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Sample records for cation diffusion facilitator

  1. Genes Encoding Proteins of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator Family That Confer Manganese Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Delhaize, Emmanuel; Kataoka, Tatsuhiko; Hebb, Diane M.; White, Rosemary G.; Ryan, Peter R.

    2003-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing a cDNA library prepared from Stylosanthes hamata was screened for enhanced Mn2+ tolerance. From this screen, we identified four related cDNAs that encode membrane-bound proteins of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family. One of these cDNAs (ShMTP1) was investigated in detail and found to confer Mn2+ tolerance to yeast by internal sequestration rather than by efflux of Mn2+. Expression of ShMTP1 in a range of yeast mutants suggested that it functions as a proton:Mn2+ antiporter on the membrane of an internal organelle. Similarly, when expressed in Arabidopsis, ShMTP1 conferred Mn2+ tolerance through internal sequestration. The ShMTP1 protein fused to green fluorescent protein was localized to the tonoplast of Arabidopsis cells but appeared to localize to the endoplasmic reticulum of yeast. We suggest that the ShMTP1 proteins are members of the CDF family involved in conferring Mn2+ tolerance and that at least one of these proteins (ShMTP1) confers tolerance by sequestering Mn2+ into internal organelles. PMID:12724539

  2. Cation diffusion in titanomagnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, R.; McCallister, R. H.; Harrison, H. R.

    1984-02-01

    Interdiffusion couple experiments were performed with titanomagnetite single crystals at 1,000°C, 1,100° C and 1,200° C in various buffered atmospheres. The dependence of the interdiffusion coefficient on oxygen fugacity, composition and temperature was interpreted in terms of point defect structure. Estimates of the cation tracer diffusivities indicate that Fe migrates via a point defect mechanism, involving mixed tetrahedral-octahedral site jumps, with an activation energy of 33 Kcal/mole; whereas Ti migration is one to two orders of magnitude slower, is restricted to octahedral sites and has an activation energy of 60 Kcal/mole.

  3. Disease-Homologous Mutation in the Cation Diffusion Facilitator Protein MamM Causes Single-Domain Structural Loss and Signifies Its Importance

    PubMed Central

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Uebe, René; Davidov, Geula; Navon, Yotam; Sherf, Dror; Chill, Jordan H.; Kass, Itamar; Bitton, Ronit; Schüler, Dirk; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-01-01

    Cation diffusion facilitators (CDF) are highly conserved, metal ion efflux transporters that maintain divalent transition metal cation homeostasis. Most CDF proteins contain two domains, the cation transporting transmembrane domain and the regulatory cytoplasmic C-terminal domain (CTD). MamM is a magnetosome-associated CDF protein essential for the biomineralization of magnetic iron-oxide particles in magnetotactic bacteria. To investigate the structure-function relationship of CDF cytoplasmic domains, we characterized a MamM M250P mutation that is synonymous with the disease-related mutation L349P of the human CDF protein ZnT-10. Our results show that the M250P exchange in MamM causes severe structural changes in its CTD resulting in abnormal reduced function. Our in vivo, in vitro and in silico studies indicate that the CTD fold is critical for CDF proteins’ proper function and support the previously suggested role of the CDF cytoplasmic domain as a CDF regulatory element. Based on our results, we also suggest a mechanism for the effects of the ZnT-10 L349P mutation in human. PMID:27550551

  4. Functional Determinants of Metal Ion Transport and Selectivity in Paralogous Cation Diffusion Facilitator Transporters CzcD and MntE in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Julia E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cation diffusion facilitators (CDFs) are a large family of divalent metal transporters that collectively possess broad metal specificity and contribute to intracellular metal homeostasis and virulence in bacterial pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae expresses two homologous CDF efflux transporters, MntE and CzcD. Cells lacking mntE or czcD are sensitive to manganese (Mn) or zinc (Zn) toxicity, respectively, and specifically accumulate Mn or Zn, respectively, thus suggesting that MntE selectively transports Mn, while CzcD transports Zn. Here, we probe the origin of this metal specificity using a phenotypic growth analysis of pneumococcal variants. Structural homology to Escherichia coli YiiP predicts that both MntE and CzcD are dimeric and each protomer harbors four pairs of conserved metal-binding sites, termed the A site, the B site, and the C1/C2 binuclear site. We find that single amino acid mutations within both the transmembrane domain A site and the B site in both CDFs result in a cellular metal sensitivity similar to that of the corresponding null mutants. However, multiple mutations in the predicted cytoplasmic C1/C2 cluster of MntE have no impact on cellular Mn resistance, in contrast to the analogous substitutions in CzcD, which do have on impact on cellular Zn resistance. Deletion of the MntE-specific C-terminal tail, present only in Mn-specific bacterial CDFs, resulted in only a modest growth phenotype. Further analysis of MntE-CzcD functional chimeric transporters showed that Asn and Asp in the ND-DD A-site motif of MntE and the most N-terminal His in the HD-HD site A of CzcD (the specified amino acids are underlined) play key roles in transporter metal selectivity. IMPORTANCE Cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) proteins are divalent metal ion transporters that are conserved in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans and that play important roles in cellular physiology, from metal homeostasis and resistance to type I diabetes in vertebrates

  5. Defining the Roles of the Cation Diffusion Facilitators in Fe2+/Zn2+ Homeostasis and Establishment of Their Participation in Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Salusso, Agostina; Raimunda, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Transporters of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family form dimers that export transition metals from the cytosol. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes three homologous CDF genes, czcD (PA0397), aitP (PA1297), and yiiP (PA3963). The three proteins are required for virulence in a plant host model. Disruption of the aitP gene leads to higher Fe2+ and Co2+ sensitivity together with an intracellular accumulation of these ions and to a decreased survival in presence of H2O2. Strains lacking czcD and yiiP showed low Zn2+ sensitivity. However, in iron-rich media and in the presence of Zn2+ these strains secreted higher levels of the iron chelator pyoverdine. Disruption of czcD and yiiP in a non-pyoverdine producer strain and lacking the Zn2+-transporting ATPase, increased the Zn2+ sensitivity and the accumulation of this ion. Most importantly, independent of the pyoverdine production strains lacking CzcD or YiiP, presented lower resistance to imipenem, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, and gentamicin. These observations correlated with a lower survival rate upon EDTA-lysozyme treatment and overexpression of OprN and OprD porins. We hypothesize that while AitP is an Fe2+/Co2+ efflux transporter required for Fe2+ homeostasis, and ultimately redox stress handling, CzcD, and YiiP export Zn2+ to the periplasm for proper Zn2+-dependent signaling regulating outer membrane stability and therefore antibiotic tolerance. PMID:28373967

  6. Diffusion of Solvents and Cations in Porous Sol - Glass.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koone, Neil Douglas

    Diffusion coefficients of selected solvents (acetone, acetonitrile, chloroform, cyclohexane, toluene) and rare -earth cation (erbium and neodymium) solutions were determined in porous sol-gel glass. The traditional diaphragm technique was used to measure the diffusion coefficients of solvents, and new experimental techniques have been developed which employ spectroscopy to determine the diffusion coefficients of cations and anions. The concentrations of the solvents were ascertained using IR spectroscopy. The diffusion coefficient for acetone within the pores was studied over the temperature range 11-42^circC and the activation energy was determined. It was shown that molecular translational motion inside the pores is hindered by geometrical restrictions and surface interactions. The effect of chemical interactions was best illustrated when selected samples had their internal surface modified by replacing hydroxyl groups with trimethylsilane groups, causing the diffusion coefficient for acetone to decrease by 50%. To explain this unexpected result, acetone diffusion was compared with molecular dynamics computer simulations. Concentration profiles of cations and anions within impregnated monoliths were ascertained using UV-visible absorption and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. To study the effects of ligands on the diffusion, four different erbium salts were used: nitrate, chloride, bromide, and perchlorate. Diffusion coefficients for the anions nitrate and perchlorate were found to diffuse with the same rate as the cations. Nitrate anions are found to hinder diffusion, while perchlorate anions do not seem to impede and possibly facilitate diffusion of erbium cations. Absorption spectra were recorded for Nd^{3+} in bulk liquid, liquid inside pores, and for heat treated porous glass. Spectra indicate that cations are surrounded by similar species in bulk liquids and liquid within pores, and increasingly interact with the irregular structure of the porous matrix as

  7. Facilitated diffusion buffers noise in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Schoech, Armin P; Zabet, Nicolae Radu

    2014-09-01

    Transcription factors perform facilitated diffusion [three-dimensional (3D) diffusion in the cytosol and 1D diffusion on the DNA] when binding to their target sites to regulate gene expression. Here, we investigated the influence of this binding mechanism on the noise in gene expression. Our results showed that, for biologically relevant parameters, the binding process can be represented by a two-state Markov model and that the accelerated target finding due to facilitated diffusion leads to a reduction in both the mRNA and the protein noise.

  8. Facilitated diffusion buffers noise in gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoech, Armin P.; Zabet, Nicolae Radu

    2014-09-01

    Transcription factors perform facilitated diffusion [three-dimensional (3D) diffusion in the cytosol and 1D diffusion on the DNA] when binding to their target sites to regulate gene expression. Here, we investigated the influence of this binding mechanism on the noise in gene expression. Our results showed that, for biologically relevant parameters, the binding process can be represented by a two-state Markov model and that the accelerated target finding due to facilitated diffusion leads to a reduction in both the mRNA and the protein noise.

  9. Atmospheric CO2 enrichment facilitates cation release from soil.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L; Zhu, J; Chen, G; Zheng, X; Oh, N-H; Rufty, T W; Richter, D deB; Hu, S

    2010-03-01

    Atmospheric CO(2) enrichment generally stimulates plant photosynthesis and nutrient uptake, modifying the local and global cycling of bioactive elements. Although nutrient cations affect the long-term productivity and carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems, little is known about the effect of CO(2) enrichment on cation availability in soil. In this study, we present evidence for a novel mechanism of CO(2)-enhancement of cation release from soil in rice agricultural systems. Elevated CO(2) increased organic C allocation belowground and net H(+) excretion from roots, and stimulated root and microbial respiration, reducing soil redox potential and increasing Fe(2+) and Mn(2+) in soil solutions. Increased H(+), Fe(2+), and Mn(2+) promoted Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) release from soil cation exchange sites. These results indicate that over the short term, elevated CO(2) may stimulate cation release from soil and enhance plant growth. Over the long-term, however, CO(2)-induced cation release may facilitate cation losses and soil acidification, negatively feeding back to the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

  10. On facilitated oxygen diffusion in muscle tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, J E

    1980-01-01

    The role of myoglobin in facilitated diffusion of oxygen in muscle in examined in a tissue model that utilizes a central supplying capillary and a tissue cylinder concentric with the central capillary, and that includes the nonlinear characteristics of the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation reaction. In contrast to previous work, this model exhibits the effect of blood flow and a realistic, though ideal, tissue-capillary geometry. Solutions of the model equations are obtained by a singular-perturbation technique, and numerical results are discussed for model parameters of physiologic interest. In contrast to the findings of Murray, Rubinow, Taylor, and others, fractional order perturbation terms obtained for the "boundary-layer" regions near the supplying capillaries are quite significant in the overall interpretation of the modeling results. Some closed solutions are found for special cases, and these are contrasted with the full singular-perturbation solution. Interpretations are given for parameters of physiologic interest. PMID:7295866

  11. Thermodynamics and Cation Diffusion in the Oxygen Ion Conductor Lsgm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M.; Schulz, O.

    Perovskite type oxides based on LaGaO3 are of large technical interest because of their high oxygen-ion conductivity. Lanthanum gallate doped with Sr on A- and Mg on B-sites, La1-xSrxGa1-yMgyO3-(x+y)/2 (LSGM), reaches higher oxygen-ion conductivities than yttria-doped zirconia (YSZ). Thus LSGM represents a promising alternative for YSZ as electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Cells using thin LSGM-layers as electrolyte are expected to operate at intermediate temperatures around 700°C for more than 30000 hours without severe degradation. A potential long term degradation effect of LSGM is kinetic demixing of the electrolyte, caused by different cation diffusion coefficients. In this paper we report on experimental studies concerning the phase diagram of LSGM and the diffusion of cations. Cation self-diffusion of 139La, 84Sr and 25Mg and cation impurity diffusion of 144Nd, 89Y and 56Fe in polycrystalline LSGM samples was investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for temperatures between 900°C and 1400°C. It was found that diffusion occurs by means of bulk and grain boundaries. The bulk diffusion coefficients are similar for all cations with activation energies which are strongly dependent on temperature. At high temperatures, the activation energies are about 5 eV, while at low temperatures values of about 2 eV are found. These results are explained by a frozen in defect structure at low temperatures. This means that the observed activation energy at low temperatures represents only the migration energy of the different cations while the observed activation energy at high temperatures is the sum of the defect formation energy and the migration energy. The migration energies for all cations are nearly identical, although 139La, 84Sr and 144Nd are occupying A-sites while 25Mg and 56Fe are occupying B-sites in the perovskite-structure. To explain these experimental findings we propose a defect cluster containing cation vacancies in both the A

  12. Enhancing Cation Diffusion and Suppressing Anion Diffusion via Lewis-Acidic Polymer Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Brett M; Webb, Michael A; Miller, Thomas F

    2017-02-02

    Solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) have the potential to increase both the energy density and stability of lithium-based batteries, but low Li(+) conductivity remains a barrier to technological viability. SPEs are designed to maximize Li(+) diffusivity relative to the anion while maintaining sufficient salt solubility. It is thus remarkable that poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), the most widely used SPE, exhibits Li(+) diffusivity that is an order of magnitude smaller than that of typical counterions at moderate salt concentrations. We show that Lewis-basic polymers like PEO favor slow cation and rapid anion diffusion, while this relationship can be reversed in Lewis-acidic polymers. Using molecular dynamics, polyboranes are identified that achieve up to 10-fold increases in Li(+) diffusivities and significant decreases in anion diffusivities, relative to PEO in the dilute-ion regime. These results illustrate a general principle for increasing Li(+) diffusivity and transference number with chemistries that exhibit weaker cation and stronger anion coordination.

  13. Role of Reverse Divalent Cation Diffusion in Forward Osmosis Biofouling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming; Bar-Zeev, Edo; Hashmi, Sara M; Nghiem, Long D; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-11-17

    We investigated the role of reverse divalent cation diffusion in forward osmosis (FO) biofouling. FO biofouling by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was simulated using pristine and chlorine-treated thin-film composite polyamide membranes with either MgCl2 or CaCl2 draw solution. We related FO biofouling behavior-water flux decline, biofilm architecture, and biofilm composition-to reverse cation diffusion. Experimental results demonstrated that reverse calcium diffusion led to significantly more severe water flux decline in comparison with reverse magnesium permeation. Unlike magnesium, reverse calcium permeation dramatically altered the biofilm architecture and composition, where extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) formed a thicker, denser, and more stable biofilm. We propose that FO biofouling was enhanced by complexation of calcium ions to bacterial EPS. This hypothesis was confirmed by dynamic and static light scattering measurements using extracted bacterial EPS with the addition of either MgCl2 or CaCl2 solution. We observed a dramatic increase in the hydrodynamic radius of bacterial EPS with the addition of CaCl2, but no change was observed after addition of MgCl2. Static light scattering revealed that the radius of gyration of bacterial EPS with addition of CaCl2 was 20 times larger than that with the addition of MgCl2. These observations were further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy imaging, where bacterial EPS in the presence of calcium ions was globular, while that with magnesium ions was rod-shaped.

  14. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Radioactive Cations in the Vadose Zone: Field Experiments Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    James E. Saiers

    2012-09-20

    The overarching goal of this study was to improve understanding of colloid-facilitated transport of radioactive cations through unsaturated soils and sediments. We conducted a suite of laboratory experiments and field experiments on the vadose-zone transport of colloids, organic matter, and associated contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The laboratory and field experiments, together with transport modeling, were designed to accomplish the following detailed objectives: 1. Evaluation of the relative importance of inorganic colloids and organic matter to the facilitation of radioactive cation transport in the vadose zone; 2. Assessment of the role of adsorption and desorption kinetics in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 3. Examination of the effects of rainfall and infiltration dynamics and in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations through the vadose zone; 4. Exploration of the role of soil heterogeneity and preferential flow paths (e.g., macropores) on the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 5. Development of a mathematical model of facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone that accurately incorporates pore-scale and column-scale processes with the practicality of predicting transport with readily available parameters.

  15. Facilitated diffusion of proteins through crumpled fractal DNA globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrek, Jan; Grosberg, Alexander Y.

    2015-07-01

    We explore how the specific fractal globule conformation, found for the chromatin fiber of higher eukaryotes and topologically constrained dense polymers, affects the facilitated diffusion of proteins in this environment. Using scaling arguments and supporting Monte Carlo simulations, we relate DNA looping probability distribution, fractal dimension, and protein nonspecific affinity for the DNA to the effective diffusion parameters of the proteins. We explicitly consider correlations between subsequent readsorption events of the proteins, and we find that facilitated diffusion is faster for the crumpled globule conformation with high intersegmental surface dimension than in the case of dense fractal conformations with smooth surfaces. As a byproduct, we obtain an expression for the macroscopic conductivity of a hypothetic material consisting of conducting fractal nanowires immersed in a weakly conducting medium.

  16. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Oxygen and Cation Diffusion in Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is of interest to the aerospace community, notably for its application as a thermal barrier coating for turbine engine components. In such an application, diffusion of both oxygen ions and cations is of concern. Oxygen diffusion can lead to deterioration of a coated part, and often necessitates an environmental barrier coating. Cation diffusion in YSZ is much slower than oxygen diffusion. However, such diffusion is a mechanism by which creep takes place, potentially affecting the mechanical integrity and phase stability of the coating. In other applications, the high oxygen diffusivity of YSZ is useful, and makes the material of interest for use as a solid-state electrolyte in fuel cells. The kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) method offers a number of advantages compared with the more widely known molecular dynamics simulation method. In particular, kMC is much more efficient for the study of processes, such as diffusion, that involve infrequent events. We describe the results of kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulations of oxygen and cation diffusion in YSZ. Using diffusive energy barriers from ab initio calculations and from the literature, we present results on the temperature dependence of oxygen and cation diffusivity, and on the dependence of the diffusivities on yttria concentration and oxygen sublattice vacancy concentration. We also present results of the effect on diffusivity of oxygen vacancies in the vicinity of the barrier cations that determine the oxygen diffusion energy barriers.

  17. Facilitated diffusion in a crowded environment: from kinetics to stochastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meroz, Yasmine; Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2009-10-01

    Facilitated diffusion is a fundamental search process used to describe the problem of a searcher protein finding a specific target site over a very large DNA strand. In recent years macromolecular crowding has been recognized to affect this search process. In this paper, we bridge between two different modelling methodologies of facilitated diffusion: the physics-oriented kinetic approach, which yields the reaction rate of the search process, and the probability-oriented stochastic approach, which yields the probability distribution of the search duration. We translate the former approach to the latter, ascertaining that the two approaches yield coinciding results, both with and without macromolecular crowding. We further show that the stochastic approach markedly generalizes the kinetic approach by accommodating a vast array of search mechanisms, including mechanisms having no reaction rates, and thus being beyond the realm of the kinetic approach.

  18. Reduction of anoxia through myoglobin-facilitated diffusion of oxygen.

    PubMed Central

    Salathé, E P; Kolkka, R W

    1986-01-01

    At relatively low perfusion rates, anoxic regions may occur in tissue even though oxygen remains in the blood as it leaves the capillary at the venous end. In this paper a mathematical theory of facilitated diffusion is developed and used to determine the extent to which myoglobin increases the removal of oxygen from blood and aids in the reduction or elimination of regions of anoxia. PMID:3790691

  19. Facilitated diffusion of acetonitrile revealed by quantitative breath analysis using extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Ding, Jianhua; Gu, Haiwei; Zhang, Yan; Pan, Susu; Xu, Ning; Chen, Huanwen; Li, Hongmei

    2013-01-01

    By using silver cations (Ag⁺) as the ionic reagent in reactive extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS), the concentrations of acetonitrile in exhaled breath samples from the volunteers including active smokers, passive smokers, and non-smokers were quantitatively measured in vivo, without any sample pretreatment. A limit of detection (LOD) and relative standard deviation (RSD) were 0.16 ng/L and 3.5% (n = 8), respectively, for the acetonitrile signals in MS/MS experiments. Interestingly, the concentrations of acetonitrile in human breath continuously increased for 1-4 hours after the smoker finished smoking and then slowly decreased to the background level in 7 days. The experimental data of a large number of (> 165) samples indicated that the inhaled acetonitrile is excreted most likely by facilitated diffusion, instead of simple diffusion reported previously for other volatile compounds.

  20. Probing the DNA Structural Requirements for Facilitated Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    DNA glycosylases perform a genome-wide search to locate damaged nucleotides among a great excess of undamaged nucleotides. Many glycosylases are capable of facilitated diffusion, whereby multiple sites along the DNA are sampled during a single binding encounter. Electrostatic interactions between positively charged amino acids and the negatively charged phosphate backbone are crucial for facilitated diffusion, but the extent to which diffusing proteins rely on the double-helical structure DNA is not known. Kinetic assays were used to probe the DNA searching mechanism of human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) and to test the extent to which diffusion requires B-form duplex DNA. Although AAG excises εA lesions from single-stranded DNA, it is not processive on single-stranded DNA because dissociation is faster than N-glycosidic bond cleavage. However, the AAG complex with single-stranded DNA is sufficiently stable to allow for DNA annealing when a complementary strand is added. This observation provides evidence of nonspecific association of AAG with single-stranded DNA. Single-strand gaps, bubbles, and bent structures do not impede the search by AAG. Instead, these flexible or bent structures lead to the capture of a nearby site of damage that is more efficient than that of a continuous B-form duplex. The ability of AAG to negotiate these helix discontinuities is inconsistent with a sliding mode of diffusion but can be readily explained by a hopping mode that involves microscopic dissociation and reassociation. These experiments provide evidence of relatively long-range hops that allow a searching protein to navigate around DNA binding proteins that would serve as obstacles to a sliding protein. PMID:25495964

  1. Electrochemistry of cations in diopsidic melt - Determining diffusion rates and redox potentials from voltammetric curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.; Crane, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on determinations of reduction potentials and their temperature dependence of selected ions in diopsidic melt, by using linear sweep voltammetry. Diffusion coefficients were measured for cations of Eu, Mn, Cr, and In. Enthalpies and entropies of reduction were determined for the cations V(V), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Mn(3+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Mo(VI), Sn(IV), and Eu(3+). Reduction potentials were used to study the structural state of cations in the melt.

  2. Structure and ionic diffusion of alkaline-earth ions in mixed cation glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Petr; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2015-08-15

    A series of mixed cation silicate glasses of the composition A2O – 2MO – 4SiO2, with A=Li,Na,K and M=Ca,Sr,Ba has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the effect of the nature of the cations on the mobility of the alkaline-earth ions within the glass network. The size of the alkaline-earth cation was found to affect the inter-atomic distances, the coordination number distributions and the bond angle distributions , whereas the medium-range order was almost unaffected by the type of the cation. All the alkaline-earth cations contribute to lower vibrational frequencies but it is observed that that there is a shift to smaller frequencies and the vibrational density of states distribution gets narrower as the size of the alkaline-earth increases. The results from our modeling for the ionic diffusion of the alkaline-earth cations are in a qualitative agreement with the experimental observations in that there is a distinct correlation between the activation energy for diffusion of alkaline earth-ions and the cation radii ratio. An asymmetrical linear behavior in the diffusion activation energy with increasing size difference is observed. The results can be described on the basis of a theoretical model that relates the diffusion activation energy to the electrostatic interactions of the cations with the oxygens and the elastic deformation of the silicate network.

  3. The lac repressor displays facilitated diffusion in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hammar, Petter; Leroy, Prune; Mahmutovic, Anel; Marklund, Erik G; Berg, Otto G; Elf, Johan

    2012-06-22

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that regulate the expression of genes by binding sequence-specific sites on the chromosome. It has been proposed that to find these sites fast and accurately, TFs combine one-dimensional (1D) sliding on DNA with 3D diffusion in the cytoplasm. This facilitated diffusion mechanism has been demonstrated in vitro, but it has not been shown experimentally to be exploited in living cells. We have developed a single-molecule assay that allows us to investigate the sliding process in living bacteria. Here we show that the lac repressor slides 45 ± 10 base pairs on chromosomal DNA and that sliding can be obstructed by other DNA-bound proteins near the operator. Furthermore, the repressor frequently (>90%) slides over its natural lacO(1) operator several times before binding. This suggests a trade-off between rapid search on nonspecific sequences and fast binding at the specific sequence.

  4. Facilitated diffusion framework for transcription factor search with conformational changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartailler, Jérôme; Reingruber, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Cellular responses often require the fast activation or repression of specific genes, which depends on transcription factors (TFs) that have to quickly find the promoters of these genes within a large genome. TFs search for their DNA promoter target by alternating between bulk diffusion and sliding along the DNA, a mechanism known as facilitated diffusion. We study a facilitated diffusion framework with switching between three search modes: a bulk mode and two sliding modes triggered by conformational changes between two protein conformations. In one conformation (search mode) the TF interacts unspecifically with the DNA backbone resulting in fast sliding. In the other conformation (recognition mode) it interacts specifically and strongly with DNA base pairs leading to slow displacement. From the bulk, a TF associates with the DNA at a random position that is correlated with the previous dissociation point, which implicitly is a function of the DNA structure. The target affinity depends on the conformation. We derive exact expressions for the mean first passage time (MFPT) to bind to the promoter and the conditional probability to bind before detaching when arriving at the promoter site. We systematically explore the parameter space and compare various search scenarios. We compare our results with experimental data for the dimeric Lac repressor search in E. coli bacteria. We find that a coiled DNA conformation is absolutely necessary for a fast MFPT. With frequent spontaneous conformational changes, a fast search time is achieved even when a TF becomes immobilized in the recognition state due to the specific bindings. We find a MFPT compatible with experimental data in presence of a specific TF-DNA interaction energy that has a Gaussian distribution with a large variance.

  5. A Report on Facilitating Educational Change with Local School Districts through the National Diffusion Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Ralph

    The National Diffusion Network was initiated in 1974 by the United States Office of Education (USOE). Thirty states developed state facilitators the first year and 36 states had facilitators the second year. Among the facilitators in the network, there appears to be considerable difference in the approaches that are taken to diffuse the projects…

  6. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Cation Diffusion in Low-K Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Low thermal conductivity (low-K) ceramic materials are of interest to the aerospace community for use as the thermal barrier component of coating systems for turbine engine components. In particular, zirconia-based materials exhibit both low thermal conductivity and structural stability at high temperature, making them suitable for such applications. Because creep is one of the potential failure modes, and because diffusion is a mechanism by which creep takes place, we have performed computer simulations of cation diffusion in a variety of zirconia-based low-K materials. The kinetic Monte Carlo simulation method is an alternative to the more widely known molecular dynamics (MD) method. It is designed to study "infrequent-event" processes, such as diffusion, for which MD simulation can be highly inefficient. We describe the results of kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulations of cation diffusion in several zirconia-based materials, specifically, zirconia doped with Y, Gd, Nb and Yb. Diffusion paths are identified, and migration energy barriers are obtained from density functional calculations and from the literature. We present results on the temperature dependence of the diffusivity, and on the effects of the presence of oxygen vacancies in cation diffusion barrier complexes as well.

  7. Diffusion of cations in chromia layers grown on iron-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lobnig, R.E.; Hennesen, K.; Grabke, H.J. ); Schmidt, H.P.

    1992-02-01

    Diffusion of the cations Cr, Fe, Mn, and Ni in Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been investigated at 1,173 K. The diffusion measurements were performed on chromia layers grown on the model alloys Fe-20Cr and Fe-20Cr-12Ni in order to consider effects of small amounts of dissolved alien cations in Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The samples were diffusion annealed in H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at an oxygen partial pressure close to the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Cr equilibrium. For all tracers the lattice-diffusion coefficients are 3-5 orders of magnitude smaller than the grain-boundary diffusion coefficients. The lattice diffusivity of Mn is about two orders of magnitude greater than the other lattice-diffusion coefficients, especially in Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} grown on Fe-20Cr-12Ni. The values of the diffusion coefficients for Cr, Fe, and Ni are in the same range. Diffusion of the tracers in Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} grown on different alloys did not show significant differences with the exception of Mn.

  8. The mathematical model of dye diffusion and adsorption on modified cellulose with triazine derivatives containing cationic and anionic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, K.; Hou, A.; Chen, Y.

    2008-02-01

    Cellulose fabric is chemically modified with the compounds containing cationic and anionic groups. The molecular chains of modified cellulose have both cationic and anionic groups. Dye diffusion properties on modified cellulose are discussed. The dye adsorption and diffusion on modified cellulose are higher than those on unmodified cellulose. The diffusion properties of dyes at different temperature are discussed. Compared with unmodified cellulose, the diffusion processing of dyes in the modified cotton cellulose shows significant change.

  9. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Cations in an Unsaturated Fractured Soil Under Transient Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Joseph

    2015-01-31

    Rainfall experiments were conducted using intact soil cores and an instrumented soil pedon to examine the effect of physical heterogeneity and rainfall characteristics on the mobilization of colloids, organic matter, cesium, and strontium in a fractured soil. To measure the spatial variability of infiltration of colloids and contaminants, samples were collected through a 19-port grid placed below the soil core in laboratory study and in 27 samplers at multiple depths in the soil pedon in the field study. Cesium and strontium were applied to the soil cores and the soil pedon prior to mobilization experiments. Rainwater solutions of multiple ionic strengths and organic matter concentrations were applied to the soil cores and soil pedon to mobilize in situ colloids, cesium, and strontium. The mobilization of colloids and metal cations occurred through preferential flow paths in the soil cores. Compared to steady rainfall, greater amounts of colloids were mobilized during rainfall interrupted by pauses, which indicates that the supply of colloids to be mobilized was replenished during the pauses. A maximum in the amount of mobilized colloids were mobilized during a rainfall following a pause of 2.5 d. Pauses of shorter or longer duration resulted in less colloid mobilization. Freeze-thaw cycles, a transient condition in winter, enhanced colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of cesium and strontium in the soil cores. The exchange of solutes between the soil matrix and macropores caused a hysteretic mobilization of colloids, cesium, and strontium during changes in ionic strength. Colloid-facilitated mobilization of cesium and strontium was important at low ionic strength in fractures where slow flow allowed greater exchange of flow between the fractures and the surrounding matrix. The release of cesium and strontium by cation exchange occurred at high ionic strength in fractures where there is a little exchange of pore water with the surrounding matrix

  10. Modeling cation diffusion in compacted water-saturated sodium bentonite at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Bourg, Ian C; Sposito, Garrison; Bourg, Alain C M

    2007-12-01

    Sodium bentonites are used as barrier materials for the isolation of landfills and are under consideration for a similar use in the subsurface storage of high-level radioactive waste. The performance of these barriers is determined in large part by molecular diffusion in the bentonite pore space. We tested two current models of cation diffusion in bentonite against experimental data on the relative apparent diffusion coefficients of two representative cations, sodium and strontium. On the "macropore/nanopore" model, solute molecules are divided into two categories, with unequal pore-scale diffusion coefficients, based on location: in macropores or in interlayer nanopores. On the "surface diffusion" model, solute molecules are divided into categories based on chemical speciation: dissolved or adsorbed. The macropore/nanopore model agrees with all experimental data at partial montmorillonite dry densities ranging from 0.2 (a dilute bentonite gel) to 1.7 kg dm(-3) (a highly compacted bentonite with most of its pore space located in interlayer nanopores), whereas the surface diffusion model fails at partial montmorillonite dry densities greater than about 1.3 kg dm(-3).

  11. Modeling cation diffusion in compacted water-saturatedNa-bentonite at low ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, Ian C.; Sposito, Garrison; Bourg, Alain C.M.

    2007-08-28

    Sodium bentonites are used as barrier materials for the isolation of landfills and are under consideration for a similar use in the subsurface storage of high-level radioactive waste. The performance of these barriers is determined in large part by molecular diffusion in the bentonite pore space. We tested two current models of cation diffusion in bentonite against experimental data on the relative apparent diffusion coefficients of two representative cations, sodium and strontium. On the 'macropore/nanopore' model, solute molecules are divided into two categories, with unequal pore-scale diffusion coefficients, based on location: in macropores or in interlayer nanopores. On the 'surface diffusion' model, solute molecules are divided into categories based on chemical speciation: dissolved or adsorbed. The macropore/nanopore model agrees with all experimental data at partial montmorillonite dry densities ranging from 0.2 (a dilute bentonite gel) to 1.7 kg dm{sup -3} (a highly compacted bentonite with most of its pore space located in interlayer nanopores), whereas the surface diffusion model fails at partial montmorillonite dry densities greater than about 1.2 kg dm{sup -3}.

  12. Effect of cation ordering on oxygen vacancy diffusion pathways in double perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Pilania, Ghanshyam

    2015-07-08

    Perovskite structured oxides (ABO3) are attractive for a number of technological applications, including as superionics because of the high oxygen conductivities they exhibit. Double perovskites (AA’BB’O6) provide even more flexibility for tailoring properties. Using accelerated molecular dynamics, we examine the role of cation ordering on oxygen vacancy mobility in one model double perovskite SrLaTiAlO6. We find that the mobility of the vacancy is very sensitive to the cation ordering, with a migration energy that varies from 0.6 to 2.7 eV. In the extreme cases, the mobility is both higher and lower than either of the two end member single perovskites. Further, the nature of oxygen vacancy diffusion, whether one-dimensional, two-dimensional, or three-dimensional, also varies with cation ordering. We correlate the dependence of oxygen mobility on cation structure to the distribution of Ti4+ cations, which provide unfavorable environments for the positively charged oxygen vacancy. The results demonstrate the potential of using tailored double perovskite structures to precisely control the behavior of oxygen vacancies in these materials.

  13. Effect of cation ordering on oxygen vacancy diffusion pathways in double perovskites

    DOE PAGES

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Pilania, Ghanshyam

    2015-07-08

    Perovskite structured oxides (ABO3) are attractive for a number of technological applications, including as superionics because of the high oxygen conductivities they exhibit. Double perovskites (AA’BB’O6) provide even more flexibility for tailoring properties. Using accelerated molecular dynamics, we examine the role of cation ordering on oxygen vacancy mobility in one model double perovskite SrLaTiAlO6. We find that the mobility of the vacancy is very sensitive to the cation ordering, with a migration energy that varies from 0.6 to 2.7 eV. In the extreme cases, the mobility is both higher and lower than either of the two end member single perovskites.more » Further, the nature of oxygen vacancy diffusion, whether one-dimensional, two-dimensional, or three-dimensional, also varies with cation ordering. We correlate the dependence of oxygen mobility on cation structure to the distribution of Ti4+ cations, which provide unfavorable environments for the positively charged oxygen vacancy. The results demonstrate the potential of using tailored double perovskite structures to precisely control the behavior of oxygen vacancies in these materials.« less

  14. Predicting diffusive transport of cationic liposomes in 3-dimensional tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Wientjes, Michael G; Yeung, Bertrand Z; Lu, Ze; Wientjes, M Guillaume; Au, Jessie L S

    2014-10-28

    Nanotechnology is widely used in cancer research. Models that predict nanoparticle transport and delivery in tumors (including subcellular compartments) would be useful tools. This study tested the hypothesis that diffusive transport of cationic liposomes in 3-dimensional (3D) systems can be predicted based on liposome-cell biointerface parameters (binding, uptake, retention) and liposome diffusivity. Liposomes comprising different amounts of cationic and fusogenic lipids (10-30mol% DOTAP or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine, 1-20mol% DOPE or 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, +25 to +44mV zeta potential) were studied. We (a) measured liposome-cell biointerface parameters in monolayer cultures, and (b) calculated effective diffusivity based on liposome size and spheroid composition. The resulting parameters were used to simulate the liposome concentration-depth profiles in 3D spheroids. The simulated results agreed with the experimental results for liposomes comprising 10-30mol% DOTAP and ≤10mol% DOPE, but not for liposomes with higher DOPE content. For the latter, model modifications to account for time-dependent extracellular concentration decrease and liposome size increase did not improve the predictions. The difference among low- and high-DOPE liposomes suggests concentration-dependent DOPE properties in 3D systems that were not captured in monolayers. Taken together, our earlier and present studies indicate the diffusive transport of neutral, anionic and cationic nanoparticles (polystyrene beads and liposomes, 20-135nm diameter, -49 to +44mV) in 3D spheroids, with the exception of liposomes comprising >10mol% DOPE, can be predicted based on the nanoparticle-cell biointerface and nanoparticle diffusivity. Applying the model to low-DOPE liposomes showed that changes in surface charge affected the liposome localization in intratumoral subcompartments within spheroids.

  15. Specific aquaporins facilitate the diffusion of hydrogen peroxide across membranes.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Gerd P; Møller, Anders L B; Kristiansen, Kim A; Schulz, Alexander; Møller, Ian M; Schjoerring, Jan K; Jahn, Thomas P

    2007-01-12

    The metabolism of aerobic organisms continuously produces reactive oxygen species. Although potentially toxic, these compounds also function in signaling. One important feature of signaling compounds is their ability to move between different compartments, e.g. to cross membranes. Here we present evidence that aquaporins can channel hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Twenty-four aquaporins from plants and mammals were screened in five yeast strains differing in sensitivity toward oxidative stress. Expression of human AQP8 and plant Arabidopsis TIP1;1 and TIP1;2 in yeast decreased growth and survival in the presence of H2O2. Further evidence for aquaporin-mediated H2O2 diffusion was obtained by a fluorescence assay with intact yeast cells using an intracellular reactive oxygen species-sensitive fluorescent dye. Application of silver ions (Ag+), which block aquaporin-mediated water diffusion in a fast kinetics swelling assay, also reversed both the aquaporin-dependent growth repression and the H2O2-induced fluorescence. Our results present the first molecular genetic evidence for the diffusion of H2O2 through specific members of the aquaporin family.

  16. Gel for Simultaneous Chemical Imaging of Anionic and Cationic Solutes Using Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report on a novel gel based on diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) for the simultaneous measurement of cations and anions and its suitability for high resolution chemical imaging by using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). The new high resolution mixed binding gel (HR-MBG) is based on zirconium-hydroxide and suspended particulate reagent-iminodiacetate (SPR-IDA) as resin materials which are embedded in an ether-based urethane polymer hydrogel. The use of this polymer hydrogel material allows the production of ultrathin, highly stable and tear-proof resin gel layers with superior handling properties compared to existing ultrathin polyacrylamide gels. The gel was characterized regarding its uptake kinetics, the anion and cation capacities, and the effects of pH, ionic strength, and aging on the performance of the HR-MBG. Our results demonstrate the capability of this novel gel for concomitant sampling of anions and cations. The suitability of this new gel type for DGT chemical imaging at submm spatial resolution in soils using LA-ICPMS is shown. 2D images of P, As, Co, Cu, Mn, and Zn distributions around roots of Zea mays L. demonstrate the new opportunities offered by the HR-MBG for high-resolution mapping of solute dynamics in soil and sediment hotspots, such as the rhizosphere, by simultaneous observation of anionic and cationic solute species. PMID:24256092

  17. Cation diffusion in the interlayer space of swelling clay minerals - A combined macroscopic and microscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertre, Emmanuel; Delville, Alfred; Prêt, Dimitri; Hubert, Fabien; Ferrage, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the diffusion process of calcium cations confined in the interlayer space of 5 mm disks of vermiculite swelling clay minerals during the Na-for-Ca exchange process. Diffusion experiments were performed at four NaCl salinities (3 × 10-3, 5 × 10-2, 0.1 and 1 M) of the exchanger solution. A macroscopic analysis of the diffusion process based on the aqueous calcium concentrations released in the solution and on Ca-profiles obtained in the solid was performed using a pore diffusion model that has been classically used in the literature. The results obtained at the macroscopic scale showed that the apparent diffusion coefficients describing both aqueous and profiles data for Ca depend on the diffusion time and salinity of the aqueous reservoir. Such variations suggested that interlayer diffusion was driven by (1) the gradient of the sorbed species in the interlayer, which depends on the diffusion time due to the ion exchange equilibrium; and (2) the discontinuity, due to Donnan equilibrium, existing at the limit between the "internal disk border" and the "external disk border" in contact with the aqueous reservoir. Then, a set of molecular and Brownian dynamics simulations was used to (1) assess such interpretations and (2) quantitatively predict aqueous and profile data obtained at the macroscopic scale. For an aqueous reservoir with high salinity (1 M NaCl), a good agreement was obtained between the macroscopic data and the predictions obtained from Brownian dynamics simulations, confirming the role played by the gradient of the interlayer species that is suggested at the macroscopic scale and which is at the basis of the "surface diffusion models" published in literature. In addition, for aqueous reservoirs with lower salinity (5 × 10-2 M), the results obtained by Brownian dynamics simulations and normalized to the exchange rate measured at infinite time showed that the diffusion properties of the species in the aqueous reservoir cannot be

  18. The rate of the deoxygenation reaction limits myoglobin- and hemoglobin-facilitated O₂ diffusion in cells.

    PubMed

    Endeward, Volker

    2012-05-01

    A mathematical model describing facilitation of O(2) diffusion by the diffusion of myoglobin and hemoglobin is presented. The equations are solved numerically by a finite-difference method for the conditions as they prevail in cardiac and skeletal muscle and in red cells without major simplifications. It is demonstrated that, in the range of intracellular diffusion distances, the degree of facilitation is limited by the rate of the chemical reaction between myglobin or hemoglobin and O(2). The results are presented in the form of relationships between the degree of facilitation and the length of the diffusion path on the basis of the known kinetics of the oxygenation-deoxygenation reactions. It is concluded that the limitation by reaction kinetics reduces the maximally possible facilitated oxygen diffusion in cardiomyoctes by ∼50% and in skeletal muscle fibers by ∼ 20%. For human red blood cells, a reduction of facilitated O(2) diffusion by 36% is obtained in agreement with previous reports. This indicates that, especially in cardiomyocytes and red cells, chemical equilibrium between myoglobin or hemoglobin and O(2) is far from being established, an assumption that previously has often been made. Although the "O(2) transport function" of myoglobin in cardiac muscle cells thus is severely limited by the chemical reaction kinetics, and to a lesser extent also in skeletal muscle, it is noteworthy that the speed of release of O(2) from MbO(2), the "storage function," is not limited by the reaction kinetics under physiological conditions.

  19. Self-assembly of two-dimensional DNA origami lattices using cation-controlled surface diffusion.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sungwook; Rothemund, Paul W K

    2014-09-10

    DNA origami has proven useful for organizing diverse nanoscale components into patterns with 6 nm resolution. However for many applications, such as nanoelectronics, large-scale organization of origami into periodic lattices is desired. Here, we report the self-assembly of DNA origami rectangles into two-dimensional lattices based on stepwise control of surface diffusion, implemented by changing the concentrations of cations on the surface. Previous studies of DNA–mica binding identified the fractional surface density of divalent cations (ñ(s2))as the parameter which best explains the behaviour of linear DNA on mica. We show that for ñ(s2) between 0.04 and 0.1, over 90% of DNA rectangles were incorporated into lattices and that, compared with other functions of cation concentration, ñ(s2) best captures the behaviour of DNA rectangles. This work shows how a physical understanding of DNA–mica binding can be used to guide studies of the higher-order assembly of DNA nanostructures, towards creating large-scale arrays of nanodevices for technology.

