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Sample records for cation condensed dna

  1. Intermolecular forces between low generation PAMAM dendrimer condensed DNA helices: role of cation architecture.

    PubMed

    An, Min; Parkin, Sean R; DeRouchey, Jason E

    2014-01-28

    In recent years, dendriplexes, complexes of cationic dendrimers with DNA, have become attractive DNA delivery vehicles due to their well-defined chemistries. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing dendriplexes, we studied low generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-DNA complexes and compared them to comparably charged linear arginine peptides. Using osmotic stress coupled with X-ray scattering, we have investigated the effect of molecular chain architecture on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance within these polycation condensed DNA arrays. In order to compact DNA, linear cations are believed to bind in DNA grooves and to interact with the phosphate backbone of apposing helices. We have previously shown a length dependent attraction resulting in higher packaging densities with increasing charge for linear cations. Hyperbranched polycations, such as polycationic dendrimers, presumably would not be able to bind to DNA and correlate their charges in the same manner as linear cations. We show that attractive and repulsive force amplitudes in PAMAM-DNA assemblies display significantly different trends than comparably charged linear arginines resulting in lower DNA packaging densities with increasing PAMAM generation. The salt and pH dependencies of packaging in PAMAM dendrimer-DNA and linear arginine-DNA complexes were also investigated. Significant differences in the force curve behaviour and salt and pH sensitivities suggest that different binding modes may be present in DNA condensed by dendrimers when compared to linear polycations.

  2. Thermodynamics of cationic lipid binding to DNA and DNA condensation: roles of electrostatics and hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Matulis, Daumantas; Rouzina, Ioulia; Bloomfield, Victor A

    2002-06-26

    Alkylammonium binding to DNA was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry. Experimental data, obtained as functions of alkyl chain length, salt concentration, DNA concentration, and temperature, provided a detailed thermodynamic description of lipid-DNA binding reactions leading to DNA condensation. Lipid binding, counterion displacement, and DNA condensation were highly cooperative processes, driven by a large increase in entropy and opposed by a relatively small endothermic enthalpy at room temperature. Large negative heat capacity change indicated a contribution from hydrophobic interactions between aliphatic tails. An approximation of lipid-DNA binding as dominated by two factors-ionic and hydrophobic interactions-yielded a model that was consistent with experimental data. Chemical group contributions to the energetics of binding were determined and could be used to predict energetics of other lipid binding to DNA. Electrostatic and hydrophobic contributions to Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity could be distinguished by applying additivity principles. Binding of lipids with two, three, and four aliphatic tails was investigated and compared to single-tailed lipid binding. Structurally, the model suggests that lipid cationic headgroups and aliphatic tails distribute evenly and lay down on DNA surface without the formation of micelles.

  3. Scutellarin-graft cationic β-cyclodextrin-polyrotaxane: Synthesis, characterization and DNA condensation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qi; Ma, Xue; Liao, Xiali; Yang, Bo

    2017-02-01

    As a prerequisite of gene delivery in living cells, DNA condensation has attracted more and more attention. In order to improve the efficiencies of polyamine-β-cyclodextrin-based cationic polyrotaxanes (PR-EDA and PR-DETA) as DNA condensation materials, we have designed and prepared two novel scutellarin-grafted cationic polyrotaxanes (PR-EDA-SCU and PR-DETA-SCU), in which scutellarins (SCU), the planar molecules, were conjugated on the cyclodextrin molecules of PR-EDA and PR-DETA. These materials were characterized by 1D and 2D NMR, XRD, TG and DSC. The electrophoresis assays showed that pDNA condensation efficiencies of PR-EDA and PR-DETA were better than that of PR-EDA and PR-DETA. The complexes of PR-EDA, PR-DETA, PR-EDA-SCU and PR-DETA-SCU with pDNA were further investigated by zeta potential and atomic force microscopy analysis. The results indicated that the planar structure of SCU played an important role in improvement of pDNA condensation efficiencies of PR-EDA-SCU and PR-DETA-SCU. The satisfactory pDNA condensation abilities of PR-EDA-SCU and PR-DETA-SCU could be helpful in designing non-viral gene delivery vectors to control gene expression and delivery.

  4. The greater negative charge density of DNA in tris-borate buffers does not enhance DNA condensation by multivalent cations.

    PubMed

    Schwinefus, J J; Bloomfield, V A

    2000-12-01

    As indicated by recent measurements of the electrophoretic free solution mobility, DNA appears to have a greater helical charge density in Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) buffers than in Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffers. Since electrostatic forces play a major role in DNA packaging processes, we have investigated the condensation of closed circular plasmid DNA using total intensity and dynamic light scattering in Tris-borate, Tris-acetate, and Tris-cacodylate buffers with cobaltic hexa-amine (III) [Co(NH(3))(3+)(6)]. We find that neither the critical concentration of Co(NH(3))(3+)(6) nor the hydrodynamic radii of the resulting condensates vary significantly in the buffer systems studied here despite the prediction that DNA condensation should occur at significantly lower Co(NH(3))(3+)(6) concentrations in Tris-borate buffers. Assuming a persistence length behavior similar to B-DNA in the presence of multivalent cations, a decrease in the attractive counterion correlation pressure decay length in Tris-borate buffers does not account for our observations. It is possible that the binding of multivalent cations to DNA may hinder borate association with the DNA double helix.

  5. Nanostructure-induced DNA condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ting; Llizo, Axel; Wang, Chen; Xu, Guiying; Yang, Yanlian

    2013-08-01

    The control of the DNA condensation process is essential for compaction of DNA in chromatin, as well as for biological applications such as nonviral gene therapy. This review endeavours to reflect the progress of investigations on DNA condensation effects of nanostructure-based condensing agents (such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, cationic polymer and peptide agents) observed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other techniques. The environmental effects on structural characteristics of nanostructure-induced DNA condensates are also discussed.

  6. Nanoscopic structure of DNA condensed for gene delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, D D; Maggi, A; Soria, M R; Monaco, L

    1997-01-01

    Scanning force microscopy was used to examine DNA condensates prepared with varying stoichiometries of lipospermine or polyethylenimine in physiological solution. For the first time, individual DNA strands were clearly visualized in incomplete condensates without drying. Using lipospermine at sub-saturating concentrations, discrete nuclei of condensation were observed often surrounded by folded loops of DNA. Similar packing of DNA loops occurred for polyethylenimine-induced condensation. Increasing the amount of the condensing agent led to the progressive coalescence or aggregation of initial condensation nuclei through folding rather than winding the DNA. At over-saturating charge ratios of the cationic lipid or polymer to DNA, condensates had sizes smaller than or equal to those measured previously in electron micrographs. Polyethylenimine condensates were more compact than lipospermine condensates and both produced more homogeneously compacted plasmids when used in a 2-4-fold charge excess. The size and morphology of the condensates may affect their efficiency in transfection. PMID:9224610

  7. Divalent counterion-induced condensation of triple-strand DNA.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiangyun; Parsegian, V Adrian; Rau, Donald C

    2010-12-14

    Understanding and manipulation of the forces assembling DNA/RNA helices have broad implications for biology, medicine, and physics. One subject of significance is the attractive force between dsDNA mediated by polycations of valence ≥ 3. Despite extensive studies, the physical origin of the "like-charge attraction" remains unsettled among competing theories. Here we show that triple-strand DNA (tsDNA), a more highly charged helix than dsDNA, is precipitated by alkaline-earth divalent cations that are unable to condense dsDNA. We further show that our observation is general by examining several cations (Mg(2+), Ba(2+), and Ca(2+)) and two distinct tsDNA constructs. Cation-condensed tsDNA forms ordered hexagonal arrays that redissolve upon adding monovalent salts. Forces between tsDNA helices, measured by osmotic stress, follow the form of hydration forces observed with condensed dsDNA. Probing a well-defined system of point-like cations and tsDNAs with more evenly spaced helical charges, the counterintuitive observation that the more highly charged tsDNA (vs. dsDNA) is condensed by cations of lower valence provides new insights into theories of polyelectrolytes and the biological and pathological roles of tsDNA. Cations and tsDNAs also hold promise as a model system for future studies of DNA-DNA interactions and electrostatic interactions in general.

  8. Divalent counterion-induced condensation of triple-strand DNA

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiangyun; Parsegian, V. Adrian; Rau, Donald C.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding and manipulation of the forces assembling DNA/RNA helices have broad implications for biology, medicine, and physics. One subject of significance is the attractive force between dsDNA mediated by polycations of valence ≥3. Despite extensive studies, the physical origin of the “like-charge attraction” remains unsettled among competing theories. Here we show that triple-strand DNA (tsDNA), a more highly charged helix than dsDNA, is precipitated by alkaline-earth divalent cations that are unable to condense dsDNA. We further show that our observation is general by examining several cations (Mg2+, Ba2+, and Ca2+) and two distinct tsDNA constructs. Cation-condensed tsDNA forms ordered hexagonal arrays that redissolve upon adding monovalent salts. Forces between tsDNA helices, measured by osmotic stress, follow the form of hydration forces observed with condensed dsDNA. Probing a well-defined system of point-like cations and tsDNAs with more evenly spaced helical charges, the counterintuitive observation that the more highly charged tsDNA (vs. dsDNA) is condensed by cations of lower valence provides new insights into theories of polyelectrolytes and the biological and pathological roles of tsDNA. Cations and tsDNAs also hold promise as a model system for future studies of DNA–DNA interactions and electrostatic interactions in general. PMID:21098260

  9. Simple simulations of DNA condensation.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, M J

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a simple, bead-spring model of semiflexible polyelectrolytes such as DNA are performed. All charges are explicitly treated. Starting from extended, noncondensed conformations, condensed structures form in the simulations with tetravalent or trivalent counterions. No condensates form or are stable for divalent counterions. The mechanism by which condensates form is described. Briefly, condensation occurs because electrostatic interactions dominate entropy, and the favored coulombic structure is a charge-ordered state. Condensation is a generic phenomenon and occurs for a variety of polyelectrolyte parameters. Toroids and rods are the condensate structures. Toroids form preferentially when the molecular stiffness is sufficiently strong. PMID:11159388

  10. Simple Simulations of DNA Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-07-12

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a simple, bead-spring model of semiflexible polyelectrolytes such as DNA are performed. All charges are explicitly treated. Starting from extended, noncondensed conformations, condensed structures form in the simulations with tetravalent or trivalent counterions. No condensates form or are stable for divalent counterions. The mechanism by which condensates form is described. Briefly, condensation occurs because electrostatic interactions dominate entropy, and the favored Coulombic structure is a charge ordered state. Condensation is a generic phenomena and occurs for a variety of polyelectrolyte parameters. Toroids and rods are the condensate structures. Toroids form preferentially when the molecular stiffness is sufficiently strong.

  11. The structure and intermolecular forces of DNA condensates.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-03-18

    Spontaneous assembly of DNA molecules into compact structures is ubiquitous in biological systems. Experiment has shown that polycations can turn electrostatic self-repulsion of DNA into attraction, yet the physical mechanism of DNA condensation has remained elusive. Here, we report the results of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations that elucidated the microscopic structure of dense DNA assemblies and the physics of interactions that makes such assemblies possible. Reproducing the setup of the DNA condensation experiments, we measured the internal pressure of DNA arrays as a function of the DNA-DNA distance, showing a quantitative agreement between the results of our simulations and the experimental data. Analysis of the MD trajectories determined the DNA-DNA force in a DNA condensate to be pairwise, the DNA condensation to be driven by electrostatics of polycations and not hydration, and the concentration of bridging cations, not adsorbed cations, to determine the magnitude and the sign of the DNA-DNA force. Finally, our simulations quantitatively characterized the orientational correlations of DNA in DNA arrays as well as diffusive motion of DNA and cations.

  12. The structure and intermolecular forces of DNA condensates

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous assembly of DNA molecules into compact structures is ubiquitous in biological systems. Experiment has shown that polycations can turn electrostatic self-repulsion of DNA into attraction, yet the physical mechanism of DNA condensation has remained elusive. Here, we report the results of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations that elucidated the microscopic structure of dense DNA assemblies and the physics of interactions that makes such assemblies possible. Reproducing the setup of the DNA condensation experiments, we measured the internal pressure of DNA arrays as a function of the DNA–DNA distance, showing a quantitative agreement between the results of our simulations and the experimental data. Analysis of the MD trajectories determined the DNA–DNA force in a DNA condensate to be pairwise, the DNA condensation to be driven by electrostatics of polycations and not hydration, and the concentration of bridging cations, not adsorbed cations, to determine the magnitude and the sign of the DNA–DNA force. Finally, our simulations quantitatively characterized the orientational correlations of DNA in DNA arrays as well as diffusive motion of DNA and cations. PMID:26883635

  13. Chiral DNA packaging in DNA-cationic liposome assemblies.

    PubMed

    Zuidam, N J; Barenholz, Y; Minsky, A

    1999-09-03

    Recent studies have indicated that the structural features of DNA-lipid assemblies, dictated by the lipid composition and cationic lipid-to-DNA ratio, critically affect the efficiency of these complexes in acting as vehicles for cellular delivery of genetic material. Using circular dichroism we find that upon binding DNA, positively-charged liposomes induce a secondary conformational transition of the DNA molecules from the native B form to the C motif. Liposomes composed of positively-charged and neutral 'helper' lipids, found to be particularly effective as transfecting agents, induce - in addition to secondary conformational changes - DNA condensation into a left-handed cholesteric-like phase. A structural model is presented according to which two distinct, yet inter-related modes of DNA packaging coexist within such assemblies. The results underline the notion that subtle changes in the components of a supramolecular assembly may substantially modulate the interplay of interactions which dictate its structure and functional properties.

  14. Divalent cation shrinks DNA but inhibits its compaction with trivalent cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongu, Chika; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Zinchenko, Anatoly; Chen, Ning; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-05-01

    Our observation reveals the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA 166 kbp) by fluorescence microscopy. It was found that divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. As the control experiment, we have confirmed the minimum effect of monovalent cation, Na(+) on the DNA higher-order structure. We interpret the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counterions. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we consider the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly charged polyelectrolyte, double-stranded DNA, by the 3+ cations. In contrast, the presence of 2+ cation decreases the gain of entropy contribution by the ion-exchange between monovalent and 3+ ions.

  15. A multi-field approach to DNA condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Shi-Yong; Jia, Jun-Li

    2015-12-01

    DNA condensation is an important process in many fields including life sciences, polymer physics, and applied technology. In the nucleus, DNA is condensed into chromosomes. In polymer physics, DNA is treated as a semi-flexible molecule and a polyelectrolyte. Many agents, including multi-valent cations, surfactants, and neutral poor solvents, can cause DNA condensation, also referred to as coil-globule transition. Moreover, DNA condensation has been used for extraction and gene delivery in applied technology. Many physical theories have been presented to elucidate the mechanism underlying DNA condensation, including the counterion correlation theory, the electrostatic zipper theory, and the hydration force theory. Recently several single-molecule studies have focused on DNA condensation, shedding new light on old concepts. In this document, the multi-field concepts and theories related to DNA condensation are introduced and clarified as well as the advances and considerations of single-molecule DNA condensation experiments are introduced. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21204065 and 20934004) and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. Y4110357).

  16. Linker DNA destabilizes condensed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Green, G R; Ferlita, R R; Walkenhorst, W F; Poccia, D L

    2001-01-01

    The contribution of the linker region to maintenance of condensed chromatin was examined in two model systems, namely sea urchin sperm nuclei and chicken red blood cell nuclei. Linkerless nuclei, prepared by extensive digestion with micrococcal nuclease, were compared with Native nuclei using several assays, including microscopic appearance, nuclear turbidity, salt stability, and trypsin resistance. Chromatin in the Linkerless nuclei was highly condensed, resembling pyknotic chromatin in apoptotic cells. Linkerless nuclei were more stable in low ionic strength buffers and more resistant to trypsin than Native nuclei. Analysis of histones from the trypsinized nuclei by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that specific histone H1, H2B, and H3 tail regions stabilized linker DNA in condensed nuclei. Thermal denaturation of soluble chromatin preparations from differentially trypsinized sperm nuclei demonstrated that the N-terminal regions of histones Sp H1, Sp H2B, and H3 bind tightly to linker DNA, causing it to denature at a high temperature. We conclude that linker DNA exerts a disruptive force on condensed chromatin structure which is counteracted by binding of specific histone tail regions to the linker DNA. The inherent instability of the linker region may be significant in all eukaryotic chromatins and may promote gene activation in living cells.

  17. DNA condensation in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardatscher, Günther; Bracha, Dan; Daube, Shirley S.; Vonshak, Ohad; Simmel, Friedrich C.; Bar-Ziv, Roy H.

    2016-12-01

    DNA can be programmed to assemble into a variety of shapes and patterns on the nanoscale and can act as a template for hybrid nanostructures such as conducting wires, protein arrays and field-effect transistors. Current DNA nanostructures are typically in the sub-micrometre range, limited by the sequence space and length of the assembled strands. Here we show that on a patterned biochip, DNA chains collapse into one-dimensional (1D) fibres that are 20 nm wide and around 70 µm long, each comprising approximately 35 co-aligned chains at its cross-section. Electron beam writing on a photocleavable monolayer was used to immobilize and pattern the DNA molecules, which condense into 1D bundles in the presence of spermidine. DNA condensation can propagate and split at junctions, cross gaps and create domain walls between counterpropagating fronts. This system is inherently adept at solving probabilistic problems and was used to find the possible paths through a maze and to evaluate stochastic switching circuits. This technique could be used to propagate biological or ionic signals in combination with sequence-specific DNA nanotechnology or for gene expression in cell-free DNA compartments.

  18. Temperature dependence of DNA condensation at high ionic concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wei; Gao, Qingqing; Liu, Yanhui; Fan, Yangtao; Hu, Lin; Xu, Houqiang

    2016-08-01

    A series of experiments pointed out that compact states of DNA condensed by multivalent cation prefer higher temperature. The condensed DNA takes elongated coil or compact globule states and the population of the compact globule states increases with an increase in temperature. At the same time, a recent experimental work carried out in buffer solution without multivalent cation points out that DNA persistence length strongly depends on the temperature. DNA persistence length is a key parameter for quantitative interpretation of the conformational properties of DNA and related to the bending rigidity of DNA. It is necessary to revolve the effects of temperature dependence of persistence length on DNA condensation, and a model including the temperature dependence of persistence length and strong correlation of multivalent cation on DNA is provided. The autocorrelation function of the tangent vectors is found as an effective way to detect the temperature dependence of toroid conformations. With an increase in temperature, the first periodic oscillation in the autocorrelation function shifts left and the number of segments containing the first periodic oscillation decreases gradually. According to the experiments mentioned above, the long-axis length is defined to estimate the temperature dependence of condensation process further. At the temperatures defined in experiments mentioned above, the relation between long-axis length and temperature matches the experimental results.

  19. On the effects of intercalators in DNA condensation: a force spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis study.

    PubMed

    Rocha, M S; Cavalcante, A G; Silva, R; Ramos, E B

    2014-05-08

    In this work we have characterized the effects of the intercalator ethidium bromide (EtBr) on the DNA condensation process by using force spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. We have tested two condensing agents: spermine (spm(4+)), a tetravalent cationic amine which promotes cation-induced DNA condensation, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), a neutral polymer which promotes DNA ψ-condensation. Two different types of experiments were performed. In the first type, bare DNA molecules disperse in solution are first treated with EtBr for intercalation, and then the condensing agent is added to the sample with the purpose of verifying the effects of the intercalator in hindering DNA condensation. In the second experiment type, the bare DNA molecules are first condensed, and then the intercalator is added to the sample in order to verify its influence on the previously condensed DNA. The results obtained with the two different experimental techniques used agree very well, indicating that previously intercalated EtBr can hinder both cation-induced and ψ-condensation, being more efficient in the first case. On the other hand, EtBr has little effect on the previously formed cation-induced condensates, but is efficient in unfolding the ψ-condensates.

  20. Catch-bond behavior of DNA condensate under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Wong, Wei-Juan; Lim, Ci-Ji; Ju, Hai-Peng; Li, Ming; Yan, Jie; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2015-12-01

    Toroid formation is an important mechanism underlying DNA condensation, which has been investigated extensively by single-molecule experiments in vitro. Here, the de-condensation dynamics of DNA condensates were studied using magnetic tweezers combined with Brownian dynamics simulations. The experimental results revealed a surprising non-monotonic dependence of the unfolding rate on the force applied under strong adhesion conditions, resembling the catch-bond behavior reported in the field of ligand-receptor interactions. Simulation results showed that the different unfolding pathways of DNA condensate under large forces derive from the force-dependent deformation of the DNA toroid, which explains the catch-bond behavior of DNA condensate in the magnetic tweezers experiments. These results challenge the universality of the regular toroidal DNA unwrapping mechanism and provide the most complete description to date of multivalent cation-dependent DNA unwrapping under tension. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11104341, 11474346, 11274374, and 61275192), the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), and the Mechanobiology Institute at National University of Singapore.

  1. Cation charge dependence of the forces driving DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    DeRouchey, Jason; Parsegian, V Adrian; Rau, Donald C

    2010-10-20

    Understanding the strength and specificity of interactions among biologically important macromolecules that control cellular functions requires quantitative knowledge of intermolecular forces. Controlled DNA condensation and assembly are particularly critical for biology, with separate repulsive and attractive intermolecular forces determining the extent of DNA compaction. How these forces depend on the charge of the condensing ion has not been determined, but such knowledge is fundamental for understanding the basis of DNA-DNA interactions. Here, we measure DNA force-distance curves for a homologous set of arginine peptides. All forces are well fit as the sum of two exponentials with 2.4- and 4.8-Å decay lengths. The shorter-decay-length force is always repulsive, with an amplitude that varies slightly with length or charge. The longer-decay-length force varies strongly with cation charge, changing from repulsion with Arg¹ to attraction with Arg². Force curves for a series of homologous polyamines and the heterogeneous protein protamine are quite similar, demonstrating the universality of these forces for DNA assembly. Repulsive amplitudes of the shorter-decay-length force are species-dependent but nearly independent of charge within each species. A striking observation was that the attractive force amplitudes for all samples collapse to a single curve, varying linearly with the inverse of the cation charge.

  2. Possible prebiotic significance of polyamines in the condensation, protection, encapsulation, and biological properties of DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baeza, I.; Ibanez, M.; Wong, C.; Chavez, P.; Gariglio, P.; Oro, J.

    1991-01-01

    Some properties of DNA condensed with spermidine have been compared with the properties of DNA condensed with Co3+(NH3)6 to determine whether condensation of DNA with these trivalent cations protects DNA against the action of DNase I and increases transcription and encapsulation of DNA into liposomes. It was shown that DNA condensed with Co3+(NH3)6 was resistant to the action of the endonuclease DNase I such as DNA condensed with spermidine was. However, DNA condensed with Co3+(NH3)6 was significantly less active in transcription with the E. coli RNA polymerase than DNA-spermidine condensed forms. In addition, it was demonstrated that both compacted forms of DNA were more efficiently encapsulated into neutral liposomes; however, negatively, charged liposomes were scarcely formed in the presence of DNA condensed with Co3+(NH3)6. These experiments and the well documented properties of polyamines increasing the resistance to radiations and hydrolysis of nucleic acids, as well as their biological activities, such as replication, transcription, and translation, together with the low concentration of Co3+ in the environment, lead us to propose spermidine as a plausible prebiotic DNA condensing agent rather than Co3+ and the basic proteins proposed by other authors. Then, we consider the possible role and relevance of the polyamine-nucleic acids complexes in the evolution of life.

  3. Understanding DNA Condensation: From Simple Ions to Protamine-DNA Packaging in Sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derouchey, Jason

    2014-03-01

    DNA in nature exists primarily in a highly compacted state critical for most biological functions. DNA condensation, however, remains poorly understood at the molecular level. We are interested in understanding the fundamental interactions, molecular scale forces and elucidating mechanisms by which polycations interact with DNA in vitro and in vivo. We use osmotic stress coupled with x-ray scattering, to study packaging densities and compaction energies between DNA helices in the presence of various cations. In this talk, we will discuss from simple ions to complex proteins and how these cations modulate both the attractive and repulsive forces between DNA helices. Lastly, the biological implications of these forces will be discussed with regards to spermatogenesis where chromatin histones are replaced by arginine-rich protamines to densely compact DNA in sperm heads. Tight packaging from spermatogenesis is considered essential for both successful transport as well as to protect DNA from damage.

  4. Effects of Ionic Dependence of DNA Persistence Length on the DNA Condensation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wei; Liu, Yan-Hui; Hu, Lin; Xu, Hou-Qiang

    2016-05-01

    DNA persistence length is a key parameter for quantitative interpretation of the conformational properties of DNA and related to the bending rigidity of DNA. A series of experiments pointed out that, in the DNA condensation process by multivalent cations, the condensed DNA takes elongated coil or compact globule states and the population of the compact globule states increases with an increase in ionic concentration. At the same time, single molecule experiments carried out in solution with multivalent cations (such as spermidine, spermine) indicated that DNA persistence length strongly depends on the ionic concentration. In order to revolve the effects of ionic concentration dependence of persistence length on DNA condensation, a model including the ionic concentration dependence of persistence length and strong correlation of multivalent cation on DNA is provided. The autocorrelation function of the tangent vectors is found as an effective way to detect the ionic concentration dependence of toroidal conformations. With an increase in ion concentration, the first periodic oscillation contained in the autocorrelation function shifts, the number of segment contained in the first periodic oscillation decreases gradually. According to the experiments, the average long-axis length is defined to estimate the ionic concentration dependence of condensation process further. The relation between long-axis length and ionic concentration matches the experimental results qualitatively. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11047022, 11204045, 11464004 and 31360215; The Research Foundation from Ministry of Education of China (212152), Guizhou Provincial Tracking Key Program of Social Development (SY20123089, SZ20113069); The General Financial Grant from the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2014M562341); The Research Foundation for Young University Teachers from Guizhou University (201311); The West Light Foundation (2015) and College

  5. Spermine Condenses DNA, but Not RNA Duplexes

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Andrea M.; Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Baker, Nathan; Onufriev, Alexey V.; Pollack, Lois

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between the polyamine spermine and nucleic acids drive important cellular processes. Spermine condenses DNA, and some RNAs such as poly(rA):poly(rU). A large fraction of the spermine present in cells is bound to RNA, but apparently does not condense it. Here, we study the effect of spermine binding to short duplex RNA and DNA and compare our findings with predictions of molecular dynamics simulations. When small numbers of spermine are introduced, RNA with a designed sequence, containing a mixture of 14 GC pairs and 11 AU pairs, resists condensation relative to DNA of an equivalent sequence or to 25 base pair poly(rA):poly(rU) RNA. Comparison of wide-angle x-ray scattering profiles with simulation suggests that spermine is sequestered deep within the major groove of mixed sequence RNA, preventing condensation by limiting opportunities to bridge to other molecules as well as stabilizing the RNA by locking it into a particular conformation. In contrast, for DNA, simulations suggest that spermine binds external to the duplex, offering opportunities for intermolecular interaction. The goal of this study is to explain how RNA can remain soluble, and available for interaction with other molecules in the cell, despite the presence of spermine at concentrations high enough to precipitate DNA.

  6. Brownian dynamics simulation of DNA condensation.

    PubMed Central

    Sottas, P E; Larquet, E; Stasiak, A; Dubochet, J

    1999-01-01

    DNA condensation observed in vitro with the addition of polyvalent counterions is due to intermolecular attractive forces. We introduce a quantitative model of these forces in a Brownian dynamics simulation in addition to a standard mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann repulsion. The comparison of a theoretical value of the effective diameter calculated from the second virial coefficient in cylindrical geometry with some experimental results allows a quantitative evaluation of the one-parameter attractive potential. We show afterward that with a sufficient concentration of divalent salt (typically approximately 20 mM MgCl(2)), supercoiled DNA adopts a collapsed form where opposing segments of interwound regions present zones of lateral contact. However, under the same conditions the same plasmid without torsional stress does not collapse. The condensed molecules present coexisting open and collapsed plectonemic regions. Furthermore, simulations show that circular DNA in 50% methanol solutions with 20 mM MgCl(2) aggregates without the requirement of torsional energy. This confirms known experimental results. Finally, a simulated DNA molecule confined in a box of variable size also presents some local collapsed zones in 20 mM MgCl(2) above a critical concentration of the DNA. Conformational entropy reduction obtained either by supercoiling or by confinement seems thus to play a crucial role in all forms of condensation of DNA. PMID:10512808

  7. Mode of formation and structural features of DNA-cationic liposome complexes used for transfection.

    PubMed

    Gershon, H; Ghirlando, R; Guttman, S B; Minsky, A

    1993-07-20

    Complexes formed between cationic liposomes and nucleic acids represent a highly efficient vehicle for delivery of DNA and RNA molecules into a large variety of eukaryotic cells. By using fluorescence, gel electrophoresis, and metal-shadowing electron microscopy techniques, the factors that affect the, yet unclear, interactions between DNA and cationic liposomes as well as the structural features of the resulting complexes have been elucidated. A model is suggested according to which cationic liposomes bind initially to DNA molecules to form clusters of aggregated vesicles along the nucleic acids. At a critical liposome density, two processes occur, namely, DNA-induced membrane fusion, indicated by lipid mixing studies, and liposome-induced DNA collapse, pointed out by the marked cooperativity of the encapsulation processes, by their modulations by DNA-condensing agents, and also by their conspicuous independence upon DNA length. The DNA collapse leads to the formation of condensed structures which can be completely encapsulated within the fused lipid bilayers in a fast, highly cooperative process since their exposed surface is substantially smaller than that of extended DNA molecules. The formation of the transfecting DNA-liposome complexes in which the nucleic acids are fully encapsulated within a positively-charged lipid bilayer is proposed, consequently, to be dominated by mutual effects exerted by the DNA and the cationic liposomes, leading to interrelated lipid fusion and DNA collapse.

  8. Decondensation behavior of DNA chains induced by multivalent cations at high salt concentrations: Molecular dynamics simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yang-Wei; Ran, Shi-Yong; He, Lin-Li; Wang, Xiang-Hong; Zhang, Lin-Xi

    2015-11-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we study the decondensation process of DNA chains induced by multivalent cations at high salt concentrations in the presence of short cationic chains in solutions. The typical simulation conformations of DNA chains with varying salt concentrations for multivalent cations imply that the concentration of salt cations and the valence of multivalent cations have a strong influence on the process of DNA decondensation. The DNA chains are condensed in the absence of salt or at low salt concentrations, and the compacted conformations of DNA chains become loose when a number of cations and anions are added into the solution. It is explicitly demonstrated that cations can overcompensate the bare charge of the DNA chains and weaken the attraction interactions between the DNA chains and short cationic chains at high salt concentrations. The condensation-decondensation transitions of DNA are also experimentally observed in mixing spermidine with λ-phage DNA at different concentrations of NaCl/MgCl2 solutions. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 31340026), the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant Nos. Z13F20019 and LQ12E01003), and the Science and Technology Project of Zhejiang Science and Technology Department, China (Grant No. 2014C31147).

  9. Theory and simulations of toroidal and rod-like structures in single-molecule DNA condensation.

    PubMed

    Cortini, Ruggero; Caré, Bertrand R; Victor, Jean-Marc; Barbi, Maria

    2015-03-14

    DNA condensation by multivalent cations plays a crucial role in genome packaging in viruses and sperm heads, and has been extensively studied using single-molecule experimental methods. In those experiments, the values of the critical condensation forces have been used to estimate the amplitude of the attractive DNA-DNA interactions. Here, to describe these experiments, we developed an analytical model and a rigid body Langevin dynamics assay to investigate the behavior of a polymer with self-interactions, in the presence of a traction force applied at its extremities. We model self-interactions using a pairwise attractive potential, thereby treating the counterions implicitly. The analytical model allows to accurately predict the equilibrium structures of toroidal and rod-like condensed structures, and the dependence of the critical condensation force on the DNA length. We find that the critical condensation force depends strongly on the length of the DNA, and finite-size effects are important for molecules of length up to 10(5)μm. Our Langevin dynamics simulations show that the force-extension behavior of the rod-like structures is very different from the toroidal ones, so that their presence in experiments should be easily detectable. In double-stranded DNA condensation experiments, the signature of the presence of rod-like structures was not unambiguously detected, suggesting that the polyamines used to condense DNA may protect it from bending sharply as needed in the rod-like structures.

  10. Tubular cationized pullulan hydrogels as local reservoirs for plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Aurélie; Ducrocq, Grégory; Hlawaty, Hanna; Bataille, Isabelle; Guénin, Erwann; Letourneur, Didier; Feldman, Laurent J

    2007-12-01

    In the present study, we measured the ability of various cationized pullulan tubular hydrogels to retain plasmid DNA, and tested the ability of retained plasmid DNA to transfect vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Cationized pullulans were obtained by grafting at different charge densities ethylamine (EA) or diethylaminoethylamine (DEAE) on the pullulan backbone. Polymers were characterized by elemental analysis, acid-base titration, size exclusion chromatography, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The complexation of cationized pullulans in solution with plasmid DNA was evidenced by fluorescence quenching with PicoGreen. Cationized pullulans were then chemically crosslinked with phosphorus oxychloride to obtain tubular cationized pullulan hydrogels. Native pullulan tubes did not retain loaded plasmid DNA. In contrast, the ability of cationized pullulan tubes to retain plasmid DNA was dependent on both the amine content and the type of amine. The functional integrity of plasmid DNA in cationized pullulan tubes was demonstrated by in vitro transfection of VSMCs. Hence, cationized pullulan hydrogels can be designed as tubular structures with high affinity for plasmid DNA, which may provide new biomaterials to enhance the efficiency of local arterial gene transfer strategies.

  11. Characterizing DNA Condensation and Conformational Changes in Organic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Fuyou; Luu, Yen Kim; Hadjiargyrou, Michael; Liang, Dehai

    2010-01-01

    Organic solvents offer a new approach to formulate DNA into novel structures suitable for gene delivery. In this study, we examined the in situ behavior of DNA in N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF) at low concentration via laser light scattering (LLS), TEM, UV absorbance and Zeta potential analysis. Results revealed that, in DMF, a 21bp oligonucleotide remained intact, while calf thymus DNA and supercoiled plasmid DNA were condensed and denatured. During condensation and denaturation, the size was decreased by a factor of 8–10, with calf thymus DNA forming spherical globules while plasmid DNA exhibited a toroid-like conformation. In the condensed state, DNA molecules were still able to release the counterions to be negatively charged, indicating that the condensation was mainly driven by the excluded volume interactions. The condensation induced by DMF was reversible for plasmid DNA but not for calf thymus DNA. When plasmid DNA was removed from DMF and resuspended in an aqueous solution, the DNA was quickly regained a double stranded configuration. These findings provide further insight into the behavior and condensation mechanism of DNA in an organic solvent and may aid in developing more efficient non-viral gene delivery systems. PMID:20949017

  12. C 3-symmetric opioid scaffolds are pH-responsive DNA condensation agents

    PubMed Central

    McStay, Natasha; Molphy, Zara; Coughlan, Alan; Cafolla, Attilio; McKee, Vickie; Gathergood, Nicholas; Kellett, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Herein we report the synthesis of tripodal C3-symmetric opioid scaffolds as high-affinity condensation agents of duplex DNA. Condensation was achieved on both supercoiled and canonical B-DNA structures and identified by agarose electrophoresis, viscosity, turbidity and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. Structurally, the requirement of a tris-opioid scaffold for condensation is demonstrated as both di- (C2-symmetric) and mono-substituted (C1-symmetric) mesitylene-linked opioid derivatives poorly coordinate dsDNA. Condensation, observed by toroidal and globule AFM aggregation, arises from surface-binding ionic interactions between protonated, cationic, tertiary amine groups on the opioid skeleton and the phosphate nucleic acid backbone. Indeed, by converting the 6-hydroxyl group of C3-morphine (MC3) to methoxy substituents in C3-heterocodeine (HC3) and C3-oripavine (OC3) molecules, dsDNA compaction is retained thus negating the possibility of phosphate—hydroxyl surface-binding. Tripodal opioid condensation was identified as pH dependent and strongly influenced by ionic strength with further evidence of cationic amine-phosphate backbone coordination arising from thermal melting analysis and circular dichroism spectroscopy, with compaction also witnessed on synthetic dsDNA co-polymers poly[d(A-T)2] and poly[d(G-C)2]. On-chip microfluidic analysis of DNA condensed by C3-agents provided concentration-dependent protection (inhibition) to site-selective excision by type II restriction enzymes: BamHI, HindIII, SalI and EcoRI, but not to the endonuclease DNase I. PMID:27899572

  13. C 3-symmetric opioid scaffolds are pH-responsive DNA condensation agents.

    PubMed

    McStay, Natasha; Molphy, Zara; Coughlan, Alan; Cafolla, Attilio; McKee, Vickie; Gathergood, Nicholas; Kellett, Andrew

    2017-01-25

    Herein we report the synthesis of tripodal C3-symmetric opioid scaffolds as high-affinity condensation agents of duplex DNA. Condensation was achieved on both supercoiled and canonical B-DNA structures and identified by agarose electrophoresis, viscosity, turbidity and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. Structurally, the requirement of a tris-opioid scaffold for condensation is demonstrated as both di- (C2-symmetric) and mono-substituted (C1-symmetric) mesitylene-linked opioid derivatives poorly coordinate dsDNA. Condensation, observed by toroidal and globule AFM aggregation, arises from surface-binding ionic interactions between protonated, cationic, tertiary amine groups on the opioid skeleton and the phosphate nucleic acid backbone. Indeed, by converting the 6-hydroxyl group of C3-morphine ( MC3: ) to methoxy substituents in C3-heterocodeine ( HC3: ) and C3-oripavine ( OC3: ) molecules, dsDNA compaction is retained thus negating the possibility of phosphate-hydroxyl surface-binding. Tripodal opioid condensation was identified as pH dependent and strongly influenced by ionic strength with further evidence of cationic amine-phosphate backbone coordination arising from thermal melting analysis and circular dichroism spectroscopy, with compaction also witnessed on synthetic dsDNA co-polymers poly[d(A-T)2] and poly[d(G-C)2]. On-chip microfluidic analysis of DNA condensed by C3-agents provided concentration-dependent protection (inhibition) to site-selective excision by type II restriction enzymes: BamHI, HindIII, SalI and EcoRI, but not to the endonuclease DNase I.

  14. Complexation Between Cationic Diblock Copolymers and Plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seyoung; Reineke, Theresa; Lodge, Timothy

    Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA), as polyanions, can spontaneously bind with polycations to form polyelectrolyte complexes. When the polycation is a diblock copolymer with one cationic block and one uncharged hydrophilic block, the polyelectrolyte complexes formed with plasmid DNA (pDNA) are often colloidally stable, and show great promise in the field of polymeric gene therapy. While the resulting properties (size, stability, and toxicity to biological systems) of the complexes have been studied for numerous cationic diblocks, the fundamentals of the pDNA-diblock binding process have not been extensively investigated. Herein, we report how the cationic block content of a diblock influences the pDNA-diblock interactions. pDNA with 7164 base pairs and poly(2-deoxy-2-methacrylamido glucopyranose)-block-poly(N-(2-aminoethyl) methacrylamide) (PMAG-b-PAEMA) are used as the model pDNA and cationic diblock, respectively. To vary the cationic block content, two PMAG-b-PAEMA copolymers with similar PMAG block lengths but distinct PAEMA block lengths and a PAEMA homopolymer are utilized. We show that the enthalpy change from pDNA-diblock interactions is dependent on the cationic diblock composition, and is closely associated with both the binding strength and the pDNA tertiary structure.

  15. Binding of DNA to zwitterionic lipid layers mediated by divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Mengistu, Demmelash H; Bohinc, Klemen; May, Sylvio

    2009-09-10

    Divalent cations, i.e., calcium, magnesium, and others, are able to enhance the ability of DNA to interact with membranes that are composed of zwitterionic lipids such as phosphatidylcholine. The resulting condensed complexes offer potential applications as nontoxic gene delivery vehicles. The present study suggests a generic theoretical model to describe the energetics and structural features of a zwitterionic lipid-DNA complex in the presence of divalent cations. Specifically, we consider the adsorption of a single molecule of double-stranded DNA onto a planar zwitterionic lipid layer. Our theoretical model is based on the continuum Poisson-Boltzmann formalisms, which we modified so as to account for the two opposite charges and orientational freedom of the zwitterionic lipid headgroups. We find a substantially more favorable adsorption free energy of the DNA if divalent cations are present. In addition, our model predicts the divalent cations to preferentially interact with the phosphate groups of the zwitterionic lipids, given these lipids are located in close vicinity to the DNA. This is accompanied by a small but notable reorientation of the zwitterionic headgroups toward the DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of DNA onto a zwitterionic lipid layer is not driven by the release of counterions. Instead, the binding leads to a partial redistribution of the divalent cations, from the phosphate groups of the DNA (prior to the binding) to the phosphate groups of the zwitterionic lipids (after the binding). Our results thus suggest a general physical mechanism underlying complex formation between DNA and zwitterionic lipids in terms of mean-field electrostatics, i.e., neither involving correlations nor specific interactions of the divalent cations.

  16. Intranuclear DNA density affects chromosome condensation in metazoans.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yuki; Iwabuchi, Mari; Ohsumi, Keita; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2013-08-01

    Chromosome condensation is critical for accurate inheritance of genetic information. The degree of condensation, which is reflected in the size of the condensed chromosomes during mitosis, is not constant. It is differentially regulated in embryonic and somatic cells. In addition to the developmentally programmed regulation of chromosome condensation, there may be adaptive regulation based on spatial parameters such as genomic length or cell size. We propose that chromosome condensation is affected by a spatial parameter called the chromosome amount per nuclear space, or "intranuclear DNA density." Using Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we show that condensed chromosome sizes vary during early embryogenesis. Of importance, changing DNA content to haploid or polyploid changes the condensed chromosome size, even at the same developmental stage. Condensed chromosome size correlates with interphase nuclear size. Finally, a reduction in nuclear size in a cell-free system from Xenopus laevis eggs resulted in reduced condensed chromosome sizes. These data support the hypothesis that intranuclear DNA density regulates chromosome condensation. This suggests an adaptive mode of chromosome condensation regulation in metazoans.

  17. Molecular recognition of genomic DNA in a condensate with a model surfactant for potential gene-delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priya; Choudhury, Susobhan; Chandra, Goutam Kumar; Lemmens, Peter; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The functionality of a gene carrying nucleic acid in an artificial gene-delivery system is important for the overall efficiency of the vehicle in vivo. Here, we have studied a well-known artificial gene-delivery system, which is a condensate of calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with a model cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) to investigate the molecular recognition of the genomic DNA in the condensate. While dynamic light scattering (DLS) and circular dichroism (CD) reveal structural aspects of the condensate and the constituting DNA respectively, picosecond resolved polarization gated spectroscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) reveal molecular recognition of the genomic DNA in the condensate. We have considered ethidium bromide (EB) and crystal violet (CV), which are well known DNA-binding agents through intercalative (specific) and electrostatic (non-specific) interactions, respectively, as model ligands for the molecular recognition studies. A fluorescent cationic surfactant, Nonyl Acridine Orange (NAO) is considered to be a mimic of CTAB in the condensate. The polarization gated fluorescence of NAO at various temperatures has been used to investigate the local microviscosity of the condensate. The excellent spectral overlap of NAO emission and the absorption spectra of both EB and CV allow us to investigate FRET-distances of the ligands with respect to NAO in the condensate at various temperatures and thermal stability of ligand-binding of the genomic DNA. The thermodynamic properties of the molecular recognition have also been explored using Van't Hoff equation. We have also extended our studies to molecular recognition of the genomic DNA in the condensate as dried thin films. This has important implications for its application in bioelectronics.

  18. Activation of DNA damage response signaling by condensed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Burman, Bharat; Kruhlak, Michael J; Misteli, Tom

    2014-12-11

    The DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in the context of chromatin, and architectural features of chromatin have been implicated in DNA damage signaling and repair. Whereas a role of chromatin decondensation in the DDR is well established, we show here that chromatin condensation is integral to DDR signaling. We find that, in response to DNA damage chromatin regions transiently expand before undergoing extensive compaction. Using a protein-chromatin-tethering system to create defined chromatin domains, we show that interference with chromatin condensation results in failure to fully activate DDR. Conversely, forced induction of local chromatin condensation promotes ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and ATR-dependent activation of upstream DDR signaling in a break-independent manner. Whereas persistent chromatin compaction enhanced upstream DDR signaling from irradiation-induced breaks, it reduced recovery and survival after damage. Our results demonstrate that chromatin condensation is sufficient for activation of DDR signaling and is an integral part of physiological DDR signaling.

  19. Catching elusive glycosyl cations in a condensed phase with HF/SbF5 superacid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A.; Arda, A.; Désiré, J.; Martin-Mingot, A.; Probst, N.; Sinaÿ, P.; Jiménez-Barbero, J.; Thibaudeau, S.; Blériot, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Glycosyl cations are universally accepted key ionic intermediates in the mechanism of glycosylation, the reaction that covalently links carbohydrates to other molecules. These ions have remained hypothetical species so far because of their extremely short life in organic media as a consequence of their very high reactivity. Here, we report the use of liquid hydrofluoric acid-antimony pentafluoride (HF/SbF5) superacid to generate and stabilize the glycosyl cations derived from peracetylated 2-deoxy and 2-bromoglucopyranose in a condensed phase. Their persistence in this superacid medium allows their three-dimensional structure to be studied by NMR, aided by complementary computations. Their deuteration further confirms the impact of the structure of the glycosyl cation on the stereochemical outcome of its trapping.

  20. Condensation transition and forced unravelling of DNA-histone H1 toroids: a multi-state free energy landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, A. H.; Schlingman, D. J.; Salinas, R. D.; Regan, L.; Mochrie, S. G. J.

    2015-02-01

    DNA is known to condense with multivalent cations and positively charged proteins. However, the properties and energetics of DNA superstructures, such as chromatin, are poorly understood. As a model system, we investigate histone H1 condensation of DNA with tethered particle motion and force-extension measurements. We show that after the addition of H1 to DNA, a concentration dependent lag time is followed by the DNA spontaneously condensing. The trigger for this condensation phase transition can be modeled as sufficient H1s having bound to the DNA, providing insight into the 30 nm fiber condensation upon H1 binding. Furthermore, optical tweezers force-extension measurements of histone H1 condensed DNA reveals a sequence of state transitions corresponding to the unwinding of superhelical turns. We determine the complete, experimental, multi-state free energy landscape for the complex using Crooks fluctuation theorem. The measured force-versus-extension and free energy landscape are compared to predictions from a simple, theoretical model. This work encourages the theoretical description of DNA/protein structure and energetics and their role in chromatin and other, more complex, systems.

  1. Effect of clustered peptide binding on DNA condensation.

    PubMed

    Haley, Jennifer; Kabiru, Paul; Geng, Yan

    2010-01-01

    DNA condensation in-vitro has been studied as a model system to reveal common principles underlying gene packaging in biology, and as the critical first step towards the development of non-viral gene delivery vectors. In this study, we use a bio-inspired approach, where small DNA-binding peptides are controllably clustered by an amphiphilic block copolymer scaffold, to reveal the effect of clustered peptide binding on the energetics, size, shape and physical properties of DNA condensation in-vitro. This provides insights into the general architectural effect of gene-binding proteins on DNA condensation process. Moreover, the versatility afforded by regulating the clustering density and composition of peptides may provide a novel design platform for gene delivery applications in the future.

  2. Linking number anomalies in DNA under conditions close to condensation.

    PubMed

    Ringquist, S; Shinn, R; Hanlon, S

    1989-02-07

    Changes in linking number and the apparent winding angle of pBR322 DNA have been evaluated in mixed ethanol-water solvents containing either Na or Mg as the major counterion contributing to the electrostatic shielding of the duplex. The average number of superhelical turns (tau) produced in the standard electrophoresis buffer (Tris-borate-EDTA, pH 8.0) by the transfer of DNA, relaxed in 200 mM NaCl, 10 mM NaH2PO4/Na2HPO4, and 2 mM EDTA, pH 7, by calf thymus topoisomerase or ligated in 6.6 mM MgCl2, 1 mM KCl, 1 mM ATP, 1 mM dithiothreitol, and 66 mM Tris, pH 7.6, by T4 ligase, was determined as a function of the EtOH concentration. At low enzyme concentrations, the tau values became increasingly more positive in the presence of both cations as the ethanol concentration increased, indicating that the duplex structure was overwound in the ethanol solvents. Winding angle changes between 0 and 20% ethanol, calculated from these values of tau, exhibited the same correlations with CD spectral properties as had been previously observed for 100% aqueous systems containing monovalent cations [Kilkuskie, R., Wood, N., Shinn, R., Ringquist, S., & Hanlon, S. (1988) Biochemistry 27, 4377-4386]. The results at higher concentrations of ethanol (25-30%), however, were anomalous for the Mg-ligase system. The anomalies increased with higher ethanol, ligase, or Mg concentration. Gel run under these conditions showed enhanced concentrations of slow-moving components, indicative of ligation of intermolecular associated DNA species. At a 10-fold higher level of ligase, ethanol appeared to unwind the duplex, confirming the results of Lee, Mizusawa, and Kakefuda [(1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78, 2838-2842]. All of these anomalies occur under solvent conditions which are close to conditions which produce a heterogeneous dispersion of sedimenting species in ultracentrifugal experiments and compact rodlike structures, visualized by electron microscopy. The circular dichroism spectra

  3. Enantioselective DNA condensation induced by heptameric lanthanum helical supramolecular enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Bao, Fei-Fei; Xu, Xin-Xin; Zhou, Wen; Pang, Chun-Yan; Li, Zaijun; Gu, Zhi-Guo

    2014-09-01

    DNA condensation induced by a pair of heptameric La(III) helical enantiomers M-[La7(S-L)6(CO3)(NO3)6(OCH3)(CH3OH)7]·2CH3OH·5H2O and P-[La7(R-L)6(CO3)(NO3)6(OCH3)(CH3OH)5(H2O)2]·2CH3OH·4H2O (M-La and P-La, L=2-(2-hydroxybenzylamino)-3-carbamoylpropanoic acid) has been investigated by UV/vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, CD spectroscopy, EMSA, RALS, DLS, and SEM. The enantiomers M-La and P-La could induce CT-DNA condensation at a low concentration as observed in UV/vis spectroscopy. DNA condensates possessed globular nanoparticles with nearly homogeneous sizes in solid state determined by SEM (ca. 250 nm for M-La and ca. 200 nm for P-La). The enantiomers bound to DNA through electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bond interactions in a major groove, and rapidly condensed free DNA into its compact state. DNA decompaction has been acquired by using EDTA as disassembly agent, and analyzed by UV/vis spectroscopy, CD spectroscopy and EMSA. Moreover, the enantiomers M-La and P-La displayed discernible discrimination in DNA interaction and DNA condensation, as well as DNA decondensation. Our study suggested that lanthanum(III) enantiomers M-La and P-La were efficient DNA packaging agents with potential applications in gene delivery.

  4. Multistep assembly of DNA condensation clusters by SMC

    PubMed Central

    Kim, HyeongJun; Loparo, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) family members play essential roles in chromosome condensation, sister chromatid cohesion and DNA repair. It remains unclear how SMCs structure chromosomes and how their mechanochemical cycle regulates their interactions with DNA. Here we used single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to visualize how Bacillus subtilis SMC (BsSMC) interacts with flow-stretched DNAs. We report that BsSMC can slide on DNA, switching between static binding and diffusion. At higher concentrations, BsSMCs form clusters that condense DNA in a weakly ATP-dependent manner. ATP increases the apparent cooperativity of DNA condensation, demonstrating that BsSMC can interact cooperatively through their ATPase head domains. Consistent with these results, ATPase mutants compact DNA more slowly than wild-type BsSMC in the presence of ATP. Our results suggest that transiently static BsSMC molecules can nucleate the formation of clusters that act to locally condense the chromosome while forming long-range DNA bridges. PMID:26725510

  5. Microscopic insight into the DNA condensation process of a zwitterion-functionalized polycation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Zhou, Li; Chen, Xiaolu; Han, Xia; Wang, Rui; Liu, Honglai

    2016-11-01

    Zwitterion-functionalized polycations are ideal gene carriers with long circulation, high cellular uptaking and low cell viability. However, the trade-off between the DNA condensation efficiency and the cell viability must be addressed. The purpose of this study is to provide a microscopic insight into the DNA condensation process and to explore the effect of a zwitterionic block of zwitterion-functionalized polycation, which is of great significance in designing novel gene delivery systems. Poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate-b-(sulfobetaine methacrylate)] (PDMAEMA-b-PSBMA) copolymers were synthesized and used as the model systems. Different from the conventional concept that the PSBMA zwitterionic block act only as the "stealthy" groups, the subtle differences in physical and colloidal characteristics between the polycation/DNA polyplexes show that the PSBMA segment is capable of wrapping DNA attributed to the quaternary ammonium cations, without compromising the DNA condensation capability. On the other hand, the incorporation of PSBMA block reduces the surface charge of the polyplexes, which substantially result in the inefficient transfection and the reduced cytotoxicity.

  6. Unfolding DNA condensates produced by DNA-like charged depletants: A force spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, C. H. M.; Rocha, M. S.; Ramos, E. B.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we have measured, by means of optical tweezers, forces acting on depletion-induced DNA condensates due to the presence of the DNA-like charged protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). The stretching and unfolding measurements performed on the semi-flexible DNA chain reveal (1) the softening of the uncondensed DNA contour length and (2) a mechanical behavior strikingly different from those previously observed: the force-extension curves of BSA-induced DNA condensates lack the "saw-tooth" pattern and applied external forces as high as ≈80 pN are unable to fully unfold the condensed DNA contour length. This last mechanical experimental finding is in agreement with force-induced "unpacking" detailed Langevin dynamics simulations recently performed by Cortini et al. on model rod-like shaped condensates. Furthermore, a simple thermodynamics analysis of the unfolding process has enabled us to estimate the free energy involved in the DNA condensation: the estimated depletion-induced interactions vary linearly with both the condensed DNA contour length and the BSA concentration, in agreement with the analytical and numerical analysis performed on model DNA condensates. We hope that future additional experiments can decide whether the rod-like morphology is the actual one we are dealing with (e.g. pulling experiments coupled with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy).

  7. Polycation-DNA complexes for gene delivery: a comparison of the biopharmaceutical properties of cationic polypeptides and cationic lipids.

    PubMed

    Pouton, C W; Lucas, P; Thomas, B J; Uduehi, A N; Milroy, D A; Moss, S H

    1998-04-30

    DNA plasmids formed particulate complexes with a variety of cationic polyamino acids and cationic lipids, which were used to transfect mammalian cells in culture. Complexation was studied by assaying for exclusion of ethidium using a fluorometric assay, which indicated that complexation with cationic polyamino acids took place with utilisation of the majority of charged functional groups. The particle sizes and zeta potentials of a range of complexes were determined. Generally polyamino acids formed uniform particles 80-120 nm in diameter in water, but their particle size increased on dilution of the particles in electrolytes or cell culture media. The efficiency of transfection was compared using complexes of pRSVlacZ, a reporter construct which expressed beta-galactosidase under the control of the Rous sarcoma virus promoter. Positively charged DNA/polyamino acid complexes were taken up by cells but required an endosomolytic agent, such as chloroquine, to facilitate transfection. Polyornithine complexes resulted in the highest levels of expression, in comparison with other homopolyamino acids (polyornithine>poly-L-lysine=poly-D-lysine>polyarginine). Copolyamino acids of lysine and alanine condensed DNA but were less active in transfection experiments. Copoly(L-Lys, L-Ala 1:1) was inactive even in the presence of chloroquine. In contrast DNA/cationic lipid complexes transfected cells spontaneously, and chloroquine did not improve the extent of expression, rather it usually reduced efficiency. There was little correlation between comparative efficiencies of lipid complexes between cell lines suggesting that the nature of the cell membrane and differences in mechanisms of internalisation were determinants of efficiency. In an effort to explore better cell culture models for gene delivery, monolayers of Caco-2 cells were transfected in filter culture. As the cells differentiated and formed a polarized monolayer, expression of beta-galactosidase was reduced until at

  8. A comparison of plasmid DNA delivery efficiency and cytotoxicity of two cationic diblock polyoxazoline copolymers.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Roman; Liu, Kegang; Wang, Xueya; Wolf, Marc; Hunziker, Patrick

    2017-04-28

    Cationic polymers as non-viral gene delivery carriers are widely used because of their strong condensing properties and long-term safety, but acute cytotoxicity is a persistent challenge. In this study, two types of polyplexes were prepared by co-formulating plasmid DNA and two cationic diblock copolymers PABOXA5-b-PMOXA33-PA (primary amine) and PABOXA5-b-PMOXA33-TA (tertiary amine) to check their transfection efficacies in HeLa cells and HEK293T cells, respectively. The plasmid DNA/PABOXA5-b-PMOXA33-PA polyplex showed higher transfection efficacy compared to the plasmid DNA/PABOXA5-b-PMOXA33-TA polyplex under an N/P ratio of 40. Both polymers exhibited low toxicity, attributed to the shielding effect of a hydrophilic, noncharged block. Mechanistic insight into differential transfection efficiencies of the polymers were gained by visualization and comparison of the condensates via transmission electron and atomic force microscopy. The results provide information suited for further structure optimization of polymers that are aimed for targeted gene delivery.

  9. Measuring Cation Dependent DNA Polymerase Fidelity Landscapes by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kording, Konrad; Schmidt, Daniel; Martin-Alarcon, Daniel; Tyo, Keith; Boyden, Edward S.; Church, George

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput recording of signals embedded within inaccessible micro-environments is a technological challenge. The ideal recording device would be a nanoscale machine capable of quantitatively transducing a wide range of variables into a molecular recording medium suitable for long-term storage and facile readout in the form of digital data. We have recently proposed such a device, in which cation concentrations modulate the misincorporation rate of a DNA polymerase (DNAP) on a known template, allowing DNA sequences to encode information about the local cation concentration. In this work we quantify the cation sensitivity of DNAP misincorporation rates, making possible the indirect readout of cation concentration by DNA sequencing. Using multiplexed deep sequencing, we quantify the misincorporation properties of two DNA polymerases – Dpo4 and Klenow exo− – obtaining the probability and base selectivity of misincorporation at all positions within the template. We find that Dpo4 acts as a DNA recording device for Mn2+ with a misincorporation rate gain of ∼2%/mM. This modulation of misincorporation rate is selective to the template base: the probability of misincorporation on template T by Dpo4 increases >50-fold over the range tested, while the other template bases are affected less strongly. Furthermore, cation concentrations act as scaling factors for misincorporation: on a given template base, Mn2+ and Mg2+ change the overall misincorporation rate but do not alter the relative frequencies of incoming misincorporated nucleotides. Characterization of the ion dependence of DNAP misincorporation serves as the first step towards repurposing it as a molecular recording device. PMID:22928047

  10. Adsorption of Divalent Cations on DNA

    PubMed Central

    Morfin, Isabelle; Horkay, Ferenc; Basser, Peter J.; Bley, Françoise; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Rochas, Cyrille; Geissler, Erik

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of divalent ions in semidilute solutions of high-molecular-mass DNA containing both sodium chloride and strontium chloride in near-physiological conditions is studied by small-angle x-ray scattering and by small-angle neutron scattering. Both small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering reveal a continuous increase in the scattering intensity at low q with increasing divalent ion concentration, while at high q the scattering curves converge. The best fit to the data is found for a configuration in which DNA strands of cross-sectional radius 10 Å are surrounded by a counterion sheath of outer radius ∼13.8 Å, independent of the strontium chloride concentration. When the strontium chloride is replaced by calcium chloride, similar results are obtained, but the thickness of the sheath increases when the divalent salt concentration decreases. These results correspond in both cases to partial localization of the counterions within a layer that is thinner than the effective Debye screening length. PMID:15454479

  11. Possible prebiotic significance of polyamines in the condensation, protection, encapsulation, and biological properties of DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baeza, Isabel; Ibanez, Miguel; Wong, Carlos; Chavez, Pedro; Gariglio, Patricio; Oro, J.

    1992-01-01

    While DNA which has undergone ionic condensation with Co(3+)(NH3)6 is resistant to the action of the endonuclase DNAse I, in much the same way as DNA condensed with spermidine, it was significantly less active in transcription with the E. coli RNA polymerase than DNA-spermidine condensed forms. Although both compacted forms of DNA were more efficiently encapsulated into neutral liposomes, negatively charged liposomes were seldom formed in the presence of the present, positive ion-condensed DNA; spermidine is accordingly proposed as a plausible prebiotic DNA-condensing agent. Attention is given to the relevance of the polyimide-nucleic acids complexes in the evolution of life.

  12. Computational and analytical modeling of cationic lipid-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Farago, Oded; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels

    2007-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the physical properties of cationic lipid-DNA (CL-DNA) complexes--a promising synthetically based nonviral carrier of DNA for gene therapy. The study is based on a coarse-grained molecular model, which is used in Monte Carlo simulations of mesoscopically large systems over timescales long enough to address experimental reality. In the present work, we focus on the statistical-mechanical behavior of lamellar complexes, which in Monte Carlo simulations self-assemble spontaneously from a disordered random initial state. We measure the DNA-interaxial spacing, d(DNA), and the local cationic area charge density, sigma(M), for a wide range of values of the parameter (c) representing the fraction of cationic lipids. For weakly charged complexes (low values of (c)), we find that d(DNA) has a linear dependence on (c)(-1), which is in excellent agreement with x-ray diffraction experimental data. We also observe, in qualitative agreement with previous Poisson-Boltzmann calculations of the system, large fluctuations in the local area charge density with a pronounced minimum of sigma(M) halfway between adjacent DNA molecules. For highly-charged complexes (large (c)), we find moderate charge density fluctuations and observe deviations from linear dependence of d(DNA) on (c)(-1). This last result, together with other findings such as the decrease in the effective stretching modulus of the complex and the increased rate at which pores are formed in the complex membranes, are indicative of the gradual loss of mechanical stability of the complex, which occurs when (c) becomes large. We suggest that this may be the origin of the recently observed enhanced transfection efficiency of lamellar CL-DNA complexes at high charge densities, because the completion of the transfection process requires the disassembly of the complex and the release of the DNA into the cytoplasm. Some of the structural properties of the system are also predicted by a continuum

  13. Competitive interaction of monovalent cations with DNA from 3D-RISM

    PubMed Central

    Giambaşu, George M.; Gebala, Magdalena K.; Panteva, Maria T.; Luchko, Tyler; Case, David A.; York, Darrin M.

    2015-01-01

    The composition of the ion atmosphere surrounding nucleic acids affects their folding, condensation and binding to other molecules. It is thus of fundamental importance to gain predictive insight into the formation of the ion atmosphere and thermodynamic consequences when varying ionic conditions. An early step toward this goal is to benchmark computational models against quantitative experimental measurements. Herein, we test the ability of the three dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) to reproduce preferential interaction parameters determined from ion counting (IC) experiments for mixed alkali chlorides and dsDNA. Calculations agree well with experiment with slight deviations for salt concentrations >200 mM and capture the observed trend where the extent of cation accumulation around the DNA varies inversely with its ionic size. Ion distributions indicate that the smaller, more competitive cations accumulate to a greater extent near the phosphoryl groups, penetrating deeper into the grooves. In accord with experiment, calculated IC profiles do not vary with sequence, although the predicted ion distributions in the grooves are sequence and ion size dependent. Calculations on other nucleic acid conformations predict that the variation in linear charge density has a minor effect on the extent of cation competition. PMID:26304542

  14. Tailor-made poly(amidoamine)s for controlled complexation and condensation of DNA.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Laura; Häfele, Stefanie; Peschka-Süss, Regine; Antonietti, Markus; Börner, Hans G

    2008-01-01

    A set of polymer carriers for DNA delivery was synthesized by combining monodisperse, sequence-defined poly(amidoamine) (PAA) segments with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) blocks. The precise definition of the PAA segments provides the possibility of correlating the chemical structure (monomer sequence) with the resulting biological properties. Three different PAA-PEO conjugates were synthesized by solid-phase supported synthesis, and the cationic nature of the PAA segments was systematically varied. This allows for the tailoring of interactions with double-stranded plasmid DNA (dsDNA). The potential of the PAA-PEO conjugates as non-viral vectors for gene delivery is demonstrated by investigating the dsDNA complexation and condensation properties. Depending on the applied carrier, a transition in polyplex (polymer-DNA ion complex) structures is observed. This reaches from extended ring-like structures to highly compact toroidal structures, where supercoiling of the DNA is induced. An aggregation model is proposed that is based on structural investigations of the polyplexes with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). While the cationic PAA segment mediates primarily the contact of the carrier to the dsDNA, the PEO block stabilizes the polyplex and generates a "stealth" aggregate, as was suggested by Zeta potentials that were close to zero. The controlled aggregation leads to stable, single-plasmid complexes, and stabilizes the DNA structure itself. This is shown by ethidium bromide intercalation assays and DNase digestion assays. The presented PAA-PEO systems allow for the formation of well-defined single-plasmid polyplexes, preventing hard DNA compression and strongly polydisperse polyplexes. Moreover carrier polymers and the resulting polyplexes exhibit no cytotoxicity, as was shown by viability tests; this makes the carriers potentially suitable for in vivo delivery applications.

