ease of application of such methods maintain them as attractive alternatives for engineering practitioners. This study is intended to evaluate to what extent precipitation estimates provided by traditional methods are appropriate in the case of Andean catchments. The catchment case study is Aconcagua River at Chacabuquito, located in the Andean region of Central Chile. This is a snowmelt dominated catchment with a surface of 2110[Km2], where approximately 5% corresponds to glaciers. Elevation ranges from 950[m.a.s.l.] to 5930[m.a.s.l.]. Most precipitation occurs between May and August, while precipitation amounts during the rest of the year are relatively low. The pluviometric network is extremely sparse. In this study, monthly data from nine precipitation stations in the period April 1965-March 2001 are used. All of these stations are located between 600[m.a.s.l.] and 3000[m.a.s.l.] and only four of them are actually within the catchment Precipitation interpolation techniques applied in this study include multiquadratic function (MF) fitting, Thiessen Polygons (TP) and inverse distance (ID) weighting. The goodness of fit of precipitation estimates is evaluated by means of cross validation experiments. Due to the limitations existing in the spatial extent of data, these experiments only provide information about the plausibility of the precipitation estimates below 3000[m.a.s.l.], where about 62% of the catchment area is located. Results reveal that estimation errors are significant for all methods, especially during the humid season. Throughout the hydrological year, the MF method provides the

  5. Understanding sediment sources in a peri-urban Mediterranean catchment using geochemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla; Walsh, Rory; Kikuchi, Ryunosuke; Blake, Will

    2016-04-01

    different particle size fractions (0.125-2.000mm, 0.063-0.125mm and <0.063mm). Seventeen stream sites were sampled plus a sample of sediment from a road surface immediately it entered the stream network. The elemental composition (40 elements) of each size fraction was assessed using a Niton X-ray fluorescence elemental analyser. Results show that rock type has a profound influence on the geochemical properties of bed-sediments. Catchment outlet sediment collected after the summer and a storm of high rainfall intensity following dry weather displayed geochemical properties closer to those of sediment from sandstone sub-catchments, and in particularly sediment from the enterprise park under construction. After the storm that followed very wet weather, however, limestone areas became of much greater significance as sediment sources, probably because of the high soil saturation. At limestone stream sites receiving runoff from the newly constructed road, fine bed-sediment geochemistry was found to be similar to that of road sediment, indicating a high contribution of this source. These results are supported by spatio-temporal differences in streamflow and suspended sediment concentrations at instrumented monitoring stations. It is concluded that this methodology represents a potentially useful tool to enable river managers to detect and assess sediment sources in urbanized and partly urbanized catchments, and to supporting them in designing and implementing effective land-use mosaics and site-specific measures to mitigate erosion.

  6. Digital divide 2.0: the role of social networking sites in seeking health information online from a longitudinal perspective.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yang; Xie, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    Adopting a longitudinal angle, this study analyzed data from the Pew Internet's Health Tracking Survey in 2006, 2008, and 2010 to identify potential communication inequalities in social networking site use. Results showed that with the growing role of social networking site use in predicting people's likelihood of seeking health information online, the socioeconomic and demographic factors that contributed to the disparities in social networking site use could also lead to disparities in seeking health information online. Also, results indicated that people are more likely to seek heath-related information online if they or their close family or friends have a chronic disease situation.

  7. The many levels of causal brain network discovery. Comment on "Foundational perspectives on causality in large-scale brain networks" by M. Mannino and S.L. Bressler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes-Sosa, Pedro A.

    2015-12-01

    Unraveling the dynamically changing networks of the brain is probably the single most important current task for the neurosciences. I wish to commend the authors on this refreshing and provocative paper [1], which not only recapitulates some of the longstanding philosophical difficulties involved in the analysis of causality in the sciences, but also summarizes current work on statistical methods for determining causal networks in the brain. I fully concur with several of the opinions defended by the authors: The most fruitful level of analysis for systems neuroscience is that of neural masses, each comprising thousands of neurons. This is what is known as the mesoscopic scale.

  8. Catchment classification and similarity using correlation in streamflow time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, B.; Archfield, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Catchment classification is an important component of hydrologic analyses, particularly for linking changes in ecological integrity to streamflow alteration, transferring time series or model parameters from gauged to ungauged locations, and as a way to understand the similarity in the response of catchments to change. Metrics of similarity used in catchment classification have ranged from aggregate catchment properties such as geologic or climate characteristics to variables derived from the daily streamflow hydrograph; however, no one set of classification variables can fully describe similarity between catchments as the variables used for such assessments often depend on the question being asked. We propose an alternative method based on similarity for hydrologic classification: correlation between the daily streamflow time series. If one assumes that the streamflow signal is the integrated response of a catchment to both climate and geology, then the strength of correlation in streamflow between two catchments is a measure of the strength of similarity in hydrologic response between those two catchments. Using the nonparametric Spearman rho correlation coefficient between streamflow time series at 54 unregulated and unaltered streamgauges in the mid-Atlantic United States, we show that correlation is a parsimonious classification metric that results in physically interpretable classes. Using the correlation between the deseasonalized streamflow time series and reclassifying the streamgauges, we also find that seasonality plays an important role in understanding catchment flow dynamics, especially those that can be linked to ecological response and similarity although not to a large extent in this study area.

  9. Spatio-temporal organization of dynamics in a two-dimensional periodically driven vortex flow: A Lagrangian flow network perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Michael; Donner, Reik V.

    2017-03-01

    We study the Lagrangian dynamics of passive tracers in a simple model of a driven two-dimensional vortex resembling real-world geophysical flow patterns. Using a discrete approximation of the system's transfer operator, we construct a directed network that describes the exchange of mass between distinct regions of the flow domain. By studying different measures characterizing flow network connectivity at different time-scales, we are able to identify the location of dynamically invariant structures and regions of maximum dispersion. Specifically, our approach allows us to delimit co-existing flow regimes with different dynamics. To validate our findings, we compare several network characteristics to the well-established finite-time Lyapunov exponents and apply a receiver operating characteristic analysis to identify network measures that are particularly useful for unveiling the skeleton of Lagrangian chaos.

  10. Catchment-scale evaluation of pollution potential of urban snow at two residential catchments in southern Finland.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, Nora; Koivusalo, Harri

    2013-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of snow in the hydrological cycle in cold climate conditions, monitoring studies of urban snow quality often lack discussions about the relevance of snow in the catchment-scale runoff management. In this study, measurements of snow quality were conducted at two residential catchments in Espoo, Finland, simultaneously with continuous runoff measurements. The results of the snow quality were used to produce catchment-scale estimates of areal snow mass loads (SML). Based on the results, urbanization reduced areal snow water equivalent but increased pollutant accumulation in snow: SMLs in a medium-density residential catchment were two- to four-fold higher in comparison with a low-density residential catchment. The main sources of pollutants were related to vehicular traffic and road maintenance, but also pet excrement increased concentrations to a high level. Ploughed snow can contain 50% of the areal pollutant mass stored in snow despite its small surface area within a catchment.

  11. Modelling overbank flow on farmed catchments taking into account spatial hydrological discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, R.; Tilma, M.; Chahinian, N.; Huttel, O.

    2003-04-01

    In agricultural catchments, hydrological processes are largely variable in space due to human impact causing hydrological discontinuities such as ditch network, field limits and terraces. The ditch network accelerates runoff by concentrating flows, drains the water table or replenishes it by reinfiltration of the runoff water. During extreme flood events, overbank flow occurs and surface pathflows are modified. The purpose of this study is to assess the influence of overbank flow on hydrograph shape during flood events. For that, MHYDAS, a physically based distributed hydrological model, was especially developed to take into account these hydrological discontinuities. The model considers the catchment as a series of interconnected hydrological unit. Runoff from each unit is estimated using a deterministic model based on the pounding-time algorithm and then routed through the ditch network using the diffusive wave equation. Overbank flow is modelled by modifying links between the hydrological units and the ditch network. The model was applied to simulate the main hydrological processes on a small headwater farmed Mediterranean catchment located in Southern France. The basic hydrometeorological equipment consists of a meteorological station, rain gauges, a tensio-neutronic and a piezometric measurement network, and eight water flow measurements. A multi-criteria and multi-scale approach was used. Three independent error criteria (Nash, error on volume and error on peak flow) were calculated and combined using the Pareto technique. Then, a multi-scale approach was used to calibrate and validate the model for the eight water flow measurements. The application of MHYDAS on the extreme ten flood events of the last decade enables to identify the ditches where overbank flows occur and to calculate discharge at various points of the ditch network. Results show that for the extreme flood event, more than 45% of surface runoff occur due to overbank flow. Discussion shows that

  12. Development of a data-driven semi-distributed hydrological model for regional scale catchments prone to Mediterranean flash floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovic, M.; Branger, F.; Braud, I.; Kralisch, S.

    2016-10-01

    performance of the model for the continuous and flash flood events occurring under wet conditions, whereas the model underestimates discharge for events occurring after a long dry period. The simple modeling approach provided interesting insight into the Ardèche catchment functioning and offers perspective for a better simulation of flash floods, mainly under wet conditions.

  13. Runoff responses to forest thinning at plot and catchment scales in a headwater catchment draining Japanese cypress forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dung, Bui Xuan; Gomi, Takashi; Miyata, Shusuke; Sidle, Roy C.; Kosugi, Kenichiro; Onda, Yuichi

    2012-06-01

    SummaryWe examined the effect of forest thinning on runoff generation at plot and catchment scales in headwater basins draining a Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) forest. We removed 58.3% of the stems (corresponding to 43.2% of the basal area) in the treated headwater basin (catchment M5), and left the control catchment (M4) untreated. In both catchments, we monitored overland flow from hillslope plots and stream runoff from catchments at basin outlets over a 2-year pre-thinning period and a 2-year post-thinning period. Paired catchment analysis revealed that annual catchment runoff increased 240.7 mm after thinning. Delayed runoff increased significantly, while quick runoff followed similar patterns in the pre- and post-thinning periods. Flow duration in the ephemeral channel in catchment M5 increased from 56.9% in the pre-thinning period to 73.3% in the post-thinning period. Despite the changes in hydrological responses at the catchment scale, increases in overland flow were not significant. The increased availability of water in the soil matrix, caused by decreased interception loss and evapotranspiration, increased base flow after thinning. Based on the summarized data of previous studies together with this study, the effects of forest thinning on increases in runoff were less than partial harvesting in which the managed areas were concentrated within a watershed. We demonstrated that the effect of forest thinning was strongly scale dependent, an important finding for optimizing water and forest management in forested watersheds.

  14. Extreme Rainfall Impacts in Fractured Permeable Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    Serious groundwater flooding events have occurred on Chalk catchments in both the UK and north west Europe in the last decade, causing substantial amounts of disruption and economic damage. These fractured, permeable catchments are characterized by low surface runoff, high baseflow indices and strongly attenuated streamflow hydrographs. They have a general resilience to drought and pluvial/fluvial flooding. The small pore size of the Chalk matrix (~ 1 µm) exerts a high suction, such that dynamic storage is primarily due to the fractures, and amounts to ~ 1% of the total volume. As a result, under sustained rainfall the water table can rise up to exceptional levels leading to surface water emergence from springs and valleys. Floodwater may slowly drain with the topography, or, in localized depressions, it may simply pond until the groundwater levels decline. In winter 2000/1, a sequence of individually unexceptional rainfall events over several months led to large scale flooding in the Pang catchment, Berkshire, UK. By contrast, an extreme rainfall event on 20th July 2007 in the same catchment caused a very rapid response at the water table, but due to the antecedent conditions did not lead to flooding. The objective of this study is to quantify how the water table in a fractured permeable catchment responds to different types of rainfall, and the implications of this for groundwater flooding. We make use of measurements from the Pang catchment, including: rainfall (tipping bucket gauges); actual evaporation (eddy flux correlation); soil water content (profile probes and neutron probes); near surface matric potential (tensiometers and equitensiometers); deep (>10m) matric potential (deep jacking tensiometers); and water table elevation (piezometers). Conventional treatment of recharge in Chalk aquifers considers a fixed bypass component of rainfall, normally 15%, to account for the role of the fractures. However, interpretation of the field data suggest three modes

  15. Modeling relationships between catchment attributes and river water quality in southern catchments of the Caspian Sea.

