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Sample records for catharanthus roseus mesophyll

  1. Patterns of indole alkaloids synthesis in response to heat shock, 5-azacytidine and Na-butyrate treatment of cultured catharanthus roseus mesophyll protoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Saleem, M.; Cutler, A.J.

    1986-04-01

    Alkaloids of C. roseus are in high demand for therapeutic and other reasons. Cultured Catharanthus cells can produce limited quantities of these alkaloids. The authors have found that cultured mesophyll protoplasts in the presence of /sup 14/C-Tryptamine are capable of synthesizing alkaloids. The pattern of alkaloids synthesis changes when protoplasts are subjected to a heat shock at 37/sup 0/C. The heat shocked protoplasts incorporated 33% more /sup 14/C-Tryptamine and produced 3 new types of alkaloids. Treatment of protoplasts with 5-azacytidine, a DNA hypomethylating agent and Na-butyrate which induces hyperacetylation of histones produced qualitative and quantitative changes in the alkaloid pattern. Four new alkaloids following the above treatments were detected by TLC and HPLC of the extracts. It is suggested that the alkaloid pattern of the cultured protoplasts can be altered by treatment with compounds known as regulators of gene expression. Work is in progress to isolate and identify these new alkaloids.

  2. Biosynthesis and regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianhua; Wang, Mingxuan; Wen, Wei; Yu, Rongmin

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces a wide range of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIA). Many of them, such as vinblastine and vincristine, have significant bioactivity. They are valuable chemotherapy drugs used in combination with other drugs to treat lymphoma and leukemia. The TIA biosynthetic pathway has been investigated for many years, for scientific interest and for their potential in manufacturing applications, to fulfill the market demand. In this review, the progress and perspective of C. roseus TIA biosynthesis and its regulating enzymes are described. In addition, the culture condition, hormones, signaling molecules, precursor feeding on the accumulation of TIA, and gene expression are also evaluated and discussed. PMID:26009689

  3. 7-O-Methylated anthocyanidin glycosides from Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Toki, Kenjiro; Saito, Norio; Irie, Yuki; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Shigihara, Atsushi; Honda, Toshio

    2008-03-01

    Anthocyanins were isolated from orange-red flowers of Catharanthus roseus cv 'Equator Deep Apricot', and identified as rosinidin 3-O-[6-O-(alpha-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-galactopyranoside] (1), and also 7-O-methylcyanidin 3-O-[6-O-(alpha-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-galactopyranoside] (2) by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Pigment 1 was found to be a major anthocyanin in the flowers of this cultivar. By contrast, the distribution of rosinidin glycosides is very limited in plants, and reported only in the flowers of Primula. Pigment 2 was found in smaller concentrations, but its aglycone, 7-O-methylcyanidin, has been reported only once before, from the fruit of mango.

  4. Effect of thermal power plant emissions on Catharanthus roseus L

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.M.; Pandey, V.; Shukla, J.; Singh, N.; Yunus, M.; Singh, S.N.; Ahmad, K.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Most of the industrialized nations depend largely on the combustion of fossil fuels for their energy requirements. During the past few years in India quite a few thermal power plants have been commissioned to cater to the increasing energy requirements. As most of the power plants are coal-fired, a complex mixture of several pollutants is released in the atmosphere on the combustion of coal. Leaves by virtue of their unique position on plants and their functions, experience the maximum brunt of exposure and undergo certain changes in form, structure and function with the changes in surrounding environs, and such modifications are likely to serve as markers of environmental pollution. The present paper deals with the long term exposure effects of thermal power plant emissions on Catharanthus roseus L. - a common perennial shrub, with glossy leaves and white, mauve or pink colored flowers and of great medicinal value is grown as an ornamental plant all over the country.

  5. Hypoglycemic Activity of Aqueous Extracts from Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Ávila, Elisa; Cano-Velasco, José Luis; Alarcón-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Fajardo Ortíz, María del Carmen; Almanza-Pérez, Julio César; Román-Ramos, Rubén

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Catharanthus roseus (L.) is used in some countries to treat diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hypoglycemic activity of extracts from the flower, leaf, stem, and root in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Methods. Roots, leaves, flowers, and stems were separated to obtain organic and aqueous extracts. The blood glucose lowering activity of these extracts was determinate in healthy and alloxan-induced (75 mg/Kg) diabetic mice, after intraperitoneal administration (250 mg/Kg body weight). Blood samples were obtained and blood glucose levels were analyzed employing a glucometer. The data were statistically compared by ANOVA. The most active extract was fractioned. Phytochemical screen and chromatographic studies were also done. Results. The aqueous extracts from C. roseus reduced the blood glucose of both healthy and diabetic mice. The aqueous stem extract (250 mg/Kg) and its alkaloid-free fraction (300 mg/Kg) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced blood glucose in diabetic mice by 52.90 and 51.21%. Their hypoglycemic activity was comparable to tolbutamide (58.1%, P < 0.05). Conclusions. The best hypoglycemic activity was presented for the aqueous extracts and by alkaloid-free stem aqueous fraction. This fraction is formed by three polyphenols compounds. PMID:23056144

  6. First report of Tomato chlorotic spot virus on Annual Vinca (Catharanthus roseus) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato chlorotic spot virus was identified in the ornamental crop Catharanthus roseus (commonly known as vinca) in south Florida, the first report of this virus naturally infecting this species. Genetic diversity of the virus was characterized. This report provides an overview of this emerging vir...

  7. Peroxidase from Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don and the biosynthesis of alpha-3',4'-anhydrovinblastine: a specific role for a multifunctional enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sottomayor, M; Ros Barceló, A

    2003-09-01

    We have characterized a basic peroxidase with alpha-3',4'-anhydrovinblastine (AVLB) synthase activity, which was purified from Catharanthus roseus leaves. This enzyme was the single peroxidase isoenzyme detected in C. roseus leaves, and the single AVLB synthase activity detected in C. roseus extracts. It was observed that the monomeric substrates of AVLB, vindoline and catharanthine, are both suitable electron donors for the oxidizing intermediates of the basic peroxidase, compounds I and II. Results also showed that the reaction proceeds by a radical-propagated mechanism. Substrate specificity studies of the enzyme revealed that it was also able to oxidize several common peroxidase substrates, indicating a broad range of substrate specificity that is characteristic of class III plant peroxidases. Cytochemical studies showed that the enzyme is localized in C. roseus mesophyll vacuoles, in individual spots at the inner surface of the tonoplast. This particular location suggests a meaningful spatial organization that led to the proposal of a metabolic channeling model for the peroxidase-mediated synthesis of AVLB. The importance of this type of mechanism in the regulation of peroxidase isoenzyme functions in vivo is discussed. In view of the results obtained it is concluded that the basic peroxidase present in C. roseus leaves fulfills all the requirements to be considered as an AVLB synthase, and it is proposed that this specific function of this multifunctional enzyme is determined by metabolic channeling resulting from specific protein-protein interactions.

  8. Cytogenetic characterization and genome size of the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Guilherme; Cardoso, Luísa; Oliveira, Helena; Santos, Conceição; Duarte, Patrícia; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Catharanthus roseus is a highly valuable medicinal plant producing several terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) with pharmaceutical applications, including the anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine. Due to the interest in its TIAs, C. roseus is one of the most extensively studied medicinal plants and has become a model species for the study of plant secondary metabolism. However, very little is known about the cytogenetics and genome size of this species, in spite of their importance for breeding programmes, TIA genetics and emerging genomic research. Therefore, the present paper provides a karyotype description and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) data for C. roseus, as well as a rigorous characterization of its genome size. Methodology The organization of C. roseus chromosomes was characterized using several DNA/chromatin staining techniques and FISH of rDNA. Genome size was investigated by flow cytometry using an optimized methodology. Principal results The C. roseus full chromosome complement of 2n = 16 includes two metacentric, four subtelocentric and two telocentric chromosome pairs, with the presence of a single nucleolus organizer region in chromosome 6. An easy and reliable flow cytometry protocol for nuclear genome analysis of C. roseus was optimized, and the C-value of this species was estimated to be 1C = 0.76 pg, corresponding to 738 Mbp. Conclusions The organization and size of the C. roseus genome were characterized, providing an important basis for future studies of this important medicinal species, including further cytogenetic mapping, genomics, TIA genetics and breeding programmes. PMID:22479673

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of Catharanthus roseus for Gene Discovery and Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Raghvendra; Sinha, Alok K.; Jain, Mukesh

    2014-01-01

    The medicinal plant, Catharanthus roseus, accumulates wide range of terpenoid indole alkaloids, which are well documented therapeutic agents. In this study, deep transcriptome sequencing of C. roseus was carried out to identify the pathways and enzymes (genes) involved in biosynthesis of these compounds. About 343 million reads were generated from different tissues (leaf, flower and root) of C. roseus using Illumina platform. Optimization of de novo assembly involving a two-step process resulted in a total of 59,220 unique transcripts with an average length of 1284 bp. Comprehensive functional annotation and gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed the representation of many genes involved in different biological processes and molecular functions. In total, 65% of C. roseus transcripts showed homology with sequences available in various public repositories, while remaining 35% unigenes may be considered as C. roseus specific. In silico analysis revealed presence of 11,620 genic simple sequence repeats (excluding mono-nucleotide repeats) and 1820 transcription factor encoding genes in C. roseus transcriptome. Expression analysis showed roots and leaves to be actively participating in bisindole alkaloid production with clear indication that enzymes involved in pathway of vindoline and vinblastine biosynthesis are restricted to aerial tissues. Such large-scale transcriptome study provides a rich source for understanding plant-specialized metabolism, and is expected to promote research towards production of plant-derived pharmaceuticals. PMID:25072156

  10. Binary stress induces an increase in indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Yang, Bingxian; Komatsu, Setsuko; Lu, Xiaoping; Li, Ximin; Tian, Jingkui

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus is an important medicinal plant, which produces a variety of indole alkaloids of significant pharmaceutical relevance. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the potential stress-induced increase of indole alkaloid biosynthesis in C. roseus using proteomic technique. The contents of the detectable alkaloids ajmalicine, vindoline, catharanthine, and strictosidine in C. roseus were significantly increased under binary stress. Proteomic analysis revealed that the abundance of proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle and cell wall was largely increased; while, that of proteins related to tetrapyrrole synthesis and photosynthesis was decreased. Of note, 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of indole alkaloid was two-fold more abundant in treated group compared to the control. In addition, mRNA expression levels of genes involved in the indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway indicated an up-regulation in their transcription in C. roseus under UV-B irradiation. These results suggest that binary stress might negatively affect the process of photosynthesis in C. roseus. In addition, the induction of alkaloid biosynthesis appears to be responsive to binary stress. PMID:26284098

  11. Selection and validation of reference genes for transcript normalization in gene expression studies in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Rischer, Heiko; Goossens, Alain

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative Real-Time PCR (qPCR), a sensitive and commonly used technique for gene expression analysis, requires stably expressed reference genes for normalization of gene expression. Up to now, only one reference gene for qPCR analysis, corresponding to 40S Ribosomal protein S9 (RPS9), was available for the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus, the only source of the commercial anticancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. Here, we screened for additional reference genes for this plant species by mining C. roseus RNA-Seq data for orthologs of 22 genes known to be stably expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana and qualified as superior reference genes for this model plant species. Based on this, eight candidate C. roseus reference genes were identified and, together with RPS9, evaluated by performing qPCR on a series of different C. roseus explants and tissue cultures. NormFinder, geNorm and BestKeeper analyses of the resulting qPCR data revealed that the orthologs of At2g28390 (SAND family protein, SAND), At2g32170 (N2227-like family protein, N2227) and At4g26410 (Expressed protein, EXP) had the highest expression stability across the different C. roseus samples and are superior as reference genes as compared to the traditionally used RPS9. Analysis of publicly available C. roseus RNA-Seq data confirmed the expression stability of SAND and N2227, underscoring their value as reference genes for C. roseus qPCR analysis.

  12. [Microbiological analysis of vindolinina (an alkaloid isolated from Catharanthus roseus) and some of its structural changes].

    PubMed

    Rojas Hernández, N M; Cuellar Cuellar, A

    1976-01-01

    Bacteriostatic properties of vindolinina (an alkaloid isolated from Catharanthus roseus that has an ester group within its molecule) as well as of its alkaline-hydrolysis product (vindolininic acid) crystallized as chlorhydrate, and of the product of its reduction with lithium and aluminum hydrides (vindolininol) are compared. Several strains of bacteria pathogenic to man (Proteus, Escherichia, Shigella, Staphylococcus, and Pseudomonas) cultured in nutritive-agar dishes containing disks and incubated at 37 degrees C were used and results were assessed 24 hours later. Data obtained show that bacterial growth inhibition is closely related to the structure of the compound as well as to its type of grouping.

  13. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using leaves of Catharanthus roseus Linn. G. Don and their antiplasmodial activities

    PubMed Central

    Ponarulselvam, S; Panneerselvam, C; Murugan, K; Aarthi, N; Kalimuthu, K; Thangamani, S

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop a novel approach for the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using aqueous leaves extracts of Catharanthus roseus (C. roseus) Linn. G. Don which has been proven active against malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum). Methods Characterizations were determined by using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction. Results SEM showed the formation of silver nanoparticles with an average size of 35–55 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the particles were crystalline in nature with face centred cubic structure of the bulk silver with the broad peaks at 32.4, 46.4 and 28.0. Conclusions It can be concluded that the leaves of C. roseus can be good source for synthesis of silver nanoparticle which shows antiplasmodial activity against P. falciparum. The important outcome of the study will be the development of value added products from medicinal plants C. roseus for biomedical and nanotechnology based industries. PMID:23569974

  14. ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma hispanicum’, a novel taxon associated with Mexican periwinkle virescence disease of Catharanthus roseus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mexican periwinkle virescence (MPV) phytoplasma was originally discovered in diseased plants of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) in Yucatán, Mexico. On the basis of results from RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain MPV was previously classified as the first know...

  15. Complete nucleotide sequences of two begomoviruses infecting Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Muhammad; Nawaz, Kiran; Shafiq, Muhammad; Haider, Muhammad Saleem; Shahid, Ahmad Ali

    2013-02-01

    Though Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle) is an ornamental plant, it is famous for its medicinal value. Its alkaloids are known for anti-cancerous properties, and this plant is studied mainly for its alkaloids. Here, this plant has been studied for its viral diseases. Complete DNA sequences of two begomoviruses infecting C. roseus originating from Pakistan were determined. The sequence of one begomovirus (clone KN4) shows the highest level of nucleotide sequence identity (86.5 %) to an unpublished virus, chili leaf curl India virus (ChiLCIV), and then (84.4 % identity) to papaya leaf curl virus (PaLCV), and thus represents a new species, for which the name "Catharanthus yellow mosaic virus" (CYMV) is proposed. The sequence of another begomovirus (clone KN6) shows the highest level of sequence identity (95.9 % to 99 %) to a newly reported virus from India, papaya leaf crumple virus (PaLCrV). Sequence analysis shows that KN4 and KN6 are recombinants of Pedilanthus leaf curl virus (PedLCV) and croton yellow vein mosaic virus (CrYVMV).

  16. Potent Antioxidant Properties of rolB-transformed Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don

    PubMed Central

    Mardani-Nejad, Shahin; Khavari-Nejad, Ramazan Ali; Saadatmand, Sara; Najafi, Farzaneh; Aberoomand Azar, Parviz

    2016-01-01

    Free radicals play an important role in pathological processes such as aging and developing cancer; hence, natural products inhibit free radical production, and can play an important role in preventing diseases. We aimed to evaluate the scavenging activity of free radicals, reducing power, inhibition of lipid peroxidation and malondialdehyde (MDA) formation, and the antioxidant composition of rolB-transformed hairy roots and leaf callus of Catharanthus roseus. Hairy roots of the Catharanthus roseus were induced using Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain ATCC 15834 to transfer the rolB gene. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to identify the presence of the gene in the transformed hairy roots. Folin-Ciocalteu reagent, aluminum chloride calorimetry and high performance liquid chromatography were used to determine the content of total phenolic, flavonoid and gallic acid, respectively. To this end, we assayed the free radicals scavenging activity by 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), reducing power, inhibition of lipid peroxidation and inhibition of malondialdehyde production. The results showed that phenolic, flavonoid, and gallic acid contents in the ethanol extract of the hairy roots were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.01) than those naturally found in the extracts of root, leaf, and leaf callus of C. roseus. The hairy roots extract showed the lowest IC50 for the inhibition of DPPH•. Furthermore, the ethanol extract showed the best reducing power and had the highest potential to inhibit lipid peroxidation and to form the MDA. The transformed hairy roots can be considered a rich natural source of antioxidants. PMID:27642325

  17. Alterations in osmoregulation, antioxidant enzymes and indole alkaloid levels in Catharanthus roseus exposed to water deficit.

    PubMed

    Jaleel, C Abdul; Manivannan, P; Kishorekumar, A; Sankar, B; Gopi, R; Somasundaram, R; Panneerselvam, R

    2007-10-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don plants were grown in different water regimes in order to study the drought induced osmotic stress and proline (PRO) metabolism, antioxidative enzyme activities and indole alkaloid accumulation. The plants under pot culture were subjected to 10, 15 and 20 days interval drought (DID) stress from 30 days after sowing (DAS) and regular irrigation was kept as control. The plants were uprooted on 41DAS (10DID), 46DAS (15DID) and 51DAS (20DID). The drought stressed plants showed increased aminoacid (AA), glycine betaine (GB) and PRO contents and decreased proline oxidase (PROX) and increased gamma-glutamyl kinase (gamma-GK) activities when compared to control. The antioxidative enzymes like peroxidase (POX) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) increased to a significant level in drought stressed plants when compared to control. The drought stressed C. roseus plants showed an increase in total indole alkaloid content in shoots and roots when compared to well-watered control plants. Our results suggest that the cultivation of medicinal plants like C. roseus in water deficit areas would increase its PRO metabolism, osmoregulation, defense system and the level of active principles.

  18. Effects of mercury (II) species on cell suspension cultures of catharanthus roseus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L. ); Cullen, W.R. )

    1994-11-01

    Mercury has received considerable attention because of its high toxicity. Widespread contamination with mercury poses severe environmental problems despite our extensive knowledge of its toxicity in living systems. It is generally accepted that the toxicity of mercury is related to its oxidation states and species, the organic forms being more toxic than the inorganic forms. In the aquatic environment, the toxicity of mercury depends on the aqueous speciation of the mercuric ion (Hg[sup 2+]). Because of the complex coordination chemistry of mercury in aqueous systems, the nature of the Hg[sup 2+] species present in aquatic environments is influenced greatly by water chemistry (e. g, pH, inorganic ion composition, and dissolved organics). Consequently, the influence of environmental factors on the aqueous speciation of mercury has been the focus of much attention. However, there is very little information available regarding the effects of the species and speciation on Hg (II) toxicity in plant-tissue cultures. Catharanthus roseus (C. roseus), commonly called the Madagascar Periwinkle, is a member of the alkaloid rich family Apocynaceae. The present investigation was concerned with the toxicity of mercury on the growth of C. roseus cell suspension cultures as influenced by mercury (II) species and speciation. The specific objectives of the study were to (a) study the effects of mercury species on the growth of C. roseus cultures from the point of view of environmental biology and toxicology; (b) evaluate the effects of selenate, selenite and selected ligands such as chloride, 1-cysteine in the media on the acute toxicity of mercuric oxide; (c) determine the impact of the initial pH of the culture media on the toxicities of mercuric compounds; (d) discuss the dependence of the toxicity on the chemical species and speciation of Hg (II). 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of palladium nanoparticles using Catharanthus roseus leaf extract and its application in the photo-catalytic degradation.

    PubMed

    Kalaiselvi, Aasaithambi; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana; Madhumitha, Gunabalan; Ramalingam, C; Elango, Ganesh

    2015-01-25

    The potential effect of Catharanthus roseus leaf extract for the formation of palladium nanoparticles and its application on dye degradation was discussed. The efficiency of C.roseus leaves are used as a bio-material for the first time as reducing agent. Synthesized palladium nanoparticles were supported by UV-vis spectrometry, XRD, FT-IR and TEM analysis. The secondary metabolites which are responsible for the formation of nanoparticles were identified by GC-MS. The results showed that effect of time was directly related to synthesized nanoparticles and functional groups has a critical role in reducing the metal ions and stabilizing the palladium nanoparticles in an eco-friendly process.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of palladium nanoparticles using Catharanthus roseus leaf extract and its application in the photo-catalytic degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaiselvi, Aasaithambi; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana; Madhumitha, Gunabalan; Ramalingam, C.; Elango, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    The potential effect of Catharanthus roseus leaf extract for the formation of palladium nanoparticles and its application on dye degradation was discussed. The efficiency of C.roseus leaves are used as a bio-material for the first time as reducing agent. Synthesized palladium nanoparticles were supported by UV-vis spectrometry, XRD, FT-IR and TEM analysis. The secondary metabolites which are responsible for the formation of nanoparticles were identified by GC-MS. The results showed that effect of time was directly related to synthesized nanoparticles and functional groups has a critical role in reducing the metal ions and stabilizing the palladium nanoparticles in an eco-friendly process.

  1. Uptake and metabolism of sugars by suspension-cultured catharanthus roseus cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Sagishima, Kyoko; Kubota, Kaoru )

    1989-04-01

    The Uptake and metabolism of sugars by suspension-cultured Catharanthus roseus cells were investigated. Substantially all the sucrose in the culture medium was hydrolyzed to glucose and fructose before being taken up by the cells. The activity of invertase bound to cell walls, determined in situ, was high at the early stage of culture. Glucose was more easily taken up by the cells than was fructose. Tracer experiments using (U-{sup 14}C)glucose and (U-{sup 14}C)fructose indicated that glucose is a better precursor for respiration than fructose, while fructose is preferentially utilized for the synthesis of sucrose, especially in the early phase of cell growth. These results suggest that fructose is utilized for the synthesis of sucrose via the reaction catalyzed by sucrose synthase, prior to the phosphorylation by hexokinase or fructokinase.

  2. 'Candidatus Phytoplasma hispanicum', a novel taxon associated with Mexican periwinkle virescence disease of Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert E; Harrison, Nigel A; Zhao, Yan; Wei, Wei; Dally, Ellen L

    2016-09-01

    Mexican periwinkle virescence (MPV) phytoplasma was originally discovered in diseased plants of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) in Yucatán, Mexico. On the basis of results from RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain MPV was previously classified as the first known member of phytoplasma group 16SrXIII, and a new subgroup (16SrXIII-A) was established to accommodate MPV phytoplasma. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain MPV represents a lineage distinct from previously described 'CandidatusPhytoplasma' species. Nucleotide sequence alignments revealed that strain MPV shared less than 97.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with all previously described 'Ca.Phytoplasma' species. Based on unique properties of the DNA, we propose recognition of Mexican periwinkle virescence phytoplasma strain MPV as representative of a novel taxon, 'CandidatusPhytoplasma hispanicum'.

  3. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Catharanthus roseus root extract and its larvicidal effects.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Thangavel; Jemimah, Irudayaraj Anto Amal; Ponmanickam, Ponnirul; Ayyanar, Muniappan

    2015-11-01

    Phytosynthesis of silver nanoparticles has attracted considerable attention due to their biocompatibility, low toxicity, cost-effectiveness and being a novel method has an eco-friendly approach. Biological activity of root extracts as well as synthesized silver nanoparticles of Catharanthus roseus were evaluated against larvae of Aedes aegyptiand Culex quinquefasciatus. The structure and proportion of the synthesized nanoparticles was defined by exploitation ultraviolet spectrophotometry, X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy methods. Reduction of silver ions occurred when silver nitrate solution was treated with aqueous root extract at 60°C. Synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were confirmed by analyzing the excitation of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using UV-vis spectrophotometer at 423 nm. FTIR showed aliphatic amines and alkanes corresponding peaks to be presence of responsible compounds to produced nanoparticles in the reaction mixture. Spherical shaped and crystalline nature of particles was recorded under XRD analysis. Presence of silver metal and 35-55nm sized particles were recorded using EDAX and SEM respectively. Larvicidal activitywas observed after24 hrs of exposure to root extracts and synthesized silver nanoparticles. The highest larval mortality was observed in synthesized silver nanopartiucles against Aedes aegypti (LC50= 2.01 ± 0.34; LC90= 5.29 ± 0.07 at 5.0 mg(-1) concentration) and Culex quinquefasciatus (LC50= 1.18 ± 0.15; LC90= 2.55 ± 0.76 at 3.5 to 5.0 mgl(-1) concentration) respectively. The present study provides evidence that synthesized silver nanoparticles of Catharanthus roseus offer potential source for larvicidal activity againstthe larvae of both dengue and filariasis vectors.

  4. Differential Network Analysis Reveals Evolutionary Complexity in Secondary Metabolism of Rauvolfia serpentina over Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Pathania, Shivalika; Bagler, Ganesh; Ahuja, Paramvir S.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative co-expression analysis of multiple species using high-throughput data is an integrative approach to determine the uniformity as well as diversification in biological processes. Rauvolfia serpentina and Catharanthus roseus, both members of Apocyanacae family, are reported to have remedial properties against multiple diseases. Despite of sharing upstream of terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway, there is significant diversity in tissue-specific synthesis and accumulation of specialized metabolites in these plants. This led us to implement comparative co-expression network analysis to investigate the modules and genes responsible for differential tissue-specific expression as well as species-specific synthesis of metabolites. Toward these goals differential network analysis was implemented to identify candidate genes responsible for diversification of metabolites profile. Three genes were identified with significant difference in connectivity leading to differential regulatory behavior between these plants. These genes may be responsible for diversification of secondary metabolism, and thereby for species-specific metabolite synthesis. The network robustness of R. serpentina, determined based on topological properties, was also complemented by comparison of gene-metabolite networks of both plants, and may have evolved to have complex metabolic mechanisms as compared to C. roseus under the influence of various stimuli. This study reveals evolution of complexity in secondary metabolism of R. serpentina, and key genes that contribute toward diversification of specific metabolites. PMID:27588023

  5. Salt-induced lipid changes in Catharanthus roseus cultured cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Elkahoui, Salem; Smaoui, Abderrazek; Zarrouk, Mokhtar; Ghrir, Rachid; Limam, Férid

    2004-07-01

    Salt treatment strongly affected cell growth by decreasing dry weight. Exposure of Catharanthus roseus cell suspensions to increasing salinity significantly enhanced total lipid (TL) content. The observed increase is mainly due to high level of phospholipids (PL). Hundred mM NaCl treatment increased phospholipid species phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), whereas it reduced glycolipid ones monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) but not sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG). Moreover, fatty acid composition was clearly modified when cells were cultured in the presence of 100 mM NaCl, whereas only few changes occurred at 50 mM. Salt treatment decreased palmitic acid (16:0) level and increased that of linolenic acid (18:2). Such effect was observed in phospholipid species PC and PE and in glycolipid DGDG. Double bond index (DBI) was enhanced more than 2-fold in fatty acids of either glycolipids or phospholipids from cells submitted to 100 mM NaCl. Free sterol content was also significantly enhanced, especially at 100 mM NaCl, whereas free sterols/phospholipids (St/PL) ratio was slightly decreased. All these salt-induced changes in membrane lipids suggest an increase in membrane fluidity of C. roseus cells.

  6. Characterization of 10-Hydroxygeraniol Dehydrogenase from Catharanthus roseus Reveals Cascaded Enzymatic Activity in Iridoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Krithika, Ramakrishnan; Srivastava, Prabhakar Lal; Rani, Bajaj; Kolet, Swati P.; Chopade, Manojkumar; Soniya, Mantri; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V.

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus [L.] is a major source of the monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs), which are of significant interest due to their therapeutic value. These molecules are formed through an intermediate, cis-trans-nepetalactol, a cyclized product of 10-oxogeranial. One of the key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of MIAs is an NAD(P)+ dependent oxidoreductase system, 10-hydroxygeraniol dehydrogenase (Cr10HGO), which catalyses the formation of 10-oxogeranial from 10-hydroxygeraniol via 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial. This work describes the cloning and functional characterization of Cr10HGO from C. roseus and its role in the iridoid biosynthesis. Substrate specificity studies indicated that, Cr10HGO has good activity on substrates such as 10-hydroxygeraniol, 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial over monohydroxy linear terpene derivatives. Further it was observed that incubation of 10-hydroxygeraniol with Cr10HGO and iridoid synthase (CrIDS) in the presence of NADP+ yielded a major metabolite, which was characterized as (1R, 4aS, 7S, 7aR)-nepetalactol by comparing its retention time, mass fragmentation pattern, and co-injection studies with that of the synthesized compound. These results indicate that there is concerted activity of Cr10HGO with iridoid synthase in the formation of (1R, 4aS, 7S, 7aR)-nepetalactol, an important intermediate in iridoid biosynthesis. PMID:25651761

  7. Growth and photosynthetic pigments responses of two varieties of Catharanthus roseus to triadimefon treatment.

    PubMed

    Jaleel, Cheruth Abdul; Gopi, Ragupathi; Panneerselvam, Rajaram

    2008-04-01

    Triadimefon, potential fungicide cum plant-growth retardant was used in this study to investigate its effect on the growth and the photosynthetic pigment contents of two varieties of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don. The plants of both varieties were subjected to 15 mg l(-1) triadimefon treatment by soil drenching 30, 45, 60, and 75 days after planting (DAP). Plants were uprooted on 90 DAP, and morphological parameters, like plant height, number of leaves, leaf area, root length and fresh and dry weights were determined. The photosynthetic pigments, like chlorophylls a and b, total chlorophyll, carotenoids, floral pigment, anthocyanin, were extracted and estimated. It was observed that plant height, number of leaves and leaf area were decreased and that root length, fresh and dry weights were increased under triadimefon treatment. The photosynthetic and floral pigments were increased under triadimefon treatment in both varieties. The results suggest that the application of this plant-growth retardant (triadimefon) has favourable effects on the reduction of plant height; it can thus be used for replacing manual hand pruning and for improving floral and vegetation colour in bedding plants like C. roseus.

  8. Efficient regeneration and improved sonication-assisted Agrobacterium transformation (SAAT) method for Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Alam, Pravej; Khan, Zainul Abdeen; Abdin, Malik Zainul; Khan, Jawaid A; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Elkholy, Shereen F; Sharaf-Eldin, Mahmoud A

    2017-05-01

    Catharanthus roseus is an important medicinal plant known for its pharmacological qualities such as antimicrobial, anticancerous, antifeedant, antisterility, antidiabetic activities. More than 130 bioactive compounds like vinblastine, vindoline and vincristine have been synthesized in this plant. Extensive studies have been carried out for optimization regeneration and transformation protocols. Most of the protocol described are laborious and time-consuming. Due to sophisticated protocol of regeneration and genetic transformation, the production of these bioactive molecules is less and not feasible to be commercialized worldwide. Here we have optimized the efficient protocol for regeneration and transformation to minimize the time scale and enhance the transformation frequency through Agrobacterium and sonication-assisted transformation (SAAT) method. In this study, hypocotyl explants responded best for maximal production of transformed shoots. The callus percentage were recorded 52% with 1.0 mg L(-1) (BAP) and 0.5 mg L(-1) (NAA) while 80% shoot percentage obtained with 4.0 mg L(-1) (BAP) and 0.05 mg L(-1) (NAA). The microscopic studies revealed that the expression of GFP was clearly localized in leaf tissue of the C. roseus after transformation of pRepGFP0029 construct. Consequently, transformation efficiency was revealed on the basis of GFP localization. The transformation efficiency of SAAT method was 6.0% comparable to 3.5% as conventional method. Further, PCR analysis confirmed the integration of the nptII gene in the transformed plantlets of C. roseus.

  9. Alterations in seedling vigour and antioxidant enzyme activities in Catharanthus roseus under seed priming with native diazotrophs.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, B; Jaleel, C A; Gopi, R; Deiveekasundaram, M

    2007-07-01

    An experiment was conducted on Catharanthus roseus to study the effect of seed treatments with native diazotrophs on its seedling growth and antioxidant enzyme activities. The treatments had significant influence on various seedling parameters. There is no significant influence on dry matter production with the diazotrophs, Azospirillum and Azotobacter. However, the vital seedling parameters such as germination percentage and vigour index were improved. Azotobacter treatment influenced maximum of 50% germination, whereas Azospirillum and Azotobacter were on par with C. roseus with respect to their vigour index. There was significant difference in the population of total diazotrophs. Azospirillum and Azotobacter between rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils of C. roseus had the same trend and were observed at various locations of the study. The activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX) and catalase (CAT) were increased to a significant extent due to the treatment with diazotrophs.

  10. Metabolic Discrimination of Catharanthus roseus Leaves Infected by Phytoplasma Using 1H-NMR Spectroscopy and Multivariate Data Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Hae; Tapias, Elisabet Casas; Kim, Hye Kyong; Lefeber, Alfons W.M.; Erkelens, Cornelis; Verhoeven, Jacobus Th.J.; Brzin, Jernej; Zel, Jana; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive metabolomic profiling of Catharanthus roseus L. G. Don infected by 10 types of phytoplasmas was carried out using one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy followed by principal component analysis (PCA), an unsupervised clustering method requiring no knowledge of the data set and used to reduce the dimensionality of multivariate data while preserving most of the variance within it. With a combination of these techniques, we were able to identify those metabolites that were present in different levels in phytoplasma-infected C. roseus leaves than in healthy ones. The infection by phytoplasma in C. roseus leaves causes an increase of metabolites related to the biosynthetic pathways of phenylpropanoids or terpenoid indole alkaloids: chlorogenic acid, loganic acid, secologanin, and vindoline. Furthermore, higher abundance of Glc, Glu, polyphenols, succinic acid, and Suc were detected in the phytoplasma-infected leaves. The PCA of the 1H-NMR signals of healthy and phytoplasma-infected C. roseus leaves shows that these metabolites are major discriminating factors to characterize the phytoplasma-infected C. roseus leaves from healthy ones. Based on the NMR and PCA analysis, it might be suggested that the biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids, together with that of phenylpropanoids, is stimulated by the infection of phytoplasma. PMID:15286294

  11. Transcriptional Regulation and Transport of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid in Catharanthus roseus: Exploration of New Research Directions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiaqi; Cai, Junjun; Wang, Rui; Yang, Shihai

    2016-01-01

    As one of the model medicinal plants for exploration of biochemical pathways and molecular biological questions on complex metabolic pathways, Catharanthus roseus synthesizes more than 100 terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) used for clinical treatment of various diseases and for new drug discovery. Given that extensive studies have revealed the major metabolic pathways and the spatial-temporal biosynthesis of TIA in C. roseus plant, little is known about subcellular and inter-cellular trafficking or long-distance transport of TIA end products or intermediates, as well as their regulation. While these transport processes are indispensable for multi-organelle, -tissue and -cell biosynthesis, storage and their functions, great efforts have been made to explore these dynamic cellular processes. Progress has been made in past decades on transcriptional regulation of TIA biosynthesis by transcription factors as either activators or repressors; recent studies also revealed several transporters involved in subcellular and inter-cellular TIA trafficking. However, many details and the regulatory network for controlling the tissue-or cell-specific biosynthesis, transport and storage of serpentine and ajmalicine in root, catharanthine in leaf and root, vindoline specifically in leaf and vinblastine and vincristine only in green leaf and their biosynthetic intermediates remain to be determined. This review is to summarize the progress made in biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation and transport of TIAs. Based on analysis of organelle, tissue and cell-type specific biosynthesis and progresses in transport and trafficking of similar natural products, the transporters that might be involved in transport of TIAs and their synthetic intermediates are discussed; according to transcriptome analysis and bioinformatic approaches, the transcription factors that might be involved in TIA biosynthesis are analyzed. Further discussion is made on a broad context of transcriptional and

  12. Biochemical and Ultrastructural Changes in Sida cordifolia L. and Catharanthus roseus L. to Auto Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vijeta; Chandra, Neelam

    2014-01-01

    Auto pollution is the by-product of our mechanized mobility, which adversely affects both plant and human life. However, plants growing in the urban locations provide a great respite to us from the brunt of auto pollution by absorbing the pollutants at their foliar surface. Foliar surface configuration and biochemical changes in plant species, namely, Sida cordifolia L. and Catharanthus roseus L. grown at roadside (polluted site 1, Talkatora; polluted site 2, Charbagh) in Lucknow city and in the garden of the university campus, which has been taken as reference site, were investigated. It was observed that air pollution caused by auto exhaust showed marked alterations in photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll, carotenoid, and phaeophytin), and relative water content was reduced while antioxidative enzymes like catalase and peroxidase were found to be enhanced. The changes in the foliar configuration reveal marked alteration in epidermal traits, with decreased number of stomata, stomatal indices, and epidermal cells per unit area, while length and breadth of stomata and epidermal cells were found to be increased in leaves samples wich can be used as biomarkers of auto pollution. PMID:27355010

  13. Vindogentianine, a hypoglycemic alkaloid from Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    Tiong, Soon Huat; Looi, Chung Yeng; Arya, Aditya; Wong, Won Fen; Hazni, Hazrina; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Awang, Khalijah

    2015-04-01

    Vindogentianine, a new indole alkaloid together with six known alkaloids, vindoline, vindolidine, vindolicine, vindolinine, perivine and serpentine were isolated from leaf extract (DA) of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods; NMR, MS, UV and IR. Vindogentianine is a dimer containing a vindoline moiety coupled to a gentianine moiety. After 24h incubation, vindogentianine exhibited no cytotoxic effect in C2C12 mouse myoblast and β-TC6 mouse pancreatic cells (IC50>50μg/mL). Real-time cell proliferation monitoring also indicated vindogentianine had little or no effect on C2C12 mouse myoblast cell growth at the highest dose tested (200μg/mL), without inducing cell death. Vindogentianine exhibited potential hypoglycemic activity in β-TC6 and C2C12 cells by inducing higher glucose uptake and significant in vitro PTP-1B inhibition. However, in vitro α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibition assay showed low inhibition under treatment of vindogentianine. This suggests that hypoglycemic activity of vindogentianine may be due to the enhancement of glucose uptake and PTP-1B inhibition, implying its therapeutic potential against type 2 diabetes.

  14. Biochemical and Ultrastructural Changes in Sida cordifolia L. and Catharanthus roseus L. to Auto Pollution.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vijeta; Chandra, Neelam

    2014-01-01

    Auto pollution is the by-product of our mechanized mobility, which adversely affects both plant and human life. However, plants growing in the urban locations provide a great respite to us from the brunt of auto pollution by absorbing the pollutants at their foliar surface. Foliar surface configuration and biochemical changes in plant species, namely, Sida cordifolia L. and Catharanthus roseus L. grown at roadside (polluted site 1, Talkatora; polluted site 2, Charbagh) in Lucknow city and in the garden of the university campus, which has been taken as reference site, were investigated. It was observed that air pollution caused by auto exhaust showed marked alterations in photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll, carotenoid, and phaeophytin), and relative water content was reduced while antioxidative enzymes like catalase and peroxidase were found to be enhanced. The changes in the foliar configuration reveal marked alteration in epidermal traits, with decreased number of stomata, stomatal indices, and epidermal cells per unit area, while length and breadth of stomata and epidermal cells were found to be increased in leaves samples wich can be used as biomarkers of auto pollution.

  15. Biotransformation of artemisinin using cell suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G.Don and Lavandula officinalis L.

    PubMed

    Patel, Suman; Gaur, Rashmi; Verma, Priyanka; Bhakuni, Rajendra S; Mathur, Archana

    2010-08-01

    Artemisinin, an antimalarial compound, at 5 mg/40 ml, was transformed by cell suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G.Don and Lavandula officinalis L. into deoxyartemisinin with yields >78% (3.93 mg deoxyartemisinin from 5 mg artemisinin). Maximum conversion (78.6 and 78%) occurred after 6 and 7 days of adding artemisinin to 20 and 9 days old cultures of C. roseus and L. officinalis, respectively. The procedure was scaled up by and 500 mg artemisinin was transformed into 390 mg deoxyartemisinin. Addition of artemisinin at the beginning of the culture cycle resulted in >50% reduction in dry biomass production with no bioconversion. Conversion of artemisinin occurred intracellularly followed by leaching of the product into the medium.

  16. Epidermis is a pivotal site of at least four secondary metabolic pathways in Catharanthus roseus aerial organs.

    PubMed

    Mahroug, Samira; Courdavault, Vincent; Thiersault, Martine; St-Pierre, Benoit; Burlat, Vincent

    2006-05-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces a wide range of secondary metabolites, some of which present high therapeutic values such as antitumoral monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), vinblastine and vincristine, and the hypotensive MIA, ajmalicine. We have recently shown that a complex multicellular organisation of the MIA biosynthetic pathway occurred in C. roseus aerial organs. In particular, the final steps of both the secoiridoid-monoterpene and indole pathways specifically occurred in the epidermis of leaves and petals. Chorismate is the common precursor of indole and phenylpropanoid pathways. In an attempt to better map the spatio-temporal organisation of diverse secondary metabolisms in Catharanthus roseus aerial organs, we studied the expression pattern of genes encoding enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase [PAL, E.C. 4.3.1.5], cinnamate 4-hydroxylase [C4H, E.C. 1.14.13.11] and chalcone synthase [CHS, E.C. 2.3.1.74]). In situ hybridisation experiments revealed that CrPAL and CrC4H were specifically localised to lignifying xylem, whereas CrPAL, CrC4H and CrCHS were specifically expressed in the flavonoid-rich upper epidermis. Interestingly, these three genes were co-expressed in the epidermis (at least the upper, adaxial one) together with three MIA-related genes, indicating that single epidermis cells were capable of concomitantly producing a wide range of diverse secondary metabolites (e.g. flavonoïds, indoles, secoiridoid-monoterpenes and MIAs). These results, and data showing co-accumulation of flavonoids and alkaloids in single cells of C. roseus cell lines, indicated the spatio-temporal feasibility of putative common regulation mechanisms for the expression of these genes involved in at least four distinct secondary metabolisms.

  17. Evaluation of the nutritive and organoleptic values of food products developed by incorporated Catharanthus roseus (Sadabahar) fresh leaves explore their hypoglycemic potential.

    PubMed

    Bisla, Gita; Choudhary, Shailza; Chaudhary, Vijeta

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes becomes a real problem of public health in developing countries, where its prevalence is increasing steadily. Diabetes mellitus can be found in almost every population in the world. Since the Ayurvedic practice started in India, plants are being used in the cure of diseases. Although the Catharanthus roseus have been used for their alleged health benefits and avail their hypoglycemic effect, used as medicine by diabetics. Medicinal plants have rarely been incorporated in food preparations. To fill these lacunae, food products were prepared by using Catharanthus roseus (Sadabahar) fresh leaves with hypoglycemic properties. Commonly consumed recipes in India are prepared for diabetic patients and were developed at different levels at 3 g, 4 g, and 6 g per serving. Food product development and their acceptability appraisal through organoleptic evaluation were carried out by semitrained panel comprising 15 trained panelists from the department of Food Science and Nutrition, Banasthali University. Seven products were developed by incorporating Catharanthus roseus fresh leaves. Nine point hedonic scale was used as a medium to know about the product acceptability at various variances. All products are moderately acceptable at different concentrations except product fare "6 g" which was more acceptable than the standard. Among the three variations of incorporating the Catharanthus roseus (Sadabahar) Leaves, 3 g variation is more acceptable than other variations.

  18. Folivory elicits a strong defense reaction in Catharanthus roseus: metabolomic and transcriptomic analyses reveal distinct local and systemic responses.

    PubMed

    Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Carqueijeiro, Inês; Lanoue, Arnaud; Lafontaine, Florent; Sánchez Bel, Paloma; Liesecke, Franziska; Musset, Karine; Oudin, Audrey; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Pichon, Olivier; Besseau, Sébastien; Clastre, Marc; St-Pierre, Benoit; Flors, Victor; Maury, Stéphane; Huguet, Elisabeth; O'Connor, Sarah E; Courdavault, Vincent

    2017-01-17

    Plants deploy distinct secondary metabolisms to cope with environment pressure and to face bio-aggressors notably through the production of biologically active alkaloids. This metabolism-type is particularly elaborated in Catharanthus roseus that synthesizes more than a hundred different monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs). While the characterization of their biosynthetic pathway now reaches completion, still little is known about the role of MIAs during biotic attacks. As a consequence, we developed a new plant/herbivore interaction system by challenging C. roseus leaves with Manduca sexta larvae. Transcriptomic and metabolic analyses demonstrated that C. roseus respond to folivory by both local and systemic processes relying on the activation of specific gene sets and biosynthesis of distinct MIAs following jasmonate production. While a huge local accumulation of strictosidine was monitored in attacked leaves that could repel caterpillars through its protein reticulation properties, newly developed leaves displayed an increased biosynthesis of the toxic strictosidine-derived MIAs, vindoline and catharanthine, produced by up-regulation of MIA biosynthetic genes. In this context, leaf consumption resulted in a rapid death of caterpillars that could be linked to the MIA dimerization observed in intestinal tracts. Furthermore, this study also highlights the overall transcriptomic control of the plant defense processes occurring during herbivory.

  19. Folivory elicits a strong defense reaction in Catharanthus roseus: metabolomic and transcriptomic analyses reveal distinct local and systemic responses

    PubMed Central

    Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Carqueijeiro, Inês; Lanoue, Arnaud; Lafontaine, Florent; Sánchez Bel, Paloma; Liesecke, Franziska; Musset, Karine; Oudin, Audrey; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Pichon, Olivier; Besseau, Sébastien; Clastre, Marc; St-Pierre, Benoit; Flors, Victor; Maury, Stéphane; Huguet, Elisabeth; O’Connor, Sarah E.; Courdavault, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Plants deploy distinct secondary metabolisms to cope with environment pressure and to face bio-aggressors notably through the production of biologically active alkaloids. This metabolism-type is particularly elaborated in Catharanthus roseus that synthesizes more than a hundred different monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs). While the characterization of their biosynthetic pathway now reaches completion, still little is known about the role of MIAs during biotic attacks. As a consequence, we developed a new plant/herbivore interaction system by challenging C. roseus leaves with Manduca sexta larvae. Transcriptomic and metabolic analyses demonstrated that C. roseus respond to folivory by both local and systemic processes relying on the activation of specific gene sets and biosynthesis of distinct MIAs following jasmonate production. While a huge local accumulation of strictosidine was monitored in attacked leaves that could repel caterpillars through its protein reticulation properties, newly developed leaves displayed an increased biosynthesis of the toxic strictosidine-derived MIAs, vindoline and catharanthine, produced by up-regulation of MIA biosynthetic genes. In this context, leaf consumption resulted in a rapid death of caterpillars that could be linked to the MIA dimerization observed in intestinal tracts. Furthermore, this study also highlights the overall transcriptomic control of the plant defense processes occurring during herbivory. PMID:28094274

  20. Impact of cadmium and lead on Catharanthus roseus--a phytoremediation study.

    PubMed

    Pandey, S; Gupta, K; Mukherjee, A K

    2007-07-01

    The Madagascar Periwinkle, Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don (a valued medicinal plant) was exposed to different concentrations ofheavymetals like, CdCl, and PbCl, with a view to observe their bioaccumulation efficiency. Germination was inhibited by both the heavy metals in the seeds previously imbibed in GA, and KNO, for 24 hr. EC50 (the effective concentration which inhibits root length by 50%) was recorded as 180 microM for CdCl2, and 50 microM for PbCl2. Both alpha-amylase and protease activity were reduced substantially on treatment of seeds with increasing concentrations of CdCl2, and PbCl2. Malondialdehyde (MDA) a product of lipoxigenase (LOX) activity also increased due to the treatment of both CdCl, and PbCl2. When two-months-old plants grown in normal soil were transferred to soils containing increasing amounts of these two heavy metals, senescence of lower leaves and extensive chlorosis were noticed after four days of transfer However, plants gradually acclimatized and after 20 days the chlorophyll content was almost comparable to normal. Plants receiving CdCl2 treatment (250 microg g(-1) and less) became acclimatized after two weeks and started normal growth. But PbCl2 of 432 microg g(-1) and less could not affect the plant growth throughout, after a preliminary shock was erased. In case of CdCl2 treatment, a stunted growth with reduced leaf area, reduced biomass and sterility were recorded after six months, while plants show normal growth and flowering in case of PbCl2 treatment. Total alkaloid was also found to be decreased in the roots of CdCl2 treated plants. No change was observed in case of PbCl2. GA3 treatments to the CdCl2 treated plants show internode elongation and increase in leaf area with relatively elongated leaves and thinning of stem diameter AAS analyses of leaves of treated plants exhibited 5-10% accumulation of cadmium, but there was no accumulation of lead at all.

  1. Screening and kinetic studies of catharanthine and ajmalicine accumulation and their correlation with growth biomass in Catharanthus roseus hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Benyammi, Roukia; Paris, Cédric; Khelifi-Slaoui, Majda; Zaoui, Djamila; Belabbassi, Ouarda; Bakiri, Nouara; Meriem Aci, Myassa; Harfi, Boualem; Malik, Sonia; Makhzoum, Abdullah; Desobry, Stéphane; Khelifi, Lakhdar

    2016-10-01

    Context Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don (Apocynaceae) is still one of the most important sources of terpene indole alkaloids including anticancer and hypertensive drugs as vincristine and vinblastine. These final compounds have complex pathway and many enzymes are involved in their biosynthesis. Indeed, ajmalicine and catharanthine are important precursors their increase can lead to enhance levels of molecules of interest. Objective This study aims at selecting the highest yield of hairy root line(s) and at identifying best times for further treatments. We study kinetics growth and alkaloids (ajmalicine and catharanthine) accumulation of three selected hairy root lines during the culture cycle in order to determine the relationship between biomass production and alkaloids accumulation. Materials and methods Comparative analysis has been carried out on three selected lines of Catharanthus roseus hairy roots (LP10, LP21 and L54) for their kinetics of growth and the accumulation of ajamalicine and catharanthine, throughout a 35-day culture cycle. The methanolic extract for each line in different times during culture cycle is analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results Maximum accumulation of the alkaloids is recorded for LP10 line in which the peak of ajmalicine and catharanthine accumulation reached to 3.8 and 4.3 mg/g dry weight (DW), respectively. This increase coincides with an exponential growth phase. Discussion and conclusion Our results suggest that the evolution of accumulation of ajmalicine and catharanthine are positively correlated with the development of the biomass growth. Significantly, for LP10 line the most promising line to continue optimizing the production of TIAs. Additionally, the end of exponential phase remains the best period for elicitor stimuli.

  2. Fungal endophytes of Catharanthus roseus enhance vindoline content by modulating structural and regulatory genes related to terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Shiv S.; Singh, Sucheta; Babu, C. S. Vivek; Shanker, Karuna; Srivastava, N. K.; Shukla, Ashutosh K.; Kalra, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Not much is known about the mechanism of endophyte-mediated induction of secondary metabolite production in Catharanthus roseus. In the present study two fungal endophytes, Curvularia sp. CATDLF5 and Choanephora infundibulifera CATDLF6 were isolated from the leaves of the plant that were found to enhance vindoline content by 229–403%. The isolated endophytes did not affect the primary metabolism of the plant as the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII, net CO2 assimilation, plant biomass and starch content of endophyte-inoculated plants was similar to endophyte-free control plants. Expression of terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) pathway genes, geraniol 10-hydroxylase (G10H), tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), strictosidine synthase (STR), 16-hydoxytabersonine-O-methyltransferase (16OMT), desacetoxyvindoline-4-hydroxylase (D4H), deacetylvindoline-4-O-acetyltransferase (DAT) were upregulated in endophyte-inoculated plants. Endophyte inoculation upregulated the expression of the gene for transcriptional activator octadecanoid-responsive Catharanthus AP2-domain protein (ORCA3) and downregulated the expression of Cys2/His2-type zinc finger protein family transcriptional repressors (ZCTs). The gene for the vacuolar class III peroxidase (PRX1), responsible for coupling vindoline and catharanthine, was upregulated in endophyte-inoculated plants. These endophytes may enhance vindoline production by modulating the expression of key structural and regulatory genes of vindoline biosynthesis without affecting the primary metabolism of the host plant. PMID:27220774

  3. Silencing the Transcriptional Repressor, ZCT1, Illustrates the Tight Regulation of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus Hairy Roots

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Noreen F.; Weaver, Jessica D.; Cram, Erin J.; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W. T.

    2016-01-01

    The Catharanthus roseus plant is the source of many valuable terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), including the anticancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Transcription factors (TFs) are promising metabolic engineering targets due to their ability to regulate multiple biosynthetic pathway genes. To increase TIA biosynthesis, we elicited the TIA transcriptional activators (ORCAs and other unidentified TFs) with the plant hormone, methyl jasmonate (MJ), while simultaneously silencing the expression of the transcriptional repressor ZCT1. To silence ZCT1, we developed transgenic hairy root cultures of C. roseus that expressed an estrogen-inducible Zct1 hairpin for activating RNA interference. The presence of 17β-estradiol (5μM) effectively depleted Zct1 in hairy root cultures elicited with MJ dosages that either optimize or inhibit TIA production (250 or 1000μM). However, silencing Zct1 was not sufficient to increase TIA production or the expression of the TIA biosynthetic genes (G10h, Tdc, and Str), illustrating the tight regulation of TIA biosynthesis. The repression of the TIA biosynthetic genes at the inhibitory MJ dosage does not appear to be solely regulated by ZCT1. For instance, while Zct1 and Zct2 levels decreased through activating the Zct1 hairpin, Zct3 levels remained elevated. Since ZCT repressors have redundant yet distinct functions, silencing all three ZCTs may be necessary to relieve their repression of alkaloid biosynthesis. PMID:27467510

  4. cDNA-AFLP-based numerical comparison of leaf and root organ cDNAs in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ashutosh K; Shasany, Ajit K; Khanuja, Suman P S

    2012-01-01

    Comparative transcriptome study of the leaf and root tissues of Catharanthus roseus is a prerequisite for causing any favorable tissue-specific change in the secondary metabolism of this species. This study was aimed at comparative analysis of the leaf and root cDNAs in C. roseus, using a cDNA-AFLP approach. Using 64 primer combinations (EcoRI and MseI), a total of 784 distinct transcriptionally-defined fragments (TDFs) could be detected in the root and leaf tissue transcript populations. The leaf tissue yielded a larger number of TDFs than the root tissue (556 versus 464), indicating a greater variety of expressing genes in the leaf. The leaf-specific TDFs (320) outnumbered the root-specific TDFs (228), indicating a higher number of leaf-specific functions and the relative complexity of the leaf tissue vis-à-vis the root tissue. Among the 236 TDFs that were detected in both types of tissues, 42 had nearly equal expression levels in both the tissues (L=R). Common TDFs having higher expression levels in the leaf (L>R; 124) outnumbered those having higher expression levels in the root (L

  5. Application of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-based technology for authentication of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Anis Ahmad; Hemant; Mohsin, Mohd; Ahmad, Altaf

    2012-04-01

    In this study, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-based molecular marker was developed for authentication of Catharanthus roseus, a medicinal plant. Samples of this plant were collected from different geographical locations in India. Random amplified polymorphic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis of collected samples was carried out with 25 random primers. A 610-bp DNA fragment, common to all accessions, was eluted, cloned, and sequenced. Four LAMP primers were designed on the basis of sequence of 610 bp DNA fragment. LAMP reaction, containing 10× Bst DNA polymerase reaction buffer, Bst DNA polymerase, four in-house designed primers, dNTPs, MgSO(4), and betaine, was incubated at 65°C for 1 h. The resulting amplicon was visualized by adding SYBR Green I to the reaction tube. The data showed confirmatory results. Since the assay method is simple, sensitive, and cost-effective, it is a feasible method for identifying and authentication of C. roseus.

  6. Effect of chromium on antioxidant potential of Catharanthus roseus varieties and production of their anticancer alkaloids: vincristine and vinblastine.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vartika; Tandon, Pramod Kumar; Khatoon, Sayyada

    2014-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don, a medicinal plant, has a very important place in the traditional as well as modern pharmaceutical industry. Two common varieties of this plant rosea and alba are named so because of pink and white coloured flowers, respectively. This plant comprises of about 130 terpenoid indole alkaloids and two of them, vincristine and vinblastine, are common anticancer drugs. The effect of chromium (Cr) on enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant components and on secondary metabolites vincristine and vinblastine was studied under pot culture conditions of both varieties of C. roseus. Antioxidant responses of these varieties were analyzed under 0, 10, 50, and 100  μM chromium (Cr) level in order to investigate the plant's protective mechanisms against Cr induced oxidative stress. The results indicated that Cr affects all the studied parameters and decreases growth performance. However, vincristine and vinblastine contents were increased under Cr stress. Results are quite encouraging, as this plant shows good antioxidant potential and increased the level of active constituents under Cr stress.

  7. Identification and quantification of active alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus by liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qinhua; Zhang, Wenpeng; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Jing; Chen, Zilin

    2013-08-15

    Catharanthus roseus is an important dicotyledonous medicinal plant that produces anticancer compounds. The active alkaloids vinblastine, vindoline, ajmalicine, catharanthine, and vinleurosine were identified by direct-injection ion trap-mass spectrometry (IT-MS) for collecting MS(1-2) spectra. The determinations of five alkaloids were accomplished by liquid chromatography (LC) with UV and MS detections. The analytes provided good signals corresponding to the protonated molecular ions [M+H](+) and product ions. The precursor ions and product ions for quantification of vinblastine, vindoline, ajmalicine, catharanthine, and vinleurosine were m/z 825→807, 457→397, 353→144, 337→144 and 809→748 by LC-IT-MS, respectively. Two methods were used to evaluate a number of validation characteristics (repeatability, LOD, calibration range, and recovery). MS provided a high selectivity and sensitivity for determination of five alkaloids in positive mode. After optimisation of the methods, separation, identification and quantification of the five components in C. roseus were comprehensively accomplished by HPLC with UV and MS detection.

  8. Correspondence between flowers and leaves in terpenoid indole alkaloid metabolism of the phytoplasma-infected Catharanthus roseus plants.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Suchi; Pandey, Richa; Kumar, Sushil; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2014-11-01

    Several plants of Catharanthus roseus cv 'leafless inflorescence (lli)' showing phenotype of phytoplasma infection were observed for symptoms of early flowering, virescence, phyllody, and apical clustering of branches. Symptomatic plants were studied for the presence/absence and identity of phytoplasma in flowers. Transcription levels of several genes involved in plants' metabolism and development, accumulation of pharmaceutically important terpenoid indole alkaloids in flowers and leaves and variation in the root-associated microbial flora were examined. The expression profile of 12 genes studied was semi-quantitatively similar in control leaves and phytoplasma-infected leaves and flowers, in agreement with the symptoms of virescence and phyllody in phytoplasma-infected plants. The flowers of phytoplasma-infected plants possessed the TIA profile of leaves and accumulated catharanthine, vindoline, and vincristine and vinblastine in higher concentrations than leaves. The roots of the infected plants displayed lower microbial diversity than those of normal plants. In conclusion, phytoplasma affected the biology of C. roseus lli plants multifariously, it reduced the differences between the metabolite accumulates of the leaves and flowers and restrict the microbial diversity of rhizosphere.

  9. Effect of Chromium on Antioxidant Potential of Catharanthus roseus Varieties and Production of Their Anticancer Alkaloids: Vincristine and Vinblastine

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Pramod Kumar; Khatoon, Sayyada

    2014-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don, a medicinal plant, has a very important place in the traditional as well as modern pharmaceutical industry. Two common varieties of this plant rosea and alba are named so because of pink and white coloured flowers, respectively. This plant comprises of about 130 terpenoid indole alkaloids and two of them, vincristine and vinblastine, are common anticancer drugs. The effect of chromium (Cr) on enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant components and on secondary metabolites vincristine and vinblastine was studied under pot culture conditions of both varieties of C. roseus. Antioxidant responses of these varieties were analyzed under 0, 10, 50, and 100 μM chromium (Cr) level in order to investigate the plant's protective mechanisms against Cr induced oxidative stress. The results indicated that Cr affects all the studied parameters and decreases growth performance. However, vincristine and vinblastine contents were increased under Cr stress. Results are quite encouraging, as this plant shows good antioxidant potential and increased the level of active constituents under Cr stress. PMID:24734252

  10. Water deficit stress mitigation by calcium chloride in Catharanthus roseus: effects on oxidative stress, proline metabolism and indole alkaloid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Jaleel, C Abdul; Manivannan, P; Sankar, B; Kishorekumar, A; Gopi, R; Somasundaram, R; Panneerselvam, R

    2007-10-15

    The present investigation was conducted to determine whether CaCl(2) increases Catharanthus roseus drought tolerance and if such tolerance is correlated with changes in oxidative stress, osmoregulation and indole alkaloid accumulation. C. roseus plants were grown under water deficit environments with or without CaCl(2). Drought induced oxidative stress was measured in terms of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and H(2)O(2) contents, osmolyte concentration, proline (PRO) metabolizing enzymes and indole alkaloid accumulation. The plants under pot culture were subjected to 10, 15 and 20 days interval drought (DID) stress and drought stress with 5mM CaCl(2) and 5mM CaCl(2) alone from 30 days after planting (DAP) and regular irrigation was kept as control. The plants were uprooted on 41 DAS (10 DID), 46 DAS (15 DID) and 51 DAS (20 DID). Drought stressed plants showed increased LPO, H(2)O(2), glycine betaine (GB) and PRO contents and decreased proline oxidase (PROX) activity and increased gamma-glutamyl kinase (gamma-GK) activity when compared to control. Addition of CaCl(2) to drought stressed plants lowered the PRO concentration by increasing the level of PROX and decreasing the gamma-GK activities. Calcium ions increased the GB contents. CaCl(2) appears to confer greater osmoprotection by the additive role with drought in GB accumulation. The drought with CaCl(2)-treated C. roseus plants showed an increase in total indole alkaloid content in shoots and roots when compared to drought stressed and well-watered plants.

  11. Cytosine hypomethylation at CHG and CHH sites in the pleiotropic mutants of Mendelian inheritance in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Renu; Yadav, Gitanjali; Sharma, Vishakha; Sharma, Vinay; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-12-01

    The 5S and 18S rDNA sequences of Catharanthus roseus cv 'Nirmal' (wild type) and its leafless inflorescence (lli), evergreen dwarf (egd) and irregular leaf lamina (ill) single mutants and lli egd, lli ill and egd ill double mutants were characterized. The lli, egd and ill mutants of Mendelian inheritance bore the names after their most conspicuous morphological feature(s). They had been chemically induced and isolated for their salt tolerance. The double mutants were isolated as morphological segregants from crosses between single mutants. The morphological features of the two parents accompanied salt tolerance in the double mutants. All the six mutants were hypomethylated at repeat sequences, upregulated and downregulated for many genes and carried pleiotropic alterations for several traits. Here the 5S and 18S rDNAs of C. roseus were found to be relatively low in cytosine content. Cytosines were preponderantly in CG context (53%) and almost all of them were methylated (97%). The cytosines in CHH and CHG (where H = A, T or C) contexts were largely demethylated (92%) in mutants. The demethylation was attributable to reduced expression of RDR2 and DRM2 led RNA dependant DNA methylation and CMT3 led maintenance methylation pathways. Mutants had gained some cytosines by substitution of C at T sites. These perhaps arose on account of errors in DNA replication, mediated by widespread cytosine demethylation at CHG and CHH sites. It was concluded that the regulation of cytosine ethylation mechanisms was disturbed in the mutants. ILL, EGD and LLI genes were identified as the positive regulators of other genes mediating the RdDM and CMT3 pathways, for establishment and maintenance of cytosine methylation in C. roseus.

  12. The miRNAome of Catharanthus roseus: identification, expression analysis, and potential roles of microRNAs in regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ethan M.; Singh, Sanjay K.; Ghosh, Jayadri S.; Patra, Barunava; Paul, Priyanka; Yuan, Ling; Pattanaik, Sitakanta

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate numerous crucial biological processes in plants. However, information is limited on their involvement in the biosynthesis of specialized metabolites in plants, including Catharanthus roseus that produces a number of pharmaceutically valuable, bioactive terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs). Using small RNA-sequencing, we identified 181 conserved and 173 novel miRNAs (cro-miRNAs) in C. roseus seedlings. Genome-wide expression analysis revealed that a set of cro-miRNAs are differentially regulated in response to methyl jasmonate (MeJA). In silico target prediction identified 519 potential cro-miRNA targets that include several auxin response factors (ARFs). The presence of cleaved transcripts of miRNA-targeted ARFs in C. roseus cells was confirmed by Poly(A) Polymerase-Mediated Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (PPM-RACE). We showed that auxin (indole acetic acid, IAA) repressed the expression of key TIA pathway genes in C. roseus seedlings. Moreover, we demonstrated that a miRNA-regulated ARF, CrARF16, binds to the promoters of key TIA pathway genes and repress their expression. The C. roseus miRNAome reported here provides a comprehensive account of the cro-miRNA populations, as well as their abundance and expression profiles in response to MeJA. In addition, our findings underscore the importance of miRNAs in posttranscriptional control of the biosynthesis of specialized metabolites. PMID:28223695

  13. A simple and rapid HPLC-DAD method for simultaneously monitoring the accumulation of alkaloids and precursors in different parts and different developmental stages of Catharanthus roseus plants.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qifang; Saiman, Mohd Zuwairi; Mustafa, Natali Rianika; Verpoorte, Robert; Tang, Kexuan

    2016-03-01

    A rapid and simple reversed phase liquid chromatographic system has been developed for simultaneous analysis of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) and their precursors. This method allowed separation of 11 compounds consisting of eight TIAs (ajmalicine, serpentine, catharanthine, vindoline, vindolinine, vincristine, vinblastine, and anhydrovinblastine) and three related precursors i.e., tryptophan, tryptamine and loganin. The system has been applied for screening the TIAs and precursors in Catharanthus roseus plant extracts. In this study, different organs i.e., flowers, leaves, stems, and roots of C. roseus were investigated. The results indicate that TIAs and precursor accumulation varies qualitatively and quantitatively in different organs of C. roseus. The precursors showed much lower levels than TIAs in all organs. Leaves and flowers accumulate higher level of vindoline, catharanthine and anhydrovinblastine while roots have higher level of ajmalicine, vindolinine and serpentine. Moreover, the alkaloid profiles of leaves harvested at different ages and different growth stages were studied. The results show that the levels of monoindole alkaloids decreased while bisindole alkaloids increased with leaf aging and upon plant growth. The HPLC method has been successfully applied to detect TIAs and precursors in different types of C. roseus samples to facilitate further study of the TIA pathway and its regulation in C. roseus plants.

  14. Vindoline Formation in Shoot Cultures of Catharanthus roseus is Synchronously Activated with Morphogenesis Through the Last Biosynthetic Step

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Tamayo, Freddy; Hernández-Domínguez, Elizabeta; Vázquez-Flota, Felipe

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) produces the monoterpenoid alkaloid vindoline, which requires a specialized cell organization present only in the aerial tissues. Vindoline content can be affected by photoperiod and this effect seems to be associated with the morphogenetic capacity of branches; this association formed the basis of the study reported here. Methods Vindoline-producing in vitro shoot cultures were exposed either to continuous light or a 16-h photoperiod regime. New plantlet formation and alkaloid biosynthesis were analysed throughout a culture cycle. Key Results In cultures under the photoperiod, the formation of new plantlets occurred in a more synchronized fashion as compared to those under continuous light. The accumulation of vindoline in cultures under the photoperiod occurred in co-ordination with plantlet formation, in constrast to cultures under continuous light, and coincided with a peak of activity of deacetylvindoline acetyl CoA acetyltransferase (DAT), the enzyme that catalyses the last step in vindoline biosynthesis. When new plantlet formation was blocked in cultures under the photoperiod by treatment with phytoregulators, vindoline synthesis was also reduced via an effect on DAT activity. No association between plantlet formation and other biosynthetic enzymes, such as tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) and deacetoxyvindoline 4-hydroxylase (D4H), was found. Effects of light treatment on vindoline synthesis were not mediated by ORCA-3 proteins (which are involved in the induction of alkaloid synthesis in response to elicitation), suggesting that the presence of a different set of regulatory proteins. Conclusions The data suggest that vindoline biosynthesis is associated with morphogenesis in shoot cultures of C. roseus. PMID:18587132

  15. An Endophytic Fungus, Talaromyces radicus, Isolated from Catharanthus roseus, Produces Vincristine and Vinblastine, Which Induce Apoptotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Jayabaskaran, Chelliah

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic fungi isolated from Catharanthus roseus were screened for the production of vincristine and vinblastine. Twenty-two endophytic fungi isolated from various tissues of C. roseus were characterized taxonomically by sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA and grouped into 10 genera: Alternaria, Aspergillus, Chaetomium, Colletotrichum, Dothideomycetes, Eutypella, Eutypa, Flavodon, Fusarium and Talaromyces. The antiproliferative activity of these fungi was assayed in HeLa cells using the MTT assay. The fungal isolates Eutypella sp—CrP14, obtained from stem tissues, and Talaromyces radicus—CrP20, obtained from leaf tissues, showed the strongest antiproliferative activity, with IC50 values of 13.5 μg/ml and 20 μg/ml, respectively. All 22 endophytic fungi were screened for the presence of the gene encoding tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), the key enzyme in the terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway, though this gene could only be amplified from T. radicus—CrP20 (NCBI GenBank accession number KC920846). The production of vincristine and vinblastine by T. radicus—CrP20 was confirmed and optimized in nine different liquid media. Good yields of vincristine (670 μg/l) in modified M2 medium and of vinblastine (70 μg/l) in potato dextrose broth medium were obtained. The cytotoxic activity of partially purified fungal vincristine was evaluated in different human cancer cell lines, with HeLa cells showing maximum susceptibility. The apoptosis-inducing activity of vincristine derived from this fungus was established through cell cycle analysis, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation patterns. PMID:26697875

  16. An Endophytic Fungus, Talaromyces radicus, Isolated from Catharanthus roseus, Produces Vincristine and Vinblastine, Which Induce Apoptotic Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Palem, Padmini P C; Kuriakose, Gini C; Jayabaskaran, Chelliah

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic fungi isolated from Catharanthus roseus were screened for the production of vincristine and vinblastine. Twenty-two endophytic fungi isolated from various tissues of C. roseus were characterized taxonomically by sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA and grouped into 10 genera: Alternaria, Aspergillus, Chaetomium, Colletotrichum, Dothideomycetes, Eutypella, Eutypa, Flavodon, Fusarium and Talaromyces. The antiproliferative activity of these fungi was assayed in HeLa cells using the MTT assay. The fungal isolates Eutypella sp--CrP14, obtained from stem tissues, and Talaromyces radicus--CrP20, obtained from leaf tissues, showed the strongest antiproliferative activity, with IC50 values of 13.5 μg/ml and 20 μg/ml, respectively. All 22 endophytic fungi were screened for the presence of the gene encoding tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), the key enzyme in the terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway, though this gene could only be amplified from T. radicus--CrP20 (NCBI GenBank accession number KC920846). The production of vincristine and vinblastine by T. radicus--CrP20 was confirmed and optimized in nine different liquid media. Good yields of vincristine (670 μg/l) in modified M2 medium and of vinblastine (70 μg/l) in potato dextrose broth medium were obtained. The cytotoxic activity of partially purified fungal vincristine was evaluated in different human cancer cell lines, with HeLa cells showing maximum susceptibility. The apoptosis-inducing activity of vincristine derived from this fungus was established through cell cycle analysis, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation patterns.

  17. The bHLH transcription factor BIS1 controls the iridoid branch of the monoterpenoid indole alkaloid pathway in Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Van Moerkercke, Alex; Steensma, Priscille; Schweizer, Fabian; Pollier, Jacob; Gariboldi, Ivo; Payne, Richard; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Miettinen, Karel; Espoz, Javiera; Purnama, Purin Candra; Kellner, Franziska; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; O’Connor, Sarah E.; Rischer, Heiko; Memelink, Johan; Goossens, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Plants make specialized bioactive metabolites to defend themselves against attackers. The conserved control mechanisms are based on transcriptional activation of the respective plant species-specific biosynthetic pathways by the phytohormone jasmonate. Knowledge of the transcription factors involved, particularly in terpenoid biosynthesis, remains fragmentary. By transcriptome analysis and functional screens in the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle), the unique source of the monoterpenoid indole alkaloid (MIA)-type anticancer drugs vincristine and vinblastine, we identified a jasmonate-regulated basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factor from clade IVa inducing the monoterpenoid branch of the MIA pathway. The bHLH iridoid synthesis 1 (BIS1) transcription factor transactivated the expression of all of the genes encoding the enzymes that catalyze the sequential conversion of the ubiquitous terpenoid precursor geranyl diphosphate to the iridoid loganic acid. BIS1 acted in a complementary manner to the previously characterized ethylene response factor Octadecanoid derivative-Responsive Catharanthus APETALA2-domain 3 (ORCA3) that transactivates the expression of several genes encoding the enzymes catalyzing the conversion of loganic acid to the downstream MIAs. In contrast to ORCA3, overexpression of BIS1 was sufficient to boost production of high-value iridoids and MIAs in C. roseus suspension cell cultures. Hence, BIS1 might be a metabolic engineering tool to produce sustainably high-value MIAs in C. roseus plants or cultures. PMID:26080427

  18. Ornamental Exterior versus Therapeutic Interior of Madagascar Periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus): The Two Faces of a Versatile Herb

    PubMed Central

    Valdiani, Alireza; Cahill, David; Tan, Yee-How; Maziah, Mahmood; Abiri, Rambod

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) known as Madagascar periwinkle (MP) is a legendary medicinal plant mostly because of possessing two invaluable antitumor terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), vincristine and vinblastine. The plant has also high aesthetic value as an evergreen ornamental that yields prolific blooms of splendid colors. The plant possesses yet another unique characteristic as an amiable experimental host for the maintenance of the smallest bacteria found on earth, the phytoplasmas and spiroplasmas, and serves as a model for their study. Botanical information with respect to synonyms, vernacular names, cultivars, floral morphology, and reproduction adds to understanding of the plant while the geography and ecology of periwinkle illustrate the organism's ubiquity. Good agronomic practices ensure generous propagation of healthy plants that serve as a source of bioactive compounds and multitudinous horticultural applications. The correlation between genetic diversity, variants, and TIA production exists. MP is afflicted with a whole range of diseases that have to be properly managed. The ethnobotanical significance of MP is exemplified by its international usage as a traditional remedy for abundant ailments and not only for cancer. TIAs are present only in micro quantities in the plant and are highly poisonous per se rendering a challenge for researchers to increase yield and reduce toxicity. PMID:25667940

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of Crmdr1, a novel MDR-type ABC transporter gene from Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hongbin; Liu, Donghui; Zuo, Kaijing; Gong, Yifu; Miao, Zhiqi; Chen, Yuhui; Ren, Weiwei; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2007-08-01

    A novel gene encoding a MDR-like ABC transporter protein was cloned from Catharanthus roseus, a medicinal plant with more than 120 kinds of secondary metabolites, through rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). This gene (named as Crmdr1; GenBank accession no.: DQ660356) had a total length of 4395 bp with an open reading frame of 3801 bp, and encoded a predicted polypeptide of 1266 amino acids with a molecular weight of 137.1 kDa. The CrMDR1 protein shared 59.8, 62.5, 60.0 and 58.2% identity with other MDR proteins isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana (AAD31576), Coptis japonica (CjMDR), Gossypium hirsutum (GhMDR) and Triticum aestivum (TaMDR) at amino acid level, respectively. Southern blot analysis showed that Crmdr1 was a low-copy gene. Expression pattern analysis revealed that Crmdr1 constitutively expressed in the root, stem and leaf, but with lower expression in leaf. The domains analysis showed that CrMDR1 protein possessed two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) arranging in "TMD1-NBD1-TMD2-NBD2" direction, which is consistent with other MDR transporters. Within NBDs three characteristic motifs common to all ABC transporters, "Walker A", "Walker B" and C motif, were found. These results indicate that CrMDR1 is a MDR-like ABC transporter protein that may be involved in the transport and accumulation of secondary metabolites.

  20. Simultaneous quantification of four indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus cell line C20hi by UPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    He, Lihong; Yang, Li; Xiong, Aizhen; Zhao, Shujuan; Wang, Zhengtao; Hu, Zhibi

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method to simultaneously quantify vindoline, catharanthine, serpentine and ajmalicine in Catharanthus roseus cell line C20hi is reported. Samples were extracted with 1% acetic acid, basified to pH 10 with ammonia, then extracted with ethyl acetate, dried, reconstituted with methanol-1% acetic acid water solution (1:1, v/v) and analyzed using an acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid gradient as the mobile phase. Detection was carried out by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the positive-ion mode with selective ion monitoring. The analysis of one sample was achieved in 6 min. The limits of detection were 0.46 - 0.70 ng/ml in cell samples, and 0.10 - 0.16 ng/ml in medium samples. The linearity of detection was over the wide range of 1.00 - 6250.0 ng/ml. Intra- and inter-day accuracies (recovery 88.0 - 111.8%) and precision (RSD 1.25 - 7.81%) showed the performance of the assay. This method provides a more sensitive and high-throughput technique to quantify the four alkaloids in large amount of samples, and will be helpful in high-production cultivar screening.