  20. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a zinc diffusion facilitator protein in native nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Bersch, Beate; Dörr, Jonas M.; Hessel, Audrey; Killian, J. Antoinette; Schanda, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The structure, dynamics and function of membrane proteins are intimately linked to the properties of the membrane environment in which the proteins are embedded. For structural and biophysical characterization, membrane proteins generally need to be extracted from the membrane, and reconstituted in a suitable membrane-mimicking environment. Ensuring functional and structural integrity in these environments is often a major concern. The styrene/maleic acid co-polymer has recently been shown to be able to extract lipid/membrane protein patches directly from native membranes, forming nanosize discoidal proteolipid particles, also referred to as native nanodiscs. Here we show, for the first time, that high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra can be obtained from an integral membrane protein in native nanodiscs, as exemplified with the 2 x 34 kDa-large bacterial cation diffusion facilitator CzcD from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. PMID:28128538

  1. Nuclear Spin Dependent Chemistry of the Trihydrogen Cation in Diffuse Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, Kyle

    2015-05-01

    The trihydrogen cation, H3+,long thought to be the species responsible for initiating ion-molecule chemistry in the interstellar medium, was first observed in interstellar clouds twenty years ago. Since its detection, this cation has been used to infer temperatures, densities, cloud sizes, and the local cosmic ray ionization rate. However, in diffuse molecular clouds the excitation temperature of its two nuclear spin modifications, ortho (I = 3 / 2) and para-H3+(I = 1 / 2) is found to differ markedly from the cloud kinetic temperature inferred from the spin modifications of molecular hydrogen (H2) in the same environment. A steady state analysis of the chemical kinetics of ortho and para-H3+suggests that the interplay of thermalizing collisions with H2 and nuclear spin dependent dissociative recombination with electrons may result in a nonthermal excitation temperature. Each of these processes is complex. Collisions between H3+and H2 must obey selection rules based on conservation of nuclear spin angular momentum, and the allowed spin conversion reactions, which proceed through the fluxional (H5+)* intermediate, each have different statistical weights and energetic requirements. Meanwhile, theoretical and experimental studies of H3+electron recombination carried out over the past 40 years have yielded rates that span 4 orders of magnitude in range. We will present experimental measurements of the nuclear spin dependence of the reactions of H3+with H2 and with electrons, as well as astronomical observations of H3+in diffuse molecular clouds and time-dependent chemical modeling of these environments. Astrochemical models incorporating the latest experimental data still do not satisfactorily explain the observed excitation temperature in diffuse molecular clouds, and point to the need for state-selective measurements of the H3+electron recombination rate.

  2. Azole drugs are imported by facilitated diffusion in Candida albicans and other pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Bryce E; Oltean, Hanna N; Oliver, Brian G; Hoot, Samantha J; Leyde, Sarah E; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; White, Theodore C

    2010-09-30

    Despite the wealth of knowledge regarding the mechanisms of action and the mechanisms of resistance to azole antifungals, very little is known about how the azoles are imported into pathogenic fungal cells. Here the in-vitro accumulation and import of Fluconazole (FLC) was examined in the pathogenic fungus, Candida albicans. In energized cells, FLC accumulation correlates inversely with expression of ATP-dependent efflux pumps. In de-energized cells, all strains accumulate FLC, suggesting that FLC import is not ATP-dependent. The kinetics of import in de-energized cells displays saturation kinetics with a K(m) of 0.64 μM and V(max) of 0.0056 pmol/min/10⁸ cells, demonstrating that FLC import proceeds via facilitated diffusion through a transporter rather than passive diffusion. Other azoles inhibit FLC import on a mole/mole basis, suggesting that all azoles utilize the same facilitated diffusion mechanism. An analysis of related compounds indicates that competition for azole import depends on an aromatic ring and an imidazole or triazole ring together in one molecule. Import of FLC by facilitated diffusion is observed in other fungi, including Cryptococcus neoformans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida krusei, indicating that the mechanism of transport is conserved among fungal species. FLC import was shown to vary among Candida albicans resistant clinical isolates, suggesting that altered facilitated diffusion may be a previously uncharacterized mechanism of resistance to azole drugs.

  3. Bidirectional diffusion of ammonium and sodium cations in forward osmosis: role of membrane active layer surface chemistry and charge.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinglin; Boo, Chanhee; Ma, Jun; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-12-16

    Systematic fundamental understanding of mass transport in osmosis-driven membrane processes is important for further development of this emerging technology. In this work, we investigate the role of membrane surface chemistry and charge on bidirectional solute diffusion in forward osmosis (FO). In particular, bidirectional diffusion of ammonium (NH4(+)) and sodium (Na(+)) is examined using FO membranes with different materials and surface charge characteristics. Using an ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) draw solution, we observe dramatically enhanced cation fluxes with sodium chloride feed solution compared to that with deionized water feed solution for thin-film composite (TFC) FO membrane. However, the bidirectional diffusion of cations does not change, regardless of the type of feed solution, for cellulose triacetate (CTA) FO membrane. We relate this phenomenon to the membrane fixed surface charge by employing different feed solution pH to foster different protonation conditions for the carboxyl groups on the TFC membrane surface. Membrane surface modification is also carried out with the TFC membrane using ethylenediamine to alter carboxyl groups into amine groups. The modified TFC membrane, with less negatively charged groups, exhibits a significant decrease in the bidirectional diffusion of cations under the same conditions employed with the pristine TFC membrane. Based on our experimental observations, we propose Donnan dialysis as a mechanism responsible for enhanced bidirectional diffusion of cations in TFC membranes.

  4. Effect of exchangeable cations on apparent diffusion of Ca 2+ ions in Na- and Ca-montmorillonite mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozaki, T.; Sawaguchi, T.; Fujishima, A.; Sato, S.

    Compacted Na-bentonite, of which the major mineral is montmorillonite, is a candidate buffer material for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. A potential alteration of the bentonite in a repository is the partial replacement of the exchangeable cations of Na + with Ca 2+. The Ca 2+ cations could be released from cementitious materials and diffuse into the buffer material in the repository. In this study, to evaluate the alteration that could reduce the performance of the bentonite buffer, the apparent diffusion coefficients of HTO and Ca 2+ ions were determined from non-steady, one-dimensional diffusion experiments using Na- and Ca-montmorillonite mixtures with different ionic equivalent fractions of Ca 2+ ions. The apparent diffusion coefficient of HTO at a dry density of 1.0 Mg m -3 slightly increased with an increase in the ionic equivalent fraction of Ca 2+ ions. However, the apparent diffusion coefficient of Ca 2+ and the activation energy for diffusion at the same dry density were independent of the ionic equivalent fraction of Ca 2+ ions. These findings suggest that unlike HTO, which can be postulated to diffuse mainly in pore water, Ca 2+ ion diffusion could occur predominantly in interlayer spaces, of which the basal spacing was determined to be constant by the XRD technique.

  5. Visual tracing of diffusion and biodistribution for amphiphilic cationic nanoparticles using photoacoustic imaging after ex vivo intravitreal injections.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; Xu, Zhaokang; Liu, Junyi; Zhang, Zhaoliang; Chen, Hao; Li, Xingyi; Shi, Shuai

    To visually trace the diffusion and biodistribution of amphiphilic cation micelles after vitreous injection, various triblock copolymers of monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone)-polyethylenimine were synthesized with different structures of hydrophilic and hydrophobic segments, followed by labeling with near-infrared fluorescent dye Cyanine5 or Cyanine7. The micellar size, polydispersity index, and surface charge were measured by dynamic light scattering. The diffusion was monitored using photoacoustic imaging in real time after intravitreal injections. Moreover, the labeled nanoparticle distribution in the posterior segment of the eye was imaged histologically by confocal microscopy. The results showed that the hydrophilic segment increased vitreous diffusion, while a positive charge on the particle surface hindered diffusion. In addition, the particles diffused through the retinal layers and were enriched in the retinal pigment epithelial layer. This work tried to study the diffusion rate via a simple method by using visible images, and then provided basic data for the development of intraocular drug carriers.

  6. Modeling sorption of divalent metal cations on hydrous manganese oxide using the diffuse double layer model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tonkin, J.W.; Balistrieri, L.S.; Murray, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Manganese oxides are important scavengers of trace metals and other contaminants in the environment. The inclusion of Mn oxides in predictive models, however, has been difficult due to the lack of a comprehensive set of sorption reactions consistent with a given surface complexation model (SCM), and the discrepancies between published sorption data and predictions using the available models. The authors have compiled a set of surface complexation reactions for synthetic hydrous Mn oxide (HMO) using a two surface site model and the diffuse double layer SCM which complements databases developed for hydrous Fe (III) oxide, goethite and crystalline Al oxide. This compilation encompasses a range of data observed in the literature for the complex HMO surface and provides an error envelope for predictions not well defined by fitting parameters for single or limited data sets. Data describing surface characteristics and cation sorption were compiled from the literature for the synthetic HMO phases birnessite, vernadite and ??-MnO2. A specific surface area of 746 m2g-1 and a surface site density of 2.1 mmol g-1 were determined from crystallographic data and considered fixed parameters in the model. Potentiometric titration data sets were adjusted to a pH1EP value of 2.2. Two site types (???XOH and ???YOH) were used. The fraction of total sites attributed to ???XOH (??) and pKa2 were optimized for each of 7 published potentiometric titration data sets using the computer program FITEQL3.2. pKa2 values of 2.35??0.077 (???XOH) and 6.06??0.040 (???YOH) were determined at the 95% confidence level. The calculated average ?? value was 0.64, with high and low values ranging from 1.0 to 0.24, respectively. pKa2 and ?? values and published cation sorption data were used subsequently to determine equilibrium surface complexation constants for Ba2+, Ca2+, Cd 2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Mg2+, Mn 2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Sr2+ and Zn 2+. In addition, average model parameters were used to predict additional

  7. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Calculations of Large Compact PAH Cations: Implications for the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisman, Jennifer L.; Lee, Timothy J.; Salama, Farid; Gordon-Head, Martin; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the electronic absorption spectra of several maximally pericondensed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations with time dependent density functional theory calculations. We find interesting trends in the vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths for this series containing pyrene through circumcoronene, the largest species containing more than 50 carbon atoms. We discuss the implications of these new results for the size and structure distribution of the diffuse interstellar band carriers.

  8. Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls and nerve injury: restoring an imbalance between descending monoamine inhibitions and facilitations.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Kirsty; Patel, Ryan; Goncalves, Leonor; Townson, Louisa; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNICs) utilize descending inhibitory controls through poorly understood brain stem pathways. The human counterpart, conditioned pain modulation, is reduced in patients with neuropathy aligned with animal data showing a loss of descending inhibitory noradrenaline controls together with a gain of 5-HT3 receptor-mediated facilitations after neuropathy. We investigated the pharmacological basis of DNIC and whether it can be restored after neuropathy. Deep dorsal horn neurons were activated by von Frey filaments applied to the hind paw, and DNIC was induced by a pinch applied to the ear in isoflurane-anaesthetized animals. Spinal nerve ligation was the model of neuropathy. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control was present in control rats but abolished after neuropathy. α2 adrenoceptor mechanisms underlie DNIC because the antagonists, yohimbine and atipamezole, markedly attenuated this descending inhibition. We restored DNIC in spinal nerve ligated animals by blocking 5-HT3 descending facilitations with the antagonist ondansetron or by enhancing norepinephrine modulation through the use of reboxetine (a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, NRI) or tapentadol (μ-opioid receptor agonist and NRI). Additionally, ondansetron enhanced DNIC in normal animals. Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls are reduced after peripheral nerve injury illustrating the central impact of neuropathy, leading to an imbalance in descending excitations and inhibitions. Underlying noradrenergic mechanisms explain the relationship between conditioned pain modulation and the use of tapentadol and duloxetine (a serotonin, NRI) in patients. We suggest that pharmacological strategies through manipulation of the monoamine system could be used to enhance DNIC in patients by blocking descending facilitations with ondansetron or enhancing norepinephrine inhibitions, so possibly reducing chronic pain.

  9. Presynaptic calcium diffusion from various arrays of single channels. Implications for transmitter release and synaptic facilitation.

    PubMed Central

    Fogelson, A L; Zucker, R S

    1985-01-01

    A one-dimensional model of presynaptic calcium diffusion away from the membrane, with cytoplasmic binding, extrusion by a surface pump, and influx during action potentials, can account for the rapid decay of phasic transmitter release and the slower decay of synaptic facilitation following one spike, as well as the very slow decline in total free calcium observed experimentally. However, simulations using this model, and alternative versions in which calcium uptake into organelles and saturable binding are included, fail to preserve phasic transmitter release to spikes in a long tetanus. A three-dimensional diffusion model was developed, in which calcium enters through discrete membrane channels and acts to release transmitter within 50 nm of entry points. Analytic solutions of the equations of this model, in which calcium channels were distributed in active zone patches based on ultrastructural observations, were successful in predicting synaptic facilitation, phasic release to tetanic spikes, and the accumulation of total free calcium. The effects of varying calcium buffering, pump rate, and channel number and distribution were explored. Versions appropriate to squid giant synapses and frog neuromuscular junctions were simulated. Limitations of key assumptions, particularly rapid nonsaturable binding, are discussed. PMID:2418887

  10. Visual tracing of diffusion and biodistribution for amphiphilic cationic nanoparticles using photoacoustic imaging after ex vivo intravitreal injections

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xu; Xu, Zhaokang; Liu, Junyi; Zhang, Zhaoliang; Chen, Hao; Li, Xingyi; Shi, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    To visually trace the diffusion and biodistribution of amphiphilic cation micelles after vitreous injection, various triblock copolymers of monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)–poly(ε-caprolactone)–polyethylenimine were synthesized with different structures of hydrophilic and hydrophobic segments, followed by labeling with near-infrared fluorescent dye Cyanine5 or Cyanine7. The micellar size, polydispersity index, and surface charge were measured by dynamic light scattering. The diffusion was monitored using photoacoustic imaging in real time after intravitreal injections. Moreover, the labeled nanoparticle distribution in the posterior segment of the eye was imaged histologically by confocal microscopy. The results showed that the hydrophilic segment increased vitreous diffusion, while a positive charge on the particle surface hindered diffusion. In addition, the particles diffused through the retinal layers and were enriched in the retinal pigment epithelial layer. This work tried to study the diffusion rate via a simple method by using visible images, and then provided basic data for the development of intraocular drug carriers. PMID:27785015

  11. Kinetics of self-assembly via facilitated diffusion: Formation of the transcription complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalay, Ziya

    2015-10-01

    We present an analytically solvable model for self-assembly of a molecular complex on a filament. The process is driven by a seed molecule that undergoes facilitated diffusion, which is a search strategy that combines diffusion in three dimensions and one dimension. Our study is motivated by single-molecule-level observations revealing the dynamics of transcription factors that bind to the deoxyribonucleic acid at early stages of transcription. We calculate the probability that a complex made up of a given number of molecules is completely formed, as well as the distribution of completion times, upon the binding of a seed molecule at a target site on the filament (without explicitly modeling the three-dimensional diffusion that precedes binding). We compare two different mechanisms of assembly where molecules bind in sequential and random order. Our results indicate that while the probability of completion is greater for random binding, the completion time scales exponentially with the size of the complex; in contrast, it scales as a power law or slower for sequential binding, asymptotically. Furthermore, we provide model predictions for the dissociation and residence times of the seed molecule, which are observables accessible in single-molecule tracking experiments.

  12. Anisotropic cation diffusion in the GaAs capping of InAs/GaAs(001) quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisbi, E.; Latini, V.; Patella, F.; Placidi, E.; Arciprete, F.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of the As flux on the kinetics of Ga and In cations, and the role of the elastic strain were studied in the capping process of isolated InAs quantum dots with GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. Using a fixed evaporation geometry and a suitable choice of growth parameters which enhance the anisotropic diffusion of In and Ga cations, we obtained, at variance with current results, the formation of asymmetric GaAs caps. The growth of a second InAs layer led to the formation of vertically aligned couples of dots (one buried, the other uncapped) placed on the right side of the GaAs caps on the surface, with no other dots in different locations.

  13. Matrix diffusion of simple cations, anions, and neutral species in fractured crystalline rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Haruo . Tokai Works)

    1999-08-01

    The diffusion of radionuclides into the pore spaces of a rock matrix and the pore properties in fractured crystalline rocks were studied. The work concentrated on the predominant water-conducting fracture system in the host granodiorite of the Kamaishi In Situ Test Site, which consists of fracture fillings and altered grandodiorite. Through-diffusion experiments to obtain effective and apparent diffusion coefficients (De and Da, respectively) for Na[sup +], Cs[sup +], HTO, Cl[sup [minus

  14. Misfit strain driven cation inter-diffusion across an epitaxial multiferroic thin film interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankara Rama Krishnan, P. S.; Morozovska, Anna N.; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Ramasse, Quentin M.; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Liang, Wen-I.; Chu, Ying-Hao; Munroe, Paul; Nagarajan, V.

    2014-02-01

    Cation intermixing at functional oxide interfaces remains a highly controversial area directly relevant to interface-driven nanoelectronic device properties. Here, we systematically explore the cation intermixing in epitaxial (001) oriented multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) grown on a (001) lanthanum aluminate (LAO) substrate. Aberration corrected dedicated scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy reveal that the interface is not chemically sharp, but with an intermixing of ˜2 nm. The driving force for this process is identified as misfit-driven elastic strain. Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire-based phenomenological theory was combined with the Sheldon and Shenoy formula in order to understand the influence of boundary conditions and depolarizing fields arising from misfit strain between the LAO substrate and BFO film. The theory predicts the presence of a strong potential gradient at the interface, which decays on moving into the bulk of the film. This potential gradient is significant enough to drive the cation migration across the interface, thereby mitigating the misfit strain. Our results offer new insights on how chemical roughening at oxide interfaces can be effective in stabilizing the structural integrity of the interface without the need for misfit dislocations. These findings offer a general formalism for understanding cation intermixing at highly strained oxide interfaces that are used in nanoelectronic devices.

  15. Tuning Equilibrium Compositions in Colloidal Cd1-xMnxSe Nanocrystals Using Diffusion Doping and Cation Exchange.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Charles J; Chakraborty, Pradip; Kornowske, Lindsey M; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-01-26

    The physical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals can be tuned dramatically via composition control. Here, we report a detailed investigation of the synthesis of high-quality colloidal Cd1-xMnxSe nanocrystals by diffusion doping of preformed CdSe nanocrystals. Until recently, Cd1-xMnxSe nanocrystals proved elusive because of kinetic incompatibilities between Mn(2+) and Cd(2+) chemistries. Diffusion doping allows Cd1-xMnxSe nanocrystals to be prepared under thermodynamic rather than kinetic control, allowing access to broader composition ranges. We now investigate this chemistry as a model system for understanding the characteristics of nanocrystal diffusion doping more deeply. From the present work, a Se(2-)-limited reaction regime is identified, in which Mn(2+) diffusion into CdSe nanocrystals is gated by added Se(2-), and equilibrium compositions are proportional to the amount of added Se(2-). At large added Se(2-) concentrations, a solubility-limited regime is also identified, in which x = xmax = ∼0.31, independent of the amount of added Se(2-). We further demonstrate that Mn(2+) in-diffusion can be reversed by cation exchange with Cd(2+) under exactly the same reaction conditions, purifying Cd1-xMnxSe nanocrystals back to CdSe nanocrystals with fine tunability. These chemistries offer exceptional composition control in Cd1-xMnxSe NCs, providing opportunities for fundamental studies of impurity diffusion in nanocrystals and for development of compositionally tuned nanocrystals with diverse applications ranging from solar energy conversion to spin-based photonics.

  16. Effect of cation distribution on self-diffusion of molecular hydrogen in Na3Al3Si3O12 sodalite: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, A W C; Bromley, S T; Flikkema, E; Jansen, J C

    2004-11-22

    The diffusion of hydrogen in sodium aluminum sodalite (NaAlSi-SOD) is modeled using classical molecular dynamics, allowing for full flexibility of the host framework, in the temperature range 800-1200 K. From these simulations, the self-diffusion coefficient is determined as a function of temperature and the hydrogen uptake at low equilibrium hydrogen concentration is estimated at 573 K. The influence of the cation distribution over the framework on the hydrogen self-diffusion is investigated by comparing results employing a low energy fully ordered cation distribution with those obtained using a less ordered distribution. The cation distribution is found to have a surprisingly large influence on the diffusion, which appears to be due to the difference in framework flexibility for different cation distributions, the occurrence of correlated hopping in case of the ordered distribution, and the different nature of the diffusion processes in both systems. Compared to our previously reported calculations on all silica sodalite (all-Si-SOD), the hydrogen diffusion coefficient of sodium aluminum sodalite is higher in the case of the ordered distribution and lower in case of the disordered distribution. The hydrogen uptake rates of all-Si-SOD and NaSiAl-SOD are comparable at high temperatures (approximately 1000 K) and lower for all-Si-SOD at lower temperatures (approximately 400 K).

  17. Facilitation of polymer looping and giant polymer diffusivity in crowded solutions of active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeoh; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Kim, Won Kyu; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    We study the dynamics of polymer chains in a bath of self-propelled particles (SPP) by extensive Langevin dynamics simulations in a two-dimensional model system. Specifically, we analyse the polymer looping properties versus the SPP activity and investigate how the presence of the active particles alters the chain conformational statistics. We find that SPPs tend to extend flexible polymer chains, while they rather compactify stiffer semiflexible polymers, in agreement with previous results. Here we show that higher activities of SPPs yield a higher effective temperature of the bath and thus facilitate the looping kinetics of a passive polymer chain. We explicitly compute the looping probability and looping time in a wide range of the model parameters. We also analyse the motion of a monomeric tracer particle and the polymer’s centre of mass in the presence of the active particles in terms of the time averaged mean squared displacement, revealing a giant diffusivity enhancement for the polymer chain via SPP pooling. Our results are applicable to rationalising the dimensions and looping kinetics of biopolymers at constantly fluctuating and often actively driven conditions inside biological cells or in suspensions of active colloidal particles or bacteria cells.

  18. Channel-facilitated diffusion boosted by particle binding at the channel entrance.

    PubMed

    Pagliara, Stefano; Dettmer, Simon L; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2014-07-25

    We investigate single-file diffusion of Brownian particles in arrays of closely confining microchannels permeated by a variety of attractive optical potentials and connecting two baths with equal particle concentration. We simultaneously test free diffusion in the channel, diffusion in optical traps coupled in the center of the channel, and diffusion in traps extending into the baths. We found that both classes of attractive optical potentials enhance the translocation rate through the channel with respect to free diffusion. Surprisingly, for the latter class of potentials we measure a 40-fold enhancement in the translocation rate with respect to free diffusion and find a sublinear power law dependence of the translocation rate on the average number of particles in the channel. Our results reveal the function of particle binding at the channel entrances for diffusive transport and open the way to a better understanding of membrane transport and design of synthetic membranes with enhanced diffusion rate.

  19. Kinetics of Coloration in Photochromic Tungsten(VI) Oxide/Silicon Oxycarbide/Silica Hybrid Xerogel: Insight into Cation Self-diffusion Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kenta; Tokushige, Masataka; Omata, Kaoru; Yamazaki, Suzuko; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2016-06-08

    Silicon oxycarbide/silica composites with well-dispersed tungsten(VI) oxide (WO3) nanoparticles were obtained as transparent hybrid xerogels via an acid-catalyzed sol-gel process (hydrolysis/condensation polymerization) of 3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TESPMA) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). The self-diffusion mechanism of alkali-metal cations and the kinetics of the photochromic coloration process in the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogel systems have been systematically investigated. Under continuous UV illumination, a gradual color change (colorless → blue) corresponding to the reduction of W(6+) into W(5+) states in WO3 nanoparticles can be confirmed from the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogels containing alkali-metal sulfates, although no coloration of the hybrid xerogel without alkali-metal sulfate was observed. The coloration behavior depended exclusively on a variety of alkali-metal cations present in the hybrid xerogel system. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the self-diffusion mechanism confirmed that the alkali-metal cations electrostatically interact with a layer of unreacted silanol groups on the TESPMA/TEOS matrix surface, and subsequently pass through the interconnected pore network of the hybrid xerogel. More interestingly, in the context of an Arrhenius analysis, we found a good coincidence between the activation energies for alkali-metal cation self-diffusion and UV-induced coloration in the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogel system containing the corresponding alkali-metal sulfate. It is experimentally obvious that the photochromic properties are dominated by the diffusion process of alkali-metal cations in the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogel system. Such hybrid materials with cation-controlled photochromic properties will show promising prospects in applications demanding energy-efficient "smart windows" and "smart glasses".

  20. Isotopic mass-dependence of metal cation diffusion coefficients in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Richter, F.M.; Christensen, J.N.; Sposito, G.

    2009-01-11

    Isotope distributions in natural systems can be highly sensitive to the mass (m) dependence of solute diffusion coefficients (D) in liquid water. Isotope geochemistry studies routinely have assumed that this mass dependence either is negligible (as predicted by hydrodynamic theories) or follows a kinetic-theory-like inverse square root relationship (D {proportional_to} m{sup -0.5}). However, our recent experimental results and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed that the mass dependence of D is intermediate between hydrodynamic and kinetic theory predictions (D {proportional_to} m{sup -{beta}} with 0 {<=} {beta} < 0.2 for Li{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, Mg{sup 2+}, and the noble gases). In this paper, we present new MD simulations and experimental results for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, and Ca{sup 2+} that confirm the generality of the inverse power-law relation D {proportional_to} m{sup -{beta}}. Our new findings allow us to develop a general description of the influence of solute valence and radius on the mass dependence of D for monatomic solutes in liquid water. This mass dependence decreases with solute radius and with the magnitude of solute valence. Molecular-scale analysis of our MD simulation results reveals that these trends derive from the exponent {beta} being smallest for those solutes whose motions are most strongly coupled to solvent hydrodynamic modes.

  1. Machine Learning Based Dimensionality Reduction Facilitates Ligand Diffusion Paths Assessment: A Case of Cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Rydzewski, J; Nowak, W

    2016-04-12

    In this work we propose an application of a nonlinear dimensionality reduction method to represent the high-dimensional configuration space of the ligand-protein dissociation process in a manner facilitating interpretation. Rugged ligand expulsion paths are mapped into 2-dimensional space. The mapping retains the main structural changes occurring during the dissociation. The topological similarity of the reduced paths may be easily studied using the Fréchet distances, and we show that this measure facilitates machine learning classification of the diffusion pathways. Further, low-dimensional configuration space allows for identification of residues active in transport during the ligand diffusion from a protein. The utility of this approach is illustrated by examination of the configuration space of cytochrome P450cam involved in expulsing camphor by means of enhanced all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The expulsion trajectories are sampled and constructed on-the-fly during molecular dynamics simulations using the recently developed memetic algorithms [ Rydzewski, J.; Nowak, W. J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 143 ( 12 ), 124101 ]. We show that the memetic algorithms are effective for enforcing the ligand diffusion and cavity exploration in the P450cam-camphor complex. Furthermore, we demonstrate that machine learning techniques are helpful in inspecting ligand diffusion landscapes and provide useful tools to examine structural changes accompanying rare events.

  2. Facilitating Changes in Ninth Grade Students' Understanding of Dissolution and Diffusion through DSLM Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    She, Hsiao-Ching

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the nature and process of ninth grade students' conceptual change regarding their mental model of dissolution and diffusion as a result of instructions using the Dual Situated Learning Model (DSLM). The dual situated learning events of this model are designed according to the students' ontological viewpoint of the science…

  3. Actin restricts FcεRI diffusion and facilitates antigen-induced receptor immobilisation

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Nicholas L.; Lidke, Keith A.; Pfeiffer, Janet R.; Burns, Alan R.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Oliver, Janet M.; Lidke, Diane S.

    2010-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated in restricting diffusion of plasma membrane components. Here, simultaneous observations of quantum dot-labelled FcεRI motion and GFP-tagged actin dynamics provide direct evidence that actin filament bundles define micron-sized domains that confine mobile receptors. Dynamic reorganisation of actin structures occurs over seconds, making the location and dimensions of actin-defined domains time dependent. Multiple FcεRI often maintain extended close proximity without detectable correlated motion, suggesting that they are co-confined within membrane domains. FcεRI signalling is activated by cross-linking with multivalent antigen. We show that receptors become immobilised within seconds of cross-linking. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton results in delayed immobilisation kinetics and increased diffusion of cross-linked clusters. These results implicate actin in membrane partitioning that not only restricts diffusion of membrane proteins, but also dynamically influences their long-range mobility, sequestration, and response to ligand binding. PMID:18641640

  4. Cation diffusion in the electrical double layer enhances the mass transfer rates for Sr2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ in compacted illite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaus, M. A.; Aertsens, M.; Appelo, C. A. J.; Kupcik, T.; Maes, N.; Van Laer, L.; Van Loon, L. R.

    2015-09-01

    Enhanced mass transfer rates have been frequently observed in diffusion studies with alkaline and earth alkaline elements in compacted clay minerals and clay rocks. Whether this phenomenon - often termed surface diffusion - is also relevant for more strongly sorbing species is an open question. We therefore investigated the diffusion of Sr2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ in compacted illite with respect to variations of the concentration of the background electrolyte, pH and carbonate. New experimental techniques were developed in order to avoid artefacts stemming from the confinement of the clay sample. A distinct dependence of the effective diffusion coefficients on the concentration of the background electrolyte was observed for all three elements. A similar correlation was found for the sorption distribution ratio (Rd) derived from tracer breakthrough in the case of Sr2+, while this dependence was much weaker for Co2+ and Zn2+. Model calculations using Phreeqc resulted in a good agreement with the experimental data when it was assumed that the cationic species, present in the electrical double layer (EDL) of the charged clay surface, are mobile. Species bound to the specific surface complexation sites at the clay edges were assumed to be immobile. An assessment of the mobility of the type of cationic elements studied here in argillaceous media thus requires an analysis of their distribution among specifically sorbed surface species and species in the EDL. The normal approach of deriving unknown effective diffusion coefficients from reference values of an uncharged water tracer may significantly underestimate the mobility of metal cations in argillaceous media.

  5. Obtaining the porewater composition of a clay rock by modeling the in- and out-diffusion of anions and cations from an in-situ experiment.

    PubMed

    Appelo, C A J; Vinsot, A; Mettler, S; Wechner, S

    2008-10-23

    A borehole in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock in ANDRA's underground research facility was sampled during 1 year and chemically analyzed. Diffusion between porewater and the borehole solution resulted in concentration changes which were modeled with PHREEQC's multicomponent diffusion module. In the model, the clay rock's pore space is divided in free porewater (electrically neutral) and diffuse double layer water (devoid of anions). Diffusion is calculated separately for the two domains, and individually for all the solute species while a zero-charge flux is maintained. We explain how the finite difference formulas for radial diffusion can be translated into mixing factors for solutions. Operator splitting is used to calculate advective flow and chemical reactions such as ion exchange and calcite dissolution and precipitation. The ion exchange reaction is formulated in the form of surface complexation, which allows distributing charge over the fixed sites and the diffuse double layer. The charge distribution affects pH when calcite dissolves, and modeling of the experimental data shows that about 7% of the cation exchange capacity resides in the diffuse double layer. The model calculates the observed concentration changes very well and provides an estimate of the pristine porewater composition in the clay rock.

  6. Diffusion or bulk flow: how plasmodesmata facilitate pre-phloem transport of assimilates.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Assimilates synthesized in the mesophyll of mature leaves move along the pre-phloem transport pathway to the bundle sheath of the minor veins from which they are loaded into the phloem. The present review discusses the most probable driving force(s) for the pre-phloem pathway, diffusion down the concentration gradient or bulk flow along a pressure gradient. The driving force seems to depend on the mode of phloem loading. In a majority of plant species phloem loading is a thermodynamically active process, involving the activity of membrane transporters in the sieve-element companion cell complex. Since assimilate movement includes an apoplasmic step, this mode is called apoplasmic loading. Well established is also the polymer-trap loading mode, where the phloem-transport sugars are raffinose-family oligomers in herbaceous plants. Also this mode depends on the investment of energy, here for sugar oligomerization, and leads to a high sugar accumulation in the phloem, even though the phloem is not symplasmically isolated, but well coupled by plasmodesmata (PD). Hence the mode polymer-trap mode is also designated active symplasmic loading. For woody angiosperms and gymnosperms an alternate loading mode is currently matter of discussion, called passive symplasmic loading. Based on the limited material available, this review compares the different loading modes and suggests that diffusion is the driving force in apoplasmic loaders, while bulk flow plays an increasing role in plants having a continuous symplasmic pathway from mesophyll to sieve elements. Crucial for the driving force is the question where water enters the pre-phloem pathway. Surprisingly, the role of PD in water movement has not been addressed so far appropriately. Modeling of assimilate and water fluxes indicates that in symplasmic loaders a considerable part of water flux happens through the PD between bundle sheath and phloem.

  7. Understanding innovators' experiences of barriers and facilitators in implementation and diffusion of healthcare service innovations: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Healthcare service innovations are considered to play a pivotal role in improving organisational efficiency and responding effectively to healthcare needs. Nevertheless, healthcare organisations encounter major difficulties in sustaining and diffusing innovations, especially those which concern the organisation and delivery of healthcare services. The purpose of the present study was to explore how healthcare innovators of process-based initiatives perceived and made sense of factors that either facilitated or obstructed the innovation implementation and diffusion. Methods A qualitative study was designed. Fifteen primary and secondary healthcare organisations in the UK, which had received health service awards for successfully generating and implementing service innovations, were studied. In-depth, semi structured interviews were conducted with the organisational representatives who conceived and led the development process. The data were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. Results Four main themes were identified in the analysis of the data: the role of evidence, the function of inter-organisational partnerships, the influence of human-based resources, and the impact of contextual factors. "Hard" evidence operated as a proof of effectiveness, a means of dissemination and a pre-requisite for the initiation of innovation. Inter-organisational partnerships and people-based resources, such as champions, were considered an integral part of the process of developing, establishing and diffusing the innovations. Finally, contextual influences, both intra-organisational and extra-organisational were seen as critical in either impeding or facilitating innovators' efforts. Conclusions A range of factors of different combinations and co-occurrence were pointed out by the innovators as they were reflecting on their experiences of implementing, stabilising and diffusing novel service initiatives. Even though the innovations studied were of various

  8. Electrically facilitated translocations of proteins through silicon nitride nanopores: conjoint and competitive action of diffusion, electrophoresis, and electroosmosis.

    PubMed

    Firnkes, Matthias; Pedone, Daniel; Knezevic, Jelena; Döblinger, Markus; Rant, Ulrich

    2010-06-09

    Solid-state nanopores bear great potential to be used to probe single proteins; however, the passage of proteins through nanopores was found to be complex, and unexpected translocation behavior with respect to the passage direction, rate, and duration was observed. Here we study the translocation of a model protein (avidin) through silicon nitride nanopores focusing on the electrokinetic effects that facilitate protein transport across the pore. The nanopore zeta potential zeta(pore) and the protein zeta potential zeta(protein) are measured independently as a function of solution pH. Our results reveal that electroosmotic transport may enhance or dominate and reverse electrophoretic transport in nanopores. The translocation behavior is rationalized by accounting for the charging states of the protein and the pore, respectively; the resulting translocation direction can be predicted according to the difference in zeta potentials, zeta(protein) - zeta(pore). When electrophoresis and electroosmosis cancel each other out, diffusion becomes an effective (and bias-independent) mechanism which facilitates protein transport across the pore at a significant rate.

  9. Analysis of experimental data on divalent cation diffusion kinetics in aluminosilicate garnets with application to timescales of peak Barrovian metamorphism, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xu; Ague, Jay J.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new statistical framework to analyze the diffusion data for divalent cations (Fe, Mg, Mn, and Ca) in aluminosilicate garnet using published experimental data and an Arrhenius relationship that accounts for dependence on temperature, pressure, garnet unit-cell dimension, and oxygen fugacity. The regression is based on Bayesian statistics and is implemented by the Markov chain Monte Carlo approach. All reported experimental uncertainties are incorporated, and the data are weighted by the precision of the experimental conditions. We also include a new term, the inter-experiment bias, to compensate for possible inconsistencies among experiments and to represent any experimental variability not explicitly presented in the Arrhenius relationship (e.g., water content, defect density). At high temperatures where most experiments were conducted, the diffusion coefficients calculated with the new parameters agree well with previous diffusion models (e.g., Chakraborty and Ganguly in Contrib Mineral Petrol, 111:74-86, 1992; Carlson in Am Mineral, 91:1-11, 2006). However, the down-temperature extrapolation leads to notable differences at lower temperatures for common petrological applications. For example, at 600 °C, the diffusion coefficients of Fe and Mn are one half-to-one order of magnitude faster and the diffusion coefficient of Ca is about one order of magnitude slower than calculated with parameters in Carlson (2006). Our statistical analysis also provides well-defined uncertainty bounds for timescale estimates based on garnet diffusion profiles. Application of the newly derived coefficients indicates that the timescale of the thermal peak of Barrovian metamorphism (Dalradian belt of Scotland) is about four to seven times longer than that estimated using previously published diffusion coefficients. The peak is still geologically brief, however—of the order of 106 years (0.75 Myr +0.70/-0.36 Myr; ±1σ). This brevity requires pulsed advective heat input

  10. Influence of the water content on the diffusion coefficients of Li+ and water across naphthalenic based copolyimide cation-exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Leoncio; Pozuelo, Javier; López-González, Mar; Yan, Gengwei; Fang, Jianhua; Riande, Evaristo

    2012-09-27

    The transport of lithium ions in cation-exchange membranes based on sulfonated copolyimide membranes is reported. Diffusion coefficients of lithium are estimated as a function of the water content in membranes by using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR and electrical conductivity techniques. It is found that the lithium transport slightly decreases with the diminution of water for membranes with water content lying in the range 14 < λ < 26.5, where λ is the number of molecules of water per fixed sulfonate group. For λ < 14, the value of the diffusion coefficient of lithium experiences a sharp decay with the reduction of water in the membranes. The dependence of the diffusion of lithium on the humidity of the membranes calculated from conductivity data using Nernst-Planck type equations follows a trend similar to that observed by NMR. The possible explanation of the fact that the Haven ratio is higher than the unit is discussed. The diffusion of water estimated by (1)H PFG-NMR in membranes neutralized with lithium decreases as λ decreases, but the drop is sharper in the region where the decrease of the diffusion of protons of water also undergoes considerable reduction. The diffusion of lithium ions computed by full molecular dynamics is similar to that estimated by NMR. However, for membranes with medium and low concentration of water, steady state conditions are not reached in the computations and the diffusion coefficients obtained by MD simulation techniques are overestimated. The curves depicting the variation of the diffusion coefficient of water estimated by NMR and full dynamics follow parallel trends, though the values of the diffusion coefficient in the latter case are somewhat higher. The WAXS diffractograms of fully hydrated membranes exhibit the ionomer peak at q = 2.8 nm(-1), the peak being shifted to higher q as the water content of the membranes decreases. The diffractograms present additional peaks at higher q, common to wet and dry membranes, but

  11. GEMAS: prediction of solid-solution partitioning coefficients (Kd) for cationic metals in soils using mid-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Janik, Leslie J; Forrester, Sean T; Soriano-Disla, José M; Kirby, Jason K; McLaughlin, Michael J; Reimann, Clemens

    2015-02-01

    Partial least squares regression (PLSR) models, using mid-infrared (MIR) diffuse reflectance Fourier-transformed (DRIFT) spectra, were used to predict distribution coefficient (Kd) values for selected added soluble metal cations (Ag(+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Sn(4+), and Zn(2+)) in 4813 soils of the Geochemical Mapping of Agricultural Soils (GEMAS) program. For the development of the PLSR models, approximately 500 representative soils were selected based on the spectra, and Kd values were determined using a single-point soluble metal or radioactive isotope spike. The optimum models, using a combination of MIR-DRIFT spectra and soil pH, resulted in good predictions for log Kd+1 for Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn (R(2) ≥ 0.83) but poor predictions for Ag, Cu, and Sn (R(2)  < 0.50). These models were applied to the prediction of log Kd+1 values in the remaining 4313 unknown soils. The PLSR models provide a rapid and inexpensive tool to assess the mobility and potential availability of selected metallic cations in European soils. Further model development and validation will be needed to enable the prediction of log K(d+1) values in soils worldwide with different soil types and properties not covered in the existing model.

  12. Cation diffusion and hybridization effects at the Mn-GaSe(0001) reacted interface: Ab initio calculations and soft x-ray electron spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S.; Joshi, N.; Drera, G.; Ghosh, P.; Magnano, E.; Bondino, F.; Galinetto, P.; Mozzati, M. C.; Salvinelli, G.; Aguekian, V.; Sangaletti, L.

    2016-03-01

    The electronic properties of the Mn:GaSe interface, produced by evaporating Mn at room temperature on a ɛ -GaSe(0001) single-crystal surface, have been studied by soft x-ray spectroscopies, and the experimental results are discussed at the light of ab initio DFT+U calculations of a model Ga1 -xMnxSe (x =0.055 ) surface alloy. Consistently with these calculations that also predict a high magnetic moment for the Mn ions (4.73 -4.83 μB), XAS measurements at the Mn L edge indicate that Mn diffuses into the lattice as a Mn2 + cation with negligible crystal-field effects. Ab initio calculations also show that the most energetically favorable lattice sites for Mn diffusion are those where Mn substitutes Ga cations in the Ga layers of the topmost Se-Ga-Ga-Se sandwich. Mn s and p states are found to strongly hybridize with Se and Ga p states, while weaker hybridization is predicted for Mn d states with Se s and p orbitals. Furthermore, unlike other Mn-doped semiconductors, there is strong interaction between the Ga -s and Mn -dz2 states. The effects of hybridization of Mn 3 d electrons with neighboring atoms are still clearly detectable from the characteristic charge-transfer satellites observed in the photoemission spectra. The Mn 3 d spectral weight in the valence band is probed by resonant photoemission spectroscopy at the Mn L edge, which also allowed an estimation of the charge transfer (Δ =2.95 eV) and Mott-Hubbard (U =6.4 eV) energies on the basis of impurity-cluster configuration-interaction model of the photoemission process. The Mott-Hubbard correlation energy U is consistent with the Ueff on-site Coulomb repulsion parameter (5.84 eV) determined for the ab initio calculations.

  13. Effect of cation driven loading of dibenzo-18-crown-6 in Nafion-117 membrane on the diffusion and transport behavior of alkali metal ions.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, A; Goswami, A

    2009-10-01

    The possibility of enhancing the selectivity to separate the alkali metal ions was studied by loading dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) in Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+) form of cation exchange membrane, Nafion-117 (M-Naf-Cr where M = Li, Na, K, and Cs). DB18C6 was incorporated in Nafion-117 in corresponding ionic forms. Presence of DB18C6 in Nafion-117 was confirmed by FTIR. Self-diffusion and ion exchange kinetics of the alkali metal ions were studied in these membranes. It was observed that the diffusion in the membrane slowed down drastically from Li(+) to all other monovalent alkali metal ions. Two compartment cell experiments were done with DB18C6 loaded Cs(+)- form of Nafion-117 (Cs-Naf-Cr) membrane to study the transport of Na(+) and Cs(+) ions. No transport of ions was observed. When the same experiment were performed by replacing Li(+) of Li-Naf-Cr with Cs(+) (Cs-Li-Naf-Cr), transport of Cs(+) and H(+) were observed at much faster time scale compared to Cs-Naf-Cr. The selectivity of Cs(+) over Li(+) was enhanced by a factor of about 6 when Li-Naf-Cr was used in place Li(+) form of Nafion-117 for the transport experiments.

  14. Huntingtin regulates Ca(2+) chemotaxis and K(+)-facilitated cAMP chemotaxis, in conjunction with the monovalent cation/H(+) exchanger Nhe1, in a model developmental system: insights into its possible role in Huntington׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Deborah; Lusche, Daniel F; Scherer, Amanda; Kuhl, Spencer; Myre, Michael A; Soll, David R

    2014-10-01

    Huntington׳s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder, attributable to an expanded trinucleotide repeat in the coding region of the human HTT gene, which encodes the protein huntingtin. These mutations lead to huntingtin fragment inclusions in the striatum of the brain. However, the exact function of normal huntingtin and the defect causing the disease remain obscure. Because there are indications that huntingtin plays a role in Ca(2+) homeostasis, we studied the deletion mutant of the HTT ortholog in the model developmental system Dictyostelium discoideum, in which Ca(2+) plays a role in receptor-regulated behavior related to the aggregation process that leads to multicellular morphogenesis. The D. discoideum htt(-)-mutant failed to undergo both K(+)-facilitated chemotaxis in spatial gradients of the major chemoattractant cAMP, and chemotaxis up a spatial gradient of Ca(2+), but behaved normally in Ca(2+)-facilitated cAMP chemotaxis and Ca(2+)-dependent flow-directed motility. This was the same phenotypic profile of the null mutant of Nhel, a monovalent cation/H(+)exchanger. The htt(-)-mutant also failed to orient correctly during natural aggregation, as was the case for the Nhel mutant. Moreover, in a K(+)-based buffer the normal localization of actin was similarly defective in both htt(-) and nhe1(-) cells in a K(+)-based buffer, and the normal localization of Nhe1 was disrupted in the htt(-) mutant. These observations demonstrate that Htt and Nhel play roles in the same specific cation-facilitated behaviors and that Nhel localization is directly or indirectly regulated by Htt. Similar cation-dependent behaviors and a similar relationship between Htt and Nhe1 have not been reported for mammalian neurons and deserves investigation, especially as it may relate to Huntington׳s disease.