    PubMed

    Hasani Sangani, Mohammad; Jabbarian Amiri, Bahman; Alizadeh Shabani, Afshin; Sakieh, Yousef; Ashrafi, Sohrab

    2015-04-01

    Increasing land utilization through diverse forms of human activities, such as agriculture, forestry, urban growth, and industrial development, has led to negative impacts on the water quality of rivers. To find out how catchment attributes, such as land use, hydrologic soil groups, and lithology, can affect water quality variables (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), Cl(-), HCO 3 (-) , pH, TDS, EC, SAR), a spatio-statistical approach was applied to 23 catchments in southern basins of the Caspian Sea. All input data layers (digital maps of land use, soil, and lithology) were prepared using geographic information system (GIS) and spatial analysis. Relationships between water quality variables and catchment attributes were then examined by Spearman rank correlation tests and multiple linear regression. Stepwise approach-based multiple linear regressions were developed to examine the relationship between catchment attributes and water quality variables. The areas (%) of marl, tuff, or diorite, as well as those of good-quality rangeland and bare land had negative effects on all water quality variables, while those of basalt, forest land cover were found to contribute to improved river water quality. Moreover, lithological variables showed the greatest most potential for predicting the mean concentration values of water quality variables, and noting that measure of EC and TDS have inversely associated with area (%) of urban land use.

  16. Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology

    SciTech Connect

    Nimz, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed {open_quotes}lithogenic{close_quotes} solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing {open_quotes}cosmogenic{close_quotes} nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing {open_quotes}thermonuclear{close_quotes} nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading {open_quotes}cosmogenic nuclides{close_quotes}, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system.

  17. Evaluation of TOPLATS on three Mediterranean catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loizu, Javier; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Casalí, Javier; Goñi, Mikel

    2016-08-01

    Physically based hydrological models are complex tools that provide a complete description of the different processes occurring on a catchment. The TOPMODEL-based Land-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (TOPLATS) simulates water and energy balances at different time steps, in both lumped and distributed modes. In order to gain insight on the behavior of TOPLATS and its applicability in different conditions a detailed evaluation needs to be carried out. This study aimed to develop a complete evaluation of TOPLATS including: (1) a detailed review of previous research works using this model; (2) a sensitivity analysis (SA) of the model with two contrasted methods (Morris and Sobol) of different complexity; (3) a 4-step calibration strategy based on a multi-start Powell optimization algorithm; and (4) an analysis of the influence of simulation time step (hourly vs. daily). The model was applied on three catchments of varying size (La Tejeria, Cidacos and Arga), located in Navarre (Northern Spain), and characterized by different levels of Mediterranean climate influence. Both Morris and Sobol methods showed very similar results that identified Brooks-Corey Pore Size distribution Index (B), Bubbling pressure (ψc) and Hydraulic conductivity decay (f) as the three overall most influential parameters in TOPLATS. After calibration and validation, adequate streamflow simulations were obtained in the two wettest catchments, but the driest (Cidacos) gave poor results in validation, due to the large climatic variability between calibration and validation periods. To overcome this issue, an alternative random and discontinuous method of cal/val period selection was implemented, improving model results.

  18. Resilience of catchment sediment yield to climate perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Wiel, Marco; Lipkowski, Emily

    2015-04-01

    It is commonly thought that catchment sediment yield is largely governed by allogenic controls acting on the catchment. Under this paradigm, variations in climatic, tectonic or anthropogenic forcing are directly transmitted to the catchment sediment yield. The sediment yield thus represents a temporal signature of the governing external forces. This paradigm, however, has been challenged by recent research, which has shown that autogenic controls from within the catchment can significantly affect and, in some cases, overwrite the allogenic signal in the sediment yield signal. In these cases the catchment sediment yield can be considered to be resilient to external perturbation. On the other hand, it also has been shown that, in some other cases, the allogenic signal can indeed be transmitted efficiently through the catchment, without too much distortion by the autogenic controls. In these latter cases, the sediment yield signal, and hence the downstream sediment deposits, can be a reliable archive of past environmental forcing. This study uses computer simulation to investigate the autogenic resilience of catchment sediment yields. Specifically, it investigates allogenic signal preservation in catchment sediment yield in the context of climate signals. It is hypothesized that 1) the resilience of the catchment sediment yield signal is largely determined by the catchment's spatial heterogeneity (of topography, vegetation, soil properties, ...) and the external signal's temporal heterogeneity and amplitude; and 2) catchment resilience is inversely correlated with spatial heterogeneity and positively correlated with the temporal heterogeneity and amplitude of the allogenic signal. This hypothesis is tested using a set of similar catchments, but with different relief ranges, different levels of topographic smoothness, different sediment distributions, and different artificial vegetation covers. These catchments are subjected to a range of rainfall scenarios over a 300

  19. Validation of Pacific Northwest Hydrologic Landscapes at the Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicz, K. A.; Leibowitz, S. G.; Comeleo, R. L.; Wigington, P. J., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between the physical properties of a catchment (form) and climatic forcing of precipitation and energy control how water is partitioned, stored, and conveyed through a catchment (function). Hydrologic Landscapes (HLs) were previously developed across Oregon and describe climatic and physical properties for over 5000 assessment units. This approach was then extended to the three Pacific Northwest states of Washington, Oregon and Idaho (PNW HL). The HLs were developed using the National Hydrography Dataset's WBD HU12 scale and are comprised of classification components describing climate, climate seasonality, aquifer permeability, terrain, and soil permeability. To compare the PNW HL classification to catchment hydrologic behavior, HLs were aggregated to catchment scale to compare against the input/output of water in the catchment. HL aggregation must preserve information on the location of the HL within the catchment outlet (upstream vs. downstream) and properties of that HL (i.e. water source vs. sink). Catchment function was investigated by use of hydrologic signatures, which are attributes of long-term time series of water into and out of the catchment. Signatures include Runoff Ratio, Baseflow Index, Snow Ratio, and Recession Coefficients. This study has three primary objectives: 1) derivation of hydrologic signatures to capture the hydrologic behavior for catchments in the Pacific Northwest: 2) development of methodology to aggregate HLs to the catchment scale; and 3) statistical analysis of signature values and trends with respect to aggregated HL classification. We hypothesize that we will find: 1) strong relationships between aggregated HLs and hydrologic signatures; 2) signatures related to water balance are explained by climatic conditions; and 3) signatures describing flow paths are predicted by terrain, soil, and aquifer permeability. This study examined 230 catchments to achieve objectives and test hypotheses stated.

  20. A numerical solution to define channel heads and hillslope parameters from digital topography of glacially conditioned catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcher, Bernhard; Baumann, Sebastian; Kober, Florian; Robl, Jörg; Heiniger, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of the slope-area relationship in bedrock streams is a common way for discriminating the channel from the hillslope domain and associated landscape processes. Spatial variations of these domains are important indicators of landscape change. In fluvial catchments, this relationship is a function of contributing drainage area, channel slope and the threshold drainage area for fluvial erosion. The resulting pattern is related to climate, tectonic and underlying bedrock. These factors may become secondary in catchments affected by glacial erosion, as it is the case in many mid- to high-latitude mountain belts. The perturbation (i.e. the destruction) of an initial steady state fluvial bedrock morphology (where uplift is balanced by surface lowering rates) will tend to become successively larger if the repeated action of glacial processes exceeds the potential of fluvial readjustment during deglaciated periods. Topographic change is associated with a decrease and fragmentation of the channel network and an extension of the hillslope domain. In case of glacially conditioned catchments discrimination of the two domains remains problematic and a discrimination inconsistent. A definition is therefore highly needed considering that (i) a spatial shift in the domains affect the process and rate of erosion and (ii) topographic classifications of alpine catchments often base on channel and hillslope parameters (i.e.channel or hillslope relief). Here we propose a novel numerical approach to topographically define channel heads from digital topography in glacially conditioned mountain range catchments in order to discriminate the channel from the hillslope domain. We analyzed the topography of the southern European Central Alps, a region which (i) has been glaciated multiple times during the Quaternary, shows (ii) little lithological variations, is (iii) home of very low erodible rocks and is (iv) known as a region were tectonic processes have largely ceased. The

  1. Human-Landscape interaction in cultivated lowland catchments (Louroux catchment, Loire Valley, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdan, Olivier; Foucher, Anthony; Gay, Aurore; Salvador Blanes, Sébastien; Evrard, Olivier; Desmet, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Change of land use or agricultural practices are known to have high impacts on sediment transfer in catchments and rivers. Numerous studies have particularly illustrated these effects in sloping land in tropical areas undergoing deforestation. Much less attention has been paid to lowland humid areas, where permanent land uses have been plowed more recently. However recent studies reported significant erosion rates in these environments despite the gentle topography and the temperate climate. In order to quantify these changing fluxes of sediment, several instrumentation and historical database analyses were carried out in various catchments of the Loire Valley, France. More particularly, a multiparameter analysis was conducted on sedimentary deposits of a pond created in the 11th century in a catchment representative of cultivated and drained lowland environments where an intensification of agricultural practices has occurred during the last 60 years. The results showed that the initial land consolidation period (1954-1960) was characterized by a dominance of allochtonous material input to the pond. This input represents an erosion of 1900 to 2300 t.km-².yr-1 originating from the catchment. Then, between 1970-1990, terrigenous material flow decreased progressively and tended to stabilize, whereas eutrophication and associated primary production increased in the pond. In addition to these temporal changes, material input across the pond during the last 10 years corresponds to a loss of material in the catchment ranging between 90 and 102 t.km-2.yr-1. While a strong decrease is observed, it still represents a 60-fold increase of the sediment fluxes to the pond compared to the preintensification period. Subsequent research monitoring studies permitted to differentiate between the different sources of sediment and highlight the importance of surface erosion during flood events and of bank erosion during low flows. The increased export of the sediment is primarily due

  2. Topological and canonical kriging for design flood prediction in ungauged catchments: an improvement over a traditional regional regression approach?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Pugliese, Alessio; Castellarin, Attilio; Skøien, Jon O.; Kiang, Julie E.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, estimation of flood frequency quantiles at ungauged locations has been largely based on regional regression techniques that relate measurable catchment descriptors to flood quantiles. More recently, spatial interpolation techniques of point data have been shown to be effective for predicting streamflow statistics (i.e., flood flows and low-flow indices) in ungauged catchments. Literature reports successful applications of two techniques, canonical kriging, CK (or physiographical-space-based interpolation, PSBI), and topological kriging, TK (or top-kriging). CK performs the spatial interpolation of the streamflow statistic of interest in the two-dimensional space of catchment descriptors. TK predicts the streamflow statistic along river networks taking both the catchment area and nested nature of catchments into account. It is of interest to understand how these spatial interpolation methods compare with generalized least squares (GLS) regression, one of the most common approaches to estimate flood quantiles at ungauged locations. By means of a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure, the performance of CK and TK was compared to GLS regression equations developed for the prediction of 10, 50, 100 and 500 yr floods for 61 streamgauges in the southeast United States. TK substantially outperforms GLS and CK for the study area, particularly for large catchments. The performance of TK over GLS highlights an important distinction between the treatments of spatial correlation when using regression-based or spatial interpolation methods to estimate flood quantiles at ungauged locations. The analysis also shows that coupling TK with CK slightly improves the performance of TK; however, the improvement is marginal when compared to the improvement in performance over GLS.

  3. Parental attitudes, attachment styles, social networks, and psychological processes in autism spectrum disorders: a cross-cultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Sotgiu, Igor; Galati, Dario; Manzano, Mayra; Gandione, Marina; Gómez, Kyuttzza; Romero, Yuniel; Rigardetto, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    In this study the authors used a cross-cultural approach to examine parental attitudes, attachment styles, social networks, and some of the psychological processes involved in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Fifty-two children (aged 4-11 years) took part in the study: 30 Italians (15 with ASD and 15 controls) and 22 Cubans (11 with ASD and 11 controls). Findings indicated significant differences between the two cultural groups in terms of the structure of the children's social network and parental attitudes toward their children. However, the mother-child attachment relationship and cognitive and emotional functioning of the study participants were independent of culture.

  4. Effects of impervious pavements on reducing runoff in an arid urban catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epshtein, O.; Turnbull, L.; Earl, S.

    2011-12-01

    from 5 mm to 25 mm. Model testing shows total event discharge simulated well, although low Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients for events indicate a poor fit between the shape and timing of the modeled and monitored hydrograph, which we attribute to poor characterization of friction factors in urban catchments. Scenario-based model analysis tested catchment response to substitution of pervious for conventional pavement by percent and pavement-function scenarios. Results are consistent with previous findings in that short duration-high intensity storms trigger threshold infiltration capacity, past which pervious pavement damping of runoff volume levels off, approaching conventional levels. However at the modeled catchment scale, this initial damping represents a significant reduction in volume, peak flow velocity, and contaminant loading potential. Urban surface drainage networks concentrate and channel flow along roads: the capacity of pervious pavements to simultaneously increase infiltration directly at location of greatest runoff and mitigate inflow effects from remote points has compelling potential as a hydrologic and urban systems engineering tool.