  1. A polymorphic (GA/CT)n- SSR influences promoter activity of Tryptophan decarboxylase gene in Catharanthus roseus L. Don

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2016-01-01

    Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) of polypurine-polypyrimidine type motifs occur very frequently in the 5′ flanks of genes in plants and have recently been implicated to have a role in regulation of gene expression. In this study, 2 accessions of Catharanthus roseus having (CT)8 and (CT)21 varying motifs in the 5′UTR of Tryptophan decarboxylase (Tdc) gene, were investigated for its role in regulation of gene expression. Extensive Tdc gene expression analysis in the 2 accessions was carried out both at the level of transcription and translation. Transcript abundance was estimated using Northern analysis and qRT-PCR, whereas the rate of Tdc gene transcription was assessed using in-situ nuclear run-on transcription assay. Translation status of Tdc gene was monitored by quantification of polysome associated Tdc mRNA using qRT-PCR. These observations were validated through transient expression analysis using the fusion construct [CaM35S:(CT)8–21:GUS]. Our study demonstrated that not only does the length of (CT)n -SSRs influences the promoter activity, but the presence of SSRs per se in the 5′-UTR significantly enhances the level of gene expression. We termed this phenomenon as “microsatellite mediated enhancement” (MME) of gene expression. Results presented here will provide leads for engineering plants with enhanced amounts of medicinally important alkaloids. PMID:27623355

  2. A differentially regulated AP2/ERF transcription factor gene cluster acts downstream of a MAP kinase cascade to modulate terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Paul, Priyanka; Singh, Sanjay K; Patra, Barunava; Sui, Xueyi; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling

    2017-02-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces bioactive terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), including the chemotherapeutics, vincristine and vinblastine. Transcriptional regulation of TIA biosynthesis is not fully understood. The jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive AP2/ERF transcription factor (TF), ORCA3, and its regulator, CrMYC2, play key roles in TIA biosynthesis. ORCA3 forms a physical cluster with two uncharacterized AP2/ERFs, ORCA4 and 5. Here, we report that (1) the ORCA gene cluster is differentially regulated; (2) ORCA4, while overlapping functionally with ORCA3, modulates an additional set of TIA genes. Unlike ORCA3, ORCA4 overexpression resulted in dramatic increase of TIA accumulation in C. roseus hairy roots. In addition, CrMYC2 is capable of activating ORCA3 and co-regulating TIA pathway genes concomitantly with ORCA3. The ORCA gene cluster and CrMYC2 act downstream of a MAP kinase cascade that includes a previously uncharacterized MAP kinase kinase, CrMAPKK1. Overexpression of CrMAPKK1 in C. roseus hairy roots upregulated TIA pathways genes and increased TIA accumulation. This work provides detailed characterization of a TF gene cluster and advances our understanding of the transcriptional and post-translational regulatory mechanisms that govern TIA biosynthesis in C. roseus.

  3. Directed biosynthesis of alkaloid analogs in the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2006-11-08

    Terpene indole alkaloids are plant natural products with diverse structures and biological activities. A highly branched biosynthetic pathway is responsible for the production of approximately 130 different alkaloids in Madagascar periwinkle (C. roseus) from a common biosynthetic intermediate derived from tryptamine. Although numerous biosynthetic pathways can incorporate unnatural starting materials to yield novel natural products, it was not clear how efficiently the complex, eukaryotic TIA pathway could utilize unnatural substrates to make new alkaloids. This work demonstrates that the TIA biosynthetic machinery can be used to produce novel alkaloid structures and also highlights the potential of this pathway for future metabolic engineering efforts.

  4. [Fungal activity of various alkaloids isolated from Catharanthus roseus G. Don].

    PubMed

    Rojas Hernández, N M; Díaz Pérez, C

    1977-01-01

    Evaluation is made of the fungal activity of ajmalicine, aparacine, catarantine, reserpine, tetrahydroalstonine, vincubine, vindoline and vindolinina--alkaloids isolated from C. roseus growing in Cuba--on new fungi strains and yeasts which include some of human clinical interest. The method employed was the diffusion in an agar mean with sections or cylinders containing solutions of the alkaloids at 2% and 3% concentrations. The best results are obtained with an aparicine base, while tetrahydroalstonine, vincubine and vindolinine solutions did not inhibit the growth in any of the germs tested.

  5. Synthesis and study of a molecularly imprinted polymer for the specific extraction of indole alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus extracts.

    PubMed

    Lopez, C; Claude, B; Morin, Ph; Max, J-P; Pena, R; Ribet, J-P

    2011-01-10

    Two molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) for catharanthine and vindoline have been synthesized in order to specifically extract these natural indole alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus by solid-phase extraction (SPE). Each MIP was prepared by thermal polymerisation using catharanthine (or vindoline) as template, methacrylic acid (or itaconic acid) as functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as cross-linking agent and acetonitrile (or acetone) as porogenic solvent. For catharanthine-MIP, a SPE protocol (ACN-AcOH 99/1 washing and MeOH-AcOH 90/10 elution) allows a good MIP/NIP selectivity (imprinting factor 12.6). The specificity of catharanthine-MIP versus related bisindole alkaloids was assessed by cross-reactivity study. The catharanthine-MIP specifically retained catharanthine and its N-oxide analogue but displayed a weak cross-reactivity for other Vinca alkaloids (vinorelbine, vincristine, vinblastine, vindoline, vinflunine). It appears that the catharanthine-like unit of these molecules are hardly trapped in catharanthine cavities located in the MIP, probably due to the sterical hindrance of the vindoline moiety. Finally, the MIP-SPE applied to C. roseus extract enabled quantitative recovery of catharanthine (101%) and the total removal of vindoline. Its capacity was determined and was equal to 2.43 μmol g(-1). Vindoline is a weaker base than catharanthine, so the vindoline-MIP was achieved with a strong acidic monomer (itaconic acid) to increase vindoline-monomer interactions and a modified washing solvent (ACN-HCOOH 99/1) to reduce non-specific interactions. The influence of the amount of HCOOH (protic modifier) percolated during the washing step upon the elution yield and the imprinting factor for vindoline was investigated. This preliminary optimisation of the washing step, and in particular the number of moles of acid percolated, seems useful to emphasize the use of MIP in conditions of high selectivity or high yield. A compromise was

  6. The Complete Plastid Genome Sequence of Madagascar Periwinkle Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don: Plastid Genome Evolution, Molecular Marker Identification, and Phylogenetic Implications in Asterids.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chuan; Chung, Wan-Chia; Chen, Ling-Ling; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2013-01-01

    The Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthusroseus in the family Apocynaceae) is an important medicinal plant and is the source of several widely marketed chemotherapeutic drugs. It is also commonly grown for its ornamental values and, due to ease of infection and distinctiveness of symptoms, is often used as the host for studies on phytoplasmas, an important group of uncultivated plant pathogens. To gain insights into the characteristics of apocynaceous plastid genomes (plastomes), we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete plastome of C. roseus, which could be applied to other C. roseus-related studies. The C. roseus plastome is the second completely sequenced plastome in the asterid order Gentianales. We performed comparative analyses with two other representative sequences in the same order, including the complete plastome of Coffeaarabica (from the basal Gentianales family Rubiaceae) and the nearly complete plastome of Asclepiassyriaca (Apocynaceae). The results demonstrated considerable variations in gene content and plastome organization within Apocynaceae, including the presence/absence of three essential genes (i.e., accD, clpP, and ycf1) and large size changes in non-coding regions (e.g., rps2-rpoC2 and IRb-ndhF). To find plastome markers of potential utility for Catharanthus breeding and phylogenetic analyses, we identified 41 C. roseus-specific simple sequence repeats. Furthermore, five intergenic regions with high divergence between C. roseus and three other euasterids I taxa were identified as candidate markers. To resolve the euasterids I interordinal relationships, 82 plastome genes were used for phylogenetic inference. With the addition of representatives from Apocynaceae and sampling of most other asterid orders, a sister relationship between Gentianales and Solanales is supported.

  7. High-throughput transcriptome analysis of the leafy flower transition of Catharanthus roseus induced by peanut witches'-broom phytoplasma infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Yu Daisy; Tseng, Hsin-I; Lin, Chan-Pin; Lin, Yen-Yu; Huang, Yuan-Hung; Huang, Chien-Kang; Chang, Tean-Hsu; Lin, Shih-Shun

    2014-05-01

    Peanut witches'-broom (PnWB) phytoplasma are obligate bacteria that cause leafy flower symptoms in Catharanthus roseus. The PnWB-mediated leafy flower transitions were studied to understand the mechanisms underlying the pathogen-host interaction; however, our understanding is limited because of the lack of information on the C. roseus genome. In this study, the whole-transcriptome profiles from healthy flowers (HFs) and stage 4 (S4) PnWB-infected leafy flowers of C. roseus were investigated using next-generation sequencing (NGS). More than 60,000 contigs were generated using a de novo assembly approach, and 34.2% of the contigs (20,711 genes) were annotated as putative genes through name-calling, open reading frame determination and gene ontology analyses. Furthermore, a customized microarray based on this sequence information was designed and used to analyze samples further at various stages of PnWB infection. In the NGS profile, 87.8% of the genes showed expression levels that were consistent with those in the microarray profiles, suggesting that accurate gene expression levels can be detected using NGS. The data revealed that defense-related and flowering gene expression levels were altered in S4 PnWB-infected leafy flowers, indicating that the immunity and reproductive stages of C. roseus were compromised. The network analysis suggested that the expression levels of >1,000 candidate genes were highly associated with CrSVP1/2 and CrFT expression, which might be crucial in the leafy flower transition. In conclusion, this study provides a new perspective for understanding plant pathology and the mechanisms underlying the leafy flowering transition caused by host-pathogen interactions through analyzing bioinformatics data obtained using a powerful, rapid high-throughput technique.

  8. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a Vacuolar Class III Peroxidase Involved in the Metabolism of Anticancer Alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus1[C

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Maria Manuela R.; Hilliou, Frederique; Duarte, Patrícia; Pereira, Luís Gustavo; Almeida, Iolanda; Leech, Mark; Memelink, Johan; Barceló, Alfonso Ros; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2008-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces low levels of two dimeric terpenoid indole alkaloids, vinblastine and vincristine, which are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. The dimerization reaction leading to α-3′,4′-anhydrovinblastine is a key regulatory step for the production of the anticancer alkaloids in planta and has potential application in the industrial production of two semisynthetic derivatives also used as anticancer drugs. In this work, we report the cloning, characterization, and subcellular localization of an enzyme with anhydrovinblastine synthase activity identified as the major class III peroxidase present in C. roseus leaves and named CrPrx1. The deduced amino acid sequence corresponds to a polypeptide of 363 amino acids including an N-terminal signal peptide showing the secretory nature of CrPrx1. CrPrx1 has a two-intron structure and is present as a single gene copy. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that CrPrx1 belongs to an evolutionary branch of vacuolar class III peroxidases whose members seem to have been recruited for different functions during evolution. Expression of a green fluorescent protein-CrPrx1 fusion confirmed the vacuolar localization of this peroxidase, the exact subcellular localization of the alkaloid monomeric precursors and dimeric products. Expression data further supports the role of CrPrx1 in α-3′,4′-anhydrovinblastine biosynthesis, indicating the potential of CrPrx1 as a target to increase alkaloid levels in the plant. PMID:18065566

  9. Preparation of sealed tonoplast and plasma-membrane vesicles from Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don. cells by free-flow electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Canut, H; Baudracco, S; Cabané, M; Boudet, A M; Marigo, G

    1991-07-01

    Highly purified tonoplast and plasmamembrane vesicles were isolated from microsomes of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don. by preparative free-flow electrophoresis. The relative amounts of tonoplast and plasma-membrane vesicles in the total microsomes varied with the pH of the grinding medium. The most electronegative fractions were identified as tonoplast using nitrate-inhibited, azide-resistant Mg(2+)-ATPase and pyrophosphatase activities as enzyme markers. The least electronegative fractions were identified as plasma membrane using glucan-synthase-II and UDPG:sterolglucosyl-transferase activities as enzyme markers. Other membrane markers, latent inosine-5'-diphosphatase (Golgi), NADPH-cytochrome-c reductase (ER) and cytochrome-c oxidase (mitochondria) were recovered in the fractions intermediate between tonoplast and plasma membrane and did not contaminate either the tonoplast or the plasma-membrane fractions. In the course of searching for a reliable marker for tonoplast, the pyrophosphatase activity was found to be essentially associated with the tonoplast fractions purified by free-flow electrophoresis from C. roseus and other plant materials. The degree of sealing of the tonoplast and plasmamembrane vesicles was probed by their ability to pump protons (measurements of quinacrine quenching) and to generate a membrane potential (absorption spectroscopy of Oxonol VI). A critical evaluation of vesicles sidedness is presented.

  10. The Combined Effects of Ethylene and MeJA on Metabolic Profiling of Phenolic Compounds in Catharanthus roseus Revealed by Metabolomics Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Zhong-Hua; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Efferth, Thomas; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic compounds belong to a class of secondary metabolites and are implicated in a wide range of responsive mechanisms in plants triggered by both biotic and abiotic elicitors. In this study, we approached the combinational effects of ethylene and MeJA (methyl jasmonate) on phenolic compounds profiles and gene expressions in the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus. In virtue of a widely non-targeted metabolomics method, we identified a total of 34 kinds of phenolic compounds in the leaves, composed by 7 C6C1-, 11 C6C3-, and 16 C6C3C6 compounds. In addition, 7 kinds of intermediates critical for the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds and alkaloids were identified and discussed with phenolic metabolism. The combinational actions of ethylene and MeJA effectively promoted the total phenolic compounds, especially the C6C1 compounds (such as salicylic acid, benzoic acid) and C6C3 ones (such as cinnamic acid, sinapic acid). In contrast, the C6C3C6 compounds displayed a notably inhibitory trend in this case. Subsequently, the gene-to-metabolite networks were drawn up by searching for correlations between the expression profiles of 5 gene tags and the accumulation profiles of 41 metabolite peaks. Generally, we provide an insight into the controlling mode of ethylene-MeJA combination on phenolic metabolism in C. roseus leaves.

  11. The Combined Effects of Ethylene and MeJA on Metabolic Profiling of Phenolic Compounds in Catharanthus roseus Revealed by Metabolomics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Zhong-Hua; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Efferth, Thomas; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic compounds belong to a class of secondary metabolites and are implicated in a wide range of responsive mechanisms in plants triggered by both biotic and abiotic elicitors. In this study, we approached the combinational effects of ethylene and MeJA (methyl jasmonate) on phenolic compounds profiles and gene expressions in the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus. In virtue of a widely non-targeted metabolomics method, we identified a total of 34 kinds of phenolic compounds in the leaves, composed by 7 C6C1-, 11 C6C3-, and 16 C6C3C6 compounds. In addition, 7 kinds of intermediates critical for the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds and alkaloids were identified and discussed with phenolic metabolism. The combinational actions of ethylene and MeJA effectively promoted the total phenolic compounds, especially the C6C1 compounds (such as salicylic acid, benzoic acid) and C6C3 ones (such as cinnamic acid, sinapic acid). In contrast, the C6C3C6 compounds displayed a notably inhibitory trend in this case. Subsequently, the gene-to-metabolite networks were drawn up by searching for correlations between the expression profiles of 5 gene tags and the accumulation profiles of 41 metabolite peaks. Generally, we provide an insight into the controlling mode of ethylene-MeJA combination on phenolic metabolism in C. roseus leaves. PMID:27375495

  12. Gene transcript profiles of the TIA biosynthetic pathway in response to ethylene and copper reveal their interactive role in modulating TIA biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ya-Jie; Liu, Jia; Guo, Xiao-Rui; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Research on transcriptional regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) biosynthesis of the medicinal plant, Catharanthus roseus, has largely been focused on gene function and not clustering analysis of multiple genes at the transcript level. Here, more than ten key genes encoding key enzyme of alkaloid synthesis in TIA biosynthetic pathways were chosen to investigate the integrative responses to exogenous elicitor ethylene and copper (Cu) at both transcriptional and metabolic levels. The ethylene-induced gene transcripts in leaves and roots, respectively, were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and the results showed the overall expression of TIA pathway genes indicated as the Q value followed a standard normal distribution after ethylene treatments. Peak gene expression was at 15-30 μM of ethephon, and the pre-mature leaf had a higher Q value than the immature or mature leaf and root. Treatment with elicitor Cu found that Cu up-regulated overall TIA gene expression more in roots than in leaves. The combined effects of Cu and ethephon on TIA gene expression were stronger than their separate effects. It has been documented that TIA gene expression is tightly regulated by the transcriptional factor (TF) ethylene responsive factor (ERF) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. The loading plot combination with correlation analysis for the genes of C. roseus showed that expression of the MPK gene correlated with strictosidine synthase (STR) and strictosidine b-D-glucosidase(SGD). In addition, ERF expression correlated with expression of secologanin synthase (SLS) and tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), specifically in roots, whereas MPK and myelocytomatosis oncogene (MYC) correlated with STR and SGD genes. In conclusion, the ERF regulates the upstream pathway genes in response to heavy metal Cu mainly in C. roseus roots, while the MPK mainly participates in regulating the STR gene in response to ethylene in pre-mature leaf. Interestingly, the

  13. CaaX-prenyltransferases are essential for expression of genes involvedin the early stages of monoterpenoid biosynthetic pathway in Catharanthus roseus cells.

    PubMed

    Courdavault, Vincent; Thiersault, Martine; Courtois, Martine; Gantet, Pascal; Oudin, Audrey; Doireau, Pierre; St-Pierre, Benoit; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie

    2005-04-01

    CaaX-prenyltransferases (CaaX-PTases) catalyse the covalent attachment of isoprenyl groups to conserved cysteine residues located at the C-terminal CaaX motif of a protein substrate. This post-translational modification is required for the function and/or subcellular localization of some transcription factors and components of signal transduction and membrane trafficking machinery. CaaX-PTases, including protein farnesyltransferase (PFT) and type-I protein geranylgeranyltransferase (PGGT-I), are heterodimeric enzymes composed of a common alpha subunit and a specific beta subunit. We have established RNA interference cell lines targeting the beta subunits of PFT and PGGT-I, respectively, in the Catharanthus roseus C20D cell line, which synthesizes monoterpenoid indole alkaloids in response to auxin depletion from the culture medium. In both types of RNAi cell lines, expression of a subset of genes involved in the early stage of monoterpenoid biosynthetic pathway (ESMB genes), including the MEP pathway, is strongly decreased. The role of CaaX-PTases in ESMB gene regulation was confirmed by using the general prenyltransferase inhibitor s-perillyl alcohol (SP) and the specific PFT inhibitor Manumycin A on the wild type line. Furthermore, supplementation of SP inhibited cells with monoterpenoid intermediates downstream of the steps encoded by the ESMB genes restores monoterpenoid indole alkaloids biosynthesis. We conclude that protein targets for both PFT and PGGT-I are required for the expression of ESMB genes and monoterpenoid biosynthesis in C. roseus, this represents a non previously described role for protein prenyltransferase in plants.

  14. Pleiotropic phenotypes of the salt-tolerant and cytosine hypomethylated leafless inflorescence, evergreen dwarf and irregular leaf lamina mutants of Catharanthus roseus possessing Mendelian inheritance.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Renu; Sharma, Vishakha; Sharma, Vinay; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-12-01

    In Catharanthus roseus, three morphological cum salt-tolerant chemically induced mutants of Mendelian inheritance and their wild-type parent cv Nirmal were characterized for overall cytosine methylation at DNA repeats, expression of 119 protein coding and seven miRNA-coding genes and 50 quantitative traits. The mutants, named after their principal morphological feature(s), were leafless inflorescence (lli), evergreen dwarf (egd) and irregular leaf lamina (ill). The Southern-blot analysis of MspI digested DNAs of mutants probed with centromeric and 5S and 18S rDNA probes indicated that, in comparison to wild type, the mutants were extensively demethylated at cytosine sites. Among the 126 genes investigated for transcriptional expression, 85 were upregulated and 41 were downregulated in mutants. All of the five genes known to be stress responsive had increased expression in mutants. Several miRNA genes showed either increased or decreased expression in mutants. The C. roseus counterparts of CMT3, DRM2 and RDR2 were downregulated in mutants. Among the cell, organ and plant size, photosynthesis and metabolism related traits studied, 28 traits were similarly affected in mutants as compared to wild type. Each of the mutants also expressed some traits distinctively. The egd mutant possessed superior photosynthesis and water retention abilities. Biomass was hyperaccumulated in roots, stems, leaves and seeds of the lli mutant. The ill mutant was richest in the pharmaceutical alkaloids catharanthine, vindoline, vincristine and vinblastine. The nature of mutations, origins of mutant phenotypes and evolutionary importance of these mutants are discussed.

  15. Identification of a human ABCC10 orthologue in Catharanthus roseus reveals a U12-type intron determinant for the N-terminal domain feature.

    PubMed

    El-Guizani, Taissir; Guibert, Clotilde; Triki, Saida; St-Pierre, Benoit; Ducos, Eric

    2014-04-01

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters are members of a large superfamily of proteins that utilize ATP hydrolysis to translocate a wide range of substrates across biological membranes. In general, members of C subfamily (ABCC) are structurally characterized by an additional (N-terminal) transmembrane domain (TMD0). Phylogenetic analysis of plant ABCCs separates their protein sequences into three distinct clusters: I and II are plant specific whereas cluster III contains both human and plant ABCCs. Screening of the Plant Medicinal Genomics Resource database allowed us to identify 16 ABCCs partial sequences in Catharanthus roseus; two of which belong to the unique CrABCC1 transcript that we identified in cluster III. Genomic organization of CrABCC1 TMD0 coding sequence displays an AT-AC U12-type intron that is conserved in higher plant orthologues. We showed that CrABCC1, like its human orthologue ABCC10, produces alternative transcripts that encode protein sequences with a truncated form of TMD0 without the first transmembrane span (TM1). Subcellular localization of CrABCC1 TMD0 variants using yellow fluorescent protein fusions reveals that the TM1 is required for a correct routing of the TMD0 to the tonoplast. Finally, the specific repartition of CrABCC1 orthologues in some species suggests that this gene was lost several times during evolution and that its physiological function may, rely on a common feature of multicellular eukaryotes.

  16. Methyl jasmonate induces ATP biosynthesis deficiency and accumulation of proteins related to secondary metabolism in Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-May, Eliel; De-la-Peña, Clelia; Galaz-Ávalos, Rosa M; Lei, Zhentian; Watson, Bonnie S; Sumner, Lloyd W; Loyola-Vargas, Víctor M

    2011-08-01

    Jasmonates are specific signal molecules in plants that are involved in a diverse set of physiological and developmental processes. However, methyl jasmonate (MeJA) has been shown to have a negative effect on root growth and, so far, the biochemical mechanism for this is unknown. Using Catharanthus roseus hairy roots, we were able to observe the effect of MeJA on growth inhibition, cell disorganization and cell death of the root cap. Hairy roots treated with MeJA induced the perturbation of mitochondrial membrane integrity and a diminution in ATP biosynthesis. Furthermore, several proteins were identified that were involved in energy and secondary metabolism; the changes in accumulation of these proteins were observed with 100 μM MeJA. In conclusion, our results suggest that a switch of the metabolic fate of hairy roots in response to MeJA could cause an increase in the accumulation of secondary metabolites. This is likely to have important consequences in the production of specific alkaloids important for the pharmaceutical industry.

  17. Effect of loss of T-DNA genes on MIA biosynthetic pathway gene regulation and alkaloid accumulation in Catharanthus roseus hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Jyoti; Jaggi, Monika; Wankhede, Dhammaprakash Pandhari; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2010-10-01

    Hairy roots are generated by integration of T-DNA in host plant genome from root inducing (Ri) plasmid of Agrobacterium rhizogenes and have been utilized for production of secondary metabolites in different plant systems. In Catharanthus roseus, hairy roots are known to show different morphologies, growth patterns, and alkaloid contents. It is also known that during transformation, there is a differential loss of a few T-DNA genes. To decipher the effect of loss of T-DNA genes on the various aspects of hairy roots, ten hairy root clones were analyzed for the presence or absence of T-DNA genes and its implications. It was found that the loss of a few ORFs drastically affects the growth and morphological patterns of hairy roots. The absence of T(R)-DNA from hairy roots revealed increased transcript accumulation and higher alkaloid concentrations, whereas callusing among hairy root lines led to decreased transcript and alkaloid accumulation. Significantly higher expression of MIA biosynthetic pathway genes and low abundance of regulator transcripts in hairy root clones in comparison with non-transformed control roots were also observed. This study indicates that it is not only the integration of T-DNA at certain region of host plant genome but also the presence or absence of important ORFs that affects the expression patterns of MIA biosynthetic pathway genes, regulators, and accumulation of specific alkaloids.

  18. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of Catharanthus roseus hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase gene promoter from the methyl erythritol phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Ginis, Olivia; Courdavault, Vincent; Melin, Céline; Lanoue, Arnaud; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; St-Pierre, Benoit; Courtois, Martine; Oudin, Audrey

    2012-05-01

    The Madagascar periwinkle produces monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIA) of high interest due to their therapeutical values. The terpenoid moiety of MIA is derived from the methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) and seco-iridoid pathways. These pathways are regarded as the limiting branch for MIA biosynthesis in C. roseus cell and tissue cultures. In previous studies, we demonstrated a coordinated regulation at the transcriptional and spatial levels of genes from both pathways. We report here on the isolation of the 5'-flanking region (1,049 bp) of the hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase (HDS) gene from the MEP pathway. To investigate promoter transcriptional activities, the HDS promoter was fused to GUS reporter gene. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of young tobacco leaves revealed that the cloned HDS promoter displays a tissue-specific GUS staining restricted to the vascular region of the leaves and limited to a part of the vein that encompasses the phloem in agreement with the previous localization of HDS transcripts in C. roseus aerial organs. Further functional characterizations in stably or transiently transformed C. roseus cells allowed us to identify the region that can be consider as the minimal promoter and to demonstrate the induction of HDS promoter by several hormonal signals (auxin, cytokinin, methyljasmonate and ethylene) leading to MIA production. These results, and the bioinformatic analysis of the HDS 5'-region, suggest that the HDS promoter harbours a number of cis-elements binding specific transcription factors that would regulate the flux of terpenoid precursors involved in MIA biosynthesis.

  19. Optimisation of supercritical fluid extraction of indole alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus using experimental design methodology--comparison with other extraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Verma, Arvind; Hartonen, Kari; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2008-01-01

    Response surface modelling, using MODDE 6 software for Design of Experiments and Optimisation, was applied to optimise supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) conditions for the extraction of indole alkaloids from the dried leaves of Catharanthus roseus. The effects of pressure (200-400 bar), temperature (40-80 degrees C), modifier concentration (2.2-6.6 vol%) and dynamic extraction time (20-60 min) on the yield of alkaloids were evaluated. The extracts were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography and the analytes were identified using ion trap-electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry. The method was linear for alkaloid concentration in the range 0.18-31 microg/mL. The limits of detection and quantification for catharanthine, vindoline, vinblastine and vincristine were 0.2, 0.15, 0.1 and 0.08 microg/mL and 2.7, 2.0, 1.3 and 1.1 microg/g, respectively. The dry weight content of major alkaloids in the plants were compared using different extraction methods, i.e. SFE, Soxhlet extraction, solid-liquid extraction with sonication and hot water extraction at various temperatures. The extraction techniques were also compared in terms of reproducibility, selectivity and analyte recoveries. Relative standard deviations for the major alkaloids varied from 4.1 to 17.5% in different extraction methods. The best recoveries (100%) for catharanthine were obtained by SFE at 250 bar and 80 degrees C using 6.6 vol% methanol as modifier for 40 min, for vindoline by Soxhlet extraction using dichloromethane in a reflux for 16 h, and for 3',4'-anhydrovinblastine by solid-liquid extraction using a solution of 0.5 m sulphuric acid and methanol (3:1 v/v) in an ultrasonic bath for 3 h.

  20. Ethylene-Induced Vinblastine Accumulation Is Related to Activated Expression of Downstream TIA Pathway Genes in Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Pan, Ya-Jie; Chang, Bo-Wen; Hu, Yan-Bo; Guo, Xiao-Rui; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    We selected different concentrations of ethephon, to stress C. roseus. We used qRT-PCR and HPLC followed by PCA to obtain comprehensive profiling of the vinblastine biosynthesis in response to ethephon. Based on our findings, the results showed that the high concentration of ethephon had a positive effect at both transcriptional and metabolite level. Meanwhile, there was a remarkable decrease of hydrogen peroxide content and a promoted peroxidase activity in leaves. The loading plot combination with correlation analysis suggested that CrPrx1 could be regarded as a positive regulator and interacts with ethylene response factor (ERF) to play a key role in vinblastine content and peroxidase (POD) activity. This study provides the foundation for a better understanding of the regulation and accumulation of vinblastine in response to ethephon. PMID:27314017

  1. Ethylene-Induced Vinblastine Accumulation Is Related to Activated Expression of Downstream TIA Pathway Genes in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Pan, Ya-Jie; Chang, Bo-Wen; Hu, Yan-Bo; Guo, Xiao-Rui; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    We selected different concentrations of ethephon, to stress C. roseus. We used qRT-PCR and HPLC followed by PCA to obtain comprehensive profiling of the vinblastine biosynthesis in response to ethephon. Based on our findings, the results showed that the high concentration of ethephon had a positive effect at both transcriptional and metabolite level. Meanwhile, there was a remarkable decrease of hydrogen peroxide content and a promoted peroxidase activity in leaves. The loading plot combination with correlation analysis suggested that CrPrx1 could be regarded as a positive regulator and interacts with ethylene response factor (ERF) to play a key role in vinblastine content and peroxidase (POD) activity. This study provides the foundation for a better understanding of the regulation and accumulation of vinblastine in response to ethephon.

  2. Molecular cloning and characterization of desacetoxyvindoline-4-hydroxylase, a 2-oxoglutarate dependent-dioxygenase involved in the biosynthesis of vindoline in Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Flota, F; De Carolis, E; Alarco, A M; De Luca, V

    1997-08-01

    A 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase (EC 1.14.11.11) which catalyzes the 4-hydroxylation of desacetoxyvindoline was purified to homogeneity. Three oligopeptides isolated from a tryptic digest of the purified protein were microsequenced and one oligopeptide showed significant homology to hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase from Hyoscyamus niger. A 36-mer degenerate oligonucleotide based on this peptide sequence was used to screen a Catharanthus roseus cDNA library and three clones, cD4H-1 to -3, were isolated. Although none of the three clones were full-length, the open reading frame on each clone encoded a putative protein containing the sequence of all three peptides. Primer extension analysis suggested that cD4H-3, the longest cDNA clone, was missing 156 bp at the 5' end of the clone and sequencing of the genomic clone, gD4H-8, confirmed these results. Southern blot analysis suggested that d4h is present as a single-copy gene in C. roseus which is a diploid plant, and the significant differences in the sequence of the 3'-UTR between cD4H-1 and -3 suggest that they represent dimorphic alleles of the same hydroxylase. The identity of the clone was further confirmed when extracts of transformed Escherichia coli expressed D4H enzyme activity. The D4H clone encoded a putative protein of 401 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 45.5 kDa and the amino acid sequence showed a high degree of similarity with those of a growing family of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases of plant and fungal origin. The similarity was not restricted to the dioxygenase protein sequences but was also extended to the gene structure and organization since the 205 and 1720 bp introns of d4h were inserted around the same highly conserved amino acid consensus sequences as those for e8 protein, hyoscyamine-6 beta-hydroxylase and ethylene-forming enzyme. These results provide further support that a common ancestral gene is responsible for the appearance of this family of dioxygenases

  3. Identification of a Bipartite Jasmonate-Responsive Promoter Element in the Catharanthus roseus ORCA3 Transcription Factor Gene That Interacts Specifically with AT-Hook DNA-Binding Proteins1[W

    PubMed Central

    Vom Endt, Débora; Soares e Silva, Marina; Kijne, Jan W.; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Memelink, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Jasmonates are plant signaling molecules that play key roles in defense against certain pathogens and insects, among others, by controlling the biosynthesis of protective secondary metabolites. In Catharanthus roseus, the APETALA2-domain transcription factor ORCA3 is involved in the jasmonate-responsive activation of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic genes. ORCA3 gene expression is itself induced by jasmonate. By loss- and gain-of-function experiments, we located a 74-bp region within the ORCA3 promoter, which contains an autonomous jasmonate-responsive element (JRE). The ORCA3 JRE is composed of two important sequences: a quantitative sequence responsible for a high level of expression and a qualitative sequence that appears to act as an on/off switch in response to methyl jasmonate. We isolated 12 different DNA-binding proteins having one of four different types of DNA-binding domains, using the ORCA3 JRE as bait in a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) one-hybrid transcription factor screening. The binding of one class of proteins bearing a single AT-hook DNA-binding motif was affected by mutations in the quantitative sequence within the JRE. Two of the AT-hook proteins tested had a weak activating effect on JRE-mediated reporter gene expression, suggesting that AT-hook family members may be involved in determining the level of expression of ORCA3 in response to jasmonate. PMID:17496112

  4. Novel type of receptor-like protein kinase from a higher plant (Catharanthus roseus). cDNA, gene, intramolecular autophosphorylation, and identification of a threonine important for auto- and substrate phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Muth, P; Irmler, S; Schröder, G; Schröder, J

    1996-10-25

    We characterize CrRLK1, a novel type of receptor-like kinase (RLK), from the plant Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle). The protein (90.2 kDa) deduced from the complete genomic and cDNA sequences is a RLK by predicting a N-terminal signal peptide, a large extracytoplasmic domain, a membrane-spanning hydrophobic region followed by a transfer-stop signal, and a C-terminal cytoplasmic protein kinase with all 11 conserved subdomains. It is a novel RLK type because the predicted extracytoplasmic region shares no similarity with other RLKs. The autophosphorylation was investigated with affinity-purified proteins expressed in Escherichia coli. The activity was higher with Mn2+ than with Mg2+ and achieved half-maximal rates at 2-2.5 microM ATP. The phosphorylation was predominantly on Thr, less on Ser, and not on Tyr. In contrast to other plant RLK, the kinase used an intra- rather than an intermolecular phosphorylation mechanism. After protein cleavage with formic acid, most of the radioactivity was in a 14.1-kDa peptide located at the end of the kinase domain. Mutagenesis of the four Thr residues in this peptide identified Thr-720 in the subdomain XI as important for autophosphorylation and for phosphorylation of beta-casein. This Thr is conserved in other related kinases, suggesting a subfamily sharing common autophosphorylation mechanisms.

  5. Effects of ambient and elevated CO2 on growth, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthetic pigments, antioxidants, and secondary metabolites of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G Don. grown under three different soil N levels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aradhana; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2015-03-01

    Catharanthus roseus L. plants were grown under ambient (375 ± 30 ppm) and elevated (560 ± 25 ppm) concentrations of atmospheric CO2 at different rates of N supply (without supplemental N, 0 kg N ha(-1); recommended N, 50 kg N ha(-1); and double recommended N, 100 kg N ha(-1)) in open top chambers under field condition. Elevated CO2 significantly increased photosynthetic pigments, photosynthetic efficiency, and organic carbon content in leaves at recommended (RN) and double recommended N (DRN), while significantly decreased total nitrogen content in without supplemental N (WSN). Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase were declined, while glutathione reductase, peroxidase, and phenylalanine-ammonia lyase were stimulated under elevated CO2. However, the responses of the above enzymes were modified with different rates of N supply. Elevated CO2 significantly reduced superoxide production rate, hydrogen peroxide, and malondialdehyde contents in RN and DRN. Compared with ambient, total alkaloids content increased maximally at recommended level of N, while total phenolics in WSN under elevated CO2. Elevated CO2 stimulated growth of plants by increasing plant height and numbers of branches and leaves, and the magnitude of increment were maximum in DRN. The study suggests that elevated CO2 has positively affected plants by increasing growth and alkaloids production and reducing the level of oxidative stress. However, the positive effects of elevated CO2 were comparatively lesser in plants grown under limited N availability than in moderate and higher N availability. Furthermore, the excess N supply in DRN has stimulated the growth but not the alkaloids production under elevated CO2.

  6. The Catharanthus alkaloids: pharmacognosy and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    van Der Heijden, Robert; Jacobs, Denise I; Snoeijer, Wim; Hallard, Didier; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-03-01

    The Catharanthus (or Vinca) alkaloids comprise a group of about 130 terpenoid indole alkaloids. Vinblastine is now marketed for more than 40 years as an anticancer drug and became a true lead compound for drug development. Due to the pharmaceutical importance and the low content in the plant of vinblastine and the related alkaloid vincristine, Catharanthus roseus became one of the best-studied medicinal plants. Consequently it developed as a model system for biotechnological studies on plant secondary metabolism. The aim of this review is to acquaint a broader audience with the recent progress in this research and with its exciting perspectives. The pharmacognostical aspects of the Catharanthus alkaloids cover botanical (including some historical), phytochemical and analytical data. An up-to-date view on the biosynthesis of the alkaloids is given. The pharmacological aspects of these alkaloids and their semi-synthetic derivatives are only discussed briefly. The biotechnological part focuses on alternative production systems for these alkaloids, for example by in vitro culture of C. roseus cells. Subsequently it will be discussed to what extent the alkaloid biosynthetic pathway can be manipulated genetically ("metabolic engineering"), aiming at higher production levels of the alkaloids. Another approach is to produce the alkaloids (or their precursors) in other organisms such as yeast. Despite the availability of only a limited number of biosynthetic genes, the research on C. roseus has already led to a broad scientific spin-off. It is clear that many interesting results can be expected when more genes become available.

  7. Candidatus Phytoplasma malaysianum, a novel taxon associated with virescence and phyllody of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study addressed the taxonomic position and group classification of a phytoplasma responsible for virescence and phyllody symptoms in naturally diseased Madagascar periwinkle plants in western Malaysia. Unique regions in the 16S rRNA gene from the Malaysian periwinkle virescence (MaPV) phytopla...

  8. Phytoremediation of TNT: C. roseus hairy roots as a model system

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritzen, J.R.; Hughes, J.B.; Shanks, J.V.

    1996-12-31

    Widespread contamination by 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) of Soil exists at former munitions production and handling facilities. Phytoremediation may be an effective alternative to existing methods of TNT remediation: incineration is highly expensive and recalcitrant reduction products are formed in composting. Recently, the intrinsic ability of plants to transform TNT has been demonstrated using hairy root cultures of Catharanthus roseus as a model system. Kinetic studies were performed at concentrations of 30 and 50 mg/L TNT in growth medium. The pseudo-first order rate constants for disappearance ranged from 0.0103 to 0.0161 (L/g-day); TNT disappears completely within seven to ten days of exposure. The fate of the TNT molecule in plants is also currently under study, mass balance studies were performed with 1-{sup 14}C TNT. After a seven day exposure period, 72% of the label was associated with the roots and 30% was associated with the medium. However, HPLC analysis shows that less than 5% (wt%) of the TNT added is recoverable from both the plants and the media in the form of reduction products. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Expression Patterns of Genes Involved in the Defense and Stress Response of Spiroplasma citri Infected Madagascar Periwinkle Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Nejat, Naghmeh; Vadamalai, Ganesan; Dickinson, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Madagascar periwinkle is an ornamental and a medicinal plant, and is also an indicator plant that is highly susceptible to phytoplasma and spiroplasma infections from different crops. Periwinkle lethal yellows, caused by Spiroplasma citri, is one of the most devastating diseases of periwinkle. The response of plants to S. citri infection is very little known at the transcriptome level. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to investigate the expression levels of four selected genes involved in defense and stress responses in naturally and experimentally Spiroplasma citri infected periwinkles. Strictosidine β-glucosidase involved in terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) biosynthesis pathway showed significant upregulation in experimentally and naturally infected periwinkles. The transcript level of extensin increased in leaves of periwinkles experimentally infected by S. citri in comparison to healthy ones. A similar level of heat shock protein 90 and metallothionein expression was observed in healthy, naturally and experimentally spiroplasma-diseased periwinkles. Overexpression of Strictosidine β-glucosidase demonstrates the potential utility of this gene as a host biomarker to increase the fidelity of S. citri detection and can also be used in breeding programs to develop stable disease-resistance varieties. PMID:22408455

  10. Isolation and Identification of Echinenone from Micrococcus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzel, E. H.; Cooney, J. J.

    1970-01-01

    An orange carotenoid from Micrococcus roseus was purified by solvent partitioning followed by column and thin-layer chromatography. Absorption spectra, chromatographic mobility, and partition coefficient suggested that the pigment was echinenone (4-keto-β-carotene). Reduction yielded a pigment with the spectral and polar properties of isocryptoxanthin (4-hydroxy-β-carotene), the expected product. The orange pigment and its reduction product co-chromatographed with the respective authentic pigments, confirming the original pigment as echinenone. To our knowledge echinenone has not been identified previously as a bacterial pigment. PMID:5473895

  11. Mesophyll conductance among soybean cultivars sets a tradeoff between photosynthesis and water-use.

    PubMed

    Tomeo, Nicholas J; Rosenthal, David M

    2017-03-07

    Photosynthetic efficiency is a critical determinant of crop yield potential, though it remains below the theoretical optimum in modern crop varieties. Enhancing mesophyll conductance, i.e. the rate of carbon dioxide diffusion from substomatal cavities to the sites of carboxylation, may increase photosynthetic and water use efficiencies. To improve water-use-efficiency mesophyll conductance should be increased without concomitantly increasing stomatal conductance. Here we partition variance in mesophyll conductance to within and among cultivar components across soybeans grown under both controlled and field conditions, and examine the covariation of mesophyll conductance with photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, water-use-efficiency and leaf mass per area. We demonstrate that mesophyll conductance varies more than 2-fold and that 38% of this variation is due to cultivar identity. As expected mesophyll conductance is positively correlated with photosynthetic rates. However, a strong positive correlation between mesophyll and stomatal conductance among cultivars apparently impedes positive scaling between mesophyll conductance and water-use-efficiency in soybean. Contrary to expectations, photosynthetic rates and mesophyll conductance both increased with increasing leaf mass per area. The presence of genetic variation for mesophyll conductance suggests there is potential to increase photosynthesis and mesophyll conductance by selecting for greater leaf mass per area. Increasing water-use-efficiency though, is unlikely unless there is simultaneous stabilizing selection on stomatal conductance.

  12. Rhabdobacter roseus gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Ram Hari; Kim, Jaisoo

    2016-01-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, oxidase- and catalase-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped, pink-pigmented bacterium, designated strain R49T, was isolated from soil. Flexirubin-type pigments were absent. Phylogenetic analysis based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain R49T formed a lineage within the family Cytophagaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes that was distinct from the most closely related genera Dyadobacter (91.98-93.85 % sequence similarity), Persicitalea (88.69 %) and Runella (84.79-85.81 %). The major isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone-7 (MK-7) and the major polar lipid was phosphatidylethanolamine. The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c), iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 1ω5c, C16 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH. The DNA G+C content of strain R49T was 53.9 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic analysis, strain R49T represents a novel species of a new genus in the family Cytophagaceae, for which the name Rhabdobacter roseus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Rhabdobacter roseus is R49T ( = KEMB 9005-318T = KACC 18395T = JCM 30685T).

  13. Accumulation of Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids in Periwinkle Seedlings ("Catharanthus roseus") as a Model for the Study of Plant-Environment Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda-Ham, Maria de Lourdes; Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Vazquez-Flota, Felipe

    2007-01-01

    Alkaloids are part of the chemical arsenal designed to protect plants against an adverse environment. Therefore, their synthesis and accumulation are frequently induced in response to certain environmental conditions and are mediated by chemical signals, which are formed as the first responses to the external stimulus. A set of experiments using…

  14. Variable rsponses of mesophyll conductance to substomatal carbon dioxide concentration in common bean and soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some reports indicate that mesophyll conductance to carbon dioxide varies greatly with the sub-stomatal carbon dioxide concentration during the measurement, while other reports indicate little or no change. I used the oxygen sensitivity of photosynthesis to determine the response of mesophyll condu...

  15. Genotypically Identifying Wheat Mesophyll Conductance Regulation under Progressive Drought Stress

    PubMed Central

    Olsovska, Katarina; Kovar, Marek; Brestic, Marian; Zivcak, Marek; Slamka, Pavol; Shao, Hong Bo

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis limitation by CO2 flow constraints from sub-stomatal cavities to carboxylation sites in chloroplasts under drought stress conditions is, at least in some plant species or crops not fully understood, yet. Leaf mesophyll conductance for CO2 (gm) may considerably affect both photosynthesis and water use efficiency (WUE) in plants under drought conditions. The aim of our study was to detect the responses of gm in leaves of four winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes from different origins under long-term progressive drought. Based on the measurement of gas-exchange parameters the variability of genotypic responses was analyzed at stomatal (stomata closure) and non-stomatal (diffusional and biochemical) limits of net CO2 assimilation rate (AN). In general, progressive drought caused an increasing leaf diffusion resistance against CO2 flow leading to the decrease of AN, gm and stomatal conductance (gs), respectively. Reduction of gm also led to inhibition of carboxylation efficiency (Vcmax). On the basis of achieved results a strong positive relationship between gm and gs was found out indicating a co-regulation and mutual independence of the relationship under the drought conditions. In severely stressed plants, the stomatal limitation of the CO2 assimilation rate was progressively increased, but to a less extent in comparison to gm, while a non-stomatal limitation became more dominant due to the prolonged drought. Mesophyll conductance (gm) seems to be a suitable mechanism and parameter for selection of improved diffusional properties and photosynthetic carbon assimilation in C3 plants, thus explaining their better photosynthetic performance at a whole plant level during periods of drought. PMID:27551283

  16. [Mycobacteria in the digestive tract of pink Flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber roseus, Pallas)].

    PubMed

    Rollin, P E; Rollin, D; Baylet, R; Johnson, A R

    1981-01-01

    Cloacal swabs were taken from 37 young wild Greater Flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber roseus, Pallas) in Camargue (South of France). Neither pathogenic strain, nor environmental one were found. The absence of the latter could be attributed to the high NaCl levels of the ecosystems.

  17. Acquisition of dwarf male "harems" by recently settled females of Osedax roseus n. sp. (Siboglinidae; Annelida).

    PubMed

    Rouse, G W; Worsaae, K; Johnson, S B; Jones, W J; Vrijenhoek, R C

    2008-02-01

    After the deployment of several whale carcasses in Monterey Bay, California, a time-series analysis revealed the presence of a new species of Osedax, a genus of bone-eating siboglinid annelids. That species is described here as Osedax roseus n. sp. It is the fifth species described since the erection of this genus and, like its congeners, uses a ramifying network of "roots" to house symbiotic bacteria. In less than 2 months, Osedax roseus n. sp. colonized the exposed bones of a whale carcass deposited at 1018-m depth, and many of the females were fecund in about 3 months post-deployment. As with other Osedax spp., the females have dwarf males in their tube lumens. The males accrue over time until the sex ratio is markedly male-biased. This pattern of initial female settlement followed by gradual male accumulation is consistent with the hypothesis that male sex may be environmentally determined in Osedax. Of the previously described species in this genus, Osedax roseus n. sp. is most similar to O. rubiplumus, but it has several anatomical differences, as well as much smaller females, dwarf males, and eggs. Osedax roseus n. sp. is markedly divergent (minimally 16.6%) for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) sequences from any other Osedax species.

  18. Rufibacter roseus sp. nov., isolated from radiation-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Dong; Gu, Mei-Ying; Zhu, Jing; Li, Shan-Hui; Zhang, Li-Juan; Xie, Yu-Qing; Shi, Yu-Hu; Wang, Wei; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-05-01

    A rose, Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that was motile by gliding, and designated strain H359(T), was isolated from radiation-polluted soil (with high Cs(137)) from the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of PR China and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic analysis. The isolate grew optimally at 30 °C and pH 7.0. It grew with NaCl up to 4% (w/v). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain H359(T) belonged to the genus Rufibacter, a member of the family Cytophagaceae, with Rufibacter tibetensis CCTCC AB 208084(T) as its closest phylogenetic relative, having 96.1% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the type strain. Strain H359(T) contained menaquinone-7 (MK-7) as the predominant menaquinone, and the major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, summed feature 4 (iso-C17 : 1 I and/or anteiso-C17 : 1 B), summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) and C16 : 1ω5c. The polar lipid profile had phosphatidylethanolamine as the major component. The DNA G+C content was 43.9 mol%. Based on phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic evidence, strain H359(T) represents a novel species of the genus Rufibacter, for which the name Rufibacter roseus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H359(T) ( =CPCC 100615(T) =KCTC 42217(T)).

  19. Programmed Cell Death Progresses Differentially in Epidermal and Mesophyll Cells of Lily Petals

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki-Kawai, Hiroko; Niki, Tomoko; Shibuya, Kenichi; Ichimura, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    In the petals of some species of flowers, programmed cell death (PCD) begins earlier in mesophyll cells than in epidermal cells. However, PCD progression in each cell type has not been characterized in detail. We separately constructed a time course of biochemical signs and expression patterns of PCD-associated genes in epidermal and mesophyll cells in Lilium cv. Yelloween petals. Before visible signs of senescence could be observed, we found signs of PCD, including DNA degradation and decreased protein content in mesophyll cells only. In these cells, the total proteinase activity increased on the day after anthesis. Within 3 days after anthesis, the protein content decreased by 61.8%, and 22.8% of mesophyll cells was lost. A second peak of proteinase activity was observed on day 6, and the number of mesophyll cells decreased again from days 4 to 7. These biochemical and morphological results suggest that PCD progressed in steps during flower life in the mesophyll cells. PCD began in epidermal cells on day 5, in temporal synchrony with the time course of visible senescence. In the mesophyll cells, the KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase (LoCYP) and S1/P1 nuclease (LoNUC) genes were upregulated before petal wilting, earlier than in epidermal cells. In contrast, relative to that in the mesophyll cells, the expression of the SAG12 cysteine proteinase homolog (LoSAG12) drastically increased in epidermal cells in the final stage of senescence. These results suggest that multiple PCD-associated genes differentially contribute to the time lag of PCD progression between epidermal and mesophyll cells of lily petals. PMID:26605547

  20. Programmed Cell Death Progresses Differentially in Epidermal and Mesophyll Cells of Lily Petals.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki-Kawai, Hiroko; Niki, Tomoko; Shibuya, Kenichi; Ichimura, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    In the petals of some species of flowers, programmed cell death (PCD) begins earlier in mesophyll cells than in epidermal cells. However, PCD progression in each cell type has not been characterized in detail. We separately constructed a time course of biochemical signs and expression patterns of PCD-associated genes in epidermal and mesophyll cells in Lilium cv. Yelloween petals. Before visible signs of senescence could be observed, we found signs of PCD, including DNA degradation and decreased protein content in mesophyll cells only. In these cells, the total proteinase activity increased on the day after anthesis. Within 3 days after anthesis, the protein content decreased by 61.8%, and 22.8% of mesophyll cells was lost. A second peak of proteinase activity was observed on day 6, and the number of mesophyll cells decreased again from days 4 to 7. These biochemical and morphological results suggest that PCD progressed in steps during flower life in the mesophyll cells. PCD began in epidermal cells on day 5, in temporal synchrony with the time course of visible senescence. In the mesophyll cells, the KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase (LoCYP) and S1/P1 nuclease (LoNUC) genes were upregulated before petal wilting, earlier than in epidermal cells. In contrast, relative to that in the mesophyll cells, the expression of the SAG12 cysteine proteinase homolog (LoSAG12) drastically increased in epidermal cells in the final stage of senescence. These results suggest that multiple PCD-associated genes differentially contribute to the time lag of PCD progression between epidermal and mesophyll cells of lily petals.

  1. Differential positioning of chloroplasts in C4 mesophyll and bundle sheath cells.

    PubMed

    Maai, Eri; Miyake, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka

    2011-08-01

    Chloroplast photorelocation movement is extensively studied in C3 but not C4 plants. C4 plants have 2 types of photosynthetic cells: mesophyll and bundle sheath cells. Mesophyll chloroplasts are randomly distributed along cell walls, whereas bundle sheath chloroplasts are located close to the vascular tissues or mesophyll cells depending on the plant species. The cell-specific C 4 chloroplast arrangement is established during cell maturation, and is maintained throughout the life of the cell. However, only mesophyll chloroplasts can change their positions in response to environmental stresses. The migration pattern is unique to C4 plants and differs from that of C3 chloroplasts. In this mini-review, we highlight the cell-specific disposition of chloroplasts in C4 plants and discuss the possible physiological significances.

  2. Metabolomic Responses of Guard Cells and Mesophyll Cells to Bicarbonate

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Biswapriya B.; de Armas, Evaldo; Tong, Zhaohui; Chen, Sixue

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 presently at 400 ppm is expected to reach 550 ppm in 2050, an increment expected to affect plant growth and productivity. Paired stomatal guard cells (GCs) are the gate-way for water, CO2, and pathogen, while mesophyll cells (MCs) represent the bulk cell-type of green leaves mainly for photosynthesis. We used the two different cell types, i.e., GCs and MCs from canola (Brassica napus) to profile metabolomic changes upon increased CO2 through supplementation with bicarbonate (HCO3-). Two metabolomics platforms enabled quantification of 268 metabolites in a time-course study to reveal short-term responses. The HCO3- responsive metabolomes of the cell types differed in their responsiveness. The MCs demonstrated increased amino acids, phenylpropanoids, redox metabolites, auxins and cytokinins, all of which were decreased in GCs in response to HCO3-. In addition, the GCs showed differential increases of primary C-metabolites, N-metabolites (e.g., purines and amino acids), and defense-responsive pathways (e.g., alkaloids, phenolics, and flavonoids) as compared to the MCs, indicating differential C/N homeostasis in the cell-types. The metabolomics results provide insights into plant responses and crop productivity under future climatic changes where elevated CO2 conditions are to take center-stage. PMID:26641455

  3. Unbiased estimation of chloroplast number in mesophyll cells: advantage of a genuine three-dimensional approach

    PubMed Central

    Kubínová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast number per cell is a frequently examined quantitative anatomical parameter, often estimated by counting chloroplast profiles in two-dimensional (2D) sections of mesophyll cells. However, a mesophyll cell is a three-dimensional (3D) structure and this has to be taken into account when quantifying its internal structure. We compared 2D and 3D approaches to chloroplast counting from different points of view: (i) in practical measurements of mesophyll cells of Norway spruce needles, (ii) in a 3D model of a mesophyll cell with chloroplasts, and (iii) using a theoretical analysis. We applied, for the first time, the stereological method of an optical disector based on counting chloroplasts in stacks of spruce needle optical cross-sections acquired by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. This estimate was compared with counting chloroplast profiles in 2D sections from the same stacks of sections. Comparing practical measurements of mesophyll cells, calculations performed in a 3D model of a cell with chloroplasts as well as a theoretical analysis showed that the 2D approach yielded biased results, while the underestimation could be up to 10-fold. We proved that the frequently used method for counting chloroplasts in a mesophyll cell by counting their profiles in 2D sections did not give correct results. We concluded that the present disector method can be efficiently used for unbiased estimation of chloroplast number per mesophyll cell. This should be the method of choice, especially in coniferous needles and leaves with mesophyll cells with lignified cell walls where maceration methods are difficult or impossible to use. PMID:24336344

  4. Isolation of Mesophyll Cells from Sedum telephium Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, I.; Vines, H. M.; Black, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    A technique is described for mechanically isolating metabolically active individual spongy mesophyll cells from the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant, Sedum telephium. Mature leaves are selected at about 2 PM when acidity is low, and three different media are used to reduce the problem of leaf acidity and to maintain isotonic conditions. The upper and lower epidermis is peeled from chilled leaves and the leaves are suspended in a buffered “soaking medium,” then gently ground with a mortar and pestle. Cells and debris are separated using a “washing medium,” with cells being filtered through a 136 micron net and collected on an 80 micron net. Cells then are suspended in a “cell suspension medium” and concentrated by centrifugation. Approximately 2 hours are required for the isolation procedure, and activity in CO2 fixation is constant for up to 4 hours after isolation. Microscopic examination shows about 65% of the isolated cells appear intact and unplasmolyzed and are similar to leaf msophyll cells. The yield of cells on a leaf chlorophyll basis is about 1%. A light micrograph of the isolated cells is given. The isolated cells upon addition of phosphoenolpyruvate, 2-phosphoglycerate, and ribulose-1, 5-diphosphate fix CO2 as rapidly as intact leaves; however, without exogenous substrate the cells only fix CO2 between 10 and 20% of intact leaves. The temperature and pH optima for cellular CO2 fixation in the presence of phosphoenolpyruvate is 35 to 45 C and 7.5 to 9.0, respectively. The light and dark portions of CO2 fixation with the isolated cells are considered in relation to a scheme for net CO2 fixation by Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. Images PMID:16658305

  5. Avian poxvirus infection in flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) in a zoo in Japan.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Toshiaki; Kaneko, Mikako; Mase, Masaji

    2010-06-01

    Two diseased flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) with nodular lesions (pock) characteristic of poxvirus infection were found in a zoo in Japan. Avian poxvirus was isolated from the lesions (upper beak) of the affected birds and was genetically characterized by polymerase chain reaction, nucleotide sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis. Based on the phylogenetic analysis, the virus isolated from these flamingos was genetically close to those isolated from pigeons, suggesting the possibility of interspecies transmission.

  6. Normal and clinical haematology of greater and lesser flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus and Phoeniconaias minor).

    PubMed

    Hawkey, C M; Hart, M G; Samour, H J

    1985-10-01

    Normal haematological reference values were obtained for Greater and Lesser flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus, Phoeniconaias minor). Statistically significant differences in the total white cell count and the absolute heterophil count were found in the two species. The reference values were used to identify abnormalities in the blood of five sick birds. Three of these were anaemic, all showed red cell hypochromia and four had heterophilia. The findings suggested that haematological testing is of potential diagnostic value in the species.

  7. Photochemical Properties of Mesophyll and Bundle Sheath Chloroplasts of Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Bazzaz, Maarib Bakri; Govindjee

    1973-01-01

    Several photochemical and spectral properties of maize (Zea mays) bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts are reported that provide a better understanding of the photosynthetic apparatus of C4 plants. The difference absorption spectrum at 298 K and the fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of chlorophyll at 298 K and 77 K provide new information on the different forms of chlorophyll a in bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts: the former contain, relative to short wavelength chlorophyll a forms, more long wavelength chlorophyll a form (e.g. chlorophyll a 693 and chlorophyll a 705) and less chlorophyll b than the latter. The degree of polarization of chlorophyll a fluorescence is 6% in bundle sheath and 4% in mesophyll chloroplasts. This result is consistent with the presence of relatively high amounts of oriented long wavelength forms of chlorophyll a in bundle sheath compared to mesophyll chloroplasts. The relative yield of variable, with respect to constant, chorophyll a fluorescence in mesophyll chloroplasts is more than twice that in bundle sheath chloroplast. Furthermore, the relative yield of total chlorophyll a fluorescence is 40% lower in bundle sheath compared to that in mesophyll chloroplasts. This is in agreement with the presence of the higher ratio of the weakly fluorescent pigment system I to pigment system II in bundle sheath than in mesophyll chloroplast. The efficiency of energy transfer from chlorophyll b and carotenoids to chlorophyll a are calculated to be 100 and 50%, respectively, in both types of chloroplasts. Fluorescence quenching of atebrin, reflecting high energy state of chloroplasts, is 10 times higher in mesophyll chloroplasts than in bundle sheath chloroplasts during noncyclic electron flow but is equal during cyclic flow. The entire electron transport chain is shown to be present in both types of chloroplasts, as inferred from the antagonistic effect of red (650 nm) and far red (710 nm) lights on the absorbance changes at

  8. TEMPRANILLO Reveals the Mesophyll as Crucial for Epidermal Trichome Formation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Jaramillo, Andrea E.; Osnato, Michela; Shani, Eilon

    2016-01-01

    Plant trichomes are defensive specialized epidermal cells. In all accepted models, the epidermis is the layer involved in trichome formation, a process controlled by gibberellins (GAs) in Arabidopsis rosette leaves. Indeed, GA activates a genetic cascade in the epidermis for trichome initiation. Here we report that TEMPRANILLO (TEM) genes negatively control trichome initiation not only from the epidermis but also from the leaf layer underneath the epidermis, the mesophyll. Plants over-expressing or reducing TEM specifically in the mesophyll, display lower or higher trichome numbers, respectively. We surprisingly found that fluorescently labeled GA3 accumulates exclusively in the mesophyll of leaves, but not in the epidermis, and that TEM reduces its accumulation and the expression of several newly identified GA transporters. This strongly suggests that TEM plays an essential role, not only in GA biosynthesis, but also in regulating GA distribution in the mesophyll, which in turn directs epidermal trichome formation. Moreover, we show that TEM also acts as a link between GA and cytokinin signaling in the epidermis by negatively regulating downstream genes of both trichome formation pathways. Overall, these results call for a re-evaluation of the present theories of trichome formation as they reveal mesophyll essential during epidermal trichome initiation. PMID:26802039

  9. [Diversity of Cuproproteins and Copper Homeostasis Systems in Melioribacter roseus, a Facultatively Anaerobic Thermophilic Member of a New Phylum Ignavibacteriae].

    PubMed

    Karnachuk, O V; Gavrilov, S N; Avakyan, M R; Podosokorskaya, O A; Frank, Yu A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E A; Kublanov, I B

    2015-01-01

    The genome of Melioribacter roseus, one of two members of the recently described phylum Ignavibacteriae, was searched for the genes encoding proteins associated with copper transport or containing copper as cofactors, and the effect of Cu2+ concentration in the medium on M. roseus growth was investigated. Genomic analysis revealed a variety of copper-containing oxidoreductases in this facultative anaerobe. Three ATPases responsible for copper transport were identified. One of them (MROS_1511) was.probably involved in assembly of the copper-containing cytochrome c oxidase, while two others (MROS_0327 and MROS_0791) probably carried out a detoxification function. The presence of several copper-containing oxidoreductases and copper homeostasis systems in M. roseus is in agreement with the previously hypothesized origin of the phylum Ignavibacteriae from an aerobic ancestor common with those of Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi.

  10. Leaf light reflectance, transmittance, absorptance, and optical and geometrical parameters for eleven plant genera with different leaf mesophyll arrangements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Wiegand, C. L.; Escobar, D. E.; Rodriguez, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    Review of research on radiation interactions within plant canopies and communities and interactions of various leaf structures (mesophyll arrangements) with electromagnetic radiation involved in the interpretation of data sensed from air or spacecraft. The hypothesis underlying the research reported is that leaf mesophyll arrangements influence spectral energy measurements of leaves.

  11. High precision and continuous measurements of mesophyll and stomatal conductance to CO2 diffusion during photosynthesis using QCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, N.; Wada, R.; Nakayama, T.; Takemura, K.; Takahashi, K.; Hanba, Y. T.; Matsumi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The diffusion of CO2 within leaves during photosynthesis can be an important limiting factor for productivity. Mesophyll conductance had been thought to be infinite or constant over the time. Recent studies, however, have revealed that mesophyll conductance is altered by growth environment,and may respond rapidly to some environmental variables such as light and CO2 concentration. Mesophyll conductance has been suggested to be dependent on leaf anatomical and morphological structures, and aquaporin have been proven to play an important role in CO2 transport across cell membranes. In this study we used transgenic Eucalyptus overexpressing radish aquaporin PIP2 to investigate the effect of aquaporin on mesophyll conductance. We hypothesized that stomatal and mesophyll conductance may respond differently to environmental alterations. A mid-infrared laser absorption spectrometer (QCL; Aerodyne research Inc.) was coupled to a photosynthesis system to allow simultaneous measurement of exchange of CO2 and its isotopologues.We found that mesophyll conductance responded more rapidly to alteration of the light intensity compared to stomatal conductance, regardless of aquaporin expression. However, mesophyll conductance was higher in the leaves with higher aquaporin content. The mesophyll response was completed within 5 minutes, considerably faster than the stomatal response to the same perturbation.

  12. Factors affecting polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in mesophyll cells of sugarcane and switchgrass

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polyhydroxyalkanoates are linear biodegradable polyesters produced by bacteria as a carbon store and used to produce a range of bioplastics. Widespread polyhydroxyalkanoate production in C4 crops would decrease petroleum dependency by producing a renewable supply of biodegradable plastics along with residual biomass that could be converted into biofuels or energy. Increasing yields to commercial levels in biomass crops however remains a challenge. Previously, lower accumulation levels of the short side chain polyhydroxyalkanoate, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), were observed in the chloroplasts of mesophyll (M) cells compared to bundle sheath (BS) cells in transgenic maize (Zea mays), sugarcane (Saccharum sp.), and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) leading to a significant decrease in the theoretical yield potential. Here we explore various factors which might affect polymer accumulation in mesophyll cells, including targeting of the PHB pathway enzymes to the mesophyll plastid and their access to substrate. Results The small subunit of Rubisco from pea effectively targeted the PHB biosynthesis enzymes to both M and BS chloroplasts of sugarcane and switchgrass. PHB enzyme activity was retained following targeting to M plastids and was equivalent to that found in the BS plastids. Leaf total fatty acid content was not affected by PHB production. However, when fatty acid synthesis was chemically inhibited, polymer accumulated in M cells. Conclusions In this study, we provide evidence that access to substrate and neither poor targeting nor insufficient activity of the PHB biosynthetic enzymes may be the limiting factor for polymer production in mesophyll chloroplasts of C4 plants. PMID:25209261

  13. Oil bodies in leaf mesophyll cells of angiosperms: overview and a selected survey.

    PubMed

    Lersten, Nels R; Czlapinski, Albert R; Curtis, John D; Freckmann, Robert; Horner, Harry T

    2006-12-01

    Neutral (storage) oil bodies occur in leaf mesophyll cells of many angiosperms, but their literature has been largely forgotten. We review this literature and provide a survey of 302 species and hybrids from mostly north-central US species representing 113 families. Freehand cross sections of fresh leaves stained with Sudan IV verified the presence of oil. In 71 species from 24 families we observed 1-15 oil bodies per mesophyll cell. The eudicot families Asteraceae, Caprifoliaceae, Lamiaceae, and Rosaceae had the highest number of species with oil bodies, whereas few or no species in the Apiaceae, Betulaceae, Fabaceae, and Scrophulariaceae had them. Only three of 19 monocot species sampled had oil bodies. Repeat sampling of a Malus (crabapple) cultivar and a Euonymus species showed conspicuous oil bodies in mid-summer and also in mid-autumn in both attached and recently shed leaves. Oil bodies in leaf mesophyll cells are conspicuous (visible in hand cross sections using moderate magnification in unstained water mounts) in numerous species, and they occur throughout the growing season in at least some species. Neutral oil bodies in leaf mesophyll cells are not mentioned in contemporary textbooks and advanced works, but they deserve recognition as significant cellular components of many taxa, in which they may be significant sources of commercial oils.

  14. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis. PMID:27502666

  15. Modulation of osmotic stress effects on photosynthesis and respiration by temperature in mesophyll protoplast of pea.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Padmanabh; Raghavendra, A S

    2004-12-01

    Exposure of mesophyll protoplast of pea to osmotic stress decreases the rate of photosynthesis while stimulating marginally the respiratory rate of mesophyll protoplasts. The interaction of osmotic and temperature stress during the modulation of photosynthetic and respiratory rates of pea (Pisum sativum var Azad P1) mesophyll protoplasts was investigated. The protoplasts were exposed to either iso-osmotic (0.4 M) or hyper-osmotic (1.0 M) concentration of sorbitol at 15 degrees and 25 degrees C. The rates of photosynthesis and respiration were studied. At optimum temperature of 25 degrees C, there was a decrease in photosynthesis (< 10%) at hyper-osmoticum (osmotic effect), whereas respiration increased marginally (by about 15%). Low temperature (15 degrees C) aggravated the sensitivity of both respiration and photosynthesis to osmotic stress. At 15 degrees C, the decrease in photosynthesis due to osmotic stress was > 35%, while the respiratory rate was stimulated by 30%. The relative proportion of cytochrome pathway decreased by about 50% at both 15 degrees C and 25 degrees C while that of alternative pathway increased, more so, at 15 degrees C, when the mesophyll protoplasts were subjected to hyper-osmoticum stress. The titration experiments showed that extent of engagement of alternative pathway was higher, the slope value was slightly higher for 15 degrees C compared to 25 degrees C. Low temperature modulates the effect of hyper-osmoticum stress on photosynthesis and respiration, and results in increased participation of alternative pathway.

  16. Potassium retention in leaf mesophyll as an element of salinity tissue tolerance in halophytes.

    PubMed

    Percey, William J; Shabala, Lana; Wu, Qi; Su, Nana; Breadmore, Michael C; Guijt, Rosanne M; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-12-01

    Soil salinity remains a major threat to global food security, and the progress in crop breeding for salinity stress tolerance may be achieved only by pyramiding key traits mediating plant adaptive responses to high amounts of dissolved salts in the rhizosphere. This task may be facilitated by studying natural variation in salinity tolerance among plant species and, specifically, exploring mechanisms of salinity tolerance in halophytes. The aim of this work was to establish the causal link between mesophyll ion transport activity and plant salt tolerance in a range of evolutionary contrasting halophyte and glycophyte species. Plants were grown under saline conditions in a glasshouse, followed by assessing their growth and photosynthetic performance. In a parallel set of experiments, net K(+) and H(+) transport across leaf mesophyll and their modulation by light were studied in control and salt-treated mesophyll segments using vibrating non-invasive ion selective microelectrode (the MIFE) technique. The reported results show that mesophyll cells in glycophyte species loses 2-6 fold more K(+) compared with their halophyte counterparts. This decline was reflected in a reduced maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, chlorophyll content and growth observed in the glasshouse experiments. In addition to reduced K(+) efflux, the more tolerant species also exhibited reduced H(+) efflux, which is interpreted as an energy-saving strategy allowing more resources to be redirected towards plant growth. It is concluded that the ability of mesophyll to retain K(+) without a need to activate plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase is an essential component of salinity tolerance in halophytes and halophytic crop plants.

  17. Effects of shading on the photosynthetic characteristics and mesophyll cell ultrastructure of summer maize.

    PubMed

    Ren, Baizhao; Cui, Haiyan; Camberato, James J; Dong, Shuting; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Jiwang

    2016-08-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of shading on the photosynthetic characteristics and mesophyll cell ultrastructure of two summer maize hybrids Denghai605 (DH605) and Zhengdan958 (ZD958). The ambient sunlight treatment was used as control (CK) and shading treatments (40 % of ambient sunlight) were applied at different growth stages from silking (R1) to physiological maturity (R6) (S1), from the sixth leaf stage (V6) to R1 (S2), and from seeding to R6 (S3), respectively. The net photosynthetic rate (P n) was significantly decreased after shading. The greatest reduction of P n was found at S3 treatment, followed by S1 and S2 treatments. P n of S3 was decreased by 59 and 48 % for DH605, and 39 and 43 % for ZD958 at tasseling and milk-ripe stages, respectively, compared to that of CK. Additionally, leaf area index (LAI) and chlorophyll content decreased after shading. In terms of mesophyll cell ultrastructure, chloroplast configuration of mesophyll cells dispersed, and part of chloroplast swelled and became circular. Meanwhile, the major characteristics of chloroplasts showed poorly developed thylakoid structure at the early growth stage, blurry lamellar structure, loose grana, and a large gap between slices and warping granum. Then, plasmolysis occurred in mesophyll cells and the endomembrane system was destroyed, which resulted in the dissolution of cell membrane, karyotheca, mitochondria, and some membrane structures. The damaged mesophyll cell ultrastructure led to the decrease of photosynthetic capacity, and thus resulted in significant yield reduction by 45, 11, and 84 % in S1, S2, and S3 treatments, respectively, compared to that of CK.

  18. Genomic analysis of Melioribacter roseus, facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep lineage within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group.

    PubMed

    Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Mardanov, Andrey V; Podosokorskaya, Olga A; Gavrilov, Sergey N; Kublanov, Ilya V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2013-01-01

    Melioribacter roseus is a moderately thermophilic facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep branch within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group. To better understand the metabolic capabilities and possible ecological functions of M. roseus and get insights into the evolutionary history of this bacterial lineage, we sequenced the genome of the type strain P3M-2(T). A total of 2838 open reading frames was predicted from its 3.30 Mb genome. The whole proteome analysis supported phylum-level classification of M. roseus since most of the predicted proteins had closest matches in Bacteriodetes, Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Firmicutes and deeply-branching bacterium Caldithrix abyssi, rather than in one particular phylum. Consistent with the ability of the bacterium to grow on complex carbohydrates, the genome analysis revealed more than one hundred glycoside hydrolases, glycoside transferases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases. The reconstructed central metabolism revealed pathways enabling the fermentation of complex organic substrates, as well as their complete oxidation through aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Genes encoding the photosynthetic and nitrogen-fixation machinery of green sulfur bacteria, as well as key enzymes of autotrophic carbon fixation pathways, were not identified. The M. roseus genome supports its affiliation to a novel phylum Ignavibateriae, representing the first step on the evolutionary pathway from heterotrophic ancestors of Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group towards anaerobic photoautotrophic Chlorobi.

  19. Comparative Proteomic Insights into the Lactate Responses of Halophilic Salinicoccus roseus W12

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Limin; Yang, Han; Cai, Yumeng; Sun, Lifan; Xue, Yanfen; Yu, Bo; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Extremophiles use adaptive mechanisms to survive in extreme environments, which is of great importance for several biotechnological applications. A halophilic strain, Salinicoccus roseus W12, was isolated from salt lake in Inner Mongolia, China in this study. The ability of the strain to survive under high sodium conditions (including 20% sodium lactate or 25% sodium chloride, [w/v]) made it an ideal host to screen for key factors related to sodium lactate resistance. The proteomic responses to lactate were studied using W12 cells cultivated with or without lactate stress. A total of 1,656 protein spots in sodium lactate-treated culture and 1,843 spots in NaCl-treated culture were detected by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and 32 of 120 significantly altered protein spots (fold change > 2, p < 0.05) were identified by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Among 21 successfully identified spots, 19 proteins were upregulated and 2 were downregulated. The identified proteins are mainly involved in metabolism, cellular processes and signaling, and information storage and processing. Transcription studies confirmed that most of the encoding genes were upregulated after the cells were exposed to lactate in 10 min. Cross-protecting and energy metabolism-related proteins played an important role in lactate tolerance for S. roseus W12. PMID:26358621

  20. Plasticity in mesophyll volume fraction modulates light-acclimation in needle photosynthesis in two pines.

    PubMed

    Niinemets, Ulo; Lukjanova, Aljona; Turnbull, Matthew H; Sparrow, Ashley D

    2007-08-01

    Acclimation potential of needle photosynthetic capacity varies greatly among pine species, but the underlying chemical, anatomical and morphological controls are not entirely understood. We investigated the light-dependent variation in needle characteristics in individuals of Pinus patula Schlect. & Cham., which has 19-31-cm long pendulous needles, and individuals of P. radiata D. Don., which has shorter (8-17-cm-long) stiffer needles. Needle nitrogen and carbon contents, mesophyll and structural tissue volume fractions, needle dry mass per unit total area (M(A)) and its components, volume to total area ratio (V/A(T)) and needle density (D = M(A)/(V/A(T))), and maximum carboxylase activity of Rubisco (V(cmax)) and capacity of photosynthetic electron transport (J(max)) were investigated in relation to seasonal mean integrated irradiance (Q(int)). Increases in Q(int) from canopy bottom to top resulted in proportional increases in both needle thickness and width such that needle total to projected surface area ratio, characterizing the efficiency of light interception, was independent of Q(int). Increased light availability also led to larger M(A) and nitrogen content per unit area (N(A)). Light-dependent modifications in M(A) resulted from increases in both V/A(T) and D, whereas N(A) changed because of increases in both M(A) and mass-based nitrogen content (N(M)) (N(A) = N(M)M(A)). Overall, the volume fraction of mesophyll cells increased with increasing irradiance and V/A(T) as the fraction of hypodermis and epidermis decreased with increasing needle thickness. Increases in M(A) and N(A) resulted in enhanced J(max) and V(cmax) per unit area in both species, but mass-based photosynthetic capacity increased only in P. patula. In addition, J(max) and V(cmax) showed greater plasticity in response to light in P. patula. Species differences in mesophyll volume fraction explained most of the variation in mass-based needle photosynthetic capacity between species

  1. Impact of Mesophyll Diffusion on Estimated Global Land CO2 Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Gu, L.; Dickinson, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    In C3 plants, CO2 concentrations drop considerably along mesophyll diffusion pathways from substomatal cavities to chloroplasts where CO2 assimilation occurs. Global carbon cycle models have not explicitly represented this internal drawdown and so overestimate CO2 available for carboxylation and underestimate photosynthetic responsiveness to atmospheric CO2. An explicit consideration of mesophyll diffusion increases the modeled cumulative CO2 fertilization effect (CFE) for global gross primary production (GPP) from 915 PgC to 1057 PgC for the period of 1901 to 2010. This increase represents a 16% correction large enough to explain the persistent overestimation of growth rates of historical atmospheric CO2 by Earth System Models. Without this correction, the CFE for global GPP is underestimated by 0.05 PgC yr-1ppm-1. This finding implies that the contemporary terrestrial biosphere is more CO2-limited than previously thought.

  2. Leaf anatomy mediates coordination of leaf hydraulic conductance and mesophyll conductance to CO2 in Oryza.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dongliang; Flexas, Jaume; Yu, Tingting; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang

    2017-01-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf ) and mesophyll conductance (gm ) both represent major constraints to photosynthetic rate (A), and previous studies have suggested that Kleaf and gm is correlated in leaves. However, there is scarce empirical information about their correlation. In this study, Kleaf , leaf hydraulic conductance inside xylem (Kx ), leaf hydraulic conductance outside xylem (Kox ), A, stomatal conductance (gs ), gm , and anatomical and structural leaf traits in 11 Oryza genotypes were investigated to elucidate the correlation of H2 O and CO2 diffusion inside leaves. All of the leaf functional and anatomical traits varied significantly among genotypes. Kleaf was not correlated with the maximum theoretical stomatal conductance calculated from stomatal dimensions (gsmax ), and neither gs nor gsmax were correlated with Kx . Moreover, Kox was linearly correlated with gm and both were closely related to mesophyll structural traits. These results suggest that Kleaf and gm are related to leaf anatomical and structural features, which may explain the mechanism for correlation between gm and Kleaf .