  15. M4FT-16LL080303052-State of Knowledge for Colloid Facilitated Radionuclide Transport and Update on Actinide Diffusion in Bentonite Backfill

    SciTech Connect

    Zavarin, Mavrik; Joseph, C.

    2016-08-16

    This progress report (Level 4 Milestone Number M4FT-16LL080303052) summarizes research conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) within the Crystalline Disposal R&D Activity Number FT-16LL080303051 and Crystalline International Collaborations Activity Number FT-16LL080303061. The focus of this research is the interaction of radionuclides with Engineered Barrier System (EBS) and host rock materials at various physico-chemical conditions relevant to subsurface repository environments. They include both chemical and physical processes such as solubility, sorption, and diffusion. The colloid-facilitated transport effort focused on preparation of a draft manuscript summarizing the state of knowledge and parameterization of colloid-facilitated transport mechanisms in support of reactive transport and performance assessment models for generic crystalline repositories. This draft manuscript is being submitted as a level 3 milestone with LANL as the primary author. LLNL’s contribution to that effort is summarized only briefly in the present report. A manuscript summarizing long-term U(VI) diffusion experiments through bentonite backfill material was recently accepted for publication; the contents of that manuscript are summarized in the present report. The Np(IV) diffusion experiments were started mid-year and are ongoing. The completion of these experiments is planned for early FY17. Our progress in quantifying Np(IV) diffusion in bentonite backfill is summarized in the present report. Our involvement with the NEA TDB project was summarized in a recent Argillite Disposal activity report. It is not included in this report.

  16. Cation Mixing Properties toward Co Diffusion at the LiCoO2 Cathode/Sulfide Electrolyte Interface in a Solid-State Battery.

    PubMed

    Haruyama, Jun; Sodeyama, Keitaro; Tateyama, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-11

    All-solid-state Li-ion batteries (ASS-LIBs) are expected to be the next-generation battery, however, their large interfacial resistance hinders their widespread application. To understand and resolve the possible causes of this resistance, we examined mutual diffusion properties of the cation elements at LiCoO2 (LCO) cathode/β-Li3PS4 (LPS) solid electrolyte interface as a representative system as well as the effect of a LiNbO3 buffer layer by first-principles calculations. Evaluating energies of exchanging ions between the cathode and the electrolyte, we found that the mixing of Co and P is energetically preferable to the unmixed states at the LCO/LPS interface. We also demonstrated that the interposition of the buffer layer suppresses such mixing because the exchange of Co and Nb is energetically unfavorable. Detailed analyses of the defect levels and the exchange energies by using the individual bulk crystals as well as the interfaces suggest that the lower interfacial states in the energy gap can make a major contribution to the stabilization of the Co ↔ P exchange, although the anion bonding preference of Co and P as well as the electrostatic interactions may have effects as well. Finally, the Co ↔ P exchanges induce interfacial Li sites with low chemical potentials, which enhance the growth of the Li depletion layer. These atomistic understandings can be meaningful for the development of ASS-LIBs with smaller interfacial resistances.

  17. Lower bound on the precision of transcriptional regulation and why facilitated diffusion can reduce noise in gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paijmans, Joris; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2014-09-01

    The diffusive arrival of transcription factors at the promoter sites on DNA sets a lower bound on how accurately a cell can regulate its protein levels. Using results from the literature on diffusion-influenced reactions, we derive an analytical expression for the lower bound on the precision of transcriptional regulation. In our theory, transcription factors can perform multiple rounds of one-dimensional (1D) diffusion along the DNA and 3D diffusion in the cytoplasm before binding to the promoter. Comparing our expression for the lower bound on the precision against results from Green's function reaction dynamics simulations shows that the theory is highly accurate under biologically relevant conditions. Our results demonstrate that, to an excellent approximation, the promoter switches between the transcription-factor bound and unbound state in a Markovian fashion. This remains true even in the presence of sliding, i.e., with 1D diffusion along the DNA. This has two important implications: (1) Minimizing the noise in the promoter state is equivalent to minimizing the search time of transcription factors for their promoters; (2) the complicated dynamics of 3D diffusion in the cytoplasm and 1D diffusion along the DNA can be captured in a well-stirred model by renormalizing the promoter association and dissociation rates, making it possible to efficiently simulate the promoter dynamics using Gillespie simulations. Based on the recent experimental observation that sliding can speed up the promoter search by a factor of 4, our theory predicts that sliding can enhance the precision of transcriptional regulation by a factor of 2.

  18. A linear gradient line source facilitates the use of diffusion models with high order approximation for efficient, accurate turbid sample optical properties recovery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Wei; Hung, Cheng-Hung; Liao, Jung-Li; Cheng, Nan-Yu; Hou, Ming-Feng; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that a scanning MEMS mirror can be employed to create a linear gradient line source that is equivalent to a planar source. This light source setup facilitates the use of diffusion models of increased orders of approximation having closed form solution, and thus enhance the efficiency and accuracy in sample optical properties recovery. In addition, compared with a regular planar light source, the linear gradient line source occupies much less source area and has an elevated measurement efficiency. We employed a δ-P1 diffusion equation with a closed form solution and carried out a phantom study to understand the performance of this new method in determining the absorption and scattering properties of turbid samples. Moreover, our Monte Carlo simulation results indicated that this geometry had probing depths comparable to those of the conventional diffuse reflectance measurement geometry with a source-detector separation of 3 mm. We expect that this new source setup would facilitate the investigating of superficial volumes of turbid samples in the wavelength regions where tissue absorption coefficients are comparable to scattering coefficients.

  19. Development of Online pH Gradient-Eluted Strong Cation Exchange Nanoelectrospray-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Proteomic Analysis Facilitating Basic and Histidine-Containing Peptides Identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Gao, Jing; Yu, Chengli; He, Han; Yang, Yiming; Figeys, Daniel; Zhou, Hu

    2016-01-05

    A novel one-dimensional online pH gradient-eluted strong cation exchange-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (SCX-nano-ESI-MS/MS) method was developed for protein identification and tested with a mixture of six standard proteins, total lysate of HuH7 and N2a cells, as well as membrane fraction of N2a cells. This method utilized an online nanoflow SCX column in a nano-LC system coupled with a nanoelectrospray high-resolution mass spectrometer. Protein digests were separated on a nanoflow SCX column with a pH gradient and directly introduced into a mass spectrometer through nanoelectrospray ionization. More than five thousand unique peptides were identified in each 90 min LC-MS/MS run using 500 nanogram of protein digest either from total cell lysate or from membrane fraction. The unique peptide overlap between online strong cation exchange nano-ESI-MS/MS (SCXLC-MS/MS) and reverse phase nano-ESI-MS/MS (RPLC-MS/MS) is only ≤30%, which indicated these two methods were complementary to each other. The correlation coefficient of retention time and theoretical isoelectric point (pI) of identified peptides in SCXLC-MS/MS was higher than 0.4, which showed that peptides elution in SCXLC-MS/MS was dependent on their charge states. Furthermore, SCXLC-MS/MS showed identification capability for a higher proportion of basic peptides compared to the RPLC-MS/MS method, especially for histidine-containing peptides. Our SCXLC-MS/MS method is an excellent alternative method to the RPLC-MS/MS method for analysis of standard proteins, total cell and membrane proteomes.

  20. Facilitated diffusion of iron(II) and dioxygen substrates into human H-chain ferritin. A fluorescence and absorbance study employing the ferroxidase center substitution Y34W.

    PubMed

    Bou-Abdallah, Fadi; Zhao, Guanghua; Biasiotto, Giorgio; Poli, Maura; Arosio, Paolo; Chasteen, N Dennis

    2008-12-31

    Ferritin is a widespread iron mineralizing and detoxification protein that stores iron as a hydrous ferric oxide mineral core within a shell-like structure of 4/3/2 octahedral symmetry. Iron mineralization is initiated at dinuclear ferroxidase centers inside the protein where Fe(2+) and O(2) meet and react to form a mu-1,2-peroxodiferric intermediate that subsequently decays to form mu-oxo dimeric and oligomeric iron(III) species and ultimately the mineral core. Several types of channels penetrate the protein shell and are possible pathways for the diffusion of iron and dioxygen to the ferroxidase centers. In the present study, UV/visible and fluorescence stopped-flow spectrophotometries were used to determine the kinetics and pathways of Fe(2+) diffusion into the protein shell, its binding at the ferroxidase center and its subsequent oxidation by O(2). Three fluorescence variants of human H-chain ferritin were prepared in which Trp34 was introduced near the ferroxidase center. They included a control variant no. 1 (W93F/Y34W), a "1-fold" channel variant no. 2 (W93F/Y34W/Y29Q) and a 3-fold channel variant no. 3 (Y34W/W93F/D131I/E134F). Anaerobic rapid mixing of Fe(2+) with apo-variant no. 1 quenched the fluorescence of Trp34 with a rate exhibiting saturation kinetics with respect to Fe(2+) concentration, consistent with a process involving facilitated diffusion. A half-life of approximately 3 ms for this process is attributed to the time for diffusion of Fe(2+) across the protein shell to the ferroxidase center. No fluorescence quenching was observed with the 3-fold channel variant no. 3 or when Zn(2+) was prebound in each of the eight 3-fold channels of variant no. 1, observations indicating that the hydrophilic channels are the only avenues for rapid Fe(2+) access to the ferroxidase center. Substitution of Tyr29 with glutamine at the entrance of the "1-fold" hydrophobic channel had no effect on the rate of Fe(2+) oxidation to form the mu-1,2-peroxodiferric

  1. A comparative study on the effect of Curcumin and Chlorin-p6 on the diffusion of two organic cations across a negatively charged lipid bilayer probed by second harmonic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, R. K.; Varshney, G. K.; Dube, A.; Gupta, P. K.; Das, K.

    2014-09-01

    The influence of Curcumin and Chlorin-p6 (Cp6) on the real time diffusion kinetics of two organic cations, LDS (LDS-698) and Malachite Green (MG) across a negatively charged phospholipid bilayer is investigated by Second Harmonic (SH) spectroscopy. The diffusion time constant of LDS at neutral pH in liposomes containing either Curcumin or Cp6 is significantly reduced, the effect being more pronounced with Curcumin. At acidic pH, the quantum of reduction in the diffusion time constant of MG by both the drugs was observed to be similar. The relative changes in the average diffusion time constants of the cations with increasing drug concentration at pH 5.0 and 7.4 shows a substantial pH effect for Curcumin induced membrane permeability, while a modest pH effect was observed for Cp6 induced membrane permeability. Based on available evidence this can be attributed to the increased interaction between the drug and the polar head groups of the lipid at pH 7.4 where the drug resides closer to the lipid-water interface.

  2. Implementing a web-based home monitoring system within an academic health care network: barriers and facilitators to innovation diffusion.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Alexandra C; Jethwani, Kamal; Bello, Heather; Kvedar, Joseph; Grant, Richard W

    2011-01-01

    The practice of outpatient type 2 diabetes management is gradually moving from the traditional visit-based, fee-for-service model to a new, health information communication technology (ICT)-supported model that can enable non-visit-based diabetes care. To date, adoption of innovative health ICT tools for diabetes management has been slowed by numerous barriers, such as capital investment costs, lack of reliable reimbursement mechanisms, design defects that have made some systems time-consuming and inefficient to use, and the need to integrate new ICT tools into a system not primarily designed for their use. Effective implementation of innovative diabetes health ICT interventions must address local practice heterogeneity and the interaction of this heterogeneity with clinical care delivery. The Center for Connected Health at Partners Healthcare has implemented a new ICT intervention, Diabetes Connect (DC), a Web-based glucose home monitoring and clinical messaging system. Using the framework of the diffusion of innovation theory, we review the implementation and examine lessons learned as we continue to deploy DC across the health care network.

  3. Increased gene expression of a facilitated diffusion urea transporter in the skin of the African lungfish (Protopterus annectens) during massively elevated post-terrestrialization urea excretion.

    PubMed

    Hung, Carrie Y C; Galvez, Fernando; Ip, Yuen K; Wood, Chris M

    2009-04-01

    The full-length cDNA sequence of a putative urea transporter (lfUT) of the facilitated diffusion UT-A type has been cloned from the African lungfish Protopterus annectens. The lfUT cDNA is 1990 bp in length and its open reading frame encodes a 409 amino acid long protein, with a calculated molecular mass of 44,723 Da. The sequence is closest to those of amphibians ( approximately 65% amino acid homology), followed by mammals and elasmobranchs ( approximately 60%), and then teleosts ( approximately 50%). lfUT was clearly expressed in gill, kidney, liver, skeletal muscle and skin. Upon re-immersion in water after 33 days of air exposure ('terrestrialization'), lungfish exhibited a massive rise in urea-N excretion which peaked at 12-30 h with rates of 2000-5000 micromol-N kg(-1) h(-1) (versus normal aquatic rates of <130 micromol-N kg(-1) h(-1)) and persisted until 70 h. This appears to occur mainly through the skin. Total 'excess' urea-N excretion amounted to approximately 81,000-91,000 micromol-N kg(-1) over 3 days. By real-time PCR, there was no difference in lfUT expression in the ventral abdominal skin between aquatic ammoniotelic controls and terrestrialized lungfish immediately after return to water (0 h), and no elevation of urea-N excretion at this time. However, skin biopsies revealed a significant 2.55-fold elevation of lfUT expression at 14 h, coincident with peak urea-N excretion. At 48 h, there was no longer any significant difference in lfUT mRNA levels from those at 0 and 14 h, or from aquatic fed controls. In accordance with earlier studies, which identified elevated urea-N excretion via the skin of P. dolloi with pharmacology typical of UT-A carriers, these results argue that transcriptional activation of a facilitated diffusion type urea transporter (lfUT) occurs in the skin during re-immersion. This serves to clear the body burden of urea-N accumulated during terrestrialization.

  4. Efficacy of HGF carried by ultrasound microbubble-cationic nano-liposomes complex for treating hepatic fibrosis in a bile duct ligation rat model, and its relationship with the diffusion-weighted MRI parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shou-hong; Wen, Kun-ming; Wu, Wei; Li, Wen-yan; Zhao, Jian-nong

    2013-12-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a major consequence of liver aggression. Finding novel ways for counteracting this damaging process, and for evaluating fibrosis with a non-invasive imaging approach, represent important therapeutic and diagnostic challenges. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is an anti-fibrosis cell growth factor that induces apoptosis in activated hepatic stellate cells, reduces excessive collagen deposition, and stimulates hepatocyte regeneration. Thus, using HGF in gene therapy against liver fibrosis is an attractive approach. The aims of the present study were: (i) to explore the efficacy of treating liver fibrosis using HGF expression vector carried by a novel ultrasound microbubble delivery system; (ii) to explore the diagnostic interest of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI-MRI) in evaluating liver fibrosis. We established a rat model of hepatic fibrosis. The rats were administered HGF linked to novel ultrasound micro-bubbles. Progression of hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by histopathology, hydroxyproline content, and DWI-MRI to determine the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Our targeted gene therapy produced a significant anti-fibrosis effect, as shown by liver histology and significant reduction of hydroxyproline content. Moreover, using DWI-MRI, the b value (diffusion gradient factor) was equal to 300s/mm(2), and the ADC values significantly decreased as the severity of hepatic fibrosis increased. Using this methodology, F0-F2 could be distinguished from F3 and F4 (P<0.01). This is the first in vivo report of using an ultrasound microbubble-cationic nano-liposome complex for gene delivery. The data indicate that, this approach is efficient to counteract the fibrosis process. DWI-MRI appears a promising imaging technique for evaluating liver fibrosis.

  5. Cell volume-regulated cation channels.

    PubMed

    Wehner, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Considering the enormous turnover rates of ion channels when compared to carriers it is quite obvious that channel-mediated ion transport may serve as a rapid and efficient mechanism of cell volume regulation. Whenever studied in a quantitative fashion the hypertonic activation of non-selective cation channels is found to be the main mechanism of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Some channels are inhibited by amiloride (and may be related to the ENaC), others are blocked by Gd(3) and flufenamate (and possibly linked to the group of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels). Nevertheless, the actual architecture of hypertonicity-induced cation channels remains to be defined. In some preparations, hypertonic stress decreases K(+) channel activity so reducing the continuous K(+) leak out of the cell; this is equivalent to a net gain of cell osmolytes facilitating RVI. The hypotonic activation of K(+) selective channels appears to be one of the most common principles of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and, in most instances, the actual channels involved could be identified on the molecular level. These are BKCa (or maxi K(+)) channels, IK(Ca) and SK(Ca) channels (of intermediate and small conductance, respectively), the group of voltage-gated (Kv) channels including their Beta (or Kv ancilliary) subunits, two-pore K(2P) channels, as well as inwardly rectifying K(+) (Kir) channels (also contributing to K(ATP) channels). In some cells, hypotonicity activates non-selective cation channels. This is surprising, at first sight, because of the inside negative membrane voltage and the sum of driving forces for Na(+) and K(+) diffusion across the cell membrane rather favouring net cation uptake. Some of these channels, however, exhibit a P(K)/P(Na) significantly higher than 1, whereas others are Ca(++) permeable linking hypotonic stress to the activation of Ca(++) dependent ion channels. In particular, the latter holds for the group of TRPs which are specialised in the

  6. Electrochemically influenced cation inter-diffusion and Co3O4 formation on La0.6Sr0.4CoO3 infiltrated into SOFC cathodes

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Xueyan; Lee, Shiwoo; Chen, Yun; ...

    2015-06-18

    Nanosized LSC electrocatalyst was infiltrated into a porous scaffold cathode composed of Sm2O3-doped CeO2 (SDC) and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) in a commercial button solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). To understand the stability of cathodes infiltrated with LSC, the infiltrated composite cells were subjected to both electrochemical operating and thermal aging states at 750 °C for 1500 h. Nanostructure and local chemistry evolution of La0.6Sr0.4CoO3 (LSC) infiltrated cathodes upon operation and aging were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. After operation, the LSC remained a cubic perovskite, and the crystal grains exhibit comparable size to as-infiltrated LSC grains. Inter-diffusion of Fe from themore » LSCF to a Fe-incorporated LSC layer developed on the LSCF backbone. However, only sharp interfaces were observed between LSC and SDC backbone in the as-infiltrated cathode and such interfaces remain after operation. The infiltrated LSC on the SDC backbone also retains granular particle morphology. Furthermore, newly grown Co3O4 nanocrystals were found in the operated cathode. After thermal aging, on the other hand, cation inter-diffusion across the interfaces of the infiltrate particles and the cathode backbones is less than that from the operated cells. Lastly, the following hypothesis is proposed: Co3O4 forms on LSC arising from local charge balancing between cobalt and oxygen vacancies.« less

  7. Selective Cation Exchange in the Core Region of Cu2–xSe/Cu2–xS Core/Shell Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We studied cation exchange (CE) in core/shell Cu2–xSe/Cu2–xS nanorods with two cations, Ag+ and Hg2+, which are known to induce rapid exchange within metal chalcogenide nanocrystals (NCs) at room temperature. At the initial stage of the reaction, the guest ions diffused through the Cu2–xS shell and reached the Cu2–xSe core, replacing first Cu+ ions within the latter region. These experiments prove that CE in copper chalcogenide NCs is facilitated by the high diffusivity of guest cations in the lattice, such that they can probe the whole host structure and identify the preferred regions where to initiate the exchange. For both guest ions, CE is thermodynamically driven as it aims for the formation of the chalcogen phase characterized by the lower solubility under the specific reaction conditions. PMID:26360611

  8. Band-gap energy of heteropoly compounds containing Keggin polyanion-[PVxMo12-xO40]-(3+x) relates to counter-cations and temperature studied by UV-VIS diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasca, Viorel; Popa, Alexandru

    2013-10-01

    The band gap energy (absorption edge energies) of the pure H3[PMo12O40].13H2O and H4[PVMo11O40].13H2O, respectively, supported on SiO2 and SiC and some of its NH4+ and Cs+ salts were determined by different methods. The influence of the counter-cations and the temperature on band gap energy was studied. In this purpose, the diffuse reflectance spectra of above mentioned compounds were registered at different temperatures, and it were transposed in the curves of the Kubelka-Munk function vs. wavelength. The band gap energies were determined by processing of low field energy of the ligand-metal charge transfer band (O2- → Mo6+ and O2- → V5+) usually observed between 200 and 400 nm on these curves. In this aim, the Tauc's relation was adapted for Kubelka-Munk function use and it was plotted for n = 1/2 (direct transition) and 2 (indirect transition) vs. wave energy (photon energy). The intersection of the curves' tangent drawn to their point of inflection with horizontal axis gives the band gap energy. The other method for calculation of band gap energy was the differential calculus on the Kubelka-Munk function vs. wave energy curve where the x value corresponding to curves' maximum is the found value. The comparison between experimental band gap values and literature data showed their partial fit. The higher temperature produces the band gap energy diminution as a result of a stronger interaction between Keggin Units, which occurs especially by the crystallization water loss. The Keggin Units isolation one from another by voluminous counter-ion or their spreading on a support leads to a weaker interaction between them and as a consequence, the increasing of absorption edge energy. A linear correlation of the crystallites size with band gap energy was observed.

  9. Nanocrystal diffusion doping.

    PubMed

    Vlaskin, Vladimir A; Barrows, Charles J; Erickson, Christian S; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2013-09-25

    A diffusion-based synthesis of doped colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals is demonstrated. This approach involves thermodynamically controlled addition of both impurity cations and host anions to preformed seed nanocrystals under equilibrium conditions, rather than kinetically controlled doping during growth. This chemistry allows thermodynamic crystal compositions to be prepared without sacrificing other kinetically trapped properties such as shape, size, or crystallographic phase. This doping chemistry thus shares some similarities with cation-exchange reactions, but proceeds without the loss of host cations and excels at the introduction of relatively unreactive impurity ions that have not been previously accessible using cation exchange. Specifically, we demonstrate the preparation of Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Se (0 ≤ x ≤ ∼0.2) nanocrystals with narrow size distribution, unprecedentedly high Mn(2+) content, and very large magneto-optical effects by diffusion of Mn(2+) into seed CdSe nanocrystals grown by hot injection. Controlling the solution and lattice chemical potentials of Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) allows Mn(2+) diffusion into the internal volumes of the CdSe nanocrystals with negligible Ostwald ripening, while retaining the crystallographic phase (wurtzite or zinc blende), shape anisotropy, and ensemble size uniformity of the seed nanocrystals. Experimental results for diffusion doping of other nanocrystals with other cations are also presented that indicate this method may be generalized, providing access to a variety of new doped semiconductor nanostructures not previously attainable by kinetic routes or cation exchange.

  10. A subgroup of plant aquaporins facilitate the bi-directional diffusion of As(OH)3 and Sb(OH)3 across membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bienert, Gerd P; Thorsen, Michael; Schüssler, Manuela D; Nilsson, Henrik R; Wagner, Annemarie; Tamás, Markus J; Jahn, Thomas P

    2008-01-01

    Background Arsenic is a toxic and highly abundant metalloid that endangers human health through drinking water and the food chain. The most common forms of arsenic in the environment are arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)). As(V) is a non-functional phosphate analog that enters the food chain via plant phosphate transporters. Inside cells, As(V) becomes reduced to As(III) for subsequent extrusion or compartmentation. Although much is known about As(III) transport and handling in microbes and mammals, the transport systems for As(III) have not yet been characterized in plants. Results Here we show that the Nodulin26-like Intrinsic Proteins (NIPs) AtNIP5;1 and AtNIP6;1 from Arabidopsis thaliana, OsNIP2;1 and OsNIP3;2 from Oryza sativa, and LjNIP5;1 and LjNIP6;1 from Lotus japonicus are bi-directional As(III) channels. Expression of these NIPs sensitized yeast cells to As(III) and antimonite (Sb(III)), and direct transport assays confirmed their ability to facilitate As(III) transport across cell membranes. On medium containing As(V), expression of the same NIPs improved yeast growth, probably due to increased As(III) efflux. Our data furthermore provide evidence that NIPs can discriminate between highly similar substrates and that they may have differential preferences in the direction of transport. A subgroup of As(III) permeable channels that group together in a phylogenetic tree required N-terminal truncation for functional expression in yeast. Conclusion This is the first molecular identification of plant As(III) transport systems and we propose that metalloid transport through NIPs is a conserved and ancient feature. Our observations are potentially of great importance for improved remediation and tolerance of plants, and may provide a key to the development of low arsenic crops for food production. PMID:18544156

  11. The cubyl cation rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Cabellos, Jose Luis; Martinez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernandez-Herrera, Maria A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-02-25

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations and high-level ab initio computations predict that the cage-opening rearrangement of the cubyl cation to the 7H(+)-pentalenyl cation is feasible in the gas phase. The rate-determining step is the formation of the cuneyl cation with an activation barrier of 25.3 kcal mol(-1) at the CCSD(T)/def2-TZVP//MP2/def2-TZVP level. Thus, the cubyl cation is kinetically stable enough to be formed and trapped at moderate temperatures, but it may be rearranged at higher temperatures.

  12. Computer simulation of displacement cation exchange chromatography: separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1980-05-01

    A first-generation mathematical model of displacement cation exchange chromatography (CES) was constructed. The model incorporated the following phenomena: diffusion of cations up and down the column, diffusion of cations from the bulk liquid to the resin surface, and equilibrium of cations between liquid and solid resin beads. A limited number of experiments with rare earths using DTPA as the separation agent were undertaken to increase the current understanding of the processes involved in cation exchange chromatography. The numerical computer program based on the mathematical model was written in FORTRAN IV for use on the IBM 360 series of computers.

  13. Extrinsic Cation Selectivity of 2D Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    From a systematic study of the concentration driven diffusion of positive and negative ions across porous 2D membranes of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), we prove their cation selectivity. Using the current–voltage characteristics of graphene and h-BN monolayers separating reservoirs of different salt concentrations, we calculate the reversal potential as a measure of selectivity. We tune the Debye screening length by exchanging the salt concentrations and demonstrate that negative surface charge gives rise to cation selectivity. Surprisingly, h-BN and graphene membranes show similar characteristics, strongly suggesting a common origin of selectivity in aqueous solvents. For the first time, we demonstrate that the cation flux can be increased by using ozone to create additional pores in graphene while maintaining excellent selectivity. We discuss opportunities to exploit our scalable method to use 2D membranes for applications including osmotic power conversion. PMID:28157333

  14. Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

    1999-02-10

    The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

  15. Enhanced desorption of cesium from collapsed interlayer regions in vermiculite by hydrothermal treatment with divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiangbiao; Wang, Xinpeng; Wu, Hao; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Takeshita, Kenji

    2017-03-15

    Adsorption of cesium (Cs) on phyllosilicates has been intensively investigated because natural soils have strong ability of immobilizing Cs within clay minerals resulting in difficulty of decontamination. The objectives of present study are to clarify how Cs fixation on vermiculite is influenced by structure change caused by Cs sorption at different loading levels and how Cs desorption is affected by various replacing cations induced at different treating temperature. As a result, more than 80% of Cs was readily desorbed from vermiculite with loading amount of 2% saturated Cs (5.49×10(-3)mmolg(-1)) after four cycles of treatment of 0.01M Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) at room temperature, but less than 20% of Cs was desorbed from saturated vermiculite. These distinct desorption patterns were attributed to inhibition of Cs desorption by interlayer collapse of vermiculite, especially at high Cs loadings. In contrast, elevated temperature significantly facilitated divalent cations to efficiently desorb Cs from collapsed regions. After five cycles of treatment at 250°C with 0.01M Mg(2+), ∼100% removal of saturated Cs was achieved. X-ray diffraction analysis results suggested that Cs desorption was completed through enhanced diffusion of Mg(2+) cations into collapsed interlayer space under hydrothermal condition resulting in subsequent interlayer decollapse and readily release of Cs(+).

  16. Ternary water-in-oil microemulsions made of cationic surfactants, water, and aromatic solvents. 3. Self-diffusion studies in relation to exchange of material between droplets and percolation

    SciTech Connect

    Zana, R.; Lang, J. ); Canet, D. )

    1991-04-18

    Ternary water-in-oil microemulsions using alkylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride (alkyl = dodecyl (N12), tetradecyl (N14), and hexadecyl (N16)) surfactants and benzene or chlorobenzene as oils have been investigated by means of electrical conductivity and NMR self-diffusion. The variations of the water self-diffusion coefficient with the (water)/(surfactant) molar concentration ratio {omega} and with the volume fraction of benzene in the oil mixture in water/(benzene + chlorobenzene)/N16 microemulsions are well correlated with the changes of electrical conductivity, as expected from a model of microemulsions where the water cores of the droplets become increasingly connected above the percolation threshold. These connections, however, have a strongly dynamic character. This model permits the authors to explain the widely differing magnitudes of the changes of electrical conductivity, water self-diffusion coefficient, and rate of exchange reactants between droplets upon increasing {omega}. The self-diffusion coefficient of the oil has been found to be about half that of the bulk oil, as in studies reported by others.

  17. Solubility and transport of cationic and anionic patterned nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jiaye; Guo, Hongxia; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2012-02-01

    Diffusion and transport of nanoparticles (NPs) though nanochannels is important for desalination, drug delivery, and biomedicine. Their surface composition dictate their efficiency separating them by reverse osmosis, delivering into into cells, as well as their toxicity. We analyze bulk diffusion and transport through nanochannels of NPs with different hydrophobic-hydrophilic patterns achieved by coating a fraction of the NP sites with positive or negative charges via explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. The cationic NPs are more affected by the patterns, less water soluble, and have higher diffusion constants and fluxes than their anionic NPs counterparts. The NP-water interaction dependence on surface pattern and field strength explains these observations. For equivalent patterns, anionic NPs solubilize more than cationic NPs since the Coulomb interaction of free anionic NPs, which are much stronger than hydrophobic NP-water interactions, are about twice that of cationic NPs.

  18. Cationic Polymerization of Vinyl Ethers Controlled by Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Kottisch, Veronika; Michaudel, Quentin; Fors, Brett P

    2016-12-07

    Photoinitiated cationic polymerizations are widely used in industrial processes; however, gaining photocontrol over chain growth would expand the utility of these methods and facilitate the design of novel complex architectures. We report herein a cationic polymerization regulated by visible light. This polymerization proceeds under mild conditions: a combination of a metal-free photocatalyst, a chain-transfer agent, and light irradiation enables the synthesis of various poly(vinyl ether)s with good control over molecular weight and dispersity as well as excellent chain-end fidelity. Significantly, photoreversible cation formation in this system enables efficient control over polymer chain growth with light.

  19. Evidence for rotational contribution to protein-facilitated proton transport.

    PubMed Central

    Gros, G; Lavalette, D; Moll, W; Gros, H; Amand, B; Pochon, F

    1984-01-01

    Two modes of molecular motion of carrier molecules can, in principle, lead to a facilitated transport of a substrate: translational and rotational diffusion. In the present study, which deals with the mechanism of the facilitated diffusion of H+ and O2 in solutions of earthworm hemoglobin, examples for both types of facilitation are presented. Only translational, not rotational, diffusion of earthworm hemoglobin appears to lead to a facilitated O2 flux. In contrast, substantial facilitated H+ fluxes of comparable size arise from rotational diffusion as well as from translational diffusion of this large protein. This is derived from measurements of facilitated H+ and O2 fluxes in earthworm hemoglobin solutions and determinations of the rotational and translational diffusion coefficients of earthworm hemoglobin with the help of a theoretical treatment of facilitated diffusion by rotational carrier diffusion. H+ transport by rotational protein diffusion appears to be a case where the often-postulated mechanism of facilitated transport by rotation of a carrier lends itself to experimental verification. Images PMID:6324213

  20. Expanding the Palette of Phenanthridinium Cations

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Andrew G; Senn, Hans Martin; Murphy, Michael P; Hartley, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    5,6-Disubstituted phenanthridinium cations have a range of redox, fluorescence and biological properties. Some properties rely on phenanthridiniums intercalating into DNA, but the use of these cations as exomarkers for the reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide, and as inhibitors of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) do not require intercalation. A versatile modular synthesis of 5,6-disubstituted phenanthridiniums that introduces diversity by Suzuki–Miyaura coupling, imine formation and microwave-assisted cyclisation is presented. Computational modelling at the density functional theory (DFT) level reveals that the novel displacement of the aryl halide by an acyclic N-alkylimine proceeds by an SNAr mechanism rather than electrocyclisation. It is found that the displacement of halide is concerted and there is no stable Meisenheimer intermediate, provided the calculations consistently use a polarisable solvent model and a diffuse basis set. PMID:24677631

  1. [PAH Cations as Viable Carriers of DIBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Ted

    1998-01-01

    This report is intended to fill in the blanks in NASA's file system for our lab astro study of molecular ions of astrophysical interest. In order to give NASA what it needs for its files, I attach below the text of the section from our recent proposal to continue this work, in which we describe progress to date, including a large number of publications. Our initial studies were focused on PAH cations, which appear to be viable candidates as the carriers of the DIBs, an idea that has been supported by laboratory spectroscopy of PAH cations in inert matrices. Beginning with the simplest aromatic (benzene; C6H6) and moving progressively to larger species (naphthalene, C10OH8; pyrene, C16H10; and most recently chrysene, C18H12), we have been able to derive rate coefficients for reactions with neutral spices that are abundant in the diffuse interstellar medium.

  2. Electronic spectrum of 9-methylanthracenium radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Gerard D.; Sanelli, Julian A.; Dryza, Vik; Bieske, Evan J.; Schmidt, Timothy W.

    2016-04-01

    The predissociation spectrum of the cold, argon-tagged, 9-methylanthracenium radical cation is reported from 8000 cm-1 to 44 500 cm-1. The reported spectrum contains bands corresponding to at least eight electronic transitions ranging from the near infrared to the ultraviolet. These electronic transitions are assigned through comparison with ab initio energies and intensities. The infrared D1←D0 transitions exhibit significant vibronic activity, which is assigned through comparison with TD-B3LYP excited state frequencies and intensities, as well as modelled vibronic interactions. Dissociation of 9-methylanthracenium is also observed at high visible-photon energies, resulting in the loss of either CH2 or CH3. The relevance of these spectra, and the spectra of other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations, to the largely unassigned diffuse interstellar bands, is discussed.

  3. Computation Of Facilitated Transport of O2 In Hemoglobin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1991-01-01

    Report describes computations of unsteady facilitated transport of oxygen through liquid membrane of hemoglobin. Used here, "facilitated transport" means diffusion of permeant through membrane in which that diffusion enhanced by reversible chemical reaction between permeant and membrane. In this case, reversible reactions between hemoglobin and oxygen.

  4. Facilitating Facilitators: Enhancing PBL through a Structured Facilitator Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinitri, Francine D.; Wilhelm, Sheila M.; Crabtree, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    With increasing adoption of the problem-based learning (PBL) model, creative approaches to enhancing facilitator training and optimizing resources to maintain effective learning in small groups is essential. We describe a theoretical framework for the development of a PBL facilitator training program that uses the constructivist approach as the…

  5. Electrochemically influenced cation inter-diffusion and Co3O4 formation on La0.6Sr0.4CoO3 infiltrated into SOFC cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xueyan; Lee, Shiwoo; Chen, Yun; Gerdes, Kirk

    2015-06-18

    Nanosized LSC electrocatalyst was infiltrated into a porous scaffold cathode composed of Sm2O3-doped CeO2 (SDC) and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) in a commercial button solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). To understand the stability of cathodes infiltrated with LSC, the infiltrated composite cells were subjected to both electrochemical operating and thermal aging states at 750 °C for 1500 h. Nanostructure and local chemistry evolution of La0.6Sr0.4CoO3 (LSC) infiltrated cathodes upon operation and aging were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. After operation, the LSC remained a cubic perovskite, and the crystal grains exhibit comparable size to as-infiltrated LSC grains. Inter-diffusion of Fe from the LSCF to a Fe-incorporated LSC layer developed on the LSCF backbone. However, only sharp interfaces were observed between LSC and SDC backbone in the as-infiltrated cathode and such interfaces remain after operation. The infiltrated LSC on the SDC backbone also retains granular particle morphology. Furthermore, newly grown Co3O4 nanocrystals were found in the operated cathode. After thermal aging, on the other hand, cation inter-diffusion across the interfaces of the infiltrate particles and the cathode backbones is less than that from the operated cells. Lastly, the following hypothesis is proposed: Co3O4 forms on LSC arising from local charge balancing between cobalt and oxygen vacancies.

  6. Dissecting the cation-cation interaction between two uranyl units.

    PubMed

    Tecmer, Paweł; Hong, Sung W; Boguslawski, Katharina

    2016-07-21

    We present a state-of-the-art computational study of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) cation-cation interactions (dications) in aqueous solution. Reliable electronic structures of two interacting uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) subunits as well as those of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) clusters are presented for the first time. Our theoretical study elucidates the impact of cation-cation interactions on changes in the molecular structure as well as changes in vibrational and UV-Vis spectra of the bare uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) moieties for different total spin-states and total charges of the dications.

  7. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  8. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-06-15

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization.

  9. Enhanced gastrointestinal absorption of N3- O-toluyl-fluorouracil by cationic solid lipid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Donghua; Liu, Chunxi; Zou, Weiwei; Zhang, Na

    2010-03-01

    This study was aimed to prepare N3- O-toluyl-fluorouracil (TFu) loaded cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (TFu-SLNs) and evaluate the potential of a novel lipid-based drug delivery system to enhance the oral absorption of TFu. TFu-SLNs were prepared by the film dispersion-ultrasonication method, using hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide as cationic tenside. The formulation and manufacture parameters were optimized concerning the drug encapsulation efficiency and the particle size. The in vitro release characteristics, in vivo pharmacokinetic properties and bioavailability, and in situ intestinal absorption features were investigated. The morphology of TFu-SLNs was approximately spherical and the mean particle size was 178.8 ± 9.99 nm; the zeta potential was +19.54 ± 0.32 mV. The mean entrapment efficiency and drug loading were 71.03 ± 1.19% and 3.57 ± 0.08%, respectively. The release behaviors of TFu from TFu-SLNs in PBS were fitted to the bioexponential model, while in artificial gastric juice, artificial intestinal juice and artificial gastric juice (2 h) followed by artificial intestinal juice (2-48 h) were fitted to the Weibull equation. The results of the pharmacokinetic studies in mice showed that the bioavailability of TFu-SLNs was significantly increased compared with that of the TFu suspensions after oral administration. The absorption of TFu-SLNs in intestine of rat was fitted to first-order kinetics with passive diffusion mechanism and the main segments of TFu-SLNs absorbed in intestine were duodenum and jejunum for the bioadhesion mediated by electrostatic interaction between the positively charged colloidal particles and the negatively charged mucosal surface. These results indicated that cationic SLNs would offer a promising delivery system for the facilitation of the bioavailability of poorly oral absorption drugs by enhancing the bioadhesion between the absorption mucosal surface and the drug carriers.

  10. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  11. Insights into dynamic processes of cations in pyrochlores and other complex oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Perriot, Romain

    2015-08-26

    Complex oxides are critical components of many key technologies, from solid oxide fuel cells and superionics to inert matrix fuels and nuclear waste forms. In many cases, understanding mass transport is important for predicting performance and, thus, extensive effort has been devoted to understanding mass transport in these materials. However, most work has focused on the behavior of oxygen while cation transport has received relatively little attention, even though cation diffusion is responsible for many phenomena, including sintering, radiation damage evolution, and deformation processes. Here, we use accelerated molecular dynamics simulations to examine the kinetics of cation defects in one class of complex oxides, A₂B₂O₇ pyrochlore. In some pyrochlore chemistries, B cation defects are kinetically unstable, transforming to A cation defects and antisites at rates faster than they can diffuse. When this occurs, transport of B cations occurs through defect processes on the A sublattice. Further, these A cation defects, either interstitials or vacancies, can interact with antisite disorder, reordering the material locally, though this process is much more efficient for interstitials than vacancies. Whether this behavior occurs in a given pyrochlore depends on the A and B chemistry. Pyrochlores with a smaller ratio of cation radii exhibit this complex behavior, while those with larger ratios exhibit direct migration of B interstitials. Similar behavior has been reported in other complex oxides such as spinels and perovskites, suggesting that this coupling of transport between the A and B cation sublattices, while not universal, occurs in many complex oxide.

  12. Parietal connectivity mediates multisensory facilitation.

    PubMed

    Brang, David; Taich, Zachary J; Hillyard, Steven A; Grabowecky, Marcia; Ramachandran, V S

    2013-09-01

    Our senses interact in daily life through multisensory integration, facilitating perceptual processes and behavioral responses. The neural mechanisms proposed to underlie this multisensory facilitation include anatomical connections directly linking early sensory areas, indirect connections to higher-order multisensory regions, as well as thalamic connections. Here we examine the relationship between white matter connectivity, as assessed with diffusion tensor imaging, and individual differences in multisensory facilitation and provide the first demonstration of a relationship between anatomical connectivity and multisensory processing in typically developed individuals. Using a whole-brain analysis and contrasting anatomical models of multisensory processing we found that increased connectivity between parietal regions and early sensory areas was associated with the facilitation of reaction times to multisensory (auditory-visual) stimuli. Furthermore, building on prior animal work suggesting the involvement of the superior colliculus in this process, using probabilistic tractography we determined that the strongest cortical projection area connected with the superior colliculus includes the region of connectivity implicated in our independent whole-brain analysis.

  13. Cationic liposomes as vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Dennis; Korsholm, Karen Smith; Andersen, Peter; Agger, Else Marie

    2011-04-01

    The application of cationic liposomes as vaccine delivery systems and adjuvants has been investigated extensively over the last few decades. However, cationic liposomes are, in general, not sufficiently immunostimulatory, which is why the combination of liposomes with immunostimulating ligands has arisen as a strategy in the development of novel adjuvant systems. Within the last 5 years, two novel adjuvant systems based on cationic liposomes incorporating Toll-like receptor or non-Toll-like receptor immunostimulating ligands have progressed from preclinical testing in smaller animal species to clinical testing in humans. The immune responses that these clinical candidates induce are primarily of the Th1 type for which there is a profound unmet need. Furthermore, a number of new cationic liposome-forming surfactants with notable immunostimulatory properties have been discovered. In this article we review the recent progress on the application of cationic liposomes as vaccine delivery systems/adjuvants.

  14. The influence of large cations on the electrochemical properties of tunnel-structured metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yifei; Zhan, Chun; He, Kun; Chen, Hungru; Yao, Wentao; Sharifi-Asl, Soroosh; Song, Boao; Yang, Zhenzhen; Nie, Anmin; Luo, Xiangyi; Wang, Hao; Wood, Stephen M.; Amine, Khalil; Islam, M. Saiful; Lu, Jun; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2016-11-01

    Metal oxides with a tunnelled structure are attractive as charge storage materials for rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, since the tunnels enable fast reversible insertion/extraction of charge carriers (for example, lithium ions). Common synthesis methods can introduce large cations such as potassium, barium and ammonium ions into the tunnels, but how these cations affect charge storage performance is not fully understood. Here, we report the role of tunnel cations in governing the electrochemical properties of electrode materials by focusing on potassium ions in α-MnO2. We show that the presence of cations inside 2 × 2 tunnels of manganese dioxide increases the electronic conductivity, and improves lithium ion diffusivity. In addition, transmission electron microscopy analysis indicates that the tunnels remain intact whether cations are present in the tunnels or not. Our systematic study shows that cation addition to α-MnO2 has a strong beneficial effect on the electrochemical performance of this material.

  15. Diffusion of uranium in compacted sodium bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Muurinen, A.; Ollila, K.; Lehikoinen, J.

