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Sample records for catechol estrogen adducts

  1. Determination of Catechol Estrogen Adducts by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography: Establishing Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    Catechol Estrogen Adducts by High- Performance Liquid Chromatography: Establishing Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL...DAMD17-98-1-8216 Chromatography: Establishing Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer 6. AUTHOR(S) Douglas E. Stack, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING...ultimate goal of this research is the development of a biomarker for the early detection of breast cancer. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Breast

  2. Detection and evaluation of estrogen DNA-adducts and their carcinogenic effects in cultured human cells using biotinylated estradiol.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Kaushlendra; Mani, Chinnadurai; Somasagara, Ranganatha R; Clark, David W; Ananthapur, Venkateshwari; Vinaya, Kambappa; Palle, Komaraiah

    2017-03-01

    The normal female reproductive hormone estrogen has been linked with increased risk of breast and many other forms of cancer. This is largely due to metabolic conversion of estrogens into highly reactive catechol estrogen quinones which can interact with DNA and cause a variety of DNA adducts and lesions. Detection and analysis of these adducts and their associated cellular responses involve complex chemical, enzymatic, and LC-MS based methods, which are both laborious and require specialized expertise and instrumentation. Herein, we show that using a biotin-labeled estradiol allows immunodetection of estrogen-induced DNA adducts by slot blot and single-cell molecular combing and proximity ligation assays. The biotinylated and unlabeled estradiols induced similar levels of DNA single and double strand breaks as measured by comet assays. Using biotinylated estrogen, we further show that estrogens are able to activate the Fanconi anemia-BRCA tumor suppressor pathway and cause DNA strand breaks and oxidatively modified DNA bases as well as gross chromosomal aberrations. Utilization of biotin-labeled estrogens could be a powerful tool to detect estrogen adducts and associated DNA damage, and to track estrogen adduct-induced cellular responses and carcinogenic mechanisms in cultured cells. The techniques presented here allow simple and rapid detection and quantitation of estrogen adducts by slot blot as well as direct visualization on the DNA strand and could pave the way for developing new treatments to protect the genome from the effects of reactive estrogen metabolites. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Synthesis of catechol estrogens by human uterus and leiomyoma

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, V.V.; Hanjani, P.; Rajan, R.

    1981-02-01

    Homogenates of human endometrial, myometrial and leiomyoma tissues were incubated with (2,4,6,7-/sub 3/H)-estradiol and tritiated catechol estrogens were isolated and identified. Though 2- and 4-hydroxylations were about the same in endometrium, 4-hydroxylation was two to four fold higher than 2-hydroxylation in myometrium and leiomyoma. However, endometrium showed greater capacity to form both 2- and 4-hydroxyestrogens than the other two tissues. Both 2- and 4-hydroxylations were significantly less than in myometrium. In view of the reports indicating that inhibitors of catechol 0-methyl transferase (COMT) might act as antineoplastic agents due to their interference with t-RNA methylases and since catechol estrogens inhibit COMT, the present results suggest that endogenous synthesis of catechol estrogens may play an important role in the pathophysiology of uterine leiomyoma.

  4. Leptin influences estrogen metabolism and increases DNA adduct formation in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shouman, Samia; Wagih, Mohamed; Kamel, Marwa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The elevated incidence of obesity has been paralleled with higher risks of breast cancer. High adiposity increases leptin secretion from adipose tissue, which in turn increases cancer cell proliferation. The interplay between leptin and estrogen is one of the mechanisms through which leptin influences breast carcinogenesis. An unbalanced estrogen metabolism increases the formations of catechol estrogen quinones, DNA adducts, and cancer mutations. This study aims to investigate the effect of leptin on some estrogen metabolic enzymes and DNA adduction in breast cancer cells. Methods: High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was performed to analyze the DNA adducts 4-OHE1[E2]-1-N3 adenine and 4-OHE1[E2]-1-N7 guanine. Reporter gene assay, real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR), and Western blot were used to assess the expression of estrogen metabolizing genes and enzymes: Cytochrome P-450 1B1 (CYP1B1), Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-quinone oxidoreductase1 (NQO1), and Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT). Results: Leptin significantly increased the DNA adducts 4-OHE1[E2]-1-N3 adenine and 4-OHE1[E2]-1-N7 guanine. Furthermore, leptin significantly upregulated CYP1B1 promoter activity and protein expression. The luciferase promoter activities of NQO1 and mRNA levels were significantly reduced. Moreover, leptin greatly reduced the reporter activities of the COMT-P1 and COMT-P2 promoters and diminished the protein expression of COMT. Conclusions: Leptin increases DNA adduct levels in breast cancer cells partly by affecting key genes and enzymes involved in estrogen metabolism. Thus, increased focus should be directed toward leptin and its effects on the estrogen metabolic pathway as an effective approach against breast cancer. PMID:28154783

  5. Redox Cycling of Catechol Estrogens Generating Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites and 8-oxo-Deoxyguanosine via Reactive Oxygen Species Differentiates Equine and Human Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhican; Chandrasena, Esala R.; Yuan, Yang; Peng, Kuan-wei; van Breemen, Richard B.; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic activation of estrogens to catechols and further oxidation to highly reactive o-quinones generates DNA damage including apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites. 4-Hydroxyequilenin (4-OHEN) is the major catechol metabolite of equine estrogens present in estrogen replacement formulations, known to cause DNA strand breaks, oxidized bases, and stable and depurinating adducts. However, the direct formation of AP sites by 4-OHEN has not been characterized. In the present study, the induction of AP sites in vitro by 4-OHEN and the endogenous catechol estrogen metabolite, 4-hydroxyestrone (4-OHE) was examined by an aldehyde reactive probe assay. Both 4-OHEN and 4-OHE can significantly enhance the levels of AP sites in calf thymus DNA in the presence of the redox cycling agents, copper ion and NADPH. The B-ring unsaturated catechol 4-OHEN induced AP sites without added copper, whereas 4-OHE required copper. AP sites were also generated much more rapidly by 4-OHEN. For both catechol estrogens, the levels of AP sites correlated linearly with 8-oxo-dG levels, implying that depuriniation resulted from reactive oxygen species (ROS) rather than depurination of estrogen-DNA adducts. ROS modulators such as catalase which scavenges hydrogen peroxide and a Cu(I) chelator blocked the formation of AP sites. In MCF-7 breast cancer cells, 4-OHEN significantly enhanced the formation of AP sites with added NADH. In contrast, no significant induction of AP sites was detected in 4-OHE-treated cells. The greater redox activity of the equine catechol estrogen produces rapid oxidative DNA damage via ROS, which is enhanced by redox cycling agents and interestingly by NADPH-dependent quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1). PMID:20509668

  6. Site-specific covalent modifications of human insulin by catechol estrogens: Reactivity and induced structural and functional changes.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ming-Chun; Fang, Chieh-Ming; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Liang, Huei-Chen; Wang, Tzu-Fan; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chen, Chiao-Chen; Tai, Jung-Hsiang; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2016-06-29

    Proteins, covalently modified by catechol estrogens (CEs), were identified recently from the blood serum of diabetic patients and referred to as estrogenized proteins. Estrogenization of circulating insulin may occur and affect its molecular functioning. Here, the chemical reactivity of CEs towards specific amino acid residues of proteins and the structural and functional changes induced by the estrogenization of insulin were studied using cyclic voltammetry, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, circular dichroism spectroscopy, molecular modeling, and bioassays. Our results indicate that CEs, namely, 2- and 4-hydroxyl estrogens, were thermodynamically and kinetically more reactive than the catechol moiety. Upon co-incubation, intact insulin formed a substantial number of adducts with one or multiple CEs via covalent conjugation at its Cys 7 in the A or B chain, as well as at His10 or Lys29 in the B chain. Such conjugation was coupled with the cleavage of inter-chain disulfide linkages. Estrogenization on these sites may block the receptor-binding pockets of insulin. Insulin signaling and glucose uptake levels were lower in MCF-7 cells treated with modified insulin than in cells treated with native insulin. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that insulin molecules are susceptible to active estrogenization, and that such modification may alter the action of insulin.

  7. Site-specific covalent modifications of human insulin by catechol estrogens: Reactivity and induced structural and functional changes

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Ming-Chun; Fang, Chieh-Ming; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Liang, Huei-Chen; Wang, Tzu-Fan; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chen, Chiao-Chen; Tai, Jung-Hsiang; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Proteins, covalently modified by catechol estrogens (CEs), were identified recently from the blood serum of diabetic patients and referred to as estrogenized proteins. Estrogenization of circulating insulin may occur and affect its molecular functioning. Here, the chemical reactivity of CEs towards specific amino acid residues of proteins and the structural and functional changes induced by the estrogenization of insulin were studied using cyclic voltammetry, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, circular dichroism spectroscopy, molecular modeling, and bioassays. Our results indicate that CEs, namely, 2- and 4-hydroxyl estrogens, were thermodynamically and kinetically more reactive than the catechol moiety. Upon co-incubation, intact insulin formed a substantial number of adducts with one or multiple CEs via covalent conjugation at its Cys 7 in the A or B chain, as well as at His10 or Lys29 in the B chain. Such conjugation was coupled with the cleavage of inter-chain disulfide linkages. Estrogenization on these sites may block the receptor-binding pockets of insulin. Insulin signaling and glucose uptake levels were lower in MCF-7 cells treated with modified insulin than in cells treated with native insulin. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that insulin molecules are susceptible to active estrogenization, and that such modification may alter the action of insulin. PMID:27353345

  8. Site-specific covalent modifications of human insulin by catechol estrogens: Reactivity and induced structural and functional changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Ming-Chun; Fang, Chieh-Ming; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Liang, Huei-Chen; Wang, Tzu-Fan; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chen, Chiao-Chen; Tai, Jung-Hsiang; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2016-06-01

    Proteins, covalently modified by catechol estrogens (CEs), were identified recently from the blood serum of diabetic patients and referred to as estrogenized proteins. Estrogenization of circulating insulin may occur and affect its molecular functioning. Here, the chemical reactivity of CEs towards specific amino acid residues of proteins and the structural and functional changes induced by the estrogenization of insulin were studied using cyclic voltammetry, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, circular dichroism spectroscopy, molecular modeling, and bioassays. Our results indicate that CEs, namely, 2- and 4-hydroxyl estrogens, were thermodynamically and kinetically more reactive than the catechol moiety. Upon co-incubation, intact insulin formed a substantial number of adducts with one or multiple CEs via covalent conjugation at its Cys 7 in the A or B chain, as well as at His10 or Lys29 in the B chain. Such conjugation was coupled with the cleavage of inter-chain disulfide linkages. Estrogenization on these sites may block the receptor-binding pockets of insulin. Insulin signaling and glucose uptake levels were lower in MCF-7 cells treated with modified insulin than in cells treated with native insulin. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that insulin molecules are susceptible to active estrogenization, and that such modification may alter the action of insulin.

  9. Schistosome and liver fluke derived catechol-estrogens and helminth associated cancers

    PubMed Central

    Correia da Costa, José M.; Vale, Nuno; Gouveia, Maria J.; Botelho, Mónica C.; Sripa, Banchob; Santos, Lúcio L.; Santos, Júlio H.; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Brindley, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with helminth parasites remains a persistent public health problem in developing countries. Three of these pathogens, the liver flukes Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini and the blood fluke Schistosoma haematobium, are of particular concern due to their classification as Group 1 carcinogens: infection with these worms is carcinogenic. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approaches, we identified steroid hormone like (e.g., oxysterol-like, catechol estrogen quinone-like, etc.) metabolites and related DNA-adducts, apparently of parasite origin, in developmental stages including eggs of S. haematobium, in urine of people with urogenital schistosomiasis, and in the adult stage of O. viverrini. Since these kinds of sterol derivatives are metabolized to active quinones that can modify DNA, which in other contexts can lead to breast and other cancers, helminth parasite associated sterols might induce tumor-like phenotypes in the target cells susceptible to helminth parasite associated cancers, i.e., urothelial cells of the bladder in the case of urogenital schistosomiasis and the bile duct epithelia or cholangiocytes, in the case of O. viverrini and C. sinensis. Indeed we postulate that helminth induced cancers originate from parasite estrogen-host epithelial/urothelial cell chromosomal DNA adducts, and here we review recent findings that support this conjecture. PMID:25566326

  10. Estrogen-DNA Adducts as Novel Biomarkers for Ovarian Cancer Risk and for Use in Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    the association between ovarian cancer and (1) imbalances in estrogen metabolism that lead to higher levels of estrogen-DNA adducts in urine and/or (2...provides a measure of the imbalance 6 of estrogen metabolism in a person. A high ratio indicates that the person’s estrogen metabolism is...polymorphisms and risk of hormonal cancers. The estrogen quinone resulting from CYP1B1 activity may proceed to adduct formation in the presence of

  11. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  12. Biochemical and computational insights into the anti-aromatase activity of natural catechol estrogens.

    PubMed

    Neves, Marco A C; Dinis, Teresa C P; Colombo, Giorgio; Luisa Sá E Melo, M

    2008-05-01

    High levels of endogenous estrogens are associated with increased risks of breast cancer. Estrogen levels are mainly increased by the activity of the aromatase enzyme and reduced by oxidative/conjugative metabolic pathways. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time that catechol estrogen metabolites are potent aromatase inhibitors, thus establishing a link between aromatase activity and the processes involved in estrogen metabolism. In particular, the anti-aromatase activity of a set of natural hydroxyl and methoxyl estrogen metabolites was investigated using biochemical methods and subsequently compared with the anti-aromatase potency of estradiol and two reference aromatase inhibitors. Catechol estrogens proved to be strong inhibitors with an anti-aromatase potency two orders of magnitude higher than estradiol. A competitive inhibition mechanism was found for the most potent molecule, 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE(2)) and a rational model identifying the interaction determinants of the metabolites with the enzyme is proposed based on ab initio quantum-mechanical calculations. A strong relationship between activity and electrostatic properties was found for catechol estrogens. Moreover, our results suggest that natural catechol estrogens may be involved in the control mechanisms of estrogen production.

  13. Characterization of estrogen quinone-derived protein adducts and their identification in human serum albumin derived from breast cancer patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dar-Ren; Chen, Shou-Tung; Wang, Tzu-Wen; Tsai, Chen-His; Wei, Hz-Han; Chen, Guan-Jie; Yang, Tsung-Chou; Lin, Che; Lin, Po-Hsiung

    2011-05-10

    Both 17β-estradiol-2,3-quinone (E₂-2,3-Q) and 17β-estradiol-3,4-quinone (E₂-3,4-Q) are reactive metabolites of estrogen that are thought to be responsible for the estrogen-induced genotoxicity. The aim of this study was to establish a methodology to analyze estrogen quinone-derived protein adducts and to measure the background levels of these adducts in human serum albumin (Alb) derived from female blood donors in Taiwan. Results from in vitro experiments confirmed that the production of estrogen quinone-derived adducts on serum Alb increased with increased concentration of estrogen quinones. Time-course experiments suggested that both E₂-2,3-Q- and E₂-3,4-Q-derived adducts rapidly reached maximum values at 10 min mark and remained constant thereafter for up to 24 h. Additionally, with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) pretreatment, the production of estrogen quinone-derived protein adducts was detected in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells exposed to estrogen. Co-treatment of a catechol-O-methyl transferase inhibitor further enhanced the production of estrogen quinone-derived adducts in all cases. When we investigated the levels of estrogen quinone-derived adducts in human serum Alb, cysteinyl adducts of E₂-2,3-Q-1-S-Alb, E₂-2,3-Q-4-S-Alb, and E₂-3,4-Q-2-S-Alb were detected in all healthy female controls (n=10) with median levels at 147 (range 14.1-533), 197 (range 30.0-777), and 65.6 (range 17.6-1360) (pmol/g), respectively. We noticed that levels of E₂-2,3-Q-derived adducts were 2-fold greater than those of E₂-3,4-Q-2-S-Alb in controls whereas levels of E₂-3,4-Q-2-S-Alb were 2-fold higher than those of E₂-2,3-Q-derived adducts in patients (n = 20). Additionally, levels of E₂-2,3-Q-4-S-Alb correlated significantly with those of E₂-3,4-Q-2-S-Alb (correlation coefficient r = 0.684-0.850, p < 0.05). Overall, we conclude that cumulative body burden of E₂-3,4-Q is a significant predictor of breast cancer.

  14. Effects of the co-carcinogen catechol on benzo(a)pyrene metabolism and DNA adduct formation in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Melikian, A.A.; Leszczynska, J.M.; Hecht, S.S.; Hoffmann, D.

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the effects of the co-carcinogen catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) on the metabolic activation of (/sup 3/H) benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in mouse skin, in vivo and on the binding of BaP metabolites to DNA and protein at intervals from 0.5-24 h. Upon topical application of 0.015 mg (/sup 3/H)BaP and 0.25 or 0.5 mg catechol per mouse, catechol had little effect on the total amount of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolized in mouse skin, but it affected the relative proportions of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites. Catechol (0.5 mg/mouse) decreased the proportion of water-soluble (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites, ethyl acetate-soluble polar metabolites and quinones, but doubled the levels of unconjugated 3-hydroxy-BaP at all measured intervals after treatment. Catechol also caused a small increase in the levels of trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydroBaP and trans-9,10-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydroBaP 0.5 h after treatment. Two hours after treatment, the levels of these metabolites subsided to those of the controls. Catechol did not affect the levels of glutathione conjugates of BaP. However, it caused a decrease in glucuronide and sulphate conjugate formation from BaP. Catechol caused an approximately 2-fold increase in the formation of anti-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydroBaP (BPDE) DNA adducts and elevated the ratio of anti-syn-BPDE-DNA adducts 1.6 to 2.9-fold. Catechol treatment increased the radioactivity associated with epidermal proteins after (/sup 3/H)BaP application. Because catechol increased levels of 3-hydroxyBaP, we considered the possibility that 3-hydroxyBaP might enhance the tumor initiating activities of BaP or BPDE in mouse skin; a bioassay demonstrated that this was not the case. The results of this study indicate that one important effect of catechol related to its co-carcinogenicity is its ability to enhance formation of anti-BPDE-DNA adducts in mouse skin.

  15. Modulation of Estrogen-Depurinating DNA Adducts by Sulforaphane for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    oup.com Subject: Carcinogenesis MS - CARCIN-2011-00715 Date: Tue, August 30, 2011 1:41 pm To: liyang@pitt.edu 30-Aug-2011   35   36 Dear...and its metabolites may play an important role in renal cell carcinogenesis. Catechol-<i>O</i>-methyltransferase ( COMT ) participates in the estrogen...metabolism pathway by neutralizing toxic substances. Although reduced COMT activity has been suggested to be a risk factor for estrogen-associated

  16. Hydroxyl radical-induced oxidation of a phenolic C-linked 2'-deoxyguanosine adduct yields a reactive catechol.

    PubMed

    Witham, Aaron A; Beach, Daniel G; Gabryelski, Wojciech; Manderville, Richard A

    2012-02-20

    Phenolic toxins stimulate oxidative stress and generate C-linked adducts at the C8-site of 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG). We previously reported that the C-linked adduct 8-(4″-hydroxyphenyl)-dG (p-PhOH-dG) undergoes oxidation in the presence of Na(2)IrCl(6) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/H(2)O(2) to generate polymeric adducts through phenoxyl radical production [ Weishar ( 2008 ) Org. Lett. 10 , 1839 - 1842 ]. We now report on reaction of p-PhOH-dG with two radical-generating systems, Cu(II)/H(2)O(2) or Fe(II)-EDTA/H(2)O(2), which were utilized to study the fate of the C-linked adduct in the presence of hydroxyl radical (HO(•)). The radical-generating systems facilitate (i) hydroxylation of the phenolic ring to afford the catechol adduct 8-(3″,4″-dihydroxyphenyl)-dG (3″,4″-DHPh-dG) and (ii) H-atom abstraction from the sugar moiety to generate the deglycosylated base p-PhOH-G. The ratios of 3″,4″-DHPh-dG to p-PhOH-G were ∼1 for Cu(II)/H(2)O(2) and ∼0.13 for Fe(II)-EDTA/H(2)O(2). The formation of 3″,4″-DHPh-dG was found to have important consequences in terms of reactivity. The catechol adduct has a lower oxidation potential than p-PhOH-dG and is sensitive to aqueous basic media, undergoing decomposition to generate a dicarboxylic acid derivative. In the presence of excess N-acetylcysteine (NAC), oxidation of 3″,4″-DHPh-dG produced mono-NAC and di-NAC conjugates. Our results imply that secondary oxidative pathways of phenolic-dG lesions are likely to contribute to toxicity.

  17. Estrogen-DNA Adducts as Novel Biomarkers For Ovarian Cancer Risk and for Use in Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-31

    amplification and genotyping of the four single nucleotide polymorphisms , CYP1A1 (I462V), CYP1B1 (V432L), COMT (V158M) and NQO1 (P609S). Task 6. Order...genetic polymorphisms in selected enzymes that metabolize estrogens. The first year of the grant has been spent collecting urine and saliva samples...DNA adducts, estrogen metabolism, genetic polymorphisms , cancer etiology, tool for early diagnosis of ovarian cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  18. Genetic polymorphisms in the catechol estrogen metabolism pathway and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Reding, Kerryn W.; Weiss, Noel S.; Chen, Chu; Li, Christopher I.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Wilkerson, Hui-Wen; Farin, Federico M.; Thummel, Kenneth E.; Daling, Janet R.; Malone, Kathleen E.

    2009-01-01

    Background This study investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within the catechol estrogen metabolism pathway altered the risk of breast cancer alone or in combination, as well as whether menopausal hormone therapy (HT) modified the effect of these SNPs on breast cancer risk. Methods In a population-based case-control study of breast cancer, 891 cases and 878 controls were genotyped for six functional SNPs in the COMT, CYP1B1, GSTM1, GSTP1, and GSTT1 genes. Results Women homozygous with the T allele in CYP1B1*2 (Ser119; rs1056827) were at 1.69 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17–2.46) times the risk of women homozygous with the G allele; women homozygous with the G allele in GSTP1 (Val105; rs1695) were at 0.73 (95% CI: 0.54–0.99) times the risk of breast cancer compared to women homozygous with the A allele. No other SNPs tested were associated with breast cancer to any appreciable degree. Potential gene-gene and gene-HT interactions were investigated. Conclusion With the exception of GSTP1 and possibly CYP1B1*2, our findings do not provide support for the role of genetic variation in the catechol estrogen metabolism pathway and breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women. PMID:19383894

  19. Evaluation of serum estrogen-DNA adducts as potential biomarkers for breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Pruthi, Sandhya; Yang, Li; Sandhu, Nicole P; Ingle, James N; Beseler, Cheryl L; Suman, Vera J; Cavalieri, Ercole L; Rogan, Eleanor G

    2012-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether the ratio of estrogen-DNA adducts to their respective metabolites and conjugates in serum differed between women with early-onset breast cancer and those with average or high risk of developing breast cancer. Serum samples from women at average risk (n=63) or high risk (n=80) for breast cancer (using Gail model) and women newly diagnosed with early breast cancer (n=79) were analyzed using UPLC-MS/MS. Adduct ratios were statistically compared among the three groups, and the Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUC) was used to identify a diagnostic cut-off point. The median adduct ratio in the average-risk group was significantly lower than that of both the high-risk group and the breast cancer group (p values<0.0001), and provided good discrimination between those at average versus high risk of breast cancer (AUC=0.84, 95% CI 0.77-0.90). Sensitivity and specificity were maximized at an adduct ratio of 77. For women in the same age and BMI group, the odds of being at high risk for breast cancer was 8.03 (95% CI 3.46-18.7) times higher for those with a ratio of at least 77 compared to those with a ratio less than 77. The likelihood of being at high risk for breast cancer was significantly increased for those with a high adduct ratio relative to those with a low adduct ratio. These findings suggest that estrogen-DNA adducts deserve further study as potential biomarkers for risk of developing breast cancer.

  20. Catechol estrogens induce proliferation and malignant transformation in prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mosli, Hisham A; Tolba, Mai F; Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2013-07-18

    In the current study, the non-transformed prostatic epithelial cells (BPH-1) were exposed to the catechol estrogens (CE) 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2) or 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), or the parent hormone 17-β-estradiol (E2) at an equimolar concentration (1μM) for a period of 6 weeks. It was found that both 2-OHE2 and 4-OHE2 have more potent proliferation-enhancing effect than E2. Exposure to 2-OHE2, 4-OHE2 or E2 resulted in a significant increase in the protein abundance of cyclin D1 and c-myc. The treated cells exhibited a shift toward the proliferative phase as indicated by FACScan. BPH-1 cells treated with 4-OHE2 showed increased abundance of estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and its downstream IGF-1R. Reduced abundance of estrogen receptor-β (ERβ) and its downstream tumor suppressor FOXO-1 were observed in cells exposed to E2, 2-OHE2 and, to a greater extent, 4-OHE2. Comet assay revealed that CE, especially 4-OHE2, elicited significant genotoxic effects as compared to E2. 4-OHE2 showed greater ability to neoplastically transform BPH-1 cells as indicated by increased colony forming capacity in soft agar and matrix invasion. In conclusion, in vitro exposure to CE could neoplastically transform human prostatic epithelial cells. Further, 4-OHE2 is more carcinogenic to prostate epithelial cells than the parent hormone E2.

  1. Catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from the Gram-positive Rhodococcus opacus 1CP: quantitative structure/activity relationship and the crystal structures of native enzyme and catechols adducts.

    PubMed

    Matera, Irene; Ferraroni, Marta; Kolomytseva, Marina; Golovleva, Ludmila; Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio

    2010-06-01

    The first crystallographic structures of a catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from a Gram-positive bacterium Rhodococcus opacus 1CP (Rho 1,2-CTD), a Fe(III) ion containing enzyme specialized in the aerobic biodegradation of catechols, and its adducts with catechol, 3-methylcatechol, 4-methylcatechol, pyrogallol (benzene-1,2,3-triol), 3-chlorocatechol, 4-chlorocatechol, 3,5-dichlorocatechol, 4,5-dichlorocatechol and protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) have been determined and analyzed. This study represents the first extensive characterization of catechols adducts of 1,2-CTDs. The structural analyses reveal the diverse modes of binding to the active metal iron ion of the tested catechols thus allowing to identify the residues selectively involved in recognition of the diverse substrates by this class of enzymes. The comparison is further extended to the structural and functional characteristics of the other 1,2-CTDs isolated from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover the high structural homology of the present enzyme with the 3-chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase from the same bacterium are discussed in terms of their different substrate specificity. The catalytic rates for Rho 1,2-CTD conversion of the tested compounds are also compared with the calculated energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital (E(HOMO)) of the substrates. A quantitative relationship (R=0.966) between the ln k(cat) and the calculated electronic parameter E(HOMO) was obtained for catechol, 3-methylcatechol, 4-methylcatechol, pyrogallol, 3-chlorocatechol, 4-chlorocatechol. This indicates that for these substrates the rate-limiting step of the reaction cycle is dependent on their nucleophilic reactivity. The discrepancies observed in the quantitative relationship for 3,5-dichlorocatechol, 4,5-dichlorocatechol and protocatechuate are ascribed to the sterical hindrances leading to the distorted binding of such catechols observed in the corresponding structures.

  2. An assay for human erythrocyte catechol-O-methyltransferase activity using a catechol estrogen as the substrate.

    PubMed

    Bates, G W; Edman, C D; Porter, J C; Johnston, J M; MacDonald, P C

    1979-05-16

    A radiometric assay for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity in human erythrocytes is described that employs 2-hydroxy[3H]estrone, and non-radiolabeled S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as the cosubstrates. The ease of separation of the product of the reaction, 2-methoxy[3H]estrone from 2-hydroxy[3H]estrone makes it possible to achieve low reaction blanks. The assay is very sensitive, and only 200 microliter of whole blood are used per determination. The assay is highly reproducible. The interassay variability (coefficient of variation) was 6.5% for 24 assays of COMT activity in red blood cells in blood obtained daily for 24 days from one person. In incubations conducted at 37 degrees C for 30 min, the catechol-O-methyltransferase activity was a linear function of enzyme concentration (equivalent to 11 to 180 microliter of packed red blood cells). Employing this assay, we evaluated the catalytic conversion of 2-hydroxyestrone to 2-methoxyestrone by catechol-O-methyltransferase from human red blood cells and found that the apparent Michaelis constant and the apparent maximal rate of reaction were 3 x 10(-7) M and 6.7 x 10(-9) mol . ml-1 erythrocytes . h-1, respectively. The catechol-O-methyltransferase activity measured in erythrocytes obtained from 100 healthy subjects (men and nonpregnant women) was 8.2 +/- 0.17 (mean +/- S.E.) nmol 2-methoxyestrone . ml-1 erythrocytes . h-1.

  3. Catechol estrogen formation and metabolism in brain tissue: comparison of tritium release from different positions in ring A of the steroid

    SciTech Connect

    Jellinck, P.H.; Hahn, E.F.; Norton, B.I.; Fishman, J.

    1984-11-01

    Catechol estrogens labeled with /sup 3/H at different positions in rings A and B of the steroid were synthesized by chemical or enzymatic methods, and their oxidative transformation by male rat brain microsomes was followed by the transfer of /sup 3/H into /sup 3/H/sub 2/O. This reaction was shown to occur more readily with the catechol estrogens than with the parent steroid and was also influenced by the position of the radiolabel. Tritium was displaced less readily from C-1 than from C-2 or C-4 of the aromatic ring. Spermine, which is known to increase cytochrome P-450-mediated hydroxylation reactions, had no effect on the release of /sup 3/H from ring A of either estradiol or 2-hydroxyestradiol with rat brain microsomes in contrast to liver. Glutathione and other thiols were able to cause a rapid loss of /sup 3/H from labeled catechol estrogens, even in the absence of tissue, but in double label experiments with (4-/sup 3/H)- and (4-/sup 14/C)2-hydroxyestradiol, the isotope ratio in the recovered catechol estrogen was unchanged. The results illustrate some of the problems in determining accurately the metabolism of estrogens by measuring /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formation when aromatic hydroxylation is involved and also highlight the possible interaction of the catechol estrogens with cellular nucleophiles such as glutathione.

  4. Development of a Monoclonal Antibody Against Estrogen Quinone-Adducted Proteins as Potential Biomarkers of Breast Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    escape detoxification, e.g., methylation of the catechol or glutathione conjugation of the quinone, and form E2-3,4-Q adducts to proteins. The presence...benzoquinone (Figure 1). The reaction produced a characteristic red shift in the absorption spectrum of the quinone. The aminoquinone had an absorption ... absorption spectrum of the quinone. The aminoquinone exhibited a distinctive red color that permits convenient monitoring of the occurrence and progression of

  5. Unbalanced Estrogen Metabolism in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, Muhammad; Beseler, Cheryl L.; Hall, James B.; LeVan, Tricia; Cavalieri, Ercole L.; Rogan, Eleanor G.

    2013-01-01

    Greater exposure to estrogens is a risk factor for ovarian cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in ovarian cancer, a spot urine sample and a saliva sample were obtained from 33 women with ovarian cancer and 34 age-matched controls. Thirty-eight estrogen metabolites, conjugates and DNA adducts were analyzed in the urine samples by using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and the ratio of adducts to metabolites and conjugates was calculated for each sample. The ratio of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts to estrogen metabolites and conjugates was significantly higher in cases compared to controls (p<0.0001), demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. DNA was purified from the saliva samples and analyzed for genetic polymorphisms in the genes for two estrogen-metabolizing enzymes. Women with two low-activity alleles of catechol-O-methyltransferase plus one or two high-activity alleles of cytochrome P450 1B1 had higher levels of estrogen-DNA adducts and were more likely to have ovarian cancer. These findings indicate that estrogen metabolism is unbalanced in ovarian cancer and suggest that formation of estrogen-DNA adducts plays a critical role in the initiation of ovarian cancer. PMID:24170413

  6. Assessment of Cellular Estrogenic Activity Based on Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Reduction of Soluble-Form Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Expression in an ELISA-Based System

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Philip Wing-Lok; Tse, Zero Ho-Man; Liu, Hui-Fang; Lu, Song; Ho, Jessica Wing-Man; Kung, Michelle Hiu-Wai; Ramsden, David Boyer; Ho, Shu-Leong

    2013-01-01

    Xenoestrogens are either natural or synthetic compounds that mimic the effects of endogenous estrogen. These compounds, such as bisphenol-A (BPA), and phthalates, are commonly found in plastic wares. Exposure to these compounds poses major risk to human health because of the potential to cause endocrine disruption. There is huge demand for a wide range of chemicals to be assessed for such potential for the sake of public health. Classical in vivo assays for endocrine disruption are comprehensive but time-consuming and require sacrifice of experimental animals. Simple preliminary in vitro screening assays can reduce the time and expense involved. We previously demonstrated that catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen via estrogen receptor (ER). Therefore, detecting corresponding changes of COMT expression in estrogen-responsive cells may be a useful method to estimate estrogenic effects of various compounds. We developed a novel cell-based ELISA to evaluate cellular response to estrogenicity by reduction of soluble-COMT expression in ER-positive MCF-7 cells exposed to estrogenic compounds. In contrast to various existing methods that only detect bioactivity, this method elucidates direct physiological effect in a living cell in response to a compound. We validated our assay using three well-characterized estrogenic plasticizers - BPA, benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP). Cells were exposed to either these plasticizers or 17β-estradiol (E2) in estrogen-depleted medium with or without an ER-antagonist, ICI 182,780, and COMT expression assayed. Exposure to each of these plasticizers (10-9-10-7M) dose-dependently reduced COMT expression (p<0.05), which was blocked by ICI 182,780. Reduction of COMT expression was readily detectable in cells exposed to picomolar level of E2, comparable to other in vitro assays of similar sensitivity. To satisfy the demand for in vitro assays targeting different cellular

  7. Assessment of cellular estrogenic activity based on estrogen receptor-mediated reduction of soluble-form catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) expression in an ELISA-based system.

    PubMed

    Ho, Philip Wing-Lok; Tse, Zero Ho-Man; Liu, Hui-Fang; Lu, Song; Ho, Jessica Wing-Man; Kung, Michelle Hiu-Wai; Ramsden, David Boyer; Ho, Shu-Leong

    2013-01-01

    Xenoestrogens are either natural or synthetic compounds that mimic the effects of endogenous estrogen. These compounds, such as bisphenol-A (BPA), and phthalates, are commonly found in plastic wares. Exposure to these compounds poses major risk to human health because of the potential to cause endocrine disruption. There is huge demand for a wide range of chemicals to be assessed for such potential for the sake of public health. Classical in vivo assays for endocrine disruption are comprehensive but time-consuming and require sacrifice of experimental animals. Simple preliminary in vitro screening assays can reduce the time and expense involved. We previously demonstrated that catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen via estrogen receptor (ER). Therefore, detecting corresponding changes of COMT expression in estrogen-responsive cells may be a useful method to estimate estrogenic effects of various compounds. We developed a novel cell-based ELISA to evaluate cellular response to estrogenicity by reduction of soluble-COMT expression in ER-positive MCF-7 cells exposed to estrogenic compounds. In contrast to various existing methods that only detect bioactivity, this method elucidates direct physiological effect in a living cell in response to a compound. We validated our assay using three well-characterized estrogenic plasticizers - BPA, benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP). Cells were exposed to either these plasticizers or 17β-estradiol (E2) in estrogen-depleted medium with or without an ER-antagonist, ICI 182,780, and COMT expression assayed. Exposure to each of these plasticizers (10(-9)-10(-7)M) dose-dependently reduced COMT expression (p<0.05), which was blocked by ICI 182,780. Reduction of COMT expression was readily detectable in cells exposed to picomolar level of E2, comparable to other in vitro assays of similar sensitivity. To satisfy the demand for in vitro assays targeting different cellular

  8. X-ray structures of 4-chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase adducts with substituted catechols: new perspectives in the molecular basis of intradiol ring cleaving dioxygenases specificity.

    PubMed

    Ferraroni, Marta; Kolomytseva, Marina; Scozzafava, Andrea; Golovleva, Ludmila; Briganti, Fabrizio

    2013-03-01

    The crystallographic structures of 4-chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase (4-CCD) complexes with 3,5-dichlorocatechol, protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoate), hydroxyquinol (benzen-1,2,4-triol) and pyrogallol (benzen-1,2,3-triol), which act as substrates or inhibitors of the enzyme, have been determined and analyzed. 4-CCD from the Gram-positive bacterium Rhodococcus opacus 1CP is a Fe(III) ion containing enzyme specialized in the aerobic biodegradation of chlorocatechols. The structures of the 4-CCD complexes show that the catechols bind the catalytic iron ion in a bidentate mode displacing Tyr169 and the benzoate ion (found in the native enzyme structure) from the metal coordination sphere, as found in other adducts of intradiol dioxygenases with substrates. The analysis of the present structures allowed to identify the residues selectively involved in recognition of the diverse substrates. Furthermore the structural comparison with the corresponding complexes of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from the same Rhodococcus strain (Rho-1,2-CTD) highlights significant differences in the binding of the tested catechols to the active site of the enzyme, particularly in the orientation of the aromatic ring substituents. As an example the 3-substituted catechols are bound with the substituent oriented towards the external part of the 4-CCD active site cavity, whereas in the Rho-1,2-CTD complexes the 3-substituents were placed in the internal position. The present crystallographic study shed light on the mechanism that allows substrate recognition inside this class of high specific enzymes involved in the biodegradation of recalcitrant pollutants.

  9. Polymorphisms of catechol estrogens metabolism pathway genes and breast cancer risk in Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramírez, O C; Pérez-Morales, R; Castro, C; Flores-Díaz, A; Soto-Cruz, K E; Astorga-Ramos, A; Gonsebatt, M E; Casas, L; Valdés-Flores, M; Rubio, J

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is associated to estrogen exposure. Allelic variants involved in estrogen metabolism might change the risk of developing this neoplasia. We examined the potential association of breast cancer risk in Mexican women with the polymorphisms CYP1A1 rs1048943, CYP1B1 rs1056836, COMT rs4680, GSTP1 rs1695, GSTT1 null and GSTM1 null which are involved in estrogen metabolism pathway. This study included 150 cases and 150 controls. A significant association was observed between, CYP1A1 rs1048943 (OR = 1.95, C.I. 1.13-3.36) and GSTP1 rs1695 (OR = 2.39, C.I. 1.24-4.24) polymorphisms with the risk of breast cancer. This risk was increased when the women were stratified according to their menopausal status. The results show that breast cancer risk significantly increases in women with 3-6 risk polymorphisms (OR = 3.75, C.I. 1.44-9.74).

  10. Modulation of catechol estrogen synthesis by rat liver microsomes: effects of treatment with growth hormone or testosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Quail, J.A.; Jellinck, P.H.

    1987-09-01

    The ability of GH from various mammalian species, administered to normal mature male rats by constant infusion, to decrease the hepatic 2-hydroxylation of estradiol (E2) to female levels, as measured by the release of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O from (2-3H)E2, was determined. Rat and human GH (hGH) showed the highest activity while ovine GH was inactive. PRL (0.6 IU/h X kg) administered together with hGH (0.02 IU/h X kg) did not antagonize the feminizing action of GH. Infusion of hGH into male rats decreased the affinity of estradiol 2-hydroxylase for its steroid substrate and altered the linear Lineweaver-Burk plot towards a nonlinear hyperbolic plot characteristic of the female. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) for the reaction was 1.69 microM for males and 2.75 microM for testosterone-treated ovariectomized females. An equal mixture of liver microsomes from male and female rats gave kinetic values similar to those observed with males alone. Neonatal imprinting with androgen did not alter the magnitude of the response of female rats to treatment with testosterone and/or GH at maturity and the androgen effect could only be shown in ovariectomized animals. The results with rats of different endocrine status were corroborated by the kinetic data and by the pattern of metabolites obtained with (4-/sup 14/C)E2 when examined by TLC and autoradiography. The hormonal control of estradiol 2-hydroxylase, the key enzyme in catechol estrogen formation, and the contribution of sex-specific multiple forms of the enzyme to this reaction are discussed.

  11. Genetic polymorphisms of estrogen receptor alpha and catechol-O-methyltransferase genes in Turkish patients with familial prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pazarbasi, Ayfer; Yilmaz, M. Bertan; Alptekin, Davut; Luleyap, Umit; Tansug, Zuhtu; Ozpak, Lutfiye; Izmirli, Muzeyyen; Onatoglu-Arikan, Dilge; Kocaturk-Sel, Sabriye; Erkoc, Mehmet Ali; Turgut, Ozgur; Bereketoglu, Ceyhun; Tunc, Erdal; Akbal, Eylul

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Estrogen is one of the most crucial hormones participating in the proliferation and carcinogenesis of the prostate glands. Genetic polymorphisms in the estrogen metabolism pathway might be involved in the risk of prostate carcinoma development. We evaluated the association between genetic polymorphisms in estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genes and the risk of developing familial prostate carcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this study, 34 cases with prostate carcinoma whose first-degree relatives had prostate carcinoma and 30 healthy age-matched male controls were enrolled. The genotypes of ESR1 and COMT genes were analyzed employing polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. 34 cases with prostate carcinoma, whose first degree relatives had prostate carcinoma and 14 age-matched male controls were enrolled to analyze the genotype of these two genes. RESULTS: Among control patients, the ESR1 PvuII genotypes of C/C, C/T and T/T were observed in 37%, 26% and 37%, respectively, whereas the C/C, C/T and T/T genotypes were observed in 18%, 41% and 41% of case patients, respectively. Among controls, the ESR1 PvuII allele frequencies of C and T were equally observed, whereas the C and T allele frequencies were observed in 38% and 62% of patients, respectively. Among ESR1 PvuII genotypes there were not any significant difference in terms of genotype (P = 0.199) and allele (P = 0.181) frequencies. Among controls, the ESR1 XbaI genotypes of G/G, G/A and A/A were observed in 33%, 37% and 33%, respectively, whereas the G/G, G/A and A/A genotypes were observed in 12%, 47% and 41% of patients, respectively. Among controls, the ESR1 XbaI allele frequencies of A and G were observed equally, respectively, whereas the A and G frequencies were observed in 65% and 35% of patients, respectively. Among ESR1 Χ baI, there was not any significant difference in terms of genotype (P = 0.111) and allele (P = 0

  12. Formation of catechol estrogen glutathione conjugates and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase-dependent nephrotoxicity of 17beta-estradiol in the golden Syrian hamster.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, M; Lau, S S; Monks, T J

    1997-03-01

    In an animal model of hormone-mediated carcinogenesis, male golden Syrian hamsters develop renal carcinoma following prolonged exposure to 17beta-estradiol. The basis for the species and tissue specificity is unclear. Detailed information on the disposition of 17beta-estradiol in this model is lacking. Because catechol estrogens have been implicated in this model of carcinogenesis, we investigated the metabolism and nephrotoxicity of 17beta-estradiol in golden Syrian hamsters, with emphasis on the formation of catechol estrogen thioethers. 17beta-Estradiol (50 micromol/kg, i.p.) is a mild nephrotoxicant, causing significant elevations in the urinary excretion of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT), alkaline phosphatase, glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glucose. Increases in renal protein carbonyls and lipid hydroperoxides, which are markers of oxidative damage, also occur after administration of 17beta-estradiol (50 micromol/kg, i.p.). 17beta-Estradiol-mediated nephrotoxicity is reduced by treating animals with acivicin, an inhibitor of gamma-GT, implying that toxicity is mediated by metabolites requiring metabolism by this enzyme. Following administration of 17beta-[14C]estradiol (100 micromol/kg) to hamsters, 9.7% of the dose is recovered in bile after 5 h, the majority (7.9%) representing aqueous metabolites. Seven catechol estrogen GSH conjugates were identified, 2-hydroxy-1,4-bis-(glutathion-S-yl)-17beta-estradiol, 2-hydroxy-4-(glutathion-S-yl)-17beta-estradiol, 2-hydroxy-4-(glutathion-S-yl)-estrone, 4-hydroxy-1-(glutathion-S-yl)-estrone, 2-hydroxy-1-(glutathion-S-yl)-estrone, 4-hydroxy-1-(glutathion-S-yl)-17beta-estradiol, and 2-hydroxy-1-(glutathion-S-yl)-17beta-estradiol. At 5.4 micromol/kg of 17beta-estradiol, a dose-reflective of daily exposure levels in the hamster model of nephrocarcinogenicity, 12% of the dose is recovered within 5 h as a combination of GSH conjugates of 2- and 4-hydroxy-17beta-estradiol and 2- and 4-hydroxyestrone. In summary

  13. Hemoglobin adducts as biomarkers of estrogen homeostasis: elevation of estrogenquinones as a risk factor for developing breast cancer in Taiwanese women.

    PubMed

    Lin, Che; Hsieh, Wei-Chung; Chen, Dar-Ren; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Yu, Wen-Fa; Hu, Suh-Woan; Sue, Hung-Jie; Ko, Mao-Hui; Juan, Chang-Hsin; Chung, Kuo-Suan; Lin, Po-Hsiung

    2014-03-21

    The aim of this study was to establish a methodology to analyze estrogen quinone-derived adducts, including 17β-estradiol-2,3-quinone (E2-2,3-Q) and 17β-estradiol-3,4-quinone (E2-3,4-Q), in human hemoglobin (Hb). The methodology was then used to measure the levels of these adducts in Hb derived from female breast cancer patients (n=143) as well as controls (n=147) in Taiwan. Our result confirmed that both E2-2,3-Q- and E2-3,4-Q-derived adducts, including E2-2,3-Q-4-S-Hb and E2-3,4-Q-2-S-Hb, were detected in all breast cancer patients with median levels at 434 (215-1472) and 913 (559-2384) (pmol/g), respectively. Levels of E2-2,3-Q-4-S-Hb correlated significantly with those of E2-3,4-Q-2-S-Hb (r=0.622-0.628, p<0.001). By contrast, median levels of these same estrogen quinone-derived adducts in healthy controls were 71.8 (35.7-292) and 139 (69.1-453) (pmol/g). This translated to ~6-fold increase in mean values of E2-2,3-Q-4-S-Hb and E2-3,4-Q-2-S-Hb in breast cancer patients compared to those in the controls (p<0.001). Our findings add further support to the theme that cumulative body burden of estrogen quinones is an important indicator of breast cancer risk. We hypothesize that combination of genetic events and environmental factors may modulate estrogen homeostasis and enhance the production of estrogen quinones which lead to subsequent generation of pro-mutagenic DNA lesions in breast cancer patients.

  14. Depurinating estrogen–DNA adducts in the etiology and prevention of breast and other human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cavalieri, Ercole L; Rogan, Eleanor G

    2015-01-01

    Experiments on estrogen metabolism, formation of DNA adducts, mutagenicity, cell transformation and carcinogenicity have led to and supported the hypothesis that the reaction of specific estrogen metabolites, mostly the electrophilic catechol estrogen-3,4-quinones, with DNA can generate the critical mutations to initiate breast and other human cancers. Analysis of depurinating estrogen–DNA adducts in urine demonstrates that women at high risk of, or with breast cancer, have high levels of the adducts, indicating a critical role for adduct formation in breast cancer initiation. Men with prostate cancer or non-Hodgkin lymphoma also have high levels of estrogen–DNA adducts. This knowledge of the first step in cancer initiation suggests the use of specific antioxidants that can block formation of the adducts by chemical and biochemical mechanisms. Two antioxidants, N-acetylcysteine and resveratrol, are prime candidates to prevent breast and other human cancers because in various in vitro and in vivo experiments, they reduce the formation of estrogen–DNA adducts. PMID:20021210

  15. Catechol estrogen formation by brain tissue: characterization of a direct product isolation assay for estrogen-2- and 4-hydroxylase activity and its application to studies of 2- and 4-hydroxyestradiol formation by rabbit hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Hersey, R.M.; Williams, K.I.; Weisz, J.

    1981-12-01

    A direct product isolation assay for quantifying the formation of 2- and 4-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2 and 4-OHE2) from (6,7-3H)estradiol by rabbit hypothalami in vitro was developed, and the assay was used to characterize some properties of estrogen-2- and 4-hydroxylase activity in this tissue. The reaction was carried out under conditions that minimized further metabolism of enzymatically formed catechol estrogens. A simple two-step separation procedure, involving the use of a neutral alumina column, followed by thin layer chromatography, was developed to isolate the enzymatically formed catechol estrogens in a radiochemically homogeneous form. The detergent, Tween-80, was found to activate the enzyme and was used routinely at a concentration of 0.1% in the assay. The formation of 2-OHE2 was linear up to 10 min and with increasing protein concentrations up to 150 micrograms/incubation. Similar values were obtained for 4-OHE2. Maximum velocities (Vmax) for the formation of 2- and 4-OHE2 were 190 and 270 pmol/mg protein . 10 min, respectively. The apparent Km values with respect to estradiol for 2-OHE2 and 4-OHE2 were 125 and 150 microM, respectively. The highest specific activity for the enzyme was present in the 100,000 X g supernatant (S3), while the activity in the microsomal fraction (P3) was less than that in the original homogenate. Enzyme activity depended on the presence of NADPH and oxygen and was inhibited by CO as well as by high concentrations of SKF-525A. Estrogen-2- and 4-hydroxylase activity in rabbit hypothalamus differed from that in rat liver in two respects. In the liver, enzyme activity was localized in the microsomal fraction and was virtually abolished by Tween-80. In contrast, enzyme activity in rabbit hypothalamus was maximal in the soluble fraction (100,000 X g supernatant)and was stimulated by the detergent.

  16. Modulation of Estrogen-Depurinating DNA Adducts by Sulforaphane for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    GSTs) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase1 (NQO1) can decrease steady- state levels of CE- 3,4-Q and, thus, the resultant depurinating estrogen-DNA...vehicle or SFN for 24 h. After discarding the media, all plates were fed with fresh cell culture media containing 10 μM E2 or 4-OHE2 for 24 h and then...experiments were conducted in accordance with the standards established by the United States Animal Welfare Acts, set forth in NIH guidelines and the

  17. Investigation of the cumulative body burden of estrogen-3,4-quinone in breast cancer patients and controls using albumin adducts as biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Che; Chen, Dar-Ren; Hsieh, Wei-Chung; Yu, Wen-Fa; Lin, Ching-Chiuan; Ko, Mao-Huei; Juan, Chang-Hsin; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Lin, Po-Hsiung

    2013-04-26

    Both 17β-estradiol-2,3-quinone (E2-2,3-Q) and 17β-estradiol-3,4-quinone (E2-3,4-Q) are reactive metabolites of estrogen. Elevation of E2-3,4-Q to E2-2,3-Q ratio is thought to be an important indicator of estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. Our current study compared the cumulative body burden of these estrogen quinones in serum samples taken from Taiwanese women with breast cancer (n=152) vs healthy controls (n=75) by using albumin (Alb) adducts as biomarkers. Results clearly demonstrated the presence of cysteinyl adducts of E2-2,3-Q-4-S-Alb and E2-3,4-Q-2-S-Alb in all study population at levels ranging from 61.7-1330 to 66.6-1,590 pmol/g, respectively. Correlation coefficient between E2-2,3-Q-4-S-Alb and E2-3,4-Q-2-S-Alb was 0.610 for controls and 0.767 for breast cancer patients (p<0.001). We also noticed that in premenopausal subjects with body mass index (BMI) less than 27, background levels of E2-3,4-Q-2-S-Alb was inversely proportional to BMI with about 25% increase in E2-3,4-Q-2-S-Alb per 5 kg/m(2) decrease in BMI (p<0.001). In addition, we confirmed that mean levels of E2-3,4-Q-2-S-Alb in breast cancer patients were ∼5-fold greater than in those of controls (p<0.001). Overall, this evidence suggests that disparity in estrogen disposition and the subsequent elevation of cumulative body burden of E2-3,4-Q may play a role in the development of breast cancer.

  18. Effect of Tumour Necrosis Factor-Alpha on Estrogen Metabolic Pathways in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Marwa; Shouman, Samia; El-Merzebany, Mahmoud; Kilic, Gokhan; Veenstra, Timothy; Saeed, Muhammad; Wagih, Mohamed; Diaz-Arrastia, Concepcion; Patel, Deepa; Salama, Salama

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a proinflammatory cytokine that has been linked to breast cancer development. Estrogen metabolic pathway is also involved in breast carcinogenesis and DNA adducts formation. In this study we investigated the effect of TNF-α on the estrogen metabolic pathway in MCF-7, a breast cancer cell line. Capillary liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used for analysis of estrogen metabolites and estrogen-DNA adducts levels respectively. Reporter gene assay, Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to assess the expression of estrogen metabolizing genes and enzymes. TNF-α significantly increased the total EM and decreased the estrone (E1) / 17-β estradiol (E2) ratio. Moreover, it altered the expression of genes and enzymes involved in E2 activation and deactivation pathways e.g. Cytochrome P-450 1A1 (CYP1A1), Cytochrome P-450 1B1 (CYP1B1), Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) and Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). In addition, there were increased levels of some catechol estrogens e.g. 4-hydroxy-estrone (4-OHE1) and 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2) with decreased levels of methylated catechols e.g. 2-methoxy estradiol (2-MeOE2). DNA adducts especially 4-OHE1-[2]-1-N3 Adenine was significantly increased. TNF-α directs the estrogen metabolism into more hormonally active and carcinogenic products in MCF-7. This may implicate a new possible explanation for inflammation associated breast cancer. PMID:22866165

  19. Catechol metabolites of zeranol and 17β-estradiol: a comparative in vitro study on the induction of oxidative DNA damage and methylation by catechol-O-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Stefanie C; Hildebrand, Andreas A; Pfeiffer, Erika; Metzler, Manfred

    2012-04-05

    α-Zearalanol (α-ZAL, zeranol) is a highly estrogenic macrocyclic β-resorcylic acid lactone, which is used as a growth promotor for cattle in various countries. We have recently reported that α-ZAL and its major metabolite zearalanone (ZAN) are hydroxylated at the aromatic ring by microsomes from human liver in vitro, thereby forming two catechol metabolites each. Thus, the oxidative metabolism of α-ZAL and ZAN resembles that of the endogenous steroidal estrogens 17β-estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1), which also give rise to two catechols each. As these catechol metabolites are believed to mediate the carcinogenicity of E2 and E1 by causing oxidative DNA damage and DNA adducts, their methylation by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an important inactivation pathway. Here we report that hepatic microsomes from five species generate catechol metabolites of α-ZAL and ZAN, the highest amounts being formed by human liver microsomes, followed by rat, mouse, steer and swine. The microsomal extracts and the individual catechols of α-ZAL, ZAN, E2 and E1 were found to induce oxidative DNA damage, as measured by the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in a cell-free system. The ranking of pro-oxidant activity was 15-HO-ZAN>15-HO-α-ZAL≈4-HO-E2/E1≈2-HO-E2/E1>13-HO-ZAN>13-HO-α-ZAL. With respect to the rate of methylation by human hepatic COMT, the ranking was 2-HO-E2/E1>4-HO-E2/E1>15-HO-α-ZAL/ZAN>13-HO-α-ZAL/ZAN. Thus, some catechol metabolites of α-ZAL and ZAN are better pro-oxidants and poorer substrates of COMT than the catechols of E2 and E1. These findings warrant further investigations into the genotoxic potential of α-ZAL, which may constitute another biological activity in addition to its well-known estrogenicity.

  20. Mechanisms of Estrogen Carcinogenesis: The Role of E2/E1- Quinone Metabolites Suggests New Approaches to Preventive Intervention – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yager, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Studies in hamsters, mice and rats have demonstrated that estradiol (E2), its interconvertible metabolite estrone (E1) and their catechol metabolites, in particular 4-hydroxy E2/E1, are carcinogenic in the kidney, uterus and mammary gland. Observational studies and clinical trials consistently show that sustained exposure to E2/E1 is associated with the development of sporadic breast cancer. The weight of evidence supports the contribution of two complementary pathways in the initiation, promotion and progression of breast cancer. One pathway involves activation of nuclear and cytoplasmic signaling pathways through the binding of estrogen to nuclear and membrane-bound estrogen receptors leading to increased cell proliferation. The other pathway involves the oxidative metabolism of E2/E1 to catechols and then reactive quinones that can contribute to oxidative DNA damage and form specific, mutagenic depurinating adducts with adenine and guanine which then in turn can serve as biomarkers for the occurrence of these processes. Both pathways can serve as portals to preventive intervention. Antiestrogens are used clinically to block receptor-mediated signaling to block tumor growth. Various chemopreventive agents such as sulforaphane (SFN) and resveratrol have been shown in cell culture to block oxidative metabolism of E2/E1 and thus prevent DNA damage. Pretreatment of MCF-7 and MCF-10F cells with and inhibitor of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) followed by treatment with E2 or 4-OH E2 caused increased oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-dG) and depurinating DNA adducts showing the importance of E2-catechol O-methylation by COMT as a protective pathway. E2 Treatment of MCF-10A cells with E2 or 4-OH E2 caused an increase in E2-adenine and guanine adducts. Treatment with sulforaphane increased NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and glutathione-S-transferase A1 (GSTA1) expression without affecting expression of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) or cytochrome P450 1B1

  1. Catechol oxidase activity of a series of new dinuclear copper(II) complexes with 3,5-DTBC and TCC as substrates: syntheses, X-ray crystal structures, spectroscopic characterization of the adducts and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Banu, Kazi Sabnam; Chattopadhyay, Tanmay; Banerjee, Arpita; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Suresh, Eringathodi; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Zangrando, Ennio; Das, Debasis

    2008-08-18

    A series of dinuclear copper(II) complexes has been synthesized with the aim to investigate their applicability as potential structure and function models for the active site of catechol oxidase enzyme. They have been characterized by routine physicochemical techniques as well as by X-ray single-crystal structure analysis: [Cu 2(H 2L2 (2))(OH)(H 2O)(NO 3)](NO 3) 3.2H 2O ( 1), [Cu(HL1 (4))(H 2O)(NO 3)] 2(NO 3) 2.2H 2O ( 2), [Cu(L1 (1))(H 2O)(NO 3)] 2 ( 3), [Cu 2(L2 (3))(OH)(H 2O) 2](NO 3) 2, ( 4) and [Cu 2(L2 (1))(N 3) 3] ( 5) [L1 = 2-formyl-4-methyl-6R-iminomethyl-phenolato and L2 = 2,6-bis(R-iminomethyl)-4-methyl-phenolato; for L1 (1) and L2 (1), R = N-propylmorpholine; for L2 (2), R = N-ethylpiperazine; for L2 (3), R = N-ethylpyrrolidine, and for L1 (4), R = N-ethylmorpholine]. Dinuclear 1 and 4 possess two "end-off" compartmental ligands with exogenous mu-hydroxido and endogenous mu-phenoxido groups leading to intermetallic distances of 2.9794(15) and 2.9435(9) A, respectively; 2 and 3 are formed by two tridentate compartmental ligands where the copper centers are connected by endogenous phenoxido bridges with Cu-Cu separations of 3.0213(13) and 3.0152(15) A, respectively; 5 is built by an end-off compartmental ligand having exogenous mu-azido and endogenous mu-phenoxido groups with a Cu-Cu distance of 3.133(2) A (mean of two independent molecules). The catecholase activity of all of the complexes has been investigated in acetonitrile and methanol medium by UV-vis spectrophotometric study using 3,5-di- tert-butylcatechol (3,5-DTBC) and tetrachlorocatechol (TCC) as substrates. In acetonitrile medium, the conversion of 3,5-DTBC to 3,5-di- tert-butylbenzoquinone (3,5-DTBQ) catalyzed by 1- 5 is observed to proceed via the formation of two enzyme-substrate adducts, ES1 and ES2, detected spectroscopically for the first time. In methanol medium no such enzyme-substrate adduct has been detected, and the 3,5-DTBC to 3,5-DTBQ conversion is observed to be catalyzed by 1- 5

  2. Catechol metabolites of the mycotoxin zearalenone are poor substrates but potent inhibitors of catechol-O-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Erika; Wefers, Daniel; Hildebrand, Andreas A; Fleck, Stefanie C; Metzler, Manfred

    2013-08-01

    The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN) elicits estrogenic effects and is biotransformed to two catechol metabolites, in analogy to the endogenous steroidal estrogen 17ß-estradiol (E2). Previous studies have shown that the catechol metabolites of ZEN have about the same potency to induce oxidative DNA damage as the catechol metabolites of E2, but are less efficiently converted to their methyl ethers by human hepatic catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). Here, we report that the two catechol metabolites of ZEN, i.e. 13-hydroxy-ZEN and 15-hydroxy-ZEN, are not only poor substrates of human COMT but are also able to strongly inhibit the O-methylation of 2-hydroxy-E2, the major catechol metabolite of E2. 15-Hydroxy-ZEN acts as a non-competitive inhibitor and is about ten times more potent than 13-hydroxy-ZEN, which is an uncompetitive inhibitor of COMT. The catechol metabolites of ZEN were also shown to inhibit the O-methylation of 2-hydroxy-E2 by hepatic COMT from mouse, rat, steer and piglet, although to a lesser extent than observed with human COMT. The powerful inhibitory effect of catechol metabolites of ZEN on COMT may have implications for the tumorigenic activity of E2, because catechol metabolites of E2 elicit genotoxic effects, and their impaired O-methylation may increase the tumorigenicity of steroidal estrogens.

  3. Impact of estrogenic compounds on DNA integrity in human spermatozoa: evidence for cross-linking and redox cycling activities.

    PubMed

    Bennetts, L E; De Iuliis, G N; Nixon, B; Kime, M; Zelski, K; McVicar, C M; Lewis, S E; Aitken, R J

    2008-05-10

    A great deal of circumstantial evidence has linked DNA damage in human spermatozoa with adverse reproductive outcomes including reduced fertility and high rates of miscarriage. Although oxidative stress is thought to make a significant contribution to DNA damage in the male germ line, the factors responsible for creating this stress have not been elucidated. One group of compounds that are thought to be active in this context are the estrogens, either generated as a result of the endogenous metabolism of androgens within the male reproductive tract or gaining access to the latter as a consequence of environmental exposure. In this study, a wide variety of estrogenic compounds were assessed for their direct effects on human spermatozoa in vitro. DNA integrity was assessed using the Comet and TUNEL assays, lesion frequencies were quantified by QPCR using targets within the mitochondrial and nuclear (beta-globin) genomes, DNA adducts were characterized by mass spectrometry and redox activity was monitored using dihydroethidium (DHE) as the probe. Of the estrogenic and estrogen analogue compounds evaluated, catechol estrogens, quercetin, diethylstilbestrol and pyrocatechol stimulated intense redox activity while genistein was only active at the highest doses tested. Other estrogens and estrogen analogues, such as 17beta-estradiol, nonylphenol, bisphenol A and 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene were inactive. Estrogen-induced redox activity was associated with a dramatic loss of motility and, in the case of 2-hydroxyestradiol, the induction of significant DNA fragmentation. Mass spectrometry also indicated that catechol estrogens were capable of forming dimers that can cross-link the densely packed DNA strands in sperm chromatin, impairing nuclear decondensation. These results highlight the potential importance of estrogenic compounds in creating oxidative stress and DNA damage in the male germ line and suggest that further exploration of these compounds in the aetiology of male

  4. Development of an immunoassay to detect benzene adducts in hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Grassman, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop an immunoassay to detect the adducts formed in hemoglobin after exposure to benzene, which is known to cause bone marrow degeneration and acute myelogenous leukemia. The use of benzene-adduct detection as a biological monitoring method would permit measurement of low exposures and exposures sustained weeks earlier. The reactivity of hydroquinone, an important benzene metabolite, with blood proteins and amino acids was investigated in order to decide which antigens and analytes were likely to be suitable for immunoassay development. The second section determined the combination of benzene-metabolite and antigen need to produce an immunoassay with the requisite low detection limit and specificity. The immunoassays with the best performance were tested on hemoglobin from benzene-exposed mice. In vitro studies showed that hydroquinone efficiently formed adducts with erythrocyte membranes and hemoglobin but not with albumin. Adduction efficiency was greater in incubations using purified hemoglobin than whole blood. Cysteine accounted for 15 to 27% of the adducts formed by hydroquinone. The site of the other adducts were not identified although there was evidence that the hemoglobin heme was adducted. Adducts were found on only 1 of the 2 globin chains. Tryptic digestion of the globin failed to associate the adducts with a specific peptide. Antigens made from hydroquinone-adducted hemoglobin but not hydroquinone-adducted cysteines coupled to carrier proteins effectively elicited adduct-specific antibodies. Interference due to reactivity to hemoglobin was controlled by using uniform quantities of hemoglobin in all wells. The mid-range of the best assays were approximately 12 pmoles HQ per well. Antibodies directed toward hemoglobin adducted with the benzene metabolites phenol, catechol and 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene were also made. The performance of the anti-1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene were suitable for quantitative immunoassays.

  5. In vitro bioactivation of a selective estrogen receptor modulator (2S,3R)-(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-[4-(2-pyrrolidin-1-ylethoxy)phenyl]-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzoxathiin-6-ol (I) in liver microsomes: formation of adenine adducts.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Doss, George A; Li, Yan; Chen, Qing; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Zhoupeng

    2012-11-19

    As part of our efforts to develop safer selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), compound I {(2S,3R)-(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-[4-(2-pyrrolidin-1-ylethoxy)-phenyl]-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzoxathiin-6-ol} was previously identified as a lead for further development. Subsequent studies showed that compound I is genotoxic in both in vitro Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and in vivo mouse studies. To better understand the possible mechanisms for the observed genetoxicity effects, in vitro incubations of I with liver microsomes of human, monkey, and mouse in the presence of adenine were performed, which led to the detection of five adenine adducts. The formation of these adducts was NADPH-dependent, suggesting the involvement of oxidative bioactivation catalyzed by cytochrome P450 enzymes. The mechanism for the formation of the major adenine adduct (A1) involves the formation of a reactive ring-opened para-quinone intermediate. The formation of four other adenine adducts may involve the formation of a reactive epoxide or ortho-quinone intermediate. Furthermore, incubations of compound I with human hepatocytes showed dose-dependent DNA damages in Comet assays. All of the above suggest that some reactive metabolites of compound I, formed through bioactivation mechanisms, have a potential to interact with DNA molecules in vitro and in vivo. This may be one of the causes of the genotoxicity observed preclinically both in vitro and in vivo. This case study demonstrated an approach using in vitro DNA trapping assays for assessing the genotoxicity potential of drug candidates.

  6. Catechol formation: a novel pathway in the metabolism of sterigmatocystin and 11-methoxysterigmatocystin.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Erika; Fleck, Stefanie C; Metzler, Manfred

    2014-12-15

    The mycotoxin sterigmatocystin (STC) has an aflatoxin-like structure including a furofuran ring system. Like aflatoxin B1, STC is a liver carcinogen and forms DNA adducts after metabolic activation to an epoxide at the furofuran ring. In incubations of STC with human P450 isoforms, one monooxygenated and one dioxygenated STC metabolite were recently reported, and a GSH adduct was formed when GSH was added to the incubations. However, the chemical structures of these metabolites were not unambiguously elucidated. We now report that hepatic microsomes from humans and rats predominantly form the catechol 9-hydroxy-STC via hydroxylation of the aromatic ring. No STC-1,2-oxide and only small amounts of STC-1,2-dihydrodiol were detected in microsomal incubations, suggesting that epoxidation is a minor pathway compared to catechol formation. Catechol formation was also much more pronounced than furofuran epoxidation in the microsomal metabolism of 11-methoxysterigmatocystin (MSTC). In support of the preference of catechol formation, only trace amounts of the thiol adduct of the 1,2-oxides but large amounts of the thiol adducts of the 9-hydroxy-8,9-quinones were obtained when N-acetyl-l-cysteine was added to the microsomal incubations of STC and MSTC. In addition to hydroxylation at C-9, smaller amounts of 12c-hydroxylated, 9,12c-dihydroxylated, and 9,11-dihydroxylated metabolites were formed. Our study suggests that hydroxylation of the aromatic ring, yielding a catechol, represents a major and novel pathway in the oxidative metabolism of STC and MSTC, which may contribute to the toxic and genotoxic effects of these mycotoxins.

  7. Copper-Aβ Peptides and Oxidation of Catecholic Substrates: Reactivity and Endogenous Peptide Damage.

    PubMed

    Pirota, Valentina; Dell'Acqua, Simone; Monzani, Enrico; Nicolis, Stefania; Casella, Luigi

    2016-11-14

    The oxidative reactivity of copper complexes with Aβ peptides 1-16 and 1-28 (Aβ16 and Aβ28) against dopamine and related catechols under physiological conditions has been investigated in parallel with the competitive oxidative modification undergone by the peptides. It was found that both Aβ16 and Aβ28 markedly increase the oxidative reactivity of copper(II) towards the catechol compounds, up to a molar ratio of about 4:1 of peptide/copper(II). Copper redox cycling during the catalytic activity induces the competitive modification of the peptide at selected amino acid residues. The main modifications consist of oxidation of His13/14 to 2-oxohistidine and Phe19/20 to ortho-tyrosine, and the formation of a covalent His6-catechol adduct. Competition by the endogenous peptide is rather efficient, as approximately one peptide molecule is oxidized every 10 molecules of 4-methylcatechol.

  8. Oxidative calcium release from catechol.

    PubMed

    Riley, Patrick A; Stratford, Michael R L

    2015-04-01

    Oxidation of 4-methylcatechol previously exposed to aqueous calcium chloride was shown by ion chromatography to be associated with release of calcium ions. The catechol was oxidised to the corresponding orthoquinone by the use of tyrosinase from Agaricus bisporus. The oxidative release of calcium from the catechol is ascribed to the diminution of the available hydroxyl functions able to act as chelating groups. Our results suggest that the redox status of melanin may regulate calcium binding and influence calcium levels in pigmented cells.