  3. Impact of mesophyll diffusion on estimated global land CO2 fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Gu, Lianhong; Dickinson, Robert E.; Norby, Richard J.; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    2014-01-01

    In C3 plants, CO2 concentrations drop considerably along mesophyll diffusion pathways from substomatal cavities to chloroplasts where CO2 assimilation occurs. Global carbon cycle models have not explicitly represented this internal drawdown and therefore overestimate CO2 available for carboxylation and underestimate photosynthetic responsiveness to atmospheric CO2. An explicit consideration of mesophyll diffusion increases the modeled cumulative CO2 fertilization effect (CFE) for global gross primary production (GPP) from 915 to 1,057 PgC for the period of 1901–2010. This increase represents a 16% correction, which is large enough to explain the persistent overestimation of growth rates of historical atmospheric CO2 by Earth system models. Without this correction, the CFE for global GPP is underestimated by 0.05 PgC/y/ppm. This finding implies that the contemporary terrestrial biosphere is more CO2 limited than previously thought. PMID:25313079

  4. Impact of mesophyll diffusion on estimated global land CO2 fertilization

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Ying; Gu, Lianhong; Dickinson, Robert E.; ...

    2014-10-13

    In C3 plants, CO2 concentrations drop considerably along mesophyll diffusion pathways from substomatal cavities to chloroplasts where CO2 assimilation occurs. Global carbon cycle models have not explicitly represented this internal drawdown and so overestimate CO2 available for carboxylation and underestimate photosynthetic responsiveness to atmospheric CO2. An explicit consideration of mesophyll diffusion increases the modeled cumulative CO2 fertilization effect (CFE) for global gross primary production (GPP) from 915 PgC to 1057 PgC for the period of 1901 to 2010. This increase represents a 16% correction, large enough to explain the persistent overestimation of growth rates of historical atmospheric CO2 by Earthmore » System Models. Without this correction, the CFE for global GPP is underestimated by 0.05 PgC yr-1ppm-1. This finding implies that the contemporary terrestrial biosphere is more CO2-limited than previously thought.« less

  5. Sensitivity of Stomata to Abscisic Acid (An Effect of the Mesophyll).

    PubMed Central

    Trejo, C. L.; Davies, W. J.; Ruiz, LdMP.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of added abscisic acid (ABA) on the stomatal behavior of Commelina communis L. were tested using three different systems. ABA was applied to isolated epidermis or to leaf pieces incubated in the light in bathing solutions perfused with CO2-free air. ABA was also fed to detached leaves in a transpiration bioassay. The apparent sensitivity of stomata to ABA was highly dependent on the method used to feed ABA. Stomata of isolated epidermis were apparently most sensitive to ABA, such that a concentration of 1 [mu]M caused almost complete stomatal closure. When pieces of whole leaves were floated on solutions of ABA of the same concentration, the stomata were almost completely open. The same concentration of ABA fed through the midrib of transpiring detached leaves caused an intermediate response. These differences in stomatal sensitivity to added ABA were found to be a function of differences in the ABA concentration in the epidermes. Comparison of the three application systems suggested that, when leaf pieces were incubated in ABA or fed with ABA through the midrib, accumulation of ABA in the epidermes was limited by the presence of the mesophyll. Even bare mesophyll incubated in ABA solution did not accumulate ABA. Accumulation of radioactivity by leaf pieces floated on [3H]ABA confirmed ABA uptake in this system. Experiments with tetcyclacis, an inhibitor of phaseic acid formation, suggested that rapid metabolism of ABA in mesophyll can have a controlling influence on ABA concentration in both the mesophyll and the epidermis. Inhibition of ABA catabolism with tetcyclacis allows ABA accumulation and increases the apparent sensitivity of stomata to applied ABA. The results are discussed in the context of an important role for ABA metabolism in the regulation of stomatal behavior. PMID:12231838

  6. Effects of drought on mesophyll conductance and photosynthetic limitations at different tree canopy layers.

    PubMed

    Cano, F Javier; Sánchez-Gómez, David; Rodríguez-Calcerrada, Jesús; Warren, Charles R; Gil, Luis; Aranda, Ismael

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, many studies have focused on the limiting role of mesophyll conductance (gm ) to photosynthesis (An ) under water stress, but no studies have examined the effect of drought on gm through the forest canopy. We investigated limitations to An on leaves at different heights in a mixed adult stand of sessile oak (Quercus petraea) and beech (Fagus sylvatica) trees during a moderately dry summer. Moderate drought decreased An of top and lowest beech canopy leaves much more than in leaves located in the mid canopy; whereas in oak, An of the lower canopy was decreased more than in sunlit leaves. The decrease of An was probably not due to leaf-level biochemistry given that VCmax was generally unaffected by drought. The reduction in An was instead associated with reduction in stomatal and mesophyll conductances. Drought-induced increases in stomatal limitations were largest in leaves from the top canopy, whereas drought-induced increases in mesophyll limitations were largest in leaves from the lowest canopy. Sensitivity analysis highlighted the need to decompose the canopy into different leaf layers and to incorporate the limitation imposed by gm when assessing the impact of drought on the gas exchange of tree canopies.

  7. Proteasome targeting of proteins in Arabidopsis leaf mesophyll, epidermal and vascular tissues

    PubMed Central

    Svozil, Julia; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baerenfaller, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Protein and transcript levels are partly decoupled as a function of translation efficiency and protein degradation. Selective protein degradation via the Ubiquitin-26S proteasome system (UPS) ensures protein homeostasis and facilitates adjustment of protein abundance during changing environmental conditions. Since individual leaf tissues have specialized functions, their protein composition is different and hence also protein level regulation is expected to differ. To understand UPS function in a tissue-specific context we developed a method termed Meselect to effectively and rapidly separate Arabidopsis thaliana leaf epidermal, vascular and mesophyll tissues. Epidermal and vascular tissue cells are separated mechanically, while mesophyll cells are obtained after rapid protoplasting. The high yield of proteins was sufficient for tissue-specific proteome analyses after inhibition of the proteasome with the specific inhibitor Syringolin A (SylA) and affinity enrichment of ubiquitylated proteins. SylA treatment of leaves resulted in the accumulation of 225 proteins and identification of 519 ubiquitylated proteins. Proteins that were exclusively identified in the three different tissue types are consistent with specific cellular functions. Mesophyll cell proteins were enriched for plastid membrane translocation complexes as targets of the UPS. Epidermis enzymes of the TCA cycle and cell wall biosynthesis specifically accumulated after proteasome inhibition, and in the vascular tissue several enzymes involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis were found to be ubiquitylated. Our results demonstrate that protein level changes and UPS protein targets are characteristic of the individual leaf tissues and that the proteasome is relevant for tissue-specific functions. PMID:26074939

  8. Changes of mesophyll and the rubisco activity in pea plants grown in clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamchuk, N. I.

    In earlier research, it was found that microgravity causes alteration of mesophyll cell parameters and dislication at the ultrastructural level (Kordyum et al., 1989, Nedukha et al., 1991, Kordyum, 1997, Adamchuk et al., 2002). Also, destruction of the fine structure of chloroplasts was reported by Abilov et al. (1986), Aliev et al. (1987), Kordyum et al. (1989), and Adamchuk et al. (1999). In addition, Abilov et al. (1986), Aliev et al. (1987), Brown et al. (1993) have discovered the decrease in starch volume. The objective of this work was to compare quantitative ultrastructural parameters of mesophyll cells (including properties of their chloroplasts) and the level of Rubisco activity detected in clinorotated and control plants of pea (Pisum sativum L.). Plants were grown for 12 days in the nutritional medium of Hogland on a clinostat (with 2 rev. min-1 speed of rotation) at a temperature of 23-25°C and illumination 230 μ mol per m-2s-1. The comparison of transversal cross-sections of leaves has revealed a significant increase of mesophyll cell volume and intercellular space under experimental conditions. This expansion of mesophyll cells has correlated with an increase of the number of chloroplasts. Essential ultrastructural changes have affected the total volume of thylakoids. Also, the value of the photosynthetic membranes development in the clinorotated plants was higher 17.11 ± 1.94 μ m3 then in control -- 12.65 ± 1.83 μ m3 due to extension of destacking thylakoids. Increase of the volume density of plastoglobuli in the clinorotated plants on the 1.63-fold suggested the effect of either greater accumulation of lipid or acceleration of chloroplasts senescence. Under influence of clinorotation, the partial volume of starch inclusions significantly decreased in the spongy mesophyll chloroplasts -- 10.46 ± 1.80 % to compare with control -- 31.34 ± 2.37 %. However, the clinorotation of plants resulted in an increase of the Rubisco activity. Intensities

  9. Novel Endoxylanases of the Moderately Thermophilic Polysaccharide-Degrading Bacterium Melioribacter roseus.

    PubMed

    Rakitin, Andrey L; Ermakova, Alexandra Y; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2015-09-01

    Three endoxylanase-encoding genes from the moderately themophilic chemoorganotrophic bacterium Melioribacter roseus were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Genes xyl2091 (Mros_2091) and xyl2495 (Mros_2495) encode GH10 family hydrolases, whereas xyl2090 (Mros_2090) represents the GH30 family. In addition to catalytic domains, Xyl2090 and Xyl2091 contain carbohydrate-binding modules that could facilitate their binding to xylans and Por sorting domains associated with the sorting of proteins from the periplasm to the outer membrane, where they are covalently attached. Recombinant endoxylanase Xyl2495 exhibited a high specific activity of 1,920 U/mg on birchwood xylan at 40°C. It is active at low temperatures, exhibiting more than 30% of the maximal activity even at 0°C. Endoxylanases Xyl2090 and Xyl2091 have lower specific activities but higher temperature optima at 80°C and 65°C, respectively. Analysis of xylan hydrolysis products revealed that Xyl2090 generates xylo-oligosaccharides longer than xylopentaose. Xylose and xylobiose are the major products of xylan hydrolysis by the recombinant Xyl2091 and Xyl2495. No activity against cellulose was observed for all enzymes. The presence of three xylanases ensures efficient xylan hydrolysis by M. roseus. The highly processive "free" endoxylanase Xyl2495 could hydrolyze xylan under moderate temperatures. Xylan hydrolysis at elevated temperatures could be accomplished by concerted action of two cell-bound xylanases; Xyl2090 that probably degrades xylans to long xylo-oligosaccharides, and Xyl2091 hydrolyzing them to xylose and xylobiose. The new endoxylanases could be useful for saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass in biofuels production, bleaching of paper pulp, and obtaining low molecular weight xylooligosaccharides.

  10. Online CO2 and H2 O oxygen isotope fractionation allows estimation of mesophyll conductance in C4 plants, and reveals that mesophyll conductance decreases as leaves age in both C4 and C3 plants.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Margaret M; Evans, John R; Simonin, Kevin A; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    Mesophyll conductance significantly, and variably, limits photosynthesis but we currently have no reliable method of measurement for C4 plants. An online oxygen isotope technique was developed to allow quantification of mesophyll conductance in C4 plants and to provide an alternative estimate in C3 plants. The technique is compared to an established carbon isotope method in three C3 species. Mesophyll conductance of C4 species was similar to that in the C3 species measured, and declined in both C4 and C3 species as leaves aged from fully expanded to senescing. In cotton leaves, simultaneous measurement of carbon and oxygen isotope discrimination allowed the partitioning of total conductance to the chloroplasts into cell wall and plasma membrane versus chloroplast membrane components, if CO2 was assumed to be isotopically equilibrated with cytosolic water, and the partitioning remained stable with leaf age. The oxygen isotope technique allowed estimation of mesophyll conductance in C4 plants and, when combined with well-established carbon isotope techniques, may provide additional information on mesophyll conductance in C3 plants.

  11. Abscisic Acid Induces Rapid Reductions in Mesophyll Conductance to Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Giuseppe; Haworth, Matthew; Wahbi, Said; Mahmood, Tariq; Zuomin, Shi; Centritto, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The rate of photosynthesis (A) of plants exposed to water deficit is a function of stomatal (gs) and mesophyll (gm) conductance determining the availability of CO2 at the site of carboxylation within the chloroplast. Mesophyll conductance often represents the greatest impediment to photosynthetic uptake of CO2, and a crucial determinant of the photosynthetic effects of drought. Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a fundamental role in signalling and co-ordination of plant responses to drought; however, the effect of ABA on gm is not well-defined. Rose, cherry, olive and poplar were exposed to exogenous ABA and their leaf gas exchange parameters recorded over a four hour period. Application with ABA induced reductions in values of A, gs and gm in all four species. Reduced gm occurred within one hour of ABA treatment in three of the four analysed species; indicating that the effect of ABA on gm occurs on a shorter timescale than previously considered. These declines in gm values associated with ABA were not the result of physical changes in leaf properties due to altered turgor affecting movement of CO2, or caused by a reduction in the sub-stomatal concentration of CO2 (Ci). Increased [ABA] likely induces biochemical changes in the properties of the interface between the sub-stomatal air-space and mesophyll layer through the actions of cooporins to regulate the transport of CO2. The results of this study provide further evidence that gm is highly responsive to fluctuations in the external environment, and stress signals such as ABA induce co-ordinated modifications of both gs and gm in the regulation of photosynthesis. PMID:26862904

  12. Roles of mesophyll conductance and plant functional diversities in tropical photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, L.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical photosynthesis dominates global terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) and will likely play a defining role in determining how global GPP will respond to climate change. Yet, our current understanding of biological, ecological, edaphic and environmental controls on tropical photosynthesis is poor. The overly simplistic schemes that current Earth System Models use to simulate tropical photosynthesis cannot capture the functional diversities associated with high species diversities in the tropics. New approaches that explicitly represent the functional diversities of tropical photosynthesis in Earth System Models are needed in order to realistically model responses of tropical photosynthesis to increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations and associated climate changes. To establish a basis for such approaches, we conducted intensive field measurements of leaf photosynthesis at three forest sites along a strong rainfall gradient in Panama in 2012-2013. The three sites are Parque Natural Metropolitano, Gamboa, and Parque Nacional San Lorenzo. The Parque Natural Metropolitano receives an annual precipitation of less than 1800mm and Parque Nacional San Lorenzo over 3300 mm with Gamboa in between. The three sites differ in species diversity with Parque Nacional San Lorenzo having the highest species diversity and Parque Nacional San Lorenzo the lowest. At the three contrasting sites, we measured A/Ci curves, leaf traits and leaf nutrient (N and P) contents of about 100 species. We determined mesophyll conductance with the LeafWeb approach. From these measurements, we developed practical but realistic parameterizations of functional diversities of tropical plant species at the three sites and implemented these parameterizations in the latest version of the Community Land Model. We found that mesophyll conductance is key to representing functional diversities of tropical forest species. Without it, responses of tropical photosynthesis to increased atmospheric CO2

  13. Distinct abscisic acid signaling pathways for modulation of guard cell versus mesophyll cell potassium channels revealed by expression studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, F.; Paul, S. S.; Wang, X. Q.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Regulation of guard cell ion transport by abscisic acid (ABA) and in particular ABA inhibition of a guard cell inward K(+) current (I(Kin)) is well documented. However, little is known concerning ABA effects on ion transport in other plant cell types. Here we applied patch clamp techniques to mesophyll cell protoplasts of fava bean (Vicia faba cv Long Pod) plants and demonstrated ABA inhibition of an outward K(+) current (I(Kout)). When mesophyll cell protoplast mRNA (mesophyll mRNA) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, I(Kout) was generated that displayed similar properties to I(Kout) observed from direct analysis of mesophyll cell protoplasts. I(Kout) expressed by mesophyll mRNA-injected oocytes was inhibited by ABA, indicating that the ABA signal transduction pathway observed in mesophyll cells was preserved in the frog oocytes. Co-injection of oocytes with guard cell protoplast mRNA and cRNA for KAT1, an inward K(+) channel expressed in guard cells, resulted in I(Kin) that was similarly inhibited by ABA. However, oocytes co-injected with mesophyll mRNA and KAT1 cRNA produced I(Kin) that was not inhibited by ABA. These results demonstrate that the mesophyll-encoded signaling mechanism could not substitute for the guard cell pathway. These findings indicate that mesophyll cells and guard cells use distinct and different receptor types and/or signal transduction pathways in ABA regulation of K(+) channels.

  14. A Modeling Approach to Quantify the Effects of Stomatal Behavior and Mesophyll Conductance on Leaf Water Use Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Moualeu-Ngangue, Dany P.; Chen, Tsu-Wei; Stützel, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Water use efficiency (WUE) is considered as a determinant of yield under stress and a component of crop drought resistance. Stomatal behavior regulates both transpiration rate and net assimilation and has been suggested to be crucial for improving crop WUE. In this work, a dynamic model was used to examine the impact of dynamic properties of stomata on WUE. The model includes sub-models of stomatal conductance dynamics, solute accumulation in the mesophyll, mesophyll water content, and water flow to the mesophyll. Using the instantaneous value of stomatal conductance, photosynthesis, and transpiration rate were simulated using a biochemical model and Penman-Monteith equation, respectively. The model was parameterized for a cucumber leaf and model outputs were evaluated using climatic data. Our simulations revealed that WUE was higher on a cloudy than a sunny day. Fast stomatal reaction to light decreased WUE during the period of increasing light (e.g., in the morning) by up to 10.2% and increased WUE during the period of decreasing light (afternoon) by up to 6.25%. Sensitivity of daily WUE to stomatal parameters and mesophyll conductance to CO2 was tested for sunny and cloudy days. Increasing mesophyll conductance to CO2 was more likely to increase WUE for all climatic conditions (up to 5.5% on the sunny day) than modifications of stomatal reaction speed to light and maximum stomatal conductance. PMID:27379150

  15. Evidence for a specific glutamate/H/sup +/ cotransport in isolated mesophyll cells. [Asparagus sprengeri

    SciTech Connect

    McCutcheon, S.L.; Bown, A.W.

    1987-03-01

    Mechanically isolated Asparagus sprengeri Regel mesophyll cells were suspended in 1 millimolar CaSO/sub 4/. Immediate alkalinization of the medium occurred on the addition of 1 millimolar concentrations of L-glutamate (Glu) and its analog L-methionine-D,L-sulfoximine (L-MSO). D-Glu and the L isomers of the protein amino acids did not elicit alkalinization. L-Glu dependent alkalinization was transient and acidification resumed after approximately 30 to 45 minutes. At pH 6.0, 5 millimolar L-Glu stimulated initial rates of alkalinization that varied between 1.3 to 4.1 nmol H/sup +//10/sup 6/ cells minute. L-Glu dependent alkalinization was saturable, increased with decreasing pH, was inhibited by carbonyl cyanide-p-trichloromethoxyphenyl hydrazone (CCCP), and was not stimulated by light. Uptake of L-(U-/sup 14/C)glutamate increased as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 5.5, and was inhibited by L-MSO. L-Glu had no influence on K/sup +/ efflux. Although evidence for multiple amino acid/proton cotransport systems has been found in other tissues, the present report indicates that a highly specific L-Glu/proton uptake process is present in Asparagus mesophyll cells.

  16. Air pollution effects on the ultrastructure of Phlomis fruticosa mesophyll cells

    SciTech Connect

    Psaras, G.K.; Christodoulakis, N.S.

    1987-04-01

    Plant physiologists and environmental scientists suggest that a basic effect of air pollution on plants leads towards the minimization of their productivity. On the other hand the action of individual pollutants on intact plants has been studied from biochemical as well as structural viewpoint. Thus the study of plant responses to SO/sub 2/ exposure revealed that this agent causes acute and chronic injury. Chronic injury results in chlorosis and subsequent necrosis due to destruction of chlorophylls and final chloroplast lysis. It has been documented that ultrastructural characteristics of leaves are affected prior to any visible injury. Electron microscope examination of SO/sub 2/ fumigated plant-attached leaves of Vicia faba revealed chloroplast thylakoids starting to swell whilst photosynthesis rate was drastically reduced. The first light microscope-detected effects of air pollution on the leaf structure of plants common in natural ecosystems of Athens metropolitan area, have been reported. A chlorosis phenomenon in Urginea maritima leaves as well as an indication of detrimental effects of Phlomis fruticosa mesophyll chloroplasts were documented. In this work further investigation has been undertaken in order to elucidate the precise effects of air pollution on the ultrastructure of the photosynthesizing mesophyll cells.

  17. Stomatal density is controlled by a mesophyll-derived signaling molecule.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Tatsuhiko; Kajita, Ryoko; Miyazaki, Aya; Hokoyama, Mayumi; Nakamura-Miura, Touko; Mizuno, Satoko; Masuda, Yuichi; Irie, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Yuki; Takada, Shinobu; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Sakagami, Youji

    2010-01-01

    Stomata are composed of a pair of guard cells and a pore between them, and their density and positions are regulated by developmental and environmental signals. In a screen in which we overexpressed many genes coding for putative secretory proteins one by one in Arabidopsis, we identified a gene named STOMAGEN, which increases stomatal density when overexpressed. The STOMAGEN gene encodes a small peptide with a putative secretory signal sequence at its N-terminus and is expressed preferentially in mesophyll cells. This peptide belongs to the EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR (EPF) family of the cysteine-rich peptides superfamily. The mature form was a 45-amino-acid peptide (stomagen) with three intramolecular disulfide bonds. Stomagen treatment at very low concentrations, as low as 10 nM, increased the stomatal density of wild-type Arabidopsis plants. We propose that stomagen is a mesophyll-to-epidermis signaling molecule that positively regulates stomatal density. We also suggest that stomagen increases stomatal density by competing with negative regulators EPF1 and EPF2 for the receptor-like protein TOO MANY MOUTHS.

  18. Variation among Soybean Cultivars in Mesophyll Conductance and Leaf Water Use Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bunce, James

    2016-01-01

    Improving water use efficiency (WUE) may prove a useful way to adapt crop species to drought. Since the recognition of the importance of mesophyll conductance to CO2 movement from inside stomatal pores to the sites of photosynthetic carboxylation, there has been interest in how much intraspecific variation in mesophyll conductance (gm) exists, and how such variation may impact leaf WUE within C3 species. In this study, the gm and leaf WUE of fifteen cultivars of soybeans grown under controlled conditions were measured under standardized environmental conditions. Leaf WUE varied by a factor of 2.6 among the cultivars, and gm varied by a factor of 8.6. However, there was no significant correlation (r = −0.047) between gm and leaf WUE. Leaf WUE was linearly related to the sub-stomatal CO2 concentration. The value of gm affected the ratio of maximum Rubisco carboxylation capacity calculated from the sub-stomatal CO2 concentration to that calculated from the CO2 concentration at the site of carboxylation. That is, variation in gm affected the efficiency of Rubisco carboxylation, but not leaf WUE. Nevertheless, there is considerable scope for genetically improving soybean leaf water use efficiency. PMID:27973433

  19. Impact of mesophyll diffusion on estimated global land CO2 fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ying; Gu, Lianhong; Dickinson, Robert E.; Norby, Richard J.; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    2014-10-13

    In C3 plants, CO2 concentrations drop considerably along mesophyll diffusion pathways from substomatal cavities to chloroplasts where CO2 assimilation occurs. Global carbon cycle models have not explicitly represented this internal drawdown and so overestimate CO2 available for carboxylation and underestimate photosynthetic responsiveness to atmospheric CO2. An explicit consideration of mesophyll diffusion increases the modeled cumulative CO2 fertilization effect (CFE) for global gross primary production (GPP) from 915 PgC to 1057 PgC for the period of 1901 to 2010. This increase represents a 16% correction, large enough to explain the persistent overestimation of growth rates of historical atmospheric CO2 by Earth System Models. Without this correction, the CFE for global GPP is underestimated by 0.05 PgC yr-1ppm-1. This finding implies that the contemporary terrestrial biosphere is more CO2-limited than previously thought.

  20. Cell-level anatomical characteristics explain high mesophyll conductance and photosynthetic capacity in sclerophyllous Mediterranean oaks.

    PubMed

    Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Sisó, Sergio; Flexas, Jaume; Galmés, Jeroni; García-Nogales, Ana; Niinemets, Ülo; Sancho-Knapik, Domingo; Saz, Miguel Ángel; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2017-04-01

    Leaf mass per area (LMA) has been suggested to negatively affect the mesophyll conductance to CO2 (gm ), which is the most limiting factor for area-based photosynthesis (AN ) in many Mediterranean sclerophyll species. However, despite their high LMA, these species have similar AN to plants from other biomes. Variations in other leaf anatomical traits, such as mesophyll and chloroplast surface area exposed to intercellular air space (Sm /S and Sc /S), may offset the restrictions imposed by high LMA in gm and AN in these species. Seven sclerophyllous Mediterranean oaks from Europe/North Africa and North America with contrasting LMA were compared in terms of morphological, anatomical and photosynthetic traits. Mediterranean oaks showed specific differences in AN that go beyond the common morphological leaf traits reported for these species (reduced leaf area and thick leaves). These variations resulted mainly from the differences in gm , the most limiting factor for carbon assimilation in these species. Species with higher AN showed increased Sc /S, which implies increased gm without changes in stomatal conductance. The occurrence of this anatomical adaptation at the cell level allowed evergreen oaks to reach AN values comparable to congeneric deciduous species despite their higher LMA.

  1. Methods of mesophyll conductance estimation: its impact on key biochemical parameters and photosynthetic limitations in phosphorus-stressed soybean across CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photosynthetic potential in C3 plants is largely limited by CO2 diffusion through stomata (Ls) and mesophyll (Lm) and photo-biochemical (Lb) processes. Accurate estimation of mesophyll conductance (gm) using gas exchange (GE) and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) parameters of the photosynthetic proces...

  2. Plumage variation and social partner choice in the greater flamingo (Phoenicopterus roseus).

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hani D; Valuska, Annie J; Taylor, Ryan R; Ferrie, Gina M; Grand, Alison P; Leighty, Katherine A

    2016-09-01

    There is evidence that plumage coloration is related to mate choice in several different bird species. However, the relationship between plumage coloration to mate or other social partner choice has rarely been investigated in flamingos. This is important to study because we know plumage coloration can be an indicator of welfare. We assessed plumage color score in relation to sex, age, and social partner choice over a 9-month period in a flock of 34 adult greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) living at Disney's Animal Kingdom(®) . When looking at primary social partners, redder males were more likely to have primary social partners compared to less red males. In addition, primary social partners tended to have similar color scores to each other. These findings provide insight into one factor that might influence social partner choice in greater flamingos living in ex situ situations. Future studies should investigate how these results relate to reproductive success as part of ex situ management. Zoo Biol. 35:409-414, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Asymmetrical effects of mesophyll conductance on fundamental photosynthetic parameters and their relationships estimated from leaf gas exchange measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most previous analyses of leaf gas exchange measurements assumed an infinite value of mesophyll conductance (gm) and thus equaled CO2 partial pressures in the substomatal cavity and chloroplast. Yet an increasing number of studies have recognized that gm is finite and there is a drawdown of CO2 part...

  4. Subcellular Localization of Dhurrin β-Glucosidase and Hydroxynitrile Lyase in the Mesophyll Cells of Sorghum Leaf Blades 1

    PubMed Central

    Thayer, Susan S.; Conn, Eric E.

    1981-01-01

    Studies with purified mesophyll and epidermal protoplasts and bundle sheath strands have shown that the cyanogenic glucoside dhurrin (p-hydroxy-(S)-mandelonitrile-β-d-glucoside) is localized in the epidermis of sorghum leaves whereas the enzymes involved in its degradation (dhurrin β-glucosidase and hydroxynitrile lyase) are localized in the mesophyll tissue (Kojima M, JE Poulton, SS Thayer, EE Conn 1979 Plant Physiol 63: 1022-1028). The subcellular localization of these enzymes has now been examined using linear 30 to 55% (w/w) sucrose gradients by fractionation of mesophyll protoplast components. The hydroxynitrile lyase is found in the supernatant fractions suggesting a cytoplasmic (soluble cytoplasm, microsomal or vacuolar location). The dhurrin β-glucosidase (dhurrinase) is particulate and mostly chloroplast-associated. The dhurrinase activity peak has a shoulder of activity more dense than that of the intact chloroplasts. This shoulder does not coincide with markers of any other cell fraction. In studies of chloroplasts isolated from ruptured mesophyll protoplasts by differential, low-speed centrifugation, the dhurrinase partitions in the same manner as the chloroplast marker triose phosphate dehydrogenase. Chloroplast localization of the β-glucosidase has also been shown in histochemical studies using 6-bromo-2-naphthyl-β-d-glucoside substrate coupled with fast Blue B. Images PMID:16661725

  5. Ultrastructural analyses of somatic embryo initiation, development and polarity establishment from mesophyll cells of Dactylis glomerata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasilenko, A.; McDaniel, J. K.; Conger, B. V.

    2000-01-01

    Somatic embryos initiate and develop directly from single mesophyll cells in in vitro-cultured leaf segments of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.). Embryogenic cells establish themselves in the predivision stage by formation of thicker cell walls and dense cytoplasm. Electron microscopy observations for embryos ranging from the pre-cell-division stage to 20-cell proembryos confirm previous light microscopy studies showing a single cell origin. They also confirm that the first division is predominantly periclinal and that this division plane is important in establishing embryo polarity and in determining the embryo axis. If the first division is anticlinal or if divisions are in random planes after the first division, divisions may not continue to produce an embryo. This result may produce an embryogenic cell mass, callus formation, or no structure at all. Grant numbers: NAGW-3141, NAG10-0221.

  6. Isolation and identification of thermophilic and mesophylic proteolytic bacteria from shrimp paste "Terasi"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murwani, R.; Supriyadi, Subagio, Trianto, A.; Ambariyanto

    2015-12-01

    Terasi is a traditional product generally made of fermented shrimp. There were many studies regarding lactic acid bacteria of terasi but none regarding proteolitic bacteria. This study was conducted to isolate and identify the thermophilic and mesophylic proteolytic bacteria from terasi. In addition, the effect of different salt concentrations on the growth of the isolated proteolytic bacteria with the greatest proteolytic activity was also studied. Terasi samples were obtained from the Northern coast region of Java island i.e. Jepara, Demak and Batang. The study obtained 34 proteolytic isolates. Four isolates were identified as Sulfidobacillus, three isolates as Vibrio / Alkaligenes / Aeromonas, two isolates as Pseudomonas, 21 isolates as Bacillus, three isolates as Kurthia/ Caryophanon and one isolates as Amphibacillus. The growth of proteolytic bacteria was affected by salt concentration. The largest growth was found at 0 ppm salt concentrations and growth was declined as salt concentration increased. Maximum growth at each salt concentration tested was found at 8 hours incubation.

  7. Reaction to phytotoxins in a potato population derived from mesophyll protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Matern, Ulrich; Strobel, Gary; Shepard, James

    1978-01-01

    Alternaria solani, the causal agent of early blight disease in potato, produces two host-specific, lipidlike toxins in culture. Both compounds are required in the leaf bioassay for the elicitation of typical early blight symptoms, but the compounds are individually inactive. The procedures for the preparation of both compounds are outlined. These compounds can be used effectively to select for toxin-insensitive and sensitive clones of a Russet Burbank potato cultivar that have been regenerated from single mesophyll protoplasts. Furthermore, both sensitivity and insensitivity to the toxins in these clones is well correlated with susceptibility and resistance to A. solani. Potato clones that have been produced by somatic cell regeneration techniques maintain their reaction type to these fungal toxins for at least two generations of vegetative propagation. The genetic basis for this variation among these potato clones remains to be explained. Images PMID:16592580

  8. Plant regeneration from mesophyll protoplasts of Centaurea cyanus, Senecio x hybridus and Callistephus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Pillai, V; Davey, M R; Power, J B

    1990-11-01

    Protoplasts were isolated from leaves of glasshouse-grown plants of Centaurea cyanus and axenic shoot cultures of Senecio x hybridus. Upon culture, using modified MS-based media, protoplasts of both systems entered division to produce callus, followed by plant regeneration. Leaf protoplasts of Callistephus chinensis entered sustained division only following the preconditioning for 24h of peeled leaf tissues on agar-solidified MS-based medium. Protoplasts were also isolated from cell suspensions of C. chinensis and divided in MS-based or KM media. However, only leaf mesophyll protoplasts of Callistephus produced callus, which developed shoots.The establishment of protoplast-to-plant protocols for these ornamental species has provided a basis for broadening their gene pools through somatic hybridisation.

  9. Kinetics of determination in the differentiation of isolated mesophyll cells of Zinnia elegans to tracheary elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, D. L.; Galston, A. W.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanically isolated mesophyll cells of Zinnia elegans L. cv Envy differentiate to tracheary elements when cultured in inductive medium containing 0.5 micromolar alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid and 0.5 micromolar benzyladenine. The cells do not differentiate when cultured in medium in which the concentration of auxin and/or cytokinin has been reduced to 0.005 micromolar. Cells require an initial 24-hour exposure to inductive cytokinin and 56-hour exposure to inductive auxin for differentiation at 72 hours of culture. Freshly isolated Zinnia cells can be maintained in medium having low concentrations of both auxin and cytokinin for only 1 day without significant loss of potential to differentiate upon transfer to inductive medium. Initial culture for up to 2 days in medium having high auxin and low cytokinin, or low auxin and high cytokinin, allows full differentiation on the third day after transfer to inductive medium and potentiates the early differentiation of some cells.

  10. Establishment of transient gene expression systems in protoplasts from Liriodendron hybrid mesophyll cells

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Ailing; Chen, Zhenyu; Wang, Pengkai; Yang, Liming; Wang, Guangping; Wang, Dandan; Liao, Suchan; Cheng, Tielong; Chen, Jinhui; Shi, Jisen

    2017-01-01

    Liriodendron is a genus of the magnolia family comprised of two flowering tree species that produce hardwoods of great ecological and economic value. However, only a limited amount of genetic research has been performed on the Liriodendron genus partly because transient or stable transgenic trees have been difficult to produce. In general, transient expression systems are indispensable for rapid, high-throughput screening and systematic characterization of gene functions at a low cost; therefore, development of such a system for Liriodendron would provide a necessary step forward for research on Magnoliaceae and other woody trees. Herein, we describe an efficient and rapid protocol for preparing protoplasts from the leaf mesophyll tissue of a Liriodendron hybrid and an optimized system for polyethylene glycol–mediated transient transfection of the protoplasts. Because the leaves of the Liriodendron hybrid are waxy, we formulated an enzyme mix containing 1.5% (w/v) Cellulase R-10, 0.5% (w/v) Macerozyme R-10, and 0.1% (w/v) Pectolyase Y-23 to efficiently isolate protoplasts from the Liriodendron hybrid leaf mesophyll tissue in 3 h. We optimized Liriodendron protoplast transfection efficiency by including 20 μg plasmid DNA per 104 protoplasts, a transformation time of 20 min, and inclusion of 20% (w/v) polyethylene glycol 4000. After integrating the Liriodendron WOX1 gene into pJIT166-GFP to produce a WOX1-GFP fusion product and transfecting it into isolated protoplasts, LhWOX1-GFP was found to localize to the nucleus according to its green fluorescence. PMID:28323890

  11. Differential positioning of C4 mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts: aggregative movement of C4 mesophyll chloroplasts in response to environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masahiro; Kawasaki, Michio; Sugiyama, Tatsuo; Miyake, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka

    2009-10-01

    In C(4) plants, mesophyll (M) chloroplasts are randomly distributed along the cell walls, while bundle sheath (BS) chloroplasts are typically located in either a centripetal or centrifugal position. We investigated whether these intracellular positions are affected by environmental stresses. When mature leaves of finger millet (Eleusine coracana) were exposed to extremely high intensity light, most M chloroplasts aggregatively re-distributed to the BS side, whereas the intracellular arrangement of BS chloroplasts was unaffected. Compared with the homologous light-avoidance movement of M chloroplasts in C(3) plants, it requires extremely high light (3,000-4,000 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) and responds more slowly (distinctive movement observed in 1 h). The high light-induced movement of M chloroplasts was also observed in maize (Zea mays), another C(4) species, but with a distinct pattern of redistribution along the sides of anticlinal walls, analogous to C(3) plants. The aggregative movement of M chloroplasts occurred at normal light intensities (250-500 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) in response to environmental stresses, such as drought, salinity and hyperosmosis. Moreover, the re-arrangement of M chloroplasts was observed in field-grown C(4) plants when exposed to mid-day sunlight, but also under midsummer drought conditions. The migration of M chloroplasts was controlled by actin filaments and also induced in a light-dependent fashion upon incubation with ABA, which may be the physiological signal transducer. Together these results suggest that M and BS cells of C(4) plants have different mechanisms controlling intracellular chloroplast positioning, and that the aggregative movement of C(4) M chloroplasts is thought to be a protective response under environmental stress conditions.

  12. Meiothermus roseus sp. nov., a thermophilic bacterium isolated from a geothermal area.

    PubMed

    Ming, Hong; Duan, Yan-Yan; Guo, Qian-Qian; Yin, Yi-Rui; Zhou, En-Min; Liu, Lan; Li, Shuai; Nie, Guo-Xing; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-10-01

    Two closely related thermophilic bacterial strains, designated YIM 71031(T) and YIM 71039, were isolated from a hot spring in Tengchong county, Yunnan province, south-western China. The novel isolates were observed to be Gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped and yellow-pigmented bacteria. The strains were found to be able to grow at 37-65 °C, pH 6.0-9.0 and with a NaCl tolerance up to 1.0 % (w/v). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed these two isolates in the genus Meiothermus. They were found to be closely related to Meiothermus timidus DSM 17022(T) (98.6 % similarity), and formed a cluster with this species. The predominant menaquinone was identified as MK-8 and the major fatty acids (>10 %) as anteiso-C15:0, iso-C15:0, anteiso-C17:0, iso-C16:0 and C16:0. The genomic DNA G+C contents of strains YIM 71031(T) and YIM 71039 were determined to be 64.0 and 65.4 mol%, respectively. DNA-DNA hybridizations showed low values between strains YIM 71031(T) and YIM 71039 and their closely related neighbour M. timidus DSM 17022(T). Morphological phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic results suggest that strains YIM 71031(T) and YIM 71039 are representatives of a new species within the genus Meiothermus, for which the name Meiothermus roseus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YIM 71031(T) (=KCTC 42495(T) =NBRC 110900(T)).

  13. Ultrastructure of mesoderm in embryos of Opisthopatus roseus (Onychophora, Peripatopsidae): revision of the "long germ band" hypothesis for Opisthopatus.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Georg; Bartolomaeus, Thomas; Ruhberg, Hilke

    2005-01-01

    In previous studies, an unusual pattern of development which resembles the "long germ band" development of some insects has been described in the onychophoran Opisthopatus cinctipes. This pattern has been proposed to be a characteristic of the genus Opisthopatus. To test this assumption, the ultrastructure of embryos of O. roseus, the sister species of O. cinctipes, was examined. Two kinds of paired, segmentally arranged coelomic cavities were found in the embryos studied: 1) dorsolateral coelomic cavities lined by extremely thin epithelia, and 2) ventral coelomic cavities situated within the anlagen of ventrolateral body appendages. Only the dorsolateral coelomic cavities can be considered "somites," since they occur earlier during embryogenesis. This is in contrast with the previous view that suggested a ventral position of "somites" in O. cinctipes. In addition, an anterior-to-posterior gradient occurs in the development of O. roseus. Based on our findings, we reevaluated the previous data on O. cinctipes. From this survey, no evidence in support of a "long germ band" hypothesis in Opisthopatus was found. Instead, the embryogenesis in representatives of Opisthopatus is more similar to that in other onychophorans than expected.

  14. Simultaneous degradation of bad wine and electricity generation with the aid of the coexisting biocatalysts Acetobacter aceti and Gluconobacter roseus.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Karthikeyan; Berchmans, Sheela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the cooperative effect of the two biocatalysts Acetobacter aceti and Gluconobacter roseus for biodegradation as well as current generation. The electro activity of the biofilms of these two microorganisms was investigated by the bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol and glucose using cyclic voltammetry. Two chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were constructed using single culture of A. aceti (A-MFC), and G. roseus (G-MFC) and also using mixed culture (AG-MFC). Each MFC was fed with four different substrates viz., glucose, ethanol, acetate and bad wine. AG-MFC produced higher power density with glucose (1.05 W/m(3)), ethanol (1.97 W/m(3)), acetate (1.39 W/m(3)) and bad wine (3.82 W/m(3)). COD removal (94%) was maximum for acetate fed MFCs. Higher coulombic efficiency was obtained with bad wine (45%) as the fuel. This work provides the scope of using these biofuel cells in wineries for performing the dual duty of bad wine degradation along with current generation.

  15. Benzophenone Synthase and Chalcone Synthase Accumulate in the Mesophyll of Hypericum perforatum Leaves at Different Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Belkheir, Asma K; Gaid, Mariam; Liu, Benye; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    The active medicinal constituents in Hypericum perforatum, used to treat depression and skin irritation, include flavonoids and xanthones. The carbon skeletons of these compounds are formed by chalcone synthase (CHS) and benzophenone synthase (BPS), respectively. Polyclonal antisera were raised against the polyketide synthases from Hypericum androsaemum and their IgG fractions were isolated. Immunoblotting and immunotitration were used to test the IgGs for crossreactivity and monospecificity in H. perforatum leaf protein extract. Immunofluorescence localization revealed that both CHS and BPS are located in the mesophyll. The maximum fluorescence levels were observed in approx. 0.5 and 1 cm long leaves, respectively. The fluorescence intensity observed for CHS significantly exceeded that for BPS. Using histochemical staining, flavonoids were detected in the mesophyll, indicating that the sites of biosynthesis and accumulation coincide. Our results help understand the biosynthesis and underlying regulation of active H. perforatum constituents.

  16. Benzophenone Synthase and Chalcone Synthase Accumulate in the Mesophyll of Hypericum perforatum Leaves at Different Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Belkheir, Asma K.; Gaid, Mariam; Liu, Benye; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    The active medicinal constituents in Hypericum perforatum, used to treat depression and skin irritation, include flavonoids and xanthones. The carbon skeletons of these compounds are formed by chalcone synthase (CHS) and benzophenone synthase (BPS), respectively. Polyclonal antisera were raised against the polyketide synthases from Hypericum androsaemum and their IgG fractions were isolated. Immunoblotting and immunotitration were used to test the IgGs for crossreactivity and monospecificity in H. perforatum leaf protein extract. Immunofluorescence localization revealed that both CHS and BPS are located in the mesophyll. The maximum fluorescence levels were observed in approx. 0.5 and 1 cm long leaves, respectively. The fluorescence intensity observed for CHS significantly exceeded that for BPS. Using histochemical staining, flavonoids were detected in the mesophyll, indicating that the sites of biosynthesis and accumulation coincide. Our results help understand the biosynthesis and underlying regulation of active H. perforatum constituents. PMID:27446151

  17. Mesophyll conductance plays a central role in leaf functioning of Oleaceae species exposed to contrasting sunlight irradiance.

    PubMed

    Fini, Alessio; Loreto, Francesco; Tattini, Massimiliano; Giordano, Cristiana; Ferrini, Francesco; Brunetti, Cecilia; Centritto, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    The ability to modify mesophyll conductance (gm ) in response to changes in irradiance may be a component of the acclimation of plants to shade-sun transitions, thus influencing species-specific distributions along light-gradients, and the ecological niches for the different species. To test this hypothesis we grew three woody species of the Oleaceae family, the evergreen Phillyrea latifolia (sun-requiring), the deciduous Fraxinus ornus (facultative sun-requiring) and the hemi-deciduous Ligustrum vulgare (shade tolerant) at 30 or 100% sunlight irradiance. We show that neither mesophyll conductance calculated with combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence techniques (gm) nor CO2 assimilation significantly varied in F. ornus because of sunlight irradiance. This corroborates previous suggestions that species with high plasticity for light requirements, do not need to undertake extensive reorganization of leaf conductances to CO2 diffusion to adapt to different light environments. On the other hand, gm steeply declined in L. vulgare and increased in P. latifolia exposed to full-sun conditions. In these two species, leaf anatomical traits are in part responsible for light-driven changes in gm , as revealed by the correlation between gm and mesophyll conductance estimated by anatomical parameters (gmA). Nonetheless, gm was greatly overestimated by gmA when leaf metabolism was impaired because of severe light stress. We show that gm is maximum at the light intensity at which plant species have evolved and we conclude that gm actually plays a key role in the sun and shade adaptation of Mediterranean species. The limits of gmA in predicting mesophyll conductance are also highlighted.

  18. Epidermal Micromorphology and Mesophyll Structure of Populus euphratica Heteromorphic Leaves at Different Development Stages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yubing; Li, Xinrong; Chen, Guoxiong; Li, Mengmeng; Liu, Meiling; Liu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Leaf epidermal micromorphology and mesophyll structure during the development of Populus euphratica heteromorphic leaves, including linear, lanceolate, ovate, dentate ovate, dentate rhombic, dentate broad-ovate and dentate fan-shaped leaves, were studied by using electron and light microscopy. During development of heteromorphic leaves, epidermal appendages (wax crystals and trichomes) and special cells (mucilage cells and crystal idioblasts) increased in all leaf types while chloroplast ultrastructure and stomatal characters show maximum photosynthetic activity in dentate ovate and rhombic leaves. Also, functional analysis by subordinate function values shows that the maximum adaptability to adverse stress was exhibited in the broad type of mature leaves. The 12 heteromorphic leaf types are classified into three major groups by hierarchical cluster analysis: young, developing and mature leaves. Mature leaves can effectively obtain the highest stress resistance by combining the protection of xerophytic anatomy from drought stress, regulation of water uptake in micro-environment by mucilage and crystal idioblasts, and assistant defense of transpiration reduction through leaf epidermal appendages, which improves photosynthetic activity under arid desert conditions. Our data confirms that the main leaf function is differentiated during the developing process of heteromorphic leaves. PMID:26356300

  19. The Relationship between Photosynthesis and a Mastoparan-Induced Hypersensitive Response in Isolated Mesophyll Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Lisa J.; MacGregor, Kennaway B.; Koop, Randall S.; Bruce, Doug H.; Karner, Julie; Bown, Alan W.

    1999-01-01

    The G-protein activator mastoparan (MP) was found to elicit the hypersensitive response (HR) in isolated Asparagus sprengeri mesophyll cells at micromolar concentrations. The HR was characterized by cell death, extracellular alkalinization, and an oxidative burst, indicated by the reduction of molecular O2 to O2⋅−. To our knowledge, this study was the first to monitor photosynthesis during the HR. MP had rapid and dramatic effects on photosynthetic electron transport and excitation energy transfer as determined by variable chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements. A large increase in nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll a fluorescence accompanied the initial stages of the oxidative burst. The minimal level of fluorescence was also quenched, which suggests the origin of this nonphotochemical quenching to be a decrease in the antenna size of photosystem II. In contrast, photochemical quenching of fluorescence decreased dramatically during the latter stages of the oxidative burst, indicating a somewhat slower inhibition of photosystem II electron transport. The net consumption of O2 and the initial rate of O2 uptake, elicited by MP, were higher in the light than in the dark. These data indicate that light enhances the oxidative burst and suggest a complex relationship between photosynthesis and the HR. PMID:10198081

  20. Photosynthetic characterization of Rubisco transplantomic lines reveals alterations on photochemistry and mesophyll conductance.

    PubMed

    Galmés, Jeroni; Perdomo, Juan Alejandro; Flexas, Jaume; Whitney, Spencer M

    2013-07-01

    Improving Rubisco catalysis is considered a promising way to enhance C3-photosynthesis and photosynthetic water use efficiency (WUE) provided the introduced changes have little or no impact on other processes affecting photosynthesis such as leaf photochemistry or leaf CO2 diffusion conductances. However, the extent to which the factors affecting photosynthetic capacity are co-regulated is unclear. The aim of the present study was to characterize the photochemistry and CO2 transport processes in the leaves of three transplantomic tobacco genotypes expressing hybrid Rubisco isoforms comprising different Flaveria L-subunits that show variations in catalysis and differing trade-offs between the amount of Rubisco and its activation state. Stomatal conductance (g s) in each transplantomic tobacco line matched wild-type, while their photochemistry showed co-regulation with the variations in Rubisco catalysis. A tight co-regulation was observed between Rubisco activity and mesophyll conductance (g m) that was independent of g s thus producing plants with varying g m/g s ratios. Since the g m/g s ratio has been shown to positively correlate with intrinsic WUE, the present results suggest that altering photosynthesis by modifying Rubisco catalysis may also be useful for targeting WUE.

  1. Pico-projector-based optical sectioning microscopy for 3D chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of mesophyll cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Szu-Yu; Hsu, Yu John; Yeh, Chia-Hua; Chen, S.-Wei; Chung, Chien-Han

    2015-03-01

    A pico-projector-based optical sectioning microscope (POSM) was constructed using a pico-projector to generate structured illumination patterns. A net rate of 5.8 × 106 pixel/s and sub-micron spatial resolution in three-dimensions (3D) were achieved. Based on the pico-projector’s flexibility in pattern generation, the characteristics of POSM with different modulation periods and at different imaging depths were measured and discussed. With the application of different modulation periods, 3D chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of mesophyll cells was carried out in freshly plucked leaves of four species without sectioning or staining. For each leaf, an average penetration depth of 120 μm was achieved. Increasing the modulation period along with the increment of imaging depth, optical sectioning images can be obtained with a compromise between the axial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. After ∼30 min imaging on the same area, photodamage was hardly observed. Taking the advantages of high speed and low damages of POSM, the investigation of the dynamic fluorescence responses to temperature changes was performed under three different treatment temperatures. The three embedded blue, green and red light-emitting diode light sources were applied to observe the responses of the leaves with different wavelength excitation.

  2. Functional Differentiation of Bundle Sheath and Mesophyll Maize Chloroplasts Determined by Comparative ProteomicsW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Majeran, Wojciech; Cai, Yang; Sun, Qi; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2005-01-01

    Chloroplasts of maize (Zea mays) leaves differentiate into specific bundle sheath (BS) and mesophyll (M) types to accommodate C4 photosynthesis. Consequences for other plastid functions are not well understood but are addressed here through a quantitative comparative proteome analysis of purified M and BS chloroplast stroma. Three independent techniques were used, including cleavable stable isotope coded affinity tags. Enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis, nitrogen import, and tetrapyrrole and isoprenoid biosynthesis are preferentially located in the M chloroplasts. By contrast, enzymes involved in starch synthesis and sulfur import preferentially accumulate in BS chloroplasts. The different soluble antioxidative systems, in particular peroxiredoxins, accumulate at higher levels in M chloroplasts. We also observed differential accumulation of proteins involved in expression of plastid-encoded proteins (e.g., EF-Tu, EF-G, and mRNA binding proteins) and thylakoid formation (VIPP1), whereas others were equally distributed. Enzymes related to the C4 shuttle, the carboxylation and regeneration phase of the Calvin cycle, and several regulators (e.g., CP12) distributed as expected. However, enzymes involved in triose phosphate reduction and triose phosphate isomerase are primarily located in the M chloroplasts, indicating that the M-localized triose phosphate shuttle should be viewed as part of the BS-localized Calvin cycle, rather than a parallel pathway. PMID:16243905

  3. Abscisic acid and blue light signaling pathways in chloroplast movements in Arabidopsis mesophyll.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Janowiak, Franciszek; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and phototropins act antagonistically to control stomatal movements. Here, we investigated the role of ABA in phototropin-directed chloroplast movements in mesophyll cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. We analyzed the expression of phototropins at mRNA and protein level under the influence of ABA. PHOT1 mRNA level was decreased by ABA in the dark while it was insensitive to ABA in light. PHOT2 mRNA level was independent of the hormone treatment. The levels of phototropin proteins were down-regulated by ABA, both in darkness and light. No impact of exogenous ABA on amplitudes and kinetics of chloroplast movements was detected. Chloroplast responses in wild type Arabidopsis and three mutants, abi4, abi2 (abscisic acid insensitive4, 2) and aba1 (abscisic acid1), were measured to account for endogenous ABA signaling. The chloroplast responses were slightly reduced in abi2 and aba1 mutants in strong light. To further investigate the effect, abi2 and aba1 mutants were supplemented with exogenous ABA. In the aba1 mutant, the reaction was rescued but in abi2 it was unaffected. Our results show that ABA is not directly involved in phototropin-controlled chloroplast responses in mature leaves of Arabidopsis. However, the disturbance of ABA biosynthesis and signaling in mutants affects some elements of the chloroplast movement mechanism. In line with its role as a stress hormone, ABA appears to enhance plant sensitivity to light and promote the chloroplast avoidance response.

  4. Possible association of actin filaments with chloroplasts of spinach mesophyll cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kumatani, T; Sakurai-Ozato, N; Miyawaki, N; Yokota, E; Shimmen, T; Terashima, I; Takagi, S

    2006-11-01

    In palisade mesophyll cells of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) kept under low-intensity white light, chloroplasts were apparently immobile and seemed to be surrounded by fine bundles of actin filaments. High-intensity blue light induced actin-dependent chloroplast movement concomitant with the appearance of a couple of long, straight bundles of actin filaments in each cell, whereas high-intensity red light was essentially ineffective in inducing these responses. The actin organization observed under low-intensity white light has been postulated to function in anchoring chloroplasts at proper intracellular positions through direct interaction with the chloroplasts. Intact chloroplasts, which retained their outer envelopes, were isolated after homogenization of leaves and Percoll centrifugation. No endogenous actin was detected by immunoblotting in the final intact-chloroplast fraction prepared from the leaves kept under low-intensity white light or in darkness. In cosedimentation assays with exogenously added skeletal muscle filamentous actin, however, actin was detected in the intact-chloroplast fraction precipitated after low-speed centrifugation. The association of actin with chloroplasts was apparently dependent on incubation time and chloroplast density. After partial disruption of the outer envelope of isolated chloroplasts by treatment with trypsin, actin was no longer coprecipitated. The results suggest that chloroplasts in spinach leaves can directly interact with actin, and that this interaction may be involved in the regulation of intracellular positioning of chloroplasts.

  5. Effects of potassium supply on limitations of photosynthesis by mesophyll diffusion conductance in Carya cathayensis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Song Heng; Huang, Jian Qin; Li, Xue Qin; Zheng, Bing Song; Wu, Jia Sen; Wang, Zheng Jia; Liu, Gen Hua; Chen, Miao

    2011-10-01

    Potassium (K) influences the photosynthesis process in a number of ways; however, the mechanisms underlying the photosynthetic response to differences in K supply are not well understood. Concurrent measurements of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were made to investigate the effect of K nutrition on photosynthetic efficiency and mesophyll conductance (g(m)) in hickory seedlings (Carya cathayensis Sarg.) in a greenhouse. The results show that leaf K concentrations < 0.7-0.8% appeared to limit the leaf net CO2 assimilation rate (A), and that the relative limitation of photosynthesis due to g(m) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) decreased with increasing supplies of K. However, a sensitivity analysis indicated that A was most sensitive to the maximum carboxylation rate of Rubisco (V(c,max)) and the maximum rate of electron transport (J(max)). These results indicate that the photosynthetic rate is primarily limited by the biochemical processes of photosynthesis (V(c,max) and J(max)), rather than by g(m) and g(s) in K-deficient plants. Additionally, g(m) was closely correlated with g(s) and the leaf dry mass per unit area (M(A)) in hickory seedlings, which indicates that decreased g(m) and g(s) may be a consequence of leaf anatomical adaptation.

  6. RNA processing body (P-body) dynamics in mesophyll protoplasts re-initiating cell division.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Dilbag S; Sheahan, Michael B; Rose, Ray J

    2016-12-07

    The ability of plants to regenerate lies in the capacity of differentiated cells to reprogram and re-enter the cell cycle. Reprogramming of cells requires changes in chromatin organisation and gene expression. However, there has been less focus on changes at the post transcription level. We have investigated P-bodies, sites of post transcriptional gene regulation, in plant cell reprogramming in cultured mesophyll protoplasts; by using a YFP-VARICOSE (YFP-VCSc) translational fusion. We showed an early increase in P-body number and volume, followed by a decline, then a subsequent continued increase in P-body number and volume as cell division was initiated and cell proliferation continued. We infer that plant P-bodies have a role to play in reprogramming the mature cell and re-initiating the cell division cycle. The timing of the first phase is consistent with the degredation of messages no longer required, as the cell transits to the division state, and may also be linked to the stress response associated with division induction in cultured cells. The subsequent increase in P-body formation, with partitioning to the daughter cells during the division process, suggests a role in the cell cycle and its re-initiation in daughter cells. P-bodies were shown to be mobile in the cytoplasm and show actin-based motility which facilitates their post-transcriptional role and partitioning to daughter cells.

  7. Salinity induces membrane structure and lipid changes in maize mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Omoto, Eiji; Iwasaki, Yugo; Miyake, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka

    2016-05-01

    The membranes of Zea mays (maize) mesophyll cell (MC) chloroplasts are more vulnerable to salinity stress than are those of bundle sheath cell (BSC) chloroplasts. To clarify the mechanism underlying this difference in salt sensitivity, we monitored changes in the glycerolipid and fatty acid compositions of both types of chloroplast upon exposure to salinity stress. The monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) contents were higher in MC chloroplasts than in BSC chloroplasts, in both the presence and absence of salt treatment. Under salt conditions, the MGDG level in MC chloroplasts was significantly lower than under normal conditions, while it was unchanged in BSC chloroplasts. In both types of chloroplast, the contents of DGDG, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol remained at the same levels in control and salt-treated plants, whereas sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine were significantly lower and higher, respectively, upon salt treatment. In addition, the fatty acid composition and double bond index of individual lipid classes were changed by salt treatment in both BSC and MC chloroplasts, although these factors had no effect on glycerolipid content. These findings suggest that the difference in salt sensitivity of MC and BSC chloroplast membranes is related to differences in MGDG responses to salinity. Thus, we propose that the low MGDG content and the low sensitivity of MGDG to salinity in BSC chloroplasts render them more tolerant than MC chloroplasts to salinity stress.

  8. Proteasome Inhibitors Prevent Tracheary Element Differentiation in Zinnia Mesophyll Cell Cultures1

    PubMed Central

    Woffenden, Bonnie J.; Freeman, Thomas B.; Beers, Eric P.

    1998-01-01

    To determine whether proteasome activity is required for tracheary element (TE) differentiation, the proteasome inhibitors clasto-lactacystin β-lactone and carbobenzoxy-leucinyl-leucinyl-leucinal (LLL) were used in a zinnia (Zinnia elegans) mesophyll cell culture system. The addition of proteasome inhibitors at the time of culture initiation prevented differentiation otherwise detectable at 96 h. Inhibition of the proteasome at 48 h, after cellular commitment to differentiation, did not alter the final percentage of TEs compared with controls. However, proteasome inhibition at 48 h delayed the differentiation process by approximately 24 h, as indicated by examination of both morphological markers and the expression of putative autolytic proteases. These results indicate that proteasome function is required both for induction of TE differentiation and for progression of the TE program in committed cells. Treatment at 48 h with LLL but not clasto-lactacystin β-lactone resulted in partial uncoupling of autolysis from differentiation. Results from gel analysis of protease activity suggested that the observed incomplete autolysis was due to the ability of LLL to inhibit TE cysteine proteases. PMID:9765527

  9. Transport of Arginine and Aspartic Acid into Isolated Barley Mesophyll Vacuoles 1

    PubMed Central

    Martinoia, Enrico; Thume, Monika; Vogt, Esther; Rentsch, Doris; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    1991-01-01

    The transport of arginine into isolated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) mesophyll vacuoles was investigated. In the absence of ATP, arginine uptake was saturable with a Km of 0.3 to 0.4 millimolar. Positively charged amino acids inhibited arginine uptake, lysine being most potent with a Ki of 1.2 millimolar. In the presence of free ATP, but not of its Mg-complex, uptake of arginine was drastically enhanced and a linear function of its concentration up to 16 millimolar. The nonhydrolyzable adenylyl imidodiphosphate, but no other nucleotide tested, could substitute for ATP. Therefore, it is suggested that this process does not require energy and does not involve the tonoplast ATPase. The ATP-dependent arginine uptake was strongly inhibited by p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid. Furthermore, hydrophobic amino acids were inhibitory (I50 phenylalanine 1 millimolar). Similar characteristics were observed for the uptake of aspartic acid. However, rates of ATP-stimulated aspartic acid transport were 10-fold lower as compared to arginine transport. Uptake of aspartate in the absence of ATP was negligible. PMID:16668447

  10. How succulent leaves of Aizoaceae avoid mesophyll conductance limitations of photosynthesis and survive drought

    PubMed Central

    Ripley, Brad S.

    2013-01-01

    In several taxa, increasing leaf succulence has been associated with decreasing mesophyll conductance (g M) and an increasing dependence on Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). However, in succulent Aizoaceae, the photosynthetic tissues are adjacent to the leaf surfaces with an internal achlorophyllous hydrenchyma. It was hypothesized that this arrangement increases g M, obviating a strong dependence on CAM, while the hydrenchyma stores water and nutrients, both of which would only be sporadically available in highly episodic environments. These predictions were tested with species from the Aizoaceae with a 5-fold variation in leaf succulence. It was shown that g M values, derived from the response of photosynthesis to intercellular CO2 concentration (A:C i), were independent of succulence, and that foliar photosynthate δ13C values were typical of C3, but not CAM photosynthesis. Under water stress, the degree of leaf succulence was positively correlated with an increasing ability to buffer photosynthetic capacity over several hours and to maintain light reaction integrity over several days. This was associated with decreased rates of water loss, rather than tolerance of lower leaf water contents. Additionally, the hydrenchyma contained ~26% of the leaf nitrogen content, possibly providing a nutrient reservoir. Thus the intermittent use of C3 photosynthesis interspersed with periods of no positive carbon assimilation is an alternative strategy to CAM for succulent taxa (Crassulaceae and Aizoaceae) which occur sympatrically in the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa. PMID:24127513

  11. The photosynthetic capacity in 35 ferns and fern allies: mesophyll CO2 diffusion as a key trait.

    PubMed

    Tosens, Tiina; Nishida, Keisuke; Gago, Jorge; Coopman, Rafael Eduardo; Cabrera, Hernán Marino; Carriquí, Marc; Laanisto, Lauri; Morales, Loreto; Nadal, Miquel; Rojas, Roke; Talts, Eero; Tomas, Magdalena; Hanba, Yuko; Niinemets, Ülo; Flexas, Jaume

    2016-03-01

    Ferns and fern allies have low photosynthetic rates compared with seed plants. Their photosynthesis is thought to be limited principally by physical CO2 diffusion from the atmosphere to chloroplasts. The aim of this study was to understand the reasons for low photosynthesis in species of ferns and fern allies (Lycopodiopsida and Polypodiopsida). We performed a comprehensive assessment of the foliar gas-exchange and mesophyll structural traits involved in photosynthetic function for 35 species of ferns and fern allies. Additionally, the leaf economics spectrum (the interrelationships between photosynthetic capacity and leaf/frond traits such as leaf dry mass per unit area or nitrogen content) was tested. Low mesophyll conductance to CO2 was the main cause for low photosynthesis in ferns and fern allies, which, in turn, was associated with thick cell walls and reduced chloroplast distribution towards intercellular mesophyll air spaces. Generally, the leaf economics spectrum in ferns follows a trend similar to that in seed plants. Nevertheless, ferns and allies had less nitrogen per unit DW than seed plants (i.e. the same slope but a different intercept) and lower photosynthesis rates per leaf mass area and per unit of nitrogen.

  12. The Péclet effect on leaf water enrichment correlates with leaf hydraulic conductance and mesophyll conductance for CO(2).

    PubMed

    Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Pou, Alícia; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Gessler, Arthur; Kodama, Naomi; Flexas, Jaume; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel

    2012-03-01

    Leaf water gets isotopically enriched through transpiration, and diffusion of enriched water through the leaf depends on transpiration flow and the effective path length (L). The aim of this work was to relate L with physiological variables likely to respond to similar processes. We studied the response to drought and vein severing of leaf lamina hydraulic conductance (K(lamina) ), mesophyll conductance for CO(2) (g(m) ) and leaf water isotope enrichment in Vitis vinifera L cv. Grenache. We hypothesized that restrictions in water pathways would reduce K(lamina) and increase L. As a secondary hypothesis, we proposed that, given the common pathways for water and CO(2) involved, a similar response should be found in g(m) . Our results showed that L was strongly related to mesophyll variables, such as K(lamina) or g(m) across experimental drought and vein-cutting treatments, showing stronger relationships than with variables included as input parameters for the models, such as transpiration. Our findings were further supported by a literature survey showing a close link between L and leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf) = 31.5 × L(-0.43) , r(2) = 0.60, n = 24). The strong correlation found between L, K(lamina) and g(m) supports the idea that water and CO(2) share an important part of their diffusion pathways through the mesophyll.

  13. Starch Biosynthesis in Guard Cells But Not in Mesophyll Cells Is Involved in CO2-Induced Stomatal Closing1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Aaron B.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Starch metabolism is involved in stomatal movement regulation. However, it remains unknown whether starch-deficient mutants affect CO2-induced stomatal closing and whether starch biosynthesis in guard cells and/or mesophyll cells is rate limiting for high CO2-induced stomatal closing. Stomatal responses to [CO2] shifts and CO2 assimilation rates were compared in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants that were either starch deficient in all plant tissues (ADP-Glc-pyrophosphorylase [ADGase]) or retain starch accumulation in guard cells but are starch deficient in mesophyll cells (plastidial phosphoglucose isomerase [pPGI]). ADGase mutants exhibited impaired CO2-induced stomatal closure, but pPGI mutants did not, showing that starch biosynthesis in guard cells but not mesophyll functions in CO2-induced stomatal closing. Nevertheless, starch-deficient ADGase mutant alleles exhibited partial CO2 responses, pointing toward a starch biosynthesis-independent component of the response that is likely mediated by anion channels. Furthermore, whole-leaf CO2 assimilation rates of both ADGase and pPGI mutants were lower upon shifts to high [CO2], but only ADGase mutants caused impairments in CO2-induced stomatal closing. These genetic analyses determine the roles of starch biosynthesis for high CO2-induced stomatal closing. PMID:27208296

  14. Drought response of mesophyll conductance in forest understory species--impacts on water-use efficiency and interactions with leaf water movement.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Robert; Siegwolf, Rolf; Saurer, Matthias; Farquhar, Graham D; Kayler, Zachary; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Gessler, Arthur

    2014-09-01

    Regulation of stomatal (gs ) and mesophyll conductance (gm ) is an efficient means for optimizing the relationship between water loss and carbon uptake in plants. We assessed water-use efficiency (WUE)-based drought adaptation strategies with respect to mesophyll conductance of different functional plant groups of the forest understory. Moreover we aimed at assessing the mechanisms of and interactions between water and CO2 conductance in the mesophyll. The facts that an increase in WUE was observed only in the two species that increased gm in response to moderate drought, and that over all five species examined, changes in mesophyll conductance were significantly correlated with the drought-induced change in WUE, proves the importance of gm in optimizing resource use under water restriction. There was no clear correlation of mesophyll CO2 conductance and the tortuosity of water movement in the leaf across the five species in the control and drought treatments. This points either to different main pathways for CO2 and water in the mesophyll either to different regulation of a common pathway.

  15. Effects of Waterlogging on Leaf Mesophyll Cell Ultrastructure and Photosynthetic Characteristics of Summer Maize

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Baizhao; Zhang, Jiwang; Dong, Shuting; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A field experiment was performed to study the effects of waterlogging on the leaf mesophyll cell ultrastructure, chlorophyll content, gas exchange parameters, chlorophyll fluorescence, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content of summer maize (Zea mays L.) hybrids Denghai605 (DH605) and Zhengdan958 (ZD958). The waterlogging treatments were implemented for different durations (3 and 6 days) at the third leaf stage (V3), the sixth leaf stage (V6), and the 10th day after the tasseling stage (10VT). Leaf area index (LAI), chlorophyll content, photosynthetic rate (Pn), and actual photochemical efficiency (ΦPSII) were reduced after waterlogging, indicating that waterlogging significantly decreased photosynthetic capacity. The chloroplast shapes changed from long and oval to elliptical or circular after waterlogging. In addition, the internal structures of chloroplasts were degenerated after waterlogging. After waterlogging for 6 d at V3, the number of grana and grana lamellae of the third expanded leaf in DH605 were decreased by 26.83% and 55.95%, respectively, compared to the control (CK). Those in ZD958 were reduced by 30.08% and 31.94%, respectively. Waterlogging increased MDA content in both hybrids, suggesting an impact of waterlogging on membrane integrity and thus membrane deterioration. Waterlogging also damaged the biological membrane structure and mitochondria. Our results indicated that the physiological reactions to waterlogging were closely related to lower LAI, chlorophyll content, and Pn and to the destruction of chloroplast ultrastructure. These negative effects resulted in the decrease of grain yield in response to waterlogging. Summer maize was the most susceptible to damage when waterlogging occurred at V3, followed by V6 and 10VT, with damage increasing in the wake of waterlogging duration increasing. PMID:27583803

  16. l-Glutamate-Dependent Medium Alkalinization by Asparagus Mesophyll Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    McCutcheon, Steve L.; Ciccarelli, Bruce W.; Chung, Induk; Shelp, Barry; Bown, Alan W.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanically isolated Asparagus sprengeri Regel mesophyll cells cause alkalinization of the suspension medium on the addition of l-glutamate or its analog l-methionine-d,l-sulfoximine. Using a radiolabeled pH probe, it was found that both compounds caused internal acidification whereas l-aspartate did not. Fusicoccin stimulated H+ efflux from the cells by 111% and the uptake of l-[U-14C]glutamate by 55%. Manometric experiments demonstrated that, unlike l-methionine-d,l-sulfoximine, l-glutamate stimulated CO2 evolution from nonilluminated cells. Simultaneous measurements of medium alkalinization and 14CO2 evolution upon the addition of labeled l-glutamate showed that alkalinization was immediate and reached a maximum value after 45 minutes whereas 14CO2 evolution exhibited a lag before its appearance and continued in a linear manner for at least 100 minutes. Rates of alkalinization and uptake of l-[U-14C]glutamate were higher in the light while rates of 14CO2 evolution were higher in the dark. The major labeled product of glutamate decarboxylation, γ-aminobutyric acid, was found in the cells and the suspension medium. Its addition to the cell suspension did not result in medium alkalinization and evidence indicates that it is lost from the cell to the medium. The data suggest that the origin of medium alkalinization is co-transport not metabolism, and that the loss of labeled CO2 and γ-aminobutyric acid from the cell result in an overestimation of the stoichiometry of the H+/l-glutamate uptake process. Images Fig. 5 PMID:16666418

  17. Evidence for Mediated HCO3− Transport in Isolated Pea Mesophyll Protoplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Volokita, Micha; Kaplan, Aaron; Reinhold, Leonora

    1981-01-01

    The kinetics of 14C fixation, and inorganic C (Cinorg) accumulation, have been followed in isolated pea mesophyll protoplasts. NaH14CO3 was supplied to the protoplasts in media the pH of which was varied between 7 and 8. When 14CO2 fixation was plotted against the calculated concentration of free CO2 in the media, the apparent Km for CO2 was observed to rise as external pH increased. The Vmax did not alter significantly. Similarly, when Cinorg uptake, either in the light or in the dark, was plotted against external CO2 concentration the slope of the curves was steeper at higher external pH. Investigation of the time course of uptake showed that internal Cinorg concentration rose throughout the experimental period, and that in the light it surpassed the external Cinorg concentration after about 3 minutes. Irradiation of protoplasts previously taking up 14Cinorg in the dark brought about a sharp increase in the rate of 14Cinorg accumulation which was sustained for at least 20 minutes. Estimates of internal pH based on the distribution of labeled 5,5-dimethyloxazoladine-2,4-dione (DMO) between protoplast and medium suggested that internal pH altered relatively little with change in external pH. The values for internal pH as calculated from Cinorg distribution were always higher than those calculated from DMO distribution, i.e. the internal Cinorg concentration was higher than would be predicted on the assumption of passive distribution in accordance with pH. Addition of carbonic anhydrase to the external solution was without effect either on rate of 14CO2 fixation or Cinorg accumulation. Various possible interpretations of the results are considered. It is concluded that the most reasonable explanation, consistent with all the data, is that HCO3− ions can cross the protoplast membranes, and that their passage is mediated by a transfer mechanism. PMID:16661821

  18. Mesophyll Chloroplast Investment in C3, C4 and C2 Species of the Genus Flaveria.

    PubMed

    Stata, Matt; Sage, Tammy L; Hoffmann, Natalie; Covshoff, Sarah; Ka-Shu Wong, Gane; Sage, Rowan F

    2016-05-01

    The mesophyll (M) cells of C4 plants contain fewer chloroplasts than observed in related C3 plants; however, it is uncertain where along the evolutionary transition from C3 to C4 that the reduction in M chloroplast number occurs. Using 18 species in the genus Flaveria, which contains C3, C4 and a range of C3-C4 intermediate species, we examined changes in chloroplast number and size per M cell, and positioning of chloroplasts relative to the M cell periphery. Chloroplast number and coverage of the M cell periphery declined in proportion to increasing strength of C4 metabolism in Flaveria, while chloroplast size increased with increasing C4 cycle strength. These changes increase cytosolic exposure to the cell periphery which could enhance diffusion of inorganic carbon to phosphenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a cytosolic enzyme. Analysis of the transcriptome from juvenile leaves of nine Flaveria species showed that the transcript abundance of four genes involved in plastid biogenesis-FtsZ1, FtsZ2, DRP5B and PARC6-was negatively correlated with variation in C4 cycle strength and positively correlated with M chloroplast number per planar cell area. Chloroplast size was negatively correlated with abundance of FtsZ1, FtsZ2 and PARC6 transcripts. These results indicate that natural selection targeted the proteins of the contractile ring assembly to effect the reduction in chloroplast numbers in the M cells of C4 Flaveria species. If so, efforts to engineer the C4 pathway into C3 plants might evaluate whether inducing transcriptome changes similar to those observed in Flaveria could reduce M chloroplast numbers, and thus introduce a trait that appears essential for efficient C4 function.

  19. Phosphate translocator of mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts of a C sub 4 plant, Panicum miliaceum L

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Junichi; Fluegge, U.I.; Heldt, H.W. )

    1989-12-01

    The phosphate translocator was identified in the envelope membranes of both mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts of Panicum miliaceum L. by labeling with (1,2-{sup 3}H)1,2-(2,2{prime}-disulfo-4,4{prime}-diisothiocyano)diphenylethane (({sup 3}H)H{sub 2}DIDS) and by using SDS-PAGE. Assay of {sup 32}Pi uptake by the chloroplasts showed that the phosphate translocators of both types of chloroplasts have a higher affinity for phosphoenolpyruvate than the C{sub 3} counterpart and can be regarded as C{sub 4} types.

  20. Determination of Compartmented Metabolite Pools by a Combination of Rapid Fractionation of Oat Mesophyll Protoplasts and Enzymic Cycling 1

    PubMed Central

    Hampp, Rüdiger; Goller, Marion; Füllgraf, Helene

    1984-01-01

    In vivo pool sizes of a range of metabolites have been determined in subcellular fractions of darkened and illuminated mesophyll protoplasts of Avena sativa L. These estimations were made by combining a method of rapid protoplast fractionation with enzymic cycling techniques. Results are given for reduced and oxidized pyridine nucleotides, triose phosphates, 3-phosphoglycerate, inorganic phosphate, aspartate, malate, oxaloacetate, glutamate, 2-oxoglutarate, and citrate, from chloroplasts, mitochondria, and a fraction representing the remainder of the protoplast. The results indicate distinct differences of compartmented levels of certain metabolites between darkened and illuminated protoplasts. PMID:16663726

  1. Symplastic Transfer of Fluorescent Dyes from Mesophyll to Sieve Tube in Stripped Leaf Tissue and Partly Isolated Minor Veins of Commelina benghalensis

    PubMed Central

    van Kesteren, W. J. P.; van der Schoot, C.; van Bel, A. J. E.

    1988-01-01

    We have stripped small (3 × 3 mm) fields of the upper and the opposite lower epidermis of Commelina benghalensis leaves. Pectinase treatment of the resulting chlorenchyma windows produced free-lying viable minor veins with small lumps of mesophyll cells attached. These veins were still connected with the intact remainder of the leaf. Fluorescent dyes were injected into mesophyll cells or mestome sheath cells. Continuous following of the dye from the moment of injection and use of the simple vein system allowed an unhindered and precise assessment of the cell-to-cell route of dye transfer. Disodium fluorescein and Lucifer Yellow CH injected into mesophyll or mestome sheath cells readily moved to the sieve tube. This symplastic dye transfer from mesophyll to sieve tube was also observed after injection into unmacerated stripped leaf tissue. The displacement of fluorescent dyes substantiates a symplastic continuity between mesophyll and sieve tube and therefore supports the possibility of symplastic phloem loading. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16666366

  2. Photosynthetic Response of an Alpine Plant, Rhododendron delavayi Franch, to Water Stress and Recovery: The Role of Mesophyll Conductance

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yanfei; Wang, Jihua; Li, Shifeng; Zhang, Lu; Peng, Lvchun; Xie, Weijia; Liu, Feihu

    2015-01-01

    Rhododendron delavayi Franch is an evergreen shrub or small tree with large scarlet flowers that makes it highly attractive as an ornamental species. The species is native to southwest China and southeast Asia, especially the Himalayan region, showing good adaptability, and tolerance to drought. To understand the water stress coping mechanisms of R. delavayi, we analyzed the plant's photosynthetic performance during water stress and recovery. In particular, we looked at the regulation of stomatal (gs) and mesophyll conductance (gm), and maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax). After 4 days of water stress treatment, the net CO2 assimilation rate (AN) declined slightly while gs and gm were not affected and stomatal limitation (SL) was therefore negligible. At this stage mesophyll conductance limitation (MCL) and biochemical limitation (BL) constituted the main limitation factors. After 8 days of water stress treatment, AN, gs, and gm had decreased notably. At this stage SL increased markedly and MCL even more so, while BL remained relatively constant. After re-watering, the recovery of AN, gs, and gm was rapid, although remaining below the levels of the control plants, while Vcmax fully regained control levels after 3 days of re-watering. MCL remained the main limitation factor irrespective of the degree of photosynthetic recovery. In conclusion, in our experiment MCL was the main photosynthetic limitation factor of R. delavayi under water stress and during the recovery phase, with the regulation of gm probably being the result of interactions between the environment and leaf anatomical features. PMID:26697043

  3. The mechanistic basis of internal conductance: a theoretical analysis of mesophyll cell photosynthesis and CO2 diffusion.