  15. Counterion condensation in short cationic peptides: limiting mobilities beyond the Onsager-Fuoss theory.

    PubMed

    Wernersson, Erik; Heyda, Jan; Kubíčková, Anna; Křížek, Tomáš; Coufal, Pavel; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the effect of the background electrolyte (BGE) anions on the electrophoretic mobilities of the cationic amino acids arginine and lysine and the polycationic peptides tetraarginine, tetralysine, nonaarginine, and nonalysine. BGEs composed of sodium chloride, sodium propane-1,3-disulfonate, and sodium sulfate were used. For the amino acids, determination of the limiting mobility by extrapolation, using the Onsager-Fuoss (OF) theory expression, yielded consistent estimates. For the peptides, however, the estimates of the limiting mobilities were found to spuriously depend on the BGE salt. This paradox was resolved using molecular modeling. Simulations, on all-atom as well as coarse-grained levels, show that significant counterion condensation, an effect not accounted for in OF theory, occurs for the tetra- and nonapeptides, even for low BGE concentrations. Including this effect in the quantitative estimation of the BGE effect on mobility removed the discrepancy between the estimated limiting mobilities in different salts. The counterion condensation was found to be mainly due to electrostatic interactions, with specific ion effects playing a secondary role. Therefore, the conclusions are likely to be generalizable to other analytes with a similar density of charged groups and OF theory is expected to fail in a predictable way for such analytes.

  16. Cation binding to 15-TBA quadruplex DNA is a multiple-pathway cation-dependent process

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnikov, Roman V.; Sponer, Jiri; Rassokhina, Olga I.; Kopylov, Alexei M.; Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Makarov, Alexander A.; Golovin, Andrey V.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation (30 simulations reaching 4 µs in total), hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach and isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the atomistic picture of ion binding to 15-mer thrombin-binding quadruplex DNA (G-DNA) aptamer. Binding of ions to G-DNA is complex multiple pathway process, which is strongly affected by the type of the cation. The individual ion-binding events are substantially modulated by the connecting loops of the aptamer, which play several roles. They stabilize the molecule during time periods when the bound ions are not present, they modulate the route of the ion into the stem and they also stabilize the internal ions by closing the gates through which the ions enter the quadruplex. Using our extensive simulations, we for the first time observed full spontaneous exchange of internal cation between quadruplex molecule and bulk solvent at atomistic resolution. The simulation suggests that expulsion of the internally bound ion is correlated with initial binding of the incoming ion. The incoming ion then readily replaces the bound ion while minimizing any destabilization of the solute molecule during the exchange. PMID:21893589

  17. Cation binding to 15-TBA quadruplex DNA is a multiple-pathway cation-dependent process.

    PubMed

    Reshetnikov, Roman V; Sponer, Jiri; Rassokhina, Olga I; Kopylov, Alexei M; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Makarov, Alexander A; Golovin, Andrey V

    2011-12-01

    A combination of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation (30 simulations reaching 4 µs in total), hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach and isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the atomistic picture of ion binding to 15-mer thrombin-binding quadruplex DNA (G-DNA) aptamer. Binding of ions to G-DNA is complex multiple pathway process, which is strongly affected by the type of the cation. The individual ion-binding events are substantially modulated by the connecting loops of the aptamer, which play several roles. They stabilize the molecule during time periods when the bound ions are not present, they modulate the route of the ion into the stem and they also stabilize the internal ions by closing the gates through which the ions enter the quadruplex. Using our extensive simulations, we for the first time observed full spontaneous exchange of internal cation between quadruplex molecule and bulk solvent at atomistic resolution. The simulation suggests that expulsion of the internally bound ion is correlated with initial binding of the incoming ion. The incoming ion then readily replaces the bound ion while minimizing any destabilization of the solute molecule during the exchange.

  18. Optical tweezers reveal a dynamic mechanical response of cationic peptide-DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Amy; Zheng, Tai; Sucayan, Sarah; Chou, Szu-Ting; Tricoli, Lucas; Hustedt, Jason; Kahn, Jason; Mixson, A. James; Seog, Joonil

    2013-03-01

    Nonviral carriers have been developed to deliver nucleic acids by forming nanoscale complexes; however, there has been limited success in achieving high transfection efficiency. Our hypothesis is that a factor affecting gene delivery efficiency is the mechanical response of the condensed complex. To begin to test this hypothesis, we directly measured the mechanical properties of DNA-carrier complexes using optical tweezers. Histidine-lysine (HK) polymer, Asparagine-lysine (NK) polymer and poly-L-lysine were used to form complexes with a single DNA molecule. As carriers were introduced, a sudden decrease in DNA extension occurrs at a force level which is defined as critical force (Fc). Fc is carrier and concentration dependent. Pulling revealed reduction in DNA extension length for HK-DNA complexes. The characteristics of force profiles vary by agent and can be dynamically manipulated by changes in environmental conditions such as ionic strength of the buffer as well as pH. Heparin can remove cationic reagents which are otherwise irreversibly bound to DNA. The implications for optimizing molecular interactions to enhance transfection efficiency will be discussed.

  19. Electrochemical uranyl cation biosensor with DNA oligonucleotides as receptor layer.

    PubMed

    Jarczewska, Marta; Ziółkowski, Robert; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-04-01

    The present study aims at the further development of the uranyl oligonucleotide-based voltammetric biosensor, which takes advantage of strong interaction between UO2(2+) and phosphate DNA backbone. Herein we report the optimization of working parameters of previously elaborated electrochemical DNA biosensor. It is shown that the sensor sensitivity is highly dependent on the oligonucleotide probe length and the incubation time of sensor in a sample solution. Consequently, the highest sensitivity was obtained for 10-nucleotide sequence and 60 min incubation time. The lower detection limit towards uranyl cation for developed biosensor was 30 nM. The influence of mixed monolayers and the possibility of developing a non-calibration device were also investigated. The selectivity of the proposed biosensor was significantly improved via elimination of adenine nucleobases from the DNA probe. Moreover, the regeneration procedure was elaborated and tested to prolong the use of the same biosensor for 4 subsequent determinations of UO2(2+).

  20. [A fluoride-sensor for kink structure in DNA condensation process].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Ying-Bing; Li, Yu-Pu; Hu, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Bloomfield has pointed out that the kink structure occurs for sharp bending during DNA condensation process, until now, which has not been proved by experiments. Using UV Spectrophotometer, the effects of fluoride and chlorine on the polyamine-DNA condensation system can be detected. Fluoride and chlorine both belong to the halogen family, but their effects on spermine-DNA condensation system are totally different. Fluoride ions make blue-shift and hyperchromicity appear in the spermine-DNA condensation system, but chlorine ions only make insignificant hyperchromicity happen in this system. Both fluoride ions and chlorine ions only make insignificant hyperchromicity happen in spermidine-DNA condensation system. Based on the distinguished character of fluoride, a fluoride-sensor for "kink" structure in DNA condensation was developed and the second kind of "kink" structure only appear in the spermine-DNA condensation system.

  1. The phase behavior of cationic lipid-DNA complexes.

    PubMed Central

    May, S; Harries, D; Ben-Shaul, A

    2000-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the phase behavior of solutions containing DNA, cationic lipids, and nonionic (helper) lipids. Our model allows for five possible structures, treated as incompressible macroscopic phases: two lipid-DNA composite (lipoplex) phases, namely, the lamellar (L(alpha)(C)) and hexagonal (H(II)(C)) complexes; two binary (cationic/neutral) lipid phases, that is, the bilayer (L(alpha)) and inverse-hexagonal (H(II)) structures, and uncomplexed DNA. The free energy of the four lipid-containing phases is expressed as a sum of composition-dependent electrostatic, elastic, and mixing terms. The electrostatic free energies of all phases are calculated based on Poisson-Boltzmann theory. The phase diagram of the system is evaluated by minimizing the total free energy of the three-component mixture with respect to all the compositional degrees of freedom. We show that the phase behavior, in particular the preferred lipid-DNA complex geometry, is governed by a subtle interplay between the electrostatic, elastic, and mixing terms, which depend, in turn, on the lipid composition and lipid/DNA ratio. Detailed calculations are presented for three prototypical systems, exhibiting markedly different phase behaviors. The simplest mixture corresponds to a rigid planar membrane as the lipid source, in which case, only lamellar complexes appear in solution. When the membranes are "soft" (i.e., low bending modulus) the system exhibits the formation of both lamellar and hexagonal complexes, sometimes coexisting with each other, and with pure lipid or DNA phases. The last system corresponds to a lipid mixture involving helper lipids with strong propensity toward the inverse-hexagonal phase. Here, again, the phase diagram is rather complex, revealing a multitude of phase transitions and coexistences. Lamellar and hexagonal complexes appear, sometimes together, in different regions of the phase diagram. PMID:10733951

  2. Mechanistic aspects of hydration of guanine radical cations in DNA.

    PubMed

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Cadet, Jean; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2014-04-23

    The mechanistic aspects of hydration of guanine radical cations, G(•+) in double- and single-stranded oligonucleotides were investigated by direct time-resolved spectroscopic monitoring methods. The G(•+) radical one-electron oxidation products were generated by SO4(•-) radical anions derived from the photolysis of S2O8(2-) anions by 308 nm laser pulses. In neutral aqueous solutions (pH 7.0), after the complete decay of SO4(•-) radicals (∼5 μs after the actinic laser flash) the transient absorbance of neutral guanine radicals, G(-H)(•) with maximum at 312 nm, is dominant. The kinetics of decay of G(-H)(•) radicals depend strongly on the DNA secondary structure. In double-stranded DNA, the G(-H)(•) decay is biphasic with one component decaying with a lifetime of ∼2.2 ms and the other with a lifetime of ∼0.18 s. By contrast, in single-stranded DNA the G(-H)(•) radicals decay monophasically with a ∼ 0.28 s lifetime. The ms decay component in double-stranded DNA is correlated with the enhancement of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) yields which are ∼7 greater than in single-stranded DNA. In double-stranded DNA, it is proposed that the G(-H)(•) radicals retain radical cation character by sharing the N1-proton with the N3-site of C in the [G(•+):C] base pair. This [G(-H)(•):H(+)C ⇆ G(•+):C] equilibrium allows for the hydration of G(•+) followed by formation of 8-oxoG. By contrast, in single-stranded DNA, deprotonation of G(•+) and the irreversible escape of the proton into the aqueous phase competes more effectively with the hydration mechanism, thus diminishing the yield of 8-oxoG, as observed experimentally.

  3. DNA packaging induced by micellar aggregates: a novel in vitro DNA condensation system.

    PubMed

    Ghirlando, R; Wachtel, E J; Arad, T; Minsky, A

    1992-08-11

    Evidence for a conceptually novel DNA packaging process is presented. X-ray scattering, electron microscopy, and circular dichroism measurements indicate that in the presence of positively charged micellar aggregates and flexible anionic polymers, such as negatively charged polypeptides or single-stranded RNA species, a complex is formed in which DNA molecules are partially embedded within a micellar scaffold and partially condensed into highly packed chiral structures. Based on studies of micelle-DNA and micelle-flexible anionic polymer systems, as well as on the known effects of a high charge density upon the micellar organization, a DNA packaging model is proposed. According to this model, the DNA induces the elongation of the micelles into rodlike aggregates, forming a closely packed matrix in which the DNA molecules are immobilized. In contrast, the flexible anionic polymers stabilize clusters of spherical micelles which are proposed to effect a capping of the rodlike micelles, thus arresting their elongation and creating surfactant-free segments of the DNA that are able to converge and collapse. Thus, unlike other in vitro DNA packaging systems, in which condensation follows encounters between charge-neutralized DNA molecules, a prepackaging phase where the DNA is immobilized within a matrix is proposed in this case. Cellular and nuclear membranes have been implicated in DNA packaging processes in vivo, and negatively charged polyelectrolytes were shown to be involved in the processes. These observations, combined with the basic tenets of the DNA condensation system described here, allow for the progression to the study of more elaborate model systems and thus might lead to insights into the nature and roles of the intricate in vivo DNA-membrane complexes.

  4. In vitro transfection of plasmid DNA by cationized gelatin prepared from different amine compounds.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tomoshige, Ryuji; Iwanaga, Kazunori; Kakemi, Masawo; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the in vitro transfection efficiency of a luciferase plasmid DNA using cationized gelatin prepared from different amine compounds. The compounds used here were ethylenediamine, putrescine, spermidine and spermine, chemically introduced to the carboxyl group of gelatin for the cationization. Complexation of the cationized gelatin with the plasmid DNA was performed by simply mixing the two materials at various N+/P- mixing ratios (the molar number ratio of amino groups of gelatin to the phosphate groups of DNA) in aqueous solution. Gel retardation studies revealed that the formation of cationized-gelatin-plasmid DNA complexes depended on the N+/P- mixing ratio. The stronger interaction of plasmid DNA with the cationized gelatin of spermine compared to the other cationized gelatins was observed by an ethidium bromide intercalation assay and Scatchard binding analysis. When the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA complexed with the various cationized gelatins at different N+/P- mixing ratios was evaluated for mouse L929 fibroblasts, the highest transfection efficiency was observed for the complex prepared from the cationized gelatin of spermine at a N+/P- mixing ratio of 2. The present study indicates that there is an optimal N+/P- mixing ratio and a type of amine compound or cationization extent of cationized gelatin to enhance the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA.

  5. Controlled release of plasmid DNA from hydrogels prepared from gelatin cationized by different amine compounds.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tomoshige, Ryuji; Iwanaga, Kazunori; Kakemi, Masawo; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2006-05-15

    This paper is an investigation to compare the in vivo controlled release of a plasmid DNA from biodegradable hydrogels prepared from gelatin cationized by different amine compounds, ethylenediamine, putrescine, spermidine, and spermine and the consequent profile of gene expression. Cationized gelatin prepared through the chemical introduction of each amine compound was crosslinked by various concentrations of glutaraldehyde to obtain cationized gelatin hydrogels for the carrier of plasmid DNA release. When the cationized gelatin hydrogels incorporating 125I-labeled plasmid DNA were implanted into the femoral muscle of mice, the radioactivity remaining decreased with time and the retention period of radioactivity prolonged with a decrease in the water content of hydrogels. When 125I-labeled cationized gelatin hydrogels with the higher water content was implanted, the radioactivity remaining was decreased faster with time. The remaining time profile of plasmid DNA radioactivity was in good accordance with that of hydrogel radioactivity, irrespective of the type of cationized gelatin. Following intramuscular implantation, any cationized gelatin hydrogel incorporating plasmid DNA enhanced the expression level of plasmid DNA to a significantly higher extent than the free plasmid DNA injection. In addition, prolonged time period of gene expression was observed although there was no significant difference in the expressed period between the cationized gelatin hydrogels. It was concluded that plasmid DNA of biological activity was released from every cationized gelatin hydrogel accompanied with the in vivo degradation, resulting in enhanced and prolonged gene expression.

  6. Cationic Lipid-Coated Polyplexes (Lipopolyplexes) for DNA and Small RNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ewe, Alexander; Aigner, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The delivery of nucleic acids (NA) like DNA for cell transfection or siRNAs for gene knockdown is of major interest for in vitro studies as well as for applications in vivo. The same is true for other small RNA molecules like miRNAs or miRNA inhibitors (antimiRs). Important nonviral gene delivery vectors include liposomes and cationic polymers. With regard to cationic polymers, polyethylenimines (PEIs) are well established for the delivery of NA, by acting as nanoscale delivery platforms (polyplexes). Their combination with liposomes comprising different phospholipids leads to the formation of lipopolyplexes and can further improve their efficacy and biocompatibility, by combining the favorable properties of lipid systems (high stability, efficient cellular uptake, low cytotoxicity) and PEI (NA condensation, facilitated endosomal release).In this chapter, optimal lipopolyplex compositions containing different liposomes and certain branched or linear low-molecular weight PEIs are given. This also includes optimal parameters for lipopolyplex generation, based on various PEIs, N/P ratios, lipids, lipid/PEI ratios, and preparation conditions.Importantly, certain lipopolyplexes retain their biological activity and physicochemical integrity upon prolonged storage at room temperature (RT), in the presence of serum and upon nebulization, thus extending their usefulness toward various applications in vivo.

  7. Ultrasound enhances in vivo tumor expression of plasmid DNA by PEG-introduced cationized dextran.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2005-11-28

    This study is an investigation to experimentally confirm whether or not ultrasound (US) irradiation is effective in enhancing the in vivo gene expression of plasmid DNA in tumor. Dextran was cationized by introducing spermine to the hydroxyl groups to allow to polyionically complex with a plasmid DNA. The cationized dextran prepared was additionally modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules which have an active ester and methoxy groups at each terminal, to obtain cationized dextran with different percentages of PEG introduced. Various cationized dextrans with or without PEG introduction were mixed with a plasmid DNA of LacZ to form cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complexes. Electrophoretical examination revealed that the plasmid DNA was complexed both with the cationized dextran and PEG-introduced cationized dextran, irrespective of the PEG introduction percentage, although the higher N/P ratio was needed for plasmid DNA complexation with the latter. By complexation with the cationized dextran, the zeta potential of plasmid DNA was changed to be positive. The charge of PEG-introduced cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complexes became close to 0 mV as their percentage of PEG introduced increased, although the molecular size was about 250 nm, irrespective of the PEG introduction. When cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complexes with or without PEG introduction were intravenously injected to mice carrying a subcutaneous Meth-AR-1 fibrosarcoma mass and the subsequent US irradiation to the tumor mass percutaneously, the PEG-introduced cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complex plus US irradiation enhanced the tumor level of gene expression to a significantly high extent compared with the cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complex and free plasmid DNA with or without US irradiation. The enhanced level depended on the time period and timing of US irradiation. Fluorescent microscopic studies revealed that the localization of plasmid DNA and the gene expression were observed in

  8. DNA condensates organized by the capsid protein VP15 in White Spot Syndrome Virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingjie; Wu, Jinlu; Chen, Hu; Hew, Choy Leong; Yan, Jie

    2010-12-20

    The White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) has a large circular double-stranded DNA genome of around 300kb and it replicates in the nucleus of the host cells. The machinery of how the viral DNA is packaged has been remained unclear. VP15, a highly basic protein, is one of the major capsid proteins found in the virus. Previously, it was shown to be a DNA binding protein and was hypothesized to participate in the viral DNA packaging process. Using Atomic Force Microscopy imaging, we show that the viral DNA is associated with a (or more) capsid proteins. The organized viral DNA qualitatively resembles the conformations of VP15 induced DNA condensates in vitro. Furthermore, single-DNA manipulation experiments revealed that VP15 is able to condense single DNA against forces of a few pico Newtons. Our results suggest that VP15 may aid in the viral DNA packaging process by directly condensing DNA.

  9. Investigation of the influence on conformational transition of DNA induced by cationic lipid vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheling; Huang, Weimin; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on the structural features of DNA-lipid assemblies. In this paper we take nile blue A (NBA) as a probe molecule to study the influence of the conformational transition of DNA induced by didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) cationic vesicles to the interaction between DNA and the probe molecules. We find that upon binding to DNA, a secondary conformational transition of DNA induced by the cationic liposome from the native B-form to the C-form resulted in the change of binding modes of NBA to DNA and different complexes are formed between DNA, DDAB and NBA.

  10. Cationic comb-type copolymers for DNA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won Jong; Sato, Yuichi; Akaike, Toshihiro; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2003-12-01

    Genetic diagnoses, such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing, allow elucidation of gene-based physiological differences, such as susceptibility to diseases and response to drugs, among individuals. Many detection technologies, including allele-specific hybridization, allele-specific primer extension and oligonucleotide ligation, are being used to discriminate SNP alleles. These methods still have many unsolved practical issues. In general they require adequate and specific hybridizations of primer or probe DNAs with target DNAs. This frequently needs optimization of the probe/primer structures and operating conditions. In nature, highly homology-sensitive hybridization is assisted by a nucleic acid chaperone that reduces the energy barrier associated with breakage and reassociation of nucleic base pairs. Here we report a simple, quick, precise but enzyme-free method for SNP analysis. The method uses cationic comb-type copolymers (CCCs) producing high nucleic acid chaperone activities. A single-base mismatch in 20-mer DNA can be detected within a few minutes at ambient temperatures (25-37 °C). Even without careful optimization processes, the method has the sensitivity to detect the mismatches causing subtle changes (ΔTm ~ 1 °C) in duplex thermal stability. CCCs may have various bioanalytical applications where precise hybridization of nucleic acids is needed.

  11. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic investigation of cationic polymer/DNA complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, Cosimo; Bassi, Andrea; Taroni, Paola; Pezzoli, Daniele; Volonterio, Alessandro; Candiani, Gabriele

    2011-07-01

    Since DNA is not internalized efficiently by cells, the success of gene therapy depends on the availability of carriers to efficiently deliver genetic material into target cells. Gene delivery vectors can be broadly categorized into viral and non-viral ones. Non-viral gene delivery systems are represented by cationic lipids and polymers rely on the basics of supramolecular chemistry termed "self-assembling": at physiological pH, they are cations and spontaneously form lipoplexes (for lipids) and polyplexes (for polymers) complexing nucleic acids. In this scenario, cationic polymers are commonly used as non-viral vehicles. Their effectiveness is strongly related to key parameters including DNA binding ability and stability in different environments. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of SYBR Green I (DNA dye) was carried out to characterize cationic polymer/DNA complex (polyplex) formation dispersed in aqueous solution. Both fluorescence amplitude and lifetime proved to be very sensitive to the polymer/DNA ratio (N/P ratio, +/-).

  12. Grand-canonical simulation of DNA condensation with two salts, effect of divalent counterion size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Toan T.

    2016-02-01

    The problem of DNA- DNA interaction mediated by divalent counterions is studied using a generalized grand-canonical Monte-Carlo simulation for a system of two salts. The effect of the divalent counterion size on the condensation behavior of the DNA bundle is investigated. Experimentally, it is known that multivalent counterions have strong effect on the DNA condensation phenomenon. While tri- and tetra-valent counterions are shown to easily condense free DNA molecules in solution into toroidal bundles, the situation with divalent counterions is not as clear cut. Some divalent counterions like Mg+2 are not able to condense free DNA molecules in solution, while some like Mn+2 can condense them into disorder bundles. In restricted environment such as in two dimensional system or inside viral capsid, Mg+2 can have strong effect and able to condense them, but the condensation varies qualitatively with different system, different coions. It has been suggested that divalent counterions can induce attraction between DNA molecules but the strength of the attraction is not strong enough to condense free DNA in solution. However, if the configuration entropy of DNA is restricted, these attractions are enough to cause appreciable effects. The variations among different divalent salts might be due to the hydration effect of the divalent counterions. In this paper, we try to understand this variation using a very simple parameter, the size of the divalent counterions. We investigate how divalent counterions with different sizes can lead to varying qualitative behavior of DNA condensation in restricted environments. Additionally, a grand canonical Monte-Carlo method for simulation of systems with two different salts is presented in detail.

  13. Grand-canonical simulation of DNA condensation with two salts, effect of divalent counterion size.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Toan T

    2016-02-14

    The problem of DNA- DNA interaction mediated by divalent counterions is studied using a generalized grand-canonical Monte-Carlo simulation for a system of two salts. The effect of the divalent counterion size on the condensation behavior of the DNA bundle is investigated. Experimentally, it is known that multivalent counterions have strong effect on the DNA condensation phenomenon. While tri- and tetra-valent counterions are shown to easily condense free DNA molecules in solution into toroidal bundles, the situation with divalent counterions is not as clear cut. Some divalent counterions like Mg(+2) are not able to condense free DNA molecules in solution, while some like Mn(+2) can condense them into disorder bundles. In restricted environment such as in two dimensional system or inside viral capsid, Mg(+2) can have strong effect and able to condense them, but the condensation varies qualitatively with different system, different coions. It has been suggested that divalent counterions can induce attraction between DNA molecules but the strength of the attraction is not strong enough to condense free DNA in solution. However, if the configuration entropy of DNA is restricted, these attractions are enough to cause appreciable effects. The variations among different divalent salts might be due to the hydration effect of the divalent counterions. In this paper, we try to understand this variation using a very simple parameter, the size of the divalent counterions. We investigate how divalent counterions with different sizes can lead to varying qualitative behavior of DNA condensation in restricted environments. Additionally, a grand canonical Monte-Carlo method for simulation of systems with two different salts is presented in detail.

  14. Activation of DNA strand exchange by cationic comb-type copolymers: effect of cationic moieties of the copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Won; Kano, Arihiro; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    We have previously reported that poly(l-lysine)-graft-dextran cationic comb-type copolymers accelerate strand exchange reaction between duplex DNA and its complementary single strand by >4 orders of magnitude, while stabilizing duplex. However, the stabilization of the duplex is considered principally unfavourable for the accelerating activity since the strand exchange reaction requires, at least, partial melting of the initial duplex. Here we report the effects of different cationic moieties of cationic comb-type copolymers on the accelerating activity. The copolymer having guanidino groups exhibited markedly higher accelerating effect on strand exchange reactions than that having primary amino groups. The high accelerating effect of the former is considered to be due to its lower stabilizing effect on duplex DNA, resulting from its increased affinity to single-stranded DNA. The difference in affinity was clearly demonstrated by a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study; the interaction of the former with single-stranded DNA still remained high even at 1 M NaCl, while that of the latter completely disappeared. These results suggest that some modes of interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, other than electrostatic interactions between the copolymers having guanidino groups and DNAs may be involved in strand exchange activation. PMID:18033803

  15. A linear-dendritic cationic vector for efficient DNA grasp and delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Sun, Yun-xia; Yi, Wen-jie; Yang, Juan; Liu, Chen-wei; Cheng, Han; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-zheng; Zhuo, Ren-xi

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an attempt to design an efficient and biocompatible cationic gene vector via structural optimization that favors the efficient utilization of amine groups for DNA condensation. To this end, a linear-dendritic block copolymer of methoxyl-poly(ethylene glycol)-dendritic polyglycerol-graft-tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (mPEG-DPG-g-TAEA) was prepared with specially designed multiple functions including strong DNA affinity, endosomal buffering and expected serum-tolerance. Based on the transfection in serum-free and serum-conditioned media, the influences of the polymer structures including the degree of polymerization of DPG and TAEA substitution degree were explored. As compared to polyethylenimine (M(w)=5 kDa) (PEI5k) with similar molecular weight and higher amine density, mPEG-DPG-g-TAEA displayed comparably high DNA affinity due to the special linear-dendritic architecture. Consequently, at very low N/P ratio, mPEG-DPG-g-TAEA vectors could mediate efficient in vitro luciferase expression at levels that are comparable with or even superior to the commercially available Lipofectamine™ 2000, while being apparently higher than PEI5k. The designed vectors exhibit considerably higher cell biocompatibility and better resistance against bovine serum albumin adsorption than PEI5k. The stability of the complexes on coincubation with heparin was found to be largely dependent on the polymer structure. As concluded from the comparative transfection study in the absence/presence of chloroquine, it is likely that the polycation itself could produce endosomal buffering. This linear-dendritic vector shows promising potential for the application of gene delivery.

  16. Binding and condensation of plasmid DNA onto functionalized carbon nanotubes: toward the construction of nanotube-based gene delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravi; Pantarotto, Davide; McCarthy, David; Chaloin, Olivier; Hoebeke, Johan; Partidos, Charalambos D; Briand, Jean-Paul; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2005-03-30

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) constitute a class of nanomaterials that possess characteristics suitable for a variety of possible applications. Their compatibility with aqueous environments has been made possible by the chemical functionalization of their surface, allowing for exploration of their interactions with biological components including mammalian cells. Functionalized CNTs (f-CNTs) are being intensively explored in advanced biotechnological applications ranging from molecular biosensors to cellular growth substrates. We have been exploring the potential of f-CNTs as delivery vehicles of biologically active molecules in view of possible biomedical applications, including vaccination and gene delivery. Recently we reported the capability of ammonium-functionalized single-walled CNTs to penetrate human and murine cells and facilitate the delivery of plasmid DNA leading to expression of marker genes. To optimize f-CNTs as gene delivery vehicles, it is essential to characterize their interactions with DNA. In the present report, we study the interactions of three types of f-CNTs, ammonium-functionalized single-walled and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-NH3+; MWNT-NH3+), and lysine-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-Lys-NH3+), with plasmid DNA. Nanotube-DNA complexes were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, PicoGreen dye exclusion, and agarose gel shift assay. The results indicate that all three types of cationic carbon nanotubes are able to condense DNA to varying degrees, indicating that both nanotube surface area and charge density are critical parameters that determine the interaction and electrostatic complex formation between f-CNTs with DNA. All three different f-CNT types in this study exhibited upregulation of marker gene expression over naked DNA using a mammalian (human) cell line. Differences in the levels of gene expression were correlated with the structural and biophysical data obtained for the f-CNT:DNA

  17. Cationized bovine serum albumin as gene carrier: Influence of specific secondary structure on DNA complexibility and gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianwei; Li, Bangbang; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Youxiang

    2016-07-01

    In this research, BSA, one of the natural rigid globular proteins with ca. 51% of α-helix secondary structure, was utilized to prepare cationized BSA (cBSA) as gene carrier. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) or polyethylenimine (PEI1800) was grafted to BSA with different grafting levels. Based on the circular dichoism (CD) spectra, all cBSA remained α-helical structure to some degree. This was exciting to endow cBSA with quite different DNA complexibility and cellular biology behavior from the random coiled and flexible polycations such as PEI and poly-l-lysine (PLL). Strangely, the DNA condensability decreased with the increment of TEPA or PEI1800 grafting level. Also, the cBSA could condense DNA effectively to form irregular nanoparticles around 50-200nm above N/P ratio of 10. On account of the excellent hydration of BSA, the cBSA/DNA complexes revealed good colloidal stability under physiological salt condition. Cell culture experiments indicated this BSA-based gene carrier possessed good cellular compatibility. Surprisingly, cBSA/DNA complexes could be uptaken excellently by up to 90% cells. This might be owing to the agitation effect of α-helical structure and the positive potential of these complexes. BSA-PEI1800/DNA complexes with quick endosome escape even had transfection efficiency as high as PEI25k/DNA complexes. Overall, this paper provided us the potential of cBSA as gene carrier and might have some instructions in the design of protein-based gene delivery system.

  18. Cationic antimicrobial peptides in psoriatic skin cooperate to break innate tolerance to self-DNA.

    PubMed

    Lande, Roberto; Chamilos, Georgios; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Demaria, Olivier; Frasca, Loredana; Durr, Sophie; Conrad, Curdin; Schröder, Jens; Gilliet, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a T-cell-mediated skin autoimmune disease characterized by the aberrant activation of dermal dendritic cells (DCs) and the sustained epidermal expression of antimicrobial peptides. We have previously identified a link between these two events by showing that the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide LL37 has the ability to trigger self-nucleic acid mediated activation of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in psoriatic skin. Whether other cationic antimicrobial peptides exert similar activities is unknown. By analyzing heparin-binding HPLC fractions of psoriatic scales, we found that human beta-defensin (hBD)2, hBD3, and lysozyme are additional triggers of pDC activation in psoriatic skin lesions. Like LL37, hBD2, hBD3, and lysozyme are able to condense self-DNA into particles that are endocytosed by pDCs, leading to activation of TLR9. In contrast, other antimicrobial peptides expressed in psoriatic skin including elafin, hBD1, and psoriasin (S100A7) did not show similar activities. hBD2, hBD3, and lysozyme were detected in psoriatic skin lesions in the vicinity of pDCs and found to cooperate with LL37 to induce high levels of IFN production by pDCs, suggesting their concerted role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  19. DNA interaction and photocleavage properties of porphyrins containing cationic substituents at the peripheral position.

    PubMed

    Mettath, S; Munson, B R; Pandey, R K

    1999-01-01

    A series of mono- and disubstituted cationic porphyrins (1-8) were synthesized and investigated for their ability to bind and cleave DNA in the presence of light. In these porphyrins, the cationic substituents were introduced at various peripheral positions, i.e., the non-meso positions of the porphyrin system. The modes of binding of these porphyrins to DNA were investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and an unwinding assay. The intrinsic binding constants Kb of these porphyrins to calf thymus DNA was found to be in the range 10(4)-10(5) M-1. Two of the zinc(II) complexes of non-meso-substituted cationic porphyrins (5 and 8) were found to bind to DNA via intercalation, which is in contrast to the previously reported outside-binding mode for the Zn(II) complexes of meso-substituted cationic porphyrins. Except for monocationic porphyrin 1 and Ni(II) dicationic porphyrin 6, all the other porphyrins were found to be efficient photocleavers of DNA. The DNA photocleavage characteristics of this series of cationic porphyrins were found to depend on the structural characteristics of the poprhyrins such as (a) length of the side chain of the cationic substituents (2 vs 4), (b) the position of the side chain on the porphyrin ring (4 vs 7), and (c) the presence of the chelating metal in 3, 5, and 8 as compared to the nonmetallo porphyrins 2, 4, and 7, respectively.

  20. Unsuitability of exhaled breath condensate for the detection of herpesviruses DNA in the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Costa, Cristina; Bucca, Caterina; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Solidoro, Paolo; Rolla, Giovanni; Cavallo, Rossana

    2011-05-01

    Exhaled breath condensate is a non-invasive method for detecting a wide number of molecules as well as genomic DNA in the airways. No study investigated the detection of viral DNA in exhaled breath condensate, while only one study excluded its usefulness for detection of influenza virus RNA. In this study, the suitability of exhaled breath condensate for detecting herpesviruses infection or reactivation in the respiratory tract of lung transplant recipients was evaluated. Twenty-four matched samples (exhaled breath condensate, bronchoalveolar lavage, whole blood, transbronchial biopsy) were evaluated for the detection of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), human herpesvirus (HHV-6 and -7), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA by real-time PCR. Eighteen bronchoalveolar lavages (75%), six whole blood samples (25%), and two transbronchial biopsies (8.3%) were positive for at least one herpesvirus. Only one exhaled breath condensate specimen was positive for HCMV DNA (and positive also in the bronchoalveolar lavage, with low viral load in both specimens); while no other patient, irrespective of the viral load in any specimen or the presence of clinical symptoms and signs, had a positive exhaled breath condensate. These findings seem to exclude the suitability of exhaled breath condensate for non-invasive detection of viral DNA in the respiratory tract of lung transplant recipients.

  1. Blood compatibility of novel water soluble hyperbranched polyglycerol-based multivalent cationic polymers and their interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Kainthan, Rajesh Kumar; Gnanamani, Muthiah; Ganguli, Munia; Ghosh, Tanay; Brooks, Donald E; Maiti, Souvik; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2006-11-01

    A novel class of hyperbranched polymers based on polyglycerol (PG) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) are synthesized by multibranching anionic ring opening polymerization. Multivalent cationic sites are added to these polymers by a post-amination and quarternization reactions. Blood compatibility studies using these polymers at different concentrations showed insignificant effects on complement activation, platelet activation, coagulation, erythrocyte aggregation and hemolysis compared to branched cationic polyethyleneimine (PEI). The degree of quarternization does not have large influence on the blood compatibility of the new polymers. Cytotoxicity of these polymers is significantly lower than that of PEI and is a function of quarternized nitrogen present in the polymer. Also, these polymers bind DNA in the nanomolar range and are able to condense DNA to highly compact, stable, water soluble nanoparticles in the range of 60-80 nm. Gel electrophoresis studies showed that they form electroneutral complexes with DNA around N/P ratio 1 irrespective of the percentage of quarternization under the conditions studied.

  2. Ultrasound enhancement of in vitro transfection of plasmid DNA by a cationized gelatin.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Aoyama, Teruyoshi; Ogawa, Osamu; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2002-05-01

    In vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid DNA for rat gastric mucosal (RGM)-1 cells was enhanced by ultrasound (US) irradiation. Ethylenediamine was introduced to the carboxyl groups of gelatin to prepare a cationized gelatin as the vector of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase. An electrophoresis experiment revealed that the cationized gelatin was mixed with plasmid DNA at the weight ratio of 5.0 to form a cationized gelatin-plasmid DNA complex. The complex obtained was about 200nm in diameter with a positive charge. When incubated with the cationized gelatin-plasmid DNA complex and subsequently exposed to US, RGM-1 cells exhibited a significantly enhanced luciferase activity although the extent increased with an increase in the DNA concentration, in contrast to the cationized gelatin alone with or without US irradiation and US irradiation alone. US irradiation was also effective in enhancing the activity by free plasmid DNA although the extent was less than that of the complex. The US-induced enhancement of luciferase activity was influenced by the exposure time period, frequency, and intensity of US. The activity enhancement became higher to be significant at the irradiation time period of 60 s and thereafter decreased. A series of cytotoxicity experiments revealed that an increase in the irradiation time period and intensity of US decreased the viability of cells themselves. It is possible that US irradiation under an appropriate condition enables cells to accelerate the permeation of the cationized gelatin-plasmid DNA complex through the cell membrane, resulted in enhanced transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA. These findings clearly indicate that US exposure is a simple and promising method to enhance the gene expression of plasmid DNA.

  3. Effective and reversible DNA condensation induced by a simple cyclic/rigid polyamine containing carbonyl moiety.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ma, Chunying; Xu, Pengxiang; Gao, Yuxing; Zhang, Jin; Qiao, Renzhong; Zhao, Yufen

    2013-07-03

    The transfection of DNA in gene therapy largely depends on the possibility of obtaining its condensation. The details of nanoparticle formation are essential for functioning, as mediated by the diverse elements containing molecular structure, ionic strength in mediums, and condensing motivator. Here, we report two kinds of DNA condensing agents based on simple cyclic/rigid polyamine molecules, having evaluated their structural effect on nanoparticle formation. The reversible condensation-dissociation process was achieved by ion-switching, attributing to a possible condensing mechanism-competitive building of external hydrogen bonds. Using poly[(dA-dT)2] and poly[(dG-dC)2] as substrates, respectively, circular dichroism (CD) signals clearly presented dissimilar interactions between polyamines and both rich sequences, implying potential preference for G-C sequence. The presence of divalent ion Zn(2+) as an efficient motivator accelerated the achievement of DNA condensation, and an accessible schematic model was depicted to explain the promotion in detail. In addition, by comparison with the behaviors of linear polyamines, differences between condensation and aggregation were explicitly elucidated in aspects of morphology and surface charges, as well as induced condition. The present work may have the potential to reveal the precise mechanism of DNA nanoparticle formation and, in particular, be applied to gene delivery as an efficient nonviral vector.

  4. Spectroscopic study on interaction between three cationic surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths and DNA.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lili; Zhang, Zhaohong; Qiao, Heng; Liu, Miao; Shen, Manli; Yuan, Tianxin; Chen, Jing; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the interaction between cationic surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths, such as hexyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (HTAB), dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), and DNA was investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity techniques. The results showed that these three cationic surfactants with different hydrocarbon chain lengths could all interact with DNA. Their binding modes were estimated and their interaction strength was compared. In addition, the effects of the surfactant, NaCl and phosphate ion concentrations on the interaction were reviewed. It is wished that this work would provide some valuable references to investigate the influence of cationic surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths on DNA.

  5. Effect of amine type on the expression of plasmid DNA by cationized dextran.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jun-ichiro; Nagane, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Masaya; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to prepare a non-viral carrier of gene expression from the polysaccharide dextran and evaluate the effect of amine compounds introduced to dextran on the level of gene expression. Dextran with a molecular weight of 74 x 10(3) was cationized by the chemical introduction of different amine compounds. The cationized dextran was complexed with a plasmid DNA and the vitro gene transfection was investigated for HeLa cells. The level of gene expression depended on the amine compound introduced to dextran. The highest level was observed for the complex of spermine-introduced dextran and plasmid DNA. The highest cellular internalization and the best buffering effect were observed among every cationized dextran. Every complex did not show any cytotoxicity. It is concluded that the superior properties of spermine-introduced dextran enabled the plasmid DNA to enhance the expression level to a great extent compared with other cationized dextrans. Cationized dextran is a promising non-viral carrier of plasmid DNA.

  6. The effect of pH on charge inversion and condensation of DNA.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zilong; Wang, Yanwei; Yang, Anthony; Yang, Guangcan

    2016-08-21

    Charge inversion and condensation of DNA in solutions of trivalent and quadrivalent counterions are significantly influenced by the pH value of the solution. We systematically investigated the condensation and charge compensation of DNA by spermidine, hexammine cobalt(iii) (cohex, [Co(NH3)6](3+)) and spermine in solutions of a wide range of pH values from 3 to 9.3 by dynamic light scattering, magnetic tweezers, and atomic force microscopy. In trivalent counterion solution, we found that there is a critical concentration (0.75 mM for cohex and 0.5 mM for spermidine), under which the electrophoresis mobility of DNA initially increases, reaches a maximum, and finally decreases when the pH value is decreased. In contrast, above the critical concentration, the electrophoretic mobility of DNA increases monotonously with decreasing pH value of the solution. The corresponding condensing force has the same dependence on the pH value. However, for the case of quadrivalent counterions, the electrophoretic mobility of DNA is monotonously promoted by lowering the pH value of the solution at any concentration of counterions in which charge inversion of DNA may occur. In atomic force microscopy images and force spectroscopy of magnetic tweezers, we found that maximal charge neutralization and condensation force correspond to the most compact DNA condensation. We propose a mechanism of promoting DNA charge neutralization: small and highly mobile hydrogen ions tend to attach to the DNA-counterion complex to further neutralize its remaining charge, which is related to the surface area of the complex. Therefore, this further neutralization is prominent when the complex is toroidal which corresponds to the case of mild ion concentration while it is less prominent for more compact globules or rod complexes at high counterion concentration.

  7. Targeting of plasmid DNA to renal interstitial fibroblasts by cationized gelatin.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Nagata-Nakajima, Natsuki; Sugai, Manabu; Shimizu, Akira; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2005-10-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis is the common pathway of chronic renal disease, while it causes end-stage renal failure. A lot of cytokines and biologically active substances are well recognized to be the candidates of primary mediators to induce accumulation of extracelluar matrix (ECM) in the interstitial fibrotic area. Interstitial fibroblasts are played a crucial role in the accumulation of excess ECM during renal interstitial fibrogenesis. Therefore, the targeting of therapeutic drugs and genes to interstitial renal fibroblasts is effective in suppressing the progress of interstitial renal failure. However, despite various approaches and techniques, few successful results have been reported on the in vivo targeting for interstitial fibroblasts. The objective of this study is to deliver an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmid DNA, as a model plasmid DNA, into renal interstitial space by a cationized gelatin. After the plasmid DNA with or without complexation of the cationized gelatin was injected to the left kidney of mice via the ureter, unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) was performed for the mice injected to induce the renal interstitial fibrosis. When the EGFP plasmid DNA complexed with the cationized gelatin was injected, EGFP expression was observed in the fibroblasts in the interstitial area of renal cortex. It is concluded that the retrograde injection of EGFP plasmid DNA complexed with the cationized gelatin is available to target the interstitial renal fibroblasts which are currently considered as the cell source responsible for excessive ECM synthesis.

  8. Patterned Thread-like Micelles and DNA-Tethered Nanoparticles: A Structural Study of PEGylated Cationic Liposome–DNA Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Majzoub, Ramsey N.; Ewert, Kai K.; Jacovetty, Erica L.; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S.; Li, Youli; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2015-01-01

    The self-assembly of oppositely charged biomacromolecules has been extensively studied due to its pertinence in the design of functional nanomaterials. Using cryo electronic microscopy (cryo-EM), optical light scattering and fluorescence microscopy, we investigated the structure and phase behavior of PEGylated (PEG: poly(ethylene-glycol)) cationic liposome–DNA nanoparticles (CL–DNA NPs) as a function of DNA length, topology (linear and circular) and ρchg (the molar charge ratio of cationic lipid to anionic DNA). Although all NPs studied showed a lamellar internal nanostructure, NPs formed with short (~ 2 kbps), linear, polydisperse DNA were defect-rich and contained smaller domains. Unexpectedly, we found distinctly different equilibrium structures away from the isoelectric point. At ρchg > 1, in the excess cationic lipid regime, thread-like micelles rich in PEG-lipid were found to coexist with NPs, cationic liposomes and spherical micelles. At high concentrations these PEGylated thread-like micelles formed a well-ordered, patterned morphology with highly uniform inter-micellar spacing. At ρchg < 1, in the excess DNA regime and with no added salt, individual NPs were tethered together via long, linear DNA (48 kbps λ-phage DNA) into a biopolymer-mediated floc. Our results provide insight on what equilibrium nanostructures can form when oppositely charged macromolecules self-assemble in aqueous media. Self-assembled, well-ordered thread-like micelles and tethered nanoparticles may have a broad range of applications in bionanotechnology, including nanoscale lithograpy and the development of lipid-based multi-functional nanoparticle networks. PMID:26048043

  9. Sulfate ion (SO4(2-)) release from old and new cation exchange resins used in condensate polishing systems for power plants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi-Ping; Tang, Xue-Ying; Yin, Zhao-Hui; Yu, Wei-Wei

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a dynamic cycle test, a static immersion method and a pyrolysis experiment were combined to examine the characteristics of SO4(2-) released from several new and old cation exchange resins used in condensate polishing systems for power plants. The results show that the quantity and velocity of SO4(2-) released from new and old resins tend to balance in a short time during the dynamic cycle experiment. SO4(2-) is released by 1500H (monosphere super gel type cation exchange resins) and 001 × 7 (gel type cation exchange resins) new and old cation exchange resins, the quantity of which increases according to immersion time. In the pyrolysis experiment, the quantity of SO4(2-) released from resins increases and the pH of the pyrolysis solution transforms from alkaline to acidic with an increase in temperature.

  10. Interaction between cationic agents and small interfering RNA and DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unksov, I. N.; Slita, A. V.; Petrova, A. V.; Pereviazko, I.; Bakulev, V. M.; Rolich, V. I.; Bondarenko, A. B.; Kasyanenko, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    Azobenzene containing surfactant AzoTAB was used for investigation of binding in cationic- agent + nucleic acid in NaCl salt aqueous solutions. Two nucleic acids, macromolecular DNA and small interfering RNA, were examined upon the interaction with the surfactant. For DNA the interaction was studied using spectral methods and the methods of viscometry and flow birefringence measurement. For siRNA the possibility of surfactant-based delivery was checked in vitro.

  11. Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipid Gene-Carriers: Membrane Charge Density Controls Universal Transfection Behavior in Lamellar Cationic Liposome-DNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Alison J.; Slack, Nelle L.; Ahmad, Ayesha; George, Cyril X.; Samuel, Charles E.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2003-01-01

    observed to be in a condensed state, most likely with oppositely charged macro-ion condensing agents from the cytoplasm, which remain to be identified. Much of the observed bulk of condensed DNA may be transcriptionally inactive and may determine the current limiting factor to transfection by cationic lipid gene vectors. PMID:12719260

  12. Construction and DNA condensation of cyclodextrin-coated gold nanoparticles with anthryl grafts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Di; Chen, Yong; Liu, Yu

    2014-07-01

    The condensation of DNA in a controlled manner is one of the key steps in gene delivery and gene therapy. For this purpose, a water-soluble supramolecular nanostructure is constructed by coating 14 β-cyclodextrins onto the surface of a gold nanoparticle, followed by the noncovalent association of different amounts of anthryl-modified adamantanes with coated β-cyclodextrins. The strong binding of β-cyclodextrins with anthryl adamantanes (K(S) =8.61×10(4)  M(-1)) efficiently stabilizes the supramolecular nanostructure. Spectrophotometric fluorescence spectra and microscopic studies demonstrated that, with many anthryl grafts that can intercalate in the outer space of the DNA double helix, this supramolecular nanostructure showed good condensation abilities to calf thymus DNA. Significantly, the condensation efficiency of supramolecular nanostructure towards DNA could be conveniently controlled by adjusting the ratio between gold nanoparticles and anthryl adamantane grafts, leading to the formation of DNA condensates of a size that are suitable for the endocytosis of hepatoma cells, which will make it potentially applicable in many fields of medicinal science and biotechnology.

  13. Distribution of DNA-condensing protein complexes in the adenovirus core

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; Marion, Sanjin; Chichón, F. Javier; Fernández, José J.; Winkler, Dennis C.; Carrascosa, José L.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Šiber, Antonio; San Martín, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Genome packing in adenovirus has long evaded precise description, since the viral dsDNA molecule condensed by proteins (core) lacks icosahedral order characteristic of the virus protein coating (capsid). We show that useful insights regarding the organization of the core can be inferred from the analysis of spatial distributions of the DNA and condensing protein units (adenosomes). These were obtained from the inspection of cryo-electron tomography reconstructions of individual human adenovirus particles. Our analysis shows that the core lacks symmetry and strict order, yet the adenosome distribution is not entirely random. The features of the distribution can be explained by modeling the condensing proteins and the part of the genome in each adenosome as very soft spheres, interacting repulsively with each other and with the capsid, producing a minimum outward pressure of ∼0.06 atm. Although the condensing proteins are connected by DNA in disrupted virion cores, in our models a backbone of DNA linking the adenosomes is not required to explain the experimental results in the confined state. In conclusion, the interior of an adenovirus infectious particle is a strongly confined and dense phase of soft particles (adenosomes) without a strictly defined DNA backbone. PMID:25820430

  14. PEGylation enhances tumor targeting of plasmid DNA by an artificial cationized protein with repeated RGD sequences, Pronectin.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2004-05-31

    The objective of this study is to investigate feasibility of a non-viral gene carrier with repeated RGD sequences (Pronectin F+) in tumor targeting for gene expression. The Pronectin F+ was cationized by introducing spermine (Sm) to the hydroxyl groups to allow to polyionically complex with plasmid DNA. The cationized Pronectin F+ prepared was additionally modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules which have active ester and methoxy groups at the terminal, to form various PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+. The cationized Pronectin F+ with or without PEGylation at different extents was mixed with a plasmid DNA of LacZ to form respective cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes. The plasmid DNA was electrophoretically complexed with cationized Pronectin F+ and PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, irrespective of the PEGylation extent, although the higher N/P ratio of complexes was needed for complexation with the latter Pronectin F+. The molecular size and zeta potential measurements revealed that the plasmid DNA was reduced in size to about 250 nm and the charge was changed to be positive by the complexation with cationized Pronectin F+. For the complexation with PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, the charge of complex became neutral being almost 0 mV with the increasing PEGylation extents, while the molecular size was similar to that of cationized Pronectin F+. When cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes with or without PEGylation were intravenously injected to mice carrying a subcutaneous Meth-AR-1 fibrosarcoma mass, the PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complex specifically enhanced the level of gene expression in the tumor, to a significantly high extent compared with the cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes and free plasmid DNA. The enhanced level of gene expression depended on the percentage of PEG introduced, the N/P ratio, and the plasmid DNA dose. A fluorescent microscopic study revealed that the

  15. Self-assembly of two-dimensional DNA origami lattices using cation-controlled surface diffusion.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sungwook; Rothemund, Paul W K

    2014-09-10

    DNA origami has proven useful for organizing diverse nanoscale components into patterns with 6 nm resolution. However for many applications, such as nanoelectronics, large-scale organization of origami into periodic lattices is desired. Here, we report the self-assembly of DNA origami rectangles into two-dimensional lattices based on stepwise control of surface diffusion, implemented by changing the concentrations of cations on the surface. Previous studies of DNA–mica binding identified the fractional surface density of divalent cations (ñ(s2))as the parameter which best explains the behaviour of linear DNA on mica. We show that for ñ(s2) between 0.04 and 0.1, over 90% of DNA rectangles were incorporated into lattices and that, compared with other functions of cation concentration, ñ(s2) best captures the behaviour of DNA rectangles. This work shows how a physical understanding of DNA–mica binding can be used to guide studies of the higher-order assembly of DNA nanostructures, towards creating large-scale arrays of nanodevices for technology.

  16. Unique condensation patterns of triplex DNA: physical aspects and physiological implications

    PubMed Central

    Goobes, Rivka; Cohen, Orit; Minsky, Abraham

    2002-01-01

    Triple-stranded DNA structures can be formed in living cells, either by native DNA sequences or following the application of antigene strategies, in which triplex-forming oligonucleotides are targeted to the nucleus. Recent studies imply that triplex motifs may play a role in DNA transcription, recombination and condensation processes in vivo. Here we show that very short triple-stranded DNA motifs, but not double-stranded segments of a comparable length, self-assemble into highly condensed and ordered structures. The condensation process, studied by circular dichroism and polarized-light microscopy, occurs under conditions that mimic cellular environments in terms of ionic strength, ionic composition and crowding. We argue that the unique tendency of triplex DNA structures to self-assemble, a priori unexpected in light of the very short length and the large charge density of these motifs, reflects the presence of strong attractive interactions that result from enhanced ion correlations. The results provide, as such, a direct experimental link between charge density, attractive interactions between like-charge polymers and DNA packaging. Moreover, the observations strongly support the notion that triple-stranded DNA motifs may be involved in the regulation of chromosome organization in living cells. PMID:12000835

  17. Vibrational CD (VCD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of DNA interaction with Cr3+ ions: VCD and AFM evidence of DNA condensation.

    PubMed

    Andrushchenko, V; Leonenko, Z; Cramb, D; van de Sande, H; Wieser, H

    The interaction of natural calf thymus DNA with Cr(3+) ions was studied at room temperature by means of vibrational CD (VCD) and infrared absorption (ir) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cr(3+) ion binding mainly to N(7) (G) and to phosphate groups was demonstrated. Psi-type VCD spectra resembling electronic CD (ECD) spectra, which appear during psi-type DNA condensation, were observed. These spectra are characterized mainly by an anomalous, severalfold increase of VCD intensity. Such anomalous VCD spectra were assigned to DNA condensation with formation of large and dense particles of a size comparable to the wavelength of the probing ir beam and possessing large-scale helicity. Atomic force microscopy confirmed DNA condensation by Cr(3+) ions and the formation of tight DNA particles responsible for the psi-type VCD spectra. Upon increasing the Cr(3+) ion concentration the shape of the condensates changed from loose flower-like structures to highly packed dense spheres. No DNA denaturation was seen even at the highest concentration of Cr(3+) ions studied. The secondary structure of DNA remained in a B-form before and after the condensation. VCD and ir as well as AFM proved to be an effective combination for investigating DNA condensation. In addition to the ability of VCD to determine DNA condensation, VCD and ir can in the same experiment provide unambiguous information about the secondary structure of DNA contained in the condensed particles.

  18. Isothermal titration calorimetric analysis of the interaction between cationic lipids and plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Lobo, B A; Davis, A; Koe, G; Smith, J G; Middaugh, C R

    2001-02-01

    The effects of buffer and ionic strength upon the enthalpy of binding between plasmid DNA and a variety of cationic lipids used to enhance cellular transfection were studied using isothermal titration calorimetry at 25.0 degrees C and pH 7.4. The cationic lipids DOTAP (1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethyl ammonium propane), DDAB (dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide), DOTAP:cholesterol (1:1), and DDAB:cholesterol (1:1) bound endothermally to plasmid DNA with a negligible proton exchange with buffer. In contrast, DOTAP: DOPE (L-alpha-dioleoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine) (1:1) and DDAB:DOPE (1:1) liposomes displayed a negative enthalpy and a significant uptake of protons upon binding to plasmid DNA at neutral pH. These findings are most easily explained by a change in the apparent pKa of the amino group of DOPE upon binding. Complexes formed by reverse addition methods (DNA into lipid) produced different thermograms, sizes, zeta potentials, and aggregation behavior, suggesting that structurally different complexes were formed in each titration direction. Titrations performed in both directions in the presence of increasing ionic strength revealed a progressive decrease in the heat of binding and an increase in the lipid to DNA charge ratio at which aggregation occurred. The unfavorable binding enthalpy for the cationic lipids alone and with cholesterol implies an entropy-driven interaction, while the negative enthalpies observed with DOPE-containing lipid mixtures suggest an additional contribution from changes in protonation of DOPE.

  19. Resonance light scattering method for the determination of DNA with cationic methacrylate based polymer nanoparticle probes.

    PubMed

    Zou, Qi-Chao; Zhang, Jin-Zhi; Chai, Shi-Gan

    2011-11-01

    Narrowly distributed cationic poly (methyl methacrylate-co-diacetone acrylamide) (P(MMA-DAAM)) nanoparticles were successfully prepared by microemulsion polymerization. Photon correlation spectrometer (PCS) measurement and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation revealed that z-average particle size of P(MMA-DAAM) is ∼27.5 nm. It was found that these cationic nanoparticles interact with DNA through electrostatic interaction to form P(MMA-DAAM)-DNA complex, which significantly enhances the resonance light scattering (RLS) signal. Therefore, a novel method using this polymer nanoparticle as a new probe for the detection of DNA by RLS technique is developed in this paper. The results showed this method is very convenient, sensitive, and reproducible.

  20. Cationic Liposome-DNA Complexes: From supramolecular assembly toward gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Heather M.; Ahmad, A.; Ewert, K.; Martin, A.; Safinya, Cr

    2003-03-01

    Cationic liposomes (CL) present a viable alternative to viral delivery of therapeutic DNA and peptides to cells. We complex CL with DNA to deliver foreign DNA (genes) to cells. Typical self-assembly of CL-DNA shown by x-ray diffraction reveals multilamellar lipids with DNA intercalated between the lipid layers, having a DNA interaxial spacing d(DNA)[1]. The length d(DNA) can be tuned at the subnanometer level (from 35 down to 5 angstroms) by control of the membrane charge density and other parameters. Three distinct DNA-DNA interaction regimes were found due to repulsive long-range electrostatic forces, repulsive short-range hydration forces, and a polymer induced attractive depletion force [2-4]. We correlate d(DNA) to transfection in mammalian cells. These compact DNA structures suggest use for high density storage of genetic information, as well as for biological templates. Supported by NSF DMR-0203755, NIH GM59288. 1. J Radler et al, Science 275, 810 (1997). 2. AJ Lin et al, Biophys. J. (in press). 3. K Ewert, A Ahmad, H Evans et al, J. Med. Chem. 45, 5023 (2002). 4. A Martin et al, (submitted).

  1. Fingerprinting DNA oxidation processes: IR characterization of the 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine radical cation.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Dominik B; Pilles, Bert M; Pfaffeneder, Toni; Carell, Thomas; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2014-02-24

    Methylated cytidine plays an important role as an epigenetic signal in gene regulation. Its oxidation products are assumed to be involved in active demethylation processes but also in damaging DNA. Here, we report the photochemical production of the 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine radical cation via a two-photon ionization process. The radical cation is detected by time-resolved IR spectroscopy and identified by band assignment using density functional theory calculations. Two final oxidation products are characterized with liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

  2. Birefringence and DNA Condensation of Liquid Crystalline Chromosomes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Man H.; Yan, Kosmo T. H.; Bennett, Michael J.; Wong, Joseph T. Y.

    2010-01-01

    DNA can self-assemble in vitro into several liquid crystalline phases at high concentrations. The largest known genomes are encoded by the cholesteric liquid crystalline chromosomes (LCCs) of the dinoflagellates, a diverse group of protists related to the malarial parasites. Very little is known about how the liquid crystalline packaging strategy is employed to organize these genomes, the largest among living eukaryotes—up to 80 times the size of the human genome. Comparative measurements using a semiautomatic polarizing microscope demonstrated that there is a large variation in the birefringence, an optical property of anisotropic materials, of the chromosomes from different dinoflagellate species, despite their apparently similar ultrastructural patterns of bands and arches. There is a large variation in the chromosomal arrangements in the nuclei and individual karyotypes. Our data suggest that both macroscopic and ultrastructural arrangements affect the apparent birefringence of the liquid crystalline chromosomes. Positive correlations are demonstrated for the first time between the level of absolute retardance and both the DNA content and the observed helical pitch measured from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) photomicrographs. Experiments that induced disassembly of the chromosomes revealed multiple orders of organization in the dinoflagellate chromosomes. With the low protein-to-DNA ratio, we propose that a highly regulated use of entropy-driven force must be involved in the assembly of these LCCs. Knowledge of the mechanism of packaging and arranging these largest known DNAs into different shapes and different formats in the nuclei would be of great value in the use of DNA as nanostructural material. PMID:20400466

  3. Thermodynamics of cationic lipid-DNA complex formation as studied by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Pozharski, Edwin; MacDonald, Robert C

    2002-07-01

    The detailed analysis of the cationic lipid-DNA complex formation by means of isothermal titration calorimetry is presented. Most experiments were done using 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EDOPC), but basic titrations were also done using DOTAP, DOTAP:DOPC, and DOTAP:DOPE mixtures. Complex formation was endothermic with less than 1 kcal absorbed per mole of lipid or DNA charge. This enthalpy change was attributed to DNA-DNA mutual repulsion within the lamellar complex. The exception was DOTAP:DOPE-containing lipoplex for which the enthalpy of formation was exothermic, presumably because of DOPE amine group protonation. Experimental conditions, namely, direction and titration increment as well as concentration of titrant, which dictate the structure of resulting lipoplex (whether lamellar complex or DNA-coated vesicle), were found to affect the apparent thermodynamics of complex formation. The structure, in turn, influences the biological properties of the lipoplex. If the titration of lipid into DNA was carried out in large increments, the DeltaH was larger than when the injection increments were smaller, a finding that is consistent with increased vesicle disruption under large increments and which is expected theoretically. Cationic lipid-DNA binding was weak in high ionic strength solutions, however, the effective binding constant is within micromolar range because of macromolecular nature of the interaction.

  4. Thermodynamics of cationic lipid-DNA complex formation as studied by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Pozharski, Edwin; MacDonald, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    The detailed analysis of the cationic lipid-DNA complex formation by means of isothermal titration calorimetry is presented. Most experiments were done using 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EDOPC), but basic titrations were also done using DOTAP, DOTAP:DOPC, and DOTAP:DOPE mixtures. Complex formation was endothermic with less than 1 kcal absorbed per mole of lipid or DNA charge. This enthalpy change was attributed to DNA-DNA mutual repulsion within the lamellar complex. The exception was DOTAP:DOPE-containing lipoplex for which the enthalpy of formation was exothermic, presumably because of DOPE amine group protonation. Experimental conditions, namely, direction and titration increment as well as concentration of titrant, which dictate the structure of resulting lipoplex (whether lamellar complex or DNA-coated vesicle), were found to affect the apparent thermodynamics of complex formation. The structure, in turn, influences the biological properties of the lipoplex. If the titration of lipid into DNA was carried out in large increments, the DeltaH was larger than when the injection increments were smaller, a finding that is consistent with increased vesicle disruption under large increments and which is expected theoretically. Cationic lipid-DNA binding was weak in high ionic strength solutions, however, the effective binding constant is within micromolar range because of macromolecular nature of the interaction. PMID:12080142

  5. Bell Curve for Transfection by Lamellar Cationic Lipid--DNA Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Evans, Heather M.; Ewert, K.; George, C. X.; Samuel, C. E.; Safinya, C. R.

    2004-03-01

    Cationic liposomes (CL) present a viable alternative to viral delivery of therapeutic DNA to cells. We combine CL with DNA in order to form complexes that can deliver foreign DNA (genes) to cells. In trying to improve the transfection efficiency (TE) of lamellar CL-DNA complexes, we have identified universal trends depending on the headgroup size and charge of the cationic lipid. By using new multivalent lipids ranging from 2+ to 16+ (e.g. Ewert et al, J. Med. Chem. 2002; 45: 5023) we are able to access a wide range of membrane charge density values, or σ _M. TE plots vs. σ M for multivalent lipids merge onto a universal curve with a Gaussian shape. The optimal σ M depends on the overall CL/DNA charge. The universal TE curve shows three regimes related to cellular obstacles: at low σ _M, TE is limited by endosomal escape of CL-DNA, while at high σ M TE is limited by complex dissociation and DNA release into the cytoplasm. Funded by NIH GM-59288 and NSF DMR-0203755.

  6. Determination of the cationic amphiphilic drug-DNA binding mode and DNA-assisted fluorescence resonance energy transfer amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Zahid; Banday, Abdul Rouf; Hussain, Mohammed Aamir; Tabish, Mohammad; Kabir-ud-Din

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of drug-DNA binding is crucial for predicting the potential genotoxicity of drugs. Agarose gel electrophoresis, absorption, steady state fluorescence, and circular dichroism have been used in exploring the interaction of cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) such as amitriptyline hydrochloride (AMT), imipramine hydrochloride (IMP), and promethazine hydrochloride (PMT) with calf thymus or pUC19 DNA. Agarose gel electrophoresis assay, along with absorption and steady state fluorescence studies, reveal interaction between the CADs and DNA. A comparative study of the drugs with respect to the effect of urea, iodide induced quenching, and ethidium bromide (EB) exclusion assay reflects binding of CADs to the DNA primarily in an intercalative fashion. Circular dichroism data also support the intercalative mode of binding. Besides quenching, there is fluorescence exchange energy transfer (FRET) in between CADs and EB using DNA as a template.

  7. Arginine-based cationic liposomes for efficient in vitro plasmid DNA delivery with low cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Satya Ranjan; Aoshima, Yumiko; Hokama, Ryosuke; Inoue, Takafumi; Sou, Keitaro; Takeoka, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently available gene delivery vehicles have many limitations such as low gene delivery efficiency and high cytotoxicity. To overcome these drawbacks, we designed and synthesized two cationic lipids comprised of n-tetradecyl alcohol as the hydrophobic moiety, 3-hydrocarbon chain as the spacer, and different counterions (eg, hydrogen chloride [HCl] salt or trifluoroacetic acid [TFA] salt) in the arginine head group. Methods Cationic lipids were hydrated in 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) buffer to prepare cationic liposomes and characterized in terms of their size, zeta potential, phase transition temperature, and morphology. Lipoplexes were then prepared and characterized in terms of their size and zeta potential in the absence or presence of serum. The morphology of the lipoplexes was determined using transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The gene delivery efficiency was evaluated in neuronal cells and HeLa cells and compared with that of lysine-based cationic assemblies and Lipofectamine™ 2000. The cytotoxicity level of the cationic lipids was investigated and compared with that of Lipofectamine™ 2000. Results We synthesized arginine-based cationic lipids having different counterions (ie, HCl-salt or TFA-salt) that formed cationic liposomes of around 100 nm in size. In the absence of serum, lipoplexes prepared from the arginine-based cationic liposomes and plasmid (p) DNA formed large aggregates and attained a positive zeta potential. However, in the presence of serum, the lipoplexes were smaller in size and negative in zeta potential. The morphology of the lipoplexes was vesicular. Arginine-based cationic liposomes with HCl-salt showed the highest transfection efficiency in PC-12 cells. However, arginine-based cationic liposomes with TFA salt showed the highest transfection efficiency in HeLa cells, regardless of the presence of serum, with very low associated cytotoxicity. Conclusion The gene

  8. Synthesis of homogeneous glycopeptides and their utility as DNA condensing agents.

    PubMed

    Collard, W T; Evers, D L; McKenzie, D L; Rice, K G

    2000-01-12

    Two glycopeptides were synthesized by attaching purified glycosylamines (N-glycans) to a 20 amino acid peptide. Triantennary and Man9 Boc-tyrosinamide N-glycans were treated with trifluoroacetic acid to remove the Boc group and expose a tyrosinamide amine. The amine group was coupled with iodoacetic acid to produce N-iodoacetyl-oligosaccharides. These were reacted with the sulfhydryl group of a cysteine-containing peptide (CWK18), resulting in the formation of glycopeptides in good yield that were characterized by 1H NMR and ESIMS. Both glycopeptides were able to bind to plasmid DNA and form DNA condensates of approximately 110 nm mean diameter with zeta potential of +31 mV. The resulting homogeneous glycopeptide DNA condensates will be valuable as receptor-mediated gene-delivery agents.