  5. Investigating the impact of data uncertainty on the estimation of catchment nutrient fluxes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Charlotte; Freer, Jim; Collins, Adrian; Johnes, Penny; Coxon, Gemma

    2014-05-01

    Changing climate and a growing population are increasing pressures on the world's water bodies. Maintaining food security has resulted in changes in agricultural practices, leading to adverse impacts on water quality. To address this problem robust evidence is needed to determine which on-farm mitigation strategies are likely to be most effective in reducing pollutant impacts. The introduction of in-situ quasi-continuous monitoring of water quality provides the means to improve the characterisation of pollutant behaviour and gain new and more robust understanding of hydrological and biogeochemical flux behaviours in catchments. Here we analyse a suite of high temporal resolution data sets generated from in-situ sensor networks within an uncertainty framework to provide robust estimates of nutrient fluxes from catchments impacted by intensive agricultural production practices. Previous research into nutrient flux estimation has focused on assessing the uncertainty associated with the use of different load models to interpolate or extrapolate nutrient data where daily or sub-daily discharge data are generally available and used with lower resolution nutrient concentrations. In such studies examples of datasets where paired discharge and nutrient concentrations are available are used as a benchmark of 'truth' against which the other data models or sample resolutions are tested. This work illustrates that even given high temporal-resolution paired datasets, where no load model is necessary, there will still be significant uncertainties and therefore demonstrates the importance of analysing such data within an uncertainty framework to obtain robust estimates of catchment nutrient loads. This study uses 15-minute resolution paired velocity and stage height data, in order to calculate river discharge, along with high temporal resolution (15 or 30 minute) nutrient data from four field sites collected as part of the Hampshire Avon Demonstration Test Catchment project

  6. Catchment Restoration in the Tweed UNESCO-IHP HELP Basin - Eddleston Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spray, Christopher

    2013-04-01

    initial characterisation of the catchment; the identification of potential key locations and types of intervention to improve ecological status and flood risk reduction; the setting up of the monitoring networks, the engagement with local communities and land managers; initial habitat modifications and the early results of the study. We situate this within the wider context of priorities for restoration and the UNESCO IHP-HELP programme.

  7. A simple linear catchment-response model for investigating sediment efflux associated with climate and land use change in Goodwin Creek, MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubeneau, A. F.; Thompson, S. E.; Hassan, M. A.; Packman, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    Erosion and sediment transport are influenced by hydrological regime (rainfall-runoff), catchment properties (vegetation, topography, soil properties), management practices (land use), and their interactions. Here, we use a simple linear catchment response model to describe sediment transport in the Goodwin Creek catchment. The model includes two linear stores, one for the hillslope and one for the fluvial network. The hillslope store is supplied with sediments from upland erosion, with event-driven mobilization occurring over the effective duration of each storm. Some of the mobilized sediments are redeposited on the hillslope and the remainder is transferred to the river network. Additional sediment supply to the network occurs from the channel via bank erosion. Suspended sediment transport and deposition are considered along river channels in order to determine the timing and magnitude of sediment efflux from the catchment. In environments dominated by hillslope erosion, sediment delivery ratio (the ratio between upland erosion and sediment yield at the outlet) is expected to be closely related to catchment hydrological response. However, fluvial storage obscures this relationship by modulating the morphodynamic response to primary hydrological and geomorphological drivers. We used the model to distinguish the relative influence of climate forcing, hydrological response and land use practices on sediment transport and delivery in the Goodwin Creek catchment, where sediment and channel dynamics have been monitored in fourteen sub-catchments for over twenty years. These sub-catchments include a range of channel sizes and a diversity of management practices over the length of the data record. Our results suggest that hillslope processes dominate the delivery ratio in smaller catchments but that channel processes become more important at larger spatial scales. Furthermore, although climate variability could explain a large proportion of the variability in sediment

  8. Generality of Fractal 1/f Scaling in Catchment Tracer Time Series: Implications for Catchment Travel Time Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godsey, S. E.; Palucis, M. C.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2007-12-01

    The mean travel time - the time that it takes a parcel of rainwater to reach the stream - is a basic parameter used to characterize catchments. More generally, a catchment is characterized by its travel-time distribution, which is described not only by its mean but also its shape. The travel time distribution of water in a catchment is typically inferred from passive tracer time series (typically water isotopes or chloride concentrations) in rainfall and streamflow. The catchment mixes precipitation inputs (and thus passive tracers) falling at different points in time; as a result, tracer fluctuations in streamflow are usually strongly damped relative to precipitation. Mathematically, this mixing of waters of different ages is represented by the convolution of the travel time distribution and the precipitation inputs to generate the stream outputs. Previous analyses of both rainfall and streamflow tracer time series from several catchments in Wales have demonstrated that rainfall chemistry spectra resemble white noise, whereas these same catchments exhibit fractal 1/f scaling in stream tracer chemistry over three orders of magnitude. These observations imply that these catchments have an approximate power-law distribution of travel times, and thus they retain a long memory of past inputs. The observed fractal scaling places strong constraints on possible models of catchment behavior: commonly-used exponential or advection-dispersion travel time distribution models do not exhibit fractal scaling. Here we test the generality of the observed fractal scaling of streamflow chemistry, by analyzing long-term tracer time series from 17 other catchments in North America and Europe. Special care is taken to account for the effects of spectral aliasing. We demonstrate that 1/f fractal scaling of stream chemistry is a common feature of these catchments and discuss the implications of this observation to catchment-scale hydrologic modeling. We then present the best-fit travel

  9. Standardised survey method for identifying catchment risks to water quality.

    PubMed

    Baker, D L; Ferguson, C M; Chier, P; Warnecke, M; Watkinson, A

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a systematic methodology to identify and quantify risks in drinking water and recreational catchments. The methodology assesses microbial and chemical contaminants from both diffuse and point sources within a catchment using Escherichia coli, protozoan pathogens and chemicals (including fuel and pesticides) as index contaminants. Hazard source information is gathered by a defined sanitary survey process involving use of a software tool which groups hazards into six types: sewage infrastructure, on-site sewage systems, industrial, stormwater, agriculture and recreational sites. The survey estimates the likelihood of the site affecting catchment water quality, and the potential consequences, enabling the calculation of risk for individual sites. These risks are integrated to calculate a cumulative risk for each sub-catchment and the whole catchment. The cumulative risks process accounts for the proportion of potential input sources surveyed and for transfer of contaminants from upstream to downstream sub-catchments. The output risk matrices show the relative risk sources for each of the index contaminants, highlighting those with the greatest impact on water quality at a sub-catchment and catchment level. Verification of the sanitary survey assessments and prioritisation is achieved by comparison with water quality data and microbial source tracking.

  10. An Eco-hydrologic Assessment of Small Experimental Catchments with Various Land Uses within the Panama Canal Watershed: Agua Salud Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, T. D.; Ogden, F. L.; Stallard, R. F.; Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama Canal Watershed Experiment, Agua Salud Project

    2010-12-01

    Hydrological processes in the humid tropics are poorly understood and an important topic when it comes to water management in the seasonal tropics. The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama Canal Watershed Experiment, Agua Salud Project, seeks to understand these processes and quantify the long-term effects of different land cover and uses across the Panama Canal Watershed. One of the project’s main objectives is to understand how reforestation effects seasonal stream flows. To meet this objective, a baseline characterization of hydrology on the small catchment scale is being assessed across different land uses typical in rural Panama. The small experimental catchments are found within Panama’s protected Soberania National Park and the adjacent headwaters of the Agua Salud and Mendoza Rivers, all of which are part of the greater Panama Canal Watershed. The land uses being monitored include a variety of control catchments as well as treated pasture sites. The catchments used for this study include a mature old regrowth forest, a 50% deforested or mosaic regrowth site, an active pasture and a monoculture invasive grass site (saccharum spontaneum) as experimental controls and two treated catchments that were recently abandoned pastures converted to teak and native species timber plantations. Installed instrumentation includes a network of rain gauges, v-notched weirs, atmometers, an eddy covariance system and an assortment of meteorological and automated geochemical sampling systems. Spatial, rainfall, runoff and ET data across these six geologically and topographically similar catchments are available from 2009 and 2010. Classic water balance and paired catchment techniques were used to compare the catchments on an annual, seasonal, and event basis. This study sets the stage for hydrologic modeling and for better understanding the effects of vegetation and land-use history on rainfall-runoff processes for the Agua Salud Project and Panama Canal

  11. Optimization models for siting water quality monitoring stations in a catchment.

    PubMed

    Kao, Jehng-Jung; Li, Pei-Hao; Hu, Wen-Shin

    2012-01-01

    A water quality monitoring network (WQMN) must be designed so as to adequately protect the water quality in a catchment. Although a simulated annealing (SA) method was previously applied to design a WQMN, the SA method cannot ensure the solution it obtained is the global optimum. Therefore, two new linear optimization models are proposed in this study to minimize the deviation of the cost values expected to identify the possible pollution sources based on uniform cost (UC) and coverage elimination uniform cost (CEUC) schemes. The UC model determines the expected cost values by considering each sub-catchment being covered by which station, while the CEUC model determines the coverage of each station by eliminating the area covered by any upstream station. The proposed models are applied to the Derchi reservoir catchment in Taiwan. Results show that the global optimal WQMN can be effectively determined by using the UC or CEUC model, for which both results are better than those from the SA method, especially when the number of stations becomes large.

  12. Network neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Danielle S; Sporns, Olaf

    2017-02-23

    Despite substantial recent progress, our understanding of the principles and mechanisms underlying complex brain function and cognition remains incomplete. Network neuroscience proposes to tackle these enduring challenges. Approaching brain structure and function from an explicitly integrative perspective, network neuroscience pursues new ways to map, record, analyze and model the elements and interactions of neurobiological systems. Two parallel trends drive the approach: the availability of new empirical tools to create comprehensive maps and record dynamic patterns among molecules, neurons, brain areas and social systems; and the theoretical framework and computational tools of modern network science. The convergence of empirical and computational advances opens new frontiers of scientific inquiry, including network dynamics, manipulation and control of brain networks, and integration of network processes across spatiotemporal domains. We review emerging trends in network neuroscience and attempt to chart a path toward a better understanding of the brain as a multiscale networked system.

  13. Catchment Systems Engineering: A New Paradigm in Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. F.; Wilkinson, M. E.; Burke, S.; O'Donnell, G. M.; Jonczyk, J.; Barber, N.; Nicholson, A.

    2012-04-01

    Recent catchment initiatives have highlighted the need for new holistic approaches to sustainable water management. Catchment Systems Engineering seeks to describe catchment the function (or role) as the principal driver for evaluating how it should be managed in the future. Catchment Systems Engineering does not seek to re-establish a natural system but rather works with natural processes in order to engineer landscapes to accrue multiple benefits. The approach involves quantifying and assessing catchment change, impacts and most importantly, suggests an urgent and proactive agenda for future planning. In particular, an interventionist approach to managing hydrological flow pathways across scale is proposed. It is already accepted that future management will require a range of scientific expertise and full engagement with stakeholders. This inclusive concept under a Catchment Systems Engineering agenda forces any consortia to commit to actively changing and perturbing the catchment system and thus learn, in situ, how to manage the environment for collective benefits. The shared cost, the design, the implementation, the evaluation and any subsequent modifications should involve all relevant parties in the consortia. This joint ownership of a 'hands on' interventionist agenda to catchment change is at the core of Catchment Systems Engineering. In this paper we show a range of catchment engineering projects from the UK that have addressed multi-disciplinary approaches to flooding, pollution and ecosystem management, whilst maintaining economic food production. Examples using soft engineered features such as wetlands, ponds, woody debris dams and infiltration zones will be shown. Local scale demonstration activities, led by local champions, have proven to be an effective means of encouraging wider uptake. Evidence that impacts can be achieved at local catchment scale will be introduced. Catchment Systems Engineering is a concept that relies on all relevant parties

  14. Unpacking (In)formal Learning in an Academic Development Programme: A Mixed-Method Social Network Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rienties, Bart; Hosein, Anesa

    2015-01-01

    How and with whom academics develop and maintain formal and informal networks for reflecting on their teaching practice has received limited attention even though academic development (AD) programmes have become an almost ubiquitous feature of higher education. The primary goal of this mixed-method study is to unpack how 114 academics in an AD…

  15. Cooperative VET in Training Networks: Analysing the Free-Rider Problem in a Sociology-of-Conventions Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leemann, Regula Julia; Imdorf, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In training networks, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises pool their resources to train apprentices within the framework of the dual VET system, while an intermediary organisation is tasked with managing operations. Over the course of their apprenticeship, the apprentices switch from one training company to another on a (half-) yearly…

  16. Grist for Riedl's mill: a network model perspective on the integration and modularity of the human skull.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Altava, Borja; Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Botella, Héctor; Bastir, Markus; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2013-12-01

    Riedl's concept of burden neatly links development and evolution by ascertaining that structures that show a high degree of developmental co-dependencies with other structures are more constrained in evolution. The human skull can be precisely modeled as an articulated complex system of bones connected by sutures, forming a network of structural co-dependencies. We present a quantitative analysis of the morphological integration, modularity, and hierarchical organization of this human skull network model. Our overall results show that the human skull is a small-world network, with two well-delimited connectivity modules: one facial organized around the ethmoid bone, and one cranial organized around the sphenoid bone. Geometric morphometrics further support this two-module division, stressing the direct relationship between the developmental information enclosed in connectivity patterns and skull shape. Whereas the facial module shows a hierarchy of clustered blocks of bones, the bones of the cranial modules show a regular pattern of connections. We analyze the significance of these arrangements by hypothesizing specific structural roles for the most important bones involved in the formation of both modules, in the context of Riedl's burden. We conclude that it is the morphological integration of each group of bones that defines the semi-hierarchical organization of the human skull, reflecting fundamental differences in the ontogenetic patterns of growth and the structural constraints that generate each module. Our study also demonstrates the adequacy of network analysis as an innovative tool to understand the morphological complexity of anatomical systems.