    PubMed

    Tholen, Danny; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2011-05-01

    Photosynthesis is limited by the conductance of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) from intercellular spaces to the sites of carboxylation. Although the concept of internal conductance (g(i)) has been known for over 50 years, shortcomings in the theoretical description of this process may have resulted in a limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms. To tackle this issue, we developed a three-dimensional reaction-diffusion model of photosynthesis in a typical C(3) mesophyll cell that includes all major components of the CO(2) diffusion pathway and associated reactions. Using this novel systems model, we systematically and quantitatively examined the mechanisms underlying g(i). Our results identify the resistances of the cell wall and chloroplast envelope as the most significant limitations to photosynthesis. In addition, the concentration of carbonic anhydrase in the stroma may also be limiting for the photosynthetic rate. Our analysis demonstrated that higher levels of photorespiration increase the apparent resistance to CO(2) diffusion, an effect that has thus far been ignored when determining g(i). Finally, we show that outward bicarbonate leakage through the chloroplast envelope could contribute to the observed decrease in g(i) under elevated CO(2). Our analysis suggests that physiological and anatomical features associated with g(i) have been evolutionarily fine-tuned to benefit CO(2) diffusion and photosynthesis. The model presented here provides a novel theoretical framework to further analyze the mechanisms underlying diffusion processes in the mesophyll.

  4. Effect of composites based nickel foam anode in microbial fuel cell using Acetobacter aceti and Gluconobacter roseus as a biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Rengasamy; Krishnaraj, Navanietha; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan Woon-Chung; Lee, Patrick K H; Leung, Michael K H; Berchmans, Sheela

    2016-10-01

    This study explores the use of materials such as chitosan (chit), polyaniline (PANI) and titanium carbide (TC) as anode materials for microbial fuel cells. Nickel foam (NF) was used as the base anode substrate. Four different types of anodes (NF, NF/PANI, NF/PANI/TC, NF/PANI/TC/Chit) are thus prepared and used in batch type microbial fuel cells operated with a mixed consortium of Acetobacter aceti and Gluconobacter roseus as the biocatalysts and bad wine as a feedstock. A maximum power density of 18.8Wm(-3) (≈2.3 times higher than NF) was obtained in the case of the anode modified with a composite of PANI/TC/Chit. The MFCs running under a constant external resistance of (50Ω) yielded 14.7% coulombic efficiency with a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of 87-93%. The overall results suggest that the catalytic materials embedded in the chitosan matrix show the best performance and have potentials for further development.

  5. Comparison of isoflurane and alfaxalone (Alfaxan) for the induction of anesthesia in flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) undergoing orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Villaverde-Morcillo, Silvia; Benito, Javier; García-Sánchez, Rubén; Martín-Jurado, Olga; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2014-06-01

    Used since the 1970s as an avian anesthetic, the neurosteroid alfaxalone has been reformulated to avoid side effects from its castor oil excipient. This case report describes the clinical use of a new alfaxalone formulation (Alfaxan) as an intravenous anesthetic induction agent in wild isoflurane-anesthetized rose flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus). Twenty-five male and female rose flamingos underwent orthopedic surgery using isoflurane anesthesia. The animals were induced following one of two protocols: inhaled isoflurane by facemask (ISO; n = 9) or intravenous alfaxalone (2 mg/kg; ALF; n = 16). The time and quality of anesthetic induction (until first signs of muscle relaxation) and the time and quality of recovery (sternal recumbency) were recorded using a scoring system. Mild sedation was first observed at 18.4 +/- 3.8 min and 1.7 +/- 0.3 min, following isoflurane and alfaxalone administration, respectively (P < 0.001). Alfaxalone induction time was significantly shorter and induction quality was considered smoother than in the ISO group. Flamingos given alfaxalone induction required lower isoflurane concentrations for maintenance anesthesia than did flamingos induced with mask isoflurane (1.5-2 % vol vs. 4-5 % vol for ALF vs. ISO, respectively). Alfaxalone produced moderate cardiorespiratory effects not seen in the isoflurane induction group. Recovery times were similar with both protocols without significant differences in quality and length. The new alfaxalone formulation produces a safe and effective anesthetic induction in rose flamingos and has significant isoflurane-sparing effects during anesthesia.

  6. Characterization of Melioribacter roseus gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel facultatively anaerobic thermophilic cellulolytic bacterium from the class Ignavibacteria, and a proposal of a novel bacterial phylum Ignavibacteriae.

    PubMed

    Podosokorskaya, Olga A; Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Gavrilov, Sergey N; Mardanov, Andrey V; Merkel, Alexander Y; Karnachuk, Olga V; Ravin, Nikolay V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Kublanov, Ilya V

    2013-06-01

    A novel moderately thermophilic, facultatively anaerobic chemoorganotrophic bacterium strain P3M-2(T) was isolated from a microbial mat developing on the wooden surface of a chute under the flow of hot water (46°C) coming out of a 2775-m-deep oil exploration well (Tomsk region, Russia). Strain P3M-2(T) is a moderate thermophile and facultative anaerobe growing on mono-, di- or polysaccharides by aerobic respiration, fermentation or by reducing diverse electron acceptors [nitrite, Fe(III), As(V)]. Its closest cultivated relative (90.8% rRNA gene sequence identity) is Ignavibacterium album, the only chemoorganotrophic member of the phylum Chlorobi. New genus and species Melioribacter roseus are proposed for isolate P3M-2(T) . Together with I. album, the new organism represents the class Ignavibacteria assigned to the phylum Chlorobi. The revealed group includes a variety of uncultured environmental clones, the 16S rRNA gene sequences of some of which have been previously attributed to the candidate division ZB1. Phylogenetic analysis of M. roseus and I. album based on their 23S rRNA and RecA sequences confirmed that these two organisms could represent an even deeper, phylum-level lineage. Hence, we propose a new phylum Ignavibacteriae within the Bacteroidetes-Chlorobi group with a sole class Ignavibacteria, two families Ignavibacteriaceae and Melioribacteraceae and two species I. album and M. roseus. This proposal correlates with chemotaxonomic data and phenotypic differences of both organisms from other cultured representatives of Chlorobi. The most essential differences, supported by the analyses of complete genomes of both organisms, are motility, facultatively anaerobic and obligately organotrophic mode of life, the absence of chlorosomes and the apparent inability to grow phototrophically.

  7. Stomatal and mesophyll conductances to CO2 are the main limitations to photosynthesis in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) plants grown with excess zinc.

    PubMed

    Sagardoy, R; Vázquez, S; Florez-Sarasa, I D; Albacete, A; Ribas-Carbó, M; Flexas, J; Abadía, J; Morales, F

    2010-07-01

    *The effects of zinc (Zn) toxicity on photosynthesis and respiration were investigated in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) plants grown hydroponically with 1.2, 100 and 300 microM Zn. *A photosynthesis limitation analysis was used to assess the stomatal, mesophyll, photochemical and biochemical contributions to the reduced photosynthesis observed under Zn toxicity. *The main limitation to photosynthesis was attributable to stomata, with stomatal conductances decreasing by 76% under Zn excess and stomata being unable to respond to physiological and chemical stimuli. The effects of excess Zn on photochemistry were minor. Scanning electron microscopy showed morphological changes in stomata and mesophyll tissue. Stomatal size and density were smaller, and stomatal slits were sealed in plants grown under high Zn. Moreover, the mesophyll conductance to CO(2) decreased by 48% under Zn excess, despite a marked increase in carbonic anhydrase activity. Respiration, including that through both cytochrome and alternative pathways, was doubled by high Zn. *It can be concluded that, in sugar beet plants grown in the presence of excess Zn, photosynthesis is impaired due to a depletion of CO(2) at the Rubisco carboxylation site, as a consequence of major decreases in stomatal and mesophyll conductances to CO(2).

  8. A new mechanism for the regulation of stomatal aperture size in intact leaves: Accumulation of mesophyll-derived sucrose in the guard-cell wall of Vicia faba

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ping; Outlaw, W.H. Jr.; Smith, B.G.; Freed, G.A.

    1997-05-01

    At various times after pulse-labeling broad bean (Vicia faba L.) leaflets with {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, whole-leaf pieces and rinsed epidermal peels were harvested and subsequently processed for histochemical analysis. Cells dissected from whole leaf retained apoplastic contents, whereas those from rinsed peels contained only symplastic contents. Sucrose (Suc)-specific radioactivity peaked (111 GBq mol{sup -1}) in palisade cells at 20 min. In contrast, the {sup 14}C content and Suc-specific radioactivity were very low in guard cells for 20 min, implying little CO, incorporation; both then peaked at 40 min. The guard-cell apoplast had a high maximum Suc-specific radioactivity (204 GBq mol{sup -1}) and a high Suc influx rate (0.05 pmol stoma{sup -1} min{sup -1}). These and other comparisons implied the presence of (a) multiple Suc pools in mesophyll cells, M a localized mesophyll-apoplast region that exchanges with phloem and stomata, and mesophyll-derived Suc in guard-cell walls sufficient to diminish stomatal opening by approximately 3 pm. Factors expected to enhance Suc accumulation in guard-cell walls are (a) high transpiration rate, which closes stomata, and N high apoplastic Suc concentration, which is elevated when mesophyll Suc efflux exceeds translocation. Therefore, multiple physiological factors are integrated in the attenuation of stomatal aperture size by this previously unrecognized mechanism. 50 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Compartmentation of malic acid in mesophyll cells of Kalanchoee daigremontiana: indications of a intracellular cytosolic vesicle transport mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Balsamo, R.A.; Uribe, E.G.

    1987-04-01

    Leaf tissue was harvested over a 24hr period at one to three hour intervals. The malic acid levels in the tissue were assayed spectrophotometrically and the percent cell volume occupied by cytosolic vesicles in replicate samples was determined. The total volume of the cytosolic vesicles fluctuated throughout the photoperiod concommitantly with malic acid concentrations present in the tissue. An intact leaf tissue section (10.2cm/sup 2/) was radiolabeled with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ seven hours into the dark period for thirty minutes. Two dimensional thin layer chromatography and electrophoresis of the tissue determined that 96% of the label was incorporated into malic acid. A freeze substitution procedure was initiated followed by microautoradiography (Fisher 1971) which allowed for the tracing of intracellular malic acid migration and compartmentation within the mesophyll cells. The results and interpretation of this experiment will be presented.

  10. Kinetics of Determination in the Differentiation of Isolated Mesophyll Cells of Zinnia elegans to Tracheary Elements 1

    PubMed Central

    Church, Diane L.; Galston, Arthur W.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanically isolated mesophyll cells of Zinnia elegans L. cv Envy differentiate to tracheary elements when cultured in inductive medium containing 0.5 micromolar α-naphthaleneacetic acid and 0.5 micromolar benzyladenine. The cells do not differentiate when cultured in medium in which the concentration of auxin and/or cytokinin has been reduced to 0.005 micromolar. Cells require an initial 24-hour exposure to inductive cytokinin and 56-hour exposure to inductive auxin for differentiation at 72 hours of culture. Freshly isolated Zinnia cells can be maintained in medium having low concentrations of both auxin and cytokinin for only 1 day without significant loss of potential to differentiate upon transfer to inductive medium. Initial culture for up to 2 days in medium having high auxin and low cytokinin, or low auxin and high cytokinin, allows full differentiation on the third day after transfer to inductive medium and potentiates the early differentiation of some cells. PMID:11537443

  11. Blue light differentially represses mesophyll conductance in high vs low latitude genotypes of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray.

    PubMed

    Momayyezi, Mina; Guy, Robert D

    2017-03-16

    To explore what role chloroplast positioning might have in relation to latitudinal variation in mesophyll conductance (gm) of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray (black cottonwood), we examined photosynthetic response to different blue light treatments in six representative genotypes (three northern and three southern). The proportion of blue (B) to red light was varied from 0:100, 10:90, 20:80, 40:60, and 60:40 while keeping the total photosynthetic photon flux density constant. Mesophyll conductance was estimated by monitoring chlorophyll fluorescence in combination with gas exchange. Compared to the control (10% B), gm was significantly lower with increasing blue light. Consistent with a change in chloroplast positioning, there was a simultaneous but reversible decrease in chlorophyll content index (CCI), as measured by foliar greenness, while the extracted, actual chlorophyll content (ACC) remained unchanged. Blue-light-induced decreases in gm and CCI were greater in northern genotypes than in southern genotypes, both absolutely and proportionally, consistent with their inherently higher photosynthetic rate. Treatment of leaves with cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin-based chloroplast motility, reduced both CCI and ACC but had no effect on the CCI/ACC ratio and fully blocked any effect of blue light on CCI. Cytochalasin D reduced gm by ∼56% under 10% B, but did not block the effect of 60% B on gm, which was reduced a further 20%. These results suggest that the effect of high blue light on gm is at least partially independent of chloroplast repositioning. High blue light reduced carbonic anhydrase activity by 20% (P<0.05), consistent with a possible reduction in protein-mediated facilitation of CO2 diffusion.

  12. Reductions in mesophyll and guard cell photosynthesis impact on the control of stomatal responses to light and CO2.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Tracy; Lefebvre, Stephane; Baker, Neil R; Morison, James I L; Raines, Christine A

    2008-01-01

    Transgenic antisense tobacco plants with a range of reductions in sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase (SBPase) activity were used to investigate the role of photosynthesis in stomatal opening responses. High resolution chlorophyll a fluorescence imaging showed that the quantum efficiency of photosystem II electron transport (F(q)(')/F(m)(')) was decreased similarly in both guard and mesophyll cells of the SBPase antisense plants compared to the wild-type plants. This demonstrated for the first time that photosynthetic operating efficiency in the guard cells responds to changes in the regeneration capacity of the Calvin cycle. The rate of stomatal opening in response to a 30 min, 10-fold step increase in red photon flux density in the leaves from the SBPase antisense plants was significantly greater than wild-type plants. Final stomatal conductance under red and mixed blue/red irradiance was greater in the antisense plants than in the wild-type control plants despite lower CO(2) assimilation rates and higher internal CO(2) concentrations. Increasing CO(2) concentration resulted in a similar stomatal closing response in wild-type and antisense plants when measured in red light. However, in the antisense plants with small reductions in SBPase activity greater stomatal conductances were observed at all C(i) levels. Together, these data suggest that the primary light-induced opening or CO(2)-dependent closing response of stomata is not dependent upon guard or mesophyll cell photosynthetic capacity, but that photosynthetic electron transport, or its end-products, regulate the control of stomatal responses to light and CO(2).

  13. Anatomical basis of variation in mesophyll resistance in eastern Australian sclerophylls: news of a long and winding path

    PubMed Central

    Tosens, Tiina

    2012-01-01

    In sclerophylls, photosynthesis is particularly strongly limited by mesophyll diffusion resistance from substomatal cavities to chloroplasts (r m), but the controls on diffusion limits by integral leaf variables such as leaf thickness, density, and dry mass per unit area and by the individual steps along the diffusion pathway are imperfectly understood. To gain insight into the determinants of r m in leaves with varying structure, the full CO2 physical diffusion pathway was analysed in 32 Australian species sampled from sites contrasting in soil nutrients and rainfall, and having leaf structures from mesophytic to strongly sclerophyllous. r m was estimated based on combined measurements of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence. In addition, r m was modelled on the basis of detailed anatomical measurements to separate the importance of different serial resistances affecting CO2 diffusion into chloroplasts. The strongest sources of variation in r m were S c/S, the exposed surface area of chloroplasts per unit leaf area, and mesophyll cell wall thickness, t cw. The strong correlation of r m with t cw could not be explained by cell wall thickness alone, and most likely arose from a further effect of cell wall porosity. The CO2 drawdown from intercellular spaces to chloroplasts was positively correlated with t cw, suggesting enhanced diffusional limitations in leaves with thicker cell walls. Leaf thickness and density were poorly correlated with S c/S, indicating that widely varying combinations of leaf anatomical traits occur at given values of leaf integrated traits, and suggesting that detailed anatomical studies are needed to predict r m for any given species. PMID:22888123

  14. Photosynthetic Response of an Alpine Plant, Rhododendron delavayi Franch, to Water Stress and Recovery: The Role of Mesophyll Conductance.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yanfei; Wang, Jihua; Li, Shifeng; Zhang, Lu; Peng, Lvchun; Xie, Weijia; Liu, Feihu

    2015-01-01

    Rhododendron delavayi Franch is an evergreen shrub or small tree with large scarlet flowers that makes it highly attractive as an ornamental species. The species is native to southwest China and southeast Asia, especially the Himalayan region, showing good adaptability, and tolerance to drought. To understand the water stress coping mechanisms of R. delavayi, we analyzed the plant's photosynthetic performance during water stress and recovery. In particular, we looked at the regulation of stomatal (g s) and mesophyll conductance (g m), and maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax). After 4 days of water stress treatment, the net CO2 assimilation rate (AN) declined slightly while g s and g m were not affected and stomatal limitation (SL) was therefore negligible. At this stage mesophyll conductance limitation (MCL) and biochemical limitation (BL) constituted the main limitation factors. After 8 days of water stress treatment, AN, g s, and g m had decreased notably. At this stage SL increased markedly and MCL even more so, while BL remained relatively constant. After re-watering, the recovery of AN, g s, and g m was rapid, although remaining below the levels of the control plants, while Vcmax fully regained control levels after 3 days of re-watering. MCL remained the main limitation factor irrespective of the degree of photosynthetic recovery. In conclusion, in our experiment MCL was the main photosynthetic limitation factor of R. delavayi under water stress and during the recovery phase, with the regulation of g m probably being the result of interactions between the environment and leaf anatomical features.

  15. Assessing sex-related chick provisioning in greater flamingo Phoenicopterus roseus parents using capture-recapture models.

    PubMed

    Rendón, Miguel A; Garrido, Araceli; Rendón-Martos, Manuel; Ramírez, José M; Amat, Juan A

    2014-03-01

    In sexually dimorphic species, the parental effort of the smaller sex may be reduced due to competitive exclusion in the feeding areas by the larger sex or physiological constraints. However, to determine gender effects on provisioning patterns, other intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting parental effort should be accounted for. Greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) exhibit sexual size dimorphism. In Fuente de Piedra colony, the lake dries out almost completely during the breeding season and both parents commute between breeding and foraging sites >130 km away during the chick-rearing period. Applying multistate capture-recapture models to daily observations of marked parents, we determined the effects of sex, and their interactions with other intrinsic and extrinsic factors, on the probability of chick desertion and sojourn in the colony and feeding areas. Moreover, using stable isotopes in the secretions that parents produce to feed their chicks, we evaluated sex-specific use of wetlands. The probability of chick attendance (complementary to chick desertion) was >0.98. Chick desertion was independent of parental sex, but decreased with parental age. Females stayed in the feeding areas for shorter periods [mean: 7.5 (95% CI: 6.0-9.4) days] than males [9.2 (7.3-11.8) days]. Isotopic signatures of secretions did not show sex differences in δ(13)C, but males' secretions were enriched in δ(15)N, suggesting they fed on prey of higher trophic levels than females. Both parents spent approximately 1 day in the colony, but females prolonged their mean stay when the lake dried out. Females also allocated more time to foraging in the flooded areas remaining in the colony, likely because they were energetically more stressed than males. The results indicate that sex-specific provisioning behaviour in greater flamingo is related to differential effects of both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Males seem forage less efficiently than females, whereas females' body

  16. Arsenicicoccus dermatophilus sp. nov., a hypha-forming bacterium isolated from the skin of greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) with pododermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gobeli, Stefanie; Thomann, Andreas; Wyss, Fabia; Kuehni-Boghenbor, Kathrin; Brodard, Isabelle; Perreten, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Dermatophilus-like bacteria were observed in histological examinations of samples of diseased foot skin from greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) living in zoological gardens in Switzerland. When grown on TSA-SB containing polymyxin B, the bacteria isolated from these skin samples formed hyphae, as is typical for Dermatophilus congolensis, but these bacteria were non-haemolytic. The closest relatives based on 16S rRNA gene sequences were the two members of the genus Arsenicicoccus, Arsenicicoccus bolidensis and Arsenicicoccus piscis. A representative of the isolated strains shared 34.3 % DNA-DNA relatedness with the type strain of A. bolidensis, 32.3 % with the type strain of A. piscis and 34.5 % with the type strain of D. congolensis, demonstrating that these strains do not belong to any of these species. The phenotypic characteristics differed from those of members of the genus Arsenicicoccus as well as from those of D. congolensis. The G+C content of strain KM 894/11(T) was 71.6 mol%. The most abundant fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, summed feature 3 (including C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH) and C18 : 1ω9c. MK-8(H4) was the predominant menaquinone. Cell-wall structure analysis revealed that the peptidoglycan type was A3γ ll-Dpm-Gly (type A41.1). Based on genotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, the isolated strains represent a novel species within the genus Arsenicicoccus, for which the name Arsenicicoccus dermatophilus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is KM 894/11(T) ( = DSM 25571(T) = CCUG 62181(T) = CCOS 690(T)), and strain KM 1/12 ( = DSM 25572 = CCUG 62182 = CCOS 691) is a reference strain.

  17. Transgenic Rice Expressing Ictb and FBP/Sbpase Derived from Cyanobacteria Exhibits Enhanced Photosynthesis and Mesophyll Conductance to CO2.

    PubMed

    Gong, Han Yu; Li, Yang; Fang, Gen; Hu, Dao Heng; Jin, Wen Bin; Wang, Zhao Hai; Li, Yang Sheng

    2015-01-01

    To find a way to promote the rate of carbon flux and further improve the photosynthetic rate in rice, two CO2-transporting and fixing relevant genes, Ictb and FBP/Sbpase, which were derived from cyanobacteria with the 35SCaMV promotor in the respective constructs, were transformed into rice. Three homologous transgenic groups with Ictb, FBP/Sbpase and the two genes combined were constructed in parallel, and the functional effects of these two genes were investigated by physiological, biochemical and leaf anatomy analyses. The results indicated that the mesophyll conductance and net photosynthetic rate were higher at approximately 10.5-36.8% and 13.5-34.6%, respectively, in the three groups but without any changes in leaf anatomy structure compared with wild type. Other physiological and biochemical parameters increased with the same trend in the three groups, which showed that the effect of FBP/SBPase on improving photosynthetic capacity was better than that of ICTB and that there was an additive effect in ICTB+FBP/SBPase. ICTB localized in the cytoplasm, whereas FBP/SBPase was successfully transported to the chloroplast. The two genes might show a synergistic interaction to promote carbon flow and the assimilation rate as a whole. The multigene transformation engineering and its potential utility for improving the photosynthetic capacity and yield in rice were discussed.

  18. Mesophyll conductance to CO2 and Rubisco as targets for improving intrinsic water use efficiency in C3 plants.

    PubMed

    Flexas, J; Díaz-Espejo, A; Conesa, M A; Coopman, R E; Douthe, C; Gago, J; Gallé, A; Galmés, J; Medrano, H; Ribas-Carbo, M; Tomàs, M; Niinemets, Ü

    2016-05-01

    Water limitation is a major global constraint for plant productivity that is likely to be exacerbated by climate change. Hence, improving plant water use efficiency (WUE) has become a major goal for the near future. At the leaf level, WUE is the ratio between photosynthesis and transpiration. Maintaining high photosynthesis under water stress, while improving WUE requires either increasing mesophyll conductance (gm ) and/or improving the biochemical capacity for CO2 assimilation-in which Rubisco properties play a key role, especially in C3 plants at current atmospheric CO2 . The goals of the present analysis are: (1) to summarize the evidence that improving gm and/or Rubisco can result in increased WUE; (2) to review the degree of success of early attempts to genetically manipulate gm or Rubisco; (3) to analyse how gm , gsw and the Rubisco's maximum velocity (Vcmax ) co-vary across different plant species in well-watered and drought-stressed conditions; (4) to examine how these variations cause differences in WUE and what is the overall extent of variation in individual determinants of WUE; and finally, (5) to use simulation analysis to provide a theoretical framework for the possible control of WUE by gm and Rubisco catalytic constants vis-à-vis gsw under water limitations.

  19. 4-Coumarate:coenzyme A ligase and isoperoxidase expression in Zinnia mesophyll cells induced to differentiate into tracheary elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, D. L.; Galston, A. W.

    1988-01-01

    When cultured in inductive medium containing adequate auxin and cytokinin, isolated mesophyll cells of Zinnia elegans L. cv Envy differentiate into tracheary elements with lignified secondary wall thickenings. Differentiation does not occur when cells are cultured in control medium, which has reduced levels of auxin and/or cytokinin. The activities of two enzymes involved in lignin synthesis, 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase and peroxidase, were examined. An induction-specific cationic isoperoxidase, visualized by low pH polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, is detectable in soluble and wall fractions of cultured Zinnia cells long before tracheary elements visibly differentiate and is thus an early marker of differentiation. Compounds (such as antiauxins, anticytokinins, and tunicamycin) that inhibit or delay differentiation alter the expression of this isoperoxidase. 4-Coumarate:coenzyme A ligase activity increases dramatically only as cells differentiate. Together, these results suggest that the onset of lignification in differentiating Zinnia cells might be controlled by the availability of precursors synthesized by way of 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase. These precursors would then be polymerized into lignin in the cell wall by the induction-specific isoperoxidase.

  20. Spatio-temporal decoupling of stomatal and mesophyll conductance induced by vein cutting in leaves of Helianthus annuus

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, David T.; Green, Laura E.; Pockman, William T.

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of hydraulic conductance to the canopy has been shown to result in stomatal responses to limit transpiration. To test for similar responses to perturbations of the hydraulic network in leaves, we simultaneously measured leaf gas exchange with spatially explicit chlorophyll-a fluorescence and leaf temperature to examine the effects of cutting a primary leaf vein in Helianthus annuus. We repeated the leaf treatment at each of three different vapor pressure deficits and monitored the short-term dynamics of gas exchange following the treatment. Immediately after treatment, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance (gs) showed a transient “wrong way” response in which photosynthesis declined despite increased gs. Comparisons of fluorescence and temperature across the leaf showed that both photosynthesis and gs were transiently patchy across the measured leaf area, but that the patchiness of the two processes did not correspond in space or time. This suggests that photosynthesis and gs respond to vein cutting-induced cavitation via different mechanisms. Because the stomatal response varied by vapor pressure difference condition but photosynthesis did not, it is likely that gs, but not photosynthesis, responded to a hydraulic signal. In contrast, we hypothesize that photosynthesis declined due to a wound-induced electrical signal that has recently been shown to transiently decrease mesophyll conductance to CO2. The interaction of epidermal hydraulics and the electrical signal across the leaf likely created a patchy pattern of chlorophyll fluorescence and leaf temperature that cannot be explained through the action of a single signal. PMID:24065972

  1. Light and CO2 do not affect the mesophyll conductance to CO2 diffusion in wheat leaves.

    PubMed

    Tazoe, Youshi; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Badger, Murray R; Evans, John R

    2009-01-01

    In C(3) plants, diffusion of CO(2) into leaves is restricted by stomata and subsequently by the intercellular airspaces and liquid phase into chloroplasts. While considerable information exists on the effect of environmental conditions on stomatal conductance (g(s)), little is known on whether the mesophyll conductance to CO(2) diffusion (g(m)) changes with respect to photon flux density (PFD) and CO(2) partial pressure (pCO(2)). In this study, the effects of PFD and/or pCO(2) on g(m) were examined in wheat leaves by combining gas exchange with carbon isotope discrimination measurements using a membrane inlet mass spectrometer. Measurements were made in 2% O(2) to reduce the fractionation associated with photorespiration. The magnitude of g(m) was estimated using the observed carbon isotope discrimination (Delta), ambient and intercellular pCO(2), CO(2) assimilation and respiration rates, either from an individual measurement made under one environmental condition or from a global fit to multiple measurements where PFD was varied. It was found that respiration made a significant and variable contribution to the observed discrimination, which associated with the difference in isotopic composition between CO(2) in the greenhouse and that used for gas exchange measurements. In wheat, g(m) was independent of PFD between 200 and 1500 micromol m(-2) s(-1) and was independent of p(i) between 80 and 500 microbar.

  2. Artifactual responses of mesophyll conductance to CO2 and irradiance estimated with the variable J and online isotope discrimination methods

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Lianhong; Sun, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Studies with the variable J method have reported that mesophyll conductance (gm) rapidly decreases with increasing intercellular CO2 partial pressures (Ci) or decreasing irradiance. Similar responses have been suggested with the online isotope discrimination method, although with less consistency. Here we show that even when the true gm is constant, the variable J method can produce an artifactual dependence of gm on Ci or irradiance similar to those reported in previous studies for any of the following factors: day respiration and chloroplastic CO2 photocompensation point are estimated with Laisk method; Ci or electron transport rate is positively biased; net photosynthetic rate is negatively biased; insufficient NADPH is assumed while insufficient ATP limits RuBP regeneration. The isotopic method produces similar artifacts if fractionation of carboxylation or Ci are positively biased or 13 negatively biased. A nonzero chloroplastic resistance to CO2 movement results in a qualitatively different dependence of gm on Ci or irradiance and this dependence is only sensitive at low Ci. We thus cannot rule out the possibility that previously reported dependence of gm on Ci or irradiance is a methodological artifact. Recommendations are made to take advantage of sensitivities of the variable J and isotopic methods for estimating gm.

  3. Mesophyll cells of C4 plants have fewer chloroplasts than those of closely related C3 plants.

    PubMed

    Stata, Matt; Sage, Tammy L; Rennie, Troy D; Khoshravesh, Roxana; Sultmanis, Stefanie; Khaikin, Yannay; Ludwig, Martha; Sage, Rowan F

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of C(4) photosynthesis from C(3) ancestors eliminates ribulose bisphosphate carboxylation in the mesophyll (M) cell chloroplast while activating phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation in the cytosol. These changes may lead to fewer chloroplasts and different chloroplast positioning within M cells. To evaluate these possibilities, we compared chloroplast number, size and position in M cells of closely related C(3), C(3) -C(4) intermediate and C(4) species from 12 lineages of C(4) evolution. All C(3) species had more chloroplasts per M cell area than their C(4) relatives in high-light growth conditions. C(3) species also had higher chloroplast coverage of the M cell periphery than C(4) species, particularly opposite intercellular air spaces. In M cells from 10 of the 12 C(4) lineages, a greater fraction of the chloroplast envelope was pulled away from the plasmalemma in the C(4) species than their C(3) relatives. C(3) -C(4) intermediate species generally exhibited similar patterns as their C(3) relatives. We interpret these results to reflect adaptive shifts that facilitate efficient C(4) function by enhancing diffusive access to the site of primary carbon fixation in the cytosol. Fewer chloroplasts in C(4) M cells would also reduce shading of the bundle sheath chloroplasts, which also generate energy required by C(4) photosynthesis.

  4. [Responses of mesophyllic conductance in leaves of 4 dominant subtropical forest tree species to moderate high temperature].

    PubMed

    Sun, Gu-chou; Zhao, Ping

    2007-06-01

    By using CO2 exchange system and chlorophyll fluorescence method, the magnitude of mesophyllic conductance (g(m)), namely the CO2 transfer conductance from intercellular space to chloroplast, in the leaves of four dominant subtropical forest tree species under moderate high temperature (38 degrees C) was studied. The results revealed that sun or early-successional species Schima superba had a higher g(m) than mesophytic and shade-tolerant species, such as Castanopsis hystrix, C. fissa and Cryptocarya concinna, and the leaves under full direct light had a higher g(m) than those under shade. The average g(m) of the four test trees from 25 degrees C to 38 degrees C was 1.59 +/- 0.27, and the responses of g(m) to temperature were dependant on the tree species and their leaf type (sun or shade leaves). Because the diffusion of CO2 in water was only about 1.25, g(m) might be controlled by a protein-related process besides temperature. Moderate high temperature could increase the g(m) value, resulting in the increase of CO2 concentration and carboxylation rate in chloroplasts. Comparing with that of S. superba, the carboxylation rate of C. hystrix, C. fissa and C. concinna was significantly increased by moderate high temperature, regardless of under full direct light or shading, indicating that moderate high temperature would favor the succession of mid- and late-successional species.

  5. Transgenic Rice Expressing Ictb and FBP/Sbpase Derived from Cyanobacteria Exhibits Enhanced Photosynthesis and Mesophyll Conductance to CO2

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Han Yu; Li, Yang; Fang, Gen; Hu, Dao Heng; Jin, Wen Bin; Wang, Zhao Hai; Li, Yang Sheng

    2015-01-01

    To find a way to promote the rate of carbon flux and further improve the photosynthetic rate in rice, two CO2-transporting and fixing relevant genes, Ictb and FBP/Sbpase, which were derived from cyanobacteria with the 35SCaMV promotor in the respective constructs, were transformed into rice. Three homologous transgenic groups with Ictb, FBP/Sbpase and the two genes combined were constructed in parallel, and the functional effects of these two genes were investigated by physiological, biochemical and leaf anatomy analyses. The results indicated that the mesophyll conductance and net photosynthetic rate were higher at approximately 10.5–36.8% and 13.5–34.6%, respectively, in the three groups but without any changes in leaf anatomy structure compared with wild type. Other physiological and biochemical parameters increased with the same trend in the three groups, which showed that the effect of FBP/SBPase on improving photosynthetic capacity was better than that of ICTB and that there was an additive effect in ICTB+FBP/SBPase. ICTB localized in the cytoplasm, whereas FBP/SBPase was successfully transported to the chloroplast. The two genes might show a synergistic interaction to promote carbon flow and the assimilation rate as a whole. The multigene transformation engineering and its potential utility for improving the photosynthetic capacity and yield in rice were discussed. PMID:26488581

  6. The avoidance and aggregative movements of mesophyll chloroplasts in C(4) monocots in response to blue light and abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Maai, Eri; Shimada, Shouu; Yamada, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Tatsuo; Miyake, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka

    2011-05-01

    In C(4) plants, mesophyll (M) chloroplasts are randomly distributed along the cell walls, whereas bundle sheath chloroplasts are located in either a centripetal or centrifugal position. It was reported previously that only M chloroplasts aggregatively redistribute to the bundle sheath side in response to extremely strong light or environmental stresses. The aggregative movement of M chloroplasts is also induced in a light-dependent fashion upon incubation with abscisic acid (ABA). The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and red/blue light in the aggregative movement of M chloroplasts are examined here in two distinct subtypes of C(4) plants, finger millet and maize. Exogenously applied hydrogen peroxide or ROS scavengers could not change the response patterns of M chloroplast movement to light and ABA. Blue light irradiation essentially induced the rearrangement of M chloroplasts along the sides of anticlinal walls, parallel to the direction of the incident light, which is analogous to the avoidance movement of C(3) chloroplasts. In the presence of ABA, most of the M chloroplasts showed the aggregative movement in response to blue light but not red light. Together these results suggest that ROS are not involved in signal transduction for the aggregative movement, and ABA can shift the blue light-induced avoidance movement of C(4)-M chloroplasts to the aggregative movement.

  7. [AGGLUTINATION OF MESOPHYLL PLASTIDS AND OBLITERATION OF PHLOEM SIEVE TUBES ARE THE TOTAL RESULT OF SEASONAL PAUSES IN PHOTOSYNTHATE EXPORT].

    PubMed

    Gamalei, Yu V

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplast agglutination and sieve tube obliteration are related to the different plant tissues: the agglutination--to the leaf mesophyll, and the obliteration--to the axis phloem. Being equally produced by photosynthate export dynamics, both phenomena are synchronous and can be used for diagnostics of seasonal flashes and pauses of photosynthetic activity with equal success. The nature of the mobility of chloroplast and their shuttle displacements from the nuclear envelope to the cell periphery connected with export dynamics have been established. It is assumed that nuclear envelope is the base structure of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) inside which the chloroplasts are localized. Activation of photosynthesis and sugar accumulation inside the ER induces its expansion followed by centrifugal diffusion of chloroplasts. Come back effect--ER collapse, its return to the source--can be induced by the blockade of photosynthesis. Centripetal collapse is accompanied by plastid concentration around the nuclear envelope. Displacements of ER and the chloroplasts dislocating inside it are reversible. It depends on seasonal fluctuations of photosynthesis and export intensities. Changes in the volume of sieve tubes, which are due to the same reason, are irreversible. Each seasonal wave of photosynthesis and sugar export forms new series of sieve tubes, replacing obliterated ones.

  8. Influence of Drought on Mesophyll Resistance to CO2 Diffusion and its Impact on Water-Use Efficiency in Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Beverly, D.; Cook, C.; Ewers, B. E.; Williams, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The resistance to CO2 diffusion inside leaves (mesophyll resistance; rm) during photosynthesis is often comparable in magnitude to stomatal diffusion resistance, and varies among species and across environmental conditions. Consequently, photosynthesis is strongly limited by rm at low internal CO2 partial pressures, such that its variation may determine patterns of leaf water-use efficiency (WUE). Reduction in stomatal conductance with drought typically increases WUE, but also decreases photosynthesis. In theory, the decrease in photosynthesis could be countered by reduction in rm while maintaining high WUE. It is still uncertain how drought-related changes in rm affect short- and long-term WUE strategies of different tree species. We conducted field observations of instantaneous WUE and 13C discrimination in two dominant conifer species (Pinus contorta and Picea engelmannii) in SE Wyoming over the seasonal dry-down period in the summer of 2015. rm was examined by on-line 13C discrimination using isotope laser spectroscopy. Controlled environment studies on three conifer species (P. contorta, P. engelmannii, and Abies lasiocarpa) and one angiosperm (Populus tremuloides) are in progress. We hypothesize that the plasticity of rm in response to drought accounts for significant adjustments in photosynthetic capacity and WUE. Needle leaf conifers are known to have relatively high rm, and we expect them to show greater improvements in photosynthesis and WUE when rm is decreased compared to angiosperm tree species.

  9. Disentangling the contributions of osmotic and ionic effects of salinity on stomatal, mesophyll, biochemical and light limitations to photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsu-Wei; Kahlen, Katrin; Stützel, Hartmut

    2015-08-01

    There are conflicting opinions on the relative importance of photosynthetic limitations under salinity. Quantitative limitation analysis of photosynthesis provides insight into the contributions of different photosynthetic limitations, but it has only been applied under saturating light conditions. Using experimental data and modelling approaches, we examined the influence of light intensity on photosynthetic limitations and quantified the osmotic and ionic effects of salinity on stomatal (LS ), mesophyll (LM ), biochemical (LB ) and light (LL ) limitations in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) under different light intensities. Non-linear dependencies of LS , LM and LL to light intensity were found. Osmotic effects on LS and LM increased with the salt concentration in the nutrient solution (Ss ) and the magnitude of LM depended on light intensity. LS increased with the Na(+) concentration in the leaf water (Sl ) and its magnitude depended on Ss . Biochemical capacity declined linearly with Sl but, surprisingly, the relationship between LB and Sl was influenced by Ss . Our results suggest that (1) improvement of stomatal regulation under ionic stress would be the most effective way to alleviate salinity stress in cucumber and (2) osmotic stress may alleviate the ionic effects on LB but aggravate the ionic effects on LS .

  10. Chloroplast downsizing under nitrate nutrition restrained mesophyll conductance and photosynthesis in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Ren, Binbin; Yang, Xiuxia; Xu, Guohua; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

    2012-05-01

    The phenomenon whereby ammonium enhances the tolerance of rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L., cv. 'Shanyou 63' hybrid indica China) to water stress has been reported in previous studies. To study the intrinsic mechanism of biomass synthesis related to photosynthesis, hydroponic experiments supplying different nitrogen (N) forms were conducted; water stress was simulated by the addition of polyethylene glycol. Water stress decreased leaf water potential (Ψ(leaf)) under nitrate nutrition, while it had no negative effect under ammonium nutrition. The decreased Ψ(leaf) under nitrate nutrition resulted in chloroplast downsizing and subsequently decreased mesophyll conductance to CO(2) (g(m)). The decreased g(m) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) under nitrate nutrition with water stress restrained the CO(2) supply to the chloroplast and Rubisco. The relatively higher distribution of leaf N to Rubisco under ammonium nutrition might also be of benefit for photosynthesis under water stress. In conclusion, chloroplast downsizing induced a decline in g(m), a relatively higher decrease in g(s) under nitrate nutrition with water stress, restrained the CO(2) supply to Rubisco and finally decreased the photosynthetic rate.

  11. Proton/l-Glutamate Symport and the Regulation of Intracellular pH in Isolated Mesophyll Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Snedden, Wayne A.; Chung, Induk; Pauls, Randy H.; Bown, Alan W.

    1992-01-01

    Addition of l-[U-14C]glutamate to a suspension of mechanically isolated asparagus (Asparagus sprengeri Regel) mesophyll cells results in (a) alkalinization of the medium, (b) uptake of l-[U-14C]glutamate, and (c) efflux of [14C]4-aminobutyrate, a product of glutamate decarboxylation. All three phenomena were eliminated by treatment with 1 millimolar aminooxyacetate. In vitro glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) assays showed that (a) 2 millimolar aminooxyacetate eliminated enzyme activity, (b) activity was pyridoxal phosphate-dependent, and (c) activity exhibited a sharp pH optimum at 6.0 that decreased to 20% of optimal activity at pH 5.0 and 7.0. Addition of 1.5 millimolar sodium butyrate or sodium acetate to cell suspensions caused immediate alkalinization of the medium followed by a resumption of acidification of the medium at a rate approximately double the initial rate. The data indicate that (a) continued H+/l-glutamate contransport is dependent upon GAD activity, (b) the pH-dependent properties of GAD are consistent with a role in a metabolic pH-stat, and (c) the regulation of intracellular pH during H+/l-Glu symport may involve both H+ consumption during 4-aminobutyrate production and ATP-driven H+ efflux. PMID:16668938

  12. Vacuolar Localization of Proteases and Degradation of Chloroplasts in Mesophyll Protoplasts from Senescing Primary Wheat Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Wittenbach, Vernon A.; Lin, Willy; Hebert, Richard R.

    1982-01-01

    Mesophyll protoplasts isolated from primary leaves of wheat seedlings were used to follow the localization of proteases and the breakdown of chloroplasts during dark-induced senescence. Protoplasts were readily obtained from leaf tissue, even after 80% of the chlorophyll and protein had been lost. Intact chloroplasts and vacuoles could be isolated from the protoplasts at all stages of senescence. All the proteolytic activity associated with the degradation of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase in the protoplasts could be accounted for by that localized within the vacuole. Moreover, this localization was retained late into senescence. Protoplasts isolated during leaf senescence first showed a decline in photosynthesis, then a decline in ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity, followed by a decline in chloroplast number. There was a close correlation between the decline in chloroplast number and the loss of chlorophyll and soluble protein per protoplast, suggesting a sequential degradation of chloroplasts during senescence. Ultrastructural studies indicated a movement of chloroplasts in toward the center of the protoplasts during senescence. Thus, within senescing protoplasts, chloroplasts appeared either to move into invaginations of the vacuole or to be taken up into the vacuole. Images PMID:16662193

  13. A novel method of measuring leaf epidermis and mesophyll stiffness shows the ubiquitous nature of the sandwich structure of leaf laminas in broad-leaved angiosperm species

    PubMed Central

    Onoda, Yusuke; Schieving, Feike; Anten, Niels P. R.

    2015-01-01

    Plant leaves commonly exhibit a thin, flat structure that facilitates a high light interception per unit mass, but may increase risks of mechanical failure when subjected to gravity, wind and herbivory as well as other stresses. Leaf laminas are composed of thin epidermis layers and thicker intervening mesophyll layers, which resemble a composite material, i.e. sandwich structure, used in engineering constructions (e.g. airplane wings) where high bending stiffness with minimum weight is important. Yet, to what extent leaf laminas are mechanically designed and behave as a sandwich structure remains unclear. To resolve this issue, we developed and applied a novel method to estimate stiffness of epidermis- and mesophyll layers without separating the layers. Across a phylogenetically diverse range of 36 angiosperm species, the estimated Young’s moduli (a measure of stiffness) of mesophyll layers were much lower than those of the epidermis layers, indicating that leaf laminas behaved similarly to efficient sandwich structures. The stiffness of epidermis layers was higher in evergreen species than in deciduous species, and strongly associated with cuticle thickness. The ubiquitous nature of sandwich structures in leaves across studied species suggests that the sandwich structure has evolutionary advantages as it enables leaves to be simultaneously thin and flat, efficiently capturing light and maintaining mechanical stability under various stresses. PMID:25675956

  14. High quality draft genome sequence and analysis of Pontibacter roseus type strain SRC-1T (DSM 17521T) isolated from muddy waters of a drainage system in Chandigarh, India

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Supratim; Lapidus, Alla; Shapiro, Nicole; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, James; Reddy, TBK; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Tindall, Brian J.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Pati, Amrita

    2015-01-01

    Pontibacter roseus Suresh et al 2006 is a member of genus Pontibacter family Cytophagaceae, class Cytophagia. While the type species of the genus Pontibacter actiniarum was isolated in 2005 from a marine environment, subsequent species of the same genus have been found in different types of habitats ranging from seawater, sediment, desert soil, rhizosphere, contaminated sites, solar saltern and muddy water. Here we describe the features of Pontibacter roseus strain SRC-1T along with its complete genome sequence and annotation from a culture of DSM 17521T. The 4,581,480 bp long draft genome consists of 12 scaffolds with 4,003 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes and is a part of Genomic encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG-I) project.

  15. High quality draft genome sequence and analysis of Pontibacter roseus type strain SRC-1T (DSM 17521T) isolated from muddy waters of a drainage system in Chandigarh, India

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Supratim; Lapidus, Alla; Shapiro, Nicole; Cheng, Jan -Fang; Han, James; Reddy, T. B. K.; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Tindall, Brian J.; Klenk, Hans -Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Pati, Amrita

    2015-02-09

    Pontibacter roseus is a member of genus Pontibacter family Cytophagaceae, class Cytophagia. While the type species of the genus Pontibacter actiniarum was isolated in 2005 from a marine environment, subsequent species of the same genus have been found in different types of habitats ranging from seawater, sediment, desert soil, rhizosphere, contaminated sites, solar saltern and muddy water. Here we describe the features of Pontibacter roseus strain SRC-1T along with its complete genome sequence and annotation from a culture of DSM 17521T. In conclusion, the 4,581,480 bp long draft genome consists of 12 scaffolds with 4,003 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes and is a part of Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains: KMG-I project.

  16. High quality draft genome sequence and analysis of Pontibacter roseus type strain SRC-1T (DSM 17521T) isolated from muddy waters of a drainage system in Chandigarh, India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pontibacter roseus is a member of genus Pontibacter family Cytophagaceae, class Cytophagia. While the type species of the genus Pontibacter actiniarum was isolated in 2005 from a marine environment, subsequent species of the same genus have been found in different types of habitats ranging from seawater, sediment, desert soil, rhizosphere, contaminated sites, solar saltern and muddy water. Here we describe the features of Pontibacter roseus strain SRC-1T along with its complete genome sequence and annotation from a culture of DSM 17521T. The 4,581,480 bp long draft genome consists of 12 scaffolds with 4,003 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes and is a part of Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains: KMG-I project. PMID:26203325

  17. High quality draft genome sequence and analysis of Pontibacter roseus type strain SRC-1(T) (DSM 17521(T)) isolated from muddy waters of a drainage system in Chandigarh, India.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Supratim; Lapidus, Alla; Shapiro, Nicole; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, James; Reddy, Tbk; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Tindall, Brian J; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Pati, Amrita

    2015-01-01

    Pontibacter roseus is a member of genus Pontibacter family Cytophagaceae, class Cytophagia. While the type species of the genus Pontibacter actiniarum was isolated in 2005 from a marine environment, subsequent species of the same genus have been found in different types of habitats ranging from seawater, sediment, desert soil, rhizosphere, contaminated sites, solar saltern and muddy water. Here we describe the features of Pontibacter roseus strain SRC-1(T) along with its complete genome sequence and annotation from a culture of DSM 17521(T). The 4,581,480 bp long draft genome consists of 12 scaffolds with 4,003 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes and is a part of Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains: KMG-I project.

  18. High quality draft genome sequence and analysis of Pontibacter roseus type strain SRC-1T (DSM 17521T) isolated from muddy waters of a drainage system in Chandigarh, India

    DOE PAGES

    Mukherjee, Supratim; Lapidus, Alla; Shapiro, Nicole; ...

    2015-02-09

    Pontibacter roseus is a member of genus Pontibacter family Cytophagaceae, class Cytophagia. While the type species of the genus Pontibacter actiniarum was isolated in 2005 from a marine environment, subsequent species of the same genus have been found in different types of habitats ranging from seawater, sediment, desert soil, rhizosphere, contaminated sites, solar saltern and muddy water. Here we describe the features of Pontibacter roseus strain SRC-1T along with its complete genome sequence and annotation from a culture of DSM 17521T. In conclusion, the 4,581,480 bp long draft genome consists of 12 scaffolds with 4,003 protein-coding and 50 RNA genesmore » and is a part of Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains: KMG-I project.« less

  19. Stomatal and mesophyll conductances to CO₂ in different plant groups: underrated factors for predicting leaf photosynthesis responses to climate change?

    PubMed

    Flexas, Jaume; Carriquí, Marc; Coopman, Rafael E; Gago, Jorge; Galmés, Jeroni; Martorell, Sebastià; Morales, Fermín; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    The climate change conditions predicted for the end of the current century are expected to have an impact on the performance of plants under natural conditions. The variables which are foreseen to have a larger effect are increased CO2 concentration and temperature. Although it is generally considered CO2 assimilation rate could be increased by the increasing levels of CO2, it has been reported in previous studies that acclimation to high CO2 results in reductions of physiological parameters involved in photosynthesis, like the maximum carboxylation rate (Vc,max), stomatal conductance (gs) and mesophyll conductance to CO2 (gm). On the one hand, most of the previous modeling efforts have neglected the potential role played by the acclimation of gm to high CO2 and temperature. On the other hand, the effect of climate change on plant clades other than angiosperms, like ferns, has received little attention, and there are no studies evaluating the potential impact of increasing CO2 and temperature on these species. In this study we predicted responses of several representative species among angiosperms, gymnosperms and ferns to increasing CO2 and temperature. Our results show that species with lower photosynthetic capacity - such as some ferns and gymnosperms - would be proportionally more favored under these foreseen environmental conditions. The main reason for this difference is the lower diffusion limitation imposed by gs and gm in plants having high capacity for photosynthesis among the angiosperms, which reduces the positive effect of increasing CO2. However, this apparent advantage of low-diffusion species would be canceled if the two conductances - gs and gm - acclimate and are down regulated to high CO2, which is basically unknown, especially for gymnosperms and ferns. Hence, for a better understanding of different plant responses to future climate, studies are urged in which the actual photosynthetic response/acclimation to increased CO2 and temperature of

  20. Cytoplasm-specific Effects of Helminthosporium maydis Race T Toxin on Survival of Corn Mesophyll Protoplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Earle, Elizabeth D.; Gracen, Vernon E.; Yoder, Olen C.; Gemmill, Karen P.

    1978-01-01

    High yields of mesophyll protoplasts were obtained from leaves of corn (Zea mays L., inbred W64A). Many protoplasts survived a week in the dark in a simple osmoticum. Culture filtrate from Helminthosporium maydis race T at dilutions of 1:10,000 to 1:20,000 destroyed protoplasts with Texas male-sterile (T) cytoplasm. Substantial damage to protoplasts with nonmale-sterile (N) cytoplasm occurred only at a 1:20 dilution. High concentrations of partially purified H. maydis race T (HMT) toxin (32.5-130 μg dry weight/ml) did not reduce survival of protoplasts with N cytoplasm or C or S male-sterile cytoplasms after 6 days of exposure. Protoplasts with T or TRf (fertility restored) cytoplasm collapsed within 1 to 3 days after treatment with 0.13 μg of HMT toxin/ml, which was one-fifth the level causing 50% inhibition of T cytoplasm seedling root growth. Protoplasts with T cytoplasm which were washed after 30 minutes or more of exposure to HMT toxin also collapsed within a few days. Cultured W64A T protoplasts and freshly isolated protoplasts from inbreds C103 and Mo17 with T cytoplasm were less sensitive to HMT toxin than freshly isolated W64A T protoplasts. Toxin-treated protoplasts survived longer in the light than in the dark. The sensitivity and specificity of the system described will facilitate physiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of toxin action. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:16660306

  1. Greater efficiency of water use in poplar clones having a delayed response of mesophyll conductance to drought.

    PubMed

    Théroux Rancourt, Guillaume; Éthier, Gilbert; Pepin, Steeve

    2015-02-01

    Improvement of water use efficiency is a key objective to improve the sustainability of cultivated plants, especially fast growing species with high water consumption like poplar. It is well known that water use efficiency (WUE) varies considerably among poplar genotypes, and it was recently suggested that the use of the mesophyll-to-stomatal conductance ratio (gm/gs) would be an appropriate trait to improve WUE. The responses of 7-week-old cuttings of four hybrid poplar clones and one native Balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera L.) to a water stress-recovery cycle were examined to evaluate the relation between the gm/gs ratio and transpiration efficiency (TE), a leaf-level component of WUE. A contrasting gs response to water stress was observed among the five clones, from stomatal closure early on during soil drying up to limited closure in Balsam poplar. However in the hybrids, the decline in gm was consistently delayed by a few days compared with gs. Moreover, in the most water use-efficient hybrids, the recovery following rehydration occurred faster for gm than for gs. Thus, the delay in the response of gm to drought and its faster recovery upon rewatering increased the gm/gs of the hybrids and this ratio scaled positively with TE. Our results support the use of the gm/gs ratio to select genotypes with improved WUE, and the notion that breeding strategies focusing mainly on stomatal responses to soil drying should also look for a strong curvilinearity between net carbon assimilation rate and gs, the indication of a significant increase in gm/gs in the earlier stages of stomatal closure.

  2. Carbon dioxide diffusion across stomata and mesophyll and photo-biochemical processes as affected by growth CO2 and phosphorus nutrition in cotton.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shardendu K; Badgujar, Girish; Reddy, Vangimalla R; Fleisher, David H; Bunce, James A

    2013-06-15

    Nutrients such as phosphorus may exert a major control over plant response to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (CO2), which is projected to double by the end of the 21st century. Elevated CO2 may overcome the diffusional limitations to photosynthesis posed by stomata and mesophyll and alter the photo-biochemical limitations resulting from phosphorus deficiency. To evaluate these ideas, cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) was grown in controlled environment growth chambers with three levels of phosphate (Pi) supply (0.2, 0.05 and 0.01mM) and two levels of CO2 concentration (ambient 400 and elevated 800μmolmol(-1)) under optimum temperature and irrigation. Phosphate deficiency drastically inhibited photosynthetic characteristics and decreased cotton growth for both CO2 treatments. Under Pi stress, an apparent limitation to the photosynthetic potential was evident by CO2 diffusion through stomata and mesophyll, impairment of photosystem functioning and inhibition of biochemical process including the carboxylation efficiency of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxyganase and the rate of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration. The diffusional limitation posed by mesophyll was up to 58% greater than the limitation due to stomatal conductance (gs) under Pi stress. As expected, elevated CO2 reduced these diffusional limitations to photosynthesis across Pi levels; however, it failed to reduce the photo-biochemical limitations to photosynthesis in phosphorus deficient plants. Acclimation/down regulation of photosynthetic capacity was evident under elevated CO2 across Pi treatments. Despite a decrease in phosphorus, nitrogen and chlorophyll concentrations in leaf tissue and reduced stomatal conductance at elevated CO2, the rate of photosynthesis per unit leaf area when measured at the growth CO2 concentration tended to be higher for all except the lowest Pi treatment. Nevertheless, plant biomass increased at elevated CO2 across Pi nutrition with taller plants

  3. Structural characterization of a mixed-linkage glucan deficient mutant reveals alteration in cellulose microfibril orientation in rice coleoptile mesophyll cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Smith-Moritz, Andreia M.; Hao, Zhao; Fernández-Nino, Susana G.; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Willats, William G. T.; Ronald, Pamela C.; Scheller, Henrik V.; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Vega-Sanchez, Miguel E.

    2015-08-18

    The CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE F6 (CslF6) gene was previously shown to mediate the biosynthesis of mixed-linkage glucan (MLG), a cell wall polysaccharide that is hypothesized to be tightly associated with cellulose and also have a role in cell expansion in the primary cell wall of young seedlings in grass species. We have recently shown that loss-of-function cslf6 rice mutants do not accumulate MLG in most vegetative tissues. Despite the absence of a structurally important polymer, MLG, these mutants are unexpectedly viable and only show a moderate growth compromise compared to wild type. Therefore these mutants are ideal biological systems to test the current grass cell wall model. In order to gain a better understanding of the role of MLG in the primary wall, we performed in-depth compositional and structural analyses of the cell walls of 3 day-old rice seedlings using various biochemical and novel microspectroscopic approaches. We found that cellulose content as well as matrix polysaccharide composition was not significantly altered in the MLG deficient mutant. However, we observed a significant change in cellulose microfibril bundle organization in mesophyll cell walls of the cslf6 mutant. Using synchrotron source Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared (FTM-IR) Spectromicroscopy for high-resolution imaging, we determined that the bonds associated with cellulose and arabinoxylan, another major component of the primary cell walls of grasses, were in a lower energy configuration compared to wild type, suggesting a slightly weaker primary wall in MLG deficient mesophyll cells. Finally, taken together, these results suggest that MLG may influence cellulose deposition in mesophyll cell walls without significantly affecting anisotropic growth thus challenging MLG importance in cell wall expansion.

  4. Structural characterization of a mixed-linkage glucan deficient mutant reveals alteration in cellulose microfibril orientation in rice coleoptile mesophyll cell walls

    DOE PAGES

    Smith-Moritz, Andreia M.; Hao, Zhao; Fernández-Nino, Susana G.; ...

    2015-08-18

    The CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE F6 (CslF6) gene was previously shown to mediate the biosynthesis of mixed-linkage glucan (MLG), a cell wall polysaccharide that is hypothesized to be tightly associated with cellulose and also have a role in cell expansion in the primary cell wall of young seedlings in grass species. We have recently shown that loss-of-function cslf6 rice mutants do not accumulate MLG in most vegetative tissues. Despite the absence of a structurally important polymer, MLG, these mutants are unexpectedly viable and only show a moderate growth compromise compared to wild type. Therefore these mutants are ideal biological systems to testmore » the current grass cell wall model. In order to gain a better understanding of the role of MLG in the primary wall, we performed in-depth compositional and structural analyses of the cell walls of 3 day-old rice seedlings using various biochemical and novel microspectroscopic approaches. We found that cellulose content as well as matrix polysaccharide composition was not significantly altered in the MLG deficient mutant. However, we observed a significant change in cellulose microfibril bundle organization in mesophyll cell walls of the cslf6 mutant. Using synchrotron source Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared (FTM-IR) Spectromicroscopy for high-resolution imaging, we determined that the bonds associated with cellulose and arabinoxylan, another major component of the primary cell walls of grasses, were in a lower energy configuration compared to wild type, suggesting a slightly weaker primary wall in MLG deficient mesophyll cells. Finally, taken together, these results suggest that MLG may influence cellulose deposition in mesophyll cell walls without significantly affecting anisotropic growth thus challenging MLG importance in cell wall expansion.« less

  5. Inorganic carbon uptake during photosynthesis. II. Uptake by isolated Asparagus mesophyll cells during isotopic disequilibrium. [Asparagus sprengeri

    SciTech Connect

    Espie, G.S.; Owttrim, G.W.; Colman, B.

    1986-04-01

    The species of inorganic carbon (CO/sub 2/ or HCO/sub 3//sup -/) taken up as a source of substrate for photosynthetic fixation by isolated Asparagus sprengeri mesophyll cells is investigated. Discrimination between CO/sub 2/ or HCO/sub 3//sup -/ transport, during steady state photosynthesis, is achieved by monitoring the changes (by /sup 14/C fixation) which occur in the specific activity of the intracellular pool of inorganic carbon when the inorganic carbon present in the suspending medium is in a state of isotopic disequilibrium. Quantitative comparisons between theoretical (CO/sub 2/ or HCO/sub 3//sup -/ transport) and experimental time-courses of /sup 14/C incorporation, over the pH range of 5.2 to 7.5, indicate that the specific activity of extracellular CO/sub 2/, rather than HCO/sub 3//sup -/, is the appropriate predictor of the intracellular specific activity. It is concluded, therefore, that CO/sub 2/ is the major source of exogenous inorganic carbon taken up by Asparagus cells. However, at high pH (8.5), a component of net DIC uptake may be attributable to HCO/sub 3//sup -/ transport, as the incorporation of /sup 14/C during isotopic disequilibrium exceeds the maximum possible incorporation predicted on the basis of CO/sub 2/ uptake alone. The contribution of HCO/sub 3//sup -/ to net inorganic carbon uptake (pH 8.5) is variable, ranging from 5 to 16%, but is independent of the extracellular HCO/sub 3//sup -/ concentration. The evidence for direct HCO/sub 3//sup -/ transport is subject to alternative explanations and must, therefore, be regarded as equivocal. Nonlinear regression analysis of the rate of /sup 14/C incorporation as a function of time indicates the presence of a small extracellular resistance to the diffusion of CO/sub 2/, which is partially alleviated by a high extracellular concentration of HCO/sub 3//sup -/.

  6. The role of mesophyll conductance during water stress and recovery in tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris): acclimation or limitation?

    PubMed

    Galle, Alexander; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Tomas, Magdalena; Pou, Alicia; Medrano, Hipolito; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel; Flexas, Jaume

    2009-01-01

    While the responses of photosynthesis to water stress have been widely studied, acclimation to sustained water stress and recovery after re-watering is poorly understood. In particular, the factors limiting photosynthesis under these conditions, and their possible interactions with other environmental conditions, are unknown. To assess these issues, changes of photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation (A(N)) and its underlying limitations were followed during prolonged water stress and subsequent re-watering in tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) plants growing under three different climatic conditions: outdoors in summer, outdoors in spring, and indoors in a growth chamber. In particular, the regulation of stomatal conductance (g(s)), mesophyll conductance to CO(2) (g(m)), leaf photochemistry (chlorophyll fluorescence), and biochemistry (V(c,max)) were assessed. Leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence data revealed that water stress induced a similar degree of stomatal closure and decreased A(N) under all three conditions, while V(c,max) was unaffected. However, the behaviour of g(m) differed depending on the climatic conditions. In outdoor plants, g(m) strongly declined with water stress, but it recovered rapidly (1-2 d) after re-watering in spring while it remained low many days after re-watering in summer. In indoor plants, g(m) initially declined with water stress, but then recovered to control values during the acclimation period. These differences were reflected in different velocities of recovery of A(N) after re-watering, being the slowest in outdoor summer plants and the fastest in indoor plants. It is suggested that these differences among the experiments are related to the prevailing climatic conditions, i.e. to the fact that stress factors other than water stress have been superimposed (e.g. excessive light and elevated temperature). In conclusion, besides g(s), g(m) contributes greatly to the limitation of photosynthesis during water stress and during

  7. Height-related decreases in mesophyll conductance, leaf photosynthesis and compensating adjustments associated with leaf nitrogen concentrations in Pinus densiflora.

    PubMed

    Han, Qingmin

    2011-09-01

    Hydraulic limitations associated with increasing tree height result in reduced foliar stomatal conductance (g(s)) and light-saturated photosynthesis (A(max)). However, it is unclear whether the decline in A(max) is attributable to height-related modifications in foliar nitrogen concentration (N), to mesophyll conductance (g(m)) or to biochemical capacity for photosynthesis (maximum rate of carboxylation, V(cmax)). Simultaneous measurements of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were made to determine g(m) and V(cmax) in four height classes of Pinus densiflora Sieb. & Zucc. trees. As the average height of growing trees increased from 3.1 to 13.7 m, g(m) decreased from 0.250 to 0.107 mol m(-2) s(-1), and the CO(2) concentration from the intercellular space (C(i)) to the site of carboxylation (C(c)) decreased by an average of 74 µmol mol(-1). Furthermore, V(cmax) estimated from C(c) increased from 68.4 to 112.0 µmol m(-2) s(-1) with the increase in height, but did not change when it was calculated based on C(i). In contrast, A(max) decreased from 14.17 to 10.73 µmol m(-2) s(-1). Leaf dry mass per unit area (LMA) increased significantly with tree height as well as N on both a dry mass and an area basis. All of these parameters were significantly correlated with tree height. In addition, g(m) was closely correlated with LMA and g(s), indicating that increased diffusive resistance for CO(2) may be the inevitable consequence of morphological adaptation. Foliar N per unit area was positively correlated with V(cmax) based on C(c) but negatively with A(max), suggesting that enhancement of photosynthetic capacity is achieved by allocating more N to foliage in order to minimize the declines in A(max). Increases in the N cost associated with carbon gain because of the limited water available to taller trees lead to a trade-off between water use efficiency and photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency. In conclusion, the height-related decrease in photosynthetic

  8. Importance of producing economic compounds to combat cancer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Rojas, Jesús

    2017-01-26

    The manuscript published by Microb Biotechnol, volume 10, highlights the relevance of the fungus Nigrospora sphaerica, an endophyte isolated from Catharanthus roseus, as an alternative source to obtain vinblastine, a compound used in chemotherapy schemes to treat several types of cancer. Authors showed that purification of vinblastine from extracts of the fungus has higher activity and yield in comparison with that obtained from the plant Catharanthus roseus. This work represents a biotechnological approach to obtain vinblastine with promising results to decrease the production cost.

  9. Analyzing the Light Energy Distribution in the Photosynthetic Apparatus of C4 Plants Using Highly Purified Mesophyll and Bundle-Sheath Thylakoids.

    PubMed Central

    Pfundel, E.; Nagel, E.; Meister, A.

    1996-01-01

    The chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics of mesophyll and bundle-sheath thylakoids from plant species with the C4 dicarboxylic acid pathway of photosynthesis were investigated using flow cytometry. Ten species with the NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) biochemical type of C4 photosynthesis were tested: Digitaria sanguinalis (L.) Scop., Euphorbia maculata L., Portulaca grandiflora Hooker, Saccharum officinarum L., Setaria viridis (L.) Beauv., Zea mays L., and four species of the genus Flaveria. This study also included three species with NAD-ME biochemistry (Atriplex rosea L., Atriplex spongiosa F. Muell., and Portulaca oleracea L.). Two C4 species of unknown biochemical type were investigated: Cyperus papyrus L. and Atriplex tatarica L. Pure mesophyll and bundle-sheath thylakoids were prepared by flow cytometry and characterized by low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy. In pure bundle-sheath thylakoids from many species with C4 photosynthesis of the NADP-ME type, significant amounts of photosystem II (PSII) emission can be detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. Simulation of fluorescence excitation spectra of these thylakoids showed that PSII light absorption contributes significantly to the apparent excitation spectrum of photosystem I. Model calculations indicated that the excitation energy of PSII is efficiently transferred to photosystem I in bundle-sheath thylakoids of many NADP-ME species. PMID:12226432

  10. Developmental changes in mesophyll diffusion conductance and photosynthetic capacity under different light and water availabilities in Populus tremula: how structure constrains function.

    PubMed

    Tosens, Tiina; Niinemets, Ulo; Vislap, Vivian; Eichelmann, Hillar; Castro Díez, Pilar

    2012-05-01

    Finite mesophyll diffusion conductance (g(m) ) significantly constrains net assimilation rate (A(n) ), but g(m) variations and variation sources in response to environmental stresses during leaf development are imperfectly known. The combined effects of light and water limitations on g(m) and diffusion limitations of photosynthesis were studied in saplings of Populus tremula L. An one-dimensional diffusion model was used to gain insight into the importance of key anatomical traits in determining g(m) . Leaf development was associated with increases in dry mass per unit area, thickness, density, exposed mesophyll (S(mes) /S) and chloroplast (S(c) /S) to leaf area ratio, internal air space (f(ias) ), cell wall thickness and chloroplast dimensions. Development of S(mes) /S and S(c) /S was delayed under low light. Reduction in light availability was associated with lower S(c) /S, but with larger f(ias) and chloroplast thickness. Water stress reduced S(c) /S and increased cell wall thickness under high light. In all treatments, g(m) and A(n) increased and CO(2) drawdown because of g(m) , C(i) -C(c) , decreased with increasing leaf age. Low light and drought resulted in reduced g(m) and A(n) and increased C(i) -C(c) . These results emphasize the importance of g(m) and its components in determining A(n) variations during leaf development and in response to stress.

  11. Importance of leaf anatomy in determining mesophyll diffusion conductance to CO2 across species: quantitative limitations and scaling up by models

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, Magdalena; Flexas, Jaume; Copolovici, Lucian; Galmés, Jeroni; Hallik, Lea; Medrano, Hipólito; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel; Tosens, Tiina; Vislap, Vivian; Niinemets, Ülo

    2013-01-01

    Foliage photosynthetic and structural traits were studied in 15 species with a wide range of foliage anatomies to gain insight into the importance of key anatomical traits in the limitation of diffusion of CO2 from substomatal cavities to chloroplasts. The relative importance of different anatomical traits in constraining CO2 diffusion was evaluated using a quantitative model. Mesophyll conductance (g m) was most strongly correlated with chloroplast exposed surface to leaf area ratio (S c/S) and cell wall thickness (T cw), but, depending on foliage structure, the overall importance of g m in constraining photosynthesis and the importance of different anatomical traits in the restriction of CO2 diffusion varied. In species with mesophytic leaves, membrane permeabilities and cytosol and stromal conductance dominated the variation in g m. However, in species with sclerophytic leaves, g m was mostly limited by T cw. These results demonstrate the major role of anatomy in constraining mesophyll diffusion conductance and, consequently, in determining the variability in photosynthetic capacity among species. PMID:23564954

  12. Implications of the mesophyll conductance to CO2 for photosynthesis and water-use efficiency during long-term water stress and recovery in two contrasting Eucalyptus species.

    PubMed

    Cano, F Javier; López, Rosana; Warren, Charles R

    2014-11-01

    Water stress (WS) slows growth and photosynthesis (A(n)), but most knowledge comes from short-time studies that do not account for longer term acclimation processes that are especially relevant in tree species. Using two Eucalyptus species that contrast in drought tolerance, we induced moderate and severe water deficits by withholding water until stomatal conductance (g(sw)) decreased to two pre-defined values for 24 d, WS was maintained at the target g(sw) for 29 d and then plants were re-watered. Additionally, we developed new equations to simulate the effect on mesophyll conductance (g(m)) of accounting for the resistance to refixation of CO(2). The diffusive limitations to CO(2), dominated by the stomata, were the most important constraints to A(n). Full recovery of A(n) was reached after re-watering, characterized by quick recovery of gm and even higher biochemical capacity, in contrast to the slower recovery of g(sw). The acclimation to long-term WS led to decreased mesophyll and biochemical limitations, in contrast to studies in which stress was imposed more rapidly. Finally, we provide evidence that higher gm under WS contributes to higher intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) and reduces the leaf oxidative stress, highlighting the importance of gm as a target for breeding/genetic engineering.

  13. The use of an acetoacetyl-CoA synthase in place of a β-ketothiolase enhances poly-3-hydroxybutyrate production in sugarcane mesophyll cells.

    PubMed

    McQualter, Richard B; Petrasovits, Lars A; Gebbie, Leigh K; Schweitzer, Dirk; Blackman, Deborah M; Chrysanthopoulos, Panagiotis; Hodson, Mark P; Plan, Manuel R; Riches, James D; Snell, Kristi D; Brumbley, Stevens M; Nielsen, Lars K

    2015-06-01

    Engineering the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) into high biomass bioenergy crops has the potential to provide a sustainable supply of bioplastics and energy from a single plant feedstock. One of the major challenges in engineering C4 plants for the production of poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) is the significantly lower level of polymer produced in the chloroplasts of mesophyll (M) cells compared to bundle sheath (BS) cells, thereby limiting the full PHB yield-potential of the plant. In this study, we provide evidence that the access to substrate for PHB synthesis may limit polymer production in M chloroplasts. Production of PHB in M cells of sugarcane is significantly increased by replacing β-ketothiolase, the first enzyme in the bacterial PHA pathway, with acetoacetyl-CoA synthase. This novel pathway enabled the production of PHB reaching an average of 6.3% of the dry weight of total leaf biomass, with levels ranging from 3.6 to 11.8% of the dry weight (DW) of individual leaves. These yields are more than twice the level reported in PHB-producing sugarcane containing the β-ketothiolase and illustrate the importance of producing polymer in mesophyll plastids to maximize yield. The molecular weight of the polymer produced was greater than 2 × 10(6)  Da. These results are a major step forward in engineering a high biomass C4 grass for the commercial production of PHB.

  14. Effects of leaf age and tree size on stomatal and mesophyll limitations to photosynthesis in mountain beech (Nothofagus solandrii var. cliffortiodes).

    PubMed

    Whitehead, David; Barbour, Margaret M; Griffin, Kevin L; Turnbull, Matthew H; Tissue, David T

    2011-09-01

    Mesophyll conductance, g(m), was estimated from measurements of stomatal conductance to carbon dioxide transfer, g(s), photosynthesis, A, and chlorophyll fluorescence for Year 0 (current-year) and Year 1 (1-year-old) fully sunlit leaves from short (2 m tall, 10-year-old) and tall (15 m tall, 120-year-old) Nothofagus solandrii var. cliffortiodes trees growing in adjacent stands. Rates of photosynthesis at saturating irradiance and ambient CO(2) partial pressure, A(satQ), were 25% lower and maximum rates of carboxylation, V(cmax), were 44% lower in Year 1 leaves compared with Year 0 leaves across both tree sizes. Although g(s) and g(m) were not significantly different between Year 0 and Year 1 leaves and g(s) was not significantly different between tree heights, g(m) was significantly (19%) lower for leaves on tall trees compared with leaves on short trees. Overall, V(cmax) was 60% higher when expressed on the basis of CO(2) partial pressure at the chloroplasts, C(c), compared with V(cmax) on the basis of intercellular CO(2) partial pressure, C(i), but this varied with leaf age and tree size. To interpret the relative stomatal and mesophyll limitations to photosynthesis, we used a model of carbon isotopic composition for whole leaves incorporating g(m) effects to generate a surface of 'operating values' of A over the growing season for all leaf classes. Our analysis showed that A was slightly higher for leaves on short compared with tall trees, but lower g(m) apparently reduced actual A substantially compared with A(satQ). Our findings showed that lower rates of photosynthesis in Year 1 leaves compared with Year 0 leaves were attributable more to increased biochemical limitation to photosynthesis in Year 1 leaves than differences in g(m). However, lower A in leaves on tall trees compared with those on short trees could be attributed in part to lower g(m) and higher stomatal, L(s), and mesophyll, L(m), limitations to photosynthesis, consistent with steeper hydraulic

  15. Light-Induced Changes in Hydrogen, Calcium, Potassium, and Chloride Ion Fluxes and Concentrations from the Mesophyll and Epidermal Tissues of Bean Leaves. Understanding the Ionic Basis of Light-Induced Bioelectrogenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Shabala, Sergey; Newman, Ian

    1999-01-01

    Noninvasive, ion-selective vibrating microelectrodes were used to measure the kinetics of H+, Ca2+, K+, and Cl− fluxes and the changes in their concentrations caused by illumination near the mesophyll and attached epidermis of bean (Vicia faba L.). These flux measurements were related to light-induced changes in the plasma membrane potential. The influx of Ca2+ was the main depolarizing agent in electrical responses to light in the mesophyll. Changes in the net fluxes of H+, K+, and Cl− occurred only after a significant delay of about 2 min, whereas light-stimulated influx of Ca2+ began within the time resolution of our measurements (5 s). In the absence of H+ flux, light caused an initial quick rise of external pH near the mesophyll and epidermal tissues. In the mesophyll this fast alkalinization was followed by slower, oscillatory pH changes (5–15 min); in the epidermis the external pH increased steadily and reached a plateau 3 min later. We explain the initial alkalinization of the medium as a result of CO2 uptake by photosynthesizing tissue, whereas activation of the plasma membrane H+ pump occurred 1.5 to 2 min later. The epidermal layer seems to be a substantial barrier for ion fluxes but not for CO2 diffusion into the leaf. PMID:10069851

  16. A/C(i) curve analysis across a range of woody plant species: influence of regression analysis parameters and mesophyll conductance.