  9. Microneedle-mediated transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA coated on cationic PLGA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Wonganan, Piyanuch; Sandoval, Michael A.; Li, Xinran; Zhu, Saijie; Cui, Zhengrong

    2012-01-01

    Previously, it was shown that microneedle-mediated transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA can potentially induce a stronger immune response than intramuscular injection of the same plasmid DNA. In the present study, we showed that the immune responses induced by transcutaneous immunization by applying plasmid DNA onto a skin area pretreated with solid microneedles were significantly enhanced by coating the plasmid DNA on the surface of cationic nanoparticles. In addition, the net surface charge of the DNA-coated nanoparticles significantly affected their in vitro skin permeation and their ability to induce immune responses in vivo. Transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA-coated net positively charged anoparticles elicited a stronger immune response than with plasmid DNA-coated net negatively charged nanoparticles or by intramuscular immunization with plasmid DNA alone. Transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA-coated net positively charged nanoparticles induced comparable immune responses as intramuscular injection of them, but transcutaneous immunization was able to induce specific mucosal immunity and a more balanced T helper type 1 and type 2 response. The ability of the net positively charged DNA-coated nanoparticles to induce a strong immune response through microneedle-mediated transcutaneous immunization may be attributed to their ability to increase the expression of the antigen gene encoded by the plasmid and to more effectively stimulate the maturation of antigen-presenting cells. PMID:22921518

  10. Condensations of single DNA molecules induced by heptaplatin and its chiral isomer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hong-Yan; Liu, Yu-Ru; Li, Wei; Li, Hui; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xie, Ping; Wang, Wei-Chi; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2014-08-15

    Heptaplatin is a third-generation platinum antitumor drug. It has a chiral isomer. We studied the interactions between the two isomers and DNA by using magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the effect of chiralities of the isomers on the interactions. We found that the extension curves and average condensation rates of DNA molecules incubated with heptaplatin were nearly the same as those incubated with its chiral isomer. In addition, the structures of DNA molecules incubated with heptaplatin were also similar to those incubated with its chiral isomer. These results indicate the difference in chirality of the two isomers does not induce different interactions of the isomers with DNA. Our study may facilitate the understanding of interactions of platinum complexes with DNA and the design of new antitumor platinum complexes.

  11. Condensations of single DNA molecules induced by heptaplatin and its chiral isomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Yan; Liu, Yu-Ru; Li, Wei; Li, Hui; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xie, Ping; Wang, Wei-Chi; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2014-08-01

    Heptaplatin is a third-generation platinum antitumor drug. It has a chiral isomer. We studied the interactions between the two isomers and DNA by using magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the effect of chiralities of the isomers on the interactions. We found that the extension curves and average condensation rates of DNA molecules incubated with heptaplatin were nearly the same as those incubated with its chiral isomer. In addition, the structures of DNA molecules incubated with heptaplatin were also similar to those incubated with its chiral isomer. These results indicate the difference in chirality of the two isomers does not induce different interactions of the isomers with DNA. Our study may facilitate the understanding of interactions of platinum complexes with DNA and the design of new antitumor platinum complexes.

  12. Selective transport of cationized fluorescent topoisomerase into nuclei of live cells for DNA damage studies.

    PubMed

    Minchew, Candace L; Didenko, Vladimir V

    2014-01-01

    The targeted delivery of fluorescently labeled, DNA-modifying proteins into cellular nuclei permits investigation of DNA damage and chromatin function in living cells. Commercially available protein delivery vectors cannot provide selective intranuclear transportation and primarily unload their cargo in the cytoplasm. Here we describe a simple approach for specific intranuclear transportation of vaccinia topoisomerase protein based on its cationization. The delivered protein can be observed and monitored by fluorescence microscopy. The technique is cost-efficient and time-saving. It can be useful in live cell studies.

  13. In vivo release of plasmid DNA from composites of oligo(poly(ethylene glycol)fumarate) and cationized gelatin microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kasper, F Kurtis; Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Kimura, Yu; Mikos, Antonios G; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2005-10-20

    Composites of cationized gelatin microspheres (CGMS), crosslinked with either 3 mM or 6 mM glutaraldehyde solution, and a novel hydrogel material, oligo(poly(ethylene glycol)fumarate) (OPF) were fabricated and investigated toward prolonging the release of plasmid DNA in vivo relative to the constituent materials. The composites and constituent materials were investigated in a subcutaneous murine model to assess the release of 125I-labeled plasmid DNA and 125I-labeled cationized gelatin in vivo. The time profiles of the radioactivity remaining were employed to compare the profiles of DNA release and cationized gelatin degradation. Both composite formulations (incorporating either 3 mM or 6 mM CGMS) prolonged the bioavailability of plasmid DNA relative to both injected plasmid DNA solution and the respective non-embedded cationized gelatin microspheres. Injected plasmid DNA solution persisted in the subject for only 7-10 days, whereas the persistence of DNA from composites of OPF and either 3 mM or 6 mM CGMS extended to at least day 42. The 3 mM and 6 mM CGMS each increased the persistence of DNA slightly, relative to injection of DNA solution, to between 28 and 35 days. Interestingly, the release profile of plasmid DNA from composites was not significantly different from the release of DNA from OPF alone. The release of plasmid DNA from the composites was in accord with the degradation of the microspheres within the OPF. These results show that composites of OPF and cationized gelatin microspheres are able to prolong the availability of plasmid DNA in vivo relative to cationized gelatin microspheres alone and provide a promising candidate material for the sustained, controlled release of plasmid DNA.

  14. Antibacterial effect of cationic porphyrazines and anionic phthalocyanine and their interaction with plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Leila; Hakimian, Fatemeh; Safaei, Elham; Fazeli, Zahra

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is a public health issue and identification of new antibacterial agents is one of the most important goals of pharmacological research. Among the novel developed antibacterial agents, porphyrin complexes and their derivatives are ideal candidates for use in medical applications. Phthalocyanines differ from porphyrins by having nitrogen atoms link the individual pyrrol units. The aza analogues of the phthalocyanines (azaPcs) such as tetramethylmetalloporphyrazines are heterocyclic Pc analogues. In this investigation, interaction of an anionic phthalocyanine (Cu(PcTs)) and two cationic tetrapyridinoporphyrazines including [Cu(2,3-tmtppa)]4+ and [Cu(3,4-tmtppa)]4+ complexes with plasmid DNA was studied using spectroscopic and gel electrophoresis methods. In addition, antibacterial effect of the complexes against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria was investigated using dilution test method. The results indicated that both porphyrazines have significant antibacterial properties, but Cu(PcTs) has weak antibacterial effect. Compairing the binding of the phthalocyanine and the porphyrazines to DNA demonstrated that the interaction of cationic porphyrazines is stronger than the anionic phthalocyanine remarkably. The extent of hypochromicity and red shift of absorption spectra indicated preferential intercalation of the two porphyrazine into the base pairs of DNA helix. Gel electrophoresis result implied Cu(2,3-tmtppa) and Cu(3,4-tmtppa) are able to perform cleavage of the plasmid DNA. Consequently, DNA binding and cleavage might be one of the antibacterial mechanisms of the complexes.

  15. Novel cationic vesicle platform derived from vernonia oil for efficient delivery of DNA through plant cuticle membranes.

    PubMed

    Wiesman, Zeev; Dom, Naomi Ben; Sharvit, Efrat; Grinberg, Sarina; Linder, Charles; Heldman, Eli; Zaccai, Michele

    2007-05-31

    Novel cationic amphiphilic compounds were prepared from vernonia oil, a natural epoxidized triglyceride, and studied with respect to vesicle formation, encapsulation of biomaterials such as DNA, and their physical stability and transport through isolated plant cuticle membranes. The amphiphiles studied were a single-headed compound III (a quaternary ammonium head group with two alkyl chains) and a triple-headed compound IV, which is essentially three molecules of compound III bound together through a glycerol moiety. Vesicles of the two amphiphiles, prepared by sonication in water and solutions of uranyl acetate or the herbicide 2,4-D (2,4-dichloropenoxy acetic acid), were examined by TEM, SEM, AFM, and confocal laser systems and had a spherical shape which encapsulated the solutes with diameters between 40 and 110 nm. Vesicles from amphiphile IV could be made large enough to encapsulate a condensed 5.2kb DNA plasmid (pJD328). Vesicles of amphiphile IV were also shown to pass intact across isolated plant cuticle membranes and the rate of delivery of encapsulated radio-labeled 2,4-D through isolated plant cuticle membranes obtained with these vesicles was clearly greater in comparison to liposomes prepared from dipalmitopyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and the control, nonencapsulated 2,4-D. Vesicles from amphiphiles III and IV were found to be more stable than those of liposomes from DPPC. The data indicate the potential of vesicles prepared from the novel amphiphile IV to be a relatively efficient nano-scale delivery system to transport DNA and other bioactive agents through plant biological barriers. This scientific approach may open the way for further development of efficient in vivo plant transformation systems.

  16. Inhibition of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase of Rous sarcoma virus by thiosemicarbazones and several cations.

    PubMed

    Levinson, W; Faras, A; Woodson, B; Jackson, J; Bishop, J M

    1973-01-01

    The RNA-dependent DNA polymerase of Rous sarcoma virus is inhibited by N-methyl isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone and by thiosemicarbazide, but not by semicarbazide. These inhibitors also inactivate, upon contact with the virion, the transforming ability of Rous sarcoma virus. Sulfhydryl donors, such as 2-mercapto-ethanol, can prevent these effects. The RNA-directed activity of the purified polymerase is inhibited to a greater degree than is the DNA-directed activity. Two cations, Cu(++) and Hg(++), can inhibit RNA-dependent DNA polymerase and inactivate the transforming ability of the virus. Synergism between N-methyl isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone and Cu(++) occurs, since treatment of the virus with a low dose of either N-methyl isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone or Cu(++) has little effect; however, when the two compounds are mixed together, significant inactivation occurs. This observation supports the hypothesis that the antiviral action of thiosemicarbazones is a function of their ability to act as a ligand for metallic ions. Several cations (Ag(+), Co(++), Zn(++), Cd(++), and Ni(++)) significantly inactivate the RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, but have little effect on the transforming ability. In view of this result, the conclusion that the enzyme activity is required for transformation remains open to question.

  17. Interaction of cationic phthalocyanines with DNA. Importance of the structure of the substituents.

    PubMed

    López Zeballos, N C; Gauna, G A; García Vior, M C; Awruch, J; Dicelio, L E

    2014-07-05

    The interaction of novel zinc (II) cationic phthalocyanines with CT-DNA was studied using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as thermal denaturation profiles. Results showed an electrostatic interaction between the phthalocyanines and CT-DNA. The properties of these phthalocyanines were compared taking the structure of the macrocycle peripheral substituents into account. 2,9(10),16(17),23(24)-tetrakis[(N-butyl-N-methylammonium)ethylsulfanyl]phthalocyaninatozinc(II) tetraiodide (Pc6) had a greater affinity for the CT-DNA helix than its bioisoster 2,9(10),16(17),23(24)-tetrakis[(N-dibutyl-N-methylammonium)ethoxy]phthalocyaninatozinc(II) tetraiodide (Pc7). 2,9(10),16(17),23(24)-tetrakis[(2-trimethylammonium)ethyl-sulfanyl]phthalocyaninatozinc(II) tetraiodide (Pc13) also carried a sulfur atom like Pc6, but linked to bulky substituents such as trimethylammonium groups. The planar aromatic region of the cationic phthalocyanines in this study appears to be unable to facilitate their intercalation with CT-DNA.

  18. Cationic polymers for DNA origami coating - examining their binding efficiency and tuning the enzymatic reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiviaho, Jenny K.; Linko, Veikko; Ora, Ari; Tiainen, Tony; Järvihaavisto, Erika; Mikkilä, Joona; Tenhu, Heikki; Nonappa, Affc; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2016-06-01

    DNA origamis are fully tailored, programmable, biocompatible and readily functionalizable nanostructures that provide an excellent foundation for the development of sophisticated drug-delivery systems. However, the DNA origami objects suffer from certain drawbacks such as low cell-transfection rates and low stability. A great deal of studies on polymer-based transfection agents, mainly focusing on polyplex formation and toxicity, exists. In this study, the electrostatic binding between a brick-like DNA origami and cationic block-copolymers was explored. The effect of the polymer structure on the binding was investigated and the toxicity of the polymer-origami complexes evaluated. The study shows that all of the analyzed polymers had a suitable binding efficiency irrespective of the block structure. It was also observed that the toxicity of polymer-origami complexes was insignificant at the biologically relevant concentration levels. Besides brick-like DNA origamis, tubular origami carriers equipped with enzymes were also coated with the polymers. By adjusting the amount of cationic polymers that cover the DNA structures, we showed that it is possible to control the enzyme kinetics of the complexes. This work gives a starting point for further development of biocompatible and effective polycation-based block copolymers that can be used in coating different DNA origami nanostructures for various bioapplications.DNA origamis are fully tailored, programmable, biocompatible and readily functionalizable nanostructures that provide an excellent foundation for the development of sophisticated drug-delivery systems. However, the DNA origami objects suffer from certain drawbacks such as low cell-transfection rates and low stability. A great deal of studies on polymer-based transfection agents, mainly focusing on polyplex formation and toxicity, exists. In this study, the electrostatic binding between a brick-like DNA origami and cationic block-copolymers was explored. The

  19. Role of Amino Acid Insertions on Intermolecular Forces between Arginine Peptide Condensed DNA Helices

    PubMed Central

    DeRouchey, Jason E.; Rau, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    In spermatogenesis, chromatin histones are replaced by arginine-rich protamines to densely compact DNA in sperm heads. Tight packaging is considered necessary to protect the DNA from damage. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing protamine-DNA assemblies and their dependence on amino acid content, the effect of neutral and negatively charged amino acids on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces was studied using model peptides containing six arginines. We have previously observed that the neutral amino acids in salmon protamine decrease the net attraction between protamine-DNA helices compared with the equivalent homo-arginine peptide. Using osmotic stress coupled with x-ray scattering, we have investigated the component attractive and repulsive forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance as a function of the chemistry, position, and number of the amino acid inserted. Neutral amino acids inserted into hexa-arginine increase the short range repulsion while only slightly affecting longer range attraction. The amino acid content alone of salmon protamine is enough to rationalize the forces that package DNA in sperm heads. Inserting a negatively charged amino acid into hexa-arginine dramatically weakens the net attraction. Both of these observations have biological implications for protamine-DNA packaging in sperm heads. PMID:21994948

  20. Modulation of pyridinium cationic lipid-DNA complex properties by pyridinium gemini surfactants and its impact on lipoplex transfection properties.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishnu Dutt; Lees, Julia; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Brailoiu, Eugen; Madesh, Muniswamy; Wunder, Stephanie L; Ilies, Marc A

    2014-02-03

    The study presents the effects of blending a cationic gemini surfactant into cationic lipid bilayers and its impact on the plasmid DNA compaction and delivery process. Using nanoDSC, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, and electrophoretic mobility measurements, together with transfection (2D- and 3D-) and viability assays, we identified the main physicochemical parameters of the lipid bilayers, liposomes, and lipoplexes that are affected by the gemini surfactant addition. We also correlated the cationic bilayer composition with the dynamics of the DNA compaction process and with transfection efficiency, cytotoxicity, and the internalization mechanism of the resultant nucleic acid complexes. We found that the blending of gemini surfactant into the cationic bilayers fluidized the supramolecular assemblies, reduced the amount of positive charge required to fully compact the plasmid DNA and, in certain cases, changed the internalization mechanism of the lipoplexes. The transfection efficiency of select ternary lipoplexes derived from cationic gemini surfactants and lipids was several times superior to the transfection efficiency of corresponding binary lipoplexes, also surpassing standard transfection systems. The overall impact of gemini surfactants into the formation and dynamic of cationic bilayers was found to depend heavily on the presence of colipids, their nature, and amount present in lipoplexes. The study confirmed the possibility of combining the specific properties of pyridinium gemini surfactants and cationic lipids synergistically to obtain efficient synthetic transfection systems with negligible cytotoxicity useful for therapeutic gene delivery.

  1. Preparation, characterization, and DNA interaction studies of cationic europium luminescent copolymer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ziwei; Hu, Xiaoxi; Wang, Yun; Yin, Yanzhen; Peng, Bo; Xu, Zushun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposed a simple synthetic strategy towards a novel cationic europium luminescent copolymer, poly(METAC-co-NIPAm-co-Eu(AA)3Phen) (PMNEu), and investigation about their complexation ability with DNA. In this approach, first, Eu(AA)3Phen complex monomer containing Eu(3+), acrylic acid (AA), and 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) was synthesized, and subsequently, free radical copolymerization of Eu(AA)3Phen complex monomer with other two functional monomers, [2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride (METAC) and N-isopropylarylamide (NIPAm), was carried out in methanol using azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator. (1)HNMR, GPC, fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and TEM were used to investigate the chemical structures, molecular weight and molecular weight distribution, fluorescence properties, UV spectra, and morphologies of PMNEu copolymer, respectively. Furthermore, the interaction of PMNEu with DNA was also studied with fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis. These results indicated that PMNEu could interact with DNA via an electrostatic bonding mode and the bonding constant was 2.2 × 10(5) L/mol. Additionally, TEM observation showed that pure PMNEu formed micelles in water solution, while the size-controllable aggregations of PMNEu with DNA were obtained when PMNEu was mixed with DNA at various concentration ratios. A good biocompability of PMNEu was demonstrated through in vitro cytotoxicity assays.

  2. Investigation on interaction of DNA and several cationic surfactants with different head groups by spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and viscosity technologies.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing; Zhang, Zhaohong; Song, Youtao; Liu, Shuo; Gao, Wei; Qiao, Heng; Guo, Lili; Wang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the interaction between DNA and several cationic surfactants with different head groups such as ethyl hexadecyl dimethyl ammonium bromide (EHDAB), hexadecyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (HDBAC), and cetyl pyridinium bromide (CPB) were investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and viscosity technologies. The results show that these cationic surfactants can interact with DNA and major binding modes are electrostatic and hydrophobic. Also, CPB and HDBAC molecules interact with DNA by partial intercalation, and CPB has slightly stronger intercalation than HDBAC, while EHDAB interacts with DNA by non-intercalation. The different head groups of the surfactant molecules can influence the interaction strength. CPB has the stronger interaction with DNA than the others. Moreover, surfactant concentration, the ratio of DNA and fluorescence probe, ionic strength can influence the interaction. The surfactants may interact with DNA by the competition reactions with BR for DNA-BR. The increase of ionic strength may favor the surface binding between DNA and surfactants to some extent. This work provides deep mechanistic insight on the toxicity of cationic surfactants with different head groups to DNA molecules.

  3. Role of the central cations in the mechanical unfolding of DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Bergues-Pupo, Ana Elisa; Arias-Gonzalez, J. Ricardo; Morón, María Carmen; Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Falo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Cations are known to mediate diverse interactions in nucleic acids duplexes but they are critical in the arrangement of four-stranded structures. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent to analyse the mechanical unfolding of representative intramolecular G-quadruplex structures: a parallel, a hybrid and an antiparallel DNA and a parallel RNA, in the presence of stabilising cations. We confirm the stability of these conformations in the presence of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\rm {K}^+$\\end{document} central ions and observe distortions from the tetrad topology in their absence. Force-induced unfolding dynamics is then investigated. We show that the unfolding events in the force-extension curves are concomitant to the loss of coordination between the central ions and the guanines of the G-quadruplex. We found lower ruptures forces for the parallel configuration with respect to the antiparallel one, while the behaviour of the force pattern of the parallel RNA appears similar to the parallel DNA. We anticipate that our results will be essential to interpret the fine structure rupture profiles in stretching assays at high resolution and will shed light on the mechanochemical activity of G-quadruplex-binding machinery. PMID:26170233

  4. Role of the central cations in the mechanical unfolding of DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Bergues-Pupo, Ana Elisa; Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo; Morón, María Carmen; Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Falo, Fernando

    2015-09-03

    Cations are known to mediate diverse interactions in nucleic acids duplexes but they are critical in the arrangement of four-stranded structures. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent to analyse the mechanical unfolding of representative intramolecular G-quadruplex structures: a parallel, a hybrid and an antiparallel DNA and a parallel RNA, in the presence of stabilising cations. We confirm the stability of these conformations in the presence of [Formula: see text] central ions and observe distortions from the tetrad topology in their absence. Force-induced unfolding dynamics is then investigated. We show that the unfolding events in the force-extension curves are concomitant to the loss of coordination between the central ions and the guanines of the G-quadruplex. We found lower ruptures forces for the parallel configuration with respect to the antiparallel one, while the behaviour of the force pattern of the parallel RNA appears similar to the parallel DNA. We anticipate that our results will be essential to interpret the fine structure rupture profiles in stretching assays at high resolution and will shed light on the mechanochemical activity of G-quadruplex-binding machinery.

  5. Liposome-induced DNA compaction and reentrant condensation investigated by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuzzi, S.; Cametti, C.; Onori, G.; Sennato, S.

    2007-07-01

    Interaction of DNA with oppositely charged objects, such as multivalent ions, cationic surfactants, cationic liposomes, basic proteins, and alcohols, up to nano- or mesoscopic particles, gives rise to a very interesting and fascinating phenomenology, where the shape, size, and stability of the resulting aggregates depend on a delicate balance between different driving forces, mainly of electrostatic origin. We have studied the cationic liposome-DNA complexes during the whole complexation process, below, close to, and above the isoelectric condition, where the number of cationic lipids equals the number of phosphate groups on the DNA chain. We took advantage of the combined use of dynamic light scattering, laser Doppler electrophoretic mobility, and radio-wave dielectric relaxation measurements in order to characterize both the structural parameters (hydrodynamic radius) and the electrical parameters (charge and counterion concentration) of the resulting structures. These structures are fundamentally of two types, clusters of liposomes stuck together by DNA chains (cluster phase in low-density colloidal suspension) and coexisting DNA coils and DNA globules, according to the procedure through which interactions occur (liposomes in excess DNA solution or DNA in excess liposome suspension).

  6. Effects of low-energy electrons on DNA constituents: effective cross sections for condensed thymidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panajotovic, Radmila

    2009-05-01

    Since the first experiments of low-energy electron scattering from condensed DNA [1] have been performed, the interest in studying low-energy electron-biomolecule interactions has been increasing. Knowledge of effective cross sections for single- and double-strand breaks of DNA and for vibrational and electronic excitation of nucleic bases and nucleosides are opening the door to better understanding of effects of radiation on live tissue and possibly indicating interaction pathways leading to gene mutations and cancer. The strong variation of effective cross sections for DNA single-strand breaks with incident electron energy and the resonant enhancement at 1 eV suggested that considerable damage is inflicted by very low-energy electrons to DNA, and indicates the important role of π* shape resonances in the bond-breaking process. However, the complexity of DNA, even if studied as a short single-strand chain, imposes a need to perform measurements on its isolated constituents, such as nucleic bases and nucleosides. Thymidine is one of the most important nucleosides of DNA and an important component of antiviral compounds. In the condensed phase, thymidine's 2'-deoxyribose ring is in the pentose sugar ring form, which is a true conformation of this nucleoside in DNA. Results from High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss [2] study of monomolecular films of thymidine will be discussed and the presence of resonances in the effective cross sections at incident energy below 5 eV will be commented as a possible indication of the dissociative electron attachment. In addition, results on the resonance structures in the effective cross sections for electronic excitations for the incident electron energy from 1.5 to 12 eV will be discussed as a possible pathway for strand brakes in DNA. [4pt] [1] Boudaiffa B, Cloutier P, Hunting D, Huels M A and Sanche L 2002 Rad. Res. 157 227-234[0pt] [2] Panajotovic R, Martin F, Cloutier P, Hunting, D, and Sanche L, 2006 Rad.Res. 165 452

  7. Conformation Transformation Determined by Different Self-Assembled Phases in a DNA Complex with Cationic Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Lipid

    SciTech Connect

    Cui,L.; Chen, D.; Zhu, L.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a novel cube-shaped cationic lipid based on the imidazolium salt of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was complexed with double-stranded DNA. Because of the negative spontaneous curvature of the cationic POSS imidazolium lipid, an inverted hexagonal phase resulted above the melting point of POSS crystals. Depending on the competition between the crystallization of POSS molecules and the negative spontaneous curvature of cationic POSS imidazolium lipids, different self-assembled phase morphologies were obtained. A lamellar phase was obtained when the POSS crystallization was relatively slow. When the POSS crystallization was fast, an inverted hexagonal phase was obtained with POSS lamellar crystals grown in the interstitials of DNA cylinders. On the basis of a circular dichroism study, double-stranded DNA adopted the B-form helical conformation in the inverted hexagonal phase, whereas the helical conformation was largely destroyed in the lamellar phase.

  8. Thermal treatment effects imposed on solid DNA cationic lipid complex with hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride, observed by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nizioł, Jacek

    2014-12-21

    DNA cationic lipid complexes are materials of properties required for applications in organic electronics and optoelectronics. Often, their thermal stability demonstrated by thermogravimetry is cited in the literature as important issue. However, little is known about processes occurring in heated solid DNA cationic lipid complexes. In frame of this work, thin films of Deoxyribonucleic acid-hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DNA-CTMA) were deposited on silicon wafers. Samples were thermally annealed, and simultaneously, their optical functions were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. At lower temperatures, thermal expansion coefficient of solid DNA-CTMA was negative, but at higher temperatures positive. Thermally induced modification of absorption spectrum in UV-vis was observed. It occurred at a range of temperatures higher than this of DNA denaturation in solution. The observed phenomenon was irreversible, at least in time scale of the experiment (one day)

  9. DNA condensation by TmHU studied by optical tweezers, AFM and molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Olbrich, Carsten; Brutzer, Hergen; Salomo, Mathias; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Kremer, Friedrich

    2010-01-01

    The compaction of DNA by the HU protein from Thermotoga maritima (TmHU) is analysed on a single-molecule level by the usage of an optical tweezers-assisted force clamp. The condensation reaction is investigated at forces between 2 and 40 pN applied to the ends of the DNA as well as in dependence on the TmHU concentration. At 2 and 5 pN, the DNA compaction down to 30% of the initial end-to-end distance takes place in two regimes. Increasing the force changes the progression of the reaction until almost nothing is observed at 40 pN. Based on the results of steered molecular dynamics simulations, the first regime of the length reduction is assigned to a primary level of DNA compaction by TmHU. The second one is supposed to correspond to the formation of higher levels of structural organisation. These findings are supported by results obtained by atomic force microscopy. PMID:22210966

  10. The electrokinetic characterization of gold nanoparticles, functionalized with cationic functional groups, and its' interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Geraldine Genevive; Revaprasadu, Neerish; López-Viota, Julián; Singh, Moganavelli

    2014-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles have attracted strong biomedical interest for drug delivery due to their low toxic nature, surface plasmon resonance and capability of increasing the stability of the payload. However, gene transfection represents another important biological application. Considering that cellular barriers keep enclosed their secret to deliver genes using nanoparticles, an important step can be achieved by studying the functionalization of nanoparticles with DNA. In the present contribution the synthesis of nanoparticles consisting of a gold core coated with one or more layers of amino acid (l-lysine), and cationic polyelectrolytes (poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine) is reported. All nanoparticles were subjected to dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility measurements, UV-vis optical spectrophotometry analysis and transmission electron microscopy imaging. In addition, the adsorption of DNA plasmid (pSGS) with linear and supercoiled configurations was studied for those gold nanoparticles under the most suitable surface modifications. Preliminary results showed that the gold nanoparticles functionalized with poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine, respectively, and bound to linear DNA configurations, present in absolute value a higher electrophoretic mobility irrespective of the pH of the media, compared to the supercoiled and nicked configuration. The findings from this study suggest that poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine functionalized gold nanoparticles are biocompatible and may be promising in the chemical design and future optimization of nanostructures for biomedical applications such as gene and drug delivery.

  11. Theoretical investigation on DNA/RNA base pairs mediated by copper, silver, and gold cations.

    PubMed

    Marino, Tiziana; Russo, Nino; Toscano, Marirosa; Pavelka, Matej

    2012-02-14

    B3LYP density functional based computations were performed in order to characterize the interactions present in some Cu(+), Ag(+), and Au(+) metal ion-mediated DNA and RNA base pairs from both structural and electronic points of view. Examined systems involve as ligands canonical Watson-Crick, Hoogsteen and Wobble base pairs. Two artificial Hoogsteen base pairs were also taken into account. Binding energy values indicate that complexes involving silver cations are less stable than those in which copper or gold are present, and propose a similar behaviour for these two latter ions. The nature of the bond linking metal ions and bases was described by the NBO analysis that suggests metal coordinative interactions to be covalent. An evaluation of the dispersion contributions for the investigated systems was performed with the B3LYP-D3 functional.

  12. Role of cholesterol on the transfection barriers of cationic lipid/DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Daniela; Cardarelli, Francesco; Salomone, Fabrizio; Marchini, Cristina; Amenitsch, Heinz; Barbera, Giorgia La; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2014-08-01

    Most lipid formulations need cholesterol for efficient transfection, but the precise motivation remains unclear. Here, we have investigated the effect of cholesterol on the transfection efficiency (TE) of cationic liposomes made of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane and dioleoylphosphocholine in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The transfection mechanisms of cholesterol-containing lipoplexes have been investigated by TE, synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering, and laser scanning confocal microscopy experiments. We prove that cholesterol-containing lipoplexes enter the cells using different endocytosis pathways. Formulations with high cholesterol content efficiently escape from endosomes and exhibit a lamellar-nonlamellar phase transition in mixture with biomembrane mimicking lipid formulations. This might explain both the DNA release ability and the high transfection efficiency. These studies highlight the enrichment in cholesterol as a decisive factor for transfection and will contribute to the rational design of lipid nanocarriers with superior TE.

  13. Influence of cationic molecules on the hairpin to duplex equilibria of self-complementary DNA and RNA oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Shu-ichi; Kirihata, Toshimasa; Fujii, Satoshi; Sakai, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Masayasu; Sawai, Hiroaki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    A self-complementary nucleotide sequence can form both a unimolecular hairpin and a bimolecular duplex. In this study, the secondary structures of the self-complementary DNA and RNA oligonucleotides with different sequences and lengths were investigated under various solution conditions by gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism (CD) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and a ultraviolet (UV) melting analysis. The DNA sequences tended to adopt a hairpin conformation at low cation concentrations, but a bimolecular duplex was preferentially formed at an elevated cationic strength. On the other hand, fully matched RNA sequences adopted a bimolecular duplex regardless of the cation concentration. The thermal melting experiments indicated a greater change in the melting temperature of the bimolecular duplexes (by ∼20°C) than that of the hairpin (by ∼10°C) by increasing the NaCl concentration from 10 mM to 1 M. Hairpin formations were also observed for the palindrome DNA sequences derived from Escherichia coli, but association of the complementary palindrome sequences was observed when spermine, one of the major cationic molecules in a cell, existed at the physiological concentration. The results indicate the role of cations for shifting the structural equilibrium toward a nucleotide assembly and implicate nucleotide structures in cells. PMID:17169988

  14. Nucleosome and DNA-protein condensed structures in solution from flow birefringence and intrinsic viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, R.E.

    1980-10-01

    Highly sensitive streaming birefringence measurements combined with intrinsic viscosity are used to characterize the shape anisometry and optical anisotropy of nucleosomes over a range of salt concentration > 30 mM KCl and of structures obtained by the condensation of high molecular weight DNA with polylysine. These measurements appear useful for several reasons. Both streaming birefringence and intrinsic viscosity are hydrodynamic properties based upon the rotational diffusion of macromolecular particles and hence are inherently more sensitive to details of particle anisometry than are hydrodynamic properties based upon translational diffusion. An established body of both hydrodynamic and continuum dielectric optical theory is available with which to interpret streaming birefringence results. Extinction angles (i.e., mean orientation angles of particles in a velocity gradient) are entirely hydrodynamic properties, and hence can be interpreted through the rotational coefficient to characterize particle anisometry and to estimate absolute dimensions. The ratio of Maxwell coefficient to intrinsic viscosity is proportional to the absolute particle anisotropy. The high optical anisotropy of DNA relative to that of associated protein permits certain details of tertiary structure and shape anisometry to be estimated from the observed optical anisotropy compared to optical models involving the DNA alone. The method is essentially independent of solvent.

  15. DNA condensation by the rat spermatidal protein TP2 shows GC-rich sequence preference and is zinc dependent.

    PubMed

    Kundu, T K; Rao, M R

    1995-04-18

    Transition protein-2 (TP2), isolated from rat testes, was recently shown to be a zinc metalloprotein. We have now carried out a detailed analysis of the DNA condensing properties of TP2 with various polynucleotides using circular dichroism spectroscopy. The condensation of the alternating copolymers by TP2 (incubated with 10 microM ZnSO4), namely, poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) and poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT), was severalfold higher than condensation of either of the homoduplexes poly(dG).poly-(dC) and poly(dA).poly(dT) or rat oligonucleosomal DNA. Between the two alternating copolymers, poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) was condensed 3.2-fold more effectively than poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT). Preincubation of TP2 with 5 mM EDTA significantly reduced its DNA-condensing property. Interestingly, condensation of the alternating copolymer poly(dI-dC).poly(dI-dC) by TP2 was much less as compared to that of poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC). The V8 protease-derived N-terminal fragment (88 aa) condensed poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) to a very small extent but did not have any effect on poly(dG-dC).poly-(dG-dC). The C-terminal fragment (28 aa) was able to condense poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) more effectively than poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC). These results suggest that TP2 in its zinc-coordinated form condenses GC-rich polynucleotides much more effectively than other types of polynucleotides. Neither the N-terminal two-thirds of TP2 which is the zinc-binding domain nor the C-terminal basic domain are as effective as intact TP2 in bringing about condensation of DNA.

  16. Multi-colored fibers by self-assembly of DNA, histone proteins, and cationic conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengyan; Liu, Zhang; Wang, Bing; Feng, Liheng; Liu, Libing; Lv, Fengting; Wang, Yilin; Wang, Shu

    2014-01-07

    The development of biomolecular fiber materials with imaging ability has become more and more useful for biological applications. In this work, cationic conjugated polymers (CCPs) were used to construct inherent fluorescent microfibers with natural biological macromolecules (DNA and histone proteins) through the interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (IPC) procedure. Isothermal titration microcalorimetry results show that the driving forces for fiber formation are electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, as well as the release of counterions and bound water molecules. Color-encoded IPC fibers were also obtained based on the co-assembly of DNA, histone proteins, and blue-, green-, or red- (RGB-) emissive CCPs by tuning the fluorescence resonance energy-transfer among the CCPs at a single excitation wavelength. The fibers could encapsulate GFP-coded Escherichia coli BL21, and the expression of GFP proteins was successfully regulated by the external environment of the fibers. These multi-colored fibers show a great potential in biomedical applications, such as biosensor, delivery, and release of biological molecules and tissue engineering.

  17. Highly sensitive colorimetric sensor for Hg(2+) detection based on cationic polymer/DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingyue; Cai, Yilin; Zhu, Yibo; Zheng, Lixue; Ding, Jianying; Quan, Ying; Wang, Limei; Qi, Bin

    2015-07-15

    The detection of ultralow concentrations of mercury is a currently significant challenge. Here, a novel strategy is proposed: the colorimetric detection of Hg(2+) based on the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) driven by a cationic polymer. In this three-component system, DNA combines electrostatically with phthalic diglycol diacrylate (PDDA) in a solution of AuNPs. In the presence of Hg(2+), thymine (T)-Hg(2+)-T induced hairpin turns are formed in the DNA strands, which then do not interact with PDDA, enabling the freed PDDA to subsequently facilitate aggregation of the AuNPs. Thus, according to the change in color from wine-red to blue-purple upon AuNPs aggregation, a colorimetric sensor is established to detect Hg(2+). Under optimal conditions, the color change is clearly seen with the naked eye. A linear range of 0.25-500nM was obtained by absorption spectroscopy with a detection limit of approximately 0.15nM. Additionally, the proposed method shows high selectivity toward Hg(2+) in the presence of other heavy metal ions. Real sample analysis was evaluated with the use of lake water and the results suggest good potential for practical application.

  18. Is the formation of cationic lipid-DNA complexes a thermodynamically driven phenomenon? Structure and phase behavior of DC-Chol/DNA complexes say not

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Pozzi, Daniela; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2006-07-01

    The currently accepted mechanism of formation of cationic lipid-DNA complexes (lipoplexes) relies on the basic assumption that equilibrium structure of lipoplexes is regulated by thermodynamics. The main consequence is that neutral lipoplexes are one phase whereas positively (or negatively) charged ones coexist with excess lipid (or excess DNA). The authors report a small angle x-ray diffraction study on the structure of lipoplexes made of the cationic lipid 3β-[N-(N ,N-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl]cholesterol and calf thymus Na-DNA. Here the authors show that positively charged lipoplexes can coexist with unbound DNA and they claim that steric size effects are definitely important to determine the equilibrium structure of lipoplexes.

  19. Kinetic study of the binding of triplex-forming oligonucleotides containing partial cationic modifications to double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Hari, Yoshiyuki; Ijitsu, Shin; Akabane-Nakata, Masaaki; Yoshida, Takuya; Obika, Satoshi

    2014-07-15

    Several triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) partially modified with 2'-O-(2-aminoethyl)- or 2'-O-(2-guanidinoethyl)-nucleotides were synthesized and their association rate constants (kon) with double-stranded DNA were estimated by UV spectrophotometry. Introduction of cationic modifications in the 5'-region of the TFOs significantly increased the kon values compared to that of natural TFO, while no enhancement in the rate of triplex DNA formation was observed when the modifications were in the middle and at the 3'-region. The kon value of a TFO with three adjacent cationic modifications at the 5'-region was found to be 3.4 times larger than that of a natural one. These results provide useful information for overcoming the inherent sluggishness of triplex DNA formation.

  20. CNT loading into cationic cholesterol suspensions show improved DNA binding and serum stability and ability to internalize into cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhikara, Bhupender S.; Misra, Santosh K.; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2012-02-01

    Methods which disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water as ‘debundled’, while maintaining their unique physical properties are highly useful. We present here a family of cationic cholesterol compounds (Chol+) {Cholest-5en-3β-oxyethyl pyridinium bromide (Chol-PB+), Cholest-5en-3β-oxyethyl N-methyl pyrrolidinium bromide (Chol-MPB+), Cholest-5en-3β-oxyethyl N-methyl morpholinium bromide (Chol-MMB+) and Cholest-5en-3β-oxyethyl diazabicyclo octanium bromide (Chol-DOB+)}. Each of these could be easily dispersed in water. The resulting cationic cholesterol (Chol+) suspensions solubilized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by the non-specific physical adsorption of Chol+ to form stable, transparent, dark aqueous suspensions at room temperature. Electron microscopy reveals the existence of highly segregated CNTs in these samples. Zeta potential measurements showed an increase in potential of cationic cholesterol aggregates on addition of CNTs. The CNT-Chol+ suspensions were capable of forming stable complexes with genes (DNA) efficiently. The release of double-helical DNA from such CNT-Chol+ complexes could be induced upon the addition of anionic micellar solution of SDS. Furthermore, the CNT-based DNA complexes containing cationic cholesterol aggregates showed higher stability in fetal bovine serum media at physiological conditions. Confocal studies confirm that CNT-Chol+ formulations adhere to HeLa cell surfaces and get internalized more efficiently than the cationic cholesterol suspensions alone (devoid of any CNTs). These cationic cholesterol-CNT suspensions therefore appear to be a promising system for further use in biological applications.

  1. DNA Binding and Condensation Properties of the Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Triplex Protein VP19C

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Alakesh; Perkins, Edward M.; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Heng; Desai, Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Herpesvirus capsids are regular icosahedrons with a diameter of a 125 nm and are made up of 162 capsomeres arranged on a T = 16 lattice. The capsomeres (VP5) interact with the triplex structure, which is a unique structural feature of herpesvirus capsid shells. The triplex is a heterotrimeric complex; one molecule of VP19C and two of VP23 form a three-pronged structure that acts to stabilize the capsid shell through interactions with adjacent capsomeres. VP19C interacts with VP23 and with the major capsid protein VP5 and is required for the nuclear localization of VP23. Mutation of VP19C results in the abrogation of capsid shell synthesis. Analysis of the sequence of VP19C showed the N-terminus of VP19C is very basic and glycine rich. It was hypothesized that this domain could potentially bind to DNA. In this study an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and a DNA condensation assay were performed to demonstrate that VP19C can bind DNA. Purified VP19C was able to bind to both a DNA fragment of HSV-1 origin as well as a bacterial plasmid sequence indicating that this activity is non-specific. Ultra-structural imaging of the nucleo-protein complexes revealed that VP19C condensed the DNA and forms toroidal DNA structures. Both the DNA binding and condensing properties of VP19C were mapped to the N-terminal 72 amino acids of the protein. Mutational studies revealed that the positively charged arginine residues in this N-terminal domain are required for this binding. This DNA binding activity, which resides in a non-conserved region of the protein could be required for stabilization of HSV-1 DNA association in the capsid shell. PMID:25121591

  2. Enhanced non-inflammasome mediated immune responses by mannosylated zwitterionic-based cationic liposomes for HIV DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chenmeng; Liu, Jiandong; Yang, Jun; Li, Yan; Weng, Jie; Shao, Yiming; Zhang, Xin

    2016-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA vaccine can induce cellular and humoral immunity. A safe and effective HIV DNA vaccine is urgent need to prevent the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The major drawback of DNA vaccines is the low immunogenicity, which is caused by the poor delivery to antigen presenting cells and insufficient antigen expression. Sparked by the capability of endosomal/lysosomal escape of the zwitterionic lipid distearoyl phosphoethanol-amine-polycarboxybetaine (DSPE-PCB), we attempted to develop a zwitterionic-based cationic liposome with enhanced immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. The mannosylated zwitterionic-based cationic liposome (man-ZCL) was constructed as a DNA vaccine adjuvant for HIV vaccination. Man-ZCL could complex with DNA antigens to form a tight structure and protect them from nuclei enzyme degradation. Benefited from the capability of the specific mannose receptor mediated antigen processing cells targeting and enhanced endosomal/lysosomal escape, the man-ZCL lipoplexes were supposed to promote antigen presentation and the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. In vitro and in vivo results revealed that man-ZCL lipoplexes showed enhanced anti-HIV immune responses and lower toxicity compared with CpG/DNA and Lipo2k/DNA, and triggered a Th1/Th2 mixed immunity. An antigen-depot effect was observed in the administration site, and this resulted in enhanced retention of DNA antigens in draining lymph nodes. Most importantly, the man-ZCL could assist to activate T cells through a non-inflammasome pathway. These findings suggested that the man-ZCL could be potentially applied as a safe and efficient DNA adjuvant for HIV vaccines.

  3. Synthesis and studies of polypeptide materials: Self-assembled block copolypeptide amphiphiles, DNA-condensing block copolypeptides and membrane-interactive random copolypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrsta, Michael Dmytro

    A new class of transition metal initiators for the controlled polymerization of alpha-aminoacid-N-carboxyanhydrides (alpha-NCAs), has been developed by Deming et al. This discovery has allowed for the synthesis of well-defined "protein-like" polymers. Using this chemistry we have made distinct block/random copolypeptides for biomedical applications. Drug delivery, gene delivery, and antimicrobial polymers were the focus of our research efforts. The motivation for the synthesis and study of synthetic polypeptide based materials comes from proteins. Natural proteins are able to adopt a staggeringly large amount of uniquely well-defined folded structures. These structures account for the diversity in properties of proteins. As catalysts (enzymes) natural proteins perform some of the most difficult chemistry with ease and precision at ambient pressures and temperatures. They also exhibit incredible structural properties that directly result from formation of complex hierarchical assemblies. Self-assembling block copolymers were synthesized with various compositions and architectures. In general, di- and tri-block amphiphiles were studied for their self-assembling properties. Both spherical and tubular vesicles were found to assemble from di- and tri-block amphiphiles, respectively. In addition to self-assembly, pH responsiveness was engineered into these amphiphiles by the incorporation of basic residues (lysine) into the hydrophobic block. Another form of self-assembly studied was the condensation of DNA using cationic block copolymers. It was found that cationic block copolymers could condense DNA into compact, ordered, water-soluble aggregates on the nanoscale. These aggregates sufficiently protected DNA from nucleases and yet were susceptible to proteases. These studies form the basis of a gene delivery platform. The ease with which NCAs are polymerized renders them completely amenable to parallel synthetic methods. We have employed this technique to discover new

  4. The intracellular delivery of plasmid DNA using cationic reducible carbon nanotube - Disulfide conjugates of polyethylenimine.

    PubMed

    Nia, Azadeh Hashem; Eshghi, Hossein; Abnous, Kalil; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2017-03-30

    A series of polyethylenimine conjugates of single-walled carbon nanotube (PEI-SWNT) containing bioreducible disulfide bonds was synthesized and evaluated for their transfection efficiency. Different molecular weights of polyethylenimine (PEI) were thiolated with different mole ratio of 2-iminothiolane (2-IT). Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) was first carboxylated and then three different cysteine-functionalized SWNT formulations were synthesized via introduced linkers: a) carbonyl group b) spermidine c) 1,8-diamino 3,6-dioxo octane. The final nanocarriers were fabricated upon conjugation of thiolated PEIs and thiolated SWNT via oxidative disulfide bond formation. All PEI-disulfide-SWNT conjugates were capable of DNA condensation and showed improved viability and transfection efficiency compared to PEI itself. Transfection efficiencies were up to 1500 times greater than PEI 25kDa (C/P=0.8). The results of this study suggest that the synthesized formulations based on SWNT-CO-Cysteine and PEI 1.8kDa were the most efficient carriers. Considering the decreased cytotoxicity and higher transfection levels, the conjugates bear the potential for effective delivery of genetic materials.

  5. Membranes of cationic gemini lipids based on cholesterol with hydroxyl headgroups and their interactions with DNA and phospholipid.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Joydeep; Bajaj, Avinash; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2011-01-27

    Two series of cholesterol-based cationic gemini lipids with and without hydroxyl functions at the headgroups possessing different lengths of polymethylene [-(CH(2))(n)-] (n = 3, 4, 5, 6, 12) spacer have been synthesized. Each gemini lipid formed stable suspension in water. The suspensions of these gemini lipids in water were investigated using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential measurements and X-ray diffraction to characterize the nature of the individual aggregates formed therein. The aggregation properties of these gemini lipids in water were found to strongly depend upon the length of the spacer and the presence of hydroxyl group at the headgroup region. Lipoplex formation (DNA binding) and the release of the DNA from such lipoplexes were performed to understand the nature of interactions that prevail between these cationic cholesterol aggregates and duplex DNA. The interactions between such gemini lipids and DNA depend both on the presence of OH on the headgroups and the spacer length between the headgroups. Finally, we studied the effect of incorporation of each cationic gemini lipid into dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles using differential scanning calorimetry. The properties of the resulting mixed membranes were found again to depend upon the nature of the headgroup and the spacer chain length.

  6. Successful gene transfer into dendritic cells with cationized gelatin and plasmid DNA complexes via a phagocytosis-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Inada, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Atsuji, Kiyoto; Takashima, Kazuhiro; Araki, Yasunobu; Kubota, Takeshi; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Yamagishi, Hisakazu

    2006-01-01

    The use of gene-modified dendritic cells (DC) is a powerful tool to enhance antitumor immune responses stimulated by these cells in cancer immunotherapy. Cationized gelatin is preferably incorporated via phagocytosis and is gradually degraded by proteolysis while buffering lysosomal activity. This may be appropriate for gene transfer into phagocytic cells, such as immature DC. In the present study, successful transfection into monocyte-derived immature DC was demonstrated using cationized gelatin and plasmid DNA complexes. A high transfection efficiency, approaching 16%, was obtained upon transfection of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene as evaluated by flow cytometry. Transgene expression of EGFP and murine interleukin 12 were also detected by RT-PCR. The antigen-presenting capacity of the transfected DC was equal to that of untransfected DC as evaluated by the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. Cationized gelatin has the potential to be a unique non-viral vector for gene transfer into DC.

  7. Controlling DNA compaction with cationic amphiphiles for efficient delivery systems A step forward towards non-viral Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savarala, Sushma

    The synthesis of pyridinium cationic lipids, their counter-ion exchange, and the transfection of lipoplexes consisting of these lipids with firefly luciferase plasmid DNA (6.7 KDa), into lung, prostate and breast cancer cell lines was investigated. The transfection ability of these newly synthesized compounds was found to be twice as high as DOTAP/cholesterol and Lipofectamine TM (two commercially available successful transfection agents). The compaction of the DNA onto silica (SiO2) nanoparticles was also investigated. For this purpose, it was necessary to study the stability and fusion studies of colloidal systems composed of DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), a zwitterionic lipid, and mixtures of DMPC with cationic DMTAP (1,2-dimyristoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane).

  8. Structural and Functional Consequences of Poly(ethylene glycol) Inclusion on DNA Condensation For Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Millili, Peter G.; Selekman, Joshua A.; Blocker, Kory M.; Johnson, David A.; Naik, Ulhas P.; Sullivan, Millicent O.

    2010-01-01

    Polycationic polymers have been used to condense therapeutic DNA into sub-micron particles, offering protection from shear-induced or enzymatic degradation. However, the spontaneous nature of this self-assembly process gives rise to the formation of multimolecular aggregates, resulting in significant polyplex heterogeneity. Additionally, cytotoxicity issues and serum instability have limited the in vivo efficacy of such systems. One way these issues can be addressed is through the inclusion of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). PEG has known steric effects that inhibit polyplex self-aggregation. A variety of PEGylated gene delivery formulations have been previously pursued in an effort to take advantage of this material’s benefits. Due to such interest, our aim was to further explore the consequences of PEG inclusion on the structure and activity of gene delivery vehicle formulations. We explored the complexation of plasmid DNA with varying ratios of a PEGylated tri-lysine peptide (PEG-K3) and 25 kDa polyethylenimine (PEI). Atomic force and scanning electron microscopy were utilized to assess the polyplex size and shape, and revealed that a critical threshold of PEG was necessary to promote the formation of homogeneous polyplexes. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses suggested that the presence of PEG inhibited transfection efficiency as a consequence of changes in intracellular trafficking, and promoted an increased reliance on energy-independent mechanisms of cellular uptake. These studies provide new information on the role of PEG in delivery vehicle design and lay the foundation for future work aimed at elucidating the details of the intracellular transport of PEGylated polyplexes. PMID:20232467

  9. Why double-stranded RNA resists condensation.

    PubMed

    Tolokh, Igor S; Pabit, Suzette A; Katz, Andrea M; Chen, Yujie; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of multivalent cations to solutions containing double-stranded DNA leads to inter-DNA attraction and eventual condensation. Surprisingly, the condensation is suppressed in double-stranded RNA, which carries the same negative charge as DNA, but assumes a different double helical form. Here, we combine experiment and atomistic simulations to propose a mechanism that explains the variations in condensation of short (25 base-pairs) nucleic acid (NA) duplexes, from B-like form of homopolymeric DNA, to mixed sequence DNA, to DNA:RNA hybrid, to A-like RNA. Circular dichroism measurements suggest that duplex helical geometry is not the fundamental property that ultimately determines the observed differences in condensation. Instead, these differences are governed by the spatial variation of cobalt hexammine (CoHex) binding to NA. There are two major NA-CoHex binding modes--internal and external--distinguished by the proximity of bound CoHex to the helical axis. We find a significant difference, up to 5-fold, in the fraction of ions bound to the external surfaces of the different NA constructs studied. NA condensation propensity is determined by the fraction of CoHex ions in the external binding mode.

  10. Selective release of excreted DNA sequences from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Effects of trypsin and divalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    Distelhorst, C W; Cramer, K; Rogers, J C

    1978-01-01

    We studied the synthesis of excreted DNA sequences and their release from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes under conditions permitting optimal cell growth. Cells were labeled by constant exposure to low specific activity [3H]thymidine. Excreted DNA sequences were synthesized during the period of logarithmic cell growth and moved slowly from the high molecular weight chromosomal DNA fraction into the low molecular weight cell DNA fraction (Hirt supernate) from which they could be specifically released by treating the cells briefly with small amounts of various proteases; 1 microgram/ml trypsin for 5 min was optimal. On day 5 of culture, 13.3 +/- 6.9% of the total cellular acid-precipitable [3H]thymidine was released by this treatment. Trypsin-induced release was partially and reversibly inhibited by incubating the cells for 16 h with 5 mM dibutyryl-cyclic AMP. Cells incubated in the absence of divalent cations spontaneously released this Hirt supernatant DNA; after maximal release had occurred under these circumstances, additional trypsin treatment caused no further release of DNA. Trypsin-induced DNA release could be completely and reversibly inhibited by incubating the cells in the presence of 10 mM calcium. Trypsin-released DNA was isolated and analyzed by reassociation kinetics. A major component, representing 54% of the DNA, reassociated with a C0t1/2 of 68 mol.s/liter (the value at which DNA association is 50% complete). The reassociation of this DNA was studied in the presence of an excess of DNA isolated from stimulated lymphocytes on day 3 in culture, and in the presence of an excess of resting lymphocyte DNA. The high molecular weight fraction of day-3 cell DNA contained three times more copies of the trypsin-released DNA major component as compared to resting lymphocyte DNA. Hirt supernatant DNA isolated from day-5 stimulated lymphocytes reassociated in an intermediate component representing 34% of the DNA with a Cot1/2 of

  11. Ultrasound-Mediated Gene Delivery with Cationic Versus Neutral Microbubbles: Effect of DNA and Microbubble Dose on In Vivo Transfection Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Panje, Cedric M.; Wang, David S.; Pysz, Marybeth A.; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Ren, Ying; Tranquart, Francois; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of varying microbubble (MB) and DNA doses on the overall and comparative efficiencies of ultrasound (US)-mediated gene delivery (UMGD) to murine hindlimb skeletal muscle using cationic versus neutral MBs. Materials and Methods: Cationic and control neutral MBs were characterized for size, charge, plasmid DNA binding, and ability to protect DNA against endonuclease degradation. UMGD of a codon optimized firefly luciferase (Fluc) reporter plasmid to endothelial cells (1 MHz, 1 W/cm², 20% duty cycle, 1 min) was performed in cell culture using cationic, neutral, or no MBs. In vivo UMGD to mouse hindlimb muscle was performed by insonation (1 MHz, 2 W/cm², 50% duty cycle, 5 min) after intravenous administration of Fluc combined with cationic, neutral, or no MBs. Gene delivery efficiency was assessed by serial in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Efficiency of in vivo UMGD with cationic versus neutral MBs was systematically evaluated by varying plasmid DNA dose (10, 17.5, 25, 37.5, and 50 µg) while maintaining a constant MB dose of 1x108 MBs and by changing MB dose (1x107, 5x107, 1x108, or 5x108 MBs) while keeping a constant DNA dose of 50 µg. Results: Cationic and size-matched control neutral MBs differed significantly in zeta potential with cationic MBs being able to bind plasmid DNA (binding capacity of 0.03 pg/MB) and partially protect DNA from nuclease degradation while neutral MBs could not. Cationic MBs enhanced UMGD compared to neutral MBs as well as no MB and no US controls both in cell culture (P < 0.001) and in vivo (P < 0.05). Regardless of MB type, in vivo UMGD efficiency increased dose-dependently with DNA dose and showed overall maximum transfection with 50 µg DNA. However, there was an inverse correlation (ρ = -0.90; P = 0.02) between DNA dose and the degree of enhanced UMGD efficiency observed with using cationic MBs instead of neutral MBs. The delivery efficiency advantage associated with cationic MBs was most prominent

  12. Continuity of states between the cholesteric → line hexatic transition and the condensation transition in DNA solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yasar, Selcuk; Podgornik, Rudolf; Valle-Orero, Jessica; Johnson, Mark R.; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2014-11-05

    A new method of finely temperature-tuning osmotic pressure allows one to identify the cholesteric → line hexatic transition of oriented or unoriented long-fragment DNA bundles in monovalent salt solutions as first order, with a small but finite volume discontinuity. This transition is similar to the osmotic pressure-induced expanded → condensed DNA transition in polyvalent salt solutions at small enough polyvalent salt concentrations. Therefore there exists a continuity of states between the two. This finding with the corresponding empirical equation of state, effectively relates the phase diagram of DNA solutions for monovalent salts to that for polyvalent salts and sheds some light on the complicated interactions between DNA molecules at high densities.

  13. Continuity of states between the cholesteric → line hexatic transition and the condensation transition in DNA solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Yasar, Selcuk; Podgornik, Rudolf; Valle-Orero, Jessica; ...

    2014-11-05

    A new method of finely temperature-tuning osmotic pressure allows one to identify the cholesteric → line hexatic transition of oriented or unoriented long-fragment DNA bundles in monovalent salt solutions as first order, with a small but finite volume discontinuity. This transition is similar to the osmotic pressure-induced expanded → condensed DNA transition in polyvalent salt solutions at small enough polyvalent salt concentrations. Therefore there exists a continuity of states between the two. This finding with the corresponding empirical equation of state, effectively relates the phase diagram of DNA solutions for monovalent salts to that for polyvalent salts and sheds somemore » light on the complicated interactions between DNA molecules at high densities.« less

  14. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth using a combination of NK4 plasmid DNA-PEG engrafted cationized dextran complex and ultrasound irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, H; Kushibiki, T; Matsumoto, K; Nakamura, T; Tabata, Y

    2006-05-01

    This investigation aims to determine experimentally whether or not ultrasound (US) irradiation is effective in enhancing the in vivo gene expression of NK4 plasmid DNA and suppressing tumor growth. NK4, composed of the NH2-terminal hairpin and subsequent four-kringle domains of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), acts as an HGF-antagonist and angiogenesis inhibitor. Dextran was cationized by introducing spermine to the hydroxyl groups to allow for polyionic complexation with NK4 plasmid DNA. The cationized dextran was additionally modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules giving PEG engrafted cationized dextran. Significant suppression of tumor growth was observed when PEG engrafted cationized dextran-NK4 plasmid DNA complexes were intravenously injected into mice carrying a subcutaneous Lewis lung carcinoma tumor mass with subsequent US irradiation when compared with the cationized dextran-NK4 plasmid DNA complex and naked NK4 plasmid DNA with or without US irradiation. We conclude that complexation with PEG-engrafted cationized dextran in combination with US irradiation is a promising way to target the NK4 plasmid DNA to the tumor for gene expression.

  15. UVA-visible photo-excitation of guanine radical cations produces sugar radicals in DNA and model structures

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Malkhasian, Aramice Y. S.; Collins, Sean; Koppen, Jessica; Becker, David; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents evidence that photo-excitation of guanine radical cations results in high yields of deoxyribose sugar radicals in DNA, guanine deoxyribonucleosides and deoxyribonucleotides. In dsDNA at low temperatures, formation of C1′• is observed from photo-excitation of G•+ in the 310–480 nm range with no C1′• formation observed ≥520 nm. Illumination of guanine radical cations in 2′dG, 3′-dGMP and 5′-dGMP in aqueous LiCl glasses at 143 K is found to result in remarkably high yields (∼85–95%) of sugar radicals, namely C1′•, C3′• and C5′•. The amount of each of the sugar radicals formed varies dramatically with compound structure and temperature of illumination. Radical assignments were confirmed using selective deuteration at C5′ or C3′ in 2′-dG and at C8 in all the guanine nucleosides/tides. Studies of the effect of temperature, pH, and wavelength of excitation provide important information about the mechanism of formation of these sugar radicals. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations verify that specific excited states in G•+ show considerable hole delocalization into the sugar structure, in accord with our proposed mechanism of action, namely deprotonation from the sugar moiety of the excited molecular radical cation. PMID:16204456

  16. Chelation of Membrane-Bound Cations by Extracellular DNA Activates the Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J. Q.; Tang, Le; Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Parkins, Michael D.; Lewenza, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs its type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a highly effective and tightly regulated weapon to deliver toxic molecules to target cells. T6SS-secreted proteins of P. aeruginosa can be detected in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, who typically present a chronic and polymicrobial lung infection. However, the mechanism of T6SS activation in the CF lung is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that extracellular DNA (eDNA), abundant within the CF airways, stimulates the dynamics of the H1-T6SS cluster apparatus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Addition of Mg2+ or DNase with eDNA abolished such activation, while treatment with EDTA mimicked the eDNA effect, suggesting that the eDNA-mediated effect is due to chelation of outer membrane-bound cations. DNA-activated H1-T6SS enables P. aeruginosa to nonselectively attack neighboring species regardless of whether or not it was provoked. Because of the importance of the T6SS in interspecies interactions and the prevalence of eDNA in the environments that P. aeruginosa inhabits, our report reveals an important adaptation strategy that likely contributes to the competitive fitness of P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial communities. PMID:27271742

  17. Chelation of Membrane-Bound Cations by Extracellular DNA Activates the Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J Q; Tang, Le; Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Parkins, Michael D; Lewenza, Shawn; Dong, Tao G

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs its type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a highly effective and tightly regulated weapon to deliver toxic molecules to target cells. T6SS-secreted proteins of P. aeruginosa can be detected in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, who typically present a chronic and polymicrobial lung infection. However, the mechanism of T6SS activation in the CF lung is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that extracellular DNA (eDNA), abundant within the CF airways, stimulates the dynamics of the H1-T6SS cluster apparatus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Addition of Mg(2+) or DNase with eDNA abolished such activation, while treatment with EDTA mimicked the eDNA effect, suggesting that the eDNA-mediated effect is due to chelation of outer membrane-bound cations. DNA-activated H1-T6SS enables P. aeruginosa to nonselectively attack neighboring species regardless of whether or not it was provoked. Because of the importance of the T6SS in interspecies interactions and the prevalence of eDNA in the environments that P. aeruginosa inhabits, our report reveals an important adaptation strategy that likely contributes to the competitive fitness of P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial communities.

  18. Conversion of DNA damage into chromosome damage in response to cell cycle regulation of chromatin condensation after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Terzoudi, G I; Pantelias, G E

    1997-07-01

    Cell fusion, premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and conventional cytogenetics were used to test whether the biochemical process of chromatin condensation-decondensation throughout the cell cycle, which depends on cyclin-regulated histone H1 kinase activity, affects the conversion of DNA damage into chromosome damage and determines intrinsic cell cycle-stage radiosensitivity. Results from three sets of experiments are presented. Irradiated G0 human lymphocytes were fused to exponentially growing hamster cells and time allowed for repair, while following the hamster cells in their progress towards mitosis. Severe fragmentation was observed in the induced lymphocyte PCCs when hamster cells entered mitosis 13 h after irradiation, suggesting conversion of DNA damage into non-repairable chromosome damage during G1/S transition. When PCC was used to analyse chromosome damage directly in G0 and G2 phase lymphocytes, the induction of breaks per cell per chromatid per Gy was found to be similar, suggesting that G2 increased radiosensitivity is related to chromatin condensation occurring during G2/M transition and not to an inherent chromatin structure at this phase. When chromatin condensation-decondensation at the G1/S and G2/M transitions was modified after irradiation by using conditioned media or elevated temperature (40 degrees C), a dramatic change in the yield and the type of chromosomal aberrations was observed. All results obtained were consistent with the proposed hypothesis. They may be also helpful in the characterization of a DNA-chromosome damage conversion process which could give a biochemical explanation of the variability in radiosensitivity observed at the various stages of the cell cycle as well as among mutant cells and cells of different origin. The proposed conversion process is cell cycle-regulated and, therefore, subject to up-regulation or down-regulation following mutagen exposure and genetic alterations.

  19. Pel is a cationic exopolysaccharide that cross-links extracellular DNA in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Laura K; Storek, Kelly M; Ledvina, Hannah E; Coulon, Charlène; Marmont, Lindsey S; Sadovskaya, Irina; Secor, Patrick R; Tseng, Boo Shan; Scian, Michele; Filloux, Alain; Wozniak, Daniel J; Howell, P Lynne; Parsek, Matthew R

    2015-09-08

    Biofilm formation is a complex, ordered process. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Psl and Pel exopolysaccharides and extracellular DNA (eDNA) serve as structural components of the biofilm matrix. Despite intensive study, Pel's chemical structure and spatial localization within mature biofilms remain unknown. Using specialized carbohydrate chemical analyses, we unexpectedly found that Pel is a positively charged exopolysaccharide composed of partially acetylated 1→4 glycosidic linkages of N-acetylgalactosamine and N-acetylglucosamine. Guided by the knowledge of Pel's sugar composition, we developed a tool for the direct visualization of Pel in biofilms by combining Pel-specific Wisteria floribunda lectin staining with confocal microscopy. The results indicate that Pel cross-links eDNA in the biofilm stalk via ionic interactions. Our data demonstrate that the cationic charge of Pel is distinct from that of other known P. aeruginosa exopolysaccharides and is instrumental in its ability to interact with other key biofilm matrix components.