  17. Thinking Management and Leadership within Colleges and Schools Somewhat Differently: A Practice-Based, Actor-Network Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Dianne; Perillo, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the significance of materiality for management and leadership in education using resources provided by actor-network theory (ANT). Espousing the idea that human interactions are mediated by material objects and that these objects participate in the production of practices, ANT affords thinking management and leadership in a…

  18. CHUM: a hydrochemical model for upland catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipping, Edward

    1996-01-01

    CHUM (CHemistry of the Uplands Model) simulates soil-water chemical interactions and water flows in upland catchments with acid soils. The chemical interactions are described with the equilibrium speciation code WHAM, which emphasises the interactions of inorganic chemical species with solid-phase and dissolved organic matter, and also considers inorganic solution speciation and sorption reactions of fulvic acid. Of special significance is the treatment of aluminium chemistry; control of dissolved aluminium concentrations is assumed to be due primarily to complexation reactions with solid phase organic matter, whereas previous models have postulated equilibrium with mineral phases or simple ion-exchange. In addition, CHUM takes nitrogen transformations and weathering (dissolution) reactions into account. The catchment is conceptualised as a series of columns consisting of two soil horizons and an underlying permeable or fractured bedrock zone. Water flows are described with a hydrological submodel that distinguishes immobile water present in soil micropores (which is in chemical equilibrium with the soil solids) from mobile drainage water. The mobile water can move vertically from one horizon to another, from one column to the column immediately downslope, or as outflow from a column adjacent to a stream or lake. Solutes exchange between the mobile and immobile compartments. The model runs on a daily time-step. The fundamentals of the model are given, together with a description of its application to a site in the English Lake District.

  19. Pesticide modelling for a small catchment using SWAT-2000.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Narayanan; White, Sue M; Worrall, Fred; Whelan, Mick J

    2006-01-01

    Pesticides in stream flow from the 142 ha Colworth catchment in Bedfordshire, UK were monitored from October 1999 to December 2000. About 47% of the catchment is tile-drained and different pesticides and cropping patterns have recently been evaluated in terms of their effect on nutrient and pesticide losses to the stream. The data from Colworth were used to test soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) 2000 predictions of pesticide concentrations at the catchment outlet. A sound model set-up to carry out pesticide modelling was created by means of hydrological modelling with proper simulation of crop growth and evapotranspiration. The pesticides terbuthylazine, terbutryn, cyanazine and bentazone were modelled. There was close agreement between SWAT-predicted pesticide concentration values and observations. Scenario trials were conducted to explore management options for reducing pesticide loads arriving at the catchment outlet. The results obtained indicate that SWAT can be used as a tool to understand pesticide behavior at the catchment scale.

  20. Catchments' hedging strategy on evapotranspiration for climatic variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Ding, Wei; Li, Yu; Tang, Yin; Wang, Dingbao

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we test the hypothesis that natural catchments utilize hedging strategy for evapotranspiration and water storage carryover with uncertain future precipitation. The hedging strategy for evapotranspiration in catchments under different levels of water availability is analytically derived with marginal utility principle. It is found that there exists hedging between evapotranspiration for present and future only with a portion of water availability. Observation data sets of 160 catchments in the United States covering the period from 1983 to 2003 demonstrate the existence of hedging in catchment hydrology and validate the proposed hedging strategy. We also find that more water is allocated to carryover storage for hedging against the future evapotranspiration deficit in the catchments with larger aridity indexes or with larger variability in future precipitation, i.e., long-term climate and precipitation variability control the degree of hedging.

  1. Root reinforcement and its implications in shallow landsliding susceptibility on a small alpine catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi, M. C.; Farabegoli, E.; Onorevoli, G.

    2012-04-01

    Roots shear resistance offers a considerable contribution to hill-slope stability on vegetated terrains. Through the pseudo-cohesion of shrubs, trees and turf's roots, the geomechanical properties of soils can be drastically increased, exerting a positive influence on the hillslope stability. We analysed the shallow landsliding susceptibility of a small alpine catchment (Duron valley, Central Dolomites, Italy) that we consider representative of a wide altitude belt of the Dolomites (1800 - 2400 m a.s.l). The catchment is mostly mantled by grass (Nardetum strictae s.l.), with clustered shrubs (Rhododendron hirsutum and Juniperus nana), and trees (Pinus cembra, Larix decidua and Picea abies). The soil depth, investigated with direct and indirect methods, ranges from 0 to 180 cm, with its peak at the hollow axes. Locally, the bedrock, made of Triassic volcanic rocks, is deeply incised by the Holocene drainage network. Intensive grazing of cows and horses pervades the catchment area and cattle-trails occupy ca 20% of the grass cover. We used laboratory and field tests to characterize the geotechnical properties of these alpine soils; moreover we designed and tested an experimental device that measures, in situ, the shear strengths of the grass mantle. In the study area we mapped 18 shallow landslides, mostly related to road cuts and periodically reactivated as retrogressive landslides. The triggering mechanisms of these shallow landslides were qualitatively analysed at large scale and modelled at smaller scale. We used SHALSTAB to model the shallow landsliding susceptibility of the catchment at the basin scale and SLIDE (RocScience) to compute the Safety Factor at the versant scale. Qualitative management solutions are provided, in order to reduce the shallow landsliding susceptibility risk in this alpine context.

  2. Examining Sediment-bound Radiocesium Dynamics in Two Fukushima Coastal Catchments with Sediment Fingerprinting Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laceby, J. P.; Lepage, H.; Bonté, P.; Joron, J. L.; Onda, Y.; Lefèvre, I.; Ayrault, S.; Evrard, O.

    2015-12-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident resulted in the significant fallout of radiocesium (137Cs and 134Cs) over the Fukushima region. After deposition on the soil surface, radiocesium is primarily bound to fine soil particles. Subsequently, rainfall and snow melt run-off events result in the downstream migration of radiocesium. Understanding the spatial distribution and relative contribution of different sediment sources is therefore fundamental to the management of radiocesium migration. Sediment fingerprinting techniques were used to determine the location and relative contributions of different sediment sources in the Mano and Niida Rivers, in the Fukushima region. First, we modelled the relative contributions of radiocesium from the upstream portions of the catchment, that received greater proportions of the fallout (e.g. >20 kBq kg-1), to sediment sampled in the downstream coastal regions. Second, we examined the elemental geochemistry of the major soil types (e.g. Andosols, Cambisols, Fluvisols) within these catchments and modelled their relative contribution to sediment sampled throughout these catchments. Elemental composition was measured with neutron activation analysis, radiocesium with gamma-spectrometry and a distribution modelling approach quantified source contributions. In the Mano River ~20% of the radiocesium sampled was modelled to be derived from the upstream area compared to ~50% in the Niida River. The highest contribution of upstream radiocesium was modelled after the typhoon seasons in 2011 and 2013. Fluvisols were found to be the dominant source of sediment (76%). The dominance of Fluvisols indicates that sediments are likely derived from sources that are highly connected to the river network (e.g. rice paddy fields). Understanding the relative contributions of these different sediment sources will allow for more direct management of sediment and thus radiocesium transfers in these Fukushima coastal catchments.

  3. Linking nitrogen cycling and export with variable source area dynamics in forested and urbanizing catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, L. E.; Tague, C. E.; Groffman, P.; Belt, K.

    2001-05-01

    One of the goals of the Baltimore Urban LTER site is to investigate how interactions between ecological processes and urban land use effect ecosystem functions, such as the cycling and export of nutrients. As part of this project, nitrogen export from Pond Branch, a 41 hectare forested catchment in Baltimore County, has been monitored since 1998 and is compared with nitrogen export from neighboring agricultural and urbanizing catchments. To better understand the spatial structure of nitrogen cycling and export processes in this region, a GIS and physically based, hydro-ecological model is used to investigate the interactions between soil water levels, flowpath dynamics and nitrogen cycling and export in Pond Branch. Rates of key ecosystem processes including vegetation uptake, litterfall, decomposition, mineralization, nitrification and denitrification vary in regular spatial and temporal patterns in response to meteorologically driven variations in soil water, temperature and biological activity as well as decadal level variations in canopy composition and extent. Alteration in the distribution of nitrogen sinks and sources in the landscape are particularly manifest in the dynamics of riparian areas that result in peak nitrogen export during the active growing season in this catchment. Urbanization effects can be added to the simulation by altering irrigation and fertilization rates, vegetation patterns and by altering hydrologic flowpaths through the construction of roads and sewer networks. The model is used to investigate current nitrogen cycling and export patterns and scenarios for urbanization of the Pond Branch catchment. Variation in the pattern of land cover change and infrastructure development with respect to the existing pattern of vegetation and topographic controls on nitrogen cycling is shown by the model to influence the impact of urbanization on nitrogen export.

  4. Reach-scale geomorphic differences between headwater streams draining mountaintop mined and unmined catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Kristin L.

    2015-05-01

    Mountaintop surface mining (MTM) is a controversial coal extraction method commonly practiced in the central and southern Appalachian Mountains, USA, that drastically reengineers previously steep, forested landscapes and alters sediment and water delivery processes to and along headwater channels draining mined areas. Although sediment delivery and hydrologic response from MTM operations remain highly variable and poorly resolved, the inherent close coupling between hillslopes and headwater channels is expected to result in geomorphic differences in stream channels draining MTM landscapes relative to unmined landscapes. Dedicated geomorphic studies are severely lacking in comparison to extensive research on water quality impacts of MTM. This study reports moderate geomorphic differences between headwater (catchment area <~ 6 km2) stream channels draining MTM and unmined catchments in tributaries of the Mud River in southern West Virginia. Univariate and multivariate analyses indicate that MTM streams are characterized by deeper maximum channel depths, smaller width-to-depth ratios, increased bedrock exposure along the streambed, and increased frequency of very fine silt and sand deposition relative to channels draining unmined catchments. Geomorphic differences are most pronounced for streams draining the smallest catchment areas (< 3.5 km2). Collectively, geomorphic differences provide evidence for relatively rapid channel adjustment of accelerated bedrock incision attributed to potential increased hydraulic driving forces and altered sediment regimes in MTM channels, notably sustained delivery of very fine sediment and potentially reduced coarse sediment delivery. More rapid delivery and transfer of water in addition to excess delivery of very fine sediments to and through headwater channels will have consequences to flooding and water quality in the short term and landscape evolution processes over longer time scales. Given the extent of MTM operations in this

  5. Climate, runoff and landuse trends in the Owo River Catchment in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegun, O.; Odunuga, S.; Ajayi, O. S.