  9. Synthetic models of the active site of catechol oxidase: mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Koval, Iryna A; Gamez, Patrick; Belle, Catherine; Selmeczi, Katalin; Reedijk, Jan

    2006-09-01

    The ability of copper proteins to process dioxygen at ambient conditions has inspired numerous research groups to study their structural, spectroscopic and catalytic properties. Catechol oxidase is a type-3 copper enzyme usually encountered in plant tissues and in some insects and crustaceans. It catalyzes the conversion of a large number of catechols into the respective o-benzoquinones, which subsequently auto-polymerize, resulting in the formation of melanin, a dark pigment thought to protect a damaged tissue from pathogens. After the report of the X-ray crystal structure of catechol oxidase a few years earlier, a large number of publications devoted to the biomimetic modeling of its active site appeared in the literature. This critical review (citing 114 references) extensively discusses the synthetic models of this enzyme, with a particular emphasis on the different approaches used in the literature to study the mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of the substrate (catechol) by these compounds. These are the studies on the substrate binding to the model complexes, the structure-activity relationship, the kinetic studies of the catalytic oxidation of the substrate and finally the substrate interaction with (per)oxo-dicopper adducts. The general overview of the recognized types of copper proteins and the detailed description of the crystal structure of catechol oxidase, as well as the proposed mechanisms of the enzymatic cycle are also presented.

  10. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  11. Sensitive radioenzymatic assay for catechol drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Durrett, L.R.; Ziegler, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    This assay measures picogram quantities of catechol drugs and endogenous catecholamines in body tissues and fluids. The catechols are converted to their 3H-O-methyl metabolites during incubation with 3H-S-adenosylmethionine then separated by solvent extraction and thin-layer chromatography. Most drugs containing the catechol structure can be radiolabeled and separated from norepinephrine and epinephrine by this technique to provide simultaneous measurement of endogenous and exogenously administered catechols. The disposition of isoproterenol in tissues and fluids of man and experimental animals is measured to illustrate the utility of this assay. The reactivity of several commonly administered catechol drugs with COMT is described and the possible implications discussed.

  12. A new boronic acid based fluorescent reporter for catechol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongyu; Li, Minyong; Fang, Hao; Wang, Binghe

    2012-12-01

    Catechol skeleton widely exists in natural products and bioactive substances. Fluorescent reporters which could recognize catechol are very promising for the construction of chemosensors to detect catechol and its derivatives in biological environment. Herein, we reported a novel catechol reporter, 2-(4-boronophenyl)quinoline-4-carboxylic acid, which exhibits significant fluorescent property changes upon binding catechol containing molecules in an aqueous solution.

  13. Isolevuglandin Adducts in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Wenzhao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A diverse family of lipid-derived levulinaldehydes, isolevuglandins (isoLGs), is produced by rearrangement of endoperoxide intermediates generated through both cyclooxygenase (COX) and free radical-induced cyclooxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids and their phospholipid esters. The formation and reactions of isoLGs with other biomolecules has been linked to alcoholic liver disease, Alzheimer's disease, age-related macular degeneration, atherosclerosis, cardiac arythmias, cancer, end-stage renal disease, glaucoma, inflammation of allergies and infection, mitochondrial dysfunction, multiple sclerosis, and thrombosis. This review chronicles progress in understanding the chemistry of isoLGs, detecting their production in vivo and understanding their biological consequences. Critical Issues: IsoLGs have never been isolated from biological sources, because they form adducts with primary amino groups of other biomolecules within seconds. Chemical synthesis enabled investigation of isoLG chemistry and detection of isoLG adducts present in vivo. Recent Advances: The first peptide mapping and sequencing of an isoLG-modified protein present in human retina identified the modification of a specific lysyl residue of the sterol C27-hydroxylase Cyp27A1. This residue is preferentially modified by iso[4]LGE2 in vitro, causing loss of function. Adduction of less than one equivalent of isoLG can induce COX-associated oligomerization of the amyloid peptide Aβ1-42. Adduction of isoLGE2 to phosphatidylethanolamines causes gain of function, converting them into proinflammatory isoLGE2-PE agonists that foster monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Future Directions: Among the remaining questions on the biochemistry of isoLGs are the dependence of biological activity on isoLG isomer structure, the structures and mechanism of isoLG-derived protein–protein and DNA–protein cross-link formation, and its biological consequences. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22

  14. Alcohol, Aldehydes, Adducts and Airways

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Muna; Wyatt, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes results in the formation of reactive aldehydes in the lung, which are capable of forming adducts with several proteins and DNA. Acetaldehyde and malondialdehyde are the major aldehydes generated in high levels in the lung of subjects with alcohol use disorder who smoke cigarettes. In addition to the above aldehydes, several other aldehydes like 4-hydroxynonenal, formaldehyde and acrolein are also detected in the lung due to exposure to toxic gases, vapors and chemicals. These aldehydes react with nucleophilic targets in cells such as DNA, lipids and proteins to form both stable and unstable adducts. This adduction may disturb cellular functions as well as damage proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Among several adducts formed in the lung, malondialdehyde DNA (MDA-DNA) adduct and hybrid malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) protein adducts have been shown to initiate several pathological conditions in the lung. MDA-DNA adducts are pre-mutagenic in mammalian cells and induce frame shift and base-pair substitution mutations, whereas MAA protein adducts have been shown to induce inflammation and inhibit wound healing. This review provides an insight into different reactive aldehyde adducts and their role in the pathogenesis of lung disease. PMID:26556381

  15. Spectroscopic Studies of the Catechol Dioxygenases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Que, Lawrence Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The catechol dioxygenases are bacterial iron-containing enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of catechols. These enzymes serve as a component of nature's mechanisms for degrading aromatic compounds in the environment. The structure and mechanistic aspects of these enzymes are described. (JN)

  16. A redox-neutral catechol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Yan, Dingyuan; Chen, Ying; Wang, Ting; Xiong, Feng; Wei, Wei; Lu, Yi; Sun, Wei-Yin; Li, Jie Jack; Zhao, Jing

    2017-01-27

    Ubiquitous tyrosinase catalyses the aerobic oxidation of phenols to catechols through the binuclear copper centres. Here, inspired by the Fischer indole synthesis, we report an iridium-catalysed tyrosinase-like approach to catechols, employing an oxyacetamide-directed C-H hydroxylation on phenols. This method achieves one-step, redox-neutral synthesis of catechols with diverse substituent groups under mild conditions. Mechanistic studies confirm that the directing group (DG) oxyacetamide acts as the oxygen source. This strategy has been applied to the synthesis of different important catechols with fluorescent property and bioactivity from the corresponding phenols. Finally, our method also provides a convenient route to (18)O-labelled catechols using (18)O-labelled acetic acid.

  17. A redox-neutral catechol synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qian; Yan, Dingyuan; Chen, Ying; Wang, Ting; Xiong, Feng; Wei, Wei; Lu, Yi; Sun, Wei-Yin; Li, Jie Jack; Zhao, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Ubiquitous tyrosinase catalyses the aerobic oxidation of phenols to catechols through the binuclear copper centres. Here, inspired by the Fischer indole synthesis, we report an iridium-catalysed tyrosinase-like approach to catechols, employing an oxyacetamide-directed C-H hydroxylation on phenols. This method achieves one-step, redox-neutral synthesis of catechols with diverse substituent groups under mild conditions. Mechanistic studies confirm that the directing group (DG) oxyacetamide acts as the oxygen source. This strategy has been applied to the synthesis of different important catechols with fluorescent property and bioactivity from the corresponding phenols. Finally, our method also provides a convenient route to 18O-labelled catechols using 18O-labelled acetic acid.

  18. A redox-neutral catechol synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qian; Yan, Dingyuan; Chen, Ying; Wang, Ting; Xiong, Feng; Wei, Wei; Lu, Yi; Sun, Wei-Yin; Li, Jie Jack; Zhao, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Ubiquitous tyrosinase catalyses the aerobic oxidation of phenols to catechols through the binuclear copper centres. Here, inspired by the Fischer indole synthesis, we report an iridium-catalysed tyrosinase-like approach to catechols, employing an oxyacetamide-directed C–H hydroxylation on phenols. This method achieves one-step, redox-neutral synthesis of catechols with diverse substituent groups under mild conditions. Mechanistic studies confirm that the directing group (DG) oxyacetamide acts as the oxygen source. This strategy has been applied to the synthesis of different important catechols with fluorescent property and bioactivity from the corresponding phenols. Finally, our method also provides a convenient route to 18O-labelled catechols using 18O-labelled acetic acid. PMID:28128196

  19. Tamoxifen-DNA adduct formation in monkey and human reproductive organs.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Ramon, Elena E; Sandoval, Nicole A; John, Kaarthik; Cline, J Mark; Wood, Charles E; Woodward, Ruth A; Poirier, Miriam C

    2014-05-01

    The estrogen analog tamoxifen (TAM), used for adjuvant therapy of breast cancer, induces endometrial and uterine tumors in breast cancer patients. Proliferation stimulus of the uterine endometrium is likely involved in tumor induction, but genotoxicity may also play a role. Formation of TAM-DNA adducts in human tissues has been reported but remains controversial. To address this issue, we examined TAM-DNA adducts in uteri from two species of monkeys, Erythrocebus patas (patas) and Macaca fascicularis (macaque), and in human endometrium and myometrium. Monkeys were given 3-4 months of chronic TAM dosing scaled to be equivalent to the daily human dose. In the uteri, livers and brains from the patas (n = 3), and endometrium from the macaques (n = 4), TAM-DNA adducts were measurable by TAM-DNA chemiluminescence immunoassay. Average TAM-DNA adduct values for the patas uteri (23 adducts/10(8) nucleotides) were similar to those found in endometrium of the macaques (19 adducts/10(8) nucleotides). Endometrium of macaques exposed to both TAM and low-dose estradiol (n = 5) averaged 34 adducts/10(8) nucleotides. To examine TAM-DNA persistence in the patas, females (n = 3) were exposed to TAM for 3 months and to no drug for an additional month, resulting in low or non-detectable TAM-DNA in livers and uteri. Human endometrial and myometrial samples from women receiving (n = 8) and not receiving (n = 8) TAM therapy were also evaluated. Women receiving TAM therapy averaged 10.3 TAM-DNA adducts/10(8) nucleotides, whereas unexposed women showed no detectable TAM-DNA. The data indicate that genotoxicity, in addition to estrogen agonist effects, may contribute to TAM-induced human endometrial cancer.

  20. Modulation of Estrogen Chemical Carcinogenesis by Botanical Supplements used for Postmenopausal Women’s Health

    PubMed Central

    Snelten, Courtney S.; Dietz, Birgit; Bolton, Judy L.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer risk has been associated with long-term estrogen exposure including traditional hormone therapy (HT, formally hormone replacement therapy). To avoid traditional HT and associated risks, women have been turning to botanical supplements such as black cohosh, red clover, licorice, hops, dong gui, and ginger to relieve menopausal symptoms despite a lack of efficacy evidence. The mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenesis involve both hormonal and chemical pathways. Botanical supplements could protect women from estrogen carcinogenesis by modulating key enzymatic steps [aromatase, P4501B1, P4501A1, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging] in estradiol metabolism leading to estrogen carcinogenesis as outlined in Figure 1. This review summarizes the influence of popular botanical supplements used for women’s health on these key steps in the estrogen chemical carcinogenesis pathway, and suggests that botanical supplements may have added chemopreventive benefits by modulating estrogen metabolism. PMID:24223609

  1. Association of Active and Sedentary Behaviors with Postmenopausal Estrogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dallal, Cher M.; Brinton, Louise A.; Matthews, Charles E.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Hartman, Terryl J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Falk, Roni T.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Gierach, Gretchen L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Physical activity may reduce endogenous estrogens but few studies have assessed effects on estrogen metabolism and none have evaluated sedentary behavior in relation to estrogen metabolism. We assessed relationships between accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary behavior and 15 urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites (EM) among postmenopausal controls from a population-based breast cancer case-control study conducted in Poland (2000-2003). Methods Postmenopausal women (N=542) were ages 40 to 72 years and not currently using hormone therapy. Accelerometers, worn for seven days, were used to derive measures of average activity (counts/day) and sedentary behavior (<100 counts/min/day). EM were measured in 12-hour urine samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. EM were analyzed individually, in metabolic pathways (C-2, -4, or -16), and as ratios relative to parent estrogens. Geometric means of EM by tertiles of accelerometer-measures, adjusted for age and body mass, were computed using linear models. Results High activity was associated with lower levels of estrone and estradiol (p-trend=0.01) while increased sedentary time was positively associated with these parent estrogens (p-trend=0.04). Inverse associations were observed between high activity and 2-methoxyestradiol, 4-methoxyestradiol, 17-epiestriol and 16-epiestriol (p-trend=0.03). Sedentary time was positively associated with methylated catechols in the 2- and 4-hydroxylation pathways (p-trend≤0.04). Women in the highest tertile of activity had increased hydroxylation at the C-2, -4, and -16 sites relative to parent estrogens (p-trend≤0.02) while increased sedentary time was associated with a lower 16-pathway:parent estrogen ratio (p-trend=0.01). Conclusions Higher activity was associated with lower urinary estrogens, possibly through increased estrogen hydroxylation and subsequent metabolism, while sedentary behavior may reduce metabolism. PMID:26460631

  2. Cloning and expression of a novel catechol-O-methyltransferase in common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shotaro; Uno, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Takashi; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2017-02-04

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyzes the O-methylation of endogenous catechol amines and estrogens and exogenous catechol-type of drugs. A Parkinson's disease model of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) has been widely used in preclinical studies to evaluate inhibitory potential of new drug candidates on marmoset COMT. Despite COMT inhibitors could potentiate the pharmacological action of levodopa on Parkinson's disease in animal models, marmoset COMT cDNA has not yet been identified and characterized. In this study, a cDNA highly homologous to human COMT was cloned from marmoset livers. This cDNA encoded 268 amino acids containing a transmembrane region and critical amino acid residues for catalytic function. The amino acid sequences of marmoset COMT shared high sequence identity (90%) with human COMT. COMT mRNA was expressed in all five tissues tested, including brain, lung, liver, kidney and small intestine, and was more abundant in marmoset liver and kidney. Membrane-bound COMT was immunochemically detected in livers and kidneys, whereas soluble COMT was detected in livers, similar to humans. These results indicated that the molecular characteristics of marmoset COMT were generally similar to the human ortholog.

  3. Cloning and expression of a novel catechol-O-methyltransferase in common marmosets

    PubMed Central

    UEHARA, Shotaro; UNO, Yasuhiro; INOUE, Takashi; SASAKI, Erika; YAMAZAKI, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyzes the O-methylation of endogenous catechol amines and estrogens and exogenous catechol-type of drugs. A Parkinson’s disease model of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) has been widely used in preclinical studies to evaluate inhibitory potential of new drug candidates on marmoset COMT. Despite COMT inhibitors could potentiate the pharmacological action of levodopa on Parkinson’s disease in animal models, marmoset COMT cDNA has not yet been identified and characterized. In this study, a cDNA highly homologous to human COMT was cloned from marmoset livers. This cDNA encoded 268 amino acids containing a transmembrane region and critical amino acid residues for catalytic function. The amino acid sequences of marmoset COMT shared high sequence identity (90%) with human COMT. COMT mRNA was expressed in all five tissues tested, including brain, lung, liver, kidney and small intestine, and was more abundant in marmoset liver and kidney. Membrane-bound COMT was immunochemically detected in livers and kidneys, whereas soluble COMT was detected in livers, similar to humans. These results indicated that the molecular characteristics of marmoset COMT were generally similar to the human ortholog. PMID:27890888

  4. 40 CFR 721.10711 - Alkyl substituted catechol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl substituted catechol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10711 Alkyl substituted catechol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... substituted catechol (PMN P-13-197) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  5. The role of catechol-O-methyltransferase in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suriguga,; Li, Xiao-Fei; Li, Yang; Yu, Chun-Hong; Li, Yi-Ran; Yi, Zong-Chun

    2013-12-15

    Catechol is widely used in pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Catechol is also one of phenolic metabolites of benzene in vivo. Our previous study showed that catechol improved erythroid differentiation potency of K562 cells, which was associated with decreased DNA methylation in erythroid specific genes. Catechol is a substrate for the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-mediated methylation. In the present study, the role of COMT in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells was investigated. Benzidine staining showed that exposure to catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation and induced mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes in K562 cells. Treatment with catechol caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in guaiacol concentration in the medium of cultured K562 cells. When COMT expression was knocked down by COMT shRNA expression in K562 cells, the production of guaiacol significantly reduced, and the sensitivity of K562 cells to cytotoxicity of catechol significantly increased. Knockdown of COMT expression by COMT shRNA expression also eliminated catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. In addition, the pre-treatment with methyl donor S-adenosyl-L-methionine or its demethylated product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine induced a significant increase in hemin-induced Hb synthesis in K562 cells and the mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes. These findings indicated that O-methylation catalyzed by COMT acted as detoxication of catechol and involved in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells, and the production of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine partly explained catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation. - Highlights: • Catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation. • COMT-catalyzed methylation acted as detoxication of catechol. • COMT involved in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation.

  6. Site-specific inhibitory mechanism for amyloid β42 aggregation by catechol-type flavonoids targeting the Lys residues.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mizuho; Murakami, Kazuma; Uno, Mayumi; Nakagawa, Yu; Katayama, Sumie; Akagi, Ken-ichi; Masuda, Yuichi; Takegoshi, Kiyonori; Irie, Kazuhiro

    2013-08-09

    The aggregation of the 42-residue amyloid β-protein (Aβ42) is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Numerous flavonoids exhibit inhibitory activity against Aβ42 aggregation, but their mechanism remains unclear in the molecular level. Here we propose the site-specific inhibitory mechanism of (+)-taxifolin, a catechol-type flavonoid, whose 3',4'-dihydroxyl groups of the B-ring plays a critical role. Addition of sodium periodate, an oxidant, strengthened suppression of Aβ42 aggregation by (+)-taxifolin, whereas no inhibition was observed under anaerobic conditions, suggesting the inhibition to be associated with the oxidation to form o-quinone. Because formation of the Aβ42-taxifolin adduct was suggested by mass spectrometry, Aβ42 mutants substituted at Arg(5), Lys(16), and/or Lys(28) with norleucine (Nle) were prepared to identify the residues involved in the conjugate formation. (+)-Taxifolin did not suppress the aggregation of Aβ42 mutants at Lys(16) and/or Lys(28) except for the mutant at Arg(5). In addition, the aggregation of Aβ42 was inhibited by other catechol-type flavonoids, whereas that of K16Nle-Aβ42 was not. In contrast, some non-catechol-type flavonoids suppressed the aggregation of K16Nle-Aβ42 as well as Aβ42. Furthermore, interaction of (+)-taxifolin with the β-sheet region in Aβ42 was not observed using solid-state NMR unlike curcumin of the non-catechol-type. These results demonstrate that catechol-type flavonoids could specifically suppress Aβ42 aggregation by targeting Lys residues. Although the anti-AD activity of flavonoids has been ascribed to their antioxidative activity, the mechanism that the o-quinone reacts with Lys residues of Aβ42 might be more intrinsic. The Lys residues could be targets for Alzheimer disease therapy.

  7. PEM Anchorage on Titanium Using Catechol Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Hélène; Barrere, Amélie; Schoentstein, Frédérique; Chavanne, Marie-Hélène; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Mora, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Background This study deals with the anchorage of polyelectrolyte films onto titanium surfaces via a cathecol-based linker for biomedical applications. Methodology The following study uses a molecule functionalized with a catechol and a carboxylic acid: 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid. This molecule is anchored to the TiO2 substrate via the catechol while the carboxylic acid reacts with polymers bearing amine groups. By providing a film anchorage of chemisorption type, it makes possible to deposit polyelectrolytes on the surface of titanium. Principal Findings Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements show that the different steps of grafting have been successfully performed. Conclusions This method based on catechol anchorage of polyelectrolytes open a window towards large possibilities of clinical applications. PMID:23226262

  8. Anomalous cage effect of the excited state dynamics of catechol in the 18-crown-6-catechol host-guest complex.

    PubMed

    Morishima, Fumiya; Kusaka, Ryoji; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Haino, Takeharu; Ebata, Takayuki

    2015-02-12

    We determined the number of isomers and their structures for the 18-crown-6 (18C6)-catechol host-guest complex, and examined the effect of the complex formation on the S1 ((1)ππ*) dynamics of catechol under a supersonically cooled gas phase condition and in cyclohexane solution at room temperature. In the gas phase experiment, UV-UV hole-burning spectra of the 18C6-catechol 1:1 complex indicate that there are three stable isomers. For bare catechol, it has been reported that two adjacent OH groups have an intramolecular hydrogen (H) bond. The IR-UV double resonance spectra show two types of isomers in the 18C6-catechol 1:1 complex; one of the three 18C6-catechol 1:1 isomers has the intramolecular H-bond between the two OH groups, while in the other two isomers the intramolecular H-bond is broken and the two OH groups are H-bonded to oxygen atoms of 18C6. The complex formation with 18C6 substantially elongates the S1 lifetime from 7 ps for bare catechol and 2.0 ns for the catechol-H2O complex to 10.3 ns for the 18C6-catechol 1:1 complex. Density functional theory calculations of the 18C6-catechol 1:1 complex suggest that this elongation is attributed to a larger energy gap between the S1 ((1)ππ*) and (1)πσ* states than that of bare catechol or the catechol-H2O complex. In cyclohexane solution, the enhancement of the fluorescence intensity of catechol was found by adding 18C6, due to the formation of the 18C6-catechol complex in solution, and the complex has a longer S1 lifetime than that of catechol monomer. From the concentration dependence of the fluorescence intensity, we estimated the equilibrium constant K for the 18C6 + catechol ⇄ 18C6-catechol reaction. The obtained value (log K = 2.3) in cyclohexane is comparable to those for alkali metal ions or other molecular ions, indicating that 18C6 efficiently captures catechol in solution. Therefore, 18C6 can be used as a sensitive sensor of catechol derivatives in solution with its high ability of

  9. Estrogens and aging skin

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity. Its protective function becomes compromised and aging is associated with impaired wound healing, hair loss, pigmentary changes and skin cancer.   Skin aging can be significantly delayed by the administration of estrogen. This paper reviews estrogen effects on human skin and the mechanisms by which estrogens can alleviate the changes due to aging. The relevance of estrogen replacement, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and phytoestrogens as therapies for diminishing skin aging is highlighted. Understanding estrogen signaling in skin will provide a basis for interventions in aging pathologies. PMID:24194966

  10. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α on Estrogen Metabolism and Endometrial Cells: Potential Physiological and Pathological Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Salama A.; Kamel, Marwa W.; Diaz-Arrastia, Concepcion R.; Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Salih, Sana; Botting, Shaleen K.; Kumar, Raj

    2009-01-01

    Context: Estrogen and its metabolites play a critical role in the pathophysiology of the endometrium. The bioavailability of estrogen and estrogen metabolites in endometrial tissues depends on the expression of enzymes involved in estrogen biosynthesis and metabolism. Substantial evidence indicates that estrogen-dependent endometrial disorders are also associated with proinflammatory milieu. However, the mechanism whereby inflammation contributes to these conditions is not known. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of TNF-α on estrogen metabolism and the expression of estrogen-metabolizing genes in human endometrial glandular epithelial cells (EM1). Design: EM1 were treated with 17β-estradiol (E2) with or without TNF-α. Capillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis was used for quantitative measurement of estrogens and estrogen metabolites. Western blot analysis, reporter gene assay, and real-time RT-PCR were used to assess the expression of estrogen-metabolizing genes. Results: TNF-α treatment significantly increased the level of total estrogen and estrogen metabolites and significantly increased the rate of conversion of estrone (E1) into E2. TNF-α also enhanced the oxidative metabolism of estrogen into catecholestrogens with concomitant inhibition of their conversion into methoxyestrogens. Gene expression analysis revealed that TNF-α induced the expression of genes involved in E2 biosynthesis (steroidogenic factor-1 and aromatase) and activation (17β- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 and cytochrome P-450, 1B1) with simultaneous repression of genes involved in estrogen inactivation (17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2; catechol O-methyltransferase; and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-quinone oxidoreductase 1). Conclusion: TNF-α increases the local estrogen biosynthesis in human endometrial glandular cells and directs estrogen metabolism into more hormonally active and carcinogenic

  11. Aluminum complexation by catechol as determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, F.J.; McBride, M.B.

    1989-03-01

    Methods of ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry were used to determine the stoichiometry and association constant for the Al-catechol complex from pH 3.8 to 4.6. Job's method of continuous variation indicated the Al-catechol complex had a 1:1 stoichiometry in the pH range studied. Aluminum titrations of catechol and pH titrations of catechol plus Al resulted in a shift in the UV spectra due to the formation of an Al-catechol complex absorbing UV radiation uniquely different than that of free catechol. General equations were developed for the determination of association constants assuming an organic and Al-organic complex absorb UV radiation. Aluminum titrations with constant catechol concentration yielded a log k/sub 0.1//sup c/ of 16.22 for a 1:1 Al-catechol complex. Calculated absorbance as a function of pH agree dwell with experimental pH titrations of solutions containing catechol plus Al. The fact that Al can be complexed by catechol at low pH indicates the o-hydroxy group provides a potential source for Al complexation in soil and surface waters.

  12. Jack of all trades: versatile catechol crosslinking mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Cohen Stuart, Martien A; Kamperman, Marleen

    2014-12-21

    Catechols play an important role in many natural systems. They are known to readily interact with both organic (e.g., amino acids) and inorganic (e.g., metal ions, metal oxides) compounds, thereby providing a powerful system for protein curing. Catechol crosslinked protein networks, such as sclerotized cuticle and byssal threads of the mussel, have been shown to exhibit excellent mechanical properties. A lot of effort has been devoted to mimicking the natural proteins using synthetic catechol-functionalized polymers. Despite the success in developing catechol-functionalized materials, the crosslinking chemistry of catechols is still a subject of debate. To develop materials with controlled and superior properties, a clear understanding of the crosslinking mechanism of catechols is of vital importance. This review describes the crosslinking pathways of catechol and derivatives in both natural and synthetic systems. We discuss existing pathways of catechol crosslinking and parameters that affect the catechol chemistry in detail. This overview will point towards a rational direction for further investigation of the complicated catechol chemistry.

  13. The role of catechol-O-methyltransferase in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Suriguga; Li, Xiao-Fei; Li, Yang; Yu, Chun-Hong; Li, Yi-Ran; Yi, Zong-Chun

    2013-12-15

    Catechol is widely used in pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Catechol is also one of phenolic metabolites of benzene in vivo. Our previous study showed that catechol improved erythroid differentiation potency of K562 cells, which was associated with decreased DNA methylation in erythroid specific genes. Catechol is a substrate for the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-mediated methylation. In the present study, the role of COMT in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells was investigated. Benzidine staining showed that exposure to catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation and induced mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes in K562 cells. Treatment with catechol caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in guaiacol concentration in the medium of cultured K562 cells. When COMT expression was knocked down by COMT shRNA expression in K562 cells, the production of guaiacol significantly reduced, and the sensitivity of K562 cells to cytotoxicity of catechol significantly increased. Knockdown of COMT expression by COMT shRNA expression also eliminated catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. In addition, the pre-treatment with methyl donor S-adenosyl-L-methionine or its demethylated product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine induced a significant increase in hemin-induced Hb synthesis in K562 cells and the mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes. These findings indicated that O-methylation catalyzed by COMT acted as detoxication of catechol and involved in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells, and the production of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine partly explained catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation.

  14. Microfluidic array for simultaneous detection of DNA oxidation and DNA-adduct damage.

    PubMed

    Song, Boya; Shen, Min; Jiang, Di; Malla, Spundana; Mosa, Islam M; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Rusling, James F

    2016-10-21

    Exposure to chemical pollutants and pharmaceuticals may cause health issues caused by metabolite-related toxicity. This paper reports a new microfluidic electrochemical sensor array with the ability to simultaneously detect common types of DNA damage including oxidation and nucleobase adduct formation. Sensors in the 8-electrode screen-printed carbon array were coated with thin films of metallopolymers osmium or ruthenium bipyridyl-poly(vinylpyridine) chloride (OsPVP, RuPVP) along with DNA and metabolic enzymes by layer-by-layer electrostatic assembly. After a reaction step in which test chemicals and other necessary reagents flow over the array, OsPVP selectively detects oxidized guanines on the DNA strands, and RuPVP detects DNA adduction by metabolites on nucleobases. We demonstrate array performance for test chemicals including 17β-estradiol (E2), its metabolites 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2), catechol, 2-nitrosotoluene (2-NO-T), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF). Results revealed DNA-adduct and oxidation damage in a single run to provide a metabolic-genotoxic chemistry screen. The array measures damage directly in unhydrolyzed DNA, and is less expensive, faster, and simpler than conventional methods to detect DNA damage. The detection limit for oxidation is 672 8-oxodG per 10(6) bases. Each sensor requires only 22 ng of DNA, so the mass detection limit is 15 pg (∼10 pmol) 8-oxodG.

  15. Estrogen and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Robert

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the use of estrogen in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Dosage levels, interactions with other factors, side effects, and the mechanism of estrogen action are discussed. (Author/MT)

  16. Estrogen Metabolism and Risk of Postmenopausal Endometrial and Ovarian Cancer: the B ∼ FIT Cohort.

    PubMed

    Dallal, Cher M; Lacey, James V; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Bauer, Douglas C; Falk, Roni T; Buist, Diana S M; Cauley, Jane A; Hue, Trisha F; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Tice, Jeffrey A; Veenstra, Timothy D; Xu, Xia; Brinton, Louise A

    2016-02-01

    Estrogen metabolites may have different genotoxic and mitogenic properties yet their relationship with endometrial and ovarian cancer risk remains unclear. Within the Breast and Bone Follow-up to the Fracture Intervention Trial (B ∼ FIT, n = 15,595), we conducted a case-cohort study to evaluate 15 pre-diagnostic serum estrogens and estrogen metabolites with risk of incident endometrial and ovarian cancer among postmenopausal women not on hormone therapy. Participants included 66 endometrial and 67 ovarian cancer cases diagnosed during follow-up (∼ 10 years) and subcohorts of 346 and 416 women, respectively, after relevant exclusions. Serum concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. Exposures were categorized in tertiles (T) and analyzed individually, as metabolic pathways (C-2, -4, or -16) and as ratios to parent estrogens (estradiol, estrone). Estradiol was significantly associated with increased endometrial cancer risk (BMI-adjusted HRT3vsT1 = 4.09, 95% CI 1.70, 9.85; p trend = 0.003). 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16α-hydroxyestrone were not associated with endometrial risk after estradiol adjustment (2-OHE1:HRT3vsT1 = 1.97, 95% CI 0.78, 4.94; 16-OHE1:HRT3vsT1 = 1.50, 95% CI 0.65, 3.46; p trend = 0.16 and 0.36, respectively). Ratios of 2- and 4-pathway catechol-to-methylated estrogens remained positively associated with endometrial cancer after BMI or estradiol adjustment (2-pathway catechols-to-methylated: HRT3vsT1 = 4.02, 95% CI 1.60, 10.1; 4-pathway catechols-to-methylated: HRT3vsT1 = 4.59, 95% CI 1.64, 12.9; p trend = 0.002 for both). Estrogens and estrogen metabolites were not associated with ovarian cancer risk; however, larger studies are needed to better evaluate these relationships. Estrogen metabolism may be important in endometrial carcinogenesis, particularly with less extensive methylation of 2- or 4

  17. Estrogen and Bazedoxifene

    MedlinePlus

    ... estrogen that controls your symptoms and only taking estrogen as long as needed can help reduce these risks. Talk to your doctor from time to time to decide if you should take a lower dose of estrogen or should stop taking the medication.Talk to ...

  18. Catechol-based matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors with additional antioxidative activity.

    PubMed

    Tauro, Marilena; Laghezza, Antonio; Loiodice, Fulvio; Piemontese, Luca; Caradonna, Alessia; Capelli, Davide; Montanari, Roberta; Pochetti, Giorgio; Di Pizio, Antonella; Agamennone, Mariangela; Campestre, Cristina; Tortorella, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    New catechol-containing chemical entities have been investigated as matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors as well as antioxidant molecules. The combination of the two properties could represent a useful feature due to the potential application in all the pathological processes characterized by increased proteolytic activity and radical oxygen species (ROS) production, such as inflammation and photoaging. A series of catechol-based molecules were synthesized and tested for both proteolytic and oxidative inhibitory activity, and the detailed binding mode was assessed by crystal structure determination of the complex between a catechol derivative and the matrix metalloproteinase-8. Surprisingly, X-ray structure reveals that the catechol oxygens do not coordinates the zinc atom.

  19. Etoposide catechol is an oxidizable topoisomerase II poison.

    PubMed

    Jacob, David A; Gibson, Elizabeth G; Mercer, Susan L; Deweese, Joseph E

    2013-08-19

    Topoisomerase II regulates DNA topology by generating transient double-stranded breaks. The anticancer drug etoposide targets topoisomerase II and is associated with the formation of secondary leukemias in patients. The quinone and catechol metabolites of etoposide may contribute to strand breaks that trigger leukemic translocations. To further analyze the characteristics of etoposide metabolites, we extend our previous analysis of etoposide quinone to the catechol. We demonstrate that the catechol is ∼2-3-fold more potent than etoposide and under oxidative reaction conditions induces high levels of double-stranded DNA cleavage. These results support a role for etoposide catechol in contributing to therapy-induced DNA damage.

  20. Synthesis and Evaluation of Heterocyclic Catechol Mimics as Inhibitors of Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-4-pyridinones and 5-hydroxy-4-pyrimidinones were identified as inhibitors of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) in a high-throughput screen. These heterocyclic catechol mimics exhibit potent inhibition of the enzyme and an improved toxicity profile versus the marketed nitrocatechol inhibitors tolcapone and entacapone. Optimization of the series was aided by X-ray cocrystal structures of the novel inhibitors in complex with COMT and cofactors SAM and Mg2+. The crystal structures suggest a mechanism of inhibition for these heterocyclic inhibitors distinct from previously disclosed COMT inhibitors. PMID:25815153

  1. Catechol Siderophore Transport by Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Allred, Benjamin E.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Payne, Shelley M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Siderophores, small iron-binding molecules secreted by many microbial species, capture environmental iron for transport back into the cell. Vibrio cholerae synthesizes and uses the catechol siderophore vibriobactin and also uses siderophores secreted by other species, including enterobactin produced by Escherichia coli. E. coli secretes both canonical cyclic enterobactin and linear enterobactin derivatives likely derived from its cleavage by the enterobactin esterase Fes. We show here that V. cholerae does not use cyclic enterobactin but instead uses its linear derivatives. V. cholerae lacked both a receptor for efficient transport of cyclic enterobactin and enterobactin esterase to promote removal of iron from the ferrisiderophore complex. To further characterize the transport of catechol siderophores, we show that the linear enterobactin derivatives were transported into V. cholerae by either of the catechol siderophore receptors IrgA and VctA, which also transported the synthetic siderophore MECAM [1,3,5-N,N′,N″-tris-(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl)-triaminomethylbenzene]. Vibriobactin is transported via the additional catechol siderophore receptor ViuA, while the Vibrio fluvialis siderophore fluvibactin was transported by all three catechol receptors. ViuB, a putative V. cholerae siderophore-interacting protein (SIP), functionally substituted for the E. coli ferric reductase YqjH, which promotes the release of iron from the siderophore in the bacterial cytoplasm. In V. cholerae, ViuB was required for the use of vibriobactin but was not required for the use of MECAM, fluvibactin, ferrichrome, or the linear derivatives of enterobactin. This suggests the presence of another protein in V. cholerae capable of promoting the release of iron from these siderophores. IMPORTANCE Vibrio cholerae is a major human pathogen and also serves as a model for the Vibrionaceae, which include other serious human and fish pathogens. The ability of these species to persist and

  2. Postmenopausal skin and estrogen.

    PubMed

    Archer, David F

    2012-10-01

    The aging global population continues to drive increasing demand for cosmaceuticals and cosmetic surgery among older men and women. Since the discovery in the 1990s that estrogen receptors are present in skin cells and decline in number from the onset of menopause in women, researchers have explored a number of ways in which estrogen can improve skin condition. Skin is estrogen responsive, and several studies now exist to support the antiaging properties of estrogen replacement therapies in postmenopausal women. Both systemic and topical estrogens appear to have positive effects on hormonal aging, increasing skin collagen content, thickness, elasticity and hydration. Estrogen therapies may also improve wound healing and reduce the incidence of wound complications. This review explores the potential for targeted estrogen replacement as a therapeutic option for long-term skin management in postmenopausal women.

  3. Photocatalytic reaction of catechol on rutile titanium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Peter; Wang, Chundao; Diebold, Ulrike

    2008-03-01

    In an attempt to understand the fundamental aspects of photocatalysis we have studied the substituted benzene catechol on TiO2(110). Previous studies have given detailed information about the catechol bonding configuration letting our group focus on molecular level interactions with scanning tunneling microscopy and X ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Under UV exposure (248 nm) in an oxygen background, catechol is observed to degrade via oxidation. This oxidation process results in removal of roughly 10% of the initial monolayer. The removal of carbon from the TiO2 surface is shown to depend upon the background gas. Formation of a residual carbon layer is achieved by annealing the catechol monolayer to 600C. This carbon layer is more difficult to remove by photocatalytic oxidation than a pristine catechol monolayer. Work supported by Intel Corporation

  4. Adsorption mechanism and valency of catechol-functionalized hyperbranched polyglycerols

    PubMed Central

    Krysiak, Stefanie; Wei, Qiang; Rischka, Klaus; Hartwig, Andreas; Haag, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nature often serves as a model system for developing new adhesives. In aqueous environments, mussel-inspired adhesives are promising candidates. Understanding the mechanism of the extraordinarily strong adhesive bonds of the catechol group will likely aid in the development of adhesives. With this aim, we study the adhesion of catechol-based adhesives to metal oxides on the molecular level using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The comparison of single catechols (dopamine) with multiple catechols on hyperbranched polyglycerols (hPG) at various pH and dwell times allowed us to further increase our understanding. In particular, we were able to elucidate how to achieve strong bonds of different valency. It was concluded that hyperbranched polyglycerols with added catechol end groups are promising candidates for durable surface coatings. PMID:26150898

  5. DNA integrity of onion root cells under catechol influence.

    PubMed

    Petriccione, Milena; Forte, Valentina; Valente, Diego; Ciniglia, Claudia

    2013-07-01

    Catechol is a highly toxic organic pollutant, usually abundant in the waste effluents of industrial processes and agricultural activities. The environmental sources of catechol include pesticides, wood preservatives, tanning lotion, cosmetic creams, dyes, and synthetic intermediates. Genotoxicity of catechol at a concentration range 5 × 10(-1)-5 mM was evaluated by applying random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and time-lapse DNA laddering tests using onion (Allium cepa) root cells as the assay system. RAPD analysis revealed polymorphisms in the nucleotidic sequence of DNA that reflected the genotoxic potential of catechol to provoke point mutations, or deletions, or chromosomal rearrangements. Time-lapse DNA laddering test provided evidence that catechol provoked DNA necrosis and apoptosis. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining could distinguish apoptotic from necrotic cells in root cells of A. cepa.

  6. Neurotoxic thioether adducts of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine identified in human urine after ecstasy ingestion.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, Ximena; O'Mathúna, Brian; Pizarro, Nieves; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Khymenets, Olha; Almeida, Bruno; Pellegrini, Manuela; Pichini, Simona; Lau, Serrine S; Monks, Terrence J; Farré, Magí; Pascual, Jose Antonio; Joglar, Jesús; de la Torre, Rafael

    2009-07-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) is a widely misused synthetic amphetamine derivative and a serotonergic neurotoxicant in animal models and possibly humans. The underlying mechanism of neurotoxicity involves the formation of reactive oxygen species although their source remains unclear. It has been postulated that MDMA-induced neurotoxicity is mediated via the formation of bioreactive metabolites. In particular, the primary catechol metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine (HHMA) and 3,4-dihydroxyamphetamine (HHA), subsequently cause the formation of glutathione and N-acetylcysteine conjugates, which retain the ability to redox cycle and are serotonergic neurotoxicants in rats. Although the presence of such metabolites has been recently demonstrated in rat brain microdialysate, their formation in humans has not been reported. The present study describes the detection of 5-(N-acetylcystein-S-yl)-3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine (N-Ac-5-Cys-HHMA) and 5-(N-acetylcystein-S-yl)-3,4-dihydroxyamphetamine (N-Ac-5-Cys-HHA) in human urine of 15 recreational users of MDMA (1.5 mg/kg) in a controlled setting. The results reveal that in the first 4 h after MDMA ingestion approximately 0.002% of the administered dose was recovered as thioether adducts. Genetic polymorphisms in CYP2D6 and catechol-O-methyltransferase expression, the combination of which are major determinants of steady-state levels of HHMA and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyamphetamine, probably explain the interindividual variability seen in the recovery of N-Ac-5-Cys-HHMA and N-Ac-5-Cys-HHA. In summary, the formation of neurotoxic thioether adducts of MDMA has been demonstrated for the first time in humans. The findings lend weight to the hypothesis that the bioactivation of MDMA to neurotoxic metabolites is a relevant pathway to neurotoxicity in humans.

  7. Estrogens and organochlorine xenoestrogens and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Starek, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is responsible for considerable morbidity and the majority of female deaths in industrialized countries. In the etiology of breast cancer many endogenous and exogenous risk factors have been discussed. It is estimated that about 40% of all cancers in women are hormonally mediated. Both estrogens and androgens play critical roles in the development of breast cancer, which has been confirmed by numerous epidemiologic data on the levels of serum and urine hormons in populations at low and high risk, as well as by case-control and cohort studies. Estrogen carcinogenesis is attributed to receptor-mediated growth and proliferation of breast epithelial cells and to DNA impairment caused by activated estrogen metabolites, e.g., catechol estrogens and free radicals. In the last decade, the organochlorine chemicals, which include pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and other representatives of the dioxin family, have been regarded as xenoestrogens. These chemicals are capable of modulating hormonally regulated processes and inducing changes in growth factors that may be responsible for carcinogenic effect. Many case-control studies have shown the distinct association between breast adipose tissue concentrations of several organochlorine xenoestrogens and breast cancer risk. Also in some studies, the women with breast cancer had higher organochlorine levels in serum as compared with controls.

  8. Cytotoxic effects of catechol to neuroblastoma N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Lima, Rute M F; Alvarez, Lisandro D G; Costa, Maria F D; Costa, Silvia L; Clarêncio, Jorge; El-Bachá, Ramon S

    2008-12-01

    The mechanisms of catechol-induced cytotoxicity were studied in cultures of neuroblastoma N2a cells. The minimal cytotoxic concentration after 72 h was 20 micromol x l(-1). The EC50 after 72 h was 38 micromol x l(-1). There was not a correlation between the cytotoxicity and the formation of quinones in the medium. Catechol-induced cytotoxicity was increased significantly when superoxide dismutase (SOD) was added. The addition of catalase did not protect cells, but this enzyme reverted the deleterious effect of SOD. The experimental studies showed a detrimental effect of deferoxamine on catechol-induced cytotoxicity suggesting that cells need iron to maintain its metabolism. NF-kappaB inhibitors increased the cytotoxicity, suggesting that this factor is also important for cell viability. L-cysteine and N-acetyl-L-cysteine protected cells significantly in a dose-dependent manner. The use of monochlorobimane showed that catechol induced reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion after 24 h, prior to cell death. The mode of cell death was studied by flow cytometry after double staining with annexin V and propidium iodide. Catechol induced apoptosis after 72 h. Furthermore, catechol also induced nuclear fragmentation. These data showed that catechol-induced cytotoxicity to N2a cell was not directly a consequence of reactive oxygen species production. Rather, it was due to GSH depletion followed by the induction of apoptosis.

  9. Fate of catechols in coal gasification condensate waters

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrich, K.E.

    1986-02-01

    Even after the wastewater has been subjected to rigorous cleaning, many chemicals still remain. In order to remove these compounds, they must be identified. Catechol is a compound which appears in the condensate water and, because its concentration changes, its fate is somewhat uncertain. In recent experiments modeling the condensate water conditions, catechol solutions were aerated in the presence of ammonia. Upon acidification of the solutions, a polymer precipitates. This polymer was compared to the black compound isolated from the condensate water by spectral and elemental analyses. The structures of the two polymers were reasonably similar. The kinetics of oxidation, as determined by the uptake of oxygen, indicates that the reaction was first order in catechol and oxygen. The rate was significantly enhanced by an increase in pH. Assuming that catechol is the only subunit of the polymers isolated from the different condensate waters, calculations would indicate that the initial catechol concentration varies from 440 to 1700 ppM. An attempt is being made to account for all of the carbon that appears in the water from the gasification process. Presently, only 60% to 70% of the carbon-containing products have been identified. Part of the remaining total organic carbon can be accounted for by the catechol polymer. Studying the fate of catechol in the coal gasification condensate water will help to develop an environmentally and financially feasible treatment of the wastewater. 4 refs.

  10. Quantification of phase I / II metabolizing enzyme gene expression and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adduct levels in human prostate

    PubMed Central

    John, Kaarthik; Ragavan, Narasimhan; Pratt, M. Margaret; Singh, Paras B.; Al-Buheissi, Salah; Matanhelia, Shyam S.; Phillips, David H.; Poirier, Miriam C.; Martin, Francis L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Studies of migrant populations suggest that dietary and/or environmental factors play a crucial role in the aetiology of prostatic adenocarcinoma (CaP). The human prostate consists of the peripheral zone (PZ), transition zone (TZ) and central zone (CZ); CaP occurs most often in the PZ. METHODS To investigate the notion that an underlying differential expression of phase I/II genes, and/or the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts might explain the elevated PZ susceptibility, we examined prostate tissues (matched tissue sets consisting of PZ and TZ) from men undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy for CaP (n=26) or cystoprostatectomy (n=1). Quantitative gene expression analysis was employed for cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and CYP1A2, as well as N-acetyltransferase 1 and 2 (NAT1 and NAT2) and catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT). RESULTS CYP1B1, NAT1 and COMT were expressed in all tissue sets; levels of CYP1B1 and NAT1 were consistently higher in the PZ compared to TZ. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of CYP1B1 (nuclear-associated and primarily in basal epithelial cells) and NAT1. Tissue sections from 23 of these aforementioned 27 matched tissue sets were analyzed for PAH-DNA adduct levels using antiserum elicited against DNA modified with r7, t8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]pyrene (BPDE). PAH-DNA adduct levels were highest in glandular epithelial cells, but a comparison of PZ and TZ showed no significant differences. CONCLUSION Although expression of activating and/or detoxifying enzymes may be higher in the PZ, PAH-DNA adduct levels appear to be similar in both zones. Therefore, factors other than PAH-DNA adducts may be responsible for promotion of tumour formation in the human prostate. PMID:19143007

  11. Role of CYP1B1 in PAH-DNA adduct formation and breast cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine; Russell, Marion L.; Muller, A.P.; Caleffi, M.; Eschiletti, J.; Graudenz, M.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that increased exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) increases breast cancer risk. PAHs are products of incomplete burning of organic matter and are present in cigarette smoke, ambient air, drinking water, and diet. PAHs require metabolic transformation to bind to DNA, causing DNA adducts, which can lead to mutations and are thought to be an important pre-cancer marker. In breast tissue, PAHs appear to be metabolized to their cancer-causing form primarily by the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1B1. Because the genotoxic impact of PAH depends on their metabolism, we hypothesized that high CYP1B1 enzyme levels result in increased formation of PAH-DNA adducts in breast tissue, leading to increased development of breast cancer. We have investigated molecular mechanisms of the relationship between PAH exposure, CYP1B1 expression and breast cancer risk in a clinic-based case-control study. We collected histologically normal breast tissue from 56 women (43 cases and 13 controls) undergoing breast surgery and analyzed these specimens for CYP1B1 genotype, PAH-DNA adducts and CYP1B1 gene expression. We did not detect any difference in aromatic DNA adduct levels of cases and controls, only between smokers and non-smokers. CYP1B1 transcript levels were slightly lower in controls than cases, but the difference was not statistically significant. We found no correlation between the levels of CYP1B1 expression and DNA adducts. If CYP1B1 has any role in breast cancer etiology it might be through its metabolism of estrogen rather than its metabolism of PAHs. However, due to the lack of statistical power these results should be interpreted with caution.

  12. Protein reactivity of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, a toxic dopamine metabolite, is dependent on both the aldehyde and the catechol.

    PubMed

    Rees, Jennifer N; Florang, Virginia R; Eckert, Laurie L; Doorn, Jonathan A

    2009-07-01

    Dopamine (DA) has been implicated as an endogenous neurotoxin to explain selective neurodegeneration, as observed for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, previous work demonstrated that 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) was more toxic than DA. DOPAL is generated as a part of DA catabolism via the activity of monoamine oxidase, and the mechanism of DOPAL toxicity is proposed to involve protein modification. Previous studies have demonstrated protein reactivity via the aldehyde moiety; however, DOPAL contains two reactive functional groups (catechol and aldehyde), both with the potential for protein adduction. The goal of this work was to determine whether protein modification by DOPAL occurs via a thiol-reactive quinone generated from oxidation of the catechol, which is known to occur for DA, or if the aldehyde forms adducts with amine nucleophiles. To accomplish this objective, the reactivity of DOPAL toward N-acetyl-lysine (NAL), N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), and two model proteins was determined. In addition, several DOPAL analogues were obtained and used for comparison of reactivity. Results demonstrate that at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C, the order of DOPAL reactivity is NAL > NAC and the product of NAL and DOPAL is stable in the absence of reducing agent. Moreover, DOPAL will react with model proteins, but in the presence of amine-selective modifiers citraconic anhydride and 2-iminothiolane hydrochloride, the reactivity of DOPAL toward the proteins is diminished. In addition, DOPAL-mediated protein cross-linking is observed when a model protein or a protein mixture (i.e., mitochondria lysate) is treated with DOPAL at concentrations of 5-100 microM. Protein cross-linking was diminished in the presence of ascorbate, suggesting the involvement of a quinone in DOPAL-mediated protein modification. These data indicate that DOPAL is highly reactive toward protein nucleophiles with the potential for protein cross-linking.

  13. Amide-type adduct of dopamine - plausible cause of Parkinson diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuebo; Yamada, Naruomi; Osawa, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is the endogenous neurotransmitter produced by nigral neurons. Dopamine loss can trigger not only prominent secondary morphological changes, but also changes in the density and sensitivity of dopamine receptors; therefore, it is a sign of PD development. The reasons for dopamine loss are attributed to dopamine's molecular instability due to it is a member of catecholamine family, whose catechol structure contributes to high oxidative stress through enzymatic and non-enzymatic oxidation. Oxidative stress in the brain easily leads to the lipid peroxidation reaction due to a high concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6/ω-3) and arachidonic acid (AA, C18:4/ω-6). Recent studies have shown that lipid hydroperoxides, the primary peroxidative products, could non-specifically react with primary amino groups to form N-acyl-type (amide-linkage) adducts. Therefore, based on the NH2-teminals in dopamine's structure, the aims of this chapter are to describes the possibility that reactive LOOH species derived from DHA/AA lipid peroxidation may modify dopamine to form amide-linkage dopamine adducts, which might be related to etiology of Parkinson's diseases.

  14. The Use of Screen-Printed Electrodes in a Proof of Concept Electrochemical Estimation of Homocysteine and Glutathione in the Presence of Cysteine Using Catechol

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Patricia T.; Lowinsohn, Denise; Compton, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Screen printed electrodes were employed in a proof of concept determination of homocysteine and glutathione using electrochemically oxidized catechol via a 1,4-Michael addition reaction in the absence and presence of cysteine, and each other. Using cyclic voltammetry, the Michael reaction introduces a new adduct peak which is analytically useful in detecting thiols. The proposed procedure relies on the different rates of reaction of glutathione and homocysteine with oxidized catechol so that at fast voltage scan rates only homocysteine is detected in cyclic voltammetry. At slower scan rates, both glutathione and homocysteine are detected. The combination of the two sets of data provides quantification for homocysteine and glutathione. The presence of cysteine is shown not to interfere provided sufficient high concentrations of catechol are used. Calibration curves were determined for each homocysteine and glutathione detection; where the sensitivities are 0.019 μA·μM−1 and 0.0019 μA·μM−1 and limit of detections are ca. 1.2 μM and 0.11 μM for homocysteine and glutathione, respectively, within the linear range. This work presents results with potential and beneficial use in re-useable and/or disposable point-of-use sensors for biological and medical applications. PMID:24926695

  15. Kinetic and inhibition studies on catechol-O-methyltransferase affinity labelling by N-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)maleimide.

    PubMed Central

    Piedrafita, F J; Fernandez-Alvarez, E; Nieto, O; Tipton, K F

    1992-01-01

    Initial velocity and product inhibition studies have been performed on soluble catechol-O-methyltransferase which has been partially purified from pig liver. The results are consistent with an ordered reaction mechanism, in which S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) is the leading substrate. The enzyme is irreversibly inhibited by maleimide derivatives in a biphasic manner, which suggests a differential reaction with two thiol groups. N-(3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl)maleimide, which has a reactive moiety (maleimide ring) and an affinity moiety (catechol ring), acts as an affinity labelling compound on the more reactive SH group; AdoMet and Mg2+ protect against this modification. Total protection of this SH group results in a pseudo-first-order inhibition of the enzyme, with the apparent rate constant being proportional to the inhibitor concentration. All the other maleimide derivatives studied inhibited the enzyme by reacting with one of the two SH groups in a non-specific manner. The reaction of the other, more reactive, SH group was either specific (active-site-directed) or non-specific, depending on the substituent present in the affinity moiety and also on the length of an intermediate chain of methylene groups present between this moiety and the reactive maleimide ring. In the presence of both AdoMet and Mg2+, 3,5-dinitrocatechol, a reversible inhibitor of the enzyme which is competitive with respect to the catechol substrate, protects the enzyme from inactivation by any of the maleimide derivatives. The adducts of these maleimide derivatives formed with dithiothreitol inhibit the enzyme reversibly, showing inhibition patterns that are consistent with the mechanism deduced from the initial velocity and product inhibition studies. PMID:1417755

  16. A stable epoxide of estrone: Evidence for formation of a 'new' estrogen metabolite.

    PubMed

    Raeside, James I; Christie, Heather L

    2017-03-01

    Oxidative metabolism of estrogens is an important feature in liver and some non-hepatic tissues. In initial studies on estrogen metabolism in tissues from the reproductive tract of the stallion, where testicular estrogen secretion is remarkably high, a prominent radiolabeled product from [(3)H]-estrone (E1) was noted on chromatography; it had a retention time (Rt) between 17β-estradiol (E2) and E1. Unexpectedly, when non-radiolabeled E1 was the substrate no UV absorption at 280nm was seen at the Rt for the [(3)H]-labeled product-suggesting a non-aromatic ring A. The following efforts were made to reveal more about the nature of the "unknown" compound. Reduction and acetylation showed, separately, the presence of a single keto and hydroxyl group. Exposure to acid gave a single radiolabeled peak with Rt of 6α-hydroxy-E1-suggesting the presence of a third molecule of oxygen. Mass spectrometry with limited material was inconclusive but supportive for a formula of C18H22O3. Thus, an epoxide involving the aromatic ring of E1 is suggested as a labile intermediate in the formation of the "unknown" metabolite. Estrogen epoxides as labile, reactive intermediates have been considered as potential precursors of the 2- and 4-hydroxy catechol estrogens with implications in breast cancer [Soloway, 2007]. Because of the association of the "unknown" metabolite with 6α-hydroxy-E1, the structural form proposed for the stable epoxide is that for 5α,6α-epoxy-estrone. This represents an alternative to the production of the 2- and 4-hydroxy-catechol estrogens. The broad range in normal tissues where the "unknown" compound was shown to be a persistent metabolite (e.g. mouse mammary glands, ovary, uterus, brain, muscle, equine conceptus, stallion and domestic boar reproductive tracts) suggests more general biological implications.

  17. Detection of DNA adducts by bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shunqing; Tan, Xianglin; Yao, Qunfeng; He, Min; Zhou, Yikai; Chen, Jian

    2001-09-01

    Luminescent assay for detection ATP is very sensitive with limitation of 10-17 moles. ATP using styrene oxide as a model carcinogen we currently apply a luminescence technique to detect the very low levels of carcinogen-DNA adducts in vitro and in vivo. The bioluminescent assay of DNA adducts entails three consecutive steps: digestion of modified DNA to adducted dinucleoside monophosphate and normal nucleotide are hydrolyzed to nucleosides (N) by nuclease P1 and prostatic acid phosphomonesterase (PAP); incorporation of (gamma) -P of ATP into normal nucleoside(N); detection of consumption of ATP by luminescence. This assay does not require separate manipulation because of the selective property of nuclease P1. One fmol of carcinogen- DNA adducts was detected by luminescent assay. A good correlation between results of luminescent assay and 32P-postlabeling procedures has been observed. We detect 1 adduct in 108 nucleotides for 10(mu) g DNA sample. The procedures of luminescent method is very simple and low- cost. IT appears applicable to the ultra sensitive detection of low levels of DNA adducts without radioactive isotope.

  18. Bioinspired catecholic copolymers for antifouling surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Cho, Joon Hee; Shanmuganathan, Kadhiravan; Ellison, Christopher J

    2013-05-01

    We report here a synthetic approach to prepare poly(methyl methacrylate)-polydopamine diblock (PMMA-PDA) and triblock (PDA-PMMA-PDA) copolymers combining mussel-inspired catecholic oxidative chemistry and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). These copolymers display very good solubility in a range of organic solvents and also a broad band photo absorbance that increases with increasing PDA content in the copolymer. Spin-cast thin films of the copolymer were stable in water and showed a sharp reduction (by up to 50%) in protein adsorption compared to those of neat PMMA. Also the peak decomposition temperature of the copolymers was up to 43°C higher than neat PMMA. The enhanced solvent processability, thermal stability and low protein adsorption characteristics of this copolymer makes it attractive for variety of applications including antifouling coatings on large surfaces such as ship hulls, buoys, and wave energy converters.

  19. Reactive oxygen species production by catechol stabilized copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2013-12-07

    Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants.

  20. Decoration of electrospun nanofibers with monomeric catechols to facilitate cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Suk; Messersmith, Phillip B; Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2014-02-01

    Monomeric catechols are displayed on the surface of polymeric nanofibers by robust catechol-thiol interactions to enhance cell adhesion and migration. Dihydroxyphenyl propionic acid is chemically conjugated to primary amine groups of poly(ϵ-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-amine (PCL-PEG) nanofibers to display catechol moieties on the surface. At basic pH, catecholized nanofibers incorporate thiol groups at a five-fold higher rate than at acidic pH, while catechol-coated surfaces do not show any pH-dependent binding. Live/dead cell staining indicates that the catecholized nanofibers do not exert any cytotoxic effects. Also, NIH 3T3 cells cultured on the catecholized nanofibers show increased attachment and migration that is proportional to the amount of the immobilized catechol moieties on the surface. These results clearly indicate that 6 nmol of monomeric catechols on the surface of nanofiber can promote cell adhesion and migration by thiol-catehol interactions.

  1. Chemisorption of catechol on gibbsite, boehmite, and noncrystalline alumina surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, M.B.; Wesselink, L.G.

    1988-06-01

    The mechanism of bonding of catechol and related phenolic compounds on aluminum oxides was elucidated from sorption behavior in the presence of competing adsorbates and the nature of the infrared spectra of the surface-bound molecules. The surfaces demonstrated a high degree of selectivity toward catechol, adsorbing the molecule in the presence of a large excess of chloride. Phosphate competed effectively with catechol for sorption sites while acetate did not. Dispersive and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy verified that catechol bound on the aluminum oxide surfaces was chemically perturbed in much the same manner as catechol chelated by Al/sup 3 +/, suggesting that the dominant sorption process involved the formation of a 1:1 bidentate complex with surface Al. The mechanisms of bonding was similar for all the aluminum oxides, but the dominant crystal surfaces of the crystalline oxides were unreactive toward catechol, and adsorption was attributed to -AlOH groups situated on edge faces. As a result, the noncrystalline oxide was more reactive per unit of surface area than the crystalline minerals boehmite and gibbsite.

  2. The Measurement of Estrogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, Geoff; Makin, Hugh L. J.; Bradlow, H. Leon

    Biologists use the word ‘estrogen' when referring to molecules which have the ability to induce uterine growth or vaginal cornification in the immature or ovariectomized rodent. The word estrogen was derived from two Greek words - oistros meaning frenzy and gennein - to beget. Chemists and biochemists, however, often restrict their use of this term to molecules that contain a characteristic 18-carbon steroid nucleus with an aromatic (phenolic) A-ring, both those that are biologically active estrogens and those without biologic activity but which are of intrinsic interest, such as the estrogen conjugates. This chapter is concerned only with these steroid compounds. The structure and inter-relationship of some common estrogens are given in Fig. 8.1. In addition to the biological estrogens, there are a wide variety of both natural and synthetic compounds which have estrogenic activity when measured by one or another parameter. While many of the assay procedures described in this review are applicable to these compounds, their application to non C18-steroids will not be discussed here. Methodology for these non-steroidal compounds can be found in reviews by Wang et al. (2002), Wu et al. (2004), Muir (2006), and Delmonte and Rader (2006). While not wishing to downgrade the importance of previous work in the estrogen field, the authors have taken a deliberate decision to exclude most publications prior to 1975, not because these do not have value but simply because space is not unlimited and readers of the present chapter might be expected to be seeking information about methodology which is less than 30 years old. Readers seeking pre-1975 information in this area can find it in Oakey and Holder (1995).

  3. Crystal structures of human 108V and 108M catechol O-methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, K.; Le Trong, I.; Stenkamp, R.E.; Parson, W.W.

    2008-08-01

    Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) plays important roles in the metabolism of catecholamine neurotransmitters and catechol estrogens. The development of COMT inhibitors for use in the treatment of Parkinson's disease has been aided by crystallographic structures of the rat enzyme. However, the human and rat proteins have significantly different substrate specificities. Additionally, human COMT contains a common valine-methionine polymorphism at position 108. The methionine protein is less stable than the valine polymorph, resulting in decreased enzyme activity and protein levels in vivo. Here we describe the crystal structures of the 108V and 108M variants of the soluble form of human COMT bound with S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and a substrate analog, 3,5-dinitrocatechol. The polymorphic residue 108 is located in the {alpha}5-{beta}3 loop, buried in a hydrophobic pocket {approx}16 {angstrom} from the SAM-binding site. The 108V and 108M structures are very similar overall [RMSD of C{sup {alpha}} atoms between two structures (C{sup {alpha}} RMSD) = 0.2 {angstrom}], and the active-site residues are superposable, in accord with the observation that SAM stabilizes 108M COMT. However, the methionine side chain is packed more tightly within the polymorphic site and, consequently, interacts more closely with residues A22 ({alpha}2) and R78 ({alpha}4) than does valine. These interactions of the larger methionine result in a 0.7-{angstrom} displacement in the backbone structure near residue 108, which propagates along {alpha}1 and {alpha}5 toward the SAM-binding site. Although the overall secondary structures of the human and rat proteins are very similar (C{sup {alpha}} RMSD = 0.4 {angstrom}), several nonconserved residues are present in the SAM-(I89M, I91M, C95Y) and catechol- (C173V, R201M, E202K) binding sites. The human protein also contains three additional solvent-exposed cysteine residues (C95, C173, C188) that may contribute to intermolecular disulfide bond

  4. Lack of association between the functional polymorphisms in the estrogen-metabolizing genes and risk for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Gangqiao; Zhai, Yun; Xie, Weimin; Cui, Ying; Cao, Jia; Zhi, Lianteng; Zhang, Hongxing; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Xiaoai; Qiu, Wei; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Xiumei; Yu, Ling; Xia, Xia; He, Fuchu

    2008-12-01

    Estrogens have been proposed to act as tumor promoters and induce hepatocarcinogenesis. Recently, we observed a significant association between the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma and the polymorphisms of the estrogen receptor (ESR) alpha (ESR1) gene, supporting the hypothesis of involvement for the estrogen-ESR axis in the estrogen-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. In this study, based on another hypothesis in which estrogen metabolites can directly cause DNA damage and affect tumor initiation, we examined whether the polymorphisms of the estrogen-metabolizing enzymes (EME), which are involved in biogenesis (CYP17, CYP19), bioavailability (CYP1A1, CYP1B1), and degradation (catechol-O-methyltransferase) of the estrogens, have any bearing on the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma. Seven functional polymorphisms in five EMEs (CYP17 MspAI site, CYP19 Trp39Arg, Ile462Val and MspI site in CYP1A1, CYP1B1 Val432Leu, and Ala72Ser and Val158Met in catechol-O-methyltransferase) were genotyped in 434 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and 480 controls by PCR-RFLP analysis. The associations between the polymorphisms and hepatocellular carcinoma risk were evaluated while controlling for confounding factors. No significant association with the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma was observed with the seven polymorphisms in hepatitis B virus carriers and non-hepatitis B virus carriers after correction for multiple comparisons. After stratification by common confounding factors of hepatocellular carcinoma, the EME polymorphism remained no significant association with the hepatocellular carcinoma risk. Furthermore, no signs of gene-gene interactions were observed for each combination of the seven polymorphisms. Our findings suggest that the polymorphisms of EMEs may not contribute significantly to the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  5. SERMs attenuate estrogen-induced malignant transformation of human mammary epithelial cells by upregulating detoxification of oxidative metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Madhubhani, L.P.; Hemachandra, P.; Patel, Hitisha; Esala, R.; Chandrasena, P.; Choi, Jaewoo; Piyankarage, Sujeewa C.; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yijin; Thayer, Emily; Scism, Rob; Michalsen, Bradley T.; Xiong, Rui; Siklos, Marton; Bolton, Judy L.; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2014-01-01

    The risk of developing hormone-dependent cancers with long-term exposure to estrogens is attributed both to proliferative, hormonal actions at the estrogen receptor (ER), and chemical carcinogenesis elicited by genotoxic, oxidative estrogen metabolites. Non-tumorigenic MCF-10A human breast epithelial cells are classified as ER(−) and undergo estrogen-induced malignant transformation. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), in use for breast cancer chemoprevention and for post-menopausal osteoporosis, were observed to inhibit malignant transformation, as measured by anchorage-independent colony growth. This chemopreventive activity was observed to correlate with reduced levels of oxidative estrogen metabolites, cellular ROS, and DNA oxidation. The ability of raloxifene, desmethylarzoxifene (DMA), and bazedoxifene to inhibit this chemical carcinogenesis pathway was not shared by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Regulation of Phase 2 rather than Phase 1 metabolic enzymes was implicated mechanistically: raloxifene and DMA were observed to upregulate sulfotransferase (SULT 1E1) and glucuronidase (UGT 1A1). The results support upregulation of Phase 2 metabolism in detoxification of catechol estrogen metabolites leading to attenuated ROS formation as a mechanism for inhibition of malignant transformation by a subset of clinically important SERMs. PMID:24598415

  6. Repair of furocoumarin adducts in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zolan, M.E.; Smith, C.A.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1984-12-01

    DNA repair was studied in cultured mammalian cells treated with the furocoumarins 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), aminomethyl trioxsalen, or angelicin and irradiated with near UV light. The amount of DNA cross-linked by 8-MOP in normal human cells decreased by about one-half in 24 hours after treatment; no decrease was observed in xeroderma pigmentosum cells, group A. At present, it is not known to what extent this decrease represents complete repair events at the sites of cross-links. Furocoumarin adducts elicited excision repair in normal human and monkey cells but not in xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells. This excision repair resembled in several aspects that elicited by pyrimidine dimers, formed in DNA by irradiation with 254-nm UV light; however, it appeared that for at least 8-MOP and aminomethyl trioxsalen, removal of adducts was not as efficient as was the removal of pyrimidine dimers. A comparison was also made of repair in the 172-base-pair repetitive alpha-DNA component of monkey cells to repair in the bulk of the genome. Although repair elicited by pyrimidine dimers in alpha-DNA was the same as in the bulk DNA, that following treatment of cells with either aminomethyl trioxsalen or angelicin and near UV was markedly deficient in alpha-DNA. This deficiency reflected the removal of fewer adducts from alpha-DNA after the same initial adduct frequencies. These results could mean that each furocoumarin may produce several structurally distinct adducts to DNA in cells and that the capacity of cellular repair systems to remove these various adducts may vary greatly.

  7. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps = 0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps = 0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps = 0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on

  8. Bioactive Flavonoids and Catechols as Hif1 and Nrf2 Protein Stabilizers - Implications for Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Natalya A.; Kaidery, Navneet Ammal; Hushpulian, Dmitry M.; Rakhman, Ilay I.; Poloznikov, Andrey A.; Tishkov, Vladimir I.; Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Gaisina, Irina N.; Pekcec, Anton; Leyen, Klaus Van; Kazakov, Sergey V.; Yang, Lichuan; Thomas, Bobby; Ratan, Rajiv R.; Gazaryan, Irina G.

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are known to trigger the intrinsic genetic adaptive programs to hypoxic or oxidative stress via estrogen receptor engagement or upstream kinase activation. To reveal specific structural requirements for direct stabilization of the transcription factors responsible for triggering the antihypoxic and antioxidant programs, we studied flavones, isoflavones and catechols including dihydroxybenzoate, didox, levodopa, and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), using novel luciferase-based reporters specific for the first step in HIF1 or Nrf2 protein stabilization. Distinct structural requirements for either transcription factor stabilization have been found: as expected, these requirements for activation of HIF ODD-luc reporter correlate with in silico binding to HIF prolyl hydroxylase. By contrast, stabilization of Nrf2 requires the presence of 3,4-dihydroxy- (catechol) groups. Thus, only some but not all flavonoids are direct activators of the hypoxic and antioxidant genetic programs. NDGA from the Creosote bush resembles the best flavonoids in their ability to directly stabilize HIF1 and Nrf2 and is superior with respect to LOX inhibition thus favoring this compound over others. Given much higher bioavailability and stability of NDGA than any flavonoid, NDGA has been tested in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-animal model of Parkinson’s Disease and demonstrated neuroprotective effects. PMID:28053825

  9. Equine cytochrome P450 aromatase exhibits an estrogen 2-hydroxylase activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Almadhidi, J; Moslemi, S; Drosdowsky, M A; Séralini, G E

    1996-09-01

    Aromatase (estrogen synthetase) is a steroidogenic enzyme complex which catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens (termed aromatization). This enzyme was purified from adult equine testis to homogeneity by five chromatographic steps. The ability of purified and reconstituted equine aromatase to exhibit an estrogen 2-hydroxylase activity was tested and compared to testosterone aromatization. Enzymatic activities were assessed by tritiated water release from labelled estradiol and testosterone. Kinetic analysis of estradiol 2-hydroxylation showed an apparent K(m) of 23 microM and a V(max) of 18 nmol/min/mg, whereas the values for testosterone aromatization were a K(m) of 15.7 nM and a V(max) of 34.6 pmol/min/mg. A specific antiserum raised against purified testicular equine P450arom and known to inhibit aromatase activity [1] was also found to inhibit the estrogen hydroxylase activity of equine placental microsomes in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 15 microl serum: 0.5 ml incubate. The estrogen hydroxylase activity was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by two classes of aromatase inhibitors, i.e. steroidal-- (4-hydroxyandrostenedione and 7alpha-([4-aminophenyl]thio)-androst-4-ene-3, 17-dione)--and non-steroidal--(fadrozole and miconazole). The IC50 values were approximately 300 and 890 nM for 4-hydroxyandrostenedione and 7alpha-([4-aminophenyl]thio)-androst-4-ene-3, 17-dione, and 92 and 285 nM, for fadrozole and miconazole, respectively. Furthermore, 4-hydroxyandrostenedione caused a time-dependent inactivation of estrogen hydroxylase activity. We conclude that equine aromatase is able to use estradiol as a substrate, and converts it to catechol estradiol in vitro, possibly using the active site of aromatization. This is the first demonstration that equine aromatase functions as an estrogen 2-hydroxylase, in addition to transforming androgens into estrogen.