    PubMed

    Manter, Daniel K; Kerrigan, Julia

    2004-12-01

    The analysis and interpretation of A/C(i) curves (net CO(2) assimilation rate, A, versus calculated substomatal CO(2) concentration, C(i)) is dependent upon a number of underlying assumptions. The influence of the C(i) value at which the A/C(i) curve switches between the Rubisco- and electron transport-limited portions of the curve was examined on A/C(i) curve parameter estimates, as well as the effect of mesophyll CO(2) conductance (g(m)) values on estimates of the maximum rate of Rubisco-mediated carboxylation (V(cmax)). Based on an analysis using 19 woody species from the Pacific Northwest, significant variation occurred in the C(i) value where the Rubisco- and electron transport-limited portions of the curve intersect (C(i_t)), ranging from 20 Pa to 152 Pa and averaging c. 71 Pa and 37 Pa for conifer and broadleaf species, respectively. Significant effects on estimated A/C(i) parameters (e.g. V(cmax)) may arise when preliminary estimates of C(i_t), necessary for the multiple regression analyses, are set either too high or too low. However, when the appropriate threshold is used, a significant relationship between A/C(i) and chlorophyll fluorescence estimates of carboxylation is achieved. The use of the V(cmax) parameter to describe accurately the Rubisco activity from the A/C(i) curve analysis is also dependent upon the assumption that C(i) is approximately equal to chloroplast CO(2) concentrations (C(c)). If leaf mesophyll conductance is low, C(c) will be much lower than C(i) and will result in an underestimation of V(cmax) from A/C(i) curves. A large range of mesophyll conductance (g(m)) values was observed across the 19 species (0.005+/-0.002 to 0.189+/-0.011 mol m(-2) s(-1) for Tsuga heterophylla and Quercus garryana, respectively) and, on average, g(m) was 1.9 times lower for the conifer species (0.058+/-0.017 mol m(-2) s(-1) for conifers versus 0.112+/-0.020 mol m(-2) s(-1) for broadleaves). When this mesophyll limitation was accounted for in V

  17. Thioredoxin-regulated beta-amylase (BAM1) triggers diurnal starch degradation in guard cells, and in mesophyll cells under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Concetta; Costa, Alex; Marri, Lucia; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Pupillo, Paolo; Trost, Paolo; Sparla, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    BAM1 is a plastid-targeted β-amylase of Arabidopsis thaliana specifically activated by reducing conditions. Among eight different chloroplast thioredoxin isoforms, thioredoxin f1 was the most efficient redox mediator, followed by thioredoxins m1, m2, y1, y2, and m4. Plastid-localized NADPH-thioredoxin reductase (NTRC) was also able partially to restore the activity of oxidized BAM1. Promoter activity of BAM1 was studied by reporter gene expression (GUS and YFP) in Arabidopsis transgenic plants. In young (non-flowering) plants, BAM1 was expressed both in leaves and roots, but expression in leaves was mainly restricted to guard cells. Compared with wild-type plants, bam1 knockout mutants were characterized by having more starch in illuminated guard cells and reduced stomata opening, suggesting that thioredoxin-regulated BAM1 plays a role in diurnal starch degradation which sustains stomata opening. Besides guard cells, BAM1 appears in mesophyll cells of young plants as a result of a strongly induced gene expression under osmotic stress, which is paralleled by an increase in total β-amylase activity together with its redox-sensitive fraction. Osmotic stress impairs the rate of diurnal starch accumulation in leaves of wild-type plants, but has no effect on starch accumulation in bam1 mutants. It is proposed that thioredoxin-regulated BAM1 activates a starch degradation pathway in illuminated mesophyll cells upon osmotic stress, similar to the diurnal pathway of starch degradation in guard cells that is also dependent on thioredoxin-regulated BAM1.

  18. Short-term water stress impacts on stomatal, mesophyll and biochemical limitations to photosynthesis differ consistently among tree species from contrasting climates.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuangxi; Medlyn, Belinda; Sabaté, Santiago; Sperlich, Dominik; Prentice, I Colin

    2014-10-01

    Predicting the large-scale consequences of drought in contrasting environments requires that we understand how drought effects differ among species originating from those environments. A previous meta-analysis of published experiments suggested that the effects of drought on both stomatal and non-stomatal limitations to photosynthesis may vary consistently among species from different hydroclimates. Here, we explicitly tested this hypothesis with two short-term water stress experiments on congeneric mesic and xeric species. One experiment was run in Australia using Eucalyptus species and the second was run in Spain using Quercus species as well as two more mesic species. In each experiment, plants were grown under moist conditions in a glasshouse, then deprived of water, and gas exchange was monitored. The stomatal response was analysed with a recently developed stomatal model, whose single parameter g1 represents the slope of the relationship between stomatal conductance and photosynthesis. The non-stomatal response was partitioned into effects on mesophyll conductance (gm), the maximum Rubisco activity (Vcmax) and the maximum electron transport rate (Jmax). We found consistency among the drought responses of g1, gm, Vcmax and Jmax, suggesting that drought imposes limitations on Rubisco activity and RuBP regeneration capacity concurrently with declines in stomatal and mesophyll conductance. Within each experiment, the more xeric species showed relatively high g1 under moist conditions, low drought sensitivity of g1, gm, Vcmax and Jmax, and more negative values of the critical pre-dawn water potential at which Vcmax declines most steeply, compared with the more mesic species. These results indicate adaptive interspecific differences in drought responses that allow xeric tree species to continue transpiration and photosynthesis for longer during periods without rain.

  19. Substrate Specificity and Diastereoselectivity of Strictosidine Glucosidase, a Key Enzyme in Monoterpene Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yerkes, Nancy; Wu, Jia; McCoy, Elizabeth; Galan, M. Carmen; Chen, Shi; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2008-01-01

    Strictosidine glucosidase (SGD) from Catharanthus roseus catalyzes the deglycosylation of strictosidine, an intermediate from which thousands of monoterpene indole alkaloids are derived. The steady state kinetics of SGD with a variety of strictosidine analogs revealed the substrate preferences of this enzyme at two key positions of the strictosidine substrate. Additionally, SGD from C. roseus turns over both strictosidine and its stereoisomer vincoside, indicating that although this enzyme prefers the naturally occurring diastereomer, the enzyme is not completely diastereoselective. The implications of the substrate specificity of SGD in metabolic engineering efforts of C. roseus are highlighted. PMID:18061449

  20. Substrate specificity and diastereoselectivity of strictosidine glucosidase, a key enzyme in monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yerkes, Nancy; Wu, Jia Xin; McCoy, Elizabeth; Galan, M Carmen; Chen, Shi; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2008-05-15

    Strictosidine glucosidase (SGD) from Catharanthus roseus catalyzes the deglycosylation of strictosidine, an intermediate from which thousands of monoterpene indole alkaloids are derived. The steady-state kinetics of SGD with a variety of strictosidine analogs revealed the substrate preferences of this enzyme at two key positions of the strictosidine substrate. Additionally, SGD from C. roseus turns over both strictosidine and its stereoisomer vincoside, indicating that although this enzyme prefers the naturally occurring diastereomer, the enzyme is not completely diastereoselective. The implications of the substrate specificity of SGD in metabolic engineering efforts of C. roseus are highlighted.

  1. Genetic polymorphism in dopamine receptor D4 is associated with early body condition in a large population of greater flamingos, Phoenicopterus roseus.

    PubMed

    Gillingham, Mark A F; Bechet, Arnaud; Geraci, Julia; Wattier, Remi; Dubreuil, Christine; Cezilly, Frank

    2012-08-01

    Body condition is an important determinant of fitness in many natural populations. However, as for many fitness traits, the underlying genes that regulate body condition remain elusive. The dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4) is a promising candidate as dopamine is known to play an important role in the regulation of food intake and the metabolism of both glucose and lipids in vertebrates. In this study, we take advantage of a large data set of greater flamingos, Phoenicopterus roseus, to test whether DRD4 polymorphism predicts early body condition (EBC) while controlling for whole-genome effects of inbreeding and outbreeding using microsatellite multilocus heterozygosity (MLH). We typed 670 of these individuals for exon 3 of the homologue of the human DRD4 gene and 10 microsatellite markers. When controlling for the effects of yearly environmental variations and differences between sexes, we found strong evidence of an association between exon 3 DRD4 polymorphisms and EBC, with 2.2-2.3% of the variation being explained by DRD4 polymorphism, whereas there was only weak evidence that MLH predicts EBC. Because EBC is most likely a polygenic trait, this is a considerable amount of variation explained by a single gene. This is to our knowledge, the first study to show an association between exon 3 DRD4 polymorphism and body condition in non-human animals. We anticipate that the DRD4 gene as well as other genes coding for neurotransmitters and their receptors may play an important role in explaining variation in traits that affect fitness.

  2. Non-linear feeding functional responses in the Greater Flamingo (Phoenicopterus roseus) predict immediate negative impact of wetland degradation on this flagship species

    PubMed Central

    Deville, Anne-Sophie; Grémillet, David; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Guillemain, Matthieu; Von Houwald, Friederike; Gardelli, Bruno; Béchet, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the functional response of predators to prey density is essential for understanding food web dynamics, to parameterize mechanistic models of animal responses to environmental change, and for designing appropriate conservation measures. Greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus), a flagship species of Mediterranean wetlands, primarily feed on Artemias (Artemia spp.) in commercial salt pans, an industry which may collapse for economic reasons. Flamingos also feed on alternative prey such as Chironomid larvae (e.g., Chironomid spp.) and rice seeds (Oryza sativa). However, the profitability of these food items for flamingos remains unknown. We determined the functional responses of flamingos feeding on Artemias, Chironomids, or rice. Experiments were conducted on 11 captive flamingos. For each food item, we offered different ranges of food densities, up to 13 times natural abundance. Video footage allowed estimating intake rates. Contrary to theoretical predictions for filter feeders, intake rates did not increase linearly with increasing food density (type I). Intake rates rather increased asymptotically with increasing food density (type II) or followed a sigmoid shape (type III). Hence, flamingos were not able to ingest food in direct proportion to their abundance, possibly because of unique bill structure resulting in limited filtering capabilities. Overall, flamingos foraged more efficiently on Artemias. When feeding on Chironomids, birds had lower instantaneous rates of food discovery and required more time to extract food from the sediment and ingest it, than when filtering Artemias from the water column. However, feeding on rice was energetically more profitable for flamingos than feeding on Artemias or Chironomids, explaining their attraction for rice fields. Crucially, we found that food densities required for flamingos to reach asymptotic intake rates are rarely met under natural conditions. This allows us to predict an immediate

  3. Non-linear feeding functional responses in the Greater Flamingo (Phoenicopterus roseus) predict immediate negative impact of wetland degradation on this flagship species.

    PubMed

    Deville, Anne-Sophie; Grémillet, David; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Guillemain, Matthieu; Von Houwald, Friederike; Gardelli, Bruno; Béchet, Arnaud

    2013-05-01

    Accurate knowledge of the functional response of predators to prey density is essential for understanding food web dynamics, to parameterize mechanistic models of animal responses to environmental change, and for designing appropriate conservation measures. Greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus), a flagship species of Mediterranean wetlands, primarily feed on Artemias (Artemia spp.) in commercial salt pans, an industry which may collapse for economic reasons. Flamingos also feed on alternative prey such as Chironomid larvae (e.g., Chironomid spp.) and rice seeds (Oryza sativa). However, the profitability of these food items for flamingos remains unknown. We determined the functional responses of flamingos feeding on Artemias, Chironomids, or rice. Experiments were conducted on 11 captive flamingos. For each food item, we offered different ranges of food densities, up to 13 times natural abundance. Video footage allowed estimating intake rates. Contrary to theoretical predictions for filter feeders, intake rates did not increase linearly with increasing food density (type I). Intake rates rather increased asymptotically with increasing food density (type II) or followed a sigmoid shape (type III). Hence, flamingos were not able to ingest food in direct proportion to their abundance, possibly because of unique bill structure resulting in limited filtering capabilities. Overall, flamingos foraged more efficiently on Artemias. When feeding on Chironomids, birds had lower instantaneous rates of food discovery and required more time to extract food from the sediment and ingest it, than when filtering Artemias from the water column. However, feeding on rice was energetically more profitable for flamingos than feeding on Artemias or Chironomids, explaining their attraction for rice fields. Crucially, we found that food densities required for flamingos to reach asymptotic intake rates are rarely met under natural conditions. This allows us to predict an immediate

  4. Yellow mosaic symptom caused by the nuclear shuttle protein gene of mungbean yellow mosaic virus is associated with single-stranded DNA accumulation and mesophyll spread of the virus.

    PubMed

    Kuruba, B L; Buvani, A P; Veluthambi, K

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-[India:Vigna] (MYMV-[IN:Vig]), a blackgram isolate of MYMV, causes yellow mosaic disease in blackgram and mungbean. Two variable DNA-B components, KA22 and KA27, cause distinct symptoms in blackgram [V. mungo (L.) Hepper] with the same DNA-A component. KA22 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed yellow mosaic symptom and accumulated high levels of viral single-stranded (ss) DNA. KA27 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed severe stunting symptom and accumulated very low levels of viral ssDNA. However, in mungbean [V. radiata (L.) Wilczek], KA27 + DNA-A caused yellow mosaic symptom and a high level of viral ssDNA accumulated. Swapping of KA27 DNA-B with the nuclear shuttle protein gene (NSP) of KA22 DNA-B (KA27xKA22 NSP) caused yellow mosaic symptom in blackgram, suggesting that KA22 NSP is the determinant of yellow mosaic symptom. Interestingly, KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram plants accumulated high levels of viral ssDNA, comparable to that of KA22 DNA-B infection, suggesting that the KA22 NSP is responsible for accumulation of high levels of viral ssDNA. MYMV distribution was studied in blackgram and mungbean plants by leaf tissue hybridization, which showed mesophyll spread of the virus in KA22-infected blackgram leaflets and in KA27-infected mungbean leaflets, both of which displayed yellow mosaic symptom. However, the virus did not accumulate in the mesophyll in the case of KA27-infected blackgram leaflets. Interestingly, the swapped KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram leaflets showed mesophyll accumulation of the virus, suggesting that KA22 NSP determines its mesophyll spread.

  5. Sustained enhancement of photosynthesis in coffee trees grown under free-air CO2 enrichment conditions: disentangling the contributions of stomatal, mesophyll, and biochemical limitations

    PubMed Central

    DaMatta, Fábio M.; Godoy, Alice G.; Menezes-Silva, Paulo E.; Martins, Samuel C.V.; Sanglard, Lílian M.V.P.; Morais, Leandro E.; Torre-Neto, André; Ghini, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Coffee (Coffea spp.), a globally traded commodity, is a slow-growing tropical tree species that displays an improved photosynthetic performance when grown under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]). To investigate the mechanisms underlying this response, two commercial coffee cultivars (Catuaí and Obatã) were grown using the first free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) facility in Latin America. Measurements were conducted in two contrasting growth seasons, which were characterized by the high (February) and low (August) sink demand. Elevated [CO2] led to increases in net photosynthetic rates (A) in parallel with decreased photorespiration rates, with no photochemical limitations to A. The stimulation of A by elevated CO2 supply was more prominent in August (56% on average) than in February (40% on average). Overall, the stomatal and mesophyll conductances, as well as the leaf nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations, were unresponsive to the treatments. Photosynthesis was strongly limited by diffusional constraints, particularly at the stomata level, and this pattern was little, if at all, affected by elevated [CO2]. Relative to February, starch pools (but not soluble sugars) increased remarkably (>500%) in August, with no detectable alteration in the maximum carboxylation capacity estimated on a chloroplast [CO2] basis. Upregulation of A by elevated [CO2] took place with no signs of photosynthetic downregulation, even during the period of low sink demand, when acclimation would be expected to be greatest. PMID:26503540

  6. Regulation of photosynthesis and stomatal and mesophyll conductance under water stress and recovery in olive trees: correlation with gene expression of carbonic anhydrase and aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Perez-Martin, Alfonso; Michelazzo, Chiara; Torres-Ruiz, Jose M; Flexas, Jaume; Fernández, José E; Sebastiani, Luca; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The hypothesis that aquaporins and carbonic anhydrase (CA) are involved in the regulation of stomatal (g s) and mesophyll (g m) conductance to CO2 was tested in a short-term water-stress and recovery experiment in 5-year-old olive plants (Olea europaea) growing outdoors. The evolution of leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and plant water status, and a quantitative analysis of photosynthesis limitations, were followed during water stress and recovery. These variables were correlated with gene expression of the aquaporins OePIP1.1 and OePIP2.1, and stromal CA. At mild stress and at the beginning of the recovery period, stomatal limitations prevailed, while the decline in g m accounted for up to 60% of photosynthesis limitations under severe water stress. However, g m was restored to control values shortly after rewatering, facilitating the recovery of the photosynthetic rate. CA was downregulated during water stress and upregulated after recovery. The use of structural equation modelling allowed us to conclude that both OePIP1.1 and OePIP2.1 expression could explain most of the variations observed for g s and g m. CA expression also had a small but significant effect on g m in olive under water-stress conditions.

  7. Light acclimation of photosynthesis in two closely related firs (Abies pinsapo Boiss. and Abies alba Mill.): the role of leaf anatomy and mesophyll conductance to CO2

    PubMed Central

    Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Sancho-Knapik, Domingo; Flexas, Jaume; Galmés, Jeroni; Niinemets, Ülo; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2016-01-01

    Leaves growing in the forest understory usually present a decreased mesophyll conductance (gm) and photosynthetic capacity. The role of leaf anatomy in determining the variability in gm among species is known, but there is a lack of information on how the acclimation of gm to shade conditions is driven by changes in leaf anatomy. Within this context, we demonstrated that Abies pinsapo Boiss. experienced profound modifications in needle anatomy to drastic changes in light availability that ultimately led to differential photosynthetic performance between trees grown in the open field and in the forest understory. In contrast to A. pinsapo, its congeneric Abies alba Mill. did not show differences either in needle anatomy or in photosynthetic parameters between trees grown in the open field and in the forest understory. The increased gm values found in trees of A. pinsapo grown in the open field can be explained by occurrence of stomata at both needle sides (amphistomatous needles), increased chloroplast surface area exposed to intercellular airspace, decreased cell wall thickness and, especially, decreased chloroplast thickness. To the best of our knowledge, the role of such drastic changes in ultrastructural needle anatomy in explaining the response of gm to the light environment has not been demonstrated in field conditions. PMID:26543153

  8. Ultrastructural observation of mesophyll cells and temporal expression profiles of the genes involved in transitory starch metabolism in flag leaves of wheat after anthesis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guozhang; Peng, Xiaoqi; Wang, Lina; Yang, Yingying; Shao, Ruixin; Xie, Yingxin; Ma, Dongyun; Wang, Chenyang; Guo, Tiancai; Zhu, Yunji

    2015-01-01

    Transitory starch in cereal plant leaves is synthesized during the day and remobilized at night to provide a carbon source for growth and grain filling, but its mechanistic basis is still poorly understood. The objective of this study is to explore the regulatory mechanism for starch biosynthesis and degradation in plant source organs. Using transmission electron microscopy, we observed that during the day after anthesis, starch granules in mesophyll cells of wheat flag leaves accumulated in chloroplasts and the number of starch granules gradually decreased with wheat leaf growth. During the night, starch granules synthesized in chloroplasts during the day were completely or partially degraded. The transcript levels of 26 starch synthesis-related genes and 16 starch breakdown-related genes were further measured using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Expression profile analysis revealed that starch metabolism genes were clustered into two groups based on their temporal expression patterns. The genes in the first group were highly expressed and presumed to play crucial roles in starch metabolism. The genes in the other group were not highly expressed in flag leaves and may have minor functions in starch metabolism in leaf tissue. The functions of most of these genes in leaves were further discussed. The starch metabolism-related genes that are predominantly expressed in wheat flag leaves differ from those expressed in wheat grain, indicating that two different pathways for starch metabolism operate in these tissues. This provides specific information on the molecular mechanisms of transitory starch metabolism in higher plants.

  9. NADP-Malate Dehydrogenase in the C4 Plant Flaveria bidentis (Cosense Suppression of Activity in Mesophyll and Bundle-Sheath Cells and Consequences for Photosynthesis).

    PubMed Central

    Trevanion, S. J.; Furbank, R. T.; Ashton, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Flaveria bidentis, a C4 dicot, was transformed with sorghum (a monocot) cDNA clones encoding NADP-malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH; EC 1.1.1.82) driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Although these constructs were designed for over-expression, many transformants contained between 5 and 50% of normal NADP-MDH activity, presumably by cosense suppression of the native gene. The activities of a range of other photosynthetic enzymes were unaffected. Rates of photosynthesis in plants with less than about 10% of normal activity were reduced at high light and at high [CO2], but were unaffected at low light or at [CO2] below about 150 [mu]L L-1. The large decrease in maximum activity of NADP-MDH was accompanied by an increase in the activation state of the enzyme. However, the activation state was unaffected in plants with 50% of normal activity. Metabolic flux control analysis of plants with a range of activities demonstrates that this enzyme is not important in regulating the steady-state flux through C4 photosynthesis in F. bidentis. Cosense suppression of gene expression was similarly effective in both the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells. Photosynthesis of plants with very low activity of NADP-MDH in the bundle-sheath cells was only slightly inhibited, suggesting that the presence of the enzyme in this compartment is not essential for supporting maximum rates of photosynthesis. PMID:12223666

  10. Enhanced Photosynthesis and Growth in atquac1 Knockout Mutants Are Due to Altered Organic Acid Accumulation and an Increase in Both Stomatal and Mesophyll Conductance1

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Samuel C.V.; Daloso, Danilo M.; Martinoia, Enrico; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; DaMatta, Fábio M.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Araújo, Wagner L.

    2016-01-01

    Stomata control the exchange of CO2 and water vapor in land plants. Thus, whereas a constant supply of CO2 is required to maintain adequate rates of photosynthesis, the accompanying water losses must be tightly regulated to prevent dehydration and undesired metabolic changes. Accordingly, the uptake or release of ions and metabolites from guard cells is necessary to achieve normal stomatal function. The AtQUAC1, an R-type anion channel responsible for the release of malate from guard cells, is essential for efficient stomatal closure. Here, we demonstrate that mutant plants lacking AtQUAC1 accumulated higher levels of malate and fumarate. These mutant plants not only display slower stomatal closure in response to increased CO2 concentration and dark but are also characterized by improved mesophyll conductance. These responses were accompanied by increases in both photosynthesis and respiration rates, without affecting the activity of photosynthetic and respiratory enzymes and the expression of other transporter genes in guard cells, which ultimately led to improved growth. Collectively, our results highlight that the transport of organic acids plays a key role in plant cell metabolism and demonstrate that AtQUAC1 reduce diffusive limitations to photosynthesis, which, at least partially, explain the observed increments in growth under well-watered conditions. PMID:26542441

  11. Alterations in the sugar metabolism and in the vacuolar system of mesophyll cells contribute to the desiccation tolerance of Haberlea rhodopensis ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, K; Rapparini, F; Bertazza, G; Mihailova, G; Sárvári, É; Solti, Á; Keresztes, Á

    2017-01-01

    Haberlea rhodopensis belongs to the small group of resurrection plants having the unique ability to survive desiccation to air dry state retaining most of its chlorophyll content and then resume normal function upon rehydration. It prefers the shady valleys and northward facing slopes of limestone ridges in mountain zones with high average humidity. Nevertheless, it can be found rarely on rocks directly exposed to the sunlight, without the coverage of the canopy. In the present study, we follow the alterations in the subcellular organization of mesophyll cells and sugar metabolism upon desiccation of shade and sun H. rhodopensis plants. Composition and content of soluble carbohydrates during desiccation and rehydration were different in plants grown below the trees or on the sunny rocks. Sucrose, however, was dominating in both ecotypes. The amount of starch grains in chloroplasts was inversely related to that of sugars. Concomitantly with these changes, the number of vacuoles was multiplied in the cells. This can be explained by the development of small (secondary) vacuoles peripherally in the cytoplasm, rather than by the fragmentation of the single vacuole, proposed earlier in the literature. Accordingly, the centripetal movement of chloroplasts and other organelles may be a result of the dynamic changes in the vacuolar system. Upon rehydration, the inner vacuoles enlarged and the organelles returned to their normal position.

  12. Silicon nutrition increases grain yield, which, in turn, exerts a feed-forward stimulation of photosynthetic rates via enhanced mesophyll conductance and alters primary metabolism in rice.

    PubMed

    Detmann, Kelly C; Araújo, Wagner L; Martins, Samuel C V; Sanglard, Lílian M V P; Reis, Josimar V; Detmann, Edenio; Rodrigues, Fabrício Á; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R; DaMatta, Fábio M

    2012-11-01

    Silicon (Si) is not considered to be an essential element for higher plants and is believed to have no effect on primary metabolism in unstressed plants. In rice (Oryza sativa), Si nutrition improves grain production; however, no attempt has been made to elucidate the physiological mechanisms underlying such responses. Here, we assessed crop yield and combined advanced gas exchange analysis with carbon isotope labelling and metabolic profiling to measure the effects of Si nutrition on rice photosynthesis, together with the associated metabolic changes, by comparing wild-type rice with the low-Si rice mutant lsi1 under unstressed conditions. Si improved the harvest index, paralleling an increase in nitrogen use efficiency. Higher crop yields associated with Si nutrition exerted a feed-forward effect on photosynthesis which was fundamentally associated with increased mesophyll conductance. By contrast, Si nutrition did not affect photosynthetic gas exchange during the vegetative growth phase or in de-grained plants. In addition, Si nutrition altered primary metabolism by stimulating amino acid remobilization. Our results indicate a stimulation of the source capacity, coupled with increased sink demand, in Si-treated plants; therefore, we identify Si nutrition as an important target in attempts to improve the agronomic yield of rice.

  13. The Metabolite Pathway between Bundle Sheath and Mesophyll: Quantification of Plasmodesmata in Leaves of C3 and C4 Monocots[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Quick, William Paul

    2016-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis is characterized by a CO2-concentrating mechanism between mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS) cells of leaves. This generates high metabolic fluxes between these cells, through interconnecting plasmodesmata (PD). Quantification of these symplastic fluxes for modeling studies requires accurate quantification of PD, which has proven difficult using transmission electron microscopy. Our new quantitative technique combines scanning electron microscopy and 3D immunolocalization in intact leaf tissues to compare PD density on cell interfaces in leaves of C3 (rice [Oryza sativa] and wheat [Triticum aestivum]) and C4 (maize [Zea mays] and Setaria viridis) monocot species. Scanning electron microscopy quantification of PD density revealed that C4 species had approximately twice the number of PD per pitfield area compared with their C3 counterparts. 3D immunolocalization of callose at pitfields using confocal microscopy showed that pitfield area per M-BS interface area was 5 times greater in C4 species. Thus, the two C4 species had up to nine times more PD per M-BS interface area (S. viridis, 9.3 PD µm−2; maize, 7.5 PD µm−2; rice 1.0 PD µm−2; wheat, 2.6 PD µm−2). Using these anatomical data and measured photosynthetic rates in these C4 species, we have now calculated symplastic C4 acid flux per PD across the M-BS interface. These quantitative data are essential for modeling studies and gene discovery strategies needed to introduce aspects of C4 photosynthesis to C3 crops. PMID:27288224

  14. Bundle-sheath cell regulation of xylem-mesophyll water transport via aquaporins under drought stress: a target of xylem-borne ABA?

    PubMed

    Shatil-Cohen, Arava; Attia, Ziv; Moshelion, Menachem

    2011-07-01

    The hydraulic conductivity of the leaf vascular system (K(leaf) ) is dynamic and decreases rapidly under drought stress, possibly in response to the stress phytohormone ABA, which increases sharply in the xylem sap (ABA(xyl) ) during periods of drought. Vascular bundle-sheath cells (BSCs; a layer of parenchymatous cells tightly enwrapping the entire leaf vasculature) have been hypothesized to control K(leaf) via the specific activity of BSC aquaporins (AQPs). We examined this hypothesis and provide evidence for drought-induced ABA(xyl) diminishing BSC osmotic water permeability (P(f) ) via downregulated activity of their AQPs. ABA fed to the leaf via the xylem (petiole) both decreased K(leaf) and led to stomatal closure, replicating the effect of drought. In contrast, smearing ABA on the leaf blade, while also closing stomata, did not decrease K(leaf) within 2-3 h of application, demonstrating that K(leaf) does not depend entirely on stomatal closure. GFP-labeled BSCs showed decreased P(f) in response to 'drought' and ABA treatment, and a reversible decrease with HgCl(2) (an AQP blocker). These P(f) responses, absent in mesophyll cells, suggest stress-regulated AQP activity specific to BSCs, and imply a role for these cells in decreasing K(leaf) via a reduction in P(f) . Our results support the above hypothesis and highlight the BSCs as hitherto overlooked vasculature sensor compartments, extending throughout the leaf and functioning as 'stress-regulated valves' converting vasculature chemical signals (possibly ABA(xyl) ) into leaf hydraulic signals.

  15. Comparative proteomics of chloroplasts envelopes from bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts reveals novel membrane proteins with a possible role in c4-related metabolite fluxes and development.

    PubMed

    Manandhar-Shrestha, K; Tamot, B; Pratt, E P S; Saitie, S; Bräutigam, A; Weber, A P M; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    As the world population grows, our need for food increases drastically. Limited amounts of arable land lead to a competition between food and fuel crops, while changes in the global climate may impact future crop yields. Thus, a second "green revolution" will need a better understanding of the processes essential for plant growth and development. One approach toward the solution of this problem is to better understand regulatory and transport processes in C4 plants. C4 plants display an up to 10-fold higher apparent CO2 assimilation and higher yields while maintaining high water use efficiency. This requires differential regulation of mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS) chloroplast development as well as higher metabolic fluxes of photosynthetic intermediates between cells and particularly across chloroplast envelopes. While previous analyses of overall chloroplast membranes have yielded significant insight, our comparative proteomics approach using enriched BS and M chloroplast envelopes of Zea mays allowed us to identify 37 proteins of unknown function that have not been seen in these earlier studies. We identified 280 proteins, 84% of which are known/predicted to be present in chloroplasts. Seventy-four percent have a known or predicted membrane association. Twenty-one membrane proteins were 2-15 times more abundant in BS cells, while 36 of the proteins were more abundant in M chloroplast envelopes. These proteins could represent additional candidates of proteins essential for development or metabolite transport processes in C4 plants. RT-PCR confirmed differential expression of 13 candidate genes. Chloroplast association for seven proteins was confirmed using YFP/GFP labeling. Gene expression of four putative transporters was examined throughout the leaf and during the greening of leaves. Genes for a PIC-like protein and an ER-AP-like protein show an early transient increase in gene expression during the transition to light. In addition, PIC gene expression is

  16. Plant, cell, and molecular mechanisms of abscisic-acid regulation of stomatal apertures. A new mechanism for the regulation of stomatal-aperture size in intact leaves: Accumulation of mesophyll-derived sucrose in the guard-cell wall of Vicia faba L.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, P.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr.; Smith, B.G.; Freed, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    At various times after pulse labeling Vicia faba L. leaflets with {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, whole-leaf pieces and rinsed epidermal peels were harvested and subsequently processed for histochemical analysis. Cells dissected from whole leaf retained apoplastic contents whereas those from rinsed peels contained only cytoplastic contents. Sucrose specific radioactivity peaked in palisade cells, 111 GBq{center_dot}mol{sup {minus}1}, at 20 min. In contrast, the {sup 14}C content and sucrose specific radioactivity were very low in guard cells for 20 min, implying little CO{sub 2} incorporation; both then peaked at 40 min. The guard-cell apoplast had a high maximum sucrose specific radioactivity and a high sucrose influx rate. These and other comparisons implied the presence of (a) multiple sucrose pools in mesophyll cells, (b) a localized mesophyll-apoplast region that exchanges with phloem and stomata, and (c) mesophyll-derived sucrose in guard-cell walls sufficient to diminish stomatal opening by {approximately} 4 {micro}m. Factors expected to enhance sucrose accumulation in guard-cell walls are (a) high transpiration rate, which closes stomata, and (b) high apoplastic sucrose concentration, which is elevated when mesophyll-sucrose efflux exceeds translocation. Therefore, multiple physiological factors are integrated in the attenuation of stomatal-aperture size by this previously unrecognized mechanism.

  17. Structural determinants of reductive terpene cyclization in iridoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Kamileen, Mohammed O.; Sherden, Nathaniel H.; Geu-Flores, Fernando; Lawson, David M.; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon skeleton of ecologically and pharmacologically important iridoid monoterpenes is formed in a reductive cyclization reaction unrelated to canonical terpene cyclization. Here we report the crystal structure of the recently discovered iridoid cyclase (Catharanthus roseus) bound to a mechanism-inspired inhibitor that illuminates substrate binding and catalytic function of the enzyme. Key features that distinguish iridoid synthase from its close homologue, progesterone 5β-reductase, are highlighted. PMID:26551396

  18. Increased leaf mesophyll porosity following transient retinoblastoma-related protein silencing is revealed by microcomputed tomography imaging and leads to a system-level physiological response to the altered cell division pattern.

    PubMed

    Dorca-Fornell, Carmen; Pajor, Radoslaw; Lehmeier, Christoph; Pérez-Bueno, Marísa; Bauch, Marion; Sloan, Jen; Osborne, Colin; Rolfe, Stephen; Sturrock, Craig; Mooney, Sacha; Fleming, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    The causal relationship between cell division and growth in plants is complex. Although altered expression of cell-cycle genes frequently leads to altered organ growth, there are many examples where manipulation of the division machinery leads to a limited outcome at the level of organ form, despite changes in constituent cell size. One possibility, which has been under-explored, is that altered division patterns resulting from manipulation of cell-cycle gene expression alter the physiology of the organ, and that this has an effect on growth. We performed a series of experiments on retinoblastoma-related protein (RBR), a well characterized regulator of the cell cycle, to investigate the outcome of altered cell division on leaf physiology. Our approach involved combination of high-resolution microCT imaging and physiological analysis with a transient gene induction system, providing a powerful approach for the study of developmental physiology. Our investigation identifies a new role for RBR in mesophyll differentiation that affects tissue porosity and the distribution of air space within the leaf. The data demonstrate the importance of RBR in early leaf development and the extent to which physiology adapts to modified cellular architecture resulting from altered cell-cycle gene expression.

  19. Spatial variation in photosynthetic CO(2) carbon and oxygen isotope discrimination along leaves of the monocot triticale (Triticum × Secale) relates to mesophyll conductance and the Péclet effect.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Naomi; Cousins, Asaph; Tu, Kevin P; Barbour, Margaret M

    2011-09-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotope discrimination of CO(2) during photosynthesis (Δ(13)C(obs) and Δ(18)O(obs)) were measured along a monocot leaf, triticale (Triticum × Secale). Both Δ(13)C(obs) and Δ(18)O(obs) increased towards the leaf tip. While this was expected for Δ(18)O(obs) , because of progressive enrichment of leaf water associated with the Péclet effect, the result was surprising for Δ(13) C(obs). To explore parameters determining this pattern, we measured activities of key photosynthetic enzymes [ribulose bis-phosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and carbonic anhydrase) as well as maximum carboxylation and electron transport rates (V(cmax) and J(max)) along the leaf. Patterns in leaf internal anatomy along the leaf were also quantified. Mesophyll conductance (g(m)) is known to have a strong influence on Δ(13)C(obs) , so we used three commonly used estimation methods to quantify variation in g(m) along the leaf. Variation in Δ(13)C(obs) was correlated with g(m) and chloroplast surface area facing the intercellular air space, but unrelated to photosynthetic enzyme activity. The observed variation could cause errors at higher scales if the appropriate portion of a leaf is not chosen for leaf-level measurements and model parameterization. Our study shows that one-third of the way from the base of the leaf represents the most appropriate portion to enclose in the leaf chamber.

  20. Review of the taxonomy of the genus Arthrobacter, emendation of the genus Arthrobacter sensu lato, proposal to reclassify selected species of the genus Arthrobacter in the novel genera Glutamicibacter gen. nov., Paeniglutamicibacter gen. nov., Pseudoglutamicibacter gen. nov., Paenarthrobacter gen. nov. and Pseudarthrobacter gen. nov., and emended description of Arthrobacter roseus.

    PubMed

    Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the taxonomy of the genus Arthrobacter is discussed, from its first description in 1947 to the present state. Emphasis is given to intrageneric phylogeny and chemotaxonomic characteristics, concentrating on quinone systems, peptidoglycan compositions and polar lipid profiles. Internal groups within the genus Arthrobacter indicated from homogeneous chemotaxonomic traits and corresponding to phylogenetic grouping and/or high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities are highlighted. Furthermore, polar lipid profiles and quinone systems of selected species are shown, filling some gaps concerning these chemotaxonomic traits. Based on phylogenetic groupings, 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities and homogeneity in peptidoglycan types, quinone systems and polar lipid profiles, a description of the genus Arthrobacter sensu lato and an emended description of Arthrobacter roseus are provided. Furthermore, reclassifications of selected species of the genus Arthrobacter into novel genera are proposed, namely Glutamicibacter gen. nov. (nine species), Paeniglutamicibacter gen. nov. (six species), Pseudoglutamicibacter gen. nov. (two species), Paenarthrobacter gen. nov. (six species) and Pseudarthrobacter gen. nov. (ten species).

  1. Inconsistency of mesophyll conductance estimate causes the inconsistency for the estimates of maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation among the linear, rectangular and non-rectangular hyperbola biochemical models of leaf photosynthesis--a case study of CO₂ enrichment and leaf aging effects in soybean.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jindong; Feng, Zhaozhong; Leakey, Andrew D B; Zhu, Xinguang; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R

    2014-09-01

    The responses of CO2 assimilation to [CO2] (A/Ci) were investigated at two developmental stages (R5 and R6) and in several soybean cultivars grown under two levels of CO2, the ambient level of 370 μbar versus the elevated level of 550 μbar. The A/Ci data were analyzed and compared by either the combined iterations or the separated iterations of the Rubisco-limited photosynthesis (Ac) and/or the RuBP-limited photosynthesis (Aj) using various curve-fitting methods: the linear 2-segment model; the non-rectangular hyperbola model; the rectangular hyperbola model; the constant rate of electron transport (J) method and the variable J method. Inconsistency was found among the various methods for the estimation of the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax), the mitochondrial respiration rate in the light (Rd) and mesophyll conductance (gm). The analysis showed that the inconsistency was due to inconsistent estimates of gm values that decreased with an instantaneous increase in [CO2], and varied with the transition Ci cut-off between Rubisco-limited photosynthesis and RuBP-regeneration-limited photosynthesis, and due to over-parameters for non-linear curve-fitting with gm included. We proposed an alternate solution to A/Ci curve-fitting for estimates of Vcmax, Rd, Jmax and gm with the various A/Ci curve-fitting methods. The study indicated that down-regulation of photosynthetic capacity by elevated [CO2] and leaf aging was due to partially the decrease in the maximum rates of carboxylation and partially the decrease in gm. Mesophyll conductance lowered photosynthetic capacity by 18% on average for the case of soybean plants.

  2. In Vivo and Real-time Monitoring of Secondary Metabolites of Living Organisms by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Ye, Wen-Cai; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2013-07-01

    Secondary metabolites are compounds that are important for the survival and propagation of animals and plants. Our current understanding on the roles and secretion mechanism of secondary metabolites is limited by the existing techniques that typically cannot provide transient and dynamic information about the metabolic processes. In this manuscript, by detecting venoms secreted by living scorpion and toad upon attack and variation of alkaloids in living Catharanthus roseus upon stimulation, which represent three different sampling methods for living organisms, we demonstrated that in vivo and real-time monitoring of secondary metabolites released from living animals and plants could be readily achieved by using field-induced direct ionization mass spectrometry.

  3. A novel method for rapid and non-invasive detection of plants senescence using delayed fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingrui; Xing, Da; Wang, Junsheng; Zeng, Lizhang; Li, Qiang

    2007-05-01

    Plants senescence is a phase of plants ontogeny marked by declining photosynthetic activity that is paralleled by a decline in chloroplast function. The photosystem II ( PSII ) in a plant is considered the primary site where light-induced delayed fluorescence (DF) is produced. With the leaves of Catharanthus roseus (Catharanthus roseus (L.) G.Don) as testing models, we have studied the effects of plants senescence induced by dark and/or exogenous hormones treatments on characteristics of DF by using a home-made portable DF detection system, which can enable various DF parameters, such as DF decay kinetic curve and DF intensity, to be rapidly produced for the plants in a short time. The results show that the changes in DF intensity of green plants can truly reflect the changes in photosynthetic capacity and chlorophyll content. Therefore, DF may be used an important means of evaluating in vivo plants senescence physiology. The changes in DF intensity may provide a new approach for the rapid and early detection of plants senescence caused by age or other senescence-related factors. DF technique could be potential useful for high throughput screening and less time-consuming and automated identifying the interesting mutants with genetic modifications that change plants senescence progress.

  4. Apocynaceae species with antiproliferative and/or antiplasmodial properties: a review of ten genera.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric Wei Chiang; Wong, Siu Kuin; Chan, Hung Tuck

    2016-07-01

    Apocynaceae is a large family of tropical trees, shrubs and vines with most species producing white latex. Major metabolites of species are triterpenoids, iridoids, alkaloids and cardenolides, which are known for a wide range of biological and pharmacological activities such as cardioprotective, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory, anticancer and antimalarial properties. Prompted by their anticancer and antimalarial properties, the current knowledge on ten genera (Allamanda, Alstonia, Calotropis, Catharanthus, Cerbera, Dyera, Kopsia, Nerium, Plumeria and Vallaris) is updated. Major classes of metabolites are described using some species as examples. Species with antiproliferative (APF) and/or antiplasmodial (APM) properties have been identified. With the exception of the genus Dyera, nine genera of 22 species possess APF activity. Seven genera (Alstonia, Calotropis, Catharanthus, Dyera, Kopsia, Plumeria and Vallaris) of 13 species have APM properties. Among these species, Alstonia angustiloba, Alstonia macrophylla, Calotropis gigantea, Calotropis procera, Catharanthus roseus, Plumeria alba and Vallaris glabra displayed both APF and APM properties. The chemical constituents of these seven species are compiled for assessment and further research.

  5. Opium poppy and Madagascar periwinkle: model non-model systems to investigate alkaloid biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Facchini, Peter J; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2008-05-01

    Alkaloids represent a large and diverse group of compounds that are related by the occurrence of a nitrogen atom within a heterocyclic backbone. Unlike other types of secondary metabolites, the various structural categories of alkaloids are unrelated in terms of biosynthesis and evolution. Although the biology of each group is unique, common patterns have become apparent. Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), which produces several benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, and Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus), which accumulates an array of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, have emerged as the premier organisms used to study plant alkaloid metabolism. The status of these species as model systems results from decades of research on the chemistry, enzymology and molecular biology responsible for the biosynthesis of valuable pharmaceutical alkaloids. Opium poppy remains the only commercial source for morphine, codeine and semi-synthetic analgesics, such as oxycodone, derived from thebaine. Catharanthus roseus is the only source for the anti-cancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. Impressive collections of cDNAs encoding biosynthetic enzymes and regulatory proteins involved in the formation of benzylisoquinoline and monoterpenoid indole alkaloids are now available, and the rate of gene discovery has accelerated with the application of genomics. Such tools have allowed the establishment of models that describe the complex cell biology of alkaloid metabolism in these important medicinal plants. A suite of biotechnological resources, including genetic transformation protocols, has allowed the application of metabolic engineering to modify the alkaloid content of these and related species. An overview of recent progress on benzylisoquinoline and monoterpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy and C. roseus is presented.

  6. Plant defense metabolism is increased by the free radical-generating compound AAPH.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, A B; Berglund, T; Komlos, P; Rydström, J

    1995-09-01

    Effects of the free radical-generating substance 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) on defense systems in plant tissue cultures were investigated. Exposure of Catharanthus roseus, C. tricophyllus, and Pisum sativum cultures to AAPH caused altered levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione. An increased total glutathione content in C. roseus was prevented by the glutathione biosynthesis inhibitor buthionine-sulfoximine. The specific phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity in a C. roseus culture was increased from 4 to 34 mukat(kg protein)-1 by 1 mM AAPH. 5 mM AAPH increased the excretion of phenolic substances into the culture medium of a Pisum sativum culture, from 18 to 67 micrograms ml-1. The level of thiobarbituric acid reactants in a C. tricophyllus culture was increased from 46 to 93 nmol(g fresh weight)-1 by 0.4 mM AAPH. The present results, which constitute the first report on effects of the radical-generator AAPH on plant tissue, were achieved with cultures of various plant species and various types of tissue differentiation and demonstrate that AAPH is a suitable agent for the stimulation of the defensive and secondary metabolism in plant tissue cultures. It is proposed that the effects caused by AAPH are mediated by the generation of free radicals and oxidative stress, and that this agent may be used as a model substance for ozone and UV-B exposure.

  7. Top-down Metabolomic Approaches for Nitrogen-Containing Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Hashimoto, Kei; Toyooka, Kiminori; Saito, Kazuki

    2017-03-07

    Streamlining the processes that reveal heteroatom-containing metabolites and their biosynthetic genes is essential in integrated metabolomics studies. These metabolites are especially targeted for their potential pharmaceutical activities. By using a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) instrument, we provide top-down targeted metabolomic analyses using ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), high-resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), and high-resolution imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) with (15)N labeling of nitrogen-containing metabolites. In this study, we efficiently extract known and unknown chemicals and spatial information from the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus, which sources several cancer drugs. The ultrahigh-resolution LC-MS analysis showed that the molecular formula of 65 N-metabolites were identified using the petals, peduncles, leaves, petioles, stems, and roots of the non- and (15)N-labeled Catharanthus plants. The high resolution MALDI analysis showed the molecular formula of 64 N-metabolites using the petals, leaves, and stems of the non- and (15)N-labeled Catharanthus. The chemical assignments using molecular formulas stored in databases identified known and unknown metabolites. The comparative analyses using the assigned metabolites revealed that most of the organ-specific ions are derived from unknown N-metabolites. The high-resolution IMS analysis characterized the spatial accumulation patterns of 32 N-metabolites using the buds, leaves, stems, and roots in Catharanthus. The comparative analysis using the non- and (15)N-labeled IMS data showed the same spatial accumulation patterns of a non- and (15)N-labeled metabolite in the organs, showing that top-down analysis can be performed even in IMS analysis.

  8. Seasonal population dynamics of Draeculacephala minerva (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) and transmission of Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-La Rosa, Juan C; Johnson, Marshall W; Civerolo, Edwin L; Chen, Jianchi; Groves, Russell L

    2008-08-01

    The grass sharpshooter, Draeculacephala minerva Ball (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), is a very common and often abundant grass-feeding leafhopper in California. Its population dynamics and ability to transmit Xylella fastidiosa were monitored over a 2-yr period in California's San Joaquin Valley. Collections of individuals from natural populations in irrigated pastures and alfalfa, Medicago savita L. fields adjacent to X. fastidiosa-infected almond (Prunus spp.) orchards indicated the occurrence of three discrete generations per year that peaked during the summer. Population densities varied significantly among experimental field survey sites. Insects captured on intercepting mesh traps, yellow sticky cards, and UV-light traps indicated local movement of these insects into and surrounding X. fastidiosa-infected, almond orchards. Local movement and seasonal transmission of X. fastidiosa from infected almonds to Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don indicated that this insect may be partly responsible for the slow spread of almond leaf scorch now recently observed in California's San Joaquin Valley.

  9. Alternariol 9-O-methyl ether.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Sreekanth; Bhadbhade, Mohan; Neilan, Brett A

    2012-05-01

    The title compound (AME; systematic name: 3,7-dihy-droxy-9-meth-oxy-1-methyl-6H-benzo[c]chromen-6-one), C(15)H(12)O(5), was isolated from an endophytic fungi Alternaria sp., from Catharanthus roseus (common name: Madagascar periwinkle). There is an intramolecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond in the essentially planar mol-ecule (r.m.s. deviation 0.02 Å). In the crystal, the molecule forms an O-H⋯O hydrogen bond with its centrosymmetric counterpart with four bridging inter-actions (two O-H⋯O and two C-H⋯O). The almost planar sheets of the dimeric units thus formed are stacked along b axis via C-H⋯π and π-π contacts [with C⋯C short contacts between aromatic moieties of 3.324 (3), 3.296 (3) and 3.374 (3) Å].

  10. Functional analysis of related CrRLK1L receptor-like kinases in pollen tube reception.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Sharon A; Lindner, Heike; Jones, Daniel S; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2015-01-01

    The Catharanthus roseus Receptor-Like Kinase 1-like (CrRLK1L) family of 17 receptor-like kinases (RLKs) has been implicated in a variety of signaling pathways in Arabidopsis, ranging from pollen tube (PT) reception and tip growth to hormonal responses. The extracellular domains of these RLKs have malectin-like domains predicted to bind carbohydrate moieties. Domain swap analysis showed that the extracellular domains of the three members analyzed (FER, ANX1, HERK1) are not interchangeable, suggesting distinct upstream components, such as ligands and/or co-factors. In contrast, their intercellular domains are functionally equivalent for PT reception, indicating that they have common downstream targets in their signaling pathways. The kinase domain is necessary for FER function, but kinase activity itself is not, indicating that other kinases may be involved in signal transduction during PT reception.

  11. Understanding CrRLK1L Function: Cell Walls and Growth Control.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Karen S; Willats, William G T; Malinovsky, Frederikke G

    2016-06-01

    To develop successfully in an ever-changing environment, it is essential for plants to monitor and control their growth. Therefore, cell expansion is carefully regulated to establish correct cell shape and size. In this review, we explore the role of the Catharanthus roseus receptor-like kinase (CrRLK1L) subfamily as regulators of cell expansion. Recently, the downstream signalling events of individual CrRLK1L pathways were discovered, implicating known modulators of cell expansion, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, Ca(2+) dynamics, and exocytosis of cell wall material. Based on these intriguing new insights, we propose a model for a common pathway of CrRLK1L signalling that enables spatial and temporal control of cell wall extensibility throughout the plant.

  12. 10 day flight performance of the plant generic bioprocessing apparatus (PGBA) plant growth facility aboard STS-77

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, Alex; Chamberlain, Dale J.; Forsyth, Sasha W.; Hanna, David S.; Scovazzo, Paul; Horner, Michael B.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Todd, Paul; Heyenga, A. Gerard; Kliss, Mark H.; Bula, Raymond; Yetka, Robert

    1997-01-01

    PGBA, a plant growth facility developed for space flight biotechnology research, successfully grew a total of 30 plants in a closed, multi-crop chamber for 10 days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor (STS-77). Artemisia annua, Catharanthus roseus, Pinus taeda, Spinacia oleracea and Trifolium repens were the five species studied during this mission. The primary mission objectives were to study the effects of microgravity for commercial and pharmaceutical production purposes. PGBA is a payload that represents a consortium of interests including BioServe Space Technologies (payload sponsor), NASA Ames Research Center (Controlled Ecological Life Support System, CELSS, Flight Program), Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), and industrial affiliates (spaceflight effects on plants and formation of plant products such as pharmaceuticals). Although BioServe is responsible for the flight hardware development and integration of PGBA, NASA Ames, WSCAR and industrial affiliates provide significant hardware subsystems and technical biological expertise support.

  13. [Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of indol alkaloids].

    PubMed

    Rojas Hernández, N M

    1979-01-01

    In pursuing the study of the antimicrobial properties of alkaloids prepared from Cuban plants the activity of 10 indol alkaloids and 4 semisynthetic variables obtained from three plants--Catharanthus roseus G. Don., Vallesia antillana Wood and Ervatamia coronaria Staph, of the family Apocynaceae--growing in Cuba was assessed in vitro. The alkaloids and the variables used were catharantine, vindoline, vindolinine, perivine, reserpine, tabernaemontanine, tetrahydroalstonine, aparicine, vindolinic acid, reserpic acid and vindolininol. These were faced to 40 bacterial strains from the genera Salmonella, Shigella, Proteus, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium as well as to fungi and yeasts from the genera Aspergillus, kCunnighamella, kCandida and Saccharomyces. The method involving cylindric sections in a double agar layer was applied and lectures were obtained at 24-48 hours of incubation at 25 degrees C for fungi and yeasts and 37 degrees C for bacteria. Inhibition zones are reported in millimeters.

  14. An NPF transporter exports a central monoterpene indole alkaloid intermediate from the vacuole.

    PubMed

    Payne, Richard M E; Xu, Deyang; Foureau, Emilien; Teto Carqueijeiro, Marta Ines Soares; Oudin, Audrey; Bernonville, Thomas Dugé de; Novak, Vlastimil; Burow, Meike; Olsen, Carl-Erik; Jones, D Marc; Tatsis, Evangelos C; Pendle, Ali; Ann Halkier, Barbara; Geu-Flores, Fernando; Courdavault, Vincent; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2017-01-13

    Plants sequester intermediates of metabolic pathways into different cellular compartments, but the mechanisms by which these molecules are transported remain poorly understood. Monoterpene indole alkaloids, a class of specialized metabolites that includes the anticancer agent vincristine, antimalarial quinine and neurotoxin strychnine, are synthesized in several different cellular locations. However, the transporters that control the movement of these biosynthetic intermediates within cellular compartments have not been discovered. Here we present the discovery of a tonoplast localized nitrate/peptide family (NPF) transporter from Catharanthus roseus, CrNPF2.9, that exports strictosidine, the central intermediate of this pathway, into the cytosol from the vacuole. This discovery highlights the role that intracellular localization plays in specialized metabolism, and sets the stage for understanding and controlling the central branch point of this pharmacologically important group of compounds.

  15. 10 day flight performance of the plant generic bioprocessing apparatus (PGBA) plant growth facility aboard STS-77

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehn, A.; Chamberlain, D.J.; Forsyth, S.W.; Hanna, D.S.; Scovazzo, P.; Horner, M.B.; Stodieck, L.S.; Todd, P.; Heyenga, A.G.; Kliss, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    PGBA, a plant growth facility developed for space flight biotechnology research, successfully grew a total of 30 plants in a closed, multi-crop chamber for 10 days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor (STS-77). {ital Artemisia annua, Catharanthus roseus, Pinus taeda, Spinacia oleracea and Trifolium repens} were the five species studied during this mission. The primary mission objectives were to study the effects of microgravity for commercial and pharmaceutical production purposes. PGBA is a payload that represents a consortium of interests including BioServe Space Technologies (payload sponsor), NASA Ames Research Center (Controlled Ecological Life Support System, CELSS, Flight Program), Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), and industrial affiliates (spaceflight effects on plants and formation of plant products such as pharmaceuticals). Although BioServe is responsible for the flight hardware development and integration of PGBA, NASA Ames, WSCAR and industrial affiliates provide significant hardware subsystems and technical biological expertise support. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Structural investigation of heteroyohimbine alkaloid synthesis reveals active site elements that control stereoselectivity

    PubMed Central

    Stavrinides, Anna; Tatsis, Evangelos C.; Caputi, Lorenzo; Foureau, Emilien; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Lawson, David M.; Courdavault, Vincent; O'Connor, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce an enormous array of biologically active metabolites, often with stereochemical variations on the same molecular scaffold. These changes in stereochemistry dramatically impact biological activity. Notably, the stereoisomers of the heteroyohimbine alkaloids show diverse pharmacological activities. We reported a medium chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR) from Catharanthus roseus that catalyses formation of a heteroyohimbine isomer. Here we report the discovery of additional heteroyohimbine synthases (HYSs), one of which produces a mixture of diastereomers. The crystal structures for three HYSs have been solved, providing insight into the mechanism of reactivity and stereoselectivity, with mutation of one loop transforming product specificity. Localization and gene silencing experiments provide a basis for understanding the function of these enzymes in vivo. This work sets the stage to explore how MDRs evolved to generate structural and biological diversity in specialized plant metabolism and opens the possibility for metabolic engineering of new compounds based on this scaffold. PMID:27418042

  17. Inheritance of flower color in periwinkle: orange-red corolla and white eye.

    PubMed

    Sreevalli, Y; Kulkarni, R N; Baskaran, K

    2002-01-01

    The commonly found flower colors in periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus)--pink, white, red-eyed, and pale pink center--are reported to be governed by the epistatic interaction between four genes--A, R, W, and I. The mode of inheritance of an uncommon flower color, orange-red corolla and white eye, was studied by crossing an accession possessing this corolla color with a white flowered variety (Nirmal). The phenotype of the F(1) plants and segregation data of F(2) and backcross generations suggested the involvement of two more interacting and independently inherited genes, one (proposed symbol E) determining the presence or absence of red eye and another (proposed symbol O) determining orange-red corolla.

  18. Aza-tryptamine substrates in monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyang-Yeol; Yerkes, Nancy; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Biosynthetic pathways can be hijacked to yield novel compounds by introduction of novel starting materials. Here we have altered tryptamine, which serves as the starting substrate for a variety of alkaloid biosynthetic pathways, by replacing the indole with one of four aza-indole isomers. We show that two aza-tryptamine substrates can be successfully incorporated into the products of the monoterpene indole alkaloid pathway in Catharanthus roseus. Use of unnatural heterocycles in precursor directed biosynthesis, in both microbial and plant natural product pathways, has not been widely demonstrated, and successful incorporation of starting substrate analogs containing the aza-indole functionality has not been previously reported. This work serves as a starting point to explore fermentation of aza-alkaloids from other tryptophan and tryptamine derived natural product pathways. PMID:20064432

  19. Aza-tryptamine substrates in monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyang-Yeol; Yerkes, Nancy; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2009-12-24

    Biosynthetic pathways can be hijacked to yield novel compounds by introduction of novel starting materials. Here we have altered tryptamine, which serves as the starting substrate for a variety of alkaloid biosynthetic pathways, by replacing the indole with one of four aza-indole isomers. We show that two aza-tryptamine substrates can be successfully incorporated into the products of the monoterpene indole alkaloid pathway in Catharanthus roseus. Use of unnatural heterocycles in precursor-directed biosynthesis, in both microbial and plant natural product pathways, has not been widely demonstrated, and successful incorporation of starting substrate analogs containing the aza-indole functionality has not been previously reported. This work serves as a starting point to explore fermentation of aza-alkaloids from other tryptophan- and tryptamine-derived natural product pathways.

  20. An exploration of the potential mechanisms and translational potential of five medicinal plants for applications in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shakir, Taner; Coulibaly, Ahmed Y; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia, and represents a vast worldwide socio-economic burden, and in the absence of a current cure, effective therapeutic strategies are still needed. Cholinergic and cerebral blood flow deficits, excessive levels of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and glutamate excitatory mechanisms are all believed to contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Scoparia dulcis, Catharanthus roseus, Sesamum indicum, Erythrina senegalensis and Vigna unguiculata represent five plants that have been used as traditional medicines for the treatment of AD in certain cultures. Review of the scientific literature was conducted to explore the properties of these plants that might be beneficial and explain what would be perceived by many to be largely anecdotal evidence of their benefit. All plants were found to possess varying levels of anti-oxidant capability. Scoparia dulcis was also found to potentiate nerve growth factor-like effects upon cell lines. Catharanthus roseus appears to inhibit acetylcholinesterase with relatively high potency, while Sesamum indicum demonstrated the strongest antioxidant ability. Comparisons with currently used plant derived therapeutics illustrate how these plants may be likely to have some therapeutic benefits in AD. The evidence presented also highlights how appropriate dietary supplementation with some of these plants in various cultural settings might have effects analogous or complementary to the so-called protective Mediterranean diet. However, prior to embarking on making any formal recommendations to this end, further rigorous evaluation is needed to better elucidate the breadth and potential toxicological aspects of medicinal properties harboured by these plants. This would be vital to ensuring a more informed and safe delivery of preparations of these plants if they were to be considered as a form of dietary supplementation and where appropriate, how these might interact

  1. An exploration of the potential mechanisms and translational potential of five medicinal plants for applications in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shakir, Taner; Coulibaly, Ahmed Y; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia, and represents a vast worldwide socio-economic burden, and in the absence of a current cure, effective therapeutic strategies are still needed. Cholinergic and cerebral blood flow deficits, excessive levels of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and glutamate excitatory mechanisms are all believed to contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Scoparia dulcis, Catharanthus roseus, Sesamum indicum, Erythrina senegalensis and Vigna unguiculata represent five plants that have been used as traditional medicines for the treatment of AD in certain cultures. Review of the scientific literature was conducted to explore the properties of these plants that might be beneficial and explain what would be perceived by many to be largely anecdotal evidence of their benefit. All plants were found to possess varying levels of anti-oxidant capability. Scoparia dulcis was also found to potentiate nerve growth factor-like effects upon cell lines. Catharanthus roseus appears to inhibit acetylcholinesterase with relatively high potency, while Sesamum indicum demonstrated the strongest antioxidant ability. Comparisons with currently used plant derived therapeutics illustrate how these plants may be likely to have some therapeutic benefits in AD. The evidence presented also highlights how appropriate dietary supplementation with some of these plants in various cultural settings might have effects analogous or complementary to the so-called protective Mediterranean diet. However, prior to embarking on making any formal recommendations to this end, further rigorous evaluation is needed to better elucidate the breadth and potential toxicological aspects of medicinal properties harboured by these plants. This would be vital to ensuring a more informed and safe delivery of preparations of these plants if they were to be considered as a form of dietary supplementation and where appropriate, how these might

  2. Vinca drug components accumulate exclusively in leaf exudates of Madagascar periwinkle

    PubMed Central

    Roepke, Jonathan; Salim, Vonny; Wu, Maggie; Thamm, Antje M. K.; Murata, Jun; Ploss, Kerstin; Boland, Wilhelm; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) continue to be the most important source of natural drugs in chemotherapy treatments for a range of human cancers. These anticancer drugs are derived from the coupling of catharanthine and vindoline to yield powerful dimeric MIAs that prevent cell division. However the precise mechanisms for their assembly within plants remain obscure. Here we report that the complex development-, environment-, organ-, and cell-specific controls involved in expression of MIA pathways are coupled to secretory mechanisms that keep catharanthine and vindoline separated from each other in living plants. Although the entire production of catharanthine and vindoline occurs in young developing leaves, catharanthine accumulates in leaf wax exudates of leaves, whereas vindoline is found within leaf cells. The spatial separation of these two MIAs provides a biological explanation for the low levels of dimeric anticancer drugs found in the plant that result in their high cost of commercial production. The ability of catharanthine to inhibit the growth of fungal zoospores at physiological concentrations found on the leaf surface of Catharanthus leaves, as well as its insect toxicity, provide an additional biological role for its secretion. We anticipate that this discovery will trigger a broad search for plants that secrete alkaloids, the biological mechanisms involved in their secretion to the plant surface, and the ecological roles played by them. PMID:20696903

  3. Integrating carbon-halogen bond formation into medicinal plant metabolism.

    PubMed

    Runguphan, Weerawat; Qu, Xudong; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2010-11-18

    Halogenation, which was once considered a rare occurrence in nature, has now been observed in many natural product biosynthetic pathways. However, only a small fraction of halogenated compounds have been isolated from terrestrial plants. Given the impact that halogenation can have on the biological activity of natural products, we reasoned that the introduction of halides into medicinal plant metabolism would provide the opportunity to rationally bioengineer a broad variety of novel plant products with altered, and perhaps improved, pharmacological properties. Here we report that chlorination biosynthetic machinery from soil bacteria can be successfully introduced into the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle). These prokaryotic halogenases function within the context of the plant cell to generate chlorinated tryptophan, which is then shuttled into monoterpene indole alkaloid metabolism to yield chlorinated alkaloids. A new functional group-a halide-is thereby introduced into the complex metabolism of C. roseus, and is incorporated in a predictable and regioselective manner onto the plant alkaloid products. Medicinal plants, despite their genetic and developmental complexity, therefore seem to be a viable platform for synthetic biology efforts.

  4. Light-dependent intracellular positioning of mitochondria in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll cells.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Sayeedul; Niwa, Yasuo; Takagi, Shingo

    2009-06-01

    Mitochondria, the power house of the cell, are one of the most dynamic cell organelles. Although there are several reports on actin- or microtubule-dependent movement of mitochondria in plant cells, intracellular positioning and motility of mitochondria under different light conditions remain open questions. Mitochondria were visualized in living Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells using green fluorescent protein fused to a mitochondrion-targeting signal. In darkness, mitochondria were distributed randomly in palisade cells. In contrast, mitochondria accumulated along the periclinal walls, similar to the accumulation response of chloroplasts, when treated with weak blue light (470 nm, 4 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). Under strong blue light (100 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), mitochondria occupied the anticlinal positions similar to the avoidance response of chloroplasts and nuclei. While strong red light (660 nm, 100 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) induced the accumulation of mitochondria along the inner periclinal walls, green light exhibited little effect on the distribution of mitochondria. In addition, the mode of movement of individual mitochondria along the outer periclinal walls under different light conditions was precisely analyzed by time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. A gradual increase in the number of static mitochondria located in the vicinity of chloroplasts with a time period of blue light illumination clearly demonstrated the accumulation response of mitochondria. Light-induced co-localization of mitochondria with chloroplasts strongly suggested their mutual metabolic interactions. This is the first characterization of the light-dependent redistribution of mitochondria in plant cells.

  5. Thermotolerant and mesophylic fungi from sugarcane bagasse and their prospection for biomass-degrading enzyme production

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Bruna Silveira Lamanes; Gomes, Arthur Filipe Sousa; Franciscon, Emanuele Giuliane; de Oliveira, Jean Maikon; Baffi, Milla Alves

    2015-01-01

    Nineteen fungi and seven yeast strains were isolated from sugarcane bagasse piles from an alcohol plant located at Brazilian Cerrado and identified up to species level on the basis of the gene sequencing of 5.8S-ITS and 26S ribosomal DNA regions. Four species were identified: Kluyveromyces marxianus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus sydowii and Aspergillus fumigatus, and the isolates were screened for the production of key enzymes in the saccharification of lignocellulosic material. Among them, three strains were selected as good producers of hemicellulolitic enzymes: A. niger (SBCM3), A. sydowii (SBCM7) and A. fumigatus (SBC4). The best β-xylosidase producer was A. niger SBCM3 strain. This crude enzyme presented optimal activity at pH 3.5 and 55 °C (141 U/g). For β-glucosidase and xylanase the best producer was A. fumigatus SBC4 strain, whose enzymes presented maximum activity at 60 °C and pH 3.5 (54 U/g) and 4.0 (573 U/g), respectively. All these crude enzymes presented stability around pH 3.0–8.0 and up to 60 °C, which can be very useful in industrial processes that work at high temperatures and low pHs. These enzymes also exhibited moderate tolerance to ethanol and the sugars glucose and xylose. These similar characteristics among these fungal crude enzymes suggest that they can be used synergistically in cocktails in future studies of biomass conversion with potential application in several biotechnological sectors. PMID:26413077

  6. First Evidence of Thaumastocoris peregrinus (Heteroptera: Thaumastocoridae) Feeding From Mesophyll of Eucalyptus Leaves.

    PubMed

    Santadino, Marina; Brentassi, María E; Fanello, Diego D; Coviella, Carlos

    2017-01-12

    The bronze bug, Thaumastocoris peregrinus Carpintero & Dellapé, 2006 (Heteroptera: Thaumastocoridae) originally restricted to Australia, is an important emerging pest of Eucalyptus plantations in the Southern Hemisphere. It feeds on mature leaves, causing the loss of photosynthetic surface area and defoliation and, according to some studies, even tree death. In this work, feeding activities of T. peregrinus on Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn leaves and its primary food resources were identified. In cross sections of leaves, solid salivary deposits on epidermal cells and in the vicinity of stomata cells were detected. In subepidermal cells of the palisade parenchyma near the stylet penetration point, disorganization and removal of chloroplasts were also observed. The presence of chlorophyll in guts of adults and nymphs was analyzed using spectrophotometry and confocal laser scanning to obtain in situ fluorescent spectra. Both spectra showed chlorophyll absorbance peaks. In addition, the presence of chlorophyll in guts of T. peregrinus using fluorescence microscopy was identified. These results provide the first evidence that T. peregrinus feeds from the palisade parenchyma (chlorenchyma) of Eucalyptus leaves.

  7. Catabolites of chlorophyll in senescing barley leaves are localized in the vacuoles of mesophyll cells

    PubMed Central

    Matile, Philippe; Ginsburg, Stefan; Schellenberg, Maja; Thomas, Howard

    1988-01-01

    Senescing barley leaves accumulate a series of pink pigments with the chemical properties of catabolites derived from chlorophyll. Levels of the major component of this group of pigments were quantified by HPLC and shown to be maximal in tissues exhibiting maximal rates of chlorophyll degradation. Protoplasts were isolated from senescent leaf tissue and fractionated to yield intact vacuoles and plastids. Although small but significant proportions both of total catabolites and of the dominant component of the series were recovered from the plastid fraction, the vast bulk of these compounds could be assigned to the vacuole. These observations suggest a role for the vacuole in the later stages of chlorophyll breakdown during senescence. PMID:16594008

  8. Shoot regeneration of mesophyll protoplasts transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens, not achievable with untransformed protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Steffen, A; Eriksson, T; Schieder, O

    1986-04-01

    Alternative methods for shoot regeneration in protoplast derived cultures were developed in Nicotiana paniculata and Physalis minima. In both species protoplast derived callus is not regeneratable to shoots by conventional methods, e.g. hormone treatment. Leaf discs and stem segments of N. paniculata and P. minima were incubated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens "shooter" strains harbouring pGV 2215 or pGV 2298 or wildtype strain B6S3. After 36 h of co-incubation protoplasts were prepared. (Leaf disc and stem segment cloning). Co-cultivation experiments were also undertaken with protoplasts of both species. Transformed clones, characterized by their hormone independent growth and octopine production, could be isolated after about two months. Transformation frequencies of "leaf disc and stem segment cloning" and co-cultivation experiments varied from 5×10(-3) to 5×10(-5). After about one year of cultivation on hormone-free culture medium, shoots could be recovered from colonies of N. paniculata, transformed by the strain harbouring pGV 2298. In protoplast derived colonies of P. minima, shoot induction was obtained only after transformation by bacteria carrying pGV 2215. This demonstrates the importance of the particular "shooter" mutant, as well as the response of the host plant. Transformed shoots of P. minima produced octopine, whereas octopine production in transformed shoots and callus of N. paniculata was undetectable after one year of cultivation, though T-DNA was still present in the plant genome. Transformed shoots of N. paniculata and P. minima do not produce any roots. Shoots of N. paniculata have an especially tumerous phenotype. Shoots of both species were successfully grafted to normal donor plants of N. tabacum.

  9. Pododermatitis in Captive and Free-Ranging Greater Flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus).

    PubMed

    Wyss, F; Schumacher, V; Wenker, C; Hoby, S; Gobeli, S; Arnaud, A; Engels, M; Friess, M; Lange, C E; Stoffel, M H; Robert, N

    2015-11-01

    Pododermatitis is frequent in captive flamingos worldwide, but little is known about the associated histopathologic lesions. Involvement of a papillomavirus or herpesvirus has been suspected. Histopathologic evaluation and viral assessment of biopsies from 19 live and 10 dead captive greater flamingos were performed. Selected samples were further examined by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Feet from 10 dead free-ranging greater flamingos were also evaluated. The histologic appearance of lesions of flamingos of increasing age was interpreted as the progression of pododermatitis. Mild histologic lesions were seen in a 3-week-old flamingo chick with no macroscopic lesions, and these were characterized by Micrococcus-like bacteria in the stratum corneum associated with exocytosis of heterophils. The inflammation associated with these bacteria may lead to further histologic changes: irregular columnar proliferations, papillary squirting, and dyskeratosis. In more chronic lesions, hydropic degeneration of keratinocytes, epidermal hyperplasia, and dyskeratosis were seen at the epidermis, as well as proliferation of new blood vessels and increased intercellular matrix in the dermis. Papillomavirus DNA was not identified in any of the samples, while herpesvirus DNA was seen only in a few cases; therefore, these viruses were not thought to be the cause of the lesions. Poor skin health through suboptimal husbandry may weaken the epidermal barrier and predispose the skin to invasion of Micrococcus-like bacteria. Histologic lesions were identified in very young flamingos with no macroscopic lesions; this is likely to be an early stage lesion that may progress to macroscopic lesions.

  10. An epizootic of lead poisoning in greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber roseus) in Spain.

    PubMed

    Mateo, R; Dolz, J C; Aguilar Serrano, J M; Belliure, J; Guitart, R

    1997-01-01

    During November 1992 to March 1993, and November 1993 to February 1994, 106 greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber) were collected dead or moribund in the wetlands of El Fondo and Salinas de Santa Pola, eastern Spain. Birds still alive were emaciated and had a bile-stained diarrhea. On necropsy, they had liquid in the upper digestive tract and the walls of their gizzards were stained dark green. Fifty-three (93%) of 57 gizzards examined contained lead shot (range one to 277 shot), and fifty-five (96%) of 57 livers contained levels of lead greater than 5 micrograms/g dry weight (DW) (median = 192.3 micrograms/g DW, range < 2.5 to 992.2 micrograms/g DW).

  11. Industrial case study on alkaloids purification by pH-zone refining centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kotland, Alexis; Chollet, Sébastien; Diard, Catherine; Autret, Jean-Marie; Meucci, Jeremy; Renault, Jean-Hugues; Marchal, Luc

    2016-11-25

    The industrial potential of pH-zone refining centrifugal partition chromatography has been evaluated by studying the purification of pharmaceutical ingredients at the pilot scale. For the first time, a scale up methodology based on both column capacity and mass transfer efficiency as invariants was developed. The purification of catharanthine and vindoline from an industrial crude extract of aerial parts of Catharanthus roseus, was used as a case of study. Toluene/CH3CN/water (4/1/5, v/v/v) was selected as biphasic solvent system, triethylamine as retainer in the organic stationary phase and sulphuric acid as displacer in the aqueous mobile phase. The separation intensification was performed on a 36mL CPC column equipped with 832 partition twin-cells. The combined effects of four parameters (displacer and retainer concentrations for intensive parameters, flow rate and rotational speed for extensive parameters) were studied by design of experiment in order to maximize both recoveries and productivities. Then, scale change was done on two larger columns (305mL and 1950mL of capacity) equipped with only 231 and 238 partition cells. For this step, it has been shown that the global mass transfer coefficient k0a (the efficiency of a column design) and the stationary phase retention (the capacity of the column) were relevant and useful scale up invariants. A CPC model based on acid-base equilibriums and interfacial mass transfer in continuously stirred tank reactors in series was used to predict fully separations on larger CPC column at the optimized operating conditions and to guide the CPC user in its scale-up strategy. The experimental validation on pilot CPC column, by injecting up to 150g of Catharanthus roseus crude extract on the 1950mL column highlighted the preservation of the separation quality, the non-linear character of the scale up in centrifugal partition chromatography and that a productivity of about 4kg of processed crude extract per day can be reached

  12. Ethnomedicines used in Trinidad and Tobago for urinary problems and diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lans, Cheryl A

    2006-01-01

    Background This paper is based on ethnobotanical interviews conducted from 1996–2000 in Trinidad and Tobago with thirty male and female respondents. Methods A non-experimental validation was conducted on the plants used for urinary problems and diabetes mellitus: This is a preliminary step to establish that the plants used are safe or effective, to help direct clinical trials, and to inform Caribbean physicians of the plants' known properties to avoid counter-prescribing. Results The following plants are used to treat diabetes: Antigonon leptopus, Bidens alba, Bidens pilosa, Bixa orellana, Bontia daphnoides, Carica papaya, Catharanthus roseus, Cocos nucifera, Gomphrena globosa, Laportea aestuans, Momordica charantia, Morus alba, Phyllanthus urinaria and Spiranthes acaulis. Apium graviolens is used as a heart tonic and for low blood pressure. Bixa orellana, Bontia daphnoides, Cuscuta americana and Gomphrena globosa are used for jaundice. The following plants are used for hypertension: Aloe vera, Annona muricata, Artocarpus altilis, Bixa orellana, Bidens alba, Bidens pilosa, Bonta daphnoides, Carica papaya, Cecropia peltata, Citrus paradisi, Cola nitida, Crescentia cujete, Gomphrena globosa, Hibiscus sabdariffa, Kalanchoe pinnata, Morus alba, Nopalea cochinellifera, Ocimum campechianum, Passiflora quadrangularis, Persea americana and Tamarindus indicus. The plants used for kidney problems are Theobroma cacao, Chamaesyce hirta, Flemingia strobilifera, Peperomia rotundifolia, Petiveria alliacea, Nopalea cochinellifera, Apium graveolens, Cynodon dactylon, Eleusine indica, Gomphrena globosa, Pityrogramma calomelanos and Vetiveria zizanioides. Plants are also used for gall stones and for cooling. Conclusion Chamaesyce hirta, Cissus verticillata, Kalanchoe pinnata, Peperomia spp., Portulaca oleraceae, Scoparia dulcis, and Zea mays have sufficient evidence to support their traditional use for urinary problems, "cooling" and high cholesterol. Eggplant extract as a

  13. CrBPF1 overexpression alters transcript levels of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic and regulatory genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun Yao; Leopold, Alex L.; Sander, Guy W.; Shanks, Jacqueline V.; Zhao, Le; Gibson, Susan I.