    2015-06-01

    The Owo River is an important surface water source in Lagos particularly to the western section. It is the source of direct water intake for water supply by Lagos State Water Corporation to Amuwo-Odofin, Ojo and parts of Badagry Local Government Areas. This paper examines the complex interactions and feedbacks between many variables and processes within that catchment and analyses the future ability of this semi-urban watershed in sustaining water supply in the face of cumulative environmental change. Stationarity analysis on rainfall, change detection analysis and morphometry analysis were combined to analyse the non-stationarity of Owo River catchment. On rainfall trend analysis, since the correlation coefficient (0.38) with test statistic of 2.17 did not satisfy the test condition we concluded that there is trend and that rainfall in the watershed is not stationary. The dominant land use impacting on the bio-geochemical fluxes is built up area (including structures and paved surfaces) which grew from about 142.92 km2 (12.20%) in 1984 to 367.22 km2 (31.36%) in 2013 recording gain of 224.3 km2 at average growth rate of 7.73 km2 per annum. Total length of streams within the catchment reduced from 622.24 km in 1964 to 556 km in 2010, while stream density reduced from 0.53 in 1964 to 0.47 in 2010 an indication of shrinking hydrological network. The observed trends in both natural and anthropogenic processes indicated non-stationarity of the hydrological fluxes within the Catchment and if this continues, the urban ecosystem services of water supply will be compromised.

  6. Runoff Variability in Field-scale Catchments and the Implications for Rainffall-Runoff Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Shuster, W.

    2004-12-01

    In this study long-term rainfall runoff records for two agricultural catchments (ca. 0.5 ha) in the USDA - Agricultural Research Service North Appalachian Experimental Watershed (Coshocton, OH) network were used to address the inter-event and inter-catchment variability of field-scale runoff processes. Through analyses of flood frequency and flow duration, the adjacent fallowed watersheds (WS106 and WS121) were found to be similar in terms of annual flood peaks, but less so in terms of the distribution of their discharge rates. Further investigation was focused on event-scale variations of runoff response and whether these variations can be effectively captured by rainfall-runoff models, which included: a) TR-20 (a lumped model); b) EPA-SWMM (a semi-distributed model); and c) GSSHA (a grid-based, fully distributed model). Each model was used to simulate 41 selected runoff episodes recorded in each of the two catchments, and subsequently calibrated to yield parameter values that maximize the correlation between the simulated and observed runoff peaks. Our results indicate that, despite calibration, the hydrographs derived from all models deviated considerably from actual observations, and on the basis of inter-event fluctuations, which furthermore lacked a conspicuous dependence on the magnitude of runoff peaks. Our findings suggest that, in the absence of information on rainfall distribution and soil moisture, distributed models may not be superior to lumped ones in forecasting runoff responses of field scale catchments; and the correspondence between runoff mechanisms and model representations needs to be better understood and accounted for in order to limit the uncertainties of model predictions.

  7. ANN modeling for flood prediction in the upstream Eure's catchment (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharroubi, Ouissem; masson, Eric; Blanpain, Olivier; Lallahem, Sami

    2013-04-01

    Rainfall-Runoff relationship at basin scale is strongly depending on the catchment complexity including multi-scale interactions. In extreme events cases (i.e. floods and droughts) this relationship is even more complex and differs from average hydrological conditions making extreme runoff prediction very difficult to achieve. However, flood warning, flood prevention and flood mitigation rely on the possibility to predict both flood peak runoff and lag time. This point is crucial for decision making and flood warning to prevent populations and economical stakes to be damaged by extreme hydrological events. Since 2003 in France, a dedicated state service is in charge of producing flood warning from national level (i.e. SCHAPI) to regional level (i.e. SPC). This flood warning service is combining national weather forecast agency (i.e. Meteo France) together with a fully automated realtime hydrological network (i.e. Rainfall-Runoff) in order to produce a flood warning national map online and provide a set of hydro-meteorological data to the SPC in charge of flood prediction from regional to local scale. The SPC is in fact the flood service delivering hydrological prediction at operational level for decision making about flood alert for municipalities and first help services. Our research in collaboration with the SPC SACN (i.e. "Seine Aval et fleuves Côtiers Normands") is focused on the implementation of an Artificial Neural Network model (ANN) for flood prediction in deferent key points of the Eure's catchment and main subcatchment. Our contribution will focus on the ANN model developed for Saint-Luperce gauging station in the upstream part of the Eure's catchment. Prediction of extreme runoff at Saint-Luperce station is of high importance for flood warning in the Eure's catchment because it gives a good indicator on the extreme status and the downstream propagation of a potential flood event. Despite a good runoff monitoring since 27 years Saint Luperce flood

  8. Cross-scale interactions between surface components and rainfall properties. Non-linearities in the hydrological and erosive behavior of semiarid catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Cantón, Yolanda; Lazaro, Roberto; Solé-Benet, Albert

    2014-09-01

    Non-vegetated areas in arid and semiarid ecosystems are usually covered by biological soil crusts (BSCs), which modify many surface properties and reduce soil erosion at local spatial scales. Nevertheless, runoff generated in these areas could increase downstream erosion, or on the contrary, supply water to downslope plants, which act as surface obstructions slowing down runoff, trapping sediments and thus reducing water erosion. However, their buffer capacity might be overwhelmed during some torrential rains, increasing catchment connectivity and modifying the hydrological behavior and subsequent water erosion measured at the catchment outlet. To progress in the knowledge of the effect of the interactions between BSCs and vegetation on runoff generation and water erosion at catchment scale, the long term hydrological response of semiarid badlands with an important cover of BSCs has been studied. This effect has been analyzed using piecewise regression analysis to find any possible break point in the runoff response of the catchment to rainfall, attributable to variations in the hydrological connectivity of the catchment. Once we found this break point, we used it to divide the database in two sub-databases, and we built two structural equation models (SEM) to identify the main hydrological drivers controlling runoff generation and water erosion at sub-datasets, corresponding with different stages of catchment connection. Our results show that during low magnitude rainfall events, runoff and erosion measured at the catchment outlet come essentially from physically crusted areas directly connected to the channel network and are controlled by rainfall intensity, whereas runoff generated in areas with BSCs is reinfiltrated downstream into local vegetation patches. However, during high-magnitude events, vegetated buffers are saturated, connecting areas covered by BSCs with the channel network and increasing the catchment efficiency in exporting water out of the system

  9. Characterising groundwater-dominated lowland catchments: the UK Lowland Catchment Research Programme (LOCAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheater, H. S.; Peach, D.; Binley, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a major UK initiative to address deficiencies in understanding the hydro-ecological response of groundwater-dominated lowland catchments. The scope and objectives of this national programme are introduced and focus on one of three sets of research basins - the Pang/Lambourn Chalk catchments, tributaries of the river Thames in southern England. The motivation for the research is the need to support integrated management of river systems that have high ecological value and are subject to pressures that include groundwater abstraction for water supply, diffuse pollution, and land use and climate change. An overview of the research programme is provided together with highlights of some current research findings concerning the hydrological functioning of these catchments. Despite the importance of the Chalk as a major UK aquifer, knowledge of the subsurface movement of water and solutes is poor. Solute transport in the dual porosity unsaturated zone depends on fracture/matrix interactions that are difficult to observe; current experimental and modelling research supports the predominance of matrix flow and suggests that slow migration of a time-history of decades of nutrient loading is occurring. Groundwater flows are complex; catchments vary seasonally and are ill-defined and karst features are locally important. Groundwater flow pathways are being investigated using natural and artificial geochemical tracers based on experimental borehole arrays; stream-aquifer interaction research is using a combination of geophysics, borehole array geochemistry and longitudinal profiles of stream flow and solutes. A complex picture of localised subsurface inflows, linked to geological controls and karst features, and significant longitudinal groundwater flow below the river channel is emerging. Management implications are discussed. Strategies to control surface application of nutrients are expected to have little effect on groundwater quality for several

  10. Catchment tomography - An approach for spatial parameter estimation in catchment hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Dorina; Kurtz, Wolfgang; Hendricks-Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Kollet, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Though forecast accuracy of hydrological models has improved in the last decades due to the development of more powerful and distributed models, uncertainties in forcings and model parameters are still challenging issues limiting the forecast reliability. As the number of unknown model parameters is generally large for distributed models, batch calibration methods usually lead to different parameter sets resulting in the same model accuracy. Catchment tomography presents an approach to reduce this non-uniqueness problem in hydrological parameter estimation by applying a moving transmitter-receiver concept on a catchment. Radar based precipitation fields serve as the transmitters and stream water gauge observations, the receivers, are sequentially assimilated into the model. The integrated stream gauge signals are resolved by a joint state-parameter update with the Ensemble Kalman Filter. The uncertain parameters are continuously constrained by sequentially integrating new information. Forward simulations are performed with the variably saturated subsurface and overland flow model ParFlow, which has been coupled to the Parallel Data Assimilation Framework (PDAF). In a first step in developing the method, catchment tomography was applied in a synthetic study of a simplified two dimensional catchment with pure overland flow (no subsurface flow) to estimate the spatially distributed Manning's roughness coefficient. The roughness coefficient was distributed in two and four zones and was updated applying different real radar precipitation time series and different initial parameter distributions. The parameters were successfully estimated with only 64 realizations over a simulation period of 30 days with hourly state and parameter updates. The error in the ensemble mean estimated parameters was reduced from up to 500% to less than 4% for all zones of both scenarios, independent from the initial ensemble mean value, if an appropriate initial ensemble spread was applied

  11. Suspended sediment fluxes in the Humber catchment, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wass, Paul D.; Leeks, Graham J. L.

    1999-05-01

    An extensive sediment monitoring network was established within the LOIS programme, involving 10 of the main tributaries of the River Humber (UK). Its primary purpose was to measure the flux of suspended sediment to the estuary. A turbidity monitoring system was developed to provide a continuous record of suspended sediment concentration in the rivers, from which the fluxes were calculated. Linear relationships were established between suspended sediment concentration and turbidity (with slopes varying from 0·89 to 1·69) to enable the conversion of nephelometric turbidity [NTU] to suspended sediment concentration [mg l-1]. Potential uncertainties were identified and quantified. The suspended sediment flux to the Humber (November 1994-October 1997) was calculated to be 699 861 t, equivalent to a yield of 15 t km-2 yr-1. Large temporal and spatial variations in the flux were measured during the monitoring period, in response to factors such as climate, land use, catchment scale, deposition and reservoir trapment. The particle size composition of the suspended sediment was measured and found to vary little, except at very high discharges, when it coarsened. The organic content of the sediment was found to be directly related to the discharge of sewage effluent to the rivers.

  12. Towards catchment classification in data-scarce regions

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, Daniel A.; Buchanan, Brian P.; Alexiades, Alex V.; Anderson, Elizabeth P.; Encalada, Andrea C.; Larson, Erin I.; McManamay, Ryan A.; Poe, Gregory L.; Walter, M. Todd; Flecker, Alexander S.

    2016-01-29

    Assessing spatial variation in hydrologic processes can help to inform freshwater management and advance ecological understanding, yet many areas lack sufficient flow records on which to base classifications. Seeking to address this challenge, we apply concepts developed in data-rich settings to public, global data in order to demonstrate a broadly replicable approach to characterizing hydrologic variation. The proposed approach groups the basins associated with reaches in a river network according to key environmental drivers of hydrologic conditions. This initial study examines Colorado (USA), where long-term streamflow records permit comparison to previously distinguished flow regime types, and the Republic of Ecuador, where data limitations preclude such analysis. The flow regime types assigned to gages in Colorado corresponded reasonably well to the classes distinguished from environmental features. The divisions in Ecuador reflected major known biophysical gradients while also providing a higher resolution supplement to an existing depiction of freshwater ecoregions. Although freshwater policy and management decisions occur amidst uncertainty and imperfect knowledge, this classification framework offers a rigorous and transferrable means to distinguish catchments in data-scarce regions. The maps and attributes of the resulting ecohydrologic classes offer a departure point for additional study and data collection programs such as the placement of stations in under-monitored classes, and the divisions may serve as a preliminary template with which to structure conservation efforts such as environmental flow assessments.

  13. Towards catchment classification in data-scarce regions

    DOE PAGES

    Auerbach, Daniel A.; Buchanan, Brian P.; Alexiades, Alex V.; ...