  10. NMR spectra and electrochemical behavior of catechol-bearing block copolymer micelles

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Urara; Moriyama, Masaki; Uyama, Hiroshi; van der Vlies, André J.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we provide the NMR spectra and AFM data for antioxidant micelles prepared from amphiphilic PAM-PDA block copolymers composed of a poly(N-acryloyl morpholine) and a redox-active catechol-bearing block with different catechol content. We also provide details of the electrochemical analysis that showed micelles higher catechol content had a similar redox potential with the small catechol compound dopamine, but slowed down the redox reaction (Hasegawa et al., Polymer (in press)). PMID:26217751

  11. Colorimetric determination of catechol siderophores in microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    Rioux, C; Jordan, D C; Rattray, J B

    1983-08-01

    A highly sensitive spectrophotometric method for the selective detection of catechol compounds such as catechol siderophores (e.g., enterobactin) is described. The basis of the method involves the ability of the vicinal aromatic hydroxyl groups under acidic conditions to bring about a reduction of Fe3+ (from ferric ammonium citrate) to Fe2+. Detection of Fe2+ in the presence of Fe3+ is made with 1,10-phenanthroline under previously established conditions. The assay mixture is heated at 60 degrees C for 1 h to accelerate the development of color which is subsequently measured at 510 nm. The Beer-Lambert law is obeyed over the range of 0.16 to 60 microM 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Compared to the Arnow nitration method, the assay is more responsive, is approximately seven times more sensitive, and is effective with catechols substituted at positions 3 and 4. The method gives positive results with catechols such as DL-DOPA, L-dopamine, (+/-)-epinephrine, and DL-norepinephrine. Very rapid color development is obtained with ascorbic acid and p-diols, while m-diols are poorly detected. Low degrees of reactivity are shown by hydroxylamino and hydroxamate compounds. Phenolic, sulfydryl, indolyl, and quinonyl derivatives do not interfere with the reaction. The method has been adapted to determine catechol compounds in the culture medium of bacterial cells grown at different iron concentrations.

  12. Dietary Catechols and their Relationship to Microbial Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Neil; Walton, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the evidence that the ability of neuroendocrine hormones, notably norepinephrine and epinephrine, to stimulate bacterial growth in iron-restricted media is not limited to molecules with a catecholamine structure but is also possessed by a variety of other catechols, many of which are of plant origin and are common in the diet. Catechols derived from the diet, such as the tea flavanols, can be present in the plasma at submicromolar and micromolar concentrations, comparable with the concentrations of catecholamines that have been shown to be effective in promoting bacterial growth under conditions of iron restriction, although many dietary catechols, notably quercetin derivatives, are present in the plasma and tissues largely as conjugates, from which the catechol function has been lost. Finally, although bacterial growth promotion through relief of iron restriction appears to be exhibited by a wide range of catechols, the gene-activation effects of catecholamines demonstrated to occur in some bacteria may be much more specific, although the definitive experiments to establish structure-function relationships have yet to be reported.

  13. Catechol conjugates are in vivo metabolites of Salicis cortex.

    PubMed

    Knuth, Susanne; Abdelsalam, Rania M; Khayyal, Mohamed T; Schweda, Frank; Heilmann, Jörg; Kees, Martin Georg; Mair, Georg; Kees, Frieder; Jürgenliemk, Guido

    2013-11-01

    After oral administration of 100 mg/kg b. w. (235.8 µmol/kg) salicortin to Wistar rats, peak serum concentrations of 1.43 mg/L (13.0 µM) catechol were detected after 0.5 h in addition to salicylic acid by HPLC-DAD after serum processing with β-glucuronidase and sulphatase. Both metabolites could also be detected in the serum of healthy volunteers following oral administration of a willow bark extract (Salicis cortex, Salix spec., Salicaceae) corresponding to 240 mg of salicin after processing with both enzymes. In humans, the cmax (1.46 mg/L, 13.3 µM) of catechol was reached after 1.2 h. The predominant phase-II metabolite in humans and rats was catechol sulphate, determined by HPLC analysis of serum samples processed with only one kind of enzyme. Without serum processing with glucuronidase and sulphatase, no unconjugated catechol could be detected in human and animal serum samples. As catechol is described as an anti-inflammatory compound, these results may contribute to the elucidation of the mechanism of the action of willow bark extract.

  14. Estrogen and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, A A; Lee, A R

    2012-07-01

    Estrogen is a potent steroid with pleiotropic effects, which have yet to be fully elucidated. Estrogen has both nuclear and non-nuclear effects. The rapid response to estrogen, which involves a membrane associated estrogen receptor(ER) and is protective, involves signaling through PI3K, Akt, and ERK 1/2. The nuclear response is much slower, as the ER-estrogen complex moves to the nucleus, where it functions as a transcription factor, both activating and repressing gene expression. Several different ERs regulate the specificity of response to estrogen, and appear to have specific effects in cardiac remodeling and the response to injury. However, much remains to be understood about the selectivity of these receptors and their specific effects on gene expression. Basic studies have demonstrated that estrogen treatment prevents apoptosis and necrosis of cardiac and endothelial cells. Estrogen also attenuates pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. Estrogen may have great benefit in aging as an anti-inflammatory agent. However, clinical investigations of estrogen have had mixed results, and not shown the clear-cut benefit of more basic investigations. This can be explained in part by differences in study design: in basic studies estrogen treatment was used immediately or shortly after ovariectomy, while in some key clinical trials, estrogen was given years after menopause. Further basic research into the underlying molecular mechanisms of estrogen's actions is essential to provide a better comprehension of the many properties of this powerful hormone.

  15. Estrogen and Cytochrome P450 1B1 Contribute to Both Early- and Late-Stage Head and Neck Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shatalova, Ekaterina G.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.P.; Devarajan, Karthik; Cukierman, Edna; Clapper, Margie L.

    2010-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) is the sixth most common type of cancer in the U.S. The goal of this study was to evaluate the contribution of estrogens to the development of HNSCCs. Various cell lines derived from early- and late-stage head and neck lesions were used to: characterize the expression of estrogen synthesis and metabolism genes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP)1B1, examine the effect of estrogen on gene expression and evaluate the role of CYP1B1 and/or estrogen in cell motility, proliferation and apoptosis. Estrogen metabolism genes (CYP1B1, CYP1A1, catechol-o-methyltransferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1, and glutathione-S-transferase P1) and estrogen receptor (ER)β were expressed in cell lines derived from both premalignant (MSK-Leuk1) and malignant (HNSCC) lesions. Exposure to estrogen induced CYP1B1 2.3 to 3.6 fold relative to vehicle-treated controls (P=0.0004) in MSK-Leuk1 cells but not in HNSCC cells. CYP1B1 knockdown by shRNA reduced the migration and proliferation of MSK-Leuk1 cells by 57% and 45%, respectively. Exposure of MSK-Leuk1 cells to estrogen inhibited apoptosis by 26%, while supplementation with the antiestrogen fulvestrant restored estrogen-dependent apoptosis. Representation of the estrogen pathway in human head and neck tissues from 128 patients was examined using tissue microarrays. The majority of the samples exhibited immunohistochemical staining for ERβ (91.9%), CYP1B1 (99.4%) and 17β-estradiol (88.4%). CYP1B1 and ERβ were elevated in HNSCCs relative to normal epithelium (P=0.024 and 0.008, respectively). These data provide novel insight into the mechanisms underlying head and neck carcinogenesis and facilitate the identification new targets for chemopreventive intervention. PMID:21205741

  16. Removal of Estrogens and Estrogenicity through Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over their possible presence in finished drining waters. In this work, two in vitro human cell line bioassays for estrogenicity were used to evaluate the removal of estrogens through conven...

  17. Neurotoxic Thioether Adducts of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine Identified in Human Urine After Ecstasy IngestionS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Perfetti, Ximena; O'Mathúna, Brian; Pizarro, Nieves; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Khymenets, Olha; Almeida, Bruno; Pellegrini, Manuela; Pichini, Simona; Lau, Serrine S.; Monks, Terrence J.; Farré, Magí; Pascual, Jose Antonio; Joglar, Jesús; de la Torre, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) is a widely misused synthetic amphetamine derivative and a serotonergic neurotoxicant in animal models and possibly humans. The underlying mechanism of neurotoxicity involves the formation of reactive oxygen species although their source remains unclear. It has been postulated that MDMA-induced neurotoxicity is mediated via the formation of bioreactive metabolites. In particular, the primary catechol metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine (HHMA) and 3,4-dihydroxyamphetamine (HHA), subsequently cause the formation of glutathione and N-acetylcysteine conjugates, which retain the ability to redox cycle and are serotonergic neurotoxicants in rats. Although the presence of such metabolites has been recently demonstrated in rat brain microdialysate, their formation in humans has not been reported. The present study describes the detection of 5-(N-acetylcystein-S-yl)-3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine (N-Ac-5-Cys-HHMA) and 5-(N-acetylcystein-S-yl)-3,4-dihydroxyamphetamine (N-Ac-5-Cys-HHA) in human urine of 15 recreational users of MDMA (1.5 mg/kg) in a controlled setting. The results reveal that in the first 4 h after MDMA ingestion ∼0.002% of the administered dose was recovered as thioether adducts. Genetic polymorphisms in CYP2D6 and catechol-O-methyltransferase expression, the combination of which are major determinants of steady-state levels of HHMA and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyamphetamine, probably explain the interindividual variability seen in the recovery of N-Ac-5-Cys-HHMA and N-Ac-5-Cys-HHA. In summary, the formation of neurotoxic thioether adducts of MDMA has been demonstrated for the first time in humans. The findings lend weight to the hypothesis that the bioactivation of MDMA to neurotoxic metabolites is a relevant pathway to neurotoxicity in humans. PMID:19349378

  18. Inactivation of urease by catechol: Kinetics and structure.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Luca; Cianci, Michele; Musiani, Francesco; Lente, Gábor; Palombo, Marta; Ciurli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Urease is a Ni(II)-containing enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to yield ammonia and carbamate at a rate 10(15) times higher than the uncatalyzed reaction. Urease is a virulence factor of several human pathogens, in addition to decreasing the efficiency of soil organic nitrogen fertilization. Therefore, efficient urease inhibitors are actively sought. In this study, we describe a molecular characterization of the interaction between urease from Sporosarcina pasteurii (SPU) and Canavalia ensiformis (jack bean, JBU) with catechol, a model polyphenol. In particular, catechol irreversibly inactivates both SPU and JBU with a complex radical-based autocatalytic multistep mechanism. The crystal structure of the SPU-catechol complex, determined at 1.50Å resolution, reveals the structural details of the enzyme inhibition.

  19. Removal of arsenic compounds from spent catecholated polymer

    DOEpatents

    Fish, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: a. treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10 and, b. separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (a) and (b) are repeated using a bicarbonate.

  20. NITRO MUSK ADDUCTS OF RAINBOW TROUT ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Rainbow trout and other fish species can serve as 'sentinel' species for the assessment of ecological status and the presence of certain environmental contaminants. As such they act as bioindicators of exposure. Here we present seminal data regarding dose-response and toxicokinetics of trout hemoglobin adduct formation from exposure to nitro musks that are frequently used as fragrance ingredients in formulations of personal care products. Hemoglobin adducts serve as biomarkers of exposure of the sentinel species as we have shown in previous studies of hemoglobin adducts formed in trout and environmental carp exposed to musk xylene (MX) and musk ketone (MK). Gas chromatography-electron capture negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-NICI-MS) employing selected ion monitoring is used to measure 4-amino-MX (4-AMX), 2-amino-MX (2-AMX), and 2-amino-MK (2-AMK) released by alkaline hydrolysis from the sulfinamide adducts of hemoglobin. Dose-response and toxicokinetics were investigated using this sensitive method for analysis of these metabolites. In the dose-response investigation, the concentrations of 4-AMX and 2-2AMX are observed to pass through a maximum at 0.10 mg/g. In the case of 2-AMK, the adduct concentration is almost the same at dosages in the range of 0.030 to 0.10 mg/g. For toxicokinetics, the concentration of the metabolites in the Hb reaches a maximum in the 3-day sample after administration of MX or MK. Further elimination of the metabo

  1. Reactive oxygen species production by catechol stabilized copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2013-11-01

    Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants.Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the synthesis of dopamine linkers and Cu NPs, peroxidase activity tests, H2O2 calibration and degradation tests for resorufin, RB and MB. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03563h

  2. Estrogen supplements in menopause.

    PubMed

    Booher, D L

    1990-01-01

    The number of women aged 65 and older is expected to double by the year 2000, increasing the need for effective management of symptoms related to menopause. Contemporary management of menopause addresses the continuum of events associated with the effects of estrogen deprivation on quality and duration of life, including neuroendocrine changes, urogenital atrophy, sexual dysfunction, skin and hair changes, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease. The risks and benefits of management strategies, including hormone replacement therapy, must be weighted carefully by both physician and patient. The use of estrogens and progestins, alterative compounds, dosages, routes of administration, and their advantages and disadvantages must be analyzed.

  3. Conjugation of catechols by recombinant human sulfotransferases, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, and soluble catechol O-methyltransferase: structure-conjugation relationships and predictive models.

    PubMed

    Taskinen, Jyrki; Ethell, Brian T; Pihlavisto, Pia; Hood, Alan M; Burchell, Brian; Coughtrie, Michael W H

    2003-09-01

    Conjugation of a structurally diverse set of 53 catechol compounds was studied in vitro using six recombinant human sulfotransferases (SULTs), five UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) and the soluble form of catechol O-methyltransferase (S-COMT) as catalyst. The catechol set comprised endogenous compounds, such as catecholamines and catecholestrogens, drugs, natural plant constituents, and other catechols with diverse substituent properties and substitution patterns. Most of the catechols studied were substrates of S-COMT and four SULT isoforms (1A1, 1A2, 1A3, and 1B1), but the rates of conjugation varied considerably, depending on the substrate structure and the enzyme form. SULT1E1 sulfated fewer catechols. Only low activities were observed for SULT1C2. UGT1A9 glucuronidated catechols representing various structural classes, and almost half of the studied compounds were glucuronidated at a high rate. The other UGT enzymes (1A1, 1A6, 2B7, and 2B15) showed narrower substrate specificity for catechols, but each glucuronidated some catechols at a high rate. Dependence of specificity and rate of conjugation on the molecular structure of the substrate was characterized by structure-activity relationship analysis and quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling. Twelve structural descriptors were used to characterize lipophilicity/polar interaction properties, steric properties, and electronic effects of the substituents modifying the catechol structure. PLS models explaining more than 80% and predicting more than 70% of the variance in conjugation activity were derived for the representative enzyme forms SULT1A3, UGT1A9, and S-COMT. Several structural factors governing the conjugation of catechol hormones, metabolites, and drugs were identified. The results have significant implications for predicting the metabolic fate of catechols.

  4. Antiproliferative and Antiestrogenic Activities of Bonediol an Alkyl Catechol from Bonellia macrocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Moo-Puc, Rosa; Caamal-Fuentes, Edgar; Peraza-Sánchez, Sergio R.; Slusarz, Anna; Jackson, Glenn; Drenkhahn, Sara K.; Lubahn, Dennis B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate antiproliferative activity of bonediol, an alkyl catechol isolated from the Mayan medicinal plant Bonellia macrocarpa. Bonediol was assessed for growth inhibition of androgen-sensitive (LNCaP), androgen-insensitive (PC-3), and metastatic androgen-insensitive (PC-3M) human prostate tumor cells; toxicity on normal cell line (HEK 293) was also evaluated. Hedgehog pathway was evaluated and competitive 3H-estradiol ligand binding assay was performed. Additionally, antioxidant activity on Nrf2-ARE pathway was evaluated. Bonediol induced a growth inhibition on prostate cancer cell lines (IC50 from 8.5 to 20.6 µM). Interestingly, bonediol binds to both estrogen receptors (ERα (2.5 µM) and ERβ (2.1 µM)) and displaces the native ligand E2 (17β-estradiol). No significant activity was found in the Hedgehog pathway. Additionally, activity of bonediol on Nrf2-ARE pathway suggested that bonediol could induce oxidative stress and activation of detoxification enzymes at 1 µM (3.8-fold). We propose that the compound bonediol may serve as a potential chemopreventive treatment with therapeutic potential against prostate cancer. PMID:26557704

  5. Catechol-O-methyltransferase val(158)met Polymorphism Interacts with Sex to Affect Face Recognition Ability.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Yvette N; McKay, Nicole S; Singh, Shrimal S; Waldie, Karen E; Kirk, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) val158met polymorphism affects the breakdown of synaptic dopamine. Consequently, this polymorphism has been associated with a variety of neurophysiological and behavioral outcomes. Some of the effects have been found to be sex-specific and it appears estrogen may act to down-regulate the activity of the COMT enzyme. The dopaminergic system has been implicated in face recognition, a form of cognition for which a female advantage has typically been reported. This study aimed to investigate potential joint effects of sex and COMT genotype on face recognition. A sample of 142 university students was genotyped and assessed using the Faces I subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III). A significant two-way interaction between sex and COMT genotype on face recognition performance was found. Of the male participants, COMT val homozygotes and heterozygotes had significantly lower scores than met homozygotes. Scores did not differ between genotypes for female participants. While male val homozygotes had significantly lower scores than female val homozygotes, no sex differences were observed in the heterozygotes and met homozygotes. This study contributes to the accumulating literature documenting sex-specific effects of the COMT polymorphism by demonstrating a COMT-sex interaction for face recognition, and is consistent with a role for dopamine in face recognition.

  6. Catechol-O-methyltransferase val158met Polymorphism Interacts with Sex to Affect Face Recognition Ability

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Yvette N.; McKay, Nicole S.; Singh, Shrimal S.; Waldie, Karen E.; Kirk, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) val158met polymorphism affects the breakdown of synaptic dopamine. Consequently, this polymorphism has been associated with a variety of neurophysiological and behavioral outcomes. Some of the effects have been found to be sex-specific and it appears estrogen may act to down-regulate the activity of the COMT enzyme. The dopaminergic system has been implicated in face recognition, a form of cognition for which a female advantage has typically been reported. This study aimed to investigate potential joint effects of sex and COMT genotype on face recognition. A sample of 142 university students was genotyped and assessed using the Faces I subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale – Third Edition (WMS-III). A significant two-way interaction between sex and COMT genotype on face recognition performance was found. Of the male participants, COMT val homozygotes and heterozygotes had significantly lower scores than met homozygotes. Scores did not differ between genotypes for female participants. While male val homozygotes had significantly lower scores than female val homozygotes, no sex differences were observed in the heterozygotes and met homozygotes. This study contributes to the accumulating literature documenting sex-specific effects of the COMT polymorphism by demonstrating a COMT-sex interaction for face recognition, and is consistent with a role for dopamine in face recognition. PMID:27445927

  7. Optimization of catechol production by membrane-immobilized polyphenol oxidase: a modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Boshoff, A; Burton, M H; Burton, S G

    2003-07-05

    Although previous research has focused on phenol removal efficiencies using polyphenol oxidase in nonimmobilized and immobilized forms, there has been little consideration of the use of polyphenol oxidase in a biotransformation system for the production of catechols. In this study, polyphenol oxidase was successfully immobilized on various synthetic membranes and used to convert phenolic substrates to catechol products. A neural network model was developed and used to model the rates of substrate utilization and catechol production for both nonimmobilized and immobilized polyphenol oxidase. The results indicate that the biotransformation of the phenols to their corresponding catechols was strongly influenced by the immobilization support, resulting in differing yields of catechols. Hydrophilic membranes were found to be the most suitable immobilization supports for catechol production. The successful biocatalytic production of 3-methylcatechol, 4-methylcatechol, catechol, and 4-chlorocatechol is demonstrated.

  8. Cytochrome c Adducts with PCB Quinoid Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Miao; Teesch, Lynn M.; Murry, Daryl J.; Pope, R. Marshal; Li, Yalan; Robertson, Larry W.; Ludewig, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    PCBs are a group of 209 individual congeners widely used as industrial chemicals. PCBs are found as by-products in dye and paint manufacture and are legacy, ubiquitous and persistent as human and environmental contaminants. PCBs with fewer chlorine atoms may be metabolized to hydroxy- and dihydroxy- metabolites and further oxidized to quinoid metabolites both in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, quinoid metabolites may form adducts on nucleophilic sites within cells. We hypothesized that the PCB-quinones covalently bind to cytochrome c and thereby cause defects in the function of cytochrome c. In this study synthetic PCB quinones (2-(4’-chlorophenyl)-1,4-benzoquinone, 2-(3’, 5’-dichlorophenyl)-1,4-benzoquinone, 2-(3’,4’, 5’-trichlorophenyl)-1,4-benzoquinone, and 2-(4’-chlorophenyl)-3,6-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone) were incubated with cytochrome c, and adducts were detected by LC-MS and MALDI TOF. SDS PAGE gel electrophoresis was employed to separate the adducted proteins, while trypsin digestion and LC-MS/MS were applied to identify the amino acid binding sites on cytochrome c. Conformation change of cytochrome c after binding with PCB3-para-quinone was investigated by SYBYL-X simulation and cytochrome c function was examined. We found that more than one molecule of PCB-quinone may bind to one molecule of cytochrome c. Lysine and glutamic acid were identified as the predominant binding sites. Software simulation showed conformation changes of adducted cytochrome c. Additionally, cross-linking of cytochrome c was observed on the SDS PAGE gel. Cytochrome c was found to be in the reduced form after incubation with PCB quinones. These data provide evidence that the covalent binding of PCB quinone metabolites to cytochrome c may be included among the toxic effects of PCBs. PMID:26062463

  9. Interactions between genetic polymorphism of cytochrome P450-1B1, sulfotransferase 1A1, catechol-o-methyltransferase and tobacco exposure in breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Saintot, Monique; Malaveille, Christian; Hautefeuille, Agnès; Gerber, Mariette

    2003-11-20

    Genetic polymorphisms of enzymes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics and estrogens might play a role in breast carcinogenesis related to environmental exposures. In a case-only study on 282 women with breast cancer, we studied the interaction effects (ORi) between smoking habits and the gene polymorphisms of Cytochrome P450 1B1 (Val432Leu CYP1B1), Phenol-sulfotransferase 1A1 (Arg213His SULT1A1) and Catechol-O-methyltransferase (Val158Met COMT). The smokers carrying the Val CYP1B1 allele associated with a high hydroxylation activity had a higher risk of breast cancer than never smokers with the Leu/Leu genotype (ORi=2.32, 95%CI: 1.00-5.38). Also, the smokers carrying the His SULT1A1 allele associated with a low sulfation activity had a 2-fold excess risk compared to never smokers carrying Arg/Arg SULT1A1 common genotype (ORi= 2.55, 95%CI: 1.21-5.36). The His SULT1A1 allele increased the risk only in premenopausal patients. The Met COMT allele with a lower methylation activity than Val COMT did not modify the risk among smokers. The excess risk due to joint effect could result from a higher exposure to activated tobacco-compounds for women homo/heterozygous for the Val CYP1B1 allele. Also, a lower sulfation of the tobacco carcinogens among women with His SULT1A1 could increase exposure to genotoxic compounds. Alternatively, the Val CYP1B1 or His SULT1A1 allele with modified ability to metabolize estrogens could increase the level of genotoxic catechol estrogen (i.e., 4-hydroxy-estradiol) among smokers. Our study showed that gene polymorphisms of CYP1B1 and SULT1A1 induce an individual susceptibility to breast cancer among current smokers.

  10. Human DNA adduct measurements: State of the art

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.C.; Weston, A.

    1996-10-01

    Human DNA adduct formation (covalent modification of DNA with chemical carcinogens) is a promising biomarker for elucidating the molecular epidemiology of cancer. Classes of compounds for which human DNA adducts have been observed include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitrosamines, mycotoxins, aromatic amines, heterocyclic amines, ultraviolet light, and alkylating cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Most human DNA adduct exposure monitoring has been performed with either {sup 32}P-postlabeling or immunoassays, neither of which is able to chemically characterize specific DNA adducts. Recently developed combinations of methods with chemical and physical end points have allowed identification of specific adducts in human tissues. Studies are presented that demonstrate that high ambient levels of benzo[a]pyrene are associated with high levels of DNA adducts in human blood cell DNA and that the same DNA adduct levels drop when the ambient PAH levels decrease significantly. DNA adduct dosimetry, which has been achieved with some dietary carcinogens and cancer chemotherapeutic agents, is described, as well as studies correlating DNA adducts with other biomarkers. It is likely that some toxic, noncarcinogenic compounds may have genotoxic effects, including oxidative damage, and that adverse health outcomes other than cancer may be correlated with DNA adduct formation. The studies presented here may serve as useful prototypes for exploration of other toxicological end points. 156 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. Iron-Binding Catechols and Virulence in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Henry J.

    1973-01-01

    Previous work suggested that virulent bacteria, which can grow rapidly in serum, must possess a specific mechanism for removing iron from its transferrin complex. Two strains of Escherichia coli were examined with this in mind. Strain O141, which showed inoculum-dependent growth in serum and multiplied in the mouse peritoneum, secreted iron-binding catechols into both synthetic medium and serum. One of these compounds has an association constant for iron similar to that of transferrin. Both transferrin and ethylenediamine-di-o-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid (EDDA), which have very high affinities for ferric iron, induced catechol synthesis in growing cultures of strain O111. This organism was inhibited by normal horse serum. Further work showed that traces of specific antibody inhibited catechol synthesis by O111 exposed to EDDA; therefore, the existence of this inhibitory process means that the organism can no longer obtain Fe3+, which all remains bound to transferrin in serum. In vivo, the inhibition of O111 is similar to that produced by serum in vitro. Neither phagocytosis nor killing by complement appeared to be of any significance during the first 4 h of the infections. Significantly, the purified catechol was capable of abolishing bacteriostasis in vivo. Since these results show that the production of iron-binding catechols is essential for rapid bacterial growth both in vitro and in vivo, these compounds should therefore be considered as true virulence factors. Conversely, any interference by the host with the production or activity of these compounds would constitute an important aspect of antibacterial defense. Images PMID:16558077

  12. RNA Regulation of Estrogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision...Estrogen 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0353 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) J. Andrew...ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER University of Oregon Eugene OR 97403-5295

  13. Protein modification by acrolein: Formation and stability of cysteine adducts

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Pierce, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The toxicity of the ubiquitous pollutant and endogenous metabolite, acrolein, is due in part to covalent protein modifications. Acrolein reacts readily with protein nucleophiles via Michael addition and Schiff base formation. Potential acrolein targets in protein include the nucleophilic side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues as well as the free amino terminus of proteins. Although cysteine is the most acrolein-reactive residue, cysteine-acrolein adducts are difficult to identify in vitro and in vivo. In this study, model peptides with cysteine, lysine, and histidine residues were used to examine the reactivity of acrolein. Results from these experiments show that acrolein reacts rapidly with cysteine residues through Michael addition to form M+56 Da adducts. These M+56 adducts are, however, not stable, even though spontaneous dissociation of the adduct is slow. Further studies demonstrated that when acrolein and model peptides are incubated at physiological pH and temperature, the M+56 adducts decreased gradually accompanied by the increase of M+38 adducts, which are formed from intra-molecular Schiff base formation. Adduct formation with the side chains of other amino acid residues (lysine and histidine) was much slower than cysteine and required higher acrolein concentration. When cysteine residues were blocked by reaction with iodoacetamide and higher concentrations of acrolein were used, adducts of the N-terminal amino group or histidyl residues were formed but lysine adducts were not detected. Collectively, these data demonstrate that acrolein reacts avidly with protein cysteine residues and that the apparent loss of protein-acrolein Michael adducts over time may be related to the appearance of a novel (M+38) adduct. These findings may be important in identification of in vivo adducts of acrolein with protein cysteine residues. PMID:19231900

  14. Quantitation of carcinogen bound protein adducts by fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Liang-Shang; Otteson, Michael S.; Doxtader, Mark M.; Skipper, Paul L.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    A highly significant correlation of aflatoxin B 1 serum albumin adduct level with daily aflatoxin B 1 intake was observed in a molecular epidemiological study of aflatoxin carcinogenesis which used conventional fluorescence spectroscopy methods for adduct quantitation. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence techniques have been employed to quantitate antibenzo[ a]pyrene diol epoxide derived globin peptide adducts. Fast and efficient methods to isolate the peptide adducts as well as eliminate protein fluorescence background are described. A detection limit of several femtomoles has been achieved. Experimental and technical considerations of low temperature synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence line narrowing to improve the detection sensitivities are also presented.

  15. Role of malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde adducts in liver injury.

    PubMed

    Tuma, Dean J

    2002-02-15

    Malondialdehyde and acetaldehyde react together with proteins in a synergistic manner and form hybrid protein adducts, designated as MAA adducts. MAA-protein adducts are composed of two major products whose structures and mechanism of formation have been elucidated. MAA adduct formation, especially in the liver, has been demonstrated in vivo during ethanol consumption. These protein adducts are capable of inducing a potent immune response, resulting in the generation of antibodies against both MAA epitopes, as well as against epitopes on the carrier protein. Chronic ethanol administration to rats results in significant circulating antibody titers against MAA-adducted proteins, and high anti-MAA titers have been associated with the severity of liver damage in humans with alcoholic liver disease. In vitro exposure of liver endothelial or hepatic stellate cells to MAA adducts induces a proinflammatory and profibrogenic response in these cells. Thus, during excessive ethanol consumption, ethanol oxidation and ethanol-induced oxidative stress result in the formation of acetaldehyde and malondialdehyde, respectively. These aldehydes can react together synergistically with proteins and generate MAA adducts, which are very immunogenic and possess proinflammatory and profibrogenic properties. By virtue of these potentially toxic effects, MAA adducts may play an important role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury.

  16. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometric characterization of acrylamide adducts to hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.L.; Goheen, S.C.; Edmonds, C.G. ); Bull, R.J.; Sylvester, D.M. )

    1993-01-01

    The most common procedure to identify hemoglobin adducts has been to cleave the adducts from the protein and characterize the adducting species, by, for example, derivatization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. To extend these approaches we used electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to characterize adducted hemoglobin. For this we incubated [[sup 14]C]acrylamide with the purified human hemoglobin (type A[sub 0]) under conditions that yielded high adduct levels. When the hemoglobin was separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), 65% of the radioactivity copurified with the [beta]-subunit. Three adducted species were prominent in the ESI mass spectrum of the intact [beta]-subunit, indicating acrylamide adduction (i.e., mass increase of 71 Da) and two addition unidentified moieties with mass increments of 102 and 135 Da. Endoproteinase Glu-C digestion of the adducted [beta]-subunit resulted in a peptide mixture that, upon reversed-phase HPLC separation, provided several radiolabeled peptides. Using ESI-MS we identified these as the V[sub 91-101] and V[sub 102-122] peptides that represent the cysteine-containing peptides of the [beta]-subunit. These results provide definitive information on acrylamide-modified human hemoglobin and demonstrate that ESI-MS provides valuable structure information on chemically adducted proteins. 30 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Estrogenic effects from household stoves.

    PubMed

    Wu, W Z; Chen, J; Rehmann, K; Schramm, K W; Kettrup

    2002-09-01

    With the application of a genetically modified yeast, estrogen receptor-activating compounds were detected in the soot and emission gas of a wood-burning household stove. The EC50 value of 17beta-estradiol was divided by the EC50 value of soot, and the obtained relative estrogenic value for raw soot was 2.37E-5, indicating that soot was about 100,000 times less estrogenic than 17beta-estradiol. Chemical analysis revealed that alkyl phenol, benzonic acid, and PAHs represented the major constituents in the most potent fractions of the soot. Along with PAHs, other constituents might also contribute to the estrogenicity of soot.

  18. Exercise, Eating, Estrogen, and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people, especially women. Three methods for preventing or managing osteoporosis are recommended: (1) exercise; (2) increased calcium intake; and (3) estrogen replacement therapy. (CB)

  19. Iron(III) complexes of tripodal tetradentate 4N ligands as functional models for catechol dioxygenases: the electronic vs. steric effect on extradiol cleavage.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, Mani; Vadivelu, Prabha; Palaniandavar, Mallayan

    2014-10-21

    A few mononuclear iron(iii) complexes of the type [Fe(L)Cl2]Cl , where L is a tetradentate tripodal 4N ligand such as N,N-dimethyl-N',N'-bis(pyrid-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (), N,N-diethyl-N',N'-bis(pyrid-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (), N,N-dimethyl-N',N'-bis-(6-methylpyrid-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (), N,N-dimethyl-N'-(pyrid-2-ylmethyl)-N'-(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (), N,N-dimethyl-N',N'-bis(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine () and N,N-dimethyl-N',N'-bis(quinolin-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (), have been isolated and characterized by CHN analysis, UV-Visible spectroscopy and electrochemical methods. The complex cation [Fe(H)Cl3](+) possesses a distorted octahedral geometry in which iron is coordinated by the monoprotonated 4N ligand in a tridentate fashion and the remaining three sites of the octahedron are occupied by chloride ions. The DFT optimized octahedral geometries of , and contain iron(iii) with a high-spin (S = 5/2) ground state. The catecholate adducts [Fe(L)(DBC)](+), where H2DBC is 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol, of all the complexes have been generated in situ in acetonitrile solution and their spectral and redox properties and dioxygenase activities have been studied. The DFT optimized geometries of the catecholate adducts [Fe()(DBC)](+), [Fe()(DBC)](+) and [Fe()(DBC)](+) have also been generated to illustrate the ability of the complexes to cleave H2DBC in the presence of molecular oxygen to afford varying amounts of intra- (I) and extradiol (E) cleavage products. The extradiol to intradiol product selectivity (E/I, 0.1-2.0) depends upon the asymmetry in bidentate coordination of catecholate, as determined by the stereoelectronic properties of the ligand donor functionalities. While the higher E/I value obtained for [Fe()(DBC)](+) is on account of the steric hindrance of the quinolyl moiety to coordination the lower value observed for [Fe()(DBC)](+) and [Fe()(DBC)](+) is on account of the electron

  20. Biological degradation of catechol in wastewater using the sequencing continuous-inflow reactor (SCR).

    PubMed

    Aghapour, Ali Ahmad; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Yaghmaeian, Kamyar

    2013-05-24

    Catechol is used in many industries. It can be removed from wastewater by various methods but biological processes are the most superior and commonly used technology. The SCR is a modified form of SBR used to degrade catechol. The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of SCR for biodegradation and mineralization of catechol under various inlet concentrations (630-1500 mg/L) and hydraulic retention times (HRT) (18-9 h). This study used a bench scale SCR setup to test catechol degradation. The acclimation time of biomass for catechol at degradation at 630 mg/L was 41 d. The SCR operating cycle time was 6 h and the consecutive times taken for aerating, settling and decanting were 4, 1.5 and 0.5 h, respectively. This study investigated the effects of inlet catechol concentration (630-1560 mg/L) and HRT (18-9 h). The average catechol removal efficiencies in steady-state conditions of 630, 930, 12954 and 1559 mg/L of catechol were 98.5%, 98.5%, 98.2% and 96.9% in terms catechol and 97.8%, 97.7%, 96.4% and 94.3% for COD, respectively. SCR with acclimated biomasses could effectively remove the catechol and the corresponding COD from wastewater with concentrations of up to 1560, at the loading rate of 5.38 kg COD/m3.d and at a HRT of up to 13 h. The HRT was determined as an important variable affecting catechol removal from wastewater. Reducing the HRT to below 13 h led to reduced removal of catechol and COD.

  1. Biological degradation of catechol in wastewater using the sequencing continuous-inflow reactor (SCR)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Catechol is used in many industries. It can be removed from wastewater by various methods but biological processes are the most superior and commonly used technology. The SCR is a modified form of SBR used to degrade catechol. The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of SCR for biodegradation and mineralization of catechol under various inlet concentrations (630–1500 mg/L) and hydraulic retention times (HRT) (18–9 h). This study used a bench scale SCR setup to test catechol degradation. The acclimation time of biomass for catechol at degradation at 630 mg/L was 41 d. The SCR operating cycle time was 6 h and the consecutive times taken for aerating, settling and decanting were 4, 1.5 and 0.5 h, respectively. This study investigated the effects of inlet catechol concentration (630–1560 mg/L) and HRT (18–9 h). The average catechol removal efficiencies in steady-state conditions of 630, 930, 12954 and 1559 mg/L of catechol were 98.5%, 98.5%, 98.2% and 96.9% in terms catechol and 97.8%, 97.7%, 96.4% and 94.3% for COD, respectively. SCR with acclimated biomasses could effectively remove the catechol and the corresponding COD from wastewater with concentrations of up to 1560, at the loading rate of 5.38 kg COD/m3.d and at a HRT of up to 13 h. The HRT was determined as an important variable affecting catechol removal from wastewater. Reducing the HRT to below 13 h led to reduced removal of catechol and COD. PMID:24499534

  2. The role of DNA methylation in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Wu, Xiao-Rong; Xue, Ming; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jie; Li, Yang; Suriguga,; Zhang, Guang-Yao; Yi, Zong-Chun

    2012-11-15

    Catechol is one of phenolic metabolites of benzene in vivo. Catechol is also widely used in pharmaceutical and chemical industries. In addition, fruits, vegetables and cigarette smoke also contain catechol. Our precious study showed that several benzene metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and 1,2,4-benzenetriol) inhibited erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. In present study, the effect of catechol on erythroid differentiation of K562 cells was investigated. Moreover, to address the role of DNA methylation in catechol-induced effect on erythroid differentiation in K562 cells, methylation levels of erythroid-specific genes were analyzed by Quantitative MassARRAY methylation analysis platform. Benzidine staining showed that exposure to catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation in K562 cells in concentration- and time-dependent manners. The mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes, including α-globin, β-globin, γ-globin, erythroid 5-aminolevulinate synthase, erythroid porphobilinogen deaminase, and transcription factor GATA-1 genes, showed a significant concentration-dependent increase in catechol-treated K562 cells. The exposure to catechol caused a decrease in DNA methylation levels at a few CpG sites in some erythroid specific genes including α-globin, β-globin and erythroid porphobilinogen deaminase genes. These results indicated that catechol improved erythroid differentiation potency of K562 cells at least partly via up-regulating transcription of some erythroid related genes, and suggested that inhibition of DNA methylation might be involved in up-regulated expression of some erythroid related genes. -- Highlights: ► Catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation. ► Exposure to catechol resulted in up-regulated expression of erythroid genes. ► Catechol reduced methylation levels at some CpG sites in erythroid genes.

  3. Improved Performance of Protected Catecholic Polysiloxanes for Bioinspired Wet Adhesion to Surface Oxides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-26

    REPORT Improved Performance of Protected Catecholic Polysiloxanes for Bioinspired Wet Adhesion to Surface Oxides 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - Improved Performance of Protected Catecholic Polysiloxanes for Bioinspired Wet Adhesion to Surface Oxides Report Title...Protected Catecholic P Block 13: Supplementary Note © 2012 . Published in Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. Ed. 0 134, (49) (2012), ( (49). DoD

  4. Computational Study on the Stacking Interaction in Catechol Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estévez, Laura; Otero, Nicolás; Mosquera, Ricardo A.

    2009-09-01

    The stability and electron density topology of catechol complexes (dimers and tetramer) were studied using the MPW1B95 functional. The QTAIM analysis shows that both dimers (face to face and C-H/π one) display a different electronic origin. The formation of the former is accompanied by a significant change in the values of atomic electron dipole and quadrupole components, flattening the most diffuse part of the electron density distribution toward the molecular plane. A small electron population transfer is observed between catechol monomers connected by C-H/π interactions, whose QTAIM characterization does not differ from that of a weak hydrogen bond. Cooperative effects in the tetramer on binding energies are small and negligible for bond properties and charge transfer. Nevertheless, they are significant on atomic electron populations.

  5. Tyrosinase versus Catechol Oxidase: One Asparagine Makes the Difference.

    PubMed

    Solem, Even; Tuczek, Felix; Decker, Heinz

    2016-02-18

    Tyrosinases mediate the ortho-hydroxylation and two-electron oxidation of monophenols to ortho-quinones. Catechol oxidases only catalyze the oxidation of diphenols. Although it is of significant interest, the origin of the functional discrimination between tyrosinases and catechol oxidases has been unclear. Recently, it has been postulated that a glutamate and an asparagine bind and activate a conserved water molecule towards deprotonation of monophenols. Here we demonstrate for the first time that a polyphenoloxidase, which exhibits only diphenolase activity, can be transformed to a tyrosinase by mutation to introduce an asparagine. The asparagine and a conserved glutamate are necessary to properly orient the conserved water in order to abstract a proton from the monophenol. These results provide direct evidence for the crucial importance of a proton shuttle for tyrosinase activity of type 3 copper proteins, allowing a consistent understanding of their different chemical reactivities.

  6. Amperometric catechol biosensor based on polyaniline-polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yongyan; Guo, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jinghui; Kan, Jinqing

    2010-03-15

    A novel catechol biosensor was described based on the immobilization of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) into polyaniline (PANI), which was easily constructed by direct electropolymerization of aniline in a solution containing ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate (EMIES). The developed biosensor for the detection of catechol has a linear range of 1.25-150 micromol dm(-3). The maximum response current (I(max)) and the Michaelis-Menten constant (k'(m)) are 0.62 microA and 146 micromol dm(-3), respectively. The activation energy (E(a)) of the PPO catalytic reaction is 31.1 kJ mol(-1) in the B-R buffer. The biosensor shows good reproducibility (a relative standard deviation of 3.1% was obtained) and remarkable long-term stability (it retains 75% of the original activity after four months). The effects of potential and pH on the response current of the biosensor are also described.

  7. A catechol biosensor based on electrospun carbon nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dawei; Pang, Zengyuan; Chen, Xiaodong; Luo, Lei; Cai, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    Summary Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were prepared by combining electrospinning with a high-temperature carbonization technique. And a polyphenol biosensor was fabricated by blending the obtained CNFs with laccase and Nafion. Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) were, respectively, employed to investigate the structures and morphologies of the CNFs and of the mixtures. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were employed to study the electrocatalysis of the catechol biosensor. The results indicated that the sensitivity of the biosensor was 41 µA·mM−1, the detection limit was 0.63 µM, the linear range was 1–1310 µM and the response time was within 2 seconds, which excelled most other laccase-based biosensor reported. Furthermore, the biosensor showed good repeatability, reproducibility, stability and tolerance to interferences. This novel biosensor also demonstrated its promising application in detecting catechol in real water samples. PMID:24778958

  8. Low catechol-O-methyltransferase activity in a Saami population.

    PubMed

    Klemetsdal, B; Straume, B; Giverhaug, T; Aarbakke, J

    1994-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyzes the O-methylation of catechol hormones, neurotransmitters and certain drugs. It is subject to genetic polymorphism and ethnic differences. High red blood cell (RBC) COMT activity has been correlated with a poor response to levodopa treatment in Parkinson's disease. RBC COMT was determined in a Norwegian population (n = 213) of whom 115 were Saami (Laaps). The Saami had 16.5% lower RBC COMT activity compared to a non-Saami population sample from the northern part of Norway (n = 50), 13.9 vs. 16.4 units/ml RBC (U) (P = 0.04). This is the first report of any population with lower RBC COMT activity than a Caucasian population. A wide range of RBC COMT activities was found in the entire population examined (1.3-38.3 U).

  9. Brain catechol synthesis - Control by brain tyrosine concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.; Larin, F.; Mostafapour, S.; Fernstrom, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Brain catechol synthesis was estimated by measuring the rate at which brain dopa levels rose following decarboxylase inhibition. Dopa accumulation was accelerated by tyrosine administration, and decreased by treatments that lowered brain tyrosine concentrations (for example, intraperitoneal tryptophan, leucine, or parachlorophenylalanine). A low dose of phenylalanine elevated brain tyrosine without accelerating dopa synthesis. Our findings raise the possibility that nutritional and endocrine factors might influence brain catecholamine synthesis by controlling the availability of tyrosine.

  10. Defining the Catechol-Cation Synergy for Enhanced Wet Adhesion to Mineral Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Michael V; Maier, Greg P; Dobbs, Howard A; Higdon, Nicholas J; Waite, J Herbert; Butler, Alison; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2016-07-27

    Mussel foot proteins (Mfps) exhibit remarkably adaptive adhesion and bridging between polar surfaces in aqueous solution despite the strong hydration barriers at the solid-liquid interface. Recently, catechols and amines-two functionalities that account for >50 mol % of the amino acid side chains in surface-priming Mfps-were shown to cooperatively displace the interfacial hydration and mediate robust adhesion between mineral surfaces. Here we demonstrate that (1) synergy between catecholic and guanidinium side chains similarly promotes adhesion, (2) increasing the ratio of cationic amines to catechols in a molecule reduces adhesion, and (3) the catechol-cation synergy is greatest when both functionalities are present within the same molecule.

  11. Identification of catechol as a new marker for detecting propolis adulteration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuai; Zhang, Cui-Ping; Li, George Q; Sun, Yue-Yi; Wang, Kai; Hu, Fu-Liang

    2014-07-14

    Adulteration of propolis with poplar extract is a serious issue in the bee products market. The aim of this study was to identify marker compounds in adulterated propolis, and examine the transformation of chemical components from poplar buds to propolis. The chemical profiles of poplar extracts and propolis were compared, and a new marker compound, catechol, was isolated and identified from the extracts of poplar buds. The polyphenol oxidase, catechol oxidase, responsible for catalyzing oxidation of catechol was detected in poplar buds and propolis. The results indicate catechol can be used as a marker to detect propolis adulterated with poplar extract.

  12. Aerosol formation yields from the reaction of catechol with ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Tomas, Alexandre; Guilloteau, Angélique; Henry, Françoise; Ledoux, Frédéric; Visez, Nicolas; Riffault, Véronique; Wenger, John C.; Bedjanian, Yuri

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol from the gas-phase reaction of catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) with ozone has been studied in two smog chambers. Aerosol production was monitored using a scanning mobility particle sizer and loss of the precursor was determined by gas chromatography and infrared spectroscopy, whilst ozone concentrations were measured using a UV photometric analyzer. The overall organic aerosol yield ( Y) was determined as the ratio of the suspended aerosol mass corrected for wall losses ( Mo) to the total reacted catechol concentrations, assuming a particle density of 1.4 g cm -3. Analysis of the data clearly shows that Y is a strong function of Mo and that secondary organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas-particle partitioning absorption model. The aerosol formation is affected by the initial catechol concentration, which leads to aerosol yields ranging from 17% to 86%. The results of this work are compared to similar studies reported in the literature.

  13. Immobilization of Amphiphilic Polycations by Catechol Functionality for Antimicrobial Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hua; Wu, Jianfeng; Avery, Christopher W.; Mizutani, Masato; Jiang, Xiaoming; Kamigaito, Masami; Chen, Zhan; Xi, Chuanwu; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    A new strategy to prepare antimicrobial surfaces by a simple dip-coating procedure is reported. Amphiphilic polycations with different mole ratios of monomers containing dodecyl quaternary ammonium, methoxyethyl, and catechol groups were synthesized by free-radical polymerization. The polymer coatings were prepared by immersing glass slides into a polymer solution and subsequent drying and heating. The quaternary ammonium side chains endow the coatings with potent antibacterial activity, while the methoxyetyhyl side chains enable tuning the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance and the catachol groups promote immobilization of the polymers into films. The polymer coated surfaces displayed bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in a dynamic contact assay and prevented accumulation of viable E. coli, S. aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii for up to 96 hours. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of coating surfaces indicated that the surfaces exhibit virtually the same smoothness for all polymers except the most hydrophobic. The hydrophobic polymer without methoxyethyl side chains showed clear structuring into polymer domains, causing high surface roughness. Sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy characterization of the surface structures demonstrated that the dodecyl chains are predominantly localized at the surface-air interface of the coatings. SFG also showed that the phenyl groups of the catechols are oriented on the substrate surface. These results support our hypothesis that the adhesive or cross-linking functionality of catechol groups discourages leaching of polymers, allowing tuning of the amphiphilic balance by incorporating hydrophilic components into the polymer chains to gain potent biocidal activity. PMID:21391641

  14. Platinum Nanoparticles: Efficient and Stable Catechol Oxidase Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wu, Haohao; Chong, Yu; Wamer, Wayne G; Xia, Qingsu; Cai, Lining; Nie, Zhihong; Fu, Peter P; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2015-09-09

    Although enzyme-like nanomaterials have been extensively investigated over the past decade, most research has focused on the peroxidase-like, catalase-like, or SOD-like activity of these nanomaterials. Identifying nanomaterials having oxidase-like activities has received less attention. In this study, we demonstrate that platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) exhibit catechol oxidase-like activity, oxidizing polyphenols into the corresponding o-quinones. Four unique approaches are employed to demonstrate the catechol oxidase-like activity exerted by Pt NPs. First, UV-vis spectroscopy is used to monitor the oxidation of polyphenols catalyzed by Pt NPs. Second, the oxidized products of polyphenols are identified by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) identification. Third, electron spin resonance (ESR) oximetry techniques are used to confirm the O2 consumption during the oxidation reaction. Fourth, the intermediate products of semiquinone radicals formed during the oxidation of polyphenols are determined by ESR using spin stabilization. These results indicate Pt NPs possess catechol oxidase-like activity. Because polyphenols and related bioactive substances have been explored as potent antioxidants that could be useful for the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, and Pt NPs have been widely used in the chemical industry and medical science, it is essential to understand the potential effects of Pt NPs for altering or influencing the antioxidant activity of polyphenols.

  15. An antioxidant role for catecholate siderophores in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Achard, Maud E S; Chen, Kaiwen W; Sweet, Matthew J; Watts, Rebecca E; Schroder, Kate; Schembri, Mark A; McEwan, Alastair G

    2013-09-15

    Iron acquisition is an important aspect of the host-pathogen interaction. In the case of Salmonella it is established that catecholate siderophores are important for full virulence. In view of their very high affinity for ferric iron, functional studies of siderophores have been almost exclusively focused on their role in acquisition of iron from the host. In the present study, we investigated whether the siderophores (enterobactin and salmochelin) produced by Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium could act as antioxidants and protect from the oxidative stress encountered after macrophage invasion. Our results show that the ability to produce siderophores enhanced the survival of Salmonella in the macrophage mainly at the early stages of infection, coincident with the oxidative burst. Using siderophore biosynthetic and siderophore receptor mutants we demonstrated that salmochelin and enterobactin protect S. Typhimurium against ROS (reactive oxygen species) in vitro and that siderophores must be intracellular to confer full protection. We also investigated whether other chemically distinct siderophores (yersiniabactin and aerobactin) or the monomeric catechol 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate could provide protection against oxidative stress and found that only catecholate siderophores have this property. Collectively, the results of the present study identify additional functions for siderophores during host-pathogen interactions.

  16. Estrogen receptors in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huaman, A

    1979-11-01

    On the basis of estrogen receptor assays, breast carcinomas are presently classified as estrogen-dependent tumors, which respond to endocrine therapy, and autonomous tumors, for which endocrine therapy is useless. This paper presents a short review of the biochemical principles of estrogen dependence, the procedures used to determine estrogen receptors, and the clinical applications of the findings of these assay procedures. Biobhemically, the estroogen dependence of normal breast cells is explained as a biochemical reaction occurring between the circulating estradiol and the breast cell, which occurs in 3 steps: 1) circulating estradiol penetrates the cellular membrane by passive diffusion, followed by 2) combining of estradiol with the estrogen-binding protein (estrophilin) and formation of an estrogen receptor complex which undergoes activation and translocation into the nucleus, to result in 3) the activated steroid receptor which combines with the nuclear charomatin and stimulates ribonucleic acid synthesis for the formation of estradiol binding proteins or estradiol receptors. The cytosol method of Wittliff et al. is described in brief and entails radioactive competitive analysis; the other available laboratory procedure is immunofluorescence of tumor sections. Quantification of estrogen receptor content can be used clinically to decide on ablative endocrine therapy, to determine the effectiveness of anti-estrogen administration, to determine the primary site of metastatic carcinoma, and as a screenng device.

  17. The antimicrobial activities of the cinnamaldehyde adducts with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing-Yi; Xiong, Jia-Jun; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Chao; Wen Ye

    2011-11-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a well-established natural antimicrobial compound. It is probable for cinnamaldehyde to react with amino acid forming Schiff base adduct in real food system. In this paper, 9 such kind of adducts were prepared by the direct reaction of amino acids with cinnamaldehyde at room temperature. Their antimicrobial activities against Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated with benzoic acid as a reference. The adducts showed a dose-dependent activities against the three microbial strains. Both cinnamaldehyde and their adducts were more active against B. subtilis than on E. coli, and their antimicrobial activities were higher at lower pH. Both cinnamaldehyde and its adducts were more active than benzoic acid at the same conditions. The adduct compound A was non-toxic by primary oral acute toxicity study in mice. However, in situ effect of the adduct compound A against E. coli was a little lower than cinnamaldehyde in fish meat. This paper for the first time showed that the cinnamaldehyde adducts with amino acids had similar strong antimicrobial activities as cinnamaldehyde, which may provide alternatives to cinnamaldehyde in food to avoid the strong unacceptable odor of cinnamaldehyde.

  18. Estrogen therapy for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Lorraine A

    2006-08-01

    Osteoporosis is a worldwide problem that results in fractures that lead to disability and high costs to society. Estrogen therapy is frequently utilized for postmenopausal symptoms, but also has proven protective effects on the skeleton. The main action of estrogen at the cellular level is to inhibit the osteoclast by increasing levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG). OPG binds to the receptor activator of NFkB and prevents osteoclast differentiation, activity and survival. Numerous trials have demonstrated the positive effect estrogen has on the improvement of bone mineral density, and lower doses have also proven efficacious with fewer side effects. Both observational and randomized clinical trials have demonstrated the ability of estrogen treatment to prevent fractures. Topics that remain controversial include the appropriate length of estrogen treatment for postmenopausal women and the appropriate follow-up after treatment discontinuation.

  19. Risks of estrogens and progestogens.

    PubMed

    L'Hermite, M

    1990-09-01

    The risks and benefits of specific types of postmenopausal estrogens and progestogens are explored: those affecting serum lipids, clotting elements, hepatic proteins synthesis, blood pressure, glucose tolerance, endometrial, breast and cervical cancer. Ethinyl estradiol taken orally is the only estrogen likely to cause gall bladder disease. It also induces liver protein synthesis when taken orally or vaginally. Natural estrogens do not heighten coagulation factors, and may shift towards fibrinolysis. Both ethinyl estradiol and equine estrogens may increase blood pressure, while natural estrogens may decrease it. Similarly natural estrogens induce prostacyclin synthesis, while ethinyl estradiol activates both prostacyclin and thromboxanes. Progestagens, especially so the norprogestins, disturb carbohydrate metabolism and tend to reverse the beneficial effects of estrogens on serum lipids, a 40-70% reduction in risk of mortality from coronary heart disease. A meta- analysis of 23 studies concluded that menopausal estrogens do not increase the risk of breast cancer by a measurable degree, except in high doses and in those predisposed by family history. There is an increased risk of endometrial carcinoma for those taking unopposed estrogens for more than 3-6 years. This can be attenuated by taking combined estrogen-progestins, which will eventually result in absence of bleeding, or a 12-day progestogen course every 4-6 cycles. Oral micronized progesterone decreases blood pressure. The relative androgenic effects of progestins other than the norprogesterone derivatives are less significant. As an alternative to taking a progestogen, a woman could have regular endometrial sampling or abdominal or vaginal sonograms to detect endometrial cancer.

  20. Quantitative structure-activity relationship for the cleavage of C3/C4-substituted catechols by a prototypal extradiol catechol dioxygenase with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Horiike, Kihachiro

    2004-06-01

    Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase [EC 1.13.11.2] from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 (Mpc) catalyzes the extradiol cleavage of catechol to produce 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde. The K(m) values for the catecholic substrate (K(mA)) and O(2) (K(mO2)), and catalytic constants (k(cat)) were kinetically determined for eight C3/C4-substituted catechols at 25 degrees C and pH 6.5 or 7.5. The first pK(a) values (pK(1)) were determined for eleven catechols (pK(1) = 7.26-9.47), correlated with Hammett substituent constants, and electron-withdrawing substituents significantly stabilized the monoanionic species of free catechols. Mpc preferred catechols with non-ionic substituents at the C3 or C4 position. 3-Phenylcatechol, a biphenyl, was cleaved, while 4-tert-butylcatechol was not. The logarithm of k(cat)/K(mA) (substrate specificity constant) exhibited a good linear correlation with pK(1), with the exception of those for 4-halocatechols. The logarithm of k(cat)/K(mO2) showed a good linear correlation with pK(1), with the exception of that of 3-phenylcatechol. These results demonstrate that catechol binding to the Mpc active site, the following O(2) binding, and the activation of the bound O(2) are all sensitive to electronic effects of the substituents. However, k(cat) did not correlate significantly with pK(1). The present study distinguishes clearly between the electronic and the steric effects of catecholic substrates in the reactivity of Mpc, and provides important insight into the mechanistic basis for a vast range of substrate specificities of extradiol dioxygenases.

  1. Adduct Formation in ESI/MS by Mobile Phase Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruve, Anneli; Kaupmees, Karl

    2017-03-01

    Adduct formation is a common ionization method in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). However, this process is poorly understood and complicated to control. We demonstrate possibilities to control adduct formation via mobile phase additives in ESI positive mode for 17 oxygen and nitrogen bases. Mobile phase additives were found to be a very effective measure for manipulating the formation efficiencies of adducts. An appropriate choice of additive may increase sensitivity by up to three orders of magnitude. In general, sodium adduct [M + Na]+ and protonated molecule [M + H]+ formation efficiencies were found to be in good correlation; however, the former were significantly more influenced by mobile phase properties. Although the highest formation efficiencies for both species were observed in water/acetonitrile mixtures not containing additives, the repeatability of the formation efficiencies was found to be improved by additives. It is concluded that mobile phase additives are powerful, yet not limiting factors, for altering adduct formation.

  2. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are now being used as a treatment for breast cancer, osteoporosis and postmenopausal symptoms, as these drugs have features that can act as an estrogen agonist and an antagonist, depending on the target tissue. After tamoxifen, raloxifene, lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene SERMs have been developed and used for treatment. The clinically decisive difference among these drugs (i.e., the key difference) is their endometrial safety. Compared to bisphosphonate drug formulations for osteoporosis, SERMs are to be used primarily in postmenopausal women of younger age and are particularly recommended if there is a family history of invasive breast cancer, as their use greatly reduces the incidence of this type of cancer in women. Among the above mentioned SERMs, raloxifene has been widely used in prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures, and clinical studies are now underway to test the comparative advantages of raloxifene with those of bazedoxifene, a more recently developed SERM. Research on a number of adverse side effects of SERM agents is being performed to determine the long-term safety of this class of compouds for treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27559463

  3. Estrogen receptor signaling during vertebrate development

    PubMed Central

    Bondesson, Maria; Hao, Ruixin; Lin, Chin-Yo; Williams, Cecilia; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors are expressed and their cognate ligands produced in all vertebrates, indicative of important and conserved functions. Through evolution estrogen has been involved in controlling reproduction, affecting both the development of reproductive organs and reproductive behavior. This review broadly describes the synthesis of estrogens and the expression patterns of aromatase and the estrogen receptors, in relation to estrogen functions in the developing fetus and child. We focus on the role of estrogens for development of reproductive tissues, as well as non-reproductive effects on the developing brain. We collate data from human, rodent, bird and fish studies and highlight common and species-specific effects of estrogen signaling on fetal development. Morphological malformations originating from perturbed estrogen signaling in estrogen receptor and aromatase knockout mice are discussed, as well as the clinical manifestations of rare estrogen receptor alpha and aromatase gene mutations in humans. PMID:24954179

  4. Detection of Catechol by Potentiometric-Flow Injection Analysis in the Presence of Interferents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, Suzanne K.; Widera, Justyna; Zhang, Hong

    2007-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate analytical chemistry experiment developed to teach instrumental lab skills while incorporating common interferents encountered in the real-world analysis of catechol. The lab technique incorporates potentiometric-flow injection analysis on a dibenzo-18-crown-6 dual platinum electrode to detect catechol in…

  5. Succinimide complexes of borated alkyl catechols and lubricating oil compositions containing same

    SciTech Connect

    Liston, T.V.

    1986-12-16

    A composition is described comprising a complex prepared by reacting a borated alkyl catechol and an oil soluble alkyl or alkenyl succinimide wherein the weight percent ratio of the alkyl or alkenyl succinimide to the borated alkyl catechol ranges from 3:1 to 16:1.

  6. Investigation of polymorphisms in genes involved in estrogen metabolism in menstrual migraine.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Heidi G; Champion, Morgane; Plays, Amelie; Stuart, Shani; Haupt, Larisa M; Frith, Alison; MacGregor, E Anne; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-04-05

    Migraine is a common, disabling headache disorder, which is influenced by multiple genes and environmental triggers. After puberty, the prevalence of migraine in women is three times higher than in men and >50% of females suffering from migraine report a menstrual association, suggesting hormonal fluctuations can influence the risk of migraine attacks. It has been hypothesized that the drop in estrogen during menses is an important trigger for menstrual migraine. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are involved in estrogen synthesis and metabolism. Functional polymorphisms in these genes can influence estrogen levels and therefore may be associated with risk of menstrual migraine. In this study we investigated four single nucleotide polymorphisms in three genes involved in estrogen metabolism that have been reported to impact enzyme levels or function, in a specific menstrual migraine cohort. 268 menstrual migraine cases and 142 controls were genotyped for rs4680 in COMT (Val158Met), rs4646903 and rs1048943 in CYP1A1 (T3801C and Ile462Val) and rs700519 in CYP19A1 (Cys264Arg). Neither genotype nor allele frequencies for the COMT and CYP SNPs genotyped were found to be significantly different between menstrual migraineurs and controls by chi-square analysis (P>0.05). Therefore we did not find association of functional polymorphisms in the estrogen metabolism genes COMT, CYP1A1 or CYP19A1 with menstrual migraine. Further studies are required to assess whether menstrual migraine is genetically distinct from the common migraine subtypes and identify genes that influence risk.

  7. Prolonged Acetaminophen-Protein Adduct Elimination During Renal Failure, Lack of Adduct Removal by Hemodiafiltration, and Urinary Adduct Concentrations After Acetaminophen Overdose.

    PubMed

    Curry, Steven C; Padilla-Jones, Angela; O'Connor, Ayrn D; Ruha, Anne-Michelle; Bikin, Dale S; Wilkins, Diana G; Rollins, Douglas E; Slawson, Matthew H; Gerkin, Richard D

    2015-06-01

    Elevated concentrations of serum acetaminophen-protein adducts, measured as protein-derived acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS), have been used to support a diagnosis of APAP-induced liver injury when histories and APAP levels are unhelpful. Adducts have been reported to undergo first-order elimination, with a terminal half-life of about 1.6 days. We wondered whether renal failure would affect APAP-CYS elimination half-life and whether continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF), commonly used in liver failure patients, would remove adducts to lower their serum concentrations. Terminal elimination half-lives of serum APAP-CYS were compared between subjects with and without renal failure in a prospective cohort study of 168 adults who had ingested excessive doses of APAP. APAP-CYS concentrations were measured in plasma ultrafiltrate during CVVHDF at times of elevated serum adduct concentrations. Paired samples of urine and serum APAP-CYS concentrations were examined to help understand the potential importance of urinary elimination of serum adducts. APAP-CYS elimination half-life was longer in 15 renal failure subjects than in 28 subjects with normal renal function (41.3 ± 2.2 h versus 26.8 ± 1.1 h [mean ± SEM], respectively, p < 0.001). CVVHDF failed to remove detectable amounts of APAP-CYS in any of the nine subjects studied. Sixty-eight percent of 557 urine samples from 168 subjects contained no detectable APAP-CYS, despite levels in serum up to 16.99 μM. Terminal elimination half-life of serum APAP-CYS was prolonged in patients with renal failure for reasons unrelated to renal urinary adduct elimination, and consideration of prolonged elimination needs to be considered if attempting back-extrapolation of adduct concentrations. CVVHDF did not remove detectable APAP-CYS, suggesting approximate APAP-protein adduct molecular weights ≥ 50,000 Da. The presence of urinary APAP-CYS in the minority of instances was most compatible with renal

  8. Immunodetection of Serum Albumin Adducts as Biomarkers for Organophosphorus Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sigeng; Zhang, Jun; Lumley, Lucille

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in organophosphate (OP) research has been the identification and utilization of reliable biomarkers for the rapid, sensitive, and efficient detection of OP exposure. Although Tyr 411 OP adducts to human serum albumin (HSA) have been suggested to be one of the most robust biomarkers in the detection of OP exposure, the analysis of HSA-OP adduct detection has been limited to techniques using mass spectrometry. Herein, we describe the procurement of two monoclonal antibodies (mAb-HSA-GD and mAb-HSA-VX) that recognized the HSA Tyr 411 adduct of soman (GD) or S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl]-O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX), respectively, but did not recognize nonphosphonylated HSA. We showed that mAb-HSA-GD was able to detect the HSA Tyr 411 OP adduct at a low level (i.e., human blood plasma treated with 180 nM GD) that could not be detected by mass spectrometry. mAb-HSA-GD and mAb-HSA-VX showed an extremely low-level detection of GD adducted to HSA (on the order of picograms). mAb-HSA-GD could also detect serum albumin OP adducts in blood plasma samples from different animals administered GD, including rats, guinea pigs, and monkeys. The ability of the two antibodies to selectively recognize nerve agents adducted to serum albumin suggests that these antibodies could be used to identify biomarkers of OP exposure and provide a new biologic approach to detect OP exposure in animals. PMID:23192655

  9. Quantitation of DNA adducts by stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tretyakova, Natalia; Goggin, Melissa; Janis, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to endogenous and exogenous chemicals can lead to the formation of structurally modified DNA bases (DNA adducts). If not repaired, these nucleobase lesions can cause polymerase errors during DNA replication, leading to heritable mutations potentially contributing to the development of cancer. Due to their critical role in cancer initiation, DNA adducts represent mechanism-based biomarkers of carcinogen exposure, and their quantitation is particularly useful for cancer risk assessment. DNA adducts are also valuable in mechanistic studies linking tumorigenic effects of environmental and industrial carcinogens to specific electrophilic species generated from their metabolism. While multiple experimental methodologies have been developed for DNA adduct analysis in biological samples – including immunoassay, HPLC, and 32P-postlabeling – isotope dilution high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) generally has superior selectivity, sensitivity, accuracy, and reproducibility. As typical DNA adducts concentrations in biological samples are between 0.01 – 10 adducts per 108 normal nucleotides, ultrasensitive HPLC-ESI-MS/MS methodologies are required for their analysis. Recent developments in analytical separations and biological mass spectrometry – especially nanoflow HPLC, nanospray ionization MS, chip-MS, and high resolution MS – have pushed the limits of analytical HPLC-ESI-MS/MS methodologies for DNA adducts, allowing researchers to accurately measure their concentrations in biological samples from patients treated with DNA alkylating drugs and in populations exposed to carcinogens from urban air, drinking water, cooked food, alcohol, and cigarette smoke. PMID:22827593

  10. The epigenetics of estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zaorui; Fan, Lu

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic processes have been implicated in everything from cell proliferation to maternal behavior. Epigenetic alterations, including histone alterations and DNA methylation, have also been shown to play critical roles in the formation of some types of memory, and in the modulatory effects that factors, such as stress, drugs of abuse and environmental stimulation, have on the brain and memory function. Recently, we demonstrated that the ability of the sex-steroid hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) to enhance memory formation is dependent on histone acetylation and DNA methylation, a finding that has important implications for understanding how hormones influence cognition in adulthood and aging. In this article, we provide an overview of the literature demonstrating that epigenetic processes and E2 influence memory, describe our findings indicating that epigenetic alterations regulate E2-induced memory enhancement, and discuss directions for future work on the epigenetics of estrogen. PMID:21593594

  11. Binding to PLA2 may contribute to the anti-inflammatory activity of catechol.

    PubMed

    Dileep, Kalarickal V; Tintu, Ignatius; Mandal, Pradeep K; Karthe, Ponnuraj; Haridas, Madathilkovilakathu; Sadasivan, Chittalakkottu

    2012-01-01

    Inhibiting PLA(2) activity should, in theory, be an effective approach to control the inflammation. Several naturally occurring polyphenolic compounds have been reported as inhibitors of PLA(2) . Among the naturally occurring polyphenols, catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) possesses anti-inflammatory activity. Catechol can inhibit cyclooxygenase and lipo-oxygenase. By means of enzyme kinetic study, it was revealed that catechol can inhibit PLA(2) also. Crystal structure showed that catechol binds to PLA(2) at the opening of the active site cleft. This might stop the entry of substrate into the active site. Hence, catechol can be used as a lead compound for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs with PLA(2) as the target.