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus is a complex and highly regulated process. Understanding the biochemistry and regulation of the TIA pathway is of particular interest as it may allow the engineering of plants to accumulate higher levels of pharmaceutically important alkaloids. Toward this end, we generated a transgenic C. roseus hairy root line that overexpresses the CrBPF1 transcriptional activator under the control of a β-estradiol inducible promoter. CrBPF1 is a MYB-like protein that was previously postulated to help regulate the expression of the TIA biosynthetic gene STR. However, the role of CrBPF1 in regulation of the TIA and related pathways had not been previously characterized. In this study, transcriptional profiling revealed that overexpression of CrBPF1 results in increased transcript levels for genes from both the indole and terpenoid biosynthetic pathways that provide precursors for TIA biosynthesis, as well as for genes in the TIA biosynthetic pathway. In addition, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increases in the transcript levels for 11 out of 13 genes postulated to act as transcriptional regulators of genes from the TIA and TIA feeder pathways. Interestingly, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increased transcript levels for both TIA transcriptional activators and repressors. Despite the fact that CrBPF1 overexpression affects transcript levels of a large percentage of TIA biosynthetic and regulatory genes, CrBPF1 overexpression has only very modest effects on the levels of the TIA metabolites analyzed. This finding may be due, at least in part, to the up-regulation of both transcriptional activators and repressors in response to CrBPF1 overexpression, suggesting that CrBPF1 may serve as a “fine-tune” regulator for TIA biosynthesis, acting to help regulate the timing and amplitude of TIA gene expression. PMID:26483828

  14. Iridoid synthase activity is common among the plant progesterone 5β-reductase family.

    PubMed

    Munkert, Jennifer; Pollier, Jacob; Miettinen, Karel; Van Moerkercke, Alex; Payne, Richard; Müller-Uri, Frieder; Burlat, Vincent; O'Connor, Sarah E; Memelink, Johan; Kreis, Wolfgang; Goossens, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus, the Madagascar periwinkle, synthesizes bioactive monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, including the anti-cancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. The monoterpenoid branch of the alkaloid pathway leads to the secoiridoid secologanin and involves the enzyme iridoid synthase (IS), a member of the progesterone 5β-reductase (P5βR) family. IS reduces 8-oxogeranial to iridodial. Through transcriptome mining, we show that IS belongs to a family of six C. roseus P5βR genes. Characterization of recombinant CrP5βR proteins demonstrates that all but CrP5βR3 can reduce progesterone and thus can be classified as P5βRs. Three of them, namely CrP5βR1, CrP5βR2, and CrP5βR4, can also reduce 8-oxogeranial, pointing to a possible redundancy with IS (corresponding to CrP5βR5) in secoiridoid synthesis. In-depth functional analysis by subcellular protein localization, gene expression analysis, in situ hybridization, and virus-induced gene silencing indicate that besides IS, CrP5βR4 may also participate in secoiridoid biosynthesis. We cloned a set of P5βR genes from angiosperm plant species not known to produce iridoids and demonstrate that the corresponding recombinant proteins are also capable of using 8-oxogeranial as a substrate. This suggests that IS activity is intrinsic to angiosperm P5βR proteins and has evolved early during evolution.

  15. Iridoid Synthase Activity Is Common among the Plant Progesterone 5β-Reductase Family.

    PubMed

    Munkert, Jennifer; Pollier, Jacob; Miettinen, Karel; Van Moerkercke, Alex; Payne, Richard; Müller-Uri, Frieder; Burlat, Vincent; O'Connor, Sarah E; Memelink, Johan; Kreis, Wolfgang; Goossens, Alain

    2014-09-19

    Catharanthus roseus, the Madagascar periwinkle, synthesizes bioactive monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, among which the anti-cancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. The monoterpenoid branch of the alkaloid pathway leads to the secoiridoid secologanin and involves the enzyme iridoid synthase (IS), a member of the progesterone 5β-reductase (P5βR) family. IS reduces 8-oxogeranial to iridodial. Through transcriptome mining, we show that IS belongs to a family of six C. roseus P5βR genes. Characterisation of recombinant CrP5βR proteins demonstrates that all but CrP5βR3 can reduce progesterone, and thus can be classified as P5βRs. Three of them, namely CrP5βR1, CrP5βR2 and CrP5βR4, could also reduce 8-oxogeranial, pointing to a possible redundancy with IS (corresponding to CrP5βR5) in secoiridoid synthesis. In depth functional analysis by subcellular protein localisation, gene expression analysis, in situ hybridisation and virus-induced gene silencing, indicates that besides IS, CrP5βR4 may also participate in secoiridoid biosynthesis. Finally, we cloned a set of P5βR genes from angiosperm plant species not known to produce iridoids and demonstrate that the corresponding recombinant proteins are also capable of using 8-oxogeranial as a substrate. This suggests that 'IS activity' is intrinsic to angiosperm P5βR proteins and has evolved early during evolution.

  16. Clade IVa Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors Form Part of a Conserved Jasmonate Signaling Circuit for the Regulation of Bioactive Plant Terpenoid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Jan; Van Moerkercke, Alex; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Pollier, Jacob; Goossens, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Plants produce many bioactive, specialized metabolites to defend themselves when facing various stress situations. Their biosynthesis is directed by a tightly controlled regulatory circuit that is elicited by phytohormones such as jasmonate (JA). The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) bHLH iridoid synthesis 1 (BIS1) and Triterpene Saponin Activating Regulator (TSAR) 1 and 2, from Catharanthus roseus and Medicago truncatula, respectively, all belong to clade IVa of the bHLH protein family and activate distinct terpenoid pathways, thereby mediating monoterpenoid indole alkaloid (MIA) and triterpene saponin (TS) accumulation, respectively, in these two species. In this study, we report that promoters of the genes encoding the enzymes involved in the specific terpenoid pathway of one of these species can be transactivated by the orthologous bHLH factor from the other species through recognition of the same cis-regulatory elements. Accordingly, ectopic expression of CrBIS1 in M. truncatula hairy roots up-regulated the expression of all genes required for soyasaponin production, resulting in strongly increased levels of soyasaponins in the transformed roots. Likewise, transient expression of MtTSAR1 and MtTSAR2 in C. roseus petals led to up-regulation of the genes involved in the iridoid branch of the MIA pathway. Together, our data illustrate the functional similarity of these JA-inducible TFs and indicate that recruitment of defined cis-regulatory elements constitutes an important aspect of the evolution of conserved regulatory modules for the activation of species-specific terpenoid biosynthesis pathways by common signals such as the JA phytohormones.

  17. Development of Transcriptomic Resources for Interrogating the Biosynthesis of Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids in Medicinal Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Góngora-Castillo, Elsa; Childs, Kevin L.; Fedewa, Greg; Hamilton, John P.; Liscombe, David K.; Magallanes-Lundback, Maria; Mandadi, Kranthi K.; Nims, Ezekiel; Runguphan, Weerawat; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Varbanova-Herde, Marina; DellaPenna, Dean; McKnight, Thomas D.; O’Connor, Sarah; Buell, C. Robin

    2012-01-01

    The natural diversity of plant metabolism has long been a source for human medicines. One group of plant-derived compounds, the monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs), includes well-documented therapeutic agents used in the treatment of cancer (vinblastine, vincristine, camptothecin), hypertension (reserpine, ajmalicine), malaria (quinine), and as analgesics (7-hydroxymitragynine). Our understanding of the biochemical pathways that synthesize these commercially relevant compounds is incomplete due in part to a lack of molecular, genetic, and genomic resources for the identification of the genes involved in these specialized metabolic pathways. To address these limitations, we generated large-scale transcriptome sequence and expression profiles for three species of Asterids that produce medicinally important MIAs: Camptotheca acuminata, Catharanthus roseus, and Rauvolfia serpentina. Using next generation sequencing technology, we sampled the transcriptomes of these species across a diverse set of developmental tissues, and in the case of C. roseus, in cultured cells and roots following elicitor treatment. Through an iterative assembly process, we generated robust transcriptome assemblies for all three species with a substantial number of the assembled transcripts being full or near-full length. The majority of transcripts had a related sequence in either UniRef100, the Arabidopsis thaliana predicted proteome, or the Pfam protein domain database; however, we also identified transcripts that lacked similarity with entries in either database and thereby lack a known function. Representation of known genes within the MIA biosynthetic pathway was robust. As a diverse set of tissues and treatments were surveyed, expression abundances of transcripts in the three species could be estimated to reveal transcripts associated with development and response to elicitor treatment. Together, these transcriptomes and expression abundance matrices provide a rich resource for

  18. Methylation of sulfhydryl groups: a new function for a family of small molecule plant O-methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Coiner, Heather; Schröder, Gudrun; Wehinger, Elke; Liu, Chang-Jun; Noel, Joseph P.; Schwab, Wilfried; Schröder, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Summary In plants, type I and II S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent O-methyltransferases (OMTs) catalyze most hydroxyl group methylations of small molecules. A homology-based RT-PCR strategy using Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle) RNA previously identified six new type I plant OMT family members. We now describe the molecular and biochemical characterization of a seventh protein. It shares 56–58% identity with caffeic acid OMTs (COMTs), but it failed to methylate COMT substrates, and had no activity with flavonoids. However, the in vitro incubations revealed unusually high background levels without added substrates. A search for the responsible component revealed that the enzyme methylated dithiothreitol (DTT), the reducing agent added for enzyme stabilization. Unexpectedly, product analysis revealed that the methylation occurred on a sulfhydryl moiety, not on a hydroxyl group. Analysis of 34 compounds indicated a broad substrate range, with a preference for small hydrophobic molecules. Benzene thiol (Km 220 μM) and furfuryl thiol (Km 60 μM) were the best substrates (6–7-fold better than DTT). Small isosteric hydrophobic substrates with hydroxyl groups, like phenol and guaiacol, were also methylated, but the activities were at least 5-fold lower than with thiols. The enzyme was named C. roseus S-methyltransferase 1 (CrSMT1). Models based on the COMT crystal structure suggest that S-methylation is mechanistically identical to O-methylation. CrSMT1 so far is the only recognized example of an S-methyltransferase in this protein family. Its properties indicate that a few changes in key residues are sufficient to convert an OMT into a S-methyltransferase (SMT). Future functional investigations of plant methyltransferases should consider the possibility that the enzymes may direct methylation at sulfhydryl groups. PMID:16623883

  19. Engineering of a Nepetalactol-Producing Platform Strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the Production of Plant Seco-Iridoids.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Alex; Bauchart, Philippe; Gold, Nicholas D; Zhu, Yun; De Luca, Vincenzo; Martin, Vincent J J

    2016-05-20

    The monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) are a valuable family of chemicals that include the anticancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. These compounds are of global significance-appearing on the World Health Organization's list of model essential medicines-but remain exorbitantly priced due to low in planta levels. Chemical synthesis and genetic manipulation of MIA producing plants such as Catharanthus roseus have so far failed to find a solution to this problem. Synthetic biology holds a potential answer, by building the pathway into more tractable organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recent work has taken the first steps in this direction by producing small amounts of the intermediate strictosidine in yeast. In order to help improve on these titers, we aimed to optimize the early biosynthetic steps of the MIA pathway to the metabolite nepetalactol. We combined a number of strategies to create a base strain producing 11.4 mg/L of the precursor geraniol. We also show production of the critical intermediate 10-hydroxygeraniol and demonstrate nepetalactol production in vitro. Lastly we demonstrate that activity of the iridoid synthase toward the intermediates geraniol and 10-hydroxygeraniol results in the synthesis of the nonproductive intermediates citronellol and 10-hydroxycitronellol. This discovery has serious implications for the reconstruction of the MIA in heterologous organisms.

  20. Zoospore density-dependent behaviors of Phytophthora nicotianae are autoregulated by extracellular products.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ping; Hong, Chuanxue

    2010-07-01

    Phytophthora species are destructive fungus-like plant pathogens that use asexual single-celled flagellate zoospores for dispersal and plant infection. Many of the zoospore behaviors are density-dependent although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we use P. nicotianae as a model and demonstrate autoregulation of some zoospore behaviors using signal molecules that zoospores release into the environment. Specifically, zoospore aggregation, plant targeting, and infection required or were enhanced by threshold concentrations of these signal molecules. Below the threshold concentration, zoospores did not aggregate and move toward a cauline leaf of Arabidopsis thaliana (Col-0) and failed to individually attack annual vinca (Catharanthus roseus cv. Little Bright Eye). These processes were reversed when supplemented with zoospore-free fluid (ZFF) prepared from a zoospore suspension above threshold densities but not with calcium chloride at a concentration equivalent to extracellular Ca(2+) in ZFF. These results suggest that Ca(2+) is not a primary signal molecule regulating these communal behaviors. Zoospores coordinated their communal behaviors by releasing, detecting, and responding to signal molecules. This chemical communication mechanism raises the possibility that Phytophthora plant infection may not depend solely on zoospore number in the real world. Single zoospore infection may take place if it is signaled by a common molecule available in the environment which contributes to the destructiveness of these plant pathogens.

  1. Cytotoxic Effect of Erythroxylum suberosum Combined with Radiotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Taysa B C; Elias, Silvia T; Torres, Hianne M; Yamamoto-Silva, Fernanda Paula; Silveira, Dâmaris; Magalhães, Pérola O; Lofrano-Porto, Adriana; Guerra, Eliete N S; Silva, Maria Alves G

    2016-01-01

    The mouth and oropharynx cancer is the 6th most common type of cancer in the world. The treatment may involve surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. More than 50% of drugs against cancer were isolated from natural sources, such as Catharanthus roseus and epipodophyllotoxin, isolated from Podophyllum. The biggest challenge is to maximize the control of the disease, while minimizing morbidity and toxicity to the surrounding normal tissues. The Erythroxylum suberosum is a common plant in the Brazilian Cerrado biome and is popularly known as "cabelo-de-negro". The objective of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic activity of Erythroxylum suberosum plant extracts of the Brazilian Cerrado biome associated with radiotherapy in human cell lines of oral and hypopharynx carcinomas. Cells were treated with aqueous, ethanolic and hexanic extracts of Erythroxylum suberosum and irradiated at 4 Gy, 6 Gy and 8 Gy. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT assay and the absorbance was measured at 570 nm in a Beckman Counter reader. Cisplatin, standard chemotherapy, was used as positive control. The use of Erythroxylum suberosum extracts showed a possible radiosensitizing effect in vitro for head and neck cancer. The cytotoxicity effect in the cell lines was not selective and it is very similar to the effect of standard chemotherapy. The aqueous extract of Erythroxylum suberosum, combined with radiotherapy was the most cytotoxic extract to oral and hypopharynx carcinomas.

  2. Boosting Sensitivity in Liquid Chromatography-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Product Ion Analysis of Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Kitajima, Mariko; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    In metabolomics, the analysis of product ions in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is noteworthy to chemically assign structural information. However, the development of relevant analytical methods are less advanced. Here, we developed a method to boost sensitivity in liquid chromatography-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-tandem mass spectrometry analysis (MS/MS boost analysis). To verify the MS/MS boost analysis, both quercetin and uniformly labeled (13)C quercetin were analyzed, revealing that the origin of the product ions is not the instrument, but the analyzed compounds resulting in sensitive product ions. Next, we applied this method to the analysis of monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs). The comparative analyses of MIAs having indole basic skeleton (ajmalicine, catharanthine, hirsuteine, and hirsutine) and oxindole skeleton (formosanine, isoformosanine, pteropodine, isopteropodine, rhynchophylline, isorhynchophylline, and mitraphylline) identified 86 and 73 common monoisotopic ions, respectively. The comparative analyses of the three pairs of stereoisomers showed more than 170 common monoisotopic ions in each pair. This method was also applied to the targeted analysis of MIAs in Catharanthus roseus and Uncaria rhynchophylla to profile indole and oxindole compounds using the product ions. This analysis is suitable for chemically assigning features of the metabolite groups, which contributes to targeted metabolome analysis.

  3. Dynamic flux cartography of hairy roots primary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, M; Perrier, M; Jolicoeur, M

    2007-01-01

    A dynamic model for plant cell and hairy root primary metabolism is presented. The model includes nutrient uptake (Pi, sugars, nitrogen sources), the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways, the TCA cycle, amino acid biosynthesis, respiratory chain, biosynthesis of cell building blocks (structural hexoses, organic acids, lipids, and organic phosphated molecules). The energy shuttles (ATP, ADP) and cofactors (NAD/H, NADP/H) are also included. The model describes the kinetics of 44 biochemical reactions (fluxes) of the primary metabolism of plant cells and includes 41 biochemical species (metabolites, nutrients, biomass components). Multiple Michaelis-Menten type kinetics are used to describe biochemical reaction rates. Known regulatory phenomena on metabolic pathways are included using sigmoid switch functions. A visualization framework showing fluxes and metabolite concentrations over time is presented. The visualization of fluxes and metabolites is used to analyze simulation results from Catharanthus roseus hairy root 50 d batch cultures. The visualization of the metabolic system allows analyzing split ratios between pathways and flux time-variations. For carbon metabolism, the cells were observed to have relatively high and stable fluxes for the central carbon metabolism and low and variable fluxes for anabolic pathways. For phosphate metabolism, a very high free intracellular Pi turnover rate was observed with higher flux variations than for the carbon metabolism. Nitrogen metabolism also exhibited large flux variations. The potential uses of the model are also discussed.

  4. Evaluation of the Larvicidal Efficacy of Five Indigenous Weeds against an Indian Strain of Dengue Vector, Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aarti; Kumar, Sarita; Tripathi, Pushplata

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Aedes aegypti, dengue fever mosquito, is primarily associated with the transmission of dengue and chikungunya in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The present investigations were carried out to assess the larvicidal efficiency of five indigenous weeds against Ae. aegypti. Methods. The 1,000 ppm hexane and ethanol extracts prepared from the leaves and stem of five plants (Achyranthes aspera, Cassia occidentalis, Catharanthus roseus, Lantana camara, and Xanthium strumarium) were screened for their larvicidal activity against early fourth instars of dengue vector. The extracts which could cause 80–100% mortality were further investigated for their efficacy. Results. The preliminary screening established the efficacy of hexane extracts as compared to the ethanol extracts. Further investigations revealed the highest larvicidal potential of A. aspera extracts exhibiting LC50 value of 82.555 ppm and 68.133 ppm, respectively. Further, their leaf extracts showed 5–85.9% higher larvicidal activity and stem extracts exhibited 0.23- to 0.85-fold more efficiency than the other four extracts. Conclusion. The present investigations suggest the possible use of A. aspera as an ideal ecofriendly, larvicidal agent for the control of dengue vector, Ae. aegypti. Future studies are, however, required to explore and identify the bioactive component involved and its mode of action. PMID:26941996

  5. Virus-induced gene silencing in Rauwolfia species.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Cyrielle; Lafontaine, Florent; Sepúlveda, Liuda Johana; Carqueijeiro, Ines; Courtois, Martine; Lanoue, Arnaud; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Besseau, Sébastien; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Papon, Nicolas; Atehortúa, Lucia; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Clastre, Marc; St-Pierre, Benoit; Oudin, Audrey; Courdavault, Vincent

    2017-01-24

    Elucidation of the monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis has recently progressed in Apocynaceae through the concomitant development of transcriptomic analyses and reverse genetic approaches performed by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). While most of these tools have been primarily adapted for the Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus), the VIGS procedure has scarcely been used on other Apocynaceae species. For instance, Rauwolfia sp. constitutes a unique source of specific and valuable monoterpene indole alkaloids such as the hypertensive reserpine but are also well recognized models for studying alkaloid metabolism, and as such would benefit from an efficient VIGS procedure. By taking advantage of a recent modification in the inoculation method of the Tobacco rattle virus vectors via particle bombardment, we demonstrated that the biolistic-mediated VIGS approach can be readily used to silence genes in both Rauwolfia tetraphylla and Rauwolfia serpentina. After establishing the bombardment conditions minimizing injuries to the transformed plantlets, gene downregulation efficiency was evaluated at approximately a 70% expression decrease in both species by silencing the phytoene desaturase encoding gene. Such a gene silencing approach will thus constitute a critical tool to identify and characterize genes involved in alkaloid biosynthesis in both of these prominent Rauwolfia species.

  6. GAME9 regulates the biosynthesis of steroidal alkaloids and upstream isoprenoids in the plant mevalonate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Pablo D.; Sonawane, Prashant D.; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Dewangan, Veena; Weithorn, Efrat; Tal, Lior; Meir, Sagit; Rogachev, Ilana; Malitsky, Sergey; Giri, Ashok P.; Goossens, Alain; Burdman, Saul; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are cholesterol-derived molecules produced by solanaceous species. They contribute to pathogen defence but are toxic to humans and considered as anti-nutritional compounds. Here we show that GLYCOALKALOID METABOLISM 9 (GAME9), an APETALA2/Ethylene Response Factor, related to regulators of alkaloid production in tobacco and Catharanthus roseus, controls SGA biosynthesis. GAME9 knockdown and overexpression in tomato and potato alters expression of SGAs and upstream mevalonate pathway genes including the cholesterol biosynthesis gene STEROL SIDE CHAIN REDUCTASE 2 (SSR2). Levels of SGAs, C24-alkylsterols and the upstream mevalonate and cholesterol pathways intermediates are modified in these plants. Δ(7)-STEROL-C5(6)-DESATURASE (C5-SD) in the hitherto unresolved cholesterol pathway is a direct target of GAME9. Transactivation and promoter-binding assays show that GAME9 exerts its activity either directly or cooperatively with the SlMYC2 transcription factor as in the case of the C5-SD gene promoter. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of SGA biosynthesis and means for manipulating these metabolites in crops. PMID:26876023

  7. Experimental Evidence and In Silico Identification of Tryptophan Decarboxylase in Citrus Genus.

    PubMed

    De Masi, Luigi; Castaldo, Domenico; Pignone, Domenico; Servillo, Luigi; Facchiano, Angelo

    2017-02-11

    Plant tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) converts tryptophan into tryptamine, precursor of indolealkylamine alkaloids. The recent finding of tryptamine metabolites in Citrus plants leads to hypothesize the existence of TDC activity in this genus. Here, we report for the first time that, in Citrus x limon seedlings, deuterium labeled tryptophan is decarboxylated into tryptamine, from which successively deuterated N,N,N-trimethyltryptamine is formed. These results give an evidence of the occurrence of the TDC activity and the successive methylation pathway of the tryptamine produced from the tryptophan decarboxylation. In addition, with the aim to identify the genetic basis for the presence of TDC, we carried out a sequence similarity search for TDC in the Citrus genomes using as a probe the TDC sequence reported for the plant Catharanthus roseus. We analyzed the genomes of both Citrus clementina and Citrus sinensis, available in public database, and identified putative protein sequences of aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase. Similarly, 42 aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase sequences from 23 plant species were extracted from public databases. Potential sequence signatures for functional TDC were then identified. With this research, we propose for the first time a putative protein sequence for TDC in the genus Citrus.

  8. Co-overexpression of geraniol-10-hydroxylase and strictosidine synthase improves anti-cancer drug camptothecin accumulation in Ophiorrhiza pumila

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lijie; Ni, Xiaoling; Ji, Qian; Teng, Xiaojuan; Yang, Yanru; Wu, Chao; Zekria, David; Zhang, Dasheng; Kai, Guoyin

    2015-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) belongs to a group of monoterpenoidindole alkaloids (TIAs) and its derivatives such as irinothecan and topothecan have been widely used worldwide for the treatment of cancer, giving rise to rapidly increasing market demands. Genes from Catharanthus roseus encoding strictosidine synthase (STR) and geraniol 10-hydroxylase (G10H), were separately and simultaneously introduced into Ophiorrhiza pumila hairy roots. Overexpression of individual G10H (G lines) significantly improved CPT production with respect to non-transgenic hairy root cultures (NC line) and single STR overexpressing lines (S lines), indicating that G10H plays a more important role in stimulating CPT accumulation than STR in O. pumila. Furthermore, co-overexpression of G10H and STR genes (SG Lines) caused a 56% increase on the yields of CPT compared to NC line and single gene transgenic lines, showed that simultaneous introduction of G10H and STR can produce a synergistic effect on CPT biosynthesis in O. pumila. The MTT assay results indicated that CPT extracted from different lines showed similar anti-tumor activity, suggesting that transgenic O. pumila hairy root lines could be an alternative approach to obtain CPT. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the enhancement of CPT production in O. pumila employing a metabolic engineering strategy. PMID:25648209

  9. Nonradioactive Screening Method for Isolation of Disease-Specific Probes To Diagnose Plant Diseases Caused by Mycoplasmalike Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ing-Ming; Davis, Robert E.; DeWitt, Natalie D.

    1990-01-01

    DNA fragments of tomato big bud (BB) mycoplasmalike organism (MLO) in diseased periwinkle plants (Catharanthus roseus L.) were cloned to pSP6 plasmid vectors and amplified in Escherichia coli JM83. A nonradioactive method was developed and used to screen for MLO-specific recombinants. Cloned DNA probes were prepared by nick translation of the MLO recombinant plasmids by using biotinylated nucleotides. The probes all hybridized with nucleic acid from BB MLO-infected, but not healthy, plants. Results from dot hybridization analyses indicated that several MLOs, e.g., those of Italian tomato big bud, periwinkle little leaf, and clover phyllody, are closely related to BB MLO. The Maryland strain of aster yellows and maize bushy stunt MLOs are also related to BB MLO. Among the remaining MLOs used in this study, Vinca virescence and elm yellows MLOs may be very distantly related, if at all, to BB MLO. Potato witches' broom, clover proliferation, ash yellows, western X, and Canada X MLOs are distantly related to BB MLO. Southern hybridization analyses revealed that BB MLO contains extrachromosomal DNA that shares sequence homologies with extrachromosomal DNAs from aster yellows and periwinkle little leaf MLOs. Images PMID:16348195

  10. GAME9 regulates the biosynthesis of steroidal alkaloids and upstream isoprenoids in the plant mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Pablo D; Sonawane, Prashant D; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Dewangan, Veena; Weithorn, Efrat; Tal, Lior; Meir, Sagit; Rogachev, Ilana; Malitsky, Sergey; Giri, Ashok P; Goossens, Alain; Burdman, Saul; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-02-15

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are cholesterol-derived molecules produced by solanaceous species. They contribute to pathogen defence but are toxic to humans and considered as anti-nutritional compounds. Here we show that GLYCOALKALOID METABOLISM 9 (GAME9), an APETALA2/Ethylene Response Factor, related to regulators of alkaloid production in tobacco and Catharanthus roseus, controls SGA biosynthesis. GAME9 knockdown and overexpression in tomato and potato alters expression of SGAs and upstream mevalonate pathway genes including the cholesterol biosynthesis gene STEROL SIDE CHAIN REDUCTASE 2 (SSR2). Levels of SGAs, C24-alkylsterols and the upstream mevalonate and cholesterol pathways intermediates are modified in these plants. Δ(7)-STEROL-C5(6)-DESATURASE (C5-SD) in the hitherto unresolved cholesterol pathway is a direct target of GAME9. Transactivation and promoter-binding assays show that GAME9 exerts its activity either directly or cooperatively with the SlMYC2 transcription factor as in the case of the C5-SD gene promoter. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of SGA biosynthesis and means for manipulating these metabolites in crops.

  11. Comprehensive protein-based artificial microRNA screens for effective gene silencing in plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Feng; Chung, Hoo Sun; Niu, Yajie; Bush, Jenifer; McCormack, Matthew; Sheen, Jen

    2013-05-01

    Artificial microRNA (amiRNA) approaches offer a powerful strategy for targeted gene manipulation in any plant species. However, the current unpredictability of amiRNA efficacy has limited broad application of this promising technology. To address this, we developed epitope-tagged protein-based amiRNA (ETPamir) screens, in which target mRNAs encoding epitope-tagged proteins were constitutively or inducibly coexpressed in protoplasts with amiRNA candidates targeting single or multiple genes. This design allowed parallel quantification of target proteins and mRNAs to define amiRNA efficacy and mechanism of action, circumventing unpredictable amiRNA expression/processing and antibody unavailability. Systematic evaluation of 63 amiRNAs in 79 ETPamir screens for 16 target genes revealed a simple, effective solution for selecting optimal amiRNAs from hundreds of computational predictions, reaching ∼100% gene silencing in plant cells and null phenotypes in transgenic plants. Optimal amiRNAs predominantly mediated highly specific translational repression at 5' coding regions with limited mRNA decay or cleavage. Our screens were easily applied to diverse plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana, tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), sunflower (Helianthus annuus), Catharanthus roseus, maize (Zea mays) and rice (Oryza sativa), and effectively validated predicted natural miRNA targets. These screens could improve plant research and crop engineering by making amiRNA a more predictable and manageable genetic and functional genomic technology.

  12. Enhanced camptothecin production by ethanol addition in the suspension culture of the endophyte, Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, Aarthi; Srivastava, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Ethanolic extract of a non-camptothecin producing plant, Catharanthus roseus when added in the suspension culture of the endophyte Fusarium solani known to produce camptothecin, resulted in enhanced production of camptothecin by 10.6-fold in comparison to that in control (2.8 μg/L). Interestingly, addition of pure ethanol (up to 5% v/v) in the suspension culture of F. solani resulted in maximum enhancement in camptothecin production (up to 15.5-fold) from that obtained in control. In the presence of ethanol, a reduced glucose uptake (by ∼ 40%) and simultaneous ethanol consumption (up to 9.43 g/L) was observed during the cultivation period (14 days). Also, the total NAD level and the protein content in the biomass increased by 3.7- and 1.9-fold, respectively, in comparison to that in control. The study indicates a dual role of ethanol, presumably as an elicitor and also as a carbon/energy source, leading to enhanced biomass and camptothecin production.

  13. Dimethylallyl pyrophosphate is not the committed precursor of isopentenyl pyrophosphate during terpenoid biosynthesis from 1-deoxyxylulose in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Arigoni, D; Eisenreich, W; Latzel, C; Sagner, S; Radykewicz, T; Zenk, M H; Bacher, A

    1999-02-16

    Cell cultures of Catharanthus roseus were supplied with [2-13C, 3-2H]-deoxyxylulose or [2-13C,4-2H]1-deoxyxylulose. Lutein and chlorophylls were isolated from the cell mass, and hydrolysis of the chlorophyll mixtures afforded phytol. Isotope labeling patterns of phytol and lutein were determined by 2H NMR and 1H,2H-decoupled 13C NMR. From the data it must be concluded that the deuterium atom in position 3 of deoxyxylulose was incorporated into both isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate with a rate of 75% (with respect to the internal 13C label). The detected stereochemical signature implies that the label is located preferentially in the (E)-hydrogen atom of IPP. This preferential labeling, in turn, rules out dimethylallyl pyrophosphate as the compulsory precursor of IPP. In the experiment with [2-13C, 4-2H]1-deoxyxylulose, the 13C label was efficiently transferred to the terpenoids whereas the 2H label was completely washed out, most probably after IPP formation as a consequence of the isomerization and elongation process. In addition, the data cast light on the stereochemical course of the dehydrogenation and cyclization steps involved in the biosynthesis of lutein.

  14. Boosting Sensitivity in Liquid Chromatography–Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance–Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Product Ion Analysis of Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Kitajima, Mariko; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    In metabolomics, the analysis of product ions in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is noteworthy to chemically assign structural information. However, the development of relevant analytical methods are less advanced. Here, we developed a method to boost sensitivity in liquid chromatography–Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance–tandem mass spectrometry analysis (MS/MS boost analysis). To verify the MS/MS boost analysis, both quercetin and uniformly labeled 13C quercetin were analyzed, revealing that the origin of the product ions is not the instrument, but the analyzed compounds resulting in sensitive product ions. Next, we applied this method to the analysis of monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs). The comparative analyses of MIAs having indole basic skeleton (ajmalicine, catharanthine, hirsuteine, and hirsutine) and oxindole skeleton (formosanine, isoformosanine, pteropodine, isopteropodine, rhynchophylline, isorhynchophylline, and mitraphylline) identified 86 and 73 common monoisotopic ions, respectively. The comparative analyses of the three pairs of stereoisomers showed more than 170 common monoisotopic ions in each pair. This method was also applied to the targeted analysis of MIAs in Catharanthus roseus and Uncaria rhynchophylla to profile indole and oxindole compounds using the product ions. This analysis is suitable for chemically assigning features of the metabolite groups, which contributes to targeted metabolome analysis. PMID:26734034

  15. Conserved Roles of CrRLK1L Receptor-Like Kinases in Cell Expansion and Reproduction from Algae to Angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Trigo, Sergio; Gray, Julie E.; Smith, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are regulators of plant development through allowing cells to sense their extracellular environment. They facilitate detection of local endogenous signals, in addition to external biotic and abiotic stimuli. The Catharanthus roseus RLK1-like (CrRLK1L) protein kinase subfamily, which contains FERONIA, plays a central role in regulating fertilization and in cell expansion mechanisms such as cell elongation and tip growth, as well as having indirect links to plant–pathogen interactions. Several components of CrRLK1L signaling pathways have been identified, including an extracellular ligand, coreceptors, and downstream signaling elements. The presence and abundance of the CrRLK1L proteins in the plant kingdom suggest an origin within the Streptophyta lineage, with a notable increase in prevalence in the seeded land plants. Given the function of the sole CrRLK1L protein in a charophycean alga, the possibility of a conserved role in detection and/or regulation of cell wall integrity throughout the Strephtophytes is discussed. Orthologs of signaling pathway components are also present in extant representatives of non-vascular land plants and early vascular land plants including the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, the moss Physcomitrella patens and the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. Deciphering the roles in development of the CrRLK1L protein kinases in early diverging land plants will provide insights into their ancestral function, furthering our understanding of this diversified subfamily of receptors in higher plants. PMID:27621737

  16. Expression of a synthetic gene encoding P2 ribonuclease from the extreme thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus in mesophylic hosts.

    PubMed

    Fusi, P; Grisa, M; Mombelli, E; Consonni, R; Tortora, P; Vanoni, M

    1995-02-27

    This work reports the molecular cloning and expression of a synthetic gene encoding P2, a 7-kDa ribonuclease (RNase) previously isolated in our laboratory from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus [Fusi et al., Eur. J. Biochem. 211 (1993) 305-310]. The P2-encoding synthetic gene was expressed in E. coli and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recombinant (re-) protein was produced to approx. 1.5% of the total protein content in S. cerevisiae using the galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter and to 3% (tac/lac tandem promoters) or 6.5% (T7 promoter) in E. coli as judged by immunological and biochemical criteria. E. coli-produced P2 was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity through a one-step procedure, i.e., DEAE-Sephacel chromatography at pH 9.3. S. cerevisiae-produced P2 additionally required filtration through a Centricon-10 microconcentrator to obtain the same purity. The re-P2 was found to be indistinguishable from the Su. solfataricus enzyme on the basis of heat stability, pH optimum and RNA digestion pattern. Furthermore, monodimensional nuclear magnetic resonance showed that the E. coli- and Su. solfataricus-produced enzymes were structurally identical, the only exceptions being that Lys4 and Lys6 were not methylated in the re-enzyme, thus showing that lysine methylation does not play a role in P2 thermostabilization.

  17. Isolation of Mesophyll Protoplasts from Mediterranean Woody Plants for the Study of DNA Integrity under Abiotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Kuzminsky, Elena; Meschini, Roberta; Terzoli, Serena; Pavani, Liliana; Silvestri, Cristian; Choury, Zineb; Scarascia-Mugnozza, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses have considerable negative impact on Mediterranean plant ecosystems and better comprehension of the genetic control of response and adaptation of trees to global changes is urgently needed. The single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay could be considered a good estimator of DNA damage in an individual eukaryotic cell. This method has been mainly employed in animal tissues, because the plant cell wall represents an obstacle for the extraction of nuclei; moreover, in Mediterranean woody species, especially in the sclerophyll plants, this procedure can be quite difficult because of the presence of sclerenchyma and hardened cells. On the other hand, these plants represent an interesting material to be studied because of the ability of these plants to tolerate abiotic stress. For instance, holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) has been selected as the model plant to identify critical levels of O3 for Southern European forests. Consequently, a quantitative method for the evaluation of cell injury of leaf tissues of this species is required. Optimal conditions for high-yield nuclei isolation were obtained by using protoplast technology and a detailed description of the method is provided and discussed. White poplar (Populus alba L.) was used as an internal control for protoplast isolation. Such a method has not been previously reported in newly fully developed leaves of holm oak. This method combined with SCGE assay represents a new tool for testing the DNA integrity of leaf tissues in higher plants under stress conditions.

  18. Isolation of Mesophyll Protoplasts from Mediterranean Woody Plants for the Study of DNA Integrity under Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminsky, Elena; Meschini, Roberta; Terzoli, Serena; Pavani, Liliana; Silvestri, Cristian; Choury, Zineb; Scarascia-Mugnozza, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses have considerable negative impact on Mediterranean plant ecosystems and better comprehension of the genetic control of response and adaptation of trees to global changes is urgently needed. The single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay could be considered a good estimator of DNA damage in an individual eukaryotic cell. This method has been mainly employed in animal tissues, because the plant cell wall represents an obstacle for the extraction of nuclei; moreover, in Mediterranean woody species, especially in the sclerophyll plants, this procedure can be quite difficult because of the presence of sclerenchyma and hardened cells. On the other hand, these plants represent an interesting material to be studied because of the ability of these plants to tolerate abiotic stress. For instance, holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) has been selected as the model plant to identify critical levels of O3 for Southern European forests. Consequently, a quantitative method for the evaluation of cell injury of leaf tissues of this species is required. Optimal conditions for high-yield nuclei isolation were obtained by using protoplast technology and a detailed description of the method is provided and discussed. White poplar (Populus alba L.) was used as an internal control for protoplast isolation. Such a method has not been previously reported in newly fully developed leaves of holm oak. This method combined with SCGE assay represents a new tool for testing the DNA integrity of leaf tissues in higher plants under stress conditions. PMID:27574524

  19. The ORCA2 transcription factor plays a key role in regulation of the terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) pathway leads to the production of pharmaceutically important drugs, such as the anticancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Unfortunately, these drugs are produced in trace amounts, causing them to be very costly. To increase production of these drugs, an improved understanding of the TIA regulatory pathway is needed. Towards this end, transgenic Catharanthus roseus hairy roots that overexpress the ORCA2 TIA transcriptional activator were generated and characterized. Results Transcriptional profiling experiments revealed that overexpression of ORCA2 results in altered expression of key genes from the indole and terpenoid pathways, which produce precursors for the TIA pathway, and from the TIA pathway itself. In addition, metabolite-profiling experiments revealed that overexpression of ORCA2 significantly affects the levels of several TIA metabolites. ORCA2 overexpression also causes significant increases in transcript levels of several TIA regulators, including TIA transcriptional repressors. Conclusions Results presented here indicate that ORCA2 plays a critical role in regulation of TIA metabolism. ORCA2 regulates expression of key genes from both feeder pathways, as well as the genes (STR and SGD) encoding the enzymes that catalyze the first two steps in TIA biosynthesis. ORCA2 may play an especially important role in regulation of the downstream branches of the TIA pathway, as it regulates four out of five genes characterized from this part of the pathway. Regulation of TIA transcriptional repressors by ORCA2 may provide a mechanism whereby increases in TIA metabolite levels in response to external stimuli are transient and limited in magnitude. PMID:24099172

  20. Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of a Madagascar Periwinkle Root-Specific Minovincinine-19-Hydroxy-O-Acetyltransferase1

    PubMed Central

    Laflamme, Pierre; St-Pierre, Benoit; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2001-01-01

    The terminal steps in the biosynthesis of the monoterpenoid indole alkaloids vindoline and minovincinine are catalyzed by separate acetyl coenzyme A-dependent O-acetyltransferases in Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus G. Don). Two genes were isolated that had 63% nucleic acid identity and whose deduced amino acid sequences were 78% identical. Active enzymes that were expressed as recombinant His-tagged proteins in Escherichia coli were named minovincinine-19-O-acetyltransferase (MAT) and deacetylvindoline-4-O-acetyltransferase (DAT) because they catalyzed the 19-O-acetylation of indole alkaloids such as minovincinine and hörhammericine and the 4-O-acetylation of deacetylvindoline, respectively. Kinetic studies showed that the catalytic efficiency of recombinant MAT (rMAT) was very poor compared with that of recombinant DAT (rDAT), whose turnover rates for Acetyl-coenzyme A and deacetylvindoline were approximately 240- and 10,000-fold greater than those of rMAT. Northern-blot analyses showed that MAT is expressed in cortical cells of the root tip, whereas DAT is only expressed in specialized idioblast and laticifer cells within light exposed tissues like leaves and stems. The coincident expression of trytophan decarboxylase, strictosidine synthase, and MAT within root cortical cells suggests that the entire pathway for the biosynthesis of tabersonine and its substituted analogs occurs within these cells. The ability of MAT to catalyze the 4-O-acetylation of deacetylvindoline with low efficiency suggests that this enzyme, rather than DAT, is involved in vindoline biosynthesis within transformed cell and root cultures, which accumulate low levels of this alkaloid under certain circumstances. PMID:11154328

  1. Function of AP2/ERF Transcription Factors Involved in the Regulation of Specialized Metabolism in Ophiorrhiza pumila Revealed by Transcriptomics and Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Udomsom, Nirin; Rai, Amit; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Okuyama, Jun; Imai, Ryosuke; Mori, Tetsuya; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Saito, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Mami

    2016-01-01

    The hairy roots (HR) of Ophiorrhiza pumila produce camptothecin (CPT), a monoterpenoid indole alkaloid used as a precursor in the synthesis of chemotherapeutic drugs. O. pumila HR culture is considered as a promising alternative source of CPT, however, the knowledge about the biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanism is still limited. In this study, five genes that encode AP2/ERF transcription factors, namely OpERF1–OpERF5, were isolated from HR of O. pumila. Phylogenetic analysis of AP2/ERF protein sequences suggested the close evolutionary relationship of OpERF1 with stress-responsive ERF factors in Arabidopsis and of OpERF2 with ERF factors reported to regulate alkaloid production, such as ORCA3 in Catharanthus roseus, NIC2 locus ERF in tobacco, and JRE4 in tomato. We generated the transgenic HR lines of O. pumila, ERF1i and ERF2i, in which the expression of OpERF1 and OpERF2, respectively, was suppressed using RNA interference technique. The transcriptome and metabolome of these suppressed HR were analyzed for functional characterization of OpERF1 and OpERF2. Although significant changes were not observed in the metabolome, including CPT and related compounds, the suppression of OpERF2 resulted in reduced expression of genes in the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate and secologanin-strictosidine pathways, which supply a precursor, strictosidine, for CPT biosynthesis. Furthermore, while it was not conclusive for OpERF1, enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes in the suppressed HR showed that the gene ontology terms for oxidation-reduction, presumably involved in secondary metabolite pathways, were enriched in the ERF2i downregulated gene set. These results suggest a positive role of OpERF2 in regulating specialized metabolism in O. pumila. PMID:28018397

  2. Medicinal plants used for treatment of diabetes by the Marakh sect of the Garo tribe living in Mymensingh district, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahmatullah, Mohammed; Azam, Md Nur Kabidul; Khatun, Zubaida; Seraj, Syeda; Islam, Farhana; Rahman, Md Atiqur; Jahan, Sharmin; Aziz, Md Shah

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an endocrinological disorder arising from insulin deficiency or due to ineffectiveness of the insulin produced by the body. This results in high blood glucose and with time, to neurological, cardiovascular, retinal and renal complications. It is a debilitating disease and affects the population of every country of the world. Around 200 million people of the world suffer from this disease and this figure is projected to rise to 300 million in the coming years. The disease cannot be cured with allopathic medicine as the drugs used do not restore normal glucose homeostasis and moreover have side-effects. On the other hand, traditional medicinal practitioners of various countries claim to cure diabetes or at least alleviate the major symptoms and progression of this disease through administration of medicinal plants. The Garos are an indigenous community of Bangladesh, who still follow their traditional medicinal practices. Their traditional medicinal formulations contain a number of plants, which they claim to be active antidiabetic agents. Since observation of indigenous practices have led to discovery of many modern drugs, it was the objective of the present study to conduct a survey among the Marakh sect of the Garos residing in Mymensingh district of Bangladesh to find out the medicinal plants that they use for treatment of diabetes. It was found that the tribal practitioners of the Marakh sect of the Garos use twelve medicinal plants for treatment of diabetes. These plants were Lannea coromandelica, Alstonia scholaris, Catharanthus roseus, Enhydra fluctuans, Terminalia chebula, Coccinia grandis, Momordica charantia, Cuscuta reflexa, Phyllanthus emblica, Syzygium aqueum, Drynaria quercifolia, and Clerodendrum viscosum. A review of the scientific literature demonstrated that almost all the plants used by the Garo tribal practitioners have reported antidiabetic and/or antioxidant properties and have enormous potential for possible development of

  3. Biochemical Evaluation of the Decarboxylation and Decarboxylation-Deamination Activities of Plant Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylases*

    PubMed Central

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P.; Liu, Pingyang; Ding, Haizhen; Harich, Kim; Gillaspy, Glenda; Li, Jianyong

    2013-01-01

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) enzymes are capable of catalyzing either decarboxylation or decarboxylation-deamination on various combinations of aromatic amino acid substrates. These two different activities result in the production of arylalkylamines and the formation of aromatic acetaldehydes, respectively. Variations in product formation enable individual enzymes to play different physiological functions. Despite these catalytic variations, arylalkylamine and aldehyde synthesizing AAADs are indistinguishable without protein expression and characterization. In this study, extensive biochemical characterization of plant AAADs was performed to identify residues responsible for differentiating decarboxylation AAADs from aldehyde synthase AAADs. Results demonstrated that a tyrosine residue located on a catalytic loop proximal to the active site of plant AAADs is primarily responsible for dictating typical decarboxylase activity, whereas a phenylalanine at the same position is primarily liable for aldehyde synthase activity. Mutagenesis of the active site phenylalanine to tyrosine in Arabidopsis thaliana and Petroselinum crispum aromatic acetaldehyde synthases primarily converts the enzymes activity from decarboxylation-deamination to decarboxylation. The mutation of the active site tyrosine to phenylalanine in the Catharanthus roseus and Papaver somniferum aromatic amino acid decarboxylases changes the enzymes decarboxylation activity to a primarily decarboxylation-deamination activity. Generation of these mutant enzymes enables the production of unusual AAAD enzyme products including indole-3-acetaldehyde, 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, and phenylethylamine. Our data indicates that the tyrosine and phenylalanine in the catalytic loop region could serve as a signature residue to reliably distinguish plant arylalkylamine and aldehyde synthesizing AAADs. Additionally, the resulting data enables further insights into the mechanistic roles of active site

  4. [Effect of fucoidan on the ultrastructure of mesophyll cells of Datura stramonium L. and accumulation of potato virus X in them].

    PubMed

    Lapshina, L A; Reunov, A V; Nagorskaia, V P; Zviagintseva, T N; Shevchenko, N M

    2009-01-01

    Influence of fucoidan from brown alga Fucus evanescens C. Ag. on the development of infection induced by potato virus X (PVX) in Datura stramonium leaves was studied. It as been shown that 24 h after the treatment of the leaves with fucoidan and following infection of them with PVX the accumulation of virus particles in infected cells during early infection period was substantially less than that in untreated control. Using ultrastructure-morphometric analysis, it has been established that fucoidan treatment increases at protein-synthesizing capability of cells (nucleolus dimension, amount of mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes become increased). At the same time, the fucoidan treatment causes some activation of lytic compartment which leads to destruction of virus particles and, therefore, might be considered as one of fucoidan-dependent protective mechanisms limiting virus accumulation in cells. Fucoidan stimulation of the formation of PVX-specific laminated structures capable of virus particles binding is possibly another induced antiviral cell mechanism, preventing from virus reproduction and transposition.

  5. [Callose content in cell walls of leaf epidermis and mesophyll in Alisma plantago-aquatica L. plants growing in different conditions of water supply].

    PubMed

    Ovruts'ka, I I

    2014-01-01

    The relative callose content in Alisma plantago-aquatica leaves has been studied at the phases of budding and flowering--fruiting. The callose content in cell walls was shown to vary depending on the type of tissue, phase of ontogenesis and of water supply.

  6. Carbon dioxide diffusion across stomata and mesophyll and photo-biochemical processes as affected by growth CO2 and phosphorus nutrition in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrients such as phosphorus availability may exert a major control over plant response to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (CO2), which is projected to double by the end of 21st century. Elevated CO2 may overcome the diffusional limitation to photosynthesis posed by stomata and mesop...

  7. To feed or not to feed: plant factors located in the epidermis, mesophyll, and sieve elements influence pea aphid's ability to feed on legume species.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Alexander; Rosenberger, Daniel; Niebergall, Martin; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Kunert, Grit

    2013-01-01

    The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris), a legume specialist, encompasses at least 11 genetically distinct sympatric host races. Each host race shows a preference for a certain legume species. Six pea aphid clones from three host races were used to localize plant factors influencing aphid probing and feeding behavior on four legume species. Aphid performance was tested by measuring survival and growth. The location of plant factors influencing aphid probing and feeding was determined using the electrical penetration graph (EPG) technique. Every aphid clone performed best on the plant species from which it was originally collected, as well as on Vicia faba. On other plant species, clones showed intermediate or poor performance. The most important plant factors influencing aphid probing and feeding behavior were localized in the epidermis and sieve elements. Repetitive puncturing of sieve elements might be relevant for establishing phloem feeding, since feeding periods appear nearly exclusively after these repetitive sieve element punctures. A combination of plant factors influences the behavior of pea aphid host races on different legume species and likely contributes to the maintenance of these races.

  8. CO2 enrichment and leaf aging down-regulate both maximum rates of Rubisco carboxylation and mesophyll conductance in SoyFACE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several soybean cultivars were grown under 2 levels of CO2, the ambient level of 370 microbar versus the elevated level of 550 microbar, in SoyFACE (Free Air CO2 Enrichment) in 2007. The responses of CO2 assimilation to CO2, leaf chlorophyll fluorescence, leaf contents of chlorophyll and carotenoids...

  9. Use of the response of photosynthesis to oxygen to estimate mesophyll conductance to carbon dioxide in water-stressed soybean leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several types of evidence indicate that there is a significant resistance to the movement of carbon dioxide from the substomatal air space to the site of fixation in the chloroplasts and that the resistance may vary with temperature, carbon dioxide concentration and water stress. Methods of estimat...

  10. Changes in mesophyll element distribution and phytometabolite contents involved in fluoride tolerance of the arid gypsum-tolerant plant species Atractylis serratuloides Sieber ex Cass. (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Boukhris, Asma; Laffont-Schwob, Isabelle; Rabier, Jacques; Salducci, Marie-Dominique; El Kadri, Lefi; Tonetto, Alain; Tatoni, Thierry; Chaieb, Mohamed

    2015-05-01

    Atractylis serratuloides is an abundant native spiny species that grows in the surroundings of superphosphate factories in Tunisia. This plant species is adapted to arid environments and tolerates a high level of fluoride pollution in soils. The aim of this study was to better understand the physiological mechanisms of fluoride tolerance of this species, comparing the fluoride-contaminated sites of Gabes and Skhira with the reference site of Smara. Results demonstrated the involvement of leaf element and phytometabolite balances in the in situ response of A. serrulatoides to fluoride. Calcium, sulphur and magnesium were differently distributed between the sites of Gabes and Smara in all plant organs. No specific tissue fluorine accumulation in root, stem and leaf, even in the most contaminated site at Gabes, was detected by EDAX mapping. Lower anthocyan and flavonol levels but enhanced nitrogen balance index were found in A. serrulatoides leaves from Gabes compared to the two other sites. A. serratuloides appeared as a fluoride excluder and its tolerance involved calcium interactions with fluoride. Moreover, an occurrence of dark septate endophytes and arbuscular mycorhizal fungi in root systems of A. serratuloides was reported for the first time, and these symbioses were present but low at all sites. We suggest the use of this plant species for fluoride-polluted soil stabilization.

  11. Comparison of plasma vitamin A and E, copper and zinc levels in free-ranging and captive greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) and their relation to pododermatitis.

    PubMed

    Wyss, F; Wolf, P; Wenker, C; Hoby, S; Schumacher, V; Béchet, A; Robert, N; Liesegang, A

    2014-12-01

    Pododermatitis is a worldwide problem in captive flamingos. Studies in domestic poultry showed that nutrition is a possible influencing factor for pododermatitis. Vitamin A and E, copper and zinc levels were analysed in two different diets (diet 1 = in-house mix and diet 2 = commercial diet) and in plasma of captive greater flamingos fed these diets and compared to those of free-ranging greater flamingos. Results were analysed with respect to type and severity of foot lesions of the individuals from the different groups. Juvenile and subadult/adult captive flamingos on diet 1 showed various types and severities of foot lesions, whereas no foot lesions were found at the time of blood sampling in juvenile captive flamingos on diet 2. Juvenile captive flamingos on diet 1 had significantly lower plasma zinc levels than juvenile captive flamingos on diet 2 and juvenile free-ranging flamingos; data were also lower than reference ranges for flamingos, poultry and cranes. There were no significant differences in plasma vitamin A, vitamin E, copper or zinc levels between animals with different types of foot lesions or with different severity scores. Shortly after the change to diet 2 (fed to juvenile captive flamingos that did not show any foot lesion), the flooring of the outdoor water pools was covered with fine granular sand. Because both factors (nutrition and flooring) were changed during the same evaluation period, it cannot be concluded which factor contributed in what extent to the reduction of foot lesions. While it is assumed that low plasma zinc levels identified in the group of juvenile captive flamingos on diet 1 were not directly responsible for foot lesions observed in these animals, they may have played a role in altering the skin integrity of the feet and predisposing them to pododermatitis.

  12. Interannual variations in feeding frequencies and food quality of greater flamingo chicks (Phoenicopterus roseus): evidence from plasma chemistry and effects on body condition.

    PubMed

    Amat, Juan A; Hortas, Francisco; Arroyo, Gonzalo M; Rendón, Miguel A; Ramírez, José M; Rendón-Martos, Manuel; Pérez-Hurtado, Alejandro; Garrido, Araceli

    2007-06-01

    Greater flamingos in southern Spain foraged in areas distant from a breeding site, spending 4-6 days in foraging areas between successive visits to the colony to feed their chicks. During four years, we took blood samples from chicks to ascertain whether there were interannual variations in several blood parameters, indicative of food quality and feeding frequencies. When the chicks were captured, 20-31% of them had their crops empty, indicating that not all chicks were fed daily. Additional evidence of variations in feeding frequencies was obtained from a principal component analysis (PCA) on plasma chemistry values, which also indicated that there were annual variations in the quality of food received by chicks. The association of cholesterol and glucose with some PC axes indicated that some chicks were experiencing fasting periods. Of all plasma metabolites considered, cholesterol was the best one to predict body condition. Greater flamingo chicks experiencing longer fasting intervals, as suggested by higher plasma levels of cholesterol, were in lower body condition.

  13. Ethnomedicines used in Trinidad and Tobago for reproductive problems

    PubMed Central

    Lans, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    Background Throughout history women have tried to control or enhance their fertility using herbal remedies, with various levels of societal support. Caribbean folk medicine has been influenced by European folk medicine, either through the early Spanish and French settlers or through the continuous immigration of Spanish-speaking peoples from Venezuela. Some folk uses are ancient and were documented by Galen and Pliny the Elder. Methods Thirty respondents, ten of whom were male were interviewed from September 1996 to September 2000. The respondents were obtained by snowball sampling, and were found in thirteen different sites, 12 in Trinidad (Paramin, Talparo, Sangre Grande, Mayaro, Carapichaima, Kernahan, Newlands, Todd's Road, Arima, Guayaguayare, Santa Cruz, Port of Spain and Siparia) and one in Tobago (Mason Hall). Snowball sampling was used because there was no other means of identifying respondents and to cover the entire islands. The validation of the remedies was conducted with a non-experimental method. Results Plants are used for specific problems of both genders. Clusea rosea, Urena sinuata and Catharanthus roseus are used for unspecified male problems. Richeria grandis and Parinari campestris are used for erectile dysfunction. Ageratum conyzoides, Scoparia dulcis, Cucurbita pepo, Cucurbita maxima, Gomphrena globosa and Justicia pectoralis are used for prostate problems. The following plants are used for childbirth and infertility: Mimosa pudica, Ruta graveolens, Abelmoschus moschatus, Chamaesyce hirta, Cola nitida, Ambrosia cumanenesis, Pilea microphylla, Eryngium foetidum, Aristolochia rugosa, Aristolochia trilobata, Coleus aromaticus, Laportea aestuans and Vetiveria zizanioides. The following plants are used for menstrual pain and unspecified female complaints: Achyranthes indica, Artemisia absinthium, Brownea latifolia, Eleutherine bulbosa, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Eupatorium macrophyllum, Justicia secunda, Parthenium hysterophorus, Wedelia trilobata

  14. Current status of plant products reported to inhibit sperm.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, N R; Waller, D P

    1982-06-01

    This report reviews research on plant-derived agents that prevent sperm production if taken orally by the male or that incapacitate or kill sperm on contact if used vaginally by the female. It would be of great value to develop fertility inhibitors that are totally selective for reproductive systems and enzymes, and there is a possibility that a plant-derived drug may have this effect. Plants that have been studied for their fertility inhibiting effects in the male include: Aristolochia indica L. (Aristolochiaceae); Azadirachta indica A. Juss (Meliaceae); Balanites roxburghii Planch. (Zygophyllaceae); Calotropis procera (Ait) R.Br. (Asclepiadaceae); Carica papaya L. (Caricaceae); Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don (Apocynaceae); Dieffenbachia seguine (Jacquin) Schott. (Araceae); Ecaballium elaterium A. Richard (Cucurbitaceae); Gossypium species (Malvaceae); Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. (Malvaceae); Hippophae salicifolia D. Don (Elaeagnaceae); Leucaena glauca (L.) Benth. (Leguminosae); Lonicera ciliosa Poir. (Caprifoliaceae); Lupinus termis Forsk. (Leguminosae); Malvaviscus conzattii Greenm. (Malvaceae); Momordica charantia L. (Curcurbitaceae); Ocimum sanctum L. (Labiatae); Prunus emarginata Walp. (Rosaceae); and Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal (Solanaceae). A large number of plants have been randomly selected and screened for spermicidal activity "in vitro" and several seem promising. Those species found to be active and the nature of the active principle(s), when known, are presented in a table as are plant-derived chemical substances of known or partially known structure reported to be spermicidal "in vitro." Plants warrant systematic study as potential sources of sperm-agglutinating compounds. Of 1600 Indian plants tested, 90 showed positive semen coagulating properties. There seems to be a lack of correlation among experimental results obtained by different groups of investigators, between data obtained "in vitro" and "in vivo," and between experimental results and

  15. Building a model: developing genomic resources for common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) with low coverage genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Milkweeds (Asclepias L.) have been extensively investigated in diverse areas of evolutionary biology and ecology; however, there are few genetic resources available to facilitate and compliment these studies. This study explored how low coverage genome sequencing of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.) could be useful in characterizing the genome of a plant without prior genomic information and for development of genomic resources as a step toward further developing A. syriaca as a model in ecology and evolution. Results A 0.5× genome of A. syriaca was produced using Illumina sequencing. A virtually complete chloroplast genome of 158,598 bp was assembled, revealing few repeats and loss of three genes: accD, clpP, and ycf1. A nearly complete rDNA cistron (18S-5.8S-26S; 7,541 bp) and 5S rDNA (120 bp) sequence were obtained. Assessment of polymorphism revealed that the rDNA cistron and 5S rDNA had 0.3% and 26.7% polymorphic sites, respectively. A partial mitochondrial genome sequence (130,764 bp), with identical gene content to tobacco, was also assembled. An initial characterization of repeat content indicated that Ty1/copia-like retroelements are the most common repeat type in the milkweed genome. At least one A. syriaca microread hit 88% of Catharanthus roseus (Apocynaceae) unigenes (median coverage of 0.29×) and 66% of single copy orthologs (COSII) in asterids (median coverage of 0.14×). From this partial characterization of the A. syriaca genome, markers for population genetics (microsatellites) and phylogenetics (low-copy nuclear genes) studies were developed. Conclusions The results highlight the promise of next generation sequencing for development of genomic resources for any organism. Low coverage genome sequencing allows characterization of the high copy fraction of the genome and exploration of the low copy fraction of the genome, which facilitate the development of molecular tools for further study of a target species and its relatives

  16. Antiplasmodial potential of medicinal plant extracts from Malaiyur and Javadhu hills of South India.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Chinnaperumal; Kaushik, Naveen Kumar; Mohanakrishnan, Dinesh; Elango, Gandhi; Bagavan, Asokan; Zahir, Abdul Abduz; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Sahal, Dinkar

    2012-08-01

    The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum with resistance to chloroquine (CQ), the safest and cheapest anti-malarial drug, coupled with the increasing cost of alternative drugs especially in developing countries have necessitated the urgent need to tap the potential of plants for novel anti-malarials. The present study investigates the anti-malarial activity of the methanolic extracts of 13 medicinal plants from the Malaiyur and Javadhu hills of South India against blood stage CQ-sensitive (3D7) and CQ-resistant (INDO) strains of P. falciparum in culture using the fluorescence-based SYBR Green I assay. Sorbitol-synchronized parasites were incubated under normal culture conditions at 2% hematocrit and 1% parasitemia in the absence or presence of increasing concentrations of plant extracts. CQ and artemisinin were used as positive controls, while 0.4% DMSO was used as the negative control. The cytotoxic effects of extracts on host cells were assessed by functional assay using HeLa cells cultured in RPMI containing 10% fetal bovine serum, 0.21% sodium bicarbonate and 50 μg/mL gentamycin (complete medium). Plant extracts (bark methanol extracts of Annona squamosa (IC(50), 30 μg/mL), leaf extracts of Ocimum gratissimum (IC(50), 32 μg/mL), Ocimum tenuiflorum (IC(50), 31 μg/mL), Solanum torvum (IC(50), 31 μg/mL) and Justicia procumbens (IC(50), 63 μg/mL), showed moderate activity. The leaf extracts of Aristolochia indica (IC(50), 10 μg/mL), Cassia auriculata (IC(50), 14 μg/mL), Chrysanthemum indicum (IC(50), 20 μg/mL) and Dolichos biflorus (IC(50), 20 μg/mL) showed promising activity and low activity was observed in the flower methanol extracts of A. indica , leaf methanol extract of Catharanthus roseus, and Gymnema sylvestre (IC(50), >100 μg/mL). These four extracts exhibited promising IC(50) (μg/mL) of 17, 24, 19 and 24 respectively also against the CQ resistant INDO strain of P. falciparum. The high TC(50) in mammalian cell cytotoxicity assay and

  17. Potent α-amylase inhibitory activity of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Indian medicinal plants used in the Ayurvedic traditional system to treat diabetes are a valuable source of novel anti-diabetic agents. Pancreatic α-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post-prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. In this study, seventeen Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for α-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and evaluate their inhibitory potential on PPA (porcine pancreatic α-amylase). Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the lead extracts was performed in order to determine the probable constituents. Methods Analysis of the 126 extracts, obtained from 17 plants (Aloe vera (L.) Burm.f., Adansonia digitata L., Allium sativum L., Casia fistula L., Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don., Cinnamomum verum Persl., Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt., Linum usitatisumum L., Mangifera indica L., Morus alba L., Nerium oleander L., Ocimum tenuiflorum L., Piper nigrum L., Terminalia chebula Retz., Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers., Trigonella foenum-graceum L., Zingiber officinale Rosc.) for PPA inhibition was initially performed qualitatively by starch-iodine colour assay. The lead extracts were further quantified with respect to PPA inhibition using the chromogenic DNSA (3, 5-dinitrosalicylic acid) method. Phytochemical constituents of the extracts exhibiting≥ 50% inhibition were analysed qualitatively as well as by GC-MS (Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry). Results Of the 126 extracts obtained from 17 plants, 17 extracts exhibited PPA inhibitory potential to varying degrees (10%-60.5%) while 4 extracts showed low inhibition (< 10%). However, strong porcine pancreatic amylase inhibitory activity (> 50%) was obtained with 3 isopropanol extracts. All these 3 extracts exhibited concentration dependent inhibition with IC50 values, viz., seeds of Linum usitatisumum (540 μgml-1), leaves of Morus alba (1440

  18. Inconsistency of mesophyll conductance estimate causes the inconsistency for the estimates of maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation among the linear, rectangular, and non-rectangular hyperbola biochemical models of leaf...

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The responses of CO2 assimilation to [CO2] (A/Ci) were investigated at two developmental stages (R5 and R6) and in several soybean cultivars grown under two levels of [CO2], the ambient level of 370 µbar versus the elevated level of 550 µbar. The A/Ci data were analyzed and compared using various cu...

  19. Bacterial diversity analysis of Huanglongbing pathogen-infected citrus, using PhyloChip and 16S rRNA gene clone library sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar Sagaram, U.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Trivedi, P.; Andersen, G.L.; Lu, S.-E.; Wang, N.

    2009-03-01

    plants (5,27,40). Tatineni and colleagues discovered that the HLB bacteria were unevenly distributed in phloem of bark tissue, vascular tissue of the leaf midrib, roots, and different floral and fruit parts (43). Unsuccessful attempts in culturing the pathogen are notably hampering efforts to understand its biology and pathogenesis mechanism. Using a modified Koch's Postulates approach, Jagoueix and colleagues were able to re-infect periwinkle plants from a mixed microbial community harvested from HLB diseased plants (25). Emergence of the disease in otherwise healthy plants led to the conclusion that HLB was associated with Candidatus Liberibacter sp. based on its 16S rDNA sequence (18,25). Currently, three species of the pathogen are recognized from trees with HLB disease based on 16S rDNA sequence: Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), Ca. Liberibacter africanus (Laf), and Ca. Liberibacter americanus (Lam); Las is the most prevalent species among HLB diseased trees (5,12,18,25,44). Las is naturally transmitted to citrus by the psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, and can be artificially transmitted by grafting from citrus to citrus and dodder (Cuscuta campestris) to periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum Xanthi) (5). Based on current research regarding the associations of Liberibacter in planta there is not enough evidence to implicate Liberibacter as the definitive causal agent of HLB disease due to its resistance to cultivation in vitro. It is possible that HLB disease may be the result of complex etiology where Liberibacter interacts with other endophytic bacteria. However, there is not enough evidence regarding its association(s) in planta to make this conclusion, nor is it known whether associated microbial communities play a role in expression of pathogenic traits. The main objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that other bacteria besides Ca. Liberibacter spp. are associated with citrus greening disease. The differences between the

  20. 50 CFR Appendix A to Part 622 - Species Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Part 622—Species Tables Table 1 of Appendix A to Part 622—Caribbean Coral Reef Resources I... Millepora spp., Fire corals Family Stylasteridae Stylaster roseus, Rose lace corals B. Anthozoans—Class Anthozoa 1. Soft corals—Order Alcyonacea Family Anthothelidae Erythropodium caribaeorum,...

  1. Neoechinorhynchus (Neoechinorhynchus) chimalapasensis n. sp. (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from the freshwater fish Awaous banana (Valenciennes) (Gobiidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo; Caspeta-Mandujano, Juan Manuel; Martínez-Ramírez, Emilio

    2010-03-01

    Neoechinorhynchus (Neoechinorhynchus) chimalapasensis n. sp. (Eoacanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) is described from the intestine of Awaous banana (Valenciennes) (Pisces: Gobiidae) collected in the Río Negro, a tributary in the upper Río Coatzacoalcos basin, Santa María Chimalapa, Oaxaca State, Mexico. It is the third species of Neoechinorhynchus Stiles & Hassall, 1905 described from Mexican freshwater fishes, although 36 other species are known from freshwater fishes in the Americas. Like four other species of Neoechinorhynchus from freshwater fishes in North America and Mexico, N. (N.) limi Muzzall & Buckner, 1982, (N.) rutili (Müller, 1780) Stiles & Hassall, 1905, N. (N.) salmonis Ching, 1984 and N. (N.) roseus Salgado-Maldonado, 1978, males and females of the new species are less than 20 mm in length, lack conspicuous sexual dimorphism in size, have a small proboscis of about 0.1 mm in length with the largest hooks being the anteriormost, about 30-90 microm in length and of equal size, and have subequal lemnisci, larger than the proboscis receptacle but still relatively short and, in males, generally restricted to a position considerably anterior to the testes. The new species is closest to N. (N.) roseus, but it is distinguished from it by having: (1) a slightly larger cylindrical proboscis with almost parallel sides versus a globular proboscis with a rounded tip which is shorter and somewhat wider in N. (N.) roseus; (2) smaller but robust anterior proboscis hooks that do not reach the equatorial level or extend beyond the hooks of the middle circle as in N. (N.) roseus; and (3) the female gonopore situated ventrally subterminal, as opposed to being a significant distance anteriorly to the posterior extremity in N. (N.) roseus.

  2. Protein bodies from the cotyledons of Cytisus scoparius L. (Link). Ultrastructure, isolation, and subunit composition of albumin, legumin and vicilin.

    PubMed

    Citharel, L; Citharel, J

    1985-09-01

    The structure of protein bodies differs in the upper and lower parts of the cotyledons of mature seeds of Cytisus scoparius L. The palisade-mesophyll cells contain essentially homogeneous protein bodies, without globoids, but the protein bodies of the spongy-mesophyll cells are heterogeneous, with numerous globoids. Albumins, legumins and vicilins were selectively extracted from isolated protein bodies and their subunits separated by SDS-PAGE, under non-reducing and reducing conditions.

  3. Bioaugmentation with hydrolytic microbes to improve the anaerobic biodegradability of lignocellulosic agricultural residues.

    PubMed

    Tsapekos, P; Kougias, P G; Vasileiou, S A; Treu, L; Campanaro, S; Lyberatos, G; Angelidaki, I

    2017-03-12

    Bioaugmentation with hydrolytic microbes was applied to improve the methane yield of bioreactors fed with agricultural wastes. The efficiency of Clostridium thermocellum and Melioribacter roseus to degrade lignocellulosic matter was evaluated in batch and continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). Results from batch assays showed that C. thermocellum enhanced the methane yield by 34%. A similar increase was recorded in CSTR during the bioaugmentation period; however, at steady-state the effect was noticeably lower (7.5%). In contrast, the bioaugmentation with M. roseus did not promote markedly the anaerobic biodegradability, as the methane yield was increased up to 10% in batch and no effect was shown in CSTR. High-throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was used to assess the effect of bioaugmentation strategies on bacterial and archaeal populations. The microbial analysis revealed that both strains were not markedly resided into biogas microbiome. Additionally, the applied strategies did not alter significantly the microbial communities.

  4. Alkaline Bohr effect of bird hemoglobins: the case of the flamingo.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Maria Teresa; Manconi, Barbara; Podda, Gabriella; Olianas, Alessandra; Pellegrini, Mariagiuseppina; Castagnola, Massimo; Messana, Irene; Giardina, Bruno

    2007-08-01

    The hemoglobin (Hb) substitution His-->Gln at position alpha89, very common in avian Hbs, is considered to be responsible for the weak Bohr effect of avian Hbs. Phoenicopterus ruber ruber is one of the few avian Hbs that possesses His at alpha89, but it has not been functionally characterized yet. In the present study the Hb system of the greater flamingo (P. ruber roseus), a bird that lives in Mediterranean areas, has been investigated to obtain further insight into the role played by the alpha89 residue in determining the strong reduction of the Bohr effect. Functional analysis of the two purified Hb components (HbA and HbD) of P. ruber roseus showed that both are characterized by high oxygen affinity in the absence of organic phosphates, a strong modulating effect of inositol hexaphosphate, and a reduced Bohr effect. Indeed, in spite of the close phylogenetic relationship between the two flamingo species, structural analysis based on tandem mass spectrometry of the alpha(A) chain of P. ruber roseus Hb showed that a Gln residue is present at position alpha89.

  5. Structural assessment of the impact of environmental constraints on Arabidopsis thaliana leaf growth: a 3D approach.

    PubMed

    Wuyts, Nathalie; Massonnet, Catherine; Dauzat, Myriam; Granier, Christine

    2012-09-01

    Light and soil water content affect leaf surface area expansion through modifications in epidermal cell numbers and area, while effects on leaf thickness and mesophyll cell volumes are far less documented. Here, three-dimensional imaging was applied in a study of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf growth to determine leaf thickness and the cellular organization of mesophyll tissues under moderate soil water deficit and two cumulative light conditions. In contrast to surface area, thickness was highly conserved in response to water deficit under both low and high cumulative light regimes. Unlike epidermal and palisade mesophyll tissues, no reductions in cell number were observed in the spongy mesophyll; cells had rather changed in volume and shape. Furthermore, leaf features of a selection of genotypes affected in leaf functioning were analysed. The low-starch mutant pgm had very thick leaves because of unusually large palisade mesophyll cells, together with high levels of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance. By means of an open stomata mutant and a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase overexpressor, it was shown that stomatal conductance does not necessarily have a major impact on leaf dimensions and cellular organization, pointing to additional mechanisms for the control of CO(2) diffusion under high and low stomatal conductance, respectively.

  6. The absence of phloem loading in willow leaves

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Robert; Medville, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Willow (Salix babylonica L.) is representative of a large group of plants that have extensive plasmodesmatal connections between minor vein phloem and adjoining cells. Because plasmodesmata provide a diffusion pathway for small molecules, it is unclear how sucrose could be loaded from the mesophyll into the phloem against a concentration gradient. In the studies reported here, the minor vein phloem of willow leaves plasmolyzed in approximately the same concentration of osmoticum as the mesophyll. Sucrose concentrations in mesophyll cells were greater than those reported in the literature for aphid stylet exudate from willow stems. Calculated turgor pressures in the mesophyll and minor vein phloem were greater than turgor reported in the literature for sieve elements in the stems of willow. Images of minor veins were not obtained in autoradiographs when attached leaves, or leaf pieces, were provided with 14CO2 or [14C]sucrose. Therefore, no evidence could be found for accumulation of sucrose against a concentration gradient in the minor vein phloem of willow. In these leaves, the mesophyll apparently acts as the “source” for long distance transport of sugar. The mechanism of translocation in willow, and the evolution of phloem loading, are discussed. PMID:9751789

  7. Effects of reduced carbonic anhydrase activity on CO2 assimilation rates in Setaria viridis: a transgenic analysis.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Hannah L; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Sharwood, Robert E; Covshoff, Sarah; Evans, John R; Furbank, Robert T; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    In C4 species, the major β-carbonic anhydrase (β-CA) localized in the mesophyll cytosol catalyses the hydration of CO2 to HCO3(-), which phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase uses in the first step of C4 photosynthesis. To address the role of CA in C4 photosynthesis, we generated transgenic Setaria viridis depleted in β-CA. Independent lines were identified with as little as 13% of wild-type CA. No photosynthetic defect was observed in the transformed lines at ambient CO2 partial pressure (pCO2). At low pCO2, a strong correlation between CO2 assimilation rates and CA hydration rates was observed. C(18)O(16)O isotope discrimination was used to estimate the mesophyll conductance to CO2 diffusion from the intercellular air space to the mesophyll cytosol (gm) in control plants, which allowed us to calculate CA activities in the mesophyll cytosol (Cm). This revealed a strong relationship between the initial slope of the response of the CO2 assimilation rate to cytosolic pCO2 (ACm) and cytosolic CA activity. However, the relationship between the initial slope of the response of CO2 assimilation to intercellular pCO2 (ACi) and cytosolic CA activity was curvilinear. This indicated that in S. viridis, mesophyll conductance may be a contributing limiting factor alongside CA activity to CO2 assimilation rates at low pCO2.

  8. Cell-Specific Vacuolar Calcium Storage Mediated by CAX1 Regulates Apoplastic Calcium Concentration, Gas Exchange, and Plant Productivity in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Simon J.; Athman, Asmini; Schreiber, Andreas W.; Baumann, Ute; Moller, Isabel; Cheng, Ning-Hui; Stancombe, Matthew A.; Hirschi, Kendal D.; Webb, Alex A.R.; Burton, Rachel; Kaiser, Brent N.; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Leigh, Roger A.

    2011-01-01

    The physiological role and mechanism of nutrient storage within vacuoles of specific cell types is poorly understood. Transcript profiles from Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells differing in calcium concentration ([Ca], epidermis <10 mM versus mesophyll >60 mM) were compared using a microarray screen and single-cell quantitative PCR. Three tonoplast-localized Ca2+ transporters, CAX1 (Ca2+/H+-antiporter), ACA4, and ACA11 (Ca2+-ATPases), were identified as preferentially expressed in Ca-rich mesophyll. Analysis of respective loss-of-function mutants demonstrated that only a mutant that lacked expression of both CAX1 and CAX3, a gene ectopically expressed in leaves upon knockout of CAX1, had reduced mesophyll [Ca]. Reduced capacity for mesophyll Ca accumulation resulted in reduced cell wall extensibility, stomatal aperture, transpiration, CO2 assimilation, and leaf growth rate; increased transcript abundance of other Ca2+ transporter genes; altered expression of cell wall–modifying proteins, including members of the pectinmethylesterase, expansin, cellulose synthase, and polygalacturonase families; and higher pectin concentrations and thicker cell walls. We demonstrate that these phenotypes result from altered apoplastic free [Ca2+], which is threefold greater in cax1/cax3 than in wild-type plants. We establish CAX1 as a key regulator of apoplastic [Ca2+] through compartmentation into mesophyll vacuoles, a mechanism essential for optimal plant function and productivity. PMID:21258004

  9. Plant Nuclei Move to Escape Ultraviolet-Induced DNA Damage and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Kosei; Hidema, Jun; Tamura, Kentaro; Takagi, Shingo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2016-02-01

    A striking feature of plant nuclei is their light-dependent movement. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf mesophyll cells, the nuclei move to the side walls of cells within 1 to 3 h after blue-light reception, although the reason is unknown. Here, we show that the nuclear movement is a rapid and effective strategy to avoid ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damages. Mesophyll nuclei were positioned on the cell bottom in the dark, but sudden exposure of these cells to UVB caused severe DNA damage and cell death. The damage was remarkably reduced in both blue-light-treated leaves and mutant leaves defective in the actin cytoskeleton. Intriguingly, in plants grown under high-light conditions, the mesophyll nuclei remained on the side walls even in the dark. These results suggest that plants have two strategies for reducing UVB exposure: rapid nuclear movement against acute exposure and nuclear anchoring against chronic exposure.

  10. Phloem restriction of viroids in three citrus hosts is overcome by grafting with Etrog citron: potential involvement of a translocatable factor.

    PubMed

    Bani-Hashemian, Seyed Mehdi; Pensabene-Bellavia, Giovanni; Duran-Vila, Nuria; Serra, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Viroid systemic spread involves cell-to-cell movement from initially infected cells via plasmodesmata, long-distance movement within the phloem and again cell-to-cell movement to invade distal tissues including the mesophyll. Citrus exocortis viroid (CEVd), hop stunt viroid, citrus bent leaf viroid, citrus dwarfing viroid, citrus bark cracking viroid and citrus viroid V remained phloem restricted when singly infecting Citrus karna, Citrus aurantium and Poncirus trifoliata, but not Etrog citron, where they were additionally detected in mesophyll protoplasts. However, when CEVd-infected C. karna was side-grafted with Etrog citron--with the resulting plants being composed of a C. karna stock and an Etrog citron branch--the viroid was detected in mesophyll protoplasts of the former, thus indicating that the ability of Etrog citron to support viroid invasion of non-vascular tissues was transferred to the stock. Further results suggest that a translocatable factor from Etrog citron mediates this viroid trafficking.