    2016-01-29

    Assessing spatial variation in hydrologic processes can help to inform freshwater management and advance ecological understanding, yet many areas lack sufficient flow records on which to base classifications. Seeking to address this challenge, we apply concepts developed in data-rich settings to public, global data in order to demonstrate a broadly replicable approach to characterizing hydrologic variation. The proposed approach groups the basins associated with reaches in a river network according to key environmental drivers of hydrologic conditions. This initial study examines Colorado (USA), where long-term streamflow records permit comparison to previously distinguished flow regime types, and the Republic of Ecuador,more » where data limitations preclude such analysis. The flow regime types assigned to gages in Colorado corresponded reasonably well to the classes distinguished from environmental features. The divisions in Ecuador reflected major known biophysical gradients while also providing a higher resolution supplement to an existing depiction of freshwater ecoregions. Although freshwater policy and management decisions occur amidst uncertainty and imperfect knowledge, this classification framework offers a rigorous and transferrable means to distinguish catchments in data-scarce regions. The maps and attributes of the resulting ecohydrologic classes offer a departure point for additional study and data collection programs such as the placement of stations in under-monitored classes, and the divisions may serve as a preliminary template with which to structure conservation efforts such as environmental flow assessments.« less

  14. Pollution from urban development and setback outfalls as a catchment management measure for river water quality improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Deonie; Haynes, Heather; Arthur, Scott

    2016-04-01

    Urban development causes an increase in fine sediment and heavy metal stormwater pollution. Pollution load estimation theorises that stormwater pollutant load and type are strongly, directly influenced by contributing catchment land use. The research presented investigates the validity of these assumptions using an extensive novel field data set of 53 catchments. This research has investigated the relationships between land use and pollutant concentrations (Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, Ca, Ba, Sn, Mn) in urban stormwater outfall sediments. Cartographic and aerial photography data have been utilised to delineate the surface and subsurface contributing catchment land use. A zoned sub-catchment approach to catchment characterisation of stormwater pollutant concentration has been defined and tested. This method effectively describes the specific land use influence on pollutant concentrations at the stormwater outfall, showing strong dependency with road length, brake points, impervious area and open space. Road networks and open space are found to influence land use, and thus stormwater pollution, closer to stormwater outfall/receiving waterbody suggesting storage, treatment, assimilation, loss or dilution of the land use influence further away from stormwater outfall. An empirical description has been proposed with which to predict outfall pollutant contributions to the receiving urban waterbody based on catchment land use information. With the definition and quantification of contributing catchment specific fine sediment and urban heavy metal pollutants, the influence of urban stormwater outfall management on the receiving watercourse has been considered. The locations of stormwater outfalls, and their proximity to the receiving waterway, are known as key water quality and river health influences. Water quality benefits from the implementation of stormwater outfalls set back from the receiving waterway banks have been investigated using the catchment case study. Setback outfalls

  15. A bioinformatics analysis of Lamin-A regulatory network: a perspective on epigenetic involvement in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arancio, Walter

    2012-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare human genetic disease that leads to premature aging. HGPS is caused by mutation in the Lamin-A (LMNA) gene that leads, in affected young individuals, to the accumulation of the progerin protein, usually present only in aging differentiated cells. Bioinformatics analyses of the network of interactions of the LMNA gene and transcripts are presented. The LMNA gene network has been analyzed using the BioGRID database (http://thebiogrid.org/) and related analysis tools such as Osprey (http://biodata.mshri.on.ca/osprey/servlet/Index) and GeneMANIA ( http://genemania.org/). The network of interaction of LMNA transcripts has been further analyzed following the competing endogenous (ceRNA) hypotheses (RNA cross-talk via microRNAs [miRNAs]) and using the miRWalk database and tools (www.ma.uni-heidelberg.de/apps/zmf/mirwalk/). These analyses suggest particular relevance of epigenetic modifiers (via acetylase complexes and specifically HTATIP histone acetylase) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent chromatin remodelers (via pBAF, BAF, and SWI/SNF complexes).

  16. Multicausal systems ask for multicausal approaches: A network perspective on subjective well-being in individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Deserno, Marie K; Borsboom, Denny; Begeer, Sander; Geurts, Hilde M

    2016-08-17

    Given the heterogeneity of autism spectrum disorder, an important limitation of much autism spectrum disorder research is that outcome measures are statistically modeled as separate dependent variables. Often, their multivariate structure is either ignored or treated as a nuisance. This study aims to lift this limitation by applying network analysis to explicate the multivariate pattern of risk and success factors for subjective well-being in autism spectrum disorder. We estimated a network structure for 27 potential factors in 2341 individuals with autism spectrum disorder to assess the centrality of specific life domains and their importance for well-being. The data included both self- and proxy-reported information. We identified social satisfaction and societal contribution as the strongest direct paths to subjective well-being. The results suggest that an important contribution to well-being lies in resources that allow the individual to engage in social relations, which influence well-being directly. Factors most important in determining the network's structure include self-reported IQ, living situation, level of daily activity, and happiness. Number of family members with autism spectrum disorder and openness about one's diagnosis are least important of all factors for subjective well-being. These types of results can serve as a roadmap for interventions directed at improving the well-being of individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

  17. Model‐based analysis of the influence of catchment properties on hydrologic partitioning across five mountain headwater subcatchments

    PubMed Central

    Wagener, Thorsten; McGlynn, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ungauged headwater basins are an abundant part of the river network, but dominant influences on headwater hydrologic response remain difficult to predict. To address this gap, we investigated the ability of a physically based watershed model (the Distributed Hydrology‐Soil‐Vegetation Model) to represent controls on metrics of hydrologic partitioning across five adjacent headwater subcatchments. The five study subcatchments, located in Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest in central Montana, have similar climate but variable topography and vegetation distribution. This facilitated a comparative hydrology approach to interpret how parameters that influence partitioning, detected via global sensitivity analysis, differ across catchments. Model parameters were constrained a priori using existing regional information and expert knowledge. Influential parameters were compared to perceptions of catchment functioning and its variability across subcatchments. Despite between‐catchment differences in topography and vegetation, hydrologic partitioning across all metrics and all subcatchments was sensitive to a similar subset of snow, vegetation, and soil parameters. Results also highlighted one subcatchment with low certainty in parameter sensitivity, indicating that the model poorly represented some complexities in this subcatchment likely because an important process is missing or poorly characterized in the mechanistic model. For use in other basins, this method can assess parameter sensitivities as a function of the specific ungauged system to which it is applied. Overall, this approach can be employed to identify dominant modeled controls on catchment response and their agreement with system understanding. PMID:27642197

  18. A distributed continuous simulation model to identify critical source areas of phosphorus at the catchment scale: model description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, B. K.; Dunn, S. M.; Ferrier, R. C.

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents CAMEL (Chemicals from Agricultural Management and Erosion Losses), a distributed continuous simulation model to simulate daily phosphorus (P) transformations and transport at the catchment scale. CAMEL is a process-oriented mass-balance model that is based on both analytical and numerical approaches. In the model, a catchment is represented using a network of square grid cells each of which is comprised of various storages of water, sediment and P. Most of hydrological processes, soil erosion, sediment transport, and P transformations and transport are described using process-based equations. The P transformations between five P storages (active organic, stable organic, labile, active inorganic, and stable organic) are described using first-order kinetic equations. A comprehensive cascade routing scheme is used to simulate P retention and transport along the channel system. Dissolved P is also transported by groundwater flows, described using a two-dimensional Boussinesq equation. CAMEL simulates both surface and subsurface processes explicitly and therefore is suitable for catchment-scale applications. The distributed, process-oriented structure of CAMEL enables the model to be used for identifying critical source areas of P at the catchment-scale. CAMEL is also computationally efficient, allowing for long-term scale applications.

  19. Development of a data-driven distributed hydrological model for regional scale catchments prone to Mediterranean flash floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marko, Adamovic; Flora, Branger; Isabelle, Braud

    2015-04-01

    behaving as a simple dynamical system. Although based on recession analysis, the model proved to be able to simulate properly flood events in a Mediterranean context. The regionalization based on geology proved to be efficient. The approach must be evaluated on other catchments before being used by practitioners, but these results open perspectives for the building of a new generation of flood forecasting models in the Mediterranean context, provided that reliable data sets are available for model parameter estimation.

  20. Comparison of drought occurrence in selected Slovak and Czech catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendekova, Miriam; Fendek, Marian; Porubska, Diana; Hanel, Martin; Horacek, Stanislav; Martinkova, Marta; Vizina, Adam

    2014-05-01

    The presented study is focused on the analysis and comparison of hydrological drought occurrence, development and duration in six small to middle sized catchments in the Czech Republic (CZ) and Slovakia. The main questions to be answered are: (1) are there correlations between the physical conditions in the catchments and drought occurrence, and (2) does the spatial trend of drought occurrence exist. The Žitava catchment is located in the central western part of Slovakia having runoff dominated by rainfall with the contribution of snow melting during the spring period. The Belá River catchment is located on the contact of Západné and Vysoké Tatry Mts. in the north of Slovakia. The runoff is snow to snow-rain combined type. The Ľupčianka catchment is located on the northern slopes of the Nízke Tatry Mts. in the northern part of the central Slovakia. The runoff regime is snow-rain combined in the upper part of the catchment, and of rain-snow type in the rest of catchment. The Rakovnický potok brook (CZ) has its spring in Rakovnická pahorkatina hilly land. Runoff is dominated by rainfall, quite heavily influenced by water uptakes in the catchment. The Teplá River (CZ) originates in peat meadows in the western part of the Czech Republic. Runoff is dominated by rainfall. The Metuje catchment (CZ) is formed by Adršsbach-Teplické stěny Upland. The headwater part is typical by deeply incest valleys, table mountains and pseudokarst caves. The discharge is fed dominantly by groundwater. The streamflow drought was characterized using discharge data, the groundwater drought using the base flow values. The local minimum method was used for base flow separation. The threshold level method (Q80, BF80) and the sequent peak algorithm were used for calculation of drought duration in discharge and base flow time series. The data of the same three decades of the common period (1971 - 1980, 1981 - 1990 and 1991 - 2000) were used. The resulting base flow values along with

  1. Flow path and travel time dynamics in a lowland catchment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velde, Ype; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of time it takes water from the moment of precipitation to reach the catchment outlet is widely used as a characteristic for catchment flow path contributions, catchment vulnerability to pollution spreading and pollutant loads from catchments to downstream waters. However, this distribution tends to vary in time driven by variability in precipitation and evapotranspiration. Catchment scale mixing of water controls how dynamics in rainfall and evapotranspiration are translated into dynamics of travel time distributions. In this presentation we use the concept of StorAge selection (SAS) functions, that quantify catchment scale mixing of water, to describe chloride and nitrate flow. We will show how SAS functions relate to the topography and subsurface and how they are effective in describing nitrate and chloride transport. The presented analyses will combine unique datasets of high-frequency discharge and water quality concentrations with conceptual models of water flow and solute transport. Remarkable findings are the large contrasts in travel times between lowland and sloping catchments and the strong relationship between evapotranspiration and stream water nutrient concentration dynamics.

  2. Pesticide uses and transfers in urbanised catchments.

    PubMed

    Blanchoud, Hélène; Farrugia, Frédéric; Mouchel, Jean Marie

    2004-05-01

    An investigation on herbicide uses in two semi-urban catchments was performed simultaneously with sampling campaigns at six stations inside both watersheds from April to July 1998. Urban uses of herbicides exceeded agricultural uses, and transfer coefficients were also higher in urban areas. Therefore, the most used product in urban areas (diuron) was by far the most contaminating product. Householders accounted for 30% of all uses. The highest measured diuron concentration in water surface was 8.7 microg l(-1) due to its use on impervious surfaces. Compared to EEC standards for drinking water production (0.1 microg l(-1)), it is clear that suburban uses of herbicides may severely endanger drinking water production from river water.

  3. Biogeochemical and Hydrological Heterogeneity and Emergent Archetypical Catchment Response Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawitz, J. W.; Gall, H. E.; Rao, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    What can stream hydrologic and biogeochemical signals tell us about interactions among spatially heterogeneous hydrological and biogeochemical processes at the catchment-scale? We seek to understand how the spatial structure of solute sources coupled with both stationary and nonstationary hydroclimatic drivers affect observed archetypes of concentration-discharge (C-Q) patterns. These response patterns are the spatially integrated expressions of the spatiotemporal structure of solutes exported from managed catchments, and can provide insight into likely ecological consequences of receiving water bodies (e.g., wetlands, rivers, lakes, and coastal waters). We investigated the following broad questions: (1) How does the spatial correlation between the structure of flow-generating areas and biogeochemical source areas across a catchment evolve under stochastic hydro-climatic forcing? (2) What are the feasible hydrologic and biogeochemical responses that lead to the emergence of archetypical C-Q patterns? and; (3) What implications do these coupled dynamics have for catchment monitoring and implementation of management practices? We categorize the observed temporal signals into three archetypical C-Q patterns: dilution; accretion, and constant concentration. We applied a parsimonious stochastic model of heterogeneous catchments, which act as hydrologic and biogeochemical filters, to examine the relationship between spatial heterogeneity and temporal history of solute export signals. The core concept of the modeling framework is considering the type and degree of spatial correlation between solute source zones and flow generating zones, and activation of different portions of the catchments during rainfall events. Our overarching hypothesis is that each archetype C-Q pattern can be generated by explicitly linking landscape-scale hydrologic responses and spatial distributions of solute source properties within a catchment. We compared observed multidecadal data to

  4. Assessing the role of urban developments on storm runoff response through multi-scale catchment experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Owen, Gareth; Geris, Josie; Soulsby, Chris; Quinn, Paul

    2015-04-01

    patterns in the timing and magnitude of the contributions of the different land use zones and their nested integrated runoff response at increasing scales. These can be clearly linked to variations in antecedent conditions and precipitation patterns. For low antecedent flow conditions, the main flood peak is dominated by urban origins (faster responding and larger in relative magnitude); for high antecedent flow conditions, rural (and peri-urban) sources are most dominant. A third type of response involves mixed events, where both rural and urban contributions interact and reinforce the peak flow response. Our analyses showed that the effectiveness of the GIs varied substantially between the different events, suggesting that their design could be improved by introducing variable drainage rates and strategic placements to allow for interactions with the stream network. However, more information is needed on the spatio-temporal variability in water sources, flow pathways and residence times. This is of particular importance to also assess other multiple benefits of GIs, including the impacts on water quality. These challenges are currently addressed in two new case study catchment in the North East of Scotland (10km2) which are undergoing major land use change from rural to urban. Here, integrated tracer and hydrometric data are being collected to characterise the integrated impacts of urbanisation and GIs on flow pathways (nature and length) and associated water quality.