  20. Efficient Condensation of DNA into Environmentally Responsive Polyplexes Produced from Block Catiomers Carrying Amine or Diamine Groups.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Lindomar J C; Annes, Kelly; Milazzotto, Marcella P; Mattei, Bruno; Riske, Karin A; Jäger, Eliézer; Pánek, Jiří; Štěpánek, Petr; Kapusta, Peter; Muraro, Paulo I R; De Freitas, Augusto G O; Schmidt, Vanessa; Giacomelli, Cristiano; Bonvent, Jean-Jacques; Giacomelli, Fernando C

    2016-01-19

    The intracellular delivery of nucleic acids requires a vector system as they cannot diffuse across lipid membranes. Although polymeric transfecting agents have been extensively investigated, none of the proposed gene delivery vehicles fulfill all of the requirements needed for an effective therapy, namely, the ability to bind and compact DNA into polyplexes, stability in the serum environment, endosome-disrupting capacity, efficient intracellular DNA release, and low toxicity. The challenges are mainly attributed to conflicting properties such as stability vs efficient DNA release and toxicity vs efficient endosome-disrupting capacity. Accordingly, investigations aimed at safe and efficient therapies are still essential to achieving gene therapy clinical success. Taking into account the mentioned issues, herein we have evaluated the DNA condensation ability of poly(ethylene oxide)113-b-poly[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate]50 (PEO113-b-PDPA50), poly(ethylene oxide)113-b-poly[2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate]50 (PEO113-b-PDEA50), poly[oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate]70-b-poly[oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate10-co-2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate47-co-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate47] (POEGMA70-b-P(OEGMA10-co-DEA47-co-DPA47), and poly[oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate]70-b-poly{oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate10-co-2-methylacrylic acid 2-[(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)methylamino]ethyl ester44} (POEGMA70-b-P(OEGMA10-co-DAMA44). Block copolymers PEO113-b-PDEA50 and POEGMA70-b-P(OEGMA10-co-DEA47-co-DPA47) were evidenced to properly condense DNA into particles with a desirable size for cellular uptake via endocytic pathways (R(H) ≈ 65-85 nm). The structure of the polyplexes was characterized in detail by scattering techniques and atomic force microscopy. The isothermal titration calorimetric data revealed that the polymer/DNA binding is endothermic; therefore, the process in entropically driven

  1. Synthesis of cationic carbosilane dendrimers via click chemistry and their use as effective carriers for DNA transfection into cancerous cells.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz, Eduardo; Doucede, Lorena I; García-Gallego, Sandra; Urbiola, Koldo; Gómez, Rafael; Tros de Ilarduya, Conchita; de la Mata, F Javier

    2012-03-05

    New amine-terminated carbosilane dendrimers have been prepared by a Huisgen cycloaddition ("click chemistry" reaction) of azide-terminated carbosilane dendrimers with two different propargyl amines. The corresponding cationic derivatives with peripheral ammonium groups were obtained by subsequent addition of MeI. Quaternized dendrimers are soluble and stable in water or other protic solvents for long time periods, and have been studied as nonviral vectors for the transfection of DNA to cancer cells. In this study DNA-dendrimeric nanoparticles (dendriplexes) formulated with two different families of cationic carbosilane dendrimers (family 1 (G1, G2 and G3) and family 2 (G1, G2)) were characterized and evaluated for their ability to transfect cells in vitro and in vivo. Dendriplex derived from second generation dendrimer of family 1 (F1G2 5/1 (+/-)) increased the efficiency of plasmid-mediated gene transfer in HepG2 cells as compared to naked DNA and the commercial control dendrimer. Also, intravenously administered dendriplex F1G3 20/1 (+/-) is superior in terms of gene transfer efficiency in vivo.

  2. Role of amino acid insertions on intermolecular forces between arginine peptide condensed DNA helices: implications for protamine-DNA packaging in sperm.

    PubMed

    DeRouchey, Jason E; Rau, Donald C

    2011-12-09

    In spermatogenesis, chromatin histones are replaced by arginine-rich protamines to densely compact DNA in sperm heads. Tight packaging is considered necessary to protect the DNA from damage. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing protamine-DNA assemblies and their dependence on amino acid content, the effect of neutral and negatively charged amino acids on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces was studied using model peptides containing six arginines. We have previously observed that the neutral amino acids in salmon protamine decrease the net attraction between protamine-DNA helices compared with the equivalent homo-arginine peptide. Using osmotic stress coupled with x-ray scattering, we have investigated the component attractive and repulsive forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance as a function of the chemistry, position, and number of the amino acid inserted. Neutral amino acids inserted into hexa-arginine increase the short range repulsion while only slightly affecting longer range attraction. The amino acid content alone of salmon protamine is enough to rationalize the forces that package DNA in sperm heads. Inserting a negatively charged amino acid into hexa-arginine dramatically weakens the net attraction. Both of these observations have biological implications for protamine-DNA packaging in sperm heads.

  3. DNA adduct formation in mice following dermal application of smoke condensates from cigarettes that burn or heat tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.K.; Brown, B.G.; Reed, E.A.; Mosberg, A.T.; Doolittle, D.J.; Hayes, A.W. ); Hejtmancik, M. )

    1992-01-01

    A prototype cigarette that heats tobacco (test cigarette), developed by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, has yielded consistently negative results in several in vivo and in vitro genetic toxicology tests. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) from the test cigarette to induce DNA adducts in mouse tissues and compare the results with those obtained with CSC from a reference tobacco-burning cigarette (1R4F). CD-1 mice were skin-painted with CSF from reference and test cigarettes three times a week for 4 weeks. The highest mass of CSC applied was 180 mg tar per week per animal for both reference and test cigarette. DNA adducts were analyzed in skin and lung tissues using the [sup 32]P-postlabeling method with the P[sub 1] nuclease modification. Distinct diagonal radioactive zones (DRZ) were observed in the DNA from both skin and lung tissues of animals dosed with reference CSC, whereas no corresponding DRZ were observed from the DNA of animals dosed with either test CSC or acetone (solvent control). The relative adduct labeling (RAL) values of skin and lung DNA from reference CSC-treated animals were significantly greater than those of the test CSC-treated animals. The RAL values of the test CSC-treated animals were no greater than those of solvent controls. The negative results in DNA adduct assays with test CSC are consistent with all previous results of in vivo and in vitro genetic toxicology testing on this cigarette and provide additional evidence that smoke condensate from the test cigarette is not genotoxic. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. DNA‐Accelerated Catalysis of Carbene‐Transfer Reactions by a DNA/Cationic Iron Porphyrin Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Rioz‐Martínez, Ana; Oelerich, Jens; Ségaud, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A novel DNA‐based hybrid catalyst comprised of salmon testes DNA and an iron(III) complex of a cationic meso‐tetrakis(N‐alkylpyridyl)porphyrin was developed. When the N‐methyl substituents were placed at the ortho position with respect to the porphyrin ring, high reactivity in catalytic carbene‐transfer reactions was observed under mild conditions, as demonstrated in the catalytic enantioselective cyclopropanation of styrene derivatives with ethyl diazoacetate (EDA) as the carbene precursor. A remarkable feature of this catalytic system is the large DNA‐induced rate acceleration observed in this reaction and the related dimerization of EDA. It is proposed that high effective molarity of all components of the reaction in or near the DNA is one of the key contributors to this unique reactivity. This study demonstrates that the concept of DNA‐based asymmetric catalysis can be expanded into the realm of organometallic chemistry. PMID:27730731

  5. A novel cationic microbubble coated with stearic acid-modified polyethylenimine to enhance DNA loading and gene delivery by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Wang, Zhiyong; Yan, Fei; Deng, Zhiting; Ni, Fei; Wu, Junru; Shandas, Robin; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2013-01-01

    A novel cationic microbubble (MB) for improvement of the DNA loading capacity and the ultrasound-mediated gene delivery efficiency has been developed; it has been prepared with commercial lipids and a stearic acid modified polyethylenimine 600 (Stearic-PEI600) polymer synthesized via acylation reaction of branched PEI600 and stearic acid mediated by N, N'-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI). The MBs' concentration, size distribution, stability and zeta potential (ζ-potential) were measured and the DNA loading capacity was examined as a function of the amount of Stearic-PEI600. The gene transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity were also examined using breast cancer MCF-7 cells via the reporter plasmid pCMV-Luc, encoding the firefly luciferase gene. The results showed that the Stearic-PEI600 polymer caused a significant increase in magnitude of ζ-potential of MBs. The addition of DNA into cationic MBs can shift ζ-potentials from positive to negative values. The DNA loading capacity of the MBs grew linearly from (5±0.2) ×10⁻³ pg/µm² to (20±1.8) ×10⁻³ pg/µm² when Stearic-PEI600 was increased from 5 mol% to 30 mol%. Transfection of MCF-7 cells using 5% PEI600 MBs plus ultrasound exposure yielded 5.76±2.58×10³ p/s/cm²/sr average radiance intensity, was 8.97- and 7.53-fold higher than those treated with plain MBs plus ultrasound (6.41±5.82) ×10² p/s/cm²/sr, (P<0.01) and PEI600 MBs without ultrasound (7.65±6.18) ×10² p/s/cm²/sr, (P<0.01), respectively. However, the PEI600 MBs showed slightly higher cytotoxicity than plain MBs. The cells treated with PEI600-MBs and plain MBs plus ultrasound showed 59.5±6.1% and 71.4±7.1% cell viability, respectively. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that the novel cationic MBs were able to increase DNA loading capacity and gene transfection efficiency and could be potentially applied in targeted gene delivery and therapy.

  6. Synthesis of linear and cyclic peptide-PEG-lipids for stabilization and targeting of cationic liposome-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Ewert, Kai K; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Majzoub, Ramsey N; Steffes, Victoria M; Wonder, Emily A; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2016-03-15

    Because nucleic acids (NAs) have immense potential value as therapeutics, the development of safe and effective synthetic NA vectors continues to attract much attention. In vivo applications of NA vectors require stabilized, nanometer-scale particles, but the commonly used approaches of steric stabilization with a polymer coat (e.g., PEGylation; PEG=poly(ethylene glycol)) interfere with attachment to cells, uptake, and endosomal escape. Conjugation of peptides to PEG-lipids can improve cell attachment and uptake for cationic liposome-DNA (CL-DNA) complexes. We present several synthetic approaches to peptide-PEG-lipids and discuss their merits and drawbacks. A lipid-PEG-amine building block served as the common key intermediate in all synthetic routes. Assembling the entire peptide-PEG-lipid by manual solid phase peptide synthesis (employing a lipid-PEG-carboxylic acid) allowed gram-scale synthesis but is mostly applicable to linear peptides connected via their N-terminus. Conjugation via thiol-maleimide or strain-promoted (copper-free) azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry is highly amenable to on-demand preparation of peptide-PEG-lipids, and the appropriate PEG-lipid precursors are available in a single chemical step from the lipid-PEG-amine building block. Azide-alkyne cycloaddition is especially suitable for disulfide-bridged peptides such as iRGD (cyclic CRGDKGPDC). Added at 10 mol% of a cationic/neutral lipid mixture, the peptide-PEG-lipids stabilize the size of CL-DNA complexes. They also affect cell attachment and uptake of nanoparticles in a peptide-dependent manner, thereby providing a platform for preparing stabilized, affinity-targeted CL-DNA nanoparticles.

  7. Condensation and salt-induced decondensation of DNA upon incorporation of a V-shaped luminescent [Ru2(bpy)4(mbpibH2)](4+).

    PubMed

    Gan, Gui-Lian; Chao, Hui; Cai, Xue-Ping; Jiang, Zhen-Shen; Li, Hong

    2013-12-01

    This paper first reports on the condensation of DNA to a tightly packed state induced by a V-shaped di-ruthenium(II) complex [Ru2(bpy)4(mbpibH2)]Cl4 (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine and mbpibH2=1,3-bis([1,10]phenanthroline[5,6-d]imidazol-2-yl)benzene), which binds to the groove of herring sperm DNA (hsDNA) with the binding constant of 2.0×10(7)M(-1) (0.05M NaCl, pH7.2). The di-Ru(II) complex is found to induce the condensation of both hsDNA to long chain-like particle clusters and originally circular plasmid pBR322 DNA to particulate structure under neutral conditions. More interestingly, the presence of NaCl has a significant impact on the condensation and decondensation of DNA upon incorporation of [Ru2(bpy)4(mbpibH2)](4+), representing tunable luminescence characteristics by NaCl. High salt concentration facilitates the decondensation of DNA-[Ru2(bpy)4(mbpibH2)](4+) adducts. The results from this study offer an effective method to control the condensation and decondensation of DNA upon incorporation of luminescent concentrators.

  8. Shock waves and DNA-cationic lipid assemblies: a synergistic approach to express exogenous genes in human cells.

    PubMed

    Millán-Chiu, Blanca; Camacho, Giselle; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo; Tamariz, Elisa; Fernández, Francisco; López-Marín, Luz M; Loske, Achim M

    2014-07-01

    Cationic lipid/DNA complexes (lipoplexes) represent a powerful tool for cell transfection; however, their use is still limited by important concerns, including toxicity and poor internalization into deep tissues. In this work, we investigated the use of shock wave-induced acoustic cavitation in vitro for the transfection of lipoplexes in human embryo kidney 293 cells. We selected shock waves with the ability to internalize 10-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran into cells while maintaining survival rates above 50%. Cell transfection was tested using the green fluorescent protein-encoding plasmid pCX::GFPGPI2. Confocal microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting analyses revealed successful transfection after treatments ranging from 1 to 3 min using 60 to 180 shock waves at peak amplitudes of 12.3 ± 1.5 MPa. Interestingly, the combination of shock waves and lipoplexes induced a 3.1- and 3.8-fold increase in the expression of the reporter gene compared with the use of lipoplexes or shock waves alone, respectively. These results indicate that cationic DNA assembly and shock waves act in a synergistic manner to promote transfection of human cells, revealing a potential approach for non-invasive site-specific gene therapy.

  9. Aggregation of nucleosomes by divalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    de Frutos, M; Raspaud, E; Leforestier, A; Livolant, F

    2001-01-01

    Conditions of precipitation of nucleosome core particles (NCP) by divalent cations (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) have been explored over a large range of nucleosome and cation concentrations. Precipitation of NCP occurs for a threshold of divalent cation concentration, and redissolution is observed for further addition of salt. The phase diagram looks similar to those obtained with DNA and synthetic polyelectrolytes in the presence of multivalent cations, which supports the idea that NCP/NCP interactions are driven by cation condensation. In the phase separation domain the effective charge of the aggregates was determined by measurements of their electrophoretic mobility. Aggregates formed in the presence of divalent cations (Mg(2+)) remain negatively charged over the whole concentration range. They turn positively charged when aggregation is induced by trivalent (spermidine) or tetravalent (spermine) cations. The higher the valency of the counterions, the more significant is the reversal of the effective charge of the aggregates. The sign of the effective charge has no influence on the aspect of the phase diagram. We discuss the possible reasons for this charge reversal in the light of actual theoretical approaches. PMID:11463653

  10. DNA condensation by protamine and arginine-rich peptides: analysis of toroid stability using single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Balhorn, R; Brewer, L; Corzett, M

    2000-06-01

    Both somatic cells and sperm have been shown to take up exogenous DNA, but the frequency of its integration is usually low. Scanning probe microscopy studies of sperm chromatin and synthetic DNA-protamine complexes indicate that the coiling of DNA into toroidal subunits, a process initiated in the maturing spermatid to prepare its genome for delivery into the egg, can be mimicked by simply adding protamine to DNA in vitro. The increased resistance of DNA-protamine complexes to nuclease digestion and their structural similarity to native sperm chromatin suggest that the packaging of DNA by protamine might offer a new approach for improving the efficiency of DNA uptake by sperm. Decondensation experiments performed with individual DNA molecules have provided a direct measure of the stability of toroids produced using salmon protamine and smaller arginine-rich peptides. These experiments show that the arginine content of protamine-related sequences can have a dramatic effect on their rate of dissociation from DNA. This technique and the information it provides can be used to identify protamine analogs that can be bound to DNA to increase the efficiency of its uptake by sperm and other cells.

  11. Effect of ionic strength and cationic DNA affinity binders on the DNA sequence selective alkylation of guanine N7-positions by nitrogen mustards

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.A.; Forrow, S.M.; Souhami, R.L. )

    1990-03-27

    Large variations in alkylation intensities exist among guanines in a DNA sequence following treatment with chemotherapeutic alkylating agents such as nitrogen mustards, and the substituent attached to the reactive group can impose a distinct sequence preference for reaction. In order to understand further the structural and electrostatic factors which determine the sequence selectivity of alkylation reactions, the effect of increase ionic strength, the intercalator ethidium bromide, AT-specific minor groove binders distamycin A and netropsin, and the polyamine spermine on guanine N7-alkylation by L-phenylalanine mustard (L-Pam), uracil mustard (UM), and quinacrine mustard (QM) was investigated with a modification of the guanine-specific chemical cleavage technique for DNA sequencing. The result differed with both the nitrogen mustard and the cationic agent used. The effect, which resulted in both enhancement and suppression of alkylation sites, was most striking in the case of netropsin and distamycin A, which differed from each other. DNA footprinting indicated that selective binding to AT sequences in the minor groove of DNA can have long-range effects on the alkylation pattern of DNA in the major groove.

  12. The neutrophil-activating Dps protein of Helicobacter pylori, HP-NAP, adopts a mechanism different from Escherichia coli Dps to bind and condense DNA.

    PubMed

    Ceci, Pierpaolo; Mangiarotti, Laura; Rivetti, Claudio; Chiancone, Emilia

    2007-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP), a member of the Dps family, is a fundamental virulence factor involved in H.pylori-associated disease. Dps proteins protect bacterial DNA from oxidizing radicals generated by the Fenton reaction and also from various other damaging agents. DNA protection has a chemical component based on the highly conserved ferroxidase activity of Dps proteins, and a physical one based on the capacity of those Dps proteins that contain a positively charged N-terminus to bind and condense DNA. HP-NAP does not possess a positively charged N-terminus but, unlike the other members of the family, is characterized by a positively charged protein surface. To establish whether this distinctive property could be exploited to bind DNA, gel shift, fluorescence quenching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed over the pH range 6.5-8.5. HP-NAP does not self-aggregate in contrast to Escherichia coli Dps, but is able to bind and even condense DNA at slightly acid pH values. The DNA condensation capacity acts in concert with the ferritin-like activity and could be used to advantage by H.pylori to survive during host-infection and other stress challenges. A model for DNA binding/condensation is proposed that accounts for all the experimental observations.

  13. The neutrophil-activating Dps protein of Helicobacter pylori, HP-NAP, adopts a mechanism different from Escherichia coli Dps to bind and condense DNA

    PubMed Central

    Mangiarotti, Laura; Rivetti, Claudio; Chiancone, Emilia

    2007-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP), a member of the Dps family, is a fundamental virulence factor involved in H.pylori-associated disease. Dps proteins protect bacterial DNA from oxidizing radicals generated by the Fenton reaction and also from various other damaging agents. DNA protection has a chemical component based on the highly conserved ferroxidase activity of Dps proteins, and a physical one based on the capacity of those Dps proteins that contain a positively charged N-terminus to bind and condense DNA. HP-NAP does not possess a positively charged N-terminus but, unlike the other members of the family, is characterized by a positively charged protein surface. To establish whether this distinctive property could be exploited to bind DNA, gel shift, fluorescence quenching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed over the pH range 6.5–8.5. HP-NAP does not self-aggregate in contrast to Escherichia coli Dps, but is able to bind and even condense DNA at slightly acid pH values. The DNA condensation capacity acts in concert with the ferritin-like activity and could be used to advantage by H.pylori to survive during host-infection and other stress challenges. A model for DNA binding/condensation is proposed that accounts for all the experimental observations. PMID:17371778

  14. Structural dynamics and cation interactions of DNA quadruplex molecules containing mixed guanine/cytosine quartets revealed by large-scale MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Spacková, N; Berger, I; Sponer, J

    2001-04-11

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been utilized to study G-DNA quadruplex molecules containing mixed GCGC and all-guanine GGGG quartet layers. Incorporation of mixed GCGC quartets into G-DNA stems substantially enhances their sequence variability. The mixed quadruplexes form rigid assemblies that require integral monovalent cations for their stabilization. The interaction of cations with the all-guanine quartets is the leading contribution for the stability of the four-stranded assemblies, while the mixed quartets are rather tolerated within the structure. The simulations predict that two cations are preferred to stabilize a four-layer quadruplex stem composed of two GCGC and two all-guanine quartets. The distribution of cations in the structure is influenced by the position of the GCGC quartets within the quadruplex, the presence and arrangement of thymidine loops connecting the guanine/cytosine stretches forming the stems, and the cation type present (Na(+) or K(+)). The simulations identify multiple nanosecond-scale stable arrangements of the thymidine loops present in the molecules investigated. In these thymidine loops, several structured pockets are identified capable of temporarily coordinating cations. However, no stable association of cations to a loop has been observed. The simulations reveal several paths through the thymidine loop regions that can be followed by the cations when exchanging between the central ion channel in the quadruplex stem and the surrounding solvent. We have carried out 20 independent simulations while the length of simulations reaches a total of 90 ns, rendering this study one of the most extensive MD investigations carried out on nucleic acids so far. The trajectories provide a largely converged characterization of the structural dynamics of these four-stranded G-DNA molecules.

  15. Influence of biological media on the structure and behavior of ferrocene-containing cationic lipid/DNA complexes used for DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Golan, Sharon; Aytar, Burcu S; Muller, John P E; Kondo, Yukishige; Lynn, David M; Abbott, Nicholas L; Talmon, Yeshayahu

    2011-06-07

    Biological media affect the physicochemical properties of cationic lipid-DNA complexes (lipoplexes) and can influence their ability to transfect cells. To develop new lipids for efficient DNA delivery, the influence of serum-containing media on the structures and properties of the resulting lipoplexes must be understood. To date, however, a clear and general picture of how serum-containing media influences the structures of lipoplexes has not been established. Some studies suggest that serum can disintegrate lipoplexes formed using certain types of cationic lipids, resulting in the inhibition of transfection. Other studies have demonstrated that lipoplexes formulated from other lipids are stable in the presence of serum and are able to transfect cells efficiently. In this article, we describe the influence of serum-containing media on lipoplexes formed using the redox-active cationic lipid bis(n-ferrocenylundecyl)dimethylammonium bromide (BFDMA). This lipoplex system promotes markedly decreased levels of transgene expression in COS-7 cells as serum concentrations are increased from 0 to 2, 5, 10, and 50% (v/v). To understand the cause of this decrease in transfection efficiency, we used cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and measurements of zeta potential to characterize lipoplexes in cell culture media supplemented with 0, 2, 5, 10, and 50% serum. Cryo-TEM revealed that in serum-free media BFDMA lipoplexes form onionlike, multilamellar nanostructures. However, the presence of serum in the media caused disassociation of the intact multilamellar lipoplexes. At low serum concentrations (2 and 5%), DNA threads appeared to separate from the complex, leaving the nanostructure of the lipoplexes disrupted. At higher serum concentration (10%), disassociation increased and bundles of multilamellae were discharged from the main multilamellar complex. In contrast, lipoplexes characterized in serum-free aqueous salt (Li(2)SO(4)) medium and in OptiMEM cell

  16. Cationized gelatin delivery of a plasmid DNA expressing small interference RNA for VEGF inhibits murine squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Goichi; Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Kinoshita, Yukihiko; Lee, Ushaku; Omi, Yasushi; Kubota, Eiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2006-04-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) plays a major role in RNA interference (RNAi), a process in which segments of dsRNA are initially cleaved by the Dicer into shorter segments (21-23 nt) called small interfering RNA (siRNA). These siRNA then specifically target homologous mRNA molecules causing them to be degraded by cellular ribonucleases. RNAi down regulates endogenous gene expression in mammalian cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key molecule in vasculogenesis as well as in angiogenesis. Tumor growth is an angiogenesis-dependent process, and therapeutic strategies aimed at inhibiting angiogenesis are theoretically attractive. To investigate the feasibility of using siRNA for VEGF in the specific knockdown of VEGF mRNA, thereby inhibiting angiogenesis, we have performed experiments with a DNA vector based on a siRNA system that targets VEGF (siVEGF). It almost completely inhibited the expression of three different isoforms (VEGF120, VEGF164 and VEGF188) of VEGF mRNA and the secretion of VEGF protein in mouse squamous cell carcinoma NRS-1 cells. The siVEGF released from cationized gelatin microspheres suppressed tumor growth in vivo. A marked reduction in vascularity accompanied the inhibition of a siVEGF-transfected tumor. Fluorescent microscopic study showed that the complex of siVEGF with cationized gelatin microspheres was still present around the tumor 10 days after injection, while free siVEGF had vanished by that time. siVEGF gene therapy increased the fraction of vessels covered by pericytes and induced expression of angiopoietin-1 by pericytes. These data suggest that cationized-gelatin microspheres containing siVEGF can be used to normalize tumor vasculature and inhibit tumor growth in a NRS-1 squamous cell carcinoma xenograft model.

  17. Interaction between a cationic porphyrin and ctDNA investigated by SPR, CV and UV-vis spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zi-Qiang; Zhou, Bo; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Dai, Jie; Liu, Yi

    2013-10-01

    The interaction between ctDNA and a cationic porphyrin was studied in this work. The binding process was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy in detail. The association, dissociation rate constants and the binding constants calculated by global analysis were 2.4×10(2)±26.4M(-1)s(-1), 0.011±0.0000056s(-1) and 2.18×10(4)M(-1), respectively. And the results were confirmed by cyclic voltammetry and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The binding constants obtained from cyclic voltammetry and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy were 8.28×10(4)M(-1) and 6.73×10(4)M(-1) at 298K, respectively. The covalent immobilization methodology of ctDNA onto gold surface modified with three different compounds was also investigated by SPR. These compounds all contain sulfydryl but with different terminated functional groups. The results indicated that the 11-MUA (HS(CH2)10COOH)-modified gold film is more suitable for studying the DNA-drug interaction.

  18. Cationic Lipid-Nucleic Acid Complexes for Gene Delivery And Silencing: Pathways And Mechanisms for Plasmid Dna And Sirna

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, K.K.; Zidovska, A.; Ahmad, A.; Bouxsein, N.F.; Evans, H.M.; McAllister, C.S.; Samuel, C.E.; Safinya, C.R.; /SLAC

    2012-07-17

    Motivated by the promises of gene therapy, there is great interest in developing non-viral lipid-based vectors for therapeutic applications due to their low immunogenicity, low toxicity, ease of production, and the potential of transferring large pieces of DNA into cells. In fact, cationic liposome (CL) based vectors are among the prevalent synthetic carriers of nucleic acids (NAs) currently used in gene therapy clinical trials worldwide. These vectors are studied both for gene delivery with CL-DNA complexes and gene silencing with CL-siRNA (short interfering RNA) complexes. However, their transfection efficiencies and silencing efficiencies remain low compared to those of engineered viral vectors. This reflects the currently poor understanding of transfection-related mechanisms at the molecular and self-assembled levels, including a lack of knowledge about interactions between membranes and double stranded NAs and between CL-NA complexes and cellular components. In this review we describe our recent efforts to improve the mechanistic understanding of transfection by CL-NA complexes, which will help to design optimal lipid-based carriers of DNA and siRNA for therapeutic gene delivery and gene silencing.

  19. Pel is a cationic exopolysaccharide that cross-links extracellular DNA in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Laura K.; Storek, Kelly M.; Ledvina, Hannah E.; Coulon, Charlène; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Sadovskaya, Irina; Secor, Patrick R.; Tseng, Boo Shan; Scian, Michele; Filloux, Alain; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Howell, P. Lynne; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a complex, ordered process. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Psl and Pel exopolysaccharides and extracellular DNA (eDNA) serve as structural components of the biofilm matrix. Despite intensive study, Pel’s chemical structure and spatial localization within mature biofilms remain unknown. Using specialized carbohydrate chemical analyses, we unexpectedly found that Pel is a positively charged exopolysaccharide composed of partially acetylated 1→4 glycosidic linkages of N-acetylgalactosamine and N-acetylglucosamine. Guided by the knowledge of Pel’s sugar composition, we developed a tool for the direct visualization of Pel in biofilms by combining Pel-specific Wisteria floribunda lectin staining with confocal microscopy. The results indicate that Pel cross-links eDNA in the biofilm stalk via ionic interactions. Our data demonstrate that the cationic charge of Pel is distinct from that of other known P. aeruginosa exopolysaccharides and is instrumental in its ability to interact with other key biofilm matrix components. PMID:26311845

  20. Ultratrace DNA Detection Based on the Condensing-Enrichment Effect of Superwettable Microchips.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Ping; Chen, Yanxia; Yang, Gao; Shi, Wanxin; Dai, Bing; Li, Guannan; Cao, Yanhua; Wen, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Shutao

    2015-11-18

    A sensitive nucleic acid detection platform based on superhydrophilic microwells spotted on a superhydrophobic substrate is fabricated. Due to the wettability differences, ultratrace DNA molecules are enriched and the fluorescent signals are amplified to allow more sensitive detection. The biosensing interface based on superwettable materials provides a simple and cost-effective way for ultratrace DNA sensing.

  1. Why double-stranded RNA resists condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette; Katz, Andrea M.; Chen, Yujie; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan A.; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey

    2014-09-15

    The addition of small amounts of multivalent cations to solutions containing double-stranded DNA leads to attraction between the negatively charged helices and eventually to condensation. Surprisingly, this effect is suppressed in double-stranded RNA, which carries the same charge as the DNA, but assumes a different double helical form. However, additional characterization of short (25 base-pairs) nucleic acid (NA) duplex structures by circular dichroism shows that measured differences in condensation are not solely determined by duplex helical geometry. Here we combine experiment, theory, and atomistic simulations to propose a mechanism that connects the observed variations in condensation of short NA duplexes with the spatial variation of cobalt hexammine (CoHex) binding at the NA duplex surface. The atomistic picture that emerged showed that CoHex distributions around the NA reveals two major NA-CoHex binding modes -- internal and external -- distinguished by the proximity of bound CoHex to the helical axis. Decreasing trends in experimentally observed condensation propensity of the four studied NA duplexes (from B-like form of homopolymeric DNA, to mixed sequence DNA, to DNA:RNA hybrid, to A-like RNA) are explained by the progressive decrease of a single quantity: the fraction of CoHex ions in the external binding mode. Thus, while NA condensation depends on a complex interplay between various structural and sequence features, our coupled experimental and theoretical results suggest a new model in which a single parameter connects the NA condensation propensity with geometry and sequence dependence of CoHex binding.

  2. Microfluidic Assembly of Cationic-β-Cyclodextrin:Hyaluronic Acid-Adamantane Host:Guest pDNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Aditya; VerHeul, Ross; DeFrees, Kyle; Collins, Christopher J.; Schuldt, Ryan A.; Vlahu, Alexander; Thompson, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, transfection complexes are typically formed by bulk mixing, producing particles with high polydispersity and limited control over vector size. Herein, we demonstrate the use of a commercial micro-reactor to assemble pDNA:cationic cyclodextrin:pendant polymer nanoparticles using a layer-by-layer approach. Our studies reveal that the particles formulated via microfluidic assembly have much smaller sizes, lower polydispersity, lower ζ-potentials, and comparable cell viability and transfection profiles in HeLa cells than bulk mixed particles. The complexes also show a flow rate-dependent stability, with particles formed at slower flow rates giving rise to more stable complexes as determined by heparin challenge. Our findings suggest that microfluidic reactors offer an attractive method for assembling reproducible, size-controlled complexes from multi-component transfection complex assemblies. PMID:24349706

  3. Structural basis for stabilization of Z-DNA by cobalt hexaammine and magnesium cations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gessner, R. V.; Quigley, G. J.; Wang, A. H.; van der Marel, G. A.; van Boom, J. H.; Rich, A.

    1985-01-01

    In the equilibrium between B-DNA and Z-DNA in poly(dC-dG), the [Co(NH3)6]3+ ion stabilizes the Z form 4 orders of magnitude more effectively than the Mg2+ ion. The structural basis of this difference is revealed in Z-DNA crystal structures of d(CpGpCpGpCpG) stabilized by either Na+/Mg2+ or Na+/Mg2+ plus [Co(NH3)6]3+. The crystals diffract X-rays to high resolution, and the structures were refined at 1.25 A. The [Co(NH3)6]3+ ion forms five hydrogen bonds onto the surface of Z-DNA, bonding to a guanine O6 and N7 as well as to a phosphate group in the ZII conformation. The Mg2+ ion binds through its hydration shell with up to three hydrogen bonds to guanine N7 and O6. Higher charge, specific fitting of more hydrogen bonds, and a more stable complex all contribute to the great effectiveness of [Co(NH3)6]3+ in stabilizing Z-DNA.

  4. Cationic Nanoparticles Assembled from Natural-Based Steroid Lipid for Improved Intracellular Transport of siRNA and pDNA

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Ruilong; Zhuang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Zhao; Cao, Amin; Lin, Kaili; Zhu, Julian X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Developing new functional biomaterials from biocompatible natural-based resources for gene/drug delivery has attracted increasing attention in recent years. In this work, we prepared a series of cationic nanoparticles (Diosarg-DOPE NPs) by assembly of a natural steroid diosgenin-based cationic lipid (Diosarg) with commercially-available helper lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorethanolamine (DOPE). These cationic Diosarg-DOPE NPs were able to efficiently bind siRNA and plasmid DNA (pDNA) via electrostatic interactions to form stable, nano-sized cationic lipid nanoparticles instead of lamellar vesicles in aqueous solution. The average particle size, zeta potentials and morphologies of the siRNA and pDNA complexes of the Diosarg-DOPE NPs were examined. The in vitro cytotoxicity of NPs depends on the dose and assembly ratio of the Diosarg and DOPE. Notably, the intracellular transportation efficacy of the exogenesis siRNA and pDNA could be greatly improved by using the Diosarg-DOPE NPs as the cargoes in H1299 cell line. The results demonstrated that the self-assembled Diosarg-DOPE NPs could achieve much higher intracellular transport efficiency for siRNA or pDNA than the cationic lipid Diosarg, indicating that the synergetic effect of different functional lipid components may benefit the development of high efficiency nano-scaled gene carriers. Moreover, it could be noted that the traditional “lysosome localization” involved in the intracellular trafficking of the Diosarg and Diosarg-DOPE NPs, indicating the co-assembly of helper lipid DOPE, might not significantly affect the intracellular localization features of the cationic lipids. PMID:28335197

  5. [Investigation of the structure of magnesium and lithium salts of T2 phage DNA by the method of x-ray diffraction. The possible mechanisms of the participation of cations in the structural transformation of double-stranded DNA].

    PubMed

    Skuratovskii, I Ia; Bartenev, V N

    1978-01-01

    The secondary structure of DNA is known to be largely determined by the kind of counterion bound to it. We have used the X-ray diffraction method to study the structure of magnesium and lithium salts of T2 phage DNA in oriented fibres. The structural behaviour of this glucosylated DNA in the form of magnesium and lithium salts was shown to be identical to the behaviour of the same salts of "normal" calf thymus DNA throughout the studied range of relative humidities (44-95%). However these two DNAs in the form of sodium salt are known to behave quite differently. One can presume that Mg2+ and Li+ influence the structural behaviour of double-stranded DNA so effectively as to be able to "ignore" the fact that T2 phage DNA contains glucoside residues. The results of this work and the already known facts concerning the structure of DNA in the form of various cation salts (in solution and in "solid" fibres) indicate that the structural behaviour of double-stranded DNA is mainly determined by the cation located in the region of the narrow groove of the double helix. If cations are graded according to the efficiency of their influence on the structural behaviour of DNA in fibres, the scale will coincide with that of their DNA-binding strength in water solution, that is: Mg2+ greater than Li+ greater than Na+ greater than K+ greater than Rb+. A qualitative consideration of electrostatic interaction between the cations and the negatively charged DNA strands leads one to suppose that this interaction must obstruct the transition of individual DNA molecules from the B-form to the A-form. Aggregation of self-aggregation of DNA molecules is presumed necessary to enable them to adopt the A-conformation.

  6. Assessment of SYBR green I dye-based fluorescence assay for screening antimalarial activity of cationic peptides and DNA intercalating agents.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Rakesh; Gautam, Ankur; Gautam, Shailendra K; Mehta, Divya; Kumar, Vinod; Raghava, Gajendra P S; Varshney, Grish C

    2015-05-01

    The SYBR green I (SG) dye-based fluorescence assay for screening antimalarial compounds is based on direct quantitation of parasite DNA. We show that DNA-interacting cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and intercalating agents compete with SG dye to bind to DNA. Therefore, readouts of this assay, unlike those of the [(3)H]hypoxanthine incorporation assay, for the antimalarial activity of the above DNA binding agents may be erroneous. In the case of CPPs, false readouts can be improved by the removal of excess peptides.

  7. Cationic phosphoramidate α-oligonucleotides efficiently target single-stranded DNA and RNA and inhibit hepatitis C virus IRES-mediated translation

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Thibaut; Martinand-Mari, Camille; Debart, Françoise; Lebleu, Bernard; Robbins, Ian; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques

    2003-01-01

    A potential means to improve the efficacy of steric-blocking antisense oligonucleotides (ON) is to increase their affinity for a target RNA. The grafting of cationic amino groups to the backbone of the ON is one way to achieve this, as it reduces the electrostatic repulsion between the ON and its target. We have examined the duplex stabilising effects of introducing cationic phosphoramidate internucleoside linkages into ON with a non-natural α-anomeric configuration. Cationic α-ON bound with high affinity to single-stranded DNA and RNA targets. Duplex stabilisation was proportional to the number of cationic modifications, with fully cationic ON having particularly high thermal stability. The average stabilisation was greatly increased at low ionic strength. The duplex formed between cationic α-ON and their RNA targets were not substrates for RNase H. The penalty in Tm inflicted by a single mismatch, however, was high; suggesting that they are well suited as sequence-specific, steric-blocking, antisense agents. Using a well-described target sequence in the internal ribosome entry site of the human hepatitis C virus, we have confirmed this potential in a cell-free translation assay as well as in a whole cell assay. Interestingly, no vectorisation was necessary for the cationic α-ON in cell culture. PMID:12954764

  8. Condensation and Demixing in Solutions of DNA Nanostars and Their Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We present a numerical/theoretical approach to efficiently evaluate the phase diagram of self-assembling DNA nanostars. Combining input information based on a realistic coarse-grained DNA potential with the Wertheim association theory, we derive a parameter-free thermodynamic description of these systems. We apply this method to investigate the phase behavior of single components and mixtures of DNA nanostars with different numbers of sticky arms, elucidating the role of the system functionality and of salt concentration. Specifically, we evaluate the propensity to demix, the gas–liquid phase boundaries and the location of the critical points. The predicted critical parameters compare very well with existing experimental results for the available compositions. The approach developed here is very general, easily extensible to other all-DNA systems, and provides guidance for future experiments. PMID:28157331

  9. The Relation between the Physical Properties of Self-Assembling Cationic Lipid:DNA Complexes and Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Slack, N. L.; Evans, Heather M.; Lin, Alison; Martin, A.; Safinya, C. R.

    2000-03-01

    The use of cationic lipids (CL) as carriers of genes (DNA sequences) for delivery in cells is a promising alternative to viral-carriers. Previous work on CL:DNA complexes has focused on binary mixtures of lipids and has shown that the optimal gene delivery vehicle may be mediated by physical properties of the lipid self-assembly(1). Using x-ray diffraction and biological assays, we show that membrane charge density and geometric shape may be universal parameters for successful gene delivery by binary CL mixtures in vitro. Preliminary results from complexes containing novel ternary CL mixtures further elucidate key parameters for gene delivery. Funded by NIH R01-GM59288-01 and R37-AI12520-24, UCBiotechnology Research and Education Program (97-02), NSF-DMR-9972246. 1. J. Raedler et al, Science 275, 810 (1997), Koltover et al Science 281, 78-81 (1998), Koltover et al, Biophysical Journal 77, 95 (1999), A. J. Lin, N. L. Slack, A. Ahmad, I. Koltover, C. X. George, C. E. Samuel, C. R. Safinya, Journal of Drug Targeting (to appear)

  10. Cationic solid-lipid nanoparticles are as efficient as electroporation in DNA vaccination against visceral leishmaniasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Saljoughian, N; Zahedifard, F; Doroud, D; Doustdari, F; Vasei, M; Papadopoulou, B; Rafati, S

    2013-12-01

    The use of an appropriate delivery system has recently emerged as a promising approach for the development of effective vaccination against visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Here, we compare two vaccine delivery systems, namely electroporation and cationic solid-lipid nanoparticle (cSLN) formulation, to administer a DNA vaccine harbouring the L. donovani A2 antigen along with L. infantum cysteine proteinases [CPA and CPB without its unusual C-terminal extension (CPB(-CTE) )] and evaluate their potential against L. infantum challenge. Prime-boost administration of the pcDNA-A2-CPA-CPB(-CTE) delivered by either electroporation or cSLN formulation protects BALB/c mice against L. infantum challenge and that protective immunity is associated with high levels of IFN-γ and lower levels of IL-10 production, leading to a strong Th1 immune response. At all time points, the ratio of IFN-γ: IL-10 induced upon restimulation with rA2-rCPA-rCPB and F/T antigens was significantly higher in vaccinated animals. Moreover, Th2-efficient protection was elicited through a high humoral immune response. Nitric oxide production, parasite burden and histopathological analysis were also in concordance with other findings. Overall, these data indicate that similar to the electroporation delivery system, cSLNs as a nanoscale vehicle of Leishmania antigens could improve immune response, hence indicating the promise of these strategies against visceral leishmaniasis.

  11. Cloning and expression of the cDNA of chicken cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, M; Ma, Z; Sly, W S

    1995-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced the 8767-bp full-length cDNA for the chicken cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR), of interest because, unlike its mammalian homologs, it does not bind insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The cDNA encodes a protein of 2470 aa that includes a putative signal sequence, an extracytoplasmic domain consisting of 15 homologous repeat sequences, a 23-residue transmembrane sequence, and a 161-residue cytoplasmic sequence. Overall, it shows 60% sequence identity with human and bovine CI-MPR homologs, and all but two of 122 cysteine residues are conserved. However, it shows much less homology in the N-terminal signal sequence, in repeat 11, which is proposed to contain the IGF-II-binding site in mammalian CI-MPR homologs, and in the 14-aa residue segment in the cytoplasmic sequence that has been proposed to mediate G-protein-coupled signal transduction in response to IGF-II binding by the human CI-MPR. Transient expression in COS-7 cells produced a functional CI-MPR which exhibited mannose-6-phosphate-inhibitable binding and mediated endocytosis of recombinant human beta-glucuronidase. Expression of the functional chicken CI-MPR in mice lacking the mammalian CI-MPR should clarify the controversy over the physiological role of the IGF-II-binding site in mammalian CI-MPR homologs. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7568213

  12. CL22 - a novel cationic peptide for efficient transfection of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Haines, A M; Irvine, A S; Mountain, A; Charlesworth, J; Farrow, N A; Husain, R D; Hyde, H; Ketteringham, H; McDermott, R H; Mulcahy, A F; Mustoe, T L; Reid, S C; Rouquette, M; Shaw, J C; Thatcher, D R; Welsh, J H; Williams, D E; Zauner, W; Phillips, R O

    2001-01-01

    Condensing peptide-DNA complexes have great potential as nonviral agents for gene delivery. To date, however, such complexes have given transfection activities greatly inferior to adenovirus and somewhat inferior to cationic lipid-DNA complexes, even for cell lines and primary cells in vitro. We report here the identification of a novel condensing peptide, CL22, which forms DNA complexes that efficiently transfect many cell lines, as well as primary dendritic and endothelial cells. We report studies with sequence and structure variants that define some properties of the peptide that contribute to efficient transfection. We demonstrate that the superior transfection activity of CL22 compared with other DNA condensing peptides is conferred at a step after uptake of the complexes into cells. We show that CL22-DNA complexes have transfection activity that is at least equivalent to the best available nonviral agents.

  13. Direct measurement of the intermolecular forces between counterion-condensed DNA double helices. Evidence for long range attractive hydration forces.

    PubMed

    Rau, D C; Parsegian, V A

    1992-01-01

    Rather than acting by modifying van der Waals or electrostatic double layer interactions or by directly bridging neighboring molecules, polyvalent ligands bound to DNA double helices appear to act by reconfiguring the water between macromolecular surfaces to create attractive long range hydration forces. We have reached this conclusion by directly measuring the repulsive forces between parallel B-form DNA double helices pushed together from the separations at which they have self organized into hexagonal arrays of parallel rods. For all of the wide variety of "condensing agents" from divalent Mn to polymeric protamines, the resulting intermolecular force varies exponentially with a decay rate of 1.4-1.5 A, exactly one-half that seen previously for hydration repulsion. Such behavior qualitatively contradicts the predictions of all electrostatic double layer and van der Waals force potentials previously suggested. It fits remarkably well with the idea, developed and tested here, that multivalent counterion adsorption reorganizes the water at discrete sites complementary to unadsorbed sites on the apposing surface. The measured strength and range of these attractive forces together with their apparent specificity suggest the presence of a previously unexpected force in molecular organization.

  14. Direct measurement of the intermolecular forces between counterion-condensed DNA double helices. Evidence for long range attractive hydration forces.

    PubMed Central

    Rau, D C; Parsegian, V A

    1992-01-01

    Rather than acting by modifying van der Waals or electrostatic double layer interactions or by directly bridging neighboring molecules, polyvalent ligands bound to DNA double helices appear to act by reconfiguring the water between macromolecular surfaces to create attractive long range hydration forces. We have reached this conclusion by directly measuring the repulsive forces between parallel B-form DNA double helices pushed together from the separations at which they have self organized into hexagonal arrays of parallel rods. For all of the wide variety of "condensing agents" from divalent Mn to polymeric protamines, the resulting intermolecular force varies exponentially with a decay rate of 1.4-1.5 A, exactly one-half that seen previously for hydration repulsion. Such behavior qualitatively contradicts the predictions of all electrostatic double layer and van der Waals force potentials previously suggested. It fits remarkably well with the idea, developed and tested here, that multivalent counterion adsorption reorganizes the water at discrete sites complementary to unadsorbed sites on the apposing surface. The measured strength and range of these attractive forces together with their apparent specificity suggest the presence of a previously unexpected force in molecular organization. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:1540693

  15. Analysis of self-assembled cationic lipid-DNA gene carrier complexes using flow field-flow fractionation and light scattering.

    PubMed

    Lee, H; Williams, S K; Allison, S D; Anchordoquy, T J

    2001-02-15

    Self-assembled cationic lipid-DNA complexes have shown an ability to facilitate the delivery of heterologous DNA across outer cell membranes and nuclear membranes (transfection) for gene therapy applications. While the size of the complex and the surface charge (which is a function of the lipid-to-DNA mass ratio) are important factors that determine transfection efficiency, lipid-DNA complex preparations are heterogeneous with respect to particle size and net charge. This heterogeneity contributes to the low transfection efficiency and instability of cationic lipid-DNA vectors. Efforts to define structure-activity relations and stable vector populations have been hampered by the lack of analytical techniques that can separate this type of particle and analyze both the physical characteristics and biological activity of the resulting fractions. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of flow field-flow fractionation (flow FFF) to separate cationic lipid-DNA complexes prepared at various lipid-DNA ratios. The compatibility of the lipid-DNA particles with several combinations of FFF carrier liquids and channel membranes was assessed. In addition, changes in elution profiles (or size distributions) were monitored as a function of time using on-line ultraviolet, multiangle light scattering, and refractive index detectors. Multiangle light scattering detected the formation of particle aggregates during storage, which were not observed with the other detectors. In comparison to population-averaged techniques, such as photon correlation spectroscopy, flow FFF allows a detailed examination of subtle changes in the physical properties of nonviral vectors and provides a basis for the definition of structure-activity relations for this novel class of pharmaceutical agents.

  16. Mucosal application of cationic poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles as carriers of DNA vaccine and adjuvants to protect chickens against infectious bursal disease.

    PubMed

    Negash, Tamiru; Liman, Martin; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2013-08-12

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is an immunosuppressive virus of chickens. The virus protein (VP) 2 induces neutralizing antibodies, which protect chickens against the disease. The aim of this study was to develop a cationic poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticle (MP) based IBDV-VP2 DNA vaccine (MP-IBDV-DNA) for chickens to be delivered orally and by eye drop route. The tested IBDV-VP2 DNA vaccines were immunogenic for specific-pathogen-free chickens and induced an antibody response after intramuscular application. Co-inoculation with a plasmid encoding chicken IL-2 (chIL-2) or CpG-ODN did not significantly improve protection against IBDV challenge. However, the application of a MP-IBDV-DNA vaccine alone or in combination with a delayed oral and eye drop application of cationic MP loaded with CpG-ODN or chIL-2 improved protection against challenge. The MP-IBDV-DNA-vaccinated chickens showed less pathological and histopathological bursal lesions, a reduced IBDV antigen load as well as T-cell influx into the bursa of Fabricius (BF) compared to the other groups (p<0.05). The addition of chIL-2 loaded MP improved challenge virus clearance from the BF as demonstrated by lower neutralizing antibody titers and reduced IL-4 and IFN-α mRNA expression in the bursa at 7 days postchallenge compared to the other challenged groups. Overall, the efficacy of the IBDV-DNA vaccine was improved by adsorption of the DNA vaccine onto cationic PLGA-MP, which also allowed mucosal application of the DNA vaccine.

  17. DNA-based vaccination against hepatitis B virus using dissolving microneedle arrays adjuvanted by cationic liposomes and CpG ODN.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuqin; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Suohui; Xu, Bai; Gao, Yunhua; Hu, Yan; Hou, Jun; Bai, Bingke; Shen, Honghui; Mao, Panyong

    2016-09-01

    DNA vaccines are simple to produce and can generate strong cellular and humoral immune response, making them attractive vaccine candidates. However, a major shortcoming of DNA vaccines is their poor immunogenicity when administered intramuscularly. Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) via microneedles is a promising alternative delivery route to enhance the vaccination efficacy. A novel dissolving microneedle array (DMA)-based TCI system loaded with cationic liposomes encapsulated with hepatitis B DNA vaccine and adjuvant CpG ODN was developed and characterized. The pGFP expression in mouse skin using DMA was imaged over time. In vivo immunity tests in mice were performed to observe the capability of DMA to induce immune response after delivery of DNA. The results showed that pGFP could be delivered into skin by DMA and expressed in skin. Further, the amount of expressed GFP was likely to peak at day 4. The immunity tests showed that the DMA-based DNA vaccination could induce effective immune response. CpG ODN significantly improved the immune response and achieved the shift of immune type from predominate Th2 type to a balance Th1/Th2 type. The cationic liposomes could further improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. In conclusion, the novel DMA-based TCI system can effectively deliver hepatitis B DNA vaccine into skin, inducing effective immune response and change the immune type by adjuvant CpG ODN.

  18. Nucleic acid binding properties of a helix stabilising nucleoid protein from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that condenses DNA into compact structures.

    PubMed

    Celestina, F; Suryanarayana, T

    1995-12-01

    Helix stabilising nucleoid protein (HSNP-C') from an acidothermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius has been characterised with respect to interaction with nucleic acids by gel retardation assay, binding to nucleic acid columns, fluorescence titrations and electron microscopy. The protein exists in solution as very large multimeric aggregates as indicated by cross-linking studies. The protein binds strongly and co-operatively to double stranded DNA. Electron microscopy of the complexes of the protein with DNA shows compact structures suggesting that the protein condenses DNA.

  19. Synthesis of bifunctional molecules containing [12]aneN3 and coumarin moieties as effective DNA condensation agents and new non-viral gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Yue, Pan; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Zhi-Fo; Cao, Ao-Cheng; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Zhai, Yong-Gong

    2015-04-21

    A series of bifunctional molecules with different combinations of macrocyclic polyamine [12]aneN3 and coumarin moieties, 4a/b and 5a/b, were synthesized by a two-step copper(I)-mediated alkyne–azide click reactions between 1,3,5-tris(azidomethyl)benzene and Boc-protected N-propynyl-[12]aneN3/7-propynyloxycoumarins. Agarose gel electrophoresis experiments indicated that bifunctional molecules 4b and 5b effectively induced complete plasmid DNA condensation at concentrations up to 40 μM. It was found that the structural variation had a major impact on the condensation behavior of these compounds. The electrostatic interaction involving the [12]aneN3 moiety can be compensated by the binding contribution of the coumarin units during the DNA condensation process. These two types of interaction showed different effects on the reversibility of DNA condensation. Results from studies using dynamic laser scattering, atomic force microscopy, and EB replacement assay further supported the above conclusion. Cytotoxicity assays on bifunctional compounds 4a/b and 5a/b indicated their low cytotoxicity. Results from cellular uptake and cell transfection experiments proved that bifunctional compounds 4b and 5b successfully served as non-viral gene vectors. Furthermore, methyl substituents attached to the coumarin unit (4b and 5b) greatly enhanced their DNA condensation capability and gene transfection. These bifunctional molecules, with the advantages of lower cytotoxicity, good water solubility, and potential structural modification, will have great potential for the development of new non-viral gene delivery agents.

  20. 32P-postlabelling analysis of DNA adducts in the skin of mice treated with petrol and diesel engine lubricating oils and exhaust condensates.

    PubMed

    Schoket, B; Hewer, A; Grover, P L; Phillips, D H

    1989-08-01

    Samples of unused or used petrol and diesel engine lubricating oils were applied to the shaved dorsal skin of 4- to 6-week-old male Parkes mice, either as a single treatment (50 microliters/mouse) or as four consecutive daily treatments (50 microliters/application). DNA isolated from the skin 24 h after the final treatment was digested to 3'-mononucleotides and analysed by 32P-postlabelling for the presence of aromatic adducts. Enhancement of sensitivity using butanol extraction or nuclease P1 digestion of the DNA hydrolysates led to the detection of up to eight adduct spots on polyethyleneimine-cellulose thin-layer chromatograms with samples of DNA from skin treated with used engine oils, at levels of 40-150 amol total adducts/micrograms DNA. Multiple treatments with the used oils gave rise to similar patterns of adducts in lung DNA. A single treatment of mouse skin with petrol engine exhaust condensate (50 microliters), or diesel engine exhaust condensate (50 microliters), containing 20 and 46 micrograms benzo[a]pyrene (BaP)/g respectively, gave rise to approximately 75 amol total adducts/micrograms DNA in skin. A significant proportion, 31 and 48% respectively, of the adducts formed by the petrol and diesel engine exhaust condensates co-chromatographed with the major BaP-DNA adduct, but with the used engine oils, only petrol engine oil, and not diesel engine oil, produced significant amounts of an adduct (22% of total) that corresponded to the BaP-DNA adduct.

  1. Targeting peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers to mitochondria within cells by conjugation to lipophilic cations: implications for mitochondrial DNA replication, expression and disease

    PubMed Central

    Muratovska, Aleksandra; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Smith, Robin A. J.; Wilce, Jacqueline A.; Martin, Stephen W.; Murphy, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    The selective manipulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and expression within mammalian cells has proven difficult. One promising approach is to use peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers, nucleic acid analogues that bind selectively to complementary DNA or RNA sequences inhibiting replication and translation. However, the potential of PNAs is restricted by the difficulties of delivering them to mitochondria within cells. To overcome this problem we conjugated a PNA 11mer to a lipophilic phosphonium cation. Such cations are taken up by mitochondria through the lipid bilayer driven by the membrane potential across the inner membrane. As anticipated, phosphonium–PNA (ph–PNA) conjugates of 3.4–4 kDa were imported into both isolated mitochondria and mitochondria within human cells in culture. This was confirmed by using an ion-selective electrode to measure uptake of the ph–PNA conjugates; by cell fractionation in conjunction with immunoblotting; by confocal microscopy; by immunogold-electron microscopy; and by crosslinking ph–PNA conjugates to mitochondrial matrix proteins. In all cases dissipating the mitochondrial membrane potential with an uncoupler prevented ph–PNA uptake. The ph–PNA conjugate selectively inhibited the in vitro replication of DNA containing the A8344G point mutation that causes the human mtDNA disease ‘myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibres’ (MERRF) but not the wild-type sequence that differs at a single nucleotide position. Therefore these modified PNA oligomers retain their selective binding to DNA and the lipophilic cation delivers them to mitochondria within cells. When MERRF cells were incubated with the ph–PNA conjugate the ratio of MERRF to wild-type mtDNA was unaffected, even though the ph–PNA content of the mitochondria was sufficient to inhibit MERRF mtDNA replication in a cell-free system. This unexpected finding suggests that nucleic acid derivatives cannot bind their complementary sequences during mtDNA

  2. Stress-induced condensation of bacterial genomes results in re-pairing of sister chromosomes: implications for double strand DNA break repair.

    PubMed

    Shechter, Nelia; Zaltzman, Liron; Weiner, Allon; Brumfeld, Vlad; Shimoni, Eyal; Fridmann-Sirkis, Yael; Minsky, Abraham

    2013-08-30

    Genome condensation is increasingly recognized as a generic stress response in bacteria. To better understand the physiological implications of this response, we used fluorescent markers to locate specific sites on Escherichia coli chromosomes following exposure to cytotoxic stress. We find that stress-induced condensation proceeds through a nonrandom, zipper-like convergence of sister chromosomes, which is proposed to rely on the recently demonstrated intrinsic ability of identical double-stranded DNA molecules to specifically identify each other. We further show that this convergence culminates in spatial proximity of homologous sites throughout chromosome arms. We suggest that the resulting apposition of homologous sites can explain how repair of double strand DNA breaks might occur in a mechanism that is independent of the widely accepted yet physiologically improbable genome-wide search for homologous templates. We claim that by inducing genome condensation and orderly convergence of sister chromosomes, diverse stress conditions prime bacteria to effectively cope with severe DNA lesions such as double strand DNA breaks.

  3. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    PubMed

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  4. Rapid renaturation of complementary DNA strands mediated by cationic detergents: a role for high-probability binding domains in enhancing the kinetics of molecular assembly processes.

    PubMed Central

    Pontius, B W; Berg, P

    1991-01-01

    The rate of renaturation for complementary DNA strands can be enhanced greater than 10(4)-fold by the addition of simple cationic detergents, and the reaction is qualitatively and quantitatively very similar to that found with purified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 protein. Under optimal conditions, renaturation rates are greater than 2000-fold faster than reactions run in 1 M NaCl at 68 degrees C. The reaction is second-order with respect to DNA concentration, and reaction rates approach or equal the rate with which complementary strands are expected to encounter each other in solution. Renaturation can even be observed well above the expected melting temperature of the duplex DNA, demonstrating that some cationic detergents have DNA double-helix-stabilizing properties. The reaction is also extremely rapid in the presence of up to a 10(6)-fold excess of noncomplementary sequences, establishing that renaturation is specific and relatively independent of heterologous DNA. This finding also implies that up to several thousand potential target sequences can be sampled per strand per second. Such reagents may be useful for procedures that require rapid nucleic acid renaturation, and these results suggest ways to identify and design other compounds that increase the kinetics of association reactions. Moreover, this work provides further support for a model relating the existence of flexible, weakly interacting, repeating domains to their function in rapid molecular assembly processes in vitro and in vivo. PMID:1896475

  5. Self-Assembled Multivalent (SAMul) Polyanion Binding - Impact of Hydrophobic Modifications in the Micellar Core on DNA and Heparin Binding at the Peripheral Cationic Ligands.

    PubMed

    Albanyan, Buthaina; Laurini, Erik; Posocco, Paola; Pricl, Sabrina; Smith, David K

    2017-03-20

    This paper reports a small family of cationic surfactants designed to bind polyanions such as DNA and heparin. Each molecule has the same hydrophilic cationic ligand, and a hydrophobic aliphatic group with eighteen carbon atoms with either one, two or three alkene groups within the hydrophobic chain (C18-1, C18-2 and C18-3). Dynamic light scattering indicates that more alkenes lead to geometric distortion, giving rise to larger self-assembled multivalent (SAMul) nanostructures. Mallard Blue and Ethidium Bromide dye displacement assays demonstrate that heparin and DNA have markedly different binding preferences, with heparin binding most effectively to C18-1, and DNA to C18-3, even though the molecular structural differences of these SAMul systems are buried in the hydrophobic core. Multiscale modelling suggests that adaptive heparin maximises enthalpically-favourable interactions with C18-1, while shape-persistent DNA forms a similar number of interactions with each ligand display, but with slightly less entropic cost for binding to C18-3 - fundamental thermodynamic differences in SAMul binding of heparin or DNA. This study therefore provides unique insight into electrostatic molecular recognition between highly charged nanoscale surfaces in biologically-relevant systems.

  6. Effect of metallic cations on the efficiency of DNA amplification. Implications for nucleic acid replication during early stages of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arribas, María; de Vicente, Aránzazu; Arias, Armando; Lázaro, Ester

    2005-04-01

    The process of catalysis of biochemical reactions has been essential since the first organic molecules appeared on Earth. As the complexity of the ensemble of primitive biomolecules was very low, primitive catalysts had necessarily to be very simple molecules or ions. The evolution of catalysts had to be in parallel with the evolution of the molecular species reacting. An example of this parallel evolution is nucleic acid polymerization. Synthesis of primitive short oligonucleotides could have been catalysed by metal ions either in solution or on the surface of minerals such as montmorillonite clays. Some oligonucleotides could start to function as templates for the synthesis of complementary copies and there is experimental evidence supporting the role also played by metal ions in this process. In later stages of evolution, a group of enzymatic proteins, nucleic acid polymerases, has been selected to catalyse nucleic acid replication. The presence of Mg2+ in the active centre of these enzymes suggests that evolution has preserved some of the primitive catalysts, including them as cofactors of more complex molecules. However, the reasons why Mg2+ was selected among other ions that possibly were present in primitive environments are unknown. In this paper we try to approach this question by analysing the amplification efficiency of the polymerase chain reaction of a DNA fragment in the presence of different metal ions. In some cases the conditions of the reaction have been displaced from optimum (by the presence of nucleotide imbalances and a suboptimal Mg2+concentration). The results obtained permit one to draw interesting conclusions about how some metallic cations can help replication to proceed in conditions of limited substrate availability, a circumstance that could have been frequent at prebiotic stages, when nucleic acid synthesis was dependent on the physico-chemical conditions of the environment.

  7. Cationic Liposomes Modified with Polyallylamine as a Gene Carrier: Preparation, Characterization and Transfection Efficiency Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi Oskuee, Reza; Mahmoudi, Asma; Gholami, Leila; Rahmatkhah, Alireza; Malaekeh-Nikouei, Bizhan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cationic polymers and cationic liposomes have shown to be effective non-viral gene delivery vectors. In this study, we tried to improve the transfection efficiency by employing the advantages of both. Methods: For this purpose, modified polyallylamines (PAAs) were synthesized. These modifications were done through the reaction of PAA (15 KDa) with acrylate and 6-bromoalkanoic acid derivatives. Liposomes comprising of these cationic polymers and cationic lipid were prepared and extruded through polycarbonate filters to obtain desired size. Liposome-DNA nanocomplexes were prepared in three carrier to plasmid (C/P) ratios. Size, zeta potential and DNA condensation ability of each complex were characterized separately and finally transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity of prepared vectors were evaluated in Neuro2A cell line. Results: The results showed that mean particle size of all these nanocomplexes was lower than 266 nm with surface charge of 22.0 to 33.9 mV. Almost the same condensation pattern was observed in all vectors and complete condensation was occurred at C/P ratio of 1.5. The lipoplexes containing modified PAA 15 kDa with 10% hexyl acrylate showed the highest transfection efficacy and lowest cytotoxicity in C/P ratio of 0.5. Conclusion: In some cases nanocomplexes consisting of cationic liposome and modified PAA showed better transfection activity and lower cytotoxicity compared to PAA. PMID:28101458

  8. Spatiotemporal organization of AT- and GC-rich DNA and their association with transition proteins TP1 and TP2 in rat condensing spermatids.

    PubMed

    Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas; Pradeepa, Madapura M; Gupta, Nikhil; Narayanaswamy, Rammohan; Rao, Manchanahalli R Satyanarayana

    2009-10-01

    Transition protein 1 (TP1) and TP2 replace histones during midspermiogenesis (stages 12-15) and are finally replaced by protamines. TPs play a predominant role in DNA condensation and chromatin remodeling during mammalian spermiogenesis. TP2 is a zinc metalloprotein with two novel zinc finger modules that condenses DNA in vitro in a GC-preference manner. TP2 also localizes to the nucleolus in transfected HeLa and Cos-7 cells, suggesting a GC-rich preference, even in vivo. We have now studied the localization pattern of TP2 in the rat spermatid nucleus. Colocalization studies using GC-selective DNA-binding dyes chromomycin A3 and 7-amino actinomycin D and an AT-selective dye, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, indicate that TP2 is preferentially localized to GC-rich sequences. Interestingly, as spermatids mature, TP2 and GC-rich DNA moves toward the nuclear periphery, and in the late stages of spermatid maturation, TP2 is predominantly localized at the nuclear periphery. Another interesting observation is the mutually exclusive localization of GC- and AT-rich DNA in the elongating and elongated spermatids. A combined immunofluorescence experiment with anti-TP2 and anti-TP1 antibodies revealed several foci of overlapping localization, indicating that TP1 and TP2 may have concerted functional roles during chromatin remodeling in mammalian spermiogenesis.