  11. [Effects of local induction of ipt-gene in roots on cytokinins content in leaf cells tobacco plants].

    PubMed

    Vysotskaia, L B; Akhiiarova, G P; Sharapova, G V; Dedova, M A; Veselov, S Iu; Zaĭtsev, D Iu; Kudoiarova, G P

    2014-01-01

    Identification of cytokinins in differentiated leaf cells has received little attention. We have carried out immunohistochemical localization of cytokinins in leaves of transgenic tobacco plants in which the level of increased due to induced in their roots the expression of ipt-gene controlling cytokinin synthesis. Immuno-labeling of cytokinins with the help of antibodies raised against zeatin riboside was characteristic of mesophyll cells. The label was localized in cytoplasm adjacent to cell walls and was absent in vacuoles. Immunohistochemical staining also revealed the presence of cytokinins in guard cells. Induction of cytokinin synthesis enhanced the immunohistochemical staining of both mesophyll cells and guard cells, which was accompanied by elevated stomatal conductance. The possibility of a direct effect of cytokinins on stomatal conductance and their indirect influence through photosynthesis in the mesophyll cells is discussed.

  12. Effect of heat shock on ultrastructure and calcium distribution in Lavandula pinnata L. glandular trichomes.

    PubMed

    Huang, S S; Kirchoff, B K; Liao, J P

    2013-02-01

    The effects of heat shock (HS) on the ultrastructure and calcium distribution of Lavandula pinnata secretory trichomes are examined using transmission electron microscopy and potassium antimonate precipitation. After 48-h HS at 40°C, plastids become distorted and lack stroma and osmiophilic deposits, the cristae of the mitochondria become indistinct, the endoplasmic reticulum acquires a chain-like appearance with ribosomes prominently attached to the lamellae, and the plasma and organelle membranes become distorted. Heat shock is associated with a decrease in calcium precipitates in the trichomes, while the number of precipitates increases in the mesophyll cells. Prolonged exposure to elevated calcium levels may be toxic to the mesophyll cells, while the lack of calcium in the glands cell may deprive them of the normal protective advantages of elevated calcium levels. The inequality in calcium distribution may result not only from uptake from the transpiration stream, but also from redistribution of calcium from the trichomes to the mesophyll cells.

  13. Functional role of red (retro)-carotenoids as passive light filters in the leaves of Buxus sempervirens L.: increased protection of photosynthetic tissues?

    PubMed

    Hormaetxe, Koldobika; Becerril, José María; Fleck, Isabel; Pintó, Marta; García-Plazaola, José Ignacio

    2005-10-01

    Red (retro)-carotenoids accumulate in chloroplasts of Buxus sempervirens leaves during the process of winter leaf acclimation. As a result of their irregular presence, different leaf colour phenotypes can be found simultaneously in the same location. Five different colour phenotypes (green, brown, red, orange, and yellow), with a distinct pattern of pigment distribution and concentration, have been characterized. Leaf reddening due to the presence of anthocyanins or carotenoids, is a process frequently observed in plant species under photoinhibitory situations. Two main hypotheses have been proposed to explain the function of such colour change: antioxidative protection exerted by red-coloured molecules, and green light filtering. The potential photoprotective role of red (retro-) carotenoids as light filters was tested in Buxus sempervirens leaves. In shade leaves of this species the upper (adaxial) mesophyll of the lamina was replaced by the equivalent upper part of a different colour phenotype. These hybrid leaves were exposed to a photoinhibitory treatment in order to compare the photoprotective effect exerted by adaxial parts of phenotypes with a different proportion of red (retro)-carotenoids in the lower mesophyll of a shade leaf. The results indicated that the presence of red (retro)-carotenoids in the upper mesophyll did not increase photoprotection of the lower mesophyll when compared with chlorophyll, and the best protection was achieved by an upper green layer. This was due to the fact that the extent of photoinhibition was proportional to the amount of red light transmitted by the upper mesophyll and/or to the chlorophyll pool located above. These results do not exclude a protective function of carotenoids in the upper leaf layer, but imply that, at least under the conditions of this experiment, the accumulation of red pigments in the outer leaf layers does not increase photoprotection in the lower mesophyll.

  14. Isolation and characterization of microorganisms from instruments used by pedicurists operating within Lagos metropolis, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, I A; Osidipe, O O

    2004-12-01

    Eight bacterial and five fungal species were isolated from swab samples taken from instruments used by pedicurists operating at three different sites in Lagos, Nigeria. The bacterial isolates included Micrococcus luteus, Micrococcus roseus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Hafnia spp, Shigella spp, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus spp. The five fungal isolates were identified as Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Mucor spp, Trichophyton spp and Candida albicans. The presence of these microorganisms, some of which are pathogenic, is an indication that pedicurists could be contributing towards the spread of skin and nail infections within the Lagos metropolis.

  15. [Antimicrobial properties of bee preparations in ointment form].

    PubMed

    Postoienko, V O; Senchuhova, N A; Postoienko, O M; Patyka, V P

    2004-01-01

    High antimicrobial activity apiphytopreparation in the form of the ointments containing pine turpentine, different concentration of propolis (from 4 to 20 %), honey and carotene oil from carrots (ointment N 4) has been. While testing by the method of diffusion in agar all the studied apiphytopreparation suppressed growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Micrococcus luteus, M. roseus. This effect increased with propolis content increase in the content of ointments. Bee honey and carotene oil intensified their antimicrobial activity. The latter was caused by the action of phenolic compounds, ether oils and other biologically active substances--the apiculture and vegetative raw material.

  16. ANGUSTIFOLIA3 signaling coordinates proliferation between clonally distinct cells in leaves.

    PubMed

    Kawade, Kensuke; Horiguchi, Gorou; Usami, Takeshi; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2013-05-06

    Coordinated proliferation between clonally distinct cells via inter-cell-layer signaling largely determines the size and shape of plant organs. Nonetheless, the signaling mechanism underlying this coordination in leaves remains elusive because of a lack of understanding of the signaling molecule (or molecules) involved. ANGUSTIFOLIA3 (AN3, also called GRF-INTERACTING FACTOR1) encodes a putative transcriptional coactivator with homology to human synovial sarcoma translocation protein. AN3 transcripts accumulate in mesophyll cells but are not detectable in leaf epidermal cells. However, we found here that in addition to mesophyll cells, epidermal cells of an3 leaves show defective proliferation. This spatial difference between the accumulation pattern of AN3 transcripts and an3 leaf phenotype is explained by AN3 protein movement across cell layers. AN3 moves into epidermal cells after being synthesized within mesophyll cells and helps control epidermal cell proliferation. Interference with AN3 movement results in abnormal leaf size and shape, indicating that AN3 signaling is indispensable for normal leaf development. AN3 movement does not require type II chaperonin activity, which is needed for movement of some mobile proteins. Taking these findings together, we present a novel model emphasizing the role of mesophyll cells as a signaling source coordinating proliferation between clonally independent leaf cells.

  17. Subcellular concentrations of sugar alcohols and sugars in relation to phloem translocation in Plantago major, Plantago maritima, Prunus persica, and Apium graveolens.

    PubMed

    Nadwodnik, Jan; Lohaus, Gertrud

    2008-04-01

    Sugar and sugar alcohol concentrations were analyzed in subcellular compartments of mesophyll cells, in the apoplast, and in the phloem sap of leaves of Plantago major (common plantain), Plantago maritima (sea plantain), Prunus persica (peach) and Apium graveolens (celery). In addition to sucrose, common plantain, sea plantain, and peach also translocated substantial amounts of sorbitol, whereas celery translocated mannitol as well. Sucrose was always present in vacuole and cytosol of mesophyll cells, whereas sorbitol and mannitol were found in vacuole, stroma, and cytosol in all cases except for sea plantain. The concentration of sorbitol, mannitol and sucrose in phloem sap was 2- to 40-fold higher than that in the cytosol of mesophyll cells. Apoplastic carbohydrate concentrations in all species tested were in the low millimolar range versus high millimolar concentrations in symplastic compartments. Therefore, the concentration ratios between the apoplast and the phloem were very strong, ranging between 20- to 100-fold for sorbitol and mannitol, and between 200- and 2000-fold for sucrose. The woody species, peach, showed the smallest concentration ratios between the cytosol of mesophyll cells and the phloem as well as between the apoplast and the phloem, suggesting a mixture of apoplastic and symplastic phloem loading, in contrast to the herbal plant species (common plantain, sea plantain, celery) which likely exhibit an active loading mode for sorbitol and mannitol as well as sucrose from the apoplast into the phloem.

  18. The impact of long-term CO2 enrichment on sun and shade needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies): photosynthetic performance, needle anatomy and phenolics accumulation.

    PubMed

    Lhotáková, Zuzana; Urban, Otmar; Dubánková, Marianna; Cvikrová, Milena; Tomášková, Ivana; Kubínová, Lucie; Zvára, Karel; Marek, Michal V; Albrechtová, Jana

    2012-06-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst) grown under ambient (365-377 μmol(CO(2)) mol(-1); AC) and elevated (700 μmol(CO(2)) mol(-1); EC) CO(2) concentrations within glass domes with automatically adjustable windows and on an open-air control site were studied after 8 years of treatment. The effect of EC on photosynthesis, mesophyll structure and phenolics accumulation in sun and shade needles was examined. Photosynthetic assimilation and dark respiration rates were measured gasometrically; the structural parameters of mesophyll were determined using confocal microscopy and stereological methods. The contents of total soluble phenolics and lignin were assessed spectrophotometrically, and localizations of different phenolic groups were detected histochemically on needle cross-sections. EC enhanced the light-saturated CO(2) assimilation rate and reduced dark respiration in the current-year needles. No effects of CO(2) enrichment on mesophyll structural parameters were observed. Similarly, the accumulation and localization of phenolics and lignin remained unaffected by EC treatment. Needles differentiated into sun and shade ecotypes in the same manner and to the same extent irrespective of CO(2) treatment. Based on these results, it is apparent that the EC-induced enhancement of photosynthesis is not related to changes in the examined structural parameters of mesophyll and accumulation of phenolic compounds.

  19. Leaf anatomy and ultrastructure of the Crassulacean-acid-metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Balsamo, R A; Uribe, E G

    1988-02-01

    Light-microscopic analysis of leaf clearings of the obligate Crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) species Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perr. has shown the existence of unusual and highly irregular venation patterns. Fifth-order veins exhibit a three-dimensional random orientation with respect to the mesophyll. Minor veins were often observed crossing over or under each other and over and under major veins in the mesophyll. Paraffin sections of mature leaves show tannin cells scattered throughout the mesophyll rather evenly spaced, and a distinct layer of tannin cells below the abaxial epidermis. Scanning electron microscopy showed that bundle-sheath cells are distinct from the surrounding mesophyll in veins of all orders. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated developing sieve-tube elements in expanded leaves. Cytosolic vesicles produced by dictyosomes undergo a diurnal variation in number and were often observed in association with the chloroplasts. These vesicles are an interesting feature of cell ultrastructure of CAM cells and may serve a regulatory role in the diurnal malic-acid fluctuations in this species.

  20. Subcellular concentrations of sugar alcohols and sugars in relation to phloem translocation in Plantago major, Plantago maritima, Prunus persica, and Apium graveolens

    PubMed Central

    Nadwodnik, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Sugar and sugar alcohol concentrations were analyzed in subcellular compartments of mesophyll cells, in the apoplast, and in the phloem sap of leaves of Plantago major (common plantain), Plantago maritima (sea plantain), Prunus persica (peach) and Apium graveolens (celery). In addition to sucrose, common plantain, sea plantain, and peach also translocated substantial amounts of sorbitol, whereas celery translocated mannitol as well. Sucrose was always present in vacuole and cytosol of mesophyll cells, whereas sorbitol and mannitol were found in vacuole, stroma, and cytosol in all cases except for sea plantain. The concentration of sorbitol, mannitol and sucrose in phloem sap was 2- to 40-fold higher than that in the cytosol of mesophyll cells. Apoplastic carbohydrate concentrations in all species tested were in the low millimolar range versus high millimolar concentrations in symplastic compartments. Therefore, the concentration ratios between the apoplast and the phloem were very strong, ranging between 20- to 100-fold for sorbitol and mannitol, and between 200- and 2000-fold for sucrose. The woody species, peach, showed the smallest concentration ratios between the cytosol of mesophyll cells and the phloem as well as between the apoplast and the phloem, suggesting a mixture of apoplastic and symplastic phloem loading, in contrast to the herbal plant species (common plantain, sea plantain, celery) which likely exhibit an active loading mode for sorbitol and mannitol as well as sucrose from the apoplast into the phloem. PMID:18188589

  1. Differential activity of plasma and vacuolar membrane transporters contributes to genotypic differences in salinity tolerance in a Halophyte Species, Chenopodium quinoa.

    PubMed

    Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar; Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Lana; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Zeng, Fanrong; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik; Shabala, Sergey

    2013-04-29

    Halophytes species can be used as a highly convenient model system to reveal key ionic and molecular mechanisms that confer salinity tolerance in plants. Earlier, we reported that quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.), a facultative C3 halophyte species, can efficiently control the activity of slow (SV) and fast (FV) tonoplast channels to match specific growth conditions by ensuring that most of accumulated Na+ is safely locked in the vacuole (Bonales-Alatorre et al. (2013) Plant Physiology). This work extends these finding by comparing the properties of tonoplast FV and SV channels in two quinoa genotypes contrasting in their salinity tolerance. The work is complemented by studies of the kinetics of net ion fluxes across the plasma membrane of quinoa leaf mesophyll tissue. Our results suggest that multiple mechanisms contribute towards genotypic differences in salinity tolerance in quinoa. These include: (i) a higher rate of Na+ exclusion from leaf mesophyll; (ii) maintenance of low cytosolic Na+ levels; (iii) better K+ retention in the leaf mesophyll; (iv) a high rate of H+ pumping, which increases the ability of mesophyll cells to restore their membrane potential; and (v) the ability to reduce the activity of SV and FV channels under saline conditions. These mechanisms appear to be highly orchestrated, thus enabling the remarkable overall salinity tolerance of quinoa species.

  2. The reduced state of the plastoquinone pool is required for chloroplast-mediated stomatal closure in response to calcium stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Hua; He, En-Ming; Chen, Juan; Guo, Ying; Chen, Juan; Liu, Xiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2016-04-01

    Besides their participation in photosynthesis, leaf chloroplasts function in plant responses to stimuli, yet how they direct stimulus-induced stomatal movement remains elusive. Here, we showed that over-reduction of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool by dibromothymoquinone (DBMIB) was closely associated with stomatal closure in plants which required chloroplastic H2O2 generation in the mesophyll. External application of H2 O2 reduced the PQ pool, whereas the cell-permeable reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) reversed the DBMIB-induced over-reduction of the PQ pool and stomatal closure. Mesophyll chloroplasts are key players of extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)o)-induced stomatal closure, but when treated with either 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) or NAC they failed to facilitate Ca(2+)o-induced stomatal closure due to the inhibition of chloroplastic H2 O2 synthesis in mesophyll. Similarly, the Arabidopsis electron transfer chain-related mutants npq4-1, stn7 and cas-1 exhibited diverse responses to Ca(2+)o or DBMIB. Transcriptome analysis also demonstrated that the PQ pool signaling pathway shared common responsive genes with the H2 O2 signaling pathway. These results implicated a mechanism for chloroplast-mediated stomatal closure involving the generation of mesophyll chloroplastic H2O2 based on the reduced state of the PQ pool, which is calcium-sensing receptor (CAS) and LHCII phosphorylation dependent.

  3. Mutation of a chloroplast-targeting signal in Alternanthera mosaic virus TGB3 impairs cell-to-cell movement and eliminates long-distance virus movement.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Vaira, Anna Maria; Bae, Hanhong; Bragg, Jennifer N; Ruzin, Steven E; Bauchan, Gary R; Dienelt, Margaret M; Owens, Robert A; Hammond, John

    2010-08-01

    Cell-to-cell movement of potexviruses requires coordinated action of the coat protein and triple gene block (TGB) proteins. The structural properties of Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) TGB3 were examined by methods differentiating between signal peptides and transmembrane domains, and its subcellular localization was studied by Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression and confocal microscopy. Unlike potato virus X (PVX) TGB3, AltMV TGB3 was not associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, and accumulated preferentially in mesophyll cells. Deletion and site-specific mutagenesis revealed an internal signal VL(17,18) of TGB3 essential for chloroplast localization, and either deletion of the TGB3 start codon or alteration of the chloroplast-localization signal limited cell-to-cell movement to the epidermis, yielding a virus that was unable to move into the mesophyll layer. Overexpression of AltMV TGB3 from either AltMV or PVX infectious clones resulted in veinal necrosis and vesiculation at the chloroplast membrane, a cytopathology not observed in wild-type infections. The distinctive mesophyll and chloroplast localization of AltMV TGB3 highlights the critical role played by mesophyll targeting in virus long-distance movement within plants.

  4. The Arabidopsis minE mutation causes new plastid and FtsZ1 localization phenotypes in the leaf epidermis.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Makoto T; Kojo, Kei H; Kazama, Yusuke; Sasaki, Shun; Abe, Tomoko; Itoh, Ryuuichi D

    2015-01-01

    Plastids in the leaf epidermal cells of plants are regarded as immature chloroplasts that, like mesophyll chloroplasts, undergo binary fission. While mesophyll chloroplasts have generally been used to study plastid division, recent studies have suggested the presence of tissue- or plastid type-dependent regulation of plastid division. Here, we report the detailed morphology of plastids and their stromules, and the intraplastidic localization of the chloroplast division-related protein AtFtsZ1-1, in the leaf epidermis of an Arabidopsis mutant that harbors a mutation in the chloroplast division site determinant gene AtMinE1. In atminE1, the size and shape of epidermal plastids varied widely, which contrasts with the plastid phenotype observed in atminE1 mesophyll cells. In particular, atminE1 epidermal plastids occasionally displayed grape-like morphology, a novel phenotype induced by a plastid division mutation. Observation of an atminE1 transgenic line harboring an AtMinE1 promoter::AtMinE1-yellow fluorescent protein fusion gene confirmed the expression and plastidic localization of AtMinE1 in the leaf epidermis. Further examination revealed that constriction of plastids and stromules mediated by the FtsZ1 ring contributed to the plastid pleomorphism in the atminE1 epidermis. These results illustrate that a single plastid division mutation can have dramatic consequences for epidermal plastid morphology, thereby implying that plastid division and morphogenesis are differentially regulated in epidermal and mesophyll plastids.

  5. Electron transport, pep carboxylase activity, and maximal net co2 assimilation exhibit coordinated and proportional decline with loss of hydraulic conductance during water stress in Zea mays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efforts to improve the photosynthetic performance of species are presently focused on leaf-level traits (e.g., quantum efficiency, mesophyll osmoregulation, stress protein regulation). Here, we emphasize that efforts to improve plant performance in arid environments would benefit from also consider...

  6. Leaf Histology--Two Modern Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    Two methods for examining leaf structure are presented; both methods involve use of "superglue." The first method uses the glue to form a thin, permanent, direct replica of a leaf surface on a microscope slide. The second method uses the glue to examine the three-dimensional structure of spongy mesophyll. (JN)

  7. Interactions of C4 subtype metabolic activities and transport in maize are revealed through the characterization of DCT2 mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    C4 photosynthesis is an elaborate set of metabolic pathways that utilize specialized anatomical and biochemical adaptations to concentrate CO2 around RuBisCO. The activities of the C4 pathways are coordinated between two specialized leaf cell types, mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS), and rely hea...

  8. Morphology of the pre-imaginal stages of Lasioptera Donacis Coutin(Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), a candidate biocontrol agent of giant arundo cane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The larval stages of Lasioptera donacis Coutin consists of three instars, which develop within the mesophyll of the leaf sheaths of Arundo donax (L.) They feed aggregatively on mycelia of an endophytic fungus. The larval instars are similar to other members of the genus except for a three pronged sp...

  9. Phloem Loading in Two Scrophulariaceae Species. What Can Drive Symplastic Flow via Plasmodesmata?1

    PubMed Central

    Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V.; Koroleva, Olga A.; Batashev, Denis R.; Knop, Christian; Tomos, A. Deri; Gamalei, Yuri V.; Heldt, Hans-Walter; Lohaus, Gertrud

    2006-01-01

    To determine the driving forces for symplastic sugar flux between mesophyll and phloem, gradients of sugar concentrations and osmotic pressure were studied in leaf tissues of two Scrophulariaceae species, Alonsoa meridionalis and Asarina barclaiana. A. meridionalis has a typical symplastic configuration of minor-vein phloem, i.e. intermediary companion cells with highly developed plasmodesmal connections to bundle-sheath cells. In A. barclaiana, two types of companion cells, modified intermediary cells and transfer cells, were found in minor-vein phloem, giving this species the potential to have a complex phloem-loading mode. We identified all phloem-transported carbohydrates in both species and analyzed the levels of carbohydrates in chloroplasts, vacuoles, and cytoplasm of mesophyll cells by nonaqueous fractionation. Osmotic pressure was measured in single epidermal and mesophyll cells and in whole leaves and compared with calculated values for phloem sap. In A. meridionalis, a 2-fold concentration gradient for sucrose between mesophyll and phloem was found. In A. barclaiana, the major transported carbohydrates, sucrose and antirrhinoside, were present in the phloem in 22- and 6-fold higher concentrations, respectively, than in the cytoplasm of mesophyll cells. The data show that diffusion of sugars along their concentration gradients is unlikely to be the major mechanism for symplastic phloem loading if this were to occur in these species. We conclude that in both A. meridionalis and A. barclaiana, apoplastic phloem loading is an indispensable mechanism and that symplastic entrance of solutes into the phloem may occur by mass flow. The conditions favoring symplastic mass flow into the phloem are discussed. PMID:16377750

  10. Non-steady-state, non-uniform transpiration rate and leaf anatomy effects on the progressive stable isotope enrichment of leaf water along monocot leaves.

    PubMed

    Ogée, J; Cuntz, M; Peylin, P; Bariac, T

    2007-04-01

    This study focuses on the spatial patterns of transpiration-driven water isotope enrichment (Delta(lw)) along monocot leaves. It has been suggested that these spatial patterns are the result of competing effects of advection and (back-)diffusion of water isotopes along leaf veins and in the mesophyll, but also reflect leaf geometry (e.g. leaf length, interveinal distance) and non-uniform gas-exchange parameters. We therefore developed a two-dimensional model of isotopic leaf water enrichment that incorporates new features, compared with previous models, such as radial diffusion in the xylem, longitudinal diffusion in the mesophyll, non-uniform gas-exchange parameters and non-steady-state effects. The model reproduces well all published measurements of Delta(lw) along monocot leaf blades, except at the leaf tip and given the uncertainties on measurements and model parameters. We show that the longitudinal diffusion in the mesophyll cannot explain the observed reduction in the isotope gradient at the leaf tip. Our results also suggest that the observed differences in Delta(lw) between C(3) and C(4) plants reflect more differences in mesophyll tortuosity rather than in leaf length or interveinal distance. Mesophyll tortuosity is by far the most sensitive parameter and different values are required for different experiments on the same plant species. Finally, using new measurements of non-steady-state, spatially varying leaf water enrichment we show that spatial patterns are in steady state around midday only, just as observed for bulk leaf water enrichment, but can be easily upscaled to the whole leaf level, regardless of their degree of heterogeneity along the leaf.

  11. Vertical leaf mass per area gradient of mature sugar maple reflects both height-driven increases in vascular tissue and light-driven increases in palisade layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Coble, Adam P; Cavaleri, Molly A

    2017-03-03

    A key trait used in canopy and ecosystem function modeling, leaf mass per area (LMA), is influenced by changes in both leaf thickness and leaf density (LMA = Thickness × Density). In tall trees, LMA is understood to increase with height through two primary mechanisms: (i) increasing palisade layer thickness (and thus leaf thickness) in response to light and/or (ii) reduced cell expansion and intercellular air space in response to hydrostatic constraints, leading to increased leaf density. Our objective was to investigate within-canopy gradients in leaf anatomical traits in order to understand environmental factors that influence leaf morphology in a sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marshall) forest canopy. We teased apart the effects of light and height on anatomical traits by sampling at exposed and closed canopies that had different light conditions at similar heights. As expected, palisade layer thickness responded strongly to cumulative light exposure. Mesophyll porosity, however, was weakly and negatively correlated with light and height (i.e., hydrostatic gradients). Reduced mesophyll porosity was not likely caused by limitations on cell expansion; in fact, epidermal cell width increased with height. Palisade layer thickness was better related to LMA, leaf density and leaf thickness than was mesophyll porosity. Vein diameter and fraction of vascular tissue also increased with height and LMA, density and thickness, revealing that greater investment in vascular and support tissue may be a third mechanism for increased LMA with height. Overall, decreasing mesophyll porosity with height was likely due to palisade cells expanding into the available air space and also greater investments in vascular and support tissue, rather than a reduction of cell expansion due to hydrostatic constraints. Our results provide evidence that light influences both palisade layer thickness and mesophyll porosity and indicate that hydrostatic gradients influence leaf vascular and support

  12. In vivo localization of manganese in the hyperaccumulator Gossia bidwillii (Benth.) N. Snow & Guymer (Myrtaceae) by cryo-SEM/EDAX.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Denise R; Batianoff, George N; Baker, Alan J; Woodrow, Ian E

    2006-05-01

    Gossia bidwillii (Myrtaceae) is a manganese (Mn)-hyperaccumulating tree native to subtropical eastern Australia. It typically contains foliar Mn levels in excess of 1% dry weight. However, in G. bidwillii and other Mn-hyperaccumulating species, the cellular and subcellular localization of Mn has not been measured. Quantitative in vivo cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) was used to localize Mn and other elements in tissue collected from mature trees growing in a natural population. Cryo-SEM showed that the leaf mesophyll is differentiated as a double-layer palisade mesophyll above spongy mesophyll. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the palisade and epidermal cells are highly vacuolated. EDAX data were used to estimate in situ vacuolar Mn concentrations of all cell types in fresh cryo-fixed leaf tissues. The highest average vacuolar Mn concentration of over 500 mM was found in the upper-layer palisade mesophyll, while the lowest concentration of around 100 mM was found in the spongy mesophyll. Qualitative in vivo cryo-SEM/EDAX was employed to further investigate the spatial distribution of Mn in fresh leaf tissues and young bark tissue, which was also found to have a high Mn concentration. It is concluded that Mn distribution in G. bidwillii is quantitatively different to metal distribution in other hyperaccumulating species where the highest localized concentrations of these elements occur in non-photosynthmetic tissues such as epidermal cells and associated dermal structures including trichomes and leaf hairs.

  13. Phloem loading in two Scrophulariaceae species. What can drive symplastic flow via plasmodesmata?

    PubMed

    Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V; Koroleva, Olga A; Batashev, Denis R; Knop, Christian; Tomos, A Deri; Gamalei, Yuri V; Heldt, Hans-Walter; Lohaus, Gertrud

    2006-01-01

    To determine the driving forces for symplastic sugar flux between mesophyll and phloem, gradients of sugar concentrations and osmotic pressure were studied in leaf tissues of two Scrophulariaceae species, Alonsoa meridionalis and Asarina barclaiana. A. meridionalis has a typical symplastic configuration of minor-vein phloem, i.e. intermediary companion cells with highly developed plasmodesmal connections to bundle-sheath cells. In A. barclaiana, two types of companion cells, modified intermediary cells and transfer cells, were found in minor-vein phloem, giving this species the potential to have a complex phloem-loading mode. We identified all phloem-transported carbohydrates in both species and analyzed the levels of carbohydrates in chloroplasts, vacuoles, and cytoplasm of mesophyll cells by nonaqueous fractionation. Osmotic pressure was measured in single epidermal and mesophyll cells and in whole leaves and compared with calculated values for phloem sap. In A. meridionalis, a 2-fold concentration gradient for sucrose between mesophyll and phloem was found. In A. barclaiana, the major transported carbohydrates, sucrose and antirrhinoside, were present in the phloem in 22- and 6-fold higher concentrations, respectively, than in the cytoplasm of mesophyll cells. The data show that diffusion of sugars along their concentration gradients is unlikely to be the major mechanism for symplastic phloem loading if this were to occur in these species. We conclude that in both A. meridionalis and A. barclaiana, apoplastic phloem loading is an indispensable mechanism and that symplastic entrance of solutes into the phloem may occur by mass flow. The conditions favoring symplastic mass flow into the phloem are discussed.

  14. Carotenoids in Rhodoplanes species: variation of compositions and substrate specificity of predicted carotenogenesis enzymes.

    PubMed

    Takaichi, Shinichi; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V; Okamura, Keiko; Hiraishi, Akira

    2012-08-01

    Phototrophic bacteria necessarily contain carotenoids for photosynthesis, and accumulate unusual carotenoids in some cases. The carotenoids in all established species of Rhodoplanes (Rpl.), a representative of phototrophic genera, were identified using spectroscopic methods. The major carotenoid was spirilloxanthin in Rpl. roseus and Rpl. serenus, and rhodopin in "Rpl. cryptolactis". Rpl. elegans contained rhodopin, anhydrorhodovibrin, and spirilloxanthin. Rpl. pokkaliisoli contained not only rhodopin but also 1,1'-dihydroxylycopene and 3,4,3',4'-tetrahydrospirilloxanthin. These variations in carotenoid composition suggested that Rpl. roseus and Rpl. serenus had normal substrate specificity of the carotenogenesis enzymes of CrtC (acyclic carotene 1,2-hydratase), CrtD (acyclic carotenoid 3,4-desaturase), and CrtF (acyclic 1-hydroxycarotenoid methyltransferase). On the other hand, CrtC of Rpl. elegans, CrtD of "Rpl. cryptolactis", and CrtC, CrtD, and CrtF of Rpl. pokkaliisoli might have different characteristics from the usual activity of these normal enzymes in the normal spirilloxanthin pathway. These results suggest that the variation of carotenoids among the species of Rhodoplanes results from modified substrate specificity of the carotenogenesis enzymes involved.

  15. Actinomycetal complex of light sierozem on the Kopet-Dag piedmont plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenova, G. M.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Manucharova, N. A.; Stepanova, O. A.; Chernov, I. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    The population density of actinomycetes in the samples of light sierozem from the Kopet Dag piedmont plain (75 km from Ashkhabad, Turkmenistan) reaches hundreds of thousand CFU/g soil. The actinomycetal complex is represented by two genera: Streptomyces and Micromonospora. Representatives of the Streptomyces genus predominate and comprise 73 to 87% of the actinomycetal complex. In one sample, representatives of the Micromonospora genus predominated in the complex (75%). The Streptomyces genus in the studied soil samples is represented by the species from several sections and series: the species of section Helvolo-Flavus series Helvolus represent the dominant component of the streptomycetal complex; their portion is up to 77% of all isolated actinomycetes. The species of other sections and series are much less abundant. Thus, the percentage of the Cinereus Achromogenes section in the actinomycetal complex does not exceed 28%; representatives of the Albus section Albus series, Roseus section Lavendulae-Roseus series, and Imperfectus section belong to rare species; they have been isolated not from all the studied samples of light sierozem, and their portion does not exceed 10% of the actinomycetal complex.

  16. Experimental Evaluation of Liquid Film Resistance in Oxygen Transport to Microbial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, John D.; Johnson, Marvin J.

    1967-01-01

    A membrane probe was used to monitor the dissolved oxygen concentrations in continuous cultures of Candida utilis and Micrococcus roseus growing at low dissolved oxygen concentrations and various agitation levels. For the yeast fermentations, increasing the agitation level within the range of 0.1 to 0.3 w per liter lowered steady-state dissolved oxygen concentrations in the fermentor. The steady-state dissolved oxygen concentration in the fermentor was not influenced by the agitation level within the range of 0.3 to 1.8 w per liter. With M. roseus, no effect of agitation on steady-state dissolved oxygen concentrations in the fermentor was observed within the range of 0.1 to 1.8 w per liter. It was concluded that, under the conditions used, a measurable transfer barrier from the liquid to the yeast cells existed at agitation levels below 0.3 w per liter and that this barrier did not exist at agitation levels above 0.3 w per liter. The transfer barrier from the liquid to the yeast surface could be represented by a stagnant film of liquid 0.6 × 10-4 cm thick surrounding the cell at an agitation level of 0.10 w per liter. This film represented an oxygen concentration drop of 1.3 × 10-7 M from the bulk of the medium to the cells under the experimental conditions. PMID:16349771

  17. Automatic Classification of Staphylococci by Principal-Component Analysis and a Gradient Method1

    PubMed Central

    Hill, L. R.; Silvestri, L. G.; Ihm, P.; Farchi, G.; Lanciani, P.

    1965-01-01

    Hill, L. R. (Università Statale, Milano, Italy), L. G. Silvestri, P. Ihm, G. Farchi, and P. Lanciani. Automatic classification of staphylococci by principal-component analysis and a gradient method. J. Bacteriol. 89:1393–1401. 1965.—Forty-nine strains from the species Staphylococcus aureus, S. saprophyticus, S. lactis, S. afermentans, and S. roseus were submitted to different taxometric analyses; clustering was performed by single linkage, by the unweighted pair group method, and by principal-component analysis followed by a gradient method. Results were substantially the same with all methods. All S. aureus clustered together, sharply separated from S. roseus and S. afermentans; S. lactis and S. saprophyticus fell between, with the latter nearer to S. aureus. The main purpose of this study was to introduce a new taxometric technique, based on principal-component analysis followed by a gradient method, and to compare it with some other methods in current use. Advantages of the new method are complete automation and therefore greater objectivity, execution of the clustering in a space of reduced dimensions in which different characters have different weights, easy recognition of taxonomically important characters, and opportunity for representing clusters in three-dimensional models; the principal disadvantage is the need for large computer facilities. Images PMID:14293013

  18. Comparative analyses of leaf anatomy of dicotyledonous species in Tibetan and Inner Mongolian grasslands.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianjing; Ji, Chengjun; Han, Mei; Zhang, Tingfang; Yan, Xuedong; Hu, Dong; Zeng, Hui; He, Jinsheng

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the leaf anatomy of grassland plants is crucial for understanding how these plants adapt to the environment. Tibetan alpine grasslands and Inner Mongolian temperate grasslands are two major grassland types in northern China. Tibetan alpine grasslands occur in high-altitude regions where the low temperatures limit plant growth. Inner Mongolian temperate grasslands are found in arid regions where moisture is the limiting factor. Few comparative studies concerning the leaf anatomy of grassland plants of the Tibetan Plateau and Inner Mongolian Plateau have been conducted. We examined leaf characteristics at 71 sites and among 65 species, across the alpine grasslands of the Tibetan Plateau and the temperate grasslands of the Inner Mongolian Plateau. We compared the leaf structures of plants with different life forms and taxonomies, and their adaptation to arid or cold environments. We explored relationships among leaf features and the effects of climatic factors (i.e., growing season temperature and precipitation) on leaf characteristics. Our results showed that (i) there were significant differences in leaf anatomy between Tibetan alpine and Inner Mongolian temperate grasslands. Except for mesophyll cell density, the values obtained for thickness of leaf tissue, surface area and volume of mesophyll cells were larger on the Tibetan Plateau than on the Inner Mongolian Plateau. (ii) Within the same family or genus, leaf anatomy showed significant differences between two regions, and trends were consistent with those of whole species. (iii) Leaf anatomy of woody and herbaceous plants also showed significant differences between the regions. Except for mesophyll cell density, the values obtained for the thickness of leaf tissue, and the surface area and volume of mesophyll cells were larger in herbaceous than in woody plants. (iv) Leaf anatomical traits changed accordingly. Total leaf thickness, thicknesses of lower and upper epidermal cells, and surface area

  19. The coordination of ploidy and cell size differs between cell layers in leaves

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Yohei; Hasegawa, Junko; Fujikura, Ushio; Hoshino, Rina; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Growth and developmental processes are occasionally accompanied by multiple rounds of DNA replication, known as endoreduplication. Coordination between endoreduplication and cell size regulation often plays a crucial role in proper organogenesis and cell differentiation. Here, we report that the level of correlation between ploidy and cell volume is different in the outer and inner cell layers of leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana using a novel imaging technique. Although there is a well-known, strong correlation between ploidy and cell volume in pavement cells of the epidermis, this correlation was extremely weak in palisade mesophyll cells. Induction of epidermis cell identity based on the expression of the homeobox gene ATML1 in mesophyll cells enhanced the level of correlation between ploidy and cell volume to near that of wild-type epidermal cells. We therefore propose that the correlation between ploidy and cell volume is regulated by cell identity. PMID:26903507

  20. Development and structure of drought-tolerant leaves of the Mediterranean shrub Capparis spinosa L.

    PubMed

    Rhizopoulou, Sophia; Psaras, George K

    2003-09-01

    Capparis spinosa (caper), a winter-deciduous perennial shrub, is a consistent floristic element of Mediterranean ecosystems, growing from May to October, i.e. entirely during the prolonged summer drought. The internal architecture of young and fully expanded leaves was studied, along with certain physiological characteristics. Capparis spinosa possesses thick, amphistomatic and homobaric leaves with a multilayered mesophyll. The latter possesses an increased number of photosynthesizing cells per unit leaf surface, a large surface area of mesophyll cells facing intercellular spaces (Smes) and a low percentage of intercellular space per tissue volume. Smes and chlorophyll content attain their maximum values synchronously, slightly before full leaf expansion. Nitrogen investment is also completed before full leaf expansion. The structural features, in combination with the water status, could contribute to enhanced rates of transpiration and photosynthesis under field water shortage conditions.

  1. Leaf anatomy and histochemistry of three species of Ficus sect. Americanae supported by light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Nathalia Diniz; Coelho, Victor Peçanha M; Ventrella, Marília Contin; Agra, Maria de Fátima

    2014-02-01

    In this work the leaf anatomy of three species of Ficus section Americanae (Miq.) Miq. from Brazil, whose leaves and latex are used in folk medicine is reported. The work was carried out using light and scanning electron microscopy in order to characterize these species and to evaluate their taxonomic significance, and also contribute to the quality control of their ethnodrugs. The three species (Ficus cyclophylla, Ficus elliotiana, and Ficus caatingae) showed hypostomatic leaves, anomocytic stomata, straight epidermal cell outlines, and a dorsiventral mesophyll. Some micro-morphological characters such as density and distribution of epicuticular waxes, glandular trichomes, the length and width of stomata, as well as the palisade of mesophyll and petiole outlines proved to be the most useful and distinctive characters for the separation of species. These may contribute as additional support for the taxonomy of the section and for the quality control of their ethnodrugs.

  2. Photosynthetic metabolism of malate and aspartate in Flaveria trinervia a C/sub 4/ dicot

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    C/sub 4/ species are known to vary in their apparent relative use of malate and aspartate to mediate carbon flux through the C/sub 4/ cycle. These studies investigate some of the adjustments in photosynthetic carbon metabolism that occur during a dark to light transition and during expansion of leaves of Flaveria trinervia, a C/sub 4/ dicot. Enzyme localization studies with isolated leaf mesophyll and bundle sheath protoplasts, indicated that both C/sub 4/ acids are formed in the mesophyll chloroplast, and that aspartate is metabolized to malate in the bundle sheath chloroplast prior to decaroxylation there. During photosynthetic induction, the partitioning of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ between malate and aspartate showed a single oscillation of increased aspartate labelling after 5 min of illumination. Turnover of (4-14C) (malate plus aspartate) was slow initially during illumination, prior to establishment of active pools of C/sub 4/ cycle metabolites.

  3. Physical Changes in Satsuma Mandarin Leaf after Infection of Elsinoë fawcettii Causing Citrus Scab Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paudyal, Dilli Prasad; Hyun, Jae-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Citrus scab disease is one of the destructive diseases that reduce the value of fruit for the fresh market. We analyzed the process of symptom development after infection with scab pathogen Elsinoë fawcettii in the susceptible satsuma mandarin leaves to observe the structural modification against pathogen. The cuticle and epidermal cells along with 3–5 layers of mesophyll tissue were degraded 1–2 days post inoculation. Surrounding peripheral cells of degraded tissues grew rapidly and then enveloped the necrotic area along with the growing conidia. Cross sections through the lesion revealed hyphal colonization in epidermis and mesophyll tissues. In response to the pathogen colonization, host cell walls were lignified, inner cells were rapidly compartmentalized and a semi-circular boundary was formed that separated the infected region from the non-infected region, and finally prevented the intercellular pathogen spread. PMID:26674386

  4. Subcellular Localization of a UDP-Glucose:Aldehyde Cyanohydrin β-Glucosyl Transferase in Epidermal Plastids of Sorghum Leaf Blades 1

    PubMed Central

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Thayer, Susan S.; Conn, Eric E.

    1982-01-01

    Epidermal and mesophyll protoplasts, prepared from leaf blades of 6-day-old light-grown Sorghum bicolor seedlings were separated by differential sedimentation and assayed for a number of enzymes. The epidermal protoplasts contained higher levels of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase (EC 1.6.2.4), triose phosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.1), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31), and a UDP-glucose:cyanohydrin β-glucosyl transferase (EC 2.4.1.85), but lower levels of NADP+ triosephosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) than did mesophyll protoplasts. When protoplast preparations were lysed and applied to linear sucrose density gradients, triosephosphate isomerase was found to be present in epidermal plastids. A significant fraction (41%) of the glucosyl transferase activity was also associated with the epidermal plastids. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16662753

  5. A survey for isoenzymes of glucosephosphate isomerase, phosphoglucomutase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in C3-, C 4-and crassulacean-acid-metabolism plants, and green algae.

    PubMed

    Herbert, M; Burkhard, C; Schnarrenberger, C

    1979-01-01

    Two isoenzymes each of glucosephosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9), phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.43) were separated by (NH4)2SO4 gradient solubilization and DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange chromatography from green leaves of the C3-plants spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), of the Crassulacean-acid-metabolism plants Crassula lycopodioides Lam., Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Sedum rubrotinctum R.T. Clausen, and from the green algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardii. After isolation of cell organelles from spinach leaves by isopyenic centrifugation in sucrose gradients one of two isoenzymes of each of the four enzymes was found to be associated with whole chloroplasts while the other was restricted to the soluble cell fraction, implying the same intracellular distribution of these isoenzymes also in the other species.Among C4-plants, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were found in only one form in corn (Zea mays L.), sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) and Coix lacrymajobi L., but as two isoenzymes in Atriplex spongiosa L. and Portulaca oleracea L. In corn, the two dehydrogenases were mainly associated with isolated mesophyll protoplasts while in Atriplex spongiosa they were of similar specific activity in both mesophyll protoplasts and bundle-sheath strands. In all five C4-plants three isoenzymes of glucosephosphate isomerase and phosphoglucomutase were found. In corn two were localized in the bundle-sheath strands and the third one in the mesophyll protoplasts. The amount of activity of the enzymes was similar in each of the two cell fractions. Apparently, C4 plants have isoenzymes not only in two cell compartments, but also in physiologically closely linked cell types such as mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells.

  6. The Arabidopsis minE mutation causes new plastid and FtsZ1 localization phenotypes in the leaf epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Makoto T.; Kojo, Kei H.; Kazama, Yusuke; Sasaki, Shun; Abe, Tomoko; Itoh, Ryuuichi D.

    2015-01-01

    Plastids in the leaf epidermal cells of plants are regarded as immature chloroplasts that, like mesophyll chloroplasts, undergo binary fission. While mesophyll chloroplasts have generally been used to study plastid division, recent studies have suggested the presence of tissue- or plastid type-dependent regulation of plastid division. Here, we report the detailed morphology of plastids and their stromules, and the intraplastidic localization of the chloroplast division-related protein AtFtsZ1-1, in the leaf epidermis of an Arabidopsis mutant that harbors a mutation in the chloroplast division site determinant gene AtMinE1. In atminE1, the size and shape of epidermal plastids varied widely, which contrasts with the plastid phenotype observed in atminE1 mesophyll cells. In particular, atminE1 epidermal plastids occasionally displayed grape-like morphology, a novel phenotype induced by a plastid division mutation. Observation of an atminE1 transgenic line harboring an AtMinE1 promoter::AtMinE1-yellow fluorescent protein fusion gene confirmed the expression and plastidic localization of AtMinE1 in the leaf epidermis. Further examination revealed that constriction of plastids and stromules mediated by the FtsZ1 ring contributed to the plastid pleomorphism in the atminE1 epidermis. These results illustrate that a single plastid division mutation can have dramatic consequences for epidermal plastid morphology, thereby implying that plastid division and morphogenesis are differentially regulated in epidermal and mesophyll plastids. PMID:26500667

  7. Leaf morphology of 40 evergreen and deciduous broadleaved subtropical tree species and relationships to functional ecophysiological traits.

    PubMed

    Kröber, W; Heklau, H; Bruelheide, H

    2015-03-01

    We explored potential of morphological and anatomical leaf traits for predicting ecophysiological key functions in subtropical trees. We asked whether the ecophysiological parameters stomatal conductance and xylem cavitation vulnerability could be predicted from microscopy leaf traits. We investigated 21 deciduous and 19 evergreen subtropical tree species, using individuals of the same age and from the same environment in the Biodiversity-Ecosystem Functioning experiment at Jiangxi (BEF-China). Information-theoretic linear model selection was used to identify the best combination of morphological and anatomical predictors for ecophysiological functions. Leaf anatomy and morphology strongly depended on leaf habit. Evergreen species tended to have thicker leaves, thicker spongy and palisade mesophyll, more palisade mesophyll layers and a thicker subepidermis. Over 50% of all evergreen species had leaves with multi-layered palisade parenchyma, while only one deciduous species (Koelreuteria bipinnata) had this. Interactions with leaf habit were also included in best multi-predictor models for stomatal conductance (gs ) and xylem cavitation vulnerability. In addition, maximum gs was positively related to log ratio of palisade to spongy mesophyll thickness. Vapour pressure deficit (vpd) for maximum gs increased with the log ratio of palisade to spongy mesophyll thickness in species having leaves with papillae. In contrast, maximum specific hydraulic conductivity and xylem pressure at which 50% loss of maximum specific xylem hydraulic conductivity occurred (Ψ50 ) were best predicted by leaf habit and density of spongy parenchyma. Evergreen species had lower Ψ50 values and lower maximum xylem hydraulic conductivities. As hydraulic leaf and wood characteristics were reflected in structural leaf traits, there is high potential for identifying further linkages between morphological and anatomical leaf traits and ecophysiological responses.

  8. Longevity of guard cell chloroplasts in falling leaves: implication for stomatal function and cellular aging

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiger, E.; Schwartz, A.

    1982-11-12

    Guard cell chloroplasts in senescing leaves from 12 species of perennial trees and three species of annual plants survived considerably longer than their mesophyll counterparts. In Ginkgo biloba, stomata from yellow leaves opened during the day and closed at night; guard cell chloroplasts from these leaves showed fluorescence transients associated with electron transport and photophosphorylation. These findings indicate that guard cell chloroplasts are highly conserved throughout the life-span of the leaf and that leaves retain stomatal control during senescence.

  9. Rainfall Chemistry and Potential Beneficial/Detrimental Impact to Indigenous Vegetation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-23

    elevation sites. The biological significance of high air pollution concen- trations during darkness is unclear. Air pollutants must enter leaf mesophyll...tissues in order to alter plant metabo- lism and thereby reduce plant growth. Plants are generally thought to close their stomata at night and, upon doing...so, would be somewhat Immune from ambient air pollutants since these agents could not be absorbed into the leaf . However, plants may not close

  10. Analysis of Desert Shrubs along First-Order Channels on the Desert Piedmonts: Possible Indicators of Ecosystem Health and Historic Variation - (SEED Project)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    midday xylem water potentials, 2) midday net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and transpiration, and 3) stable carbon isotope ratio (δC13) and...Potential Predawn and mid-day xylem water potentials were measured in the field using a Scholander type pressure chamber (Plant Moisture Stress Inc...mesophyll; this process moves water up through the xylem of the stem and roots, and out of the soil. Cutting a stem breaks the water column, which

  11. Sudden Collapse of Vacuoles in Saintpaulia sp. Palisade Cells Induced by a Rapid Temperature Decrease

    PubMed Central

    Kadohama, Noriaki; Goh, Tatsuaki; Ohnishi, Miwa; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Mimura, Tetsuro; Suzuki, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that saintpaulia leaf is damaged by the rapid temperature decrease when cold water is irrigated onto the leaf surface. We investigated this temperature sensitivity and the mechanisms of leaf damage in saintpaulia (Saintpaulia sp. cv. ‘Iceberg’) and other Gesneriaceae plants. Saintpaulia leaves were damaged and discolored when subjected to a rapid decrease in temperature, but not when the temperature was decreased gradually. Sensitivity to rapid temperature decrease increased within 10 to 20 min during pre-incubation at higher temperature. Injury was restricted to the palisade mesophyll cells, where there was an obvious change in the color of the chloroplasts. During a rapid temperature decrease, chlorophyll fluorescence monitored by a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer diminished and did not recover even after rewarming to the initial temperature. Isolated chloroplasts were not directly affected by the rapid temperature decrease. Intracellular pH was monitored with a pH-dependent fluorescent dye. In palisade mesophyll cells damaged by rapid temperature decrease, the cytosolic pH decreased and the vacuolar membrane collapsed soon after a temperature decrease. In isolated chloroplasts, chlorophyll fluorescence declined when the pH of the medium was lowered. These results suggest that a rapid temperature decrease directly or indirectly affects the vacuolar membrane, resulting in a pH change in the cytosol that subsequently affects the chloroplasts in palisade mesophyll cells. We further confirmed that the same physiological damage occurs in other Gesneriaceae plants. These results strongly suggested that the vacuoles of palisade mesophyll cells collapsed during the initial phase of leaf injury. PMID:23451194

  12. Transient gene expression in electroporated Solanum protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Jones, H; Ooms, G; Jones, M G

    1989-11-01

    Electroporation was used to evaluate parameters important in transient gene expression in potato protoplasts. The protoplasts were from leaves of wild potato Solanum brevidens, and from leaves, tubers and suspension cells of cultivated Solanum tuberosum cv. Désirée. Reporter enzyme activity, chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, depended on the field strength and the pulse duration used for electroporation. Using field pulses of 85 ms duration, the optimum field strengths for maximum CAT activity were: S. brevidens mesophyll protoplasts--250 V/cm; Désirée mesophyll protoplasts--225 V/cm; Désirée suspension culture protoplasts--225 V/cm; and Désirée tuber protoplasts--150 V/cm. The optimum field strengths correlated inversely with the size of the protoplasts electroporated; this is consistent with biophysical theory. In time courses, maximum CAT activity (in Désirée mesophyll protoplasts) occurred 36-48 h after electroporation. Examination at optimised conditions of a chimaeric gene consisting of a class II patatin promoter linked to the beta-glucuronidase (gus) gene, showed expression (at DNA concentrations between 0-10 pmol/ml) comparable to the CaMV 35S promoter in both tuber and mesophyll protoplasts. At higher DNA concentrations (20-30 pmol/ml) the patatin promoter directed 4-5 times higher levels of gus expression. Implications and potential contributions towards studying gene expression, in particular of homologous genes in potato, are discussed.

  13. A Specific Transcriptome Signature for Guard Cells from the C4 Plant Gynandropsis gynandra.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Sylvain; Aresheva, Olga; Reyna-Llorens, Ivan; Smith-Unna, Richard D; Hibberd, Julian M; Genty, Bernard

    2016-03-01

    C4 photosynthesis represents an excellent example of convergent evolution that results in the optimization of both carbon and water usage by plants. In C4 plants, a carbon-concentrating mechanism divided between bundle sheath and mesophyll cells increases photosynthetic efficiency. Compared with C3 leaves, the carbon-concentrating mechanism of C4 plants allows photosynthetic operation at lower stomatal conductance, and as a consequence, transpiration is reduced. Here, we characterize transcriptomes from guard cells in C3 Tareneya hassleriana and C4 Gynandropsis gynandra belonging to the Cleomaceae. While approximately 60% of Gene Ontology terms previously associated with guard cells from the C3 model Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) are conserved, there is much less overlap between patterns of individual gene expression. Most ion and CO2 signaling modules appear unchanged at the transcript level in guard cells from C3 and C4 species, but major variations in transcripts associated with carbon-related pathways known to influence stomatal behavior were detected. Genes associated with C4 photosynthesis were more highly expressed in guard cells of C4 compared with C3 leaves. Furthermore, we detected two major patterns of cell-specific C4 gene expression within the C4 leaf. In the first, genes previously associated with preferential expression in the bundle sheath showed continually decreasing expression from bundle sheath to mesophyll to guard cells. In the second, expression was maximal in the mesophyll compared with both guard cells and bundle sheath. These data imply that at least two gene regulatory networks act to coordinate gene expression across the bundle sheath, mesophyll, and guard cells in the C4 leaf.

  14. Hormonal induction and antihormonal inhibition of tracheary element differentiation in Zinnia cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, D. L.; Galston, A. W.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanically isolated mesophyll cells of Zinnia elegans L. cv Envy differentiate to tracheary elements when cultured in inductive medium containing sufficient auxin and cytokinin. Tracheary element differentiation was induced by the three auxins (alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) and four cytokinins (6-benzyladenine, kinetin, 2-isopentenyladenine and zeatin) tested. Tracheary element formation is inhibited or delayed if the inductive medium is supplemented with an anticytokinin, antiauxin, or inhibitor of auxin transport.

  15. Photosynthetic Diffusional Constraints Affect Yield in Drought Stressed Rice Cultivars during Flowering

    PubMed Central

    Lauteri, Marco; Haworth, Matthew; Serraj, Rachid; Monteverdi, Maria Cristina; Centritto, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Global production of rice (Oryza sativa) grain is limited by water availability and the low ‘leaf-level’ photosynthetic capacity of many cultivars. Oryza sativa is extremely susceptible to water-deficits; therefore, predicted increases in the frequency and duration of drought events, combined with future rises in global temperatures and food demand, necessitate the development of more productive and drought tolerant cultivars. We investigated the underlying physiological, isotopic and morphological responses to water-deficit in seven common varieties of O. sativa, subjected to prolonged drought of varying intensities, for phenotyping purposes in open field conditions. Significant variation was observed in leaf-level photosynthesis rates (A) under both water treatments. Yield and A were influenced by the conductance of the mesophyll layer to CO2 (gm) and not by stomatal conductance (gs). Mesophyll conductance declined during drought to differing extents among the cultivars; those varieties that maintained gm during water-deficit sustained A and yield to a greater extent. However, the variety with the highest gm and yield under well-watered conditions (IR55419-04) was distinct from the most effective cultivar under drought (Vandana). Mesophyll conductance most effectively characterises the photosynthetic capacity and yield of O. sativa cultivars under both well-watered and water-deficit conditions; however, the desired attributes of high gm during optimal growth conditions and the capacity for gm to remain constant during water-deficit may be mutually exclusive. Nonetheless, future genetic and physiological studies aimed at enhancing O. sativa yield and drought stress tolerance should investigate the biochemistry and morphology of the interface between the sub-stomatal pore and mesophyll layer. PMID:25275452

  16. [Effects of chilling stress on antioxidant system and ultrastructure of walnut cultivars].

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing-hua; Wang, Hong-xia; Zhang, Zhi-hua; Gao, Yi

    2015-05-01

    In order to reveal cold hardiness mechanisms and ascertain suitable cold hardiness biochemical indicators of walnut (Juglans regia) , three walnut cultivars ' Hartley' , 'Jinlong 1' and 'Jinlong 2' with strong to weak tolerance of chilling stress, were used to investigate variations of leaf antioxidant enzyme activity and superoxide anion (O2-·) content in one year-old branches under chilling stress at 1 °C in leaf-expansion period. The mesophyll cells ultrastructure of ' Hartley' and 'Jinlong 2' under chilling stress were also observed by transmission electron microscope. The results showed that the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) enzyme activities were the strongest and O2-· content was the lowest in chilling-tolerant cultivar ' Hartley' under chilling stress among the three cultivars. The ultrastructure of the mesophyll cells was stable, and chilling injury symptoms of the leaves were not observed. In chilling-sensitive cultivar 'Jinlong 2' , the SOD, POD and catalase enzyme ( CAT) activities decreased sharply, and the O2-· content was kept at a high level under chilling stress. The ultrastructure of the mesophyll cells was injured obviously at 1 °C∟ for 72 hours. Most of chloroplasts were swollen, and grana lamella became thinner and fewer. A number of chloroplasts envelope and plasma membrane were damaged and became indistinct. At the same time, the edges of some of 'Jinlong 2' young leaves became water-soaked. It was concluded that the ultrastructure stability of mesophyll cells under chilling stress was closely related to walnut cold hardiness. SOD, POD enzyme activities and O2-· content in walnut leaves could be used as biochemical indicators of walnut cold hardiness in leaf-expansion period. There might be a correlation between the damage of cell membrane system and reactive oxygen accumulation under chilling stress.

  17. A Specific Transcriptome Signature for Guard Cells from the C4 Plant Gynandropsis gynandra1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aresheva, Olga; Reyna-Llorens, Ivan; Genty, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis represents an excellent example of convergent evolution that results in the optimization of both carbon and water usage by plants. In C4 plants, a carbon-concentrating mechanism divided between bundle sheath and mesophyll cells increases photosynthetic efficiency. Compared with C3 leaves, the carbon-concentrating mechanism of C4 plants allows photosynthetic operation at lower stomatal conductance, and as a consequence, transpiration is reduced. Here, we characterize transcriptomes from guard cells in C3 Tareneya hassleriana and C4 Gynandropsis gynandra belonging to the Cleomaceae. While approximately 60% of Gene Ontology terms previously associated with guard cells from the C3 model Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) are conserved, there is much less overlap between patterns of individual gene expression. Most ion and CO2 signaling modules appear unchanged at the transcript level in guard cells from C3 and C4 species, but major variations in transcripts associated with carbon-related pathways known to influence stomatal behavior were detected. Genes associated with C4 photosynthesis were more highly expressed in guard cells of C4 compared with C3 leaves. Furthermore, we detected two major patterns of cell-specific C4 gene expression within the C4 leaf. In the first, genes previously associated with preferential expression in the bundle sheath showed continually decreasing expression from bundle sheath to mesophyll to guard cells. In the second, expression was maximal in the mesophyll compared with both guard cells and bundle sheath. These data imply that at least two gene regulatory networks act to coordinate gene expression across the bundle sheath, mesophyll, and guard cells in the C4 leaf. PMID:26818731

  18. [Morphological analysis of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the PnEXPA3 gene of black poplar (Populus nigra)].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Safiullina, M G; Kniazev, A V; Chemeris, A V

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the PnEXPA3 gene of black poplar (Populus nigra), which encodes alpha-expansin, were obtained. The transgenic plants were characterized by increased size of epidermic and mesophyll cells of leaves. However, the size of leaves remained normal. Overexpression of the PnEXPA3 gene provided stimulatory effect only on the stem length. Other morphological traits of the transgenic plants remained unchanged.

  19. Photosynthetic diffusional constraints affect yield in drought stressed rice cultivars during flowering.

    PubMed

    Lauteri, Marco; Haworth, Matthew; Serraj, Rachid; Monteverdi, Maria Cristina; Centritto, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Global production of rice (Oryza sativa) grain is limited by water availability and the low 'leaf-level' photosynthetic capacity of many cultivars. Oryza sativa is extremely susceptible to water-deficits; therefore, predicted increases in the frequency and duration of drought events, combined with future rises in global temperatures and food demand, necessitate the development of more productive and drought tolerant cultivars. We investigated the underlying physiological, isotopic and morphological responses to water-deficit in seven common varieties of O. sativa, subjected to prolonged drought of varying intensities, for phenotyping purposes in open field conditions. Significant variation was observed in leaf-level photosynthesis rates (A) under both water treatments. Yield and A were influenced by the conductance of the mesophyll layer to CO2 (g(m)) and not by stomatal conductance (g(s)). Mesophyll conductance declined during drought to differing extents among the cultivars; those varieties that maintained g(m) during water-deficit sustained A and yield to a greater extent. However, the variety with the highest g(m) and yield under well-watered conditions (IR55419-04) was distinct from the most effective cultivar under drought (Vandana). Mesophyll conductance most effectively characterises the photosynthetic capacity and yield of O. sativa cultivars under both well-watered and water-deficit conditions; however, the desired attributes of high g(m) during optimal growth conditions and the capacity for g(m) to remain constant during water-deficit may be mutually exclusive. Nonetheless, future genetic and physiological studies aimed at enhancing O. sativa yield and drought stress tolerance should investigate the biochemistry and morphology of the interface between the sub-stomatal pore and mesophyll layer.

  20. Multi-Photon Micro-Spectroscopy of Biological Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    point. As a result, the technology has the capacity for micro-spectroscopy of biological specimen at high spatial resolution. Mesophyll protoplasts of...Micro-spectroscopy, multi-photon fluorescence spectroscopy, second harmonic generation, plant tissues, stem, chloroplast, protoplast , maize, Arabidopsis...noise may be greatly reduced due to the naturally limited excitation volume of the focused laser beam. In this study, leaf protoplasts of Arabidopsis

  1. The Infrared Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    absorption band maximum between 0.61 and 0.66 /jan and should visually appear cyan . There are several kinds of chlorophyll, all of which absorb in...palisade layers, poms mesophyll Pepper Capsicum amuum L. and other spp. Solanaceae Dorsi ventral Druse crystals Pigweed Amaranthus cetroflexus L...the relationship between the spectral Green Red Infrared I T ^Original Subject Yellow Filter Infrared Green Red Cyan Yellow Magenta

  2. Light-induced transient ion flux responses from maize leaves and their association with leaf growth and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zivanović, B D; Pang, J; Shabala, S

    2005-03-01

    Net fluxes of H+, K+ and Ca2+ ions from maize (Zea mays L.) isolated leaf segments were measured non-invasively using ion-selective vibrating microelectrodes (the MIFE technique). Leaf segments were isolated from the blade base, containing actively elongating cells (basal segments), and from non-growing tip regions (tip segments). Ion fluxes were measured in response to bright white light (2600 micromoles m-2 s-1) from either the leaf segments or the underlying mesophyll (after stripping the epidermis). Fluxes measured from the mesophyll showed no significant difference between basal and tip regions. In leaf segments (epidermis attached), light-induced flux kinetics of all ions measured (H+, Ca2+ and K+) were strikingly different between the two regions. It appears that epidermal K+ fluxes are required to drive leaf expansion growth, whereas in the mesophyll light-induced K+ flux changes are likely to play a charge balancing role. Light-stimulated Ca2+ influx was not directly attributable either to leaf photosynthetic performance or to leaf expansion growth. It is concluded that light-induced ion flux changes are associated with both leaf growth and photosynthesis.

  3. Polyamine metabolism and osmotic stress. I. Relation to protoplast viability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Masdeu, M. A.; Dumortier, F. M.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    Cereal leaves subjected to the osmotica routinely used for protoplast isolation show a rapid increase in arginine decarboxylase activity, a massive accumulation of putrescine, and slow conversion of putrescine to the higher polyamines, spermidine and spermine (HE Flores, AW Galston 1984 Plant Physiol 75: 102). Mesophyll protoplasts from these leaves, which have a high putrescine:polyamine ratio, do not undergo sustained division. By contrast, in Nicotiana, Capsicum, Datura, Trigonella, and Vigna, dicot genera that readily regenerate plants from mesophyll protoplasts, the response of leaves to osmotic stress is opposite to that in cereals. Putrescine titer as well as arginine and ornithine decarboxylase activities decline in these osmotically stressed dicot leaves, while spermidine and spermine titers increase. Thus, the putrescine:polyamine ratio in Vigna protoplasts, which divide readily, is 4-fold lower than in oat protoplasts, which divide poorly. We suggest that this differing response of polyamine metabolism to osmotic stress may account in part for the failure of cereal mesophyll protoplasts to develop readily in vitro.

  4. Cyclic and noncyclic photophosphorylation in isolated guard cell chloroplasts from Vicia faba L

    SciTech Connect

    Shimazaki, K.; Zeiger, E.

    1985-06-01

    High rates of both cyclic and noncyclic photophosphorylation were measured in chloroplast lamellae isolated from purified guard cell protoplasts from Vicia Faba L. Typical rates of light-dependent incorporation of /sup 32/P into ATP were 100 and 190 micromoles ATP per milligram chlorophyll per hour for noncyclic (water to ferricyanide) and cyclic (phenazine methosulfate) photophosphorylation, respectively. These rates were 50 to 80% of those observed with mesophyll chloroplasts. Noncyclic photophosphorylation in guard cell chloroplasts was completely inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea supporting the notion that photophosphorylation is coupled to linear electron flow from photosystem II to photosystem I. Several lines of evidence indicated that contamination by mesophyll chloroplasts cannot account for the observed photophosphorylation rates. A comparison of the photon fluence dependence of noncyclic photophosphorylation in mesophyll and guard cell chloroplasts showed significant differences between the two preparations, with half saturation at 0.04 and 0.08 millimole per square meter per second, respectively.

  5. Photorespiration plays an important role in the regulation of photosynthetic electron flow under fluctuating light in tobacco plants grown under full sunlight

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2015-01-01

    Plants usually experience dynamic fluctuations of light intensities under natural conditions. However, the responses of mesophyll conductance, CO2 assimilation, and photorespiration to light fluctuation are not well understood. To address this question, we measured photosynthetic parameters of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence in tobacco leaves at 2-min intervals while irradiance levels alternated between 100 and 1200 μmol photons m−2 s−1. Compared with leaves exposed to a constant light of 1200 μmol photons m−2 s−1, both stomatal and mesophyll conductances were significantly restricted in leaves treated with fluctuating light condition. Meanwhile, CO2 assimilation rate and electron flow devoted to RuBP carboxylation at 1200 μmol photons m−2 s−1 under fluctuating light were limited by the low chloroplast CO2 concentration. Analysis based on the C3 photosynthesis model indicated that, at 1200 μmol photons m−2 s−1 under fluctuating light, the CO2 assimilation rate was limited by RuBP carboxylation. Electron flow devoted to RuBP oxygenation at 1200 μmol photons m−2 s−1 under fluctuating light remained at nearly the maximum level throughout the experimental period. We conclude that fluctuating light restricts CO2 assimilation by decreasing both stomatal and mesophyll conductances. Under such conditions, photorespiration plays an important role in the regulation of photosynthetic electron flow. PMID:26322062

  6. Relationship between hexokinase and the aquaporin PIP1 in the regulation of photosynthesis and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Gilor; Sade, Nir; Attia, Ziv; Secchi, Francesca; Zwieniecki, Maciej; Holbrook, N Michele; Levi, Asher; Alchanatis, Victor; Moshelion, Menachem; Granot, David

    2014-01-01

    Increased expression of the aquaporin NtAQP1, which is known to function as a plasmalemma channel for CO₂ and water, increases the rate of both photosynthesis and transpiration. In contrast, increased expression of Arabidopsis hexokinase1 (AtHXK1), a dual-function enzyme that mediates sugar sensing, decreases the expression of photosynthetic genes and the rate of transpiration and inhibits growth. Here, we show that AtHXK1 also decreases root and stem hydraulic conductivity and leaf mesophyll CO₂ conductance (g(m)). Due to their opposite effects on plant development and physiology, we examined the relationship between NtAQP1 and AtHXK1 at the whole-plant level using transgenic tomato plants expressing both genes simultaneously. NtAQP1 significantly improved growth and increased the transpiration rates of AtHXK1-expressing plants. Reciprocal grafting experiments indicated that this complementation occurs when both genes are expressed simultaneously in the shoot. Yet, NtAQP1 had only a marginal effect on the hydraulic conductivity of the double-transgenic plants, suggesting that the complementary effect of NtAQP1 is unrelated to shoot water transport. Rather, NtAQP1 significantly increased leaf mesophyll CO₂ conductance and enhanced the rate of photosynthesis, suggesting that NtAQP1 facilitated the growth of the double-transgenic plants by enhancing mesophyll conductance of CO₂.

  7. The Evolutionary Basis of Naturally Diverse Rice Leaves Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Jolly; Dionora, Jacqueline; Elmido-Mabilangan, Abigail; Wanchana, Samart; Thakur, Vivek; Bandyopadhyay, Anindya; Brar, Darshan S.; Quick, William Paul

    2016-01-01

    Rice contains genetically and ecologically diverse wild and cultivated species that show a wide variation in plant and leaf architecture. A systematic characterization of leaf anatomy is essential in understanding the dynamics behind such diversity. Therefore, leaf anatomies of 24 Oryza species spanning 11 genetically diverse rice genomes were studied in both lateral and longitudinal directions and possible evolutionary trends were examined. A significant inter-species variation in mesophyll cells, bundle sheath cells, and vein structure was observed, suggesting precise genetic control over these major rice leaf anatomical traits. Cellular dimensions, measured along three growth axes, were further combined proportionately to construct three-dimensional (3D) leaf anatomy models to compare the relative size and orientation of the major cell types present in a fully expanded leaf. A reconstruction of the ancestral leaf state revealed that the following are the major characteristics of recently evolved rice species: fewer veins, larger and laterally elongated mesophyll cells, with an increase in total mesophyll area and in bundle sheath cell number. A huge diversity in leaf anatomy within wild and domesticated rice species has been portrayed in this study, on an evolutionary context, predicting a two-pronged evolutionary pathway leading to the ‘sativa leaf type’ that we see today in domesticated species. PMID:27792743

  8. Comparative leaf growth strategies in response to low-water and low-light availability: variation in leaf physiology underlies variation in leaf mass per area in Populus tremuloides.

    PubMed

    Baird, Alec S; Anderegg, Leander D L; Lacey, Melissa E; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    2017-04-04

    Developmental phenotypic plasticity can allow plants to buffer the effects of abiotic and biotic environmental stressors. Therefore, it is vital to improve our understanding of how phenotypic plasticity in ecological functional traits is coordinated with variation in physiological performance in plants. To identify coordinated leaf responses to low-water (LW) versus low-light (LL) availability, we measured leaf mass per area (LMA), leaf anatomical characteristics and leaf gas exchange of juvenile Populus tremuloides Michx. trees. Spongy mesophyll tissue surface area (Asmes/A) was correlated with intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi: photosynthesis, (Aarea)/stomatal conductance (gs)). Under LW availability, these changes occurred at the cost of greater leaf tissue density and reduced expansive growth, as leaves were denser but were only 20% the final area of control leaves, resulting in elevated LMA and elevated WUEi. Low light resulted in reduced palisade mesophyll surface area (Apmes/A) while spongy mesophyll surface area was maintained (Asmes/A), with no changes to WUEi. These leaf morphological changes may be a plastic strategy to increase laminar light capture while maintaining WUEi. With reduced density and thickness, however, leaves were 50% the area of control leaves, ultimately resulting in reduced LMA. Our results illustrate that P. tremuloides saplings partially maintain physiological function in response to water and light limitation by inducing developmental plasticity in LMA with underlying anatomical changes. We discuss additional implications of these results in the context of developmental plasticity, growth trade-offs and the ecological impacts of climate change.

  9. Nutrient influences on leaf photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Longstreth, D.J.; Nobel, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The net rate of CO/sub 2/ uptake for leaves of Gossypium hirsutum L. was reduced when the plants were grown at low concentrations of NO/sub 3//sup -/, PO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, or K/sup +/. The water vapor conductance was relatively constant for all nutrient levels, indicating little effect on stomatal response. Although leaves under nutrient stress tended to be lower in chlorophyll and thinner, the ratio of mesophyll surface area to leaf area did not change appreciably. Thus, the reduction in CO/sub 2/ uptake rate at low nutrient levels was due to a decrease in the CO/sub 2/ conductance expressed per unit mesophyll cell wall area (g/sub CO/sup cell//sub 2/). The use of g/sub CO//sup cell//sub 2/ and nutrient levels expressed per unit of mesophyll cell wall provides a new means of assessing nutrient effects on CO/sub 2/ uptake of leaves. 14 figures, 1 table.

  10. Light-induced STOMAGEN-mediated stomatal development in Arabidopsis leaves.

    PubMed

    Hronková, Marie; Wiesnerová, Dana; Šimková, Marie; Skůpa, Petr; Dewitte, Walter; Vráblová, Martina; Zažímalová, Eva; Šantrůček, Jiří

    2015-08-01

    The initiation of stomata, microscopic valves in the epidermis of higher plants that control of gas exchange, requires a co-ordinated sequence of asymmetric and symmetric divisions, which is under tight environmental and developmental control. Arabidopsis leaves grown under elevated photosynthetic photon flux density have a higher density of stomata. STOMAGEN encodes an epidermal patterning factor produced in the mesophyll, and our observations indicated that elevated photosynthetic irradiation stimulates STOMAGEN expression. Our analysis of gain and loss of function of STOMAGEN further detailed its function as a positive regulator of stomatal formation on both sides of the leaf, not only in terms of stomatal density across the leaf surface but also in terms of their stomatal index. STOMAGEN function was rate limiting for the light response of the stomatal lineage in the adaxial epidermis. Mutants in pathways that regulate stomatal spacing in the epidermis and have elevated stomatal density, such as stomatal density and distribution (sdd1) and too many mouth alleles, displayed elevated STOMAGEN expression, suggesting that STOMAGEN is either under the direct control of these pathways or is indirectly affected by stomatal patterning, suggestive of a feedback mechanism. These observations support a model in which changes in levels of light irradiation are perceived in the mesophyll and control the production of stomata in the epidermis by mesophyll-produced STOMAGEN, and whereby, conversely, stomatal patterning, either directly or indirectly, influences STOMAGEN levels.

  11. Leaf morphological and anatomical traits from tropical to temperate coniferous forests: Mechanisms and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miao; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Hou, Jihua

    2016-01-22

    Leaf traits may reflect the adaptation mechanisms of plants to the environment. In this study, we investigated leaf morphological and anatomical traits in nine cold-temperate to tropical forests along a 4,200-km transect to test how they vary across latitudinal gradients. The results showed that leaf dry weight decreased (P < 0.05), while specific leaf area (SLA) increased (P < 0.05) with increasing latitude. Stomatal length and stomatal density did not change significantly, while stomatal pore area index increased (P < 0.05) with increasing latitude. The palisade-leaf mesophyll thickness ratio increased (P < 0.01), while the spongy-leaf mesophyll thickness ratio decreased, with increasing latitude (P < 0.01). Climate and leaf nutrients were the main factors that regulated leaf morphological and anatomical traits. Furthermore, we identified positive correlations between leaf area and leaf dry weight, leaf thickness and palisade mesophyll thickness, but negative correlations between stomatal length and stomatal density (all P < 0.01). The observed negative correlations represented the adaptive mechanisms of leaves through their morphological and anatomical traits. These findings provided new insights into the responses of leaf morphological and anatomical traits to climate changes and important parameters for future model optimization.

  12. Changes of leaf morphological, anatomical structure and carbon isotope ratio with the height of the Wangtian tree (Parashorea chinensis) in Xishuangbanna, China.

    PubMed

    He, Chun-Xia; Li, Ji-Yue; Zhou, Ping; Guo, Ming; Zheng, Quan-Shui

    2008-02-01

    Leaf morphological and anatomical structure and carbon isotope ratio (delta13C) change with increasing tree height. To determine how tree height affects leaf characteristics, we measured the leaf area, specific leaf mass (ratio of leaf mass to leaf area [LMA]), thickness of the total leaf, cuticle, epidermis, palisade and sponge mesophyll, stomata traits and delta13C at different heights of Parashorea chinensis with methods of light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. The correlation and stepwise regression between tree height and leaf structure traits were carried out with SPSS software. The results showed that leaf structures and delta13C differed significantly along the tree height gradient. The leaf area, thickness of sponge mesophyll and size of stomata decreased with increasing height, whereas the thickness of lamina, palisade mesophyll, epidermis, and cuticle, ratios of palisade to spongy thickness, density of stomata and vascular bundles, LMA and delta13C increased with tree height. Tree height showed a significant relationship with all leaf indices and the most significant relationship was with epidermis thickness, leaf area, cuticle thickness, delta13C. The delta13C value showed a significantly positive relationship with LMA (R = 0.934). Our results supported the hypothesis that the leaf structures exhibited more xeromorphic characteristics with the increasing gradient of tree height.

  13. Leaf morphological and anatomical traits from tropical to temperate coniferous forests: Mechanisms and influencing factors

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Miao; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Hou, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Leaf traits may reflect the adaptation mechanisms of plants to the environment. In this study, we investigated leaf morphological and anatomical traits in nine cold-temperate to tropical forests along a 4,200-km transect to test how they vary across latitudinal gradients. The results showed that leaf dry weight decreased (P < 0.05), while specific leaf area (SLA) increased (P < 0.05) with increasing latitude. Stomatal length and stomatal density did not change significantly, while stomatal pore area index increased (P < 0.05) with increasing latitude. The palisade-leaf mesophyll thickness ratio increased (P < 0.01), while the spongy-leaf mesophyll thickness ratio decreased, with increasing latitude (P < 0.01). Climate and leaf nutrients were the main factors that regulated leaf morphological and anatomical traits. Furthermore, we identified positive correlations between leaf area and leaf dry weight, leaf thickness and palisade mesophyll thickness, but negative correlations between stomatal length and stomatal density (all P < 0.01). The observed negative correlations represented the adaptive mechanisms of leaves through their morphological and anatomical traits. These findings provided new insights into the responses of leaf morphological and anatomical traits to climate changes and important parameters for future model optimization. PMID:26796339

  14. Capacity for C/sub 4/ photosynthesis among relatively advanced species of Flaveria. [Flaveria vaginata; Flaveria palmeri; Flaveria australasica; Flaveria bidentis; Flaveria trinervia

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.D.; Ku, M.S.B.; Edwards, G.E.