    1993-12-31

    In this study the diffusion of uranium dissolved from uranium oxide fuel was studied experimentally in compacted sodium bentonite (Wyoming bentonite MX-80). The parameters varied in the study were the density of bentonite, the salt content of the solution and the redox conditions. In the studies with non-saline water of total dissolved solids about 300 ppm, uranium was both in aerobic and anaerobic experiments as anionic complexes and followed the anionic diffusion mechanism. Anion exclusion decreased effective diffusion coefficients, especially in more dense samples. In the studies with saline water of total dissolves solids about 35000 ppm, uranium appeared in the aerobic experiments probably as cationic complexes and followed the cationic diffusion mechanism. Uranium in the saline, anaerobic experiment was probably U(OH){sub 4} and followed the diffusion mechanism of neutral species.

  16. Cation Transport in Li+ and Na+ Rich Antiperovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, John; Daemen, Luke; Zhao, Yusheng; LANL Team; UNLV Team

    2014-03-01

    A large number of compounds possessing the perovskite crystal structure demonstrate interesting properties such as ferroelectricity, magnetoresistance, and superconductivity. In this study, we present findings on a new class of materials, namely Li+ and Na+ rich antiperovskites, with emphasis on cation transport for solid state battery applications. The electrolytes have the general formula A3 BX where A is a Li+ or Na+ cation, B is an O2- or S2- anion, and X is a Cl- or Br- anion; mixed compositions were also studied. X-ray diffraction techniques were used for phase identification, sample purity, and unit cell refinement. In each case, the materials crystallize in a cubic unit cell with space group Pm 3 m . The ionic conductivity was determined for each material as a function of temperature using impedance spectroscopy methods. Activation energies for cation diffusion were determined by fitting the conductivity data to the Arrhenius equation σ = σ0/T e -Ea /kB T .

  17. Low-Temperature Cationic Rearrangement in a Bulk Metal Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Rong; Retuerto, Maria; Stephens, Peter W; Croft, Mark; Sheptyakov, Denis; Pomjakushin, Vladimir; Deng, Zheng; Akamatsu, Hirofumi; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Sánchez-Benítez, Javier; Saouma, Felix O; Jang, Joon I; Walker, David; Greenblatt, Martha

    2016-08-16

    Cationic rearrangement is a compelling strategy for producing desirable physical properties by atomic-scale manipulation. However, activating ionic diffusion typically requires high temperature, and in some cases also high pressure in bulk oxide materials. Herein, we present the cationic rearrangement in bulk Mn2 FeMoO6 at unparalleled low temperatures of 150-300 (o) C. The irreversible ionic motion at ambient pressure, as evidenced by real-time powder synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction, and second harmonic generation, leads to a transition from a Ni3 TeO6 -type to an ordered-ilmenite structure, and dramatic changes of the electrical and magnetic properties. This work demonstrates a remarkable cationic rearrangement, with corresponding large changes in the physical properties in a bulk oxide at unprecedented low temperatures.

  18. Golgi localized barley MTP8 proteins facilitate Mn transport.

    PubMed

    Pedas, Pai; Schiller Stokholm, Michaela; Hegelund, Josefine Nymark; Ladegård, Anne Hald; Schjoerring, Jan Kofod; Husted, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Many metabolic processes in plants are regulated by manganese (Mn) but limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms controlling cellular Mn homeostasis. In this study, a yeast assay was used to isolate and characterize two genes, MTP8.1 and MTP8.2, which encode membrane-bound proteins belonging to the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family in the cereal species barley (Hordeum vulgare). Transient expression in onion epidermal cells showed that MTP8.1 and MTP8.2 proteins fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) are localized to Golgi. When heterologously expressed in yeast, MTP8.1 and MTP8.2 were found to be Mn transporters catalysing Mn efflux in a similar manner as the Golgi localized endogenous yeast protein Pmr1p. The level of MTP8.1 transcripts in barley roots increased with external Mn supply ranging from deficiency to toxicity, while MTP8.2 transcripts decreased under the same conditions, indicating non-overlapping functions for the two genes. In barley leaves, the expression of both MTP8 genes declined in response to toxic Mn additions to the roots suggesting a role in ensuring proper delivery of Mn to Golgi. Based on the above we suggest that barley MTP8 proteins are involved in Mn loading to the Golgi apparatus and play a role in Mn homeostasis by delivering Mn to Mn-dependent enzymes and/or by facilitating Mn efflux via secretory vesicles. This study highlights the importance of MTP transporters in Mn homeostasis and is the first report of Golgi localized Mn2+ transport proteins in a monocot plant species.

  19. Kinetics of Isovalent (Cd(2+)) and Aliovalent (In(3+)) Cation Exchange in Cd1-xMnxSe Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Pradip; Jin, Yu; Barrows, Charles J; Dunham, Scott T; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-10-05

    Ion exchange, in which an in-diffusing ion replaces a lattice ion, has been widely exploited as a synthetic tool for semiconductor doping and solid-to-solid chemical transformations, both in bulk and at the nanoscale. Here, we present a systematic investigation of cation-exchange reactions that involve the displacement of Mn(2+) from CdSe nanocrystals by Cd(2+) or In(3+). For both incoming cations, Mn(2+) displacement is spontaneous but thermally activated, following Arrhenius behavior over a broad experimental temperature range. At any given temperature, cation exchange by In(3+) is approximately 2 orders of magnitude faster than that by Cd(2+), illustrating a critical dependence on the incoming cation. Quantitative analysis of the kinetics data within a Fick's-law diffusion model yields diffusion barriers (ED) and limiting diffusivities (D0) for both incoming ions. Despite their very different kinetics, indistinguishable diffusion barriers of ED ≈ 1.1 eV are found for both reactions (In(3+) and Cd(2+)). A dramatically enhanced diffusivity is found for Mn(2+) cation exchange by In(3+). Overall, these findings provide unique experimental insights into cation diffusion within colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, contributing to our fundamental understanding of this rich and important area of nanoscience.

  20. Surface hopping investigation of the relaxation dynamics in radical cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assmann, Mariana; Weinacht, Thomas; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2016-01-01

    Ionization processes can lead to the formation of radical cations with population in several ionic states. In this study, we examine the dynamics of three radical cations starting from an excited ionic state using trajectory surface hopping dynamics in combination with multiconfigurational electronic structure methods. The efficiency of relaxation to the ground state is examined in an effort to understand better whether fragmentation of cations is likely to occur directly on excited states or after relaxation to the ground state. The results on cyclohexadiene, hexatriene, and uracil indicate that relaxation to the ground ionic state is very fast in these systems, while fragmentation before relaxation is rare. Ultrafast relaxation is facilitated by the close proximity of electronic states and the presence of two- and three-state conical intersections. Examining the properties of the systems in the Franck-Condon region can give some insight into the subsequent dynamics.

  1. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: Permeant cations chaperoned by anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  2. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  3. Cu Vacancies Boost Cation Exchange Reactions in Copper Selenide Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated cation exchange reactions in copper selenide nanocrystals using two different divalent ions as guest cations (Zn2+ and Cd2+) and comparing the reactivity of close to stoichiometric (that is, Cu2Se) nanocrystals with that of nonstoichiometric (Cu2–xSe) nanocrystals, to gain insights into the mechanism of cation exchange at the nanoscale. We have found that the presence of a large density of copper vacancies significantly accelerated the exchange process at room temperature and corroborated vacancy diffusion as one of the main drivers in these reactions. Partially exchanged samples exhibited Janus-like heterostructures made of immiscible domains sharing epitaxial interfaces. No alloy or core–shell structures were observed. The role of phosphines, like tri-n-octylphosphine, in these reactions, is multifaceted: besides acting as selective solvating ligands for Cu+ ions exiting the nanoparticles during exchange, they also enable anion diffusion, by extracting an appreciable amount of selenium to the solution phase, which may further promote the exchange process. In reactions run at a higher temperature (150 °C), copper vacancies were quickly eliminated from the nanocrystals and major differences in Cu stoichiometries, as well as in reactivities, between the initial Cu2Se and Cu2–xSe samples were rapidly smoothed out. These experiments indicate that cation exchange, under the specific conditions of this work, is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperature. PMID:26140622

  4. Cu Vacancies Boost Cation Exchange Reactions in Copper Selenide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lesnyak, Vladimir; Brescia, Rosaria; Messina, Gabriele C; Manna, Liberato

    2015-07-29

    We have investigated cation exchange reactions in copper selenide nanocrystals using two different divalent ions as guest cations (Zn(2+) and Cd(2+)) and comparing the reactivity of close to stoichiometric (that is, Cu2Se) nanocrystals with that of nonstoichiometric (Cu(2-x)Se) nanocrystals, to gain insights into the mechanism of cation exchange at the nanoscale. We have found that the presence of a large density of copper vacancies significantly accelerated the exchange process at room temperature and corroborated vacancy diffusion as one of the main drivers in these reactions. Partially exchanged samples exhibited Janus-like heterostructures made of immiscible domains sharing epitaxial interfaces. No alloy or core-shell structures were observed. The role of phosphines, like tri-n-octylphosphine, in these reactions, is multifaceted: besides acting as selective solvating ligands for Cu(+) ions exiting the nanoparticles during exchange, they also enable anion diffusion, by extracting an appreciable amount of selenium to the solution phase, which may further promote the exchange process. In reactions run at a higher temperature (150 °C), copper vacancies were quickly eliminated from the nanocrystals and major differences in Cu stoichiometries, as well as in reactivities, between the initial Cu2Se and Cu(2-x)Se samples were rapidly smoothed out. These experiments indicate that cation exchange, under the specific conditions of this work, is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperature.

  5. Selective separation of sodium ions from a mixture with phenylalanine by Donnan dialysis with a profiled sulfogroup cation exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'eva, V. I.; Goleva, E. A.

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of separating ions of metal from a mixture with ampholyte (an amino acid) by Donnan dialysis with an MK-40 sulfogroup cation exchange membrane is demonstrated. Conditions ensuring the selectivity and intensity of the mass transfer of sodium ions from a mixture with bipolar phenylalanine ions into a diffusate containing hydrochloric acid through a cation exchange membrane are found.

  6. Solubility and transport of cationic and anionic patterned nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jiaye; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Guo, Hongxia

    2012-01-01

    We analyze bulk diffusion and transport through hydrophobic nanochannels of nanoparticles (NPs) with different hydrophobic-hydrophilic patterns achieved by coating a fraction of the NP sites with positive or negative charges via explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. Ten different charge pattern types including Janus charged-hydrophobic NPs are studied. The cationic NPs are more affected by the patterns and have higher diffusion constants and fluxes than their anionic NPs counterparts. The NP-water interaction dependence on surface pattern and field strength explains these observations. The NP-water Coulomb interaction of anionic NPs in the bulk, which are much stronger than the hydrophobic NP-water interactions, are stronger for NPs with higher localized charge, and stronger than in the cationic NPs counterparts. The diffusion and transport of anionic NPs such as proteins and protein charge ladders with the same total charge but different surface charge patterns are slowest for the highest localized charge pattern, which also adsorb strongest onto surfaces. Our model demonstrates the separation (by reverse osmosis, capillary electrophoresis, or chromatography) of cationic NPs, including proteins with equal net charge but different surface charge distributions.

  7. Optimal Network Modularity for Information Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nematzadeh, Azadeh; Ferrara, Emilio; Flammini, Alessandro; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the impact of community structure on information diffusion with the linear threshold model. Our results demonstrate that modular structure may have counterintuitive effects on information diffusion when social reinforcement is present. We show that strong communities can facilitate global diffusion by enhancing local, intracommunity spreading. Using both analytic approaches and numerical simulations, we demonstrate the existence of an optimal network modularity, where global diffusion requires the minimal number of early adopters.

  8. Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of ammonium cationized polyethers.

    PubMed

    Nasioudis, Andreas; Heeren, Ron M A; van Doormalen, Irene; de Wijs-Rot, Nicolette; van den Brink, Oscar F

    2011-05-01

    Quaternary ammonium salts (Quats) and amines are known to facilitate the MS analysis of high molar mass polyethers by forming low charge state adduct ions. The formation, stability, and behavior upon collision-induced dissociation (CID) of adduct ions of polyethers with a variety of Quats and amines were studied by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight, quadrupole ion trap, and linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The linear ion trap instrument was part of an Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer that allowed accurate mass MS/MS measurements. The Quats and amines studied were of different degree of substitution, structure, and size. The stability of the adduct ions was related to the structure of the cation, especially the amine's degree of substitution. CID of singly/doubly charged primary and tertiary ammonium cationized polymers resulted in the neutral loss of the amine followed by fragmentation of the protonated product ions. The latter reveals information about the monomer unit, polymer sequence, and endgroup structure. In addition, the detection of product ions retaining the ammonium ion was observed. The predominant process in the CID of singly charged quaternary ammonium cationized polymers was cation detachment, whereas their doubly charged adduct ions provided the same information as the primary and tertiary ammonium cationized adduct ions. This study shows the potential of specific amines as tools for the structural elucidation of high molar mass polyethers.

  9. Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry of Ammonium Cationized Polyethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasioudis, Andreas; Heeren, Ron M. A.; van Doormalen, Irene; de Wijs-Rot, Nicolette; van den Brink, Oscar F.

    2011-05-01

    Quaternary ammonium salts (Quats) and amines are known to facilitate the MS analysis of high molar mass polyethers by forming low charge state adduct ions. The formation, stability, and behavior upon collision-induced dissociation (CID) of adduct ions of polyethers with a variety of Quats and amines were studied by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight, quadrupole ion trap, and linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The linear ion trap instrument was part of an Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer that allowed accurate mass MS/MS measurements. The Quats and amines studied were of different degree of substitution, structure, and size. The stability of the adduct ions was related to the structure of the cation, especially the amine's degree of substitution. CID of singly/doubly charged primary and tertiary ammonium cationized polymers resulted in the neutral loss of the amine followed by fragmentation of the protonated product ions. The latter reveals information about the monomer unit, polymer sequence, and endgroup structure. In addition, the detection of product ions retaining the ammonium ion was observed. The predominant process in the CID of singly charged quaternary ammonium cationized polymers was cation detachment, whereas their doubly charged adduct ions provided the same information as the primary and tertiary ammonium cationized adduct ions. This study shows the potential of specific amines as tools for the structural elucidation of high molar mass polyethers.

  10. Cationic polymers and their self-assembly for antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Deka, Smriti Rekha; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Kumar, Pradee

    2015-01-01

    The present article focuses on the amphiphilic cationic polymers as antibacterial agents. These polymers undergo self-assembly in aqueous conditions and impart biological activity by efficiently interacting with the bacterial cell wall, hence, used in preparing chemical disinfectants and biocides. Both cationic charge as well as hydrophobic segments facilitate interactions with the bacterial cell surface and initiate its disruption. The perturbation in transmembrane potential causes leakage of cytosolic contents followed by cell death. Out of two categories of macromolecules, peptide oligomers and cationic polymers, which have extensively been used as antibacterials, we have elaborated on the current advances made in the area of cationic polymer-based (naturally occurring and commonly employed synthetic polymers and their modified analogs) antibacterial agents. The development of polymer-based antibacterials has helped in addressing challenges posed by the drug-resistant bacterial infections. These polymers provide a new platform to combat such infections in the most efficient manner. This review presents concise discussion on the amphiphilic cationic polymers and their modified analogs having low hemolytic activity and excellent antibacterial activity against array of fungi, bacteria and other microorganisms.

  11. Protonation switching to the least-basic heteroatom of carbamate through cationic hydrogen bonding promotes the formation of isocyanate cations.

    PubMed

    Kurouchi, Hiroaki; Sumita, Akinari; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2014-07-07

    We found that phenethylcarbamates that bear ortho-salicylate as an ether group (carbamoyl salicylates) dramatically accelerate OC bond dissociation in strong acid to facilitate generation of isocyanate cation (N-protonated isocyanates), which undergo subsequent intramolecular aromatic electrophilic cyclization to give dihydroisoquinolones. To generate isocyanate cations from carbamates in acidic media as electrophiles for aromatic substitution, protonation at the ether oxygen, the least basic heteroatom, is essential to promote CO bond cleavage. However, the carbonyl oxygen of carbamates, the most basic site, is protonated exclusively in strong acids. We found that the protonation site can be shifted to an alternative basic atom by linking methyl salicylate to the ether oxygen of carbamate. The methyl ester oxygen ortho to the phenolic (ether) oxygen of salicylate is as basic as the carbamate carbonyl oxygen, and we found that monoprotonation at the methyl ester oxygen in strong acid resulted in the formation of an intramolecular cationic hydrogen bond (>CO(+) H⋅⋅⋅O<) with the phenolic ether oxygen. This facilitates OC bond dissociation of phenethylcarbamates, thereby promoting isocyanate cation formation. In contrast, superacid-mediated diprotonation at the methyl ester oxygen of the salicylate and the carbonyl oxygen of the carbamate afforded a rather stable dication, which did not readily undergo CO bond dissociation. This is an unprecedented and unknown case in which the monocation has greater reactivity than the dication.

  12. Facilitation of calcium-dependent potassium current.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S H

    1994-12-01

    The activation of Ca-dependent K+ current, Ic, was studied in macropatches on the cell bodies of molluscan neurons. When a depolarizing voltage-clamp pulse was applied repeatedly, Ic facilitated in a manner that resembled the facilitation of synaptic transmitter release. Facilitation was characterized by an increase in Ic amplitude, a progressive increase in instantaneous outward current, and a decrease in utilization time. Experiments were done to investigate the mechanism responsible for Ic facilitation. Facilitation was reduced by microinjection of an exogenous Ca2+ buffer into the cytoplasm, indicating that facilitation is a Ca(2+)-dependent process. It was also reduced at elevated temperatures. Conversely, facilitation was greatly potentiated by blocking the Na/Ca exchange mechanism. It is concluded that the facilitation of Ca-dependent K+ current results from the accumulation of Ca2+ at the inner face of the membrane during the repeated activation of Ca2+ channels by depolarization. The Ca2+ indicator fluo-3 was used in fluorescence imaging experiments to measure changes in [Ca]i near the cell membrane during repeated depolarizing pulses and the interpretation of these results was aided by numerical simulations of Ca2+ accumulation, diffusion, and buffering in the peripheral cytoplasm. These experiments showed that the time course of Ic facilitation matches the time course of Ca2+ accumulation at the membrane. It was found that the strength of Ic facilitation varies among patches on the same neuron, suggesting that the accumulation of Ca2+ is not uniform along the inner surface of the membrane and that gradients in [Ca]i develop and are maintained during trains of depolarizing pulses. Potential mechanisms that may lead to local differences in Ca2+ accumulation and Ic facilitation are discussed.

  13. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  14. Facilitating Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    The first of the three papers in this symposium, "Conflicts that Arise in Small Group Facilitation: A Descriptive Study of Accounts, Actions, Outcomes, and Assessments" (Judith A. Kolb, William J. Rothwell), contains self-report verbatim accounts contributed by facilitators and the results of a literature review on small group conflict.…

  15. Evaluator or Facilitator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolding, James T.

    1978-01-01

    In American schools, the classroom teacher must act in two conflicting capacities: as a facilitator of learning and as an evaluator of his own facilitating activities. To avoid problems inherent in this, the evaluator role could be assigned elsewhere, as in the Boy Scouts' merit badge system. (SJL)

  16. Transdermal diffusion of xenon in vitro using diffusion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovsky, A.; Petrov, E.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this research was to study the diffusion rate of xenon through guinea pig skin and how viscosity of cosmetic component capryl/capric triglyceride (CCT) facilitates to deliver xenon to surface of skin patches. They were placed in Franz cell for 24 hours and diffusion rate and permeability of xenon were calculated. Thus diffusion rate was 0.031 mg/hour*cm2 and permeability was 0.003 cm/hour. Using Brookfield viscometer it was shown that viscosity of CCT decreased upon increasing xenon concentration. Obtained results can be utilized in developing of new xenon containing drugs for topical administration.

  17. Cu3-xP Nanocrystals as a Material Platform for Near-Infrared Plasmonics and Cation Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis approaches to colloidal Cu3P nanocrystals (NCs) have been recently developed, and their optical absorption features in the near-infrared (NIR) have been interpreted as arising from a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). Our pump–probe measurements on platelet-shaped Cu3-xP NCs corroborate the plasmonic character of this absorption. In accordance with studies on crystal structure analysis of Cu3P dating back to the 1970s, our density functional calculations indicate that this material is substoichiometric in copper, since the energy of formation of Cu vacancies in certain crystallographic sites is negative, that is, they are thermodynamically favored. Also, thermoelectric measurements point to a p-type behavior of the majority carriers from films of Cu3-xP NCs. It is likely that both the LSPR and the p-type character of our Cu3-xP NCs arise from the presence of a large number of Cu vacancies in such NCs. Motivated by the presence of Cu vacancies that facilitate the ion diffusion, we have additionally exploited Cu3-xP NCs as a starting material on which to probe cation exchange reactions. We demonstrate here that Cu3-xP NCs can be easily cation-exchanged to hexagonal wurtzite InP NCs, with preservation of the anion framework (the anion framework in Cu3-xP is very close to that of wurtzite InP). Intermediate steps in this reaction are represented by Cu3-xP/InP heterostructures, as a consequence of the fact that the exchange between Cu+ and In3+ ions starts from the peripheral corners of each NC and gradually evolves toward the center. The feasibility of this transformation makes Cu3-xP NCs an interesting material platform from which to access other metal phosphides by cation exchange. PMID:25960605

  18. Cu3-x P Nanocrystals as a Material Platform for Near-Infrared Plasmonics and Cation Exchange Reactions.

    PubMed

    De Trizio, Luca; Gaspari, Roberto; Bertoni, Giovanni; Kriegel, Ilka; Moretti, Luca; Scotognella, Francesco; Maserati, Lorenzo; Zhang, Yang; Messina, Gabriele C; Prato, Mirko; Marras, Sergio; Cavalli, Andrea; Manna, Liberato

    2015-02-10

    Synthesis approaches to colloidal Cu3P nanocrystals (NCs) have been recently developed, and their optical absorption features in the near-infrared (NIR) have been interpreted as arising from a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). Our pump-probe measurements on platelet-shaped Cu3-x P NCs corroborate the plasmonic character of this absorption. In accordance with studies on crystal structure analysis of Cu3P dating back to the 1970s, our density functional calculations indicate that this material is substoichiometric in copper, since the energy of formation of Cu vacancies in certain crystallographic sites is negative, that is, they are thermodynamically favored. Also, thermoelectric measurements point to a p-type behavior of the majority carriers from films of Cu3-x P NCs. It is likely that both the LSPR and the p-type character of our Cu3-x P NCs arise from the presence of a large number of Cu vacancies in such NCs. Motivated by the presence of Cu vacancies that facilitate the ion diffusion, we have additionally exploited Cu3-x P NCs as a starting material on which to probe cation exchange reactions. We demonstrate here that Cu3-x P NCs can be easily cation-exchanged to hexagonal wurtzite InP NCs, with preservation of the anion framework (the anion framework in Cu3-x P is very close to that of wurtzite InP). Intermediate steps in this reaction are represented by Cu3-x P/InP heterostructures, as a consequence of the fact that the exchange between Cu(+) and In(3+) ions starts from the peripheral corners of each NC and gradually evolves toward the center. The feasibility of this transformation makes Cu3-x P NCs an interesting material platform from which to access other metal phosphides by cation exchange.

  19. Non-diffusing radiochromic micelle gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Kevin; Sekimoto, Masaya

    2010-11-01

    The addition of Laponite, a synthetic clay nanoparticle material to radiochromic leuco Malachite Green micelle hydrogel eliminates diffusion of the cationic dye by electrostatic binding. The clay nanoparticles also increased dose sensitivity ten-fold relative to the parent gel formulation. This material is a suitable 3D water equivalent dosimeter with optical CT readout.

  20. Facilitating Understandings of Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Christine C.; Bush, Sara

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates some learning encounters for facilitating first graders' understanding of geometry. Describes some of children's approaches using Cuisenaire rods and teacher's intervening. Presents six problems involving various combinations of Cuisenaire rods and cubes. (YP)

  1. Natural zeolite reactivity towards ozone: the role of compensating cations.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Héctor; Alejandro, Serguei; Zaror, Claudio A

    2012-08-15

    Among indoor pollutants, ozone is recognised to pose a threat to human health. Recently, low cost natural zeolites have been applied as alternative materials for ozone abatement. In this work, the effect of compensating cation content of natural zeolite on ozone removal is studied. A Chilean natural zeolite is used here as starting material. The amount of compensating cations in the zeolite framework was modified by ion exchange using an ammonium sulphate solution (0.1 mol L(-1)). Characterisation of natural and modified zeolites were performed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption at 77K, elemental analysis, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectroscopy (TGA-MS), and temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH(3)-TPD). Ozone adsorption and/or decomposition on natural and modified zeolites were studied by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Results show that the zeolite compensating cation content affects ozone interaction with zeolite active sites. Ammonium ion-exchange treatments followed by thermal out-gassing at 823 K, reduces ozone diffusion resistance inside the zeolite framework, increasing ozone abatement on zeolite surface active sites. Weak and strong Lewis acid sites of zeolite surface are identified here as the main active sites responsible of ozone removal.

  2. Cation affinity numbers of Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Christoph; Tandon, Raman; Maryasin, Boris; Larionov, Evgeny; Zipse, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Using selected theoretical methods the affinity of a large range of Lewis bases towards model cations has been quantified. The range of model cations includes the methyl cation as the smallest carbon-centered electrophile, the benzhydryl and trityl cations as models for electrophilic substrates encountered in Lewis base-catalyzed synthetic procedures, and the acetyl cation as a substrate model for acyl-transfer reactions. Affinities towards these cationic electrophiles are complemented by data for Lewis-base addition to Michael acceptors as prototypical neutral electrophiles.

  3. Millisecond Kinetics of Nanocrystal Cation Exchange UsingMicrofluidic X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Emory M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine; Elnaggar,Mariam S.; Mathies, Richard A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-05-07

    We describe the use of a flow-focusing microfluidic reactorto measure the kinetics of theCdSe-to-Ag2Se nanocrystal cation exchangereaction using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu XAS). The smallmicroreactor dimensions facilitate the millisecond mixing of CdSenanocrystal and Ag+ reactant solutions, and the transposition of thereaction time onto spatial coordinates enables the in situ observation ofthe millisecond reaction with mu XAS. XAS spectra show the progression ofCdSe nanocrystals to Ag2Se over the course of 100 ms without the presenceof long-lived intermediates. These results, along with supporting stoppedflow absorption experiments, suggest that this nanocrystal cationexchange reaction is highly efficient and provide insight into how thereaction progresses in individual particles. This experiment illustratesthe value and potential of in situ microfluidic X-ray synchrotrontechniques for detailed studies of the millisecond structuraltransformations of nanoparticles and other solution-phase reactions inwhich diffusive mixing initiates changes in local bond structures oroxidation states.

  4. Antioxidant activity of idebenone-loaded neutral and cationic solid-lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Antonio; Crasci', Lucia; Panico, Annamaria; Pignatello, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Idebenone (IDE) is a lipophilic benzoquinone electron carrier synthetic analogue of coenzyme Q10, which behaves as an antioxidant and free radical scavenging molecule. Recently, the therapeutic application of IDE in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy has been discussed. This work was aimed at evaluating the encapsulation of IDE in solid-lipid nanoparticles (SLN). In particular, we tested the possibility of adapting the quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion technique, already proposed to produce polymeric nanoparticles, to prepare positively charged SLN with different compositions. Such a charge, due to the addition of a cationic lipid, would facilitate the interaction with the negatively charged eye surface epithelium, with a consequent longer pre-corneal residence time of the colloidal systems. In a preliminary evaluation of the produced IDE-loaded SLN, the antioxidant activity of the drug was demonstrated using an oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay. Encapsulation of the drug in the nanocarrier systems seems able to protect IDE from degradation and prolong its antioxidant potential.

  5. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  6. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  7. Insights into dynamic processes of cations in pyrochlores and other complex oxides

    DOE PAGES

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Perriot, Romain

    2015-08-26

    Complex oxides are critical components of many key technologies, from solid oxide fuel cells and superionics to inert matrix fuels and nuclear waste forms. In many cases, understanding mass transport is important for predicting performance and, thus, extensive effort has been devoted to understanding mass transport in these materials. However, most work has focused on the behavior of oxygen while cation transport has received relatively little attention, even though cation diffusion is responsible for many phenomena, including sintering, radiation damage evolution, and deformation processes. Here, we use accelerated molecular dynamics simulations to examine the kinetics of cation defects in onemore » class of complex oxides, A₂B₂O₇ pyrochlore. In some pyrochlore chemistries, B cation defects are kinetically unstable, transforming to A cation defects and antisites at rates faster than they can diffuse. When this occurs, transport of B cations occurs through defect processes on the A sublattice. Further, these A cation defects, either interstitials or vacancies, can interact with antisite disorder, reordering the material locally, though this process is much more efficient for interstitials than vacancies. Whether this behavior occurs in a given pyrochlore depends on the A and B chemistry. Pyrochlores with a smaller ratio of cation radii exhibit this complex behavior, while those with larger ratios exhibit direct migration of B interstitials. Similar behavior has been reported in other complex oxides such as spinels and perovskites, suggesting that this coupling of transport between the A and B cation sublattices, while not universal, occurs in many complex oxide.« less

  8. Heavy metal cations permeate the TRPV6 epithelial cation channel.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gergely; Danko, Tamas; Bergeron, Marc J; Balazs, Bernadett; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Zsembery, Akos; Hediger, Matthias A

    2011-01-01

    TRPV6 belongs to the vanilloid family of the transient receptor potential channel (TRP) superfamily. This calcium-selective channel is highly expressed in the duodenum and the placenta, being responsible for calcium absorption in the body and fetus. Previous observations have suggested that TRPV6 is not only permeable to calcium but also to other divalent cations in epithelial tissues. In this study, we tested whether TRPV6 is indeed also permeable to cations such as zinc and cadmium. We found that the basal intracellular calcium concentration was higher in HEK293 cells transfected with hTRPV6 than in non-transfected cells, and that this difference almost disappeared in nominally calcium-free solution. Live cell imaging experiments with Fura-2 and NewPort Green DCF showed that overexpression of human TRPV6 increased the permeability for Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and interestingly also for La(3+) and Gd(3+). These results were confirmed using the patch clamp technique. (45)Ca uptake experiments showed that cadmium, lanthanum and gadolinium were also highly efficient inhibitors of TRPV6-mediated calcium influx at higher micromolar concentrations. Our results suggest that TRPV6 is not only involved in calcium transport but also in the transport of other divalent cations, including heavy metal ions, which may have toxicological implications.

  9. Molecular crowding enhances facilitated diffusion of two human DNA glycosylases

    PubMed Central

    Cravens, Shannen L.; Schonhoft, Joseph D.; Rowland, Meng M.; Rodriguez, Alyssa A.; Anderson, Breeana G.; Stivers, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular space is at a premium due to the high concentrations of biomolecules and is expected to have a fundamental effect on how large macromolecules move in the cell. Here, we report that crowded solutions promote intramolecular DNA translocation by two human DNA repair glycosylases. The crowding effect increases both the efficiency and average distance of DNA chain translocation by hindering escape of the enzymes to bulk solution. The increased contact time with the DNA chain provides for redundant damage patrolling within individual DNA chains at the expense of slowing the overall rate of damaged base removal from a population of molecules. The significant biological implication is that a crowded cellular environment could influence the mechanism of damage recognition as much as any property of the enzyme or DNA. PMID:25845592

  10. Halogenated silanes, radicals, and cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liming; He, Yi-Liang

    2008-09-01

    Quantum chemistry study has been carried out on the structure and energetics of halogenated silanes, radicals, and cations (SiHxXy0,+1, X = F, Cl, Br; x + y = 1-4). The geometries are optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G(2df,p) level. The adiabatic ionization energiess (IEas), relative energetics of cations, proton affinities (PAs) of silanes, and the enthalpies of formation are predicted using G3(CC) model chemistry. Non-classical ion complex structures are found for hydrogenated cations and transition states connecting classical and non-classical structures are also located. The most stable cations for silylene and silyl radicals have their classical divalent and trivalent structures, and those for silanes have non-classical structures except for SiH3Br+ and SiH2Br2+. The non-classical structures for halosilane cations imply difficulty in experimentally measurement of the adiabatic ionization energies using photoionization or photoelectron studies. For SiH3X, SiH2X2, and SiHX3, the G3(CC) adiabatic IEas to classical ionic structures closest to their neutrals agree better with the photoelectron spectroscopic measurements. The transition states between classical and non-classical structures also hamper the photoionization determination of the appearance energies for silylene cations from silanes. The G3(CC) results for SiHx0,+1 agree excellently with the photoionization mass spectrometric study, and the results for fluorinated and chlorinated species also agree with the previous theoretical predictions at correlation levels from BAC-MP4 to CCSD(T)/CBS. The predicted enthalpy differences between SiH2Cl+, SiHCl2+, and SiCl3+ are also in accordance with previous kinetics study. The G3(CC) results show large discrepancies to the collision-induced charge transfer and/or dissociation reactions involving SiFx+ and SiClx+ ions, for which the G3(CC) enthalpies of formation are also significantly differed from the previous theoretical predictions, especially on SiFx+ (x = 2-4). The G3

  11. [Drug facilitated sexual assault].

    PubMed

    Alempijević, Djordje; Savić, Slobodan; Stojanović, Jovan; Spasić, Andjelka

    2007-01-01

    In line with the fact that there is little information regarding drug facilitated sexual assault in national medical literature, the authors aimed to prepare a review of the phenomenon based on available international references. Therefore we offered a definition of the concept of sexual assault, and rape in particular. Consent and ability for valid consent for sexual intercourse were defined as well. A review contains discussion about the basic elements of a concept of drug-facilitated sexual assault. There is also available information in regard to pharmacology of common data rape drugs, i.e. flunitrazepam, gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), and ketamine. We indicate the utmost importance of prompt collecting of biological samples for toxicological screening in patients who are suspected victims of drug facilitated sexual assault.

  12. Understanding Facilitation: Theory and Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Christine

    This book introduces newcomers to the concept of facilitation, and it presents a critical analysis of established and current theory on facilitation for existing practitioners. The following are among the topics discussed: (1) emergence of the field of facilitation; (2) development of facilitation in management; (3) development of facilitation in…

  13. Electronic spectra of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation and radical

    SciTech Connect

    Peter R. Craig; Miller, John R.; Havlas, Zdenek; Trujillo, Marianela; Rempala, Pawel; Kirby, James P.; Noll, Bruce C.; Michl, Josef

    2016-05-02

    In this study, properties of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation 1 and its tetra-o-fluoro derivative 1a have been measured and calculated. The B3LYP/TZP optimized geometry of the free cation 1 agrees with a single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure except that in the crystal one of the phenyl substituents is strongly twisted to permit a close-packing interaction of two of its hydrogens with a nearby BF4 anion. The low-energy parts of the solution electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of 1 and 1a have been interpreted by comparison with TD-DFT (B3LYP/TZP) results. Reduction or pulse radiolysis lead to a neutral 19-electron radical, whose visible absorption and MCD spectra have been recorded and interpreted as well. The reduction is facilitated by ~0.1 V upon going from 1 to 1a

  14. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    DOEpatents

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  15. Facilitation of Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boydell, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Taking an autobiographical approach, I tell the story of my experiences facilitating adult development, in a polytechnic and as a management consultant. I relate these to a developmental framework of Modes of Being and Learning that I created and elaborated with colleagues. I connect this picture with a number of related models, theories,…

  16. Facilitator's Guide: Censorship Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layden, Kent

    To help leaders or "facilitators" of a series of simulation exercises on controversial issues for school board members, this guide describes how the simulations work and provides some of the materials required for the simulation exercise on censorship and book banning. After defining simulation or gaming exercises, the author notes the…

  17. Facilitating Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Mark H., Ed.; Rossman, Maxine E., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This collection of articles on distance learning reflects the perspectives and concerns of the learner and the facilitator of learning in distance education setting. Eight chapters are included: (1) "The Evolution and Advantages of Distance Education" (John E. Cantelon) traces the history of distance education and demonstrates how it transcends…

  18. Facilitative Strategies in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Thara M. A.; Haugabrook, Adrian K.

    2001-01-01

    Describes campus-based strategies to facilitate collaboration by examining the process of restructuring a division of student affairs as an educational partner with academic affairs. Describes three collaborative efforts at the University of Massachusetts Boston: the Beacon Leadership Project, the Diversity Research Initiative, and the Beacon…

  19. The Inclusion Facilitator's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Cheryl M.; Schuh, Mary C.; Nisbet, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Inclusion facilitators are educators who do more than teach children with disabilities--they advocate for change in schools and communities, sparking a passion for inclusion in teachers, administrators, and families and giving them the practical guidance they need to make it work. This is an essential new role in today's schools, and this guide…

  20. Transient cerebral hypoperfusion assisted intraarterial cationic liposome delivery to brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shailendra; Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Wang, Mei; Chaudhuri, Durba B.; Holcomb, Mark; Straubinger, Ninfa L.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Bigio, Irving J.; Straubinger, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Object Transient cerebral hypoperfusion (TCH) has empirically been used to assist intraarterial (IA) drug delivery to brain tumors. Transient (< 3 min) reduction of cerebral blood flow (CBF) occurs during many neuro- and cardiovascular interventions and has recently been used to better target IA drugs to brain tumors. In the present experiments, we assessed whether the effectiveness of IA delivery of cationic liposomes could be improved by TCH. Methods Cationic liposomes composed of 1:1 DOTAP:PC (dioleoyl-trimethylammonium-propane:phosphatidylcholine) were administered to three groups of Sprague Dawley rats. In the first group, we tested the effect of blood flow reduction on IA delivery of cationic liposomes. In the second group, we compared TCH-assisted IA liposomal delivery vs. intravenous (IV) administration of the same dose. In the third group, we assessed retention of cationic liposomes in brain four hours after TCH assisted delivery. The liposomes contained a near infrared dye, DilC18(7), whose concentration could be measured in vivo by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Results IA injections of cationic liposomes during TCH increased their delivery approximately four-fold compared to injections during normal blood flow. Optical pharmacokinetic measurements revealed that relative to IV injections, IA injection of cationic liposomes during TCH produced tissue concentrations that were 100-fold greater. The cationic liposomes were retained in the brain tissue four hours after a single IA injection. There was no gross impairment of neurological functions in surviving animals. Conclusions Transient reduction in CBF significantly increased IA delivery of cationic liposomes in the brain. High concentrations of liposomes could be delivered to brain tissue after IA injections with concurrent TCH while none could be detected after IV injection. IA-TCH injections were well tolerated and cationic liposomes were retained for at least 4 hours after IA administration. These

  1. Structure and dynamics of ionic liquids: Trimethylsilylpropyl-substituted cations and bis(sulfonyl)amide anions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Boning; Yamashita, Yuki; Endo, Takatsugu; Takahashi, Kenji; Castner, Edward W

    2016-12-28

    Ionic liquids with cationic organosilicon groups have been shown to have a number of useful properties, including reduced viscosities relative to the homologous cations with hydrocarbon substituents on the cations. We report structural and dynamical properties of four ionic liquids having a trimethylsilylpropyl functional group, including 1-methyl-3-trimethylsilylpropylimidazolium (Si-C3-mim(+)) cation paired with three anions: bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (FSI(-)), bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (NTf2(-)), and bis(pentafluoroethanesulfonyl)imide (BETI(-)), as well as the analogous N-methyl-N-trimethylsilylpropylpyrrolidinium (Si-C3-pyrr(+)) cation paired with NTf2(-). This choice of ionic liquids permits us to systematically study how increasing the size and hydrophobicity of the anions affects the structural and transport properties of the liquid. Structure factors for the ionic liquids were measured using high energy X-ray diffraction and calculated from molecular dynamics simulations. The liquid structure factors reveal first sharp diffraction peaks (FSDPs) for each of the four ionic liquids studied. Interestingly, the domain size for Si-C3-mim(+)/NTf2(-) indicated by the maxima for these peaks is larger than for the more polar ionic liquid with a similar chain length, 1-pentamethyldisiloxymethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (SiOSi-mim(+)/NTf2(-)). For the series of Si-C3-mim(+) ionic liquids, as the size of the anion increases, the position of FSDP indicates that the intermediate range order domains decrease in size, contrary to expectation. Diffusivities for the anions and cations are compared for a series of both hydrocarbon-substituted and silicon-substituted cations. All of the anions show the same scaling with temperature, size, and viscosity, while the cations show two distinct trends-one for hydrocarbon-substituted cations and another for organosilicon-substituted cations, with the latter displaying increased friction.

  2. SEARCHING FOR NAPHTHALENE CATION ABSORPTION IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Searles, Justin M.; Destree, Joshua D.; Snow, Theodore P.; Salama, Farid; York, Donald G.; Dahlstrom, Julie E-mail: destree@colorado.edu E-mail: Farid.Salama@nasa.gov E-mail: jdahlstrom1@carthage.edu

    2011-05-01

    Interstellar naphthalene cations (C{sub 10}H{sup +}{sub 8}) have been proposed by a study to be the carriers of a small number of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). Using an archive of high signal-to-noise spectra obtained at the Apache Point Observatory, we used two methods to test the hypothesis. Both methods failed to detect significant absorption at lab wavelengths of interstellar spectra with laboratory spectra. We thereby conclude that C{sub 10}H{sup +}{sub 8} is not a DIB carrier in typical reddened sight lines.

  3. Blood-brain barrier transport of cationized immunoglobulin G: Enhanced delivery compared to native protein

    SciTech Connect

    Triguero, D.; Buciak, J.B.; Yang, J.; Pardridge, W.M.

    1989-06-01

    IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to greater than 10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with /sup 125/I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 +/- 0.37 microM; Bmax, 1.4 +/- 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to (3H)albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiography of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB.

  4. Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Cationized Immunoglobulin G: Enhanced Delivery Compared to Native Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triguero, Domingo; Buciak, Jody B.; Yang, Jing; Pardridge, William M.

    1989-06-01

    IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to >10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with 125I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 ± 0.37 μ M; Bmax, 1.4 ± 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to [3H]albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiography of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB.

  5. Fast regeneration of carotenoids from radical cations by isoflavonoid dianions: importance of the carotenoid keto group for electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Han, Rui-Min; Chen, Chang-Hui; Tian, Yu-Xi; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Skibsted, Leif H

    2010-01-14

    Electron transfer to radical cations of beta-carotene, zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin, and astaxanthin from each of the three acid/base forms of the diphenolic isoflavonoid daidzein and its C-glycoside puerarin, as studied by laser flash photolysis in homogeneous methanol/chloroform (1/9) solution, was found to depend on carotenoid structures and more significantly on the deprotonation degree of the isoflavonoids. None of the carotenoid radical cations reacted with the neutral forms of the isoflavonoids while the monoanionic and dianionic forms of the isoflavonoids regenerated the oxidized carotenoid. Electron transfer to the beta-carotene radical cation from the puerarin dianion followed second order kinetics with the rate constant at 25 degrees C k(2) = 5.5 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), zeaxanthin 8.5 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), canthaxanthin 6.5 x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), and astaxanthin 11.1 x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) approaching the diffusion limit and establishing a linear free energy relationship between rate constants and driving force. Comparable results found for the daidzein dianion indicate that the steric hindrance from the glucoside is not important suggesting the more reducing but less acidic 4'-OH/4'-O(-) as electron donors. On the basis of the rate constants obtained from kinetic analyses, the keto group of carotenoids is concluded to facilitate electron transfer. The driving force was estimated from oxidation potentials, as determined by cyclic-voltametry for puerarin and daidzein in aqueous solutions at varying pH conditions, which led to the standard reduction potentials E degrees = 1.13 and 1.10 V versus NHE corresponding to the uncharged puerarin and daidzein. For pH > pK(a2), the apparent potentials of both puerarin and daidzein became constants and were E degrees = 0.69 and 0.65 V, respectively. Electron transfer from isoflavonoids to the carotenoid radical cation, as formed during oxidative stress, is faster for astaxanthin than for the other carotenoids, which may relate

  6. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  7. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  8. Program Facilitates Distributed Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    KNET computer program facilitates distribution of computing between UNIX-compatible local host computer and remote host computer, which may or may not be UNIX-compatible. Capable of automatic remote log-in. User communicates interactively with remote host computer. Data output from remote host computer directed to local screen, to local file, and/or to local process. Conversely, data input from keyboard, local file, or local process directed to remote host computer. Written in ANSI standard C language.