  12. Pathways for formation of catechol and 1,2,4-benzenetriol in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Osamu; Seiji, Kazunori Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai ); Ikeda, Masayuki )

    1989-08-01

    Benzene, an established human leukemogen, was once widely used as an industrial solvent and is currently an important material for organic synthesis. Its metabolism in man and animals has also been studied extensively, and phenolic compounds were identified as major metabolites in urine after benzene exposure. One point yet to be elucidated is the pathway for formation of catechol (or 1,2-benzenediol). Early studies suggested that catechol will be formed via phenol whereas a later study failed to identify catechol in the urine of men and rabbits after oral administration methods of {sup 14}C-phenol. Sensitive HPLC methods have been recently developed in our laboratory to measure urinary phenolic metabolites and t,t-muconic acid. The methods were applied to show that phenol is not a precursor of catechol in rabbits. Evidence is also presented that 1,2,4-benzenetriol is formed only from quinol (1,4-benzenediol) and not from catechol.

  13. [Uterine estrogen sulfotransferase and estrogen sulfatase in embryo implantation].

    PubMed

    Loza Arredondo, M C; González Juarez, N A

    1994-11-01

    The relation conjugated/unconjugated estrogens associated with reproductive processes has brought about the interest to study the biological role and regulation of the estrogen sulfotransferase and estrogen sulfatase which participate in the formation and hydrolysis of estrogen 3-sulfates, respectively. In this paper, both activities were measured through the reciprocal conversion of 3H-estrone sulfate and 3H-unconjugated estrogen during in vitro incubation with implantation sites (SI) and non-implanted sites (SNI) from the rat uterus, during the process of embryo implantation. Contrasting enzyme activities were found in these tissues. While sulfotransferase activity was higher in SI than in SNI (0.205 vs 0.144 pmol of E1S formed/mg protein/h, the inverse was found for the sulfatase (1.470 vs 1.977 pmol of E1 formed/mg protein/h). These results indicate the presence of both enzymes in the rat uterus and suggest the existence of a mechanism in SI that locally regulate the concentration of free and sulfoconjugated estrogens in which these enzymes participate.

  14. Photophysical properties of catechol axially substituted tetra-α-(pentyloxy) titanium (IV) phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xinxin; Lin, Ting; Lv, Huafei; Pan, Sujuan; Wu, Shijun; Zeng, Di; Jiang, Yufeng; Wang, Yuhua; Yang, Hongqin; Huang, Yide; Peng, Yiru

    2016-10-01

    Metal phthalocyanines (MPcs) have been found to be a promising photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancers and non-cancer diseases. Nevertheless, phthalocyanines are substantially limited in clinical applications owing to their poor solubility, aggregation and insufficient selectivity for cancer cells. Catechol is an important pharmaceutical intermediate, playing important in vivo biological activity in medicine. Using catechol (pyrocatechin) as axial ligands, utilizing of the pharmaceutical effect of catechins, could improve the bioavailability, and achieve synergistic therapeutic effect in PDT. To address these issues, a novel catechol axially substituted tetra-α-(pentyloxy) titanium(IV) (TiPc(OC5H11)4-Catechol) was synthesized. The structure of TiPc(OC5H11)4-Catechol was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1HNMR and MS methods. The photophysical properties of TiPc(OC5H11)4 and TiPc(OC5H11)4-Catechol have been studied by UV/Vis and steady-state fluorescence spectra. After being axially substituted with catechin groups, no obviously intensity and position of maximum wavelength in Q-band of TiPc(OC5H11)4 and TiPc(OC5H11)4-Catechol were observed. The fluorescence intensity of TiPc(OC5H11)4 was stronger than that of TiPc(OC5H11)4-Catechol, but the fluorescence lifetime of TiPc(OC5H11)4-Catechol was longer than that of TiPc(OC5H11)4. TiPc(OC5H11)4-Catechol may be considered as a promising photosensitizer for PDT.

  15. Fish populations surviving estrogen pollution.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Claus

    2014-02-10

    Among the most common pollutants that enter the environment after passing municipal wastewater treatment are estrogens, especially the synthetic 17α-ethinylestradiol that is used in oral contraceptives. Estrogens are potent endocrine disruptors at concentrations frequently observed in surface waters. However, new genetic analyses suggest that some fish populations can be self-sustaining even in heavily polluted waters. We now need to understand the basis of this tolerance.

  16. A fluorescence-based analysis of aristolochic acid-derived DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Victor; Sidorenko, Victoria; Rosenquist, Thomas A; Whyard, Terry; Grollman, Arthur P

    2012-08-01

    Aristolochic acids (AAs), major components of plant extracts from Aristolochia species, form (after metabolic activation) pro-mutagenic DNA adducts in renal tissue. The DNA adducts can be used as biomarkers for studies of AA toxicity. Identification of these adducts is a complicated and time-consuming procedure. We present here a fast, nonisotopic, fluorescence-based assay for the detection of AA-DNA adducts in multiple samples. This approach allows analysis of AA adducts in synthetic DNA with known nucleotide composition and analysis of DNA adducts formed from chemically diverse AAs in vitro. The method can be applied to compare AA-DNA adduct formation in cells and tissues.

  17. Structure of adduct X, the last unknown of the six major DNA adducts of mitomycin C formed in EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Palom, Y; Belcourt, M F; Musser, S M; Sartorelli, A C; Rockwell, S; Tomasz, M

    2000-06-01

    Treatment of EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells with mitomycin C (MC) results in the formation of six major MC-DNA adducts. We identified the last unknown of these ("adduct X") as a guanine N(2) adduct of 2, 7-diaminomitosene (2,7-DAM), in which the mitosene is linked at its C-10 position to guanine N(2). The assigned structure is based on UV and mass spectra of adduct X isolated directly from the cells, as well as on its difference UV, second-derivative UV, and circular dichroism spectra, synthesis from [8-(3)H]deoxyguanosine, and observation of its heat stability. These tests were carried out using 17 microg of synthetic material altogether. The mechanism of formation of adduct X involves reductive metabolism of MC to 2,7-DAM, which undergoes a second round of reductive activation to alkylate DNA, yielding adduct X and another 2,7-DAM-guanine adduct (adduct Y), which is linked at guanine N7 to the mitosene. Adduct Y has been described previously. Adduct X is formed preferentially at GpC, while adduct Y favors the GpG sequence. In contrast to MC-DNA adducts, the 2,7-DAM-DNA adducts are not cytotoxic.

  18. No association between germline variation in catechol-O-methyltransferase and colorectal cancer survival in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Passarelli, Michael N.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Makar, Karen W.; Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Phipps, Amanda I.; David, Sean P.; Hsu, Li; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Duggan, David J.; White, Emily; Chan, Andrew T.; Peters, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Objective Sex-steroid hormones play a role in colorectal cancer (CRC) development, but little is known about their influence on tumor progression and metastasis. Because catechol-O-methyltransferase activity (COMT; 22q11.21) is an important component of estrogen-mediated carcinogenesis, we hypothesized that germline variation in COMT may be associated with CRC survival. Methods We identified 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that tagged variation across both isoforms of COMT in 2,458 women with CRC from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS), Postmenopausal Hormones Supplementary Study to the Colon Cancer Family Registry (PMH-CCFR), VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) Study, and Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). All four studies participate in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO). Results Over a median follow-up of 7 years across all studies, there were 799 deaths, including 566 from CRC. Accounting for multiple comparisons, no associations between the SNPs and CRC-specific or overall survival reached statistical significance, including the well-characterized Val108/158Met polymorphism (rs4680; hazard ratio per minor allele [HR], 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92–1.17 for CRC-specific survival and 1.01; 0.90–1.14 for overall survival). Conclusions In this large study of women with CRC, we found no evidence that common inherited variation in COMT is associated with survival-time after diagnosis. PMID:23880798

  19. Paclitaxel Enhances Carboplatin-DNA Adduct Formation and Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuai; Pan, Amy W.; Lin, Tzu-yin; Zhang, Hongyong; Malfatti, Michael; Turteltaub, Kenneth; Henderson, Paul T.; Pan, Chong-xian

    2016-01-01

    This rapid report focuses on the pharmacodynamic mechanism of the carboplatin/paclitaxel combination and correlates it with its cytotoxicity. Consistent with the synergistic to additive antitumor activity (the combination index ranging from 0.53 to 0.94), cells exposed to this combination had significantly increased carboplatin-DNA adduct formation when compared to that of carboplatin alone (450 ± 30 versus 320 ± 120 adducts per 108 nucleotides at 2 h, p = 0.004). Removal of paclitaxel increased the repair of carboplatin-DNA adducts: 39.4 versus 33.1 adducts per 108 nucleotides per hour in carboplatin alone (p = 0.021). This rapid report provides the first pharmacodynamics data to support the use of carboplatin/paclitaxel combination in the clinic. PMID:26544157

  20. Paclitaxel Enhances Carboplatin-DNA Adduct Formation and Cytotoxicity

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Shuai; Pan, Amy W.; Lin, Tzu-yin; ...

    2015-11-06

    This rapid report focuses on the pharmacodynamic mechanism of the carboplatin/paclitaxel combination and correlates it with its cytotoxicity. Consistent with the synergistic to additive antitumor activity (the combination index ranging from 0.53 to 0.94), cells exposed to this combination had significantly increased carboplatin-DNA adduct formation when compared to that of carboplatin alone (450 ± 30 versus 320 ± 120 adducts per 108 nucleotides at 2 h, p = 0.004). Removal of paclitaxel increased the repair of carboplatin-DNA adducts: 39.4 versus 33.1 adducts per 108 nucleotides per hour in carboplatin alone (p = 0.021). In conclusion, this rapid report provides themore » first pharmacodynamics data to support the use of carboplatin/paclitaxel combination in the clinic.« less

  1. Paclitaxel Enhances Carboplatin-DNA Adduct Formation and Cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shuai; Pan, Amy W.; Lin, Tzu-yin; Zhang, Hongyong; Malfatti, Michael; Turteltaub, Kenneth; Henderson, Paul T.; Pan, Chong-xian

    2015-11-06

    This rapid report focuses on the pharmacodynamic mechanism of the carboplatin/paclitaxel combination and correlates it with its cytotoxicity. Consistent with the synergistic to additive antitumor activity (the combination index ranging from 0.53 to 0.94), cells exposed to this combination had significantly increased carboplatin-DNA adduct formation when compared to that of carboplatin alone (450 ± 30 versus 320 ± 120 adducts per 108 nucleotides at 2 h, p = 0.004). Removal of paclitaxel increased the repair of carboplatin-DNA adducts: 39.4 versus 33.1 adducts per 108 nucleotides per hour in carboplatin alone (p = 0.021). In conclusion, this rapid report provides the first pharmacodynamics data to support the use of carboplatin/paclitaxel combination in the clinic.

  2. A functional model of extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases: mimicking the 2-his-1-carboxylate facial triad.

    PubMed

    Paria, Sayantan; Halder, Partha; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2010-05-17

    The synthesis and characterization of an iron-catecholate model complex of a tridentate 2-N-1-carboxylate ligand derived from L-proline are reported. The X-ray crystal structure of the complex [(L)(3)Fe(3)(DBC)(3)] (1) (where L is 1-(2-pyridylmethyl)pyrrolidine-2-carboxylate and DBC is the dianion of 3,5-di-tert-butyl catechol) reveals that the tridentate ligand binds to the iron center in a facial manner and mimics the 2-his-1-carboxylate facial triad motif observed in extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases. The iron(III)-catecholate complex (1) reacts with dioxygen in acetonitrile in ambient conditions to cleave the C-C bond of catecholate. In the reaction, an equal amount of extra- and intradiol cleavage products are formed without any auto-oxidation product. The iron-catecholate complex is a potential functional model of extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases.

  3. Detoxication of structurally diverse polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) o-quinones by human recombinant catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) via O-methylation of PAH catechols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Jin, Yi; Chen, Mo; Huang, Meng; Harvey, Ronald G; Blair, Ian A; Penning, Trevor M

    2011-07-22

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are environmental and tobacco carcinogens. Metabolic activation of intermediate PAH trans-dihydrodiols by aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) leads to the formation of electrophilic and redox-active o-quinones. We investigated whether O-methylation by human recombinant soluble catechol-O-methyltransferase (S-COMT) is a feasible detoxication step for a panel of structurally diverse PAH-catechols produced during the redox-cycling process. Classes of PAH non-K-region o-quinones (bay region, methylated bay region, and fjord region o-quinones) produced by AKRs were employed in the studies. PAH o-quinones were reduced to the corresponding catechols by dithiothreitol under anaerobic conditions and then further O-methylated by human S-COMT in the presence of S-[³H]adenosyl-l-methionine as a methyl group donor. The formation of the O-methylated catechols was detected by HPLC-UV coupled with in-line radiometric detection, and unlabeled products were also characterized by LC-MS/MS. Human S-COMT was able to catalyze O-methylation of all of the PAH-catechols and generated two isomeric metabolites in different proportions. LC-MS/MS showed that each isomer was a mono-O-methylated metabolite. ¹H NMR was used to assign the predominant positional isomer of benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-catechol as the O-8-monomethylated catechol. The catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) varied among different classes of PAH-catechols by 500-fold. The ability of S-COMT to produce two isomeric products from PAH-catechols was rationalized using the crystal structure of the enzyme. We provide evidence that O-8-monomethylated benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-catechol is formed in three different human lung cell lines. It is concluded that human S-COMT may play a critical role in the detoxication of PAH o-quinones generated by AKRs.

  4. Mapping the conformational space accessible to catechol-O-methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Andreas; Benz, Jörg; Schlatter, Daniel; Rudolph, Markus G.

    2014-01-01

    Methylation catalysed by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is the main pathway of catechol neurotransmitter deactivation in the prefrontal cortex. Low levels of this class of neurotransmitters are held to be causative of diseases such as schizophrenia, depression and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of COMT may increase neurotransmitter levels, thus offering a route for treatment. Structure-based drug design hitherto seems to be based on the closed enzyme conformation. Here, a set of apo, semi-holo, holo and Michaelis form crystal structures are described that define the conformational space available to COMT and that include likely intermediates along the catalytic pathway. Domain swaps and sizeable loop movements around the active site testify to the flexibility of this enzyme, rendering COMT a difficult drug target. The low affinity of the co-substrate S-adenosylmethionine and the large conformational changes involved during catalysis highlight significant energetic investment to achieve the closed conformation. Since each conformation of COMT is a bona fide target for inhibitors, other states than the closed conformation may be promising to address. Crystallographic data for an alternative avenue of COMT inhibition, i.e. locking of the apo state by an inhibitor, are presented. The set of COMT structures may prove to be useful for the development of novel classes of inhibitors. PMID:25084335

  5. Estrogenic flavonoids: structural requirements for biological activity.

    PubMed

    Miksicek, R J

    1995-01-01

    A systematic survey of polycyclic phenols has been performed to identify members of this chemical group with estrogenic activity. Twelve compounds were found to be able to stimulate the transcriptional activity of the human estrogen receptor expressed in cultured cells by transient transfection. These natural estrogens belong to several distinct, but chemically related classes including chalcones, flavanones, flavones, flavonols, and isoflavones. Selected examples of estrogenic flavonoids were further analyzed to determine their biological potencies and their relative affinities for binding to the estrogen receptor. These data are interpreted with respect to the molecular structure of polycyclic phenols required for hormonal activity as nonsteroidal estrogens.

  6. Detection of adriamycin-DNA adducts by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Coldwell, Kate; Cutts, Suzanne M; Ognibene, Ted J; Henderson, Paul T; Phillips, Don R

    2010-01-01

    There have been many attempts in the past to determine whether significant levels of Adriamycin-DNA adducts form in cells and contribute to the anticancer activity of this agent. Supraclincal drug levels have been required to study drug-DNA adducts because of the lack of sensitivity associated with many of the techniques employed, including liquid scintillation counting of radiolabeled drug. The use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has provided the first direct evidence of Adriamycin-DNA adduct formation in cells at clinically relevant Adriamycin concentrations. The exceedingly sensitive nature of AMS has enabled over three orders of magnitude increased sensitivity of Adriamycin-DNA adduct detection (compared to liquid scintillation counting) and has revealed adduct formation within an hour of drug treatment. The rigorous protocol required for this approach, together with many notes on the precautions and procedures required in order to ensure that absolute levels of Adriamycin-DNA adducts can be determined with good reproducibility, is outlined in this chapter.

  7. Joining Two Natural Motifs: Catechol-Containing Poly(phosphoester)s.

    PubMed

    Becker, Greta; Ackermann, Lisa-Maria; Schechtel, Eugen; Klapper, Markus; Tremel, Wolfgang; Wurm, Frederik R

    2017-02-14

    Numerous catechol-containing polymers, including biodegradable polymers, are currently heavily discussed for modern biomaterials. However, there is no report combining poly(phosphoester)s (PPEs) with catechols. Adhesive PPEs have been prepared via acyclic diene metathesis polymerization. A novel acetal-protected catechol phosphate monomer was homo- and copolymerized with phosphoester comonomers with molecular weights up to 42000 g/mol. Quantitative release of the catechols was achieved by careful hydrolysis of the acetal groups without backbone degradation. Degradation of the PPEs under basic conditions revealed complete and statistical degradation of the phosphotri- to phosphodiesters. In addition, a phosphodiester monomer with an adhesive P-OH group and no protective group chemistry was used to compare the binding to metal oxides with the multicatechol-PPEs. All PPEs can stabilize magnetite particles (NPs) in polar solvents, for example, methanol, due to the binding of the phosphoester groups in the backbone to the particles. ITC measurements reveal that multicatechol PPEs exhibit a higher binding affinity to magnetite NPs compared to PPEs bearing phosphodi- or phosphotriesters as repeating units. In addition, the catechol-containing PPEs were used to generate organo- and hydrogels by oxidative cross-linking, due to cohesive properties of catechol groups. This unique combination of two natural adhesive motives, catechols and phosphates, will allow the design of novel future gels for tissue engineering applications or novel degradable adhesives.

  8. The role of DNA methylation in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Wu, Xiao-Rong; Xue, Ming; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jie; Li, Yang; Suriguga; Zhang, Guang-Yao; Yi, Zong-Chun

    2012-11-15

    Catechol is one of phenolic metabolites of benzene in vivo. Catechol is also widely used in pharmaceutical and chemical industries. In addition, fruits, vegetables and cigarette smoke also contain catechol. Our precious study showed that several benzene metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and 1,2,4-benzenetriol) inhibited erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. In present study, the effect of catechol on erythroid differentiation of K562 cells was investigated. Moreover, to address the role of DNA methylation in catechol-induced effect on erythroid differentiation in K562 cells, methylation levels of erythroid-specific genes were analyzed by Quantitative MassARRAY methylation analysis platform. Benzidine staining showed that exposure to catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation in K562 cells in concentration- and time-dependent manners. The mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes, including α-globin, β-globin, γ-globin, erythroid 5-aminolevulinate synthase, erythroid porphobilinogen deaminase, and transcription factor GATA-1 genes, showed a significant concentration-dependent increase in catechol-treated K562 cells. The exposure to catechol caused a decrease in DNA methylation levels at a few CpG sites in some erythroid specific genes including α-globin, β-globin and erythroid porphobilinogen deaminase genes. These results indicated that catechol improved erythroid differentiation potency of K562 cells at least partly via up-regulating transcription of some erythroid related genes, and suggested that inhibition of DNA methylation might be involved in up-regulated expression of some erythroid related genes.

  9. Bio-inspired adhesive catechol-conjugated chitosan for biomedical applications: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ji Hyun; Hong, Seonki; Lee, Haeshin

    2015-11-01

    The development of adhesive materials, such as cyanoacrylate derivatives, fibrin glues, and gelatin-based adhesives, has been an emerging topic in biomaterial science because of the many uses of these materials, including in wound healing patches, tissue sealants, and hemostatic materials. However, most bio-adhesives exhibit poor adhesion to tissue and related surfaces due to the presence of body fluid. For a decade, studies have aimed at addressing this issue by developing wet-resistant adhesives. Mussels demonstrate robust wet-resistant adhesion despite the ceaseless waves at seashores, and mussel adhesive proteins play a key role in this adhesion. Adhesive proteins located at the distal end (i.e., those that directly contact surfaces) are composed of nearly 60% of amino acids called 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), lysine, and histidine, which contain side chains of catechol, primary amines, and secondary amines, respectively. Inspired by the abundant catecholamine in mussel adhesive proteins, researchers have developed various types of polymeric mimics, such as polyethylenimine-catechol, chitosan-catechol, and other related catecholic polymers. Among them, chitosan-catechol is a promising adhesive polymer for biomedical applications. The conjugation of catechol onto chitosan dramatically increases its solubility from zero to nearly 60mg/mL (i.e., 6% w/v) in pH 7 aqueous solutions. The enhanced solubility maximizes the ability of catecholamine to behave similar to mussel adhesive proteins. Chitosan-catechol is biocompatible and exhibits excellent hemostatic ability and tissue adhesion, and thus, chitosan-catechol will be widely used in a variety of medical settings in the future. This review focuses on the various aspects of chitosan-catechol, including its (1) preparation methods, (2) physicochemical properties, and (3) current applications.

  10. VASCULAR ACTIONS OF ESTROGENS: FUNCTIONAL IMPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Virginia M.; Duckles, Sue P.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of estrogen exposure in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease is controversial. But it is clear that estrogen has important effects on vascular physiology and pathophysiology, with potential therapeutic implications. Therefore, it is the goal of this review to summarize, using an integrated approach, current knowledge of the vascular effects of estrogen, both in humans and in experimental animals. Aspects of estrogen synthesis and receptors, as well as general mechanisms of estrogenic action are reviewed with an emphasis on issues particularly relevant to the vascular system. Recent understanding of the impact of estrogen on mitochondrial function suggests that the longer lifespan of women compared to men may depend in part on the ability of estrogen to decrease production of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria. Mechanisms by which estrogen increases endothelial vasodilator function, promotes angiogenesis and modulates autonomic function are summarized. Key aspects of the relevant pathophysiology of inflammation, atherosclerosis, stroke, migraine and thrombosis are reviewed concerning current knowledge of estrogenic effects. A number of emerging concepts are addressed throughout. These include the importance of estrogenic formulation and route of administration and the impact of genetic polymorphisms, either in estrogen receptors or in enzymes responsible for estrogen metabolism, on responsiveness to hormone treatment. The importance of local metabolism of estrogenic precursors and the impact of timing for initiation of treatment and its duration are also considered. While consensus opinions are emphasized, controversial views are presented in order to stimulate future research. PMID:18579753

  11. Polymorphisms in genes involved in the estrogen pathway and mammographic density

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the estrogen pathway appear to be associated with breast cancer risk and possibly with mammographic density (MD), but little is known of these associations among premenopausal women. This study examines the association of 11 polymorphisms in five estrogen-related genes (estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERα, ERβ), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD17B1), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1)) with premenopausal MD. Effect modification of four estrogen-related factors (parity, age at menarche, hormonal derivatives use and body mass index (BMI)) on this relation is also assessed. Methods Polymorphisms were genotyped in 741 premenopausal Caucasian women whose MD was measured in absolute density (AD, cm2) and percent density using a computer-assisted method. Multivariate linear models were used to examine the associations (Ptrend) and interactions (Pi). Results None of the SNPs showed a statistically significant association with AD. However, each additional rare allele of rs1056836 CYP1B1 was associated with a reduction in AD among nulliparous women (Ptrend = 0.004), while no association was observed among parous women (Ptrend = 0.62; Pi = 0.02). An increase in the number of rare alleles of the HSD17B1 SNP (rs598126 and rs2010750) was associated with an increase in AD among women who never used hormonal derivatives (Ptrend = 0.06 and Ptrend = 0.04, respectively), but with a decrease in AD among past hormonal derivatives users (Ptrend = 0.04; Pi = 0.02 and Ptrend = 0.08; Pi = 0.01, respectively). Moreover, a negative association of rs598126 HSD17B1 SNP with AD was observed among women with higher BMI (>median) (Ptrend = 0.01; Pi = 0.02). A negative association between an increased number of rare alleles of COMT rs4680 SNP and AD was limited to women who never used hormonal derivatives (Ptrend = 0.02; Pi = 0.03) or with late age at menarche (>median) (Ptrend = 0

  12. Breast Cancer Risk in Relation to Urinary Estrogen Metabolites and Their Genetic Determinants: A Study Within the Dutch "DOM" Cohort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    methoxy metabolites of E1 and E2 2) examine relationship of polymorphic variants of genes encoding estrogen-metabolizing enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP1B1 ...exhaustive catalog of polymorphisms in the CYP1A1, CYP1B1 , CYP3A4 and COMT genes by searching the literature, and by DHPLC analysis. Complete... CYP1B1 , and CYP3A4. Furthermore, catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) is a key enzyme in the methoxylation of 2- and 4- hydroxyl groups, thus leading to

  13. A mitomycin-N6-deoxyadenosine adduct isolated from DNA.

    PubMed

    Palom, Y; Lipman, R; Musser, S M; Tomasz, M

    1998-03-01

    A minor N6-deoxyadenosine adduct of mitomycin C (MC) was isolated from synthetic oligonucleotides and calf thymus DNA, representing the first adduct of MC and a DNA base other than guanine. The structure of the adduct (8) was elucidated using submilligram quantities of total available material. UV difference spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and electrospray mass spectroscopy as well as chemical transformations were utilized in deriving the structure of 8. A series of synthetic oligonucleotides was designed to probe the specificities of the alkylation of adenine by MC. The nature and frequency of the oligonucleotide-MC adducts formed under conditions of reductive activation of MC were determined by their enzymatic digestion to the nucleoside level followed by quantitative analysis of the products by HPLC. The analyses indicated the following: (i) (A)n sequence is favored over (AT)n for adduct formation; (ii) the alkylation favors the duplex structure; (iii) at adenine sites only monofunctional alkylation occurs; (iv) the adenine-to-alkylation frequency in the model oligonucleotides was 0.3-0.6 relative to guanine alkylation at the 5'-ApG sequence but only 0.02-0.1 relative to guanine alkylation at 5'-CpG. The 5'-phosphodiester linkage of the MC-adenine adduct is resistant to snake venom diesterase. The overall ratio of adenine to guanine alkylation in calf thymus DNA was 0.03, indicating that 8 is a minor MC-DNA adduct relative to MC-DNA adducts at guanine residues in the present experimental residues in the present experimental system. However, the HPLC elution time of 8 coincides with that of a major, unknown MC adduct detected previously in mouse mammary tumor cells treated with radiolabeled MC [Bizanek, R., Chowdary, D., Arai, H., Kasai, M., Hughes, C. S., Sartorelli, A. C., Rockwell, S., and Tomasz, M. (1993) Cancer Res. 53, 5127-5134]. Thus, 8 may be identical or closely related to this major adduct formed in vivo. This possibility can now be tested by

  14. Dietary quercetin exacerbates the development of estrogen-induced breast tumors in female ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra; Mense, Sarah M; Bhat, Nimee K; Putty, Sandeep; Guthiel, William A; Remotti, Fabrizio; Bhat, Hari K

    2010-09-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that structurally mimic the endogenous estrogen 17beta-estradiol (E(2)). Despite intense investigation, the net effect of phytoestrogen exposure on the breast remains unclear. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of quercetin on E(2)-induced breast cancer in vivo. Female ACI rats were given quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) for 8 months. Animals were monitored weekly for palpable tumors, and at the end of the experiment, rats were euthanized, breast tumor and different tissues excised so that they could be examined for histopathologic changes, estrogen metabolic activity and oxidant stress. Quercetin alone did not induce mammary tumors in female ACI rats. However, in rats implanted with E(2) pellets, co-exposure to quercetin did not protect rats from E(2)-induced breast tumor development with 100% of the animals developing breast tumors within 8 months of treatment. No changes in serum quercetin levels were observed in quercetin and quercetin+E(2)-treated groups at the end of the experiment. Tumor latency was significantly decreased among rats from the quercetin+E(2) group relative to those in the E(2) group. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity was significantly downregulated in quercetin-exposed mammary tissue. Analysis of 8-isoprostane F(2alpha) (8-iso-PGF(2alpha)) levels as a marker of oxidant stress showed that quercetin did not decrease E(2)-induced oxidant stress. These results indicate that quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) does not confer protection against breast cancer, does not inhibit E(2)-induced oxidant stress and may exacerbate breast carcinogenesis in E(2)-treated ACI rats. Inhibition of COMT activity by quercetin may expose breast cells chronically to E(2) and catechol estrogens. This would permit longer exposure times to the carcinogenic metabolites of E(2) and chronic exposure to oxidant stress as a result of metabolic redox cycling to estrogen metabolites, and thus quercetin may exacerbate E(2

  15. Dietary quercetin exacerbates the development of estrogen-induced breast tumors in female ACI rats

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Bhupendra; Mense, Sarah M.; Bhat, Nimee K.; Putty, Sandeep; Guthiel, William A.; Remotti, Fabrizio; Bhat, Hari K.

    2010-09-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that structurally mimic the endogenous estrogen 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}). Despite intense investigation, the net effect of phytoestrogen exposure on the breast remains unclear. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of quercetin on E{sub 2}-induced breast cancer in vivo. Female ACI rats were given quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) for 8 months. Animals were monitored weekly for palpable tumors, and at the end of the experiment, rats were euthanized, breast tumor and different tissues excised so that they could be examined for histopathologic changes, estrogen metabolic activity and oxidant stress. Quercetin alone did not induce mammary tumors in female ACI rats. However, in rats implanted with E{sub 2} pellets, co-exposure to quercetin did not protect rats from E{sub 2}-induced breast tumor development with 100% of the animals developing breast tumors within 8 months of treatment. No changes in serum quercetin levels were observed in quercetin and quercetin + E{sub 2}-treated groups at the end of the experiment. Tumor latency was significantly decreased among rats from the quercetin + E{sub 2} group relative to those in the E{sub 2} group. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity was significantly downregulated in quercetin-exposed mammary tissue. Analysis of 8-isoprostane F{sub 2{alpha}} (8-iso-PGF{sub 2{alpha}}) levels as a marker of oxidant stress showed that quercetin did not decrease E{sub 2}-induced oxidant stress. These results indicate that quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) does not confer protection against breast cancer, does not inhibit E{sub 2}-induced oxidant stress and may exacerbate breast carcinogenesis in E{sub 2}-treated ACI rats. Inhibition of COMT activity by quercetin may expose breast cells chronically to E{sub 2} and catechol estrogens. This would permit longer exposure times to the carcinogenic metabolites of E{sub 2} and chronic exposure to oxidant stress as a result of metabolic redox

  16. Effect of an allophanic soil on humification reactions between catechol and glycine: Spectroscopic investigations of reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Masami; Miura, Akitaka; Sasaki, Masahide; Izumo, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Adduction of amino acids to phenols is a possible humification reaction pathway [F.J. Stevenson, Humus Chemistry: Genesis, Composition, Reaction, second ed., Wiley, New York, 1994, pp. 188-211; M.C. Wang, P.M. Huang, Sci. Total Environ. 62 (1987) 435; M.C. Wang, P.M. Huang, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 55 (1991) 1156; M.C. Wang, P.M. Huang, Geoderma 112 (2003) 31; M.C. Wang, P.M. Huang, Geoderma 124 (2005) 415]. To elucidate the reaction kinetics and products of abiotic humification, the effects of an allophanic soil on the adduction of amino acids to phenols were investigated using catechol (CT) and glycine (Gly) as a model phenol and amino acid, respectively. An aqueous solution containing CT and Gly (pH 7.0) in the presence of allophanic soil was incubated for 2 weeks, and the kinetics of the humification reactions were monitored by analysis of absorptivity at 600 nm ( E600). A mixture of CT and Gly in the absence of allophanic soil was used as a control. The E600 value increased markedly in the presence of allophanic soil. In addition, unreacted CT was detected in the control reaction mixture, but not in the allophane-containing reaction mixture. Under the sterilized conditions, absorbance at 600 nm for the control reaction mixture was significantly smaller than that for the allophanic soil-containing reaction mixture, which indicates there was no microbial participation during incubation. These results indicate that the allophanic soil effectively facilitated humification reactions between CT and Gly. The reaction mixtures were acidified and humic-like acid (HLA) was isolated as a precipitate. The elemental composition, acidic functional group contents, molecular weight, FT-IR, solid-state CP-MAS 13C NMR, and 1H NMR spectra of the purified HLAs were analyzed. The results of these analyses indicate that the nitrogen atom of Gly binds to the aromatic carbon of CT in the HLA products.

  17. Mixture interactions of xenoestrogens with endogenous estrogens.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. These environmental estrogens originate from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), m...

  18. Estrogen actions in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, M E

    2009-01-01

    This brief review summarizes the current state of the field for estrogen receptor actions in the cardiovascular system and the cardiovascular effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). It is organized into three parts: a short Introduction and overview of the current view of how estrogen works on blood vessels; a summary of the current status of clinical information regarding HRT and cardiovascular effects; and an update on state-of-the-art mouse models of estrogen action using estrogen receptor knockout mice.

  19. Identification of catechols as histone-lysine demethylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Anders L; Kristensen, Line H; Stephansen, Karen B; Kristensen, Jan B L; Helgstrand, Charlotte; Lees, Michael; Cloos, Paul; Helin, Kristian; Gajhede, Michael; Olsen, Lars

    2012-04-24

    Identification of inhibitors of histone-lysine demethylase (HDM) enzymes is important because of their involvement in the development of cancer. An ELISA-based assay was developed for identification of inhibitors of the HDM KDM4C in a natural products library. Based on one of the hits with affinity in the low μM range (1, a catechol), a subset of structurally related compounds was selected and tested against a panel of HDMs. In this subset, two inhibitors (2 and 10) had comparable affinities towards KDM4C and KDM6A but no effect on PHF8. One inhibitor restored H3K9me3 levels in KDM4C transfected U2-OS cells.

  20. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  1. Fish populations surviving estrogen pollution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Among the most common pollutants that enter the environment after passing municipal wastewater treatment are estrogens, especially the synthetic 17α-ethinylestradiol that is used in oral contraceptives. Estrogens are potent endocrine disruptors at concentrations frequently observed in surface waters. However, new genetic analyses suggest that some fish populations can be self-sustaining even in heavily polluted waters. We now need to understand the basis of this tolerance. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/12/1 PMID:24512617

  2. H-point curve isolation method for determination of catechol in complex unknown mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasani, Masoumeh; Mohammadi, Masoumeh; Shariati-Rad, Masoud; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2012-10-01

    In this work, the combination of H-point curve isolation method (HPCIM) and H-point standard additions method (HPSAM) was used for determination of catechol in the presence of phenolic interferents. Spectrophotometric multivariate calibration data constructed by successive standard additions of an analyte in an unknown matrix was used by the method. A cumulative spectrum for interferents in sample was extracted by HPCIM and then HPSAM is used for determination of the catechol concentration by obtained cumulative interferents spectrum. The method was tested with simulated data set. The spectrum obtained from applying HPCIM to the simulated data well agrees with the cumulative spectra of the interferents. The method was applied to the determination of catechol in the presence of highly overlapping interferents in synthetic ternary mixtures using spectrophotometric data. Moreover, the proposed method was successfully used for determination of catechol in real complicated matrices of tea and urine samples. Percent recoveries were between 95.4 and 113.6.

  3. Biotransformation of benzene and toluene to catechols by phenol hydroxylase from Arthrobacter sp. W1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fang; Shi, Sheng-Nan; Sun, Tie-Heng; Li, Ang; Zhou, Ji-Ti; Qu, Yuan-Yuan

    2013-06-01

    Phenol hydroxylase gene engineered microorganism (PHIND) was used to synthesize catechols from benzene and toluene by successive hydroxylation reaction. HPLC-MS and (1)H NMR analysis proved that the products of biotransformation were the corresponding catechols via the intermediate production of phenols. It was indicated that the main products of toluene oxidation were o-cresol and p-cresol. 3-Methylcatechol was the predominant product for m-cresol biotransformation. Formation rate of catechol (25 μM/min/g cell dry weight) was 1.43-fold higher than that of methylcatechols. It was suggested that phenol hydroxylase could be successfully used to transform both benzene and toluene to catechols by successive hydroxylation.

  4. BIOLOGICAL ADHESIVES. Adaptive synergy between catechol and lysine promotes wet adhesion by surface salt displacement.

    PubMed

    Maier, Greg P; Rapp, Michael V; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Butler, Alison

    2015-08-07

    In physiological fluids and seawater, adhesion of synthetic polymers to solid surfaces is severely limited by high salt, pH, and hydration, yet these conditions have not deterred the evolution of effective adhesion by mussels. Mussel foot proteins provide insights about adhesive adaptations: Notably, the abundance and proximity of catecholic Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and lysine residues hint at a synergistic interplay in adhesion. Certain siderophores—bacterial iron chelators—consist of paired catechol and lysine functionalities, thereby providing a convenient experimental platform to explore molecular synergies in bioadhesion. These siderophores and synthetic analogs exhibit robust adhesion energies (E(ad) ≥-15 millijoules per square meter) to mica in saline pH 3.5 to 7.5 and resist oxidation. The adjacent catechol-lysine placement provides a "one-two punch," whereby lysine evicts hydrated cations from the mineral surface, allowing catechol binding to underlying oxides.

  5. Protein-responsive assemblies from catechol-metal ion supramolecular coordination.

    PubMed

    Yuan, C; Chen, J; Yu, S; Chang, Y; Mao, J; Xu, Y; Luo, W; Zeng, B; Dai, L

    2015-03-21

    Supramolecular self-assembly driven by catechol-metal ion coordination has gained great success in the fabrication of functional materials including adhesives, capsules, coatings and hydrogels. However, this route has encountered a great challenge in the construction of nanoarchitectures in the absence of removable templates, because of the uncontrollable crosslinking of catechol-metal ion coordination. Herein, we show that a supramolecular approach, combining both catechol-metal ion coordination and polymer self-assembly together, can organize polymers into hybrid nanoassemblies ranging from solid particles, homogeneous vesicles to Janus vesicles. Without the introduction of a specific binding ligand or complicated molecular design, these assemblies can totally disassemble in response to proteins. UV/vis absorption, fluorescence quenching and recovery investigations have confirmed that proteins can seize metal ions from the hybrid nanoassemblies, thus causing the degradation of catechol-metal ion coordination networks.

  6. H-point curve isolation method for determination of catechol in complex unknown mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hasani, Masoumeh; Mohammadi, Masoumeh; Shariati-Rad, Masoud; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2012-10-01

    In this work, the combination of H-point curve isolation method (HPCIM) and H-point standard additions method (HPSAM) was used for determination of catechol in the presence of phenolic interferents. Spectrophotometric multivariate calibration data constructed by successive standard additions of an analyte in an unknown matrix was used by the method. A cumulative spectrum for interferents in sample was extracted by HPCIM and then HPSAM is used for determination of the catechol concentration by obtained cumulative interferents spectrum. The method was tested with simulated data set. The spectrum obtained from applying HPCIM to the simulated data well agrees with the cumulative spectra of the interferents. The method was applied to the determination of catechol in the presence of highly overlapping interferents in synthetic ternary mixtures using spectrophotometric data. Moreover, the proposed method was successfully used for determination of catechol in real complicated matrices of tea and urine samples. Percent recoveries were between 95.4 and 113.6.

  7. Metal salts of alkyl catechol dithiophosphoric acids and oil compositions containing the salts

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, E.S.; Liston, T.V.

    1988-03-08

    Metal salts of alkyl catechol esters of dithiophosphoric acid suitable as additives in oil compositions are disclosed in this patent. Oil compositions containing the salts of such esters show improved extreme pressure/anti-wear and anit-oxidant properties.

  8. Adaptive synergy between catechol and lysine promotes wet adhesion by surface salt displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Greg P.; Rapp, Michael V.; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Butler, Alison

    2015-08-01

    In physiological fluids and seawater, adhesion of synthetic polymers to solid surfaces is severely limited by high salt, pH, and hydration, yet these conditions have not deterred the evolution of effective adhesion by mussels. Mussel foot proteins provide insights about adhesive adaptations: Notably, the abundance and proximity of catecholic Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and lysine residues hint at a synergistic interplay in adhesion. Certain siderophores—bacterial iron chelators—consist of paired catechol and lysine functionalities, thereby providing a convenient experimental platform to explore molecular synergies in bioadhesion. These siderophores and synthetic analogs exhibit robust adhesion energies (Ead ≥-15 millijoules per square meter) to mica in saline pH 3.5 to 7.5 and resist oxidation. The adjacent catechol-lysine placement provides a “one-two punch,” whereby lysine evicts hydrated cations from the mineral surface, allowing catechol binding to underlying oxides.

  9. Thermally stable drilling fluid additive comprised of a copolymer of catechol-based monomer

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.D.

    1986-06-17

    A water soluble polymer is described having thermal stability and exhibiting utility as an aqueous drilling fluid additive comprising: (a) a major portion of a catechol based monomer; (b) a minor portion of a dicarboxylic acid monomer.

  10. Antitumor Trans Platinum Adducts of GMP and AMP

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangzhong; Sivo, Maria F.; Natile, Giovanni

    2000-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that several analogues of the clinically ineffective trans-DDP exhibit antitumor activity comparable to that of cis-DDP. The present paper describes the binding of antitumor trans-[PtCl2(E-iminoether)2] (trans-EE) to guanosinemonophosphate (GMP) and adenosinemonophosphate (AMP). We have used HPLC and 1H and 15N NMR to characterize the different adducts. In the case of a 1:1 mixture of trans-EE and GMP, at an early stage of the reaction, a monofunctional adduct is formed which, subsequently, is partly converted into a monosolvated monofunctional species. After about 70 hours an equilibrium is established between chloro and solvato monofunctional adducts at a ratio of 30/70. In the presence of excess GMP (4:1) the initially formed monofunctional adducts react further to give two bifunctional adducts, one with the iminoether ligands in their original E configurations and the other with the iminoether ligands having one E and the other, Z configurations. The coordination geometry obtained by energy minimization calculations is in qualitative agreement with 2D NMR data. PMID:18475942

  11. PROTEIN ADDUCTS AS BIOMAKERS OF EXPOSURE TO ORGANOPHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Marsillach, Judit; Costa, Lucio G.; Furlong, Clement E.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to organophosphorus (OP) compounds can lead to serious neurological damage or death. Following bioactivation by the liver cytochromes P450, the OP metabolites produced are potent inhibitors of serine active-site enzymes including esterases, proteases and lipases. OPs may form adducts on other cellular proteins. Blood cholinesterases (ChEs) have long served as biomarkers of OP exposure in humans. However, the enzymatic assays used for biomonitoring OP exposures have several drawbacks. A more useful approach will focus on multiple biomarkers and avoid problems with the enzymatic activity assays. OP inhibitory effects result from a covalent bond with the active-site serine of the target enzymes. The serine OP adducts become irreversible following a process referred to as aging where one alkyl group dissociates over variable lengths of time depending on the OP adduct. The OP-adducted enzyme then remains in circulation until it is degraded, allowing for a longer window of detection compared with direct analysis of OPs or their metabolites. Mass spectrometry (MS) provides a very sensitive method for identification of post-translational protein modifications. MS analyses of the percentage adduction of the active-site serine of biomarker proteins such as ChEs will eliminate the need for basal activity levels of the individual and will provide for a more accurate determination of OP exposure. MS analysis of biomarker proteins also provides information about the OP that has caused inhibition. Other useful biomarker proteins include other serine hydrolases, albumin, tubulin and transferrin. PMID:23261756

  12. Glutathione Adduct Patterns of Michael-Acceptor Carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Slawik, Christian; Rickmeyer, Christiane; Brehm, Martin; Böhme, Alexander; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2017-02-22

    Glutathione (GSH) has so far been considered to facilitate detoxification of soft organic electrophiles through covalent binding at its cysteine (Cys) thiol group, followed by stepwise catalyzed degradation and eventual elimination along the mercapturic acid pathway. Here we show that in contrast to expectation from HSAB theory, Michael-acceptor ketones, aldehydes and esters may form also single, double and triple adducts with GSH involving β-carbon attack at the much harder N-terminus of the γ-glutamyl (Glu) unit of GSH. In particular, formation of the GSH-N single adduct contradicts the traditional view that S alkylation always forms the initial reaction of GSH with Michael-acceptor carbonyls. To this end, chemoassay analyses of the adduct formation of GSH with nine α,β-unsaturated carbonyls employing high performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry have been performed. Besides enriching the GSH adductome and potential biomarker applications, electrophilic N-terminus functio-nalization is likely to impair GSH homeostasis substantially through blocking the γ-glutamyl transferase catalysis of the first breakdown step of modified GSH, and thus its timely reconstitution. The discussion includes a comparison with cyclic adducts of GSH and furan metabolites as reported in literature, and quantum chemically calculated thermodynamics of hard-hard, hard-soft and soft-soft adducts.

  13. Organocatalytic removal of formaldehyde adducts from RNA and DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Harcourt, Emily M.; Hewings, David S.; Lovejoy, Alexander F.; Kurtz, David M.; Ehrenschwender, Thomas; Barandun, Luzi J.; Roost, Caroline; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Kool, Eric T.

    2015-09-01

    Formaldehyde is universally used to fix tissue specimens, where it forms hemiaminal and aminal adducts with biomolecules, hindering the ability to retrieve molecular information. Common methods for removing these adducts involve extended heating, which can cause extensive degradation of nucleic acids, particularly RNA. Here, we show that water-soluble bifunctional catalysts (anthranilates and phosphanilates) speed the reversal of formaldehyde adducts of mononucleotides over standard buffers. Studies with formaldehyde-treated RNA oligonucleotides show that the catalysts enhance adduct removal, restoring unmodified RNA at 37 °C even when extensively modified, while avoiding the high temperatures that promote RNA degradation. Experiments with formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cell samples show that the catalysis is compatible with common RNA extraction protocols, with detectable RNA yields increased by 1.5-2.4-fold using a catalyst under optimized conditions and by 7-25-fold compared with a commercial kit. Such catalytic strategies show promise for general use in reversing formaldehyde adducts in clinical specimens.

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of catechols in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microglia cells: inhibition of microglial neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Long Tai; Ryu, Geun-Mu; Kwon, Byoung-Mog; Lee, Won-Ha; Suk, Kyoungho

    2008-06-24

    Microglial activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases by producing various proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO). In the present study, the anti-inflammatory and subsequent neuroprotective effects of catechol and its derivatives including 3-methylcatechol, 4-methylcatechol, and 4-tert-butylcatechol were investigated in microglia and neuroblastoma cells in culture. The four catechol compounds showed anti-inflammatory effects with different potency. The catechols significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NO and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production in BV-2 microglia cells. The catechols also inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-alpha at mRNA or protein levels in the LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. In addition, the catechols inhibited LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, IkappaB degradation, and phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in BV-2 cells. Moreover, the catechols attenuated the cytotoxicity of LPS-stimulated BV-2 microglia toward co-cultured rat B35 neuroblastoma cells. The catechols, however, did not protect B35 cells against H(2)O(2) toxicity, indicating that the compounds exerted the neuroprotective effect by inhibiting the inflammatory activation of microglia in the co-culture. The anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties of the catechols in cultured microglia and neuroblastoma cells suggest a therapeutic potential of these compounds for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases that are associated with an excessive microglial activation.

  15. Surface water enhances the uptake and photoreactivity of gaseous catechol on solid iron(III) chloride.

    PubMed

    Tofan-Lazar, Julia; Al-Abadleh, Hind A

    2014-01-01

    Uptake and photoreactivity of catechol-Fe complexes are investigated at the gas/solid interface under humid and dry conditions, along with the nature of the hydrogen-bonding network of adsorbed water. Catechol was chosen as a simple model for organics in aerosols. Iron chloride was used to distinguish ionic mobility from binding to coordinated iron(III) in hematite. Studies were conducted using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy as a function of irradiation time. Results show that adsorbed water at 30% relative humidity (RH), not light, increases the concentration of adsorbed catechol by a factor of 3 over 60 min relative to dry conditions. Also, our data show that, at 30% RH and under light and dark conditions, growth factors describing the concentration of adsorbed catechol are very similar suggesting that light does not significantly enhance the uptake of catechol vapor on FeCl3. Surface water also enhances the initial photodecay kinetics of catechol-Fe complexes at 30% RH by a factor of 10 relative to control experiments (RH < 1%, or no FeCl3 under humid conditions). Absorptions assigned to carbonyl groups were not observed with irradiation time, which was explained by the dominance of FeCl(2+) species relative to FeOH(2+) in the highly acidic "quasi-liquid" phase at 30% RH. Clear differences in the hydrogen-bonding network upon gaseous catechol uptake are observed in the dark and light and during the photodecay of adsorbed catechol. The implications of these results on our understanding of interfacial processes in aged iron-containing surfaces are discussed.

  16. Modulation of human multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 1 (ABCC1) and MRP2 (ABCC2) transport activities by endogenous and exogenous glutathione-conjugated catechol metabolites.

    PubMed

    Slot, Andrew J; Wise, Dana D; Deeley, Roger G; Monks, Terrence J; Cole, Susan P C

    2008-03-01

    Members of the multidrug resistance protein (MRP/ABCC) subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins transport a wide array of anionic compounds, including sulfate, glucuronide, and glutathione (GSH) conjugates. The present study tested the ATP-dependent vesicular transport of leukotriene C(4) and 17beta-estradiol 17-(beta-d-glucuronide) (E(2)17betaG) mediated by the MRP1 and MRP2 transporters in the presence of six potential modulators from three different classes of GSH-conjugated catechol metabolites: the ecstasy metabolite 5-(glutathion-S-yl)-N-methyl-alpha-methyldopamine (5-GS-N-Me-alpha-MeDA), the caffeic acid metabolite 2-(glutathion-S-yl)-caffeic acid (2-GS-CA), and four GSH conjugates of 2-hydroxy (OH) and 4-OH estrogens (GS estrogens). MRP1-mediated E(2)17betaG transport was inhibited in a competitive manner with a relative order of potency of GS estrogens (IC(50) <1 microM) > 2-GS-CA (IC(50) 3 microM) > 5-GS-N-Me-alpha-MeDA (IC(50) 31 microM). MRP2-mediated transport was inhibited with a similar order of potency, except the 2-hydroxy-4-(glutathion-S-yl)-estradiol and 4-hydroxy-2-(glutathion-S-yl)-estradiol conjugates were approximately 50- and 300-fold less potent, respectively. Transport activity was unaffected by N-acetylcysteine conjugates of N-Me-alpha-MeDA and CA. The position of GSH conjugation appears important as all four GS estrogen conjugates tested were potent inhibitors of MRP1 transport, but only the 2-hydroxy-1-(glutathion-S-yl)-estradiol and 2-hydroxy-1-(glutathion-S-yl)-estrone conjugates were potent inhibitors of MRP2-mediated transport. In conclusion, we have identified three new classes of MRP1 and MRP2 modulators and demonstrated that one of these, the estrogen conjugates, shows unanticipated differences in their interactions with the two transporters.

  17. Extradiol dioxygenase-SiO₂ sol-gel modified electrode for catechol and its derivatives detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Qu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xuwang; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Hongtao

    2011-07-15

    A feasible and sensitive biosensor for catechol and its derivatives using 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase (BphC)-modified glassy carbon electrode was successfully constructed by polyvinyl alcohol-modified SiO₂ sol-gel method. The as-prepared biosensor was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and the surface topography of the film was imaged by atomic force microscope. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was applied to reveal the catalytic mechanism. BphC embedded in SiO₂ gel maintained its bioactivity well and exhibited excellent eletrocatalytical response to both catechol and some of its derivatives (such as 3-methylcatechol and 4-methylcatechol). The biosensor showed a linear amperometric response range between 0.002 mM and 0.8 mM catechol. And the sensitivity was 1.268 mA/(mM cm²) with a detection limit of 0.428 μM for catechol (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the BphC biosensor exhibited perfect selectivity for catechol in the mixtures of catechol and phenol. It was suggested that this flexible protocol would open up a new avenue for designing other ring-cleavage enzyme biosensors, which could be widely used for monitoring various kinds of environmental pollutants.

  18. Removing Dissolved Silica from Waste Water with Catechol and Active Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sasan, Koroush; Brady, Patrick; Krumhansl, James L.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2017-01-01

    Fresh water scarcity is going to be a global great challenge in the near future because of the increasing population. Our water resources are limited and, hence, water treatment and recycling methods are the only alternatives for fresh water procurement in the upcoming decades. Water treatment and recycling methods serve to remove harmful or problematic constituents from ground, surface and waste waters prior to its consumption, industrial supply, or other uses. Scale formation in industrial and domestic installations is still an important problem during water treatment. In water treatment, silica scaling is a real and constant concern for plant operations. The focus of this study is on the viability of using a combination of catechol and active carbon to remove dissolved silica from concentrated cooling tower water (CCTW). Various analytical methods, such as ICP-MS and UV-vis, were used to understand the structure-property relationship between the material and the silica removal results. UV-Vis indicates that catechol can react with silica ions and form a silica-catecholate complex. The speciation calculation of catechol and silica shows that catechol and silica bind in the pH range of 8 – 10; there is no evidence of linkage between them in neutral and acidic pHs. The silica removal results indicate that using ~4g/L of catechol and 10g/L active carbon removes up to 50% of the dissolved silica from the CCTW.

  19. Melasma Associated with Topical Estrogen Cream

    PubMed Central

    Schiechert, Rachel A.; Zaiac, Martin N.

    2017-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with hyperpigmented patches on her upper extremities. The patient had begun using a topical estrogen cream in the affected areas prior to noticing the hyperpigmentation. A diagnosis of melasma secondary to topical estrogen cream was made. While systemic hormones are a well-documented trigger for the development of melasma, this case represents the first report of melasma associated with topical estrogens. Topical estrogens are frequently prescribed to postmenopausal women for skin rejuvenation. Melasma should be discussed as a potential side effect of systemic as well as topical estrogen preparations. PMID:28367263

  20. P450 enzymes of estrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Martucci, C P; Fishman, J

    1993-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous estrogens undergo extensive oxidative metabolism by specific cytochrome P450 enzymes. Certain drugs and xenobiotics have been found to be potent inducers of estrogen hydroxylating enzymes with C-2 hydroxylase induction being greater than that of C-16 hydroxylase. Oxygenated estrogen metabolites have different biological activities, with C-2 metabolites having limited or no activity and C-4 and C-16 metabolites having similar potency to estradiol. Pathophysiological roles for some of the oxygenated estrogen metabolites have been proposed, e.g. 16 alpha-hydroxyestrone and 4-hydroxyestrone. These reactive estrogens are capable of damaging cellular proteins and DNA and may be carcinogenic in specific cells.

  1. Study of S0 and S1 states of catechol and catechol-Al(III) systems in aqueous solution by TD-DFT methods and electronic spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornard, Jean-Paul; Lapouge, Christine; Allet-Bodelot, Cyrille

    2010-04-01

    The electronic structures of the ground and the lowest excited states of catechol and its 1:1 complex with aluminium have been optimized by taking into account the solvent effects. The good agreement between the theoretical absorption and fluorescence emission wavelengths with the experimental ones has allowed the validation of the computed electronic structures. If the structure of the S0 state of catechol is planar, it is twisted in the S1 state in water, contrary to the results obtained in vacuum. In opposition, the changes observed for the 1:1 complex structures in the S0 and S1 states are negligible.

  2. Estrogens and Male Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wynder, Jalissa L.; Nicholson, Tristan M.; DeFranco, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology and affect the majority of men at some time during their lives. The development of BPH/LUTS is associated with an increased ratio of estrogen to androgen levels, and this ratio, when mimicked in a variety of animals, induces BPH and lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, estrogens have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Numerous endogenous and exogenous estrogens exist in humans. These estrogens act via multiple estrogen receptors to promote or inhibit prostatic hyperplasia and other BPH-associated processes. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue, and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of estrogen action directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area and remains to be elucidated. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation illustrating their potential roles in the development of BPH as therapy. More work will be required to identify estrogen signaling pathways associated with LUTD in order to develop more efficacious drugs for BPH treatment and prevention. PMID:26156791

  3. DNA adducts: Mass spectrometry methods and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, P.B. . E-mail: pbf1@le.ac.uk; Brown, K.; Tompkins, E.; Emms, V.L.; Jones, D.J.L.; Singh, R.; Phillips, D.H.

    2005-09-01

    Detection of DNA adducts is widely used for the monitoring of exposure to genotoxic carcinogens. Knowledge of the nature and amounts of DNA adducts formed in vivo also gives valuable information regarding the mutational effects that may result from particular exposures. The power of mass spectrometry (MS) to achieve qualitative and quantitative analyses of human DNA adducts has increased greatly in recent years with the development of improved chromatographic interfaces and ionisation sources. Adducts have been detected on nucleic acid bases, 2'-deoxynucleosides or 2'-deoxynucleotides, with LC-MS/MS being the favoured technique for many of these analyses. Our current applications of this technique include the determination of N7-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-guanine, which was postulated to be found as a DNA repair product in urine following exposure to acrylamide, and of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyadenosine, as markers of oxidative damage in human lymphocyte DNA. Higher sensitivity (with a detection limit of 1-10 adducts/10{sup 12} nucleotides) may be achieved by the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), although this requires the presence of certain isotopes, such as [{sup 14}C], in the material being analysed. In order to make this technique more amenable for studies of human exposure to environmental carcinogens, new postlabelling techniques, incorporating [{sup 14}C] into specific DNA adducts after formation, are being developed. It is expected that combining the use of advanced MS techniques with existing {sup 32}P-postlabelling and immunochemical methodologies will contribute greatly to the understanding of the burden of human exposure to environmental carcinogens.

  4. Possible rare congenital dysinnervation disorder: congenital ptosis associated with adduction.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Sílvia; Beselga, Diana; Campos, Sónia; Neves, Arminda; Campos, Joana; Carvalho, Sílvia; Silva, Eduardo; Castro Sousa, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Ptosis is defined as an abnormally low position of the upper eyelid margin. It can be congenital or acquired, uni or bilateral, and isolated or associated with other ocular and nonocular defects. We report a case of a female child, aged 8 years, with congenital right ptosis increased on right adduction and with left ptosis on left adduction. There was no horizontal ocular movement limitation. Apparent underaction of the right inferior oblique muscle was also present. We believe that within the possible mechanisms it is more likely that it is a congenital innervation dysgenesis syndrome (CID)/congenital cranial dysinnervation disorder (CCDD).

  5. Chemistry and Biology of Aflatoxin-DNA Adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Michael P.; Banerjee, Surajit; Brown, Kyle L.; Egli, Martin

    2012-03-27

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal contaminant of stored rice, wheat, corn, and other grainstuffs, and peanuts. This is of concern to human health because it produces the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}), which is genotoxic and is implicated in the etiology of liver cancer. AFB{sub 1} is oxidized in vivo by cytochrome P450 to form aflatoxin B{sub 1} epoxide, which forms an N7-dG adduct (AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG) in DNA. The latter rearranges to a formamidopyrimidine (AFB{sub 1}-FAPY) derivative that equilibrates between {alpha} and {beta} anomers of the deoxyribose. In DNA, both the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG and AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adducts intercalate above the 5'-face of the damaged guanine. Each produces G {yields} T transversions in Escherichia coli, but the AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adduct is more mutagenic. The Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA polymerase IV (Dpo4) provides a model for understanding error-prone bypass of the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG and AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adducts. It bypasses the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG adduct, but it conducts error-prone replication past the AFB{sub 1}-FAPY adduct, including mis-insertion of dATP, consistent with the G {yields} T mutations characteristic of AFB{sub 1} mutagenesis in E. coli. Crystallographic analyses of a series of binary and ternary complexes with the Dpo4 polymerase revealed differing orientations of the N7-C8 bond of the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG adduct as compared to the N{sup 5}-C8 bond in the AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adduct, and differential accommodation of the intercalated AFB{sub 1} moieties within the active site. These may modulate AFB{sub 1} lesion bypass by this polymerase.

  6. Malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde-adducted protein inhalation causes lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Todd A; Kharbanda, Kusum K; McCaskill, Michael L; Tuma, Dean J; Yanov, Daniel; DeVasure, Jane; Sisson, Joseph H

    2012-02-01

    In addition to cigarette smoking, alcohol exposure is also associated with increased lung infections and decreased mucociliary clearance. However, little research has been conducted on the combination effects of alcohol and cigarette smoke on lungs. Previously, we have demonstrated in a mouse model that the combination of cigarette smoke and alcohol exposure results in the formation of a very stable hybrid malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA)-adducted protein in the lung. In in vitro studies, MAA-adducted protein stimulates bronchial epithelial cell interleukin-8 (IL-8) via the activation of protein kinase C epsilon (PKCɛ). We hypothesized that direct MAA-adducted protein exposure in the lungs would mimic such a combination of smoke and alcohol exposure leading to airway inflammation. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6J female mice were intranasally instilled with either saline, 30μL of 50μg/mL bovine serum albumin (BSA)-MAA, or unadducted BSA for up to 3 weeks. Likewise, human lung surfactant proteins A and D (SPA and SPD) were purified from human pulmonary proteinosis lung lavage fluid and successfully MAA-adducted in vitro. Similar to BSA-MAA, SPD-MAA was instilled into mouse lungs. Lungs were necropsied and assayed for histopathology, PKCɛ activation, and lung lavage chemokines. In control mice instilled with saline, normal lungs had few inflammatory cells. No significant effects were observed in unadducted BSA- or SPD-instilled mice. However, when mice were instilled with BSA-MAA or SPD-MAA for 3 weeks, a significant peribronchiolar localization of inflammatory cells was observed. Both BSA-MAA and SPD-MAA stimulated increased lung lavage neutrophils and caused a significant elevation in the chemokine, keratinocyte chemokine, which is a functional homologue to human IL-8. Likewise, MAA-adducted protein stimulated the activation of airway and lung slice PKCɛ. These data support that the MAA-adducted protein induces a proinflammatory response in the lungs and

  7. Quantitation of DNA Adducts Induced by 1,3-Butadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangaraju, Dewakar; Villalta, Peter W.; Wickramaratne, Susith; Swenberg, James; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2014-07-01

    Human exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) present in automobile exhaust, cigarette smoke, and forest fires is of great concern because of its potent carcinogenicity. The adverse health effects of BD are mediated by its epoxide metabolites such as 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), which covalently modify genomic DNA to form promutagenic nucleobase adducts. Because of their direct role in cancer, BD-DNA adducts can be used as mechanism-based biomarkers of BD exposure. In the present work, a mass spectrometry-based methodology was developed for accurate, sensitive, and precise quantification of EB-induced N-7-(1-hydroxy-3-buten-2-yl) guanine (EB-GII) DNA adducts in vivo. In our approach, EB-GII adducts are selectively released from DNA backbone by neutral thermal hydrolysis, followed by ultrafiltration, offline HPLC purification, and isotope dilution nanoLC/ESI+-HRMS3 analysis on an Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer. Following method validation, EB-GII lesions were quantified in human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells treated with micromolar concentrations of EB and in liver tissues of rats exposed to sub-ppm concentrations of BD (0.5-1.5 ppm). EB-GII concentrations increased linearly from 1.15 ± 0.23 to 10.11 ± 0.45 adducts per 106 nucleotides in HT1080 cells treated with 0.5-10 μM DEB. EB-GII concentrations in DNA of laboratory rats exposed to 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 ppm BD were 0.17 ± 0.05, 0.33 ± 0.08, and 0.50 ± 0.04 adducts per 106 nucleotides, respectively. We also used the new method to determine the in vivo half-life of EB-GII adducts in rat liver DNA (2.20 ± 0.12 d) and to detect EB-GII in human blood DNA. To our knowledge, this is the first application of nanoLC/ESI+-HRMS3 Orbitrap methodology to quantitative analysis of DNA adducts in vivo.

  8. Laboratory studies of weakly bound adducts of atmospheric interest

    SciTech Connect

    Wine, P.H.; Nicovich, J.M.; Stickel, R.E.; Hynes, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    It is now well-established that weakly bound adducts, i.e., species whose life-times toward unimolecular decomposition are only fractions of a second under atmospheric conditions, play an important role in tropospheric sulfur chemistry. In this presentation, recent results from our laboratory concerning the existence and atmospheric fates of two such weakly bound species, (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}S-OH and (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}S-Cl, will be discussed. In addition, evidence for the formation of weakly bound adducts in reactions of chlorine atoms with methyl halides will be presented.

  9. A Cyclic Disilylated Stannylene: Synthesis, Dimerization, and Adduct Formation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Reaction of 1,4-dipotassio-1,1,4,4-tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)tetramethyltetrasilane with [(Me3Si)2N]2Sn led to the formation of an endocyclic distannene via the dimerization of a transient stannylene. In the presence of strong donor molecules such as PEt3, the stannylene could be trapped as adduct. Reaction of the PEt3 derivative with B(C6F5)3 gave rise to the formation of the stannylene B(C6F5)3 adduct. PMID:21438553

  10. The Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Val158Met Polymorphism Contributes to the Risk of Breast Cancer in the Chinese Population: An Updated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Guo-Xing; Cao, Yu-Wen; Li, Wen-Qin; Li, Yu-Cong; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme plays a central role in estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. Emerging evidence from association studies has revealed that the functional Val158Met polymorphism (rs4680 G>A) of the Catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT) has been implicated in susceptibility to breast cancer in the Chinese population, while results of individual published studies remain inconclusive and inconsistent. To assess this association in the Chinese population, a meta-analysis was performed. Methods Eligible studies were searched on MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and the Chinese Biomedicine Database. Odds ratios (ORs) with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled to assess the association between COMT polymorphisms and the risk of breast cancer using RevMan 5.2 and Stata 12.0 software. Results The meta-analysis included 14 eligible studies, with a total of 4,626 breast cancer cases and 5,637 controls. Overall, the COMT Val158Met polymorphism (rs4680 G>A) was significantly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in several genetic models (A/A vs. G/G: OR, 1.59, 95% CI, 1.12-2.27; A/A vs. G/A+G/G: OR, 1.62, 95% CI, 1.14-2.29; A vs. G: OR, 1.15, 95% CI, 1.00-1.32), and a subgroup analysis according to menopausal status showed that this association was especially evident among premenopausal Chinese women (A/A vs. G/G: OR, 1.87, 95% CI, 0.99-3.54; A/A vs. G/A+G/G: OR, 1.94, 95% CI, 1.03-3.63). Conclusion The results of this meta-analysis indicated that COMT Val158Met variants contribute to breast cancer susceptibility in the Chinese population, particularly among premenopausal women. PMID:25013436

  11. Characterization of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Planococcus sp. strain S5 induced by high phenol concentration.

    PubMed

    Hupert-Kocurek, Katarzyna; Guzik, Urszula; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at characterization of a new catechol 2,3-dioxygenase isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium able to utilize phenol as the sole carbon and energy source. Planococcus sp. strain S5 grown on 1 or 2 mM phenol showed activity of both a catechol 1,2- and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase while at a higher concentrations of phenol only catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was observed. The enzyme was optimally active at 60°C and pH 8.0. Kinetic studies showed that the K(m) and V(max) of the enzyme were 42.70 µM and 329.96 mU, respectively. The catechol 2,3-dioxygenase showed the following relative meta-cleavage activities for various catechols tested: catechol (100%), 3-methylcatechol (13.67%), 4-methylcatechol (106.33%) and 4-chlorocatechol (203.80%). The high reactivity of this enzyme towards 4-chlorocatechol is different from that observed for other catechol 2,3-dioxygenases. Nucleotide sequencing and homology search revealed that the gene encoding the S5 catechol 2,3-dioxygenase shared the greatest homology with the known genes encoding isoenzymes from Gram-negative Pseudomonas strains.

  12. Heterogeneous Reactions of Surface-Adsorbed Catechol: A Comparison of Tropospheric Aerosol Surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.; Woodill, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Surface-adsorbed organics can alter the chemistry of tropospheric solid-air interfaces, such as aerosol and ground level surfaces, thereby impacting photochemical cycles and altering aerosol properties. The nature of the surface can also influence the chemistry of the surface-adsorbed organic. We employed diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to monitor the adsorption of gaseous catechol on several tropospheric aerosol surrogates and to investigate the subsequent reactivity of adsorbed-catechol with nitrogen dioxide and, in separate preliminary experiments, ozone. Graphite, kaolinite, and sodium halide (NaF, NaCl, NaBr) powders served as carbonaceous, mineral and sea salt aerosol surrogates, respectively. Broad OH stretching bands for adsorbed catechol shifted to lower wavenumber with peak frequencies following the trend NaBr > NaCl > NaF ≈ kaolinite, consistent with the increasing basicity of the halide anions and basic Brønsted sites on kaolinite. The dark heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with NaCl-adsorbed catechol at relative humidity (RH) <2% promoted nitration forming 4-nitrocatechol and oxidation forming 1,2-benzoquinone and the ring cleavage product muconic acid, with product yields of 88%, 8%, and 4%, respectively. 4-Nitrocatechol was the dominant product for catechol adsorbed on NaF and kaolinite, while NaBr-adsorbed catechol produced less 4-nitrocatechol and more 1,2-benzoquinone and muconic acid. For all three sodium halides, the reactions of NO2 with adsorbed catechol were orders of magnitude faster than between NO2 and each NaX substrate. 4-Nitrocatechol rates and product yields were consistent with the relative ability of each substrate to enhance the deprotonated nature of adsorbed-catechol. Increasing the relative humidity caused the rate of each product channel to decrease and also altered the product branching ratios. Most notably, 1,2-benzoquinone formation decreased significantly even at 13% RH. The dramatic

  13. Strategy for identifying unknown hemoglobin adducts using adductome LC-MS/MS data: Identification of adducts corresponding to acrylic acid, glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and 1-octen-3-one.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Henrik; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2016-06-01

    Electrophilic compounds have the ability to form adducts with nucleophilic sites in proteins and DNA in tissues, and thereby constitute risks for toxic effects. Adductomic approaches are developed for systematic screening of adducts to DNA and blood proteins, with the aim to detect unknown internal exposures to electrophiles. In a previous adductomic screening of adducts to N-terminals in hemoglobin, using LC-MS/MS, 19 unknown adducts were detected in addition to seven previously identified adducts. The present paper describes the identification of four of these unknown adducts, as well as the strategy used to identify them. Using LC-MS data from the screening, hypotheses about adduct identities were formulated: probable precursor electrophiles with matching molecular weights were suggested based on the molecular weights of the modifications and the retention times of the analytes, in combination with comparisons of theoretical Log P calculations and databases. Reference adducts were generated by incubation of blood samples with the hypothesized precursor electrophiles. The four identified precursor electrophiles, corresponding to the observed unknown adducts, were glyoxal, methylglyoxal, acrylic acid and 1-octen-3-one. Possible origins/exposure sources and toxicological information concerning the electrophilic precursors are discussed. The identified adducts could be explored as possible biomarkers for exposure.