  9. Altered chromatin condensation of heat-stressed spermatozoa perturbs the dynamics of DNA methylation reprogramming in the paternal genome after in vitro fertilisation in cattle.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Bozlur; Kamal, Md Mostofa; Rijsselaere, Tom; Vandaele, Leen; Shamsuddin, Mohammed; Van Soom, Ann

    2014-10-01

    Shortly after penetration of the oocyte, sperm DNA is actively demethylated, which is required for totipotent zygotic development. Aberrant DNA methylation is thought to be associated with altered chromatin condensation of spermatozoa. The objectives of this study were to investigate the dynamics of DNA methylation reprogramming in the paternal pronucleus and subsequent fertilisation potential of heat-stressed bull spermatozoa having altered chromatin condensation. Hence, bovine zygotes (n=1239) were collected at three different time points (12, 18 and 24h post insemination, hpi), and stained with an antibody against 5-methylcytosine. Fluorescence intensities of paternal and maternal pronuclei were measured by ImageJ. DNA methylation patterns in paternal pronuclei derived from heat-stressed spermatozoa did not differ between time points (P>0.05), whereas control zygotes clearly showed demethylation and de novo methylation at 18 and 24hpi, respectively. Moreover, heat-stressed spermatozoa showed a highly reduced (P<0.01) fertilisation rate compared with non-heat-stressed or normal control spermatozoa (53.7% vs 70.2% or 81.5%, respectively). Our data show that the normal pattern of active DNA demethylation followed by de novo methylation in the paternal pronucleus is perturbed when oocytes are fertilised with heat-stressed spermatozoa, which may be responsible for decreased fertilisation potential.

  10. Variation in whole DNA methylation in red maple (Acer rubrum) populations from a mining region: association with metal contamination and cation exchange capacity (CEC) in podzolic soils.

    PubMed

    Kalubi, K N; Mehes-Smith, M; Spiers, G; Omri, A

    2017-02-15

    Although a number of publications have provided convincing evidence that abiotic stresses such as drought and high salinity are involved in DNA methylation reports on the effects of metal contamination, pH, and cation exchange on DNA modifications are limited. The main objective of the present study is to determine the relationship between metal contamination and Cation exchange capacity (CEC) on whole DNA modifications. Metal analysis confirms that nickel and copper are the main contaminants in sampled sites within the Greater Sudbury Region (Ontario, Canada) and liming has increased soil pH significantly even after 30 years following dolomitic limestone applications. The estimated CEC values varied significantly among sites, ranging between 1.8 and 10.5 cmol(+) kg(-1), with a strong relationship being observed between CEC and pH (r = 0.96**). Cation exchange capacity, significantly lower in highly metal contaminated sites compared to both reference and less contaminated sites, was higher in the higher organic matter limed compared to unlimed sites. There was a significant variation in the level of cytosine methylation among the metal-contaminated sites. Significant and strong negative correlations between [5mdC]/[dG] and bioavailable nickel (r = -0.71**) or copper (r = -0.72**) contents were observed. The analysis of genomic DNA for adenine methylation in this study showed a very low level of [6N-mdA]/dT] in Acer rubrum plants analyzed ranging from 0 to 0.08%. Significant and very strong positive correlation was observed between [6N-mdA]/dT] and soil bioavailable nickel (r = 0.78**) and copper (r = 0.88**) content. This suggests that the increased bioavailable metal levels associated with contamination by nickel and copper particulates are associated with cytosine and adenine methylation.

  11. Enhanced anti-fibrotic activity of plasmid DNA expressing small interference RNA for TGF-beta type II receptor for a mouse model of obstructive nephropathy by cationized gelatin prepared from different amine compounds.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Nagata-Nakajima, Natsuki; Sugai, Manabu; Shimizu, Akira; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2006-02-21

    The objective of this study is to increase the transfection efficiency of a plasmid DNA expressing small interference RNA (siRNA) for transforming growth factor-beta receptor (TGF-betaR) by various cationized gelatins of non-viral carrier and evaluate the anti-fibrotic effect with a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Ethylenediamine, putrescine, spermidine or spermine was chemically introduced to the carboxyl groups of gelatin for the cationization. The plasmid DNA of TGF-betaR siRNA expression vector with or without complexation of each cationized gelatin was injected to the left kidney of mice via the ureter to prevent the progression of renal fibrosis of UUO mice. Irrespective of the type of cationized gelatin, the injection of plasmid DNA-cationized gelatin complex significantly decreased the renal level of TGF-betaR over-expression and the collagen content of mice kidney, in marked contrast to free plasmid DNA injection. It is concluded that retrograde injection of TGF-betaR siRNA expression vector plasmid DNA complexed with the cationized gelatin is available to suppress the progression of renal interstitial fibrosis.

  12. Endosomal Escape and Transfection Efficiency of PEGylated Cationic Lipid–DNA Complexes Prepared with an Acid-Labile PEG-Lipid

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chia-Ling; Majzoub, Ramsey N.; Shirazi, Rahau S.; Ewert, Kai K.; Chen, Yen-Ju; Liang, Keng S.

    2012-01-01

    Cationic liposome–DNA (CL–DNA) complexes are being pursued as nonviral gene delivery systems for use in applications that include clinic trials. However, to compete with viral vectors for systemic delivery in vivo, their efficiencies and pharmacokinetics need to be improved. The addition of poly (ethylene glycol)-lipids (PEGylation) prolongs circulation lifetimes of liposomes, but inhibits cellular uptake and endosomal escape of CL–DNA complexes. We show that this limits their transfection efficiency (TE) in a manner dependent on the amount of PEG-lipid, the lipid/DNA charge ratio, and the lipid membrane charge density. To improve endosomal escape of PEGylated CL–DNA complexes, we prepared an acid-labile PEG-lipid (HPEG2K-lipid, PEG MW 2000) which is designed to lose its PEG chains at the pH of late endosomes. The HPEG2K-lipid and a similar but acid-stable PEG-lipid were used to prepare PEGylated CL–DNA complexes. TLC and dynamic light scattering showed that HPEG2K-CL–DNA complexes are stable at pH 7.4 for more than 24 hours, but the PEG chains are cleaved at pH 5 within one hour, leading to complex aggregation. The acid-labile HPEG2K-CL–DNA complexes showed enhanced TE over complexes stabilized with the acid-stable PEG-lipid. Live-cell imaging showed that both types of complexes were internalized to quantitatively similar particle distributions within the first 2 hours of incubation with cells. Thus, we attribute the increased TE of the HPEG2K-CL–DNA complexes to efficient endosomal escape, enabled by the acid-labile HPEG2K-lipid which sheds its PEG chains in the low-pH environment of late endosomes, effectively switching on the electrostatic interactions that promote fusion of the membranes of complex and endosome. PMID:22469293

  13. Oxidation of guanine in double-stranded DNA by [Ru(bpy)2dppz]Cl2 in cationic reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sarah E; Grigoryan, Armine; Szalai, Veronika A

    2007-10-01

    DNA oxidation has been investigated in the medium of cationic reverse micelles (RMs). The oxidative chemistry is photochemically initiated using the DNA intercalator bis(bipyridine)dipyridophenazine ruthenium(II) chloride ([Ru(bpy)2dppz]Cl2) bound to duplex DNA in the RMs. High-resolution polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) is used to reveal and quantify guanine (G) oxidation products, including 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8OG). In buffer solution, the addition of the oxidative quenchers potassium ferricyanide or pentaamminechlorocobalt(III) dichloride leads to an increase in the amount of piperidine-labile G oxidation products generated via one-electron oxidation. In RMs, however, the yield of oxidatively generated damage is attenuated. With or without ferricyanide quencher in the RMs, the yield of oxidatively generated products is approximately the same. Inclusion of the cationic quencher [CoCl(NH3)5]2+ in the RMs increases the amount of oxidation products generated but not to the extent that it does in buffer solution. Under anaerobic conditions, all of the samples in RMs, with or without added oxidative quenchers, show decreased levels of piperidine-labile oxidation products, suggesting that the primary oxidant in RMs is singlet oxygen. G oxidation is enhanced in D2O and deuterated heptane and is diminished in the presence of sodium azide in RMs, also supporting 1O2 as the main G oxidant in RMs. Isotopic labeling experiments show that the oxygen atom in 8OG produced in RMs is not from water. The observed change in the G oxidation mechanism from a one-electron process in buffer to mostly 1O2 in RMs illustrates the importance of both DNA structure and DNA environment on the chemistry of G oxidation.

  14. Characterization of a germline Vk gene encoding cationic anti-DNA antibody and role of receptor editing for development of the autoantibody in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, N; Harada, T; Mihara, S; Sakane, T

    1996-10-15

    We found previously that cationic anti-DNA autoantibodies (autoAbs) have nephritogenic potential and usage of a specific germline Vk gene, A30, has major influences on cationic charge of the autoAb in human lupus nephritis. In the present study, we have characterized A30 germline Vk gene using cosmid cloning technique in patients with SLE. A30 gene locus locates in less than 250 kb from the Ck region, and the cationic anti-DNA mRNA used the upstream Jk2 gene, indicating that cationic anti-DNA mRNA is a product of primary gene rearrangement. By using PCR technique, we found that A30 gene locus in the genome was defective in eight out of nine SLE patients without nephritis. In contrast, all nine patients with lupus nephritis had intact A30 gene. The presence and absence of A30 gene was associated with the development of lupus nephritis or not (P < 0.01, by Fisher's exact test, two-sided). It was thus suggested that absence of functional A30 gene may rescue from developing lupus nephritis in the patients. A30 is reported to be a potentially functional but rarely expressed Vk gene in humans. It is possible that normal B cells edit primarily rearranged A30 gene with autoreactive potentials by receptor editing mechanism for changing the affinity of the B cell Ag receptor to avoid self-reactivity, whereas SLE B cells may have a defect in this mechanism. Indeed, we found that normal B cells edit A30-Jk2 gene in their genome possibly by inversion mechanism, whereas SLE B cells contain rearranged A30-Jk2-Ck gene in the genome and express A30-associated mRNA, suggesting that receptor editing mechanism is also defective in patients with SLE. Our study suggests that polymorphism of Ig Vk locus, and failure of receptor editing may contribute to the development of pathogenic anti-DNA responses in humans.

  15. Characterization of a germline Vk gene encoding cationic anti-DNA antibody and role of receptor editing for development of the autoantibody in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, N; Harada, T; Mihara, S; Sakane, T

    1996-01-01

    We found previously that cationic anti-DNA autoantibodies (autoAbs) have nephritogenic potential and usage of a specific germline Vk gene, A30, has major influences on cationic charge of the autoAb in human lupus nephritis. In the present study, we have characterized A30 germline Vk gene using cosmid cloning technique in patients with SLE. A30 gene locus locates in less than 250 kb from the Ck region, and the cationic anti-DNA mRNA used the upstream Jk2 gene, indicating that cationic anti-DNA mRNA is a product of primary gene rearrangement. By using PCR technique, we found that A30 gene locus in the genome was defective in eight out of nine SLE patients without nephritis. In contrast, all nine patients with lupus nephritis had intact A30 gene. The presence and absence of A30 gene was associated with the development of lupus nephritis or not (P < 0.01, by Fisher's exact test, two-sided). It was thus suggested that absence of functional A30 gene may rescue from developing lupus nephritis in the patients. A30 is reported to be a potentially functional but rarely expressed Vk gene in humans. It is possible that normal B cells edit primarily rearranged A30 gene with autoreactive potentials by receptor editing mechanism for changing the affinity of the B cell Ag receptor to avoid self-reactivity, whereas SLE B cells may have a defect in this mechanism. Indeed, we found that normal B cells edit A30-Jk2 gene in their genome possibly by inversion mechanism, whereas SLE B cells contain rearranged A30-Jk2-Ck gene in the genome and express A30-associated mRNA, suggesting that receptor editing mechanism is also defective in patients with SLE. Our study suggests that polymorphism of Ig Vk locus, and failure of receptor editing may contribute to the development of pathogenic anti-DNA responses in humans. PMID:8878436

  16. DNA Self-Assembling Nanostructures Induced by Trivalent Ions and Polycations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyanenko, Nina; Afanasieva, Daria

    The purpose of this work is to compare DNA condensation induced by small multivalent ions and polycations. DNA complexes with trivalent ions Fe3+, La3+, [Co(NH3)6]3+, spermidine and cationic polymers in a solution were investigated. The influence of cations on the volume, persistent length, and secondary structure of DNA was studied. A comparison of DNA packaging induced by trivalent ions and polycations was made. DNA complexes with trivalent metal ions and polycations were characterized by means of low gradient viscometry, dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism, UV spectrometry, flow birefringence, and atomic force microscopy.

  17. Nuclear DNA methylation and chromatin condensation phenotypes are distinct between normally proliferating/aging, rapidly growing/immortal, and senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin Ho; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Tajbakhsh, Jian

    2013-03-01

    This study reports on probing the utility of in situ chromatin texture features such as nuclear DNA methylation and chromatin condensation patterns - visualized by fluorescent staining and evaluated by dedicated three-dimensional (3D) quantitative and high-throughput cell-by-cell image analysis - in assessing the proliferative capacity, i.e. growth behavior of cells: to provide a more dynamic picture of a cell population with potential implications in basic science, cancer diagnostics/prognostics and therapeutic drug development. Two types of primary cells and four different cancer cell lines were propagated and subjected to cell-counting, flow cytometry, confocal imaging, and 3D image analysis at various points in culture. Additionally a subset of primary and cancer cells was accelerated into senescence by oxidative stress. DNA methylation and chromatin condensation levels decreased with declining doubling times when primary cells aged in culture with the lowest levels reached at the stage of proliferative senescence. In comparison, immortal cancer cells with constant but higher doubling times mostly displayed lower and constant levels of the two in situ-derived features. However, stress-induced senescent primary and cancer cells showed similar levels of these features compared with primary cells that had reached natural growth arrest. With regards to global DNA methylation and chromatin condensation levels, aggressively growing cancer cells seem to take an intermediate level between normally proliferating and senescent cells. Thus, normal cells apparently reach cancer-cell equivalent stages of the two parameters at some point in aging, which might challenge phenotypic distinction between these two types of cells. Companion high-resolution molecular profiling could provide information on possible underlying differences that would explain benign versus malign cell growth behaviors.

  18. Evaluation of effects of bivalent cations on the formation of purine-rich triple-helix DNA by ESI-FT-MS.

    PubMed

    Wan, Cuihong; Cui, Meng; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2009-07-01

    The GGA triplet repeats are widely dispersed throughout eukaryotic genomes. (GGA)n or (GGT)n oligonucleotides can interact with double-stranded DNA containing (GGA:CCT)n to form triple-stranded DNA. The effects of 8 divalent metal ions (3 alkaline-earth metals and 5 transition metals) on formation of these purine-rich triple-helix DNA were investigated by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-MS). In the absence of metal ions, no triplex but single-strand, duplex, and purine homodimer ions were observed in mass spectra. The triple-helix DNA complexes were observed only in the presence of certain divalent ions. The effects of different divalent cations on the formation of purine-rich triplexes were compared. Transition-metal ions, especially Co(2+) and Ni(2+), significantly boost the formation of triple-helix DNA, whereas alkaline-earth metal ions have no positive effects on triplex formation. In addition, Ba(2+) is notably beneficial to the formation of homodimer instead of triplex.

  19. Quantitative Measurement of Cationic Polymer Vector and Polymer/pDNA Polyplex Intercalation into the Cell Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Anderson, Kevin B.; Merzel, Rachel L.; Jacobovitz, Binyamin; Kaushik, Milan P.; Kelly, Christina N.; van Dongen, Mallory A.; Dougherty, Casey A.; Orr, Bradford G.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak

    2016-01-01

    Cationic gene delivery agents (vectors) are important for delivering nucleotides, but are also responsible for cytotoxicity. Cationic polymers (L-PEI, jetPEI, and G5 PAMAM) at 1x to 100x the concentrations required for translational activity (protein expression) induced the same increase in plasma membrane current of HEK 293A cells (30-50 nA) as measured by whole cell patch-clamp. This indicates saturation of the cell membrane by the cationic polymers. The increased currents induced by the polymers are not reversible for over 15 minutes. Irreversibility on this time scale is consistent with a polymer-supported pore or carpet model and indicates that the cell is unable to clear the polymer from the membrane. For polyplexes, although the charge concentration was the same (at N: P ration of 10:1), G5 PAMAM and jetPEI polyplexes induced a much larger current increase (40- 50 nA) than L-PEI polyplexes (< 20 nA). Both free cationic lipid and lipid polyplexes induced a lower increase in current than cationic polymers (< 20 nA). To quantify the membrane bound material, partition constants were measured for both free vectors and polyplexes into the HEK 293A cell membrane using a dye influx assay. The partition constants of free vectors increased with charge density of the vectors. Polyplex partition constants did not show such a trend. The long lasting cell plasma permeability induced by exposure to the polymer vectors or the polyplexes provides a plausible mechanism for the toxicity and inflammatory response induced by exposure to these materials. PMID:25952271

  20. Quantitative Measurement of Cationic Polymer Vector and Polymer-pDNA Polyplex Intercalation into the Cell Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Anderson, Kevin B; Merzel, Rachel L; Jacobovitz, Binyamin; Kaushik, Milan P; Kelly, Christina N; van Dongen, Mallory A; Dougherty, Casey A; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2015-06-23

    Cationic gene delivery agents (vectors) are important for delivering nucleotides, but are also responsible for cytotoxicity. Cationic polymers (L-PEI, jetPEI, and G5 PAMAM) at 1× to 100× the concentrations required for translational activity (protein expression) induced the same increase in plasma membrane current of HEK 293A cells (30-50 nA) as measured by whole cell patch-clamp. This indicates saturation of the cell membrane by the cationic polymers. The increased currents induced by the polymers are not reversible for over 15 min. Irreversibility on this time scale is consistent with a polymer-supported pore or carpet model and indicates that the cell is unable to clear the polymer from the membrane. For polyplexes, although the charge concentration was the same (at N/P ratio of 10:1), G5 PAMAM and jetPEI polyplexes induced a much larger current increase (40-50 nA) than L-PEI polyplexes (<20 nA). Both free cationic lipid and lipid polyplexes induced a lower increase in current than cationic polymers (<20 nA). To quantify the membrane bound material, partition constants were measured for both free vectors and polyplexes into the HEK 293A cell membrane using a dye influx assay. The partition constants of free vectors increased with charge density of the vectors. Polyplex partition constants did not show such a trend. The long lasting cell plasma permeability induced by exposure to the polymer vectors or the polyplexes provides a plausible mechanism for the toxicity and inflammatory response induced by exposure to these materials.

  1. Internal charge transfer based ratiometric interaction of anionic surfactant with calf thymus DNA bound cationic surfactant: Study I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Abhijit; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Moulik, Satya Priya; Banerjee, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) binds calf thymus (ct-) DNA like anionic biopolymers electrostatically and established equilibrium both in the ground as well as in excited state in aqueous medium at pH 7. Anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) does not show even hydrophobic interaction with ct-DNA at low concentration. On contrary, SDS can establish well defined equilibrium with DNA bound CTAB in ground state where the same CTAB-DNA isosbestic point reappears. First report of internal charge transfer (ICT) based binding of CTAB with ct-DNA as well as ICT based interaction of anionic SDS with DNA bound CTAB that shows dynamic quenching contribution also. The reappearance of anodic peak and slight increase in cathodic peak current with increasing concentration (at lower range) of anionic SDS, possibly reflect the release of CTAB from DNA bound CTAB by SDS.

  2. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Studies on the Multilamellae Formed by Mixing Lamella-Forming Cationic Diblock Copolymers with Lipids and Their Interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Po-Wei; Lin, Tsang-Lang; Liu, I-Ting; Hu, Yuan; Jeng, U-Ser; Gilbert, Elliot Paul

    2016-02-23

    We demonstrate that the lamella-forming polystyrene-block-poly(N-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium iodine) (PS-b-P4VPQ), with similar sizes of the PS and P4VPQ blocks, can be dispersed in the aqueous solutions by forming lipid/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae. Using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-d62-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (d62-DPPC) in D2O, a broad correlation peak is found in the scattering profile that signifies the formation of the loosely ordered d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae. The thicknesses of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic layers of the d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae are close to the PS layer and the condensed brush layer thicknesses as determined from previous neutron reflectometry studies on the PS-b-P4VPQ monolayer at the air-water interface. Such well-dispersed d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae are capable of forming multilamellae with DNA in aqueous solution. It is found that the encapsulation of DNA in the hydrophilic layer of the d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae slightly increases the thickness of the hydrophilic layer. Adding CaCl2 can enhance the DNA adsorption in the hydrophilic brush layer, and it is similar to that observed in the neutron reflectometry study of the DNA adsorption by the PS-b-P4VPQ monolayer.

  3. Fractionation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA in centrifugal precipitation chromatography using cationic surfactant CTAB containing inorganic salts NaCl and NH(4)Cl.

    PubMed

    Tomanee, Panarat; Hsu, James T; Ito, Yoichiro

    2004-10-05

    Centrifugal precipitation chromatography (CPC) is a separation system that mainly employs a moving concentration gradient of precipitating agent along a channel and solutes of interest undergo repetitive precipitation-dissolution, fractionate at different locations, and elute out from the channel according to their solubility in the precipitating agent solution. We report here for the first time the use of a CPC system for fractionation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA in clarified lysate produced from bacterial culture. The cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was initially used as a precipitating agent; however, all biomolecules showed no differential solubility in the moving concentration gradient of this surfactant and, as a result, no separation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA occurred. To overcome this problem, inorganic salts such as NaCl and NH(4)Cl were introduced into solution of CTAB. The protein and RNA were found to have higher solubility with the addition of these salts and separated from the plasmid DNA. Decreasing surface charge density of CTAB upon addition of NaCl and NH(4)Cl was believed to lead to lower surfactant complexation, and therefore caused differential solubility and fractionation of these biomolecules. Addition of CaCl(2) did not improve solubility and separation of RNA from plasmid DNA.

  4. Lasing the DNA fragments through β-diketimine framed Knoevenagel condensed Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes--an in vitro and in vivo approach.

    PubMed

    Raman, Natarajan; Pravin, Narayanaperumal

    2014-01-24

    The syntheses, structures and spectroscopic properties of Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes having Knoevenagel condensate β-diketimine Schiff base ligands have been investigated in this paper. Characterization of these complexes was carried out using FTIR, NMR, UV-Vis, elemental analysis, mass and EPR techniques. Absorption titration, electrochemical analyses and viscosity measurements have also been carried out to determine the mode of binding. The shift in ΔEp, E1/2 and Ipc values explores the interaction of CT DNA with the above metal complexes. Interaction of ligands and their complexes with DNA revealed an intercalative mode of binding between them. Antimicrobial studies showed an effective antimicrobial activity of the metal ions after coordination with the ligands. The antioxidant properties of the Schiff base ligands and their complexes were evaluated in a series of in vitro tests by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and H2O2 free radical scavengers. In vivo and in vitro antitumor functions of the complexes against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma tumor model have also been investigated. All the results support that β-diketone derived Knoevenagel condensate Schiff base complexes may act as novel antitumor drugs and suggest that their potent cell life inhibition may contribute to their anti-cancer efficacy.

  5. Lasing the DNA fragments through β-diketimine framed Knoevenagel condensed Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes - An in vitro and in vivo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Natarajan; Pravin, Narayanaperumal

    2014-01-01

    The syntheses, structures and spectroscopic properties of Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes having Knoevenagel condensate β-diketimine Schiff base ligands have been investigated in this paper. Characterization of these complexes was carried out using FTIR, NMR, UV-Vis, elemental analysis, mass and EPR techniques. Absorption titration, electrochemical analyses and viscosity measurements have also been carried out to determine the mode of binding. The shift in ΔEp, E1/2 and Ipc values explores the interaction of CT DNA with the above metal complexes. Interaction of ligands and their complexes with DNA revealed an intercalative mode of binding between them. Antimicrobial studies showed an effective antimicrobial activity of the metal ions after coordination with the ligands. The antioxidant properties of the Schiff base ligands and their complexes were evaluated in a series of in vitro tests by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPHrad ) and H2O2 free radical scavengers. In vivo and in vitro antitumor functions of the complexes against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma tumor model have also been investigated. All the results support that β-diketone derived Knoevenagel condensate Schiff base complexes may act as novel antitumor drugs and suggest that their potent cell life inhibition may contribute to their anti-cancer efficacy.

  6. Screening for DNA adducts in ovarian follicles exposed to benzo[a]pyrene and cigarette smoke condensate using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chunhe; Foster, Warren G; Sadeu, Jean C; Siddique, Shabana; Zhu, Jiping; Feng, Yong-Lai

    2017-01-01

    A rapid mass spectrometric method was applied to non-targeted screening of DNA adducts in follicular cells (granulosa cells and theca cells) from isolated ovarian follicles that were exposed in-vitro to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) for 13days of culture. The method employed a constant neutral loss (CNL) scan to identify chromatographic peaks associated to a neutral loss of deoxyribose moiety of DNA nucleosides. These peaks were subsequently analyzed by a product ion scan in tandem mass spectrometry to elucidate structures of DNA adducts. The identification was further confirmed through synthesis of proposed DNA adducts where possible. Three DNA adducts, benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide-dG (BPDE-dG), phenanthrene 1,2-quinone-dG (PheQ-dG) and B[a]P-7,8-quinone-dG (BPQ-dG) were identified in the follicular cells from isolated ovarian follicles exposed to B[a]P. Along with these three, an additional DNA adduct, 4-aminobiphenyl-dG, was identified in the follicular cells from isolated ovarian follicles exposed to CSC. The amounts of the identified DNA adducts in follicular cells increased in a dose-dependent manner for both B[a]P (0, 1.5, 5, 15 and 45ng/mL) and CSC (0, 30, 60, 90 and 130μg/mL). The results revealed that B[a]P-related DNA adducts were the major adducts in the ovarian follicular cells exposed to CSC. The results also revealed that two oxidative biomarkers, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy guanosine (8-OH-dG) and 8-isoprostane (8-IsoP), in both B[a]P-exposed and CSC-exposed ovarian follicles had strong correlations with the three DNA adducts, BPDE-dG, BPQ-dG and PheQ-dG. A pathway to describe formation of DNA adducts was proposed based on the DNA adducts observed.

  7. Interactions of nucleic acids with fluorescent dyes: spectral properties of condensed complexes.

    PubMed

    Kapuscinski, J

    1990-09-01

    Interaction of cations with nucleic acids (NA) often results in condensation of the product. The driving force of aromatic cation-induced condensation is the cooperative interaction between ligand and single-stranded (ss) NA. This type of reaction is highly specific with regard to the primary and secondary structure of NA, and results in destabilization of the latter. The spectral properties of fluorescent intercalating and non-intercalating ligands [acridine orange, pyronin Y(G), DAPI, Hoechst 33258, and Hoechst 33342]-NA complexes were studied in both the relaxed and condensed form. The changes in absorption, excitation, and fluorescence emission spectra and fluorescence yield that followed the condensation were examined. Although some of these effects can be explained by changes in solvation of the fluorophore and its interaction with NA bases and the solvent, the overall effect of condensation on spectral properties of the complex is unpredictable. In particular, no correlation was found between these effects and the ds DNA binding mode of these ligands. Nevertheless, the spectral data associated with polymer condensation can yield information about the composition and structure of NA and can explain some nonspecific interactions of these probes.

  8. DNA-binding and oxidative properties of cationic phthalocyanines and their dimeric complexes with anionic phthalocyanines covalently linked to oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, A A; Lukyanets, E A; Solovyeva, L I; Knorre, D G; Fedorova, O S

    2008-12-01

    Design of chemically modified oligonucleotides for regulation of gene expression has attracted considerable attention over the past decades. One actively pursued approach involves antisense or antigene oligonucleotide constructs carrying reactive groups, many of these based on transition metal complexes. The complexes of Fe(II) and Co(II) with phthalocyanines are extremely good catalysts of oxidation of organic compounds with molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The binding of positively charged Fe(II) and Co(II) phthalocyanines with single- and double-stranded DNA was investigated. It was shown that these phthalocyanines interact with nucleic acids through an outside binding mode. The site-directed modification of single-stranded DNA by O2 and H2O2 in the presence of dimeric complexes of negatively and positively charged Fe(II) and Co(II) phthalocyanines was investigated. These complexes were formed directly on single-stranded DNA through interaction between negatively charged phthalocyanine in conjugate and positively charged phthalocyanine in solution. The resulting oppositely charged phthalocyanine complexes showed significant increase of catalytic activity compared with monomeric forms of phthalocyanines Fe(II) and Co(II). These complexes catalyzed the DNA oxidation with high efficacy and led to direct DNA strand cleavage. It was determined that oxidation of DNA by molecular oxygen catalyzed by complex of Fe(II)-phthalocyanines proceeds with higher rate than in the case of Co(II)-phthalocyanines but the latter led to a greater extent of target DNA modification.

  9. The Drosophila mus101 gene, which links DNA repair, replication and condensation of heterochromatin in mitosis, encodes a protein with seven BRCA1 C-terminus domains.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, R R; Axton, J M; Yamamoto, Y; Saunders, R D; Glover, D M; Henderson, D S

    2000-01-01

    The mutagen-sensitive-101 (mus101) gene of Drosophila melanogaster was first identified 25 years ago through mutations conferring larval hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Other alleles of mus101 causing different phenotypes were later isolated: a female sterile allele results in a defect in a tissue-specific form of DNA synthesis (chorion gene amplification) and lethal alleles cause mitotic chromosome instability that can be observed genetically and cytologically. The latter phenotype presents as a striking failure of mitotic chromosomes of larval neuroblasts to undergo condensation of pericentric heterochromatic regions, as we show for a newly described mutant carrying lethal allele mus101(lcd). To gain further insight into the function of the Mus101 protein we have molecularly cloned the gene using a positional cloning strategy. We report here that mus101 encodes a member of the BRCT (BRCA1 C terminus) domain superfamily of proteins implicated in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control. Mus101, which contains seven BRCT domains distributed throughout its length, is most similar to human TopBP1, a protein identified through its in vitro association with DNA topoisomerase IIbeta. Mus101 also shares sequence similarity with the fission yeast Rad4/Cut5 protein required for repair, replication, and checkpoint control, suggesting that the two proteins may be functional homologs. PMID:11014818

  10. Effects of pulling forces, osmotic pressure, condensing agents and viscosity on the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA ejection from bacteriophages to bacterial cells: a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Anton S.; Douglas, Scott S.; Harvey, Stephen C.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we report on simulations of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) ejection from bacteriophage ϕ29 into a bacterial cell. The ejection was studied with a coarse-grained model, in which viral dsDNA was represented by beads on a torsion-less string. The bacteriophage’s capsid and the bacterial cell were defined by sets of spherical constraints. To account for the effects of the viscous medium inside the bacterial cell, the simulations were carried out using a Langevin dynamics protocol. Our simplest simulations (involving constant viscosity and no external biasing forces) produced results compatible with the push-pull model of DNA ejection, with an ejection rate significantly higher in the first part of ejection than in the latter parts. Additionally, we performed more complicated simulations, in which we included additional factors such as external forces, osmotic pressure, condensing agents and ejection-dependent viscosity. The effects of these factors (independently and in combination) on the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA ejection were studied. We found that, in general, the dependence of ejection forces and ejection rates on the amount of DNA ejected becomes more complex if the ejection is modeled with a broader, more realistic set of parameters and influences (such as variation in the solvent’s viscosity and the application of an external force). However, certain combinations of factors and numerical parameters led to the opposition of some ejection-driving and ejection-inhibiting influences, ultimately causing an apparent simplification of the ejection profiles.

  11. Development of polymeric-cationic peptide composite nanoparticles, a nanoparticle-in-nanoparticle system for controlled gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Jain, Arvind K; Massey, Ashley; Yusuf, Helmy; McDonald, Denise M; McCarthy, Helen O; Kett, Vicky L

    2015-01-01

    We report the formulation of novel composite nanoparticles that combine the high transfection efficiency of cationic peptide-DNA nanoparticles with the biocompatibility and prolonged delivery of polylactic acid-polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG). The cationic cell-penetrating peptide RALA was used to condense DNA into nanoparticles that were encapsulated within a range of PLA-PEG copolymers. The composite nanoparticles produced exhibited excellent physicochemical properties including size <200 nm and encapsulation efficiency >80%. Images of the composite nanoparticles obtained with a new transmission electron microscopy staining method revealed the peptide-DNA nanoparticles within the PLA-PEG matrix. Varying the copolymers modulated the DNA release rate >6 weeks in vitro. The best formulation was selected and was able to transfect cells while maintaining viability. The effect of transferrin-appended composite nanoparticles was also studied. Thus, we have demonstrated the manufacture of composite nanoparticles for the controlled delivery of DNA.

  12. A new optimized formulation of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles intended for gene delivery: development, characterization and DNA binding efficiency of TCERG1 expression plasmid.

    PubMed

    Fàbregas, Anna; Sánchez-Hernández, Noemí; Ticó, Josep Ramon; García-Montoya, Encarna; Pérez-Lozano, Pilar; Suñé-Negre, Josep M; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Suñé, Carlos; Miñarro, Montserrat

    2014-10-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are being considered as a new approach for therapeutics for many known diseases. In addition to drug delivery, their use as non-viral vectors for gene delivery can be achieved by the inclusion of cationic lipids, which provide a positive surface potential that favours binding to the DNA backbone. This work is based on the idea that the optimization of the components is required as the first step in simplifying the qualitative and quantitative composition of SLNs as much as possible without affecting the essential properties that define SLNs as optimal non-viral vectors for gene delivery. We selected the best lipids and surfactants in terms of particle size and zeta potential and characterized the properties of the resulting nanoparticles using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The SLNs had a particle size of approximately 120 nm and a positive surface charge of 42 mV. In addition, we analysed the main physicochemical characteristics of the bulk components of the nanoparticles using X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and mass spectrometry (MS). The suitability of the optimized SLNs for DNA binding was evaluated after the lyophilisation process using a carboxyl-terminal region of the TCERG1 gene, a human factor that has been implicated in several diseases. We show that the SLNs presented high efficiency in the binding of DNA, and importantly, they presented no toxicity when assayed in an in vivo system.

  13. Induction of a cationic shift in IgG anti-DNA autoantibodies. Role of T helper cells with classical and novel phenotypes in three murine models of lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the underlying mechanisms of systemic autoimmune disease in MRL-+/+, (NZB X NZW)F1, and (NZB X SWR)F1 mice, since these strains develop glomerulonephritis without the superimposition of any secondary lupus-accelerating genes. All three strains manifested a common immunoregulatory defect specific for the production of pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies that are of IgG class and cationic in charge. At or just before the age they began to develop lupus nephritis, spleen cells of the mice contained a subpopulation of Th cells that selectively induced their B cells in vitro to produce highly cationic IgG autoantibodies to both single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). By contrast, T cells from younger preautoimmune mice were incapable of providing this help. Moreover, only B cells of the older lupus mice could be induced to secrete cationic anti-DNA antibodies of IgG class. B cells of young lupus mice could not produce the cationic autoantibodies even with the help of T cells from the older mice, nor upon stimulation with mitogens. In the older lupus mice we found two sets of Th cells that spontaneously induced the cationic shift in autoantibodies; one set belonged to the classical Th category with L3T4+,Lyt-2- phenotype, whereas the other surprisingly belonged to a double-negative (L3T4-,Lyt-2-), Lyt-1+ subpopulation. The latter set of unusual Th cells were unexpected in these lupus mice since they lacked the lpr (lympho-proliferation) gene. Thus three apparently different murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus possess a common underlying mechanism specific for the spontaneous production of pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies. PMID:2952749

  14. How does the spacer length of cationic gemini lipids influence the lipoplex formation with plasmid DNA? Physicochemical and biochemical characterizations and their relevance in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Úbeda, Mónica; Misra, Santosh K; Barrán-Berdón, Ana L; Datta, Sougata; Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; Kondaiah, Paturu; Junquera, Elena; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Aicart, Emilio

    2012-12-10

    Lipoplexes formed by the pEGFP-C3 plasmid DNA (pDNA) and lipid mixtures containing cationic gemini surfactant of the 1,2-bis(hexadecyl dimethyl ammonium) alkanes family referred to as C16CnC16, where n=2, 3, 5, or 12, and the zwitterionic helper lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) have been studied from a wide variety of physical, chemical, and biological standpoints. The study has been carried out using several experimental methods, such as zeta potential, gel electrophoresis, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), cryo-TEM, gene transfection, cell viability/cytotoxicity, and confocal fluorescence microscopy. As reported recently in a communication (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 18014), the detailed physicochemical and biological studies confirm that, in the presence of the studied series lipid mixtures, plasmid DNA is compacted with a large number of its associated Na+ counterions. This in turn yields a much lower effective negative charge, qpDNA−, a value that has been experimentally obtained for each mixed lipid mixture. Consequently, the cationic lipid (CL) complexes prepared with pDNA and CL/DOPE mixtures to be used in gene transfection require significantly less amount of CL than the one estimated assuming a value of qDNA−=−2. This drives to a considerably lower cytotoxicity of the gene vector. Depending on the CL molar composition, α, of the lipid mixture, and the effective charge ratio of the lipoplex, ρeff, the reported SAXS data indicate the presence of two or three structures in the same lipoplex, one in the DOPE-rich region, other in the CL-rich region, and another one present at any CL composition. Cryo-TEMand SAXS studies with C16CnC16/DOPE-pDNA lipoplexes indicate that pDNA is localized between the mixed lipid bilayers of lamellar structures within a monolayer of ∼2 nm. This is consistent with a highly compacted supercoiled pDNA conformation compared with that of linear DNA. Transfection studies were carried out

  15. Controlling the extent of viral genome release by a combination of osmotic stress and polyvalent cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yan; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2015-08-01

    While several in vitro experiments on viral genome release have specifically studied the effects of external osmotic pressure and of the presence of polyvalent cations on the ejection of DNA from bacteriophages, few have systematically investigated how the extent of ejection is controlled by a combination of these effects. In this work we quantify the effect of osmotic pressure on the extent of DNA ejection from bacteriophage lambda as a function of polyvalent cation concentration (in particular, the tetravalent polyamine spermine). We find that the pressure required to completely inhibit ejection decreases from 38 to 17 atm as the spermine concentration is increased from 0 to 1.5 mM. Further, incubation of the phage particles in spermine concentrations as low as 0.15 mM—the threshold for DNA condensation in bulk solution—is sufficient to significantly limit the extent of ejection in the absence of osmolyte; for spermine concentrations below this threshold, the ejection is complete. In accord with recent investigations on the packaging of DNA in the presence of a condensing agent, we observe that the self-attraction induced by the polyvalent cation affects the ordering of the genome, causing it to get stuck in a broad range of nonequilibrated structures.

  16. Gastrointestinal Bacterial and Methanogenic Archaea Diversity Dynamics Associated with Condensed Tannin-Containing Pine Bark Diet in Goats Using 16S rDNA Amplicon Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Min, Byeng R; Solaiman, Sandra; Shange, Raymon; Eun, Jong-Su

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen Kiko-cross meat goats (n = 6) were used to collect gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria and methanogenic archaea for diversity measures when fed condensed tannin-containing pine bark (PB). Three dietary treatments were tested: control diet (0% PB and 30% wheat straw (WS); 0.17% condensed tannins (CT) dry matter (DM)); 15% PB and 15% WS (1.6% CT DM), and 30% PB and 0% WS (3.2% CT DM). A 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing technique was used to characterize and elucidate changes in GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea diversity among the diets. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum in goats with mean relative abundance values ranging from 39.7 (30% PB) to 46.5% (control) and 47.1% (15% PB). Other phyla individually accounted for fewer than 25% of the relative abundance observed. Predominant methanogens were Methanobrevibacter (75, 72, and 49%), Methanosphaera (3.3, 2.3, and 3.4%), and Methanobacteriaceae (1.2, 0.6, and 0.7%) population in control, 15, and 30% PB, respectively. Among methanogens, Methanobrevibacter was linearly decreased (P = 0.05) with increasing PB supplementation. These results indicate that feeding PB selectively altered bacteria and methanogenic archaeal populations in the GI tract of goats.

  17. Gastrointestinal Bacterial and Methanogenic Archaea Diversity Dynamics Associated with Condensed Tannin-Containing Pine Bark Diet in Goats Using 16S rDNA Amplicon Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byeng R.; Solaiman, Sandra; Shange, Raymon

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen Kiko-cross meat goats (n = 6) were used to collect gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria and methanogenic archaea for diversity measures when fed condensed tannin-containing pine bark (PB). Three dietary treatments were tested: control diet (0% PB and 30% wheat straw (WS); 0.17% condensed tannins (CT) dry matter (DM)); 15% PB and 15% WS (1.6% CT DM), and 30% PB and 0% WS (3.2% CT DM). A 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing technique was used to characterize and elucidate changes in GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea diversity among the diets. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum in goats with mean relative abundance values ranging from 39.7 (30% PB) to 46.5% (control) and 47.1% (15% PB). Other phyla individually accounted for fewer than 25% of the relative abundance observed. Predominant methanogens were Methanobrevibacter (75, 72, and 49%), Methanosphaera (3.3, 2.3, and 3.4%), and Methanobacteriaceae (1.2, 0.6, and 0.7%) population in control, 15, and 30% PB, respectively. Among methanogens, Methanobrevibacter was linearly decreased (P = 0.05) with increasing PB supplementation. These results indicate that feeding PB selectively altered bacteria and methanogenic archaeal populations in the GI tract of goats. PMID:24669219

  18. Acetylation of Transition Protein 2 (TP2) by KAT3B (p300) Alters Its DNA Condensation Property and Interaction with Putative Histone Chaperone NPM3*

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepa, Madapura M.; Nikhil, Gupta; Hari Kishore, Annavarapu; Bharath, Giriyapura N.; Kundu, Tapas K.; Rao, Manchanahalli R. Satyanarayana

    2009-01-01

    The hallmark of mammalian spermiogenesis is the dramatic chromatin remodeling process wherein the nucleosomal histones are replaced by the transition proteins TP1, TP2, and TP4. Subsequently these transition proteins are replaced by the protamines P1 and P2. Hyperacetylation of histone H4 is linked to their replacement by transition proteins. Here we report that TP2 is acetylated in vivo as detected by anti-acetylated lysine antibody and mass spectrometric analysis. Further, recombinant TP2 is acetylated in vitro by acetyltransferase KAT3B (p300) more efficiently than by KAT2B (PCAF). In vivo p300 was demonstrated to acetylate TP2. p300 acetylates TP2 in its C-terminal domain, which is highly basic in nature and possesses chromatin-condensing properties. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that p300 acetylates four lysine residues in the C-terminal domain of TP2. Acetylation of TP2 by p300 leads to significant reduction in its DNA condensation property as studied by circular dichroism and atomic force microscopy analysis. TP2 also interacts with a putative histone chaperone, NPM3, wherein expression is elevated in haploid spermatids. Interestingly, acetylation of TP2 impedes its interaction with NPM3. Thus, acetylation of TP2 adds a new dimension to its role in the dynamic reorganization of chromatin during mammalian spermiogenesis. PMID:19710011

  19. Interaction of a cationic gemini surfactant with DNA and with sodium poly(styrene sulphonate) at the air/water interface: a neutron reflectometry study.

    PubMed

    Vongsetskul, T; Taylor, D J F; Zhang, J; Li, P X; Thomas, R K; Penfold, J

    2009-04-07

    The interactions between a dicationic gemini surfactant with a six-hydrocarbon spacer (1,2-bis(dodecyldimethyl-ammonio)hexane dibromide, C12C6C12Br2) and anionic polyelectrolyte DNA or sodium (polystyrene sulfonate) (NaPSS) at the air/solution interface have been studied and compared using neutron reflectometry together with surface tension. In the presence of the dichained cationic gemini surfactant, DNA and NaPSS display very different adsorption behaviors. The DNA/gemini mixtures show adsorption behavior very similar to that of DNA/C12TAB mixtures, with enhanced surfactant adsorption at low concentrations and thick structured layers at higher concentrations. However, for the NaPSS/gemini mixtures the amount of gemini at the surface is reduced relative to that in the absence of NaPSS at concentrations below the cmc. These differences in adsorption behavior are attributed to differences in the molecular structure and flexibility of the two polyanions. NaPSS is relatively hydrophobic and flexible enough to form bulk-phase polymer-micelle complexes with the gemini surfactant at low surfactant concentrations, whereas the adsorption of surface complexes is much less favorable because the dications on the gemini would require adjacent bulky pendant charges on the NaPSS to be oriented toward the surface. This would force the NaPSS to bend significantly whereas it is more favorable for the NaPSS to adopt an extended conformation at the surface. Thus, surfactant is actually removed from the surface to form bulk-phase complexes. In contrast with NaPSS, DNA has a far more rigid structure, and the charges on the backbone are at fixed intervals, factors that make the formation of surface DNA-monomer complexes much more favorable than bulk-phase DNA-micelle complexes. Finally, a short-chain sample of NaPSS consisting of only five to six segments adsorbs very strongly at the surface with the gemini to form more extensive layered structures than have previously been observed

  20. CONDENSATION CAN

    DOEpatents

    Booth, E.T. Jr.; Pontius, R.B.; Jacobsohn, B.A.; Slade, C.B.

    1962-03-01

    An apparatus is designed for condensing a vapor to a solid at relatively low back pressures. The apparatus comprises a closed condensing chamber, a vapor inlet tube extending to the central region of the chamber, a co-axial tubular shield surrounding the inlet tube, means for heating the inlet tube at a point outside the condensing chamber, and means for refrigeratirg the said chamber. (AEC)

  1. Cationic Glycopolymers for the Delivery of pDNA to Human Dermal Fibroblasts and Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kizjakina, Karina; Bryson, Joshua M.; Grandinetti, Giovanna; Reineke, Theresa M.

    2014-01-01

    Progenitor and pluripotent cell types offer promise as regenerative therapies but transfecting these sensitive cells has proven difficult. Herein, a series of linear trehalose-oligoethyleneamine “click” copolymers were synthesized and examined for their ability to deliver plasmid DNA (pDNA) to two progenitor cell types, human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn) and rat mesenchymal stem cells (RMSC). Seven polymer vehicle analogs were synthesized in which three parameters were systematically varied: the number of secondary amines (4–6) within the polymer repeat unit (Tr433, Tr530, and Tr632), the end group functionalities [PEG (Tr4128PEG-a, Tr4118PEG-b), triphenyl (Tr4107-c), or azido (Tr499-d)], and the molecular weight (degree of polymerization of about 30 or about 100) and the biological efficacy of these vehicles was compared to three controls: Lipofectamine 2000, JetPEI, and Glycofect. The trehalose polymers were all able to bind and compact pDNA polyplexs, and promote pDNA uptake and gene expression [luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)] with these primary cell types and the results varied significantly depending on the polymer structure. Interestingly, in both cell types, Tr433 and Tr530 yielded the highest luciferase gene expression. However, when comparing the number of cells transfected with a reporter plasmid encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein, Tr433 and Tr4107-c yielded the highest number of HDFn cells positive for EGFP. Interestingly, with RMSC, all of the higher molecular weight analogs (Tr4128PEG-a, Tr4118PEG-b, Tr4107-c, Tr499-d) yielded high percentages of cells positive for EGFP (30–40%). PMID:22138032

  2. Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Two-Dimensional Self-Assembly of Tobacco Mosaic Viruses on Cationic Lipid Monolayers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-21

    surface. Consequently, as we will discuss further below, a significant amount of free, mobile charges, i.e., DOTAP and condensed counter-ions, are... phosphate moiety of the PC headgroup. Based on the reported binding constant of K = 12–20 M1 [34], we estimate the surface charge density of the pure DOPC...close packing in 2D arrays of parallel DNA rods [35]. In that study, the spacing between condensed DNAs was also found to be independent of the cationic

  3. TACN-based cationic lipids with amino acid backbone and double tails: materials for non-viral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Yi, Wen-Jing; Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Qin-Fang; Xun, Miao-Miao; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2014-04-01

    Cationic lipids have become an efficient type of non-viral vectors for gene delivery. In this Letter, four cationic lipids containing 1,4,7-triazacyclononane (TACN) headgroup, glutamic/aspartic acid backbone and dioleyl tails were designed and synthesized. The TACN headgroup gives these lipids excellent pH buffering capacities, which were higher than branched 25 kDa PEI. Cationic liposomes prepared from these lipids and DOPE showed good DNA affinity, and full DNA condensation was found at N/P ratio of 3 via agarose gel electrophoresis. The lipoplexes were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) assay, which gave proper particle sizes and zeta-potentials for transfection. In vitro gene transfection results in two cell lines reveal that TAN (with aspartic acid and amide bond in the structure) shows the best transfection efficiency, which is close to commercially available transfection agent Lipofectamine 2000.

  4. Do DC-Chol/DOPE-DNA complexes really form an inverted hexagonal phase?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2005-08-01

    Using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and energy dispersive X-ray diffraction, we have found that cationic liposomes made of the monovalent cationic lipid, 3-[ N-( N, N-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl]cholesterol (DC-Chol) and the neutral lipid dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) condense DNA molecules forming complexes (DC-Chol/DOPE-DNA) which are not assembled in an inverted hexagonal structure as recently reported, but, conversely, form a well-ordered lamellar liquid-crystalline phase with distinct regimes of DNA packing density.

  5. Reactions of 5-methylcytosine cation radicals in DNA and model systems: thermal deprotonation from the 5-methyl group vs. excited state deprotonation from sugar

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Palmer, Brian J.; Todd, Andrew D.; Heizer, Alicia N.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the formation and subsequent reactions of the 5-methyl-2′-deoxycytidine cation radical (5-Me-2′-dC•+) in nucleosides and DNA-oligomers and compare to one electron oxidized thymidine. Materials and methods Employing electron spin resonance (ESR), cation radical formation and its reactions were investigated in 5-Me-2′-dC, thymidine (Thd) and their derivatives, in fully double stranded (ds) d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 and in the 5-Me-C/A mismatched, d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG], where C* = 5-Me-C. Results We report 5-Me-2′-dC•+ production by one-electron oxidation of 5-Me-2′-dC by Cl2•− via annealing in the dark at 155 K. Progressive annealing of 5-Me-2′-dC•+ at 155 K produces the allylic radical (C-CH2•). However, photoexcitation of 5-Me-2′-dC•+ by 405 nm laser or by photoflood lamp leads to only C3′• formation. Photoexcitation of N3-deprotonated thyminyl radical in Thd and its 5′-nucleotides leads to C3′• formation but not in 3′-TMP which resulted in the allylic radical (U-CH2•) and C5′• production. For excited 5-Me-2′,3′-ddC•+, absence of the 3′-OH group does not prevent C3′• formation. For d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 and d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG], intra-base paired proton transferred form of G cation radical (G(N1-H)•:C(+H+)) is found with no observable 5-Me-2′-dC•+ formation. Photoexcitation of (G(N1-H)•:C(+H+)) in d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 produced only C1′• and not the expected photoproducts from 5-Me-2′-dC•+. However, photoexcitation of (G(N1-H)•:C(+H+)) in d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG] led to C5′• and C1′• formation. Conclusions C-CH2• formation from 5-Me-2′-dC•+ occurs via ground state deprotonation from C5-methyl group on the base. In the excited 5-Me-2′-dC•+ and 5-Me-2′,3′-ddC•+, spin and charge localization at C3′ followed by deprotonation leads to C3′• formation. Thus, deprotonation from C3′ in the excited cation radical is kinetically controlled and sugar C-H bond energies are

  6. Localization of a hole on an adenine-thymine radical cation in B-form DNA in water.

    PubMed

    Kravec, S M; Kinz-Thompson, C D; Conwell, E M

    2011-05-19

    A quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been carried out using CP2K for a hole introduced into a B-form DNA molecule consisting of 10 adenine-thymine (A/T) pairs in water. At the beginning of the simulation, the hole wave function is extended over several adenines. Within 20-25 fs, the hole wave function contracts so that it is localized on a single A. At 300 K, it stays on this A for the length of the simulation, several hundred fs, with the wave function little changed. In a range of temperatures below 300 K, proton transfer from A to T is seen to take place within the A/T occupied by the hole; it is completed by ∼40 fs after the contraction. We show that the contraction is due to polarization of the water by the hole. This polarization also plays a role in the proton transfer. Implications for transport are considered.

  7. Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor DNA cationic-lipid complexed autologous tumour cell vaccination in the treatment of canine B-cell multicentric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Turek, M M; Thamm, D H; Mitzey, A; Kurzman, I D; Huelsmeyer, M K; Dubielzig, R R; Vail, D M

    2007-12-01

    This study describes the development of an human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor DNA cationic-lipid complexed autologous tumour cell vaccine (hGM-CSF CLDC ATCV) and its implementation, following a chemotherapy treatment protocol, in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial in pet dogs with naturally occurring lymphoma. We hypothesized that the use of this vaccine would result in an antitumour immune response leading to improved first remission duration and overall survival in dogs with B-cell lymphoma when compared with chemotherapy alone. Immune stimulation generated by hGM-CSF CLDC ATCV was assessed by means of surrogate in vivo analysis (delayed-type hypersensitivity [DTH]) as well as an ex vivo cellular assay (lymphocyte proliferation assay). The vaccine approach considered in the current report did not result in clinically improved outcomes. A small measure of immunomodulation was documented by DTH and several modifications to the approach are suggested. This report illustrates the feasibility of clinical trials with vaccine strategies using companion animals with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  8. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides and Biogenic Silver Nanoparticles Kill Mycobacteria without Eliciting DNA Damage and Cytotoxicity in Mouse Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Soumitra; Jena, Prajna; Mehta, Ranjit; Pati, Rashmirekha; Banerjee, Birendranath; Patil, Satish

    2013-01-01

    With the emergence of multidrug-resistant mycobacterial strains, better therapeutic strategies are required for the successful treatment of the infection. Although antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are becoming one of the popular antibacterial agents, their antimycobacterial potential is not fully evaluated. In this study, we synthesized biogenic-silver nanoparticles using bacterial, fungal, and plant biomasses and analyzed their antibacterial activities in combination with AMPs against mycobacteria. Mycobacterium smegmatis was found to be more susceptible to AgNPs compared to M. marinum. We found that NK-2 showed enhanced killing effect with NP-1 and NP-2 biogenic nanoparticles at a 0.5-ppm concentration, whereas LLKKK-18 showed antibacterial activity only with NP-2 at 0.5-ppm dose against M. smegmatis. In case of M. marinum NK-2 did not show any additive activity with NP-1 and NP-2 and LLKKK-18 alone completely inhibited the bacterial growth. Both NP-1 and NP-2 also showed increased killing of M. smegmatis in combination with the antituberculosis drug rifampin. The sizes and shapes of the AgNPs were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. AgNPs showed no cytotoxic or DNA damage effects on macrophages at the mycobactericidal dose, whereas treatment with higher doses of AgNPs caused toxicity and micronuclei formation in cytokinesis blocked cells. Macrophages actively endocytosed fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled AgNPs resulting in nitric oxide independent intracellular killing of M. smegmatis. Apoptosis and cell cycle studies showed that treatment with higher dose of AgNPs arrested macrophages at the G1-phase. In summary, our data suggest the combined effect of biogenic-AgNPs and antimicrobial peptides as a promising antimycobacterial template. PMID:23689720

  9. Condensation polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Polyimides belong to a class of polymers known as polyheterocyclics. Unlike most other high temperature polymers, polyimides can be prepared from a variety of inexpensive monomers by several synthetic routes. The glass transition and crystalline melt temperature, thermooxidative stability, toughness, dielectric constant, coefficient of thermal expansion, chemical stability, mechanical performance, etc. of polyimides can be controlled within certain boundaries. This versatility has permitted the development of various forms of polyimides. These include adhesives, composite matrices, coatings, films, moldings, fibers, foams and membranes. Polyimides are synthesized through both condensation (step-polymerization) and addition (chain growth polymerization) routes. The precursor materials used in addition polyimides or imide oligomers are prepared by condensation method. High molecular weight polyimide made via polycondensation or step-growth polymerization is studied. The various synthetic routes to condensation polyimides, structure/property relationships of condensation polyimides and composite properties of condensation polyimides are all studied. The focus is on the synthesis and chemical structure/property relationships of polyimides with particular emphasis on materials for composite application.

  10. Electrostatic theory of the assembly of PAMAM dendrimers and DNA.

    PubMed

    Perico, Angelo

    2016-05-01

    The electrostatic interactions mediated by counterions between a cationic PAMAM dendrimer, modelized as a sphere of radius and cationic surface charge highly increasing with generation, and a DNA, modelized as an anionic elastic line, are analytically calculated in the framework of condensation theory. Under these interactions the DNA is wrapped around the sphere. For excess phosphates relative to dendrimer primary amines, the free energy of the DNA-dendrimer complex displays an absolute minimum when the complex is weakly negatively overcharged. This overcharging opposes gene delivery. For a highly positive dendrimer and a DNA fixed by experimental conditions to a number of phosphates less than the number of dendrimer primary amines, excess amine charges, the dendrimer may at the same time bind stably DNA and interact with negative cell membranes to activate cell transfection in fair agreement with molecular simulations and experiments.

  11. An efficient nonviral gene-delivery vector based on hyperbranched cationic glycogen derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xuan; Ren, Xianyue; Liu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Yingliang; Wang, Jue; Wang, Jingnan; Zhang, Li-Ming; Deng, David YB; Quan, Daping; Yang, Liqun

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to synthesize and evaluate hyperbranched cationic glycogen derivatives as an efficient nonviral gene-delivery vector. Methods A series of hyperbranched cationic glycogen derivatives conjugated with 3-(dimethylamino)-1-propylamine (DMAPA-Glyp) and 1-(2-aminoethyl) piperazine (AEPZ-Glyp) residues were synthesized and characterized by Fourier-transform infrared and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Their buffer capacity was assessed by acid–base titration in aqueous NaCl solution. Plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (pDNA) condensation ability and protection against DNase I degradation of the glycogen derivatives were assessed using agarose gel electrophoresis. The zeta potentials and particle sizes of the glycogen derivative/pDNA complexes were measured, and the images of the complexes were observed using atomic force microscopy. Blood compatibility and cytotoxicity were evaluated by hemolysis assay and MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, respectively. pDNA transfection efficiency mediated by the cationic glycogen derivatives was evaluated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy in the 293T (human embryonic kidney) and the CNE2 (human nasopharyngeal carcinoma) cell lines. In vivo delivery of pDNA in model animals (Sprague Dawley rats) was evaluated to identify the safety and transfection efficiency. Results The hyperbranched cationic glycogen derivatives conjugated with DMAPA and AEPZ residues were synthesized. They exhibited better blood compatibility and lower cytotoxicity when compared to branched polyethyleneimine (bPEI). They were able to bind and condense pDNA to form the complexes of 100–250 nm in size. The transfection efficiency of the DMAPA-Glyp/pDNA complexes was higher than those of the AEPZ-Glyp/pDNA complexes in both the 293T and CNE2 cells, and almost equal to those of bPEI. Furthermore, pDNA could be more safely delivered to the blood vessels in brain

  12. Multivalent Lipid--DNA Complexes: Distinct DNA Compaction Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Heather M.; Ahmad, A.; Ewert, K.; Safinya, C. R.

    2004-03-01

    Cationic liposomes (CL), while intrinsically advantageous in comparison to viruses, still have limited success for gene therapy and require more study. CL spontaneously self-assemble with DNA via counterion release, forming small particles approximately 200nm in diameter. X-ray diffraction reveals CL-DNA structures that are typically a multilamellar organization of lipids with DNA intercalated between the layers. We explore the structural properties of CL-DNA complexes formed with new multivalent lipids (Ewert et al, J. Med. Chem. 2002; 45:5023) that range from 2+ to 16+. Contrary to a simple prediction for the DNA interaxial spacing d_DNA based on a geometrical space-filling model, these lipids show dramatic DNA compaction, down to d_DNA ˜ 25 ÅVariations in the membrane charge density, σ _M, lead to distinct spacing regimes. We propose that this DNA condensation is controlled by a unique locking mechanism between the DNA double helix and the large, multivalent lipid head groups. Funded by NSF DMR-0203755 and NIH GM-59288.

  13. Innovative approaches to the use of polyamines for DNA nanoparticle preparation for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Vijayanathan, Veena; Agostinelli, Enzo; Thomas, Thresia; Thomas, T J

    2014-03-01

    Advances in genomic technologies, such as next generation sequencing and disease specific gene targeting through anti-sense, anti-gene, siRNA and microRNA approaches require the transport of nucleic acid drugs through the cell membrane. Membrane transport of DNA/RNA drugs is an inefficient process, and the mechanism(s) by which this process occurs is not clear. A pre-requisite for effective transport of DNA and RNA in cells is their condensation to nanoparticles of ~100 nm size. Although viral vectors are effective in gene therapy, the immune response elicited by viral proteins poses a major challenge. Multivalent cations, such as natural polyamines are excellent promoters of DNA/RNA condensation to nanoparticles. During the past 20 years, our laboratory has synthesized and tested several analogs of the natural polyamine, spermine, for their efficacy to provoke DNA condensation to nanoparticles. We determined the thermodynamics of polyamine-mediated DNA condensation, measured the structural specificity effects of polyamine analogs in facilitating the cellular uptake of oligonucleotides, and evaluated the gene silencing activity of DNA nanoparticles in breast cancer cells. Polyamine-complexed oligonucleotides showed a synergistic effect on target gene inhibition at the mRNA level compared to the use of polyamines and oligonucleotides as single agents. Ionic and structural specificity effects were evident in DNA condensation and cellular transportation effects of polyamines. In condensed DNA structures, correlation exists between the attractive and repulsive forces with structurally different polyamines and cobalt hexamine, indicating the existence of a common force in stabilizing the condensed structures. Future studies aimed at defining the mechanism(s) of DNA compaction and structural features of DNA nanoparticles might aid in the development of novel gene delivery vehicles.

  14. Viscoelastic cationic polymers containing the urethane linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A method for the synthesis and manufacturing of elastomeric compositions and articles containing quaternary nitrogen centers and condensation residues along the polymeric backbone of the centers is presented. Linear and cross-linked straight chain and block polymers having a wide damping temperature range were synthesized. Formulae for the viscoelastic cationic polymers are presented.

  15. Cationic Pd(II)/Pt(II) 5,5-diethylbarbiturate complexes with bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine and terpyridine: Synthesis, structures,DNA/BSA interactions, intracellular distribution, cytotoxic activity and induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Icsel, Ceyda; Yilmaz, Veysel T; Kaya, Yunus; Durmus, Selvi; Sarimahmut, Mehmet; Buyukgungor, Orhan; Ulukaya, Engin

    2015-11-01

    Four new cationic Pd(II) and Pt(II) 5,5-diethylbarbiturate (barb) complexes, [M(barb)(bpma)]X·H2O [M = Pd(II), X = Cl (1); M = Pt(II), X = NO3(-) (2)] and [M(barb)(terpy)]NO3·0.5H2O [M = Pd(II) (3); M = Pt(II) (4)], where bpma = bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine and terpy = terpyridine, were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV–vis, NMR, ESI-MS and X-ray crystallography. The DNA binding properties of the cationic complexes were investigated by spectroscopic titrations, displacement experiments, viscosity, DNA melting and electrophoresis measurements. The results revealed that the complexes effectively bind to FS-DNA (fish sperm DNA) via intercalative/minor groove binding modes with intrinsic binding constants (Kb) in the range of 0.50 × 10(4)–1.67 × 10(5) M(-1). Absorption, emission and synchronous fluorescence measurements showed strong association of the complexes with protein (BSA) through a static mechanism. The mode of interaction of complexes towards DNA and protein was also supported by molecular docking. Complexes 1 and 3 showed significant nuclear uptake in HT-29 cells. In addition, 1 and 3 showed higher inhibition than cisplatin on the growth of MCF-7 and HT-29 cells and induced apoptosis on these cells much more effectively than the rest of the complexes as evidenced by pyknotic nuclear morphology. The levels of caspase-cleaved cytokeratin 18 (M30 antigen) in HT-29 cells treated with 1 and 3 increased in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting apoptosis. Moreover, qRT-PCR experiments showed that 1 and 3 caused significant increases in the expression of TNFRSF10B in HT-29 cells, indicating the initiation of apoptosis via cell surface death receptors.

  16. DNA incision evaluation, binding investigation and biocidal screening of novel metallonucleases of 1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)hepta-1,6-diene-3,5-dione based Knoevenagel condensate having methionine: Synthesis and structural validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, Thiravidamani; Pravin, Narayanaperumal; Raman, Natarajan

    2015-02-01

    Four new metallonucleases of the composition [MLCl] (where M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Co(II); L = Knoevenagel condensate Schiff base, obtained by the condensation reaction of 1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)hepta-1,6-diene-3,5-dione with p-nitrobenzaldehyde and methionine amino acid) have been synthesised and characterized thoroughly by microanalytical data, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductivity, UV-Vis., IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and EPR spectral techniques. Their geometry is investigated and established to have square planar geometry. Electronic absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and viscosity measurements reveal that the complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA via an intercalation mechanism. DNA cleavage efficiency of these complexes is explored by gel electrophoresis, and they are found to endorse the cleavage of pBR322 DNA in presence of oxidant H2O2. These results reveal that all the complexes show better nuclease activity. Moreover, the biological screening against few pathogens reveals that that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligand.