  9. Ammonium catalyzed cyclitive additions: evidence for a cation-π interaction with alkynes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Edith; St Germain, Elijah; Cosme, Patrick; Maity, Pradip; Terentis, Andrew C; Lepore, Salvatore D

    2016-02-07

    The addition of carbamate nitrogen to a non-conjugated carbon-carbon triple bond is catalyzed by an ammonium salt leading to a cyclic product. Studies in homogeneous systems suggest that the ammonium agent facilitates nitrogen-carbon bond formation through a cation-π interaction with the alkyne unit that, for the first time, is directly observed by Raman spectroscopy.

  10. Ammonium Catalyzed Cyclitive Additions: Evidence for a Cation-π Interaction with Alkynes†

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Edith; St.Germain, Elijah; Cosme, Patrick; Maity, Pradip; Terentis, Andrew C.; Lepore, Salvatore D.

    2016-01-01

    The addition of carbamate nitrogen to a non-conjugated carbon-carbon triple bond is catalyzed by an ammonium salt leading to a cyclic product. Studies in homogeneous systems suggest that the ammonium agent facilitates nitrogen-carbon bond formation through a cation-π interaction with the alkyne unit that, for the first time, is directly observed by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26728333

  11. Prediction of Intrinsic Cesium Desorption from Na-Smectite in Mixed Cation Solutions.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Fukiage, Tomo

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative understanding of the stability of sorbed radionuclides in smectite is necessary to assess the performance of engineering barriers used for nuclear waste disposal. Our previous study demonstrated that the spatial organization of the smectite platelets triggered by the divalent cations led to the apparent fixation of intrinsic Cs in smectite, because some Cs is retained inside the formed tactoids. Natural water is usually a mixture of Na(+) and divalent cations (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)). This study therefore investigated the desorption behavior of intrinsic Cs in Na-smecite in mixed Na(+)-divalent cation solutions under widely various cation concentrations using batch experiments, grain size measurements, and cation exchange modeling (CEM). Results show that increased Na(+) concentrations facilitate Cs desorption because Na(+) serves as the dispersion agent. A linear relation was obtained between the logarithm of the Na(+) fraction and the accessible Cs fraction in smectite. That relation enables the prediction of accessible Cs fraction as a function of solution cationic compositions. The corrected CEM considering the effects of the spatial organization suggests that the stability of intrinsic Cs in the smectite is governed by the Na(+) concentration, and suggests that it is almost independent of the concentrations of divalent cations in natural water.

  12. Evaluation of factors affecting diffusion in compacted bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Lehikoinen, J.; Carlsson, T.; Muurinen, A.; Olin, M.; Salonen, P.

    1996-08-01

    The information available from the open literature and studies on exclusion, sorption and diffusion mechanisms of ionic and neutral species in bentonite has been compiled and re-examined in relation to the microstructure of bentonite. The emphasis is placed on a more thorough understanding of the diffusion processes taking place in compacted bentonite. Despite the scarcity of experiments performed with neutral diffusants, these imply that virtually all the pores in compacted bentonite are accessible to neutral species. Anion exclusion, induced by the overlap of electrical double layers, may render the accessible porosity for anions considerably less than the porosity obtained from the water content of the clay. On the basis of the compiled data, it is highly probable that surface diffusion plays a significant role in the transport of cations in bentonite clays. Moreover, easily soluble compounds in bentonite can affect the ionic strength of porewater and, consequently, exclusion, equilibrium between cations, and surface diffusion.

  13. Gas-phase Electronic Spectra of Coronene and Corannulene Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, F.-X.; Rice, Corey A.; Maier, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Gas-phase electronic spectra of the coronene ({{{C}}}24{{{{H}}}12}+) and corannulene ({{{C}}}20{{{{H}}}10}+) cations complexed with helium have been recorded in a quadrupole ion trap at 5 K by photodissociation. The electronic spectrum of {{{C}}}20{{{{H}}}10}+ with two helium atoms was also measured to estimate the perturbation. This method is sufficient for an astronomical comparison because the shift due to the weakly bound helium is on the order of 0.2 Å. {{{C}}}24{{{{H}}}12}+{--}{He} has the origin band of the {{{A}}}2{{{E}}}1g≤ftarrow X{}2{{{E}}}2u transition at 9438.3 Å and that to a much higher state {{{D}}}3≤ftarrow X{}2{{{E}}}2u at 4570 Å. The corannulene cation is subject to a Jahn–Teller distortion in the electronic ground state, leading to the {3}2{{A}}\\prime ≤ftarrow {{X}}{}2{{A}}\\prime \\prime and {3}2{{A}}\\prime \\prime ≤ftarrow {{X}}{}2{{A}}\\prime transitions with origin band maxima when complexed with helium at 5996.1 and 5882.6 Å. These absorptions lie in a region where there is a congestion of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). However, the recorded features have no match with astronomical observations, removing coronene and corannulene cations and probably other aromatic hydrocarbons of this size as possible carriers of the DIBs.

  14. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  15. Diffusion doping in quantum dots: bond strength and diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Saha, Avijit; Makkar, Mahima; Shetty, Amitha; Gahlot, Kushagra; A R, Pavan; Viswanatha, Ranjani

    2017-02-23

    Semiconducting materials uniformly doped with optical or magnetic impurities have been useful in a number of potential applications. However, clustering or phase separation during synthesis has made this job challenging. Recently the "inside out" diffusion doping was proposed to be successful in obtaining large sized quantum dots (QDs) uniformly doped with a dilute percentage of dopant atoms. Herein, we demonstrate the use of basic physical chemistry of diffusion to control the size and concentration of the dopants within the QDs for a given transition metal ion. We have studied three parameters; the bond strength of the core molecules and the diffusion coefficient of the diffusing metal ion are found to be important while the ease of cation exchange was not highly influential in the control of size and concentration of the single domain dilute magnetic semiconductor quantum dots (DMSQDs) with diverse dopant ions M(2+) (Fe(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), Mn(2+)). Steady state optical emission spectra reveal that the dopants are incorporated inside the semiconducting CdS and the emission can be tuned during shell growth. We have shown that this method enables control over doping percentage and the QDs show a superior ferromagnetic response at room temperature as compared to previously reported systems.

  16. Novel Cationic Lipids with Enhanced Gene Delivery and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fein, David E.; Bucki, Robert; Byfield, Fitzroy; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Janmey, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Cationic lipids facilitate plasmid delivery, and some cationic sterol-based compounds have antimicrobial activity because of their amphiphilic character. These dual functions are relevant in the context of local ongoing infection during intrapulmonary gene transfer for cystic fibrosis. The transfection activities of two cationic lipids, dexamethasone spermine (DS) and disubstituted spermine (D2S), were tested as individual components and mixtures in bovine aortic endothelial cells and A549 cells. The results showed a 3- to 7-fold improvement in transgene expression for mixtures of DS with 20 to 40 mol% D2S. D2S and coformulations with DS, dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, and DNA exhibited potent bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli MG1655, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, which was maintained in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Complete bacterial killing was demonstrated at ∼5 μM, including gene delivery formulations, with 2 orders of magnitude higher tolerance before eukaryotic membrane disruption (erythrocyte hemolysis). D2S also exhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS) scavenging activity resulting in significant inhibition of LPS-mediated activation of human neutrophils with 85 and 65% lower interleukin-8 released at 12 and 24 h, respectively. Mixtures of DS and D2S can improve transfection activity over common lipofection reagents, and D2S has strong antimicrobial action suited for the suppression of bacterial-mediated inflammation. PMID:20573781

  17. Physical Properties of Ionic Liquids Consisting of the 1-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Cation with Various Anions and the Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide Anion with Various Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hui; O'Hare, Bernie; Dong, Jing; Arzhantsev, Sergei; Baker, Gary A; Wishart, James F.; Benesi, Alan; Maroncelli, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Physical properties of 4 room-temperature ionic liquids consisting of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation with various perfluorinated anions and the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Tf2N-) anion with 12 pyrrolidinium-, ammonium-, and hydroxyl-containing cations are reported. Electronic structure methods are used to calculate properties related to the size, shape, and dipole moment of individual ions. Experimental measurements of phase-transition temperatures, densities, refractive indices, surface tensions, solvatochromic polarities based on absorption of Nile Red, 19F chemical shifts of the Tf2N- anion, temperature-dependent viscosities, conductivities, and cation diffusion coefficients are reported. Correlations among the measured quantities as well as the use of surface tension and molar volume for estimating Hildebrand solubility parameters of ionic liquids are also discussed.

  18. ADSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    DOEpatents

    Khym, J.X.

    1959-03-10

    The chromatographic separation of fission product cations is discussed. By use of this method a mixture of metal cations containing Zr, Cb, Ce, Y, Ba, and Sr may be separated from one another. Mentioned as preferred exchange adsorbents are resins containing free sulfonic acid groups. Various eluants, such as tartaric acid, HCl, and citric acid, used at various acidities, are employed to effect the selective elution and separation of the various fission product cations.

  19. Liquid Crystalline Polymers by Cationic Polymerization,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    cation mechanism of Scholl reaction the Lewis acid and by the benzylic carbocations . Hydride transfer to benzylic carbenium ions leads to methyl groups...reviewed. Examples from ring-opening, carbocationic , and radical-cation poly- merizations and oligomerizations are discussed. Accesion For DrIC TAB3...Examples from ring- opening, carbocationic , and radical-cation polymeri- zations and oligomerizations are discussed. INTRODUCTION This paper will

  20. Effects of aqueous cations on the dissolution of labradorite feldspar

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, I.J.; Nesbitt, H.W. )

    1991-11-01

    Specimens of labradorite feldspar (An {approx} 54) were dissolved in mildly acidic solutions containing the cations Al, Ca, and Mg at 9.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}, 1.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}2}, and 3.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} mmol {center dot} L{sup {minus}1} for 72 days at 21 {plus minus} 2C and atmospheric pressure. Depth profiles by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) show that the extent to which altered layers form on dissolving labradorite can be influenced by the cation concentration of the leachant solutions. Silicon-enriched altered layers {approx} 1,500 {angstrom} thick form on labradorite surfaces ((001) cleavage faces) during dissolution in aqueous HCl (pH 4). Addition of dissolved Al, Ca, and Mg to the leachant solution reduces the thickness of the altered layers. The formation of thinner altered layers may result from competition between cations and H ions for active surface sites such that the supply of H ions to the labradorite surface is reduced. Dissolved Al in the leachant solutions also alters the release rates of Ca and Al relative to one another. On the other hand, the same is not observed for labradorite specimens dissolved in solutions containing Ca{sub (aq)}. The results from these experiments also support a diffusion-limited processes for the release of Al from fresh labradorite to solutions containing Al{sub (aq)}. Previous attention has been focused on the effects of organic ligands; however, the results demonstrate the important role dissolved cations play in the dissolution of aluminosilicates.

  1. Diffusion studies of anamorphic GRIN lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekh, Md. Asraful; SoodBiswas, Nisha; Sarkar, Samir; Basuray, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    The present paper reports the diffusion study of cylindrical GRIN rod with elliptical cross section, developed by ion exchange process. The diffusion equation takes the form of Mathieu equations when transform into elliptic coordinate system and the solutions are derived in terms of angular and radial Mathieu functions. Computations of eigenvalues and expansion coefficients as well as angular and radial Mathieu functions are made which shows good agreement with the existing results. Simpler expression for ionic concentration is derived using asymptotic formulae of the functions which are used for final computation of ionic concentration of diffusing cations in elliptic GRIN. The plot of change in concentration versus diffusion depth along different directions approximately correlates with the results obtained by an earlier experimental study.

  2. Diffusion in Brain Extracellular Space

    PubMed Central

    Syková, Eva; Nicholson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion in the extracellular space (ECS) of the brain is constrained by the volume fraction and the tortuosity and a modified diffusion equation represents the transport behavior of many molecules in the brain. Deviations from the equation reveal loss of molecules across the blood-brain barrier, through cellular uptake, binding or other mechanisms. Early diffusion measurements used radiolabeled sucrose and other tracers. Presently, the real-time iontophoresis (RTI) method is employed for small ions and the integrative optical imaging (IOI) method for fluorescent macromolecules, including dextrans or proteins. Theoretical models and simulations of the ECS have explored the influence of ECS geometry, effects of dead-space microdomains, extracellular matrix and interaction of macromolecules with ECS channels. Extensive experimental studies with the RTI method employing the cation tetramethylammonium (TMA) in normal brain tissue show that the volume fraction of the ECS typically is about 20% and the tortuosity about 1.6 (i.e. free diffusion coefficient of TMA is reduced by 2.6), although there are regional variations. These parameters change during development and aging. Diffusion properties have been characterized in several interventions, including brain stimulation, osmotic challenge and knockout of extracellular matrix components. Measurements have also been made during ischemia, in models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and in human gliomas. Overall, these studies improve our conception of ECS structure and the roles of glia and extracellular matrix in modulating the ECS microenvironment. Knowledge of ECS diffusion properties are valuable in contexts ranging from understanding extrasynaptic volume transmission to the development of paradigms for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:18923183

  3. Cation-Coupled Bicarbonate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2016-01-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3− transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3− and associated with Na+ and Cl− movement. The first Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7 gene product); the Na+-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger NDCBE (SLC4A8 gene product); and NBCn2/NCBE (SLC4A10 gene product), which has been characterized as an electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter or a Na+-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger. Despite the similarity in amino acid sequence and predicted structure among the NCBTs of the SLC4-family, they exhibit distinct differences in ion dependency, transport function, pharmacological properties, and interactions with other proteins. In epithelia, NCBTs are involved in transcellular movement of acid-base equivalents and intracellular pH control. In nonepithelial tissues, NCBTs contribute to intracellular pH regulation; and hence, they are crucial for diverse tissue functions including neuronal discharge, sensory neuron development, performance of the heart, and vascular tone regulation. The function and expression levels of the NCBTs are generally sensitive to intracellular and systemic pH. Animal models have revealed pathophysiological roles of the transporters in disease states including metabolic acidosis, hypertension, visual defects, and epileptic seizures. Studies are being conducted to understand the physiological consequences of genetic polymorphisms in the SLC4-members, which are associated with cancer, hypertension, and drug addiction. Here, we describe the current knowledge regarding the function, structure, and regulation of the mammalian cation-coupled HCO3− transporters of the SLC4-family. PMID:25428855

  4. Cation-coupled bicarbonate transporters.

    PubMed

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2014-10-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3(-) transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3(-) and associated with Na(+) and Cl(-) movement. The first Na(+)-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7 gene product); the Na(+)-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger NDCBE (SLC4A8 gene product); and NBCn2/NCBE (SLC4A10 gene product), which has been characterized as an electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter or a Na(+)-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger. Despite the similarity in amino acid sequence and predicted structure among the NCBTs of the SLC4-family, they exhibit distinct differences in ion dependency, transport function, pharmacological properties, and interactions with other proteins. In epithelia, NCBTs are involved in transcellular movement of acid-base equivalents and intracellular pH control. In nonepithelial tissues, NCBTs contribute to intracellular pH regulation; and hence, they are crucial for diverse tissue functions including neuronal discharge, sensory neuron development, performance of the heart, and vascular tone regulation. The function and expression levels of the NCBTs are generally sensitive to intracellular and systemic pH. Animal models have revealed pathophysiological roles of the transporters in disease states including metabolic acidosis, hypertension, visual defects, and epileptic seizures. Studies are being conducted to understand the physiological consequences of genetic polymorphisms in the SLC4-members, which are associated with cancer, hypertension, and drug addiction. Here, we describe the current knowledge regarding the function, structure, and regulation of the mammalian cation-coupled HCO3(-) transporters of the SLC4-family.

  5. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  6. Diffusion MRI in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Mekkaoui, Choukri; Reese, Timothy G.; Jackowski, Marcel P.; Bhat, Himanshu

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion MRI provides unique information on the structure, organization, and integrity of the myocardium without the need for exogenous contrast agents. Diffusion MRI in the heart, however, has proven technically challenging because of the intrinsic non‐rigid deformation during the cardiac cycle, displacement of the myocardium due to respiratory motion, signal inhomogeneity within the thorax, and short transverse relaxation times. Recently developed accelerated diffusion‐weighted MR acquisition sequences combined with advanced post‐processing techniques have improved the accuracy and efficiency of diffusion MRI in the myocardium. In this review, we describe the solutions and approaches that have been developed to enable diffusion MRI of the heart in vivo, including a dual‐gated stimulated echo approach, a velocity‐ (M 1) or an acceleration‐ (M 2) compensated pulsed gradient spin echo approach, and the use of principal component analysis filtering. The structure of the myocardium and the application of these techniques in ischemic heart disease are also briefly reviewed. The advent of clinical MR systems with stronger gradients will likely facilitate the translation of cardiac diffusion MRI into clinical use. The addition of diffusion MRI to the well‐established set of cardiovascular imaging techniques should lead to new and complementary approaches for the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with heart disease. © 2015 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26484848

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Cation Contamination in a Proton-exchange Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adam; Delacourt, Charles

    2008-09-11

    Transport phenomena in an ion-exchange membrane containing both H+ and K+ are described using multicomponent diffusion equations (Stefan-Maxwell). A model is developed for transport through a Nafion 112 membrane in a hydrogen-pump setup. The model results are analyzed to quantify the impact of cation contamination on cell potential. It is shown that limiting current densities can result due to a decrease in proton concentration caused by the build-up of contaminant ions. An average cation concentration of 30 to 40 percent is required for appreciable effects to be noticed under typical steady-state operating conditions.

  8. Transport and separation of Ag(+) and Zn(2+) by donnan dialysis through a monovalent cation selective membrane.

    PubMed

    Cherif, A T; Gavach, C; Molenat, J; Elmidaoui, A

    1998-08-01

    Donnan Dialysis of Ag(+) and Zn(2+) was investigated through a cation exchange membrane (CMS Neosepta) when a proton concentration difference was maintained between the two sides of the membrane. Developed for the production of brine from sea water, CMS Neosepta showed a higher permeability to monovalent than to bivalent cations. Several physico-chemical parameters have been determined (electrical resistance, membrane potential, sorption of electrolytes, Zn(2+) and Ag(+) diffusion coefficients). The flux of Ag(+) and the diffusion potential in the membrane increase with HNO(3) concentrations. Ag(+) and Zn(2+) can be separated because of the preferential membrane transfer for Ag(+).

  9. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOEpatents

    Wasserman, Stephen R.; Anderson, Kenneth B.; Song, Kang; Yuchs, Steven E.; Marshall, Christopher L.

    1998-01-01

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  10. Advancements in Anion Exchange Membrane Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, Matthew R.; Long, Hai; Park, Andrew M.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-10-15

    Anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AME-FCs) are of increasingly popular interest as they enable the use of non-Pt fuel cell catalysts, the primary cost limitation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA) is the standard cation that has historically been utilized as the hydroxide conductor in AEMs. Herein we approach AEMs from two directions. First and foremost we study the stability of several different cations in a hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures. We specifically targeted BTMA and methoxy and nitro substituted BTMA. We've also studied the effects of adding an akyl spacer units between the ammonium cation and the phenyl group. In the second approach we use computational studies to predict stable ammonium cations, which are then synthesized and tested for stability. Our unique method to study cation stability in caustic conditions at elevated temperatures utilizes Teflon Parr reactors suitable for use under various temperatures and cation concentrations. NMR analysis was used to determine remaining cation concentrations at specific time points with GCMS analysis verifying product distribution. We then compare the experimental results with calculated modeling stabilities. Our studies show that the electron donating methoxy groups slightly increase stability (compared to that of BTMA), while the electron withdrawing nitro groups greatly decrease stability in base. These results give insight into possible linking strategies to be employed when tethering a BTMA like ammonium cation to a polymeric backbone; thus synthesizing an anion exchange membrane.

  11. Cation exchange capacity of pine bark substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cation exchange capacity (CEC) is an important soil and substrate chemical property. It describes a substrate's ability to retain cation nutrients. Higher CEC values for a substrate generally result in greater amounts of nutrients retained in the substrate and available for plant uptake, and great...

  12. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selective recognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure and selectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometric ion sensing are emphasised, along with their potential applications in optical sensors or optodes.

  13. Atomistic understanding of cation exchange in PbS nanocrystals using simulations with pseudoligands

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhaochuan; Lin, Li-Chiang; Buijs, Wim; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; van Huis, Marijn A.

    2016-01-01

    Cation exchange is a powerful tool for the synthesis of nanostructures such as core–shell nanocrystals, however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Interactions of cations with ligands and solvent molecules are systematically ignored in simulations. Here, we introduce the concept of pseudoligands to incorporate cation-ligand-solvent interactions in molecular dynamics. This leads to excellent agreement with experimental data on cation exchange of PbS nanocrystals, whereby Pb ions are partially replaced by Cd ions from solution. The temperature and the ligand-type control the exchange rate and equilibrium composition of cations in the nanocrystal. Our simulations reveal that Pb ions are kicked out by exchanged Cd interstitials and migrate through interstitial sites, aided by local relaxations at core–shell interfaces and point defects. We also predict that high-pressure conditions facilitate strongly enhanced cation exchange reactions at elevated temperatures. Our approach is easily extendable to other semiconductor compounds and to other families of nanocrystals. PMID:27160371

  14. Structural and energetic study of cation-π-cation interactions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Silvana; Soteras, Ignacio; Gelpí, Josep Lluis; Dehez, François; Chipot, Christophe; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles

    2017-04-12

    Cation-π interactions of aromatic rings and positively charged groups are among the most important interactions in structural biology. The role and energetic characteristics of these interactions are well established. However, the occurrence of cation-π-cation interactions is an unexpected motif, which raises intriguing questions about its functional role in proteins. We present a statistical analysis of the occurrence, composition and geometrical preferences of cation-π-cation interactions identified in a set of non-redundant protein structures taken from the Protein Data Bank. Our results demonstrate that this structural motif is observed at a small, albeit non-negligible frequency in proteins, and suggest a preference to establish cation-π-cation motifs with Trp, followed by Tyr and Phe. Furthermore, we have found that cation-π-cation interactions tend to be highly conserved, which supports their structural or functional role. Finally, we have performed an energetic analysis of a representative subset of cation-π-cation complexes combining quantum-chemical and continuum solvation calculations. Our results point out that the protein environment can strongly screen the cation-cation repulsion, leading to an attractive interaction in 64% of the complexes analyzed. Together with the high degree of conservation observed, these results suggest a potential stabilizing role in the protein fold, as demonstrated recently for a miniature protein (Craven et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 1543). From a computational point of view, the significant contribution of non-additive three-body terms challenges the suitability of standard additive force fields for describing cation-π-cation motifs in molecular simulations.

  15. Penetration and lateral diffusion characteristics of polycrystalline graphene barriers.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Taeshik; Mun, Jeong Hun; Cho, Byung Jin; Kim, Taek-Soo

    2014-01-07

    We report penetration and lateral diffusion behavior of environmental molecules on synthesized polycrystalline graphene. Penetration occurs through graphene grain boundaries resulting in local oxidation. However, when the penetrated molecules diffuse laterally, the oxidation region will expand. Therefore, we measured the lateral diffusion rate along the graphene-copper interface for the first time by the environment-assisted crack growth test. It is clearly shown that the lateral diffusion is suppressed due to the high van der Waals interaction. Finally, we employed bilayer graphene for a perfect diffusion barrier facilitated by decreased defect density and increased lateral diffusion path.

  16. Task Integration Facilitates Multitasking

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Rita F.; Raab, Markus; Hegele, Mathias; Schorer, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate multi-task integration in a continuous tracking task. We were particularly interested in how manipulating task structure in a dual-task situation affects learning of a constant segment embedded in a pursuit-tracking task. Importantly, we examined if dual-task effects could be attributed to task integration by varying the structural similarity and difficulty of the primary and secondary tasks. In Experiment 1 participants performed a pursuit tracking task while counting high-pitched tones and ignoring low-pitched tones. The tones were either presented randomly or structurally 250 ms before each tracking turn. Experiment 2 increased the motor load of the secondary tasks by asking participants to tap their feet to the tones. Experiment 3 further increased motor load of the primary task by increasing its speed and having participants tracking with their non-dominant hand. The results show that dual-task interference can be moderated by secondary task conditions that match the structure of the primary task. Therefore our results support proposals of task integration in continuous tracking paradigms. We conclude that multi-tasking is not always detrimental for motor learning but can be facilitated through task-integration. PMID:28360878

  17. Task Integration Facilitates Multitasking.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rita F; Raab, Markus; Hegele, Mathias; Schorer, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate multi-task integration in a continuous tracking task. We were particularly interested in how manipulating task structure in a dual-task situation affects learning of a constant segment embedded in a pursuit-tracking task. Importantly, we examined if dual-task effects could be attributed to task integration by varying the structural similarity and difficulty of the primary and secondary tasks. In Experiment 1 participants performed a pursuit tracking task while counting high-pitched tones and ignoring low-pitched tones. The tones were either presented randomly or structurally 250 ms before each tracking turn. Experiment 2 increased the motor load of the secondary tasks by asking participants to tap their feet to the tones. Experiment 3 further increased motor load of the primary task by increasing its speed and having participants tracking with their non-dominant hand. The results show that dual-task interference can be moderated by secondary task conditions that match the structure of the primary task. Therefore our results support proposals of task integration in continuous tracking paradigms. We conclude that multi-tasking is not always detrimental for motor learning but can be facilitated through task-integration.

  18. Program Facilitates CMMI Appraisals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweetser, Wesley

    2005-01-01

    A computer program has been written to facilitate appraisals according to the methodology of Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI). [CMMI is a government/industry standard, maintained by the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, for objectively assessing the engineering capability and maturity of an organization (especially, an organization that produces software)]. The program assists in preparation for a CMMI appraisal by providing drop-down lists suggesting required artifacts or evidence. It identifies process areas for which similar evidence is required and includes a copy feature that reduces or eliminates repetitive data entry. It generates reports to show the entire framework for reference, the appraisal artifacts to determine readiness for an appraisal, and lists of interviewees and questions to ask them during the appraisal. During an appraisal, the program provides screens for entering observations and ratings, and reviewing evidence provided thus far. Findings concerning strengths and weaknesses can be exported for use in a report or a graphical presentation. The program generates a chart showing capability level ratings of the organization. A context-sensitive Windows help system enables a novice to use the program and learn about the CMMI appraisal process.

  19. An electrodynamics-based model for ion diffusion in microbial polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M; Felmy, Andrew; Gorby, Yuri

    2004-10-10

    An electrodynamics-based model was formulated for simulation of ion diffusion in microbial polysaccharides. The fixed charges and electrostatic double layers that may associate with microbial polysaccharides and their effects on ion diffusion were explicitly built into the model. The model extends a common multicomponent ion diffusion formulation that is based on irreversible thermodynamics under a zero ionic charge flux condition, which is only applicable to the regions without fixed charges and electrostatic double layers. An efficient numerical procedure was presented to solve the differential equations in the model. The model well described key features of experimental observations of ion diffusion in negatively charged microbial polysaccharides including accelerated diffusive transport of cations, exclusion of anions, and increased rate of cation transport with increasing negative charge density. The simulated diffusive fluxes of cations and anions were consistent with a cation exchange diffusion concept in negatively charged polysaccharides at the interface of plant roots and soils; and the developed model allows to mathematically study such diffusion phenomena. An illustrative example was also provided to simulate dynamic behavior of ionic current during ion diffusion within a charged bacterial cell wall polysaccharide and the effects of the ionic current on the compression or expansion of the bacterial electrostatic double layer at the interface of the cell wall and bulk solution.

  20. Implications of cation exchange on clay release and colloid-facilitated transport in porous media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Column experiments were conducted to study chemical factors that influence the release of clay (kaolinite and quartz minerals) from saturated Ottawa sand of different sizes (710, 360, and 240 µm). A relatively minor enhancement of clay release occurred when the pH was increased (5.8 to 10) or the i...

  1. [Mechanisms of neurotransmitter release facilitation in strontium solutions].

    PubMed

    Mukhamed'iarov, M A; Kochunova, Iu O; Telina, E N; Zefirov, A L

    2008-02-01

    Mechanisms of neurotransmitter release facilitation were studied using electrophysiological recording of end-plate currents (EPC) and nerve ending (NE) responses after substitution of extracellular Ca ions with Sr ions at the frog neuromuscular junction. The solutions with 0.5 mM concentration of Ca ions (calcium solution) or 1 mM concentration of Sr ions (strontium solution) were used where baseline neurotransmitter release (at low-frequency stimulation) is equal. Decay of paired-pulse facilitation of EPC at calcium solutions with increase of interpulse interval from 5 to 500 ms was well described by three-exponential function consisting of early, first and second components. Facilitation at strontium solutions was significantly diminished due mainly to decrease of early and first components. At the same time, EPC facilitation with rhythmic stimulation (10 or 50 imp/s) at strontium solutions was significantly increased. Also more pronounced decrease of NE response 3rd phase, reflecting potassium currents was detected under rhythmic stimulation of 50 imp/s at strontium solutions comparing to calcium solutions. It was concluded that facilitation sites underlying first and early components had lower affinity to Sr ions than to Ca ions. The enhancement of frequency facilitation at strontium solutions is mediated by two mechanisms: more pronounced broadening of NE action potential and increase of bivalent cation influx due to feebly marked activation of Ca(2+)-dependent potassium current by Sr ions, and slower dynamics of Sr(2+) removal from NE axoplasm comparing to Ca(2+).

  2. INORGANIC CATIONS IN RAT KIDNEY

    PubMed Central

    Tandler, C. J.; Kierszenbaum, A. L.

    1971-01-01

    For localization of pyroantimonate-precipitable cations, rat kidney was fixed by perfusion with a saturated aqueous solution of potassium pyroantimonate (pH about 9.2, without addition of any conventional fixative). A remarkably good preservation of the tissue and cell morphology was obtained as well as a consistent and reproducible localization of the insoluble antimonate salts of magnesium, calcium, and sodium. All proximal and distal tubules and glomeruli were delimited by massive electron-opaque precipitates localized in the basement membrane and, to a lesser extent, in adjacent connective tissue. In the intraglomerular capillaries the antimonate precipitate was encountered in the basement membranes and also between the foot processes. In addition to a more or less uniform distribution in the cytoplasm and between the microvilli of the brush border, antimonate precipitates were found in all cell nuclei, mainly between the masses of condensed chromatin. The mitochondria usually contained a few large antimonate deposits which probably correspond to the so-called "dense granules" observed after conventional fixations. PMID:4106544

  3. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  4. Aggregation of nucleosomes by divalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    de Frutos, M; Raspaud, E; Leforestier, A; Livolant, F

    2001-01-01

    Conditions of precipitation of nucleosome core particles (NCP) by divalent cations (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) have been explored over a large range of nucleosome and cation concentrations. Precipitation of NCP occurs for a threshold of divalent cation concentration, and redissolution is observed for further addition of salt. The phase diagram looks similar to those obtained with DNA and synthetic polyelectrolytes in the presence of multivalent cations, which supports the idea that NCP/NCP interactions are driven by cation condensation. In the phase separation domain the effective charge of the aggregates was determined by measurements of their electrophoretic mobility. Aggregates formed in the presence of divalent cations (Mg(2+)) remain negatively charged over the whole concentration range. They turn positively charged when aggregation is induced by trivalent (spermidine) or tetravalent (spermine) cations. The higher the valency of the counterions, the more significant is the reversal of the effective charge of the aggregates. The sign of the effective charge has no influence on the aspect of the phase diagram. We discuss the possible reasons for this charge reversal in the light of actual theoretical approaches. PMID:11463653

  5. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  6. Electrochemical and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of a carotenoid cation radicals and dications: Effect of deuteration

    SciTech Connect

    Khaled, M.; Hadjipetrou, A.; Kispert, L. )

    1990-06-14

    The oxidation process involving the transfer of two electrons for {beta}-carotene is confirmed by bulk electrolysis in a CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solvent and the observation of {Delta}E = 42 mV from cyclic voltammetric measurements. A similar process is also found to occur for {beta}-apo-8{prime}-carotenal and canthaxanthin. An additional cathodic peak between 0.2 0.5 relative to SCE is shown to be dependent on the initial formation of dications followed by the loss of H{sup +} as evidenced by a large isotope effect and most likely due to the reduction of a carotenoid cation. EPR evidence exists for the formation of radical cations by the reaction of diffusing carotenoid dictations with neutral carotenoids. The rate of formation is consistent with the differences in the diffusion coefficients of the carotenoids deduced by chronocoulometric measurements, being fastest for canthaxanthin.

  7. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  8. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands.

    PubMed

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-02-28

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bearing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(i) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions provided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported catalysts feature unique geometries caused by ligation of the bulky phosphine ligands. Their activities and selectivities in standard metathesis reactions were also investigated. These cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts reported here showed moderate activity and very similar stereoselectivity when compared to the second generation ruthenium dichloride catalyst in ring-closing metathesis, cross metathesis, and ring-opening metathesis polymerization assays.

  9. Ionic charge transport between blockages: Sodium cation conduction in freshly excised bulk brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Emin, David; Akhtari, Massoud; Ellingson, B. M.; Mathern, G. W.

    2015-08-15

    We analyze the transient-dc and frequency-dependent electrical conductivities between blocking electrodes. We extend this analysis to measurements of ions’ transport in freshly excised bulk samples of human brain tissue whose complex cellular structure produces blockages. The associated ionic charge-carrier density and diffusivity are consistent with local values for sodium cations determined non-invasively in brain tissue by MRI (NMR) and diffusion-MRI (spin-echo NMR). The characteristic separation between blockages, about 450 microns, is very much shorter than that found for sodium-doped gel proxies for brain tissue, >1 cm.

  10. Effects of cation concentration on photocatalytic performance over magnesium vanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Defa; Umezawa, Naoto E-mail: ABE.Hideki@nims.go.jp; Abe, Hideki E-mail: ABE.Hideki@nims.go.jp; Ye, Jinhua

    2015-10-01

    A series of magnesium vanadates (MgV {sub 2}O{sub 6}, Mg{sub 2}V {sub 2}O{sub 7}, and Mg{sub 3}V {sub 2}O{sub 8}) were synthesized to investigate the effect of cation concentration on photocatalytic performance. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The photocatalytic O{sub 2} evolution experiments under visible light irradiation showed Mg{sub 2}V {sub 2}O{sub 7} exhibits the best performance, while Mg{sub 3}V {sub 2}O{sub 8} has the lowest activity. The density functional theory calculations indicated that the lowest unoccupied states of Mg{sub 3}V {sub 2}O{sub 8} are the mostly localized by the cation layers. The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence decay curves gave evident performances of excited states of magnesium vanadates and pointed out MgV {sub 2}O{sub 6} has a very short excited electron lift-time. Mg{sub 2}V {sub 2}O{sub 7} performs high photocatalytic activity because of its high electron mobility and long electron life-time.

  11. Cation locations and dislocations in zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Luis James

    The focus of this dissertation is the extra-framework cation sites in a particular structural family of zeolites, chabazite. Cation sites play a particularly important role in the application of these sieves for ion exchange, gas separation, catalysis, and, when the cation is a proton, acid catalysis. Structural characterization is commonly performed through the use of powder diffraction and Rietveld analysis of powder diffraction data. Use of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance, in the study of the local order of the various constituent nuclei of zeolites, complements well the long-range order information produced by diffraction. Recent developments in solid state NMR techniques allow for increased study of disorder in zeolites particularly when such phenomena test the detection limits of diffraction. These two powerful characterization techniques, powder diffraction and NMR, offer many insights into the complex interaction of cations with the zeolite framework. The acids site locations in SSZ-13, a high silica chabazite, and SAPO-34, a silicoaluminophosphate with the chabazite structure, were determined. The structure of SAPO-34 upon selective hydration was also determined. The insensitivity of X-rays to hydrogen was avoided through deuteration of the acid zeolites and neutron powder diffraction methods. Protons at inequivalent positions were found to have different acid strengths in both SSZ-13 and SAPO-34. Other light elements are incorporated into zeolites in the form of extra-framework cations, among these are lithium, sodium, and calcium. Not amenable by X-ray powder diffraction methods, the positions of such light cations in fully ion-exchanged versions of synthetic chabazite were determined through neutron powder diffraction methods. The study of more complex binary cation systems were conducted. Powder diffraction and solid state NMR methods (MAS, MQMAS) were used to examine cation site preferences and dislocations in these mixed-akali chabazites

  12. Cation-cation clusters in ionic liquids: Cooperative hydrogen bonding overcomes like-charge repulsion.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Anne; Ludwig, Ralf

    2015-12-02

    Direct spectroscopic evidence for H-bonding between like-charged ions is reported for the ionic liquid, 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate. New infrared bands in the OH frequency range appear at low temperatures indicating the formation of H-bonded cation-cation clusters similar to those known for water and alcohols. Supported by DFT calculations, these vibrational bands can be assigned to attractive interaction between the hydroxyl groups of the cations. The repulsive Coulomb interaction is overcome by cooperative hydrogen bonding between ions of like charge. The transition energy from purely cation-anion interacting configurations to those including cation-cation H-bonds is determined to be 3-4 kJmol(-1). The experimental findings and DFT calculations strongly support the concept of anti-electrostatic hydrogen bonds (AEHBs) as recently suggested by Weinhold and Klein. The like-charge configurations are kinetically stabilized with decreasing temperatures.

  13. Quasielastic neutron scattering studies on glass-forming ionic liquids with imidazolium cations.

    PubMed

    Kofu, Maiko; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Kyoko; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2015-12-21

    Relaxation processes for imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated by means of an incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering technique. In order to clarify the cation and anion effects on the relaxation processes, ten samples were measured. For all of the samples, we found three relaxations at around 1 ps, 10 ps, and 100 ps-10 ns, each corresponding to the alkyl reorientation, the relaxation related to the imidazolium ring, and the ionic diffusion. The activation energy (Ea) for the alkyl relaxation is insensitive to both anion and alkyl chain lengths. On the other hand, for the imidazolium relaxation and the ionic diffusion processes, Ea increases as the anion size decreases but is almost independent of the alkyl chain length. This indicates that the ionic diffusion and imidazolium relaxation are governed by the Coulombic interaction between the core parts of the cations (imidazolium ring) and the anions. This is consistent with the fact that the imidazolium-based ILs have nanometer scale structures consisting of ionic and neutral (alkyl chain) domains. It is also found that there is a clear correlation between the ionic diffusion and viscosity, indicating that the ionic diffusion is mainly associated with the glass transition which is one of the characteristics of imidazolium-based ILs.

  14. Quasielastic neutron scattering studies on glass-forming ionic liquids with imidazolium cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofu, Maiko; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Kyoko; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2015-12-01

    Relaxation processes for imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated by means of an incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering technique. In order to clarify the cation and anion effects on the relaxation processes, ten samples were measured. For all of the samples, we found three relaxations at around 1 ps, 10 ps, and 100 ps-10 ns, each corresponding to the alkyl reorientation, the relaxation related to the imidazolium ring, and the ionic diffusion. The activation energy (Ea) for the alkyl relaxation is insensitive to both anion and alkyl chain lengths. On the other hand, for the imidazolium relaxation and the ionic diffusion processes, Ea increases as the anion size decreases but is almost independent of the alkyl chain length. This indicates that the ionic diffusion and imidazolium relaxation are governed by the Coulombic interaction between the core parts of the cations (imidazolium ring) and the anions. This is consistent with the fact that the imidazolium-based ILs have nanometer scale structures consisting of ionic and neutral (alkyl chain) domains. It is also found that there is a clear correlation between the ionic diffusion and viscosity, indicating that the ionic diffusion is mainly associated with the glass transition which is one of the characteristics of imidazolium-based ILs.

  15. Quasielastic neutron scattering studies on glass-forming ionic liquids with imidazolium cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kofu, Maiko; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Kyoko; Yamamuro, Osamu; Tyagi, Madhusudan

    2015-12-21

    Relaxation processes for imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated by means of an incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering technique. In order to clarify the cation and anion effects on the relaxation processes, ten samples were measured. For all of the samples, we found three relaxations at around 1 ps, 10 ps, and 100 ps-10 ns, each corresponding to the alkyl reorientation, the relaxation related to the imidazolium ring, and the ionic diffusion. The activation energy (E{sub a}) for the alkyl relaxation is insensitive to both anion and alkyl chain lengths. On the other hand, for the imidazolium relaxation and the ionic diffusion processes, E{sub a} increases as the anion size decreases but is almost independent of the alkyl chain length. This indicates that the ionic diffusion and imidazolium relaxation are governed by the Coulombic interaction between the core parts of the cations (imidazolium ring) and the anions. This is consistent with the fact that the imidazolium-based ILs have nanometer scale structures consisting of ionic and neutral (alkyl chain) domains. It is also found that there is a clear correlation between the ionic diffusion and viscosity, indicating that the ionic diffusion is mainly associated with the glass transition which is one of the characteristics of imidazolium-based ILs.

  16. Mechanisms of fragmentation of cationic peptide ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Adams, Jeanette

    1993-06-01

    Fragmentation mechanisms for formation of several commonly occurring product ions in high-energy collision-induced induced decomposition spectra of either (M + Cat2+ - H)+ ions of peptides cationized with alkaline earth metal ions, (M + Ca+)+ ions cationized with alkali metal ions, or (M + H)+ ions are evaluated by using deuterium-labelled peptides. The different sources of hydrogen transferred in the reactions are identified. Our study supports some previously proposed mechanisms but also provides evidence for others.

  17. Test procedure for cation exchange chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, T.D.

    1994-08-24

    The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate the synthesis of inorganic antimonate ion exchangers and compare their performance against the standard organic cation exchangers. Of particular interest is the degradation rate of both inorganic and organic cation exchangers. This degradation rate will be tracked by determining the ion exchange capacity and thermal stability as a function of time, radiation dose, and chemical reaction.

  18. Quantitative characterization of non-classic polarization of cations on clay aggregate stability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10-5 to 10-1 mol L-1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation-surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability.

  19. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOEpatents

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1998-04-28

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate. 3 figs.

  20. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bythell, Benjamin J; Abutokaikah, Maha T; Wagoner, Ashley R; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M

    2016-11-28

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the (0,2) A 2 ion from the sodiated forms. Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. Cation-dependent stability of subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Alexander, P A; Ruan, B; Bryan, P N

    2001-09-04

    Subtilisin BPN' contains two cation binding sites. One specifically binds calcium (site A), and the other can bind both divalent and monovalvent metals (site B). By binding at specific sites in the tertiary structure of subtilisin, cations contribute their binding energy to the stability of the native state and increase the activation energy of unfolding. Deconvoluting the influence of binding sites A and B on the inactivation rate of subtilisin is complicated, however. This paper examines the stabilizing effects of cation binding at site B by using a mutant of subtilisin BPN' which lacks calcium site A. Using this mutant, we show that calcium binding at site B has relatively little effect on stability in the presence of moderate concentrations of monovalent cations. At [NaCl] =100 mM, site B is >or=98% occupied with sodium, and therefore its net occupancy with a cation varies little as subtilisin is titrated with calcium. Exchanging sodium for calcium results in a 5-fold decrease in the rate of inactivation. In contrast, because of the high selectivity of site A for calcium, its occupancy changes dramatically as calcium concentration is varied, and consequently the inactivation rate of subtilisin decreases approximately 200-fold as site A becomes saturated with calcium, irrespective of the concentration of monovalent cations.

  2. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Wagoner, Ashley R.; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the 0,2 A 2 ion from the sodiated forms. Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies.

  3. Diffusion of glycophorin A in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Giger, Katie; Habib, Ibrahim; Ritchie, Ken; Low, Philip S

    2016-11-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that glycophorin A (GPA) interacts with band 3 in human erythrocyte membranes including: i) the existence of an epitope shared between band 3 and GPA in the Wright b blood group antigen, ii) the fact that antibodies to GPA inhibit the diffusion of band 3, iii) the observation that expression of GPA facilitates trafficking of band 3 from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane, and iv) the observation that GPA is diminished in band 3 null erythrocytes. Surprisingly, there is also evidence that GPA does not interact with band 3, including data showing that: i) band 3 diffusion increases upon erythrocyte deoxygenation whereas GPA diffusion does not, ii) band 3 diffusion is greatly restricted in erythrocytes containing the Southeast Asian Ovalocytosis mutation whereas GPA diffusion is not, and iii) most anti-GPA or anti-band 3 antibodies do not co-immunoprecipitate both proteins. To try to resolve these apparently conflicting observations, we have selectively labeled band 3 and GPA with fluorescent quantum dots in intact erythrocytes and followed their diffusion by single particle tracking. We report here that band 3 and GPA display somewhat similar macroscopic and microscopic diffusion coefficients in unmodified cells, however perturbations of band 3 diffusion do not cause perturbations of GPA diffusion. Taken together the collective data to date suggest that while weak interactions between GPA and band 3 undoubtedly exist, GPA and band 3 must have separate interactions in the membrane that control their lateral mobility.