  14. 40 CFR 721.1850 - Toluene sulfonamide bis-phe-nol A epoxy adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... epoxy adduct. 721.1850 Section 721.1850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1850 Toluene sulfonamide bis-phe-nol A epoxy adduct. (a) Chemical... as toluene sulfonamide bisphenol A epoxy adduct (PMN P-90-113) is subject to reporting under...

  15. 40 CFR 721.1850 - Toluene sulfonamide bis-phe-nol A epoxy adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... epoxy adduct. 721.1850 Section 721.1850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1850 Toluene sulfonamide bis-phe-nol A epoxy adduct. (a) Chemical... as toluene sulfonamide bisphenol A epoxy adduct (PMN P-90-113) is subject to reporting under...

  16. 40 CFR 721.1850 - Toluene sulfonamide bis-phe-nol A epoxy adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... epoxy adduct. 721.1850 Section 721.1850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1850 Toluene sulfonamide bis-phe-nol A epoxy adduct. (a) Chemical... as toluene sulfonamide bisphenol A epoxy adduct (PMN P-90-113) is subject to reporting under...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1850 - Toluene sulfonamide bis-phe-nol A epoxy adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... epoxy adduct. 721.1850 Section 721.1850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1850 Toluene sulfonamide bis-phe-nol A epoxy adduct. (a) Chemical... as toluene sulfonamide bisphenol A epoxy adduct (PMN P-90-113) is subject to reporting under...

  18. 40 CFR 721.1850 - Toluene sulfonamide bis-phe-nol A epoxy adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... epoxy adduct. 721.1850 Section 721.1850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1850 Toluene sulfonamide bis-phe-nol A epoxy adduct. (a) Chemical... as toluene sulfonamide bisphenol A epoxy adduct (PMN P-90-113) is subject to reporting under...

  19. Volatile Barium Beta-Diketonate Polyether Adducts. Synthesis, Characterization and Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-31

    Volatile Barium 13- Diketonate Polyether Adducts.... Synthesis , Characterization and Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition by Robin A. Gardiner...has been approved for public release and sale: its distribution is unlimited. Volatile, Barium B- Diketonate Polyether Adducts. Synthesis ...NO. NO. INO. ACCESSION NO. Arlington, VA 22217 II 11. TITLE (include Security Classification) Volatile Barium B- Diketonate Polyether Adducts

  20. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442)...

  5. Commonly occurring plant flavonoids have estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Miksicek, R J

    1993-07-01

    A remarkable diversity of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds have been shown to mimic the biological effects of 17 beta-estradiol by virtue of their ability to bind to and activate the nuclear estrogen receptor. This report extends the family of nonsteroidal estrogens to include several multiply hydroxylated chalcones, flavanones, and flavones. The hormone-like activity of these natural plant products is indicated by their ability to stimulate an estrogen receptor-dependent transcriptional response and to promote growth of estrogen-dependent MCF7 cells in culture. The transcriptional response can be inhibited by the steroidal estrogen antagonist ICI-164,384 and is specific for the estrogen receptor. Evidence is presented to show that selected hydroxylated flavonoids interact directly with the estrogen receptor, based on their ability to compete for the binding of 17 beta-[3H]estradiol to the receptor in cell-free extracts. These compounds are less active, on a molar basis, than 17 beta-estradiol or the synthetic dihydroxystilbene estrogens, but they have potencies comparable to those of other known phytoestrogens. Together, these findings broaden our understanding of the structure-activity relationships for nonsteroidal estrogens and present a series of new chemical prototypes for the future development of potentially useful agonists and antagonists for this nuclear receptor. The wide distribution of weakly estrogenic flavonoid pigments in food crops and medicinal plants raises additional questions about the possible health risks and benefits of these compounds, meriting closer examination of their presence in the human diet.

  6. The role of environmental estrogens and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Chighizola, Cecilia; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2012-05-01

    The prevalence of autoimmune diseases has significantly increased over the recent years. It has been proposed that this epidemiological evidence could be in part attributable to environmental estrogens, compounds that display estrogen-like activity and are ubiquitously present in the environment. Environmental estrogens can be found in a wide variety of foods: phytoestrogens occur in plants such as clover and soy, while mycoestrogens are food contaminants produced by fungi. Meat, eggs and dairy products from animals given exogenous hormones contain relatively high concentration of estrogens. Among xenoestrogens, industrial estrogens are synthetic chemicals produced for specific purposes (pesticides, plastics, surfactants and detergents) while metalloestrogens are found in heavy metals. Estrogens can be also administered through medications (contraceptive pill, hormone replacement therapy, genistein, cimetidine, creams). There is a considerable burden of evidence in vitro and in animal models that these compounds may exert immunotoxic effects. However, to date there is no convincing data that exposure to environmental estrogens can be regarded as a risk for human health. In particular, there is no consensus whether prolonged exposure to relatively low concentrations of different estrogenic chemicals can affect the human immune system and induce clinically evident diseases in real-life scenario. Moreover, the effects on human health of the synergistic interactions between natural, medical, dietary and environmental estrogens have not been fully elucidated yet. Here we provide an extensive review of the in vivo and in vitro effects of environmental estrogens on the immune system, focusing on the evidences of association between exposure and autoimmune disorders.

  7. Targeting Epigenetics Therapy for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0400 TITLE: Targeting Epigenetics Therapy for Estrogen Receptor...2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting Epigenetics Therapy for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...estrogen- receptor positive breast cancer, estrogen receptor negative breast cancer, epigenetics , nuclear hormone receptor, estrogen Overall

  8. Targeted Radiotherapy of Estrogen Receptor Positive Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan Rajagopalan

    2006-08-31

    The overall objectives of the proposal were to develop estrogen receptor (ER) binding small molecule radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radiotherapy of ER positive (ER+) tumors. In particular, this proposal focused on embedding a {sup 186,188}Re or a {sup 32}P radionuclide into an estrogen steroidal framework by isosteric substitution such that the resulting structure is topologically similar to the estrogen (estrogen mimic). The estrogen mimic molecules expected to bind to the ER and exhibit biodistribution akin to that of native estrogen due to structural mimicry. It is anticipated that the {sup 186,188}Re- or a {sup 32}P-containing estrogen mimics will be useful for targeted molecular radiotherapy of ER+ tumors. It is well established that the in vivo target tissue uptake of estrogen like steroidal molecules is related to the binding of the steroids to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). SHBG is important in the uptake of estrogens and testosterone in target tissues by SHBG receptors on the cell surface. However, hitherto the design of estrogen like small molecule radiopharmaceuticals was focused on optimizing ER binding characteristics without emphasis on SHBG binding properties. Consequently, even the molecules with good ER affinity in vitro, performed poorly in biodistribution studies. Based on molecular modeling studies the proposal focused on developing estrogen mimics 1-3 which were topologically similar to native estrogens, and form hydrogen bonds in ER and SHBG in the same manner as those of native estrogens. To this end the technical objectives of the proposal focused on synthesizing the rhenium-estrone and estradiol mimics 1 and 2 respectively, and phosphorous estradiol mimic 3 and to assess their stability and in vitro binding characteristics to ER and SHBG.

  9. Theoretical investigations on the formation of nitrobenzanthrone-DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Volker M; Phillips, David H; Reynisson, Jóhannes

    2011-09-07

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a potent mutagen and suspected human carcinogen identified in diesel exhaust. The thermochemical formation cascades were calculated for six 3-NBA-derived DNA adducts employing its arylnitrenium ion as precursor using density functional theory (DFT). Clear exothermic pathways were found for four adducts, i.e., 2-(2'-deoxyadenosin-N(6)-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone, 2-(2'-deoxyguanosin-N(2)-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone, N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone and 2-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone. All four have been observed to be formed in cell-free experimental systems. The formation of N-(2'-deoxyadenosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone is predicted to be not thermochemically viable explaining its absence in either in vitro or in vivo model systems. However, 2-(2'-deoxyadenosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone, can be formed, albeit not as a major product, and is a viable candidate for an unknown adenine adduct observed experimentally. 2-nitrobenzanthrone (2-NBA), an isomer of 3-NBA, was also included in the calculations; it has a higher abundance in ambient air than 3-NBA, but a much lower genotoxic potency. Similar thermochemical profiles were obtained for the calculated 2-NBA-derived DNA adducts. This leads to the conclusion that enzymatic activation as well as the stability of its arylnitrenium ion are important determinants of 2-NBA genotoxicity.

  10. Infrared spectroscopy of fullerene C60/anthracene adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; Cataldo, F.; Manchado, A.

    2013-09-01

    Recent Spitzer Space Telescope observations of several astrophysical environments such as planetary nebulae, reflection nebulae and R Coronae Borealis stars show the simultaneous presence of mid-infrared features attributed to neutral fullerene molecules (i.e. C60) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). If C60 fullerenes and PAHs coexist in fullerene-rich space environments, then C60 may easily form adducts with a number of different PAH molecules, at least with catacondensed PAHs. Here we present the laboratory infrared spectra (˜2-25 μm) of C60 fullerene and anthracene Diels-Alder mono- and bis-adducts as produced by sonochemical synthesis. We find that C60/anthracene Diels-Alder adducts display spectral features strikingly similar to those from C60 (and C70) fullerenes and other unidentified infrared emission features. Thus, fullerene adducts - if formed under astrophysical conditions and are stable/abundant enough - may contribute to the infrared emission features observed in fullerene-containing circumstellar/interstellar environments.

  11. NMR at the Picomole Level of a DNA Adduct

    PubMed Central

    Kautz, Roger; Wang, Poguang; Giese, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the limit of detection for obtaining NMR data of a DNA adduct using modern microscale NMR instrumentation, once the adduct has been isolated at the pmol level. Eighty nanograms (130 pmol) of a DNA adduct standard, N-(2′-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene 5′-monophosphate (AAF-dGMP), in 1.5 μL of D2O with 10% methanol-d4, in a vial, was completely picked up as a droplet suspended in a fluorocarbon liquid, and loaded efficiently into a microcoil probe. This work demonstrates a practical manual method of droplet microfluidic sample loading, previously demonstrated using automated equipment, which provides a several-fold advantage over conventional flow injection. Eliminating dilution during injection and confining the sample into the observed volume realizes the full theoretical mass sensitivity of a microcoil, comparable to a micro-cryo probe. With 80 ng, an NMR spectrum acquired over 40 hr showed all of the resonances seen in a standard spectrum of AAF-dGMP, with a S/N of at least 10, despite broadening due to previously-noted effects of conformational exchange. Also a 2D TOCSY spectrum (total correlation spectroscopy) was acquired on 1.6 μg in 18 hr. This work helps to define the utility of NMR in combination with other analytical methods for the structural characterization of a small amount of a DNA adduct. PMID:24028148

  12. Conformations of DNA adducts with polycyclic aromatic carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.; Hingerty, B.

    1984-01-01

    Minimized semi-empirical potential energy calculations for a number of carcinogen adducts with dCpdG have yielded molecular views of the adduct conformations. The base displaced and Z type conformations of acetylaminofluorene (AAF) adducts to guanine C-8 have been detailed. Model building shows that base displacement causes kinking and denaturation in the B helix, while the Z helix is largely unperturbed by modification with AAF, in agreement with experimental findings. The minor AAF adduct linked to quanine N/sup 2/ can reside at a B-Z junction, with the carcinogen buried in a groove in the Z direction, without causing denaturation. The syn guanine in these modified Z forms could be mutagenic, the lesion escaping repair because the helix is undeformed, while the distorted base-displaced conformers are repaired. Aminofluorene (AF) and 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP) linked to guanine N/sup 2/ are currently believed to be critical lesions. They all have a pair of A or B type low energy states, one of which has base-base stacking with carcinogen at the helix exterior, and a second with carcinogen-base stacking. The two states are easily interconvertible. It is possible that the carcinogen may reside primarily at the unperturbed helix exterior where it escapes repair, but that carcinogen-base stacking may occur at a critical time during replication, leading to a mutation. 49 references, 8 figures.

  13. Ortho-substituted catechol derivatives: the effect of intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pathways on chloride anion recognition.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, Keith J; Smith, David K

    2007-04-13

    This paper reports a series of chloride anion receptors containing two catechol head groups connected through their ortho-positions via a spacer chain. The linking group chosen to attach the spacer chain to the catechol units has a major impact on the anion-binding potential of the receptor. Linking groups that are capable of forming stable six-membered intramolecular hydrogen-bonded rings with the catechol O-H groups significantly inhibit the ability of the catechol units to hydrogen bond to chloride anions. However, where the linking groups are only capable of forming five- or seven-membered intramolecular hydrogen-bonded rings, then anion binding via hydrogen bonding through the catechol O-H groups becomes a possibility. This process is solvent dependent; the presence of competitive solvent (e.g., DMSO-d6) disrupts the intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pattern and enhances anion binding relative to simple unfunctionalized catechol. The most effective receptor is that in which the hydrogen-bonding linker (-CH2CONH-) is most distant from the catechol units and can only form a seven-membered intramolecular hydrogen-bonded ring. In this case, the receptor, which contains two catechol units, is a more effective chloride anion binder than simple unfunctionalized catechol, demonstrating that the two head groups, in combination with the N-H groups in the linker, act cooperatively and enhance the degree of anion binding. In summary, this paper provides insight into the hydrogen-bonding patterns in ortho-functionalized catechols and the impact these have on the potential of the catechol O-H groups to hydrogen bond to a chloride anion.

  14. ANALYSIS OF LAGOON SAMPLES FROM DIFFERENT CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS FOR ESTROGENS AND ESTROGEN CONJUGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids)which ar...

  15. [Transdermal estrogenic therapy in menopause].

    PubMed

    Nencioni, T; Polvani, F; Penotti, M; Porcaro, E; Barbieri Carones, M

    1989-01-01

    The availability of percutaneous estrogenic preparations capable of directly entering the bloodstream, avoiding the liver, has opened new prospects in the treatment of the climacteric syndrome. The purpose of our work has been to compare the effectiveness and tolerability of a percutaneous 17-beta-estradiol-oral progestin association with an all oral association of conjugated estrogens and progestins and to evaluate the ability to control menopausal symptoms and biohumoral characteristics. 42 (1 to 7 years postmenopausal) heavily symptomatic patients were selected at the "Centro per lo studio e la terapia del climaterio" in Milan and divided in two equally sized groups. One group was treated using the percutaneous therapy, the other with the all-oral one. The results show that percutaneous administration leads to a quicker control of vasomotor symptomatology and metabolic effects similar to oral administration.

  16. The Estrogen Hypothesis of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, James P.; Henneberg, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The explanation of obesity as a simple result of positive energy balance fails to account for the scope of variable responses to diets and lifestyles. It is postulated that individual physiological and anatomical variation may be responsible for developing obesity. Girls in poor families develop greater adiposity than their male siblings, a trend not present in richer environments. This indicates strong influence of estrogen on fat accumulation irrespective of poor socioeconomic conditions. Obesity rates in males and females of developed nations are similar, while in poorer nations obesity is much more prevalent in females. Female to male ratio of obesity correlates inversely with gross domestic product. Therefore, the parity of male and female obesity in developed countries may result from male exposure to environmental estrogen-like substances associated with affluence. These hormonally driven mechanisms may be equally active within both sexes in more developed areas, thereby increasing overall obesity. PMID:24915457

  17. Estrogen turns down "the AIRE".

    PubMed

    Bakhru, Pearl; Su, Maureen A

    2016-04-01

    Genetic alterations are known drivers of autoimmune disease; however, there is a much higher incidence of autoimmunity in women, implicating sex-specific factors in disease development. The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene contributes to the maintenance of central tolerance, and complete loss of AIRE function results in the development of autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1. In this issue of the JCI, Dragin and colleagues demonstrate that AIRE expression is downregulated in females as the result of estrogen-mediated alterations at the AIRE promoter. The association between estrogen and reduction of AIRE may at least partially account for the elevated incidence of autoimmune disease in women and has potential implications for sex hormone therapy.

  18. Enantioselectivity in the methylation of the catecholic phase I metabolites of methylenedioxy designer drugs and their capability to inhibit catechol-O-methyltransferase-catalyzed dopamine 3-methylation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2009-06-01

    The designer drugs R,S-3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy), R,S-3,4-methylenedioxy-ethylamphetamine (MDEA, Eve), and R,S-N-methyl-benzodioxolyl-butanamine (MBDB, Eden) are chiral compounds, and their in vitro and in vivo metabolism is enantioselective with a preference for the S-enantiomer caused in part by P450-mediated demethylenation. As the elimination of the catecholamine metabolites could also be enantioselective, the aim of the present study was to investigate the O-methylation to the corresponding methoxy derivatives catalyzed by the soluble or membrane-bound form of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). As all three compounds showed substrate inhibition effects during the incubation, their inhibition potential was quantified using the methylation of dopamine as a marker reaction. For investigation of the catechol-O-methylation catalyzed by the soluble form of the COMT (sCOMT), incubations with human liver cytosol (HLC) were performed. Human liver microsomes (HLM) were used for investigation of the membrane-bound form. For inhibition studies, 3-hydroxytyramine (dopamine) was incubated in HLC. The respective catechols were added at various concentrations to check whether they influence the methylation of 3-hydroxytyramine. Our data showed that the S-enantiomers of all studied catecholamines were preferably O-methylated by both types of COMT. Comparing the resulting kinetics of the HLC and HLM assays, the affinity for all substrates was 10-fold higher for the membrane-bound COMT, whereas the turnover rate was 10-fold higher for the soluble COMT. Uncompetitive inhibition of dopamine methylation could be observed for all tested catechols. In conclusion, elimination of the catecholamine metabolites of MDMA, MDEA, and MBDB was shown to be enantioselective and might therefore contribute to the different pharmacokinetic properties observed for both enantiomers. Furthermore, the catecholic metabolites were identified to be uncompetitive inhibitors

  19. Hypnotizability and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) polymorphysms in Italians

    PubMed Central

    Presciuttini, Silvano; Gialluisi, Alessandro; Barbuti, Serena; Curcio, Michele; Scatena, Fabrizio; Carli, Giancarlo; Santarcangelo, Enrica L.

    2014-01-01

    Higher brain dopamine content depending on lower activity of Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) in subjects with high hypnotizability scores (highs) has been considered responsible for their attentional characteristics. However, the results of the previous genetic studies on association between hypnotizability and the COMT single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4680 (Val158Met) were inconsistent. Here, we used a selective genotyping approach to re-evaluate the association between hypnotizability and COMT in the context of a two-SNP haplotype analysis, considering not only the Val158Met polymorphism, but also the closely located rs4818 SNP. An Italian sample of 53 highs, 49 low hypnotizable subjects (lows), and 57 controls, were genotyped for a segment of 805 bp of the COMT gene, including Val158Met and the closely located rs4818 SNP. Our selective genotyping approach had 97.1% power to detect the previously reported strongest association at the significance level of 5%. We found no evidence of association at the SNP, haplotype, and diplotype levels. Thus, our results challenge the dopamine-based theory of hypnosis and indirectly support recent neuropsychological and neurophysiological findings reporting the lack of any association between hypnotizability and focused attention abilities. PMID:24431998

  20. A chemical proteomic probe for detecting dehydrogenases: catechol rhodanine.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xia; Sem, Daniel S

    2012-01-01

    Inherent complexity of the proteome often demands that it be studied as manageable subsets, termed subproteomes. A subproteome can be defined in a number of ways, although a pragmatic approach is to define it based on common features in an active site that lead to binding of a common small molecule ligand (e.g., a cofactor or a cross-reactive drug lead). The subproteome, so defined, can be purified using that common ligand tethered to a resin, with affinity chromatography. Affinity purification of a subproteome is described in the next chapter. That subproteome can then be analyzed using a common ligand probe, such as a fluorescent common ligand that can be used to stain members of the subproteome in a native gel. Here, we describe such a fluorescent probe, based on a catechol rhodanine acetic acid (CRAA) ligand that binds to dehydrogenases. The CRAA ligand is fluorescent and binds to dehydrogenases at pH > 7, and hence can be used effectively to stain dehydrogenases in native gels to identify what subset of proteins in a mixture are dehydrogenases. Furthermore, if one is designing inhibitors to target one or more of these dehydrogenases, the CRAA staining can be performed in a competitive assay format, with or without inhibitor, to assess the selectivity of the inhibitor for the targeted dehydrogenase. Finally, the CRAA probe is a privileged scaffold for dehydrogenases, and hence can easily be modified to increase affinity for a given dehydrogenase.

  1. Distinct Effects of Estrogen on Mouse Maternal Behavior: The Contribution of Estrogen Synthesis in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen surge following progesterone withdrawal at parturition plays an important role in initiating maternal behavior in various rodent species. Systemic estrogen treatment shortens the latency to onset of maternal behavior in nulliparous female rats that have not experienced parturition. In contrast, nulliparous laboratory mice show rapid onset of maternal behavior without estrogen treatment, and the role of estrogen still remains unclear. Here the effect of systemic estrogen treatment (for 2 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days) after progesterone withdrawal was examined on maternal behavior of C57BL/6 mice. This estrogen regimen led to different effects on nursing, pup retrieval, and nest building behaviors. Latency to nursing was shortened by estrogen treatment within 2 h. Moreover, pup retrieval and nest building were decreased. mRNA expression was also investigated for estrogen receptor α (ERα) and for genes involved in regulating maternal behavior, specifically, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor in the medial amygdala (MeA) and medial preoptic area (MPOA). Estrogen treatment led to decreased ERα mRNA in both regions. Although OTR mRNA was increased in the MeA, OTR and vasopressin receptor mRNA were reduced in the MPOA, showing region-dependent transcription regulation. To determine the mechanisms for the actions of estrogen treatment, the contribution of estrogen synthesis in the brain was examined. Blockade of estrogen synthesis in the brain by systemic letrozole treatment in ovariectomized mice interfered with pup retrieval and nest building but not nursing behavior, indicating different contributions of estrogen synthesis to maternal behavior. Furthermore, letrozole treatment led to an increase in ERα mRNA in the MeA but not in the MPOA, suggesting that involvement of estrogen synthesis is brain region dependent. Altogether, these results suggest that region-dependent estrogen synthesis leads to differential transcriptional activation due

  2. Distinct Effects of Estrogen on Mouse Maternal Behavior: The Contribution of Estrogen Synthesis in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen surge following progesterone withdrawal at parturition plays an important role in initiating maternal behavior in various rodent species. Systemic estrogen treatment shortens the latency to onset of maternal behavior in nulliparous female rats that have not experienced parturition. In contrast, nulliparous laboratory mice show rapid onset of maternal behavior without estrogen treatment, and the role of estrogen still remains unclear. Here the effect of systemic estrogen treatment (for 2 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days) after progesterone withdrawal was examined on maternal behavior of C57BL/6 mice. This estrogen regimen led to different effects on nursing, pup retrieval, and nest building behaviors. Latency to nursing was shortened by estrogen treatment within 2 h. Moreover, pup retrieval and nest building were decreased. mRNA expression was also investigated for estrogen receptor α (ERα) and for genes involved in regulating maternal behavior, specifically, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor in the medial amygdala (MeA) and medial preoptic area (MPOA). Estrogen treatment led to decreased ERα mRNA in both regions. Although OTR mRNA was increased in the MeA, OTR and vasopressin receptor mRNA were reduced in the MPOA, showing region-dependent transcription regulation. To determine the mechanisms for the actions of estrogen treatment, the contribution of estrogen synthesis in the brain was examined. Blockade of estrogen synthesis in the brain by systemic letrozole treatment in ovariectomized mice interfered with pup retrieval and nest building but not nursing behavior, indicating different contributions of estrogen synthesis to maternal behavior. Furthermore, letrozole treatment led to an increase in ERα mRNA in the MeA but not in the MPOA, suggesting that involvement of estrogen synthesis is brain region dependent. Altogether, these results suggest that region-dependent estrogen synthesis leads to differential transcriptional activation due

  3. Electrocatalytic Efficiency Analysis of Catechol Molecules for NADH Oxidation during Nanoparticle Collision.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Jun; Qian, Ruo-Can; Ma, Wei; Tian, He; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-09-06

    Electrocatalysis of molecules is a hot research topic in biological and energy-related chemistry. Here, we develop a new system to study the electrocatalytic efficiency of a single catechol molecule for NADH oxidation by single functionalized nanoparticle collision at ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs). The proposed system is composed of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with catechol molecules and a carbon-fiber ultramicroelectrode. In the absence of NADH, when a functionalized AuNP collides with an UME at a suitable voltage, a small current spike is generated due to the oxidation of catechol molecules modified on the surface of AuNP. In the presence of NADH, the current spike is significantly amplified by the combined effects of the oxidation and electrocatalysis for NADH of catechol molecules. By analyzing the variations of the average peak charges and durations without or with NADH, we calculate that around five thousands NADH molecules could be catalyzed per second by a single catechol molecule, suggesting the successful establishment of this novel catalytic system. Thus, the proposed strategy could be used as a promising platform for research of other molecular electrocatalytic systems.

  4. Simultaneous determination of hydroquinone and catechol at gold nanoparticles mesoporous silica modified carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Tashkhourian, J; Daneshi, M; Nami-Ana, F; Behbahani, M; Bagheri, A

    2016-11-15

    A new electrochemical sensor based on gold nanoparticles mesoporous silica modified carbon paste electrode (AuNPs-MPS) was developed for simultaneous determination of hydroquinone and catechol. Morphology and structure of the AuNPs-MPS were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The electrochemical behavior of hydroquinone and catechol were investigated using square wave voltammetry and the results indicate that the electrochemical responses are improved significantly at the modified electrode. The observed oxidative peaks separation of about 120mV made possible the simultaneous determination of hydroquinone and catechol in their binary-mixture. Under the optimized condition, a linear dynamic range of 10.0μM-1.0mM range for hydroquinone with the detection limit of 1.2μM and from 30.0μM-1.0mM for catechol with the detection limit of 1.1μM were obtained. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by the recovery studies of hydroquinone and catechol in spiked tap water samples.

  5. Relation Between the Adsorbed Quantity and the Immersion Enthalpy in Catechol Aqueous Solutions on Activated Carbons

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos; Blanco, Diego; Giraldo, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    An activated carbon, CarbochemTM—PS230, was modified by chemical and thermal treatment in flow of H2, in order to evaluate the influence of the activated carbon chemical characteristics in the adsorption of the catechol. The catechol adsorption in aqueous solution was studied along with the effect of the pH solution in the adsorption process of modified activated carbons and the variation of immersion enthalpy of activated carbons in the aqueous solutions of catechol. The interaction solid-solution is characterized by adsorption isotherms analysis, at 298 K and pH 7, 9 and 11 in order to evaluate the adsorption value above and below that of the catechol pKa. The adsorption capacity of carbons increases when the solution pH decreases. The retained amount increases slightly in the reduced carbon to maximum adsorption pH and diminishes in the oxidized carbon. Similar conclusions are obtained from the immersion enthalpies, whose values increase with the solute quantity retained. In granular activated carbon (CAG), the immersion enthalpies obtained are between 21.5 and 45.7 J·g−1 for catechol aqueous solutions in a range of 20 at 1500 mg·L−1. PMID:22312237

  6. Surface Complexation at the TiO(2) (anatase)/Aqueous Solution Interface: Chemisorption of Catechol.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez; Blesa; Regazzoni

    1996-01-15

    Catechol adsorbs at the TiO(2) (anatase)/aqueous solution interface forming inner-sphere surface complexes. The UV-visible differential reflectance spectrum of surface titanium-catecholate complexes presents a band centered at 420 nm which corresponds to the ligand to metal charge transfer transition within the surface complexes. At pH values below pK(a1), the surface excess of catechol is almost insensitive toward pH and presents a Langmuirian dependence with the concentration of uncomplexed catechol. The ratio Gamma(max):N(S) (N(S) being the measured density of available OH surface groups) indicates a prevailing 1 to 2 ligand exchange adsorption stoichiometry. In the range pH >/= pK(a1), the catechol surface excess decreases markedly with increasing pH. Formation of 1 to 1 surface complexes produces an excess of negative surface charge that is revealed by the shift of the iep to lower pH values. The reported data, which are supplemented with information on the charging behavior of TiO(2) suspended in indifferent electrolyte solutions, are interpreted in terms of the multi-site surface complexation model. In this model, two types of surface OH groups are considered: identical withTiOH(1/3-) and identical withOH(1/3+). Although both surface groups undergo protonation-deprotonation reactions, only identical withTiOH(1/3-) are prone to chemisorption.

  7. Catechol and humic acid sorption onto a range of laboratory-produced black carbons (biochars).

    PubMed

    Kasozi, Gabriel N; Zimmerman, Andrew R; Nkedi-Kizza, Peter; Gao, Bin

    2010-08-15

    Although the major influence of black carbon (BC) on soil and sediment organic contaminant sorption is widely accepted, an understanding of the mechanisms and natural variation in pyrogenic carbon interaction with natural organic matter (NOM) is lacking. The sorption of a phenolic NOM monomer (catechol) and humic acids (HA) onto BC was examined using biochars made from oak, pine, and grass at 250, 400, and 650 degrees C. Catechol sorption equilibrium occurred after 14 d and was described by a diffusion kinetic model, while HA required only 1 d and followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. Catechol sorption capacity increased with increasing biochar combustion temperature, from pine < oak < grass and from coarse < fine particle size. At lower catechol concentrations, sorption affinity (Freundlich constant, K(f)) was directly related to micropore surface area (measured via CO(2) sorptometry) indicating the predominance of specific adsorption. In contrast, HA exhibited an order of magnitude less sorption (0.1% versus 1%, by weight) due to its exclusion from micropores. Greater sorption of both catechol and HA occurred on biochars with nanopores, i.e. biochars made at higher temperatures. These findings suggest that addition of BC to soil, via natural fires or biochar amendments, will sequester abundant native OM through sorption.

  8. Relation between the adsorbed quantity and the immersion enthalpy in catechol aqueous solutions on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos; Blanco, Diego; Giraldo, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    An activated carbon, Carbochem(TM)-PS230, was modified by chemical and thermal treatment in flow of H(2), in order to evaluate the influence of the activated carbon chemical characteristics in the adsorption of the catechol. The catechol adsorption in aqueous solution was studied along with the effect of the pH solution in the adsorption process of modified activated carbons and the variation of immersion enthalpy of activated carbons in the aqueous solutions of catechol. The interaction solid-solution is characterized by adsorption isotherms analysis, at 298 K and pH 7, 9 and 11 in order to evaluate the adsorption value above and below that of the catechol pK(a). The adsorption capacity of carbons increases when the solution pH decreases. The retained amount increases slightly in the reduced carbon to maximum adsorption pH and diminishes in the oxidized carbon. Similar conclusions are obtained from the immersion enthalpies, whose values increase with the solute quantity retained. In granular activated carbon (CAG), the immersion enthalpies obtained are between 21.5 and 45.7 J·g(-1) for catechol aqueous solutions in a range of 20 at 1500 mg·L(-1).

  9. Bioinspired catechol-terminated self-assembled monolayers with enhanced adhesion properties.

    PubMed

    Guardingo, Mireia; Bellido, Elena; Miralles-Llumà, Rosa; Faraudo, Jordi; Sedó, Josep; Tatay, Sergio; Verdaguer, Albert; Busqué, Felix; Ruiz-Molina, Daniel

    2014-04-24

    The role of the catechol moiety in the adhesive properties of mussel proteins and related synthetic materials has been extensively studied in the last years but still remains elusive. Here, a simplified model approach is presented based on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of upward-facing catechols thiol-bound to epitaxial gold substrates. The orientation of the catechol moieties is confirmed by spectroscopy, which also showed lack of significant amounts of interfering o-quinones. Local force-distance curves on the SAM measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows an average adhesion force of 45 nN, stronger than that of a reference polydopamine coating, along with higher reproducibility and less statistical dispersion. This is attributed to the superior chemical and topographical homogeneity of the SAM coating. Catechol-terminated SAMs are also obtained on high-roughness gold substrates that show the ability to assemble magnetic nanoparticles, despite their lack of enhanced adhesion at the molecular level. Finally, the influence of the catechol group on the formation and quality of the SAM is explored both theoretically (molecular dynamics simulations) and experimentally using direct-write AFM lithography.

  10. Chloroethyinitrosourea-derived ethano cytosine and adenine adducts are substrates for escherichia coli glycosylases excising analogous etheno adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Guliaev, Anton B.; Singer, B.; Hang, Bo

    2004-05-05

    Exocyclic ethano DNA adducts are saturated etheno ring derivatives formed mainly by therapeutic chloroethylnitrosoureas (CNUs), which are also mutagenic and carcinogenic. In this work, we report that two of the ethano adducts, 3,N{sup 4}-ethanocytosine (EC) and 1,N{sup 6}-ethanoadenine (EA), are novel substrates for the Escherichia coli mismatch-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase (Mug) and 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II (AlkA), respectively. It has been shown previously that Mug excises 3,N{sup 4}-ethenocytosine ({var_epsilon}C) and AlkA releases 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A). Using synthetic oligonucleotides containing a single ethano or etheno adduct, we found that both glycosylases had a {approx}20-fold lower excision activity toward EC or EA than that toward their structurally analogous {var_epsilon}C or {var_epsilon}A adduct. Both enzymes were capable of excising the ethano base paired with any of the four natural bases, but with varying efficiencies. The Mug activity toward EC could be stimulated by E. coli endonuclease IV and, more efficiently, by exonuclease III. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed similar structural features of the etheno and ethano derivatives when present in DNA duplexes. However, also as shown by MD, the stacking interaction between the EC base and Phe 30 in the Mug active site is reduced as compared to the {var_epsilon}C base, which could account for the lower EC activity observed in this study.

  11. Photochemistry of psoralen-DNA adducts, biological effects of psoralen-DNA adducts, applications of psoralen-DNA photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yun-bo

    1988-03-01

    This thesis consists of three main parts and totally eight chapters. In Part I, The author will present studies on the photochemistry of psoralen-DNA adducts, specifically, the wavelength dependencies for the photoreversals of thymidine-HMT (4'-hydroxymethyl-4, 5', 8-trimenthylpsoralen) monoadducts and diadduct and the same adducts incorporated in DNA helices and the wavelength dependecies for the photocrossslinking of thymidine-HMT monoadducts in double-stranded helices. In Part II, The author will report some biological effects of psoralen-DNA adducts, i.e., the effects on double-stranded DNA stability, DNA structure, and transcription by E. coli and T7 RNA polymerases. Finally, The author will focus on the applications of psoralen-DNA photochemistry to investigation of protein-DNA interaction during transcription, which includes the interaction of E. coli and T7 RNA polymerases with DNA in elongation complexes arrested at specific psoralen-DNA adduct sites as revealed by DNase I footprinting experiments. 123 refs., 52 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. 32P-postlabeling DNA adduct assay: cigarette smoke-induced dna adducts in the respiratory and nonrespiratory rat tissues. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.C.; Gairola, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of the tissue DNA adducts in rats by the sensitive (32)p-postlabeling assay showed one to eight detectable DNA adducts in lung, trachea, larynx, heart and bladder of the sham controls. Chronic exposure of animals to mainstream cigarette smoke showed a remarkable enhancement of most adducts in the lung and heart DNA. Since cigarette smoke contains several thousand chemicals and a few dozen of them are known or potential carcinogens, the difference between the DNA adducts of nasal and the other tissues may reflect the diversity of reactive constituents and their differential absorption in different tissues. In comparison to the lung DNA adducts, the adducts in nasal DNA were less hydrophobic. Identity of the predominant adducts was further investigated by comparison with several reference DNA adducts from 10 PAH and aromatic amines. Since some of these chemicals are present in cigarette smoke, the results suggest that these constituents of cigarette smoke may not be directly responsible for formation of DNA adducts in the lung and heart of the smoke-exposed animals.

  13. Estrogens and Cognition: Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Korol, Donna L.; Pisani, Samantha L.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens are becoming well known for their robust enhancement on cognition particularly for learning and memory that relies upon functioning of the hippocampus and related neural systems. What is also emerging is that estrogen modulation of cognition is not uniform, at times enhancing yet at other times impairing learning. This review explores the bidirectional effects of estrogens on learning from a multiple memory systems view, focusing on the hippocampus and striatum, whereby modulation by estrogens sorts according to task attributes and neural systems engaged during cognition. We highlight our findings that show the ability to solve hippocampus-sensitive tasks typically improves under relatively high estrogen status while the ability to solve striatum-sensitive tasks degrades with estrogen exposures. Though constrained by dose and timing of exposure, these opposing enhancements and impairments of cognition can be observed following treatments with different estrogenic compounds including the hormone estradiol, the isoflavone genistein found in soybeans, and agonists that are selective for specific estrogen receptors, suggesting that activation of a single receptor type is sufficient to produce the observed shifts in learning strategies. Using this multi-dimensional framework will allow us to extend our thinking of the relationship between estrogens and cognition to other brain regions and cognitive functions. PMID:26149525

  14. Detection of Adriamycin-DNA adducts by accelerator mass spectrometry at clinically relevant Adriamycin concentrations.

    PubMed

    Coldwell, Kate E; Cutts, Suzanne M; Ognibene, Ted J; Henderson, Paul T; Phillips, Don R

    2008-09-01

    Limited sensitivity of existing assays has prevented investigation of whether Adriamycin-DNA adducts are involved in the anti-tumour potential of Adriamycin. Previous detection has achieved a sensitivity of a few Adriamycin-DNA adducts/10(4) bp DNA, but has required the use of supra-clinical drug concentrations. This work sought to measure Adriamycin-DNA adducts at sub-micromolar doses using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique with origins in geochemistry for radiocarbon dating. We have used conditions previously validated (by less sensitive decay counting) to extract [(14)C]Adriamycin-DNA adducts from cells and adapted the methodology to AMS detection. Here we show the first direct evidence of Adriamycin-DNA adducts at clinically-relevant Adriamycin concentrations. [(14)C]Adriamycin treatment (25 nM) resulted in 4.4 +/- 1.0 adducts/10(7) bp ( approximately 1300 adducts/cell) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, representing the best sensitivity and precision reported to date for the covalent binding of Adriamycin to DNA. The exceedingly sensitive nature of AMS has enabled over three orders of magnitude increased sensitivity of Adriamycin-DNA adduct detection and revealed adduct formation within an hour of drug treatment. This method has been shown to be highly reproducible for the measurement of Adriamycin-DNA adducts in tumour cells in culture and can now be applied to the detection of these adducts in human tissues.

  15. A natural small molecule, catechol, induces c-Myc degradation by directly targeting ERK2 in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Do Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jinglong; Jiang, Yanan; Dong, Ziming; Liu, Kangdong; Lee, Kun Yeong; Bae, Ki Beom; Choi, Bu Young; Deng, Yibin; Bode, Ann; Dong, Zigang

    2016-06-07

    Various carcinogens induce EGFR/RAS/MAPK signaling, which is critical in the development of lung cancer. In particular, constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is observed in many lung cancer patients, and therefore developing compounds capable of targeting ERK2 in lung carcinogenesis could be beneficial. We examined the therapeutic effect of catechol in lung cancer treatment. Catechol suppressed anchorage-independent growth of murine KP2 and human H460 lung cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Catechol inhibited ERK2 kinase activity in vitro, and its direct binding to the ERK2 active site was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Phosphorylation of c-Myc, a substrate of ERK2, was decreased in catechol-treated lung cancer cells and resulted in reduced protein stability and subsequent down-regulation of total c-Myc. Treatment with catechol induced G1 phase arrest in lung cancer cells and decreased protein expression related to G1-S progression. In addition, we showed that catechol inhibited the growth of both allograft and xenograft lung cancer tumors in vivo. In summary, catechol exerted inhibitory effects on the ERK2/c-Myc signaling axis to reduce lung cancer tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, including a preclinical patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model. These findings suggest that catechol, a natural small molecule, possesses potential as a novel therapeutic agent against lung carcinogenesis in future clinical approaches.

  16. A natural small molecule, catechol, induces c-Myc degradation by directly targeting ERK2 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Do Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jinglong; Jiang, Yanan; Dong, Ziming; Liu, Kangdong; Lee, Kun Yeong; Bae, Ki Beom; Choi, Bu Young; Deng, Yibin; Bode, Ann; Dong, Zigang

    2016-01-01

    Various carcinogens induce EGFR/RAS/MAPK signaling, which is critical in the development of lung cancer. In particular, constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is observed in many lung cancer patients, and therefore developing compounds capable of targeting ERK2 in lung carcinogenesis could be beneficial. We examined the therapeutic effect of catechol in lung cancer treatment. Catechol suppressed anchorage-independent growth of murine KP2 and human H460 lung cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Catechol inhibited ERK2 kinase activity in vitro, and its direct binding to the ERK2 active site was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Phosphorylation of c-Myc, a substrate of ERK2, was decreased in catechol-treated lung cancer cells and resulted in reduced protein stability and subsequent down-regulation of total c-Myc. Treatment with catechol induced G1 phase arrest in lung cancer cells and decreased protein expression related to G1-S progression. In addition, we showed that catechol inhibited the growth of both allograft and xenograft lung cancer tumors in vivo. In summary, catechol exerted inhibitory effects on the ERK2/c-Myc signaling axis to reduce lung cancer tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, including a preclinical patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model. These findings suggest that catechol, a natural small molecule, possesses potential as a novel therapeutic agent against lung carcinogenesis in future clinical approaches. PMID:27167001

  17. Catechol-modified activated carbon prepared by the diazonium chemistry for application as active electrode material in electrochemical capacitor.

    PubMed

    Pognon, Grégory; Cougnon, Charles; Mayilukila, Dilungane; Bélanger, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Activated carbon (Black Pearls 2000) modified with electroactive catechol groups was evaluated for charge storage application as active composite electrode material in an aqueous electrochemical capacitor. High surface area Black Pearls 2000 carbon was functionalized by introduction of catechol groups by spontaneous reduction of catechol diazonium ions in situ prepared in aqueous solution from the corresponding amine. Change in the specific surface area and pore texture of the carbon following grafting was monitored by nitrogen gas adsorption measurements. The electrochemical properties and the chemical composition of the catechol-modified carbon electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Such carbon-modified electrode combines well the faradaic capacitance, originating from the redox activity of the surface immobilized catechol groups, to the electrochemical double layer capacitance of the high surface area Black Pearls carbon. Due to the faradaic contribution, the catechol-modified electrode exhibits a higher specific capacitance (250 F/g) than pristine carbon (150 F/g) over a potential range of -0.4 to 0.75 V in 1 M H(2)SO(4). The stability of the modified electrode evaluated by long-time charge/discharge cycling revealed a low decrease of the capacitance of the catechol-modified carbon due to the loss of the catechol redox activity. Nonetheless, it was demonstrated that the benefit of redox groups persists for 10, 000 constant current charge/discharge cycles.

  18. Remarkably enhanced adhesion of coherently aligned catechol-terminated molecules on ultraclean ultraflat gold nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Miyeon; Park, Changjun; Lee, Hyoban; Kim, Hongki; Kim, Sang Youl; In, Insik; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-11-25

    We report the characterization and formation of catechol-terminated molecules immobilized on gold nanoplates (Au NPLs) using N-(3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl)-2-mercaptoacetamide (Cat-EAA-SH). Single-crystalline Au NPLs, synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor transport method, have ultraclean and ultraflat surfaces that make Cat-EAA-SH molecules aligned into a well-ordered network of a large-scale. Topographic study of the catechol-terminated molecules on Au NPLs using atomic force microscopy showed more orderly orientation and higher density, leading to significantly higher adhesion as observed from local force-distance curves than those on other Au surfaces. These coherently aligned catechol-terminated molecules on the atomically smooth gold surface led to significanty more reproducible and thus more physico-chemically meaningful measurements than was possible before by employing rough gold surfaces.

  19. Direction-dependent intermolecular interactions: catechol on TiO2(110)-1×1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shao-Chun; Diebold, Ulrike

    2009-08-01

    The adsorption of a submonolayer of catechol (C6H6O2) on the rutile TiO2(110)-1×1 surface has been investigated by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). The catechol molecules are preferentially adsorbed on the surface 5-fold coordinated Ti4+ sites, and occupy two neighboring lattice Ti sites. No preference for adsorption at surface step edges is observed at room temperature. A statistical analysis of intermolecular distances demonstrates that the interaction between the molecules strongly depends on the surface crystallographic direction: catechol molecules exhibit attractive interaction along [1-1 0], while they repel each other along the [001] direction. The attractive interaction is proposed to be caused by the coupling of π bonding electrons and the repulsive interaction is possibly mediated by substrate.

  20. Purification and spectroscopic studies on catechol oxidase from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis).

    PubMed

    Rompel, Annette; Büldt-Karentzopoulos, Klaudia; Molitor, Christian; Krebs, Bernt

    2012-09-01

    A catechol oxidase from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) moCO which only catalyzes the oxidation of catechols to quinones without hydroxylating tyrosine was purified. The molecular mass of the M. officinalis enzyme of 39,370 Da was obtained by MALDI mass spectrometry and the isoelectric point was determined to be 3.4. Addition of 2 eq. H(2)O(2) to the enzyme leads to oxy catechol oxidase. In the UV/Vis spectrum two new absorption bands occur at 343 nm (ε=8510 M(-1)cm(-1)) and 580 nm (ε=580 M(-1)cm(-1)) due to O(2)(2-)Cu (II) charge transfer transitions in accordance with the oxy forms of other type 3 copper proteins. The N-terminal sequence has been determined by Edman degradation to NPVQAPELDKCGTAT, exhibiting a proline at the second and sixth position conserved in other polyphenol oxidases.

  1. Multimodal underwater adsorption of oxide nanoparticles on catechol-based polymer nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Uchiyama, Shun; Miyashita, Tokuji; Mitsuishi, Masaya

    2016-03-01

    Multimodal underwater adsorption behaviour of catechol units was demonstrated by examining the adsorption of different oxide nanoparticles on nanoscale-integrated polymer nanosheets. Catechol-based polymer nanosheets were fabricated using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique with random copolymers (p(DDA/DMA)s) of N-dodecylacrylamide (DDA) and dopamine methacrylamide (DMA). The p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets were immersed into water dispersions of SiO2, Al2O3, and WO3 nanoparticles (NPs) respectively. The results show that the adsorption properties can be altered by varying the NP type: SiO2 NP adsorption was observed only below pH = 6, at which the o-quinone form in p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets transforms into the catechol form or vice versa. However, their transition point for Al2O3 NP adsorption was found at approximately pH 10, at which the surface potential of Al2O3 NPs changes the charge polarity, indicating that the electrostatic interaction is predominant. For WO3 NPs, adsorption was observed when citric acid, which modifies the surface of WO3 NPs by complex formation, was used as a pH-controlling agent, but no adsorption was found for hydrochloric acid used as a pH controlling agent. FT-IR measurements proved that miniscule amounts of water molecules were trapped in p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets and that they acquired hydrogen bonding network formations, which might assist nanoparticle adsorption underwater and make the catechol units adjustable. The results indicate that the nanoscale spatial arrangements of catechol units in films are crucially important for the application of multimodal adsorption of oxide nanoparticles on catechol-based polymer materials.Multimodal underwater adsorption behaviour of catechol units was demonstrated by examining the adsorption of different oxide nanoparticles on nanoscale-integrated polymer nanosheets. Catechol-based polymer nanosheets were fabricated using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique with random copolymers (p(DDA/DMA)s) of N

  2. Remarkably enhanced adhesion of coherently aligned catechol-terminated molecules on ultraclean ultraflat gold nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Miyeon; Park, Changjun; Lee, Hyoban; Kim, Hongki; Kim, Sang Youl; In, Insik; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-11-01

    We report the characterization and formation of catechol-terminated molecules immobilized on gold nanoplates (Au NPLs) using N-(3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl)-2-mercaptoacetamide (Cat-EAA-SH). Single-crystalline Au NPLs, synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor transport method, have ultraclean and ultraflat surfaces that make Cat-EAA-SH molecules aligned into a well-ordered network of a large-scale. Topographic study of the catechol-terminated molecules on Au NPLs using atomic force microscopy showed more orderly orientation and higher density, leading to significantly higher adhesion as observed from local force-distance curves than those on other Au surfaces. These coherently aligned catechol-terminated molecules on the atomically smooth gold surface led to significanty more reproducible and thus more physico-chemically meaningful measurements than was possible before by employing rough gold surfaces.

  3. Effect of β-cyclodextrin on intra and intermolecular Michael addition of some catechol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Khalafi, Lida; Rafiee, Mohammad; Fathi, Sahar

    2014-01-24

    The oxidation reactions of catechol, dopamine and epinephrine have been studied in the absence and presence of N-methylaniline by UV-Vis. Spectrophotometry. A variety of reaction pathways (inter and intramolecular reactions) that followed by this oxidation have been observed depending on the nature of catechol derivatives. The observed homogeneous rate constants of the reactions were estimated by fitting the absorption time profiles for each reaction. The effect of β-cyclodextrin and its inclusion complex has also been studied on the chosen reactions. The formation constants of the complexes of catechol, dopamine and epinephrine with β-cyclodextrin as well as the rate constants of the reactions of free and complexed forms have been obtained by fitting the absorption-time spectra to a proposed kinetic-equilibrium model.

  4. Effect of β-cyclodextrin on intra and intermolecular Michael addition of some catechol derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalafi, Lida; Rafiee, Mohammad; Fathi, Sahar

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation reactions of catechol, dopamine and epinephrine have been studied in the absence and presence of N-methylaniline by UV-Vis. Spectrophotometry. A variety of reaction pathways (inter and intramolecular reactions) that followed by this oxidation have been observed depending on the nature of catechol derivatives. The observed homogeneous rate constants of the reactions were estimated by fitting the absorption time profiles for each reaction. The effect of β-cyclodextrin and its inclusion complex has also been studied on the chosen reactions. The formation constants of the complexes of catechol, dopamine and epinephrine with β-cyclodextrin as well as the rate constants of the reactions of free and complexed forms have been obtained by fitting the absorption-time spectra to a proposed kinetic-equilibrium model.

  5. Structure and kinetics of formation of catechol complexes of ferric soybean lipoxygenase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.J.; Brennan, B.A.; Chase, D.B. |

    1995-11-21

    Ferric soybean lipoxygenase forms stable complexes with 4-substituted catechols. The structure of the complex between the enzyme and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile has been studied by resonance Raman, electron paramagnetic resonance, visible, and X-ray spectroscopies. It is a bidentate iron-catecholate complex with at least one water ligand. The kinetics of formation of complexes between lipoxygenase and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile and 3,4-dihydroxyacetophenone have been studied by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The data are consistent with two kinetically distinct, reversible steps. The pH dependence of the first step suggests that the substrate for the reaction is the catechol monoanion. When these results are combined, plausible mechanisms for the complexation reaction are suggested. 51 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Adducts of mitomycin C and DNA in EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells: effects of hypoxia and dicumarol on adduct patterns.

    PubMed

    Bizanek, R; Chowdary, D; Arai, H; Kasai, M; Hughes, C S; Sartorelli, A C; Rockwell, S; Tomasz, M

    1993-11-01

    6-CH3-3H-Mitomycin C (MC) was used to identify MC-DNA adducts formed in EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells. DNA was isolated from cells treated with 3H-MC. The DNA was enzymatically digested, and the digest was analyzed for 3H-labeled adducts by high performance liquid chromatography. All four major adducts previously isolated and characterized in cell-free systems were detected: two different monoadducts and two bisadducts forming DNA-interstrand and DNA-intrastrand cross-links, respectively. No MC-DNA adducts other than the DNA interstrand cross-link had been shown previously to be formed in living cells. A MC-deoxyguanosine adduct of unknown structure was also detected in DNA from EMT6 cells; this adduct was also formed with purified EMT6 DNA. High performance liquid chromatography analysis was further applied to study the relationship between DNA adducts and cytotoxicity. The number of adducts increased with the concentration of MC in both aerobic and hypoxic cells. At a constant drug level, more adducts were observed in cells treated under hypoxic conditions than in cells treated aerobically; at 2 microM MC, 4.8 x 10(-7) and 3.1 x 10(-7) adducts/nucleotide were observed under hypoxic and aerobic conditions, respectively. The increased adduct frequency under hypoxia correlates with the known increased cytotoxicity of MC to EMT6 cells under hypoxic conditions. In addition, a higher ratio of cross-linked adducts to monoadducts was observed in hypoxic cells. The high performance liquid chromatography techniques were also used to examine the effects of dicumarol (DIC) on adduct patterns in cells treated simultaneously with 3H-MC. The MC-DNA adduct frequencies in DIC-treated cells were increased 1.5-fold under hypoxia and decreased 1.6-fold under aerobic conditions from those observed without DIC. This finding correlates with the known DIC-induced increase and decrease in the cytotoxicity of MC in hypoxic and aerobic EMT6 cells, respectively. The monoadduct resulting

  7. Mechanistic insight into the catechol oxidase activity by a biomimetic dinuclear copper complex.

    PubMed

    Granata, Alessandro; Monzani, Enrico; Casella, Luigi

    2004-10-01

    The biomimetic catalytic oxidation of 3,5-di- tert-butylcatechol by the dicopper(II) complex of the ligand alpha,alpha'-bis(bis[1-(1'-methyl-2'-benzimidazolyl)methyl]amino)- m-xylene in the presence of dioxygen has been investigated as a function of temperature and pH in a mixed aqueous/organic solvent. The catalytic cycle occurs in two steps, the first step being faster than the second step. In the first step, one molecule of catechol is oxidized by the dicopper(II) complex, and the copper(II) centers are reduced. From the pH dependence, it is deduced that the active species of the process is the monohydroxo form of the dinuclear complex. In the second step, the second molecule of catechol is oxidized by the dicopper(I)-dioxygen complex formed upon oxygenation of the reduced complex. In both cases, catechol oxidation is an inner-sphere electron transfer process involving binding of the catechol to the active species. The binary catechol-dicopper(II) complex formed in the first step could be characterized at very low temperature (-90 degrees C), where substrate oxidation is blocked. On the contrary, the ternary complex of dicopper(I)-O(2)-catechol relevant to the second step does not accumulate in solution and could not be characterized, even at low temperature. The investigation of the biphasic kinetics of the catalytic reaction over a range of temperatures allowed the thermodynamic (Delta H degrees and Delta S degrees ) and activation parameters (Delta H( not equal) and Delta S( not equal)) connected with the key steps of the catecholase process to be obtained.

  8. SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES OF THE ANAEROBIC ENZYME-SUBSTRATE COMPLEX OF CATECHOL 1,2-DIOXYGENASE

    PubMed Central

    Horsman, Geoff P.; Jirasek, Andrew; Vaillancourt, Frédéric H.; Barbosa, Christopher J.; Jarzecki, Andrzej A.; Xu, Changliang; Mekmouche, Yasmina; Spiro, Thomas G.; Lipscomb, John D.; Blades, Michael W.; Turner, Robin F.B.; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2008-01-01

    The basis of the respective regiospecificities of intradiol and extradiol dioxygenase is poorly understood and may be linked to the protonation state of the bidentate-bound catechol in the enzyme:substrate complex. Previous ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) and UV-visible (UV-vis) difference spectroscopic studies demonstrated that in extradiol dioxygenases, the catechol is bound to the Fe(II) as a monoanion. In this study, we use the same approaches to demonstrate that in catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (C12O), an intradiol enzyme, the catechol binds to the Fe(III) as a dianion. Specifically, features at 290 nm and 1550 cm−1 in the UV-vis and UVRR difference spectra, respectively, are assigned to dianionic catechol based on spectra of the model compound, ferric tris(catecholate). The UVRR spectroscopic band assignments are corroborated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In addition, negative features at 240 nm in UV-vis difference spectra and at 1600, 1210, and 1175 cm−1 in UVRR difference spectra match those of a tyrosinate model compound, consistent with protonation of the axial tyrosinate ligand when it is displaced from the ferric ion coordination sphere upon substrate binding. The DFT calculations ascribe the asymmetry of the bound dianionic substrate to the trans donor effect of an equatorially ligated tyrosinate ligand. In addition, the computations suggest that trans donation from the tyrosinate ligand may facilitate charge-transfer from the substrate to yield the iron-bound semiquinone transition state, which is capable of reacting with dioxygen. In illustrating the importance of ligand trans effects in a biological system, the current study demonstrates the power of combining difference UVRR and optical spectroscopies to probe metal ligation in solution. PMID:16316234

  9. Catechol chemistry inspired approach to construct self-cross-linked polymer nanolayers as versatile biointerfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyue; Deng, Jie; Ma, Lang; Cheng, Chong; Nie, Chuanxiong; He, Chao; Zhao, Changsheng

    2014-12-16

    In this study, we proposed a catechol chemistry inspired approach to construct surface self-cross-linked polymer nanolayers for the design of versatile biointerfaces. Several representative biofunctional polymers, P(SS-co-AA), P(SBMA-co-AA), P(EGMA-co-AA), P(VP-co-AA), and P(MTAC-co-AA), were first synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and then the catecholic molecules (dopamine, DA) were conjugated to the acrylic acid (AA) units by the facile carbodiimide chemistry. Then, the catechol (Cat) group conjugated biofunctional polymers, named PSS-Cat, PSBMA-Cat, PEGMA-Cat, PVP-Cat, and PMTAC-Cat, were applied for the construction of self-cross-linked nanolayers on polymeric substrates via the pH induced catechol cross-linking and immobilization. The XPS spectra, surface morphology, and wettability gave robust evidence that the catechol conjugated polymers were successfully coated, and the coated substrates possessed increased surface roughness and hydrophilicity. Furthermore, the systematic in vitro investigation of protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), cell viability, and antibacterial ability confirmed that the coated nanolayers conferred the substrates with versatile biological performances. The PSS-Cat coated substrate had low blood component activation and excellent anticoagulant activity; while the PEGMA-Cat and PSBMA-Cat showed ideal resistance to protein fouling and inhibition of platelet activation. The PSS-Cat and PVP-Cat coated substrates exhibited promoted endothelial cell proliferation and viability. The PMTAC-Cat coated substrate showed an outstanding activity on bacterial inhibition. In conclusion, the catechol chemistry inspired approach allows the self-cross-linked nanolayers to be easily immobilized on polymeric substrates with the stable conformation and multiple biofunctionalities. It is expected that this low-cost and facile

  10. The effect of catechol on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Bożena; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Catechol also known as pyrocatechol or 1,2-dihydroxybenzene is formed endogenously in the organism from neurotransmitters including adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine. It is also a metabolite of many drugs like DOPA, isoproterenol or aspirin and it is also formed in the environment during transformation of various xenobiotics. We evaluated in vitro the effect of catechol on the structure and function of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The cells were incubated with xenobiotic at concentration range from 2 to 500μg/mL for 1h. Human blood mononuclear cells were obtained from leucocyte-platelet buffy coat taken from healthy donors in the Blood Bank of Łódź, Poland. Using flow cytometry we have evaluated necrotic, apoptotic and morphological changes in PBMCs incubated with catechol. Moreover, we have estimated changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation in the cells studied. The compound studied provoked necrotic (from 250μg/mL), apoptotic (from 100μg/mL), and morphological changes (from 250μg/mL) in the incubated cells. We have also noted that catechol decreased H2DCF oxidation at 2 and 10μg/mL but at higher concentrations of 250 and 500μg/mL it caused statistically significant increase in the oxidation of this probe. We also observed an increase in lipid peroxidation (from 250μg/mL) and protein carbonylation (from 50μg/mL) of PBMCs. It was observed that catechol only at high concentrations was capable of inducing changes in PBMCs. The obtained results clearly showed that catechol may induce change in PBMCs only in the caste of poisoning with this compound.

  11. Effect of β-carotene on catechol-induced genotoxicity in vitro: evidence of both enhanced and reduced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Åsgård, R; Hellman, B

    2013-09-01

    Intake of antioxidants from the diet has been recognized to have beneficial health effects, but the potential benefit of taking antioxidants such as β-carotene as supplements is controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential protective effects of a physiologically relevant concentration (2 μM) of β-carotene on the DNA damaging effects of catechol in mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells. Two different exposure protocols were used: simultaneous exposure to β-carotene and catechol for 3 h; and exposure to catechol for 3 h after 18 h pre-treatment with the vitamin. DNA damage was evaluated using the comet assay (employing one procedure for general damage, and another procedure, which also included oxidative DNA damage). Independent of exposure protocol and procedure for comet assay, β-carotene did not increase the basal level of DNA damage. However, at the highest concentration of catechol (1 mM), β-carotene was found to clearly increase the level of catechol-induced DNA damage, especially in the pre-treated cells. Interestingly, an opposite effect was observed at lower concentrations of catechol, but the β-carotene related reduction of catechol-induced genotoxicity was significant (P < 0.05) only for the procedure including oxidative damage induced by 0.5 mM catechol. Taken together our results indicate that β- carotene can both reduce and enhance the DNA damaging effects of a genotoxic agent such as catechol. This indicates that it is the level of catechol-induced DNA damage that seems to determine whether β-carotene should be regarded as a beneficial or detrimental agent when it comes to its use as a dietary supplement.

  12. A Hyperactive Cobalt-Substituted Extradiol-Cleaving Catechol Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Andrew J.; Farquhar, Erik R.

    2011-01-01

    Homoprotocatechuate (HPCA) 2,3-dioxygenase from Brevibacterium fuscum (Fe-HPCD) has an Fe(II) center in its active site that can be replaced with Mn(II) or Co(II). While Mn-HPCD exhibits steady state kinetic parameters comparable to those of Fe-HPCD, Co-HPCD behaves somewhat differently exhibiting a significantly higher KMO2 and kcat. The high activity of Co-HPCD is surprising, given that cobalt has the highest standard M(III/II) redox potential of the three metals. Comparison of the X-ray crystal structures of the resting and substrate-bound forms of Fe-, Mn-, and Co-HPCD shows that metal-substitution has no effect on the local ligand environment, the conformational integrity of the active site, or the overall protein structure, suggesting that the protein structure does not differentially tune the potential of the metal center. Analysis of the steady state kinetics of Co-HPCD suggests that the Co(II) center alters the relative rate constants for the interconversion of intermediates in the catalytic cycle but still allows the dioxygenase reaction to proceed efficiently. When compared with the kinetic data for Fe- and Mn-HPCD, these results show that dioxygenase catalysis can proceed at high rates over a wide range of metal redox potentials. This is consistent with the proposed mechanism in which the metal mediates electron transfer between the catechol substrate and O2 to form the postulated [M(II)(semiquinone)superoxo] reactive species. These kinetic differences and the spectroscopic properties of Co-HPCD provide new tools with which to explore the unique O2 activation mechanism associated with the extradiol dioxygenase family. PMID:21153851

  13. Catechol-O-methyltransferase association with hemoglobin A1c

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Kathryn T.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Chen, Ling; Harden, Maegan; Tolkin, Benjamin R.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Bray, George A.; Ridker, Paul M.; Florez, Jose C.; Chasman, Daniel I.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Catecholamines have metabolic effects on blood pressure, insulin sensitivity and blood glucose. Genetic variation in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme that degrades catecholamines, is associated with cardiometabolic risk factors and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD). Here we examined COMT effects on glycemic function and type 2 diabetes. Methods We tested whether COMT polymorphisms were associated with baseline HbA1c in the Women’s Genome Health Study (WGHS), and Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC), and with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in WGHS, DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis consortium (DIAGRAM), and the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Given evidence that COMT modifies some drug responses, we examined association with type 2 diabetes and randomized metformin and aspirin treatment. Results COMT rs4680 high-activity G-allele was associated with lower HbA1c in WGHS (β = −0.032% [0.012], p = 0.008) and borderline significant in MAGIC (β = −0.006% [0.003], p = 0.07). Combined COMT per val allele effects on type 2 diabetes were significant (OR = 0.98 [0.96–0.998], p = 0.03) in fixed-effects analyses across WGHS, DIAGRAM, and DPP. Similar results were obtained for 2 other COMT SNPs rs4818 and rs4633. In the DPP, the rs4680 val allele was borderline associated with lower diabetes incidence among participants randomized to metformin (HR = 0.81 [0.65–1.00], p = 0.05). Conclusions COMT rs4680 high-activity G-allele was associated with lower HbA1c and modest protection from type 2 diabetes. The directionality of COMT associations was concordant with those previously observed for cardiometabolic risk factors and CVD. PMID:27282867

  14. Parabens inhibit human skin estrogen sulfotransferase activity: possible link to paraben estrogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Prusakiewicz, Jeffery J; Harville, Heather M; Zhang, Yanhua; Ackermann, Chrisita; Voorman, Richard L

    2007-04-11

    Parabens (p-hydroxybenzoate esters) are a group of widely used preservatives in topically applied cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Parabens display weak associations with the estrogen receptors in vitro or in cell based models, but do exhibit estrogenic effects in animal models. It is our hypothesis that parabens exert their estrogenic effects, in part, by elevating levels of estrogens through inhibition of estrogen sulfotransferases (SULTs) in skin. We report here the results of a structure-activity-relationship of parabens as inhibitors of estrogen sulfation in human skin cytosolic fractions and normal human epidermal keratinocytes. Similar to reports of paraben estrogenicity and estrogen receptor affinity, the potency of SULT inhibition increased as the paraben ester chain length increased. Butylparaben was found to be the most potent of the parabens in skin cytosol, yielding an IC(50) value of 37+/-5 microM. Butylparaben blocked the skin cytosol sulfation of estradiol and estrone, but not the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone. The parabens were also tested as inhibitors of SULT activity in a cellular system, with normal human epidermal keratinocytes. The potency of butylparaben increased three-fold in these cells relative to the IC(50) value from skin cytosol. Overall, these results suggest chronic topical application of parabens may lead to prolonged estrogenic effects in skin as a result of inhibition of estrogen sulfotransferase activity. Accordingly, the skin anti-aging benefits of many topical cosmetics and pharmaceuticals could be derived, in part, from the estrogenicity of parabens.

  15. Regioselectivity of catechol O-methyltransferase confers enhancement of catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Douglas; Liu, Shubin; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2011-04-01

    Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catechol moieties by methylating a single hydroxyl group at the meta- or para- hydroxyl position. Hydrophobic amino acids near the active site of COMT influence the regioselectivity of this reaction. Our sequence analysis highlights their importance by showing that these residues are highly conserved throughout evolution. Reaction barriers calculated in the gas phase reveal a lower barrier during methylation at the meta- position, suggesting that the observed meta-regioselectivity of COMT can be attributed to the substrate itself, and that COMT has evolved residues to orient the substrate in a manner that increases the rate of catalysis.

  16. Synthesis, molecular structure and magnetic properties of a rhenium(IV) compound with catechol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas, A.; Geis, L.; Pintos, V.; Chiozzone, R.; Sanchíz, J.; Hummert, M.; Schumann, H.; Kremer, C.

    2009-03-01

    A novel Re(IV) complex containing catechol as ligand has been prepared and characterized. The crystal structure of (HNEt 3)(NBu 4)[ReCl 4(cat)]·H 2cat was determined. The rhenium ion presents a distorted octahedral geometry, being bonded to a bidentate catecholate group and four chloride anions. The magnetic properties of the complex were studied, a /2 D/ (the energy gap between ±3/2 and ±1/2 Kramers doublets) value of 190(10) cm -1. This is the largest /2 D/ value reported for Re(IV) up to now.

  17. Stark spectroscopy of charge-transfer transitions in catechol-sensitized TiO 2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Zdyb, Agata; Krawczyk, Stanisław

    2009-06-01

    Electronic excited states of catechol bound to titanium dioxide nanoparticles were investigated using electroabsorption (Stark effect) spectroscopy. The electronic transition at about 400 nm, characteristic for catechol bound to TiO 2 is associated with a change in permanent dipole moment by f · |Δ μ| = 15.7 D (where f is the local field correction factor), and a small negative change in the polarizability. Electron transfer distance points to the strong charge-transfer character of this transition. The electroabsorption spectra show also another electronic transition 7000 cm -1 higher energy, partially masked by the TiO 2 absorption.

  18. Intramolecular interactions in ortho-methoxyalkylphenylboronic acids and their catechol esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk-Woźniak, Agnieszka; Borys, Krzysztof M.; Czerwińska, Karolina; Gierczyk, Błażej; Jakubczyk, Michał; Madura, Izabela D.; Sporzyński, Andrzej; Tomecka, Ewelina

    2013-12-01

    Catechol esters of ortho-methoxyalkylphenylboronic acids have been synthesized and characterized by 17O NMR spectroscopy. The results were compared with the data for the parent acids. The influence of intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonds on the properties of the boronic acids has been discussed. The 17O NMR data for the boronic esters proved that there are no O → B interactions in the investigated compounds. This fact is connected with weak Lewis acidity of the parent acids and their low sugars' receptors activity. Crystal structure of ortho-methoxyphenylboronic acid catechol ester was determined.

  19. Unexpected formation of a novel pyridinium-containing catecholate ligand and its manganese(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Tippu S; Watkinson, Michael; Motevalli, Majid; Lesin, Jocelyne F

    2010-01-07

    Nucleophilic aromatic substitution of tetrachloro-o-benzoquinone by pyridine and reduction of the o-quinone to the catechol by hydroxylamine forms 1,2-dihydroxy-3,5,6-trichlorobenzene-4-pyridinium chloride. This compound reacts with manganese(II) acetate in air to form chlorobis(3,5,6-trichlorobenzene 4-pyridinium catecholate)manganese(III), which represents the first complex of this ligand class to be structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction; this complex is active in the catalytic reduction of dioxygen to hydrogen peroxide under ambient conditions and turnover frequencies (TOFs) >10,000 h(-1) can be obtained.