  17. Does Cation Size Affect Occupancy and Electrostatic Screening of the Nucleic Acid Ion Atmosphere?

    PubMed

    Gebala, Magdalena; Bonilla, Steve; Bisaria, Namita; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-08-31

    Electrostatics are central to all aspects of nucleic acid behavior, including their folding, condensation, and binding to other molecules, and the energetics of these processes are profoundly influenced by the ion atmosphere that surrounds nucleic acids. Given the highly complex and dynamic nature of the ion atmosphere, understanding its properties and effects will require synergy between computational modeling and experiment. Prior computational models and experiments suggest that cation occupancy in the ion atmosphere depends on the size of the cation. However, the computational models have not been independently tested, and the experimentally observed effects were small. Here, we evaluate a computational model of ion size effects by experimentally testing a blind prediction made from that model, and we present additional experimental results that extend our understanding of the ion atmosphere. Giambasu et al. developed and implemented a three-dimensional reference interaction site (3D-RISM) model for monovalent cations surrounding DNA and RNA helices, and this model predicts that Na(+) would outcompete Cs(+) by 1.8-2.1-fold; i.e., with Cs(+) in 2-fold excess of Na(+) the ion atmosphere would contain an equal number of each cation (Nucleic Acids Res. 2015, 43, 8405). However, our ion counting experiments indicate that there is no significant preference for Na(+) over Cs(+). There is an ∼25% preferential occupancy of Li(+) over larger cations in the ion atmosphere but, counter to general expectations from existing models, no size dependence for the other alkali metal ions. Further, we followed the folding of the P4-P6 RNA and showed that differences in folding with different alkali metal ions observed at high concentration arise from cation-anion interactions and not cation size effects. Overall, our results provide a critical test of a computational prediction, fundamental information about ion atmosphere properties, and parameters that will aid in the

  18. Amphiphilic cationic [dendritic poly(L-lysine)]-block-poly(L-lactide)-block-[dendritic poly(L-lysine)]s in aqueous solution: self-aggregation and interaction with DNA as gene delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingdan; Sheng, Ruilong; Luo, Ting; Li, Hui; Sun, Wenyan; Li, Yang; Cao, Amin

    2011-02-11

    A new series of triblock [dendritic poly(L-lysine)]-block-PLLA-block-[dendritic poly(L-lysine)]s (DL(2) -PLLA-DL(2) ) with PLLA block lengths of 11.5-26.5 and double 2-generation PLL dendrons DL(2) as model cationic amphiphiles were synthesized and characterized. Their CAC, self-aggregation and plasmid DNA binding affinities in pure water and PBS were studied. The PLLA block length dependence of particle size, morphology and ξ potential for organized pDNA/amphiphile polyplex aggregates were examined. Finally, toxicities of these DL(2) -PLLA-DL(2) amphiphiles and their polyplexes were assayed by MTT with HeLa, SMMC-7721 and COS-7 cells, and COS-7 cell luciferase and eGFP gene transfection efficacies with these amphiphiles as the delivery carriers were investigated.

  19. Design, synthesis, and transfection biology of novel cationic glycolipids for use in liposomal gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Mahidhar, Y V; Chaudhuri, A; Gopal, V; Rao, N M

    2001-11-22

    The molecular structure of the cationic lipids used in gene transfection strongly influences their transfection efficiency. High transfection efficiencies of non-glycerol-based simple monocationic transfection lipids with hydroxyethyl headgroups recently reported by us (Banerjee et al. J. Med. Chem. 1999, 42, 4292-4299) are consistent with the earlier observations that the presence of hydroxyl functionalities in the headgroup region of a cationic lipid contributes favorably in liposomal gene delivery. Using simple sugar molecules as the source of multiple hydroxyl functionalities in the headgroup region of the transfection lipids, we have synthesized four novel simple monocationic transfection lipids, namely, 1-deoxy-1-[dihexadecyl(methyl)ammonio]-D-xylitol (1), 1-deoxy-1-[methyl(ditetradecyl)ammonio]-D-arabinitol (2), 1-deoxy-1-[dihexadecyl(methyl)ammonio]-D-arabinitol (3) and 1-deoxy-1-[methyl(dioctadecyl)ammonio]-D-arabinitol (4), containing hydrophobic aliphatic tails and the hydrophilic arabinosyl or xylose sugar groups linked directly to the positively charged nitrogen atom. Syntheses, chemical characterizations, and the transfection biology of these novel transfection lipids 1-4 are described in this paper. Lipid 1, the xylosyl derivative, showed maximum transfection on COS-1 cells. All the lipids showed transfection with cholesterol as colipid and not with dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Radioactive quantitation of free and complexed DNA combined with ethidium bromide exclusion measurements suggest that though nearly 70% of the DNA exists as complexed DNA, the DNA may not have condensed as was observed with other cationic lipids. Presence of additional (more than two) hydroxyl functionalities in the headgroup of the cationic lipids appears to have improved the transfection efficiency and made these lipids less cytotoxic compared to two-hydroxyl derivatives.

  20. Condensation model for the ESBWR passive condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Revankar, S. T.; Zhou, W.; Wolf, B.; Oh, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the General Electric's Economic simplified boiling water reactor (GE-ESBWR) the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) plays a major role in containment pressure control in case of an loss of coolant accident. The PCCS condenser must be able to remove sufficient energy from the reactor containment to prevent containment from exceeding its design pressure following a design basis accident. There are three PCCS condensation modes depending on the containment pressurization due to coolant discharge; complete condensation, cyclic venting and flow through mode. The present work reviews the models and presents model predictive capability along with comparison with existing data from separate effects test. The condensation models in thermal hydraulics code RELAP5 are also assessed to examine its application to various flow modes of condensation. The default model in the code predicts complete condensation well, and basically is Nusselt solution. The UCB model predicts through flow well. None of condensation model in RELAP5 predict complete condensation, cyclic venting, and through flow condensation consistently. New condensation correlations are given that accurately predict all three modes of PCCS condensation. (authors)

  1. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  2. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-06-15

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization.

  3. Experimental and theoretical studies on the DNA-binding of cationic yttrium(III) complex containing 2,2‧-bipyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Akbari, Alireza; Mirkazehi-Rigi, Sohaila

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of DNA with [Y(bpy)(OH2)6]+3, where bpy is 2,2‧-bipyridine has been studied at physiological pH in Tris-HCl buffer. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy, agarose gel electrophoresis as well as EB quenching experiments are used to study DNA binding of the complex. The results reveal that DNA have the strong ability to bind with Y(III) complex. The binding constant, Kb and the Stern-Volmer quenching constant, KSV are determined. For characterization of the binding mode between the Y(III) complex and DNA various procedures such as: iodide quenching assay, salt effect and thermodynamical investigation are used. The results suggest that minor groove binding should be the interaction mode of complex to DNA. A gel electrophoresis assay demonstrates the ability of the complex to cleave the DNA via oxidative pathway. Electronic structure of [Y(bpy)(OH2)6]+3 was also carried out applying the density functional theory (DFT) method and applied to explain some obtained experimental observations.

  4. Low-dimensional compounds containing bioactive ligands. Part VIII: DNA interaction, antimicrobial and antitumor activities of ionic 5,7-dihalo-8-quinolinolato palladium(II) complexes with K(+) and Cs(+) cations.

    PubMed

    Farkasová, Veronika; Drweesh, Sayed Ali; Lüköová, Andrea; Sabolová, Danica; Radojević, Ivana D; Čomić, Ljiljana R; Vasić, Sava M; Paulíková, Helena; Fečko, Stanislav; Balašková, Tatiana; Vilková, Mária; Imrich, Ján; Potočňák, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    Starting from well-defined NH2(CH3)2[PdCl2(XQ)] complexes, coordination compounds of general formula Cat[PdCl2(XQ)] have been prepared by cationic exchange of NH2(CH3)2(+) and Cat cations, where XQ are biologically active halogen derivatives of quinolin-8-ol (5-chloro-7-iodo-quinolin-8-ol (CQ), 5,7-dibromo-quinolin-8-ol (dBrQ) and 5,7-dichloro-quinolin-8-ol (dClQ)) and Cat is K(+) or Cs(+). The cation exchange of all prepared complexes, K[PdCl2(CQ)] (1), K[PdCl2(dClQ)] (2), K[PdCl2(dBrQ)] (3), Cs[PdCl2(CQ)] (4), Cs[PdCl2(dClQ)] (5) and Cs[PdCl2(dBrQ)] (6) was approved using IR spectroscopy, their structures in DMSO solution were elucidated by one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments, whereas their stability in solution was verified by UV-VIS spectroscopy. Interaction of complexes to ctDNA was investigated using UV-VIS and fluorescence emission spectroscopy. The minimum inhibitory concentration and the minimum microbicidal concentration values were detected against 15 bacterial strains and 4 yeast strains to examine the antimicrobial activity for the complexes. The in vitro antitumor properties of the complexes were studied by testing the complexes on leukemic cell line L1210, ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and non-cancerous cell line HEK293. The majority of the prepared compounds exhibited moderate antimicrobial and very high cytotoxic activity.

  5. A protein ballet around the viral genome orchestrated by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase leads to an architectural switch: from nucleocapsid-condensed RNA to Vpr-bridged DNA.

    PubMed

    Lyonnais, Sébastien; Gorelick, Robert J; Heniche-Boukhalfa, Fatima; Bouaziz, Serge; Parissi, Vincent; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Restle, Tobias; Gatell, Jose Maria; Le Cam, Eric; Mirambeau, Gilles

    2013-02-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcription is achieved in the newly infected cell before viral DNA (vDNA) nuclear import. Reverse transcriptase (RT) has previously been shown to function as a molecular motor, dismantling the nucleocapsid complex that binds the viral genome as soon as plus-strand DNA synthesis initiates. We first propose a detailed model of this dismantling in close relationship with the sequential conversion from RNA to double-stranded (ds) DNA, focusing on the nucleocapsid protein (NCp7). The HIV-1 DNA-containing pre-integration complex (PIC) resulting from completion of reverse transcription is translocated through the nuclear pore. The PIC nucleoprotein architecture is poorly understood but contains at least two HIV-1 proteins initially from the virion core, namely integrase (IN) and the viral protein r (Vpr). We next present a set of electron micrographs supporting that Vpr behaves as a DNA architectural protein, initiating multiple DNA bridges over more than 500 base pairs (bp). These complexes are shown to interact with NCp7 bound to single-stranded nucleic acid regions that are thought to maintain IN binding during dsDNA synthesis, concurrently with nucleocapsid complex dismantling. This unexpected binding of Vpr conveniently leads to a compacted but filamentous folding of the vDNA that should favor its nuclear import. Finally, nucleocapsid-like aggregates engaged in dsDNA synthesis appear to efficiently bind to F-actin filaments, a property that may be involved in targeting complexes to the nuclear envelope. More generally, this article highlights unique possibilities offered by in vitro reconstitution approaches combined with macromolecular imaging to gain insights into the mechanisms that alter the nucleoprotein architecture of the HIV-1 genome, ultimately enabling its insertion into the nuclear chromatin.

  6. Physicochemical Characteristics Associated with Transfection of Cationic Cholesterol-based Gene Delivery Vectors in the Presence of DOPE

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Molinda D.; Patel, Yesha N.; Savva, Michalakis

    2010-01-01

    The physicochemical properties of a novel series of cholesterol-based cationic lipids in the presence of DOPE were studied by various techniques in an effort to correlate cationic lipid structure with transfection efficacy. It was found that while DOPE improves the β-gal activity of the active AC and MC derivatives, the overall zeta potential of the particles, pDNA complexation and condensation is not improved. This is in stark contrast with the tertiary amine derivative DC whose dispersion properties were improved and its monolayer surface potential is restored at high molecular surface density in the presence of DOPE. Overall the transfection activity mediated by DC and the quaternary ammonium TC derivative was greatly improved in the presence of DOPE and is attributed to decreased cytotoxicity, improved fusogenicity and cellular association. PMID:20727866

  7. pH and reduction dual-responsive dipeptide cationic lipids with α-tocopherol hydrophobic tail for efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Su, Rong-Chuan; Yi, Wen-Jing; Zheng, Li-Ting; Lu, Shan-Shan; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2017-03-31

    A series of tocopherol-based cationic lipid 3a-3f bearing a pH-sensitive imidazole moiety in the dipeptide headgroup and a reduction-responsive disulfide linkage were designed and synthesized. Acid-base titration of these lipids showed good buffering capacities. The liposomes formed from 3 and co-lipid 1, 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) could efficiently bind and condense DNA into nanoparticles. Gel binding and HPLC assays confirmed the encapsulated DNA could release from lipoplexes 3 upon addition of 10 mM glutathione (GSH). MTT assays in HEK 293 cells demonstrated that lipoplexes 3 had low cytotoxicity. The in vitro gene transfection studies showed cationic dipeptide headgroups clearly affected the transfection efficiency (TE), and arginine-histidine based dipeptide lipid 3f give the best TE, which was 30.4 times higher than Lipofectamine 3000 in the presence of 10% serum. Cell-uptake assays indicated that basic amino acid containing dipeptide cationic lipids exhibited more efficient cell uptake than serine and aromatic amino acids based dipeptide lipids. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies corroborated that 3 could efficiently deliver and release DNA into the nuclei of HeLa cells. These results suggest that tocopherol-based dipeptide cationic lipids with pH and reduction dual-sensitive characteristics might be promising non-viral gene delivery vectors.

  8. Mechanisms of action of escapin, a bactericidal agent in the ink secretion of the sea hare Aplysia californica: rapid and long-lasting DNA condensation and involvement of the OxyR-regulated oxidative stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ko-Chun; Tai, Phang C; Derby, Charles D

    2012-04-01

    The marine snail Aplysia californica produces escapin, an L-amino acid oxidase, in its defensive ink. Escapin uses L-lysine to produce diverse products called escapin intermediate products of L-lysine (EIP-K), including α-amino-ε-caproic acid, Δ¹-piperidine-2-carboxylic acid, and Δ²-piperidine-2-carboxylic acid. EIP-K and H₂O₂ together, but neither alone, is a powerful bactericide. Here, we report bactericidal mechanisms of escapin products on Escherichia coli. We show that EIP-K and H₂O₂ together cause rapid and long-lasting DNA condensation: 2-min treatment causes significant DNA condensation and killing, and 10-min treatment causes maximal effect, lasting at least 70 h. We isolated two mutants resistant to EIP-K plus H₂O₂, both having a single missense mutation in the oxidation regulatory gene, oxyR. A complementation assay showed that the mutated gene, oxyR(A233V), renders resistance to EIP-K plus H₂O₂, and a gene dosage effect leads to reduction of resistance for strains carrying wild-type oxyR. Temperature stress with EIP-K does not produce the bactericidal effect, suggesting the effect is due to a specific response to oxidative stress. The null mutant for any single DNA-binding protein--Dps, H-NS, Hup, Him, or MukB--was not resistant to EIP-K plus H₂O₂, suggesting that no single DNA-binding protein is necessary to mediate this bactericidal effect, but allowing for the possibility that EIP-K plus H₂O₂ could function through a combination of DNA-binding proteins. The bactericidal effect of EIP-K plus H₂O₂ was eliminated by the ferrous ion chelator 1,10-phenanthroline, and it was reduced by the hydroxyl radical scavenger thiourea, suggesting hydroxyl radicals mediate the effects of EIP-K plus H₂O₂.

  9. Discovery of metabolically stabilized electronegative polyacridine-PEG peptide DNA open polyplexes.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Christian A; Baumhover, Nicholas J; Anderson, Kevin; Rice, Kevin G

    2010-04-21

    Cationic condensing peptides and polymers bind electrostatically to DNA to form cationic polyplexes. While many cationic polyplexes are able to achieve in vitro transfection mediated through electrostatic interactions, few have been able to mediate gene transfer in vivo. The present study describes the development and testing of polyacridine PEG-peptides that bind to plasmid DNA by intercalation resulting in electronegative open polyplex DNA. Polyacridine PEG-peptides were prepared by chemically conjugating 6-(9-acridinylamino) hexanoic acid onto side chains of Lys in PEG-Cys-Trp-(Lys)(3, 4, or 5). The resulting PEG-Cys-Trp-(Lys-(Acr))(3, 4, or 5) peptides bound tightly to DNA by polyintercalation, rather than electrostatic binding. Unlike polycationic polyplexes, polyacridine PEG-peptide polyplexes were anionic and open coiled, as revealed by zeta potential and atomic force microscopy. PEG-Cys-Trp-(Lys-(Acr))(5) showed the highest DNA binding affinity and the greatest ability to protect DNA from metabolism by DNase. Polyacridine PEG-peptide DNA open polyplexes were dosed intramuscularly and electroporated in mice to demonstrate their functional activity in gene transfer. These results establish polyacridine PEG-peptide DNA open polyplexes as a novel gene delivery method for in vivo use.

  10. Calcium ions function as a booster of chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    Phengchat, Rinyaporn; Takata, Hideaki; Morii, Kenichi; Inada, Noriko; Murakoshi, Hideji; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome condensation is essential for the faithful transmission of genetic information to daughter cells during cell division. The depletion of chromosome scaffold proteins does not prevent chromosome condensation despite structural defects. This suggests that other factors contribute to condensation. Here we investigated the contribution of divalent cations, particularly Ca2+, to chromosome condensation in vitro and in vivo. Ca2+ depletion caused defects in proper mitotic progression, particularly in chromosome condensation after the breakdown of the nuclear envelope. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy-Förster resonance energy transfer and electron microscopy demonstrated that chromosome condensation is influenced by Ca2+. Chromosomes had compact globular structures when exposed to Ca2+ and expanded fibrous structures without Ca2+. Therefore, we have clearly demonstrated a role for Ca2+ in the compaction of chromatin fibres. PMID:27910894

  11. Calcium ions function as a booster of chromosome condensation.

    PubMed

    Phengchat, Rinyaporn; Takata, Hideaki; Morii, Kenichi; Inada, Noriko; Murakoshi, Hideji; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2016-12-02

    Chromosome condensation is essential for the faithful transmission of genetic information to daughter cells during cell division. The depletion of chromosome scaffold proteins does not prevent chromosome condensation despite structural defects. This suggests that other factors contribute to condensation. Here we investigated the contribution of divalent cations, particularly Ca(2+), to chromosome condensation in vitro and in vivo. Ca(2+) depletion caused defects in proper mitotic progression, particularly in chromosome condensation after the breakdown of the nuclear envelope. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy-Förster resonance energy transfer and electron microscopy demonstrated that chromosome condensation is influenced by Ca(2+). Chromosomes had compact globular structures when exposed to Ca(2+) and expanded fibrous structures without Ca(2+). Therefore, we have clearly demonstrated a role for Ca(2+) in the compaction of chromatin fibres.

  12. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  13. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  14. Cationic lipid-formulated DNA vaccine against hepatitis B virus: immunogenicity of MIDGE-Th1 vectors encoding small and large surface antigen in comparison to a licensed protein vaccine.

    PubMed

    Endmann, Anne; Klünder, Katharina; Kapp, Kerstin; Riede, Oliver; Oswald, Detlef; Talman, Eduard G; Schroff, Matthias; Kleuss, Christiane; Ruiters, Marcel H J; Juhls, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Currently marketed vaccines against hepatitis B virus (HBV) based on the small (S) hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) fail to induce a protective immune response in about 10% of vaccinees. DNA vaccination and the inclusion of PreS1 and PreS2 domains of HBsAg have been reported to represent feasible strategies to improve the efficacy of HBV vaccines. Here, we evaluated the immunogenicity of SAINT-18-formulated MIDGE-Th1 vectors encoding the S or the large (L) protein of HBsAg in mice and pigs. In both animal models, vectors encoding the secretion-competent S protein induced stronger humoral responses than vectors encoding the L protein, which was shown to be retained mainly intracellularly despite the presence of a heterologous secretion signal. In pigs, SAINT-18-formulated MIDGE-Th1 vectors encoding the S protein elicited an immune response of the same magnitude as the licensed protein vaccine Engerix-B, with S protein-specific antibody levels significantly higher than those considered protective in humans, and lasting for at least six months after the third immunization. Thus, our results provide not only the proof of concept for the SAINT-18-formulated MIDGE-Th1 vector approach but also confirm that with a cationic-lipid formulation, a DNA vaccine at a relatively low dose can elicit an immune response similar to a human dose of an aluminum hydroxide-adjuvanted protein vaccine in large animals.

  15. Cationized gelatin hydrogels mixed with plasmid DNA induce stronger and more sustained gene expression than atelocollagen at calvarial bone defects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, K; Shibata, T; Shimada, A; Ideno, H; Nakashima, K; Tabata, Y; Nifuji, A

    2016-01-01

    Gene transduction of exogenous factors at local sites in vivo is a promising approach to promote regeneration of tissue defects owing to its simplicity and capacity for expression of a variety of genes. Gene transduction by viral vectors is highly efficient; however, there are safety concerns associated with viruses. As a method for nonviral gene transduction, plasmid DNA delivery is safer and simpler, but requires an efficient carrier substance. Here, we aimed to develop a simple, efficient method for bone regeneration by gene transduction and to identify optimal conditions for plasmid DNA delivery at bone defect sites. We focused on carrier substances and compared the efficiencies of two collagen derivatives, atelocollagen, and gelatin hydrogel, as substrates for plasmid DNA delivery in vivo. To assess the efficiencies of these substrates, we examined exogenous expression of green fluorescence protein (GFP) by fluorescence microscopy, polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. GFP expression at the bone defect site was higher when gelatin hydrogel was used as a substrate to deliver plasmids than when atelocollagen was used. Moreover, the gelatin hydrogel was almost completely absorbed at the defect site, whereas some atelocollagen remained. When a plasmid harboring bone morphogenic protein 2 was delivered with the substrate to bony defect sites, more new bone formation was observed in the gelatin group than in the atelocollagen group. These results suggested that the gelatin hydrogel was more efficient than atelocollagen as a substrate for local gene delivery and may be a superior material for induction of bone regeneration.

  16. Condensates in Jovian Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermochemical equilibrium theory which starts with temperature/pressure profiles, compositional information and thermodynamic data for condensable species in the jovian planet atmospheres predicts layers of condensate clouds in the upper troposphere.

  17. The influence of chromatin structure on the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks: a study using nuclear and nucleoid monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ljungman, M. )

    1991-04-01

    To assess the influence of chromatin structure on the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks, the alkaline unwinding technique was applied to nuclear and nucleoid monolayers. These chromatin substrates were prepared by treating human fibroblasts grown as monolayers with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 and varying concentrations of cations. The chromatin structure was modified either by a stepwise removal of DNA-bound proteins by extraction in increasing concentrations of monovalent salt, or by the addition or deletion of mono- and divalent cations to condense or decondense the chromatin, respectively. It was found that the stepwise removal of DNA-bound proteins from the chromatin dramatically increased the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks. The DNA-bound proteins showed a qualitative difference in their ability to protect the DNA where proteins removed by salt concentrations above 1.0 M exerted the greatest protection. Furthermore, the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks was found to be 6 times lower in condensed chromatin than in decondensed chromatin and about 80 times lower than in protein-depleted chromatin. It is concluded that the presence of DNA-bound proteins and the folding of the chromatin into higher-order structures protect the DNA against radiation-induced strand breaks.

  18. The cubyl cation rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Cabellos, Jose Luis; Martinez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernandez-Herrera, Maria A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-02-25

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations and high-level ab initio computations predict that the cage-opening rearrangement of the cubyl cation to the 7H(+)-pentalenyl cation is feasible in the gas phase. The rate-determining step is the formation of the cuneyl cation with an activation barrier of 25.3 kcal mol(-1) at the CCSD(T)/def2-TZVP//MP2/def2-TZVP level. Thus, the cubyl cation is kinetically stable enough to be formed and trapped at moderate temperatures, but it may be rearranged at higher temperatures.

  19. Preparation of poly(ethylene glycol)-introduced cationized gelatin as a non-viral gene carrier.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare cationized gelatins grafted with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) (PEG-cationized gelatin) and evaluate the in vivo efficiency as a non-viral gene carrier. Cationized gelatin was prepared by chemical introduction of ethylenediamine to the carboxyl groups of gelatin. PEG with one terminal of active ester group was coupled to the amino groups of cationized gelatin to prepare PEG-cationized gelatins. Electrophoretic experiments revealed that the PEG-cationized gelatin with low PEGylation degrees was complexed with a plasmid DNA of luciferase, in remarked contrast to that with high PEGylation degrees. When the plasmid DNA complexed with the cationized gelatin or PEG-cationized gelatin was mixed with deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) in solution to evaluate the resistance to enzymatic degradation, stronger protection effect of the PEG-cationized gelatin was observed than that of the cationized gelatin. The complex of plasmid DNA and PEG-cationized gelatin had an apparent molecular size of about 300 nm and almost zero surface charge. These findings indicate that the PEG-cationized gelatin-plasmid DNA complex has a nano-order structure where the plasmid DNA is covered with PEG molecules. When the PEG-cationized gelatin-plasmid DNA complex was intramuscularly injected, the level of gene expression was significantly increased compared with the injection of plasmid DNA solution. It is concluded that the PEG-cationized gelatin was a promising non-viral gene carrier to enhance gene expression in vivo.

  20. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  1. Cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC) adjuvant enhances the immunogenicity and cross-protective efficacy of a pre-pandemic influenza A H5N1 vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Libo; Liu, Feng; Fairman, Jeffery; Hong, David K; Lewis, David B; Monath, Thomas; Warner, John F; Belser, Jessica A; Patel, Jenish; Hancock, Kathy; Katz, Jacqueline M; Lu, Xiuhua

    2012-01-05

    The development of pre-pandemic influenza A H5N1 vaccines that confer both antigen-sparing and cross-clade protection are a high priority given the limited worldwide capacity for influenza vaccine production, and the antigenic and genetic heterogeneity of circulating H5N1 viruses. The inclusion of potent adjuvants in vaccine formulations may achieve both of these aims. Here we show that the addition of JVRS-100, an adjuvant consisting of cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC) to a clade 1-derived H5N1 split vaccine induced significantly higher virus-specific antibody than unadjuvanted formulations, with a >30-fold dose-sparing effect and induction of increased antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses in mice. All mice that received one dose of adjuvanted vaccine and subsequent H5N1 viral challenges exhibited mild illness, lower lung viral titers, undetectable spleen and brain viral titers, and 100% survival after either homologous clade 1 or heterologous clade 2 H5N1 viral challenges, whereas unadjuvanted vaccine recipients showed significantly increased weight loss, viral titers, and mortality. The protective immunity induced by JVRS-100 adjuvanted H5N1 vaccine was shown to last for over one year without significant waning. Thus, JVRS-100 adjuvanted H5N1 vaccine elicited enhanced humoral and T-cell responses, dose-sparing, and cross-clade protection in mice. CLDC holds promise as an adjuvant for human pre-pandemic inactivated H5N1 vaccines.

  2. A cationic liposome-DNA complexes adjuvant (JVRS-100) enhances the immunogenicity and cross-protective efficacy of pre-pandemic influenza A (H5N1) vaccine in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Sun, Xiangjie; Fairman, Jeffery; Lewis, David B; Katz, Jacqueline M; Levine, Min; Tumpey, Terrence M; Lu, Xiuhua

    2016-05-01

    Influenza A (H5N1) viruses continue to pose a public health threat. As inactivated H5N1 vaccines are poorly immunogenic, adjuvants are needed to improve the immunogenicity of H5N1 vaccine in humans. Here, we investigated the immunogenicity and cross-protective efficacy in ferrets of a clade 2.2-derived vaccine with addition of JVRS-100, an adjuvant consisting of cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC). After the first vaccination, significantly higher levels of hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI) and neutralizing antibody titers were detected in ferrets immunized with adjuvanted vaccine compared to unadjuvanted vaccine. Following a second dose of adjuvanted vaccine, HAI antibody titers of ≥ 40 were detected against viruses from multiple H5N1 clades. HAI antibodies against newly isolated H5N2 and H5N8 viruses were also augmented by JVRS-100. Ferrets were challenged with a heterologous H5N1 virus. All ferrets that received two doses of adjuvanted vaccine exhibited mild illness, significantly reduced nasal wash virus titers and protection from lethal challenge. In contrast, ferrets that received unadjuvanted vaccine showed greater weight loss, high viral titers and 3 of 6 animals succumbed to the lethal challenge. Our results indicate that the addition of JVRS-100 to H5N1 vaccine enhanced immunogenicity and cross-protection against lethal H5N1 virus disease in ferrets. JVRS-100 warrants further investigation as a potential adjuvant for influenza vaccines.

  3. Unfolding Dynamics of Single Collapsed DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Y.; Wada, H.; Ishida, R.; Sano, M.

    We observed elastic responses of single DNA molecules and visualized them during the collapsing transition induced by trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD). The force-extension curves show worm-like behavior, force plateau, and stick-release responses depending on SPD concentration. The periodic stick-release responses may reflect the unraveling of toroidal condensates. At much higher SPD concentration, we observed re-elongation of a single collapsed DNA. For the visualization, a fluorescent dye, YOYO, was used. We observed bright spots in the fluorescence intensity profile of a collapsed DNA during stretching, which may correspond to the collapsed parts within the single DNA. The decrease of the intensity of the spots in stretching implies the mechanical unfolding of collapsed parts. Towards achieving a microscopic understanding of these experimental results, we also investigate the elastic properties of a highly charged polyelectrolyte (PE) chain by Brownian dynamics simulation method. In our dynamic simulation, a PE has a small intrinsic stiffness (i.e., the PE is semiflexible) to model the stiffness of DNA chain, and added multivalent counterions are explicitly taken into account. As the electrostatic coupling parameter (proportional to counterion valency) is increased, counterion condensation is observed, leading finally to the PE collapse through the discontinuous transition for a sufficiently large coupling parameter. Mechanical unfolding of a PE globule reveals its molecular elasticities including force plateau, in agreement with the experimental observations. A numerically deduced electrostatic condensation energy is compared to the experimental value. Charge ordering in the PE-counterion complex and its deformation by the external forcing are elucidated in conjunction with the PE elastic responses. Other dynamic effects such as the effect of a pulling speed are also discussed.

  4. EPRI condensate polisher guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, B.A.; Webb, L.C.; Sawochka, S.G.; Crits, G.J.; Pocock, F.J.; Wirth, L.

    1995-01-01

    Cycle chemistry is one of the most important contributors to the loss of availability of generating units. Condensate polishing can significantly improve cycle chemistry by improving cycle water quality and minimizing the transport of contaminants in the power cycle. The EPRI-funded project described in this paper developed comprehensive guidelines for condensate polishing based upon information gathered from utility surveys, equipment vendors, and resin suppliers. Existing literature was also surveyed for pertinent input. Comprehensive guidelines which outline guidance for design, operation, maintenance, surveillance, management, and retrofitting of condensate polishing systems were developed. Economics of condensate polishing were evaluated and a roadmap for economic evaluation for utilities to follow was produced.

  5. Supramolecular 1-D polymerization of DNA origami through a dynamic process at the 2-dimensionally confined air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Cervantes-Salguero, Keitel; Minami, Kosuke; Kawamata, Ibuki; Nakanishi, Waka; Hill, Jonathan P; Murata, Satoshi; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2016-05-14

    In this study, a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) system has been utilized for the regulation of polymerization of a DNA origami structure at the air-water interface as a two-dimensionally confined medium, which enables dynamic condensation of DNA origami units through variation of the film area at the macroscopic level (ca. 10-100 cm(2)). DNA origami sheets were conjugated with a cationic lipid (dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide, 2C18N(+)) by electrostatic interaction and the corresponding LB-film was prepared. By applying dynamic pressure variation through compression-expansion processes, the lipid-modified DNA origami sheets underwent anisotropic polymerization forming a one-dimensionally assembled belt-shaped structure of a high aspect ratio although the thickness of the polymerized DNA origami was maintained at the unimolecular level. This approach opens up a new field of mechanical induction of the self-assembly of DNA origami structures.

  6. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    This measure guideline on evaporative condensers provides information on properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices.

  7. Confined chiral polymer nematics: Ordering and spontaneous condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenšek, Daniel; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2012-12-01

    We investigate condensation of a long confined chiral nematic polymer inside a spherical enclosure, mimicking condensation of DNA inside a viral capsid. The Landau-de Gennes nematic free-energy Ansatz appropriate for nematic polymers allows us to study the condensation process in detail with different boundary conditions at the enclosing wall that simulate repulsive and attractive polymer-surface interactions. By increasing the chirality, we observe a transformation of the toroidal condensate into a closed surface with an increasing genus, in some respects akin to the ordered domain formation observed in cryo-microscopy of bacteriophages.

  8. Geothermal steam condensate reinjection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasteen, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Geothermal electric generating plants which use condensing turbines and generate and excess of condensed steam which must be disposed of are discussed. At the Geysers, California, the largest geothermal development in the world, this steam condensate has been reinjected into the steam reservoir since 1968. A total of 3,150,000,000 gallons of steam condensate has been reinjected since that time with no noticeable effect on the adjacent producing wells. Currently, 3,700,000 gallons/day from 412 MW of installed capacity are being injected into 5 wells. Reinjection has also proven to be a satisfactory method of disposing of geothermal condensate a Imperial Valley, California, and at the Valles Caldera, New Mexico.

  9. Cationic dialkylarylphosphates: a new family of bio-inspired cationic lipids for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Le Corre, Stéphanie S; Belmadi, Nawal; Berchel, Mathieu; Le Gall, Tony; Haelters, Jean-Pierre; Lehn, Pierre; Montier, Tristan; Jaffrès, Paul-Alain

    2015-01-28

    In this work that aims to synthesize and evaluate new cationic lipids as vectors for gene delivery, we report the synthesis of a series of cationic lipids in which a phosphate functional group acts as a linker to assemble on a molecular scale, two lipid chains and one cationic polar head. The mono or dicationic moiety is connected to the phosphate group by an aryl spacer. In this work, two synthesis strategies were evaluated. The first used the Atherton-Todd coupling reaction to introduce a phenolic derivative to dioleylphosphite. The second strategy used a sequential addition of lipid alcohol and a phenolic derivative on POCl3. The two methods are efficient, but the latter allows larger yields. Different polar head groups were introduced, thus producing amphiphilic compounds possessing either one permanent (N-methyl-imidazolium, pyridinium, trimethylammonium) or two permanent cationic charges. All these cationic lipids were formulated as liposomal solutions and characterized (size and zeta potential). They formed stable liposomal solutions both in water (at pH 7.0) and in a weakly acidic medium (at pH 5.5). Finally, this new generation of cationic lipids was used to deliver DNA into various human-derived epithelial cells cultured in vitro. Compared with Lipofectamine used as a reference commercial lipofection reagent, some cationic dialkylarylphosphates were able to demonstrate potent gene transfer abilities, and noteworthily, monocationic derivatives were much more efficient than dicationic analogues.

  10. Multivalent ion-DNA interaction: Neutron scattering estimates of polyamine distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, S. S.; Egelhaaf, S. U.; Bhuiyan, L. B.; Outhwaite, C. W.; Bratko, D.; van der Maarel, J. R. C.

    1999-12-01

    The partial structure factors pertaining to DNA-DNA, DNA-polyamine, and polyamine-polyamine density correlations in DNA fragment (contour length 54 nm) solutions have been measured with small angle neutron scattering and contrast matching in water. The effect of the polyamines putrescine and spermidine on the DNA molecular structure is gauged from the limiting behavior of the DNA-DNA partial structure factor at high values of momentum transfer. The double layer structure and the extent to which the polyamines can approach the DNA are derived from the DNA-polyamine and polyamine-polyamine partial structure factors. For this purpose, the structure factors are interpreted with the correlation functions derived from the classical Poisson-Boltzmann and the modified Poisson-Boltzmann equations and/or Monte Carlo simulation. For simple salt free DNA with tetramethylammonium or putrescine counterions, spatial fluctuations in the charge density are discussed in terms of the charge structure factor. The structural arrangement of putrescine and spermidine can be fully rationalized in terms of their valence. In the case of spermidine, it is necessary to include ionic correlation effects, but this could be accomplished by modeling the ligands as hard spheres. The polyamines have no detectable effect on the DNA molecular structure and are too large to penetrate the grooves to any significant extent. These results imply that DNA condensation in the presence of polyamines is largely governed by electrostatic interactions, rather than by the binding of the multivalent cation per se.

  11. Sedimentary condensation and authigenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föllmi, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Most marine authigenic minerals form in sediments, which are subjected to condensation. Condensation processes lead to the formation of well individualized, extremely thin (< 1m) beds, which were accumulated during extremely long time periods (> 100ky), and which experienced authigenesis and the precipitation of glaucony, verdine, phosphate, iron and manganese oxyhydroxides, iron sulfide, carbonate and/or silica. They usually show complex internal stratigraphies, which result from an interplay of sediment accumulation, halts in sedimentation, sediment winnowing, erosion, reworking and bypass. They may include amalgamated faunas of different origin and age. Hardgrounds may be part of condensed beds and may embody strongly condensed beds by themselves. Sedimentary condensation is the result of a hydrodynamically active depositional regime, in which sediment accumulation, winnowing, erosion, reworking and bypass are processes, which alternate as a function of changes in the location and intensity of currents, and/or as the result of episodic high-energy events engendered by storms and gravity flow. Sedimentary condensation has been and still is a widespread phenomenon in past and present-day oceans. The present-day distribution of glaucony and verdine-rich sediments on shelves and upper slopes, phosphate-rich sediments and phosphorite on outer shelves and upper slopes, ferromanganese crusts on slopes, seamounts and submarine plateaus, and ferromanganese nodules on abyssal seafloors is a good indication of the importance of condensation processes today. In the past, we may add the occurrence of oolitic ironstone, carbonate hardgrounds, and eventually also silica layers in banded iron formations as indicators of the importance of condensation processes. Besides their economic value, condensed sediments are useful both as a carrier of geochemical proxies of paleoceanographic and paleoenvironmental change, as well as the product of episodes of paleoceanographic and

  12. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sederquist, R.A.; Szydlowski, D.F.; Sawyer, R.D.

    1983-02-08

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well. 3 figs.

  13. Condensation of chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blander, M.

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of current experimental results concerned with the kinetic constraints on chondrule formation showed that the major physical properties of chondrules could have been produced by direct condensation of metastable liquid silicates droplets from a hot gas in the primordial nebula. It is argued that such a condensation process would have to be followed by crystallization, accretion, and partial comminution of the droplets. The chemical mechanisms driving this process are described, including: nucleation constraints on comminution and crystallization; slow transformations and chemical reactions in chain silicates; and the slow diffusion of ions. It is shown that the physical mechanisms for chondrule condensation are applicable to a broad spectrum of chondrule sources.

  14. INORGANIC CATIONS IN RAT KIDNEY

    PubMed Central

    Tandler, C. J.; Kierszenbaum, A. L.

    1971-01-01

    For localization of pyroantimonate-precipitable cations, rat kidney was fixed by perfusion with a saturated aqueous solution of potassium pyroantimonate (pH about 9.2, without addition of any conventional fixative). A remarkably good preservation of the tissue and cell morphology was obtained as well as a consistent and reproducible localization of the insoluble antimonate salts of magnesium, calcium, and sodium. All proximal and distal tubules and glomeruli were delimited by massive electron-opaque precipitates localized in the basement membrane and, to a lesser extent, in adjacent connective tissue. In the intraglomerular capillaries the antimonate precipitate was encountered in the basement membranes and also between the foot processes. In addition to a more or less uniform distribution in the cytoplasm and between the microvilli of the brush border, antimonate precipitates were found in all cell nuclei, mainly between the masses of condensed chromatin. The mitochondria usually contained a few large antimonate deposits which probably correspond to the so-called "dense granules" observed after conventional fixations. PMID:4106544

  15. Synthesis of water-based cationic polyurethane for antibacterial and gene delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Geng-Hsi; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2016-10-01

    Cationic polymers are often used as antimicrobial materials and transfection reagents. Water-based process could reduce environmental pollution and prevent the risk of solvent residue in the final product. In this study, waterborne biodegradable cationic polyurethane (WCPU) was synthesized by reacting polycaprolactone (PCL diol), isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI), and N-methyldiethanolamine (N-MDEA) under 75°C. An aqueous dispersion of WCPU nanoparticles (NPs) could be acquired by vigorous stirring under acidic condition. The particles in the dispersion had an average size of ∼80nm and a zeta potential of ∼60mV. When cast into films, the contact angle of the film was ∼67° and the zeta potential was ∼16mV. WCPU NPs demonstrated excellent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (100% inhibition with a contact time of 3h). Meanwhile, the antibacterial ratio of WCPU films to E. coli and S. aureus reached 100% after 24h of contact. Moreover, WCPU NPs could be used as a transfection reagent without significant toxicity for concentrations less than 1000μg/mL and showed the ability to condensate plasmid DNA. The transfection efficiency for HEK293T cells and hBMSCs was ∼60% and ∼30% at 48h, respectively, after the transfection. Therefore, the WCPU synthesized in this study has potential antibacterial and gene delivery applications.

  16. Key condenser failure mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, B.

    2009-04-15

    Eight practical lessons highlight many of the factors that can influence condenser tube corrosion at coal-fired utilities and the effects contaminant in-leakage can have on steam generating units. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  17. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on evaporative condensers is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for energy and demand savings in homes with cooling loads. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices. This document has been prepared to provide a process for properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs.

  18. Molecular equilibrium with condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, C. M.; Huebner, W. F.

    1990-02-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated.

  19. Condensate dark matter stars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Harko, T.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.hk

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the structure and stability properties of compact astrophysical objects that may be formed from the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. Once the critical temperature of a boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein Condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the universe. Therefore we model the dark matter inside the star as a Bose-Einstein condensate. In the condensate dark matter star model, the dark matter equation of state can be described by a polytropic equation of state, with polytropic index equal to one. We derive the basic general relativistic equations describing the equilibrium structure of the condensate dark matter star with spherically symmetric static geometry. The structure equations of the condensate dark matter stars are studied numerically. The critical mass and radius of the dark matter star are given by M{sub crit} ≈ 2(l{sub a}/1fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2}M{sub s}un and R{sub crit} ≈ 1.1 × 10{sup 6}(l{sub a}/1 fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2} cm respectively, where l{sub a} and m{sub χ} are the scattering length and the mass of dark matter particle, respectively.

  20. Quantitative analysis of chromosome condensation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Boryana; Dehler, Sascha; Kruitwagen, Tom; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Miura, Kota; Haering, Christian H

    2013-03-01

    Chromosomes undergo extensive conformational rearrangements in preparation for their segregation during cell divisions. Insights into the molecular mechanisms behind this still poorly understood condensation process require the development of new approaches to quantitatively assess chromosome formation in vivo. In this study, we present a live-cell microscopy-based chromosome condensation assay in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. By automatically tracking the three-dimensional distance changes between fluorescently marked chromosome loci at high temporal and spatial resolution, we analyze chromosome condensation during mitosis and meiosis and deduct defined parameters to describe condensation dynamics. We demonstrate that this method can determine the contributions of condensin, topoisomerase II, and Aurora kinase to mitotic chromosome condensation. We furthermore show that the assay can identify proteins required for mitotic chromosome formation de novo by isolating mutants in condensin, DNA polymerase ε, and F-box DNA helicase I that are specifically defective in pro-/metaphase condensation. Thus, the chromosome condensation assay provides a direct and sensitive system for the discovery and characterization of components of the chromosome condensation machinery in a genetically tractable eukaryote.

  1. Physical and biological properties of cationic triesters of phosphatidylcholine

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, RC; Ashley, GW; Shida, MM; Rakhmanova, VA; Tarahovsky, YS; Pantazatos, DP; Kennedy, MT; Pozharski, EV; Baker, KA; Jones, RD; Rosenzweig, HS; Choi, KL; Qiu, R; McIntosh, TJ

    1999-01-01

    The properties of a new class of phospholipids, alkyl phosphocholine triesters, are described. These compounds were prepared from phosphatidylcholines through substitution of the phosphate oxygen by reaction with alkyl trifluoromethylsulfonates. Their unusual behavior is ascribed to their net positive charge and absence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. The O-ethyl, unsaturated derivatives hydrated to generate large, unilamellar liposomes. The phase transition temperature of the saturated derivatives is very similar to that of the precursor phosphatidylcholine and quite insensitive to ionic strength. The dissociation of single molecules from bilayers is unusually facile, as revealed by the surface activity of aqueous liposome dispersions. Vesicles of cationic phospholipids fused with vesicles of anionic lipids. Liquid crystalline cationic phospholipids such as 1, 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine triflate formed normal lipid bilayers in aqueous phases that interacted with short, linear DNA and supercoiled plasmid DNA to form a sandwich-structured complex in which bilayers were separated by strands of DNA. DNA in a 1:1 (mol) complex with cationic lipid was shielded from the aqueous phase, but was released by neutralizing the cationic charge with anionic lipid. DNA-lipid complexes transfected DNA into cells very effectively. Transfection efficiency depended upon the form of the lipid dispersion used to generate DNA-lipid complexes; in the case of the O-ethyl derivative described here, large vesicle preparations in the liquid crystalline phase were most effective. PMID:10545361

  2. Selective counterion condensation in ionic micellar solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswal, V. K.; Goyal, P. S.

    2003-05-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering experiments have been carried out on micellar solutions of cationic surfactants of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr) and chloride (CTACl) in the presence of varying concentrations of salts KBr and KCl. In these systems, while the size of micelles strongly increases with the addition of KBr, the effect of addition of KCl in comparison is much less pronounced. It is found that in equimolar surfactant to salt micellar solutions of CTABr/KCl and CTACl/KBr, the micellar sizes are larger in CTACl/KBr than those in CTABr/KCl. The measurements have been done for different equimolar surfactant to salt concentrations and at different temperatures. We explain these results in terms of selective counterion condensation on the micelles. That is, while the condensation of Cl- counterions on the CTABr micelles in CTABr/KCl takes place around the condensed Br- counterions of CTABr, the Cl- counterions of CTACl in CTACl/KBr are replaced by Br- counterions of the salt. Similar results have also been obtained on micellar solutions of anionic surfactants of sodium dodecyl sulfate and lithium dodecyl sulfate in the presence of salts LiBr and NaBr, respectively.

  3. Selective counterion condensation in ionic micellar solutions.

    PubMed

    Aswal, V K; Goyal, P S

    2003-05-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering experiments have been carried out on micellar solutions of cationic surfactants of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr) and chloride (CTACl) in the presence of varying concentrations of salts KBr and KCl. In these systems, while the size of micelles strongly increases with the addition of KBr, the effect of addition of KCl in comparison is much less pronounced. It is found that in equimolar surfactant to salt micellar solutions of CTABr/KCl and CTACl/KBr, the micellar sizes are larger in CTACl/KBr than those in CTABr/KCl. The measurements have been done for different equimolar surfactant to salt concentrations and at different temperatures. We explain these results in terms of selective counterion condensation on the micelles. That is, while the condensation of Cl- counterions on the CTABr micelles in CTABr/KCl takes place around the condensed Br- counterions of CTABr, the Cl- counterions of CTACl in CTACl/KBr are replaced by Br- counterions of the salt. Similar results have also been obtained on micellar solutions of anionic surfactants of sodium dodecyl sulfate and lithium dodecyl sulfate in the presence of salts LiBr and NaBr, respectively.

  4. Keeping condensers clean

    SciTech Connect

    Wicker, K.

    2006-04-15

    The humble condenser is among the biggest contributors to a steam power plant's efficiency. But although a clean condenser can provide great economic benefit, a dirty one can raise plant heat rate, resulting in large losses of generation revenue and/or unnecessarily high fuel bills. Conventional methods for cleaning fouled tubes range form chemicals to scrapers to brushes and hydro-blasters. This article compares the available options and describes how one power station, Omaha Public Power District's 600 MW North Omaha coal-fired power station, cleaned up its act. The makeup and cooling water of all its five units comes from the Missouri River. 6 figs.

  5. THE INTRACELLULAR LOCALIZATION OF INORGANIC CATIONS WITH POTASSIUM PYROANTIMONATE

    PubMed Central

    Tandler, Carlos J.; Libanati, César M.; Sanchis, Carlos A.

    1970-01-01

    Potassium pyroantimonate, when used as fixative (saturated or half-saturated, without addition of any conventional fixative) has been demonstrated to produce intracellular precipitates of the insoluble salts of calcium, magnesium, and sodium and to preserve the general cell morphology. In both animal and plant tissues, the electron-opaque antimonate precipitates were found deposited in the nucleus—as well as within the nucleolus—and in the cytoplasm, largely at the site of the ribonucleoprotein particles; the condensed chromatin appeared relatively free of precipitates. The inorganic cations are probably in a loosely bound state since they are not retained by conventional fixatives. The implications of this inorganic cation distribution in the intact cell are discussed in connection with their anionic counterparts, i.e., complexing of cations by fixed anionic charges and the coexistence of a large pool of inorganic orthophosphate anions in the nucleus and nucleolus. PMID:4935442

  6. Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation pump, Jennings vacuum heating pump, and misc. pipes and valves. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  7. Efficient gene transfection using novel cationic polymers poly(hydroxyalkylene imines).

    PubMed

    Zaliauskiene, Lolita; Bernadisiute, Ula; Vareikis, Ausvydas; Makuska, Ricardas; Volungeviciene, Ieva; Petuskaite, Agne; Riauba, Laurynas; Lagunavicius, Arunas; Zigmantas, Sarunas

    2010-09-15

    A series of novel cationic polymers poly(hydroxyalkylene imines) were synthesized and tested for their ability to transfect cells in vitro and in vivo. Poly(hydroxyalkylene imines), in particular, poly(2-hydroxypropylene imine) (pHP), poly(2-hydroxypropylene imine ethylene imine) (pHPE), and poly(hydroxypropylene imine propylene imine) (pHPP) were synthesized by polycondensation reaction from 1,3-diamino-2-propanol and the appropriate dibromide. Electron microscopic examination demonstrated that the resulting polymers condensed DNA into toroid shape complexes of 100-150 nm in size. Transfection studies showed that all three polymers were able to deliver genetic material into the cell, with pHP being superior to pHPP and pHPE. pHP acted as an efficient gene delivery agent in a variety of different cell lines and outcompeted most of the widely used polymer or lipid based transfection reagents. Intravenous administration of pHP-DNA polyplexes in mice followed by the reporter gene analysis showed that the reagent was suitable for in vivo applications. In summary, the results indicate that pHP is a new efficient reagent for gene delivery in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Condensate removal device

    DOEpatents

    Maddox, James W.; Berger, David D.

    1984-01-01

    A condensate removal device is disclosed which incorporates a strainer in unit with an orifice. The strainer is cylindrical with its longitudinal axis transverse to that of the vapor conduit in which it is mounted. The orifice is positioned inside the strainer proximate the end which is remoter from the vapor conduit.

  9. Novel cationic SLN containing a synthesized single-tailed lipid as a modifier for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wangyang; Liu, Chunxi; Ye, Jiesheng; Zou, Weiwei; Zhang, Na; Xu, Wenfang

    2009-05-01

    Cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) can bind DNA directly via ionic interaction and mediate in vitro gene transfection. However, toxicity is still an obstacle, which is strongly dependent on the cationic lipid used. In the present study, a novel single-tailed cationic lipid, 6-lauroxyhexyl lysinate (LHLN), was synthesized and used as a modifier to prepare stable SLN-DNA complexes by a nanoprecipitation method. The commonly used cationic lipid cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) modified SLN-DNA formulation served as a contrast. These two formulations were characterized and compared in terms of morphology, particle size, surface charge, DNA binding capacity, release profile, cytotoxicity, and transfection efficiency. The LHLN SLN-DNA complexes had a similar spherical morphology, a relatively narrow particle size distribution and a more remarkable DNA loading capability compared to the CTAB ones. Most importantly, LHLN modified SLN had a higher gene transfection efficiency than the naked DNA and CTAB ones, which was approximately equal to that of Lipofectamine-DNA complexes, and a lower cytotoxicity compared with CTAB-SLN and Lipofectamine 2000. Thus, the novel cationic SLN can achieve efficient transfection of plasmid DNA, and to some extent reduce the cytotoxicity, which might overcome some drawbacks of the conventional cationic nanocarriers in vivo and may become a promising non-viral gene therapy vector.

  10. Expanding the Palette of Phenanthridinium Cations

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Andrew G; Senn, Hans Martin; Murphy, Michael P; Hartley, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    5,6-Disubstituted phenanthridinium cations have a range of redox, fluorescence and biological properties. Some properties rely on phenanthridiniums intercalating into DNA, but the use of these cations as exomarkers for the reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide, and as inhibitors of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) do not require intercalation. A versatile modular synthesis of 5,6-disubstituted phenanthridiniums that introduces diversity by Suzuki–Miyaura coupling, imine formation and microwave-assisted cyclisation is presented. Computational modelling at the density functional theory (DFT) level reveals that the novel displacement of the aryl halide by an acyclic N-alkylimine proceeds by an SNAr mechanism rather than electrocyclisation. It is found that the displacement of halide is concerted and there is no stable Meisenheimer intermediate, provided the calculations consistently use a polarisable solvent model and a diffuse basis set. PMID:24677631

  11. Factors affecting flow cytometric detection of apoptotic nuclei by DNA analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Elstein, K.H.; Thomas, D.J.; Zucker, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    Apoptotic thymocyte nuclei normally appear on a flow cytometric DNA histogram as a subdiploid peak. We observed that addition of a specific RNase A preparation to the detergent-based lysing buffer increased the fluorescence of toxicant-induced apoptotic nuclei to the level of untreated diploid nuclei. The chelating agent EDTA partially inhibited the RNase effect, suggesting contaminating divalent cations may have been involved. Moreover, spectrofluorometric analysis revealed that addition of RNase or divalent cations decreased the amount of DNA present in the lysate. This suggested that the upscale fluorescence shift was due to a decrease in the ability of the lysing buffer to extract DNA, possibly as a result of cation-induced chromatin condensation, rather than increased accessibility of fluorochrome binding sites due to apoptotic degeneration. Moreover, during a 16-h culture, we observed a similar, but time-dependent, upscale shift in the fluorescence of thymocytes undergoing apoptosis either spontaneously or as a result of exposure to 1 {mu}M tributyltin methoxide (TBT), 2% ethanol, 2% methanol, or 1 {mu}M dexamethasone phosphate (DEX). This commonality of effect suggests that a similar magnitude of chromatin reorganization occurs in apoptotic cells in prolonged culture regardless of the method of apoptotic induction. These findings should alert investigators to potential inaccuracies in the flow cytometric quantitation of apoptosis in vitro systems employing prolonged toxicant exposures or complex lysing cocktails that may contain active contaminants. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Recovery of condensate water quality in power generator's surface condenser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, Lilik Adib

    2017-03-01

    In PT Badak NGL Plant, steam turbines are used to drive major power generators, compressors, and pumps. Steam exiting the turbines is condensed in surface condensers to be returned to boilers. Therefore, surface condenser performance and quality of condensate water are very important. One of the recent problem was caused by the leak of a surface condenser of Steam Turbine Power Generator. Thesteam turbine was overhauled, leaving the surface condenser idle and exposed to air for more than 1.5 years. Sea water ingress due to tube leaks worsens the corrosionof the condenser shell. The combination of mineral scale and corrosion product resulting high conductivity condensate at outlet condenser when we restarted up, beyond the acceptable limit. After assessing several options, chemical cleaning was the best way to overcome the problem according to condenser configuration. An 8 hour circulation of 5%wt citric acid had succeed reducing water conductivity from 50 μmhos/cm to below 5 μmhos/cm. The condensate water, then meets the required quality, i.e. pH 8.3 - 9.0; conductivity ≤ 5 μmhos/cm, therefore the power generator can be operated normally without any concern until now.

  13. Feshbach-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, V. G.; Denteneer, P. J. H.

    2009-01-09

    We investigate the phase diagram of a two-species Bose-Hubbard model describing atoms and molecules on a lattice, interacting via a Feshbach resonance. We identify a region where the system exhibits an exotic super-Mott phase and regions with phases characterized by atomic and/or molecular condensates. Our approach is based on a recently developed exact quantum Monte Carlo algorithm: the stochastic Green function algorithm with tunable directionality. We confirm some of the results predicted by mean-field studies, but we also find disagreement with these studies. In particular, we find a phase with an atomic but no molecular condensate, which is missing in all mean-field phase diagrams.

  14. Gravity triggered neutrino condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela

    2010-11-01

    In this work we use the Schwinger-Dyson equations to study the possibility that an enhanced gravitational attraction triggers the formation of a right-handed neutrino condensate, inducing dynamical symmetry breaking and generating a Majorana mass for the right-handed neutrino at a scale appropriate for the seesaw mechanism. The composite field formed by the condensate phase could drive an early epoch of inflation. We find that to the lowest order, the theory does not allow dynamical symmetry breaking. Nevertheless, thanks to the large number of matter fields in the model, the suppression by additional powers in G of higher order terms can be compensated, boosting them up to their lowest order counterparts. This way chiral symmetry can be broken dynamically and the infrared mass generated turns out to be in the expected range for a successful seesaw scenario.

  15. Gravitational vacuum condensate stars

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Pawel O.; Mottola, Emil

    2004-01-01

    A new final state of gravitational collapse is proposed. By extending the concept of Bose–Einstein condensation to gravitational systems, a cold, dark, compact object with an interior de Sitter condensate pv = -ρv and an exterior Schwarzschild geometry of arbitrary total mass M is constructed. These regions are separated by a shell with a small but finite proper thickness ℓ of fluid with equation of state p = +ρ, replacing both the Schwarzschild and de Sitter classical horizons. The new solution has no singularities, no event horizons, and a global time. Its entropy is maximized under small fluctuations and is given by the standard hydrodynamic entropy of the thin shell, which is of the order kBℓMc/, instead of the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy formula, SBH = 4πkBGM2/c. Hence, unlike black holes, the new solution is thermodynamically stable and has no information paradox. PMID:15210982

  16. Cation diffusion in titanomagnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, R.; McCallister, R. H.; Harrison, H. R.

    1984-02-01

    Interdiffusion couple experiments were performed with titanomagnetite single crystals at 1,000°C, 1,100° C and 1,200° C in various buffered atmospheres. The dependence of the interdiffusion coefficient on oxygen fugacity, composition and temperature was interpreted in terms of point defect structure. Estimates of the cation tracer diffusivities indicate that Fe migrates via a point defect mechanism, involving mixed tetrahedral-octahedral site jumps, with an activation energy of 33 Kcal/mole; whereas Ti migration is one to two orders of magnitude slower, is restricted to octahedral sites and has an activation energy of 60 Kcal/mole.

  17. Niosomes based on synthetic cationic lipids for gene delivery: the influence of polar head-groups on the transfection efficiency in HEK-293, ARPE-19 and MSC-D1 cells.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, E; Puras, G; Agirre, M; Zárate, J; Grijalvo, S; Pons, R; Eritja, R; Martinez-Navarrete, G; Soto-Sanchez, C; Fernández, E; Pedraz, J L

    2015-01-28

    We designed niosomes based on three lipids that differed only in the polar-head group to analyze their influence on the transfection efficiency. These lipids were characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering before being incorporated into the niosomes which were characterized in terms of pKa, size, zeta potential, morphology and physical stability. Nioplexes were obtained upon the addition of a plasmid. Different ratios (w/w) were selected to analyze the influence of this parameter on size, charge and the ability to condense, release and protect the DNA. In vitro transfection experiments were performed in HEK-293, ARPE-19 and MSC-D1 cells. Our results show that the chemical composition of the cationic head-group clearly affects the physicochemical parameters of the niosomes and especially the transfection efficiency. Only niosomes based on cationic lipids with a dimethyl amino head group (lipid 3) showed a transfection capacity when compared with their counterparts amino (lipid 1) and tripeptide head-groups (lipid 2). Regarding cell viability, we clearly observed that nioplexes based on the cationic lipid 3 had a more deleterious effect than their counterparts, especially in ARPE-19 cells at 20/1 and 30/1 ratios. Similar studies could be extended to other series of cationic lipids in order to progress in the research on safe and efficient non-viral vectors for gene delivery purposes.

  18. Sidestream condensate polishing for PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Shor, S.W.W.; Yim, S.L.; Rios, J.; Liu, J.

    1986-06-01

    Condensate polishers are used in power plant condensate system to remove both particulate matter and ionized corrodents. Their conventional location is just downstream of the hotwell pumps (condensate pumps). Most polisher installations have enough flow capacity to polish 100% of the condensate. This inline configuration has some disadvantage, including a flow that varies with unit load and tends to disturb the polisher beds and reduce their effectiveness, and a potential for interrupting flow to the feedwater pumps. An alternate arrangement where water is extracted from either the condenser or the condensate system, polished and returned to the system, has been used in a few plants. Three different ways of doing this have been used: divide the condenser hotwell into two parts, one of which receives condensate from the tube bundles and the other of which is sheltered. Take unpolished condensate from the first part, purify it and return it to the other part from which the condensate pumps take suction; take unpolished condensate from one end of a divided header on the suction side of the hotwell pumps and after polishing it return it to the other end; and take unpolished condensate from a header on the discharge side of the condensate pumps, purify it and return it to the condensate system a short distance downstream. The three variants are analyzed in this report. It is concluded that the variant where the connections are on the discharge side of the condensate pumps is the most desirable for retrofitting, in all cases being far easier to retrofit than an inline polisher. In many cases it will be most desirable for new construction.

  19. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2005-03-17

    This article gives a brief review of Bose-Einstein condensation. It is an exotic quantum phenomenon that was observed in dilute atomic gases for the first time in 1995. It exhibits a new state of matter in which a group of atoms behaves as a single particle. Experiments on this form of matter are relevant to many different areas of physics- from atomic clocks and quantum computing to super fluidity, superconductivity and quantum phase transition.

  20. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto E-mail: alberto.diez@fisica.ugto.mx

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  1. Dissecting the cation-cation interaction between two uranyl units.

    PubMed

    Tecmer, Paweł; Hong, Sung W; Boguslawski, Katharina

    2016-07-21

    We present a state-of-the-art computational study of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) cation-cation interactions (dications) in aqueous solution. Reliable electronic structures of two interacting uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) subunits as well as those of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) clusters are presented for the first time. Our theoretical study elucidates the impact of cation-cation interactions on changes in the molecular structure as well as changes in vibrational and UV-Vis spectra of the bare uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) moieties for different total spin-states and total charges of the dications.

  2. Reentrant Behavior of Divalent-Counterion-Mediated DNA-DNA Electrostatic Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seil; Le, Tung T.; Nguyen, Toan T.

    2010-12-01

    The problem of DNA-DNA interaction mediated by divalent counterions is studied using computer simulation. Although divalent counterions cannot condense free DNA molecules in solution, we show that if DNA configurational entropy is restricted, divalent counterions can cause DNA reentrant condensation similar to that caused by tri- or tetravalent counterions. DNA-DNA interaction is strongly repulsive at small or large counterion concentration and is negligible or slightly attractive for a concentration in between. Implications of our results to experiments of DNA ejection from bacteriophages are discussed. The quantitative result serves to understand electrostatic effects in other experiments involving DNA and divalent counterions.

  3. Effect of spontaneous condensation on condensation heat transfer in the presence of non-condensable gases

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, J.; Hein, D.

    1999-07-01

    The presence of non condensable gases like nitrogen or air reduces the condensation heat transfer during condensation of binary steam mixtures. The non condensable gas accumulates in the vapor phase boundary layer and causes a high heat transfer resistance. Especially with high pressures and low water temperatures spontaneous condensation reduces heat transfer additionally. Fog forms within the steam-nitrogen boundary layer and the steam condenses on the water droplets of the fog layer. The convective mass transfer to the cooling water interface diminishes. Raman spectroscopy and film theory are used to quantify this effect locally. The calculation of overall condensation rates in large steam nitrogen systems requires to use three dimensional CFD codes. The paper presents equations to predict fog formation in the boundary layer which can be implemented in CFD codes.

  4. Evaluation of the counterion condensation theory of polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed Central

    Stigter, D

    1995-01-01

    We compare free energies of counterion distributions in polyelectrolyte solutions predicted from the cylindrical Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) model and from the counterion condensation theories of Manning: CC1 (Manning, 1969a, b), which assumes an infinitely thin region of condensed counterions, and CC2 (Manning, 1977), which assumes a region of finite thickness. We consider rods of finite radius with the linear charge density of B-DNA in 1-1 valent and 2-2 valent salt solutions. We find that under all conditions considered here the free energy of the CC1 and the CC2 models is higher than that of the PB model. We argue that counterion condensation theory imposes nonphysical constraints and is, therefore, a poorer approximation to the underlying physics based on continuum dielectrics, point-charge small ions, Poisson electrostatics, and Boltzmann distributions. The errors in counterion condensation theory diminish with increasing distance from, or radius of, the polyion. PMID:8527651

  5. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    1. General. A tribute to gene Mallove - the "Genie" reactor / K. Wallace and R. Stringham. An update of LENR for ICCF-11 (short course, 10/31/04) / E. Storms. New physical effects in metal deuterides / P. L. Hagelstein ... [et al.]. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments / D. J. Nagel -- 2. Experiments. Electrochemistry. Evidence of electromagnetic radiation from Ni-H systems / S. Focardi ... [et al.]. Superwave reality / I. Dardik. Excess heat in electrolysis experiments at energetics technologies / I. Dardik ... [et al.]. "Excess heat" during electrolysis in platinum/K[symbol]CO[symbol]/nickel light water system / J. Tian ... [et al.]. Innovative procedure for the, in situ, measurement of the resistive thermal coefficient of H(D)/Pd during electrolysis; cross-comparison of new elements detected in the Th-Hg-Pd-D(H) electrolytic cells / F. Celani ... [et al.]. Emergence of a high-temperature superconductivity in hydrogen cycled Pd compounds as an evidence for superstoihiometric H/D sites / A. Lipson ... [et al.]. Plasma electrolysis. Calorimetry of energy-efficient glow discharge - apparatus design and calibration / T. B. Benson and T. O. Passell. Generation of heat and products during plasma electrolysis / T. Mizuno ... [et al.]. Glow discharge. Excess heat production in Pd/D during periodic pulse discharge current in various conditions / A. B. Karabut. Beam experiments. Accelerator experiments and theoretical models for the electron screening effect in metallic environments / A. Huke, K. Czerski, and P. Heide. Evidence for a target-material dependence of the neutron-proton branching ratio in d+d reactions for deuteron energies below 20keV / A. Huke ... [et al.]. Experiments on condensed matter nuclear events in Kobe University / T. Minari ... [et al.]. Electron screening constraints for the cold fusion / K. Czerski, P. Heide, and A. Huke. Cavitation. Low mass 1.6 MHz sonofusion reactor / R. Stringham. Particle detection. Research

  6. Nanocarbon condensation in detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastea, Sorin

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the definition of the Gibbs free energy of a nanoparticle in a reactive fluid environment, and propose an approach for predicting the size of carbon nanoparticles produced by the detonation of carbon-rich explosives that regards their condensation as a nucleation process and takes into account absolute entropy effects of the cluster population. The results are consistent with experimental observations and indicate that such entropy considerations are important for determining chemical equilibrium states in energetic materials that contain an excess of carbon. The analysis may be useful for other applications that deal with the nucleation of nanoparticles under reactive conditions.