  5. Assessing representative soil moisture at watershed scale of Maqu catchment using spatio-temporal statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, H. A.; Rientjes, T. H. M.; Verhoef, W.

    2012-04-01

    In this study the temporal stability concept by Vachaud et al. (1985) is selected to evaluate a soil moisture measuring network in the Maqu catchment (3200 km2) in the north eastern part of the Tibetan plateau. The network serves for validation of coarse scale (25-50 km) satellite soil moisture products and comprises 20 stations with probes installed at depths of 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 cm. Besides identifying the Representative Mean Soil Moisture (RMSM) station for each respective probe depth, we applied the concept to a time series of satellite based moisture products from the Advance Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) to evaluate if a RMSM pixel can be identified from the pixels that overlay the catchment. Analysis in this study serve to evaluate how well the satellite based moisture estimates match to observation at the RMSM stations for respective depths. We aim to evaluate if the RMSM can be estimated by the satellite product so to broaden the procedure to validate satellite images. We used moisture data for the year 2009 for which data is available at 15 minutes interval using ECH2O EC-TM probes. For each probe depth a Mean Relative Difference (MRD) plot is created to identify stations that are characterized by mean, wet and dry moisture conditions. The spearman non-parametric test and pearson's correlation coefficient test are used to analyze the temporal persistence of the ranks of the measuring stations. The analysis is applied to each probe depth to evaluate the effect of the measuring depth on determining the catchment RMSM. Similar analysis is carried out on the satellite soil moisture observations that cover a full hydrological year to identify a RMSM pixel. The result of the analysis on the network showed that the station that indicates RMSM changes for each probe depth and thus a single station that indicates the catchment RMSM cannot be identified. Results on identifying a RMSM pixel shows that such pixel can be identified, however in our case, a

  6. Components of the total water balance of an urban catchment.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, V Grace; McMahon, Thomas A; Mein, Russell G

    2003-12-01

    A daily model was used to quantify the components of the total urban water balance of the Curtin catchment, Canberra, Australia. For this catchment, the mean annual rainfall was found to be three times greater than imported potable water, and the sum of the output from the separate stormwater and wastewater systems exceeded the input of imported potable water by some 50%. Seasonal and annual variations in climate exert a very strong influence over the relative magnitude of the water balance components; this needs to be accounted for when assessing the potential for utilizing stormwater and wastewater within an urban catchment.

  7. Impact of spatial climate variability on catchment streamflow predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sopan; Wigington, Jim; Leibowitz, Scott; Sproles, Eric; Comeleo, Randy

    2014-05-01

    The ability of hydrological models to predict a catchment's streamflow response serves several important needs of our society, such as flood protection, irrigation demand, domestic water supply, and preservation of fish habitat. However, spatial variability of climate within a catchment can negatively affect streamflow predictions if it is not explicitly accounted for in hydrological models. In this study, we examined the changes in streamflow predictability when a hydrological model is run with spatially variable (distributed) meteorological inputs instead of spatially uniform (lumped) meteorological inputs. Both lumped and distributed versions of the EXP-HYDRO model were implemented at 41 meso-scale (500 - 5000 km2) catchments in the Pacific Northwest region of USA (Oregon, Washington, and Idaho). We used two complementary metrics of long-term spatial climate variability, moisture homogeneity index (IM) and temperature variability index (ITV), to analyse the performance improvement with distributed model. Results showed that the distributed model performed better than the lumped model in 38 catchments, and noticeably better (>10% improvement) in 13 catchments. Furthermore, spatial variability of moisture distribution alone was insufficient to explain the observed patterns of model performance improvement. For catchments with low moisture homogeneity (IM < 80%), IM was a better predictor of model performance improvement than ITV; whereas for catchments with high moisture homogeneity (IM > 80%), ITV was a better predictor of performance improvement than IM. Based on the results, we conclude that: (1) catchments that have low homogeneity of moisture distribution are the obvious candidates for using spatially distributed meteorological inputs, and (2) catchments with homogeneous moisture distribution benefit from spatially distributed meteorological inputs if those catchments have high spatial variability of precipitation phase (rain vs. snow). Our use of spatially

  8. Towards a regional passive air sampling network and strategy for new POPs in the GRULAC region: Perspectives from the GAPS Network and first results for organophosphorus flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Rauert, Cassandra; Harner, Tom; Schuster, Jasmin K; Quinto, Karen; Fillmann, Gilberto; Castillo, Luisa Eugenia; Fentanes, Oscar; Ibarra, Martín Villa; Miglioranza, Karina S B; Rivadeneira, Isabel Moreno; Pozo, Karla; Puerta, Andrea Padilla; Zuluaga, Beatriz Helena Aristizábal

    2016-12-15

    A discussion is presented on the limitations for air monitoring studies around the Group of Latin American and Caribbean Countries (GRULAC), highlighting key issues requiring further attention, and reports on how a special initiative is addressing these limitations. Preliminary results are presented for the first reported data on organophosphorus flame retardant (OPFR) concentrations in outdoor air from the GRULAC region. At the majority of sites the concentrations and the profile of the OPFRs detected were similar with tris (chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP) dominating (networks (such as GAPS) can provide important new information to support risk assessment of these and similar chemicals. Finally, the various challenges with implementing a regional monitoring program are discussed, including harmonizing data from various monitoring programs for reporting to the GMP.

  9. Elucidating the genotype-phenotype relationships and network perturbations of human shared and specific disease genes from an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Begum, Tina; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2014-10-05

    To date, numerous studies have been attempted to determine the extent of variation in evolutionary rates between human disease and nondisease (ND) genes. In our present study, we have considered human autosomal monogenic (Mendelian) disease genes, which were classified into two groups according to the number of phenotypic defects, that is, specific disease (SPD) gene (one gene: one defect) and shared disease (SHD) gene (one gene: multiple defects). Here, we have compared the evolutionary rates of these two groups of genes, that is, SPD genes and SHD genes with respect to ND genes. We observed that the average evolutionary rates are slow in SHD group, intermediate in SPD group, and fast in ND group. Group-to-group evolutionary rate differences remain statistically significant regardless of their gene expression levels and number of defects. We demonstrated that disease genes are under strong selective constraint if they emerge through edgetic perturbation or drug-induced perturbation of the interactome network, show tissue-restricted expression, and are involved in transmembrane transport. Among all the factors, our regression analyses interestingly suggest the independent effects of 1) drug-induced perturbation and 2) the interaction term of expression breadth and transmembrane transport on protein evolutionary rates. We reasoned that the drug-induced network disruption is a combination of several edgetic perturbations and, thus, has more severe effect on gene phenotypes.

  10. Exploring Individual Creativity from Network Structure Perspective: Comparison of Task Force Team and R&D Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kun Chang; Chae, Seong Wook; Seo, Young Wook

    The objectives of this paper are to empirically investigate the fact that the factors affecting individual creativity differ depending on team characteristics and the fact that its practical implications are plentiful, especially for those who are concerned with how to design team network structures with a bid to motivate individual creativity. From previous studies, this paper suggests crucial factors for facilitating individual creativity: intrinsic motivation, organizational learning culture, and network structure. To maximize practical implications, we divide team characteristics into two types: task force teams and R&D teams. A task force team is organized with a clear mission to be completed within a rather short period. In contrast, an R&D team exists for a long time with numerous projects to finish with various terms and conditions. Empirical results reveal that individual creativity in the task force team should be controlled by adjusting the organizational learning culture and degree centrality, while individual creativity in the R&D team must be administered in a way that the individual's intrinsic motivation is stimulated and encouraged through the use of a structural hole through which external information from outside team is available.

  11. Optimal control-based efficient synthesis of building blocks of quantum algorithms: A perspective from network complexity towards time complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte-Herbrueggen, T.; Spoerl, A.; Glaser, S.J.; Khaneja, N.

    2005-10-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate how optimal control methods can be used to speed up the implementation of modules of quantum algorithms or quantum simulations in networks of coupled qubits. The gain is most prominent in realistic cases, where the qubits are not all mutually coupled. Thus the shortest times obtained depend on the coupling topology as well as on the characteristic ratio of the time scales for local controls vs nonlocal (i.e., coupling) evolutions in the specific experimental setting. Relating these minimal times to the number of qubits gives the tightest known upper bounds to the actual time complexity of the quantum modules. As will be shown, time complexity is a more realistic measure of the experimental cost than the usual gate complexity. In the limit of fast local controls (as, e.g., in NMR), time-optimized realizations are shown for the quantum Fourier transform (QFT) and the multiply controlled NOT gate (C{sup n-1}NOT) in various coupling topologies of n qubits. The speed-ups are substantial: in a chain of six qubits the quantum Fourier transform so far obtained by optimal control is more than eight times faster than the standard decomposition into controlled phase, Hadamard and SWAP gates, while the C{sup n-1}NOT gate for a completely coupled network of six qubits is nearly seven times faster.

  12. Driving factors of interactions between the exchange rate market and the commodity market: A wavelet-based complex network perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Shaobo; An, Haizhong; Chen, Zhihua; Liu, Xueyong

    2017-08-01

    In traditional econometrics, a time series must be in a stationary sequence. However, it usually shows time-varying fluctuations, and it remains a challenge to execute a multiscale analysis of the data and discover the topological characteristics of conduction in different scales. Wavelet analysis and complex networks in physical statistics have special advantages in solving these problems. We select the exchange rate variable from the Chinese market and the commodity price index variable from the world market as the time series of our study. We explore the driving factors behind the behavior of the two markets and their topological characteristics in three steps. First, we use the Kalman filter to find the optimal estimation of the relationship between the two markets. Second, wavelet analysis is used to extract the scales of the relationship that are driven by different frequency wavelets. Meanwhile, we search for the actual economic variables corresponding to different frequency wavelets. Finally, a complex network is used to search for the transfer characteristics of the combination of states driven by different frequency wavelets. The results show that statistical physics have a unique advantage over traditional econometrics. The Chinese market has time-varying impacts on the world market: it has greater influence when the world economy is stable and less influence in times of turmoil. The process of forming the state combination is random. Transitions between state combinations have a clustering feature. Based on these characteristics, we can effectively reduce the information burden on investors and correctly respond to the government's policy mix.

  13. Observational techniques for constraining hydraulic and hydrologic models for use in catchment scale flood impact assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Gareth; Wilkinson, Mark; Nicholson, Alex; Quinn, Paul; O'Donnell, Greg

    2015-04-01

    There is an increase in the use of Natural Flood Management (NFM) schemes to tackle excessive runoff in rural catchments, but direct evidence of their functioning during extreme events is often lacking. With the availability of low cost sensors, a dense nested monitoring network can be established to provide near continuous optical and physical observations of hydrological processes. This paper will discuss findings for a number of catchments in the North of England where land use management and NFM have been implemented for flood risk reduction; and show how these observations have been used to inform both a hydraulic and a rainfall-runoff model. The value of observations in understanding how measures function is of fundamental importance and is becoming increasingly viable and affordable. Open source electronic platforms such as Arduino and Raspberry Pi are being used with cheap sensors to perform these tasks. For example, a level gauge has been developed for approximately €110 and cameras capable of capturing still or moving pictures are available for approximately €120; these are being used to better understand the behaviour of NFM features such as ponds and woody debris. There is potential for networks of these instruments to be configured and data collected through Wi-Fi or other wireless networks. The potential to expand informative networks of data that can constrain models is now possible. The functioning of small scale runoff attenuation features, such as offline ponds, has been demonstrated at the local scale. Specifically, through the measurement of both instream and in-pond water levels, it has been possible to calculate the impact of storing/attenuating flood flows on the adjacent river flow. This information has been encapsulated in a hydraulic model that allows the extrapolation of impacts to the larger catchment scale, contributing to understanding of the scalability of such features. Using a dense network of level gauges located along the main

  14. Water and chemical recharge in subsurface catchment: observations and consequences for modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascuel-odoux, C.; Aquilina, L.; Faucheux, M.; Merot, P.; Molenat, J.; de Monteti, V.; Sebilo, M.; Rouxel, M.; Ruiz, L.