  20. Catechol versus bisphosphonate ligand exchange at the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles: towards multi-functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guénin, Erwann; Lalatonne, Yoann; Bolley, Julie; Milosevic, Irena; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Motte, Laurence

    2014-11-01

    We report an investigation of the ligand exchange at the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles in water. For this purpose we compared two strong chelating agents on the iron oxide surface containing catechol and bisphosphonate moieties. Interactions between the coating agents (catechol/bisphosphonate) and the nanoparticle's surface were studied by FTIR and DFT calculations. Ligand exchange experiments were performed using sonication and the exchange yield was characterized by FTIR and EDX. This methodology allowed introducing bisphosphonates with various functionalities (alkyne or biotin) permitting multi-functionalization.

  1. Au nanoparticles and graphene quantum dots co-modified glassy carbon electrode for catechol sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuan; He, Dawei; Wang, Yongsheng; Hu, Yin; Fu, Chen

    2016-03-01

    In this letter, the gold nanoparticles and graphene quantum dots were applied to the modification of glassy carbon electrode for the detection of catechol. The synergist cooperation between gold nanoparticles and graphene quantum dots can increase specific surface area and enhance electronic and catalytic properties of glassy carbon electrode. The detection limit of catechol is 0.869 μmol/L, demonstrating the superior detection efficiency of the gold nanoparticles and graphene quantum dots co-modified glassy carbon electrode as a new sensing platform.

  2. Proteomic analysis of adducted butyrylcholinesterase for biomonitoring organophosphorus exposures

    PubMed Central

    Marsillach, Judit; Hsieh, Edward J.; Richter, Rebecca J.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Furlong, Clement E.

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) compounds include a broad group of toxic chemicals such as insecticides, chemical warfare agents and antiwear agents. The liver cytochromes P450 bioactivate many OPs to potent inhibitors of serine hydrolases. Cholinesterases were the first OP targets discovered and are the most studied. They are used to monitor human exposures to OP compounds. However, the assay that is currently used has limitations. The mechanism of action of OP compounds is the inhibition of serine hydrolases by covalently modifying their active-site serine. After structural rearrangement, the complex OP inhibitor-enzyme is irreversible and will remain in circulation until the modified enzyme is degraded. Mass spectrometry is a sensitive technology for analyzing protein modifications, such as OP-adducted enzymes. These analyses also provide some information about the nature of the OP adduct. Our aim is to develop high-throughput protocols for monitoring OP exposures using mass spectrometry. PMID:23123252

  3. Biocidal properties of metal oxide nanoparticles and their halogen adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggstrom, Johanna A.; Klabunde, Kenneth J.; Marchin, George L.

    2010-03-01

    Nanosized metal oxide halogen adducts possess high surface reactivities due to their unique surface morphologies. These adducts have been used as reactive materials against vegetative cells, such as Escherichia coli as well as bacterial endospores, including Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus anthracis (Δ Sterne strain). Here we report high biocidal activities against gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and endospores. The procedure consists of a membrane method. Transmission electron micrographs are used to compare nanoparticle-treated and untreated cells and spores. It is proposed that the abrasive character of the particles, the oxidative power of the halogens/interhalogens, and the electrostatic attraction between the metal oxides and the biological material are responsible for high biocidal activities. While some activity was demonstrated, bacterial endospores were more resistant to nanoparticle treatment than the vegetative bacteria.

  4. Estrogen potency of oral contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Chihal, H J; Peppler, R D; Dickey, R P

    1975-01-01

    The estrogen potencies of 9 oral contraceptive pills, Enovid-E, Enovid-5, Ovulen, Demulen, Norinyl+80, Norinyl+50, Ovral, Norlestrin 1 mg. and Norlestrin 2.5 mg., were determined by bioassay. Relative estrogen potency was determined by analysis of variance. Enovid-5, the most estrogenic compound, had a potency of 4.88 compared to ethinyl estradiol, 50 mcg. equal 1.00; Ovral, the least estrogenic compound, had a potency of 0.81, a sixfold difference. Estrogen potencies at a fractional dose of 0.00155 correlate with reports of the incidence of minor side effects and thromboembolic disease. The effect of progestins on estrogen potency was purely additive (norgestrel and norethynodrel), purely antagonistic, or additive at low concentrations and antagonistic at high concentrations (norethindrone, norethindrone acetate, and ethynodiol diacetate). These results suggest that pills with a greater margin of safety might be developed by utilizing greater ratios of progestin to estrogen. In addition, differences in relative estrogen potency of oral contraceptive pills may be used as a basis for better clinical selection.

  5. Quantum chemical studies of estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantum chemical methods are potent tools to provide information on the chemical structure and electronic properties of organic molecules. Modern computational chemistry methods have provided a great deal of insight into the binding of estrogenic compounds to estrogenic receptors (ER), an important ...

  6. EADB: An Estrogenic Activity Database for Assessing ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Endocrine-active chemicals can potentially have adverse effects on both humans and wildlife. They can interfere with the body’s endocrine system through direct or indirect interactions with many protein targets. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are one of the major targets, and many endocrine disruptors are estrogenic and affect the normal estrogen signaling pathways. However, ERs can also serve as therapeutic targets for various medical conditions, such as menopausal symptoms, osteoporosis, and ER-positive breast cancer. Because of the decades-long interest in the safety and therapeutic utility of estrogenic chemicals, a large number of chemicals have been assayed for estrogenic activity, but these data exist in various sources and different formats that restrict the ability of regulatory and industry scientists to utilize them fully for assessing risk-benefit. To address this issue, we have developed an Estrogenic Activity Database (EADB; http://www.fda.gov/ScienceResearch/ BioinformaticsTools/EstrogenicActivityDatabaseEADB/default. htm) and made it freely available to the public. EADB contains 18,114 estrogenic activity data points collected for 8212 chemicals tested in 1284 binding, reporter gene, cell proliferation, and in vivo assays in 11 different species. The chemicals cover a broad chemical structure space and the data span a wide range of activities. A set of tools allow users to access EADB and evaluate potential endocrine activity of

  7. Androgen, Estrogen and the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have accomplished the following: 1) Characterized androgen responsive genes in mouse bone marrow (BM) via...castration (androgen ablation) and estrogen stimulation. 2) Measurements of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and of genes that regulate the local... gene expression in the bone marrow. In males, the main source of estrogen is through conversion of androgen by aromatase. We postulate that gene

  8. Estrogenic activity of naturally occurring anthocyanidins.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, E; Stopper, H

    2001-01-01

    Anthocyanins, which are natural plant pigments from the flavonoid family, represent substantial constituents of the human diet. Because some other bioflavonoids are known to have estrogenic activity, the aim of this study was to determine the estrogenic activity of the anthocyanine aglycones. Binding affinity to the estrogen receptor-alpha was 10,000- to 20,000-fold lower than that of the endogenous estrogen estradiol. In the estrogen receptor-positive cell line MCF-7, the anthocyanidins induced expression of a reporter gene. The tested anthocyanidins showed estrogen-inducible cell proliferation in two cell lines (MCF-7 and BG-1), but not in the receptor-negative human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The phytoestrogen-induced cell proliferation could be blocked by addition of the receptor antagonist 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Combination treatments with the endogenous estrogen estradiol resulted in a reduction of estradiol-induced cell proliferation. Overall, the tested anthocyanidins exert estrogenic activity, which might play a role in altering the development of hormone-dependent adverse effects.

  9. Detection of DNA Adducts in Human Breast Tissues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    techniques employed are kept simple, which in turn limits the resolution and characterization. Fourth, the limited resolution can make it difficult to...PROCEDURES Our basic scheme for detecting DNA adducts in human samples consists of three general steps. In step I, standard techniques are used to isolate...this adjustment was done without changing the pH. Buffer A was added to part B to keep the volume the same. The samples were stored at room temperature

  10. 2' and 3' Carboranyl uridines and their diethyl ether adducts

    DOEpatents

    Soloway, Albert H.; Barth, Rolf F.; Anisuzzaman, Abul K.; Alam, Fazlul; Tjarks, Werner

    1992-01-01

    There is disclosed a process for preparing carboranyl uridine nucleoside compounds and their diethyl ether adducts, which exhibit a tenfold increase in boron content over prior art boron containing nucleoside compounds. Said carboranyl uridine nucleoside compounds exhibit enhanced lipophilicity and hydrophilic properties adequate to enable solvation in aqueous media for subsequent incorporation of said compounds in methods for boron neutron capture therapy in mammalian tumor cells.

  11. Ion Pairs or Neutral Molecule Adducts? Cooperativity in Hydrogen Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKock, Roger L.; Schipper, Laura A.; Dykhouse, Stephanie C.; Heeringa, Lee P.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    We performed theoretical studies on the systems NH[subscript 3] times HF times mH[subscript 2]O, NH[subscript 3] times HCl times mH[subscript 2]O, with m = 0, 1, 2, and 6. The molecules with m = 0 form hydrogen-bonded adducts with little tendency to form an ion-pair structure. The molecule NH[subscript 3] times HCl times H[subscript 2]O cannot be…

  12. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Eyer, Peter; Eddleston, Michael; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-06-15

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos-poisoned patients have adducts on protein tyrosine. • Diethoxyphosphate-tyrosine does not lose an alkyl group. • Proteins in addition to AChE and BChE are modified by organophosphates.

  13. Polymorphisms in genes involved in estrogen and progesterone metabolism and mammographic density changes in women randomized to postmenopausal hormone therapy: results from a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Sarah J; Mack, Wendy J; Van Den Berg, David; Pike, Malcolm C; Ingles, Sue A; Haiman, Christopher A; Wang, Wei; Parisky, Yuri R; Hodis, Howard N; Ursin, Giske

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic density is a strong independent risk factor for breast cancer, and can be modified by hormonal exposures. Identifying genetic variants that determine increases in mammographic density in hormone users may be important in understanding hormonal carcinogenesis of the breast. Methods We obtained mammograms and DNA from 232 postmenopausal women aged 45 to 75 years who had participated in one of two randomized, double-blind clinical trials with estrogen therapy (104 women, taking 1 mg/day of micronized 17β-estradiol, E2), combined estrogen and progestin therapy (34 women, taking 17β-estradiol and 5 mg/day of medroxyprogesterone acetate for 12 days/month) or matching placebos (94 women). Mammographic percentage density (MPD) was measured on baseline and 12-month mammograms with a validated computer-assisted method. We evaluated polymorphisms in genes involved in estrogen metabolism (catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT (Val158Met)), cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1 (Val432Leu)), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1 (<7/≥ 7 TA repeats))) and progesterone metabolism (aldo-keto reductase 1C4 (AKR1C4 (Leu311Val))) with changes in MPD. Results The adjusted mean change in MPD was +4.6% in the estrogen therapy arm and +7.2% in the combined estrogen and progestin therapy arm, compared with +0.02% in the placebo arm (P = 0.0001). None of the genetic variants predicted mammographic density changes in women using estrogen therapy. Both the AKR1C4 and the CYP1B1 polymorphisms predicted mammographic density change in the combined estrogen and progestin therapy group (P < 0.05). In particular, the eight women carrying one or two low-activity AKR1C4 Val alleles showed a significantly greater increase in MPD (16.7% and 29.3%) than women homozygous for the Leu allele (4.0%). Conclusion Although based on small numbers, these findings suggest that the magnitude of the increase in mammographic density in women using combined estrogen and progestin therapy may be

  14. Thermal stability of DNA adducts induced by cyanomorpholinoadriamycin in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Cullinane, C; Phillips, D R

    1993-01-01

    The Adriamycin derivative, cyanomorpholinoadriamycin (CMA) was reacted with DNA in vitro to form apparent interstrand crosslinks. The extent of interstrand crosslink formation was monitored by a gel electrophoresis assay and maximal crosslinking of DNA was observed within 1 hr with 5 microM of drug. The interstrand crosslinks were heat labile, with a midpoint melting temperature of 70 degrees C (10 min exposure to heat) in 45% formamide. When CMA-induced adducts were detected as blockages of lambda-exonuclease, 12 blockage sites were observed with 8 being prior to 5'-GG sequences, one prior to 5'-CC, one prior to 5'-GC and 2 at unresolved combinations of these sequences. These exonuclease-detected blockages reveal the same sites of CMA-induced crosslinking as detected by in vitro transcription footprinting and primer-extension blockages on single strand DNA, where the blockages at 5'-GG and 5'-CC were identified as sites of intrastrand crosslinking and the 5'-GC blockage as a probable site of interstrand crosslinking. The thermal stability of both types of crosslink (10 min exposure to heat) ranged from 63-70 degrees C at individual sites. High levels of adduct were detected with poly (dG-dC) but not with poly (dI-dC). These results suggest adduct formation involving an aminal linkage between the 3 position of the morpholino moiety and N2 of guanine. Images PMID:8493102

  15. Structural Characterization of Hydroxyl Radical Adducts in Aqueous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Ireneusz; Tripathi, G. N. R.

    2015-06-01

    The oxidation by the hydroxyl (OH) radical is one of the most widely studied reactions because of its central role in chemistry, biology, organic synthesis, and photocatalysis in aqueous environments, wastewater treatment, and numerous other chemical processes. Although the redox potential of OH is very high, direct electron transfer (ET) is rarely observed. If it happens, it mostly proceeds through the formation of elusive OH adduct intermediate which facilitates ET and formation of hydroxide anion. Using time resolved resonance Raman technique we structurally characterized variety of OH adducts to sulfur containing organic compounds, halide ions as well as some metal cations. The bond between oxygen of OH radical and the atom of oxidized molecule differs depending on the nature of solute that OH radical reacts with. For most of sulfur containing organics, as well as halide and pseudo-halide ions, our observation suggested that this bond has two-center three-electron character. For several metal aqua ions studied, the nature of the bond depends on type of the cation being oxidized. Discussion on spectral parameters of all studied hydroxyl radical adducts as well as the role solvent plays in their stabilization will be presented.

  16. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Eyer, Peter; Eddleston, Michael; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. PMID:23566956

  17. Malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde adducts decrease bronchial epithelial wound repair.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Todd A; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Tuma, Dean J; Sisson, Joseph H; Spurzem, John R

    2005-05-01

    Most people who abuse alcohol are cigarette smokers. Previously, we have shown that malondialdehyde, an inflammation product of lipid peroxidation, and acetaldehyde, a component of both ethanol metabolism and cigarette smoke, form protein adducts that stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) activation in bronchial epithelial cells. We have also shown that PKC can regulate bronchial epithelial cell wound repair. We hypothesize that bovine serum albumin adducted with malondialdehyde and acetaldehyde (BSA-MAA) decreases bronchial epithelial cell wound repair via binding to scavenger receptors on bronchial epithelial cells. To test this, confluent monolayers of bovine bronchial epithelial cells were grown in serum-free media prior to wounding the cells. Bronchial epithelial cell wound closure was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner (up to 60%) in the presence of BSA-MAA than in media treated cells (Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis [LHC]-9-Roswell Park Memorial Institute [RPMI]). The specific scavenger receptor ligand, fucoidan, also stimulated PKC activation and decreased wound repair. Pretreatment with fucoidan blocked malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde binding to bronchial epithelial cells. When bronchial epithelial cells were preincubated with a PKC alpha inhibitor, Gö 6976, the inhibition of wound closure by fucoidan and BSA-MAA was blocked. Western blot demonstrated the presence of several scavenger receptors on bronchial epithelial cell membranes, including SRA, SRBI, SRBII, and CD36. Scavenger receptor-mediated activation of PKC alpha may function to reduce wound healing under conditions of alcohol and cigarette smoke exposure where malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde adducts may be present.

  18. Tunable degradation of maleimide-thiol adducts in reducing environments

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Aaron D.; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2011-01-01

    Addition chemistries are widely used in preparing biological conjugates, and in particular, maleimide-thiol adducts have been widely employed. Here we show that the resulting succinimide thioether formed by a Michael type addition of a thiol to N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), generally accepted as stable, can in fact undergo retro and exchange reactions in the presence of other thiol compounds at physiological pH and temperature, offering a novel strategy for controlled release. Model studies (1H NMR, HPLC) of NEM conjugated to 4-mercaptophenylacetic acid (MPA), N-acetylcysteine, or 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP) incubated with glutathione showed half lives of conversion from 20–80 hrs, with extents of conversion from 20–90% for MPA and N-acetylcysteine conjugates. Ring-opened the resultant succinimide thioether as well as any MP adduct did not show retro and exchange reactions. The kinetics of the retro reactions can be modulated by the Michael donor’s reactivity; therefore the degradation of maleimide-thiol adducts could be tuned for controlled release of drugs or degradation of materials at timescales different than those currently possible via disulfide-mediated release. Such approaches may find a new niche for controlled release in reducing environments relevant in chemotherapy and sub-cellular trafficking. PMID:21863904

  19. Acetaldehyde and the genome: beyond nuclear DNA adducts and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Philip J; Zakhari, Samir

    2014-03-01

    The designation of acetaldehyde associated with the consumption of alcoholic beverages as "carcinogenic to humans" (Group 1) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has brought renewed attention to the biological effects of acetaldehyde, as the primary oxidative metabolite of alcohol. Therefore, the overall focus of this review is on acetaldehyde and its direct and indirect effects on the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. We first consider different acetaldehyde-DNA adducts, including a critical assessment of the evidence supporting a role for acetaldehyde-DNA adducts in alcohol related carcinogenesis, and consideration of additional data needed to make a conclusion. We also review recent data on the role of the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway in protecting against acetaldehyde genotoxicity and carcinogenicity, as well as teratogenicity. We also review evidence from the older literature that acetaldehyde may impact the genome indirectly, via the formation of adducts with proteins that are themselves critically involved in the maintenance of genetic and epigenetic stability. Finally, we note the lack of information regarding acetaldehyde effects on the mitochondrial genome, which is notable since aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), the primary acetaldehyde metabolic enzyme, is located in the mitochondrion, and roughly 30% of East Asian individuals are deficient in ALDH2 activity due to a genetic variant in the ALDH2 gene. In summary, a comprehensive understanding of all of the mechanisms by which acetaldehyde impacts the function of the genome has implications not only for alcohol and cancer, but types of alcohol related pathologies as well.

  20. Effect of phytochemical intervention on dibenzo[a,l]pyrene-induced DNA adduct formation

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Gilandra K.; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Vadhanam, Manicka V.

    2015-01-01

    Dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) has been found to be the most potent carcinogen of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Primary sources for DBP in the environment are combustion of wood and coal burning, gasoline and diesel exhaust, and tires. Given the likelihood of environmental exposure to DBP and strong experimental evidence of its potency, it is likely to contribute to lung cancer development. Intervention with compounds of natural origin (“phytochemicals”) is considered an effective means to prevent cancer development and favorably modulate the underlying mechanisms, including DNA adduct formation. In this study, several agents have been identified that inhibit environmental carcinogen-induced DNA adduct formation using a cell-free microsomal system. Of the ten agents tested, resveratrol (648 ± 26 adducts/109 nucleotides), oltipraz (1007 ± 348 adducts/109 nucleotides), delphinidin (1252 ± 142 adducts/109 nucleotides), tanshinone I (1981 ± 213 adducts/109 nucleotides), tanshinone IIA (2606 ± 478 adducts/109 nucleotides) and diindoylmethane (3643 ± 469 adducts/109 nucleotides) were the most effective compared to vehicle treatment (14,062 ± 1097 adducts/109 nucleotides). DBP is metabolized by phase I metabolizing enzymes CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1. DBP-induced DNA adducts can be inhibited by several mechanisms. We found that all the test agents inhibited DNA adducts by inhibiting one or more of these enzymes. Oltipraz inhibited DNA adducts entirely by inhibiting the CYP450s, while resveratrol and delphinidin inhibited DNA adducts by also interacting directly with the carcinogenic metabolite, anti-dibenzo(a,l)pyrene-11,12-dihydrodiol-13,14-epoxide. PMID:25794985

  1. [Estrogen receptors and the mammary gland].

    PubMed

    Barrón, A; Bermejo, L; Castro, I

    1997-01-01

    For several decades it has been known that steroid hormones, estrogen and progesterone, regulate some genes involved in the growth, proliferation and differentiation of the mammary-gland in animals and humans. In the last years, the presence or absence of the nuclear estrogen receptor has been used by clinicians as a marker for tumor malignancy, as a prognostic index or as an important parameter for hormonal therapy with anti-estrogenic compounds of some hormone-dependent breast cancers. This review shows some advances in the knowledge of the structure, function, molecular mechanisms of estrogenic activity, and interaction with proteins like protooncogenes and growth factors. Also, we refer to the role of the estrogen receptor in the physiophatology of breast cancer.

  2. Serological characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon diolepoxide-DNA adducts using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Newman, M J; Weston, A; Carver, D C; Mann, D L; Harris, C C

    1990-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of structurally related compounds that are present in the environment in complex mixtures as common pollutants. These compounds have been studied extensively because of their carcinogenic and toxic properties to humans. We reported previously that humans exposed to certain PAHs produce antibodies that bind to different PAH diolepoxide-DNA (PAH-DNA) adducts. The ability to detect and measure antibodies to PAH-DNA adducts in human blood samples could prove useful as a biological dosimeter for identifying persons that have been exposed to high levels of PAHs, i.e. persons who may be at high cancer risk. In our initial studies we found that it was common for persons who were exposed to PAH to produce antibodies against PAH-DNA adducts. However, we were unable to identify the actual chemical types of PAH-DNA adducts that were recognized by the serum antibodies because many serum samples contained antibody activity to more than one adduct. These data indicate that different PAH-DNA adducts may be serologically similar or that humans actually produce immune responses against more than a single PAH-DNA adduct. We have used monoclonal antibody technology to determine the extent to which different PAH-DNA adducts share serologically recognized epitopes. Monoclonal antibodies were produced against two different PAH-DNA adducts, benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide-DNA (BPDE-DNA) and benz[a]anthracene diolepoxide-DNA (BADE-DNA). The binding of these antibodies to five PAH-DNA adduct preparations and to soluble PAHs was assessed. We found that most monoclonal antibodies bound to more than a single type of PAH-DNA adduct, documenting the serological relatedness of different PAH-DNA adducts. However, two monoclonal antibodies were produced that bound only to BPDE-DNA. Soluble non-metabolized PAHs and PAH tetraols were not recognized by these antibodies, thus demonstrating their specificity for PAH-DNA adducts and not the PAHs alone

  3. Cloning, expression, and characterization of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from a phenol-degrading Candida tropicalis JH8 strain.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan; Yang, Sheng; Xie, Zhixiong; Cheng, Li

    2016-10-02

    The sequence cato encoding catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from Candida tropicalis JH8 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The sequence cato contained an ORF of 858 bp encoding a polypeptide of 285 amino acid residues. The recombinant catechol 1,2-dioxygenase exists as a homodimer structure with a subunit molecular mass of 32 KD. Recombinant catechol 1,2-dioxygenase was unstable below pH 5.0 and stable from pH 7.0 to 9.0; its optimum pH was at 7.5. The optimum temperature for the enzyme was 30°C, and it possessed a thermophilic activity within a broad temperature range. Under the optimal conditions with catechol as substrate, the Km and Vmax of recombinant catechol 1,2-dioxygenase were 9.2 µM and 0.987 µM/min, respectively. This is the first article presenting cloning and expressing in E. coli of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from C. tropicalis and characterization of the recombinant catechol 1,2-dioxygenase.

  4. Correlation between Bonding Geometry and Band Gap States at Organic -- inorganic interfaces: Catechol on Rutile TiO2 (110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, Ulrike; Li, Shao-Chun; Wang, Jian-Guo; Jacobson, Peter; Gong, Xue-Qing; Selloni, Annabella

    2009-03-01

    Adsorbate-induced band gap states in semiconductors are of particular interest due to the potential of increased light absorption and photoreactivity. A combined theoretical (DFT) and experimental (STM, photoemission) study of the molecular-scale factors involved in the formation of gap states in TiO2 is presented. Using the organic catechol on rutile TiO2(110) as a model system it is found that the bonding geometry strongly affects the molecular electronic structure. At saturation catechol forms an ordered 4 x 1 overlayer. This structure is attributed to catechol adsorbed on rows of surface Ti atoms with the molecular plane tilted from the surface normal by about ±27 in an alternating fashion. In the lowest-energy structure one of the two terminal OH groups at each catechol dissociates and the O binds to a surface Ti atom in a monodentate configuration, while the other OH group forms a H-bond to the next catechol neighbor. Through proton exchange with the surface this structure transforms into one where both OH groups dissociate and the catechol is bound to two surface Ti in a bidentate configuration. Only bidendate catechol introduces states in the band gap of TiO2.

  5. Polyaniline-iron oxide nanohybrid film as multi-functional label-free electrochemical and biomagnetic sensor for catechol.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Sudeshna; Lang, Heinrich; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2013-09-17

    Polyaniline-iron oxide magnetic nanohybrid was synthesized and characterized using various spectroscopic, microstructural and electrochemical techniques. The smart integration of Fe3O4 nanoparticles within the polyaniline (PANI) matrix yielded a mesoporous nanohybrid (Fe3O4@PANI) with high surface area (94 m(2) g(-1)) and average pore width of 12.8 nm. Catechol is quasi-reversibly oxidized to o-quinone and reduced at the Fe3O4@PANI modified electrodes. The amperometric current response toward catechol was evaluated using the nanohybrid and the sensitivity and detection limit were found to be 312 μA μL(-1) and 0.2 nM, respectively. The results from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) indicated that the increased solution resistance (Rs) was due to elevated adsorption of catechol on the modified electrodes. Photoluminescence spectra showed ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) between p-π orbitals of the phenolate oxygen in catechol and the d-σ* metal orbital of Fe3O4@PANI nanohybrid. Potential dependent spectroelectrochemical behavior of Fe3O4@PANI nanohybrid toward catechol was studied using UV/vis/NIR spectroscopy. The binding activity of the biomagnetic particles to catechol through Brownian relaxation was evident from AC susceptibility measurements. The proposed sensor was used for successful recovery of catechol in tap water samples.

  6. Vascular Effects of Estrogenic Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reslan, Ossama M.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in men and postmenopausal women (Post-MW) than premenopausal women (Pre-MW). Despite recent advances in preventive measures, the incidence of CVD in women has shown a rise that matched the increase in the Post-MW population. The increased incidence of CVD in Post-MW has been related to the decline in estrogen levels, and hence suggested vascular benefits of endogenous estrogen. Experimental studies have identified estrogen receptor ERα, ERβ and a novel estrogen binding membrane protein GPR30 (GPER) in blood vessels of humans and experimental animals. The interaction of estrogen with vascular ERs mediates both genomic and non-genomic effects. Estrogen promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation by increasing nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and hyperpolarizing factor. Estrogen also inhibits the mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contraction including [Ca2+]i, protein kinase C and Rho-kinase. Additional effects of estrogen on the vascular cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, lipid profile and the vascular inflammatory response have been reported. In addition to the experimental evidence in animal models and vascular cells, initial observational studies in women using menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT) have suggested that estrogen may protect against CVD. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) such as the Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS) and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), which examined the effects of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) in older women with established CVD (HERS) or without overt CVD (WHI), failed to demonstrate protective vascular effects of estrogen treatment. Despite the initial set-back from the results of MHT RCTs, growing evidence now supports the ‘timing hypothesis’, which suggests that MHT could increase the risk of CVD if started late after menopause, but may produce beneficial cardiovascular effects in younger women during the perimenopausal period. The choice of

  7. Preserving the adhesion of catechol-conjugated hydrogels by thiourea-quinone coupling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang J; Wei, Kongchang; Zhao, Pengchao; Feng, Qian; Choi, Chun Kit K; Bian, Liming

    2016-11-15

    Mussel adhesion has inspired the development of catechol-based adhesive polymers. However, conventional strategies require basic pH conditions and lead to the loss of adhesion. To solve the problem, we report the first attempt to use thiourea-functionalized polymers for preserving hydrogel adhesion. We believe that this simple thiourea-quinone coupling chemistry is instrumental to synthetic adhesive materials.

  8. Reaction Pathways in Catechol/Primary Amine Mixtures: A Window on Crosslinking Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Saggiomo, Vittorio; Velders, Aldrik H; Cohen Stuart, Martien A; Kamperman, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Catechol chemistry is used as a crosslinking tool abundantly in both natural organisms (e.g. mussels, sandcastle worms) and synthetic systems to achieve the desired mechanical properties. Despite this abundance and success, the crosslinking chemistry is still poorly understood. In this study, to simplify the system, yet to capture the essential chemistry, model compounds 4-methyl catechol and propylamine are used. The reaction of 4-methyl catechol (2 mM) with propylamine (6 mM) is carried out in the presence of NaIO4 (2 mM) in 10 mM Na2CO3 aqueous solution. A variety of spectroscopic/spectrometric and chromatographic methods such as 1H NMR, LC-MS, and UV-VIS are used to track the reaction and identify the products/intermediates. It is found that the crosslinking chemistry of a catechol and an amine is both fast and complicated. Within five minutes, more than 60 products are formed. These products encompass 19 different masses ranging from molecular weight of 179 to 704. By combining time-dependent data, it is inferred that the dominant reaction pathways: the majority is formed via aryloxyl-phenol coupling and Michael-type addition, whereas a small fraction of products is formed via Schiff base reactions.

  9. Ultrafast Exciton Dynamics of J- and H- Aggregates of Porphyrin Catechol in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sandeep; Ghosh, Hirendra Nath

    Porphyrin catechol found to form J- and H-aggregates in different pH at certain concentration. Ultrafast exciton dynamics of J- and H-aggregates found to be 200 fs and 100 fs respectively as monitored by femtosecond visible spectroscopy

  10. Revealing the role of catechol moieties in the interactions between peptides and inorganic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Das, Priyadip; Reches, Meital

    2016-08-18

    Catechol (1,2-dihydroxy benzene) moieties are being widely used today in new adhesive technologies. Understanding their mechanism of action is therefore of high importance for developing their applications in materials science. This paper describes a single-molecule study of the interactions between catechol-related amino acid residues and a well-defined titanium dioxide (TiO2) surface. It is the first quantified measurement of the adhesion of these residues with a well-defined TiO2 surface. Single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements with AFM determined the role of different substitutions of the catechol moiety on the aromatic ring in the adhesion to the surface. These results shed light on the nature of interactions between these residues and inorganic metal oxide surfaces. This information is important for the design and fabrication of catechol-based materials such as hydrogels, coatings, and composites. Specifically, the interaction with TiO2 is important for the development of solar cells.

  11. The influence of catechol structure on the suicide-inactivation of tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Ramsden, Christopher A; Stratford, Michael R L; Riley, Patrick A

    2009-09-07

    3,6-Difluorocatechol, which cannot act as a monooxygenase tyrosinase substrate, is an oxidase substrate, and, in contrast to other catechols, oxidation does not lead to suicide-inactivation, providing experimental evidence for an inactivation mechanism involving reductive elimination of Cu(0) from the active site.

  12. Removal of arsenic, vanadium and/or nickel compounds from spent catecholated polymer

    DOEpatents

    Fish, R.H.

    1987-04-21

    Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100 C with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

  13. Removal of arsenic, vanadium and/or nickel compounds from spent catecholated polymer

    DOEpatents

    Fish, Richard H.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

  14. Catechol polymers for pH-responsive, targeted drug delivery to cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing; Chen, Feng; Cryns, Vincent L; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2011-08-10

    A novel cell-targeting, pH-sensitive polymeric carrier was employed in this study for delivery of the anticancer drug bortezomib (BTZ) to cancer cells. Our strategy is based on facile conjugation of BTZ to catechol-containing polymeric carriers that are designed to be taken up selectively by cancer cells through cell surface receptor-mediated mechanisms. The polymer used as a building block in this study was poly(ethylene glycol), which was chosen for its ability to reduce nonspecific interactions with proteins and cells. The catechol moiety was exploited for its ability to bind and release borate-containing therapeutics such as BTZ in a pH-dependent manner. In acidic environments, such as in cancer tissue or the subcellular endosome, BTZ dissociates from the polymer-bound catechol groups to liberate the free drug, which inhibits proteasome function. A cancer-cell-targeting ligand, biotin, was presented on the polymer carriers to facilitate targeted entry of drug-loaded polymer carriers into cancer cells. Our study demonstrated that the cancer-targeting drug-polymer conjugates dramatically enhanced cellular uptake, proteasome inhibition, and cytotoxicity toward breast carcinoma cells in comparison with nontargeting drug-polymer conjugates. The pH-sensitive catechol-boronate binding mechanism provides a chemoselective approach for controlling the release of BTZ in targeted cancer cells, establishing a concept that may be applied in the future toward other boronic acid-containing therapeutics to treat a broad range of diseases.

  15. Chloridazon-catechol dioxygenases, a distinct group of meta-cleaving enzymes.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, S; Müller, R; Wegst, W; Lingens, F

    1984-02-01

    We previously described a new meta-cleaving enzyme, termed chloridazon-catechol dioxygenase. The present paper describes the comparison of this enzyme with the meta-cleaving enzymes of eighteen strains of soil bacteria isolated with various aromatic compounds. Four of these strains were isolated with the herbicide chloridazon, six with the analgeticum aminopyrine and one with the analgeticum antipyrine as sole carbon source. These strains all belonged to a new type of bacteria, called Phenylobacteria. The seven other strains were isolated with aromatic compounds such as toluene, 3-phenylpropionate, benzoate, papaverine and 4-chlorobenzoate, and belonged to various species including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Nocardia. In double diffusion experiments with antibodies, prepared against chloridazon-catechol dioxygenase, extracts from the eleven strains of Phenylobacteria gave a cross reaction, whereas the extracts of the seven other strains showed no reaction. The enzymes of the eleven positive strains showed the same characteristic kinetic behaviour as the previously described enzyme. In contrast to catechol 2, 3-dioxygenase they needed the addition of exogenous Fe2+ ions for activity. On ion-exchange chromatography they emerged at the same buffer concentration as chloridazon-catechol dioxygenase. In polyacrylamide electrophoresis they migrated identically. The linkage map derived from the activities of the various enzymes with 10 different substrates revealed an identity of more than 80% for these eleven enzymes. So the meta-cleaving enzymes of the Phenylobacteria seem to form a distinct group among the non-heme iron-containing dioxygenases.

  16. Free radical scavenging potency of quercetin catecholic colonic metabolites: Thermodynamics of 2H(+)/2e(-) processes.

    PubMed

    Amić, Ana; Lučić, Bono; Stepanić, Višnja; Marković, Zoran; Marković, Svetlana; Dimitrić Marković, Jasmina M; Amić, Dragan

    2017-03-01

    Reaction energetics of the double (2H(+)/2e(-)), i.e., the first 1H(+)/1e(-) (catechol→ phenoxyl radical) and the second 1H(+)/1e(-) (phenoxyl radical→ quinone) free radical scavenging mechanisms of quercetin and its six colonic catecholic metabolites (caffeic acid, hydrocaffeic acid, homoprotocatechuic acid, protocatechuic acid, 4-methylcatechol, and catechol) were computationally studied using density functional theory, with the aim to estimate the antiradical potency of these molecules. We found that second hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and second sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET) mechanisms are less energy demanding than the first ones indicating 2H(+)/2e(-) processes as inherent to catechol moiety. The Gibbs free energy change for reactions of inactivation of selected free radicals indicate that catecholic colonic metabolites constitute an efficient group of more potent scavengers than quercetin itself, able to deactivate various free radicals, under different biological conditions. They could be responsible for the health benefits associated with regular intake of flavonoid-rich diet.

  17. Organic impurity profiling of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) synthesised from catechol.

    PubMed

    Heather, Erin; Shimmon, Ronald; McDonagh, Andrew M

    2015-03-01

    This work examines the organic impurity profile of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) that has been synthesised from catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), a common chemical reagent available in industrial quantities. The synthesis of MDMA from catechol proceeded via the common MDMA precursor safrole. Methylenation of catechol yielded 1,3-benzodioxole, which was brominated and then reacted with magnesium allyl bromide to form safrole. Eight organic impurities were identified in the synthetic safrole. Safrole was then converted to 3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl-2-propanone (MDP2P) using two synthetic methods: Wacker oxidation (Route 1) and an isomerisation/peracid oxidation/acid dehydration method (Route 2). MDMA was then synthesised by reductive amination of MDP2P. Thirteen organic impurities were identified in MDMA synthesised via Route 1 and eleven organic impurities were identified in MDMA synthesised via Route 2. Overall, organic impurities in MDMA prepared from catechol indicated that synthetic safrole was used in the synthesis. The impurities also indicated which of the two synthetic routes was utilised.

  18. Association of Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Polymorphism and Academic Achievement in a Chinese Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Chang, Chun-Yen; Hu, Chung-Yi; Yeh, Ting-Chi; Lin, Ming-Yeh

    2009-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is a methylation enzyme that catalyzes the degradation pathway and inactivation of dopamine. It is accepted widely as being involved in the modulation of dopaminergic physiology and prefrontal cortex (PFC) function. The COMT Val158Met polymorphism is associated with variation in COMT activity. COMT 158Met allele…

  19. Chitosan-catechol: a polymer with long-lasting mucoadhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyuri; Kim, Keumyeon; Ryu, Ji Hyun; Lee, Haeshin

    2015-06-01

    Numerous mucoadhesive polymers have been exploited for prolonging the residence time of formulated drugs or pharmaceuticals at specific delivery sites. However, it has been difficult to achieve satisfactory mucoadhesive properties. The two major modification strategies such as thiolation or lectin functionalization have been extensively studied, but disulfide bond reversibility in the case of thiolation and the toxicity of lectins have been problems. Thus, approaches for further improvement of mucoadhesive properties need to be developed. With an overwhelming library of mucoadhesive polymers, one practical way to improve mucoadhesion is chemical modification of existing mucoadhesive polymers. In other words, the method is based on utilizing the cooperative effect that might be achieved by chemical tethering of a small adhesive moiety to an available mucoadhesive polymer. Here, we conjugated catechols derived from mussel adhesive proteins to chitosan, which is a widely known mucoadhesive polymer. We demonstrated that the gastrointestinal (GI) tract retention of chitosan-catechol was improved compared to unmodified chitosan, which is due to the formation of irreversible catechol mediated-crosslinking with mucin. The results indicate that catechol modification of mucoadhesive polymers may possibly lead to a new generation of mucoadhesive polymers for mucosal drug delivery.

  20. Catechol-O-methyltransferase in complex with substituted 3'-deoxyribose bisubstrate inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ellermann, Manuel; Lerner, Christian; Burgy, Guillaume; Ehler, Andreas; Bissantz, Caterina; Jakob-Roetne, Roland; Paulini, Ralph; Allemann, Oliver; Tissot, Heloïse; Grünstein, Dan; Stihle, Martine; Diederich, Francois; Rudolph, Markus G

    2012-03-01

    The biological activity of catechol neurotransmitters such as dopamine in the synapse is modulated by transporters and enzymes. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT; EC 2.1.1.6) inactivates neurotransmitters by catalyzing the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to catechols in the presence of Mg²⁺. This pathway also inactivates L-DOPA, the standard therapeutic for Parkinson's disease. Depletion of catechol neurotransmitters in the prefrontal cortex has been linked to schizophrenia. The inhibition of COMT therefore promises improvements in the treatment of these diseases. The concept of bisubstrate inhibitors for COMT has been described previously. Here, ribose-modified bisubstrate inhibitors were studied. Three high-resolution crystal structures of COMT in complex with novel ribose-modified bisubstrate inhibitors confirmed the predicted binding mode but displayed subtle alterations at the ribose-binding site. The high affinity of the inhibitors can be convincingly rationalized from the structures, which document the possibility of removing and/or replacing the ribose 3'-hydroxyl group and provide a framework for further inhibitor design.

  1. Reaction Pathways in Catechol/Primary Amine Mixtures: A Window on Crosslinking Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juan; Saggiomo, Vittorio; Velders, Aldrik H.; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Kamperman, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Catechol chemistry is used as a crosslinking tool abundantly in both natural organisms (e.g. mussels, sandcastle worms) and synthetic systems to achieve the desired mechanical properties. Despite this abundance and success, the crosslinking chemistry is still poorly understood. In this study, to simplify the system, yet to capture the essential chemistry, model compounds 4-methyl catechol and propylamine are used. The reaction of 4-methyl catechol (2 mM) with propylamine (6 mM) is carried out in the presence of NaIO4 (2 mM) in 10 mM Na2CO3 aqueous solution. A variety of spectroscopic/spectrometric and chromatographic methods such as 1H NMR, LC-MS, and UV-VIS are used to track the reaction and identify the products/intermediates. It is found that the crosslinking chemistry of a catechol and an amine is both fast and complicated. Within five minutes, more than 60 products are formed. These products encompass 19 different masses ranging from molecular weight of 179 to 704. By combining time-dependent data, it is inferred that the dominant reaction pathways: the majority is formed via aryloxyl-phenol coupling and Michael-type addition, whereas a small fraction of products is formed via Schiff base reactions. PMID:27930671

  2. Catechol-O-methyltransferase: a method for autoradiographic visualization of isozymes in cellogel

    SciTech Connect

    Brahe, C.; Crosti, N.; Meera Khan, P.; Serra, A.

    1984-02-01

    An electrophoretic procedure for separating the molecular forms of catechol-O-methyltransferase in cellulose acetate gel is described; the zones of enzyme activity were revealed by autoradiography. The electrophoretic patterns of the enzyme in several tissues and cell lines derived from four different species are presented.

  3. Hydrolytic Cleavage Products of Globin Adducts in Urine as Possible Biomarkers of Cumulative Dose: Proof of Concept Using Styrene Oxide as a Model Adduct-Forming Compound.

    PubMed

    Mráz, Jaroslav; Hanzlíková, Iveta; Moulisová, Alena; Dušková, Šárka; Hejl, Kamil; Bednářová, Aneta; Dabrowská, Ludmila; Linhart, Igor

    2016-04-18

    A new experimental model was designed to study the fate of globin adducts with styrene 7,8-oxide (SO), a metabolic intermediate of styrene and a model electrophilic compound. Rat erythrocytes were incubated with SO at 7 or 22 °C. Levels of specific amino acid adducts in globin were determined by LC/MS analysis of the globin hydrolysate, and erythrocytes with known adduct content were administered intravenously to recipient rats. The course of adduct elimination from the rat blood was measured over the following 50 days. In the erythrocytes incubated at 22 °C, a rapid decline in the adduct levels on the first day post-transfusion followed by a slow phase of elimination was observed. In contrast, the adduct elimination in erythrocytes incubated at 7 °C was nearly linear, copying elimination of intact erythrocytes. In the urine of recipient rats, regioisomeric SO adducts at cysteine, valine, lysine, and histidine in the form of amino acid adducts and/or their acetylated metabolites as well as SO-dipeptide adducts were identified by LC/MS supported by synthesized reference standards. S-(2-Hydroxy-1-phenylethyl)cysteine and S-(2-hydroxy-2-phenylethyl)cysteine, the most abundant globin adducts, were excreted predominantly in the form of the corresponding urinary mercapturic acids (HPEMAs). Massive elimination of HPEMAs via urine occurred within the first day from the erythrocytes incubated at both 7 and 22 °C. However, erythrocytes incubated at 7 °C also showed a slow second phase of elimination such that HPEMAs were detected in urine up to 50 days post-transfusion. These results indicate for the first time that globin adducts can be cleaved in vivo to modified amino acids and dipeptides. The cleavage products and/or their predictable metabolites are excreted in urine over the whole life span of erythrocytes. Some of the urinary adducts may represent a new type of noninvasive biomarker for exposure to adduct-forming chemicals.

  4. Vanadium-based, extended catalytic lifetime catechol dioxygenases: evidence for a common catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yin, Cindy-Xing; Finke, Richard G

    2005-06-29

    In 1999, a catechol dioxygenase derived from a V-polyoxometalate was reported which was able to perform a record >100 000 total turnovers of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol oxygenation using O2 as the oxidant (Weiner, H.; Finke, R. G. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1999, 121, 9831). An important goal is to better understand this and other vanadium-based catechol dioxygenases. Scrutiny of 11 literature reports of vanadium-based catechol dioxygenases yielded the insight that they all proceed with closely similar selectivities. This, in turn, led to a "common catalyst hypothesis" for the broad range of vanadium based catechol dioxygenase precatalysts presently known. The following three classes of V-based compounds, 10 complexes total, have been explored to test the common catalyst hypothesis: (i) six vanadium-based polyoxometalate precatalysts, (n-Bu4N)4H5PV14O42, (n-Bu4N)7SiW9V3O40, (n-Bu4N)5[(CH3CN)(x)Fe(II).SiW9V3O40], (n-Bu4N)9P2W15V3O62, (n-Bu4N)5Na2[(CH3CN)(x)Fe(II).P2W15V3O62], and (n-Bu4N)4H2-gamma-SiW10V2O40; (ii) three vanadium catecholate complexes, [V(V)O(DBSQ)(DTBC)]2, [Et3NH]2[V(IV)O(DBTC)2].2CH3OH, and [Na(CH3OH)2]2[V(V)(DTBC)3]2.4CH3OH (where DBSQ = 3,5-di-tert-butylsemiquinone anion and DTBC = 3,5-di-tert-butylcatecholate dianion), and (iii) simple VO(acac)2. Product selectivity studies, catalytic lifetime tests, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), negative ion mode electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (negative ion ESI-MS), and kinetic studies provided compelling evidence for a common catalyst or catalyst resting state, namely, Pierpont's structurally characterized vanadyl semiquinone catecholate dimer complex, [VO(DBSQ)(DTBC)]2, formed from V-leaching from the precatalysts. The results provide a considerable simplification and unification of a previously disparate literature of V-based catechol dioxygenases.

  5. Structure of adducts of isoindolo[2,1-a]benzimidazole derivatives with maleimides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Oleksandr; Yegorova, Tatyana; Levkov, Igor; Malytskyy, Volodymyr; Shishkin, Oleg; Zubatyuk, Roman; Palamarchuk, Genadiy; Vedrenne, Marc; Baltas, Michel; Voitenko, Zoia

    2015-03-01

    The selectivity of formation and some mechanistic insights during the synthesis of substituted isoindolo[2,1-a]benzimidazoles are discussed. Furthermore, the reactions of the obtained products with maleimides were carried out. Two types rearrangement adducts together with intermediate Michael type adducts were isolated. The influence of the reaction conditions and reagents ratio is discussed. Specific spectral criteria for the identification of the Michael type adducts are indicated.

  6. Detection and quantification of 4-ABP adducts in DNA from bladder cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Beatriz; Stillwell, Sara W; Wishnok, John S; Trudel, Laura J; Skipper, Paul; Yu, Mimi C; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Wogan, Gerald N

    2007-02-01

    We analyzed bladder DNA from 27 cancer patients for dG-C8-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-ABP) adducts using the liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method with a 700 attomol (1 adduct in 10(9) bases) detection limit. Hemoglobin (Hb) 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) adduct levels were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. After isolation of dG-C8-ABP by immunoaffinity chromatography and further purification, deuterated (d9) dG-C8-ABP (MW=443 Da) was added to each sample. Structural evidence and adduct quantification were determined by selected reaction monitoring, based on the expected adduct ion [M+H+]+1, at m/z 435 with fragmentation to the product ion at m/z 319, and monitoring of the transition for the internal standard, m/z 444-->328. The method was validated by analysis of DNA (100 microg each) from calf thymus; livers from ABP-treated and untreated rats; human placentas; and TK6 lymphoblastoid cells. Adduct was detected at femtomol levels in DNA from livers of ABP-treated rats and calf thymus, but not in other controls. The method was applied to 41 DNA samples (200 microg each) from 27 human bladders; 28 from tumor and 14 from surrounding non-tumor tissue. Of 27 tissues analyzed, 44% (12) contained 5-80 dG-C8-ABP adducts per 10(9) bases; only 1 out of 27 (4%) contained adduct in both tumor and surrounding tissues. The Hb adduct was detected in samples from all patients, at levels of 12-1960 pg per gram Hb. There was no correlation between levels of DNA and Hb adducts. The presence of DNA adducts in 44% of the subjects and high levels of Hb adducts in these non-smokers indicate environmental sources of exposure to 4-ABP.

  7. Criteria for successful estrogen therapy in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, R

    1993-01-01

    Estrogens are well established as agents that stabilize the skeleton and reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures among postmenopausal women. For maximum benefit, preventive therapy should begin as early as possible after ovarian failure begins to occur. Efforts to prevent bone loss are likely to achieve the best results when initiated prior to significant loss of bone tissue and trabecular penetration. An effect on skeletal bone mass can be obtained by any route of administration and transdermal estrogen use is an alternative to oral estrogen. Long-term therapy may reduce the risk of hip fracture by 50% and of vertebral fracture by a greater amount. The minimum effective dose is probably that which achieves circulating estrogen levels in the mid-follicular range. For women with a uterus in place, a progestin usually is provided to protect the endometrium; it is given cyclically in younger women but may be given continuously in women several years past menopause. Progestins do not interfere with the effects of estrogen on the skeleton, and it is possible that some progestins enhance the skeletal effects of estrogen. For patients with osteoporosis, estrogens can be used as first-line therapy since in these patients they have the same skeletal stabilizing effect and reduce the risk of recurrent fracture.

  8. The role of the interaction between oxygen and catechol in the pitting corrosion of steel in alkaline sulfide solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, S.; Kelly, R.G.

    1995-12-01

    Black liquor corrosivity is shown to depend on the interaction of the chemical species present. Specifically, an interaction between oxygen and 1,2-dihydroxybenzene compounds (catechols) in alkaline sulfide solutions leads to a distinct increase in the severity of the attack. This increased corrosivity is explained in terms of the oxidation of catechol leading to increased open circuit potentials for steel. The importance of the ratio of sulfide concentration to hydroxyl concentration in the initiation of pitting is stressed. The possible role of catechol in stabilizing metastable pits is also discussed.

  9. Estrogen

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaginal dryness, itching, or burning, or to prevent osteoporosis (a condition in which the bones become thin ... to treat vaginal dryness or only to prevent osteoporosis should consider a different treatment. Some brands of ...

  10. Growth of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is promoted by exogenous hydroxamate and catechol siderophores.

    PubMed

    Diarra, M S; Dolence, J A; Dolence, E K; Darwish, I; Miller, M J; Malouin, F; Jacques, M

    1996-03-01

    Siderophores bind ferric ions and are involved in receptor-specific iron transport into bacteria. Six types of siderophores were tested against strains representing the 12 different serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Ferrichrome and bis-catechol-based siderophores showed strong growth-promoting activities for A. pleuropneumoniae in a disk diffusion assay. Most strains of A. pleuropneumoniae tested were able to use ferrichrome (21 of 22 or 95%), ferrichrome A (20 of 22 or 90%), and lysine-based bis-catechol (20 of 22 or 90%), while growth of 36% (8 of 22) was promoted by a synthetic hydroxamate, N5-acetyl-N5-hydroxy-L-ornithine tripeptide. A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 (strain FMV 87-682) and serotype 5 (strain 2245) exhibited a distinct yellow halo around colonies on Chrome Azurol S agar plates, suggesting that both strains can produce an iron chelator (siderophore) in response to iron stress. The siderophore was found to be neither a phenolate nor a hydroxamate by the chemical tests of Arnow and Csaky, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the production of an iron chelator and the use of exogenous siderophores by A. pleuropneumoniae. A spermidine-based bis-catechol siderophore conjugated to a carbacephalosporin was shown to inhibit growth of A. pleuropneumoniae. A siderophore-antibiotic-resistant strain was isolated and shown to have lost the ability to use ferrichrome, synthetic hydroxamate, or catechol-based siderophores when grown under conditions of iron restriction. This observation indicated that a common iron uptake pathway, or a common intermediate, for hydroxamate- and catechol-based siderophores may exist in A. pleuropneumoniae.

  11. Catechol oxidation by ozone and hydroxyl radicals at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Pillar, Elizabeth A; Camm, Robert C; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2014-12-16

    Anthropogenic emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons promptly react with hydroxyl radicals undergoing oxidation to form phenols and polyphenols (e.g., catechol) typically identified in the complex mixture of humic-like substances (HULIS). Because further processing of polyphenols in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) can continue mediated by a mechanism of ozonolysis at interfaces, a better understanding about how these reactions proceed at the air-water interface is needed. This work shows how catechol, a molecular probe of the oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbons present in SOA, can contribute interfacial reactive species that enhance the production of HULIS under atmospheric conditions. Reactive semiquinone radicals are quickly produced upon the encounter of 40 ppbv-6.0 ppmv O3(g) with microdroplets containing [catechol] = 1-150 μM. While the previous pathway results in the instantaneous formation of mono- and polyhydroxylated aromatic rings (PHA) and chromophoric mono- and polyhydroxylated quinones (PHQ), a different channel produces oxo- and dicarboxylic acids of low molecular weight (LMW). The cleavage of catechol occurs at the 1,2 carbon-carbon bond at the air-water interface through the formation of (1) an ozonide intermediate, (2) a hydroperoxide, and (3) cis,cis-muconic acid. However, variable [catechol] and [O3(g)] can affect the ratio of the primary products (cis,cis-muconic acid and trihydroxybenzenes) and higher order products observed (PHA, PHQ, and LMW oxo- and dicarboxylic acids). Secondary processing is confirmed by mass spectrometry, showing the production of crotonic, maleinaldehydic, maleic, glyoxylic, and oxalic acids. The proposed pathway can contribute precursors to aqueous SOA (AqSOA) formation, converting aromatic hydrocarbons into polyfunctional species widely found in tropospheric aerosols with light-absorbing brown carbon.

  12. Condensed-phase versus gas-phase ozonolysis of catechol: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Timothy J.; Medeiros, Nicholas; Hinrichs, Ryan Z.

    2012-08-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of volatile aromatic compounds contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), especially in urban environments. Aromatic SOA precursors typically require oxidation by hydroxyl radicals, although recent work suggests that ozonolysis of 1,2-benzenediols produces SOA in high yields. We employed attenuated total reflectance and transmission infrared spectroscopy to investigate the heterogeneous ozonolysis of catechol thin films. Formation of the dominant condensed-phase product muconic acid was highly dependent on relative humidity (RH) with few products detected below 40% RH and a maximum reactive uptake coefficient of γ = (5.6 ± 0.5) × 10-5 measured at 81.2% RH. We also performed quantum chemical calculations mapping out several reaction pathways for the homogeneous ozonolysis of gaseous catechol. 1,3-cycloaddition transition states were rate limiting with the most favorable activation energies at 45.4 and 47.1 kJ mol-1 [CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p)] corresponding to addition across and adjacent to the diol Cdbnd C, respectively. Gas-phase rate constants, calculated using transition state theory, were six orders of magnitude slower than experimental values. In contrast, a calculated activation energy was lower for the ozonolysis of a catechol•H2O complex, which serves as a first-approximation for modeling the ozonolysis of condensed-phase catechol. These combined results suggests that homogeneous ozonolysis of catechol may not be important for the formation of secondary organic aerosols but that ozonolysis of surface-adsorbed catechol may contribute to SOA growth.

  13. Formation of DNA adducts from oil-derived products analyzed by 32P-HPLC.

    PubMed

    Akkineni, L K; Zeisig, M; Baranczewski, P; Ekström, L G; Möller, L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the genotoxic potential of DNA adducts and to compare DNA adduct levels and patterns in petroleum vacuum distillates, coal tar distillate, bitumen fume condensates, and related substances that have a wide range of boiling temperatures. An in vitro assay was used for DNA adduct analysis with human and rat S-9 liver extract metabolic activation followed by 32P-postlabeling and 32P-high-performance liquid chromatography (32p-HPLC). For petroleum distillates originating from one crude oil there was a correlation between in vitro DNA adduct formation and mutagenic index, which showed an increase with a distillation temperature of 250 degrees C and a peak around a distillation point of approximately 400 degrees C. At higher temperatures, the genotoxicity (DNA adducts and mutagenicity) rapidly declined to very low levels. Different petroleum products showed a more than 100-fold range in DNA adduct formation, with severely hydrotreated base oil and bitumen fume condensates being lowest. Coal tar distillates showed ten times higher levels of DNA adduct formation than the most potent petroleum distillate. A clustered DNA adduct pattern was seen over a wide distillation range after metabolic activation with liver extracts of rat or human origin. These clusters were eluted in a region where alkylated aromatic hydrocarbons could be expected. The DNA adduct patterns were similar for base oil and bitumen fume condensates, whereas coal tar distillates had a wider retention time range of the DNA adducts formed. Reference substances were tested in the same in vitro assay. Two- and three-ringed nonalkylated aromatics were rather low in genotoxicity, but some of the three- to four-ringed alkylated aromatics were very potent inducers of DNA adducts. Compounds with an amino functional group showed a 270-fold higher level of DNA adduct formation than the same structures with a nitro functional group. The most potent DNA adduct inducers of the 16

  14. Diallyl sulfide inhibits diethylstilbesterol-induced DNA adducts in the breast of female ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Wilson, C; Newell, O; Sadrud-Din, S; Thomas, R

    2005-09-01

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is metabolized to reactive intermediates that produce DNA adducts and ultimately cancer. Diallyl sulfide (DAS) has been shown to inhibit the metabolism of several procarcinogens. The ability of DES to produce DNA adducts in microsomal, mitochondrial, and nuclear in vitro metabolic systems and in the breast of female ACI rats, as well as ability of DAS to inhibit DNA adducts were investigated. Microsomes, mitochondria, and nuclei isolated from breast tissue of female ACI rats were used to catalyze oxidation reactions. Female ACI rats were treated i.p. as follows: (1) corn oil, (2) 200mg/kg DES, (3) 200mg/kg DES/200mg/kg of DAS, (4) 200mg/kg DES/400mg/kg DAS. DES produced DNA adducts in each metabolic system. The relative adduct levels were 2.1 x 10(-4), 6.2 x 10(-6), and 2.9 x 10(-7) in microsomal, mitochondrial, and nuclear reactions, respectively. DAS inhibited DNA adducts in each metabolic system. The percent inhibition ranged from 86% in microsomes to 93% in nuclei. DES produced DNA adducts in mtDNA and nDNA. DAS completely inhibited the DES-induced mtDNA adducts and caused a dose dependent decrease in nDNA adduct formation. These findings suggest that DAS could inhibit DES-induced breast cancer by inhibiting its metabolism.

  15. Lifetimes and stabilities of familiar explosives molecular adduct complexes during ion mobility measurements

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Alan; DeBord, John Daniel; Ridgeway, Mark; Park, Melvin; Eiceman, Gary; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (TIMS-MS) was utilized for the separation and identification of familiar explosives in complex mixtures. For the first time, molecular adduct complex lifetimes, relative stability, binding energies and candidate structures are reported for familiar explosives. Experimental and theoretical results showed that the adduct size and reactivity, complex binding energy and the explosive structure tailors the stability of the molecular adduct complex. TIMS flexibility to adapt the mobility separation as a function of the molecular adduct complex stability (i.e., short or long IMS experiments / low or high IMS resolution) permits targeted measurements of explosives in complex mixtures with higher confidence levels. PMID:26153567

  16. Regiochemically controlled synthesis of a β-4-β' [70]fullerene bis-adduct

    DOE PAGES

    Cerón, Maira R.; Castro, Edison; Neti, Venkata S. Pavan K.; ...

    2016-12-22

    A β-4-β' C70 bis-adduct regioisomer and an uncommon mono-adduct β-malonate C70 derivative were synthesized by using a Diels–Alder cycloaddition followed by an addition–elimination of bromo-ethylmalonate and a retro-Diels–Alder cycloaddition reaction. Here, we also report the regioselective synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of Cs-symmetric tris- and C2v-symmetric tetra-adducts of C70, which are the precursors of the mono- and bis-adduct final products.

  17. Regiochemically controlled synthesis of a β-4-β' [70]fullerene bis-adduct

    SciTech Connect

    Cerón, Maira R.; Castro, Edison; Neti, Venkata S. Pavan K.; Dunk, Paul W.; Echegoyen, Luis A.

    2016-12-22

    A β-4-β' C70 bis-adduct regioisomer and an uncommon mono-adduct β-malonate C70 derivative were synthesized by using a Diels–Alder cycloaddition followed by an addition–elimination of bromo-ethylmalonate and a retro-Diels–Alder cycloaddition reaction. Here, we also report the regioselective synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of Cs-symmetric tris- and C2v-symmetric tetra-adducts of C70, which are the precursors of the mono- and bis-adduct final products.

  18. Mass spectrometry for the assessment of the occurrence and biological consequences of DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuo; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous and endogenous sources of chemical species can react, directly or after metabolic activation, with DNA to yield DNA adducts. If not repaired, DNA adducts may compromise cellular functions by blocking DNA replication and/or inducing mutations. Unambiguous identification of the structures and accurate measurements of the levels of DNA adducts in cellular and tissue DNA constitute the first and important step towards understanding the biological consequences of these adducts. The advances in mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation in the past 2–3 decades have rendered MS an important tool for structure elucidation, quantification, and revelation of the biological consequences of DNA adducts. In this review, we summarized the development of MS techniques on these fronts for DNA adduct analysis. We placed our emphasis of discussion on sample preparation, the combination of MS with gas chromatography-or liquid chromatography (LC)-based separation techniques for the quantitative measurement of DNA adducts, and the use of LC-MS along with molecular biology tools for understanding the human health consequences of DNA adducts. The applications of mass spectrometry-based DNA adduct analysis for predicting the therapeutic outcome of anti-cancer agents, for monitoring the human exposure to endogenous and environmental genotoxic agents, and for DNA repair studies were also discussed. PMID:26204249

  19. Temporal and spatial features of the formation of DNA adducts in sulfur mustard-exposed skin

    SciTech Connect

    Batal, Mohamed; Boudry, Isabelle; Mouret, Stéphane; Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine; Bérard, Izabel; and others

    2013-12-15

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that targets skin where it induces large blisters. DNA alkylation is a critical step to explain SM-induced cutaneous symptoms. We determined the kinetics of formation of main SM–DNA adducts and compare it with the development of the SM-induced pathogenesis in skin. SKH-1 mice were exposed to 2, 6 and 60 mg/kg of SM and treated skin was biopsied between 6 h and 21 days. Formation of SM DNA adducts was dose-dependent with a maximum immediately after exposure. However, adducts were persistent and still detectable 21 days post-exposure. The time-dependent formation of DNA adducts was also found to be correlated with the appearance of apoptotic cells. This temporal correlation suggests that these two early events are responsible for the severity of the damage to the skin. Besides, SM–DNA adducts were also detected in areas located next to contaminated zone, thus suggesting that SM diffuses in skin. Altogether, this work provides for the first time a clear picture of SM-induced genotoxicity using DNA adducts as a marker. - Highlights: • Sulfur mustard adducts are formed in DNA after skin exposure. • DNA damage formation is an early event in the pathological process of skin burn. • The amount of SM–DNA adducts is maximal at the earliest time point investigated. • Adducts are still detected 3 weeks after exposure. • Sulfur mustard diffuses in skin especially when large doses are applied.

  20. Correlation between Quadriceps Endurance and Adduction Moment in Medial Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sung-Eun; Park, Min-Ji; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2015-01-01

    It is not clear whether the strength or endurance of thigh muscles (quadriceps and hamstring) is positively or negatively correlated with the adduction moment of osteoarthritic knees. This study therefore assessed the relationships between the strength and endurance of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles and adduction moment in osteoarthritic knees and evaluated predictors of the adduction moment. The study cohort comprised 35 patients with unilateral medial osteoarthritis and varus deformity who were candidates for open wedge osteotomy. The maximal torque (60°/sec) and total work (180°/sec) of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles and knee adduction moment were evaluated using an isokinetic testing device and gait analysis system. The total work of the quadriceps (r = 0.429, P = 0.037) and hamstring (r = 0.426, P = 0.045) muscles at 180°/sec each correlated with knee adduction moment. Preoperative varus deformity was positively correlated with adduction moment (r = 0.421, P = 0.041). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that quadriceps endurance at 180°/sec was the only factor independently associated with adduction moment (β = 0.790, P = 0.032). The adduction moment of osteoarthritic knees correlated with the endurance, but not the strength, of the quadriceps muscle. However, knee adduction moment did not correlate with the strength or endurance of the hamstring muscle. PMID:26539830

  1. Gas phase adduct reactions in MOCVD growth of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Thon, A.; Kuech, T.F.

    1996-11-01

    Gas phase reactions between trimethylgallium (TMG) and ammonia were studied at high temperatures, characteristic to MOCVD of GaN reactors, by means of in situ mass spectroscopy in a flow tube reactor. It is shown, that a very fast adduct formation followed by elimination of methane occurs. The decomposition of TMG and the adduct-derived compounds are both first order and have similar apparent activation energy. The pre-exponential factor of the adduct decomposition is smaller, and hence is responsible for the higher full decomposition temperature of the adduct relative to that of TMG.

  2. Vaginal Estrogen for Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, David D.; Carberry, Cassandra; Sanses, Tatiana V.; Mamik, Mamta M.; Ward, Renée M.; Meriwether, Kate V.; Olivera, Cedric K.; Abed, Husam; Balk, Ethan M.; Murphy, Miles

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To comprehensively review and critically assess the literature on vaginal estrogen and its alternatives for women with genitourinary syndrome of menopause and to provide clinical practice guidelines. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE and Cochrane databases were searched from inception to April 2013. We included randomized controlled trials and prospective comparative studies. Interventions and comparators included all commercially available vaginal estrogen products. Placebo, no treatment, systemic estrogen (all routes), and nonhormonal moisturizers and lubricants were included as comparators. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION We double-screened 1,805 abstracts, identifying 44 eligible studies. Discrepancies were adjudicated by a third reviewer. Studies were individually and collectively assessed for methodologic quality and strength of evidence. TABULATION, INTEGRATION, AND RESULTS Studies were extracted for participant, intervention, comparator, and outcomes data, including patient-reported atrophy symptoms (eg, vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, dysuria, urgency, frequency, recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), and urinary incontinence), objective signs of atrophy, urodynamic measures, endometrial effects, serum estradiol changes, and adverse events. Compared with placebo, vaginal estrogens improved dryness, dyspareunia, urinary urgency, frequency, and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and urgency urinary incontinence (UUI). Urinary tract infection rates decreased. The various estrogen preparations had similar efficacy and safety; serum estradiol levels remained within postmenopausal norms for all except high-dose conjugated equine estrogen cream. Endometrial hyperplasia and adenocarcinoma were extremely rare among those receiving vaginal estrogen. Comparing vaginal estrogen with nonhormonal moisturizers, patients with two or more symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy were substantially more improved using vaginal estrogens, but those with one or minor complaints had similar

  3. Associations of the Fecal Microbiome With Urinary Estrogens and Estrogen Metabolites in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrman, Barbara J.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Flores, Roberto; Gail, Mitchell H.; Xu, Xia; Ravel, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Context: The gut microbiota may influence the risk of breast cancer through effects on endogenous estrogens. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate whether urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites are associated with the diversity and composition of the fecal microbiome. Design and Setting: This was a cross-sectional study among women enrolled in Kaiser Permanente of Colorado. Participants: A total of 60 women drawn from a random sample of healthy postmenopausal women (aged 55–69 y), without current or recent use of antibiotics or hormone therapy and no history of cancer or gastrointestinal disease participated in the study. Outcome Measures and Methods: Creatinine-standardized urinary estrogens (estrone and estradiol) and 13 hydroxylated estrogen metabolites were measured in spot urines by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The fecal microbiome was assessed using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons. General linear models were used to test for associations of diversity and composition of the fecal microbiome with parent estrogen (estrone + estradiol), total estrogens, and estrogen metabolites and the ratio of estrogen metabolites to parent estrogen, which has been predictive of postmenopausal breast cancer risk in previous studies. Results: The ratio of metabolites to parents was directly associated with whole-tree phylogenetic diversity (R = 0.35, P = .01). Relative abundances of the order Clostridiales (R = 0.32, P = .02) and the genus Bacteroides (R = −0.30, P = .03) were also correlated with the ratio of metabolites to parents. Associations were independent of age, body mass index, and study design factors. Conclusions: Our data suggest that women with a more diverse gut microbiome exhibit an elevated urinary ratio of hydroxylated estrogen metabolites to parent estrogen. Further research is warranted to confirm and relate these findings to clinical disease. PMID:25211668

  4. Raloxifene. Not better than estrogen.

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Raloxifene is marketed in France for prevention of nontraumatic vertebral fracture in postmenopausal women. In animal pharmacology studies, it was found to both agonize and antagonize estrogen. The assessment file is methodologically sound but fails to answer many practical questions. A placebo-controlled trial showed that raloxifene reduced the risk of vertebral collapse after 2 years of treatment, in both primary and secondary prevention, but demonstrated no effect on nonvertebral fractures. In this trial, raloxifene also reduced the risk of breast cancer. Two trials versus combined hormone replacement therapy (HRT) showed HRT had a more favourable effect on surrogate end points reflecting the risk of fracture and cardiovascular risk (changes in bone mineral density and lipid profile). Compared with combined HRT, raloxifene reduced the incidence of menorrhagia and mastodynia, but did not relieve symptoms linked to menopause. Results of animal studies call for close clinical monitoring to detect a possible increase in the incidence of ovarian cancer. PMID:10955178

  5. In Vivo Imaging of Activated Estrogen Receptors in Utero by Estrogens and Bisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    Lemmen, Josephine G.; Arends, Roel J.; van der Saag, Paul T.; van der Burg, Bart

    2004-01-01

    Environmental estrogens are of particular concern when exposure occurs during embryonic development. Although there are good models to study estrogenic activity of chemicals in adult animals, developmental exposure is much more difficult to test. The weak estrogenic activity of the environmental estrogen bisphenol A (BPA) in embryos is controversial. We have recently generated transgenic mice that carry a reporter construct with estrogen-responsive elements coupled to luciferase. We show that, using this in vivo model in combination with the IVIS imaging system, activation of estrogen receptors (ERs) by maternally applied BPA and other estrogens can be detected in living embryos in utero. Eight hours after exposure to 1 mg/kg BPA, ER transactivation could be significantly induced in the embryos. This was more potent than would be estimated from in vitro assays, although its intrinsic activity is still lower than that of diethylstilbestrol and 17β-estradiol dipropionate. On the basis of these results, we conclude that the estrogenic potency of BPA estimated using in vitro assays might underestimate its estrogenic potential in embryos. PMID:15531440

  6. In vivo imaging of activated estrogen receptors in utero by estrogens and bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Lemmen, Josephine G; Arends, Roel J; van der Saag, Paul T; van der Burg, Bart

    2004-11-01

    Environmental estrogens are of particular concern when exposure occurs during embryonic development. Although there are good models to study estrogenic activity of chemicals in adult animals, developmental exposure is much more difficult to test. The weak estrogenic activity of the environmental estrogen bisphenol A (BPA) in embryos is controversial. We have recently generated transgenic mice that carry a reporter construct with estrogen-responsive elements coupled to luciferase. We show that, using this in vivo model in combination with the IVIS imaging system, activation of estrogen receptors (ERs) by maternally applied BPA and other estrogens can be detected in living embryos in utero. Eight hours after exposure to 1 mg/kg BPA, ER transactivation could be significantly induced in the embryos. This was more potent than would be estimated from in vitro assays, although its intrinsic activity is still lower than that of diethylstilbestrol and 17beta-estradiol dipropionate. On the basis of these results, we conclude that the estrogenic potency of BPA estimated using in vitro assays might underestimate its estrogenic potential in embryos.