  4. Electronic spectra of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation and radical

    DOE PAGES

    Peter R. Craig; Miller, John R.; Havlas, Zdenek; ...

    2016-05-02

    In this study, properties of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation 1 and its tetra-o-fluoro derivative 1a have been measured and calculated. The B3LYP/TZP optimized geometry of the free cation 1 agrees with a single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure except that in the crystal one of the phenyl substituents is strongly twisted to permit a close-packing interaction of two of its hydrogens with a nearby BF–4 anion. The low-energy parts of the solution electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of 1 and 1a have been interpreted by comparison with TD-DFT (B3LYP/TZP) results. Reduction or pulse radiolysis lead to a neutral 19-electron radical,more » whose visible absorption and MCD spectra have been recorded and interpreted as well. The reduction is facilitated by ~0.1 V upon going from 1 to 1a« less

  5. Kinetics for Tautomerizations and Dissociations of Triglycine Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Chi-Kit; Zhao, Junfang; Laskin, Julia; Chu, Ivan K.; Hopkinson, Alan C.; Siu , K W Michael

    2009-06-01

    Fragmentations of tautomers of the α-centered radical triglycine radical cation, [GGG*]+, [GG*G]+, and [G*GG]+, are charge-driven, giving b-type ions; these are processes that are facilitated by a mobile proton, as in the fragmentation of protonated triglycine (Rodriquez, C.F. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3006 - 3012). By contrast, radical centers are less mobile. Two mechanisms have been examined theoretically utilizing density functional theory and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus modeling: (1) a direct hydrogen-atom migration between two α-carbons, and (2) a two-step proton migration involving a canonical [GGG]*+ as an intermediate. Predictions employing the latter mechanism are in good agreement with results of recent CID experiments (Chu, I.K. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 7862 - 7872).

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion and electrical conductivity in montmorillonite interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Cygan, Randall T.; Fredrich, Joanne T.; Jerauld, Gary R.

    2016-01-20

    In this study, the diffusion of water and ions in the interlayer region of smectite clay minerals represents a direct probe of the type and strength of clay–fluid interactions. Interlayer diffusion also represents an important link between molecular simulation and macroscopic experiments. Here we use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate trends in cation and water diffusion in montmorillonite interlayers, looking specifically at the effects of layer charge, interlayer cation and cation charge (sodium or calcium), water content, and temperature. For Na-montmorillonite, the largest increase in ion and water diffusion coefficients occurs between the one-layer and two-layer hydrates, corresponding to the transition from inner-sphere to outer-sphere surface complexes. Calculated activation energies for ion and water diffusion in Na-montmorillonite are similar to each other and to the water hydrogen bond energy, suggesting the breaking of water–water and water–clay hydrogen bonds as a likely mechanism for interlayer diffusion. A comparison of interlayer diffusion with that of bulk electrolyte solutions reveals a clear trend of decreasing diffusion coefficient with increasing electrolyte concentration, and in most cases the interlayer diffusion results are nearly coincident with the corresponding bulk solutions. Trends in electrical conductivities computed from the ion diffusion coefficients are also compared.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion and electrical conductivity in montmorillonite interlayers

    DOE PAGES

    Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Cygan, Randall T.; Fredrich, Joanne T.; ...

    2016-01-20

    In this study, the diffusion of water and ions in the interlayer region of smectite clay minerals represents a direct probe of the type and strength of clay–fluid interactions. Interlayer diffusion also represents an important link between molecular simulation and macroscopic experiments. Here we use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate trends in cation and water diffusion in montmorillonite interlayers, looking specifically at the effects of layer charge, interlayer cation and cation charge (sodium or calcium), water content, and temperature. For Na-montmorillonite, the largest increase in ion and water diffusion coefficients occurs between the one-layer and two-layer hydrates, corresponding to themore » transition from inner-sphere to outer-sphere surface complexes. Calculated activation energies for ion and water diffusion in Na-montmorillonite are similar to each other and to the water hydrogen bond energy, suggesting the breaking of water–water and water–clay hydrogen bonds as a likely mechanism for interlayer diffusion. A comparison of interlayer diffusion with that of bulk electrolyte solutions reveals a clear trend of decreasing diffusion coefficient with increasing electrolyte concentration, and in most cases the interlayer diffusion results are nearly coincident with the corresponding bulk solutions. Trends in electrical conductivities computed from the ion diffusion coefficients are also compared.« less

  8. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  9. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  10. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  11. Divalent cation shrinks DNA but inhibits its compaction with trivalent cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongu, Chika; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Zinchenko, Anatoly; Chen, Ning; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-05-01

    Our observation reveals the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA 166 kbp) by fluorescence microscopy. It was found that divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. As the control experiment, we have confirmed the minimum effect of monovalent cation, Na(+) on the DNA higher-order structure. We interpret the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counterions. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we consider the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly charged polyelectrolyte, double-stranded DNA, by the 3+ cations. In contrast, the presence of 2+ cation decreases the gain of entropy contribution by the ion-exchange between monovalent and 3+ ions.

  12. Facilitating Dialogues about Racial Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaye, Stephen John

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Facilitating dialogues about racial issues in higher education classroom settings continues to be a vexing problem facing postsecondary educators. In order for students to discuss race with their peers, they need skilled facilitators who are knowledgeable about racial issues and able to support students in these difficult…

  13. Facilitated Communication in Mainstream Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remington-Gurney, Jane; Crossley, Rosemary

    Facilitated communication is described as a method of training communication partners or facilitators to provide physical assistance to communication aid users, to help them overcome physical and emotional problems in using their aids. In Melbourne (Victoria, Australia), the DEAL (Dignity, Education and Language) Centre has identified 96 people…

  14. A Manual for Group Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auvine, Brian; And Others

    This resource manual presents guidelines and effective techniques for people who want to acquire group facilitation skills. It is a valuable resource for anyone planning or presenting a workshop; trainers or teachers interested in innovative classroom techniques; and anyone involved in a group as leader, facilitator, or participant. The manual…

  15. Penetration and lateral diffusion characteristics of polycrystalline graphene barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Taeshik; Mun, Jeong Hun; Cho, Byung Jin; Kim, Taek-Soo

    2013-12-01

    We report penetration and lateral diffusion behavior of environmental molecules on synthesized polycrystalline graphene. Penetration occurs through graphene grain boundaries resulting in local oxidation. However, when the penetrated molecules diffuse laterally, the oxidation region will expand. Therefore, we measured the lateral diffusion rate along the graphene-copper interface for the first time by the environment-assisted crack growth test. It is clearly shown that the lateral diffusion is suppressed due to the high van der Waals interaction. Finally, we employed bilayer graphene for a perfect diffusion barrier facilitated by decreased defect density and increased lateral diffusion path.We report penetration and lateral diffusion behavior of environmental molecules on synthesized polycrystalline graphene. Penetration occurs through graphene grain boundaries resulting in local oxidation. However, when the penetrated molecules diffuse laterally, the oxidation region will expand. Therefore, we measured the lateral diffusion rate along the graphene-copper interface for the first time by the environment-assisted crack growth test. It is clearly shown that the lateral diffusion is suppressed due to the high van der Waals interaction. Finally, we employed bilayer graphene for a perfect diffusion barrier facilitated by decreased defect density and increased lateral diffusion path. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03849a

  16. Cationic-modified cyclodextrin nanosphere/anionic polymer as flocculation/sorption systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Huining; Cezar, Norlito

    2005-03-15

    Simultaneous removal of dissolved and colloidal substances has been a challenging task. The cationic-modified beta-cyclodextrin nanospheres synthesized in this work, in conjunction with a water-soluble polyacrylamide-based anionic polymer, potentially provide a novel approach to address the problem. The cyclodextrin was rendered cationic using (2,3-epoxypropyl)trimethylammonium chloride as a reagent. The cationicity of the modified cyclodextrin and the reaction between cyclodextrin and the reagent were characterized by electrophoresis measurement, polyelectrolyte titration, and NMR. As a dual-component flocculation system, the cationic cyclodextrin/anionic polymer significantly induced clay flocculation, lowering the relative turbidity of the clay suspension over a wide pH range. Meanwhile, as a nanospherical absorbent, the modified cyclodextrins exhibited strong affinity toward aromatic compounds via inclusion complex formation in the hydrophobic cavities, which was monitored by UV spectroscopy. These systems facilitated the simultaneous removal of dissolved and colloidal substances, which was unachievable previously. In addition, the interaction between anionic polymers and the clay particles pretreated with cationic cyclodextrin was investigated in order to reveal the flocculation mechanism.

  17. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-07-15

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change.

  18. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  19. Cation transport in gaseous, critical, and liquid benzene and toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sam S.-S.; Freeman, Gordon R.

    1980-02-01

    The mobilities μ+ of cations in the fluids of benzene and toluene are 200-3000 fold lower than those of electrons. However, the variations of the cation mobilities with density and temperature are qualitatively similar to those of electrons, to an unexpected degree. In the liquid phase under its vapor pressure at T/Tc<0.8 the cation mobility in benzene obeys Walden's rule (μ+∝η-x, x=1.0), but in toluene it does not (x=1.1). The ratio of the diffusion coefficients (cation/solvent molecule) is equal to about 0.25 in toluene and 0.50 in benzene. Near the critical point there is a slight maximum in μ+. The maximum is more marked in the density normalized mobility μ+n; it occurs at n/nc=2.0 in benzene and 1.6 in toluene. The mobilities in the critical fluids are 2.76×10-3 and 2.50×10-3 cm2/V s in benzene and toluene, respectively. In the low density gases the ion scattering cross sections, taken to have the form σv=Aα v-α, display α=1.4 for benzene and 1.5 for toluene. The cross sections, appropriately averaged over the Maxwellian distribution of velocities, have magnitudes similar to those expected from scattering by the r-4 polarization potential, but have a greater than expected value of α. The average ion scattering cross sections are about eightfold greater than the corresponding electron scattering cross sections. The value of μ+n in the coexistence vapor is 6.3×1018 molecule/cm V s in benzene up to n/nc=1.0, and is 6.0×1018 in toluene up to n/nc=0.15. At higher densities in the latter μ+n decreases gently, reaching (μ+n)min=4.4×1018 at n/nc=0.9. The temperature coefficient of μ+ at constant n increases with n up to nc, near the coexistence curve. The increased temperature coefficient is attributed to clustering, but the clusters are small.

  20. Modelling Mixed Bed Ion Exchange Kinetics for Removal of Trace Levels of Divalent Cations in Ultrapure Water

    SciTech Connect

    B. Widman

    2003-01-01

    Ion exchanger resin fluid film mass transfer coefficients and the ionic diffusivities from which they are derived are often measured by use of ion exchange resin columns. Such tests, usually run dynamically using short resin beds, are often performed using relatively high (ppm) concentrations of ions to accurately measure output concentrations as a function of flow rate. The testing described herein was performed to determine fluid film ionic diffusivities for cationic concentrations typical of ultrapure water ({le}ppb levels) containing ppm levels of ammonia. Effective ionic diffusivities at these low ionic concentrations and high pHs were needed to complete a computer model (SIMIX) to be used in ion exchange simulations. SIMIX is a generalized multicomponent ion exchange model designed to simulate the removal of divalent cations from ultrapure water.

  1. Using Ylide Functionalization to Stabilize Boron Cations

    PubMed Central

    Scherpf, Thorsten; Feichtner, Kai‐Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The metalated ylide YNa [Y=(Ph3PCSO2Tol)−] was employed as X,L‐donor ligand for the preparation of a series of boron cations. Treatment of the bis‐ylide functionalized borane Y2BH with different trityl salts or B(C6F5)3 for hydride abstraction readily results in the formation of the bis‐ylide functionalized boron cation [Y−B−Y]+ (2). The high donor capacity of the ylide ligands allowed the isolation of the cationic species and its characterization in solution as well as in solid state. DFT calculations demonstrate that the cation is efficiently stabilized through electrostatic effects as well as π‐donation from the ylide ligands, which results in its high stability. Despite the high stability of 2 [Y−B−Y]+ serves as viable source for the preparation of further borenium cations of type Y2B+←LB by addition of Lewis bases such as amines and amides. Primary and secondary amines react to tris(amino)boranes via N−H activation across the B−C bond. PMID:28185370

  2. Polycation-DNA complexes for gene delivery: a comparison of the biopharmaceutical properties of cationic polypeptides and cationic lipids.

    PubMed

    Pouton, C W; Lucas, P; Thomas, B J; Uduehi, A N; Milroy, D A; Moss, S H

    1998-04-30

    DNA plasmids formed particulate complexes with a variety of cationic polyamino acids and cationic lipids, which were used to transfect mammalian cells in culture. Complexation was studied by assaying for exclusion of ethidium using a fluorometric assay, which indicated that complexation with cationic polyamino acids took place with utilisation of the majority of charged functional groups. The particle sizes and zeta potentials of a range of complexes were determined. Generally polyamino acids formed uniform particles 80-120 nm in diameter in water, but their particle size increased on dilution of the particles in electrolytes or cell culture media. The efficiency of transfection was compared using complexes of pRSVlacZ, a reporter construct which expressed beta-galactosidase under the control of the Rous sarcoma virus promoter. Positively charged DNA/polyamino acid complexes were taken up by cells but required an endosomolytic agent, such as chloroquine, to facilitate transfection. Polyornithine complexes resulted in the highest levels of expression, in comparison with other homopolyamino acids (polyornithine>poly-L-lysine=poly-D-lysine>polyarginine). Copolyamino acids of lysine and alanine condensed DNA but were less active in transfection experiments. Copoly(L-Lys, L-Ala 1:1) was inactive even in the presence of chloroquine. In contrast DNA/cationic lipid complexes transfected cells spontaneously, and chloroquine did not improve the extent of expression, rather it usually reduced efficiency. There was little correlation between comparative efficiencies of lipid complexes between cell lines suggesting that the nature of the cell membrane and differences in mechanisms of internalisation were determinants of efficiency. In an effort to explore better cell culture models for gene delivery, monolayers of Caco-2 cells were transfected in filter culture. As the cells differentiated and formed a polarized monolayer, expression of beta-galactosidase was reduced until at

  3. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources

    SciTech Connect

    Crivello, J.V.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this project is to make use of products obtained from renewable plant sources as monomers for the direct production of polymers which can be used for a wide range of plastic applications. In this report is described progress in the synthesis and polymerization of cationically polymerizable monomers and oligomers derived from botanical oils, terpenes, natural rubber, and lignin. Nine different botanical oils were obtained from various sources, characterized and then epoxidized. Their photopolymerization was carried out using cationic photoinitiators and the mechanical properties of the resulting polymers characterized. Preliminary biodegradation studies are being conducted on the photopolymerized films from several of these oils. Limonene was cationically polymerized to give dimers and the dimers epoxidized to yield highly reactive monomers suitable for coatings, inks and adhesives. The direct phase transfer epoxidation of squalene and natural rubber was carried out. The modified rubbers undergo facile photocrosslinking in the presence of onium salts to give crosslinked elastomers. 12 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Cationic acrylamide emulsion polymer brine thickeners

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, P.A.; Piccoline, M.A.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a thickened, solids free, aqueous drilling and servicing brine having a density of at least 14.4 ppg. comprising (a) an aqueous solution of at least one water-soluble salt of a multivalent metal, and (b) a cationic water-in-oil emulsion polymer of acrylamide or methacrylamide and a cationic monomer selected from the group consisting of a dialkylaminoalkyl acrylamide or methacrylamide, a trialkylaminoalkyl acrylamide or methacrylamide, a trialkylaminoalkyl acrylate or methacrylate, and a dialkyldialkyl ammonium halide. The acrylamide or methacrylamide to cationic monomer molar ratio of the polymer is about 70:30 to 95:5, the polymer having an I.V. in 1.0N KCl of about 1.0 to 7.0 dl/g and being present in a compatible and viscosifying amount; the thickened brine characterized by being substantially non-dilatent.

  5. Forging Colloidal Nanostructures via Cation Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Among the various postsynthesis treatments of colloidal nanocrystals that have been developed to date, transformations by cation exchange have recently emerged as an extremely versatile tool that has given access to a wide variety of materials and nanostructures. One notable example in this direction is represented by partial cation exchange, by which preformed nanocrystals can be either transformed to alloy nanocrystals or to various types of nanoheterostructures possessing core/shell, segmented, or striped architectures. In this review, we provide an up to date overview of the complex colloidal nanostructures that could be prepared so far by cation exchange. At the same time, the review gives an account of the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic parameters governing these types of reactions, as they are currently understood, and outlines the main open issues and possible future developments in the field. PMID:26891471

  6. Sequestration of organic cations by acidified hepatic endocytic vesicles and implications for biliary excretion.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, R W; Faber, E D; Meijer, D K

    1992-04-01

    A number of cationic amine drugs that are taken up by liver and excreted into bile may accumulate in acidified intracellular organelles such as lysosomes and endosomes. These studies were undertaken to assess directly the uptake and accumulation of three types of model organic cationic amines by endocytic vesicles, and the role of vesicle acidification in this process. Uptake of tubocurarine (TC), vecuronium and tributylmethylammonium (TBuMA) by purified rat liver multivesicular bodies (MVB) (prelysosomal endocytic vesicles) was dependent upon MgATP, time and drug concentration. After 60 min, 52 to 81% of MVB cation content was dependent upon vesicle acidification (due to an electrogenic proton pump), but not upon an interior positive vesicle membrane potential. Nineteen to 42% of MVB cation content appeared due to binding to MVB membranes or to internal lipoproteins. Vesicle-to-medium ATP-dependent apparent concentration ratios for these three cations were 3.3 to 51. MVB uptake of these cations resembled uptake of methylamine, a tertiary amine known to distribute across organellar membranes according to pH gradients. By contrast, MVB uptake of the lipophilic quaternary amine methyldeptropine was not dependent upon MgATP or on development of MVB pH or membrane potential gradients. In further studies, TC, vecuronium and TBuMA were rapidly taken up by the isolated perfused rat liver and excreted in bile. Exposure to 250 mciroM primaquin (which partially alkalinized acidic endosomes and lysosomes) reduced accumulation of [3H]vecuronium in a lysosomal fraction by 23%, decreased perfusate disappearance of TC and TBuMA, but not of vecuronium, and decreased biliary appearance of all three cations. These studies suggest that acidified intracellular organelles sequester certain organic cationic drugs, possibly via a drug/proton antiporter, and/or diffusion followed by intravesicular protonation and trapping of tertiary amines. However, attempts at partial displacement of

  7. Human Organic Cation Transporters 1 (SLC22A1), 2 (SLC22A2), and 3 (SLC22A3) as Disposition Pathways for Fluoroquinolone Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Mulgaonkar, Aditi; Venitz, Jürgen; Gründemann, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are important antimicrobials that exhibit activity against a wide range of bacterial pathogens and excellent tissue permeation. They exist as charged molecules in biological fluids, and thus, their disposition depends heavily on active transport and facilitative diffusion. A recent review of the clinical literature indicated that tubular secretion and reabsorption are major determinants of their half-life in plasma, efficacy, and drug-drug interactions. In particular, reported in vivo interactions between FQs and cationic drugs affecting renal clearance implicated organic cation transporters (OCTs). In this study, 13 FQs, ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, fleroxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, lomefloxacin, moxifloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, pefloxacin, prulifloxacin, rufloxacin, and sparfloxacin, were screened for their ability to inhibit transport activity of human OCT1 (hOCT1) (SLC22A1), hOCT2 (SLC22A2), and hOCT3 (SLC22A3). All, with the exception of enoxacin, significantly inhibited hOCT1-mediated uptake under initial test conditions. None of the FQs inhibited hOCT2, and only moxifloxacin inhibited hOCT3 (∼30%), even at a 1,000-fold excess. Gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, prulifloxacin, and sparfloxacin were determined to be competitive inhibitors of hOCT1. Inhibition constants (Ki) were estimated to be 250 ± 18 μM, 161 ± 19 μM, 136 ± 33 μM, and 94 ± 8 μM, respectively. Moxifloxacin competitively inhibited hOCT3-mediated uptake, with a Ki value of 1,598 ± 146 μM. Despite expression in enterocytes (luminal), hepatocytes (sinusoidal), and proximal tubule cells (basolateral), hOCT3 does not appear to contribute significantly to FQ disposition. However, hOCT1 in the sinusoidal membrane of hepatocytes, and potentially the basolateral membrane of proximal tubule cells, is likely to play a role in the disposition of these antimicrobial agents. PMID:23545524

  8. ABSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    DOEpatents

    Tompkins, E.R.; Parker, G.W.

    1959-03-10

    An improved method is presented for the chromatographic separation of fission products wherein a substantial reduction in liquid volume is obtained. The process consists in contacting a solution containing fission products with a body of ion-exchange adsorbent to effect adsorption of fission product cations. The loaded exchange resin is then contacted with a small volume of a carboxylic acid eluant, thereby recovering the fission products. The fission product carrying eluate is acidified without increasing its volume to the volume of the original solution, and the acidified eluate is then used as a feed solution for a smaller body of ion-exchange resin effecting readsorption of the fission product cations.

  9. Enhanced in-cell folding of reversibly cationized transcription factor using amphipathic peptide.

    PubMed

    Futami, Midori; Nakano, Tomoki; Yasunaga, Mayu; Makihara, Masahiro; Asama, Takashi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Futami, Junichiro

    2017-04-01

    The intracellular delivery of functionally active transcription factor proteins is emerging as a promising technique for artificial regulation of cellular functions. However, in addition to the cell membrane, which acts as a barrier to macromolecules, the aggregation-favored properties of structurally flexible transcription factor proteins limit the application of this method. In-cell folding technique can be used to overcome these issues. This technique solubilizes denatured protein by reversible alkyl-disulfide cationization (S-cationization), and simultaneously endows efficient intracellular delivery and folding to the biologically active conformation in the reducing environment of the cytosol. Because cationized protein is internalized into cells by adsorption-mediated endocytosis, endosomal escape is crucial for this technique. In this study, we utilized a sensitive luciferase reporter gene assay to quantitatively evaluate in-cell folding of the artificial transcription factor GAL4-VP16. Although the cationic moiety of S-cationized protein was slightly affected, co-transduction of amphipathic peptide Endo-PORTER dramatically improved in-cell folding efficiency. Live cell imaging of fluorescent-labeled GAL4-VP16 revealed that some of the proteins diffused into the cytosol and nucleus through co-transduction with Endo-PORTER. Real-time monitoring of light output of luciferase revealed the kinetics of in-cell folding, supporting that endosomal-release assisted by Endo-PORTER was stimulated by endosome acidification. Because this method can transduce proteins uniformly and repeatedly into living cells, S-cationized transcription factor proteins are widely applicable for the artificial regulation of cellular functions.

  10. Cationic dialkylarylphosphates: a new family of bio-inspired cationic lipids for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Le Corre, Stéphanie S; Belmadi, Nawal; Berchel, Mathieu; Le Gall, Tony; Haelters, Jean-Pierre; Lehn, Pierre; Montier, Tristan; Jaffrès, Paul-Alain

    2015-01-28

    In this work that aims to synthesize and evaluate new cationic lipids as vectors for gene delivery, we report the synthesis of a series of cationic lipids in which a phosphate functional group acts as a linker to assemble on a molecular scale, two lipid chains and one cationic polar head. The mono or dicationic moiety is connected to the phosphate group by an aryl spacer. In this work, two synthesis strategies were evaluated. The first used the Atherton-Todd coupling reaction to introduce a phenolic derivative to dioleylphosphite. The second strategy used a sequential addition of lipid alcohol and a phenolic derivative on POCl3. The two methods are efficient, but the latter allows larger yields. Different polar head groups were introduced, thus producing amphiphilic compounds possessing either one permanent (N-methyl-imidazolium, pyridinium, trimethylammonium) or two permanent cationic charges. All these cationic lipids were formulated as liposomal solutions and characterized (size and zeta potential). They formed stable liposomal solutions both in water (at pH 7.0) and in a weakly acidic medium (at pH 5.5). Finally, this new generation of cationic lipids was used to deliver DNA into various human-derived epithelial cells cultured in vitro. Compared with Lipofectamine used as a reference commercial lipofection reagent, some cationic dialkylarylphosphates were able to demonstrate potent gene transfer abilities, and noteworthily, monocationic derivatives were much more efficient than dicationic analogues.

  11. Evidence-based practice: how nurse leaders can facilitate innovation.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2006-01-01

    Evidence-based nursing practice (EBNP) is the wave of the future. Increasingly, EBNP is being identified as a key to quality and excellence in nursing services. Incorporating evidence into practice is necessary to deliver scientifically sound patient care. In addition, understanding the importance of evidence is crucial for meeting the excellence requirements of Magnet designation. Despite the growing popularity of EBNP and its documented significant benefits, the literature demonstrates that only 15% of the nursing workforce consistently practices within an EBNP framework. If EBNP adoption is to increase in the profession, it will require the active efforts of nurse leaders to pursue an aggressive innovation diffusion strategy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the nurse leader's role in facilitating EBNP in nursing using a theoretical framework grounded in innovation diffusion theory. The article develops 4 areas of focus. First, the components of innovation diffusion theory are discussed. Second, a pertinent empirical review of the EBNP adoption literature is presented. Third, strategies for applying innovation diffusion theory to facilitate EBNP adoption are proposed. Lastly, the article ends with a leadership call to action.

  12. Restructuring of a Peat in Interaction with Multivalent Cations: Effect of Cation Type and Aging Time

    PubMed Central

    Kunhi Mouvenchery, Yamuna; Jaeger, Alexander; Aquino, Adelia J. A.; Tunega, Daniel; Diehl, Dörte; Bertmer, Marko; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2013-01-01

    It is assumed to be common knowledge that multivalent cations cross-link soil organic matter (SOM) molecules via cation bridges (CaB). The concept has not been explicitly demonstrated in solid SOM by targeted experiments, yet. Therefore, the requirements for and characteristics of CaB remain unidentified. In this study, a combined experimental and molecular modeling approach was adopted to investigate the interaction of cations on a peat OM from physicochemical perspective. Before treatment with salt solutions of Al3+, Ca2+ or Na+, respectively, the original exchangeable cations were removed using cation exchange resin. Cation treatment was conducted at two different values of pH prior to adjusting pH to 4.1. Cation sorption is slower (>>2 h) than deprotonation of functional groups (<2 h) and was described by a Langmuir model. The maximum uptake increased with pH of cation addition and decreased with increasing cation valency. Sorption coefficients were similar for all cations and at both pH. This contradicts the general expectations for electrostatic interactions, suggesting that not only the interaction chemistry but also spatial distribution of functional groups in OM determines binding of cations in this peat. The reaction of contact angle, matrix rigidity due to water molecule bridges (WaMB) and molecular mobility of water (NMR analysis) suggested that cross-linking via CaB has low relevance in this peat. This unexpected finding is probably due to the low cation exchange capacity, resulting in low abundance of charged functionalities. Molecular modeling demonstrates that large average distances between functionalities (∼3 nm in this peat) cannot be bridged by CaB-WaMB associations. However, aging strongly increased matrix rigidity, suggesting successive increase of WaMB size to connect functionalities and thus increasing degree of cross-linking by CaB-WaMB associations. Results thus demonstrated that the physicochemical structure of OM is decisive for Ca

  13. Restructuring of a peat in interaction with multivalent cations: effect of cation type and aging time.

    PubMed

    Kunhi Mouvenchery, Yamuna; Jaeger, Alexander; Aquino, Adelia J A; Tunega, Daniel; Diehl, Dörte; Bertmer, Marko; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2013-01-01

    It is assumed to be common knowledge that multivalent cations cross-link soil organic matter (SOM) molecules via cation bridges (CaB). The concept has not been explicitly demonstrated in solid SOM by targeted experiments, yet. Therefore, the requirements for and characteristics of CaB remain unidentified. In this study, a combined experimental and molecular modeling approach was adopted to investigate the interaction of cations on a peat OM from physicochemical perspective. Before treatment with salt solutions of Al(3+), Ca(2+) or Na(+), respectively, the original exchangeable cations were removed using cation exchange resin. Cation treatment was conducted at two different values of pH prior to adjusting pH to 4.1. Cation sorption is slower (>2 h) than deprotonation of functional groups (<2 h) and was described by a Langmuir model. The maximum uptake increased with pH of cation addition and decreased with increasing cation valency. Sorption coefficients were similar for all cations and at both pH. This contradicts the general expectations for electrostatic interactions, suggesting that not only the interaction chemistry but also spatial distribution of functional groups in OM determines binding of cations in this peat. The reaction of contact angle, matrix rigidity due to water molecule bridges (WaMB) and molecular mobility of water (NMR analysis) suggested that cross-linking via CaB has low relevance in this peat. This unexpected finding is probably due to the low cation exchange capacity, resulting in low abundance of charged functionalities. Molecular modeling demonstrates that large average distances between functionalities (∼3 nm in this peat) cannot be bridged by CaB-WaMB associations. However, aging strongly increased matrix rigidity, suggesting successive increase of WaMB size to connect functionalities and thus increasing degree of cross-linking by CaB-WaMB associations. Results thus demonstrated that the physicochemical structure of OM is decisive for

  14. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1996-12-31

    The problems associated with the disposal of toxic metals in an environmentally acceptable manner continues to plague industry. Such metals as nickel, vanadium, molybdenum, cobalt, iron, and antimony present physiological and ecological challenges that are best addressed through minimization of exposure and dispersion. A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  15. Adsorption of phenol and nitrophenol isomers onto montmorillonite modified with hexadecyltrimethylammonium cation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, S.C.; Song, D.I.; Jeon, Y.W.

    1998-09-01

    Single- and two-component competitive adsorptions were carried out in a batch adsorber to investigate the adsorption behavior of phenol and 2-, 3-, and 4-nitrophenols in aqueous solution at 25 C onto hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA)-treated montmorillonite. HDTMA cation was exchanged for metal cations on the montmorillonite to prepare HDTMA-montmorillonite, changing its surface property from hydrophilic to organophilic. Effective solid diffusivity of HDTMA cation in the montmorillonite particle was estimated to be about 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 2}/s by fitting the film-solid diffusion model to a set of HDTMA adsorption kinetic data onto montmorillonite. Adsorption affinity on HDTMA-montmorillonite was found to be in the order 3-nitrophenol {approx} 4-nitrophenol > 2-nitrophenol > phenol. The Langmuir and the Redlich-Peterson (RP) adsorption models were used to analyze the single component adsorption equilibria. The ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) and the Langmuir competitive model (LCM) were used to predict the multicomponent competitive adsorption equilibria. These models yielded favorable representations of both individual and competitive adsorption behaviors.

  16. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  17. Viscoelastic cationic polymers containing the urethane linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A method for the synthesis and manufacturing of elastomeric compositions and articles containing quaternary nitrogen centers and condensation residues along the polymeric backbone of the centers is presented. Linear and cross-linked straight chain and block polymers having a wide damping temperature range were synthesized. Formulae for the viscoelastic cationic polymers are presented.

  18. ADSORPTION OF ORGANIC CATIONS TO NATURAL MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors that control the extent of adsorption of amphiphilic organic cations on environmental and pristine surfaces have been studied. The sorbents were kaolinite, montmorillonite, two aquifer materials, and a soil; solutions contained various concentrations of NaCl and CaCl,...

  19. Process and apparatus for the production of BI-213 cations

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Hines, John J.; Chiarizia, Renato; Dietz, Mark

    1998-01-01

    A process for producing substantially impurity-free Bi-213 cations is disclosed. An aqueous acid feed solution containing Ac-225 cations is contacted with an ion exchange medium to bind the Ac-225 cations and form an Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium. The bound Ac-225 incubates on the ion exchange medium to form Bi-213 cations by radioactive decay. The Bi-213 cations are then recovered from the Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium to form a substantially impurity-free aqueous Bi-213 cation acid solution. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  20. Process and apparatus for the production of Bi-213 cations

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Hines, J.J.; Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.

    1998-12-29

    A process for producing substantially impurity-free Bi-213 cations is disclosed. An aqueous acid feed solution containing Ac-225 cations is contacted with an ion exchange medium to bind the Ac-225 cations and form an Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium. The bound Ac-225 incubates on the ion exchange medium to form Bi-213 cations by radioactive decay. The Bi-213 cations are then recovered from the Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium to form a substantially impurity-free aqueous Bi-213 cation acid solution. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed. 7 figs.

  1. Quantitative Characterization of Non-Classic Polarization of Cations on Clay Aggregate Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10−5 to 10−1 mol L−1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation–surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability. PMID:25874864

  2. Cationic Effect on the Electrochemical Characteristics of the Hydrothermally Grown Manganese Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardou, D.; Kazas, A.; Apostolopoulou, M.; Katsarakis, N.; Koudoumas, E.

    2017-04-01

    Hydrothermal growth of manganese dioxide (MnO2) nanostructures was carried out on indium tin dioxide glass substrates at 95°C for 24 h to study the effect of cations such as K+, Li+, and Na+ on their properties. It was observed that presence of cations affected the MnO2 phase and morphology: amorphous MnO2 (no cations) showed columnar-like structure, ɛ-MnO2 (K+) presented nanowires, α-MnO2 (Na+) was composed of agglomerates of spherical nanoparticles, while β-MnO2 (Li+) consisted of spherical aggregates of nanoparticles. The different electrochemical performance depending on the structure is expected to be useful for application in Li-ion batteries. As-grown ɛ-MnO2 exhibited lower charge resistance and higher ionic diffusion rate, providing the electrode with enhanced specific discharge capacity of 910 mAh g-1 and capacity retention of 98% after 500 scans. Hence, K+ can support tunnel structures and stabilize the structure compared with the smaller cations Na+ and Li+.

  3. Ion exchange and fixation of rare-earth cation into expandable tetrasilicic fluorine mica.

    PubMed

    Han, Y S; Choi, S H; Kim, D K

    2001-03-01

    Rare-earth cation (Nd3+) are incorporated into the interlayer spaces between the silicate layers of synthetic fluorine mica, Na0.665Mg2.68(Si3.98)Al0.02F1.98, by conventional ion exchange reaction. Subsequent migration of the interlayer cations upon calcination into the vacant octahedra of 2:1 layers is followed by powder X-ray diffraction, diffuse-reflectance UV spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a function of calcination temperature. It is found from the spectroscopic analyses that the interlayer cations start to migrate into the octahedral vacant sites from 400 degrees C through the hexagonal siloxane ring of the tetrahedral silicate layers. According to the Nd L(III)-edge XANES spectra, the normalized absorption intensity gradually decreases while the FWHM increases with temperature, suggesting that the bonding character of rare-earth cations and silicate lattices evolves from ionic to covalent as the calcination temperature increases.

  4. An Electrodynamics-Based Model for Ion Diffusion in Microbial Polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gorby, Yuri A.

    2004-08-03

    An electrodynamics-based model was formulated for simulation of ion diffusion in microbial polysaccharides with fixed charges and electrostatic double layers. The model extends a common multicomponent ion diffusion model that is based on irreversible thermodynamics under a zero ionic charge flux condition, which is only applicable to the regions without fixed charges and electrostatic double layers. An efficient numerical procedure was presented to solve the differential equations in the model. The model well described key features of experimental observations of ion diffusion in negatively charged microbial polysaccharides including accelerated diffusive transport of cations, exclusion of anions, and increased rate of cation transport with increasing negative charge density. The simulated diffusive fluxes of cations and anions were consistent with a classic exchange diffusion concept in negatively charged polysaccharides at the interface of plant roots and soils; and the developed model allows to mathematically study such diffusion phenomena. Numerical simulations also showed that ion diffusive transport within a bacterial cell wall polysaccharide may induce an ionic current that compresses or expands the bacterial electrostatic double layer at the interface of the cell wall and bulk solution.

  5. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  6. The Diffusion of Innovations: A Review of Research and Theory with Implications for Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, David W.

    A review of the general literature on diffusion, innovation, and social change is worthwhile as a basis for developing more effective methods for facilitating the adoption of computer-based technologies. Much of the research on diffusion has focused on (1) characteristics of the innovation which influence the diffusion process, (2) a description…

  7. Facilitation of learning: part 1.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Tyler; Trish, Houghton; Barry, Debbie

    2016-04-06

    This article, the fourth in a series of 11, discusses the context for the facilitation of learning. It outlines the main principles and theories for understanding the process of learning, including examples which link these concepts to practice. The practical aspects of using these theories in a practice setting will be discussed in the fifth article of this series. Together, these two articles will provide mentors and practice teachers with knowledge of the learning process, which will enable them to meet the second domain of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice on facilitation of learning.

  8. Silica-based cationic bilayers as immunoadjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Lincopan, Nilton; Santana, Mariana RA; Faquim-Mauro, Eliana; da Costa, Maria Helena B; Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M

    2009-01-01

    Background Silica particles cationized by dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) bilayer were previously described. This work shows the efficiency of these particulates for antigen adsorption and presentation to the immune system and proves the concept that silica-based cationic bilayers exhibit better performance than alum regarding colloid stability and cellular immune responses for vaccine design. Results Firstly, the silica/DODAB assembly was characterized at 1 mM NaCl, pH 6.3 or 5 mM Tris.HCl, pH 7.4 and 0.1 mg/ml silica over a range of DODAB concentrations (0.001–1 mM) by means of dynamic light scattering for particle sizing and zeta-potential analysis. 0.05 mM DODAB is enough to produce cationic bilayer-covered particles with good colloid stability. Secondly, conditions for maximal adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) or a recombinant, heat-shock protein from Mycobacterium leprae (18 kDa-hsp) onto DODAB-covered or onto bare silica were determined. At maximal antigen adsorption, cellular immune responses in vivo from delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions determined by foot-pad swelling tests (DTH) and cytokines analysis evidenced the superior performance of the silica/DODAB adjuvant as compared to alum or antigens alone whereas humoral response from IgG in serum was equal to the one elicited by alum as adjuvant. Conclusion Cationized silica is a biocompatible, inexpensive, easily prepared and possibly general immunoadjuvant for antigen presentation which displays higher colloid stability than alum, better performance regarding cellular immune responses and employs very low, micromolar doses of cationic and toxic synthetic lipid. PMID:19152701

  9. Novel pH-Sensitive Cationic Lipids with Linear Ortho Ester Linkers for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haigang; Zhang, Huizhen; Thor, Der; Rahimian, Roshanak; Guo, Xin

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to develop pH-sensitive lipoplexes for efficient gene delivery, we report three novel cationic lipids containing a linear ortho ester linker that conjugates either the headgroup (Type I) or one hydrocarbon chain (Type II) with the rest of the lipid molecule. The cationic lipids carry either an iodide or a chloride counterion. Compared to our previously reported cyclic ortho ester linker, the linear ortho ester linker facilitated the construction of cationic liposomes and lipoplexes with different helper lipids. The chloride counterion not only facilitated the hydration of the lipid films during liposome construction, but also enhanced the hydrolysis of the ortho ester linker in the lipoplexes. After incubation at endosomal pH 5.5, the Type I lipoplexes aggregated and destabilized the endosome-mimicking model liposomes, but not the Type II lipoplexes. The helper lipids (DOPE or cholesterol) of the lipoplexes enhanced the pH-sensitivity of the Type I lipoplexes. In CV-1 cells (monkey kidney fibroblast), the Type I ortho ester-based lipoplexes, especially those with the chloride counterion, significantly improved the gene transfection efficiency, in some cases by more than 100 fold, compared to their pH-insensitive counterparts consisting of DOTAP. The gene transfection efficiency of the ortho ester-based lipoplexes was well correlated with their rate of aggregation and membrane destabilization in response to the endosomal pH 5.5. PMID:22480493

  10. Novel pH-sensitive cationic lipids with linear ortho ester linkers for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haigang; Zhang, Huizhen; Thor, Der; Rahimian, Roshanak; Guo, Xin

    2012-06-01

    In an effort to develop pH-sensitive lipoplexes for efficient gene delivery, we report three novel cationic lipids containing a linear ortho ester linker that conjugates either the headgroup (Type I) or one hydrocarbon chain (Type II) with the rest of the lipid molecule. The cationic lipids carry either an iodide or a chloride counterion. Compared to our previously reported cyclic ortho ester linker, the linear ortho ester linker facilitated the construction of cationic liposomes and lipoplexes with different helper lipids. The chloride counterion not only facilitated the hydration of the lipid films during liposome construction, but also enhanced the hydrolysis of the ortho ester linker in the lipoplexes. After incubation at endosomal pH 5.5, the Type I lipoplexes aggregated and destabilized the endosome-mimicking model liposomes, but not the Type II lipoplexes. The helper lipids (DOPE or cholesterol) of the lipoplexes enhanced the pH-sensitivity of the Type I lipoplexes. In CV-1 cells (monkey kidney fibroblast), the Type I ortho ester-based lipoplexes, especially those with the chloride counterion, significantly improved the gene transfection efficiency, in some cases by more than 100 fold, compared to their pH-insensitive counterparts consisting of DOTAP. The gene transfection efficiency of the ortho ester-based lipoplexes was well correlated with their rate of aggregation and membrane destabilization in response to the endosomal pH 5.5.

  11. Degradation of aqueous carbon tetrachloride by nanoscale zerovalent copper on a cation resin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin Jung; Lo, Shang-Lien; Liou, Ya Hsuan

    2005-06-01

    Nanoscale zerovalent copper supported on a cation resin was successfully synthesized to enhance the removal of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) from contaminated water. The use of the cation resin as a support prevents the reduction of surface area due to agglomeration of nanoscale zerovalent copper particles. Moreover, the cation resin recycles the copper ions resulting from the reaction between CCl(4) and Cu(0) by simultaneous ion exchange. The decline in the amount of CCl(4) in aqueous solution results from the combined effects of degradation by nanoscale zerovalent copper and sorption by the cation resin; thus the amount of CCl(4) both in aqueous solution and sorbed onto the resin were measured. The pseudo-first-order rate constant normalized by the surface-area and the mass concentration of nanoscale zerovalent copper (k(SA)) was 2.1+/-0.1 x 10(-2)lh(-1)m(-2), approximately twenty times that of commercial powdered zerovalent copper (0.04 mm). Due to the exchange between Cu(2+) and the strongly acidic ions (H(+) or Na(+)), the pH was between 3 and 4 in unbuffered solution and Cu(2+) at the concentration of less than 0.1 mg l(-1) was measured after the dechlorination reaction. In the above-ground application, resin as a support would facilitate the development of a process that could be designed for convenient emplacement and regeneration of porous reductive medium.

  12. Pressure-induced cation-cation bonding in V2O3

    DOE PAGES

    Bai, Ligang; Li, Quan; Corr, Serena A.; ...

    2015-10-09

    A pressure-induced phase transition, associated with the formation of cation-cation bonding, occurs in V2O3 by combining synchroton x-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell and ab initio evolutionary calculations. The high-pressure phase has a monoclinic structure with a C2/c space group, and it is both energetically and dynamically stable at pressures above 47 GPa to at least 105 GPa. this phase transition can be viewed as a two-dimensional Peierls-like distortion, where the cation-cation dimer chains are connected along the c axis of the monoclinic cell. In conclusion, this finding provides insights into the interplay of electron correlation and lattice distortionmore » in V2O3, and it may also help to understand novel properties of other early transition-metal oxides.« less

  13. Effects of cation on electrical responses of ionic polymer-metal composite sensors at various ambient humidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zicai; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Takagi, Kentaro; Takeda, Jun; Chang, Longfei; Asaka, Kinji

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of various cations on the electrical responses of ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) sensors at various ambient humidities. Four typical Au-Nafion IPMC samples were prepared with H+, Li+, Na+, and K+ cations. The voltage and current responses of the IPMCs were investigated under static and dynamic bending displacements. The orders of the voltage and current amplitudes were generally Li+ > Na+ > K+ > H+ and depended on the cation transport properties and the water content. The static voltage response first increased to a peak and then slowly decreased to a steady state. A negative steady-state voltage was initially observed for the IPMC with H+ cations under near saturation conditions. The voltage amplitude increased monotonously with increasing frequency from 0.1 to 10 Hz at a high relative humidity (RH, ˜90%), first increased and then decreased at moderate humidity (RH, ˜50%), and decreased continuously at low humidity (RH, ˜20%). The static current response first rapidly increased to a peak and then quickly decayed. During current decay, free oscillation decay occurred at high humidity and attenuated with decreasing humidity. This was confirmed to be the result of cation movement in the IPMC. There are three necessary conditions for oscillation: sufficient migrated cations, high cation mobility, and high stiffness of the polymer network. For the dynamic current response, the amplitude increased with increasing frequency (0.1-10 Hz) and showed good linearity. The underlying physics, mainly involving cation forward migration and back diffusion caused by mechano-chemo-electrical coupling, was clarified.