  7. Condensed Plasmas under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Konopka, U.; Rothermel, H.; Zuzic, M.; Ivlev, A.; Goree, J.; Rogers, Rick (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Experiments under microgravity conditions were carried out to study 'condensed' (liquid and crystalline) states of a colloidal plasma (ions, electrons, and charged microspheres). Systems with approximately 10(exp 6) microspheres were produced. The observed systems represent new forms of matter--quasineutral, self-organized plasmas--the properties of which are largely unexplored. In contrast to laboratory measurements, the systems under microgravity are clearly three dimensional (as expected); they exhibit stable vortex flows, sometimes adjacent to crystalline regions, and a central 'void,' free of microspheres.

  8. Nanocarbon condensation in detonation

    PubMed Central

    Bastea, Sorin

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the definition of the Gibbs free energy of a nanoparticle in a reactive fluid environment, and propose an approach for predicting the size of carbon nanoparticles produced by the detonation of carbon-rich explosives that regards their condensation as a nucleation process and takes into account absolute entropy effects of the cluster population. The results are consistent with experimental observations and indicate that such entropy considerations are important for determining chemical equilibrium states in energetic materials that contain an excess of carbon. The analysis may be useful for other applications that deal with the nucleation of nanoparticles under reactive conditions. PMID:28176827

  9. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  10. Cosmic curvature and condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, Martin

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that the universe may consist of a patchwork of domains with different Riemann curvature constants k = 0, +/-1. Features of a phase transition in which flat space breaks up in a transition 2k0 - k(-) + k(+) with initial scale factors R(-) = R(+) are postulated and explored. It is shown that such a transition is energetically permitted, has the equivalent of a Curie temperature, and can lead in a natural way to the formation of voids and galaxies. It is predicted that, if the ambient universe on average is well fitted by a purely k(-) space, with only occasional domains of k(+) containing galaxies, a density parameter of (A(z sub c + 1)) super -1 should be expected, where z sub c represents the redshift of the earliest objects to have condensed, and A takes on values ranging from about 5 to 3. Present observations of quasars would suggest a density of about 0.03 or 0.05, respectively, but it could be lower if earlier condensation took place.

  11. Pion condensation in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Dylan; Erlich, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We study pion condensation at zero temperature in a hard-wall holographic model of hadrons with isospin chemical potential. We find that the transition from the hadronic phase to the pion condensate phase is first order except in a certain limit of model parameters. Our analysis suggests that immediately across the phase boundary the condensate acts as a stiff medium approaching the Zel'dovich limit of equal energy density and pressure.

  12. Cationic liposomes as vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Dennis; Korsholm, Karen Smith; Andersen, Peter; Agger, Else Marie

    2011-04-01

    The application of cationic liposomes as vaccine delivery systems and adjuvants has been investigated extensively over the last few decades. However, cationic liposomes are, in general, not sufficiently immunostimulatory, which is why the combination of liposomes with immunostimulating ligands has arisen as a strategy in the development of novel adjuvant systems. Within the last 5 years, two novel adjuvant systems based on cationic liposomes incorporating Toll-like receptor or non-Toll-like receptor immunostimulating ligands have progressed from preclinical testing in smaller animal species to clinical testing in humans. The immune responses that these clinical candidates induce are primarily of the Th1 type for which there is a profound unmet need. Furthermore, a number of new cationic liposome-forming surfactants with notable immunostimulatory properties have been discovered. In this article we review the recent progress on the application of cationic liposomes as vaccine delivery systems/adjuvants.

  13. Condensation heat transfer in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, L. C.; Parish, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    In the present treatment of the condensation heat transfer process in a microgravity environment, two mechanisms for condensate removal are analyzed in light of two problems: (1) film condensation on a flat, porous plate, with condensate being removed by wall suction; and (2) the analytical prediction of the heat transfer coefficient of condensing annular flows, where the condensate film is driven by vapor shear. Both suction and vapor shear can effectively drain the condensate, ensuring continuous operation in microgravity.

  14. Novel gemini cationic lipids with carbamate groups for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Qureshi, Farooq; Zhang, Shu-Biao; Cui, Shao-Hui; Wang, Bing; Chen, Hui-Ying; Lv, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Fen; Huang, Leaf

    2014-05-21

    To obtain efficient non-viral vectors, a series of Gemini cationic lipids with carbamate linkers between headgroups and hydrophobic tails were synthesized. They have the hydrocarbon chains of 12, 14, 16 and 18 carbon atoms as tails, designated as G12, G14, G16 and G18, respectively. These Gemini cationic lipids were prepared into cationic liposomes for the study of the physicochemical properties and gene delivery. The DNA-bonding ability of these Gemini cationic liposomes was much better than their mono-head counterparts (designated as M12, M14, M16 and M18, respectively). In the same series of liposomes, bonding ability declined with an increase in tail length. They were tested for their gene-transferring capabilities in Hep-2 and A549 cells. They showed higher transfection efficiency than their mono-head counterparts and were comparable or superior in transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity to the commercial liposomes, DOTAP and Lipofectamine 2000. Our results convincingly demonstrate that the gene-transferring capabilities of these cationic lipids depended on hydrocarbon chain length. Gene transfection efficiency was maximal at a chain length of 14, as G14 can silence about 80 % of luciferase in A549 cells. Cell uptake results indicate that Gemini lipid delivery systems could be internalised by cells very efficiently. Thus, the Gemini cationic lipids could be used as synthetic non-viral gene delivery carriers for further study.

  15. Novel gemini cationic lipids with carbamate groups for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Qureshi, Farooq; Zhang, Shu-Biao; Cui, Shao-Hui; Wang, Bing; Chen, Hui-Ying; Lv, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Fen; Huang, Leaf

    2014-01-01

    To obtain efficient non-viral vectors, a series of Gemini cationic lipids with carbamate linkers between headgroups and hydrophobic tails were synthesized. They have the hydrocarbon chains of 12, 14, 16 and 18 carbon atoms as tails, designated as G12, G14, G16 and G18, respectively. These Gemini cationic lipids were prepared into cationic liposomes for the study of the physicochemical properties and gene delivery. The DNA-bonding ability of these Gemini cationic liposomes was much better than their mono-head counterparts (designated as M12, M14, M16 and M18, respectively). In the same series of liposomes, bonding ability declined with an increase in tail length. They were tested for their gene-transferring capabilities in Hep-2 and A549 cells. They showed higher transfection efficiency than their mono-head counterparts and were comparable or superior in transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity to the commercial liposomes, DOTAP and Lipofectamine 2000. Our results convincingly demonstrate that the gene-transferring capabilities of these cationic lipids depended on hydrocarbon chain length. Gene transfection efficiency was maximal at a chain length of 14, as G14 can silence about 80 % of luciferase in A549 cells. Cell uptake results indicate that Gemini lipid delivery systems could be internalised by cells very efficiently. Thus, the Gemini cationic lipids could be used as synthetic non-viral gene delivery carriers for further study. PMID:25045521

  16. [The effect of spermine on acid-base equilibrium in DNA molecule].

    PubMed

    Slonitskiĭ, S V; Kuptsov, V Iu

    1990-01-01

    The influence of spermine (Sp) on the acid-induced predenaturational and denaturational transitions in the DNA molecule structure has been studied by means of circular dichroism, spectrophotometric and viscometric titration at supporting electrolyte concentration 10 mM NaCl. The data available indicate that at [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.60 (here [N] and [P] are molar concentrations of Sp nitrogen and DNA phosphours, respectively) the cooperative structural B----B(+)----S transitions are accompanied by the DNA double-helice winding. No competition for proton acceptor sites in the DNA molecule between H+ and Sp4+ cations has been observed when binding to neutral macromolecule. At 0.60 less than or equal to [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.75 the displacement of the B----B(+)----S transitions midpoints to acidic pH region has been established. This is accompanied by DNA condensation and the appearance of differential scattering of circularly polarized light. The calculations carried out in the framework of the two-variable Manning theory have shown that the acid-induced reduction of the effective polyion charge density facilitates the Sp-induced DNA condensation. It has been shown that the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule is determined by local [H+] in the 2-3 A hydrated monolayer of the macromolecule. An adequate estimation of [H+] can be obtained on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzman approach. The data obtained are consistent with recently proposed hypothesis of polyelectrolyte invariance of the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule.

  17. Condenser for photolithography system

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.

    2004-03-02

    A condenser for a photolithography system, in which a mask image from a mask is projected onto a wafer through a camera having an entrance pupil, includes a source of propagating radiation, a first mirror illuminated by the radiation, a mirror array illuminated by the radiation reflected from said first mirror, and a second mirror illuminated by the radiation reflected from the array. The mirror array includes a plurality of micromirrors. Each of the micromirrors is selectively actuatable independently of each other. The first mirror and the second mirror are disposed such that the source is imaged onto a plane of the mask and the mirror array is imaged into the entrance pupil of the camera.

  18. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  19. Amine catalyzed condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S.

    2001-01-01

    The catalysis of the condensation of hydrolyzed metal alkoxides by amines has been mentioned in the literature, but there has been no systematic study of their influence on the rate of the condensation reaction of the alkoxide and the microstructure of the resultant gel.

  20. Effects of compensatory solutes on DNA and chromatin structural organization in solution.

    PubMed

    Houssier, C; Gilles, R; Flock, S

    1997-07-01

    We investigated the effect of glycine and other osmotic effectors on DNA and chromatin precipitation by mono-, di- and multivalent cations and histone H1. The addition of these compounds drastically reduces the precipitation effects with an efficiency in the order taurine > glycine > proline and sorbitol > inositol > betaine. Aminocarboxylic acids with increasing distance between the charged C- and N-terminal groups displayed enhanced efficiency in the protection effect against DNA precipitation. We interpreted these observations on the basis of Manning's counterion condensation theory, taking into account the increase in dielectric constant upon osmotic effector addition. 23Na-NMR was used to evidence sodium counterions release as a result of this increase in dielectric constant.

  1. A route to self-assemble suspended DNA nano-complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lansac, Yves; Degrouard, Jeril; Renouard, Madalena; Toma, Adriana C.; Livolant, Françoise; Raspaud, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Highly charged polyelectrolytes can self-assemble in presence of condensing agents such as multivalent cations, amphiphilic molecules or proteins of opposite charge. Aside precipitation, the formation of soluble micro- and nano-particles has been reported in multiple systems. However a precise control of experimental conditions needed to achieve the desired structures has been so far hampered by the extreme sensitivity of the samples to formulation pathways. Herein we combine experiments and molecular modelling to investigate the detailed microscopic dynamics and the structure of self-assembled hexagonal bundles made of short dsDNA fragments complexed with small basic proteins. We suggest that inhomogeneous mixing conditions are required to form and stabilize charged self-assembled nano-aggregates in large excess of DNA. Our results should help re-interpreting puzzling behaviors reported for a large class of strongly charged polyelectrolyte systems. PMID:26912166

  2. APPARATUS FOR CONDENSATION AND SUBLIMATION

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, R.J.; Fuis, F. Jr.

    1958-10-01

    An apparatus is presented for the sublimation and condensation of uranium compounds in order to obtain an improved crystalline structure of this material. The apparatus comprises a vaporizing chamber and condensing structure connected thereto. There condenser is fitted with a removable liner having a demountable baffle attached to the liner by means of brackets and a removable pin. The baffle is of spiral cross-section and is provided with cooling coils disposed between the surfaces of the baffle for circulation of a temperature controlling liquid within the baffle. The cooling coll provides for controlllng the temperature of the baffle to insure formatlon of a satisfactory condensate, and the removable liner facilitates the removal of condensate formed during tbe sublimation process.

  3. Chromatin condensation during terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baobing; Yang, Jing; Ji, Peng

    2016-09-02

    Mammalian terminal erythropoiesis involves gradual but dramatic chromatin condensation steps that are essential for cell differentiation. Chromatin and nuclear condensation is followed by a unique enucleation process, which is believed to liberate more spaces for hemoglobin enrichment and enable the generation of a physically flexible mature red blood cell. Although these processes have been known for decades, the mechanisms are still unclear. Our recent study reveals an unexpected nuclear opening formation during mouse terminal erythropoiesis that requires caspase-3 activity. Major histones, except H2AZ, are partially released from the opening, which is important for chromatin condensation. Block of the nuclear opening through caspase inhibitor or knockdown of caspase-3 inhibits chromatin condensation and enucleation. We also demonstrate that nuclear opening and histone release are cell cycle regulated. These studies reveal a novel mechanism for chromatin condensation in mammalia terminal erythropoiesis.

  4. Gas-phase energies of actinide oxides -- an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium

    SciTech Connect

    Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-08-10

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  5. Gas-Phase Energetics of Actinide Oxides: An Assessment of Neutral and Cationic Monoxides and Dioxides from Thorium to Curium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-09-01

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  6. Gas-phase energetics of actinide oxides: an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium.

    PubMed

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K

    2009-11-12

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  7. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: Permeant cations chaperoned by anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  8. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes of

  9. Pds5 regulators segregate cohesion and condensation pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tong, Kevin; Skibbens, Robert V

    2015-06-02

    Cohesins are required both for the tethering together of sister chromatids (termed cohesion) and subsequent condensation into discrete structures-processes fundamental for faithful chromosome segregation into daughter cells. Differentiating between cohesin roles in cohesion and condensation would provide an important advance in studying chromatin metabolism. Pds5 is a cohesin-associated factor that is essential for both cohesion maintenance and condensation. Recent studies revealed that ELG1 deletion suppresses the temperature sensitivity of pds5 mutant cells. However, the mechanisms through which Elg1 may regulate cohesion and condensation remain unknown. Here, we report that ELG1 deletion from pds5-1 mutant cells results in a significant rescue of cohesion, but not condensation, defects. Based on evidence that Elg1 unloads the DNA replication clamp PCNA from DNA, we tested whether PCNA overexpression would similarly rescue pds5-1 mutant cell cohesion defects. The results indeed reveal that elevated levels of PCNA rescue pds5-1 temperature sensitivity and cohesion defects, but do not rescue pds5-1 mutant cell condensation defects. In contrast, RAD61 deletion rescues the condensation defect, but importantly, neither the temperature sensitivity nor cohesion defects exhibited by pds5-1 mutant cells. In combination, these findings reveal that cohesion and condensation are separable pathways and regulated in nonredundant mechanisms. These results are discussed in terms of a new model through which cohesion and condensation are spatially regulated.

  10. Characterization of spacecraft humidity condensate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muckle, Susan; Schultz, John R.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    When construction of Space Station Freedom reaches the Permanent Manned Capability (PMC) stage, the Water Recovery and Management Subsystem will be fully operational such that (distilled) urine, spent hygiene water, and humidity condensate will be reclaimed to provide water of potable quality. The reclamation technologies currently baselined to process these waste waters include adsorption, ion exchange, catalytic oxidation, and disinfection. To ensure that the baseline technologies will be able to effectively remove those compounds presenting a health risk to the crew, the National Research Council has recommended that additional information be gathered on specific contaminants in waste waters representative of those to be encountered on the Space Station. With the application of new analytical methods and the analysis of waste water samples more representative of the Space Station environment, advances in the identification of the specific contaminants continue to be made. Efforts by the Water and Food Analytical Laboratory at JSC were successful in enlarging the database of contaminants in humidity condensate. These efforts have not only included the chemical characterization of condensate generated during ground-based studies, but most significantly the characterization of cabin and Spacelab condensate generated during Shuttle missions. The analytical results presented in this paper will be used to show how the composition of condensate varies amongst enclosed environments and thus the importance of collecting condensate from an environment close to that of the proposed Space Station. Although advances were made in the characterization of space condensate, complete characterization, particularly of the organics, requires further development of analytical methods.

  11. Condensation in Nanoporous Packed Beds.

    PubMed

    Ally, Javed; Molla, Shahnawaz; Mostowfi, Farshid

    2016-05-10

    In materials with tiny, nanometer-scale pores, liquid condensation is shifted from the bulk saturation pressure observed at larger scales. This effect is called capillary condensation and can block pores, which has major consequences in hydrocarbon production, as well as in fuel cells, catalysis, and powder adhesion. In this study, high pressure nanofluidic condensation studies are performed using propane and carbon dioxide in a colloidal crystal packed bed. Direct visualization allows the extent of condensation to be observed, as well as inference of the pore geometry from Bragg diffraction. We show experimentally that capillary condensation depends on pore geometry and wettability because these factors determine the shape of the menisci that coalesce when pore filling occurs, contrary to the typical assumption that all pore structures can be modeled as cylindrical and perfectly wetting. We also observe capillary condensation at higher pressures than has been done previously, which is important because many applications involving this phenomenon occur well above atmospheric pressure, and there is little, if any, experimental validation of capillary condensation at such pressures, particularly with direct visualization.

  12. Epimerization in peptide thioester condensation.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Akaji, Kenichi; Aimoto, Saburo

    2012-11-01

    Peptide segment couplings are now widely utilized in protein chemical synthesis. One of the key structures for the strategy is the peptide thioester. Peptide thioester condensation, in which a C-terminal peptide thioester is selectively activated by silver ions then condensed with an amino component, is a powerful tool. But the amino acid adjacent to the thioester is at risk of epimerization. During the preparation of peptide thioesters by the Boc solid-phase method, no substantial epimerization of the C-terminal amino acid was detected. Epimerization was, however, observed during a thioester-thiol exchange reaction and segment condensation in DMSO in the presence of a base. In contrast, thioester-thiol exchange reactions in aqueous solutions gave no epimerization. The epimerization during segment condensation was significantly suppressed with a less polar solvent that is applicable to segments in thioester peptide condensation. These results were applied to a longer peptide thioester condensation. The epimer content of the coupling product of 89 residues was reduced from 27% to 6% in a condensation between segments of 45 and 44 residues for the thioester and the amino component, respectively.

  13. Water condensation: a multiscale phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kasper Risgaard; Fojan, Peter; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Gurevich, Leonid

    2014-02-01

    The condensation of water is a phenomenon occurring in multiple situations in everyday life, e.g., when fog is formed or when dew forms on the grass or on windows. This means that this phenomenon plays an important role within the different fields of science including meteorology, building physics, and chemistry. In this review we address condensation models and simulations with the main focus on heterogeneous condensation of water. The condensation process is, at first, described from a thermodynamic viewpoint where the nucleation step is described by the classical nucleation theory. Further, we address the shortcomings of the thermodynamic theory in describing the nucleation and emphasize the importance of nanoscale effects. This leads to the description of condensation from a molecular viewpoint. Also presented is how the nucleation can be simulated by use of molecular models, and how the condensation process is simulated on the macroscale using computational fluid dynamics. Finally, examples of hybrid models combining molecular and macroscale models for the simulation of condensation on a surface are presented.

  14. Effect of Mechanical Agitation on Cationic Liposome Transport across an Unstirred Water Layer in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yusuke; Iwasaki, Ayu; Matsuoka, Kenta; Fujita, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    To develop an effective oral delivery system for plasmid DNA (pDNA) using cationic liposomes, it is necessary to clarify the characteristics of uptake and transport of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes into the intestinal epithelium. In particular, evaluation of the involvement of an unstirred water layer (UWL), which is a considerable permeability barrier, in cationic liposome transport is very important. Here, we investigated the effects of a UWL on the transfection efficiency of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes into a Caco-2 cell monolayer. When Caco-2 cells were transfected with cationic liposome/pDNA complexes in shaking cultures to reduce the thickness of the UWL, gene expression was significantly higher in Caco-2 cells compared with static cultures. We also found that this enhancement of gene expression by shaking was not attributable to activation of transcription factors such as activator protein-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). In addition, the increase in gene expression by mechanical agitation was observed at all charge ratios (1.5, 2.3, 3.1, 4.5) of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes. Transport experiments using Transwells demonstrated that mechanical agitation increased the uptake of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes by Caco-2 cells, whereas transport of the complexes across a Caco-2 cell monolayer did not occurr. Moreover, the augmentation of the gene expression of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes by shaking was observed in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. These results indicate that a UWL greatly affects the uptake and transfection efficiency of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes into an epithelial monolayer in vitro.

  15. Steam condenser thermal design theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, B. J.

    Test data and prediction methods for condensation in steam condenser tube banks are reviewed. Standards for thermal rating; effect of vapor velocity; vapor shear and inundation in tube banks; correction factors to the Nusselt equation; and equations for the combined effect of vapor shear and inundation are discussed. Effects of noncondensible gases; tube side heat transfer; and expressions for combined tube side and shell side heat transfer are considered. Frictional, gravitational, momentum, and pressure drop trends; and the role of access lanes to reduce pressure drop are outlined. Computer models of condensers, including algebraic representations of the field equations, are summarized.

  16. Multilayered polyelectrolyte films promote the direct and localized delivery of DNA to cells.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Christopher M; Zhang, Jingtao; Fredin, Nathaniel J; Lynn, David M

    2005-08-18

    Multilayered polyelectrolyte films fabricated from plasmid DNA and a hydrolytically degradable synthetic polycation can be used to direct the localized transfection of cells without the aid of a secondary transfection agent. Multilayered assemblies 100 nm thick consisting of alternating layers of synthetic polymer and plasmid DNA encoding for enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were deposited on quartz substrates using a layer-by-layer fabrication procedure. The placement of film-coated slides in contact with COS-7 cells growing in serum-containing culture medium resulted in gene expression in cells localized under the film-coated portion of the slides. The average percentage of cells expressing EGFP relative to the total number of cells ranged from 4.6% to 37.9%, with an average of 18.6%+/-8.2%, as determined by fluorescence microscopy. In addition to providing a mechanism for the immobilization of DNA at the cell/surface interface, a preliminary analysis of film topography by atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated that polymer /DNA films undergo significant structural rearrangements upon incubation to present surface bound condensed plasmid DNA nanoparticles. These data suggest that the presence of the cationic polymer in these materials may also contribute to the internalization and expression of plasmid. The materials and design principles reported here present an attractive framework for the local or non-invasive delivery of DNA from the surfaces of implantable materials or biomedical devices.

  17. Condensation heat transfer under a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    A description of the condensation heat transfer process in microgravity is given. A review of the literature is also reported. The most essential element of condensation heat transfer in microgravity is the condensate removal mechanism. Two mechanisms for condensate removal are analyzed by looking into two problems. The first problem is concerned with film condensation on a flat porous plate with the condensate being removed by suction at the wall. The second problem is an analytical prediction of the heat transfer coefficient for condensing annular flows with the condensate film driven by the vapor shear. It is concluded that both suction and vapor shear can effectively drain the condensate to ensure continuous operation of the condensers operated under a microgravity environment. It is recommended that zero-g flight experiments be carried out to verify the prediction made in the present report. The results contained in this report should also aid in the design of future space condensers.

  18. Phospholipid-nucleic acid recognition: energetics of DNA-Mg2+-phosphatidylcholine ternary complex formation and its further compaction as a gene delivery formulation.

    PubMed

    Süleymanoglu, Erhan

    2006-01-01

    Thermodynamic features related to the preparation and use of self-assemblies formed between multilamellar and unilamellar zwitterionic liposomes and polynucleotides with various conformation and sizes are presented. The divalent metal cation-induced adsorption, aggregation, and adhesion between single- and double-stranded polyribonucleotides and phosphatidylcholine vesicles was followed by differential adiabatic scanning microcalorimetry. Nucleic acid condensation and compaction mediated by Mg2+ was followed, with regard to interfacial interaction with unilamellar vesicles. Microcalorimetric measurements of synthetic phospholipid vesicles and poly(ribo)nucleotides and their ternary complexes with inorganic cations were used to build the thermodynamic model of their structural transitions. The increased thermal stability of the phospholipid bilayers is achieved by affecting their melting transition temperature by nucleic acid-induced electrostatic charge screening. Measurements give evidence for the stabilization of polynucleotide helices upon their association with liposomes in the presence of divalent metal cations. Such an induced aggregation of vesicles leads either to heterogeneous multilamellar DNA-lipid arrangements or to DNA-induced bilayer destabilization and lipid fusion. The further employment of these polyelectrolyte nanostructures as improved formulations in therapeutic gene delivery trials, as well as in DNA chromatography, is discussed.

  19. DNA vaccination for cervical cancer; a novel technology platform of RALA mediated gene delivery via polymeric microneedles.

    PubMed

    Ali, A A; McCrudden, C M; McCaffrey, J; McBride, J W; Cole, G; Dunne, N J; Robson, T; Kissenpfennig, A; Donnelly, R F; McCarthy, H O

    2016-12-12

    HPV subtypes (16, 18) are associated with the development of cervical cancer, with oncoproteins E6 and E7 responsible for pathogenesis. The goal of this study was to evaluate our 'smart system' technology platform for DNA vaccination against cervical cancer. The vaccination platform brings together two main components; a peptide RALA which condenses DNA into cationic nanoparticles (NPs), and a polymeric polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) microneedle (MN) patch for cutaneous delivery of the loaded NPs. RALA condensed E6/E7 DNA into NPs not exceeding 100nm in diameter, and afforded the DNA protection from degradation in PVP. Sera from mice vaccinated with MN/RALA-E6/E7 were richer in E6/E7-specific IgGs, displayed a greater T-cell-mediated TC-1 cytotoxicity and contained more IFN-γ than sera from mice that received NPs intramuscularly. More importantly, MN/RALA-E6/E7 delayed TC-1 tumor initiation in a prophylactic model, and slowed tumor growth in a therapeutic model of vaccination, and was more potent than intramuscular vaccination.

  20. Cooperative interaction between metallosurfactants, derived from the [Ru(2,2'-bpy)3](2+) complex, and DNA.

    PubMed

    Lebrón, J A; Ostos, F J; Moyá, M L; López-López, M; Carrasco, C J; López-Cornejo, P

    2015-11-01

    With the idea of improving and advancing the design and preparation of new reagents based on cationic surfactants for gene therapy, two luminescent metallosurfactants derived from the [Ru(2,2'-bpy)3](2+) complex were synthesized. Their interaction with DNA and the effect they exert on the conformation of the polynucleotide were studied by using different techniques. The equilibrium binding constants, Kb, of the two surfactants to DNA were obtained at different molar ratios X=[surfactant]/[DNA]. The observed sigmoidal dependence of Kb on X confirms the cooperative character of the binding. After the addition of a determined surfactant concentration, the condensation of the polymer was observed. The amount of surfactant needed to produce this conformational change is lower for the double stranded surfactant than for the single chain surfactant due to a stronger hydrophobic interaction. The addition of α-cyclodextrin molecules to the metallosurfactant/DNA solutions results in polynucleotide decompaction, which confirms the importance of the hydrophobic interactions in the condensation of the polynucleotide. Results also show the importance of choosing both a proper system to study and the most seeming measuring technique to use. It is demonstrated that, in some cases, the use of several techniques is desirable to obtain reliable and accurate results.

  1. Monitoring by Control Technique - Condensers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about condenser control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  2. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment is another investigation that examines the flow of a mixture of liquids and the vapors they produce when in contact with hot space system equipment. Coo...

  3. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akito; Ota, Ken-Ichiro; Iwamura, Yashuhiro

    Preface -- 1. General. Progress in condensed matter nuclear science / A. Takahashi. Summary of ICCF-12 / X. Z. Li. Overview of light water/hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions / G. H. Miley and P. J. Shrestha -- 2. Excess heat and He detection. Development of "DS-reactor" as the practical reactor of "cold fusion" based on the "DS-cell" with "DS-cathode" / Y. Arata and Y.-C. Zhang. Progress in excess of power experiments with electrochemical loading of deuterium in palladium / V. Violante ... [et al.]. Anomalous energy generation during conventional electrolysis / T. Mizuno and Y. Toriyabe. "Excess heat" induced by deuterium flux in palladium film / B. Liu ... [et al.]. Abnormal excess heat observed during Mizuno-type experiments / J.-F. Fauvarque, P. P. Clauzon and G. J.-M. Lallevé. Seebeck envelope calorimetry with a Pd|D[symbol]O + H[symbol]SO[symbol] electrolytic cell / W.-S. Zhang, J. Dash and Q. Wang. Observation and investigation of nuclear fusion and self-induced electric discharges in liquids / A. I. Koldamasov ... [et al.]. Description of a sensitive seebeck calorimeter used for cold fusion studies / E. Storms. Some recent results at ENEA / M. Apicella ... [et al.]. Heat measurement during plasma electrolysis / K. Iizumi ... [et al.]. Effect of an additive on thermal output during electrolysis of heavy water with a palladium cathode / Q. Wang and J. Dash. Thermal analysis of calorimetric systems / L. D'Aulerio ... [et al.]. Surface plasmons and low-energy nuclear reactions triggering / E. Castagna ... [et al.]. Production method for violent TCB jet plasma from cavity / F. Amini. New results and an ongoing excess heat controversy / L. Kowalski ... [et al.] -- 3. Transmutation. Observation of surface distribution of products by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry during D[symbol] gas permeation through Pd Complexes / Y. Iwamura ... [et al.]. Discharge experiment using Pd/CaO/Pd multi-layered cathode / S. Narita ... [et al.]. Producing transmutation

  4. Pyrophosphate-condensing activity linked to nucleic acid synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Volloch, V Z; Rits, S; Tumerman, L

    1979-01-01

    In some preparations of DNA dependent RNA polymerase a new enzymatic activity has been found which catalyzes the condensation of two pyrophosphate molecules, liberated in the process of RNA synthesis, to one molecule of orthophosphate and one molecule of Mg (or Mn) - chelate complex with trimetaphosphate. This activity can also cooperate with DNA-polymerase, on condition that both enzymes originate from the same cells. These results point to two general conclusions. First, energy is conserved in the overall process of nucleic acid synthesis and turnover, so that the process does not require an energy influx from the cell's general resources. Second, the synthesis of nucleic acids is catalyzed by a complex enzyme system which contains at least two separate enzymes, one responsible for nucleic acid polymerization and the other for energy conservation via pyrophosphate condensation. Images PMID:88040

  5. Advances in shell side condensation for refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Ralph L.

    The design of shell and tube condensers used in air conditioning and refrigeration applications is discussed. The geometry of interest involves condensation on the shell side of a horizontal tube bundle. Enhanced heat transfer geometries are typically used for condensation on the shell side. The heat transfer is removed by water on the tube side, which typically have tube side enhancement. Single tube and row effect condensation data are presented. Thermal design methods for sizing of the condenser are outlined.

  6. Spectroscopic evidence of 'jumping and pecking' of cholinium and H-bond enhanced cation-cation interaction in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Anne; Fumino, Koichi; Bonsa, Anne-Marie; Ludwig, Ralf

    2015-12-14

    The subtle energy-balance between Coulomb-interaction, hydrogen bonding and dispersion forces governs the unique properties of ionic liquids. To measure weak interactions is still a challenge. This is in particular true in the condensed phase wherein a melange of different strong and directional types of interactions is present and cannot be detected separately. For the ionic liquids (2-hydroxyethyl)-trimethylammonium (cholinium) bis(trifluoro-methylsulfonyl)amide and N,N,N-trimethyl-N-propylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide which differ only in the 2-hydroxyethyl and the propyl groups of the cations, we could directly observe distinct vibrational signatures of hydrogen bonding between the cation and the anion indicated by 'jumping and pecking' motions of cholinium. The assignment could be confirmed by isotopic substitution H/D at the hydroxyl group of cholinium. For the first time we could also find direct spectroscopic evidence for H-bonding between like-charged ions. The repulsive Coulomb interaction between the cations is overcome by cooperative hydrogen bonding between the 2-hydroxyethyl functional groups of cholinium. This H-bond network is reflected in the properties of protic ionic liquids (PILs) such as viscosities and conductivities.

  7. Bose-Einstein condensate strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2015-02-01

    We consider the possible existence of gravitationally bound general relativistic strings consisting of Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) matter which is described, in the Newtonian limit, by the zero temperature time-dependent nonlinear Schrödinger equation (the Gross-Pitaevskii equation), with repulsive interparticle interactions. In the Madelung representation of the wave function, the quantum dynamics of the condensate can be formulated in terms of the classical continuity equation and the hydrodynamic Euler equations. In the case of a condensate with quartic nonlinearity, the condensates can be described as a gas with two pressure terms, the interaction pressure, which is proportional to the square of the matter density, and the quantum pressure, which is without any classical analogue, though, when the number of particles in the system is high enough, the latter may be neglected. Assuming cylindrical symmetry, we analyze the physical properties of the BEC strings in both the interaction pressure and quantum pressure dominated limits, by numerically integrating the gravitational field equations. In this way we obtain a large class of stable stringlike astrophysical objects, whose basic parameters (mass density and radius) depend sensitively on the mass and scattering length of the condensate particle, as well as on the quantum pressure of the Bose-Einstein gas.

  8. Polariton condensates at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet, Thierry; Brimont, Christelle

    2016-10-01

    We review the recent developments of the polariton physics in microcavities featuring the exciton-photon strong coupling at room temperature, and leading to the achievement of room-temperature polariton condensates. Such cavities embed active layers with robust excitons that present a large binding energy and a large oscillator strength, i.e. wide bandgap inorganic or organic semiconductors, or organic molecules. These various systems are compared, in terms of figures of merit and of common features related to their strong oscillator strength. The various demonstrations of polariton laser are compared, as well as their condensation phase diagrams. The room-temperature operation indeed allows a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic and out-of-equilibrium regimes of the condensation process. The crucial role of the spatial dynamics of the condensate formation is discussed, as well as the debated issue of the mechanism of stimulated relaxation from the reservoir to the condensate under non-resonant excitation. Finally the prospects of polariton devices are presented.

  9. Cation affinity numbers of Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Christoph; Tandon, Raman; Maryasin, Boris; Larionov, Evgeny; Zipse, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Using selected theoretical methods the affinity of a large range of Lewis bases towards model cations has been quantified. The range of model cations includes the methyl cation as the smallest carbon-centered electrophile, the benzhydryl and trityl cations as models for electrophilic substrates encountered in Lewis base-catalyzed synthetic procedures, and the acetyl cation as a substrate model for acyl-transfer reactions. Affinities towards these cationic electrophiles are complemented by data for Lewis-base addition to Michael acceptors as prototypical neutral electrophiles.

  10. Spacecraft Crew Cabin Condensation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrillo, Laurie Y.; Rickman, Steven L.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2013-01-01

    A report discusses a new technique to prevent condensation on the cabin walls of manned spacecraft exposed to the cold environment of space, as such condensation could lead to free water in the cabin. This could facilitate the growth of mold and bacteria, and could lead to oxidation and weakening of the cabin wall. This condensation control technique employs a passive method that uses spacecraft waste heat as the primary wallheating mechanism. A network of heat pipes is bonded to the crew cabin pressure vessel, as well as the pipes to each other, in order to provide for efficient heat transfer to the cabin walls and from one heat pipe to another. When properly sized, the heat-pipe network can maintain the crew cabin walls at a nearly uniform temperature. It can also accept and distribute spacecraft waste heat to maintain the pressure vessel above dew point.

  11. Condensed Astatine: Monatomic and Metallic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N. W.

    2013-09-01

    The condensed matter properties of the nominal terminating element of the halogen group with atomic number 85, astatine, are as yet unknown. In the intervening more than 70 years since its discovery significant advances have been made in substrate cooling and the other techniques necessary for the production of the element to the point where we might now enquire about the key properties astatine might have if it attained a condensed phase. This subject is addressed here using density functional theory and structural selection methods, with an accounting for relativistic physics that is essential. Condensed astatine is predicted to be quite different in fascinating ways from iodine, being already at 1 atm a metal, and monatomic at that, and possibly a superconductor (as is dense iodine).

  12. Condensed astatine: monatomic and metallic.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N W

    2013-09-13

    The condensed matter properties of the nominal terminating element of the halogen group with atomic number 85, astatine, are as yet unknown. In the intervening more than 70 years since its discovery significant advances have been made in substrate cooling and the other techniques necessary for the production of the element to the point where we might now enquire about the key properties astatine might have if it attained a condensed phase. This subject is addressed here using density functional theory and structural selection methods, with an accounting for relativistic physics that is essential. Condensed astatine is predicted to be quite different in fascinating ways from iodine, being already at 1 atm a metal, and monatomic at that, and possibly a superconductor (as is dense iodine).

  13. Neuroamine condensations in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Collins, M A

    1980-01-01

    Non-enzymatic products of neuroamines and endogenous carbonyl compounds are apparent "normal" products in human metabolism, and their levels become increased during pathological conditions. DA condensation products--salsolinol, its O-methylated derivative, and methylated derivatives of 1-carboxyl-THP--are found normally in human urine, and the last TIQ is in human brain. Potential beta-carboline condensation products also occur in (aging) human lens tissue. Chronic drinking in alcoholics causes significant increases in urinary salsolinol and O-methyl-salsolinol, presumably due to the increased AcH which is made available. L-DOPA therapy (in Parkinson's disease) elevates urinary and tissue levels of the carboxylated THP derivatives, as well as of salsolinol and THP itself; hyperphenylalaninemia during PKU also increases tissue levels of a DA/phenylpyruvate-derived TIQ and an imine condensate of phenylethylamine and vitamin B6. These unusual products may interfere with neural dynamic processes, and produce cytotoxic metabolites.

  14. Introduction. Cosmology meets condensed matter.

    PubMed

    Kibble, T W B; Pickett, G R

    2008-08-28

    At first sight, low-temperature condensed-matter physics and early Universe cosmology seem worlds apart. Yet, in the last few years a remarkable synergy has developed between the two. It has emerged that, in terms of their mathematical description, there are surprisingly close parallels between them. This interplay has been the subject of a very successful European Science Foundation (ESF) programme entitled COSLAB ('Cosmology in the Laboratory') that ran from 2001 to 2006, itself built on an earlier ESF network called TOPDEF ('Topological Defects: Non-equilibrium Field Theory in Particle Physics, Condensed Matter and Cosmology'). The articles presented in this issue of Philosophical Transactions A are based on talks given at the Royal Society Discussion Meeting 'Cosmology meets condensed matter', held on 28 and 29 January 2008. Many of the speakers had participated earlier in the COSLAB programme, but the strength of the field is illustrated by the presence also of quite a few new participants.

  15. Scrutinizing the pion condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignano, Stefano; Lepori, Luca; Mammarella, Andrea; Mannarelli, Massimo; Pagliaroli, Giulia

    2017-02-01

    When the isospin chemical potential exceeds the pion mass, charged pions condense in the zero-momentum state forming a superfluid. Chiral perturbation theory provides a very powerful tool for studying this phase. However, the formalism that is usually employed in this context does not clarify various aspects of the condensation mechanism and makes the identification of the soft modes problematic. We re-examine the pion condensed phase using different approaches within the chiral perturbation theory framework. As a first step, we perform a low-density expansion of the chiral Lagrangian valid close to the onset of the Bose-Einstein condensation. We obtain an effective theory that can be mapped to a Gross-Pitaevskii Lagrangian in which, remarkably, all the coefficients depend on the isospin chemical potential. The low-density expansion becomes unreliable deep in the pion condensed phase. For this reason, we develop an alternative field expansion deriving a low-energy Lagrangian analog to that of quantum magnets. By integrating out the "radial" fluctuations we obtain a soft Lagrangian in terms of the Nambu-Goldstone bosons arising from the breaking of the pion number symmetry. Finally, we test the robustness of the second-order transition between the normal and the pion condensed phase when next-to-leading-order chiral corrections are included. We determine the range of parameters for turning the second-order phase transition into a first-order one, finding that the currently accepted values of these corrections are unlikely to change the order of the phase transition.

  16. Biophysical characterization of quaternary pyridinium functionalized polynorbornenes for DNA complexation and their cellular interactions.

    PubMed

    Guler Gokce, Zeliha; Zuhal Birol, Semra; Eren, Tarık; Ercelen Ceylan, Sebnem

    2017-04-01

    Cationic polymers with hydrophobic side chains have gained great interest as DNA carriers since they form a compact complex with negatively charged DNA phosphate groups and interact with the cell membrane. Amphiphilic polyoxanorbornenes with different quaternary alkyl pyridinium side chains with ethyl-p(OPy2) and hexyl units-p(OPy6) bearing 10 kDa MWT were synthesized by living Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization method. The physicochemical characteristics: critical micellar concentration, size distribution, surface charge, and condensation of polymer/DNA complex were investigated. Morphology of complexes was monitored by Atomic force microscopy. Cytotoxicity and interaction of these complexes with model lipid vesicles mimicking the cell membrane were examined. These polymers were enabled to form small sized complexes of DNA, which interact with model membrane vesicles. It was found that the nature of hydrophobicity of the homopolymers significantly impacts rates of DNA complexation and the surface charge of the resulting complexes. These results highlight the prospect of the further examinations of these polymers as gene carriers.

  17. Contribution of hydrophobic/hydrophilic modification on cationic chains of poly(ε-caprolactone)-graft-poly(dimethylamino ethylmethacrylate) amphiphilic co-polymer in gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Han, Shangcong; Wan, Haiying; Lin, Daoshu; Guo, Shutao; Dong, Hongxu; Zhang, Jianhua; Deng, Liandong; Liu, Ruming; Tang, Hua; Dong, Anjie

    2014-02-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) assembled from amphiphilic polycations have been certified as potential carriers for gene delivery. Structural modification of polycation moieties may be an efficient route to further enhance gene delivery efficiency. In this study two electroneutral monomers with different hydrophobicities, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA), were incorporated into the cationic poly(dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) side-chains of amphiphilic poly(ε-caprolactone)-graft-poly(dimethylamino ethylmethacrylate) (PCD) by random co-polymerization, to obtain poly(ε-caprolactone)-graft-poly(dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PCD-HEMA) and poly(ε-caprolactone)-graft-poly(dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl acrylate) (PCD-HEA). Minimal HEA or HEMA moieties in PDMAEMA do not lead to statistically significant changes in particle size, zeta potential, DNA condensation properties and buffering capacity of the naked NPs. However, the incorporation of HEMA and HEA lead to reductions and increases, respectively, in the surface hydrophilicity of the naked NPs and NPs/DNA complexes, which was confirmed by water contact angle assay. These simple modifications of PDMAEMA with HEA and HEMA moieties significantly affect the gene transfection efficiency on HeLa cells in vitro: PCD-HEMA NP/DNA complexes show a much higher transfection efficiency than PCD NPs/DNA complexes, while PCD-HEA NPs/DNA complexes show a lower transfection efficiency than PCD NP/DNA complexes. Fluorescence activated cell sorter and confocal laser scanning microscope results indicate that the incorporation of hydrophobic HEMA moieties facilitates an enhancement in both cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape, leading to a higher transfection efficiency. Moreover, the process of endosomal/lysosomal escape confirmed in our research that PCD and its derivatives do not just rely on the proton sponge mechanism, but also

  18. On the onset of surface condensation: formation and transition mechanisms of condensation mode

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Qiang; Sun, Jie; Wang, Qian; Wang, Wen; Wang, Hua Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to investigate the onset of surface condensation. On surfaces with different wettability, we snapshot different condensation modes (no-condensation, dropwise condensation and filmwise condensation) and quantitatively analyze their characteristics by temporal profiles of surface clusters. Two different types of formation of nanoscale droplets are identified, i.e. the formations with and without film-like condensate. We exhibit the effect of surface tensions on the formations of nanoscale droplets and film. We reveal the formation mechanisms of different condensation modes at nanoscale based on our simulation results and classical nucleation theory, which supplements the ‘classical hypotheses’ of the onset of dropwise condensation. We also reveal the transition mechanism between different condensation modes based on the competition between surface tensions and reveal that dropwise condensation represents the transition states from no-condensation to filmwise condensation. PMID:27481071

  19. On the onset of surface condensation: formation and transition mechanisms of condensation mode.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qiang; Sun, Jie; Wang, Qian; Wang, Wen; Wang, Hua Sheng

    2016-08-02

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to investigate the onset of surface condensation. On surfaces with different wettability, we snapshot different condensation modes (no-condensation, dropwise condensation and filmwise condensation) and quantitatively analyze their characteristics by temporal profiles of surface clusters. Two different types of formation of nanoscale droplets are identified, i.e. the formations with and without film-like condensate. We exhibit the effect of surface tensions on the formations of nanoscale droplets and film. We reveal the formation mechanisms of different condensation modes at nanoscale based on our simulation results and classical nucleation theory, which supplements the 'classical hypotheses' of the onset of dropwise condensation. We also reveal the transition mechanism between different condensation modes based on the competition between surface tensions and reveal that dropwise condensation represents the transition states from no-condensation to filmwise condensation.

  20. Condensed Matter Physics - Biology Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, G.

    The field of condensed matter physics had its genesis this century and it has had a remarkable evolution. A closer look at its growth reveals a hidden aim in the collective consciousness of the field - a part of the development this century is a kind of warm up exercise to understand the nature of living condensed matter, namely the field of biology, by a growing new breed of scientists in the coming century. Through some examples the vitality of this interaction will be pointed out.

  1. Tripol condensate polishing - operational experience

    SciTech Connect

    Swainsbury, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper gives a brief outline of the Mission Energy Management Australia Company who operate and maintain the Loy Yang B Power Station in the Latrobe Valley, Victoria, Australia. Details of the plant configuration, the water/steam circuit and cycle chemistry are discussed. The arrangement of the TRIPOL Condensate Polishing Plant and it`s operational modes are examined. Results of the first twelve months operation of the TRIPOL plant are detailed. Levels of crud removal during early commissioning phases employing the pre-filter are presented. Typical parameters achieved during a simulated condenser leak and an operational run beyond the ammonia break point are also documented.

  2. Andreev Reflection in Bosonic Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, I.; Sols, F.

    2009-05-08

    We study the bosonic analog of Andreev reflection at a normal-superfluid interface where the superfluid is a boson condensate. We model the normal region as a zone where nonlinear effects can be neglected. Against the background of a decaying condensate, we identify a novel contribution to the current of reflected atoms. The group velocity of this Andreev reflected component differs from that of the normally reflected one. For a three-dimensional planar or two-dimensional linear interface Andreev reflection is neither specular nor conjugate.

  3. Precipitation of DNA with Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael R; Sambrook, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    DNA can be precipitated out of solution for the removal of salts and/or for resuspension in an alternative buffer. Either ethanol or isopropanol can be used to achieve this purpose; however, the use of ethanol is generally preferred. Cations, provided as salts, are typically included to neutralize the negative charge of the DNA phosphate backbone. This method describes ethanol precipitation of DNA in microcentrifuge tubes.

  4. Heavy metal cations permeate the TRPV6 epithelial cation channel.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gergely; Danko, Tamas; Bergeron, Marc J; Balazs, Bernadett; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Zsembery, Akos; Hediger, Matthias A

    2011-01-01

    TRPV6 belongs to the vanilloid family of the transient receptor potential channel (TRP) superfamily. This calcium-selective channel is highly expressed in the duodenum and the placenta, being responsible for calcium absorption in the body and fetus. Previous observations have suggested that TRPV6 is not only permeable to calcium but also to other divalent cations in epithelial tissues. In this study, we tested whether TRPV6 is indeed also permeable to cations such as zinc and cadmium. We found that the basal intracellular calcium concentration was higher in HEK293 cells transfected with hTRPV6 than in non-transfected cells, and that this difference almost disappeared in nominally calcium-free solution. Live cell imaging experiments with Fura-2 and NewPort Green DCF showed that overexpression of human TRPV6 increased the permeability for Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and interestingly also for La(3+) and Gd(3+). These results were confirmed using the patch clamp technique. (45)Ca uptake experiments showed that cadmium, lanthanum and gadolinium were also highly efficient inhibitors of TRPV6-mediated calcium influx at higher micromolar concentrations. Our results suggest that TRPV6 is not only involved in calcium transport but also in the transport of other divalent cations, including heavy metal ions, which may have toxicological implications.

  5. Halogenated silanes, radicals, and cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liming; He, Yi-Liang

    2008-09-01

    Quantum chemistry study has been carried out on the structure and energetics of halogenated silanes, radicals, and cations (SiHxXy0,+1, X = F, Cl, Br; x + y = 1-4). The geometries are optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G(2df,p) level. The adiabatic ionization energiess (IEas), relative energetics of cations, proton affinities (PAs) of silanes, and the enthalpies of formation are predicted using G3(CC) model chemistry. Non-classical ion complex structures are found for hydrogenated cations and transition states connecting classical and non-classical structures are also located. The most stable cations for silylene and silyl radicals have their classical divalent and trivalent structures, and those for silanes have non-classical structures except for SiH3Br+ and SiH2Br2+. The non-classical structures for halosilane cations imply difficulty in experimentally measurement of the adiabatic ionization energies using photoionization or photoelectron studies. For SiH3X, SiH2X2, and SiHX3, the G3(CC) adiabatic IEas to classical ionic structures closest to their neutrals agree better with the photoelectron spectroscopic measurements. The transition states between classical and non-classical structures also hamper the photoionization determination of the appearance energies for silylene cations from silanes. The G3(CC) results for SiHx0,+1 agree excellently with the photoionization mass spectrometric study, and the results for fluorinated and chlorinated species also agree with the previous theoretical predictions at correlation levels from BAC-MP4 to CCSD(T)/CBS. The predicted enthalpy differences between SiH2Cl+, SiHCl2+, and SiCl3+ are also in accordance with previous kinetics study. The G3(CC) results show large discrepancies to the collision-induced charge transfer and/or dissociation reactions involving SiFx+ and SiClx+ ions, for which the G3(CC) enthalpies of formation are also significantly differed from the previous theoretical predictions, especially on SiFx+ (x = 2-4). The G3

  6. Structural Isomerization of the Gas Phase 2-NORBORNYL Cation Revealed with Infrared Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauney, Daniel; Mosley, Jonathan; Duncan, Michael A.

    2014-06-01

    The non-classical structure of the 2-norborny cation (C_7H11+) which was at the center of "the most heated chemical controversy of our time" has been observed in the condensed phase and recently using X-ray crystallography. However, no gas phase vibrational spectrum has been collected. The C_7H11+ cation is produced via H_3+ protonation of norbornene by pulsed discharge in a supersonic expansion of H_2/Ar. Ions are mass-selected and probed using infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. Due to high exothermicity, protonation via H_3+ leads to a structural isomerization to the global minimum structure 1,3-dimethylcyclopentenyl (DMCP+). Experiments are currently being conducted to find softer protonation techniques that could lead to the authentic 2-norbornyl cation. Schleyer,P.v.R. et. al.; Stable Carbocation Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons,Inc.; New York, 1997, Chapter 2

  7. Metal Cations in G-Quadruplex Folding and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Debmalya; Mirihana Arachchilage, Gayan; Basu, Soumitra

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the structural and physicochemical aspects of metal cation coordination to G-Quadruplexes (GQ) and their effects on GQ stability and conformation. G-quadruplex structures are non-canonical secondary structures formed by both DNA and RNA. G-quadruplexes regulate a wide range of important biochemical processes. Besides the sequence requirements, the coordination of monovalent cations in the GQ is essential for its formation and determines the stability and polymorphism of GQ structures. The nature, location, and dynamics of the cation coordination and their impact on the overall GQ stability are dependent on several factors such as the ionic radii, hydration energy, and the bonding strength to the O6 of guanines. The intracellular monovalent cation concentration and the localized ion concentrations determine the formation of GQs and can potentially dictate their regulatory roles. A wide range of biochemical and biophysical studies on an array of GQ enabling sequences have generated at a minimum the knowledge base that allows us to often predict the stability of GQs in the presence of the physiologically relevant metal ions, however, prediction of conformation of such GQs is still out of the realm. PMID:27668212

  8. Metal Cations in G-Quadruplex Folding and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Debmalya; Mirihana Arachchilage, Gayan; Basu, Soumitra

    2016-09-01

    This review is focused on the structural and physico-chemical aspects of metal cation coordination to G-Quadruplexes (GQ) and their effects on GQ stability and conformation. G-Quadruplex structures are non-canonical secondary structures formed by both DNA and RNA. G-quadruplexes regulate a wide range of important biochemical processes. Besides the sequence requirements, the coordination of monovalent cations in the GQ is essential for its formation and determines the stability and polymorphism of GQ structures. The nature, location and dynamics of the cation coordination and their impact on the overall GQ stability are dependent on several factors such as the ionic radii, hydration energy and the bonding strength to the O6 of guanines. The intracellular monovalent cation concentration and the localized ion concentrations determine the formation of GQs and can potentially dictate their regulatory roles. A wide range of biochemical and biophysical studies on an array of GQ enabling sequences have generated at a minimum the knowledge base that allows us to often predict the stability of GQs in presence of the physiologically relevant metal ions, however, prediction of conformation of such GQs is still out of the realm.

  9. Cation ordering and superstructures in natural layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Krivovichev, Sergey V; Yakovenchuk, Victor N; Zolotarev, Andrey A; Ivanyuk, Gregory N; Pakhomovsky, Yakov A

    2010-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) constitute an important group of materials with many applications ranging from catalysis and absorption to carriers for drug delivery, DNA intercalation and carbon dioxide sequestration. The structures of LDHs are based upon double brucite-like hydroxide layers [M(2+)(n)M(3+)(m)(OH)(2(m+n)](m+), where M(2+) = Mg(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), etc.; M(3+) = Al(3+), Fe(3+), Cr(3+), Mn(3+), etc. Structural features of LDHs such as cation ordering, charge distribution and polytypism have an immediate influence upon their properties. However, all the structural studies on synthetic LDHs deal with powder samples that prevent elucidation of such fine details of structure architecture as formation of superstructures due to cation ordering. In contrast to synthetic materials, natural LDHs are known to form single crystals accessible to single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, which provides a unique possibility to investigate 3D cation ordering in LDHs that results in formation of complex superstructures, where 2D cation order is combined with a specific order of layer stacking (polytypism). Therefore LDH minerals provide an indispensable source of structural information for modeling of structures and processes happening in LDHs at the molecular and nanoscale levels.

  10. Visualization of early chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    Kireeva, Natashe; Lakonishok, Margot; Kireev, Igor; Hirano, Tatsuya; Belmont, Andrew S.

    2004-01-01

    Current models of mitotic chromosome structure are based largely on the examination of maximally condensed metaphase chromosomes. Here, we test these models by correlating the distribution of two scaffold components with the appearance of prophase chromosome folding intermediates. We confirm an axial distribution of topoisomerase IIα and the condensin subunit, structural maintenance of chromosomes 2 (SMC2), in unextracted metaphase chromosomes, with SMC2 localizing to a 150–200-nm-diameter central core. In contrast to predictions of radial loop/scaffold models, this axial distribution does not appear until late prophase, after formation of uniformly condensed middle prophase chromosomes. Instead, SMC2 associates throughout early and middle prophase chromatids, frequently forming foci over the chromosome exterior. Early prophase condensation occurs through folding of large-scale chromatin fibers into condensed masses. These resolve into linear, 200–300-nm-diameter middle prophase chromatids that double in diameter by late prophase. We propose a unified model of chromosome structure in which hierarchical levels of chromatin folding are stabilized late in mitosis by an axial “glue.” PMID:15353545

  11. Magnetofermionic condensate in two dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Kulik, L. V.; Zhuravlev, A. S.; Dickmann, S.; Gorbunov, A. V.; Timofeev, V. B.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Schmult, S.

    2016-01-01

    Coherent condensate states of particles obeying either Bose or Fermi statistics are in the focus of interest in modern physics. Here we report on condensation of collective excitations with Bose statistics, cyclotron magnetoexcitons, in a high-mobility two-dimensional electron system in a magnetic field. At low temperatures, the dense non-equilibrium ensemble of long-lived triplet magnetoexcitons exhibits both a drastic reduction in the viscosity and a steep enhancement in the response to the external electromagnetic field. The observed effects are related to formation of a super-absorbing state interacting coherently with the electromagnetic field. Simultaneously, the electrons below the Fermi level form a super-emitting state. The effects are explicable from the viewpoint of a coherent condensate phase in a non-equilibrium system of two-dimensional fermions with a fully quantized energy spectrum. The condensation occurs in the space of vectors of magnetic translations, a property providing a completely new landscape for future physical investigations. PMID:27848969

  12. Magnetofermionic condensate in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Kulik, L V; Zhuravlev, A S; Dickmann, S; Gorbunov, A V; Timofeev, V B; Kukushkin, I V; Schmult, S

    2016-11-16

    Coherent condensate states of particles obeying either Bose or Fermi statistics are in the focus of interest in modern physics. Here we report on condensation of collective excitations with Bose statistics, cyclotron magnetoexcitons, in a high-mobility two-dimensional electron system in a magnetic field. At low temperatures, the dense non-equilibrium ensemble of long-lived triplet magnetoexcitons exhibits both a drastic reduction in the viscosity and a steep enhancement in the response to the external electromagnetic field. The observed effects are related to formation of a super-absorbing state interacting coherently with the electromagnetic field. Simultaneously, the electrons below the Fermi level form a super-emitting state. The effects are explicable from the viewpoint of a coherent condensate phase in a non-equilibrium system of two-dimensional fermions with a fully quantized energy spectrum. The condensation occurs in the space of vectors of magnetic translations, a property providing a completely new landscape for future physical investigations.

  13. Approaching Bose-Einstein Condensation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Loris

    2011-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is discussed at the level of an advanced course of statistical thermodynamics, clarifying some formal and physical aspects that are usually not covered by the standard pedagogical literature. The non-conventional approach adopted starts by showing that the continuum limit, in certain cases, cancels out the crucial…

  14. Magnetofermionic condensate in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulik, L. V.; Zhuravlev, A. S.; Dickmann, S.; Gorbunov, A. V.; Timofeev, V. B.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Schmult, S.

    2016-11-01

    Coherent condensate states of particles obeying either Bose or Fermi statistics are in the focus of interest in modern physics. Here we report on condensation of collective excitations with Bose statistics, cyclotron magnetoexcitons, in a high-mobility two-dimensional electron system in a magnetic field. At low temperatures, the dense non-equilibrium ensemble of long-lived triplet magnetoexcitons exhibits both a drastic reduction in the viscosity and a steep enhancement in the response to the external electromagnetic field. The observed effects are related to formation of a super-absorbing state interacting coherently with the electromagnetic field. Simultaneously, the electrons below the Fermi level form a super-emitting state. The effects are explicable from the viewpoint of a coherent condensate phase in a non-equilibrium system of two-dimensional fermions with a fully quantized energy spectrum. The condensation occurs in the space of vectors of magnetic translations, a property providing a completely new landscape for future physical investigations.

  15. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    DOEpatents

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  16. Micronucleus formation during chromatin condensation and under apoptotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, Gabor; Simonyi, Athene S; Turani, Melinda; Juhasz, Istvan; Nagy, Gabor; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2017-02-01

    In early S phase the newly replicated DNA is folded back to increasingly compact structures. The process of chromatin condensation inside the nucleus starts with the formation of a micronucleus observed in five established cell lines (K562, CHO, Indian muntjac, murine preB and SCC). Supercoiling of chromatin generates a polarized end-plate region extruded from the nucleus. The extruded chromatin is turned around itself forming the head portion (micronucleus) visible by fluorescence microscopy until the middle of S phase when chromatin structures are succeeded by distinguishable early forms of chromosomes. The generation of micronuclei upon apoptotic treatment was achieved by the methotrexate (MTX) treatment of cells. A close correlation was found between the frequency of micronucleus and MTX concentration, with low frequency at low (0.1 µM) and increasingly higher frequency between 1 and 100 µM concentrations. Characteristic deformation and shrinkage of nuclei indicated apoptosis. High MTX concentration (100 µM) caused the enlargement and necrotic disruption of nuclei. Inhibition of DNA synthesis during replicative DNA synthesis by biotinylated nucleotide prevented the formation of metaphase chromosomes and elevated the frequency of early intermediates of chromosome condensation including micronucleus formation. Based on these observations the micronucleus is regarded as: (a) a regularly occuring element of early chromatin condensation and (b) a typical sign of nuclear membrane damage under toxic conditions. Explanation is given why the micronucleus is hidden in nuclei under normal chromatin condensation and why chromatin motifs including micronuclei become visible upon cellular damage.

  17. A novel cationic liposome formulation for efficient gene delivery via a pulmonary route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Liu, Donghua; Sun, Xiaoli; Liu, Chunxi; Liu, Yongjun; Zhang, Na

    2011-06-01

    The clinical success of gene therapy for lung cancer is not only dependent on efficient gene carriers but also on a suitable delivery route. A pulmonary delivery route can directly deliver gene vectors to the lung which is more efficient than a systemic delivery route. For gene carriers, cationic liposomes have recently emerged as leading non-viral vectors in worldwide gene therapy clinical trials. However, cytotoxic effects or apoptosis are often observed which is mostly dependent on the cationic lipid used. Therefore, an efficient and safe cationic lipid, 6-lauroxyhexyl lysinate (LHLN), previously synthesized by our group was first used to prepare cationic liposomes. Physicochemical and biological properties of LHLN-liposomes were investigated. LHLN-liposome/DNA complexes showed positive surface charge, spherical morphology, a relatively narrow particle size distribution and strong DNA binding capability. Compared with Lipofectamine2000, the new cationic liposome formulation using LHLN exhibited not only lower cytotoxicity (P < 0.05) but also similar transfection efficiency in A549 and HepG2 lung cancer cells for in vitro tests. When administered by intratracheal instillation into rat lungs for in vivo evaluation, LHLN-liposome/DNA complexes exhibited higher pulmonary gene transfection efficiency than Lipofectamine2000/DNA complexes (P < 0.05). These results suggested that LHLN-liposomes may have great potential for efficient pulmonary gene delivery.

  18. Lipid nanocapsules functionalized with polyethyleneimine for plasmid DNA and drug co-delivery and cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skandrani, Nadia; Barras, Alexandre; Legrand, Dominique; Gharbi, Tijani; Boulahdour, Hatem; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2014-06-01

    The paper reports on the preparation of lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) functionalized with poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) moieties and their successful use as drug and gene delivery systems. The cationic LNCs were produced by a phase inversion process with a nominal size of 25 nm and subsequently modified with PEI chains using a transacylation reaction. The functionalization process allowed good control over the nanoscale particle size (26.2 +/- 3.9 nm) with monodisperse size characteristics (PI < 0.2) and positive surface charge up to +18.7 mV. The PEI-modified LNCs (LNC25-T) displayed good buffering capacity. Moreover, the cationic LNC25-T were able to condense DNA and form complexes via electrostatic interactions in a typical weight ratio-dependent relationship. It was found that the mean diameter of LNC25-T/pDNA complexes increased to ~40-50 nm with the LNC25-T/pDNA ratio from 1 to 500. Gel electrophoresis and cell viability experiments showed that the LNC25-T/pDNA complexes had high stability with no cytotoxicity due to the anchored PEI polymers on the surface of LNCs. Finally, the transfection efficiency of the LNC25-T/pDNA complexes was studied and evaluated on HEK cell lines in comparison with free PEI/pDNA polyplexes. The combination of cationic LNCs with pDNA exhibited more than a 2.8-fold increase in transfection efficiency compared to the standard free PEI/pDNA polyplexes at the same PEI concentrations. Moreover, we have demonstrated that LNC25-T/pDNA loaded with a hydrophobic drug, paclitaxel, showed high drug efficacy. The high transfection efficiency combined with the potential of simultaneous co-delivery of hydrophobic drugs, relatively small size of LNC25-T/pDNA complexes, and fluorescence imaging can be crucial for gene therapy, as small particle sizes may be more favorable for in vivo studies.The paper reports on the preparation of lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) functionalized with poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) moieties and their successful use as drug and gene

  19. Low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine enhanced gene transfer by cationic cholesterol-based nanoparticle vector.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Maitani, Yoshie

    2007-09-01

    Both polyethylenimine (PEI) polymers and cationic nanoparticles have been widely used for non-viral DNA transfection. Previously, we reported that cationic nanoparticles composed of cholesteryl-3beta-carboxyamidoethylene-N-hydroxyethylamine and Tween 80 (NP-OH) could deliver plasmid DNA (pDNA) with high transfection efficiency. To increase the transfection activity of NP-OH, we investigated the potential synergism of PEI and NP-OH for the transfection of DNA into human prostate tumor PC-3, human cervices tumor Hela, and human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. The transfection efficiency with low-molecular PEI (MW 600) was low, but that with a combination of NP-OH and PEI was higher than with NP-OH alone, being comparable to commercially available lipofectamine 2,000 and lipofectamine LTX, with very low cytotoxicity. Low-molecular weight PEI could not compact pDNA in size, but rather might help to dissociate pDNA from the complex and release pDNA from the endosome to cytoplasm by the proton sponge effect. Therefore, the combination of cationic cholesterol-based nanoparticles and a low-molecular PEI has potential as a non-viral DNA vector for gene delivery.

  20. Sandwich-type Au-PEI/DNA/PEI-Dexa nanocomplex for nucleus-targeted gene delivery in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Lifen; He, Yuling; Li, Yanfeng

    2014-08-27

    Many synthetic Au-based cationic nanoparticles (AuNPs) for nonviral gene delivery show high efficiency in vitro, but their excessive charge density, harsh reducing conditions, and nontarget delivery prevent their application in vivo. Herein, we constructed a sandwich-type layered polyethylenimine (PEI)-coated gold nanocomposite outerlaid with a nucleus-targeted Dexamethasone (Dexa), namely, Au-PEI/DNA/PEI-Dexa nanocomplex, for DNA delivery system using a low molecular weight PEI as a mild reducing agent. The nucleus-targeting Au-PEI/DNA/PEI-Dexa nanocomplex with low positive charge and low cytotoxicity condensed DNA and protected from enzymatic degradation. In vitro transfection studies demonstrated that Au-PEI/DNA/PEI-Dexa nanocomplex exhibited much more efficient nucleus transfection than Au-PEI/DNA/PEI without nucleus-targeted residues and commercially available PEI 25 kDa due to the Dexa targeting of the nucleus. Furthermore, the nanocomplex markedly transfected pTRAIL (TRAIL = tumor-necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) to tumors in vivo and subsequently inhibited the tumor growth with minimal side effects. These findings suggest that nucleus-targeting Au-PEI/DNA/PEI-Dexa ternary complexes have promising potential in gene delivery.