    2011-12-01

    Shallow groundwater that develops on hillslopes is the main compartment in headwater catchments for flow and solute transport to rivers. Although spatial and temporal variations in its chemical composition are reported in the literature, there is no coherent description of the way these variations are organized, nor is there an accepted conceptual model for the recharge mechanisms and flows in the groundwater involved. We instrumented an intensive farming and subsurface dominant catchment located in Oceanic Western Europe (France), included in AgrHyS catchments (for Agro-Hydro-SyStem) and a part of the French network of catchments for environmental research (SOERE RBV dedicated to the Critical Zone). It is strongly constrained by anthropogenic pressures (agriculture) and is characterized by a clear non-equilibrium status. A network of 42 nested piezometers was installed along a 200 m hillslope allowing water sampling in the permanent water table as well as in what we call the fluctuating zone, characterized by seasonal alternance of saturated and unsaturated conditions. Water composition was monitored at high frequency (weekly) over a 3-year period for major anion composition and over a one year period for detailed 15N, CFC, SF6 and other dissolved gases composition. The results demonstrated that (i) the anionic composition in water table fluctuation zone varied significantly compared to deeper portions of the aquifer on the hillslope, confirming that this layer constitutes a main compartment for the mixing of new recharge water and old groundwater, (ii) seasonally, the variations of 15N and CFC are much higher during the recharge period than during the recession period, confirming the preferential flow during early recharge events, iii) variations of nitrate 15N and O18 composition was suggesting any significant denitrification process in the fluctuating zone, confirming the dominance of the mixing processes in the fluctuating zone, iv) deeper parts of the aquifer

  15. Susceptibility analysis for landslides in the Xiangxi catchment (Three Gorges Reservoir area / China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohn, J.; Ehret, D.; Xiang, W.

    2009-04-01

    The Xiangxi River is a tributary of the Yangtze River. In 2009 the Three Gorges Reservoir will reach its final retention water elevation level (175 m asl). Parts of the Xiangxi valley will then flooded. Especially Jurassic sedimentary layers are predestined for intense landslides in this area. As a first step a landslide inventory map is produced. All slopes influenced directly by impoundment are mapped geotechnically in detail to assess the spatial distribution of the landslides and their shape. Furthermore, two sub-catchments in the wide-stretched catchment area of the Xiangxi River were chosen for intense investigation. All in all, about 200 km2will finally be mapped geotechnically in detail to provide data for continuative investigations. The investigation fields are divided into test and training areas for further analysis using the neural networks method. By this means the susceptibility for landslides in dependency of different features, like lithology, slope angle, exposition, distance to the river, etc will be analysed. In a second step the results of the neural network analysis will be the base of a more regional landslide susceptibility analysis for the whole catchment area of the Xiangxi River. The performance of the method will be tested by additional inspections in areas that have been found to have a high susceptibility for landslides. These works are part of the joint research project "Yangtze: land use change - erosion - landslides" financed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Joint aim of this project is to produce a landslide and erosion risk map for the whole region and to analyse the land use change caused by the impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam in this area.

  16. Approaches for quantifying and managing diffuse phosphorus exports at the farm/small catchment scale.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Richard W; Nash, David; George, Anja; Wang, Q J; Duncan, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Quantifying and managing diffuse P losses from small catchments or at the farm scale requires detailed knowledge of farming practices and their interaction with catchment processes. However, detailed knowledge may not be available and hence modeling is required. This paper demonstrates two approaches to developing tools that assist P losses from New Zealand or Australian dairy farms. The first is largely empirical and separates sources of P within a paddock into soil, fertilizer, dung, and treading impacts (including damage to grazed pasture). This information is combined with expert knowledge of hydrological processes and potential point sources (e.g., stream crossings) to create a deterministic model that can be used to evaluate the most cost and labor efficient method of mitigating P losses. For instance, in one example, 45% of annual P lost was attributed to the application of superphosphate just before a runoff event for which a mitigation strategy could be to use a less water soluble P fertilizer. The second approach uses a combination of interviews, expert knowledge and relationships to develop a Bayesian Network that describes P exports. The knowledge integration process helped stakeholders develop a comprehensive understanding of the problem. The Network, presented in the form of a "cause and effect", diagram provided a simple, visual representation of current knowledge that could be easily applied to individual circumstances and isolate factors having the greatest influence on P loss. Both approaches demonstrate that modeling P losses and mitigation strategies does not have to cover every process or permutation and that a degree of uncertainty can be handled to create a working model of P losses at a farm or small catchment scale.

  17. CNMM: a Catchment Environmental Model for Managing Water Quality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Mitigating agricultural diffuse pollution and greenhouse gas emissions is a complicated task due to tempo-spatial lags between the field practices and the watershed responses. Spatially-distributed modeling is essential to the implementation of cost-effective and best management practices (BMPs) to optimize land uses and nutrient applications as well as to project the impact of climate change on the watershed service functions. CNMM (the Catchment Nutrients Management Model) is a 3D spatially-distributed, grid-based and process-oriented biophysical model comprehensively developed to simulate energy balance, hydrology, plant/crop growth, biogeochemistry of life elements (e.g., C, N and P), waste treatment, waterway vegetation/purification, stream water quality and land management in agricultural watersheds as affected by land utilization strategies such as BMPs and by climate change. The CNMM is driven by a number of spatially-distributed data such as weather, topography (including DEM and shading), stream network, stream water, soil, vegetation and land management (including waste treatments), and runs at an hourly time step. It represents a catchment as a matrix of square uniformly-sized cells, where each cell is defined as a homogeneous hydrological response unit with all the hydrologically-significant parameters the same but varied at soil depths in fine intervals. Therefore, spatial variability is represented by allowing parameters to vary horizontally and vertically in space. A four-direction flux routing algorithm is applied to route water and nutrients across soils of cells governed by the gradients of either water head or elevation. A linear channel reservoir scheme is deployed to route water and nutrients in stream networks. The model is capable of computing CO2, CH4, NH3, NO, N2O and N2 emissions from soils and stream waters. The CNMM can serve as an idea modelling tool to investigate the overwhelming critical zone research at various catchment scales.

  18. Shuttle radar DEM hydrological correction for erosion modelling in small catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarihani, Ben; Sidle, Roy; Bartley, Rebecca

    2016-04-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) that accurately replicate both landscape form and processes are critical to support modelling of environmental processes. Catchment and hillslope scale runoff and sediment processes (i.e., patterns of overland flow, infiltration, subsurface stormflow and erosion) are all topographically mediated. In remote and data-scarce regions, high resolution DEMs (LiDAR) are often not available, and moderate to course resolution digital elevation models (e.g., SRTM) have difficulty replicating detailed hydrological patterns, especially in relatively flat landscapes. Several surface reconditioning algorithms (e.g., Smoothing) and "Stream burning" techniques (e.g., Agree or ANUDEM), in conjunction with representation of the known stream networks, have been used to improve DEM performance in replicating known hydrology. Detailed stream network data are not available at regional and national scales, but can be derived at local scales from remotely-sensed data. This research explores the implication of high resolution stream network data derived from Google Earth images for DEM hydrological correction, instead of using course resolution stream networks derived from topographic maps. The accuracy of implemented method in producing hydrological-efficient DEMs were assessed by comparing the hydrological parameters derived from modified DEMs and limited high-resolution airborne LiDAR DEMs. The degree of modification is dominated by the method used and availability of the stream network data. Although stream burning techniques improve DEMs hydrologically, these techniques alter DEM characteristics that may affect catchment boundaries, stream position and length, as well as secondary terrain derivatives (e.g., slope, aspect). Modification of a DEM to better reflect known hydrology can be useful, however, knowledge of the magnitude and spatial pattern of the changes are required before using a DEM for subsequent analyses.

  19. The European Marine Observing Network and the development of an Integrated European Ocean Observing System. An EuroGOOS perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Vicente; Gorringe, Patrick; Nolan, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    The ocean benefits many sectors of society, being the biggest reservoir of heat, water, carbon and oxygen and playing a fundamental role regulating the earth's climate. We rely on the oceans for food, transport, energy and recreation. Therefore, a sustained marine observation network is crucial to further our understanding of the oceanic environment and to supply scientific data to meet society's need. Marine data and observations in Europe, collected primarily by state governmental agencies, is offered via five Regional Operational Oceanographic Systems (ROOS) within the context of EuroGOOS (http://www.eurogos.eu), an International Non-Profit Association of national governmental agencies and research organizations (40 members from 19 member states) committed to European-scale operational oceanography within the context of the Intergovernmental Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS). Strong cooperation within these regions, enabling the involvement of additional partners and countries, forms the basis of EuroGOOS work. Ocean data collected from different type of sensors (e.g. moored buoys, tide gauges, Ferrybox systems, High Frequency radars, gliders and profiling floats) is accessible to scientist and other end users through data portals and initiatives such as the European Marine Observations and Data Network (EMODnet) (www.emodnet.eu) and the Copernicus Marine Service Copernicus (www.copernicus.eu). Although a relatively mature European ocean observing capability already exists and its well-coordinated at European level, some gaps have been identified, for example the demand for ecosystem products and services, or the case that biogeochemical observations are still relatively sparse particularly in coastal and shelf seas. Assessing gaps based on the capacity of the observing system to answer key societal challenges e.g. site suitability for aquaculture and ocean energy, oil spill response and contextual oceanographic products for fisheries and ecosystems is still

  20. The application of time-lapse photography for the observation of snow processes in mountainous catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvelmann, J.; Pohl, S.; Weiler, M.

    2012-04-01

    For the forecast of snowmelt flood events in mountainous catchments it is very important to know the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the snowcover. Topography and vegetation have the most important influence on the spatio-temporal variability of the snowcover. In order to accomplish a continuous observation of the quantity and the status of the snowcover, an extensive measurement network consisting of numerous standalone snow and meteorological sensors and time-lapse photography was established in three catchments in the Black Forest, a typical mid latitude medium elevation mountain range. Catchments with different topographic characteristic and areal extent were specifically chosen for this study. Within the catchments, a stratified sampling design was used to cover a wide range of altitudes and exposures. In order to investigate the influence of a vegetation cover on the snow processes beneath sensors and cameras have been installed under the forest canopy and on adjacent open field sites, respectively. In the presented study the application of spatially distributed time-lapse cameras for the observation of snow processes and snowcover properties at the catchment scale will be discussed. Image analysis software was applied to extract information about snowdepth, snow albedo and canopy interception from the digital images. A measurement scale with a black/white board was installed in the focus of every camera to allow a determination of the snowdepth at every camera location while the black/white board was used to provide a white balance for the albedo estimation. The albedo provides important information about the status of the snowcover and its temporal evolution is a crucial factor for the snowmelt energy balance. Furthermore the time-lapse images provided a continuous observation of the forest canopy allowing the estimation of the interception efficiency and the temporal evolution of the snow interception for different topographic situations

  1. Perspectives for a better understanding of the metabolic integration of photorespiration within a complex plant primary metabolism network.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Michael; Dellero, Younès; Keech, Olivier; Betti, Marco; Raghavendra, Agepati S; Sage, Rowan; Zhu, Xin-Guang; Allen, Doug K; Weber, Andreas P M

    2016-05-01

    Photorespiration is an essential high flux metabolic pathway that is found in all oxygen-producing photosynthetic organisms. It is often viewed as a closed metabolic repair pathway that serves to detoxify 2-phosphoglycolic acid and to recycle carbon to fuel the Calvin-Benson cycle. However, this view is too simplistic since the photorespiratory cycle is known to interact with several primary metabolic pathways, including photosynthesis, nitrate assimilation, amino acid metabolism, C1 metabolism and the Krebs (TCA) cycle. Here we will review recent advances in photorespiration research and discuss future priorities to better understand (i) the metabolic integration of the photorespiratory cycle within the complex network of plant primary metabolism and (ii) the importance of photorespiration in response to abiotic and biotic stresses.