  14. Redox Active Cation Intercalation/Deintercalation in Two-Dimensional Layered MnO2 Nanostructures for High-Rate Electrochemical Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Pan; Ma, Renzhi; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Bai, Xueyin; Li, Shen; Sasaki, Takayoshi

    2017-02-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials with a high intercalation pseudocapacitance have long been investigated for Li(+)-ion-based electrochemical energy storage. By contrast, the exploration of guest ions other than Li(+) has been limited, although promising. The present study investigates intercalation/deintercalation behaviors of various metal ions in 2D layered MnO2 with various interlayer distances, K-birnessite nanobelt (K-MnO2), its protonated form (H-MnO2), and a freeze-dried sample of exfoliated nanosheets. Series of metal ions, such as monovalent Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) and divalent Mg(2+), exhibit reversible intercalation during charge/discharge cycling, delivering high-rate pseudocapacitances. In particular, the freeze-dried MnO2 of exfoliated nanosheets restacked with the largest interlayer spacing and a less compact 3D network exhibits the best rate capability and a stable cyclability over 5000 cycles. Both theoretical calculation and kinetic analysis reveal that the increased interlayer distance facilitates the fast diffusion of cations in layered MnO2 hosts. The results presented herein provide a basis for the controllable synthesis of layered nanostructures for high-rate electrochemical energy storage using various single- and multivalent ions.

  15. Mixed-valent neptunium(IV/V) compound with cation-cation-bound six-membered neptunyl rings.

    PubMed

    Jin, Geng Bang

    2013-11-04

    A new mixed-valent neptunium(IV/V) compound has been synthesized by evaporation of a neptunium(V) acidic solution. The structure of the compound features cation-cation-bound six-membered neptunyl(V) rings. These rings are further connected by Np(IV) ions through cation-cation interactions (CCIs) into a three-dimensional neptunium cationic open framework. This example illustrates the possibility of isolating neptunyl(V) CCI oligomers in inorganic systems using other cations to compete with Np(V) in bonding with the neptunyl oxygen.

  16. Sorption mechanism and predictive models for removal of cationic organic contaminants by cation exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Jadbabaei, Nastaran; Zhang, Huichun

    2014-12-16

    Understanding the sorption mechanism of organic contaminants on cation exchange resins (CXRs) will enable application of these resins for the removal of cationic organic compounds from contaminated water. In this study, sorption of a diverse set of 12 organic cations and 8 neutral aromatic solutes on two polystyrene CXRs, MN500 and Amberlite 200, was examined. MN500 showed higher sorbed concentrations due to its microporous structure. The sorbed concentrations followed the same trend of aromatic cations > aliphatic cations > neutral solutes for both resins. Generally, solute-solvent interactions, nonpolar moiety of the solutes, and resin matrix can affect selectivity of the cations. Sorbed concentrations of the neutral compounds were significantly less than those of the cations, indicating a combined effect of electrostatic and nonelectrostatic interactions. By conducting multiple linear regression between Gibbs free energy of sorption and Abraham descriptors for all 20 compounds, polarity/polarizability (S), H-bond acidity (A), induced dipole (E), and electrostatic (J(+)) interactions were found to be involved in the sorption of the cations by the resins. After converting the aqueous sorption isotherms to sorption from the ideal gas-phase by water-wet resins, a more significant effect of J(+) was observed. Predictive models were then developed based on the linear regressions and validated by accurately estimating the sorption of different test set compounds with a root-mean-square error range of 0.91-1.1 and 0.76-0.85 for MN500 and Amberlite 200, respectively. The models also accurately predicted sorption behavior of aniline and imidazole between pH 3 and 10.

  17. Social Facilitation of Aiding Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartell, Patricia; And Others

    Research on individual's response to emergency situations in the presence of others has produced conflicting results. The bystander effect is the label applied to inaction or the unlikelihood of assistance with others present. The social facilitation effect occurs when the presence of others energizes response; strong habit responses are…

  18. Facilitating Creativity in Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Kuan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Creativity in education research has received increasing attention, although the major focus of this research has been on children. Despite pleas by several adult educators for promoting creativity, very few studies have focused on adult learners, leaving to it to be explored what approaches are useful for adult educators to facilitate creativity…

  19. SUPERFUND GROUNDWATER ISSUE - FACILITATED TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Regional Superfund Ground Water Forum is a group of ground-water scientists representing EPA's Regional Superfund Offices, organized to exchange up to date information related to ground-water remediation at Superfund sites. Facilitated transport is an issue identified by the ...

  20. Facilitating Conditions for School Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; McInerney, Dennis M.

    Primary and high school students (277 in grades 5-6; 615 in grades 7-12) in the United States (47 percent boys) responded to 26 items of the Facilitating Conditions Questionnaire (FCQ). Results indicate 7 distinct FCQ factors: perceived value of schooling; affect toward schooling; peer positive academic climate (Peer Positive); encouragement from…

  1. Facilitation of Mourning During Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliman, Gilbert; And Others

    This paper discusses case studies of children psychologically disturbed by the death of parents or siblings. Illustrations of mourning facilitation were mainly gathered from 16 orphaned children, ages 3-14. Some techniques used in helping children mourn include: discussing physical details of the illness, discussing previous deaths of animals and…

  2. Independent adsorption of monovalent cations and cationic polymers at PE/PG lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomich, Daria A.; Nesterenko, Alexey M.; Kostritskii, Andrei Yu; Kondinskaia, Diana A.; Ermakov, Yuri A.; Gurtovenko, Andrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic cationic polymers constitute a wide class of polymeric biocides. Commonly their antimicrobial effect is associated to their interaction with bacterial membranes. In the present study we analyze the interaction of various cationic polymers with model bacterial membranes comprised of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). We describe a polymer-membrane interaction as a process of modification of the surface charge. It is well known that small monovalent inorganic cations (Na+, K+) cannot overcharge the surface of a bilayer containing anionic lipids. In contrast, polycations are able to overcharge anionic membranes and demonstrate a very large input to the electric field distribution at the membrane-water interface. We aimed here to study the electrostatic effects associated with the interaction of polycations of different types with a model lipid membrane whose composition closely resembles that of bacterial membranes (PE:PG = 1:4). Four different cationic polymers (polyvinylamine, polyallylamine, poly-L-lysine and polyethylenimine) were adsorbed at a model PE/PG bilayer in MD simulations. Adsorption of sodium cations was inspected separately for PE/PG bilayers of different composition and cation’s binding parameters were determined. From computational experiments and consequent theoretical analysis we concluded that sodium adsorption at anionic binding sites does not depend on the presence of polycations. Therefore, we hypothesize that antimicrobial activity of the studied cationic polymers should depend on the ionic composition of the medium.

  3. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  4. Efficient scavenging of β-carotene radical cations by antiinflammatory salicylates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hong; Liang, Ran; Han, Rui-Min; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Skibsted, Leif H

    2014-02-01

    The radical cation generated during photobleaching of β-carotene is scavenged efficiently by the anion of methyl salicylate from wintergreen oil in a second-order reaction approaching the diffusion limit with k2 = 3.2 × 10(9) L mol(-1) s(-1) in 9 : 1 v/v chloroform-methanol at 23 °C, less efficiently by the anion of salicylic acid with 2.2 × 10(8) L mol(-1) s(-1), but still of possible importance for light-exposed tissue. Surprisingly, acetylsalicylate, the aspirin anion, reacts with an intermediate rate in a reaction assigned to the anion of the mixed acetic-salicylic acid anhydride formed through base induced rearrangements. The relative scavenging rate of the β-carotene radical cation by the three salicylates is supported by DFT-calculations.

  5. Gas-phase electronic spectroscopy of the indene cation (C9H8+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalyavi, Nahid; Dryza, Viktoras; Sanelli, Julian A.; Bieske, Evan J.

    2013-06-01

    The electronic spectrum of the indene radical cation has been investigated through resonance-enhanced photodissociation of the weakly bound C9H8+-He and C9H8+-Arn (n = 1, 2) complexes in a tandem mass spectrometer. The D2 ← D0 band origin for indene+-He is observed at 17 379 ± 15 cm-1, while the D2 ← D0 and D4 ← D0 band origins for indene+-Ar appear at 17 353 ± 15 cm-1 and 28 254 ± 15 cm-1, respectively. The vibronic structure of the D2 ← D0 band system is assigned by comparison with a simulated spectrum based on time-dependent density functional theory calculations, and is due mainly to progressions in ring deformation vibrational modes. Possible correspondences between the stronger visible transitions of the indene cation and diffuse interstellar bands observed towards the heavily reddened star HD 204827 are discussed.

  6. Improving the alkaline stability of imidazolium cations by substitution.

    PubMed

    Dong, Huilong; Gu, Fenglou; Li, Min; Lin, Bencai; Si, Zhihong; Hou, Tingjun; Yan, Feng; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Li, Youyong

    2014-10-06

    Imidazolium cations are promising candidates for preparing anion-exchange membranes because of their good alkaline stability. Substitution of imidazolium cations is an efficient way to improve their alkaline stability. By combining density functional theory calculations with experimental results, it is found that the LUMO energy correlates with the alkaline stability of imidazolium cations. The results indicate that alkyl groups are the most suitable substituents for the N3 position of imidazolium cations, and the LUMO energies of alkyl-substituted imidazolium cations depend on the electron-donating effect and the hyperconjugation effect. Comparing 1,2-dimethylimidazolium cations (1,2-DMIm+) and 1,3-dimethylimidazolium cations (1,3-DMIm+) with the same substituents reveals that the hyperconjugation effect is more significant in influencing the LUMO energy of 1,3-DMIms. This investigation reveals that LUMO energy is a helpful aid in predicting the alkaline stability of imidazolium cations.

  7. Diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

  8. Reduce Confusion about Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebrank, Mary R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents activities that allow students to explore the fundamental but poorly understood concept of diffusion by appealing to their kinesthetic senses first, then challenging their analytical skills as they try to deduce the mathematical principle involved. Presents a computer simulation of diffusion and discusses diffusion's limitations and…

  9. Diffusion Strategy Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, James R.; Sanders, John R.

    A methodology is presented for planning and managing the spread of educational innovations. The first portion of the guide develops a theoretical framework for diffusion which summarizes and capitalizes on the latest marketing and on the latest marketing and diffusion research findings. Major stages in the diffusion paradigm discussed include…

  10. A Student Diffusion Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Pearson, Bryan

    2017-02-01

    Diffusion is a truly interdisciplinary topic bridging all areas of STEM education. When biomolecules are not being moved through the body by fluid flow through the circulatory system or by molecular motors, diffusion is the primary mode of transport over short distances. The direction of the diffusive flow of particles is from high concentration toward low concentration.

  11. Handbook on atmospheric diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R.; Briggs, G.A.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Basic meteorological concepts are covered as well as plume rise, source effects, and diffusion models. Chapters are included on cooling tower plumes and urban diffusion. Suggestions are given for calculating diffusion in special situations, such as for instantaneous releases over complex terrain, over long distances, and during times when chemical reactions or dry or wet deposition are important. (PSB)

  12. Search for fullerenes and PAHs in the diffuse interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenfreund, P.; Foing, B. H.

    1995-02-01

    Recent studies suggest carbon-containing molecules as the best candidates for carriers of the unidentified diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). considering their abundance and ability to form stable bonds in interstellar space. We have searched for new DIBs in the near-IR and have detected two new diffuse bands that are consistent with laboratory measurements of C 60+ in a neon matrix. Criteria for this possible identification are discussed. From these observations and the DIB treasured absorption. we estimate that up to 0.9% of interstellar carbon could be in the form of C 60+ We also searched for poly cyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) canons and have derived corresponding limits for the presence of the coronene C 24H 12 and ovalene C 32H 14 cations in space. We have studied the ionization properties of these PAH cations, which could explain their selective destruction. From these results we discuss the role of fullerenes and PAHs as possible DIB carriers.

  13. Communication: CO oxidation by silver and gold cluster cations: Identification of different active oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Popolan, Denisia M.; Bernhardt, Thorsten M.

    2011-03-07

    The oxidation of carbon monoxide with nitrous oxide on mass-selected Au{sub 3}{sup +} and Ag{sub 3}{sup +} clusters has been investigated under multicollision conditions in an octopole ion trap experiment. The comparative study reveals that for both gold and silver cations carbon dioxide is formed on the clusters. However, whereas in the case of Au{sub 3}{sup +} the cluster itself acts as reactive species that facilitates the formation of CO{sub 2} from N{sub 2}O and CO, for silver the oxidized clusters Ag{sub 3}O{sub x}{sup +} (n= 1-3) are identified as active in the CO oxidation reaction. Thus, in the case of the silver cluster cations N{sub 2}O is dissociated and one oxygen atom is suggested to directly react with CO, whereas a second kind of oxygen strongly bound to silver is acting as a substrate for the reaction.

  14. Reversible changes of canavalin solubility controlled by divalent cation concentration in crude sword bean extract.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Kaho; Arii, Yasuhiro

    2016-12-01

    Canavalin is a vicilin-class (7S) storage protein found in sword bean (Canavalia gladiata). Our previous report indicated that canavalin is precipitated by the addition of 20 mM MgCl2 to crude sword bean extract. Here, we examined the solubility changes induced by the addition of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) at various concentrations. Canavalin tended to be insolubilized at relatively low concentrations of MgCl2 (< 20 mM) and solubilized at relatively high concentrations (> 20 mM). In addition, canavalin was slightly insolubilized in the presence of NaCl. Overall, the results revealed that solubility changes are reversible and depend on the concentration of divalent cations. Therefore, we suggested a reaction scheme that describes the effects of divalent cations on the solubility of canavalin, which would facilitate the study of its physiological function and the application of canavalin in the food processing industry.

  15. Exploring Alkaline Stable Organic Cations for Polymer Hydroxide Exchange Membranes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    Organic Cations for Polymer Hydroxide Exchange Membranes Hydroxide exchange membranes (HEMs) are important polymer electrolytes for electrochemical...Exploring Alkaline Stable Organic Cations for Polymer Hydroxide Exchange Membranes Report Title Hydroxide exchange membranes (HEMs) are important polymer ...constructing HEMs. EXPLORING ALKALINE STABLE ORGANIC CATIONS FOR POLYMER HYDROXIDE EXCHANGE MEMBRANES by Bingzi Zhang

  16. Ionic diffusion in single crystals of vermiculite

    SciTech Connect

    Maraqah, H.R.

    1993-01-01

    Novel guest-host compounds, based on single crystal vermiculite, were synthesized by diffusive techniques through a new hydrogen vermiculite. Single crystals were chosen because of the ease of characterization. An investigation of the ion transport properties of these single crystals was done to determine the mechanism of conductivity including the predominant charge carrier. Measurements of the ionic conductivity using impedance spectroscopy and X-ray lattice parameters of the ion-exchanged samples strongly suggest that the native cations and not protons are the major current carriers. Single crystals of hydrogen vermiculite were synthesized at room temperature by ion exchange from sodium-vermiculite using 1 molar acetic acid for a one week. Subsequent ion exchange with other cations was found to be much enhanced. Thus transition metals were exchanged in about a week in contrast to the need of several months using previous methods. The ionic conductivity of hydrogen vermiculite was measured and shown to be much lower than that of many other monovalent cations in the same host lattice. Its enthalpy of motion is also much lower. These marked differences suggest that protonic species do not play a significant role in charge transport in these layered materials. These materials were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and acid-base titration. Hydrogen-vermiculite was found to react with organic bases, like methylamine, ethylamine, n-butylamine, n-hexylamine, n-octylamine, n-decylamine, aniline, acrylamide, methacrylaminde, urea, 1,10phenanthroline, and 1,1phenanthroline ferrous sulfate complex, to undergo ion exchange with metal cations like sodium, zinc, copper(II) ions and polymerization reactions could be performed in the galleries of the structure like pyrrole and aniline. Its behavior was compared with that of powdered montmorillonite.

  17. Facilitating Facilitators to Facilitate, in Problem or Enquiry Based Learning Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) has been used in dental education over the past 20 years and uses a patient case scenario to stimulate learning in a small group setting, where a trained facilitator does not teach but guides the group to bring about deep contextualized learning, to be empathetic to each other and to encourage fair and equitable…

  18. Cation channels in the Arabidopsis plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Véry, Anne Aliénor; Sentenac, Hervé

    2002-04-01

    In vivo analyses have identified different functional types of ion channels in various plant tissues and cells. The Arabidopsis genome contains approximately 70 genes for ion channels, of which 57 might be cation-selective channels (K(+), Ca(2+) or poorly discriminating channels). Here, we describe the different families of (putative) cation channels: the Shakers, the two-P-domain and Kir K(+) channels (encoded by the KCO genes), the cyclic-nucleotide-gated channels, the glutamate receptors, and the Ca(2+) channel TPC1. We also compare molecular data with the data obtained in planta, which should lead to a better understanding of the identity of these channels and provide clues about their roles in plant nutrition and cell signalling.

  19. Mechanism of metal cationization in organic SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, I.; Delcorte, A.; Gonze, X.; Bertrand, P.

    2001-09-01

    A mechanism for metal cationization of phenyl group containing hydrocarbons is discussed. Intact molecules and their fragments are emitted from a thin organic layer covering a metal surface bombarded by fast ions. It is shown that the process of associative ionization of a neutral hydrocarbon molecule and a neutral excited metal atom, occurring above the surface, may contribute to the yield of cationized molecules. To demonstrate this we have calculated the potential energy curves for the model system C 6H 6+Me (Me=Ag, Cu, Au) making use of the density functional theory. The initial states of the metal atoms approaching the benzene ring along the C 6 symmetry axis were set as the ground, ionic, and excited in ( n-1)d 9ns 2 electronic configuration.

  20. Nanoheterostructure cation exchange: anionic framework conservation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prashant K; Amirav, Lilac; Aloni, Shaul; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2010-07-28

    In ionic nanocrystals the cationic sublattice can be replaced with a different metal ion via a fast, simple, and reversible place exchange, allowing postsynthetic modification of the composition of the nanocrystal, while preserving its size and shape. Here, we demonstrate that, during such an exchange, the anionic framework of the crystal is preserved. When applied to nanoheterostructures, this phenomenon ensures that compositional interfaces within the heterostructure are conserved throughout the transformation. For instance, a morphology composed of a CdSe nanocrystal embedded in a CdS rod (CdSe/CdS) was exchanged to a PbSe/PbS nanorod via a Cu(2)Se/Cu(2)S structure. During every exchange cycle, the seed size and position within the nanorod were preserved, as evident by excitonic features, Z-contrast imaging, and elemental line scans. Anionic framework conservation extends the domain of cation exchange to the design of more complex and unique nanostructures.

  1. Planar Chiral, Ferrocene-Stabilized Silicon Cations.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ruth K; Klare, Hendrik F T; Fröhlich, Roland; Oestreich, Martin

    2016-04-04

    The preparation of a series of planar chiral, ferrocenyl-substituted hydrosilanes as precursors of ferrocene-stabilized silicon cations is described. These molecules also feature stereogenicity at the silicon atom. The generation and (29)Si NMR spectroscopic characterization of the corresponding silicon cations is reported, and problems arising from interactions of the electron-deficient silicon atom and adjacent C(sp(3))-H bonds or aromatic π donors are discussed. These issues are overcome by tethering another substituent at the silicon atom to the ferrocene backbone. The resulting annulation also imparts conformational rigidity and steric hindrance in such a way that the central chirality at the silicon atom is set with complete diastereocontrol. These chiral Lewis acid catalysts were then tested in difficult Diels-Alder reactions, but no enantioinduction was seen.

  2. Two types of diffusions at the cathode/electrolyte interface in IT-SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhipeng; Mori, Toshiyuki; Auchterlonie, Graeme John; Zou Jin; Drennan, John

    2011-09-15

    Analytical transmission electron microscopy, in particular with the combination of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), has been performed to investigate the microstructure and microchemistry of the interfacial region between the cathode (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}, LSCF) and the electrolyte (Gd-doped ceria, GDC). Two types of diffusions, mutual diffusion between cathode and electrolyte as well as the diffusion along grain boundaries, have been clarified. These diffusions suggest that the chemical stability of LSCF and GDC are not as good as previously reported. The results are more noteworthy if we take into consideration the fact that such interdiffusions occur even during the sintering process of cell preparation. - Graphical Abstract: Two types of diffusions, the mutual diffusion and the diffusion along grain boundaries, occurred at the cathode/electrolyte interface of intermediate temperature solid state fuel cells, during cell preparation. The mutual diffusion is denoted by black arrows and the diffusion along grain boundaries assigned by pink arrows. Highlights: > All the cations in cathode (LSCF) and electrolyte (GDC) can mutually diffuse into each other. > Diffusing elements will segregate at grain boundaries or triple junctions around the cathode/electrolyte interface. > Two types of diffusions, the mutual diffusion and diffusion along grain boundaries, have been clarified thereafter.

  3. Interaction between silica and hydrophobic cations.

    PubMed Central

    Depasse, J

    1978-01-01

    The interactions between silica and some molecules which have a high affinity for its surface have been studied. The hydrophobic properties and the positive charge of these molecules are likely to be responsible for their strong adsorption on to silica. These observations should be useful in research into new inhibitors of the effects of silica. One of the cations tested, chloroquine, has been shown to be an effective inhibitor of the haemolytic activity of quartz. PMID:204326

  4. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  5. The effects of cationic contamination on the physio-chemical properties of perfluoroionomer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molter, Trent M.

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) technology cannot meet fuel cell and electrolyzer durability standards for stationary and transportation applications. Cell designs are not of sufficient maturity to demonstrate more than several thousand hours of invariant performance. One of the limiting factors is the operational lifetime of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA's) because of pin-holing, dry-out, mechanical breeches, chemical attack and contamination. This program investigated the role of contamination on the degradation of perfluorinated membranes in fuel cell and electrolysis environments. Tests were conducted to develop an understanding of the effects of cationic contaminants on fundamental design parameters for these membranes including water content, ion exchange capacity, gas diffusion, ionic conductivity, and mechanical properties. Tests showed that cations rapidly transport into the membrane and disperse throughout its structure achieving high equilibrium concentrations. Ion charge density appears to govern membrane water content with small ions demonstrating the highest water content. Permeability studies showed transport in accordance with Fick's law in the following order: H2>O2>N 2>H2O. Cations negatively affect gas and water transport, with charge density affecting transport rates. Unique diffusion coefficients were calculated for each contaminating species suggesting that the contaminant is an integral participant in the transport process. AC resistance measurements showed that size of the ion charge carrier is an important factor in the conduction mechanism and that membrane area specific resistance correlates well with water content. Increases in membrane yield strength and the modulus of elasticity were demonstrated with increased contamination. Tensile tests showed that cation size plays an important role in determining the magnitude of this increase, indicating that larger ions interfere more with strain than smaller ones. Contaminants reduced

  6. Sn cation valency dependence in cation exchange reactions involving Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    De Trizio, Luca; Li, Hongbo; Casu, Alberto; Genovese, Alessandro; Sathya, Ayyappan; Messina, Gabriele C; Manna, Liberato

    2014-11-19

    We studied cation exchange reactions in colloidal Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals (NCs) involving the replacement of Cu(+) cations with either Sn(2+) or Sn(4+) cations. This is a model system in several aspects: first, the +2 and +4 oxidation states for tin are relatively stable; in addition, the phase of the Cu(2-x)Se NCs remains cubic regardless of the degree of copper deficiency (that is, "x") in the NC lattice. Also, Sn(4+) ions are comparable in size to the Cu(+) ions, while Sn(2+) ones are much larger. We show here that the valency of the entering Sn ions dictates the structure and composition not only of the final products but also of the intermediate steps of the exchange. When Sn(4+) cations are used, alloyed Cu(2-4y)Sn(y)Se NCs (with y ≤ 0.33) are formed as intermediates, with almost no distortion of the anion framework, apart from a small contraction. In this exchange reaction the final stoichiometry of the NCs cannot go beyond Cu0.66Sn0.33Se (that is Cu2SnSe3), as any further replacement of Cu(+) cations with Sn(4+) cations would require a drastic reorganization of the anion framework, which is not possible at the reaction conditions of the experiments. When instead Sn(2+) cations are employed, SnSe NCs are formed, mostly in the orthorhombic phase, with significant, albeit not drastic, distortion of the anion framework. Intermediate steps in this exchange reaction are represented by Janus-type Cu(2-x)Se/SnSe heterostructures, with no Cu-Sn-Se alloys.

  7. Sn Cation Valency Dependence in Cation Exchange Reactions Involving Cu2-xSe Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We studied cation exchange reactions in colloidal Cu2-xSe nanocrystals (NCs) involving the replacement of Cu+ cations with either Sn2+ or Sn4+ cations. This is a model system in several aspects: first, the +2 and +4 oxidation states for tin are relatively stable; in addition, the phase of the Cu2-xSe NCs remains cubic regardless of the degree of copper deficiency (that is, “x”) in the NC lattice. Also, Sn4+ ions are comparable in size to the Cu+ ions, while Sn2+ ones are much larger. We show here that the valency of the entering Sn ions dictates the structure and composition not only of the final products but also of the intermediate steps of the exchange. When Sn4+ cations are used, alloyed Cu2–4ySnySe NCs (with y ≤ 0.33) are formed as intermediates, with almost no distortion of the anion framework, apart from a small contraction. In this exchange reaction the final stoichiometry of the NCs cannot go beyond Cu0.66Sn0.33Se (that is Cu2SnSe3), as any further replacement of Cu+ cations with Sn4+ cations would require a drastic reorganization of the anion framework, which is not possible at the reaction conditions of the experiments. When instead Sn2+ cations are employed, SnSe NCs are formed, mostly in the orthorhombic phase, with significant, albeit not drastic, distortion of the anion framework. Intermediate steps in this exchange reaction are represented by Janus-type Cu2-xSe/SnSe heterostructures, with no Cu–Sn–Se alloys. PMID:25340627

  8. Fast doping of Cu into ZnSe NCs by hydrazine promoted cation exchange in aqueous solution at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Shao, Haibao; Wang, Chunlei; Xu, Shuhong; Wang, Zhuyuan; Yin, Haihong; Cui, Yiping

    2015-03-01

    Controllable doping is an effective way of tuning the properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs). In this work, a simple strategy of fast doping Cu ions into ZnSe NCs under ambient conditions was proposed. The principle of doping is based on hydrazine (N2H4) promoted cation exchange reaction. By direct addition of Cu ion stock solution into the preformed ZnSe NCs, Cu doped ZnSe NCs can be obtained. Furthermore, the emission of doped NCs can be tuned by changing the amount of impurity ion addition. The cation exchange reaction is facilitated by three factors: 1) N2H4 addition, 2) fast impurity ions, and 3) partial stabilizer removal. The proposed cation exchange reaction in aqueous solution could be an alternate route for NC doping as well as synthesis of ionic NCs.

  9. Controlling chemistry with cations: photochemistry within zeolites.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, V; Shailaja, J; Kaanumalle, Lakshmi S; Sunoj, R B; Chandrasekhar, J

    2003-08-21

    The alkali ions present in the supercages of zeolites X and Y interact with included guest molecules through quadrupolar (cation-pi), and dipolar (cation-carbonyl) interactions. The presence of such interactions can be inferred through solid-state NMR spectra of the guest molecules. Alkali ions, as illustrated in this article, can be exploited to control the photochemical and photophysical behaviors of the guest molecules. For example, molecules that rarely phosphoresce can be induced to do so within heavy cation-exchanged zeolites. The nature (electronic configuration) of the lowest triplet state of carbonyl compounds can be altered with the help of light alkali metal ions. This state switch (n pi*-pi pi*) helps to bring out reactivity that normally remains dormant. Selectivity obtained during the singlet oxygen oxidation of olefins within zeolites illustrates the remarkable control that can be exerted on photoreactions with the help of a confined medium that also has active sites. The reaction cavities of zeolites, like enzymes, are not only well-defined and confined, but also have active sites that closely guide the reactant molecule from start to finish. The examples provided here illustrate that zeolites are far more useful than simple shape-selective catalysts.

  10. Low cation coordination in oxide melts

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Lawrie; Benmore, Chris J; Du, Jincheng; Weber, Richard; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Tumber, Sonia; Parise, John B

    2014-01-01

    The complete set of Faber-Ziman partial pair distribution functions for a rare earth oxide liquid were measured for the first time by combining aerodynamic levitation, neutron diffraction, high energy x-ray diffraction and isomorphic substitution using Y2 O3 and Ho2 O3 melts. The average Y- O coordination is measured to be 5.5(2), which is significantly less than the octahedral coordination of crystalline Y2 O3 (or Ho2 O3 ). Investigation of high temperature La2 O3 , ZrO2 , SiO2 , and Al2 O3 melts by x-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations also show lower-than-crystal cation- oxygen coordination. These measurements suggest a general trend towards lower M-O coordination compared to their crystalline counterparts. It is found that this coordination number drop is larger for lower field strength, larger radius cations and is negligible for high field strength (network forming) cations. These findings have broad implications for predicting the local structure and related physical properties of metal-oxide melts and oxide glasses.

  11. Modeling diffusion and adsorption in compacted bentonite: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, Ian C.; Bourg, Alain C. M.; Sposito, Garrison

    2003-03-01

    The current way of describing diffusive transport through compacted clays is a simple diffusion model coupled to a linear adsorption coefficient ( Kd). To fit the observed results of cation diffusion, this model is usually extended with an adjustable "surface diffusion" coefficient. Description of the negative adsorption of anions calls for a further adjustment through the use of an "effective porosity". The final model thus includes many fitting parameters. This is inconvenient where predictive modeling is called for (e.g., for waste confinement using compacted clay liners). The diffusion/adsorption models in current use have been derived from the common hydrogeological equation of advection/dispersion/adsorption. However, certain simplifications were also borrowed without questioning their applicability to the case of compacted clays. Among these simplifications, the assumption that the volume of the adsorbed phase is negligible should be discussed. We propose a modified diffusion/adsorption model that accounts for the volume of the adsorbed phase. It suggests that diffusion through highly compacted clay takes place through the interlayers (i.e., in the adsorbed phase). Quantitative prediction of the diffusive flux will necessitate more detailed descriptions of surface reactivity and of the mobility of interlayer species.

  12. Obstacles may facilitate and direct DNA search by proteins.

    PubMed

    Marcovitz, Amir; Levy, Yaakov

    2013-05-07

    DNA recognition by DNA-binding proteins (DBPs), which is a pivotal event in most gene regulatory processes, is often preceded by an extensive search for the correct site. A facilitated diffusion process in which a DBP combines three-dimensional diffusion in solution with one-dimensional sliding along DNA has been suggested to explain how proteins can locate their target sites on DNA much faster than predicted by three-dimensional diffusion alone. Although experimental and theoretical studies have recently advanced understanding of the biophysical principles underlying the search mechanism, the process under in vivo cellular conditions is poorly understood. In this study, we used various computational approaches to explore how the presence of obstacle proteins on the DNA influences search efficiency. At a low obstacle occupancy (i.e., when few obstacles occupy sites on the DNA), sliding by the searching DBP may be confined, which may impair search efficiency. The obstacles, however, can be bypassed during hopping events, and the number of bypasses is larger for higher obstacle occupancies. Dynamism on the part of the obstacles may even further facilitate search kinetics. Our study shows that the nature and efficiency of the search process may be governed not only by the intrinsic properties of the DBP and the salt concentration of the medium, but also by the in vivo association of DNA with other macromolecular obstacles, their location, and occupancy.

  13. Cation uptake and allocation by red pine seedlings under cation-nutrient stress in a column growth experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and aims: Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient stress on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods: Column experim...

  14. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  15. Effects of two cations on gastrointestinal absorption of ofloxacin.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez Cabarga, M; Sánchez Navarro, A; Colino Gandarillas, C I; Domínguez-Gil, A

    1991-01-01

    A study was performed to establish the effect of Al3+ and Fe2+ cations on the absorption of ofloxacin when it is administered orally at a dose of 200 mg. The study was carried out with nine volunteers, who each received three treatments (A [200 mg of ofloxacin], B [200 mg of ofloxacin plus 11 g of colloidal aluminum phosphate], and C [200 mg of ofloxacin plus 1,050 mg of FeSO4]) according to a Latin square design; the washout period was 1 week. The analytical technique was a microbiological diffusion method. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated from the cumulative urinary excretion data and from a sigma-minus plot. The total amount of ofloxacin excreted in urine had a mean value of 163.59 +/- 22.13 mg when ofloxacin was administered alone, 152.41 +/- 18.76 mg when it was administered with Al3+, and 146.49 +/- 14.85 mg when it was administered with Fe2+. No statistically significant differences were found in the F values (fractions of dose absorbed) obtained with ofloxacin alone and ofloxacin plus Al3+ (P = 0.341). When ofloxacin alone was compared with joint administration with Fe2+ the value of F decreased 10.85%; this difference is statistically significant (P = 2.623 x 10(-2)). PMID:1759833

  16. The mechanism of electron-cation geminate recombination in liquid isooctane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tieqiao; Lee, Young Jong; Kee, Tak W.; Barbara, Paul F.

    2005-02-01

    Electron-cation geminate recombination in isooctane has been reinvestigated by femtosecond spectroscopy. The observed recombination kinetics are well-fit by a single exponential decay ( τ = 400 ± 40 fs) and exhibit a significant hydrogen/deuterium kinetic isotope effect. The kinetics are not affected by varying the incident intensity or by exciting the recombining electrons with a high power 800 nm pulse. These observations strongly suggest that the recombination rate is not limited by diffusive motion of the ions to form a contact ion pair, but rather by the electron transfer reaction rate between the ions in a contact ion pair.

  17. Treatment of boundary conditions in through-diffusion: A case study of (85)Sr(2+) diffusion in compacted illite.

    PubMed

    Glaus, M A; Aertsens, M; Maes, N; Van Laer, L; Van Loon, L R

    2015-01-01

    Valuable techniques to measure effective diffusion coefficients in porous media are an indispensable prerequisite for a proper understanding of the migration of chemical-toxic and radioactive micropollutants in the subsurface and geosphere. The present article discusses possible pitfalls and difficulties in the classical through-diffusion technique applied to situations where large diffusive fluxes of cations in compacted clay minerals or clay rocks occur. The results obtained from a benchmark study, in which the diffusion of (85)Sr(2+) tracer in compacted illite has been studied using different experimental techniques, are presented. It is shown that these techniques may yield valuable results provided that an appropriate model is used for numerical simulations. It is further shown that effective diffusion coefficients may be systematically underestimated when the concentration at the downstream boundary is not taken adequately into account in modelling, even for very low concentrations. A criterion is derived for quasi steady-state situations, by which it can be decided whether the simplifying assumption of a zero-concentration at the downstream boundary in through-diffusion is justified or not. The application of the criterion requires, however, knowledge of the effective diffusion coefficient of the clay sample. Such knowledge is often absent or only approximately available during the planning phase of a diffusion experiment.

  18. Numerical simulation of cesium and strontium migration through sodium bentonite altered by cation exchange with groundwater components

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, J.S.; Carnahan, C.L.

    1988-10-01

    Numerical simulations have been used to investigate how spatial and temporal changes in the ion exchange properties of bentonite affect the migration of cationic fission products from high-level waste. Simulations in which fission products compete for exchange sites with ions present in groundwater diffusing into the bentonite are compared to simulations in which the exchange properties of bentonite are constant. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Cation/macromolecule interaction in alkaline cellulose solution characterized with pulsed field-gradient spin-echo NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Rongrong; Lu, Ang; Liu, Maili; Zhang, Lina

    2017-03-06

    As a breakthrough to the traditional (1)H diffusometry, the interaction of cations with cellulose is investigated via(7)Li and (23)Na PFG-SE NMR. The diffusion coefficient of Li(+) decreases more than that of Na(+) with the addition of cellulose, which indicates a stronger binding of LiOH with the macromolecule. Therefore, a new, facile, accurate and repeatable method to characterize ion/polymer interactions is established.

  20. Prosaposin facilitates sortilin-independent lysosomal trafficking of progranulin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolai; Sun, Lirong; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco; Qi, Xiaoyang; Brown, William J; Smolka, Marcus B; Sun, Ying; Hu, Fenghua

    2015-09-14

    Mutations in the progranulin (PGRN) gene have been linked to two distinct neurodegenerative diseases, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Accumulating evidence suggests a critical role of PGRN in lysosomes. However, how PGRN is trafficked to lysosomes is still not clear. Here we report a novel pathway for lysosomal delivery of PGRN. We found that prosaposin (PSAP) interacts with PGRN and facilitates its lysosomal targeting in both biosynthetic and endocytic pathways via the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor and low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1. PSAP deficiency in mice leads to severe PGRN trafficking defects and a drastic increase in serum PGRN levels. We further showed that this PSAP pathway is independent of, but complementary to, the previously identified PGRN lysosomal trafficking mediated by sortilin. Collectively, our results provide new understanding on PGRN trafficking and shed light on the molecular mechanisms behind FTLD and NCL caused by PGRN mutations.

  1. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chuyu; Yang, Xiaohan; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2013-01-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant specieswas reported.We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240members are separated into three families, i.e., Na+/H+ exchangers, K+ efflux antiporters, and cation/H+ exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H+ exchangers in the examined angiospermspecies. Sliding windowanalysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and foundmostmotifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants.

  2. Biological removal of cationic fission products from nuclear wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, N; Chirwa, E M N

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear energy is becoming a preferred energy source amidst rising concerns over the impacts of fossil fuel based energy on global warming and climate change. However, the radioactive waste generated during nuclear power generation contains harmful long-lived fission products such as strontium (Sr). In this study, cationic strontium uptake from solution by microbial cultures obtained from mine wastewater is evaluated. A high strontium removal capacity (q(max)) with maximum loading of 444 mg/g biomass was achieved by a mixed sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) culture. Sr removal in SRB was facilitated by cell surface based electrostatic interactions with the formation of weak ionic bonds, as 68% of the adsorbed Sr(2+) was easily desorbed from the biomass in an ion exchange reaction with MgCl₂. To a lesser extent, precipitation reactions were also found to account for the removal of Sr from aqueous solution as about 3% of the sorbed Sr was precipitated due to the presence of chemical ligands while the remainder occurred as an immobile fraction. Further analysis of the Sr-loaded SRB biomass by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled to energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) confirmed extracellular Sr(2+) precipitation as a result of chemical interaction. In summary, the obtained results demonstrate the prospects of using biological technologies for the remediation of industrial wastewaters contaminated by fission products.

  3. Nicotine activates the chemosensory cation channel TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Talavera, Karel; Gees, Maarten; Karashima, Yuji; Meseguer, Víctor M; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A J; Damann, Nils; Everaerts, Wouter; Benoit, Melissa; Janssens, Annelies; Vennekens, Rudi; Viana, Félix; Nemery, Benoit; Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    Topical application of nicotine, as used in nicotine replacement therapies, causes irritation of the mucosa and skin. This reaction has been attributed to activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in chemosensory neurons. In contrast with this view, we found that the chemosensory cation channel transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is crucially involved in nicotine-induced irritation. We found that micromolar concentrations of nicotine activated heterologously expressed mouse and human TRPA1. Nicotine acted in a membrane-delimited manner, stabilizing the open state(s) and destabilizing the closed state(s) of the channel. In the presence of the general nAChR blocker hexamethonium, nociceptive neurons showed nicotine-induced responses that were strongly reduced in TRPA1-deficient mice. Finally, TRPA1 mediated the mouse airway constriction reflex to nasal instillation of nicotine. The identification of TRPA1 as a nicotine target suggests that existing models of nicotine-induced irritation should be revised and may facilitate the development of smoking cessation therapies with less adverse effects.

  4. Detachment of surface membrane invagination systems by cationic amphiphilic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Sangar; Taylor, Kirk A.; Allcock, Natalie; Rainbow, Richard D.; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn P.

    2016-01-01

    Several cell types develop extensive plasma membrane invaginations to serve a specific physiological function. For example, the megakaryocyte demarcation membrane system (DMS) provides a membrane reserve for platelet production and muscle transverse (T) tubules facilitate excitation:contraction coupling. Using impermeant fluorescent indicators, capacitance measurements and electron microscopy, we show that multiple cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) cause complete separation of the DMS from the surface membrane in rat megakaryocytes. This includes the calmodulin inhibitor W-7, the phospholipase-C inhibitor U73122, and anti-psychotic phenothiazines. CADs also caused loss of T tubules in rat cardiac ventricular myocytes and the open canalicular system of human platelets. Anionic amphiphiles, U73343 (a less electrophilic U73122 analogue) and a range of kinase inhibitors were without effect on the DMS. CADs are known to accumulate in the inner leaflet of the cell membrane where they bind to anionic lipids, especially PI(4,5)P2. We therefore propose that surface detachment of membrane invaginations results from an ability of CADs to interfere with PI(4,5)P2 interactions with cytoskeletal or BAR domain proteins. This establishes a detubulating action of a large class of pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:26725955

  5. Effect of cation exchange on major cation chemistry in the large scale redox experiment at Aespoe

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, B.E.; Bruton, C.J.

    1994-10-01

    Predicting the chemical changes that result from excavating a repository below the groundwater table in granitic terrain is a major focus of the SKB geochemistry program. The modeling study presented here demonstrates that cation exchange can play a major role in controlling the fluid chemistry that results when groundwaters of differing composition mix due to flow induced by excavation of the HRL tunnel. The major goal of this study was to assess whether an equilibrium cation exchange model could explain the composition of groundwater sampled from boreholes in the HRL tunnel. Given the consistency of the cation exchange hypothesis with observations, geochemical modeling was used to assess whether the quantity of exchanger necessary to match model results and observation was physically reasonable. The impact of mineral dissolution and precipitation on fluid chemistry was also evaluated. Finally, the compositions of exchanger phases expected to be in equilibrium with various Aespoe groundwaters were predicted.

  6. Cation–cation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-05-01

    The isotypical compounds (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(H{sub 2}O){sub 5} (1), Ag(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2), K(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} (3), Rb(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3.5} (4), and Cs(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (5) were synthesized, characterized, and their structures determined. Each crystallizes in space group Cc. (1): a=12.979 (3), b=10.238 (2), c=11.302 (2), β=102.044 (2); (2): a=13.148 (2), b=9.520 (1), c=11.083 (2), β=101.568 (2); (3): a=13.111 (8), b=9.930 (6), c=11.242 (7), β=101.024 (7); (4): a=12.940 (2), b=10.231 (2), c=11.259(2), β=102.205 (2); (5): a=12.983 (3), b=10.191 (3), c=11.263 (4), β=101.661 (4). Compounds 1–5 are a framework of uranyl and tungsten polyhedra containing cation–cation interactions. The framework has three symmetrically distinct U(VI) cations, one tungsten, sixteen to eighteen oxygen atoms, and in 2–5, one monovalent cation. Each atom occupies a general position. Each U(VI) cation is present as a typical (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ion in an overall pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. Each pentagonal bipyramid shares two equatorial edges with two other pentagonal bipyramids, forming a trimer. Trimers are connected into chains by edge-sharing with WO{sub 6} octahedra. Chains are linked through cation–cation interactions between two symmetrically independent uranyl ions. This yields a remarkably complex system of intersecting channels that extend along [0 0 1] and [−1 1 0]. The cation exchange properties of 2 and 3 were characterized at room temperature and at 140 °C. - Graphical abstract: Chains of uranium and tungsten polyhedra are connected into a three dimensional framework by cation–cation interactions occurring between two symmetrically independent uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. Monovalent cations present in channels within the structure can be exchanged by room temperature or mild hydrothermal

  7. Strong cation exchange chromatography in analysis of posttranslational modifications: innovations and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Mariola J

    2011-01-01

    Strong cation exchange (SCX) chromatography has been utilized as an excellent separation technique that can be combined with reversed-phase (RP) chromatography, which is frequently used in peptide mass spectrometry. Although SCX is valuable as the second component of such two-dimensional separation methods, its application goes far beyond efficient fractionation of complex peptide mixtures. Here I describe how SCX facilitates mapping of the protein posttranslational modifications (PTMs), specifically phosphorylation and N-terminal acetylation. The SCX chromatography has been mainly used for enrichment of these two PTMs, but it might also be beneficial for high-throughput analysis of other modifications that alter the net charge of a peptide.