  1. Effect of lipid headgroup charge and pH on the stability and membrane insertion potential of calcium condensed gene complexes.

    PubMed

    Alhakamy, Nabil A; Elandaloussi, Ibrahim; Ghazvini, Saba; Berkland, Cory J; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2015-04-14

    Noncovalently condensed complexes of genetic material, cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), and calcium chloride present a nonviral route to improve transfection efficiency of nucleic acids (e.g., pDNA and siRNA). However, the exact mechanisms of membrane insertion and delivery of macromolecule complexes to intracellular locations as well as their stability in the intracellular environment are not understood. We show that calcium condensed gene complexes containing different hydrophilic (i.e., dTAT, K9, R9, and RH9) and amphiphilic (i.e., RA9, RL9, and RW9) CPPs formed stable cationic complexes of hydrodynamic radii 100 nm at neutral pH. However, increasing the acidity caused the complexes to become neutral or anionic and increase in size. Using zwitterionic and anionic phospholipid monolayers as models that mimic the membrane composition of the outer leaflet of cell membranes and intracellular vesicles and pHs that mimic the intracellular environment, we study the membrane insertion potential of these seven gene complexes (CPP/pDNA/Ca(2+) complexes) into model membranes. At neutral pH, all gene complexes demonstrated the highest insertion potential into anionic phospholipid membranes, with complexes containing amphiphilic peptides showing the maximum insertion. However, at acidic pH, the gene complexes demonstrated maximum monolayer insertion into zwitterionic lipids, irrespective of the chemical composition of the CPP in the complexes. Our results suggest that in the neutral environment the complexes are unable to penetrate the zwitterionic lipid membranes but can penetrate through the anionic lipid membranes. However, the acidic pH mimicking the local environment in the late endosomes leads to a significant increase in adsorption of the complexes to zwitterionic lipid headgroups and decreases for anionic headgroups. These membrane-gene complex interactions may be responsible for the ability of the complexes to efficiently enter the intracellular environment through

  2. Internally drained condenser for spacecraft thermal management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A.; Drew, Brian C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained to date in a program to develop a high heat flux condenser for use in two-phase spacecraft thermal management loops. The objective is to obtain a several fold increase in condensation heat transfer coefficient over those which can be achieved with shear-controlled or capillary-wick condensers. The internally drained condenser relies on shaped fins to develop a capillary pressure gradient over the surface of the fins and drive the condensate toward narrow drainage grooves separating the fins. The condensate then flows through a drainage network embedded in the condenser walls. Heat transfer coefficients of up to 8 W/sq cm C were measured in steam, providing a heat transfer enhancement ratio greater than a factor of 8. In the paper the proof-of-concept experiments are described and simplified models to predict the performance of the internally drained condenser are presented.

  3. Capillary electrophoresis--a new tool for ionic analysis of exhaled breath condensate.

    PubMed

    Kubáň, Petr; Kobrin, Eeva-Gerda; Kaljurand, Mihkel

    2012-12-07

    Exhaled breath condensate has been analyzed for its ionic content by capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductometric detection. A simple device for collection of small volumes (100-200 μL) of exhaled breath condensate in less than 2 min was developed. A method for simultaneous determination of inorganic cations, inorganic anions and organic anions from the samples using dual-opposite end injection principle with a short fused silica capillary (35 cm, 50 μm I.D.) was developed. A background electrolyte composed of 20mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid, 20 mM l-histidine, 30 μM cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and 2mM 18-crown-6 was used. The analysis time was less than 3 min with limits of detection reaching low μM levels for most of the anions and cations. It has been shown that changes of nitrite could be observed in acute inflammation of upper airways and in a person with diagnosed mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, while changes of other ions could also be observed. Lactate concentrations could also be monitored and about 4-fold increase of lactate concentration in exhaled breath condensate was determined following an exhaustive cycling exercise. The developed non-invasive sampling of exhaled breath condensate, followed by rapid capillary electrophoretic analysis, could be very useful in lung inflammatory disease screening as well as in monitoring fast metabolic processes such as lactate build-up and removal.

  4. Novel alkyd-type coating resins produced using cationic polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, Bret J.; Kalita, Harjyoti; Alam, Samim; Jayasooriyamu, Anurad; Fernando, Shashi; Samanata, Satyabrata; Bahr, James; Selvakumar, Sermadurai; Sibi, Mukund; Vold, Jessica; Ulven, Chad

    2015-05-06

    Novel, partially bio-based poly(vinyl ether) copolymers derived from soybean oil and cyclohexyl vinyl ether (CHVE) were produced by cationic polymerization and investigated for application as alkyd-type surface coatings. Compared to conventional alkyd resins, which are produced by high temperature melt condensation polymerization, the poly(v9nyl ether)s provide several advantages. These advantages include milder, more energy efficient polymer synthesis, elimination of issues associated with gelation during polymer synthesis, production of polymers with well-defined composition and relatively narrow molecular weight distribution, and elimination of film formation and physical property issues associated with entrained monomers, dimers, trimers, etc. The results of the studied showed that the thermal, mechanical, and physical properties of the coatings produced from these novel polymers varied considerably as a function of polymer composition and cure temperature. Overall, the results suggest a good potential for these novel copolymers to be used for coatings cured by autoxidation.

  5. Infrared spectroscopy of gas phase C{sub 3}H{sub 5}{sup +}: The allyl and 2-propenyl cations

    SciTech Connect

    Douberly, Gary E.; Ricks, Allen M.; Schleyer, Paul v. R.; Duncan, Michael A.

    2008-01-14

    C{sub 3}H{sub 5}{sup +} cations are probed with infrared photodissociation spectroscopy in the 800-3500 cm{sup -1} region using the method of rare gas tagging. The ions and their complexes with Ar or N{sub 2} are produced in a pulsed electric discharge supersonic expansion cluster source. Two structural isomers are characterized, namely, the allyl (CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2}{sup +}) and 2-propenyl (CH{sub 3}CCH{sub 2}{sup +}) cations. The infrared spectrum of the allyl cation confirms previous theoretical and condensed phase studies of the C{sub 2v} charge delocalized, resonance-stabilized structure. The 2-propenyl cation spectrum is consistent with a C{sub s} symmetry structure having a nearly linear CCC backbone and a hyperconjugatively stabilizing methyl group.

  6. Mitotic chromatin condensation in vitro using somatic cell extracts and nuclei with variable levels of endogenous topoisomerase II

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We report the development of a new method for producing mitotic extracts from tissue culture cells. These extracts reproducibly promote the condensation of chromatin in vitro when incubated with purified interphase nuclei. This condensation reaction is not species specific, since nuclei from chicken, human, and hamster cell lines all undergo chromatin condensation upon incubation with the extract. We have used this extract to investigate the role of DNA topoisomerase II (topo II) in the chromosome condensation process. Chromatin condensation does not require the presence of soluble topo II in the mitotic extract. However, the extent of formation of discrete chromosome-like structures correlates with the level of endogenous topo II present in the interphase nuclei. Our results further suggest that chromatin condensation in this extract may involve two processes: chromatin compaction and resolution into discrete chromosomes. PMID:2176652

  7. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1992-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in an annular flow regime with and without interfacial waves was experimentally investigated. The study included measurements of heat transfer rate with condensation of vapor flowing inside a horizontal rectangular duct and experiments on the initiation of interfacial waves in condensation, and adiabatic air-liquid flow. An analytical model for the condensation was developed to predict condensate film thickness and heat transfer coefficients. Some conclusions drawn from the study are that the condensate film thickness was very thin (less than 0.6 mm). The average heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing the inlet vapor velocity. The local heat transfer coefficient decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface, with the largest change at the leading edge of the test section. The interfacial shear stress, which consisted of the momentum shear stress and the adiabatic shear stress, appeared to have a significant effect on the heat transfer coefficients. In the experiment, the condensate flow along the condensing surface experienced a smooth flow, a two-dimensional wavy flow, and a three-dimensional wavy flow. In the condensation experiment, the local wave length decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface and the average wave length decreased with increasing inlet vapor velocity, while the wave speed increased with increasing vapor velocity. The heat transfer measurements are reliable. And, the ultrasonic technique was effective for measuring the condensate film thickness when the surface was smooth or had waves of small amplitude.

  8. Proceedings: 2000 Workshop on Condensate Polishing

    SciTech Connect

    2001-06-01

    Condensate polishing maintains control of impurities in the nuclear power plant and allows the unit to operate more reliably. This report presents proceedings of EPRI's 2000 Workshop on Condensate Polishing, where 30 papers were presented on current issues and utility experience involving condensate polishing at both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) plants.

  9. Exciton-polaritons condensate in a microwire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamoun, O.; Jaziri, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, polariton condensation has been claimed in microwires. Numerical solutions of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation that describes the behavior of the condensate in a trap and exciton-polariton interaction, have been obtained. In this work we study theoretically exciton-polariton one dimensional condensation in several quantized states.

  10. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  11. Polymer Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, E.; Chacón-Acosta, G.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we analyze a non-interacting one-dimensional polymer Bose-Einstein condensate in a harmonic trap within the semiclassical approximation. We use an effective Hamiltonian coming from the polymer quantization that arises in loop quantum gravity. We calculate the number of particles in order to obtain the critical temperature. The Bose-Einstein functions are replaced by series, whose high order terms are related to powers of the polymer length. It is shown that the condensation temperature presents a shift respect to the standard case, for small values of the polymer scale. In typical experimental conditions, it is possible to establish a bound for λ2 up to ≲10-16 m2. To improve this bound we should decrease the frequency of the trap and also decrease the number of particles.

  12. Effects of exchanged cation and layer charge on the sorption of water and EGME vapors on montmorillonite clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Rutherford, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of exchanged cation and layer charge on the sorption of water and ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME) vapors on montmorillonite have been studied on SAz-1 and SWy-1 source clays, each exchanged respectively with Ca, Na, K, Cs and tetramethylammonium (TMA) cations. The corresponding lattice expansions were also determined, and the corresponding N2 adsorption data were provided for comparison. For clays exchanged with cations of low hydrating powers (such as K, Cs and TMA), water shows a notably lower uptake than does N2 at low relative pressures (P/P0). By contrast, EGME shows higher uptakes than N2 on all exchanged clays at all P/P0. The anomaly for water is attributed to its relatively low attraction for siloxane surfaces of montmorillonite because of its high cohesive energy density. In addition to solvating cations and expanding interlayers, water and EGME vapors condense into small clay pores and interlayer voids created by interlayer expansion. The initial (dry) interlayer separation varies more significantly with cation type than with layer charge; the water-saturated interlayer separation varies more with cation type than the EGME-saturated interlayer separation. Because of the differences in surface adsorption and interlayer expansion for water and EGME, no general correspondence is found between the isotherms of water and EGME on exchanged clays, nor is a simple relation observed between the overall uptake of either vapor and the cation solvating power. The excess interlayer capacities of water and of EGME that result from lattice expansion of the exchanged clays are estimated by correcting for amounts of vapor adsorption on planar clay surfaces and of vapor condensation into intrinsic clay pores. The resulting data follow more closely the relative solvating powers of the exchanged cations.

  13. Extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Shafer, David; McGuire, James

    2001-01-01

    Condenser system for use with a ringfield camera in projection lithography where the condenser includes a series of segments of a parent aspheric mirror having one foci at a quasi-point source of radiation and the other foci at the radius of a ringfield have all but one or all of their beams translated and rotated by sets of mirrors such that all of the beams pass through the real entrance pupil of a ringfield camera about one of the beams and fall onto the ringfield radius as a coincident image as an arc of the ringfield. The condenser has a set of correcting mirrors with one of the correcting mirrors of each set, or a mirror that is common to said sets of mirrors, from which the radiation emanates, is a concave mirror that is positioned to shape a beam segment having a chord angle of about 25 to 85 degrees into a second beam segment having a chord angle of about 0 to 60 degrees.

  14. Condensation on Slippery Asymmetric Bumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    Controlling dropwise condensation by designing surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and be shed as quickly as possible is fundamental to water harvesting systems, thermal power generation, distillation towers, etc. However, cutting-edge approaches based on micro/nanoscale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants that synergistically couples both aspects of condensation and outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle's bump geometry in promoting condensation, we show how to maximize vapor diffusion flux at the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing curvature and shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope analogous to cactus spines couples rapid drop growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free energy profile that drives the drop down the slope. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher plant-inspired coating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion. We further observe an unprecedented six-fold higher exponent in growth rate and much faster shedding time compared to other surfaces. We envision that our fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be applied to a wide range of phase change applications.

  15. Condensation on Slippery Asymmetric Bumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-11-01

    Controlling dropwise condensation by designing surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and be shed as quickly as possible is fundamental to water harvesting systems, thermal power generation, distillation towers, etc. However, cutting-edge approaches based on micro/nanoscale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants that synergistically couples both aspects of condensation and outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle's bump geometry in promoting condensation, we show how to maximize vapor diffusion flux at the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing curvature and shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope analogous to cactus spines couples rapid drop growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free energy profile that drives the drop down the slope. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher plant-inspired coating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion. We further observe an unprecedented six-fold higher exponent in growth rate and much faster shedding time compared to other surfaces. We envision that our fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be applied to a wide range of phase change applications.

  16. Cationic Amphiphiles Increase Activity of Aminoglycoside Antibiotic Tobramycin in the Presence of Airway Polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy Drew, Kirstin R.; Sanders, Lori K.; Culumber, Zachary W.; Zribi, Olena; Wong, Gerard C.L.

    2009-06-17

    It is empirically known that anionic polyelectrolytes present in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways due to bacterial infection significantly decrease the activity of cationic antimicrobials via electrostatic binding. In this work, we use synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering to investigate the interaction between tobramycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic commonly administered to CF patients via inhalation, with DNA, which is found in high concentrations in the CF airway. We find that interactions between DNA and tobramycin are significantly modified by the presence of mixtures of amphiphilic molecules. We measure a hierarchy of self-assembled structures formed between tobramycin, DNA, and the amphiphile mixtures and show how interactions between these components can be controlled. Results indicate that mixtures of cationic and negative curvature amphiphiles optimized for DNA binding via charge matching and curvature matching can competitively displace bound tobramycin from DNA and thereby drastically suppress tobramycin-DNA binding and resultant antimicrobial inactivation. Growth inhibition assays confirm the increased activity of tobramycin in the presence of DNA with the addition of the amphiphiles. These results suggest that optimized cationic amphiphile solutions have the potential to enhance antimicrobial function in highly infected environments that contain increased concentrations of anionic inflammatory polymers.

  17. Cationic Amphiphiles Increase Activity of Aminoglycoside Antibiotic Tobramycin in the Presence of Airway Polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Drew, K.R.Purdy; Sanders, L.K.; Culumber, Z.W.; Zribi, O.; Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-05-21

    It is empirically known that anionic polyelectrolytes present in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways due to bacterial infection significantly decrease the activity of cationic antimicrobials via electrostatic binding. In this work, we use synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering to investigate the interaction between tobramycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic commonly administered to CF patients via inhalation, with DNA, which is found in high concentrations in the CF airway. We find that interactions between DNA and tobramycin are significantly modified by the presence of mixtures of amphiphilic molecules. We measure a hierarchy of self-assembled structures formed between tobramycin, DNA, and the amphiphile mixtures and show how interactions between these components can be controlled. Results indicate that mixtures of cationic and negative curvature amphiphiles optimized for DNA binding via charge matching and curvature matching can competitively displace bound tobramycin from DNA and thereby drastically suppress tobramycin-DNA binding and resultant antimicrobial inactivation. Growth inhibition assays confirm the increased activity of tobramycin in the presence of DNA with the addition of the amphiphiles. These results suggest that optimized cationic amphiphile solutions have the potential to enhance antimicrobial function in highly infected environments that contain increased concentrations of anionic inflammatory polymers.

  18. Fluorescence of the perylene radical cation and an inaccessible D0/D1 conical intersection: An MMVB, RASSCF, and TD-DFT computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokmachev, Andrei M.; Boggio-Pasqua, Martial; Mendive-Tapia, David; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The photophysics of the perylene radical cation (Pe•+) was studied using the molecular mechanics-valence bond (MMVB) hybrid force field. Potential energy surfaces of the first three electronic states were investigated. Geometry optimizations of critical points—including conical intersections between the relevant electronic states—were performed using the MMVB analytical energy gradient for cations. No accessible planar conical intersection between the D0 and D1 states of Pe•+ was found; this is consistent with the experimentally observed D1 lifetimes and the observation of D1 emission from this cation in the condensed phase. Benchmark RASSCF and TD-DFT calculations support the reliability of the MMVB results.

  19. THE DISTRIBUTION OF INORGANIC CATIONS IN MOUSE TESTIS

    PubMed Central

    Kierszenbaum, Abraham L.; Libanati, Cesar M.; Tandler, Carlos J.

    1971-01-01

    For localization of pyroantimonate-precipitable cations, mouse testes were fixed with a saturated aqueous solution of potassium pyroantimonate (pH about 9.2, without addition of any conventional fixative), hardened with formaldehyde, and postosmicated. A good preservation of the cell membranes and over-all cell morphology is obtained as well as a consistent and reproducible localization of the insoluble antimonate salts of magnesium, calcium, and sodium. Four sites of prominent antimonate deposits are revealed, besides a more or less uniform distribution of the precipitates. These sites are: (a) In the walls of the seminiferous tubules, localized in two concentric layers corresponding to the inner and outer layers of the tubular wall; (b) Around the blood vessels and adjacent connective tissue; (c) At the area of contact between the Sertoli cell and spermatids, where a double line of precipitate surrounds the head of the mature spermatids; and (d) In the cell nuclei, disposed between regions of the condensed chromatin. The nucleus of mature spermatids did not show any sign of antimonate precipitation. The implications of this inorganic cation distribution are discussed with relation to their anionic counterparts, their localization in other animal and plant tissues, and the possibility that those sites may represent barriers to the free passage of ions. PMID:4101521

  20. Condensation shocks in hypersonic nitrogen tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Susan T.; Griffith, Wayland C.; Lederer, Melissa; Ragsdale, William C.; Yanta, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental observations and a theoretical model for the onset and disappearance of condensation are provided for hypersonic flows of pure nitrogen at M = 10, 14, and 18. A method for analyzing the thermodynamic and flow properties of a partially condensed mixture from known supply conditions and measured Pitot pressure yields the local static pressure and temperature, mass fraction of the nitrogen condensed, and the Mach number of the partially condensed flow based on frozen sound speed. The transition between partially condensed-supercooled flow is found to occur at 22-25 K isobaric supercooling with the corresponding mass fraction condensed being 12-14 percent over a range of two orders of magnitude in local static pressure. The heat released and vapor mass removed during condensation ultimately raise the local pressure and temperature and reduce the flow Mach number.

  1. Serine-based gemini surfactants with different spacer linkages: from self-assembly to DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sandra G; Oliveira, Isabel S; do Vale, M Luísa C; Marques, Eduardo F

    2014-12-14

    Cationic gemini surfactants have strong potential as compaction agents of nucleic acids for efficient non-viral gene delivery. In this work, we present the aggregation behavior of three novel cationic serine-based gemini surfactants as well as their ability to compact DNA per se and mixed with a helper lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE). All the surfactants have a 12-12-12 configuration, i.e. two main 12-carbon alkyl chains linked to the nitrogen atom of the amino acid residue and a 12 methylene spacer, but they differ in the nature of the spacer linkage: for (12Ser)2N12, an amine bond; for (12Ser)2CON12, an amide bond; and for (12Ser)2COO12, an ester bond. Interestingly, while the amine-based gemini aggregates into micelles, the amide and ester ones spontaneously form vesicles, which denotes a strong influence of the type of linkage on the surfactant packing parameter. The size, ζ-potential and stability of the vesicles have been characterized by light microscopy, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The interaction of the gemini aggregates with DNA at different charge ratios and in the absence and presence of DOPE has been studied by DLS, fluorescence spectroscopy and cryo-SEM. All the compounds are found to efficiently compact DNA (complexation > 90%), but relevant differences are obtained in terms of the size, ζ-potential and stability of the lipoplexes formed. Results are rationalized in terms of headgroup differences and the type of aggregates present prior to DNA condensation.

  2. A combined EPR and DFT study of the overcrowded aromatic radical cations from Friedel-Crafts alkylation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tang, Fu Ming; Wu, Yi Fang

    2011-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance methods were used to study the polycyclic aromatic radical cations produced in a Friedel-Crafts alkylating system, and the following radical cations were indentified: 3,6,11,14-tetramethyl dibenzo (a, c) triphylene and 2,6-dimethyl-9,10-di(p-methylbenzyl) anthracene radical cations. The results indicate that the observed electron paramagnetic resonance spectra are due to overcrowded polycyclic aromatic radical cations formed from the parent hydrocarbons. It is suggested that benzyl halides produced in the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reactions undergo Scholl condensation to give polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are converted into corresponding polycyclic aromatic radical cations in the presence of AlCl 3. We carried out the theoretical calculation of the isotropic 1H hyperfine coupling constants for studied both PAHs radical cations. The results indicate that the IEFPCM-DFT calculation at B3LYP level with 6-31++G(d,p), EPRII and EPRIII basis sets could well support the experimental hfcc assignment of the observed radicals. Optimized geometry indicates that the aromatic rings in both PAHs radical cations twisted significantly out of co-planarity.

  3. Complex chromatin condensation patterns and nuclear protein transitions during spermiogenesis: examples from mollusks.

    PubMed

    Chiva, M; Saperas, N; Ribes, E

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we review and analyze the chromatin condensation pattern during spermiogenesis in several species of mollusks. Previously, we had described the nuclear protein transitions during spermiogenesis in these species. The results of our study show two types of condensation pattern: simple patterns and complex patterns, with the following general characteristics: (a) When histones (always present in the early spermatid nucleus) are directly replaced by SNBP (sperm nuclear basic proteins) of the protamine type, the spermiogenic chromatin condensation pattern is simple. However, if the replacement is not direct but through intermediate proteins, the condensation pattern is complex. (b) The intermediate proteins found in mollusks are precursor molecules that are processed during spermiogenesis to the final protamine molecules. Some of these final protamines represent proteins with the highest basic amino acid content known to date, which results in the establishment of a very strong electrostatic interaction with DNA. (c) In some instances, the presence of complex patterns of chromatin condensation clearly correlates with the acquisition of specialized forms of the mature sperm nuclei. In contrast, simple condensation patterns always lead to rounded, oval or slightly cylindrical nuclei. (d) All known cases of complex spermiogenic chromatin condensation patterns are restricted to species with specialized sperm cells (introsperm). At the time of writing, we do not know of any report on complex condensation pattern in species with external fertilization and, therefore, with sperm cells of the primitive type (ect-aquasperm). (e) Some of the mollusk an spermiogenic chromatin condensation patterns of the complex type are very similar (almost identical) to those present in other groups of animals. Interestingly, the intermediate proteins involved in these cases can be very different.In this study, we discuss the biological significance of all these features and

  4. Effect of confinement on DNA, solvent and counterion dynamics in a model biological nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markosyan, Suren; de Biase, Pablo M.; Czapla, Luke; Samoylova, Olga; Singh, Gurpreet; Cuervo, Javier; Tieleman, D. Peter; Noskov, Sergei Yu.

    2014-07-01

    The application of recent advances in nanopore technology to high-throughput DNA sequencing requires a more detailed understanding of solvent, ion and DNA interactions occurring within these pores. Here we present a combination of atomistic and coarse-grained modeling studies of the dynamics of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) homopolymers within the alpha-hemolysin pore, for the two single-stranded homopolymers poly(dA)40 and poly(dC)40. Analysis of atomistic simulations along with the per-residue decomposition of protein-DNA interactions in these simulations gives new insight into the very complex issues that have yet to be fully addressed with detailed MD simulations. We discuss a modification of the solvent properties and ion distribution around DNA within nanopore confinement and put it into the general framework of counterion condensation theory. There is a reasonable agreement in computed properties from our all-atom simulations and the resulting predictions from analytical theories with experimental data, and our equilibrium results here support the conclusions from our previous non-equilibrium Brownian dynamics studies with a recently developed BROMOC protocol that cations are the primary charge carriers through alpha-hemolysin nanopores under an applied voltage in the presence of ssDNA. Clustering analysis led to an identification of distinct conformational states of captured polymer and depth of the current blockade. Therefore, our data suggest that confined polymer may act as a flickering gate, thus contributing to excess noise phenomena. We also discuss the extent of water structuring due to nanopore confinement and the relationship between the conformational dynamics of a captured polymer and the distribution of blocked current.The application of recent advances in nanopore technology to high-throughput DNA sequencing requires a more detailed understanding of solvent, ion and DNA interactions occurring within these pores. Here we present a

  5. Comparison of different cationized proteins as biomaterials for nanoparticle-based ocular gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Giovanni K; Párraga, Jenny E; Seijo, Begoña; Sanchez, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    Cationized polymers have been proposed as transfection agents for gene therapy. The present work aims to improve the understanding of the potential use of different cationized proteins (atelocollagen, albumin and gelatin) as nanoparticle components and to investigate the possibility of modulating the physicochemical properties of the resulting nanoparticle carriers by selecting specific protein characteristics in an attempt to improve current ocular gene-delivery approaches. The toxicity profiles, as well as internalization and transfection efficiency, of the developed nanoparticles can be modulated by modifying the molecular weight of the selected protein and the amine used for cationization. The most promising systems are nanoparticles based on intermediate molecular weight gelatin cationized with the endogenous amine spermine, which exhibit an adequate toxicological profile, as well as effective association and protection of pDNA or siRNA molecules, thereby resulting in higher transfection efficiency and gene silencing than the other studied formulations.

  6. Telomere Chromatin Condensation Assay (TCCA): a novel approach to study structural telomere integrity.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Vasconcellos, Iria; Alonso-Rodríguez, Silvia; López-Baltar, Isidoro; Fernández, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres, the DNA-protein complexes located at the end of linear eukaryotic chromosomes are essential for genome stability. Improper higher-order chromatin organization at the chromosome ends can give rise to telomeric recombination and genomic instability. We report the development of an assay to quantify differences in the condensation of telomeric chromatin, thereby offering new opportunities to study telomere biology and stability. We have combined a DNA nuclease digestion with a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay of telomeric DNA, which we term the Telomere Chromatin Condensation Assay (TCCA). By quantifying the relative quantities of telomeric DNA that are progressively digested with the exonuclease Bal 31 the method can discriminate between different levels of telomeric chromatin condensation. The structural chromatin packaging at telomeres shielded against exonuclease digestion delivered an estimate, which we term Chromatin Protection Factor (CPF) that ranged from 1.7 to 2.3 fold greater than that present in unpacked DNA. The CPF was significantly decreased when cell cultures were incubated with the DNA hypomethylating agent 5-azacytidine, demonstrating the ability of the TCCA assay to discriminate between packaging levels of telomeric DNA.

  7. The role of metal ions in chemical evolution - Polymerization of alanine and glycine in a cation-exchanged clay environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Levi, N.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of the exchangeable cation on the condensation of glycine and alanine was investigated using a series of homoionic bentonites. A cycling procedure of drying, warming and wetting was employed. Peptide bond formation was observed, and the effectiveness of metal ions to catalyze the condensation was Cu(2+) greater than Ni(2) approximately equals Zn(2+) greater than Na(+). Glycine showed 6% of the monomer incorporated into oligomers with the largest detected being the pentamer. Alanine showed less peptide bond formation (a maximum of 2%) and only the dimer was observed.

  8. Studies of base pair sequence effects on DNA solvation based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Surjit B; Mezei, Mihaly; Beveridge, David L

    2012-07-01

    Detailed analyses of the sequence-dependent solvation and ion atmosphere of DNA are presented based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on all the 136 unique tetranucleotide steps obtained by the ABC consortium using the AMBER suite of programs. Significant sequence effects on solvation and ion localization were observed in these simulations. The results were compared to essentially all known experimental data on the subject. Proximity analysis was employed to highlight the sequence dependent differences in solvation and ion localization properties in the grooves of DNA. Comparison of the MD-calculated DNA structure with canonical A- and B-forms supports the idea that the G/C-rich sequences are closer to canonical A- than B-form structures, while the reverse is true for the poly A sequences, with the exception of the alternating ATAT sequence. Analysis of hydration density maps reveals that the flexibility of solute molecule has a significant effect on the nature of observed hydration. Energetic analysis of solute-solvent interactions based on proximity analysis of solvent reveals that the GC or CG base pairs interact more strongly with water molecules in the minor groove of DNA that the AT or TA base pairs, while the interactions of the AT or TA pairs in the major groove are stronger than those of the GC or CG pairs. Computation of solvent-accessible surface area of the nucleotide units in the simulated trajectories reveals that the similarity with results derived from analysis of a database of crystallographic structures is excellent. The MD trajectories tend to follow Manning's counterion condensation theory, presenting a region of condensed counterions within a radius of about 17 A from the DNA surface independent of sequence. The GC and CG pairs tend to associate with cations in the major groove of the DNA structure to a greater extent than the AT and TA pairs. Cation association is more frequent in the minor groove of AT than the GC pairs. In general, the

  9. ADSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    DOEpatents

    Khym, J.X.

    1959-03-10

    The chromatographic separation of fission product cations is discussed. By use of this method a mixture of metal cations containing Zr, Cb, Ce, Y, Ba, and Sr may be separated from one another. Mentioned as preferred exchange adsorbents are resins containing free sulfonic acid groups. Various eluants, such as tartaric acid, HCl, and citric acid, used at various acidities, are employed to effect the selective elution and separation of the various fission product cations.

  10. Liquid Crystalline Polymers by Cationic Polymerization,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    cation mechanism of Scholl reaction the Lewis acid and by the benzylic carbocations . Hydride transfer to benzylic carbenium ions leads to methyl groups...reviewed. Examples from ring-opening, carbocationic , and radical-cation poly- merizations and oligomerizations are discussed. Accesion For DrIC TAB3...Examples from ring- opening, carbocationic , and radical-cation polymeri- zations and oligomerizations are discussed. INTRODUCTION This paper will

  11. Genomic Instability in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Arises from Replicative Stress and Chromosome Condensation Defects.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Noa; Ben-David, Uri; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Storchová, Zuzana; Benvenisty, Nissim; Kerem, Batsheva

    2016-02-04

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) frequently acquire chromosomal aberrations such as aneuploidy in culture. These aberrations progressively increase over time and may compromise the properties and clinical utility of the cells. The underlying mechanisms that drive initial genomic instability and its continued progression are largely unknown. Here, we show that aneuploid hPSCs undergo DNA replication stress, resulting in defective chromosome condensation and segregation. Aneuploid hPSCs show altered levels of actin cytoskeletal genes controlled by the transcription factor SRF, and overexpression of SRF rescues impaired chromosome condensation and segregation defects in aneuploid hPSCs. Furthermore, SRF downregulation in diploid hPSCs induces replication stress and perturbed condensation similar to that seen in aneuploid cells. Together, these results suggest that decreased SRF expression induces replicative stress and chromosomal condensation defects that underlie the ongoing chromosomal instability seen in aneuploid hPSCs. A similar mechanism may also operate during initiation of instability in diploid cells.

  12. Condensing efficiency of the truncated cone condenser and its comparison with the Winston cone condenser in terahertz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Makoto; Hiromoto, Norihisa

    2015-01-01

    The angle-dependent condensing efficiency of a truncated cone condenser (TCC) in the terahertz (THz) region has been examined by 2D ray tracing and 3D electromagnetic simulation. The condensing efficiency in the THz region is transferred to that in the optical region by theoretical dispersive reflection from a rough surface, and it is confirmed that the latter is consistent with the measured condensing efficiency in the optical region. Although the TCC has a gradual field of view (FOV) compared with the Winston cone condenser (WCC), we improved the steepness of the FOV by adding a baffle before the input aperture of the TCC. We also proved that the TCC has a high condensing efficiency at around normal incidence in comparison with the WCC in the THz region.

  13. Condensation on slippery asymmetric bumps.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Grinthal, Alison; He, Neil; Fox, David; Weaver, James C; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-03-03

    Controlling dropwise condensation is fundamental to water-harvesting systems, desalination, thermal power generation, air conditioning, distillation towers, and numerous other applications. For any of these, it is essential to design surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and to be shed as quickly as possible. However, approaches based on microscale, nanoscale or molecular-scale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach--based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants--that synergistically combines these aspects of condensation and substantially outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle's bumpy surface geometry in promoting condensation, and using theoretical modelling, we show how to maximize vapour diffusion fluxat the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing the radius of curvature and cross-sectional shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope, analogous to cactus spines, directly couples facilitated droplet growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free-energy profile that drives the droplet down the slope before its growth rate can decrease. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher-plant-inspired nanocoating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion on the way down. Bumps that are rationally designed to integrate these mechanisms are able to grow and transport large droplets even against gravity and overcome the effect of an unfavourable temperature gradient. We further observe an unprecedented sixfold-higher exponent of growth rate, faster onset, higher steady-state turnover rate, and a greater volume of water collected compared to other surfaces. We envision that this fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be

  14. Condensation on slippery asymmetric bumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Grinthal, Alison; He, Neil; Fox, David; Weaver, James C.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Controlling dropwise condensation is fundamental to water-harvesting systems, desalination, thermal power generation, air conditioning, distillation towers, and numerous other applications. For any of these, it is essential to design surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and to be shed as quickly as possible. However, approaches based on microscale, nanoscale or molecular-scale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach—based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants—that synergistically combines these aspects of condensation and substantially outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle’s bumpy surface geometry in promoting condensation, and using theoretical modelling, we show how to maximize vapour diffusion fluxat the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing the radius of curvature and cross-sectional shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope, analogous to cactus spines, directly couples facilitated droplet growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free-energy profile that drives the droplet down the slope before its growth rate can decrease. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher-plant-inspired nanocoating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion on the way down. Bumps that are rationally designed to integrate these mechanisms are able to grow and transport large droplets even against gravity and overcome the effect of an unfavourable temperature gradient. We further observe an unprecedented sixfold-higher exponent of growth rate, faster onset, higher steady-state turnover rate, and a greater volume of water collected compared to other surfaces. We envision that this fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be

  15. Location of B- and Z-DNA in the chromosomes of a primitive eukaryote dinoflagellate

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The usual conformation of DNA is a right-handed double helix (B-DNA). DNA with stretches of alternating purine-pyrimidine (G-C or A-T) can form a left-handed helix (Z-DNA). The transition B----Z, facilitated by the presence of divalent cations, cytosine methylation, or constraints on DNA such as superhelicity may play a role in the regulation of gene expression and/or in DNA compaction (Zarling, D. A., D. J. Arndt-Jovin, M. Robert-Nicoud, L. P. McIntosh, R. Tomae, and T. M. Jovin. 1984. J. Mol. Biol. 176:369-415). Divalent cations are also important in the structure of the quasi-permanently condensed chromosomes of dinoflagellate protists (Herzog, M., and M.-O. Soyer. 1983. Eur. J. Cell Biol. 30:33-41) which also have superhelicity in their DNA. The absence of histones in dinoflagellate chromosomes suggest that the search for Z-DNA sequences might be fruitful and could provide one indication of the physiological role of this particular DNA conformation. We report a complete immunofluorescent and immunogold analysis of the nuclei of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans E. using monoclonal and polyclonal anti-B and anti-Z-DNA antibodies. Positive labeling was obtained with immunofluorescence using squash preparations and cryosections, both of which showed the intranuclear presence of the two DNA conformations. In ultrathin sections of aldehyde-prefixed, osmium-fixed, and epoxy-embedded cells, we have localized B-DNA and Z-DNA either with single or double immunolabeling using IgG labeled with 5- and 7-nm gold particles, respectively. Chromosomal nucleofilaments of dividing or nondividing chromosomes, as seen in ultrathin sections in their arch-shaped configuration, are abundantly labeled with anti-B-DNA antibody. Extrachromosomal anti-B- DNA labeling is also detected on the nucleoplasm that corresponds to DNA loops; we confirm the presence of these loops previously described external to the chromosomes (Soyer, M.-O., and O. K. Haapala. 1974. Chromosoma (Berl.). 47

  16. Marine Steam Condenser Design Optimization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Rerf . 61. !kS 2XLI: Those parametars which the opti heztion proqran ms--faitted to change in order to improre’the esign. Pesin variablis appear oely on...subroutine SEC& LC is called. 5. jZ.~ This subroutine determines all the parameters of each of the sectors in the condenser by row. The first...force the pressure losses to converge to a single value. Once steam flow to the sectors has been adjusted, the sector and row analysis in SEC& LC is

  17. Direct condensation by humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, S.; Schiebelsberger, B.

    1980-12-01

    The practicability of direct condensation with humid air (DKFL) for waste heat removal from thermal power plants was investigated with regard to technical, economical and environmental aspects. The adjustment of a uniform trickling-water film was examined. A vertical test tube was erected to study the phenomenon of a trickling-water film. A pilot plant with a vertical tube-bundle was installed to evaluate the main process parameters. The applicability of the cooling system is judged. A theoretical model was derived for the design of a DKFL apparatus. A vertical geometry for the test tube has essential operational and economical advantages in comparison with a horizontal one.

  18. Turbulent Distortion of Condensate Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazoume, R.; Orou Chabi, J.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1997-01-01

    When a simple model for the relationship between the density-temperature fluctuation correlation and mean values is used, we determine that the rate of change of turbulent intensity can influence directly the accretion rate of droplets. Considerable interest exists in the accretion rate for condensates in nonequilibrium flow with icing and the potential role which reactant accretion can play in nonequilibrium exothermic reactant processes. Turbulence is thought to play an important role in such flows. It has already been experimentally determined that turbulence influences the sizes of droplets in the heterogeneous nucleation of supersaturated vapors. This paper addresses the issue of the possible influence of turbulence on the accretion rate of droplets.

  19. Preparation of cationized polysaccharides as gene transfection carrier for bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jun-ichiro; Okazaki, Arimichi; Nagane, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Masaya; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to prepare a non-viral carrier of gene transfection from various polysaccharides and evaluate the feasibility in gene expression for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Various amounts of spermine were chemically introduced into pullulan, dextran and mannan with a molecular weight of around 40 000 or pullulan with different molecular weights to prepare cationized polysaccharides with different extents of spermine introduced (spermine-polysaccharide). Each cationized polysaccharide was complexed with a plasmid DNA at various ratios and in vitro gene transfection was investigated for rat bone marrow-derived MSCs. The level of gene expression depended on the type of cationized polysaccharide. The highest level was observed for the complex of spermine-pullulan and plasmid DNA. Additionally, the level also depended on the molecular weight of pullulan and the extent of spermine introduced to pullulan. Suppression of gene expression with chlorpromazine and methyl-beta-cyclodextrin of endocytosis inhibitors demonstrated that the cellular uptake of spermine-pullulan-plasmid DNA complexes was mediated by clathrin- and raft/caveolae-dependent endocytic pathways. The cationized pullulan is a promising non-viral carrier of plasmid DNA for MSCs.

  20. Novel Cationic Lipids with Enhanced Gene Delivery and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fein, David E.; Bucki, Robert; Byfield, Fitzroy; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Janmey, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Cationic lipids facilitate plasmid delivery, and some cationic sterol-based compounds have antimicrobial activity because of their amphiphilic character. These dual functions are relevant in the context of local ongoing infection during intrapulmonary gene transfer for cystic fibrosis. The transfection activities of two cationic lipids, dexamethasone spermine (DS) and disubstituted spermine (D2S), were tested as individual components and mixtures in bovine aortic endothelial cells and A549 cells. The results showed a 3- to 7-fold improvement in transgene expression for mixtures of DS with 20 to 40 mol% D2S. D2S and coformulations with DS, dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, and DNA exhibited potent bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli MG1655, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, which was maintained in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Complete bacterial killing was demonstrated at ∼5 μM, including gene delivery formulations, with 2 orders of magnitude higher tolerance before eukaryotic membrane disruption (erythrocyte hemolysis). D2S also exhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS) scavenging activity resulting in significant inhibition of LPS-mediated activation of human neutrophils with 85 and 65% lower interleukin-8 released at 12 and 24 h, respectively. Mixtures of DS and D2S can improve transfection activity over common lipofection reagents, and D2S has strong antimicrobial action suited for the suppression of bacterial-mediated inflammation. PMID:20573781

  1. Hydrogen bonding versus hyperconjugation in condensed-phase carbocations.

    PubMed

    Reed, Christopher A; Stoyanov, Evgenii S; Tham, Fook S

    2013-06-21

    Hyperconjugative stabilization of positive charge in tertiary carbocations is the textbook explanation for their stability and low frequency νCH bands in their IR spectra have long been taken as confirming evidence. While this is substantiated in the gas phase by the very close match of the IR spectrum of argon-tagged t-butyl cation with that calculated under C(s) symmetry, the situation in condensed phases is much less clear. The congruence of νCH(max) of t-Bu(+) in superacid media (2830 cm(-1)) with that in the gas phase (2834 cm(-1)) has recently been shown to be accidental. Rather, νCH(max) varies considerably as a function of counterion in a manner that reveals the presence of significant C-H···anion hydrogen bonding. This paper addresses the question of the relative importance of hyperconjugation versus H-bonding. We show by assigning IR spectra in the νCH region to specific C-H bonds in t-butyl cation that the low frequency νCH(max) band in the IR spectrum of t-butyl cation, long taken as direct evidence for hyperconjugation, appears to be due mostly to H-bonding. The appearance of similar low frequency νCH bands in the IR spectra of secondary alkyl carboranes such as i-Pr(CHB11Cl11), which have predominant sp(3) centres rather than sp(2) centres (and are therefore less supportive of hyperconjugation), also suggests the dominance of H-bonding over hyperconjugation.

  2. Multi-shell model of ion-induced nucleic acid condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Drozdetski, Aleksander V.; Pollack, Lois; Baker, Nathan A.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2016-04-01

    We present a semi-quantitative model of condensation of short nucleic acid (NA) duplexes induced by trivalent cobalt(iii) hexammine (CoHex) ions. The model is based on partitioning of bound counterion distribution around single NA duplex into "external" and "internal" ion binding shells distinguished by the proximity to duplex helical axis. In the aggregated phase the shells overlap, which leads to significantly increased attraction of CoHex ions in these overlaps with the neighboring duplexes. The duplex aggregation free energy is decomposed into attractive and repulsive components in such a way that they can be represented by simple analytical expressions with parameters derived from molecular dynamic simulations and numerical solutions of Poisson equation. The attractive term depends on the fractions of bound ions in the overlapping shells and affinity of CoHex to the "external" shell of nearly neutralized duplex. The repulsive components of the free energy are duplex configurational entropy loss upon the aggregation and the electrostatic repulsion of the duplexes that remains after neutralization by bound CoHex ions. The estimates of the aggregation free energy are consistent with the experimental range of NA duplex condensation propensities, including the unusually poor condensation of RNA structures and subtle sequence effects upon DNA condensation. The model predicts that, in contrast to DNA, RNA duplexes may condense into tighter packed aggregates with a higher degree of duplex neutralization. An appreciable CoHex mediated RNA-RNA attraction requires closer inter-duplex separation to engage CoHex ions (bound mostly in the "internal" shell of RNA) into short-range attractive interactions. The model also predicts that longer NA fragments will condense more readily than shorter ones. The ability of this model to explain experimentally observed trends in NA condensation lends support to proposed NA condensation picture based on the multivalent "ion binding

  3. Cation-Coupled Bicarbonate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2016-01-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3− transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3− and associated with Na+ and Cl− movement. The first Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7 gene product); the Na+-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger NDCBE (SLC4A8 gene product); and NBCn2/NCBE (SLC4A10 gene product), which has been characterized as an electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter or a Na+-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger. Despite the similarity in amino acid sequence and predicted structure among the NCBTs of the SLC4-family, they exhibit distinct differences in ion dependency, transport function, pharmacological properties, and interactions with other proteins. In epithelia, NCBTs are involved in transcellular movement of acid-base equivalents and intracellular pH control. In nonepithelial tissues, NCBTs contribute to intracellular pH regulation; and hence, they are crucial for diverse tissue functions including neuronal discharge, sensory neuron development, performance of the heart, and vascular tone regulation. The function and expression levels of the NCBTs are generally sensitive to intracellular and systemic pH. Animal models have revealed pathophysiological roles of the transporters in disease states including metabolic acidosis, hypertension, visual defects, and epileptic seizures. Studies are being conducted to understand the physiological consequences of genetic polymorphisms in the SLC4-members, which are associated with cancer, hypertension, and drug addiction. Here, we describe the current knowledge regarding the function, structure, and regulation of the mammalian cation-coupled HCO3− transporters of the SLC4-family. PMID:25428855

  4. Cation-coupled bicarbonate transporters.

    PubMed

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2014-10-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3(-) transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3(-) and associated with Na(+) and Cl(-) movement. The first Na(+)-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7 gene product); the Na(+)-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger NDCBE (SLC4A8 gene product); and NBCn2/NCBE (SLC4A10 gene product), which has been characterized as an electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter or a Na(+)-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger. Despite the similarity in amino acid sequence and predicted structure among the NCBTs of the SLC4-family, they exhibit distinct differences in ion dependency, transport function, pharmacological properties, and interactions with other proteins. In epithelia, NCBTs are involved in transcellular movement of acid-base equivalents and intracellular pH control. In nonepithelial tissues, NCBTs contribute to intracellular pH regulation; and hence, they are crucial for diverse tissue functions including neuronal discharge, sensory neuron development, performance of the heart, and vascular tone regulation. The function and expression levels of the NCBTs are generally sensitive to intracellular and systemic pH. Animal models have revealed pathophysiological roles of the transporters in disease states including metabolic acidosis, hypertension, visual defects, and epileptic seizures. Studies are being conducted to understand the physiological consequences of genetic polymorphisms in the SLC4-members, which are associated with cancer, hypertension, and drug addiction. Here, we describe the current knowledge regarding the function, structure, and regulation of the mammalian cation-coupled HCO3(-) transporters of the SLC4-family.

  5. A biomechanical mechanism for initiating DNA packaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haowei; Yehoshua, Samuel; Ali, Sabrina S; Navarre, William Wiley; Milstein, Joshua N

    2014-10-29

    The bacterial chromosome is under varying levels of mechanical stress due to a high degree of crowding and dynamic protein-DNA interactions experienced within the nucleoid. DNA tension is difficult to measure in cells and its functional significance remains unclear although in vitro experiments have implicated a range of biomechanical phenomena. Using single-molecule tools, we have uncovered a novel protein-DNA interaction that responds to fluctuations in mechanical tension by condensing DNA. We combined tethered particle motion (TPM) and optical tweezers experiments to probe the effects of tension on DNA in the presence of the Hha/H-NS complex. The nucleoid structuring protein H-NS is a key regulator of DNA condensation and gene expression in enterobacteria and its activity in vivo is affected by the accessory factor Hha. We find that tension, induced by optical tweezers, causes the rapid compaction of DNA in the presence of the Hha/H-NS complex, but not in the presence of H-NS alone. Our results imply that H-NS requires Hha to condense bacterial DNA and that this condensation could be triggered by the level of mechanical tension experienced along different regions of the chromosome.

  6. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOEpatents

    Wasserman, Stephen R.; Anderson, Kenneth B.; Song, Kang; Yuchs, Steven E.; Marshall, Christopher L.

    1998-01-01

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  7. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  8. Mild access to planar-chiral ortho-condensed aromatic ferrocenes via gold(i)-catalyzed cycloisomerization of ortho-alkynylaryl ferrocenes.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Antonio; Hernández-Torres, Gloria; Del Hoyo, Ana M; Martínez-Carrión, Alicia; Carmen Carreño, M

    2016-05-11

    An efficient approach to (Rp) planar-chiral tri- and tetracyclic ortho-condensed aromatic ferrocenes was developed through the enantioselective cationic Au(i)-catalyzed cycloisomerization, in the presence of bidentate phosphine ligand (R)-DTBM-Segphos, from readily available ortho-alkynylaryl ferrocenes under very mild conditions (11 examples, up to 92% yield and 93% ee).

  9. Ultra-low threshold polariton condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steger, Mark; Fluegel, Brian; Alberi, Kirstin; Snoke, David W.; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate condensation of microcavity polaritons with a very sharp threshold occuring at two orders of magnitude lower pump intensity than previous demonstrations of condensation. The long cavity-lifetime and trapping and pumping geometries are crucial to the realization of this low threshold. Polariton condensation, or "polariton lasing" has long been proposed as a promising source of coherent light at lower threshold than traditional lasing, and these results suggest methods to bring this threshold even lower.

  10. High-temperature condensates in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, L.

    1977-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations of the sequence of condensation of minerals from a cooling gas of solar composition play an important role in explaining the mineralogy and trace element content of different types of inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites. Group IV B iron meteorites and enstatite chondrites may also be direct condensates from the solar nebula. Condensation theory provides a framework within which chemical fractionations between different classes of chondrites may be understood.

  11. Ultra-low threshold polariton condensation.

    PubMed

    Steger, Mark; Fluegel, Brian; Alberi, Kirstin; Snoke, David W; Pfeiffer, Loren N; West, Ken; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2017-03-15

    We demonstrate the condensation of microcavity polaritons with a very sharp threshold occurring at a two orders of magnitude pump intensity lower than previous demonstrations of condensation. The long cavity lifetime and trapping and pumping geometries are crucial to the realization of this low threshold. Polariton condensation, or "polariton lasing" has long been proposed as a promising source of coherent light at a lower threshold than traditional lasing, and these results indicate some considerations for optimizing designs for lower thresholds.

  12. Emergent properties of dense DNA phases toward artificial biosystems on a surface.

    PubMed

    Bracha, Dan; Karzbrun, Eyal; Daube, Shirley S; Bar-Ziv, Roy H

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: The expression of genes in a cell in response to external signals or internal programs occurs within an environment that is compartmentalized and dense. Reconstituting gene expression in man-made systems is relevant for the basic understanding of gene regulation, as well as for the development of applications in bio- and nanotechnology. DNA polymer brushes assembled on a surface emulate a dense cellular environment. In a regime of significant chain overlap, the highly charged nature of DNA, its entropic degrees of freedom, and its interaction with transcription/translation machinery lead to emergent collective biophysical and biochemical properties, which are summarized in this Account. First, we describe a single-step photolithographic biochip on which biomolecules can be immobilized. Then, we present the assembly of localized DNA brushes, a few kilo-base pairs long, with spatially varying density, reaching a DNA concentration of ∼10(7) base pairs/μm(3), which is comparable to the value in E. coli. We then summarize the response of brush height to changes in density and mono- and divalent ionic strength. The balance between entropic elasticity and swelling forces leads to a rich phase behavior. At no added salt, polymers are completely stretched due to the osmotic pressure of ions, and at high salt they assume a relaxed coil conformation. Midrange, the brush height scales with ratio of density and ionic strength to the third power, in agreement with the general theory of polyelectrolyte brushes. In response to trivalent cations, DNA brushes collapse into macroscopic dendritic condensates with hysteresis, coexistence, and a hierarchy of condensation with brush density. We next present an investigation of RNA transcription in the DNA brush. In general, the brush density entropically excludes macromolecules, depleting RNA polymerase concentration in the brush compared to the bulk, therefore reducing transcription rate. The orientation of transcription

  13. Advancements in Anion Exchange Membrane Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, Matthew R.; Long, Hai; Park, Andrew M.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-10-15

    Anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AME-FCs) are of increasingly popular interest as they enable the use of non-Pt fuel cell catalysts, the primary cost limitation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA) is the standard cation that has historically been utilized as the hydroxide conductor in AEMs. Herein we approach AEMs from two directions. First and foremost we study the stability of several different cations in a hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures. We specifically targeted BTMA and methoxy and nitro substituted BTMA. We've also studied the effects of adding an akyl spacer units between the ammonium cation and the phenyl group. In the second approach we use computational studies to predict stable ammonium cations, which are then synthesized and tested for stability. Our unique method to study cation stability in caustic conditions at elevated temperatures utilizes Teflon Parr reactors suitable for use under various temperatures and cation concentrations. NMR analysis was used to determine remaining cation concentrations at specific time points with GCMS analysis verifying product distribution. We then compare the experimental results with calculated modeling stabilities. Our studies show that the electron donating methoxy groups slightly increase stability (compared to that of BTMA), while the electron withdrawing nitro groups greatly decrease stability in base. These results give insight into possible linking strategies to be employed when tethering a BTMA like ammonium cation to a polymeric backbone; thus synthesizing an anion exchange membrane.

  14. Cation exchange capacity of pine bark substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cation exchange capacity (CEC) is an important soil and substrate chemical property. It describes a substrate's ability to retain cation nutrients. Higher CEC values for a substrate generally result in greater amounts of nutrients retained in the substrate and available for plant uptake, and great...

  15. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selective recognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure and selectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometric ion sensing are emphasised, along with their potential applications in optical sensors or optodes.

  16. Treatment of evaporator condensates by pervaporation

    DOEpatents

    Blume, Ingo; Baker, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    A pervaporation process for separating organic contaminants from evaporator condensate streams is disclosed. The process employs a permselective membrane that is selectively permeable to an organic component of the condensate. The process involves contacting the feed side of the membrane with a liquid condensate stream, and withdrawing from the permeate side a vapor enriched in the organic component. The driving force for the process is the in vapor pressure across the membrane. This difference may be provided for instance by maintaining a vacuum on the permeate side, or by condensing the permeate. The process offers a simple, economic alternative to other separation techniques.

  17. Evaporative condensing minimizes system power requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Knebel, D.E.

    1997-04-01

    Evaporative condensing is a heat-rejection technology widely applied with industrial refrigeration. When employed with HVAC systems it can reduce electrical energy and demand consumption of an HVAC system by 20 to 40%, depending on location, compared to air-cooled condensing. Evaporative condensing allows direct-expansion (DX) systems to achieve energy and demand consumption comparable to the most efficient chilled water central plant systems. As the industry focuses its attention on solving the problems of energy conservation, demand reduction, and global warming, high-efficiency air conditioning systems utilizing evaporative condensing provide a reliable and cost-effective solution today. This article addresses the advantages of evaporative condensing over air-cooled and water-cooled condensing in DX packaged systems as well as chiller/cooling tower systems. A review of condensing methods and standard system operating characteristics will be used as examples to illustrate the thermodynamic benefits of evaporative condensing. Requirements for successful operation of evaporative condensers will be discussed.

  18. Vapor condensation on a turbulent liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmick, M. R.; Khoo, B. C.; Sonin, A. A.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation which seeks the fundamental relationship between the interfacial condensation rate and the parameters which control it when the liquid side is turbulent is discussed. The scaling laws for free-surface condensation are discussed for this case. It is argued that the condensation of cryogenic liquids can, in principle, be simulated in experiments using steam and water. Data are presented for the condensation rate in terms of the dimensionless scaling parameters which involve the fluid properties and the liquid-side turbulence velocity and length scales.

  19. Advances in modelling of condensation phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.S.; Zaltsgendler, E.; Hanna, B.

    1997-07-01

    The physical parameters in the modelling of condensation phenomena in the CANDU reactor system codes are discussed. The experimental programs used for thermal-hydraulic code validation in the Canadian nuclear industry are briefly described. The modelling of vapour generation and in particular condensation plays a key role in modelling of postulated reactor transients. The condensation models adopted in the current state-of-the-art two-fluid CANDU reactor thermal-hydraulic system codes (CATHENA and TUF) are described. As examples of the modelling challenges faced, the simulation of a cold water injection experiment by CATHENA and the simulation of a condensation induced water hammer experiment by TUF are described.

  20. Combined boiler feed and condensate pump

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Cooper, Titusville, N.J.

    1993-06-01

    A pump for drawing the condensate from a condenser and feeding it to a steam boiler is described, the combination comprising: an elongate casing adapted to be connected in a pipeline having an inlet for receiving the condensate from a steam condenser and an outlet for feeding the condensate to a steam boiler; a pump shaft mounted in said casing rotating in a pair of bearings spaced along said shaft and fixed in said casing; an electric motor mounted in said casing connected to one end of said shaft for driving it; control means for operating said electric motor; an inducer pump mounted at the other end of said shaft, driven by said shaft; a multiple stage centrifugal feed pump located in said casing driven by said shaft and receiving condensate from the inducer pump, pumping said condensate to a higher pressure suitable for feeding a steam boiler and delivering said condensate to the outlet of said pump, the multiple stage centrifugal feed pump being located adjacent said inducer pump; and said inducer pump being of the type to produce sufficient positive pressure for properly feeding condensate to said feed pump.

  1. Structural and energetic study of cation-π-cation interactions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Silvana; Soteras, Ignacio; Gelpí, Josep Lluis; Dehez, François; Chipot, Christophe; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles

    2017-04-12

    Cation-π interactions of aromatic rings and positively charged groups are among the most important interactions in structural biology. The role and energetic characteristics of these interactions are well established. However, the occurrence of cation-π-cation interactions is an unexpected motif, which raises intriguing questions about its functional role in proteins. We present a statistical analysis of the occurrence, composition and geometrical preferences of cation-π-cation interactions identified in a set of non-redundant protein structures taken from the Protein Data Bank. Our results demonstrate that this structural motif is observed at a small, albeit non-negligible frequency in proteins, and suggest a preference to establish cation-π-cation motifs with Trp, followed by Tyr and Phe. Furthermore, we have found that cation-π-cation interactions tend to be highly conserved, which supports their structural or functional role. Finally, we have performed an energetic analysis of a representative subset of cation-π-cation complexes combining quantum-chemical and continuum solvation calculations. Our results point out that the protein environment can strongly screen the cation-cation repulsion, leading to an attractive interaction in 64% of the complexes analyzed. Together with the high degree of conservation observed, these results suggest a potential stabilizing role in the protein fold, as demonstrated recently for a miniature protein (Craven et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 1543). From a computational point of view, the significant contribution of non-additive three-body terms challenges the suitability of standard additive force fields for describing cation-π-cation motifs in molecular simulations.

  2. Genetic Manipulation of Condensed Tannins in Higher Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Mark P.; Bavage, Adrian D.; Strudwicke, Catherine; Morris, Phillip

    1998-01-01

    We have produced and analyzed transgenic birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.) plants harboring antisense dihydroflavonol reductase (AS-DFR) sequences. In initial experiments the effect of introducing three different antisense Antirrhinum majus L. DFR constructs into a single recipient genotype (S50) was assessed. There were no obvious effects on plant biomass, but levels of condensed tannins showed a statistical reduction in leaf, stem, and root tissues of some of the antisense lines. Transformation events were also found, which resulted in increased levels of condensed tannins. In subsequent experiments a detailed study of AS-DFR phenotypes was carried out in genotype S33 using pMAJ2 (an antisense construct comprising the 5′ half of the A. majus cDNA). In this case, reduced tannin levels were found in leaf and stem tissues and in juvenile shoot tissues. Analysis of soluble flavonoids and isoflavonoids in tannin down-regulated shoot tissues indicated few obvious default products. When two S33 AS-DFR lines were outcrossed, there was an underrepresentation of transgene sequences in progeny plants and no examples of inheritance of an antisense phenotype were observed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the genetic manipulation of condensed tannin biosynthesis in higher plants. PMID:9501146

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: NEW CONDENSATOR, INC.--THE CONDENSATOR DIESEL ENGINE RETROFIT CRANKCASE VENTILATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Environmental Technology Verification Program has tested New Condensator Inc.'s Condensator Diesel Engine Retrofit Crankcase Ventilation System. Brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), the ratio of engine fuel consumption to the engine power output, was evaluated for engine...

  4. Demonstration of Nautilus Centripetal Capillary Condenser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, RIchard; Tang, Linh; Wambolt, Spencer; Golliher, Eric; Agui, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a proof of concept effort for development of a Nautilus Centripetal Capillary Condenser (NCCC or NC3) used for microgravity compatible water recovery from moist air with integral passive phase separation. Removal of liquid condensate from the air stream exiting a condenser is readily performed here on Earth. In order to perform this function in space however, without gravity or mechanical action, other tactics including utilization of inertial, drag and capillary forces are required. Within the NC3, liquid water forms via condensation on cold condenser surfaces as humid air passes along multiple spiral channels, each in its own plane, all together forming a stacked plate assembly. Non-mechanical inertial forces are employed to transfer condensate, as it forms, via centripetal action to the outer perimeter of each channel. A V-shaped groove, constructed on this outer edge of the spiral channel, increases local capillary forces thereby retaining the liquid. Air drag then pulls the liquid along to a collection region near the center of the device. Dry air produced by each parallel spiral channel is combined in a common orthogonal, out-of-plane conduit passing down the axial center of the stacked device. Similarly, the parallel condensate streams are combined and removed from the condenser/separator through yet another out-of-plane axial conduit. NC3 is an integration of conventional finned condenser operation, combined with static phase separation and capillary transport phenomena. A Mars' transit mission would be a logical application for this technology where gravity is absent and the use of vibrating, energy-intensive, motor-driven centrifugal separators is undesired. Here a vapor stream from either the Heat Melt Compactor or the Carbon dioxide Reduction Assembly, for example, would be dried to a dew point of 10 deg using a passive NC3 condenser/separator with the precious water condensate recycled to the water bus.

  5. An Experimental Study of Filmwise Condensation on Horizontal Enhanced Condenser Tubing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    with a 51 mm thick sheet of Johns - Manville Aerotube insulation. 22 D. CONDENSATE AND FEEDWATER SYSTEMS The condensate and feedwater systems are shown...desuperheater. The condensate and feedwater lines are insulated with 25.4 mm thick Johns - Manville Aerotube insulation. E. COOLING WATER SYSTEM The cooling

  6. Mono-cationic detergents play a critical role in the development of liposome-based gene vector via controlling its lamellarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryosuke; Yamada, Yuma; Kawamura, Eriko; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Controlling the number of lipid bilayers, the lamellarity, in a liposome is a major factor in the in vivo/in vitro pharmacokinetics of drug delivery using liposome-based nanocarriers. Findings reported in a previous study indicated that a mono-cationic detergent (MCD) could be useful in controlling liposomal size via interaction with the lipid envelope. Here, we investigated controlling the lamellarity of the liposomal gene vector by MCD, using a multifunctional envelope-type nano device (MEND). The MEND consisted of a condensed plasmid DNA core and lipid envelopes. The size of the MCD-contained MEND (MCD-MEND) decreased as a function of the amount of MCD, indicating that MCD can be used to control the number of the lipid bilayers. We also developed a triple-layered MEND (TL-MEND) by packaging a di-lamellar MEND into an MCD-containing lipid bilayer. We hypothesized that the TL-MEND would efficiently deliver a gene to the nucleus, when the outer single bilayer fused with the plasma membrane and the inner double membranes then fused with the nuclear double membranes. Transfection assays showed that the TL-MEND had a high transfection activity in JAWS II cells, non-dividing cells. These results indicate that MCD has the potential for enhancing the gene delivery by controlling liposomal lamellarity.

  7. Counterion condensation on heparin oligomers.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Atmuri, Anand; Kaltashov, Igor A; Dubin, Paul L

    2013-04-08

    The electropherogram of native heparin shows a broad distribution of mobilities μ, which truncates abruptly at a notably high μ = 4.7 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). This highly skewed mobility distribution is also found for the 20-saccharide chain, which shows from mass spectrometry a more uniform (symmetrical) with respect to sulfation level. Since a partially degraded heparin exhibits oligomer peaks with μ> 5 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) (appearing to escape the limitation of the mobility value for native heparin), we examined the electrophoretic behavior of chain-length monodisperse heparin oligomers. Their mobilities varied inversely with the logarithm of the contour length, L, for L from 3 to 10 nm and reached an asymptotic limit for L > 20 nm. The generality of this effect was indicated by similar behavior for oligomers of poly(styrene sulfonate). A recent theory of polyelectrolyte end effects (Manning, G. S. Macromolecules2008, 41, 6217-6227), in which chain termini exhibit reduced counterion condensation was found to quantitatively account for these results. A qualitative explanation for the anomalously high value of μ of native heparin, 10-20% higher than those seen for synthetic polyelectrolytes of higher linear charge density, is suggested on the basis of similar junction effects (Manning, G. S. Macromolecules2008, 41, 6217-6227), which reduce counterion condensation at the interfaces of regions of high and low sulfation. We suggest that these effects should be considered in models for the biofunctionality of the regulated high and low sulfation (NS/NA) domains of heparan sulfate.

  8. Tunable Vapor-Condensed Nanolenses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured optical components, such as nanolenses, direct light at subwavelength scales to enable, among others, high-resolution lithography, miniaturization of photonic circuits, and nanoscopic imaging of biostructures. A major challenge in fabricating nanolenses is the appropriate positioning of the lens with respect to the sample while simultaneously ensuring it adopts the optimal size and shape for the intended use. One application of particular interest is the enhancement of contrast and signal-to-noise ratio in the imaging of nanoscale objects, especially over wide fields-of-view (FOVs), which typically come with limited resolution and sensitivity for imaging nano-objects. Here we present a self-assembly method for fabricating time- and temperature-tunable nanolenses based on the condensation of a polymeric liquid around a nanoparticle, which we apply to the high-throughput on-chip detection of spheroids smaller than 40 nm, rod-shaped particles with diameter smaller than 20 nm, and biofunctionalized nanoparticles, all across an ultralarge FOV of >20 mm2. Previous nanoparticle imaging efforts across similar FOVs have detected spheroids no smaller than 100 nm, and therefore our results demonstrate the detection of particles >15-fold smaller in volume, which in free space have >240 times weaker Rayleigh scattering compared to the particle sizes detected in earlier wide-field imaging work. This entire platform, with its tunable nanolens condensation and wide-field imaging functions, is also miniaturized into a cost-effective and portable device, which might be especially important for field use, mobile sensing, and diagnostics applications, including, for example, the measurement of viral load in bodily fluids. PMID:24979060

  9. Molecular attraction of condensed bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derjaguin, B. V.; Abrikosova, I. I.; Lifshitz, E. M.

    2015-09-01

    From the Editorial Board. As a contribution to commemorating the 100t