    1987-04-01

    Leaves of 5 summer-grown Flaveria species, all thought to be C/sub 4/ plants, were exposed to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ for 3-16 s. Analysis of /sup 14/C-products and extrapolation of labelling curves to zero time allowed estimation of the percentage of CO/sub 2/ incorporated via the C/sub 4/ cycle. This value was about 90% in F. vaginata and F. palmeri, 95% in F. australasica, 97% in F. bidentis, and 100% in F. trinervia. Localization of leaf carboxylases and decarboxylase was examined after purifying mesophyll and bundle sheath protoplasts by a simplified procedure. All species except F. trinervia showed some enrichment of RuBisCO to NADP-malic enzyme in mesophyll preparations. Mesophyll RuBisCO activities (up to 50 ..mu..mol/mg Chl x h) constituted less than or equal to7% of the total leaf RuBisCO (corrected for Chl distribution). Incomplete compartmentation of NADP-malic enzyme of direct entry of CO/sub 2/ into the bundle sheath may also occur in F. vaginata and F. palmeri. The data indicate that at least these 2 species (along with F. brownii from previous results) should be classified as less advanced, C/sub 4/-like species.

  15. Phloem unloading in developing leaves of sugar beet

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalstig, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Physiological and transport data support a symplastic pathway for phloem unloading in developing leaves of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. Klein E, multigerm). The sulfhydryl inhibitor parachloromercuribenzene sulfonic acid (PCMBS) inhibited uptake of (/sup 14/C)-sucrose added to the free space of developing leaves, but did not affect import of (/sup 14/C)-sucrose during steady-state /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ labeling of a source leaf. The passively-transported xenobiotic sugar, (/sup 14/C)-L-glucose did not readily enter mesophyll cells when supplied through the cut end of the petiole of a sink leaf as determined by whole leaf autoradiography. In contrast, (/sup 14/C)-L-glucose translocated through the phloem from a mature leaf, rapidly entered mesophyll cells, and was evenly distributed between mesophyll and veins. Autoradiographs of developing leaves following a pulse of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ to a source leaf revealed rapid passage of phloem translocated into progressively higher order veins as the leaf developed. Entry into V order veins occurred during the last stage of import through the phloem. Import into developing leaves was inhibited by glyphosate (N-phosphomethylglycine), a herbicide which inhibits the aromatic amino acid pathway and hence protein synthesis. Glyphosate also stopped net starch accumulation in sprayed mature leaves, but did not affect export of carbon from treated leaves during the time period that import into developed leaves was inhibited.

  16. Untangling metabolic and spatial interactions of stress tolerance in plants. 1. Patterns of carbon metabolism within leaves.

    PubMed

    Biel, Karl Y; Fomina, Irina R; Nazarova, Galina N; Soukhovolsky, Vladislav G; Khlebopros, Rem G; Nishio, John N

    2010-09-01

    The localization of the key photoreductive and oxidative processes and some stress-protective reactions within leaves of mesophytic C(3) plants were investigated. The role of light in determining the profile of Rubisco, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, catalase, fumarase, and cytochrome-c-oxidase across spinach leaves was examined by exposing leaves to illumination on either the adaxial or abaxial leaf surfaces. Oxygen evolution in fresh paradermal leaf sections and CO(2) gas exchange in whole leaves under adaxial or abaxial illumination was also examined. The results showed that the palisade mesophyll is responsible for the midday depression of photosynthesis in spinach leaves. The photosynthetic apparatus was more sensitive to the light environment than the respiratory apparatus. Additionally, examination of the paradermal leaf sections by optical microscopy allowed us to describe two new types of parenchyma in spinach-pirum mesophyll and pillow spongy mesophyll. A hypothesis that oxaloacetate may protect the upper leaf tissue from the destructive influence of active oxygen is presented. The application of mathematical modeling shows that the pattern of enzymatic distribution across leaves abides by the principle of maximal ecological utility. Light regulation of carbon metabolism across leaves is discussed.

  17. Abaxial Greening Phenotype in Hybrid Aspen

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Julia S.; Douglas, Carl J.; Cronk, Quentin C.B.

    2013-01-01

    The typical angiosperm leaf, as in Arabidopsis, is bifacial consisting of top (adaxial) and bottom (abaxial) surfaces readily distinguishable by the underlying cell type (palisade and spongy mesophyll, respectively). Species of the genus Populus have leaves that are either conventionally bifacial or isobilateral. Isobilateral leaves have palisade mesophyll on the top and bottom of the leaf, making the two sides virtually indistinguishable at the macroscopic level. In poplars this has been termed the “abaxial greening” phenotype. Previous work has implicated ASYMMETRIC LEAVES1 (AS1) as an essential determinant of palisade mesophyll development. This gene, as well as other genes (84 in all) putatively involved in setting the dorsiventral axis of leaves, were investigated in two Populus species: black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa) and hybrid aspen (P. tremula x tremuloides), representative of each leaf type (bifacial and isobilateral, respectively). Poplar orthologs of AS1 have significantly higher expression in aspen leaf blade and lower in the petiole, suggestive of a potential role in the isobilateral leaf phenotype consistent with the previously observed phenotypes. Furthermore, an ABERRANT TESTA SHAPE (ATS) ortholog has significantly lower expression in aspen leaf tissue, also suggesting a possible contribution of this gene to abaxial greening. PMID:27137376

  18. Development of the cotyledon cells during olive (Olea europaea L.) in vitro seed germination and seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Jiménez-López, José Carlos; Zienkiewicz, Krzysztof; de Dios Alché, Juan; Rodríguez-García, María Isabel

    2011-10-01

    The structural changes occurred in differentiating olive cotyledon cells into mesophyll cells are described. Using histological and immunocytological methods as well as microscopic observations, we showed that in the cells of mature embryo, large electron-dense proteins bodies (PBs) are surrounded by numerous oil bodies (OBs). After 3 days of in vitro germination, the presence of large PBs originated by fusion of smaller PBs was observed. It was also detected a close spatial proximity between PBs and OBs, likely as a reflection of interconnected metabolic pathways. Between the 3rd and the 12th day of germination, the formation of a large vacuolar compartment takes place accompanied by a decrease in the PBs and OBs number. This was coincident with a progressive decrease in the amount of the 11S-type seed storage proteins (SSPs), showed in situ and after Western blot analysis of crude protein extracts. After 26 days germination, the cellular organization became typical for a leaf mesophyll cell, with well-differentiated chloroplasts surrounding a large central vacuole. Our results suggest that the olive cotyledon storage reserves are mobilized gradually until the seedling becomes autotrophic. Moreover, the specific accumulation of storage proteins in the intravacuolar material suggests that these structures may operate as a shuttle for SSPs and/or products of their degradation into the cytoplasm, where finally they supply amino acids for the differentiating mesophyll cells.

  19. Different patterns of vein loading of exogenous ( sup 14 C)sucrose in leaves of pisum sativum and coleus blumei

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, R.; Wimmers, L.E. )

    1988-05-01

    Vein loading of exogenous ({sup 14}C)sucrose was studied using short uptake and wash periods to distinguish between direct loading into veins and loading via mesophyll tissue. Mature leaf tissue of Pisum sativum L. cv Little Marvel, or Coleus blumei Benth. cv Candidum, was abraded and leaf discs were floated on ({sup 14}C)sucrose solution for 1 or 2 minutes. Discs were then washed for 1 to 30 min either at room temperature or in the cold and were frozen, lyophilized, and autoradiographed. In P. sativum, veins were clearly labeled after 1 minute uptake and 1 minute wash periods. Autoradiographic images did not change appreciably with longer times of uptake or wash. Vein loading was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid. These results indicate that uptake of exogenous sucrose occurs directly into the veins in this species. When C. blumei leaf discs were floated on ({sup 14}C)sucrose for 2 minutes and washed in the cold, the mesophyll was labeled but little, if any, minor vein loading occurred. When discs were labeled for 2 minutes and washed at room temperature, label was transferred from the mesophyll to the veins within minutes. These results indicate that there may be different patterns of phloem loading of photosynthetically derived sucrose in these two species.

  20. Apoplastic and symplastic phloem loading in Quercus robur and Fraxinus excelsior.

    PubMed

    Oner-Sieben, Soner; Lohaus, Gertrud

    2014-04-01

    Whereas most of the research on phloem loading is performed on herbaceous plants, less is known about phloem loading strategies in trees. In this study, the phloem loading mechanisms of Quercus robur and Fraxinus excelsior were analysed. The following features were examined: the minor vein structure, the sugar concentrations in phloem sap by the laser-aphid-stylet technique, the distribution of photoassimilates in the mesophyll cells by non-aqueous fractionation, gradients of sugar concentrations and osmotic pressure, and the expression of sucrose transporters. The minor vein configurations of Q. robur and F. excelsior belong to the open type. Quercus robur contained companion cells in the minor veins whereas F. excelsior showed intermediary cells in addition to ordinary companion cells. The main carbon transport form in Q. robur was sucrose (~1M). In F. excelsior high amounts of raffinose and stachyose were also transported. However, in both tree species, the osmolality of phloem sap was higher than the osmolality of the mesophyll cells. The concentration gradients between phloem sap and the cytoplasm of mesophyll cells for sucrose were 16-fold and 14-fold for Q. robur and F. excelsior, respectively. Independent of the type of translocated sugars, sucrose transporter cDNAs were cloned from both species. The results indicate that phloem loading of sucrose and other metabolites must involve active loading steps in both tree species. Quercus robur seems to be an apoplastic phloem loader while F. excelsior shows indications of being a symplastic or mixed symplastic-apoplastic phloem loader.

  1. Photorespiration plays an important role in the regulation of photosynthetic electron flow under fluctuating light in tobacco plants grown under full sunlight.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2015-01-01

    Plants usually experience dynamic fluctuations of light intensities under natural conditions. However, the responses of mesophyll conductance, CO2 assimilation, and photorespiration to light fluctuation are not well understood. To address this question, we measured photosynthetic parameters of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence in tobacco leaves at 2-min intervals while irradiance levels alternated between 100 and 1200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1). Compared with leaves exposed to a constant light of 1200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), both stomatal and mesophyll conductances were significantly restricted in leaves treated with fluctuating light condition. Meanwhile, CO2 assimilation rate and electron flow devoted to RuBP carboxylation at 1200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) under fluctuating light were limited by the low chloroplast CO2 concentration. Analysis based on the C3 photosynthesis model indicated that, at 1200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) under fluctuating light, the CO2 assimilation rate was limited by RuBP carboxylation. Electron flow devoted to RuBP oxygenation at 1200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) under fluctuating light remained at nearly the maximum level throughout the experimental period. We conclude that fluctuating light restricts CO2 assimilation by decreasing both stomatal and mesophyll conductances. Under such conditions, photorespiration plays an important role in the regulation of photosynthetic electron flow.

  2. A two-dimensional microscale model of gas exchange during photosynthesis in maize (Zea mays L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Retta, Moges; Ho, Quang Tri; Yin, Xinyou; Verboven, Pieter; Berghuijs, Herman N C; Struik, Paul C; Nicolaï, Bart M

    2016-05-01

    CO2 exchange in leaves of maize (Zea mays L.) was examined using a microscale model of combined gas diffusion and C4 photosynthesis kinetics at the leaf tissue level. Based on a generalized scheme of photosynthesis in NADP-malic enzyme type C4 plants, the model accounted for CO2 diffusion in a leaf tissue, CO2 hydration and assimilation in mesophyll cells, CO2 release from decarboxylation of C4 acids, CO2 fixation in bundle sheath cells and CO2 retro-diffusion from bundle sheath cells. The transport equations were solved over a realistic 2-D geometry of the Kranz anatomy obtained from light microscopy images. The predicted responses of photosynthesis rate to changes in ambient CO2 and irradiance compared well with those obtained from gas exchange measurements. A sensitivity analysis showed that the CO2 permeability of the mesophyll-bundle sheath and airspace-mesophyll interfaces strongly affected the rate of photosynthesis and bundle sheath conductance. Carbonic anhydrase influenced the rate of photosynthesis, especially at low intercellular CO2 levels. In addition, the suberin layer at the exposed surface of the bundle sheath cells was found beneficial in reducing the retro-diffusion. The model may serve as a tool to investigate CO2 diffusion further in relation to the Kranz anatomy in C4 plants.

  3. Veinloading in seedlings of phaseolus vulgaris exposed to excess cobalt, nickel, and zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Rauser, W.E.; Samarakoon, A.B.

    1980-04-01

    Vein loading in unifoliate leaves of white bean seedlings exposed to excess Co/sup 2 +/, Ni/sup 2 +/, or Zn/sup 2 +/ for 1 to 4 days was studied by incubating leaf discs in absolute value of /sup 14/C sucrose. The discs from plants exposed to metal exhibited an increased total uptake of radiosucrose but reduced vein loading. Uptake of radiosucrose was greater particularly in discs from seedlings exposed to excess Ni/sup 2 +/ and Zn/sup 2 +/. The effect increased as exposure of the seedlings to metal increased up to 4 days. Autoradiographs showed vein loading in control leaf tissues with most of the radiosucrose accumulating in minor veins and little remaining in the mesophyll. In discs from metal-treated plants, most of the sucrose remained in the mesophyll without accumulating perferentially in the minor veins. The effect was evident within 24 hours of exposure to excess metal and intensified with longer exposures to metal. The inhibition of vein loading was also evident in situ. Both the preferential accumulation of sucrose into the minor veins of control tissues and the accumulation into mesophyll of metal exposed tissues were sensitive to 2,4-dinitrophenol and the blockage of sulfhydryl groups. It is concluded that the inhibition of vein loading contributes markedly to the observed toxicological effects of reduced photoassimilate export and of accumulation of carbohydrates in fully expanded leaves of bean seedlings exposed to excess metal ions.

  4. [Dynamics of ultrastructure changes in sheet plate fiber flax with braking transport assimilate by nitrate-anion].

    PubMed

    Abdrakhimov, F A; Batasheva, S N; Bakirova, G G; Chikov, V I

    2008-01-01

    Changes in leaf mesophyll cell ultrastructure under nitrate feeding into the apoplast of common flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) in the form of 50 mM KNO3 solution were studied. In 30 min after the beginning of nitrate feeding through the transpiration water stream, swelling of mitochondrial and microbodies, clarification of their matrices, and curling of dictyosome discs into annular structures were observed. These events characterized symplastic domain formed by mesophyll, bundle sheath and phloem parenchyma cells, and were not found in companion cell-sieve element complex. Simultaneously, formation of large central vacuoles in companion cells was noted. Restoration of organelle structures in assimilating cells and phloem parenchyma in 1-2 h after treatment was accompanied by enhancement of morphological changes in phloem elements and companion cells and signs of plasmolysis in the mesophyll cells. It was supposed that the two-phase character of changes in leaf organelle ultrastructure and photosynthesis might reflect duality of leaf cell response to nitrate ion. The rapid alterations of the structure can be coupled with direct influence of the anion on cell metabolism and(or) with signal-regulatory functions of oxidized nitrogen forms, while the slower ones reflect the result of suppression of photoassimilate export from leaves by the anion.

  5. Apoplastic and symplastic phloem loading in Quercus robur and Fraxinus excelsior

    PubMed Central

    Lohaus, Gertrud

    2014-01-01

    Whereas most of the research on phloem loading is performed on herbaceous plants, less is known about phloem loading strategies in trees. In this study, the phloem loading mechanisms of Quercus robur and Fraxinus excelsior were analysed. The following features were examined: the minor vein structure, the sugar concentrations in phloem sap by the laser–aphid–stylet technique, the distribution of photoassimilates in the mesophyll cells by non-aqueous fractionation, gradients of sugar concentrations and osmotic pressure, and the expression of sucrose transporters. The minor vein configurations of Q. robur and F. excelsior belong to the open type. Quercus robur contained companion cells in the minor veins whereas F. excelsior showed intermediary cells in addition to ordinary companion cells. The main carbon transport form in Q. robur was sucrose (~1M). In F. excelsior high amounts of raffinose and stachyose were also transported. However, in both tree species, the osmolality of phloem sap was higher than the osmolality of the mesophyll cells. The concentration gradients between phloem sap and the cytoplasm of mesophyll cells for sucrose were 16-fold and 14-fold for Q. robur and F. excelsior, respectively. Independent of the type of translocated sugars, sucrose transporter cDNAs were cloned from both species. The results indicate that phloem loading of sucrose and other metabolites must involve active loading steps in both tree species. Quercus robur seems to be an apoplastic phloem loader while F. excelsior shows indications of being a symplastic or mixed symplastic–apoplastic phloem loader. PMID:24591056

  6. Leaf conductance and carbon gain under salt-stressed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, V.; Manzoni, S.; Marani, M.; Katul, G.

    2011-12-01

    Exposure of plants to salt stress is often accompanied by reductions in leaf photosynthesis and in stomatal and mesophyll conductances. To separate the effects of salt stress on these quantities, a model based on the hypothesis that carbon gain is maximized subject to a water loss cost is proposed. The optimization problem of adjusting stomatal aperture for maximizing carbon gain at a given water loss is solved for both a non-linear and a linear biochemical demand function. A key novel theoretical outcome of the optimality hypothesis is an explicit relationship between the stomatal and mesophyll conductances that can be evaluated against published measurements. The approaches here successfully describe gas-exchange measurements reported for olive trees (Olea europea L.) and spinach (Spinacia oleraceaL.) in fresh water and in salt-stressed conditions. Salt stress affected both stomatal and mesophyll conductances and photosynthetic efficiency of both species. The fresh water/salt water comparisons show that the photosynthetic capacity is directly reduced by 30%-40%, indicating that reductions in photosynthetic rates under increased salt stress are not due only to a limitation of CO2diffusion. An increase in salt stress causes an increase in the cost of water parameter (or marginal water use efficiency) exceeding 100%, analogous in magnitude to findings from extreme drought stress studies. The proposed leaf-level approach can be incorporated into physically based models of the soil-plant-atmosphere system to assess how saline conditions and elevated atmospheric CO2 jointly impact transpiration and photosynthesis.

  7. Contributions of photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic cell types to leaf respiration in Vicia faba L. and their responses to growth temperature.

    PubMed

    Long, Benedict M; Bahar, Nur H A; Atkin, Owen K

    2015-11-01

    In intact leaves, mitochondrial populations are highly heterogeneous among contrasting cell types; how such contrasting populations respond to sustained changes in the environment remains, however, unclear. Here, we examined respiratory rates, mitochondrial protein composition and response to growth temperature in photosynthetic (mesophyll) and non-photosynthetic (epidermal) cells from fully expanded leaves of warm-developed (WD) and cold-developed (CD) broad bean (Vicia faba L.). Rates of respiration were significantly higher in mesophyll cell protoplasts (MCPs) than epidermal cell protoplasts (ECPs), with both protoplast types exhibiting capacity for cytochrome and alternative oxidase activity. Compared with ECPs, MCPs contained greater relative quantities of porin, suggesting higher mitochondrial surface area in mesophyll cells. Nevertheless, the relative quantities of respiratory proteins (normalized to porin) were similar in MCPs and ECPs, suggesting that ECPs have lower numbers of mitochondria yet similar protein complement to MCP mitochondria (albeit with lower abundance serine hydroxymethyltransferase). Several mitochondrial proteins (both non-photorespiratory and photorespiratory) exhibited an increased abundance in response to cold in both protoplast types. Based on estimates of individual protoplast respiration rates, combined with leaf cell abundance data, epidermal cells make a small but significant (2%) contribution to overall leaf respiration which increases twofold in the cold. Taken together, our data highlight the heterogeneous nature of mitochondrial populations in leaves, both among contrasting cell types and in how those populations respond to growth temperature.

  8. An alternative methylation pathway in lignin biosynthesis in Zinnia.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Z H; Kneusel, R E; Matern, U; Varner, J E

    1994-01-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine:trans-caffeoyl-coenzyme A 3-O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT) is implicated in disease resistant response, but whether it is involved in lignin biosynthesis is not known. We isolated a cDNA clone for CCoAOMT in differentiating tracheary elements (TEs) induced from Zinnia-isolated mesophyll cells. RNA gel blot analysis showed that the expression of the CCoAOMT gene was markedly induced during TE differentiation from the isolated mesophyll cells. Tissue print hybridization showed that the expression of the CCoAOMT gene is temporally and spatially regulated and that it is associated with lignification in xylem and in phloem fibers in Zinnia organs. Both CCoAOMT and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) activities increased when the isolated Zinnia mesophyll cells were cultured, whereas only CCoAOMT activity was markedly enhanced during lignification in the in vitro-differentiating TEs. The induction pattern of the OMT activity using 5-hydroxyferuloyl CoA as substrate during lignification was the same as that using caffeoyl CoA. Taken together, the results indicate that CCoAOMT is associated with lignification during xylogenesis both in vitro and in the plant, whereas COMT is only involved in a stress response in vitro. We propose that CCoAOMT is involved in an alternative methylation pathway in lignin biosynthesis. In Zinnia in vitro-differentiating TEs, the CCoAOMT mediated methylation pathway is dominant. PMID:7994176

  9. Killer activity of yeasts isolated from natural environments against some medically important Candida species.

    PubMed

    Vadkertiová, Renata; Sláviková, Elena

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-five yeast cultures, mainly of human origin, belonging to four pathogenic yeast species--Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis were tested for their sensitivity to ten basidiomycetous and eleven ascomycetous yeast species isolated from the water and soil environments and from tree leaves. The best killer activity among basidiomycetous species was exhibited by Rhodotorula glutinis, and R. mucilaginosa. The other carotenoid producing species Cystofilobasidium capitatum, Sporobolomyces salmonicolor, and S. roseus were active only against about 40% of the tested strains and exhibited weak activity. The broadest killer activity among ascomycetous yeasts was shown by the strains Pichia anomala and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. The species Debaryomyces castellii, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia membranifaciens, and Williopsis californica did not show any killer activity. The best killer activity exhibited the strains isolated from leafy material. The lowest activity pattern was found among strains originating from soil environment.

  10. Turbo-taxonomy: 21 new species of Myzostomida (Annelida).

    PubMed

    Summers, Mindi M; Al-Hakim, Iin Inayat; Rouse, Greg W

    2014-10-17

    An efficient protocol to identify and describe species of Myzostomida is outlined and demonstrated. This taxonomic approach relies on careful identification (facilitated by an included comprehensive table of available names with relevant geographical and host information) and concise descriptions combined with DNA sequencing, live photography, and accurate host identification. Twenty-one new species are described following these guidelines: Asteromyzostomum grygieri n. sp., Endomyzostoma scotia n. sp., Endomyzostoma neridae n. sp., Mesomyzostoma lanterbecqae n. sp., Hypomyzostoma jasoni n. sp., Hypomyzostoma jonathoni n. sp., Myzostoma debiae n. sp., Myzostoma eeckhauti n. sp., Myzostoma hollandi n. sp., Myzostoma indocuniculus n. sp., Myzostoma josefinae n. sp., Myzostoma kymae n. sp., Myzostoma laurenae n. sp., Myzostoma miki n. sp., Myzostoma pipkini n. sp., Myzostoma susanae n. sp., Myzostoma tertiusi n. sp., Protomyzostomum lingua n. sp., Protomyzostomum roseus n. sp., Pulvinomyzostomum inaki n. sp., and Pulvinomyzostomum messingi n. sp.. 

  11. Comparison of physiological and anatomical changes of C3 (Oryza sativa [L.]) and C4 (Echinochloa crusgalli [L.]) leaves in response to drought stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamim, Hamim; Banon, Sri; Dorly, Dorly

    2016-01-01

    The experiment aimed to analyse the different response of C3 (Oryza sativa L.) and C4 (Echinochloa crusgalli L.) species to drought stress based on physiological and anatomical properties. Seeds of rice (Oryza sativa) and Echinochloa (Echinochloa crusgalli) were grown in 15 cm (D) pot for 6 weeks under well-watered conditions. After 6 weeks the plants were divided into two groups, (1) well-watered which were watered daily, and (2) drought stress which were withheld from watering for 6 days. After 6 days of drought, the plants were then re-watered to analyse plant recovery. During drought period, the plants were analysed for growth, leaf relative water content (RWC), photosynthesis, and leaf anatomy. Drought stress significantly reduced leaf RWC of both species, but the reduction was bigger in rice than in Echinochloa. The maximum efficiency of photosynthesis (Fv/Fm) was decrease significantly in response to drought stress by about 48.04% in rice, while it was only 34.40% in Echinochloa. Anatomical analysis showed drought treatment tended to reduce leaf thickness in the area of bulliform cell, major- as well as intervein and xylem diameter, more in Echinochloa than in rice, suggesting that the decrease of vein and xylem diameter is among the anatomical parameters that is important to overcome from drought stress in Echinochloa. The number of chloroplast in the mesophyll cell and bundle sheath cell (BSC) was different between these two species, where in Echinochloa chloroplast was found in both mesophyll as well as BSC, while in rice it was only found in mesophyll cell, confirmed that Echinochloa is a C4 and rice is a C3 species. Interestingly, in Echinochloa, the number of chloroplast was significantly increased due to drought stress in BSC, but not in mesophyll cell. The number of starch granules also dramatically increased in response to drought in the mesophyll cells of rice and Echinochloa, and in the bundle sheath cell of Echinochloa which indicate that C3

  12. Salinicoccus siamensis sp. nov., isolated from fermented shrimp paste in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pakdeeto, Amnat; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Thawai, Chitti; Moonmangmee, Somporn; Kudo, Takuji; Itoh, Takashi

    2007-09-01

    Fifteen strains of moderately halophilic, Gram-positive cocci were isolated from a traditional fermented shrimp paste ('ka-pi') produced in Thailand. These bacteria were strictly aerobic, non-motile, non-sporulating and catalase- and oxidase-positive. They produced orange pigment and grew in the presence of 1.5-25 % (w/v) NaCl. They grew optimally in 10 % (w/v) NaCl, at pH 8.5 and at 37 degrees C. The cell-wall peptidoglycan was of l-Lys type. Menaquinone with six isoprene units (MK-6) was a major component. The dominant cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(15 : 0). DNA G+C contents were in the range 44.5-47.5 mol%. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses indicated that representative strain PN1-2(T) was related most closely to Salinicoccus roseus JCM 14630(T), with 97.3 % similarity. The other novel strains were included in the same species based on their levels of DNA-DNA relatedness to strain PN1-2(T) (> or =76.6 %) but showed low DNA-DNA relatedness to S. roseus JCM 14630(T) (21.7 %). On the basis of the phenotypic and molecular data presented, the 15 novel strains are suggested to represent a single novel species of the genus Salinicoccus, for which the name Salinicoccus siamensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PN1-2(T) (=JCM 12822(T) =PCU 242(T) =TISTR 1562(T)).

  13. On the mechanism of trap closure of Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis).

    PubMed

    Hodick, D; Sievers, A

    1989-08-01

    The rapid trap closure of Dionaea muscinula Ellis has been explained by either a loss of turgor pressure of the upper epidermis, which should thus become flexible, or by a sudden acid-induced wall loosening of the motor cells. According to our experiments both explanations are doubtful. Objections against the turgor mechanism come from the determination by extracellular measurements from the upper epidermis of action-potential amplitudes before and after trap closure. Neither time course nor amplitude of the action potentials are altered by trap closure. In contrast a rise in the apoplastic concentration of K(+) or Na(+), which are the only ions present in the trap in osmotically significant concentrations, from 1 to 10 mM reduces the action-potential amplitudes by 25% and 15%, respectively. Furthermore, after trap closure the upper epidermal cells retain a considerable cell sap osmolality of 0.41 mol·kg(-1) which equals that of the mesophyll cells as determined by incipient plasmolysis. A sudden cell-wall acidification causing movement is improbable since an acidification of the apoplast from pH 6 to pH 4 reduces action-potential amplitudes by 33% whereas the amplitudes measured extracellylarly from the mesophyll and lower epidermis remain unchanged by trap closure. In addition, buffering the apoplast at pH 6 does not prevent movement in traps which have been incised several times from the margin to the midrib to facilitate buffer diffusion into the mesophyll. Even an alkalinization of cell walls of plasmolysed leaf segments to pH 9 does not prevent considerable extensions of the mesophyll and subsequent movement of the specimens during deplasmolysis.These experiments make it very likely that the mesophyll cells are already extensible but are kept compressed in the open trap, thus developing tissue tension. The mechanism which prevents their extension as long as the trap is open can so far only be explained for traps which have been paralysed by a long

  14. Photosynthesis Decrease and Stomatal Control of Gas Exchange in Abies alba Mill. in Response to Vapor Pressure Difference

    PubMed Central

    Guehl, Jean-Marc; Aussenac, Gilbert

    1987-01-01

    The responses of steady state CO2 assimilation rate (A), transpiration rate (E), and stomatal conductance (gs) to changes in leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference (ΔW) were examined on different dates in shoots from Abies alba trees growing outside. In Ecouves, a provenance representative of wet oceanic conditions in Northern France, both A and gs decreased when ΔW was increased from 4.6 to 14.5 Pa KPa−1. In Nebias, which represented the dry end of the natural range of A. alba in southern France, A and gs decreased only after reaching peak levels at 9.0 and 7.0 Pa KPa−1, respectively. The representation of the data in assimilation rate (A) versus intercellular CO2 partial pressure (Ci) graphs allowed us to determine how stomata and mesophyll photosynthesis interacted when ΔW was increased. Changes in A were primarily due to alterations in mesophyll photosynthesis. At high ΔW, and especially in Ecouves when soil water deficit prevailed, A declined, while Ci remained approximately constant, which may be interpreted as an adjustment of gs to changes in mesophyll photosynthesis. Such a stomatal control of gas exchange appeared as an alternative to the classical feedforward interpretation of E versus ΔW responses with a peak rate of E. The gas exchange response to ΔW was also characterized by considerable deviations from the optimization theory of IR Cowan and GD Farquhar (1977 Symp Soc Exp Biol 31: 471-505). PMID:16665243

  15. Characterization, localization, and seasonal changes of the sucrose transporter FeSUT1 in the phloem of Fraxinus excelsior

    PubMed Central

    Öner-Sieben, Soner; Rappl, Christine; Sauer, Norbert; Stadler, Ruth; Lohaus, Gertrud

    2015-01-01

    Trees are generally assumed to be symplastic phloem loaders. A typical feature for most wooden species is an open minor vein structure with symplastic connections between mesophyll cells and phloem cells, which allow sucrose to move cell-to-cell through the plasmodesmata into the phloem. Fraxinus excelsior (Oleaceae) also translocates raffinose family oligosaccharides in addition to sucrose. Sucrose concentration was recently shown to be higher in the phloem sap than in the mesophyll cells. This suggests the involvement of apoplastic steps and the activity of sucrose transporters in addition to symplastic phloem-loading processes. In this study, the sucrose transporter FeSUT1 from F. excelsior was analysed. Heterologous expression in baker’s yeast showed that FeSUT1 mediates the uptake of sucrose. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that FeSUT1 was exclusively located in phloem cells of minor veins and in the transport phloem of F. excelsior. Further characterization identified these cells as sieve elements and possibly ordinary companion cells but not as intermediary cells. The localization and expression pattern point towards functions of FeSUT1 in phloem loading of sucrose as well as in sucrose retrieval. FeSUT1 is most likely responsible for the observed sucrose gradient between mesophyll and phloem. The elevated expression level of FeSUT1 indicated an increased apoplastic carbon export activity from the leaves during spring and late autumn. It is hypothesized that the importance of apoplastic loading is high under low-sucrose conditions and that the availability of two different phloem-loading mechanisms confers advantages for temperate woody species like F. excelsior. PMID:26022258

  16. Ultrastructure of minor-vein phloem and assimilate export in summer and winter leaves of the symplasmically loading evergreens Ajuga reptans L., Aucuba japonica Thunb., and Hedera helix L.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann-Thoma, G; van Bel, A J; Ehlers, K

    2001-01-01

    Minor-vein ultrastructure and sugar export were studied in mature summer and winter leaves of the three broadleaf-evergreen species Ajuga reptans var. artropurpurescens L., Aucuba japonica Thunb. and Hedera helix L. to assess temperature effects on phloem loading. Leaves of the perennial herb Ajuga exported substantial amounts of assimilates in form of raffinose-family oligosaccharides (RFOs). Its minor-vein companion cells represent typical intermediary cells (ICs), with numerous small vacuoles and abundant plasmodesmal connectivity to the bundle sheath. The woody plants Hedera and Aucuba translocated sucrose as the dominant sugar species, and only traces of RFOs. Their minor-vein phloem possessed a layer of highly vacuolated cells (VCs) intervening between mesophyll and sieve elements. Depending on their location and ontogeny, VCs were classified either as companion or parenchyma cells. Both cell types showed symplasmic continuity to the adjacent mesophyll tissue although at a lower plasmodesmal frequency compared to the Ajuga ICs. p-Chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid did not reduce leaf sugar export in any of the plants, indicating a symplasmic mode of phloem loading. Winter leaves did not show symptoms of frost injury, and the vacuolar pattern in ICs and VCs was equally prominent in both seasons. Starch accumulation as a result of reduced phloem loading was not observed to be triggered by low temperature. In contrast, high amounts of starch were found in mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells of summer leaves. Physiological data on season-dependent leaf exudation showed the maintenance of sugar export in cold-acclimated winter leaves.

  17. Leaf structure affects a plant's appearance: combined multiple-mechanisms intensify remarkable foliar variegation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Shiuan; Chesson, Peter; Wu, Ho-Wei; Pao, Shang-Hung; Liu, Jian-Wei; Chien, Lee-Feng; Yong, Jean W H; Sheue, Chiou-Rong

    2017-03-01

    The presence of foliar variegation challenges perceptions of leaf form and functioning. But variegation is often incorrectly identified and misinterpreted. The striking variegation found in juvenile Blastus cochinchinensis (Melastomataceae) provides an instructive case study of mechanisms and their ecophysiological implications. Variegated (white and green areas, vw and vg) and non-variegated leaves (normal green leaves, ng) of seedlings of Blastus were compared structurally with microtechniques, and characterized for chlorophyll content and fluorescence. More limited study of Sonerila heterostemon (Melastomataceae) and Kaempferia pulchra (Zingiberaceae) tested the generality of the findings. Variegation in Blastus combines five mechanisms: epidermal, air space, upper mesophyll, chloroplast and crystal, the latter two being new mechanisms. All mesophyll cells (vw, vg, ng) have functional chloroplasts with dense thylakoids. The vw areas are distinguished by flatter adaxial epidermal cells and central trichomes containing crystals, the presence of air spaces between the adaxial epidermis and a colorless spongy-like upper mesophyll containing smaller and fewer chloroplasts. The vw area is further distinguished by having the largest spongy-tissue chloroplasts and fewer stomata. Both leaf types have similar total chlorophyll content and similar  F v/F m (maximum quantum yield of PSII), but vg has significantly higher F v/F m than ng. Variegation in Sonerila and Kaempferia is also caused by combined mechanisms, including the crystal type in Kaempferia. This finding of combined mechanisms in three different species suggests that combined mechanisms may occur more commonly in nature than current understanding. The combined mechanisms in Blastus variegated leaves represent intricate structural modifications that may compensate for and minimize photosynthetic loss, and reflect changing plant needs.

  18. Compartmentation of photosynthesis in cells and tissues of C(4) plants.

    PubMed

    Edwards, G E; Franceschi, V R; Ku, M S; Voznesenskaya, E V; Pyankov, V I; Andreo, C S

    2001-04-01

    Critical to defining photosynthesis in C(4) plants is understanding the intercellular and intracellular compartmentation of enzymes between mesophyll and bundle sheath cells in the leaf. This includes enzymes of the C(4) cycle (including three subtypes), the C(3) pathway and photorespiration. The current state of knowledge of this compartmentation is a consequence of the development and application of different techniques over the past three decades. Initial studies led to some alternative hypotheses on the mechanism of C(4) photosynthesis, and some controversy over the compartmentation of enzymes. The development of methods for separating mesophyll and bundle sheath cells provided convincing evidence on intercellular compartmentation of the key components of the C(4) pathway. Studies on the intracellular compartmentation of enzymes between organelles and the cytosol were facilitated by the isolation of mesophyll and bundle sheath protoplasts, which can be fractionated gently while maintaining organelle integrity. Now, the ability to determine localization of photosynthetic enzymes conclusively, through in situ immunolocalization by confocal light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, is providing further insight into the mechanism of C(4) photosynthesis and its evolution. Currently, immunological, ultrastructural and cytochemical studies are revealing relationships between anatomical arrangements and photosynthetic mechanisms which are probably related to environmental factors associated with evolution of these plants. This includes interesting variations in the C(4) syndrome in leaves and cotyledons of species in the tribe Salsoleae of the family Chenopodiaceae, in relation to evolution and ecology. Thus, analysis of structure-function relationships using modern techniques is a very powerful approach to understanding evolution and regulation of the photosynthetic carbon reduction mechanisms.

  19. Isolation and characterization of structural components of Aloe vera L. leaf pulp.

    PubMed

    Ni, Y; Turner, D; Yates, K M; Tizard, I

    2004-12-20

    The clear pulp, also known as inner gel, of Aloe vera L. leaf is widely used in various medical, cosmetic and nutraceutical applications. Many beneficial effects of this plant have been attributed to the polysaccharides present in the pulp. However, discrepancies exist regarding the composition of pulp polysaccharide species and an understanding of pulp structure in relation to its chemical composition has been lacking. Thus, we examined pulp structure, isolated structural components and determined their carbohydrate compositions along with analyzing a partially purified pulp-based product (Acemannan hydrogel) used to make Carrisyn hydrogel wound dressing. Light and electron microscopy showed that the pulp consisted of large clear mesophyll cells with a diameter as large as 1000 microm. These cells were composed of cell walls and cell membranes along with a very limited number of degenerated cellular organelles. No intact cellular organelles were found in mesophyll cells. Following disruption of pulp by homogenization, three components were isolated by sequential centrifugation. They were thin clear sheets, microparticles and a viscous liquid gel, which corresponded to cell wall, degenerated cellular organelles and liquid content of mesophyll cells based on morphological and chemical analysis. These three components accounted for 16.2% (+/-3.8), 0.70% (+/-0) and 83.1% of the pulp on a dry weight basis. The carbohydrate composition of each component was distinct; liquid gel contained mannan, microparticles contained galactose-rich polysaccharide(s) and cell walls contained an unusually high level of galacturonic acid (34%, w/w; Gal A). The same three components were also found in Acemannan Hydrogel with mannan as the predominant component. Thus, different pulp structural components are associated with different polysaccharides and thus may potentially be different functionally. These findings may help lay a basis for further studies and development of better

  20. MAP65-1a positively regulates H2O2 amplification and enhances brassinosteroid-induced antioxidant defence in maize.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan; Zuo, Mingxing; Liang, Yali; Jiang, Mingyi; Zhang, Jianhua; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Tan, Mingpu; Zhang, Aying

    2013-09-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR)-induced antioxidant defence has been shown to enhance stress tolerance. In this study, the role of the maize 65 kDa microtubule-associated protein (MAP65), ZmMAP65-1a, in BR-induced antioxidant defence was investigated. Treatment with BR increased the expression of ZmMAP65-1a in maize (Zea mays) leaves and mesophyll protoplasts. Transient expression and RNA interference silencing of ZmMAP65-1a in mesophyll protoplasts further revealed that ZmMAP65-1a is required for the BR-induced increase in expression and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). Both exogenous and BR-induced endogenous H2O2 increased the expression of ZmMAP65-1a. Conversely, transient expression of ZmMAP65-1a in maize mesophyll protoplasts enhanced BR-induced H2O2 accumulation, while transient silencing of ZmMAP65-1a blocked the BR-induced expression of NADPH oxidase genes and inhibited BR-induced H2O2 accumulation. Inhibiting the activity and gene expression of ZmMPK5 significantly prevented the BR-induced expression of ZmMAP65-1a. Likewise, transient expression of ZmMPK5 enhanced BR-induced activities of the antioxidant defence enzymes SOD and APX in a ZmMAP65- 1a-dependent manner. ZmMPK5 directly interacted with ZmMAP65-1a in vivo and phosphorylated ZmMAP65-1a in vitro. These results suggest that BR-induced antioxidant defence in maize operates through the interaction of ZmMPK5 with ZmMAP65-1a. Furthermore, ZmMAP65-1a functions in H2O2 self-propagation via regulation of the expression of NADPH oxidase genes in BR signalling.

  1. A proteomics approach to investigate the process of Zn hyperaccumulation in Noccaea caerulescens (J & C. Presl) F.K. Meyer.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Thomas; Persson, Daniel Pergament; Husted, Søren; Schellenberg, Maja; Gehrig, Peter; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico; Schjoerring, Jan K; Meyer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element in all living organisms, but is toxic in excess. Several plant species are able to accumulate Zn at extraordinarily high concentrations in the leaf epidermis without showing any toxicity symptoms. However, the molecular mechanisms of this phenomenon are still poorly understood. A state-of-the-art quantitative 2D liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) proteomics approach was used to investigate the abundance of proteins involved in Zn hyperaccumulation in leaf epidermal and mesophyll tissues of Noccaea caerulescens. Furthermore, the Zn speciation in planta was analyzed by a size-exclusion chromatography/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (SEC-ICP-MS) method, in order to identify the Zn-binding ligands and mechanisms responsible for Zn hyperaccumulation. Epidermal cells have an increased capability to cope with the oxidative stress that results from excess Zn, as indicated by a higher abundance of glutathione S-transferase proteins. A Zn importer of the ZIP family was more abundant in the epidermal tissue than in the mesophyll tissue, but the vacuolar Zn transporter MTP1 was equally distributed. Almost all of the Zn located in the mesophyll was stored as Zn-nicotianamine complexes. In contrast, a much lower proportion of the Zn was found as Zn-nicotianamine complexes in the epidermis. However, these cells have higher concentrations of malate and citrate, and these organic acids are probably responsible for complexation of most epidermal Zn. Here we provide evidence for a cell type-specific adaptation to excess Zn conditions and an increased ability to transport Zn into the epidermal vacuoles.

  2. Symplastic phloem loading in poplar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cankui; Han, Lu; Slewinski, Thomas L; Sun, Jianlei; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Turgeon, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Sap is driven through phloem sieve tubes by an osmotically generated pressure gradient between source and sink tissues. In many plants, source pressure results from thermodynamically active loading in which energy is used to transfer sucrose (Suc) from mesophyll cells to the phloem of leaf minor veins against a concentration gradient. However, in some species, almost all trees, correlative evidence suggests that sugar migrates passively through plasmodesmata from mesophyll cells into the sieve elements. The possibility of alternate loading mechanisms has important ramifications for the regulation of phloem transport and source-sink interactions. Here, we provide experimental evidence that, in gray poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba), Suc enters the phloem through plasmodesmata. Transgenic plants were generated with yeast invertase in the cell walls to prevent Suc loading by this route. The constructs were driven either by the constitutive 35S promoter or the minor vein-specific galactinol synthase promoter. Transgenic plants grew at the same rate as the wild type without symptoms of loading inhibition, such as accumulation of carbohydrates or leaf chlorosis. Rates of photosynthesis were normal. In contrast, alfalfa (Medicago sativa) plants, which have limited numbers of plasmodesmata between mesophyll and phloem, displayed typical symptoms of loading inhibition when transformed with the same DNA constructs. The results are consistent with passive loading of Suc through plasmodesmata in poplar. We also noted defense-related symptoms in leaves of transgenic poplar when the plants were abruptly exposed to excessively high temperatures, adding to evidence that hexose is involved in triggering the hypersensitive response.

  3. Characterization, localization, and seasonal changes of the sucrose transporter FeSUT1 in the phloem of Fraxinus excelsior.

    PubMed

    Öner-Sieben, Soner; Rappl, Christine; Sauer, Norbert; Stadler, Ruth; Lohaus, Gertrud

    2015-08-01

    Trees are generally assumed to be symplastic phloem loaders. A typical feature for most wooden species is an open minor vein structure with symplastic connections between mesophyll cells and phloem cells, which allow sucrose to move cell-to-cell through the plasmodesmata into the phloem. Fraxinus excelsior (Oleaceae) also translocates raffinose family oligosaccharides in addition to sucrose. Sucrose concentration was recently shown to be higher in the phloem sap than in the mesophyll cells. This suggests the involvement of apoplastic steps and the activity of sucrose transporters in addition to symplastic phloem-loading processes. In this study, the sucrose transporter FeSUT1 from F. excelsior was analysed. Heterologous expression in baker's yeast showed that FeSUT1 mediates the uptake of sucrose. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that FeSUT1 was exclusively located in phloem cells of minor veins and in the transport phloem of F. excelsior. Further characterization identified these cells as sieve elements and possibly ordinary companion cells but not as intermediary cells. The localization and expression pattern point towards functions of FeSUT1 in phloem loading of sucrose as well as in sucrose retrieval. FeSUT1 is most likely responsible for the observed sucrose gradient between mesophyll and phloem. The elevated expression level of FeSUT1 indicated an increased apoplastic carbon export activity from the leaves during spring and late autumn. It is hypothesized that the importance of apoplastic loading is high under low-sucrose conditions and that the availability of two different phloem-loading mechanisms confers advantages for temperate woody species like F. excelsior.

  4. Influence of light and nitrogen on the photosynthetic efficiency in the C4 plant Miscanthus × giganteus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian-Ying; Sun, Wei; Koteyeva, Nuria K; Voznesenskaya, Elena; Stutz, Samantha S; Gandin, Anthony; Smith-Moritz, Andreia M; Heazlewood, Joshua L; Cousins, Asaph B

    2017-01-01

    There are numerous studies describing how growth conditions influence the efficiency of C4 photosynthesis. However, it remains unclear how changes in the biochemical capacity versus leaf anatomy drives this acclimation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine how growth light and nitrogen availability influence leaf anatomy, biochemistry and the efficiency of the CO2 concentrating mechanism in Miscanthus × giganteus. There was an increase in the mesophyll cell wall surface area but not cell well thickness in the high-light (HL) compared to the low-light (LL) grown plants suggesting a higher mesophyll conductance in the HL plants, which also had greater photosynthetic capacity. Additionally, the HL plants had greater surface area and thickness of bundle-sheath cell walls compared to LL plants, suggesting limited differences in bundle-sheath CO2 conductance because the increased area was offset by thicker cell walls. The gas exchange estimates of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) activity were significantly less than the in vitro PEPc activity, suggesting limited substrate availability in the leaf due to low mesophyll CO2 conductance. Finally, leakiness was similar across all growth conditions and generally did not change under the different measurement light conditions. However, differences in the stable isotope composition of leaf material did not correlate with leakiness indicating that dry matter isotope measurements are not a good proxy for leakiness. Taken together, these data suggest that the CO2 concentrating mechanism in Miscanthus is robust under low-light and limited nitrogen growth conditions, and that the observed changes in leaf anatomy and biochemistry likely help to maintain this efficiency.

  5. Calcium Channels are Involved in Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation in Specialized Cells of Pistia stratiotes L.

    PubMed Central

    VOLK, GAYLE M.; GOSS, LENORA J.; FRANCESCHI, VINCENT R.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Pistia stratiotes produces large amounts of calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals in specialized cells called crystal idioblasts. The potential involvement of Ca2+ channels in Ca oxalate crystal formation by crystal idioblasts was investigated. • Methods Anatomical, ultrastructural and physiological analyses were used on plants, fresh or fixed tissues, or protoplasts. Ca2+ uptake by protoplasts was measured with 45Ca2+, and the effect of Ca2+ channel blockers studied in intact plants. Labelled Ca2+ channel blockers and a channel protein antibody were used to determine if Ca2+ channels were associated with crystal idioblasts. • Key Results 45Ca2+ uptake was more than two orders of magnitude greater for crystal idioblast protoplasts than mesophyll protoplasts, and idioblast number increased when medium Ca was increased. Plants grown on media containing 1–50 µm of the Ca2+ channel blockers, isradipine, nifedipine or fluspirilene, showed almost complete inhibition of crystal formation. When fresh tissue sections were treated with the fluorescent dihydropyridine‐type Ca2+ channel blocker, DM‐Bodipy‐DHP, crystal idioblasts were intensely labelled compared with surrounding mesophyll, and the label appeared to be associated with the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum, which is shown to be abundant in idioblasts. An antibody to a mammalian Ca2+ channel α1 subunit recognized a single band in a microsomal protein fraction but not soluble protein fraction on western blots, and it selectively and heavily labelled developing crystal idioblasts in tissue sections. • Conclusions The results demonstrate that Ca oxalate crystal idioblasts are enriched, relative to mesophyll cells, in dihydropyridine‐type Ca2+ channels and that the activity of these channels is important to transport and accumulation of Ca2+ required for crystal formation. PMID:15087302

  6. Arabidopsis thaliana leaves with altered chloroplast numbers and chloroplast movement exhibit impaired adjustments to both low and high light.

    PubMed

    Königer, Martina; Delamaide, Joy A; Marlow, Elizabeth D; Harris, Gary C

    2008-01-01

    The effects of chloroplast number and size on the capacity for blue light-dependent chloroplast movement, the ability to increase light absorption under low light, and the susceptibility to photoinhibition were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana. Leaves of wild-type and chloroplast number mutants with mean chloroplast numbers ranging from 120 to two per mesophyll cell were analysed. Chloroplast movement was monitored as changes in light transmission through the leaves. Light transmission was used as an indicator of the ability of leaves to optimize light absorption. The ability of leaves to deal with 3 h of high light stress at 10 degrees C and their capacity to recover in low light was determined by measuring photochemical efficiencies of PSII using chlorophyll a fluorescence. Chloroplast movement was comparable in leaves ranging in chloroplast numbers from 120 to 30 per mesophyll cell: the final light transmission levels after exposure to 0.1 (accumulation response) and 100 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1) (avoidance response) were indistinguishable, the chloroplasts responded quickly to small increases in light intensity and the kinetics of movement were similar. However, when chloroplast numbers per mesophyll cell decreased to 18 or below, the accumulation response was significantly reduced. The avoidance response was only impaired in mutants with nine or fewer chloroplasts, both in terms of final transmission levels and the speed of movement. Only mutants lacking both blue light receptors (phot1/phot2) or those with drastically reduced chloroplast numbers and severely impacted avoidance responses showed a reduced ability to recover from high light stress.

  7. Structural, biochemical, and physiological characterization of C4 photosynthesis in species having two vastly different types of kranz anatomy in genus Suaeda (Chenopodiaceae).

    PubMed

    Voznesenskaya, E V; Chuong, S D X; Koteyeva, N K; Franceschi, V R; Freitag, H; Edwards, G E

    2007-11-01

    C (4) species of family Chenopodiaceae, subfamily Suaedoideae have two types of Kranz anatomy in genus Suaeda, sections Salsina and Schoberia, both of which have an outer (palisade mesophyll) and an inner (Kranz) layer of chlorenchyma cells in usually semi-terete leaves. Features of Salsina (S. AEGYPTIACA, S. arcuata, S. taxifolia) and Schoberia type (S. acuminata, S. Eltonica, S. cochlearifoliA) were compared to C (3) type S. Heterophylla. In Salsina type, two layers of chlorenchyma at the leaf periphery surround water-storage tissue in which the vascular bundles are embedded. In leaves of the Schoberia type, enlarged water-storage hypodermal cells surround two layers of chlorenchyma tissue, with the latter surrounding the vascular bundles. The chloroplasts in Kranz cells are located in the centripetal position in Salsina type and in the centrifugal position in the Schoberia type. Western blots on C (4) acid decarboxylases show that both Kranz forms are NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) type C (4) species. Transmission electron microscopy shows that mesophyll cells have chloroplasts with reduced grana, while Kranz cells have chloroplasts with well-developed grana and large, specialized mitochondria, characteristic of NAD-ME type C (4) chenopods. In both C (4) types, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase is localized in the palisade mesophyll, and Rubisco and mitochondrial NAD-ME are localized in Kranz cells, where starch is mainly stored. The C (3) species S. heterophylla has Brezia type isolateral leaf structure, with several layers of Rubisco-containing chlorenchyma. Photosynthetic response curves to varying CO (2) and light in the Schoberia Type and Salsina type species were similar, and typical of C (4) plants. The results indicate that two structural forms of Kranz anatomy evolved in parallel in species of subfamily Suaedoideae having NAD-ME type C (4) photosynthesis.

  8. Distribution of calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) in the leaves of Brassica rapa under varying exogenous Ca and Mg supply

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Juan Jose; Ó Lochlainn, Seosamh; Devonshire, Jean; Graham, Neil S.; Hammond, John P.; King, Graham J.; White, Philip J.; Kurup, Smita; Broadley, Martin R.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Leafy vegetable Brassica crops are an important source of dietary calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) and represent potential targets for increasing leaf Ca and Mg concentrations through agronomy or breeding. Although the internal distribution of Ca and Mg within leaves affects the accumulation of these elements, such data are not available for Brassica. The aim of this study was to characterize the internal distribution of Ca and Mg in the leaves of a vegetable Brassica and to determine the effects of altered exogenous Ca and Mg supply on this distribution. Methods Brassica rapa ssp. trilocularis ‘R-o-18’ was grown at four different Ca:Mg treatments for 21 d in a controlled environment. Concentrations of Ca and Mg were determined in fully expanded leaves using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Internal distributions of Ca and Mg were determined in transverse leaf sections at the base and apex of leaves using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) with cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). Key Results Leaf Ca and Mg concentrations were greatest in palisade and spongy mesophyll cells, respectively, although this was dependent on exogenous supply. Calcium accumulation in palisade mesophyll cells was enhanced slightly under high Mg supply; in contrast, Mg accumulation in spongy mesophyll cells was not affected by Ca supply. Conclusions The results are consistent with Arabidopsis thaliana and other Brassicaceae, providing phenotypic evidence that conserved mechanisms regulate leaf Ca and Mg distribution at a cellular scale. The future study of Arabidopsis gene orthologues in mutants of this reference B. rapa genotype will improve our understanding of Ca and Mg homeostasis in plants and may provide a model-to-crop translation pathway for targeted breeding. PMID:22362665

  9. Symplastic Phloem Loading in Poplar1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cankui; Han, Lu; Slewinski, Thomas L.; Sun, Jianlei; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Turgeon, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sap is driven through phloem sieve tubes by an osmotically generated pressure gradient between source and sink tissues. In many plants, source pressure results from thermodynamically active loading in which energy is used to transfer sucrose (Suc) from mesophyll cells to the phloem of leaf minor veins against a concentration gradient. However, in some species, almost all trees, correlative evidence suggests that sugar migrates passively through plasmodesmata from mesophyll cells into the sieve elements. The possibility of alternate loading mechanisms has important ramifications for the regulation of phloem transport and source-sink interactions. Here, we provide experimental evidence that, in gray poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba), Suc enters the phloem through plasmodesmata. Transgenic plants were generated with yeast invertase in the cell walls to prevent Suc loading by this route. The constructs were driven either by the constitutive 35S promoter or the minor vein-specific galactinol synthase promoter. Transgenic plants grew at the same rate as the wild type without symptoms of loading inhibition, such as accumulation of carbohydrates or leaf chlorosis. Rates of photosynthesis were normal. In contrast, alfalfa (Medicago sativa) plants, which have limited numbers of plasmodesmata between mesophyll and phloem, displayed typical symptoms of loading inhibition when transformed with the same DNA constructs. The results are consistent with passive loading of Suc through plasmodesmata in poplar. We also noted defense-related symptoms in leaves of transgenic poplar when the plants were abruptly exposed to excessively high temperatures, adding to evidence that hexose is involved in triggering the hypersensitive response. PMID:25056922

  10. Multiple mechanisms of heavy metal tolerance are differentially expressed in ecotypes of Artemisia fragrans.

    PubMed

    Alirzayeva, Esmira; Neumann, Gunter; Horst, Walter; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Specht, Andre; Alizade, Valida

    2017-01-01

    Artemisia fragrans is a plant species with ability of growing on heavy metal-polluted soils. Ecotypes of this species naturally growing in polluted areas can accumulate and tolerate different amounts of heavy metals (HM), depending on soil contamination level at their origin. Heavy metal tolerance of various ecotypes collected from contaminated (AP, SP) and non-contaminated (BG) sites was compared by cultivation on a highly HM-contaminated river sediment and a non-contaminated agricultural control soil. Tissue-specific HM distribution was analyzed by laser ablation-inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) and photosynthetic activity by non-invasive monitoring of chlorophyll fluorescence. Plant-mineral analysis did not reveal ecotype-differences in concentrations of Cd, Zn, Cu in shoots of Artemisia plants, suggesting no differential expression of root uptake or root to shoot translocation of HM. There was also no detectable rhizosphere effect on HM concentrations on the contaminated soil. However, despite high soil contaminations, all ecotypes accumulated Zn only in the concentration range of generally reported for normal growth of plants, while Cu and Cd concentrations were close to or even higher than the toxicity level for most plants. As a visible symptom of differences in HM tolerance, only the AP ecotype was able to enter the generative phase to complete its life cycle. Analysis of tissue-specific metal distribution revealed significantly lower concentrations of Cd in the leaf mesophyll of this ecotype, accumulating Cd mainly in the leaf petioles. A similar mesophyll exclusion was detectable also for Cu, although not associated with preferential accumulation in the leaf petioles. However, high mesophyll concentrations of Cd and Cu in the SP and BG ecotypes were associated with disturbances of the photosynthetic activity. The findings demonstrate differential expression of HM exclusion strategies in Artemisia ecotypes and suggest Cd and Cu

  11. Photosynthetic Trichomes Contain a Specific Rubisco with a Modified pH-Dependent Activity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Laterre, Raphaëlle; Remacle, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is the most abundant enzyme in plants and is responsible for CO2 fixation during photosynthesis. This enzyme is assembled from eight large subunits (RbcL) encoded by a single chloroplast gene and eight small subunits (RbcS) encoded by a nuclear gene family. Rubisco is primarily found in the chloroplasts of mesophyll (C3 plants), bundle-sheath (C4 plants), and guard cells. In certain species, photosynthesis also takes place in the secretory cells of glandular trichomes, which are epidermal outgrowths (hairs) involved in the secretion of specialized metabolites. However, photosynthesis and, in particular, Rubisco have not been characterized in trichomes. Here, we show that tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) trichomes contain a specific Rubisco small subunit, NtRbcS-T, which belongs to an uncharacterized phylogenetic cluster (T). This cluster contains RbcS from at least 33 species, including monocots, many of which are known to possess glandular trichomes. Cluster T is distinct from the cluster M, which includes the abundant, functionally characterized RbcS isoforms expressed in mesophyll or bundle-sheath cells. Expression of NtRbcS-T in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and purification of the full Rubisco complex showed that this isoform conferred higher Vmax and Km values as well as higher acidic pH-dependent activity than NtRbcS-M, an isoform expressed in the mesophyll. This observation was confirmed with trichome extracts. These data show that an ancient divergence allowed for the emergence of a so-far-uncharacterized RbcS cluster. We propose that secretory trichomes have a particular Rubisco uniquely adapted to secretory cells where CO2 is released by the active specialized metabolism. PMID:28250069

  12. Faster Rubisco Is the Key to Superior Nitrogen-Use Efficiency in NADP-Malic Enzyme Relative to NAD-Malic Enzyme C4 Grasses1

    PubMed Central

    Ghannoum, Oula; Evans, John R.; Chow, Wah Soon; Andrews, T. John; Conroy, Jann P.; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    In 27 C4 grasses grown under adequate or deficient nitrogen (N) supplies, N-use efficiency at the photosynthetic (assimilation rate per unit leaf N) and whole-plant (dry mass per total leaf N) level was greater in NADP-malic enzyme (ME) than NAD-ME species. This was due to lower N content in NADP-ME than NAD-ME leaves because neither assimilation rates nor plant dry mass differed significantly between the two C4 subtypes. Relative to NAD-ME, NADP-ME leaves had greater in vivo (assimilation rate per Rubisco catalytic sites) and in vitro Rubisco turnover rates (kcat; 3.8 versus 5.7 s−1 at 25°C). The two parameters were linearly related. In 2 NAD-ME (Panicum miliaceum and Panicum coloratum) and 2 NADP-ME (Sorghum bicolor and Cenchrus ciliaris) grasses, 30% of leaf N was allocated to thylakoids and 5% to 9% to amino acids and nitrate. Soluble protein represented a smaller fraction of leaf N in NADP-ME (41%) than in NAD-ME (53%) leaves, of which Rubisco accounted for one-seventh. Soluble protein averaged 7 and 10 g (mmol chlorophyll)−1 in NADP-ME and NAD-ME leaves, respectively. The majority (65%) of leaf N and chlorophyll was found in the mesophyll of NADP-ME and bundle sheath of NAD-ME leaves. The mesophyll-bundle sheath distribution of functional thylakoid complexes (photosystems I and II and cytochrome f) varied among species, with a tendency to be mostly located in the mesophyll. In conclusion, superior N-use efficiency of NADP-ME relative to NAD-ME grasses was achieved with less leaf N, soluble protein, and Rubisco having a faster kcat. PMID:15665246

  13. Populus euphratica XTH overexpression enhances salinity tolerance by the development of leaf succulence in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Han, Yansha; Wang, Wei; Sun, Jian; Ding, Mingquan; Zhao, Rui; Deng, Shurong; Wang, Feifei; Hu, Yue; Wang, Yang; Lu, Yanjun; Du, Liping; Hu, Zanmin; Diekmann, Heike; Shen, Xin; Polle, Andrea; Chen, Shaoliang

    2013-11-01

    Populus euphratica is a salt-tolerant tree species that develops leaf succulence after a prolonged period of salinity stress. In the present study, a putative xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase gene (PeXTH) from P. euphratica was isolated and transferred to tobacco plants. PeXTH localized exclusively to the endoplasmic reticulum and cell wall. Plants overexpressing PeXTH were more salt tolerant than wild-type tobacco with respect to root and leaf growth, and survival. The increased capacity for salt tolerance was due mainly to the anatomical and physiological alterations caused by PeXTH overexpression. Compared with the wild type, PeXTH-transgenic plants contained 36% higher water content per unit area and 39% higher ratio of fresh weight to dry weight, a hallmark of leaf succulence. However, the increased water storage in the leaves in PeXTH-transgenic plants was not accompanied by greater leaf thickness but was due to highly packed palisade parenchyma cells and fewer intercellular air spaces between mesophyll cells. In addition to the salt dilution effect in response to NaCl, these anatomical changes increased leaf water-retaining capacity, which lowered the increase of salt concentration in the succulent tissues and mesophyll cells. Moreover, the increased number of mesophyll cells reduced the intercellular air space, which improved carbon economy and resulted in a 47-78% greater net photosynthesis under control and salt treatments (100-150 mM NaCl). Taken together, the results indicate that PeXTH overexpression enhanced salt tolerance by the development of succulent leaves in tobacco plants without swelling.

  14. Isolation of guard cell protoplasts from mechanically prepared epidermis of Vicia faba leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, T.; Tallman, G.; Zeiger, E. Univ. of California, Santa Cruz )

    1989-08-01

    A method for isolating guard cell protoplasts (GCP) from mechanically prepared epidermis of Vicia faba is described. Epidermis was prepared by homogenizing leaves in a Waring blender in a solution of 10% Ficoll, 5 millimolar CaCl{sub 2}, and 0.1% polyvinylpyrrolidone 40 (PVP). Attached mesophyll and epidermal cells were removed by shaking epidermis in a solution of Cellulysin, mannitol, CaCl{sub 2}, PVP, and pepstatin A. Cleaned epidermis was transferred to a solution of mannitol, CaCl{sub 2}, PVP, pepstatin A, cellulase Onozuka RS, and pectolyase Y-23 for the isolation of GCP. Preparations made by this method included both adaxial and abaxial GCP and contained {le}0.017% mesophyll protoplasts, {le}0.6% mesophyll fragments, and no epidermal cell contaminants. Yields averaged 9 {times} 10{sup 4} protoplasts/leaflet and 98 to 100% of the GCP excluded trypan blue, concentrated neutral red, and hydrolyzed fluorescein diacetate. Isolated GCP increased in diameter by 2.2 micrometers after incubation in darkness in 10 micromolar fusicoccin, 0.4 molar mannitol, 5 millimolar KCl, and 1 millimolar CaCl{sub 2}. Illumination of GCP with 800 micromoles per square meter per second of red light resulted in alkalinization of their suspension medium. When 10 micromolar per square meter per second of blue light was superimposed onto the red light background, the medium acidified. Measurements of chlorophyll a fast fluorescence transients from isolated GCP indicated that GCP were capable of electron transport, and slow transients contained the M peak usually associated with a functional photosynthetic carbon reduction pathway.

  15. Air-surface exchange of H2O, CO2, and O3 at a tallgrass prairie in relation to remotely sensed vegetation indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, W.; Wesely, M. L.; Cook, D. R.; Hart, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    Parameters derived from eddy correlation measurements of the air-surface exchange rates of H2O, CO2, and O3 over a tallgrass prairie are examined in terms of their relationships with spectral reflectance data remotely sensed from aircraft and satellites during the four 1987 intensive field campaigns of the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). The surface conductances were strongly modulated by photosynthetically active radiation received at the surface when the grass was green and well watered; mesophyll resistances were large for CO2 but negligible for H2O and O3.

  16. Pathogenomics of Xanthomonas: understanding bacterium-plant interactions.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Robert P; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg; Potnis, Neha; Jones, Jeffrey B; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Bogdanove, Adam J; Dow, J Maxwell

    2011-05-01

    Xanthomonas is a large genus of Gram-negative bacteria that cause disease in hundreds of plant hosts, including many economically important crops. Pathogenic species and pathovars within species show a high degree of host plant specificity and many exhibit tissue specificity, invading either the vascular system or the mesophyll tissue of the host. In this Review, we discuss the insights that functional and comparative genomic studies are providing into the adaptation of this group of bacteria to exploit the extraordinary diversity of plant hosts and different host tissues.

  17. An attempt to localize and identify the gravity sensing mechanism of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandurski, R. S.; Schulze, A.; Reinecke, D.

    1985-01-01

    The oxidation and transport of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in Zea mays is examined towards an understanding of the gravity-influenced promotion of growth in plants. An enzyme that oxidizes IAA to a nongrowth-promoting species has been partially purified, and determined to be stimulated by a lipoidal factor. Data suggest that the upward transport of IAA in the stele and outward movement from the stele into the mesophyll cortex is metabolically mediated, and possibly affected by the gravitational stimulus. It is postulated that hormone assymmetries can arise by 'potential-gating' of the transport channels between the various plant tissues.

  18. Effects of leaf age within growth stages of pepper and sorghum plants on leaf thickness, water, chlorophyll, and light reflectance. [in spectral vegetation discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Cardenas, R.; Berumen, A.

    1974-01-01

    Pepper and sorghum plants (characterized by porous and compact leaf mesophylls, respectively) were used to study the influence of leaf age on light reflectance. Measurements were limited to the upper five nodal positions within each growth stage, since upper leaves make up most of the reflectance surfaces remotely sensed. The increase in leaf thickness and water content with increasing leaf age was taken into consideration, since each of these factors affects the reflectance as well as the selection of spectral wavelength intervals for optimum discrimination of vegetation.

  19. [Somatic hybrids among transgenic Solanum tuberosum and transplastomic Solanum rickii].

    PubMed

    Marveeva, N A; Shakhovskiĭ, A M; Kuchuk, N V

    2008-01-01

    The hybrid plants with transformed plastids were regenerated after fusion of mesophyll protoplasts of Solanum rickii with aadA chloroplast selective marker gene and Solanum tuberosum with nptII nuclear selective marker gene. The hybrid callus clones were selected on the medium containing streptomycine, spectinomycine and kanamycine. The hybrids were identified on the base of PCR analysis of nuclear and plastid DNAs. The analysis have shown that regenerated plants were somatic hybrids containing aadA and nptII genes, Solanum rickii and Solanum tuberosum nuclear and chloroplast DNA.

  20. Limited acclimation in leaf anatomy to experimental drought in tropical rainforest trees

    PubMed Central

    Binks, Oliver; Meir, Patrick; Rowland, Lucy; da Costa, Antonio Carlos Lola; Vasconcelos, Steel Silva; de Oliveira, Alex Antonio Ribeiro; Ferreira, Leandro; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Dry periods are predicted to become more frequent and severe in the future in some parts of the tropics, including Amazonia, potentially causing reduced productivity, higher tree mortality and increased emissions of stored carbon. Using a long-term (12 year) through-fall exclusion (TFE) experiment in the tropics, we test the hypothesis that trees produce leaves adapted to cope with higher levels of water stress, by examining the following leaf characteristics: area, thickness, leaf mass per area, vein density, stomatal density, the thickness of palisade mesophyll, spongy mesophyll and both of the epidermal layers, internal cavity volume and the average cell sizes of the palisade and spongy mesophyll. We also test whether differences in leaf anatomy are consistent with observed differential drought-induced mortality responses among taxa, and look for relationships between leaf anatomy, and leaf water relations and gas exchange parameters. Our data show that trees do not produce leaves that are more xeromorphic in response to 12 years of soil moisture deficit. However, the drought treatment did result in increases in the thickness of the adaxial epidermis (TFE: 20.5 ± 1.5 µm, control: 16.7 ± 1.0 µm) and the internal cavity volume (TFE: 2.43 ± 0.50 mm3 cm−2, control: 1.77 ± 0.30 mm3 cm−2). No consistent differences were detected between drought-resistant and drought-sensitive taxa, although interactions occurred between drought-sensitivity status and drought treatment for the palisade mesophyll thickness (P = 0.034) and the cavity volume of the leaves (P = 0.025). The limited response to water deficit probably reflects a tight co-ordination between leaf morphology, water relations and photosynthetic properties. This suggests that there is little plasticity in these aspects of plant anatomy in these taxa, and that phenotypic plasticity in leaf traits may not facilitate the acclimation of Amazonian trees to the predicted future reductions in dry

  1. [Relationship between antophyte foliar morphology and abiotic factors in the main rainforests of Eastern Cuba].

    PubMed

    Quesada, Eddy Martínez

    2009-01-01

    Relationship between antophyte foliar morphology and abiotic factors in the main rainforests of Eastern Cuba. The foliar morphology of representative antophytes in four rainforest types of Eastern Cuba was studied in relation to the main abiotic factors. Although there are several leaf types in these forests, the microphyll type is the most important among endemic species in the ophiolites complex and the Montane rainforest. At the Lowland rainforest (metamorphic complex) the mesophyll leaf was the most important. Most foliar epidermis had structures normally found in mesomorphic plants, but xeromorphic and higromorphic morphologies were also present.

  2. Limited acclimation in leaf anatomy to experimental drought in tropical rainforest trees.

    PubMed

    Binks, Oliver; Meir, Patrick; Rowland, Lucy; da Costa, Antonio Carlos Lola; Vasconcelos, Steel Silva; de Oliveira, Alex Antonio Ribeiro; Ferreira, Leandro; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2016-12-01

    Dry periods are predicted to become more frequent and severe in the future in some parts of the tropics, including Amazonia, potentially causing reduced productivity, higher tree mortality and increased emissions of stored carbon. Using a long-term (12 year) through-fall exclusion (TFE) experiment in the tropics, we test the hypothesis that trees produce leaves adapted to cope with higher levels of water stress, by examining the following leaf characteristics: area, thickness, leaf mass per area, vein density, stomatal density, the thickness of palisade mesophyll, spongy mesophyll and both of the epidermal layers, internal cavity volume and the average cell sizes of the palisade and spongy mesophyll. We also test whether differences in leaf anatomy are consistent with observed differential drought-induced mortality responses among taxa, and look for relationships between leaf anatomy, and leaf water relations and gas exchange parameters. Our data show that trees do not produce leaves that are more xeromorphic in response to 12 years of soil moisture deficit. However, the drought treatment did result in increases in the thickness of the adaxial epidermis (TFE: 20.5 ± 1.5 µm, control: 16.7 ± 1.0 µm) and the internal cavity volume (TFE: 2.43 ± 0.50 mm(3) cm(-2), control: 1.77 ± 0.30 mm(3) cm(-2)). No consistent differences were detected between drought-resistant and drought-sensitive taxa, although interactions occurred between drought-sensitivity status and drought treatment for the palisade mesophyll thickness (P = 0.034) and the cavity volume of the leaves (P = 0.025). The limited response to water deficit probably reflects a tight co-ordination between leaf morphology, water relations and photosynthetic properties. This suggests that there is little plasticity in these aspects of plant anatomy in these taxa, and that phenotypic plasticity in leaf traits may not facilitate the acclimation of Amazonian trees to the predicted future reductions in

  3. Hybrids between tobacco crown gall cells and normal somatic cells of Atropa belladonna : Isolation and characterization of cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gleba, Y Y; Kanevsky, I F; Skarzhynskaya, M V; Komarnitsky, I K; Cherep, N N

    1986-10-01

    Protoplast fusion of Nicotiana tabacum (B6S3) crown gall cells and Atropa belladonna leaf mesophyll cells was carried out. Hybrids were selected for their capacity to grow on hormone-free media and to green in light. Shoots incapable of rhizogenesis were regenerated on the same media and grafted onto normal plants of different species. 57 hybrid cell lines differing in their genetic constitution were produced. Analysis of hybrid lines involved the determination of the lysopine dehydrogenase (LpDH) activity and the molecular forms of esterase and amylase, a restriction analysis of chloroplast DNA and a cytogenetic study.

  4. Anatomical and pollen ornamentation study on Hymenocrater species in North East of Iran.

    PubMed

    Jafari, A; Jafarzadeh, F

    2008-09-01

    The present study tends to investigate the anatomy and palynology of Hymenocrater species in Northeast of Iran. To conduct the comparative study of anatomy characters, sections from stem and leaf were prepared using microtome and differential staining. In this part of investigation, arrangement of vessel in stem, stoma type and arrangement of mesophyll in leaf were studied. For the palynology study, too a comparative investigation on the species showed, the pollen was problate spheroidal, hexacolpate, bireticulate and semitectate. Finally a variation between the shape of lumina in eu-reticulate and supra reticulate of pollen was observed.

  5. [ABA accumulation and distribution during the leaf tissues shows its role stomatal conductance regulation under short-term salinity].

    PubMed

    Akhiiarova, G R; Fricke, W; Veselov, D S; Kudoiarova, G R; Veselov, S Iu

    2006-01-01

    The regulative role of ABA in the rapid plant stomatal reactions in response to salinity was investigated. The influence of the short-term salinity on the overall ABA accumulation and its distribution within the mature leaf (revealed by immunohystochemical technique) and stomatal conductance of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) were determined. Rapid bulk leaf ABA accumulation and increase in ABA immunolabeling in the mesophyl and guard cells of stomata were shown. The bulk ABA increasing in mature barley leaves coincided with stomatal closure induced by salt treatment indicating on the ABA contribution to the rapid stomatal closure.

  6. Myosin inhibitors block accumulation movement of chloroplasts in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells.

    PubMed

    Paves, H; Truve, E

    2007-01-01

    Chloroplasts alter their distribution within plant cells depending on the external light conditions. Myosin inhibitors 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and 1-(5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexahydro-1,4-diazepine hydrochloride (ML-7) were used to study the possible role of myosins in chloroplast photorelocation in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll cells. None of these agents had an effect on the chloroplast high-fluence-rate avoidance movement but all of the three myosin inhibitors blocked the accumulation movement of chloroplasts after a high-fluence-rate irradiation of the leaves. The results suggest that myosins have a role in A. thaliana chloroplast photorelocation.

  7. Is the leaf bundle sheath a "smart flux valve" for K+ nutrition?

    PubMed

    Wigoda, Noa; Moshelion, Menachem; Moran, Nava

    2014-05-15

    Evidence has started to accumulate that the bundle sheath regulates the passage of water, minerals and metabolites between the mesophyll and the conducting vessels of xylem and phloem within the leaf veins which it envelops. Although potassium (K(+)) nutrition has been studied for several decades, and much is known about the uptake and recirculation of K(+) within the plant, the potential regulatory role of bundle sheath with regard to K(+) fluxes has just begun to be addressed. Here we have collected some facts and ideas about these processes.

  8. Shear waves in vegetal tissues at ultrasonic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariñas, M. D.; Sancho-Knapik, D.; Peguero-Pina, J. J.; Gil-Pelegrín, E.; Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, T. E.

    2013-03-01

    Shear waves are investigated in leaves of two plant species using air-coupled ultrasound. Magnitude and phase spectra of the transmission coefficient around the first two orders of the thickness resonances (normal and oblique incidence) have been measured. A bilayer acoustic model for plant leaves (comprising the palisade parenchyma and the spongy mesophyll) is proposed to extract, from measured spectra, properties of these tissues like: velocity and attenuation of longitudinal and shear waves and hence Young modulus, rigidity modulus, and Poisson's ratio. Elastic moduli values are typical of cellular solids and both, shear and longitudinal waves exhibit classical viscoelastic losses. Influence of leaf water content is also analyzed.

  9. Advantages of estimating parameters of photosynthesis model by fitting A-Ci curves at multiple subsaturating light intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, W.; Gu, L.; Hoffman, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    The photosynthesis model of Farquhar, von Caemmerer & Berry (1980) is an important tool for predicting the response of plants to climate change. So far, the critical parameters required by the model have been obtained from the leaf-level measurements of gas exchange, namely the net assimilation of CO2 against intercellular CO2 concentration (A-Ci) curves, made at saturating light conditions. With such measurements, most points are likely in the Rubisco-limited state for which the model is structurally overparameterized (the model is also overparameterized in the TPU-limited state). In order to reliably estimate photosynthetic parameters, there must be sufficient number of points in the RuBP regeneration-limited state, which has no structural over-parameterization. To improve the accuracy of A-Ci data analysis, we investigate the potential of using multiple A-Ci curves at subsaturating light intensities to generate some important parameter estimates more accurately. Using subsaturating light intensities allow more RuBp regeneration-limited points to be obtained. In this study, simulated examples are used to demonstrate how this method can eliminate the er