  7. Comparison of estrogens and estrogen metabolites in human breast tissue and urine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An important aspect of the link between estrogen and breast cancer is whether urinary estrogen levels are representative of the intra-tissue levels of bioavailable estrogens. Methods This study compares 15 estrogen and estrogen metabolite levels in breast tissue and urine of 9 women with primary breast cancer using a quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Results The average levels of estrogens (estrone, 17 beta-estradiol) were significantly higher in breast tissue than in urine. Both the 2 and the 16-hydroxylation pathways were less represented in breast tissue than urine; no components of the 4-hydroxypathway were detected in breast tissue, while 4-hydroxyestrone was measured in urine. However, the 2/16 ratio was similar in urine and breast tissue. Women carrying the variant CYP1B1 genotype (Leu/Val and Val/Val) showed significantly lower overall estrogen metabolite, estrogen, and 16-hydroxylation pathway levels in breast tissue in comparison to women carrying the wild type genotype. No effect of the CYP1B1 polymorphism was observed in urinary metabolites. Conclusions The urinary 2/16 ratio seems a good approximation of the ratio observed in breast tissue. Metabolic genes may have an important role in the estrogen metabolism locally in tissues where the gene is expressed, a role that is not readily observable when urinary measurements are performed. PMID:20678202

  8. Concentration of endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites in the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of human breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Increasing evidence also supports their involvement in the development of certain lung, colon and prostate cancers. Methods In this study we systemically surveyed endogenous estrogen and estrogen metabolite levels in each of the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines, which include human breast, central nerve system, colon, ovarian, prostate, kidney and non-small cell lung cancers, as well as melanomas and leukemia. The absolute abundances of these metabolites were measured using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method that has been previously utilized for biological fluids such as serum and urine. Results Endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites were found in all NCI-60 human tumor cell lines and some were substantially elevated and exceeded the levels found in well known estrogen-dependent and estrogen receptor-positive tumor cells such as MCF-7 and T-47D. While estrogens were expected to be present at high levels in cell lines representing the female reproductive system (that is, breast and ovarian), other cell lines, such as leukemia and colon, also contained very high levels of these steroid hormones. The leukemia cell line RMPI-8226 contained the highest levels of estrone (182.06 pg/106 cells) and 17β-estradiol (753.45 pg/106 cells). In comparison, the ovarian cancer cell line with the highest levels of these estrogens contained only 19.79 and 139.32 pg/106 cells of estrone and 17β-estradiol, respectively. The highest levels of estrone and 17β-estradiol in breast cancer cell lines were only 8.45 and 87.37 pg/106 cells in BT-549 and T-47D cells, respectively. Conclusions The data provided evidence for the presence of significant amounts of endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites in cell lines not commonly associated with these steroid hormones. This broad discovery of

  9. Formation and persistence of arylamine DNA adducts in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Beland, F A; Kadlubar, F F

    1985-01-01

    Aromatic amines are urinary bladder carcinogens in man and induce tumors at a number of sites in experimental animals including the liver, mammary gland, intestine, and bladder. In this review, the particular pathways involved in the metabolic activation of aromatic amines are considered as well as the specific DNA adducts formed in target and nontarget tissue. Particular emphasis is placed on the following compounds: 1-naphthylamine, 2-naphthylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl, 4-acetylaminobiphenyl, 4-acetylamino-4'-fluorobiphenyl, 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl, 2-acetylaminofluorene, benzidine, N-methyl-4-aminoazobenzene, 4-aminoazobenzene, and 2-acetylaminophenanthrene. PMID:4085422

  10. Adducts of rare-earth pivaloyltrifluoroacetonates with macrocyclic polyethers

    SciTech Connect

    Martynova, T.N.; Korchkov, V.P.; Nikulina, L.D.

    1986-07-01

    Adducts of lanthanide tris(pivaloyltrifluoroacetonates) with crown ethers having the formulas Ln(PTA)/sub 3/ x 18-crown-6 (Ln = La, Nd, Tb, Er, Lu) and Ln(PTA)/sub 3/ x dibenzo-18-crown-6 (Ln = Nd, Tb, Er) have been synthesized. The compounds obtained have been studied by the methods of elemental analysis, UV and IR spectroscopy, PMR, and mass spectroscopy. On the basis of the physicochemical properties and the spectra studied it has been concluded that the lanthanide tris(..beta..-diketonates) interact with the crown ethers.

  11. Acute adduction deficit in a 7-week-old infant.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sunila; Goulstine, David; Gottlob, Irene

    2002-12-01

    A 7-week-old infant with sudden onset adduction deficit and proptosis is reported. The main differential diagnoses included orbital myositis, orbital cellulitis, capillary haemangioma and rhabdomyosarcoma. A CT scan revealed a postseptal cellulitis-like picture with thickening of the medial rectus muscle. He was given a course of antibiotics, withholding steroids and biopsy. His condition resolved completely on high-dose antibiotics alone. To our knowledge this is the youngest patient with infectious orbital myositis and postseptal cellulitis described in the literature. The clinical course emphasizes the importance of administering sufficiently high doses of antibiotics.

  12. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... hormone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to an updated analysis ...

  13. Bulky DNA adducts in white blood cells: a pooled analysis of 3600 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ricceri, Fulvio; Godschalk, Roger; Peluso, Marco; Phillips, David H.; Agudo, Antonio; Georgiadis, Panos; Loft, Steffen; Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Palli, Domenico; Perera, Frederica; Vermeulen, Roel; Taioli, Emanuela; Sram, Radim J.; Munnia, Armelle; Rosa, Fabio; Allione, Alessandra; Matullo, Giuseppe; Vineis, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Background Bulky DNA adducts are markers of exposure to genotoxic aromatic compounds, which reflect an individual’s ability to metabolically activate carcinogens and to repair DNA damage. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) represent a major class of carcinogens that are capable of forming such adducts. Factors that have been reported to be related to DNA adduct levels include smoking, diet, body mass index (BMI), genetic polymorphisms, the season of collection of biologic material, and air pollutants. Methods We pooled eleven studies (3,600 subjects) in which bulky DNA adducts were measured in human white blood cells with similar 32P-postlabelling techniques and for which a similar set of variables was available, including individual data on age, gender, ethnicity, batch, smoking habits, BMI, season of blood collection and a limited set of gene variants. Results Lowest DNA adduct levels were observed in the spring (median 0.50 adducts per 108 nucleotides), followed by summer (0.64), autumn (0.70) and winter (0.85) (p=0.006). The same pattern emerged in multivariate analysis, but only among never smokers (p=0.02). Adduct levels were significantly lower (p=0.001) in Northern Europe (the Netherlands, Denmark) (mean 0.60, median 0.40) than in Southern Europe (Italy, Spain, France, Greece) (mean 0.79, median 0.60). Conclusions In this large pooled analysis, we have found only weak associations between bulky DNA adducts and exposure variables. Seasonality (with higher adducts levels in winter) and air pollution may partly explain some of the inter-area differences (North vs South Europe), but most inter-area and inter-individual variation in adduct levels still remain unexplained. Impact Our study describes the largest pooled analysis of bulky DNA adducts so far, showing that inter-individual variation is still largely unexplained, though seasonality appears to play a role. PMID:20921335

  14. Formation and persistence of benzo(a)pyrene metabolite-DNA adducts.

    PubMed Central

    Stowers, S J; Anderson, M W

    1985-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants and are suspected to be carcinogenic in man. The in vivo formation of BP metabolite-DNA adducts has been characterized in a variety of target and nontarget tissues of mice and rabbits. Tissues included were lung, liver, forestomach, colon, kidney, muscle, and brain. The major adduct identified in each tissue was the (+)-7 beta,8 alpha-dihydroxy-9 alpha,10 alpha-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-BP (BPDEI)-deoxyguanosine adduct. A 7 beta, 8 alpha-dihydroxy-9 beta,10 beta-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-BP (BPDEII)-deoxyguanosine adduct, a (-)-BPDEI-deoxyguanosine adduct, and an unidentified adduct were also observed. The adduct levels are unexpectedly similar in all the tissues examined from the same BP-treated animal. For example, the BPDEI-DNA adduct levels in muscle and brain of mice were approximately 50% of those in lung and liver at each oral BP dose used. We have also examined adduct levels formed in vivo in several cell types of lung and liver. Macrophages, type II cells, and Clara cells from lung and hepatocytes and nonpparenchymal cells from liver were isolated from BP-treated rabbits. BPDEI-deoxyguanosine adduct was observed in each cell type and, moreover, the levels were similar in various cell types. These and previous results strongly suggest that DNA in many human tissues is continuously damaged from known exposure of humans to BP and other PAH. Moreover, DNA adducts formed from BP are persistent in lung and brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4085435

  15. Depurinating acylfulvene-DNA adducts: characterizing cellular chemical reactions of a selective antitumor agent.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jiachang; Vaidyanathan, V G; Yu, Xiang; Kensler, Thomas W; Peterson, Lisa A; Sturla, Shana J

    2007-02-21

    Acylfulvenes (AFs) are a class of semisynthetic agents with high toxicity toward certain tumor cells, and for one analogue, hydroxymethylacylfulvene (HMAF), clinical trials are in progress. DNA alkylation by AFs, mediated by bioreductive activation, is believed to contribute to cytotoxicity, but the structures and chemical properties of corresponding DNA adducts are unknown. This study provides the first structural characterization of AF-specific DNA adducts. In the presence of a reductive enzyme, alkenal/one oxidoreductase (AOR), AF selectively alkylates dAdo and dGuo in reactions with a monomeric nucleoside, as well as in reactions with naked or cellular DNA, with 3-alkyl-dAdo as the apparently most abundant AF-DNA adduct. Characterization of this adduct was facilitated by independent chemical synthesis of the corresponding 3-alkyl-Ade adduct. In addition, in naked or cellular DNA, evidence was obtained for the formation of an additional type of adduct resulting from direct conjugate addition of Ade to AF followed by hydrolytic cyclopropane ring-opening, indicating the potential for a competing reaction pathway involving direct DNA alkylation. The major AF-dAdo and AF-dGuo adducts are unstable under physiologically relevant conditions and depurinate to release an alkylated nucleobase in a process that has a half-life of 8.5 h for 3-alkyladenine and less than approximately 2 h for dGuo adducts. DNA alkylation further leads to single-stranded DNA cleavage, occurring exclusively at dGuo and dAdo sites, in a nonsequence-specific manner. In AF-treated cells that were transfected with either AOR or control vectors, the DNA adducts identified match those from in vitro studies. Moreover, a positive correlation was observed between DNA adduct levels and cell sensitivity to AF. The potential contributing roles of AOR-mediated bioactivation and adduct stability to the cytotoxicity of AF are discussed.

  16. Tyrosine-lipid peroxide adducts from radical termination: para coupling and intramolecular Diels-Alder cyclization.

    PubMed

    Shchepin, Roman; Möller, Matias N; Kim, Hye-young H; Hatch, Duane M; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Radi, Rafael; Porter, Ned A

    2010-12-15

    Free radical co-oxidation of polyunsaturated lipids with tyrosine or phenolic analogues of tyrosine gave rise to lipid peroxide-tyrosine (phenol) adducts in both aqueous micellar and organic solutions. The novel adducts were isolated and characterized by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy as well as by mass spectrometry (MS). The spectral data suggest that the polyunsaturated lipid peroxyl radicals give stable peroxide coupling products exclusively at the para position of the tyrosyl (phenoxy) radicals. These adducts have characteristic (13)C chemical shifts at 185 ppm due to the cross-conjugated carbonyl of the phenol-derived cyclohexadienone. The primary peroxide adducts subsequently undergo intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) cyclization, affording a number of diastereomeric tricyclic adducts that have characteristic carbonyl (13)C chemical shifts at ~198 ppm. All of the NMR HMBC and HSQC correlations support the structure assignments of the primary and Diels-Alder adducts, as does MS collision-induced dissociation data. Kinetic rate constants and activation parameters for the IMDA reaction were determined, and the primary adducts were reduced with cuprous ion to give a phenol-derived 4-hydroxycyclohexa-2,5-dienone. No products from adduction of peroxyls at the phenolic ortho position were found in either the primary or cuprous reduction product mixtures. These studies provide a framework for understanding the nature of lipid-protein adducts formed by peroxyl-tyrosyl radical-radical termination processes. Coupling of lipid peroxyl radicals with tyrosyl radicals leads to cyclohexenone and cyclohexadienone adducts, which are of interest in and of themselves since, as electrophiles, they are likely targets for protein nucleophiles. One consequence of lipid peroxyl reactions with tyrosyls may therefore be protein-protein cross-links via interprotein Michael adducts.

  17. A fluorescent-based HPLC assay for quantification of cysteine and cysteamine adducts in Escherichia coli-derived proteins.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Brian D; Tam, Lei-Ting T; Lu, Hsieng S; Valladares, Violeta G

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli are often produced as unfolded, inactive forms accumulated in inclusion bodies. Redox-coupled thiols are typically employed in the refolding process in order to catalyze the formation of correct disulfide bonds at maximal folding efficiency. These thiols and the recombinant proteins can form mixed disulfide bonds to generate thiol-protein adducts. In this work, we apply a fluorescent-based assay for the quantification of cysteine and cysteamine adducts as observed in E. coli-derived proteins. The thiols are released by reduction of the adducted protein, collected and labeled with a fluorescent reagent, 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate. The derivatized thiols are separated by reversed-phase HPLC and can be accurately quantified after method optimization. The estimated thiol content represents total amount of adducted forms present in the analyzed samples. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was established; specifically, the lowest amount of quantifiable cysteine adduction is 30 picograms and the lowest amount of quantifiable cysteamine adduction is 60 picograms. The assay is useful for quantification of adducts in final purified products as well as in-process samples from various purification steps. The assay indicates that the purification process accomplishes a decrease in cysteine adduction from 0.19 nmol adduct/nmol protein to 0.03 nmol adduct/nmol protein as well as a decrease in cysteamine adduction from 0.24 nmol adduct/nmol protein to 0.14 nmol adduct/nmol protein.

  18. Pyrolysis of wastewater biosolids significantly reduces estrogenicity.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, T C; Zitomer, D H; McNamara, P J

    2016-11-05

    Most wastewater treatment processes are not specifically designed to remove micropollutants. Many micropollutants are hydrophobic so they remain in the biosolids and are discharged to the environment through land-application of biosolids. Micropollutants encompass a broad range of organic chemicals, including estrogenic compounds (natural and synthetic) that reside in the environment, a.k.a. environmental estrogens. Public concern over land application of biosolids stemming from the occurrence of micropollutants hampers the value of biosolids which are important to wastewater treatment plants as a valuable by-product. This research evaluated pyrolysis, the partial decomposition of organic material in an oxygen-deprived system under high temperatures, as a biosolids treatment process that could remove estrogenic compounds from solids while producing a less hormonally active biochar for soil amendment. The estrogenicity, measured in estradiol equivalents (EEQ) by the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay, of pyrolyzed biosolids was compared to primary and anaerobically digested biosolids. The estrogenic responses from primary solids and anaerobically digested solids were not statistically significantly different, but pyrolysis of anaerobically digested solids resulted in a significant reduction in EEQ; increasing pyrolysis temperature from 100°C to 500°C increased the removal of EEQ with greater than 95% removal occurring at or above 400°C. This research demonstrates that biosolids treatment with pyrolysis would substantially decrease (removal>95%) the estrogens associated with this biosolids product. Thus, pyrolysis of biosolids can be used to produce a valuable soil amendment product, biochar, that minimizes discharge of estrogens to the environment.

  19. Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    6219 TITLE: Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Matthew R. Yudt CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of...Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation ~DAMD17-96-1-6219 6. AUTHOR(S) Matthew R. Yudt 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME11S) AND AODRESS(ES...this model, tyrosine 537 (Y537) phosphorylation of one monomer interacts with another tyrosine phosphorylated monomer to constitute an hER dimer

  20. Estrogenic activity in Finnish municipal wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Välitalo, Pia; Perkola, Noora; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Sillanpää, Markus; Kuckelkorn, Jochen; Mikola, Anna; Hollert, Henner; Schultz, Eija

    2016-01-01

    Effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are a major source of estrogenic compounds to the aquatic environment. In the present work, estrogenic activities of effluents from eight municipal WWTPs in Finland were studied. The main objectives of the study were to quantify the concentrations of selected estrogenic compounds, to evaluate their contribution to estrogenic potency and to test the feasibility of the commercial bioassays for wastewater analysis. The effluent samples were analyzed by two in vitro tests, i.e. ERα-CALUX(®) and ELISA-E2, and by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for six estrogenic compounds: estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), 17α-estradiol and bisphenol A (BPA). Estrogenic effects were found in all of the effluent samples with both of the bioassays. The concentrations measured with ELISA-E2 (8.6-61.6 ng/L) were clearly higher but exhibited a similar pattern than those with chemical analysis (E2 estrogenic potency was possible only for E1 and BPA, which contributed less than 10% to the observed effects, except in one sample with a high BPA contribution (17%). The contribution of E2 was significant in two samples where it was detected (28% and 67%). The results demonstrated that more comprehensive information on potential estrogenic activity of wastewater effluents can be achieved by using in vitro biotests in addition to chemical analysis and their use would be beneficial in monitoring and screening purposes.

  1. A Novel Sensitive Method to Measure Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Activity Unravels the Presence of This Activity in Extracellular Vesicles Released by Rat Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Casal, Enriqueta; Palomo, Laura; Cabrera, Diana; Falcon-Perez, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    There is a clear need for drug treatments to be selected according to the characteristics of an individual patient, in order to improve efficacy and reduce the number and severity of adverse drug reactions. One of the main enzymes to take into account in pharmacogenomics is catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT), which catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to catechols and catecholamines, like the neurotransmitters dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Although, most of this enzyme is associated to intracellular vesicles, recently it has also been detected in extracellular vesicles secreted by hepatocytes and in serum circulating vesicles. COMT has implications in many neurological and psychiatric disorders like Parkinson's disease, chronic fatigue, pain response, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorders. Remarkably, genetic variations of COMT affect its activity and are associated to various human disorders from psychiatric diseases to estrogen-induced cancers. Consequently, the establishment of new methods to evaluate COMT activity is an important aspect to investigate the biology of this drug-metabolizing enzyme. Herein, we have developed a sensitive and selective method to determine COMT activity. We first optimized the activity in rat liver incubated with two different substrates; norepinephrine and dopamine. The enzymatically formed products (normetanephrine and 3-methoxytyramine, respectively) were extracted by solid-phase extraction using weak cation exchange cartridges, chromatographically separated, and detected and quantified using a mass spectrometer. The range of quantitation for both products was from 0.005 to 25 μg/mL. This methodology offers acceptable recovery for both enzymatic products (≥75%) and good accuracy and precision (≤15%). The lower limit of quantifications were 0.01 and 0.005 μM for 3-methoxytyramine and normetanephrine, respectively. Importantly, this sensitive assay was able to detect the presence of

  2. A Novel Sensitive Method to Measure Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Activity Unravels the Presence of This Activity in Extracellular Vesicles Released by Rat Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Casal, Enriqueta; Palomo, Laura; Cabrera, Diana; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    There is a clear need for drug treatments to be selected according to the characteristics of an individual patient, in order to improve efficacy and reduce the number and severity of adverse drug reactions. One of the main enzymes to take into account in pharmacogenomics is catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT), which catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to catechols and catecholamines, like the neurotransmitters dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Although, most of this enzyme is associated to intracellular vesicles, recently it has also been detected in extracellular vesicles secreted by hepatocytes and in serum circulating vesicles. COMT has implications in many neurological and psychiatric disorders like Parkinson's disease, chronic fatigue, pain response, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorders. Remarkably, genetic variations of COMT affect its activity and are associated to various human disorders from psychiatric diseases to estrogen-induced cancers. Consequently, the establishment of new methods to evaluate COMT activity is an important aspect to investigate the biology of this drug-metabolizing enzyme. Herein, we have developed a sensitive and selective method to determine COMT activity. We first optimized the activity in rat liver incubated with two different substrates; norepinephrine and dopamine. The enzymatically formed products (normetanephrine and 3-methoxytyramine, respectively) were extracted by solid-phase extraction using weak cation exchange cartridges, chromatographically separated, and detected and quantified using a mass spectrometer. The range of quantitation for both products was from 0.005 to 25 μg/mL. This methodology offers acceptable recovery for both enzymatic products (≥75%) and good accuracy and precision (≤15%). The lower limit of quantifications were 0.01 and 0.005 μM for 3-methoxytyramine and normetanephrine, respectively. Importantly, this sensitive assay was able to detect the presence of

  3. The Molecular, Cellular and Clinical Consequences of Targeting the Estrogen Receptor Following Estrogen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ping; Maximov, Philipp Y.; Curpan, Ramona F.; Abderrahman, Balkees; Jordan, V. Craig

    2015-01-01

    During the past twenty years our understanding of the control of breast tumor development, growth and survival has changed dramatically. The once long forgotten application of high dose synthetic estrogen therapy as the first chemical therapy to treat any cancer has been resurrected, refined and reinvented as the new biology of estrogen-induced apoptosis. High dose estrogen therapy was cast aside once tamoxifen, from its origins as a failed “morning after pill”, was reinvented as the first targeted therapy to treat any cancer. The current understanding of the mechanism of estrogen-induced apoptosis is described as a consequence of acquired resistance to long term antihormone therapy in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. The ER signal transduction pathway remains a target for therapy in breast cancer despite “antiestrogen” resistance, but becomes a regulator of resistance. Multiple mechanisms of resistance come into play: Selective ER Modulator (SERM) stimulated growth, growth factor/ER crosstalk, estrogen-induced apoptosis and mutations of ER. But it is with the science of estrogen-induced apoptosis that the next innovation in women’s health will be developed. Recent evidence suggests that the glucocorticoid properties of medroxyprogesterone acetate blunt estrogen-induced apoptosis in estrogen deprived breast cancer cell populations. As a result breast cancer develops during long-term Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). A new synthetic progestin with estrogen-like properties, such as the 19 nortestosterone derivatives used in oral contraceptives, will continue to protect the uterus from unopposed estrogen stimulation but at the same time, reinforce apoptosis in vulnerable populations of nascent breast cancer cells. PMID:26052034

  4. Estrogen receptor transcription and transactivation: Estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta - regulation by selective estrogen receptor modulators and importance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    S Katzenellenbogen, Benita; A Katzenellenbogen, John

    2000-01-01

    Estrogens display intriguing tissue-selective action that is of great biomedical importance in the development of optimal therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer, for menopausal hormone replacement, and for fertility regulation. Certain compounds that act through the estrogen receptor (ER), now referred to as selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), can demonstrate remarkable differences in activity in the various estrogen target tissues, functioning as agonists in some tissues but as antagonists in others. Recent advances elucidating the tripartite nature of the biochemical and molecular actions of estrogens provide a good basis for understanding these tissue-selective actions. As discussed in this thematic review, the development of optimal SERMs should now be viewed in the context of two estrogen receptor subtypes, ERα and ERβ, that have differing affinities and responsiveness to various SERMs, and differing tissue distribution and effectiveness at various gene regulatory sites. Cellular, biochemical, and structural approaches have also shown that the nature of the ligand affects the conformation assumed by the ER-ligand complex, thereby regulating its state of phosphorylation and the recruitment of different coregulator proteins. Growth factors and protein kinases that control the phosphorylation state of the complex also regulate the bioactivity of the ER. These interactions and changes determine the magnitude of the transcriptional response and the potency of different SERMs. As these critical components are becoming increasingly well defined, they provide a sound basis for the development of novel SERMs with optimal profiles of tissue selectivity as medical therapeutic agents. PMID:11250726

  5. Assessment of estrogen receptor--histone interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Kallos, J; Fasy, T M; Hollander, V P

    1981-01-01

    Several different in vitro binding assays show that the estrogen receptor from rabbit uterus interacts selectively with purified histones from calf thymus. The estrogen receptor binds strongly to histones H2B and H2A, moderately to histones H3 and H4, and poorly to histone H1. In the presence of histones H2B or H2A, the position at which the estrogen receptor focuses in an isoelectric gradient is shifted to a more basic zone. Kinetic experiments show that, if histone H2B is bound to a DNA, the estrogen receptor dissociates more slowly from that DNA. The portion of the estrogen receptor molecule required for binding to histone H2B is relatively stable to tryptic digestion; in contrast, the portion of the receptor molecule responsible for DNA binding is promptly lost during limited tryptic digestion. These in vitro findings suggest that the mechanism by which the estrogen receptor selectively alters gene expression may involve specific contacts with histone molecules. PMID:6942408

  6. Genipin-crosslinked catechol-chitosan mucoadhesive hydrogels for buccal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinke; Strandman, Satu; Zhu, Julian X X; Barralet, Jake; Cerruti, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Drug administration via buccal mucosa is an attractive drug delivery strategy due to good patient compliance, prolonged localized drug effect, and avoidance of gastrointestinal drug metabolism and first-pass elimination. Buccal drug delivery systems need to maintain an intimate contact with the mucosa lining in the wet conditions of the oral cavity for long enough to allow drug release and absorption. For decades, mucoadhesive polymers such as chitosan (CS) and its derivatives have been explored to achieve this. In this study, inspired by the excellent wet adhesion of marine mussel adhesive protein, we developed a buccal drug delivery system using a novel catechol-functionalized CS (Cat-CS) hydrogel. We covalently bonded catechol functional groups to the backbone of CS, and crosslinked the polymer with a non-toxic crosslinker genipin (GP). We achieved two degrees of catechol conjugation (9% and 19%), forming Cat9-CS/GP and Cat19-CS/GP hydrogels, respectively. We confirmed covalent bond formation during the catechol functionalization and GP crosslinking during the gel formation. The gelation time and the mechanical properties of Cat-CS hydrogels are similar to those of CS only hydrogels. Catechol groups significantly enhanced mucoadhesion in vitro (7 out of the 10 Cat19-CS hydrogels were still in contact with porcine mucosal membrane after 6 h, whereas all of the CS hydrogels lost contact after 1.5 h). The new hydrogel systems sustained the release of lidocaine for about 3 h. In-vivo, we compared buccal patches made of Cat19-CS/GP and CS/GP adhered to rabbit buccal mucosa. We were able to detect lidocaine in the rabbit's serum at concentration about 1 ng/ml only from the Cat19-CS patch, most likely due to the intimate contact provided by mucoadhesive Cat19-CS/GP systems. No inflammation was observed on the buccal tissue in contact with any of the patches tested. These results show that the proposed catechol-modified CS hydrogel is a promising mucoadhesive and

  7. 32P-postlabeling analysis of adducts formed between DNA and safrole 2',3'-epoxide: absence of adduct formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Qato, M K; Guenthner, T M

    1995-01-01

    We have used the 32P-postlabeling technique to examine the binding of safrole 2',3'-oxide to DNA. At least 8 covalent adducts are formed when calf thymus DNA is incubated with this oxygenated metabolite of safrole in vitro. However, no corresponding adducts are formed with liver DNA when whole animals are exposed to safrole 2',3'-oxide, or safrole itself. Although safrole 2',3'-oxide is readily formed in vivo, and is sufficiently reactive to covalently bind to DNA, it is probably not a factor in the in vivo genotoxicity of safrole. We also demonstrate that adducts with similar mobility to the major safrole 2',3'-oxide-DNA adduct are formed in vitro between safrole 2',3'-oxide and deoxyguanosine, and also between its chemical analogs allylbenzene 2',3'-oxide or estragole 2',3'-oxide and DNA.

  8. Natural compounds containing a catechol group enhance the formation of Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine of the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Kiyota, Naoko; Tsurushima, Keiichiro; Yoshitomi, Makiko; Mera, Katsumi; Sakashita, Naomi; Takeya, Motohiro; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Araki, Tomohiro; Nohara, Toshihiro; Nagai, Ryoji

    2011-04-01

    Inhibition of advanced glycation end-product (AGE) formation is a potential strategy for the prevention of clinical diabetes complications. Screening for new AGE inhibitors revealed several natural compounds that inhibited the formation of N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), a major antigenic AGE structure, whereas natural compounds containing a catechol group, such as gallic acid and epicatechin, significantly enhanced CML formation. A similar enhancing effect was also observed by culturing THP-1 macrophages in the presence of catechol compounds. Although 4-methylcatechol significantly enhanced CML formation from glycated HSA (gHSA), a model for Amadori proteins, analogues of catechol such as 5-methylresorcinol and methylhydroquinone showed no enhancing effect. Even though 1mM 4-methylcatechol, epicatechin, and gallic acid significantly enhanced CML formation from gHSA, it was significantly inhibited by decreasing their concentration. The enhancing effect of 1mM catechol compounds was inhibited in the presence of the glutathione peroxidase system, thus demonstrating that hydrogen peroxide generated from catechol compounds plays an important role in the enhancement of CML formation. Furthermore, administration of 500mg/kg/day epicatechin to STZ-induced diabetic mice for 45days enhanced CML accumulation at the surface area of gastric epithelial cells in the stomach. This study provides the first evidence that high amounts of catechol-containing structures enhance oxidative stress, thus leading to enhanced CML formation, and this phenomenon may explain the paradoxical effect that some flavonoids have on redox status.

  9. pH-dependent cross-linking of catechols through oxidation via Fe(3+) and potential implications for mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E; Barrett, Devin G; Miller, Dusty R; Kurutz, Josh W; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2014-01-01

    The mussel byssus is a remarkable attachment structure that is formed by injection molding and rapid in-situ hardening of concentrated solutions of proteins enriched in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA). Fe(3+), found in high concentrations in the byssus, has been speculated to participate in redox reactions with DOPA that lead to protein polymerization, however direct evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. Using small molecule catechols, DOPA-containing peptides, and native mussel foot proteins, we report the first direct observation of catechol oxidation and polymerization accompanied by reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). In the case of the small molecule catechol, we identified two dominant dimer species and characterized their connectivities by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the C6-C6 and C5-C6 linked species as the major and minor products, respectively. For the DOPA-containing peptide, we studied the pH dependence of the reaction and demonstrated that catechol polymerization occurs readily at low pH, but is increasingly diminished in favor of metal-catechol coordination interactions at higher pH. Finally, we demonstrate that Fe(3+) can induce cross-links in native byssal mussel proteins mefp-1 and mcfp-1 at acidic pH. Based on these findings, we discuss the potential implications to the chemistry of mussel adhesion.

  10. Development of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase-specific primers for monitoring bioremediation by competitive quantitative PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Mesarch, M.B.; Nakatsu, C.H.; Nies, L.

    2000-02-01

    Benzene, toluene, xylenes, phenol, naphthalene, and biphenyl are among a group of compounds that have at least one reported pathway for biodegradation involving catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzymes. Thus, detection of the corresponding catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes can serve as a basis for identifying and quantifying bacteria that have these catabolic abilities. Primes that can successfully amplify a 238-bp catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene fragment from eight different bacteria are described. The identities of the amplicons were confirmed by hybridization with a 238-bp catechol 2,3-dioxygenase probe. The detection limit was 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3} gene copies, which was lowered to 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 1} gene copies of hybridization. Using the dioxygenase-specific primers, an increase in catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes was detected in petroleum-amended soils. The dioxygenase genes were enumerated by competitive quantitative PCR and a 163-bp competitor that was amplified using the same primers. Target and competitor sequences had identical amplification kinetics. Potential PCR inhibitors that could coextract with DNA, nonamplifying DNA, soil factors (humics), and soil pollutants (toluene) did not impact enumeration. Therefore, this technique can be used to accurately and reproducibly quantify catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes in complex environments such as petroleum-contaminated soil. Direct, non-cultivation-based molecular techniques for detecting and enumerating microbial pollutant-biodegrading genes in environmental samples are powerful tools for monitoring bioremediation and developing field evidence in support of natural attenuation.

  11. Surface charge-transfer complex formation of catechol on titanium(IV) oxide and the application to bio-sensing.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yusuke; Hori, Hiroshige; Taga, Atsushi; Tada, Hiroaki

    2015-11-15

    Adsorption properties of 2-hydroxyphenol (catechol) on TiO2 particles has been studied at 298K. The adsorption proceeds from the aqueous solution with the Langmuir type behavior. Diffuse reflectance infrared spectra of the catechol-adsorbed TiO2 suggested that catechol is adsorbed on TiO2 solution via the chelation to the surface Ti ions. The adsorption induces a strong absorption in the whole visible region, of which intensity increases with an increase in the adsorption amount. Photoelectrochemical experiments and molecular orbital calculations indicate that the absorption stems from the charge-transfer (CT) transition from the HOMO of catechol to the conduction band of TiO2. Time courses for the adsorption of catechol on mesoporous TiO2 nanocrystalline film-coated glass was traced by measuring the change in the absorbance of the CT band, and analyzed on the basis of the Langmuir model. This study would present a new simple technique for sensing of important biomolecules bearing the catechol moiety.

  12. Evolution of CO{sub 2} during birnessite-induced oxidation of {sup 14}C-labeled catechol

    SciTech Connect

    Majcher, E.H.; Chorover, J.; Bollag, J.M.; Huang, P.M.

    2000-02-01

    Phenolic compounds undergo several transformation processes in soil and water (i.e., partial degradation, mineralization, and polymerization), many of which have been attributed primarily to biological activity. Results from previous work indicate that naturally occurring Mn oxides are also capable of oxidizing phenolic compounds. In the present study, {sup 14}C-labeled catechol was reacted with birnessite (manganese oxide) in aqueous suspension of pH 4. The mass of catechol-derived c in solid, solution, and gas phases was quantified as a function of time. Between 5 and 16% of the total catechol C was liberated as CO{sub 2} from oxidation and abiotic ring cleavage under various conditions. Most of the {sup 14}C (55--83%) was incorporated into the solid phase in the form of stable organic reaction products whereas solution phase {sup 14}C concentrations increased from 16 to 39% with a doubling of total catechol added. Polymerization and CO{sub 2} evolution appear to be competitive pathways in the transformation of catechol since their relative importance was strongly dependent on initial birnessite-catechol reaction conditions. Solid phase Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra are consistent with the presence of phenolic, quinone, and aromatic ring cleavage products. Carbon dioxide release appears to be limited by availability of reactive birnessite surface sites and it is diminished in the presence of polymerized reaction products.

  13. Effects of biochar and the geophagous earthworm Metaphire guillelmi on fate of (14)C-catechol in an agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jun; Wang, Yongfeng; Gu, Jianqiang; Zhou, Wenqiang; Ji, Rong; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2014-07-01

    Both biochar and earthworms can exert influence on behaviors of soil-borne monomeric phenols in soil; however, little was known about the combined effects of biochar and earthworm activities on fate of these chemicals in soil. Using (14)C-catechol as a representative, the mineralization, transformation and residue distribution of phenolic humus monomer in soil amended with different amounts of biochar (0%, 0.05%, 0.5%, and 5%) without/with the geophagous earthworm Metaphire guillelmi were investigated. The results showed biochar at amendment rate <0.5% did not affect (14)C-catechol mineralization, whereas 5% biochar amendment significantly inhibited the mineralization. Earthworms did not affect the mineralization of (14)C-catechol in soil amended with <0.5% biochar, but significantly enhanced the mineralization in 5% biochar amended soil when they were present in soil for 9 d. When earthworms were removed from the soil, the mineralization of (14)C-catechol was significantly lower than that of in earthworm-free soil indicating that (14)C-catecholic residues were stabilized during their passage through earthworm gut. The assimilation of (14)C by earthworms was low (1.2%), and was significantly enhanced by biochar amendment, which was attributed to the release of biochar-associated (14)C-catecholic residues during gut passage of earthworm.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of catechols in human subjects intravenously receiving XueBiJing injection, an emerging antiseptic herbal medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuxue; Cheng, Chen; Wang, Fengqing; Huang, Yühong; Jia, Weiwei; Olaleye, Olajide E; Li, Meijuan; Li, Yanfen; Li, Chuan

    2016-02-01

    XueBiJing injection, prepared from a five-herb combination, is extensively used as add-on therapy in routine sepsis care in China. Catechols, derived from the component herb Salvia miltiorrhiza roots (Danshen), are probably important because of their reported antiseptic properties. This study was designed to characterize pharmacokinetics of major circulating Danshen catechols in human subjects intravenously receiving the injection at the label doses. A total of 17 Danshen catechols were detected in XueBiJing injection (content level, 0.1-139.3 μmol/L). After dosing, tanshinol and salvianolic acid B exhibited relatively high levels of systemic exposure with mean elimination half-lives of 0.38 and 0.29 h, respectively. The total plasma clearance and apparent volume of distribution at steady state of tanshinol were 1.07 L/h/kg and 0.40 L/kg, respectively, whereas those of salvianolic acid B were 0.43 L/h/kg and 0.13 L/kg, respectively. Protocatechuic acid and five other catechols were also detected in plasma but at low exposure levels. Although protocatechuic aldehyde had the highest content level in the injection, like the remaining eight catechols, it was undetected in plasma. Protocatechuic aldehyde was extensively converted into protocatechuic acid and other metabolites. The information gained here facilitates understanding the roles of Danshen catechols in therapeutic actions of XueBiJing injection.

  15. Nitropyrene: DNA binding and adduct formation in respiratory tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, M A; King, L C; Ball, L M; Ghayourmanesh, S; Jeffrey, A M; Lewtas, J

    1985-01-01

    Binding of 1-nitro (14C)pyrene (NP) or its metabolites to cellular DNA and protein in cultures of rabbit alveolar macrophages, lung tissue, and tracheal tissue was examined. DNA binding in tracheal tissue (136 +/- 18.3 pmole NP/mg DNA) was four to five times the levels measured in either lung tissue (38 +/- 9.4 pmole NP/mg DNA) or macrophages (26 +/- 7.5 pmole NP/mg DNA). Adduct analysis of DNA isolated from lung tissue incubated with 1-nitro[H3]pyrene in vitro resulted in the identification of 2 to 5% of the NP adducts as C8-deoxyguanosine 1-aminopyrene. NP was also bound to cellular protein in tracheal tissue and lung tissue, and at a lower level in macrophages. Cocultivation of the macrophages with lung and tracheal tissue decreased the DNA binding in tracheal tissue by 45%. Following intratracheal instillation of diesel particles (5 mg) vapor-coated with 14C-NP (380 ppm, 0.085 muCi/mg) particles into rats, 5-8% of the radioactivity remained in the lungs after 20 hr. Most of the diesel particles were also deposited in the lung. Examination of DNA and protein binding in this tissue showed 5 to 12% of the pulmonary 14C bound to protein and no detectable levels of 14C bound to DNA. PMID:3841313

  16. Turned head--adducted hip--truncal curvature syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Hamanishi, C; Tanaka, S

    1994-01-01

    One hundred and eight neonates and infants who showed the clinical triad of a head turned to one side, adduction contracture of the hip joint on the occipital side of the turned head, and truncal curvature, which we named TAC syndrome, were studied. These cases included seven with congenital and five with late infantile dislocations of the hip joint and 14 who developed muscular torticollis. Forty one were among 7103 neonates examined by one of the authors. An epidemiological analysis confirmed the aetiology of the syndrome to be environmental. The side to which the head was turned and that of the adducted hip contracture showed a high correlation with the side of the maternal spine on which the fetus had been lying. TAC syndrome is an important asymmetrical deformity that should be kept in mind during neonatal examination, and may be aetiologically related to the unilateral dislocation of the hip joint, torticollis, and infantile scoliosis which develop after a vertex presentation. Images PMID:8048823

  17. Nonstoichiometric Adduct Approach for High-Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Nam-Gyu

    2017-01-03

    Since the groundbreaking report on a solid-state perovskite solar cell employing a methylammonium lead iodide-sensitized mesoporous TiO2 film and an organic hole conducting layer in 2012 by our group, the swift surge of perovskite photovoltaics opens a new paradigm in solar-cell research. As a result, ca. 1300 peer-reviewed research articles were published in 2015. In this Inorganic Chemistry Forum on Halide Perovskite, the researches with highlights of work on perovskite solar cells in my laboratory are reviewed. We have developed a size-controllable two-step spin-coating method and found that minimal nonradiative recombination in perovskite crystals could lead to high photovoltaic performance. A Lewis acid based adduct method and self-formed grain boundary process were developed for high-efficiency devices with reproducibility. A power conversion efficiency of 20.4% was achieved via grain boundary engineering based on a nonstoichiometric adduct approach. The incorporation of cesium in a formamidinium lead iodide perovskite was found to show better photostability and moisture-stability. A reduction in the dimensionality from a three-dimensitonal nanocrystal to a one-dimensional nanowire led to a hypsochromic shift of absorption and fluorescence. To enhance the charge-carrier transport and light-harvesting efficiency, a nanoarchitecture of oxide layers was proposed.

  18. Detection, characterization, and decay kinetics of ROS and thiyl adducts of mito-DEPMPO spin trap.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Micaël; Rockenbauer, Antal; Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Felix, Christopher; Lopez, Marcos; Srinivasan, Satish; Avadhani, Narayan; Tordo, Paul; Kalyanaraman, B

    2007-07-01

    We report here the detection and characterization of spin adducts formed from the trapping of reactive oxygen species (superoxide and hydroxyl radicals) and glutathiyl and carbon-centered radicals by a newly synthesized nitrone, Mito-DEPMPO. This is a cationic nitrone spin trap with a triphenyl phosphonium cation conjugated to the DEPMPO analogue. The Mito-DEPMPO-OOH adduct, formed from the trapping of superoxide by Mito-DEPMPO, was enzymatically generated using xanthine/xanthine oxidase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase, and chemically generated by KO2 in 18-crown-6. The Mito-DEPMPO-OOH adduct exhibits an eight-line EPR spectrum with partial asymmetry arising from the alternate line-width effect. The half-life of the Mito-DEPMPO-OOH adduct is 2-2.5-times greater than that of the DEPMPO-OOH. The Mito-DEPMPO-SG adduct, formed from the trapping of glutathiyl radicals by Mito-DEPMPO, is 3-times more persistent than the analogue DEPMPO-SG adduct. In this study, we describe the EPR characterization of spin adducts formed from Mito-DEPMPO. The EPR parameters of Mito-DEPMPO adducts are distinctly different and highly characteristic. The detection of superoxide from an intact mitochondrion was feasible with Mito-DEPMPO but not with DEPMPO. We conclude that Mito-DEPMPO nitrone and its analogues are more effective than most nitrone spin traps for trapping superoxide, hydroxyl, and thiyl radicals formed in biological systems, including mitochondria.

  19. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., ethylene oxide adduct. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  20. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., ethylene oxide adduct. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  1. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., ethylene oxide adduct. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., ethylene oxide adduct. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., ethylene oxide adduct. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  4. Effects of Estrogens and Estrogenic Disrupting Compounds on Fish Mineralized Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Patricia I. S.; Estêvão, Maria D.; Power, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens play well-recognized roles in reproduction across vertebrates, but also intervene in a wide range of other physiological processes, including mineral homeostasis. Classical actions are triggered when estrogens bind and activate intracellular estrogen receptors (ERs), regulating the transcription of responsive genes, but rapid non-genomic actions initiated by binding to plasma membrane receptors were recently described. A wide range of structurally diverse compounds from natural and anthropogenic sources have been shown to interact with and disrupt the normal functions of the estrogen system, and fish are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruption, as these compounds are frequently discharged or run-off into waterways. The effect of estrogen disruptors in fish has mainly been assessed in relation to reproductive endpoints, and relatively little attention has been given to other disruptive actions. This review will overview the actions of estrogens in fish, including ER isoforms, their expression, structure and mechanisms of action. The estrogen functions will be considered in relation to mineral homeostasis and actions on mineralized tissues. The impact of estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds on fish mineralized tissues will be reviewed, and the potential adverse outcomes of exposure to such compounds will be discussed. Current lacunae in knowledge are highlighted along with future research priorities. PMID:25196834

  5. MODELING THE EFFECTS OF FLEXIBILITY ON THE BINDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS TO THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the effects of flexibility on the binding of environmental estrogens to the estrogen receptor
    There are many reports of environmental endocrine disruption in the literature, yet it has been difficult to identify the specific chemicals responsible for these effects. ...

  6. Aromatase inhibiting and combined estrogenic effects of parabens and estrogenic effects of other additives in cosmetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meeuwen, J.A. van Son, O. van; Piersma, A.H.; Jong, P.C. de; Berg, M. van den

    2008-08-01

    There is concern widely on the increase in human exposure to exogenous (anti)estrogenic compounds. Typical are certain ingredients in cosmetic consumer products such as musks, phthalates and parabens. Monitoring a variety of human samples revealed that these ingredients, including the ones that generally are considered to undergo rapid metabolism, are present at low levels. In this in vitro research individual compounds and combinations of parabens and endogenous estradiol (E{sub 2}) were investigated in the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. The experimental design applied a concentration addition model (CA). Data were analyzed with the estrogen equivalency (EEQ) and method of isoboles approach. In addition, the catalytic inhibitory properties of parabens on an enzyme involved in a rate limiting step in steroid genesis (aromatase) were studied in human placental microsomes. Our results point to an additive estrogenic effect in a CA model for parabens. In addition, it was found that parabens inhibit aromatase. Noticeably, the effective levels in both our in vitro systems were far higher than the levels detected in human samples. However, estrogenic compounds may contribute in a cumulative way to the circulating estrogen burden. Our calculation for the extra estrogen burden due to exposure to parabens, phthalates and polycyclic musks indicates an insignificant estrogenic load relative to the endogenous or therapeutic estrogen burden.

  7. Effects of estrogens and estrogenic disrupting compounds on fish mineralized tissues.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patricia I S; Estêvão, Maria D; Power, Deborah M

    2014-08-15

    Estrogens play well-recognized roles in reproduction across vertebrates, but also intervene in a wide range of other physiological processes, including mineral homeostasis. Classical actions are triggered when estrogens bind and activate intracellular estrogen receptors (ERs), regulating the transcription of responsive genes, but rapid non-genomic actions initiated by binding to plasma membrane receptors were recently described. A wide range of structurally diverse compounds from natural and anthropogenic sources have been shown to interact with and disrupt the normal functions of the estrogen system, and fish are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruption, as these compounds are frequently discharged or run-off into waterways. The effect of estrogen disruptors in fish has mainly been assessed in relation to reproductive endpoints, and relatively little attention has been given to other disruptive actions. This review will overview the actions of estrogens in fish, including ER isoforms, their expression, structure and mechanisms of action. The estrogen functions will be considered in relation to mineral homeostasis and actions on mineralized tissues. The impact of estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds on fish mineralized tissues will be reviewed, and the potential adverse outcomes of exposure to such compounds will be discussed. Current lacunae in knowledge are highlighted along with future research priorities.

  8. Quantitation of 4,4′-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate human serum albumin adducts

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Leah G.; Green, Brett J.; Zhang, Fagen; Arnold, Scott M.; Siegel, Paul D.; Bartels, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    4,4′-Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (herein 4,4′-MDI) is used in the production of polyurethane foams, elastomers, coatings, adhesives and the like for a wide range of commercial products. Occupational exposure to MDI levels above current airborne exposure limits can elicit immune mediated hypersensitivity reactions such as occupational asthma in sensitive individuals. To accurately determine exposure, there has been increasing interest in developing analytical methods to measure internal biomarkers of exposure to MDI. Previous investigators have reported methodologies for measuring MDI diamine metabolites and MDI-Lysine (4,4′-MDI-Lys) adducts. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an ultra performance liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ID/MS/MS) quantitation method via a signature peptide approach to enable biomonitoring of 4,4′-MDI adducted to human serum albumin (HSA) in plasma. A murine, anti-4,4′-MDI monoclonal IgM antibody was bound to magnetic beads and utilized for enrichment of the MDI adducted HSA. Following enrichment, trypsin digestion was performed to generate the expected 414 site (primary site of adduction) 4,4′-MDI-adducted HSA signature peptide that was quantified by UPLC-ID/MS/MS. An Agilent 6530 UPLC/quadrupole time of flight MS (QTOF) system was utilized for intact adducted protein analysis and an Agilent 6490 UPLC/MS/MS system operated in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was utilized for quantification of the adducted signature peptide biomarker both for in chemico and worker serum samples. Worker serum samples were initially screened utilizing the previously developed 4,4′-MDI-Lys amino acid method and results showed that 12 samples were identified as quantifiable for 4,4′-MDI-Lys adducts. The signature peptide adduct approach was applied to the 12 worker samples identified as quantifiable for 4,4′-MDI-Lys adducts. Results indicated no positive results were obtained

  9. Liquid chromatography-thermospray mass spectrometry of DNA adducts formed with mitomycin C, porfiromycin and thiotepa.

    PubMed

    Musser, S M; Pan, S S; Callery, P S

    1989-07-14

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thermospray mass spectrometry were combined for the analysis of DNA adducts formed from the interaction of the anticancer drugs mitomycin C, porfiromycin and thiotepa with calf thymus DNA. The adducts formed from reaction of mitomycin C and porfiromycin with DNA were separated from unmodified nucleosides by HPLC on a C18 column and identified by thermospray mass spectrometry. Thiotepa DNA adducts readily depurinated from DNA and were chromatographed and identified by thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as the modified bases without the ribose moiety attached. The utility of thermospray mass spectrometry for the identification of microgram quantities of nucleoside adducts and depurinated base adducts of these anticancer drugs was demonstrated.

  10. DNA adducts in marine mussel and fresh water fishes living in polluted and unpolluted environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kurelec, B.; Checko, M.; Krca, S.; Garg, A.; Gupta, R.C. Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX )

    1988-09-01

    {sup 32}P-postlabeling analysis of DNA adducts in the digestive gland of marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis from polluted and unpolluted sites near Rovinj, Northern Adriatic, revealed that majority of adducts are caused by natural environmental factors rather than by man-made chemicals. The only pollutant-specific adducts were observed in a mussel exposed to seawater experimentally polluted with aminofluorene, and in a population of mussel living at a site heavily polluted with a waste waters of an oil refinery. Fresh water fish species Leuciscus cephalus, Barbus barbus, Abramis brama and Rutilus pigus virgo living in a polluted Sava River, Yugoslavia, or in its unpolluted tributary Korana River, have induced in their livers qualitatively identical and quantitatively similar DNA adducts. These DNA adducts had a species-specific patterns and their appearance was seasonally-dependent.

  11. MRN, CtIP, and BRCA1 mediate repair of topoisomerase II-DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomas; Baer, Richard; Gottesman, Max; Gautier, Jean

    2016-02-15

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with complex ends poses a special challenge, as additional processing is required before DNA ligation. For example, protein-DNA adducts must be removed to allow repair by either nonhomologous end joining or homology-directed repair. Here, we investigated the processing of topoisomerase II (Top2)-DNA adducts induced by treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent etoposide. Through biochemical analysis in Xenopus laevis egg extracts, we establish that the MRN (Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1) complex, CtIP, and BRCA1 are required for both the removal of Top2-DNA adducts and the subsequent resection of Top2-adducted DSB ends. Moreover, the interaction between CtIP and BRCA1, although dispensable for resection of endonuclease-generated DSB ends, is required for resection of Top2-adducted DSBs, as well as for cellular resistance to etoposide during genomic DNA replication.

  12. New Hybrid Properties of TiO2 Nanoparticles Surface Modified With Catecholate Type Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janković, Ivana A.; Šaponjić, Zoran V.; Džunuzović, Enis S.; Nedeljković, Jovan M.

    2010-01-01

    Surface modification of nanocrystalline TiO2 particles (45 Å) with bidentate benzene derivatives (catechol, pyrogallol, and gallic acid) was found to alter optical properties of nanoparticles. The formation of the inner-sphere charge-transfer complexes results in a red shift of the semiconductor absorption compared to unmodified nanocrystallites. The binding structures were investigated by using FTIR spectroscopy. The investigated ligands have the optimal geometry for chelating surface Ti atoms, resulting in ring coordination complexes (catecholate type of binuclear bidentate binding-bridging) thus restoring in six-coordinated octahedral geometry of surface Ti atoms. From the Benesi-Hildebrand plot, the stability constants at pH 2 of the order 103 M-1 have been determined.

  13. Structure-based drug design of catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors for CNS disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiguo; Liu, Hongming; Wu, Baojian

    2014-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is of great importance in pharmacology because it catalyzes the metabolism (methylation) of endogenous and xenobiotic catechols. Moreover, inhibition of COMT is the drug target in the management of central nervous system (CNS) disorders such as Parkinson's disease due to its role in regulation of the dopamine level in the brain. The X-ray crystal structures for COMT have been available since 1994. The active sites for cofactor and substrate/inhibitor binding are well resolved to an atomic level, providing valuable insights into the catalytic mechanisms as well as the role of magnesium ions in catalysis. Determination of how the substrates/inhibitors bind to the protein leads to a structure-based approach that has resulted in potent and selective inhibitors. This review focuses on the design of two types of inhibitors (nitrocatechol-type and bisubstrate inhibitors) for COMT using the protein structures. PMID:23713800

  14. Polymeric Framboidal Nanoparticles Loaded with a Carbon Monoxide Donor via Phenylboronic Acid-Catechol Complexation.

    PubMed

    van der Vlies, André J; Inubushi, Ryosuke; Uyama, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Urara

    2016-06-15

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an essential gaseous signaling molecule in the human body. Toward the controlled delivery of CO to the target tissues or cells, nanomaterial-based CO donors have attracted growing attention. Here, we present CO-releasing polymeric nanoparticles (CONPs) prepared by simple mixing of phenylboronic acid-containing framboidal nanoparticles with the catechol-bearing CO-donor Ru(CO)3Cl(L-DOPA) via phenylboronic acid-catechol complexation. The CONPs release CO in response to cysteine and suppress the production of the pro-inflammatory mediators interleukin 6 (IL-6) and nitric oxide (NO) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages. This CONP platform may show promise in therapeutic applications of CO.

  15. Catechol Removal from Aqueous Media Using Laccase Immobilized in Different Macro- and Microreactor Systems.

    PubMed

    Tušek, Ana Jurinjak; Šalić, Anita; Zelić, Bruno

    2017-01-23

    Laccase belongs to the group of enzymes that are capable to catalyze the oxidation of phenols. Since the water is only by-product in laccase-catalyzed phenol oxidations, it is ideally "green" enzyme with many possible applications in different industrial processes. To make the oxidation process more sustainable in terms of biocatalyst consumption, immobilization of the enzyme is implemented in to the processes. Additionally, when developing a process, choice of a reactor type plays a significant role in the total outcome.In this study, the use of immobilized laccase from Trametes versicolor for biocatalytic catechol oxidation was explored. Two different methods of immobilization were performed and compared using five different reactor types. In order to compare different systems used for catechol oxidation, biocatalyst turnover number and turnover frequency were calculated. With low consumption of the enzyme and good efficiency, obtained results go in favor of microreactors with enzyme covalently immobilized on the microchannel surface.

  16. Robust Alginate-Catechol@Polydopamine Free-Standing Membranes Obtained from the Water/Air Interface.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Florian; Le Houerou, Vincent; Zafeiratos, Spyridon; Gauthier, Christian; Garnier, Tony; Jierry, Loic; Ball, Vincent

    2017-03-07

    The formation of polydopamine composite membranes at the water/air interface using different chemical strategies is reported. The use of either small molecules (urea, pyrocatechol) or polymers paves the way to understand which kind of compounds can be used for the formation of PDA-composite free-standing membranes produced at the water/air interface. On the basis of these screening results, we have found that alginate grafted with catechol groups allows the formation of robust free-standing films with asymmetric composition, stimuli-responsiveness, and self-healing properties. The stickiness of these membranes depends on the relative humidity, and its adhesion behavior on PDMS was characterized using the JKR method. Thus, alginate-catechol polydopamine films appear as a new class of PDA composites, mechanically robust through covalent cross-linking and based on fully biocompatible constituting partners. These results open the door to potential applications in the biomedical field.

  17. Theoretical calculations of a compound formed by Fe(+3) and tris(catechol).

    PubMed

    Kara, İzzet; Kara, Yeşim; Öztürk Kiraz, Aslı; Mammadov, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic compounds generally have special smell, easily soluble in water, organic solvents (alcohols, esters, chloroform, ethyl acetate), in aqueous solutions of bases, colorless or colorful, crystalline and amorphous materials. Phenols form colorful complexes when they form compounds with heavy metals. In this study, the structural properties of a compound formed by catechol and Fe(+3) are investigated theoretically. The electronic and thermodynamic properties of the complex were also investigated in gas phase and organic solvents at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The formation of Fe-tris(catechol) complex compound is exothermic, and it is difficult to obtain the complex as the temperature increases. The observed and calculated FT-IR and geometric parameters spectra are in good agreement with empirical.

  18. Regiocomplementary O-Methylation of Catechols by Using Three-Enzyme Cascades.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Jutta; Aschwanden, Simon; Mordhorst, Silja; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Richter, Michael; Andexer, Jennifer N

    2015-12-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent enzymes have great potential for selective alkylation processes. In this study we investigated the regiocomplementary O-methylation of catechols. Enzymatic methylation is often hampered by the need for a stoichiometric supply of SAM and the inhibitory effect of the SAM-derived byproduct on most methyltransferases. To counteract these issues we set up an enzyme cascade. Firstly, SAM was generated from l-methionine and ATP by use of an archaeal methionine adenosyltransferase. Secondly, 4-O-methylation of the substrates dopamine and dihydrocaffeic acid was achieved by use of SafC from the saframycin biosynthesis pathway in 40-70 % yield and high selectivity. The regiocomplementary 3-O-methylation was catalysed by catechol O-methyltransferase from rat. Thirdly, the beneficial influence of a nucleosidase on the overall conversion was demonstrated. The results of this study are important milestones on the pathway to catalytic SAM-dependent alkylation processes.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a catechol-O-methyltransferase/inhibitor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, M. L.; Bonifácio, M. J.; Soares-da-Silva, P.; Carrondo, M. A.; Archer, M.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase has been co-crystallized with a novel inhibitor, which has potential therapeutic application in the Parkinson’s disease therapy. Inhibitors of the enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) are used as co-adjuvants in the therapy of Parkinson’s disease. A recombinant form of the soluble cytosolic COMT from rat has been co-crystallized with a new potent inhibitor, BIA 8-176 [(3,4-dihydroxy-2-nitrophenyl)phenylmethanone], by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 6K as precipitant. Crystals diffract to 1.6 Å resolution on a synchrotron-radiation source and belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.77, b = 79.63, c = 61.54 Å, β = 91.14°.

  20. Catechols and 3-hydroxypyridones as inhibitors of the DNA repair complex ERCC1-XPF.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Timothy M; Gillen, Kevin J; Wallace, Claire; Lee, Maximillian T; Bakrania, Preeti; Khurana, Puneet; Coombs, Peter J; Stennett, Laura; Fox, Simon; Bureau, Emilie A; Brownlees, Janet; Melton, David W; Saxty, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Catechol-based inhibitors of ERCC1-XPF endonuclease activity were identified from a high-throughput screen. Exploration of the structure-activity relationships within this series yielded compound 13, which displayed an ERCC1-XPF IC50 of 0.6 μM, high selectivity against FEN-1 and DNase I and activity in nucleotide excision repair, cisplatin enhancement and γH2AX assays in A375 melanoma cells. Screening of fragments as potential alternatives to the catechol group revealed that 3-hydroxypyridones are able to inhibit ERCC1-XPF with high ligand efficiency, and elaboration of the hit gave compounds 36 and 37 which showed promising ERCC1-XPF IC50 values of <10 μM.

  1. Removal of catechol from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto organophilic-bentonite.

    PubMed

    Shakir, K; Ghoneimy, H F; Elkafrawy, A F; Beheir, Sh G; Refaat, M

    2008-02-11

    Organophilic-bentonite, produced by exchange of cetyltrimethylammonium cation for metal cations on the bentonite, was exploited as adsorbent for removal of catechol from aqueous solutions using batch technique. The dependence of removal on various physico-chemical parameters, such as contact time (1-250 min), concentration (0.8-15.3 mmol L(-1)), temperature (30, 40, 50+/-1 degrees C) and pH (5-12) of the adsorptive solution were investigated. Obtained results show that catechol could be removed efficiently ( approximately 100%) at pH values > or =9.9. The uptake process follows first-order rate kinetics and the equilibrium data fit well into the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms over a wide range of concentration (1-10 mmol L(-1)). The magnitude of change of free energy (DeltaG degrees ), enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) were determined.

  2. Catechol-substituted L-chicoric acid analogues as HIV integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Yeol; Yoon, Kwon Joong; Lee, Yong Sup

    2003-12-15

    HIV integrase catalyzes the integration of HIV DNA copy into the host cell DNA, which is essential for the production of progeny viruses. L-Chicoric acid and dicaffeoylquinic acids, isolated from plants, are well known potent inhibitors of HIV integrase. The common structural features of these inhibitors are caffeic acid derivatives connected to tartaric acid or quinic acid through ester bonds. In the present study, we have synthesized and tested the inhibitory activities of a new type of HIV IN inhibitors, which has catechol groups in place of caffeoyl groups in the structure of L-chicoric acid. Upon substitution of catechol groups at succinic acid, pyrrole-dicarboxylic acid, maleimide or maleic anhydride, the inhibitory activities (IC(50)=3.8-23.6 microM) were retained or remarkably increased when compared to parent compound L-chicoric acid (IC(50)=13.7 microM).

  3. Accurate characterization of carcinogenic DNA adducts using MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Charles A.; Chiu, Norman H. L.

    2009-01-01

    Many chemical carcinogens and their in vivo activated metabolites react readily with genomic DNA, and form covalently bound carcinogen-DNA adducts. Clinically, carcinogen-DNA adducts have been linked to various cancer diseases. Among the current methods for DNA adduct analysis, mass spectroscopic method allows the direct measurement of unlabeled DNA adducts. The goal of this study is to explore the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) to determine the identity of carcinogen-DNA adducts. Two of the known carcinogenic DNA adducts, namely N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenyl-imidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP) and N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-ABP), were selected as our models. In MALDI-TOF MS measurements, the small matrix ion and its cluster ions did not interfere with the measurements of both selected dG adducts. To achieve a higher accuracy for the characterization of selected dG adducts, 1 keV collision energy in MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS was used to measure the adducts. In comparison to other MS/MS techniques with lower collision energies, more extensive precursor ion dissociations were observed. The detection of the corresponding fragment ions allowed the identities of guanine, PhIP or ABP, and the position of adduction to be confirmed. Some of the fragment ions of dG-C8-PhIP have not been reported by other MS/MS techniques.

  4. Line narrowing spectroscopic studies of DNA-carcinogen adducts and DNA-dye complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Myungkoo

    1995-12-06

    Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing and non-line narrowing spectroscopic methods were applied to conformational studies of stable DNA adducts of the 7β, 8α-dihydoxy-9α, l0α-epoxy-7,8,9, 10-tetrahydrobenzo[α]pyrene (anti-BPDE). Stereochemically distinct (+)-trans-, (-)-trans-, (+)-cis- and (-)-cis adducts of anti-BPDE bound to exocyclic amino group of the central guanine in an 11-mer oligonucleotide, exist in a mixture of conformations in frozen aqueous buffer matrices. The (+)-trans adduct adopts primarily an external conformation with a smaller fraction ( ~25 %) exists in a partially base-stacked conformation. Both cis adducts were found to be intercalated with significant π-π stacking interactions between the pyrenyl residues and the bases. Conformations of the trans-adduct of (+)-anti -BPDE in 11-mer oligonucleotides were studied as a function of flanking bases. In single stranded form the adduct at G2 or G3 (5 ft-flanking, base guanine) adopts a conformation with strong, interaction with the bases. In contrast, the adduct with a 5ft-flanking, thymine exists in a primarily helixexternal conformation. Similar differences were observed in the double stranded oligonucleotides. The nature of the 3ft-flanking base has little influence on the conformational equilibrium of the (+)-trans-anti BPDE-dG adduct. The formation and repair of BPDE-N2-dG in DNA isolated from the skin of mice treated topically with benzo[α]pyrene (BP) was studied. Low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy of the intact DNA identified the major adduct as (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N-dG, and the minor adduct fraction consisted mainly of (+)-cis-anti-BPDE-N2-dG.

  5. Analysis of serum PAH`s and PAH adducts by LC/MS

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, P.C.; Barr, J.R.; Maggio, V.L.

    1995-12-31

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are an important class of chemical carcinogens. Benzo[a]pyrene is the most extensively studied and best understood carcinogenic PAH It is believed that Benzo[a]pyrene is metabolized in vitro to the diol epoxide, Benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9, 10-epoxide which then can react with various nucleophilic centers on DNA. The major alkylation product appears to be the reaction of the Benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide with the N{sup 2} position of guanine sites on DNA. Methods that can measure exposure and biological response to carcinogens such as PAH`s are needed. Human Blood can be separated into plasma, lymphocytes, and red blood cells. The plasma should contain native PAH`s which may yield some useful information about recent exposure. The red blood cells contain hemoglobin and adducts of PAH`s. Hemoglobin has an average lifetime of 120 days so quantification of hemoglobin adducts should give an average of a persons exposure over four months. Also, the electrophilic metabolites that react with hemoglobin to form adducts are the same metabolites that form DNA adducts which can lead to mutations and cancer. Lymphocytes contain DNA and therefore DNA adducts. DNA adducts can be repaired by a series of enzymes so quantification of these adducts will only yield information about recent or non-repairable adducts. DNA adduct formation is believed to be the first important step in chemical carcinogenesis so quantification of these adducts should yield some information on exposure and a great deal of important data on biological response and risk from specific PAH`s.

  6. Recoveries of DNA adducts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the 32P-postlabelling assay.

    PubMed

    Segerbäck, D; Vodicka, P

    1993-12-01

    The 32P-postlabelling assay for analysis of DNA adducts of chemical carcinogens has been applied in a large number of experimental animal and human studies. Most human studies have dealt with occupational and environmental exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The postlabelling assay does not allow direct chemical identification, and most studies with this method have not been performed in a quantitative way. Very little is therefore known about the identity and absolute levels of adducts, which are important contributors to the process of risk identification and quantitation. In the present study it was, therefore, decided to test some parameters suspected to affect recoveries of adducts in the phosphorylation step of the assay. For this purpose 12 different PAHs were reacted individually and in a mixture with DNA in the presence of a rat liver S9 metabolizing system. Different concentrations of ATP, calcium chloride and polynucleotide kinase were tested using the nuclease P1 enhancement. We found that each factor contributed to adduct recovery and that optimal conditions could be defined. Diluting the modified DNA samples up to 1000 times had little influence on the recoveries of adducts. Comparing the nuclease P1 and the butanol extraction procedures for adduct purification showed that both methods gave similar patterns and levels of major adducts. The absolute recoveries in postlabelling, based on 3H-binding of radiolabelled compounds, were for most of the tested compounds relatively low. The fact that the nuclease P1 and the butanol extraction procedures gave similar recoveries points towards common factor(s) involved in the reduction of the recovered adduct levels. Based on the observed recoveries the conclusion can be drawn that when postlabelling related adducts in human samples the true total adduct levels can be considerably underestimated, even if optimal conditions are used.

  7. Effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin administration and high-fat diet on the body weight and hepatic estrogen metabolism in female C3H/HeN mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Baoting Gallo, Michael A. Burger, Conney W.; Meeker, Robert J.; Cai, May Xiaoxin; Xu Shiyao; Conney, Allan H.

    2008-01-15

    We studied the effect of administration of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) by i.p. injection once every 2 weeks in combination with a high-fat (HF) diet for 8 or 16 weeks on the body and organ weight changes as well as on the hepatic enzyme activity for estrogen metabolism in C3H/HeN female mice. Administration of TCDD at 100 {mu}g/kg b.w. once every 2 weeks for 8 weeks increased the body weight by 46% in the HF diet-fed animals, but not in the regular diet-fed animals. This is the first observation suggesting that TCDD at a high dose (100 {mu}g/kg b.w.), but not at lower doses (1 or 10 {mu}g/kg b.w.), may have a strong obesity-inducing effect in C3H/HeN mice fed an HF diet. While TCDD increased liver weight and decreased thymus weight in animals, these effects were enhanced by feeding animals an HF diet. Metabolism studies showed that TCDD administration for 8 or 16 weeks increased the liver microsomal activity for the 2- and 4-hydroxylation of 17{beta}-estradiol in animals fed a control diet, but surprisingly not in animals fed an HF diet. Treatment with TCDD dose-dependently increased the hepatic activity for the O-methylation of catechol estrogens in both control and HF diet-fed animals, and it also decreased the levels of liver microsomal sulfatase activity for hydrolysis of estrone-3-sulfate. TCDD did not significantly affect the hepatic enzyme activity for the glucuronidation or esterification of endogenous estrogens. It is suggested that enhanced metabolic inactivation of endogenous estrogens by hepatic estrogen-metabolizing enzymes in TCDD-treated, control diet-fed animals contributes importantly to the reduced incidence of estrogen-associated tumors in animals treated with TCDD.

  8. SCREENING CHEMICALS FOR ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is considering the use high-throughput and computational methods for regulatory applications in the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP). To use these new tools for regulatory decision making, computational methods must be appropriately validated. Traditional validations of toxicity tests are time intensive, evaluate a relatively small number of chemicals, and are not well-suited to high-throughput methods. Here we describe a multi-step, performance-based validation establishing scientific confidence in new computational methods and demonstrating these tools are sufficiently robust to be used in a regulatory context. Results from 18 estrogen receptor (ER) ToxCast high-throughput screening assays, measuring different points along the signaling pathway with different assay technologies, were integrated into a computational model. The resulting ToxCast ER model scores range from 0 (no activity) to 1 (bioactivity of the native ligand, 17β-estradiol) and can discriminate ER bioactivity from assay-specific interference and cytotoxicity. ToxCast ER model performance was evaluated for 40 in vitro and 43 in vivo reference chemicals. ToxCast ER model results were also compared to EDSP Tier 1 screening assays in current regulatory practice for a diverse set of more than 100 chemicals. ToxCast ER model accuracy was 95% when compared to the large set of in vitro and in vivo reference chemicals. In addition, the T

  9. Estrogenic Compounds, Estrogen Receptors and Vascular Cell Signaling in the Aging Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Dia A.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    The cardiovascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) remain controversial. The earlier clinical observations that cardiovascular disease (CVD) was less common in MHT users compared to non-users suggested cardiovascular benefits of MHT. Also, experimental studies have identified estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30, which mediate genomic or non-genomic effects in vascular endothelium, smooth muscle, and extracellular matrix (ECM). However, data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs), most notably the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study, have challenged the cardiovascular benefits and highlighted adverse cardiovascular events with MHT. The discrepancies have been attributed to the design of RCTs, the subjects' advanced age and preexisting CVD, and the form of estrogen used. The discrepancies may also stem from age-related changes in vascular ER amount, distribution, integrity, and post-receptor signaling pathways as well as structural changes in the vasculature. Age-related changes in other sex hormones such as testosterone may also alter the hormonal environment and influence the cardiovascular effects of estrogen. Investigating the chemical properties, structure-activity relationship and pharmacology of natural and synthetic estrogens should improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT. Further characterization of phytoestrogens, selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and specific ER agonists may provide substitutes to conventional MHT. Conditions with excess or low estrogen levels such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and Turner syndrome may provide insight into the development and regulation of ER and the mechanisms of aberrant estrogen-ER interactions. The lessons learned from previous RCTs have led to more directed studies such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS). Careful design of experimental models and RCTs, coupled with the development of specific ER modulators, hold the promise of improving the actions of

  10. Effect of vaginal estrogen on pessary use

    PubMed Central

    Dessie, Sybil G.; Armstrong, Katherine; Modest, Anna M.; Hacker, Michele R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Many providers recommend concurrent estrogen therapy with pessary use to limit complications; however, limited data exist to support this practice. We hypothesized that vaginal estrogen supplementation decreases incidence of pessary-related complications and discontinuation. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent a pessary fitting from 1 January 2007 through 1 September 2013 at one institution; participants were identified by billing code and were eligible if they were post-menopausal and had at least 3 months of pessary use and 6 months of follow-up. All tests were two sided, and P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Data from 199 women were included; 134 used vaginal estrogen and 65 did not. Women who used vaginal estrogen had a longer median follow-up time (29.5 months) compared with women who did not (15.4 months) and were more likely to have at least one pessary check (98.5 % vs 86.2 %, P < 0.001). Those in the estrogen group were less likely to discontinue using their pessary (30.6 % vs 58.5 %, P < 0.001) and less likely to develop increased vaginal discharge than women who did not [hazard ratio (HR) 0.31, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.17–0.58]. Vaginal estrogen was not protective against erosions (HR 0.93, 95 % CI 0.54–1.6) or vaginal bleeding (HR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.36–1.7). Conclusions Women who used vaginal estrogen exhibited a higher incidence of continued pessary use and lower incidence of increased vaginal discharge than women who did not. PMID:26992727

  11. ON BENZO[A]PYRENE DERIVED DNA ADDUCTS FORMED IN LUNG TISSUE OF MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    On Benzo [a] pyrene Derived DNA Adducts Formed in Lung Tissue of Mice
    The previously identified major DNA adducts of benzo[a]pyrene (BP) in vitro and in vivo are the stable and unstable adducts formed by reaction of the bay-region diol epoxide of BP (BPDE) and BP radical catio...

  12. CYCLOPENTA-FUSED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG: DNA ADDUCTS, ONCOGENE MUTATIONS, & TUMORIGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclopenta-fused Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Strain AJJ Mouse Lung: DNA Adducts, Oncogene Mutations, and Tumorigenesis.

    We have examined the relationships between DNA adducts, Ki-ras oncogene mutations, DNA adducts, and adenoma induction in the lungs of strain A/J...

  13. Computational Investigation of the Interplay of Substrate Positioning and Reactivity in Catechol O-Methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Patra, Niladri; Ioannidis, Efthymios I; Kulik, Heather J

    2016-01-01

    Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) is a SAM- and Mg2+-dependent methyltransferase that regulates neurotransmitters through methylation. Simulations and experiments have identified divergent catecholamine substrate orientations in the COMT active site: molecular dynamics simulations have favored a monodentate coordination of catecholate substrates to the active site Mg2+, and crystal structures instead preserve bidentate coordination along with short (2.65 Å) methyl donor-acceptor distances. We carry out longer dynamics (up to 350 ns) to quantify interconversion between bidentate and monodentate binding poses. We provide a systematic determination of the relative free energy of the monodentate and bidentate structures in order to identify whether structural differences alter the nature of the methyl transfer mechanism and source of enzymatic rate enhancement. We demonstrate that the bidentate and monodentate binding modes are close in energy but separated by a 7 kcal/mol free energy barrier. Analysis of interactions in the two binding modes reveals that the driving force for monodentate catecholate orientations in classical molecular dynamics simulations is derived from stronger electrostatic stabilization afforded by alternate Mg2+ coordination with strongly charged active site carboxylates. Mixed semi-empirical-classical (SQM/MM) substrate C-O distances (2.7 Å) for the bidentate case are in excellent agreement with COMT X-ray crystal structures, as long as charge transfer between the substrates, Mg2+, and surrounding ligands is permitted. SQM/MM free energy barriers for methyl transfer from bidentate and monodentate catecholate configurations are comparable at around 21-22 kcal/mol, in good agreement with experiment (18-19 kcal/mol). Overall, the work suggests that both binding poses are viable for methyl transfer, and accurate descriptions of charge transfer and electrostatics are needed to provide balanced relative barriers when multiple binding poses are

  14. The crystal structure of an extracellular catechol oxidase from the ascomycete fungus Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Hakulinen, Nina; Gasparetti, Chiara; Kaljunen, Heidi; Kruus, Kristiina; Rouvinen, Juha

    2013-12-01

    Catechol oxidases (EC 1.10.3.1) catalyse the oxidation of o-diphenols to their corresponding o-quinones. These oxidases contain two copper ions (CuA and CuB) within the so-called coupled type 3 copper site as found in tyrosinases (EC 1.14.18.1) and haemocyanins. The crystal structures of a limited number of bacterial and fungal tyrosinases and plant catechol oxidases have been solved. In this study, we present the first crystal structure of a fungal catechol oxidase from Aspergillus oryzae (AoCO4) at 2.5-Å resolution. AoCO4 belongs to the newly discovered family of short-tyrosinases, which are distinct from other tyrosinases and catechol oxidases because of their lack of the conserved C-terminal domain and differences in the histidine pattern for CuA. The sequence identity of AoCO4 with other structurally known enzymes is low (less than 30 %), and the crystal structure of AoCO4 diverges from that of enzymes belonging to the conventional tyrosinase family in several ways, particularly around the central α-helical core region. A diatomic oxygen moiety was identified as a bridging molecule between the two copper ions CuA and CuB separated by a distance of 4.2-4.3 Å. The UV/vis absorption spectrum of AoCO4 exhibits a distinct maximum of absorbance at 350 nm, which has been reported to be typical of the oxy form of type 3 copper enzymes.

  15. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation in endothelial cells by ortho-methoxy-substituted catechols.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David K; Schillinger, Kurt J; Kwait, David M; Hughes, Chambers V; McNamara, Erin J; Ishmael, Fauod; O'Donnell, Robert W; Chang, Ming-Mei; Hogg, Michael G; Dordick, Jonathan S; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Ziegler, Linda M; Holland, James A

    2002-01-01

    NADPH oxidase is a major enzymatic source of oxygen free radicals in stimulated endothelial cells (ECs). The ortho-methoxy-substituted catechol, apocynin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxyacetophenone), isolated from the traditional medicinal plant Picrorhiza kurroa, inhibits the release of superoxide anion (O2*-) by this enzyme. The compound acts by blocking the assembly of a functional NADPH oxidase complex. The underlying chemistry of this inhibitory activity, and its physiological significance to EC proliferation, have been investigated. A critical event is the reaction of ortho-methoxy-substituted catechols with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidase. Analysis of this reaction reveals that apocynin is converted to a symmetrical dimer through the formation of a 5,5' carbon-carbon bond. Both reduced glutathione and L-cysteine inhibit this dimerization process. Catechols without the ortho-methoxy-substituted group do not undergo this chemical reaction. Superoxide production by an endothelial cell-free system incubated with apocynin was nearly completely inhibited after a lagtime for inhibition of ca. 2 min. Conversely, O2*- production was nearly completely inhibited, without a lagtime, by incubation with the dimeric form of apocynin. The apocynin dimer undergoes a two-electron transfer reaction with standard redox potentials of -0.75 and -1.34 V as determined by cyclic voltammetry. Inhibition of endothelial NADPH oxidase by apocynin caused a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. These findings identify a metabolite of an ortho-methoxy-substituted catechol, which may be the active compound formed within stimulated ECs that prevents NADPH oxidase complex assembly and activation.

  16. Catechol Formation and Melanization by Na+ -Dependent Azotobacter chroococcum: a Protective Mechanism for Aeroadaptation?

    PubMed Central

    Shivprasad, Shailaja; Page, William J.

    1989-01-01

    Aeroadaptive microaerophilic Azotobacter chroococcum 184 produced a cell-associated black pigment when grown at high aeration rates under nitrogen-fixing conditions. This pigment was shown to be a catechol melanin. Polyphenol oxidase activity was detected in cell extracts of cells grown for 72 h. Melanin formation was optimal in the later stages of growth, and there was no correlation between nitrogenase activity and melanization. Nitrogenase activity in strain 184 was optimal at 10% O2, and melanin formation was suppressed by O2 limitation. In the presence of charcoal, an adsorbent of toxic oxygen intermediates, and benzoic acid, a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals, melanization was inhibited. However, in the presence of copper, the intensity of pigment color increased and melanization was accelerated. Copper also eliminated catalase and peroxidase activities of the organism but still permitted aerobic growth. In the presence of low levels of iron, melanization was accelerated under high aeration rates, and under low rates of aeration, melanization was observed only at higher levels of iron. Hydroxamate-siderophore production was detectable in the presence of soluble iron under high rates of aeration but was repressed by the same levels of iron under low aeration rates. Unlike melanization and hydroxamate formation, catechol formation was observed under both low and high rates of aeration under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Catechol formation and melanization were repressed by 14 mM NH4+, at which level nitrogenase activity was also repressed. Copper reversed the repressive effect of NH4+. A role for catechol formation and melanization in aeroadaptation is proposed. PMID:16347974

  17. Extraction of metals from metal ion-catechol-quaternary base systems.

    PubMed

    Vrchlabský, M; Sommer, L

    1968-09-01

    Methods are given for the extraction of iron(III), molybdenum(VI), titanium(IV), niobium(V), vanadium(IV), uranium(VI) and tungsten(VI) as ternary complexes with catechol and a quaternary cation such as n-butyltriphenylphosphonium, n-propyltriphenylphosphonium, tetraphenylarsonium, cetylpyridinium, cetyltrimethylammonium and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium, the solvent being chloroform. By use of masking agents and pH control, some of these elements can be separated from each other by this means.

  18. Secretion, but not overall synthesis, of catecholate siderophores contributes to virulence of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Caza, Mélissa; Lépine, François; Dozois, Charles M

    2011-04-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) use siderophores to sequester iron during infection. Enterobactin and salmochelins are catecholate siderophores produced by some ExPEC strains and other pathogenic enterobacteria. Siderophore export and synthesis mutants of avian ExPEC strain χ7122 were tested in a chicken infection model. In single-strain infections, siderophore-negative (ΔentDΔiuc), ΔentS and ΔentSΔiroC export mutants were attenuated in tissues and blood, whereas the ΔiroC export mutant was only attenuated in blood. Interestingly, the ΔentD mutant, producing only aerobactin, retained full virulence, and loss of entD in the ΔentSΔiroC mutant restored virulence. LC-MS/MS quantification of siderophores in export mutants demonstrated that loss of entS impaired enterobactin and mono-glucosylated enterobactin secretion, whereas loss of iroC impaired di- and tri-glucosylated enterobactin secretion. Loss of entS and/or iroC resulted in intracellular accumulation and increased secretion of siderophore monomers. Catecholate siderophore export mutants also demonstrated decreased fitness in a co-challenge infection model. By contrast, catecholate siderophore synthesis mutants (ΔentD and ΔiroB) competed as well as the wild-type strain. Results establish that EntS and IroC mediate specific export of catecholate siderophores and the role of these exporters for ExPEC virulence is contingent on enterobactin synthesis, which is not required when other siderophores like aerobactin are functional.

  19. Computational Investigation of the Interplay of Substrate Positioning and Reactivity in Catechol O-Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Niladri; Ioannidis, Efthymios I.

    2016-01-01

    Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) is a SAM- and Mg2+-dependent methyltransferase that regulates neurotransmitters through methylation. Simulations and experiments have identified divergent catecholamine substrate orientations in the COMT active site: molecular dynamics simulations have favored a monodentate coordination of catecholate substrates to the active site Mg2+, and crystal structures instead preserve bidentate coordination along with short (2.65 Å) methyl donor-acceptor distances. We carry out longer dynamics (up to 350 ns) to quantify interconversion between bidentate and monodentate binding poses. We provide a systematic determination of the relative free energy of the monodentate and bidentate structures in order to identify whether structural differences alter the nature of the methyl transfer mechanism and source of enzymatic rate enhancement. We demonstrate that the bidentate and monodentate binding modes are close in energy but separated by a 7 kcal/mol free energy barrier. Analysis of interactions in the two binding modes reveals that the driving force for monodentate catecholate orientations in classical molecular dynamics simulations is derived from stronger electrostatic stabilization afforded by alternate Mg2+ coordination with strongly charged active site carboxylates. Mixed semi-empirical-classical (SQM/MM) substrate C-O distances (2.7 Å) for the bidentate case are in excellent agreement with COMT X-ray crystal structures, as long as charge transfer between the substrates, Mg2+, and surrounding ligands is permitted. SQM/MM free energy barriers for methyl transfer from bidentate and monodentate catecholate configurations are comparable at around 21–22 kcal/mol, in good agreement with experiment (18–19 kcal/mol). Overall, the work suggests that both binding poses are viable for methyl transfer, and accurate descriptions of charge transfer and electrostatics are needed to provide balanced relative barriers when multiple binding poses are

  20. Carbonyl side-chain of catechol compounds is a key structure for the suppression of copper-associated oxidative DNA damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ando, Motozumi; Nishida, Hiroyuki; Nishino, Yoshihiko; Ohbayashi, Manabu; Ueda, Koji; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Kojima, Nakao

    2010-12-15

    Catechol is possibly carcinogenic to humans (International Agency for Research on Cancer, IARC). The key mechanism could include its oxidative DNA-damaging effect in combination with reductive-oxidative metals like Cu. We found that DNA damage was suppressed by introducing an α-carbonyl group to catechol at C4-position to produce carbonyl catechols. During the oxidative DNA-damaging process, catechols but not carbonyl catechols were oxidized to o-quinone; however, coexisting Cu(II) was reduced to Cu(I). Carbonyl catechols were possibly arrested at the oxidation step of semiquinones in the presence of Cu(II). Cu(I)-binding to DNA was stronger than Cu(II)-binding, on the basis of the circular dichroism spectral change. None of the carbonyl catechols induced such change, suggesting sequestration of Cu(I) from DNA. Solid-phase extraction experiments and spectrophotometric analyses showed the formation of semiquinone chelates with Cu(I). Thus, chelate formation could explain the suppression mechanism of the Cu-catechol-dependent DNA damage by terminating the reduction-oxidation cycle. Structural modifications such as introducing an α-carbonyl group to catechol at C4-position would contribute to reducing the risk and improving industrial and medical potentials of aromatic/phenolic compounds sustaining our daily lives.

  1. Analysis of multiplex endogenous estrogen metabolites in human urine using ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: a case study for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiang; Sun, Jianghao; Chen, Yanhua; Song, Yongmei; Dong, Lijia; Zhan, Qinmin; Zhang, Ruiping; Abliz, Zeper

    2012-01-20

    A rapid, sensitive, specific and accurate analytical method of ultra-fast liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) was established for simultaneous quantitative analysis of 16 distinct endogenous estrogens and their metabolites (EMs) in postmenopausal female urine. The quantitative method utilized a hydrolysis/extraction/derivatization step and a UFLC system to achieve separation in 16 min. The lower limit of quantitation for each estrogen metabolite was 2 pg mL(-1) with the percent recovery of a known added amount of estrogen at 93.2-109.3%. The intra-batch accuracy and precision for all analytes were 87.5-107.7% and 0.6-11.7%, respectively, while inter-batch accuracy and precision were 87.0-105.8% and 1.2-10.2%, respectively. Using this developed and validated method, the comprehensive metabolic profiling of 16 EMs in urine samples of 86 postmenopausal female breast cancer patients and 36 healthy controls was investigated by systematic statistical analysis. As a result, the circulating levels of 6 EMs were found to be different by a comparison of patients and healthy controls. The parent estrogens, estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2), as well as 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2) and 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2) were produced in higher abundance, whereas 16α-hydroxyestrone (16α-OHE1) and 2-methoxyestradiol (2-MeOE2) were decreased in the breast cancer group. 2-OHE2 and 4-OHE2 in particular showed significant elevation in patients, which are consistent with the carcinogenic mechanism hypothesis that catechol estrogens can react with DNA via quinones, resulting in mutations to induce breast cancer. Thus, 2,4-hydroxylation may be the dominant metabolic pathway for parent estrogens rather than 16α-hydroxylation. The lower level of 2-MeOE2 in the breast cancer group was believed to correlate with its protective effect against tumor formation. This study could provide valuable information on the association of the EM metabolic pathway with

  2. Effect of Metal Ions on the Formation of Trichloronitromethane during Chlorination of Catechol and Nitrite.

    PubMed

    Gan, Guojuan; Mei, Rongwu; Qiu, Lin; Hong, Huachang; Wang, Qingjun; Mazumder, Asit; Wu, Shikai; Pan, Xiangliang; Liang, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Catechol, nitrite, and dissolved metals are ubiquitous in source drinking water. Catechol and nitrite have been identified as precursors for halonitromethanes (HNMs), but the effect of metal ions on HNM formation during chlorination remains unclear. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of metal ions (Fe, Ti, Al) on the formation of trichloronitromethane (TCNM) (the most representative HNM species in disinfected water) on chlorinating catechol and nitrite. Trichloronitromethane was extracted by methyl tert-butyl ether and detected by gas chromatography. The results show that metal ions promoted the formation of TCNM and that the enhancement efficiency followed the order of Fe > Ti > Al. Trichloronitromethane formation increased greatly within 2 h, and a basic condition (pH 8-9) favored TCNM formation more than acidic or neutral conditions. The conjoint effect of the metal-ion mixtures was shown to be similar to that of the single metal ion having the highest promoting effect on TCNM formation. Our results strongly suggest that metal ions play a significant role in enhancing TCNM formation.

  3. Secondary Organic Aerosol formation from the gas-phase reaction of catechol with ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coeur-Tourneur, C.; Tomas, A.; Guilloteau, A.; Henry, F.; Ledoux, F.; Visez, N.; Riffault, V.; Wenger, J. C.; Bedjanian, Y.; Foulon, V.

    2009-04-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol from the gas-phase reaction of catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) with ozone has been studied in two smog chambers (at the LPCA in France and at the CRAC in Ireland). Aerosol production was monitored using a scanning mobility particle sizer. The overall organic aerosol yield (Y) was determined as the ratio of the suspended aerosol mass corrected for wall losses (Mo) to the total reacted catechol concentrations, assuming a particle density of 1.4 g cm-3. Analysis of the data clearly shows that Y is a strong function of Mo and that secondary organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. The aerosol formation is affected by the initial catechol concentration, which leads to aerosol yields ranging from 17% to 86%. The aerosol yields determined in the LPCA and CRAC smog chambers were comparable and were also in accordance with those determined in a previous study performed in EUPHORE (EUropean PHOto REactor, Spain).

  4. A catechol biosensor based on a gold nanoparticles encapsulated-dendrimer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravindra P

    2011-03-21

    Tyrosinase has been immobilized on a Au nanoparticles encapsulated-dendrimer bonded conducting polymer on a glassy carbon electrode for the estimation of catechol. The modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry and AFM techniques. The principle of catechol estimation was based on the reduction of biocatalytically liberated quinone species at +0.2 V versus Ag/AgCl (3 M KCl), with good stability, sensitivity, and featuring a low detection limit (about 0.002 μM) and wide linear range (0.005 μM-120 μM). The electrochemical redox peak of catechol on the GCE/PolyPATT/Den(AuNPs)/tyrosinase was also investigated. A response time of 7 s, reusability up to 5 cycles and a shelf life of more than 2 months under refrigerated conditions were reported. Various parameters influencing biosensor performance have been optimized including pH, temperature, and applied potential. The utility and application of this nanobiosensor was tested in a real water samples.

  5. Dinuclear copper complexes with imidazole derivative ligands: a theoretical study related to catechol oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana; Membrillo, Ingrid; Ugalde-Saldívar, Victor M; Gasque, Laura

    2012-07-19

    Catechol oxidase is a very important and interesting metalloprotein. In spite of the efforts to understand the reaction mechanism of this protein, there are important questions that remain unanswered concerning the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme. In this article, dinuclear copper compounds are used as biomimetic models of catechol oxidase to study plausible reaction paths. These dinuclear copper(II) complexes have distant metal centers (of 7.5 Å approximately) and superior catalytic activity to that of many dicopper complexes with shorter Cu-Cu distances. One mononuclear copper(II) complex is also analyzed in this investigation in order to see the influence of the two metal centers in the catalytic activity. Density functional theory calculations were performed to obtain optimized structures, vertical ionization energies, vertical electron affinities, the electrodonating power (ω(-)), the electroaccepting power (ω(+)) and the energy difference of several reaction paths. The K(M) experimental results that were previously reported compare well with the electroaccepting power (ω(+)) of the copper compounds that are included in this article, indicating that this index is useful for the interpretation of the electron transfer capacity and therefore the catalytic activity. The catechol moiety coordinates to only one Cu ion, but two metal atoms are needed in order to have a good electron acceptor capacity of the biomimetic models.

  6. Catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus: purification and properties.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, R N; Hou, C T; Felix, A; Lillard, M O

    1976-01-01

    Procedures for the purification of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from extracts of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain ADP-96 are described. The purified enzyme was homogeneous as judged by ultracentrifugation and acrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme contained 2 g-atoms of iron per mol of protein. The enzyme had a broad substrate specificity and catalyzed the oxidation of catechol, 4-methylcatechol, 3-methylcatechol, and 3-isopropyl catechol. The activity of the enzyme was inhibited by heavy metals, sulfhydryl inhibitors, and substrate analogues. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 85,000 as estimated by filtration on Bio-Gel agarose and 81,000 as estimated by sedimentation equilibrium analysis. The subunit size determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis was 40,000. The amino terminal amino acid was methionine. The amino acid composition and spectral properties of 1,2-dioxygenase are also presented. Antisera prepared against the purified enzyme cross-reacted and inhibited enzyme activity in crude extracts from the other strain of A. calcoaceticus, but failed to cross-react and inhibit isofunctional enzyme from organisms of the genera Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, and Nocardia. Images PMID:58860

  7. Three-Dimensional Metal-Catecholate Frameworks and Their Ultrahigh Proton Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nhung T T; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Gándara, Felipe; Trickett, Christopher A; Jeong, Hyung Mo; Cordova, Kyle E; Yaghi, Omar M

    2015-12-16

    A series of three-dimensional (3D) extended metal catecholates (M-CATs) was synthesized by combining the appropriate metal salt and the hexatopic catecholate linker, H6THO (THO(6-) = triphenylene-2,3,6,7,10,11-hexakis(olate)) to give Fe(THO)·Fe(SO4) (DMA)3, Fe-CAT-5, Ti(THO)·(DMA)2, Ti-CAT-5, and V(THO)·(DMA)2, V-CAT-5 (where DMA = dimethylammonium). Their structures are based on the srs topology and are either a 2-fold interpenetrated (Fe-CAT-5 and Ti-CAT-5) or noninterpenetrated (V-CAT-5) porous anionic framework. These examples are among the first catecholate-based 3D frameworks. The single crystal X-ray diffraction structure of the Fe-CAT-5 shows bound sulfate ligands with DMA guests residing in the pores as counterions, and thus ideally suited for proton conductivity. Accordingly, Fe-CAT-5 exhibits ultrahigh proton conductivity (5.0 × 10(-2) S cm(-1)) at 98% relative humidity (RH) and 25 °C. The coexistence of sulfate and DMA ions within the pores play an important role in proton conductivity as also evidenced by the lower conductivity values found for Ti-CAT-5 (8.2 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at 98% RH and 25 °C), whose structure only contained DMA guests.

  8. Adsorptive removal of aniline by granular activated carbon from aqueous solutions with catechol and resorcinol.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Srivastava, V C; Mishrab, I M

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, the removal of aniline by adsorption process onto granular activated carbon (GAC) is reported from aqueous solutions containing catechol and resorcinol separately. The Taguchi experimental design was applied to study the effect of such parameters as the initial component concentrations (C(0,i)) of two solutes (aniline and catechol or aniline and resorcinol) in the solution, temperature (T), adsorbent dosage (m) and contact time (t). The L27 orthogonal array consisting of five parameters each with three levels was used to determine the total amount of solutes adsorbed on GAC (q(tot), mmol/g) and the signal-to-noise ratio. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the optimum conditions. Under these conditions, the ANOVA shows that m is the most important parameter in the adsorption process. The most favourable levels of process parameters were T = 303 K, m = 10 g/l and t = 660 min for both the systems, qtot values in the confirmation experiments carried out at optimum conditions were 0.73 and 0.95 mmol/g for aniline-catechol and aniline-resorcinol systems, respectively.

  9. Isolation and characterization of two novel halotolerant Catechol 2, 3-dioxygenases from a halophilic bacterial consortium

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Guang; Fang, Tingting; Wang, Chongyang; Huang, Yong; Tian, Fang; Cui, Qijia; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Study of enzymes in halophiles will help to understand the mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in saline environment. In this study, two novel catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23O1 and C23O2) were cloned and overexpressed from a halophilic bacterial consortium enriched from an oil-contaminated saline soil. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the novel C23Os and their relatives formed a new branch in subfamily I.2.A of extradiol dioxygenases and the sequence differences were further analyzed by amino acid sequence alignment. Two enzymes with the halotolerant feature were active over a range of 0–30% salinity and they performed more stable at high salinity than in the absence of salt. Surface electrostatic potential and amino acids composition calculation suggested high acidic residues content, accounting for their tolerance to high salinity. Moreover, two enzymes were further characterized. The enzymes activity both increased in the presence of Fe3+, Fe2+, Cu2+ and Al3+ and showed no significant inhibition by other tested metal ions. The optimal temperatures for the C23Os were 40 °C and 60 °C and their best substrates were catechol and 4-methylcatechol respectively. As the firstly isolated and characterized catechol dioxygenases from halophiles, the two halotolerant C23Os presented novel characteristics suggesting their potential application in aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation. PMID:26621792

  10. Less is more: reduced catechol production permits Pseudomonas putida F1 to grow on styrene.

    PubMed

    George, Kevin W; Hay, Anthony

    2012-11-01

    Pseudomonas putida F1 is unable to grow on styrene due to the accumulation of 3-vinylcatechol, a toxic metabolite that is produced through the toluene degradation (tod) pathway and causes catechol-2,3-dioxygenase (C23O) inactivation. In this study, we characterized a spontaneous F1 mutant, designated SF1, which acquired the ability to grow on styrene and did not accumulate 3-vinylcatechol. Whereas adaptation to new aromatic substrates has typically been shown to involve increased C23O activity or the acquisition of resistance to C23O inactivation, SF1 retained wild-type C23O activity. Surprisingly, SF1 grew more slowly on toluene, its native substrate, and exhibited reduced toluene dioxygenase (TDO) activity (approximately 50 % of that of F1), the enzyme responsible for ring hydroxylation and subsequent production of 3-vinylcatechol. DNA sequence analysis of the tod operon of SF1 revealed a single base pair mutation in todA (C479T), a gene encoding the reductase component of TDO. Replacement of the wild-type todA allele in F1 with todA(C479T) reduced TDO activity to SF1 levels, obviated vinylcatechol accumulation, and conferred the ability to grow on styrene. This novel 'less is more' strategy - reduced catechol production as a means to expand growth substrate range - sheds light on an alternative approach for managing catechol toxicity during the metabolism of aromatic compounds.

  11. Isolation and characterization of two novel halotolerant Catechol 2, 3-dioxygenases from a halophilic bacterial consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guang; Fang, Tingting; Wang, Chongyang; Huang, Yong; Tian, Fang; Cui, Qijia; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Study of enzymes in halophiles will help to understand the mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in saline environment. In this study, two novel catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23O1 and C23O2) were cloned and overexpressed from a halophilic bacterial consortium enriched from an oil-contaminated saline soil. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the novel C23Os and their relatives formed a new branch in subfamily I.2.A of extradiol dioxygenases and the sequence differences were further analyzed by amino acid sequence alignment. Two enzymes with the halotolerant feature were active over a range of 0-30% salinity and they performed more stable at high salinity than in the absence of salt. Surface electrostatic potential and amino acids composition calculation suggested high acidic residues content, accounting for their tolerance to high salinity. Moreover, two enzymes were further characterized. The enzymes activity both increased in the presence of Fe3+, Fe2+, Cu2+ and Al3+ and showed no significant inhibition by other tested metal ions. The optimal temperatures for the C23Os were 40 °C and 60 °C and their best substrates were catechol and 4-methylcatechol respectively. As the firstly isolated and characterized catechol dioxygenases from halophiles, the two halotolerant C23Os presented novel characteristics suggesting their potential application in aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation.

  12. Computational studies of catechol and water interactions with titanium oxide nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Redfern, P. C.; Zapol, P.; Curtiss, L. A.; Rajh, T.; Thurnauer, M.

    2003-10-16

    The interaction of catechol and water with titanium oxide nanoparticles was investigated using ab initio molecular orbital theory and density functional theory. Hydrogen-terminated TiO{sub 2} clusters were used to model the surface of anatase nanoparticles. The calculations indicate that catechol reacts with a Ti{double_bond}O defect site on the surface to form a bidentate structure that is favored over dissociative or molecular adsorption on the (101) anatase surface. The dissociative adsorption of catechol at the defect site leads to a much larger red shift in the TiO{sub 2} excitation energy than molecular adsorption on the (101) anatase surface on the basis of ZINDO/S calculations. This is consistent with recent experimental results on small (<2 nm) titania nanoparticles. The calculations on water adsorption indicate that it can also add to the Ti{double_bond}O double bond site. However, molecular adsorption of water on the (101) anatase surface is more favorable.

  13. Catechol-rhodanine derivatives: Specific and promiscuous inhibitors of Escherichia coli deoxyxylulose phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR).

    PubMed

    Zinglé, Catherine; Tritsch, Denis; Grosdemange-Billiard, Catherine; Rohmer, Michel

    2014-07-15

    To develop more effective inhibitors than fosmidomycin, a natural compound which inhibits the deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), the second enzyme of the MEP pathway, we designed molecules possessing on the one hand a catechol that is able to chelate the magnesium dication and on the other hand a group able to occupy the NADPH recognition site. Catechol-rhodanine derivatives (1-6) were synthesized and their potential inhibition was tested on the DXR of Escherichia coli. For the inhibitors 1 and 2, the presence of detergent in the enzymatic assays led to a dramatic decrease of the inhibition suggesting, that these compounds are rather promiscuous inhibitors. The compounds 4 and 5 kept their inhibition capacity in the presence of Triton X100 and could be considered as specific inhibitors of DXR. Compound 4 showed antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. The only partial protection of NADPH against the inhibition suggested that the catechol-rhodanine derivatives did not settle in the coenzyme binding site. This paper points out the necessity to include a detergent in the DXR enzymatic assays to avoid false positive when putative hydrophobic inhibitors are tested and especially when the IC50, are in the micromolar range.

  14. DNA adducts in hematopoietic tissues and blood of the mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) from a creosote-contaminated site in the Elizabeth River, Virginia.

    PubMed

    Rose, W L; French, B L; Reichert, W L; Faisal, M

    2000-01-01

    Hydrophobic DNA adducts were examined in liver, anterior kidney, spleen, and blood of tumor-prone mummichog (Fundulus heterclitus) from the creosote-contaminated Atlantic Wood (AW) site (Elizabeth River, Virginia). DNA adducts eluted in a diagonal radioactive zone, characteristic of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure, in all examined tissues of AW fish. Mummichog demonstrated significantly higher levels of DNA adducts in spleen (394 +/- 109 nmol adducts/mol nucleotides) than in liver (201 +/- 77 nmol adducts/mol nucleotides) or anterior kidney (211 +/- 68 nmol adducts/mol nucleotides; P = 0.036). The levels of DNA adducts in the pooled blood (pool of four) were 142 nmol adducts/mol nucleotides. DNA adducts were not detected in the liver, anterior kidney, spleen and blood of fish collected from the reference site (< 2 nmol adducts/mol nucleotides). The high levels of DNA adducts detected in tissues of AW mummichog may be linked to the increased cancer incidence and immunosuppression in this population.

  15. DNA adduct formation by the environmental contaminant 3-nitrobenzanthrone after intratracheal instillation in rats.

    PubMed

    Bieler, Christian A; Cornelius, Michael G; Klein, Reinhold; Arlt, Volker M; Wiessler, Manfred; Phillips, David H; Schmeiser, Heinz H

    2005-10-10

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is an environmental pollutant and suspected human carcinogen found in emissions from diesel and gasoline engines and on the surface of ambient air particulate matter; human exposure to 3-NBA is likely to occur primarily via the respiratory tract. In our study female Sprague Dawley rats were treated by intratracheal instillation with a single dose of 0.2 or 2 mg/kg body weight of 3-NBA. Using the butanol enrichment version of the (32)P-postlabeling method, DNA adduct formation by 3-NBA 48 hr after intratracheal administration in different organs (lung, pancreas, kidney, urinary bladder, heart, small intestine and liver) and in blood was investigated. The same adduct pattern consisting of up to 5 DNA adduct spots was detected by thin layer chromatography in all tissues and blood and at both doses. Highest total adduct levels were found in lung and pancreas (350 +/- 139 and 620 +/- 370 adducts per 10(8) nucleotides for the high dose and 39 +/- 18 and 55 +/- 34 adducts per 10(8) nucleotides for the low dose, respectively) followed by kidney, urinary bladder, heart, small intestine and liver. Adduct levels were dose-dependent in all organs (approximately 10-fold difference between doses). It was demonstrated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) that all 5 3-NBA-derived DNA adducts formed in rats after intratracheal instillation are identical to those formed by other routes of application and are, as previously shown, formed from reductive metabolites bound to purine bases. Although total adduct levels in the blood were much lower (41 +/- 27 and 9.5 +/- 1.9 adducts per 10(8) nucleotides for the high and low dose, respectively) than those found in the lung, they were related to dose and to the levels found in lung. These results show that uptake of 3-NBA by the lung induces high levels of specific DNA adducts in several organs of the rat and an identical adduct pattern in DNA from blood. Therefore, 3-NBA-DNA adducts present in the

  16. Is Estrogen a Therapeutic Target for Glaucoma?

    PubMed Central

    Dewundara, Samantha; Wiggs, Janey; Sullivan, David A.; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of the association between estrogen and glaucoma. Methods A literature synthesis of articles published in peer review journals screened through May 05, 2015 using the PubMed database. Key words used were “estrogen and glaucoma,” “reproductive factors and glaucoma,” “estrogen, nitric oxide and eye.” Forty three journal articles were included. Results Markers for lifetime estrogen exposure have been measured by several studies and show that the age of menarche onset, oral contraceptive (OC) use, bilateral oophorectomy, age of menopause onset and duration between menarche to menopause are associated with primary open angle (POAG) risk. The Blue Mountain Eye Study found a significantly increased POAG risk with later (>13 years) compared with earlier (≤12 years) age of menarche. Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) investigators found that OC use of greater than 5 years was associated with a 25% increased risk of POAG. The Mayo Clinic Cohort Study of Oophorectomy and Aging found that women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before age 43 had an increased risk of glaucoma. The Rotterdam Study found that women who went through menopause before reaching the age of 45 years had a higher risk of open-angle glaucoma (2.6-fold increased risk) while the NHS showed a reduced risk of POAG among women older than 65 who entered menopause after age ≥ 54 years. Increased estrogen states may confer a reduced risk of glaucoma or glaucoma related traits such as reduced intraocular pressure (IOP). Pregnancy, a hyperestrogenemic state, is associated with decreased IOP during the third trimester. Though the role of post-menopausal hormone (PMH) use in the reduction of IOP is not fully conclusive, PMH use may reduce the risk of POAG. From a genetic epidemiologic perspective, estrogen metabolic pathway single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with POAG in women and polymorphisms in endothelial nitric oxide synthase, a gene receptive to

  17. Estrogenicity of Glabridin in Ishikawa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su Wei Poh, Melissa; Viseswaran, Navaratnam

    2015-01-01

    Glabridin is an isoflavan from licorice root, which is a common component of herbal remedies used for treatment of menopausal symptoms. Past studies have shown that glabridin resulted in favorable outcome similar to 17β-estradiol (17β-E2), suggesting a possible role as an estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). This study aims to evaluate the estrogenic effect of glabridin in an in-vitro endometrial cell line -Ishikawa cells via alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay and ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator assay. Its effect on cell proliferation was also evaluated using Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed that glabridin activated the ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator complex and displayed a dose-dependent increase in estrogenic activity supporting its use as an ERT. However, glabridin also induced an increase in cell proliferation. When glabridin was treated together with 17β-E2, synergistic estrogenic effect was observed with a slight decrease in cell proliferation as compared to treatment by 17β-E2 alone. This suggest that the combination might be better suited for providing high estrogenic effects with lower incidences of endometrial cancer that is associated with 17β-E2. PMID:25816349

  18. Estrogen therapy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Askanase, Anca D

    2004-01-01

    Given the female preponderance of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in humans, the adverse effects of female gender and sex hormones in murine lupus, and numerous reports (retrospective, often anecdotal and uncontrolled) that describe a temporal association between estrogen exposure and development or exacerbation of SLE, it is tempting to accept that estrogens and SLE simply do not mix. While there are valid concerns regarding the use of exogenous estrogens in women with SLE, there are also potential health benefits to be considered. Oral contraceptives (OCs) offer effective birth control and may be bone protective in corticosteroid-treated patients. Recent studies, albeit retrospective, suggest that OCs are well tolerated in patients with SLE. Several salutary effects of postmenopausal estrogens assume particular importance in SLE where the risks of osteoporosis, exaggerated by menopause (natural or cyclophosphamide-induced) and corticosteroids, are substantial. However, the results of the Women's Health Initiative trial significantly limit the use of hormone replacement therapy in the general population, and raise particular concern for SLE patients. Other exogenous hormones (clomifene, gonadotropins, gonadotropin-releasing hormones) may be used to elevate levels of endogenous estrogen and to stimulate ovulation in patients with diminished fertility. Patients with inactive or stable/moderate disease and at low risk for thrombosis may benefit from OCs and other hormonal therapies without a change in lupus activity. Large prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies inclusive of all ethnic groups should provide the basis for more definitive recommendations.

  19. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethinyl estradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl de...

  20. Synergistic activation of estrogen receptor with combinations of environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, S.F.; Klotz, D.M.; Collins, B.M.

    1996-06-07

    Certain chemicals in the environment are estrogenic. The low potencies of the compounds, when studied singly, suggest that they may have little effect on biological systems. The estrogenic potencies of combinations of such chemicals were screened in a simple yeast estrogen potencies of combination of such chemicals were screened in a simple yeast estrogen systems (YES) containing human estrogen receptor (hER). Combinations of two weak environmental estrogens, such as dieldrin, endosulfan, or toxaphene, were 100 times as potent in hER-mediated transactivation as any chemical alone. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls shown previously to synergistically alter sexual development in turtles also synergized in the YES. The synergistic interaction of chemical mixtures with the estrogen receptor may have profound environmental implications. These results may represent a previously uncharacterized level of regulation of estrogen-associated responses. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethynylestradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl der...

  2. Rotational Spectra of Adducts of Formaldehyde with Freons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Gou; Feng, Gang; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, W.; Lopez, Montserrat Vallejo; Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio

    2013-06-01

    The rotational spectra of three 1:1 complexes of formaldehyde (H_{2}CO) with freons, i.e. difluoromethane (CH_{2}F_{2}), fluorochloromethane (CH_{2}FCl) and trifluorochloromethane (CF_{3}Cl), have been observed and assigned using pulsed jet Fourier transform microwave technique. Several isotopologues (including some ^{13}C species) have been measured in natural abundance. The tunnelling splittings have been measured in the first two adducts with relative intensity 1:3, due to the internal rotation of the formaldehyde moity along its symmetry axis. The barriers to this motion have been estimated by using a flexible model. For the latter two complexes, each of transition displays the hyperfine structures due to the quadrupolar effects of ^{35}Cl (^{37}Cl) nucleus. The dissociation energy has been estimated within the pseudo-diatomic approximation for all three complexes.

  3. Vitamin A-aldehyde adducts: AMD risk and targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, Janet R.

    2016-01-01

    Although currently available treatment options for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are limited, particularly for atrophic AMD, the identification of predisposing genetic variations has informed clinical studies addressing therapeutic options such as complement inhibitors and anti-inflammatory agents. To lower risk of early AMD, recommended lifestyle interventions such as the avoidance of smoking and the intake of low glycemic antioxidant-rich diets have largely followed from the identification of nongenetic modifiable factors. On the other hand, the challenge of understanding the complex relationship between aging and cumulative damage leading to AMD has fueled investigations of the visual cycle adducts that accumulate in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and are a hallmark of aging retina. These studies have revealed properties of these compounds that provide insights into processes that may compromise RPE and could contribute to disease mechanisms in AMD. This work has also led to the design of targeted therapeutics that are currently under investigation. PMID:27071115

  4. Structural phase transitions and adduct release in calcium borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Paolone, A.; Palumbo, O.; Rispoli, P.; Miriametro, A.; Cantelli, R.; Luedtke, A.; Rönnebro, E.; Chandra, D.

    2011-09-01

    Ca(BH4)2 compounds were investigated above room temperature by anelastic spectroscopy (AS) and concomitant measurements of thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry (TGA/MS). Both AS and TGA/MS indicate that even after a thermal treatment at 125 °C for 20 h, a non-negligible residual of THF adduct is still present in the sample, which can be removed on a subsequent thermal treatment at temperatures lower than 250 °C. Above 250 °C dehydrogenation takes place. Moreover, AS sensitively detects the occurrence of the α → α’ structural phase transition around 180 °C, and the α’ → β transformation, which is completed around 330 °C. Finally, we also show that both transitions are irreversible and are not accompanied by a latent heat.

  5. In-vitro oxidation of bisphenol A: Is bisphenol A catechol a suitable biomarker for human exposure to bisphenol A?

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaoyun; Zhou, Xiaoliu; Needham, Larry L; Calafat, Antonia M

    2011-01-01

    The extensive use of bisphenol A (BPA) in the manufacture of consumer products results in widespread human exposure to the chemical. In the body, BPA undergoes first-pass metabolism to form BPA glucuronide, considered to be a major BPA byproduct. Concentrations of total (free plus conjugated) urinary species of BPA are used to assess human exposure to BPA. However, because BPA can be present in numerous consumer and household products, potential contamination with parent BPA during collection and handling may pose a challenge when measuring BPA in such biological samples as blood or urine. In this study we investigated the in-vitro phase I metabolism of BPA in rat and human liver microsomes by using on-line solid-phase extraction-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify phase I metabolites (e.g., BPA oxidation products) that could be used as potential alternative biomarkers of BPA exposure. We unambiguously identified 5-hydroxy BPA (BPA catechol) as an in-vitro oxidative metabolite of BPA, but human microsomes oxidized only about 10% of BPA to BPA catechol. We evaluated the usefulness of BPA catechol as a potential biomarker of human exposure to BPA by measuring total concentrations of BPA catechol and BPA in 20 urine samples. We detected BPA catechol at much lower concentrations and frequency than those of BPA. Furthermore, we found that free BPA catechol was rather unstable in urine, which highlights the importance of sampling techniques to adequate interpretation of biomonitoring data. Together, these findings suggest that BPA catechol may not be a suitable biomarker of environmental exposure to BPA, but could be used to confirm BPA exposure in special populations or in situations when urine specimens were potentially contaminated with BPA.

  6. Impacts of surface adsorbed catechol on tropospheric aerosol surrogates: heterogeneous ozonolysis and its effects on water uptake.

    PubMed

    Woodill, Laurie A; O'Neill, Erinn M; Hinrichs, Ryan Z

    2013-07-11

    Surface adsorbed organics are ubiquitous components of inorganic tropospheric aerosols and have the potential to alter aerosol chemical and physical properties. To assess the impact of adsorbed organics on water uptake by inorganic substrates, we used diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy to compared water adsorption isotherms for uncoated NaCl and α-Al2O3 samples, samples containing a monolayer of adsorbed catechol, and adsorbed catechol samples following ozonolysis. Adsorption of gaseous catechol on to the inorganic substrates produced vibrational features indicating physisorption on NaCl and displacement of surface hydroxyl groups forming binuclear bidentate catecholate on α-Al2O3, with surface concentrations of 2-3 × 10(18) molecules m(-2). Subsequent heterogeneous ozonolysis produced muconic acid at a rate 4-5 times faster on NaCl compared to α-Al2O3, with predicted atmospheric lifetimes of 4.3 and 18 h, respectively, assuming a tropospheric ozone concentration of 40 ppb. Water adsorption isotherms for all NaCl samples were indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty, indicating that these organic monolayers had negligible impact on coadsorbed water surface concentrations for these systems. α-Al2O3-catechol samples exhibited dramatically less water uptake compared to uncoated α-Al2O3, while oxidation of surface adsorbed catechol had no effect on the extent of water uptake. For both substrates, adsorbed organics increased the relative abundance of "ice-like" versus "liquid-like" water, with the effect larger for catechol than oxidized ozonolysis products. These results highlight the importance of aerosol substrate in understanding the heterogeneous ozonolysis of adsorbed polyphenols and suggest such coatings may impair ice nucleation by aluminosilicate mineral aerosol.

  7. Intervention of glutathione in pre-mutagenic catechol-mediated DNA damage in the presence of copper(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Hepel, Maria; Stobiecka, Magdalena; Peachey, Janet; Miller, Jeremiah

    2012-07-01

    The catechol-mediated DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II) ions involves oxidation of guanine to 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and DNA strand scission. It proceeds through the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The mutagenicity of 8-oxoG lesions is due to its miscoding propensity reflected in GC→TA transversion taking place during the DNA repair process. To gain new insights into the nature of catechol-mediated DNA damage and its prevention, we have investigated the changes in DNA melting characteristics and 8-oxoG formation as the indicators of DNA damage in a model calf-thymus DNA system. A novel fluorescence method for DNA melting temperature determination, based on DAPI fluorescent-probe staining, has been proposed. The DNA melting-onset temperature has been found to be more sensitive to DNA damage than the standard melting temperature due to the increased width of the melting transition observed in oxidatively damaged DNA. We have found that the efficiency of Fenton cascade in generating DNA-damaging ROS is higher for catechol than for GSH, two strong antioxidants, mainly due to the much longer distance between ROS-generating radical group in GS to nucleobases than that of semiquinone radical group to nucleobases (2.1nm vs. 0.27nm), making the ROS transport from GSH an order of magnitude less likely to damage DNA because of short lifetime of HO radicals. The antioxidant and DNA-protecting behaviors of GSH have been elucidated. We have found that the redox potential of GSH/GSSG couple is lower than that of catechol/semiquinone couple. Hence, GSH keeps catechol in the reduced state, thereby shutting down the initial step of the catechol-mediated Fenton cascade. The catechol-induced DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II) ions has also been confirmed in studies of ON-OFF hairpin-oligonucleotide beacons.

  8. Non Covalent Interactions and Internal Dynamics in Adducts of Freons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminati, Walther; Gou, Qian; Evangelisti, Luca; Feng, Gang; Spada, Lorenzo; Vallejo-López, Montserrat; Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio J.

    2014-06-01

    The complexation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) with atmospheric water and pollutants of the atmosphere affects their reactivity and it seems to accelerate, for example, the decomposition rate of freons in the atmosphere [1]. For this reason we characterized shapes, stabilities, nature of the non-covalent interactions, structures and internal dynamics of a number of complexes of CFCs with water and of their dimers or oligomers by rotational spectroscopy. It has been found that hydrogenated CFCs form adducts with other molecules through weak hydrogen bonds (WHBs). Their C-H groups can act as proton donors, enhanced by the electron withdrawing of the halogen atoms, interacting with the electron rich regions of the partner molecules [2]. Also in adducts or oligomers of hydrogenated CFCs the monomer units are held together by nets of WHBs [3]. When CFCs are perhalogenated, the positive electrostatic region ("σ-hole") can interact electrostatically with negative sites of another, or of the same molecular entity, giving rise, according to IUPAC, to the so called halogen bond (HaB). However, it has been observed that when the perhalogenated CFCs has a Π electron system, a lone pair•••Π interaction (Bürgi-Dunitz) is favoured [4]. We describe here the HaBs that CF4 and CF3Cl form with a variety of partner molecules such as water, ammonia, dimethyl ether, etc. Important spectroscopic features outline strong dynamics effects taking place in this kind of complex. References [1] V. Vaida, H. G. Kjaergaard, K. J. Feierabend, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 22 (2003) 203. [2] See, for example: W. Caminati, S. Melandri, A. Maris, P. Ottaviani, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 45 (2006) 2438. [3] G. Feng, L. Evangelisti, I. Cacelli, L. Carbonaro, G. Prampolini, W. Caminati, Chem. Commun. 50 (2014) 171. [4] Q. Gou, G. Feng, L. Evangelisti, W. Caminati, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52 (2013) 52 11888.

  9. Formation of monofunctional cisplatin-DNA adducts in carbonate buffer.

    PubMed

    Binter, Alexandra; Goodisman, Jerry; Dabrowiak, James C

    2006-07-01

    Carbonate in its various forms is an important component in blood and the cytosol. Since, under conditions that simulate therapy, carbonate reacts with cisplatin to form carbonato complexes, one of which is taken up and/or modified by the cell [C.R. Centerwall, J. Goodisman, D.J. Kerwood, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 127 (2005) 12768-12769], cisplatin-carbonato complexes may be important in the mechanism of action of cisplatin. In this report we study the binding of cisplatin to pBR322 DNA in two different buffers, using gel electrophoresis. In 23.8mM HEPES, N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid, 5mM NaCl, pH 7.4 buffer, cisplatin produces aquated species, which react with DNA to unwind supercoiled Form I DNA, increasing its mobility, and reducing the binding of ethidium to DNA. This behavior is consistent with the formation of the well-known intrastrand crosslink on DNA. In 23.8mM carbonate buffer, 5mM NaCl, pH 7.4, cisplatin forms carbonato species that produce DNA-adducts which do not significantly change supercoiling but enhance binding of ethidium to DNA. This behavior is consistent with the formation of a monofunctional cisplatin adduct on DNA. These results show that aquated cisplatin and carbonato complexes of cisplatin produce different types of lesions on DNA and they underscore the importance of carrying out binding studies with cisplatin and DNA using conditions that approximate those found in the cell.

  10. Novel Promising Estrogenic Receptor Modulators: Cytotoxic and Estrogenic Activity of Benzanilides and Dithiobenzanilides.

    PubMed

    Kucinska, Malgorzata; Giron, Maria-Dolores; Piotrowska, Hanna; Lisiak, Natalia; Granig, Walter H; Lopez-Jaramillo, Francisco-Javier; Salto, Rafael; Murias, Marek; Erker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of 27 benzanilides and dithiobenzanilides built on a stilbene scaffold and possessing various functional groups in aromatic rings previously described for their spasmolytic properties was assayed on three human cancer cell lines (A549 -lung adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 estrogen dependent breast adenocarcinoma and MDA-MB-231 estrogen independent breast adenocarcinoma) and 2 non-tumorigenic cell lines (CCD39Lu-lung fibroblasts, MCF-12A - breast epithelial). Three compounds (6, 15 and 18) showed selective antiproliferative activity against estrogen dependent MCF-7 cancer cells and their estrogenic activity was further confirmed in MCF-7 transfected with an estrogen receptor reporter plasmid and in HEK239 cells over-expressing the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Compound 18 is especially interesting as a potential candidate for therapy since it is highly toxic and selective towards estrogen dependent MCF7 cell lines (IC50 = 5.07 μM versus more than 100 μM for MDA-MB-231) and almost innocuous for normal breast cells (IC50 = 91.46 μM for MCF-12A). Docking studies have shown that compound 18 interacts with the receptor in the same cavity as estradiol although the extra aromatic ring is involved in additional binding interactions with residue W383. The role of W383 and the extended binding mode were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis.

  11. Novel Promising Estrogenic Receptor Modulators: Cytotoxic and Estrogenic Activity of Benzanilides and Dithiobenzanilides

    PubMed Central

    Kucinska, Malgorzata; Giron, Maria-Dolores; Piotrowska, Hanna; Lisiak, Natalia; Granig, Walter H.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Francisco-Javier; Salto, Rafael; Murias, Marek; Erker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of 27 benzanilides and dithiobenzanilides built on a stilbene scaffold and possessing various functional groups in aromatic rings previously described for their spasmolytic properties was assayed on three human cancer cell lines (A549 –lung adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 estrogen dependent breast adenocarcinoma and MDA-MB-231 estrogen independent breast adenocarcinoma) and 2 non-tumorigenic cell lines (CCD39Lu–lung fibroblasts, MCF-12A - breast epithelial). Three compounds (6, 15 and 18) showed selective antiproliferative activity against estrogen dependent MCF-7 cancer cells and their estrogenic activity was further confirmed in MCF-7 transfected with an estrogen receptor reporter plasmid and in HEK239 cells over-expressing the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Compound 18 is especially interesting as a potential candidate for therapy since it is highly toxic and selective towards estrogen dependent MCF7 cell lines (IC50 = 5.07 μM versus more than 100 μM for MDA-MB-231) and almost innocuous for normal breast cells (IC50 = 91.46 μM for MCF-12A). Docking studies have shown that compound 18 interacts with the receptor in the same cavity as estradiol although the extra aromatic ring is involved in additional binding interactions with residue W383. The role of W383 and the extended binding mode were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:26730945

  12. Functional associations between two estrogen receptors, environmental estrogens, and sexual disruption in the roach (Rutilus rutilus).

    PubMed

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Lange, Anke; Urushitani, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Rie; Paull, Gregory C; Cahill, Laura L; Jobling, Susan; Tyler, Charles R; Iguchi, Taisen

    2007-05-01

    Wild male roach (Rutilus rutilus) living in U.K. rivers contaminated with estrogenic effluents from wastewater treatment works show feminized responses and have a reduced reproductive capability, but the chemical causation of sexual disruption in the roach has not been established. Feminized responses were induced in male roach exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of the pharmaceutical estrogen 17alpha-ethinylestradiol, EE2 (up to 4 ng/ L), during early life (from fertilization to 84 days posthatch, dph), and these effects were signaled by altered patterns of expression of two cloned roach estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes, ERalpha. and ERbeta, in the brain and gonad/ liver. Transactivation assays were developed for both roach ER subtypes and the estrogenic potencies of steroidal estrogens differed markedly at the different ER subtypes. EE2 was by far the most potent chemical, and estrone (E1, the most prevalent environmental steroid in wastewater discharges) was equipotent with estradiol (E2) in activating the ERs. Comparison of the EC50 values for the compounds tested showed that ERbeta was 3-21-fold more sensitive to natural steroidal estrogens and 54-fold more sensitive to EE2 as compared to ERalpha. These findings add substantial support to the hypothesis that steroidal estrogens play a significant role in the induction of intersex in roach populations in U.K. rivers and that the molecular approach described could be usefully applied to understand interspecies sensitivity to xenoestrogens.

  13. Survey of estrogenic activity in fish feed by yeast estrogen-screen assay.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takeru; Kobayashi, Makito; Moriwaki, Toshihisa; Kawai, Shin'ichiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2004-10-01

    Fishes have been used as laboratory animal for research of estrogenic endocrine disrupters by many researchers. However, much less attention was paid to the possibility that compounds with estrogenic activity are present in fish diets. In order to examine this possibility, we measured the estrogenic activity in commercial fish feed by in vitro yeast estrogen-screen (YES) assay based on the binding ability of tested compounds to estrogen receptors. Estrogenic activity was detected in all the commercial fish feed examined (0.2-6.2 ng estradiol equivalent/g fish feed), some phytoestrogens (genistein, formononetin, equol and coumestrol; relative activity to estradiol, 8.6 x 10(-6)-1.1 x 10(-4) by giving a value of 1.0 to estradiol) and some androgens (testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone; relative activity to estradiol, 3.0 x 10(-6)-1.2 x 10(-4)). Therefore, it is possible that these compounds could affect the results of in vivo estrogen assay, such as vitellogenin production in male fish, especially when fish are fed commercial feed.

  14. Effect of Estrogen on Mutagenesis in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    estrogen signaling through the estrogen receptor alpha (ERa) may induce a mutator phenotype by suppressing DNA repair activity in ERa positive mammary...measure DNA MMR activity in live cells. We have also developed a method to measure mutation rate as a function of estrogen/ER signaling . Our goals were to...whether 1713-estradiol signaling through ER inhibits DNA MMR activity, we developed a method that can quantitatively assess MMR efficiency in live

  15. A mathematical model for intracellular effects of toxins on DNA adduction and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Gaver, D.P.; Jacobs, P.A.; Carpenter, R.L.; Burkhart, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    The processes by which certain classes of toxic compounds or their metabolites may react with DNA to alter the genetic information contained in subsequent generations of cells or organisms are a major component of hazard associated with exposure to chemicals in the environment. Many classes of chemicals may form DNA adducts and there may or may not be a defined mechanism to remove a particular adduct from DNA independent of replication. Many compounds and metabolites that bind DNA also readily bind existing proteins; some classes of toxins and DNA adducts have the capacity to inactive a repair enzyme and divert the repair process competitively. This paper formulates an intracellular dynamic model for one aspect of the action of toxins that form DNA adducts, recognizing a capacity for removal of those adducts by a repair enzyme combined with reaction of the toxin and/or the DNA adduct to inactive the repair enzyme. This particular model illustrates the possible saturation of repair enzyme capacity by the toxin dosage and shows that bistable behavior can occur, with the potential to induce abrupt shifts away from steady-state equilibria. The model suggests that bistable behavior, dose and variation between individuals or tissues may combine under certain conditions to amplify the biological effect of dose observed as DNA adduction and its consequences as mutation. A model recognizing stochastic phenomena also indicates that variation in within-cell toxin concentration may promote jumps between stable equilibria.

  16. Effect of exercise and gait retraining on knee adduction moment in people with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Khalaj, Nafiseh; Abu Osman, Noor A; Mokhtar, Abdul H; Mehdikhani, Mahboobeh; Wan Abas, Wan A B

    2014-02-01

    The knee adduction moment represents the medial knee joint load, and greater value is associated with higher load. In people with knee osteoarthritis, it is important to apply proper treatment with the least side effects to reduce knee adduction moment and, consequently, reduce medial knee joint load. This reduction may slow the progression of knee osteoarthritis. The research team performed a literature search of electronic databases. The search keywords were as follows: knee osteoarthritis, knee adduction moment, exercise program, exercise therapy, gait retraining, gait modification and knee joint loading. In total, 12 studies were selected, according to the selection criteria. Findings from previous studies illustrated that exercise and gait retraining programs could alter knee adduction moment in people with knee osteoarthritis. These treatments are noninvasive and nonpharmacological which so far have no or few side effects, as well as being low cost. The results of this review revealed that gait retraining programs were helpful in reducing the knee adduction moment. In contrast, not all the exercise programs were beneficial in reducing knee adduction moment. Future studies are needed to indicate best clinical exercise and gait retraining programs, which are most effective in reducing knee adduction moment in people with knee osteoarthritis.

  17. DNA adducts in carp exposed to artificial diesel-2 oil slicks.

    PubMed

    Kurelec, B; Garg, A; Krca, S; Britvić, S; Lucić, D; Gupta, R C

    1992-05-01

    In attempts to mimic field exposure, oil slicks prepared from diesel-2 oil/water emulsions were poured onto the surface of water in tanks prepared fresh every day and liver DNA adducts were analyzed by 32P-postlabeling in carp free-swimming in these tanks. 'Clusters' of lipophilic DNA adducts were detected, with five major and numerous minor adducts. Essentially a similar adduct pattern was found in the liver DNA of carp exposed to crude oil-polluted water. Diesel-2 adduct induction was observed slowly with a steady increase to greater than 3000 amol/microgram DNA at day 12. After this time fish were transferred to clean water. Adduct levels continued to increase through day 17 (approximately 10,000 amol/microgram DNA) despite the cessation of exposure, but a 30% and 80% decline was evident at day 22 and day 27, respectively. All major adducts were distinct from the known benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide-dG. These results indicate that diesel-2 oil can cause extensive DNA damage in carp in vivo and the damage accumulates proportionately with time of exposure.

  18. Detection and characterization of human serum antibodies to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon diol-epoxide DNA adducts.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, M J; Light, B A; Weston, A; Tollurud, D; Clark, J L; Mann, D L; Blackmon, J P; Harris, C C

    1988-01-01

    The presence of serum antibodies to the diol-epoxide DNA adducts of representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chrysene, benz[a]anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene, was determined by ELISA using serum samples obtained from normal healthy individuals. Antibodies that reacted against PAH adducted-DNA, but not against PAH-adducted protein, were found in the serum of approximately 40% of the test individuals. Specificity analysis of the antibodies demonstrated that serological cross-reactions between the benzo[a]pyrene and the chrysene diol-epoxide adducts were present. Similar cross-reactivity between the benz[a]anthracene and the chrysene adducts was observed. Sera containing antibodies that were apparently specific for each of the three PAH-DNA adducts were also identified. The presence of antibodies to PAH-DNA adducts indicates both past exposure to these carcinogenic PAH and their metabolic activation to the DNA damaging metabolites. These antibodies may prove to be useful in both retrospective and prospective epidemiological studies of various diseases associated with PAH exposure. PMID:3392204

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts and the CYP1A1 restriction fragment length polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, P.G.; Bowman, E.D.; Weston, A.; Harris, C.C.; Sugimura, H.; Caporaso, N.E.; Petruzzelli, S.F. ); Trump, B.F. )

    1992-11-01

    Human cancer risk assessment at a genetic level involves the investigation of carcinogen metabolism and DNA adduct formation. Wide interindividual differences in metabolism result in different DNA adduct levels. For this and other reasons, many laboratories have considered DNA adducts to be a measure of the biologically effective dose of a carcinogen. Techniques for studying DNA adducts using chemically specific assays are becoming available. A modification of the [sup 32]P-postlabeling assay for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon DNA adducts described here provides potential improvements in quantification. DNA adducts, however, reflect only recent exposure to carcinogens; in contrast, genetic testing for metabolic capacity indicates the extent to which carcinogens can be activated and exert genotoxic effects. Such studies may reflect both separate and integrated risk factors together with DNA adduct levels. A recently described restriction fragment length polymorphism for the CYP1A1, which codes for the cytochrome P450 enzyme primarily responsible for the metabolic activation of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, has been found to be associated with lung cancer risk in a Japanese population. In a subset of individuals enrolled in a US lung cancer case-control study, no association with lung cancer was found. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  20. PROTEIN TARGETS OF ACRYLAMIDE ADDUCT FORMATION IN CULTURED RAT DOPAMINERGIC CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Feswick, April; Fang, Bin; Koomen, John M.; Barber, David S.; Gavin, Terrence; LoPachin, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) is an electrophilic unsaturated carbonyl derivative that produces neurotoxicity by forming irreversible Michael-type adducts with nucleophilic sulfhydryl thiolate groups on cysteine residues of neuronal proteins. Identifying specific proteins targeted by ACR can lead to a better mechanistic understanding of the corresponding neurotoxicity. Therefore, in the present study, the ACR-adducted proteome in exposed primary immortalized mesencephalic dopaminergic cells (N27) was determined using tandem mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap). N27 cells were characterized based on the presumed involvement of CNS dopaminergic damage in ACR neurotoxicity. Shotgun proteomics identified a total of 15,243 peptides in N27 cells of which 103 unique peptides exhibited ACR-adducted Cys groups. These peptides were derived from 100 individual proteins and therefore ~0.7% of the N27 cell proteome was adducted. Proteins that contained ACR adducts on multiple peptides included annexin A1 and pleckstrin homology domain-containing family M member 1. Sub-network enrichment analyses indicated that ACR-adducted proteins were involved in processes associated with neuron toxicity, diabetes, inflammation, nerve degeneration and atherosclerosis. These results provide detailed information regarding the ACR-adducted proteome in a dopaminergic cell line. The catalog of affected proteins indicates the molecular sites of ACR action and the respective roles of these proteins in cellular processes can offer insight into the corresponding neurotoxic mechanism. PMID:23566896

  1. MEMBRANE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR REGULATION OF HYPOTHALAMIC FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Micevych, Paul E.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the decades, our understanding of estrogen receptor (ER) function has evolved. Today we are confronted by at least two nuclear ERs: ERα and ERβ; and a number of putative membrane ERs, including ERα, ERβ, ER-X, GPR30 and Gq-mER. These receptors all bind estrogens or at least estrogenic compounds and activate intracellular signaling pathways. In some cases, a well-defined pharmacology, and physiology has been discovered. In other cases, the identity or the function remains to be elucidated. This mini-review attempts to synthesize our understanding of 17β-estradiol membrane signaling within hypothalamic circuits involved in homeostatic functions focusing on reproduction and energy balance. PMID:22538318

  2. Ultraviolet irradiation of monkey cells enhances the repair of DNA adducts in alpha DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Leadon, S.A.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1984-11-01

    Excision repair of bulky adducts in alpha DNA of African green monkey cells has previously been shown to be deficient relative to that in the overall genome. We have found that u.v. irradiation of these cells results in the enhanced removal of both aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and acetylaminofluorene (AAF) adducts from the alpha DNA sequences without affecting repair in the bulk of the DNA. The degree of enhanced removal of AFB1 is dependent upon the u.v. dose and the time interval between irradiation and AFB1 treatment. The u.v. enhancement is not inhibited by cycloheximide. Exposure of the cells to dimethylsulfate or gamma-rays does not affect AFB1 adduct repair. The formation and removal of N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene (NA-AAF) adducts from alpha and bulk DNA was studied in detail. A higher initial level of the acetylated C8 adduct of guanine was found in alpha DNA than in bulk DNA. Although both the acetylated and deacetylated C8 adducts were removed from the two DNA species, the level of repair was significantly greater in the bulk DNA. Irradiation of cells with u.v. prior to treatment with NA-AAF enhanced the removal of both adducts from alpha DNA with little or no effect on repair in bulk DNA. We conclude that the presence of u.v. photoproducts or some intermediate in their processing alters the chromatin structure of alpha DNA thereby rendering bulky adducts accessible to repair enzymes. In addition, the differential formation and repair of AAF adducts in alpha DNA compared with that in the bulk of the genome supports the hypothesis of an altered chromatin structure for alpha domains.

  3. Knee adduction moment and medial contact force--facts about their correlation during gait.

    PubMed

    Kutzner, Ines; Trepczynski, Adam; Heller, Markus O; Bergmann, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The external knee adduction moment is considered a surrogate measure for the medial tibiofemoral contact force and is commonly used to quantify the load reducing effect of orthopedic interventions. However, only limited and controversial data exist about the correlation between adduction moment and medial force. The objective of this study was to examine whether the adduction moment is indeed a strong predictor for the medial force by determining their correlation during gait. Instrumented knee implants with telemetric data transmission were used to measure tibiofemoral contact forces in nine subjects. Gait analyses were performed simultaneously to the joint load measurements. Skeletal kinematics, as well as the ground reaction forces and inertial parameters, were used as inputs in an inverse dynamics approach to calculate the external knee adduction moment. Linear regression analysis was used to analyze the correlation between adduction moment and medial force for the whole stance phase and separately for the early and late stance phase. Whereas only moderate correlations between adduction moment and medial force were observed throughout the whole stance phase (R(2) = 0.56) and during the late stance phase (R(2) = 0.51), a high correlation was observed at the early stance phase (R(2) = 0.76). Furthermore, the adduction moment was highly correlated to the medial force ratio throughout the whole stance phase (R(2) = 0.75). These results suggest that the adduction moment is a surrogate measure, well-suited to predicting the medial force ratio throughout the whole stance phase or medial force during the early stance phase. However, particularly during the late stance phase, moderate correlations and high inter-individual variations revealed that the predictive value of the adduction moment is limited. Further analyses are necessary to examine whether a combination of other kinematic, kinetic or neuromuscular factors may lead to a more reliable

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts and survival among women with breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sagiv, Sharon K. Gaudet, Mia M.; Eng, Sybil M.; Abrahamson, Page E.; Shantakumar, Sumitra; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Bell, Paula; Thomas, Joyce A.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Santella, Regina M.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2009-04-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are mammary carcinogens in animal studies, and a few epidemiologic studies have suggested a link between elevated levels of PAH-DNA adducts and breast cancer incidence. An association between PAH-DNA adducts and survival among breast cancer cases has not been previously reported. We conducted a survival analysis among women with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer between 1996 and 1997, enrolled in the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. DNA was isolated from blood samples that were obtained from cases shortly after diagnosis and assayed for PAH-DNA adducts using ELISA. Among the 722 cases with PAH-DNA adduct measurements, 97 deaths (13.4%) from all causes and 54 deaths (7.5%) due to breast cancer were reported to Natio