  8. Hereditary Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schedler, Katharina J E; Traine, Peter G; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Haritoglou, Christos; Metz, Klaus A; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is one of the most common childhood cancers. The diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a rare subtype of this neoplasm. The majority of cases of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma are unilateral and occur sporadically. Herein we report on a family with three children affected by retinoblastoma, among them one girl with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. This girl was diagnosed at the age of 8 years with a unilateral diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. By contrast, the two brothers became clinically apparent in the first 2 years of life with bilateral retinoblastoma. The parents were clinically unremarkable. Genetic analysis of RB1 gene was performed. The girl with diffuse infiltrating RB was found to be heterozygous for an oncogenic mutation in the RB1 gene that was also carried by both brothers and the father of the family. These results show that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can develop on the background of a hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma.

  9. A monovalent cationic conductance that is blocked by extracellular divalent cations in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, R O; Woodward, R M; Miledi, R

    1995-01-01

    1. Native Xenopus oocytes were voltage clamped and exposed to Ringer solutions containing low concentrations of divalent cations. Oocytes, held at -60 mV, developed a reversible non-inactivating smooth inward current (Ic) associated with an increase in membrane conductance. 2. Ic was selectively carried by cations (Na+, K+), indicating that the current was not the result of a non-specific membrane breakdown, but was due instead to removal of a blocking effect of divalent cations on a specific population of endogenous ionic channels located in the oocyte membrane. 3. The blocking effects of Ca2+ and Mg2+ were voltage dependent, implying action at a binding site within the pore of the cationic channel. For example, the half-maximal inhibition (IC50) of Ic by Ca2+ was 61 microM in oocytes held at -60 mV and 212 microM in oocytes held at 0 mV. 4. The Ic channels could be unblocked by depolarization of the membrane even in the presence of physiological concentrations of Ca2+ or Mg2+. The unblocking of the channels was observed as a slowly developing outward current. 5. The novel cationic current was substantially reduced following in vitro maturation of oocytes by treatment with progesterone (10 microM, 4-5 h). 6. The physiological role of Ic channels remains to be elucidated. Nonetheless, their characteristics explain the ionic basis of the sensitivity of oocytes to reductions in extracellular divalent cations and raise the possibility that the channels play a role in calcium homeostasis. PMID:7542710

  10. Stochastic facilitation in the brain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Lawrence M.; Greenwood, Priscilla E.

    2016-05-01

    We describe the context for three unsolved problems of noise in the brain as well as provide some new results relevant to one of them. The problems are: are neural oscillations better described as noisy limit cycles or as noise-driven quasicycles, does noise facilitate synchronization and information transmission in the brain, and do noise-driven spatial patterns (quasipatterns) coexist with noise-driven quasicycles in the brain? We provide a few new results indicating that, in models at least, spatial quasipatterns of quasicycles can occur, and resemble patterns observed in other areas, such as predator-prey systems and chemical reactions.

  11. In situ electrochemical solid-phase extraction of anions and cations using polypyrrole and overoxidized sulfonated polypyrrole.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Yücel; Ercan, Betül; Sahin, Mutlu

    2008-04-15

    A new method for the extraction of both anions and cations is proposed using electro-synthesized polypyrrole (PPy) and overoxidized sulfonated polypyrrole film (OSPPy). In situ anion (chloride, nitrate, sulfate) and cation (calcium, magnesium) uptake and release were examined under controlled potential conditions for prospective applications in electrochemically controlled solid-phase extraction (EC-SPE). The PPy film was used as an anode (anion-exchanger) and OSPPy film was used as a cathode (cation-exchanger) material and reverse order of the electrodes were investigated in EC-SPE. This new cell arrangement containing two ion exchanger polymer electrodes was developed to provide in situ removal of both anions and cations from aqueous solution. Simple preparation of the film coatings on a platinum plate was possible using a constant potential method. Applied positive and negative potentials facilitated the in situ extraction and desorption of ions, respectively. Both anions and cations were desorbed into sample aliquot and were determined by ion chromatography (IC). The method was validated using a standard reference material and tested for the determination of the ions in real water samples.

  12. Nonlinearity of cationic aromatic amine sorption to aluminosilicates and soils: role of intermolecular cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Dharni; Arey, Teresa A; Dickstein, Daniel R; Newman, Mark H; Zhang, Tina Y; Kinnear, Heather M; Bader, Mohammad M

    2013-12-17

    Through the study of substituted anilines and benzylamines, we demonstrated that cooperative cation-π, π-π, and van der Waals interactions can increase aromatic cationic amine sorption to Na/Ca-montmorillonite well beyond the extent expected by cation exchange alone. Cationic amines exhibiting cooperative interactions displayed nonlinear S-shaped isotherms and increased affinity for the sorbent at low surface coverage; parallel cation exchange and cooperative interactions were noted above a sorption threshold of 0.3-2.3% of exchange sites occupied. Our experiments revealed the predominance of intermolecular cation-π interactions, which occurred between the π system of a compound retained on the surface via cation exchange and the cationic amine group of an adjacent molecule. Compounds with greater amine charge/area and electron-donating substituents that allowed for greater electron density at the center of the aromatic ring showed a greater potential for cation-π interactions on montmorillonite surfaces. However, benzylamine sorption to nine soils, at charge loadings comparable to the experiments with montmorillonite, revealed no significant cooperative interactions. It appears that cation-π interactions may be likely in soils with exceptionally high cation exchange capacities (>0.7 mol charge/kg) and low organic matter contents, abundant in montmorillonite and other expanding clay minerals.

  13. Gaseous diffusion system

    DOEpatents

    Garrett, George A.; Shacter, John

    1978-01-01

    1. A gaseous diffusion system comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of said diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof.

  14. Transport by Collective Flagellar Beating Facilitates Evolutionary Transitions to Multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Martin; Powers, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    A central problem underlying the evolution from single cells to multicellular organisms is the relationship between metabolic requirements and environmental metabolite exchange with increasing size. For organisms that form spherical colonies such as the volvocalean green algae, there is a bottleneck if diffusion alone governs nutrient uptake as they increase in size, for the diffusive flux is linear in the radius while the requirements of surface somatic cells grow quadratically. Using Volvox as a model organism, we examine experimentally and theoretically the role that advection of fluid by surface flagella plays in enhancing nutrient uptake. We show that the fluid flow driven by the coordinated beating of those flagella produces a boundary layer in the concentration of a diffusing solute which renders the metabolite exchange rate quadratic in the colony radius. This bypasses the diffusive bottleneck, facilitating evolutionary transitions to multicellularity which may be driven by other environmental factors. These results suggest that flagella may have evolved not only for motility, but also to enhance metabolite exchange.

  15. Phase singularity diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaojun; Lockerman, Yitzchak; Genack, Azriel Z

    2014-06-01

    We follow the trajectories of phase singularities at nulls of intensity in the speckle pattern of waves transmitted through random media as the frequency of the incident radiation is scanned in microwave experiments and numerical simulations. Phase singularities are observed to diffuse with a linear increase of the square displacement 〈R2〉 with frequency shift. The product of the diffusion coefficient of phase singularities in the transmitted speckle pattern and the photon diffusion coefficient through the random medium is proportional to the square of the effective sample length. This provides the photon diffusion coefficient and a method for characterizing the motion of dynamic material systems.

  16. Inpainting using airy diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorduy Hernandez, Sara

    2015-09-01

    One inpainting procedure based on Airy diffusion is proposed, implemented via Maple and applied to some digital images. Airy diffusion is a partial differential equation with spatial derivatives of third order in contrast with the usual diffusion with spatial derivatives of second order. Airy diffusion generates the Airy semigroup in terms of the Airy functions which can be rewritten in terms of Bessel functions. The Airy diffusion can be used to smooth an image with the corresponding noise elimination via convolution. Also the Airy diffusion can be used to erase objects from an image. We build an algorithm using the Maple package ImageTools and such algorithm is tested using some images. Our results using Airy diffusion are compared with the similar results using standard diffusion. We observe that Airy diffusion generates powerful filters for image processing which could be incorporated in the usual packages for image processing such as ImageJ and Photoshop. Also is interesting to consider the possibility to incorporate the Airy filters as applications for smartphones and smart-glasses.

  17. First-Principles Study of Ion Diffusion in Perovskite Solar Cell Sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Haruyama, Jun; Sodeyama, Keitaro; Han, Liyuan; Tateyama, Yoshitaka

    2015-08-19

    Hysteresis in current-voltage curves has been an important issue for conversion efficiency evaluation and development of perovskite solar cells (PSCs). In this study, we explored the ion diffusion effects in tetragonal CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) and trigonal (NH2)2CHPbI3 (FAPbI3) by first-principles calculations. The calculated activation energies of the anionic and cationic vacancy migrations clearly show that I(-) anions in both MAPbI3 and FAPbI3 can easily diffuse with low barriers of ca. 0.45 eV, comparable to that observed in ion-conducting materials. More interestingly, typical MA(+) cations and larger FA(+) cations both have rather low barriers as well, indicating that the cation molecules can migrate in the perovskite sensitizers when a bias voltage is applied. These results can explain the ion displacement scenario recently proposed by experiments. With the dilute diffusion theory, we discuss that smaller vacancy concentrations (higher crystallinity) and replacement of MA(+) with larger cation molecules will be essential for suppressing hysteresis as well as preventing aging behavior of PSC photosensitizers.

  18. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  19. Fragmentation Pathways in the Uracil Radical Cation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Congyi; Matsika, Spiridoula; Kotur, Marija; Weinacht, Thomas C.

    2012-08-24

    We investigate pathways for fragmentation in the uracil radical cation using ab initio electronic structure calculations. We focus on the main fragments produced in pump–probe dissociative ionization experiments. These are fragments with mass to charge ratios (m/z) of 69, 28, 41, and 42. Barriers to dissociation along the ground ionic surface are reported, which provide an estimate of the energetic requirements for the production of the main fragments. Finally, direct and sequential fragmentation mechanisms have been analyzed, and it is concluded that sequential fragmentation after production of fragment with m/z 69 is the dominant mechanism for the production of the smaller fragments.

  20. Development of cationic nanocrystals for ocular delivery.

    PubMed

    Romero, Gregori B; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H; Bou-Chacra, Nadia A

    2016-10-01

    A cationic nanocrystal formulation containing dexamethasone acetate nanocrystals (0.05%) and polymyxin B (0.10%) for ophthalmic application was produced using a self-developed small scale method for wet bead milling. The formulation developed offers the advantage of increased saturation solubility of the drug (due to the nano-size of the crystals) and increased residence time in the eye (due to small size and increased mucoadhesion by the cationic charge) resulting ultimately in potential increased bioavailability. Characterization of the nanosuspensions by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and transmission electron microscopy showed that the production method was successful in achieving dexamethasone crystals in the range of about 200-250nm. The physical stabilization of the nanocrystals and generation of the positive charge were realized by using cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and benzalkonium chloride (BAC) at the concentration of 0.01%. In contrast to other cationic excipients, they are regulatorily accepted due to their use as preservatives. The drug polymyxin B also contributed to the positive charge. Positive zeta potentials in the range +20 to +30mV were achieved. Isotonicity was adjusted using NaCl and non-ionic excipients (glycerol, sorbitol, dextrose). Physical and chemical stabilities were monitored for a period of 6months at room temperature, 5°C and 40°C. Particle size of the bulk population assessed by PCS remained practically unchanged over 6months of storage for the various formulations without isotonicity agents, and for the CPC-containing formulations with non-ionic isotonicity excipients. The chemical content also proved stable after 6months for all 3 temperatures evaluated. In vitro investigation of mucoadhesion was tested using mucin solutions at different concentrations, and the generated negative zeta potential was used as a measure of the interaction. The zeta potential reversed to about -15mV, indicating distinct interaction. The

  1. Nonclassical 21-Homododecahedryl Cation Rearrangement Revisited.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Osorio, Edison; Cabellos, José Luis; Martínez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernández-Herrera, María A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-03-04

    The degenerate rearrangement in the 21-homododecahedryl cation (1) has been studied via density functional theory computations and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics simulations. Compound 1 can be described as a highly fluxional hyperconjugated carbocation. Complete scrambling of 1 can be achieved by the combination of two unveiled barrierless processes. The first one is a "rotation" of one of the six-membered rings via a 0.8 kcal·mol(-1) barrier, and the second one is a slower interconvertion between two hyperconjomers via an out-of-plane methine bending (ΔG(⧧) = 4.0 kcal·mol(-1)).

  2. Soil Cation Status in Southern California: Interactions of Vehicular Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Bain, D. J.; Jenerette, D.; Clarke, L. W.

    2012-12-01

    Roadside soils are often enriched in trace metals due to vehicular deposition. However, less attention is given to base cation pools in roadside soils. Relatively high loadings of nitrate from vehicular exhaust should acidify roadside soils, potentially mobilizing cationic species by displacing them from soil exchange sites. In contrast, weathering of road materials can contribute substantial amounts of these cations to the same soils, potentially replenishing cation pools. Base cations are essential nutrients and these dynamics may alter ecosystem processes in near-road environments. Metal concentrations in park and garden soils collected from Southern California (Los Angeles and Riverside Counties) were examined across gradients of road network intensity, climate and geology. In these samples, base cation concentrations decrease in areas of denser road networks. Base cation concentrations also decrease with distance from the road, with near-road samples relatively depleted in base cation concentrations. In addition, base cation concentrations are associated with traffic flux density, with exchange pools decreasing near heavily trafficked areas. These relationships suggest road activity is mobilizing cations, depleting near-road soils of essential nutrient pools, despite road material weathering. This depletion of soil nutrients from exchange pools in roadside soils likely influences local ecological function in unpredictable ways. This observation lays the groundwork for continued characterization of soil metal processes in the increasingly common roadside environment.

  3. Effects of ionic liquids on cation dynamics in amorphous polyethylene oxide electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chattoraj, Joyjit Diddens, Diddo; Heuer, Andreas

    2014-01-14

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of a poly(ethylene oxide)-based polymer electrolyte material containing lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide salt for a wide temperature regime above and below the experimental crystallization temperature with and without N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ionic liquid (IL). The impact of the IL-concentration on the cation dynamics is studied. The increase of the cation mobility upon addition of IL is significant but temperature-independent. This can be related to distinct variations of the underlying transport properties as expressed within the previously introduced transport model of polymer electrolytes. Even for the largest IL concentration the transport model perfectly predicts the non-trivial time-dependence of the cationic mean square displacement for all temperatures. Finally, we compare our numerical and theoretical findings with the results of recent nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. In this way we can exclusively relate the strong experimentally observed dependence of the low-temperature Li-diffusivity on the IL concentration to the impact of IL on crystallization.

  4. An optical spectrum of a large isolated gas-phase PAH cation: C78H26+

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Junfeng; Mulas, Giacomo; Bonnamy, Anthony; Joblin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    A gas-phase optical spectrum of a large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cation - C78H26+- in the 410-610 nm range is presented. This large all-benzenoid PAH should be large enough to be stable with respect to photodissociation in the harsh conditions prevailing in the interstellar medium (ISM). The spectrum is obtained via multi-photon dissociation (MPD) spectroscopy of cationic C78H26 stored in the Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) cell using the radiation from a mid-band optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser. The experimental spectrum shows two main absorption peaks at 431 nm and 516 nm, in good agreement with a theoretical spectrum computed via time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). DFT calculations indicate that the equilibrium geometry, with the absolute minimum energy, is of lowered, nonplanar C2 symmetry instead of the more symmetric planar D2h symmetry that is usually the minimum for similar PAHs of smaller size. This kind of slightly broken symmetry could produce some of the fine structure observed in some diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). It can also favor the folding of C78H26+ fragments and ultimately the formation of fullerenes. This study opens up the possibility to identify the most promising candidates for DIBs amongst large cationic PAHs. PMID:26942230

  5. Effects of ionic liquids on cation dynamics in amorphous polyethylene oxide electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Chattoraj, Joyjit; Diddens, Diddo; Heuer, Andreas

    2014-01-14

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of a poly(ethylene oxide)-based polymer electrolyte material containing lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide salt for a wide temperature regime above and below the experimental crystallization temperature with and without N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ionic liquid (IL). The impact of the IL-concentration on the cation dynamics is studied. The increase of the cation mobility upon addition of IL is significant but temperature-independent. This can be related to distinct variations of the underlying transport properties as expressed within the previously introduced transport model of polymer electrolytes. Even for the largest IL concentration the transport model perfectly predicts the non-trivial time-dependence of the cationic mean square displacement for all temperatures. Finally, we compare our numerical and theoretical findings with the results of recent nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. In this way we can exclusively relate the strong experimentally observed dependence of the low-temperature Li-diffusivity on the IL concentration to the impact of IL on crystallization.

  6. Effects of ionic liquids on cation dynamics in amorphous polyethylene oxide electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattoraj, Joyjit; Diddens, Diddo; Heuer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of a poly(ethylene oxide)-based polymer electrolyte material containing lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide salt for a wide temperature regime above and below the experimental crystallization temperature with and without N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ionic liquid (IL). The impact of the IL-concentration on the cation dynamics is studied. The increase of the cation mobility upon addition of IL is significant but temperature-independent. This can be related to distinct variations of the underlying transport properties as expressed within the previously introduced transport model of polymer electrolytes. Even for the largest IL concentration the transport model perfectly predicts the non-trivial time-dependence of the cationic mean square displacement for all temperatures. Finally, we compare our numerical and theoretical findings with the results of recent nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. In this way we can exclusively relate the strong experimentally observed dependence of the low-temperature Li-diffusivity on the IL concentration to the impact of IL on crystallization.

  7. Human proximal tubule epithelial cells cultured on hollow fibers: living membranes that actively transport organic cations.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J; De Napoli, I E; Fedecostante, M; Schophuizen, C M S; Chevtchik, N V; Wilmer, M J; van Asbeck, A H; Croes, H J; Pertijs, J C; Wetzels, J F M; Hilbrands, L B; van den Heuvel, L P; Hoenderop, J G; Stamatialis, D; Masereeuw, R

    2015-11-16

    The bioartificial kidney (BAK) aims at improving dialysis by developing 'living membranes' for cells-aided removal of uremic metabolites. Here, unique human conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cell (ciPTEC) monolayers were cultured on biofunctionalized MicroPES (polyethersulfone) hollow fiber membranes (HFM) and functionally tested using microfluidics. Tight monolayer formation was demonstrated by abundant zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) protein expression along the tight junctions of matured ciPTEC on HFM. A clear barrier function of the monolayer was confirmed by limited diffusion of FITC-inulin. The activity of the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) in ciPTEC was evaluated in real-time using a perfusion system by confocal microscopy using 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)) as a fluorescent substrate. Initial ASP(+) uptake was inhibited by a cationic uremic metabolites mixture and by the histamine H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine. In conclusion, a 'living membrane' of renal epithelial cells on MicroPES HFM with demonstrated active organic cation transport was successfully established as a first step in BAK engineering.

  8. Human proximal tubule epithelial cells cultured on hollow fibers: living membranes that actively transport organic cations

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, J.; De Napoli, I. E; Fedecostante, M.; Schophuizen, C. M. S.; Chevtchik, N. V.; Wilmer, M. J.; van Asbeck, A. H.; Croes, H. J.; Pertijs, J. C.; Wetzels, J. F. M.; Hilbrands, L. B.; van den Heuvel, L. P.; Hoenderop, J. G.; Stamatialis, D.; Masereeuw, R.

    2015-01-01

    The bioartificial kidney (BAK) aims at improving dialysis by developing ‘living membranes’ for cells-aided removal of uremic metabolites. Here, unique human conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cell (ciPTEC) monolayers were cultured on biofunctionalized MicroPES (polyethersulfone) hollow fiber membranes (HFM) and functionally tested using microfluidics. Tight monolayer formation was demonstrated by abundant zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) protein expression along the tight junctions of matured ciPTEC on HFM. A clear barrier function of the monolayer was confirmed by limited diffusion of FITC-inulin. The activity of the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) in ciPTEC was evaluated in real-time using a perfusion system by confocal microscopy using 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+) as a fluorescent substrate. Initial ASP+ uptake was inhibited by a cationic uremic metabolites mixture and by the histamine H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine. In conclusion, a ‘living membrane’ of renal epithelial cells on MicroPES HFM with demonstrated active organic cation transport was successfully established as a first step in BAK engineering. PMID:26567716

  9. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity of sodium orthophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, Bashir M.; Lundén, Arnold

    2003-10-01

    The transient hot-disc method is used to measure the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity simultaneously for polycrystalline sodium orthophosphate (Na3PO4) in the temperature range 300-800 K. The thermal conductivity and diffusivity showed a gradual decrease up to the transition temperature Tc = 598 K and then rose rapidly, reaching a peak at 617 K, followed by a decreasing tendency identified with lower peaks up to 800 K. These data were compared with previous thermal conductivity and diffusivity measurements of pure Li2SO4. In the pure Li2SO4 case, the possibility of linking the heat conduction to the paddle-wheel mechanism has been reported. However, in the present case, the link was not so obvious, in spite of the fact that, in other non-thermal studies, it has been well justified. Possible reasons are given to explain the lack of sensitivity in the thermal behaviour of Na3PO4 for it to be linked to this mechanism. These reasons where attributed to the detailed microstructure and to the effect of replacing the anions (PO4)3- by (SO4)2- and/or replacing the cations Na+ by Li+ in the two cases.

  10. The temperature of formation of carbonate in Martian meteorite ALH84001: constraints from cation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hutcheon, I D; Kent, A; Phinney, D L; Ryerson, F J

    1999-08-13

    An important test of the hypothesis that Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains fossil remnants of an ancient Martian biota is the thermal history of the carbonate rosettes associated with the proposed biomarkers. If carbonates formed at temperatures over {approximately} 110 C (the limit for terrestrial life), it is unlikely that these minerals are associated with a terrestrial-like biota.

  11. The Influence of Facilitator and Facilitation Characteristics on Participants' Ratings of Stepfamily Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higginbotham, Brian J.; Myler, Cory

    2010-01-01

    We examine the relative importance of facilitator and facilitation characteristics on participant ratings of a stepfamily education program. Data from 48 facilitators and 598 participants suggest that quality facilitation is more meaningful to participants than whether facilitators have comparable demographic characteristics or life experiences.…

  12. Coupled chemical and diffusion model for compacted bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Olin, M.; Lehikoinen, J.; Muurinen, A.

    1995-12-31

    A chemical equilibrium model has been developed for ion-exchange and to a limited extent for other reactions, such as precipitation or dissolution of calcite or gypsum, in compacted bentonite water systems. The model was successfully applied to some bentonite experiments, especially as far as monovalent ions were concerned. The fitted log-binding constants for the exchange of sodium for potassium, magnesium, and calcium were 0.27, 1.50, and 2.10, respectively. In addition, a coupled chemical and diffusion model has been developed to take account of diffusion in pore water, surface diffusion and ion-exchange.d the model was applied to the same experiments as the chemical equilibrium model, and its validation was found partly successful. The above values for binding constants were used also in the coupled model. The apparent (both for anions and cations) and surface diffusion (only for cations) constants yielding the best agreement between calculated and experimental data were 3.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} m{sup 2}/s and 6.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. These values are questionable, however, as experimental results good enough for fitting are currently not available.

  13. The Infrared Spectra of BF_3 Cation and BF_2OH Cation Trapped in Solid Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacox, Marilyn E.; Thompson, Warren E.

    2010-06-01

    New, more detailed studies of the photoionization and Penning ionization of BF_3 trapped in solid neon have confirmed the earlier infrared spectroscopic identification of BF_2 and BF_2 cation and have yielded a revised assignment for the infrared absorptions of BF3 cation. The position of the absorption attributed to ν_3 of that molecule is consistent with the distortion of the ground-state cation from D3h symmetry because of strong vibronic interaction between levels of the Btilde ^2E^' state and E^' levels of the ~X ^2A_2^' ground state, as predicted by Haller and co-workers. The facile reaction of BF_3 with traces of H_2O desorbed from the walls of the vacuum system leads to the stabilization of sufficient BF_2OH for the identification of two vibrational fundamentals of BF_2OH cation. M. E. Jacox and W. E. Thompson, J. Chem. Phys. 102, 4747 (1995). E. Haller, H. Koppel, L. S. Cederbaum, W. von Niessen, and G. Bieri, J. Chem. Phys. 78, 1359 (1983).

  14. Irrigant divalent cation concentrations influence bacterial adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Dass, Clarissa L.; Walsh, Mary F.; Seo, Sue; Shiratsuchi, Hiroe; Craig, David H.; Basson, Marc D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Surgical wounds are frequently contaminated by microbes, but rarely become infected if the bacterial burden is low, and irrigation is used to reduce contamination. Wound fluids are low in calcium and high in magnesium. We hypothesized that manipulating irrigant divalent cation concentrations might influence bacterial adhesion. Methods Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were stained with fluorescent Calcein AM before plating onto fibroblast monolayers, collagen I, or uncoated bacteriologic plastic. After one hour, wells were washed with HEPES-buffered pH-balanced sterile water without or with 5mM CaCl2, 5mM MgCl2 or 1mM EDTA+EGTA, and the remaining adherent bacteria were assayed fluorometrically. Results Supplementing the irrigation with magnesium or chelators increased but calcium-supplemented irrigation reduced bacterial adhesion to collagen or fibroblasts. Non-specific electrostatic bacterial adhesion to uncoated plastic was unaffected by calcium. Conclusion Bacterial adhesion to mammalian cells and matrix proteins is influenced by divalent cations, and pathogenic bacteria may be adapted to adhere under the low calcium high magnesium conditions in wounds. Although these results await confirmation for other bacteria, and in vivo validation and safety-testing, they suggest that supplementing wound irrigation with 5mM CaCl2 may reduce bacterial adhesion and subsequent wound infection. PMID:19577252

  15. Interaction of Hyaluronan with Cationic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bano, Fouzia; Carril, Mónica; Di Gianvincenzo, Paolo; Richter, Ralf P

    2015-08-04

    The polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) is a main component of peri- and extracellular matrix, and an attractive molecule for materials design in tissue engineering and nanomedicine. Here, we study the morphology of complexes that form upon interaction of nanometer-sized amine-coated gold particles with this anionic, linear, and regular biopolymer in solution and grafted to a surface. We find that cationic nanoparticles (NPs) have profound effects on HA morphology on the molecular and supramolecular scale. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) shows that depending on their relative abundance, cationic NPs promote either strong compaction or swelling of films of surface-grafted HA polymers (HA brushes). Transmission electron and atomic force microscopy reveal that the NPs do also give rise to complexes of distinct morphologies-compact nanoscopic spheres and extended microscopic fibers-upon interaction with HA polymers in solution. In particular, stable and hydrated spherical complexes of single HA polymers with NPs can be prepared when balancing the ionizable groups on HA and NPs. The observed self-assembly phenomena could be useful for the design of drug delivery vehicles and a better understanding of the reorganization of HA-rich synthetic or biological matrices.

  16. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias

    2013-01-01

    Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs). The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications. PMID:23665898

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Geminized Amphiphilic Cationic Homopolymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Xuefeng; Yu, Danfeng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Guang; Cui, Yingxian; Sun, Keji; Wang, Jinben; Yan, Haike

    2015-12-22

    The current study is aimed at investigating the effect of cationic charge density and hydrophobicity on the antibacterial and hemolytic activities. Two kinds of cationic surfmers, containing single or double hydrophobic tails (octyl chains or benzyl groups), and the corresponding homopolymers were synthesized. The antimicrobial activity of these candidate antibacterials was studied by microbial growth inhibition assays against Escherichia coli, and hemolysis activity was carried out using human red blood cells. It was interestingly found that the homopolymers were much more effective in antibacterial property than their corresponding monomers. Furthermore, the geminized homopolymers had significantly higher antibacterial activity than that of their counterparts but with single amphiphilic side chains in each repeated unit. Geminized homopolymers, with high positive charge density and moderate hydrophobicity (such as benzyl groups), combine both advantages of efficient antibacterial property and prominently high selectivity. To further explain the antibacterial performance of the novel polymer series, the molecular interaction mechanism is proposed according to experimental data which shows that these specimens are likely to kill microbes by disrupting bacterial membranes, leading them unlikely to induce resistance.

  18. Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Porous ZrO2 and hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized from a strong acid cation exchange resin. Spherical cation exchange beads, polystyrene based polymer, were used as a morphological-directing template. Aqueous ion exchange reaction was used to chemically bind (ZrO)(2+) ions to the polystyrene structure. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene at 600 C produces porous ZrO2 spheres with a surface area of 24 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 42 microns. Hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized by using the beads as a micro-reactor. A direct surface reaction - between titanium isopropoxide and the resin beads forms a hydrous TiO2 shell around the polystyrene core. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene core at 600 C produces hollow anatase spheres with a surface area of 42 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 38 microns. The formation of ceramic spheres was studied by XRD, SEM and B.E.T. nitrogen adsorption measurements.

  19. Electronic absorptions of the benzylium cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryza, Viktoras; Chalyavi, Nahid; Sanelli, Julian A.; Bieske, Evan J.

    2012-11-01

    The electronic transitions of the benzylium cation (Bz+) are investigated over the 250-550 nm range by monitoring the photodissociation of mass-selected C7H7+-Arn (n = 1, 2) complexes in a tandem mass spectrometer. The Bz+-Ar spectrum displays two distinct band systems, the S1←S0 band system extending from 370 to 530 nm with an origin at 19 067 ± 15 cm-1, and a much stronger S3←S0 band system extending from 270 to 320 nm with an origin at 32 035 ± 15 cm-1. Whereas the S1←S0 absorption exhibits well resolved vibrational progressions, the S3←S0 absorption is broad and relatively structureless. Vibronic structure of the S1←S0 system, which is interpreted with the aid of time-dependent density functional theory and Franck-Condon simulations, reflects the activity of four totally symmetric ring deformation modes (ν5, ν6, ν9, ν13). We find no evidence for the ultraviolet absorption of the tropylium cation, which according to the neon matrix spectrum should occur over the 260 - 275 nm range [A. Nagy, J. Fulara, I. Garkusha, and J. Maier, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 50, 3022 (2011)], 10.1002/anie.201008036.

  20. Nanoheterostructure Cation Exchange: Anionic Framework Conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Prashant K.; Amirav, Lilac; Aloni, Shaul; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2010-05-11

    In ionic nanocrystals the cationic sub-lattice can be replaced with a different metal ion via a fast, simple, and reversible place-exchange, allowing post-synthetic modification of the composition of the nanocrystal, while preserving its size and shape. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that during such an exchange, the anionic framework of the crystal is preserved. When applied to nanoheterostructures, this phenomenon ensures that compositional interfaces within the heterostructure are conserved throughout the transformation. For instance, a morphology composed of a CdSe nanocrystal embedded in a CdS rod (CdSe/CdS) was exchanged to a PbSe/PbS nanorod via a Cu2Se/Cu2S structure. During every exchange cycle, the seed size and position within the nanorod were preserved, as evident by excitonic features, Z-contrast imaging, and elemental line-scans. Anionic framework conservation extends the domain of cation exchange to the design of more complex and unique nanostructures.

  1. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  2. Photodissociation of Cerium Oxide Nanocluster Cations.

    PubMed

    Akin, S T; Ard, S G; Dye, B E; Schaefer, H F; Duncan, M A

    2016-04-21

    Cerium oxide cluster cations, CexOy(+), are produced via laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source and detected with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mass spectrum displays a strongly preferred oxide stoichiometry for each cluster with a specific number of metal atoms x, with x ≤ y. Specifically, the most prominent clusters correspond to the formula CeO(CeO2)n(+). The cluster cations are mass selected and photodissociated with a Nd:YAG laser at either 532 or 355 nm. The prominent clusters dissociate to produce smaller species also having a similar CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula, always with apparent leaving groups of (CeO2). The production of CeO(CeO2)n(+) from the dissociation of many cluster sizes establishes the relative stability of these clusters. Furthermore, the consistent loss of neutral CeO2 shows that the smallest neutral clusters adopt the same oxidation state (IV) as the most common form of bulk cerium oxide. Clusters with higher oxygen content than the CeO(CeO2)n(+) masses are present with much lower abundance. These species dissociate by the loss of O2, leaving surviving clusters with the CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula. Density functional theory calculations on these clusters suggest structures composed of stable CeO(CeO2)n(+) cores with excess oxygen bound to the surface as a superoxide unit (O2(-)).

  3. Cationic antimicrobial peptides in penaeid shrimp.

    PubMed

    Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Amparyup, Piti; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya; Supungul, Premruethai

    2011-08-01

    Penaeid shrimp aquaculture has been consistently affected worldwide by devastating diseases that cause a severe loss in production. To fight a variety of harmful microbes in the surrounding environment, particularly at high densities (of which intensive farming represents an extreme example), shrimps have evolved and use a diverse array of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as part of an important first-line response of the host defense system. Cationic AMPs in penaeid shrimps composed of penaeidins, crustins, and anti-lipopolysaccharide factors are comprised of multiple classes or isoforms and possess antibacterial and antifungal activities against different strains of bacteria and fungi. Shrimp AMPs are primarily expressed in circulating hemocytes, which is the main site of the immune response, and hemocytes expressing AMPs probably migrate to infection sites to fight against pathogen invasion. Indeed, most AMPs are produced as early as the nauplii developmental stage to protect shrimp larvae from infections. In this review, we discuss the sequence diversity, expression, gene structure, and antimicrobial activities of cationic AMPs in penaeid shrimps. The information available on antimicrobial activities indicates that these shrimp AMPs have potential therapeutic applications in the control of disease problems in aquaculture.

  4. Ferrocenylbenzobisimidazoles for recognition of anions and cations.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, María; Tárraga, Alberto; Molina, Pedro

    2013-07-01

    The preparation of 2,7-disubstituted benzobisimidazoles decorated with substituents displaying different electrooptical properties is described. The presence of redox, chromogenic, and fluorescent groups at the heteroaromatic core, which acts as ditopic binding site, made these receptors potential candidates as multichannel probes for ions. The triad 4 behaves as a selective redox and fluorescent chemosensor for HSO4(-) and Hg(2+) ions, whereas receptor 5 acts as a redox and chromogenic chemosensor molecule for AcO(-) and SO4(2-) anions. The change in the absorption spectra is accompanied by a color change from yellow to orange, while sensing of Zn(2+), Hg(2+), and Pb(2+) cations is carried out only by electrochemical techniques. Receptor 6 exhibits a remarkable cathodic shift of the oxidation wave only in the presence of AcO(-), H2PO4(-), and HP2O7(3-) anions, whereas addition of Pb(2+) induces an anodic shift. A new low energy band in the absorption spectra, which is responsible for the color change from colorless to pale yellow, and an important increase of the monomer emission band is observed only in the presence of H2PO4(-), and HP2O7(3-) anions. The most salient feature of the receptor 6 is its ability to act as a multichannel (redox, chromogenic, and fluorescent) chemodosimeter for Cu(2+), and Hg(2+) metal cations.

  5. Trace element diffusivities in bone rule out simple diffusive uptake during fossilization but explain in vivo uptake and release.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Matthew J; Moses, Randolph J

    2013-01-08

    Diffusion rates of numerous trace elements in bone at 20 °C were determined using laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of experimentally induced diffusion profiles. Diffusivities are about 1 order of magnitude slower than current semiquantitative geochemical views and about 1.5 orders of magnitude faster than indirect radiotracer estimates. Intrabone volume diffusion is too slow and too similar among many elements to explain trace element profiles in young fossils and archeological materials. Diffusivity differences among elements do, however, explain disparate biokinetic washout of Sr vs. Ba and of light vs. heavy rare earth elements (REEs). These results improve the understanding of the physical principles underlying biokinetic models and rates and mechanisms of trace element alteration of phosphatic tissues in paleontological, archeological, and crystal-chemical contexts. Recrystallization and transport limitations in soils explain trace element profiles in young fossils better than intrabone volume diffusion alone and imply that diffusion of REE and other trivalent cations is likely controlled by a common charge-compensating species rather than ionic radii or partition coefficients.

  6. Trace element diffusivities in bone rule out simple diffusive uptake during fossilization but explain in vivo uptake and release

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Matthew J.; Moses, Randolph J.

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion rates of numerous trace elements in bone at 20 °C were determined using laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of experimentally induced diffusion profiles. Diffusivities are about 1 order of magnitude slower than current semiquantitative geochemical views and about 1.5 orders of magnitude faster than indirect radiotracer estimates. Intrabone volume diffusion is too slow and too similar among many elements to explain trace element profiles in young fossils and archeological materials. Diffusivity differences among elements do, however, explain disparate biokinetic washout of Sr vs. Ba and of light vs. heavy rare earth elements (REEs). These results improve the understanding of the physical principles underlying biokinetic models and rates and mechanisms of trace element alteration of phosphatic tissues in paleontological, archeological, and crystal-chemical contexts. Recrystallization and transport limitations in soils explain trace element profiles in young fossils better than intrabone volume diffusion alone and imply that diffusion of REE and other trivalent cations is likely controlled by a common charge–compensating species rather than ionic radii or partition coefficients. PMID:23267089

  7. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  8. Diffusion of Botulinum Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Matthew A.; Swope, David M.; Grimes, David

    2012-01-01

    Background It is generally agreed that diffusion of botulinum toxin occurs, but the extent of the spread and its clinical importance are disputed. Many factors have been suggested to play a role but which have the most clinical relevance is a subject of much discussion. Methods This review discusses the variables affecting diffusion, including protein composition and molecular size as well as injection factors (e.g., volume, dose, injection method). It also discusses data on diffusion from comparative studies in animal models and human clinical trials that illustrate differences between the available botulinum toxin products (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and rimabotulinumtoxinB). Results Neither molecular weight nor the presence of complexing proteins appears to affect diffusion; however, injection volume, concentration, and dose all play roles and are modifiable. Both animal and human studies show that botulinum toxin products are not interchangeable, and that some products are associated with greater diffusion and higher rates of diffusion-related adverse events than others. Discussion Each of the botulinum toxins is a unique pharmacologic entity. A working knowledge of the different serotypes is essential to avoid unwanted diffusion-related adverse events. In addition, clinicians should be aware that the factors influencing diffusion may range from properties intrinsic to the drug to accurate muscle selection as well as dilution, volume, and dose injected. PMID:23440162

  9. Investigating Diffusion with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon S.; Windelborn, Augden F.

    2013-01-01

    The activities described here allow students to explore the concept of diffusion with the use of common equipment such as computers, webcams and analysis software. The procedure includes taking a series of digital pictures of a container of water with a webcam as a dye slowly diffuses. At known time points, measurements of the pixel densities…

  10. The Diffusion of Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earabino, Gerard J.; Heyl, G. Christopher; Percorini, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    New ideas encounter obstacles on way to becoming products. Report examines process by which new ideas become products, processes, or accepted standards. Sequence of events called "the diffusion of innovation." Focuses on development of material processing in low gravity as case study in diffusion of innovation.

  11. Cosmology with matter diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Calogero, Simone; Velten, Hermano E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2013-11-01

    We construct a viable cosmological model based on velocity diffusion of matter particles. In order to ensure the conservation of the total energy-momentum tensor in the presence of diffusion, we include a cosmological scalar field φ which we identify with the dark energy component of the universe. The model is characterized by only one new degree of freedom, the diffusion parameter σ. The standard ΛCDM model can be recovered by setting σ = 0. If diffusion takes place (σ > 0) the dynamics of the matter and of the dark energy fields are coupled. We argue that the existence of a diffusion mechanism in the universe may serve as a theoretical motivation for interacting models. We constrain the background dynamics of the diffusion model with Supernovae, H(z) and BAO data. We also perform a perturbative analysis of this model in order to understand structure formation in the universe. We calculate the impact of diffusion both on the CMB spectrum, with particular attention to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe signal, and on the matter power spectrum P(k). The latter analysis places strong constraints on the magnitude of the diffusion mechanism but does not rule out the model.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, Lowell D; Focsan, A Ligia; Konovalova, Tatyana A; Lawrence, Jesse; Bowman, Michael K; Dixon, David A; Molnar, Peter; Deli, Jozsef

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond lengthening, a mechanism for nonradiative energy

  13. Alkali-cation affinities of polyoxyethylene dodecylethers and helical conformations of their cationized molecules studied by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yukio; Hirajima, Rui; Morigaki, Ken; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2007-11-01

    Relative alkali-cation affinity of polyoxyethylene (POE) dodecylethers in gas phase was studied by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry using dodecylether-poly-ethoxylate (C(12)EO:n, "n" denotes ethyleneoxide unit number) nonionic surfactants, and possible helical conformations of the cationized molecules were demonstrated. The alkali-cation affinity highly depended on the cation diameters. The mass spectra of C(12)EO:8 cationized by alkali-metal ions were dominated by potassiated molecules. The results indicated that the POE moiety could have specific affinity to K(+) ions based on a host-guest interaction between POE helix and potassium ions. This is very similar to the relationships between 18-crown-6 and K(+). The ESI mass spectra exhibited the multiply cationized C(12)EO:n in addition to the singly cationized molecules. The critical EO unit numbers necessary for producing the multiply-charged cationized molecules also depended on the cation diameters. In addition, the POE surfactants highly preferred alkali cations to proton. The results were strongly supported by molecular mechanics/dynamics calculations. A helical conformation of the POE moiety of C(12)EO:15 including two K(+) ions gave a potential minimum, while a lowest energy structure of the protonated molecule took irregular conformations due to the formation of local hydrogen bonds.

  14. Chapter 17 - Engineering cationic liposome siRNA complexes for in vitro and in vivo delivery.

    PubMed

    Podesta, Jennifer E; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference, the sequence-specific silencing of gene expression by introduction of short interfering RNA (siRNA) is a powerful tool that that the potential to act as a therapeutic agent and the advantage of decreasing toxic effects on normal tissue sometimes seen with conventional treatments i.e. small molecule inhibitors. Naked, unmodified siRNA is poorly taken up by cells and is subject to degradation when exposed to blood proteins during systemic administration. It has also been shown to produce non-specific immune response as well as having the potential to generate 'off-target' effects. Therefore there is a requirement for a delivery system to not only protect the siRNA and facilitate its uptake, but additionally to offer the potential for targeted delivery with an aim of exploiting the high specificity afforded by RNA interference. Cationic liposomes are the most studied, non-viral delivery system used for nucleic acid delivery. As such, the use of cationic liposomes is promising for siRNA for delivery. Furthermore, polyethylene glycol (PEG) can be incorporated into the liposome formulation to create sterically stabilized or 'stealth' liposomes. Addition of PEG can reduce recognition by the reticuloendothelial system (RES) thereby prolonging circulation time. Here we describe a methodology for the complexation of siRNA with cationic liposomes and PEGylated liposomes using two protocols: mixing and encapsulation. Moreover, the different formulations are compared head to head to demonstrate their efficacy for gene silencing.

  15. Facilitating submetering implementation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, M.A.

    1996-05-01

    Residential submetering is the measurement and billing of electric use in individual apartments in master-metered buildings. In master-metered building situations, residents do not bear electricity costs in proportion to consumption levels. As a result, studies have confirmed that residents in master-metered buildings tend to consume more electricity than residents with individual apartment metering, and have established electrical submetering as an effective energy conservation measure. The New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA) has commissioned a project called Facilitating Submetering Implementation to identify and analyze barriers to the implementation of residential electrical submetering in New York and to formulate recommendations that would facilitate the removal of these barriers, streamlining the process. Experienced professionals in the technical, legal, regulatory, analytical, financial, and other aspects of submetering were retained to interview key interested parties and conduct public forums. This and other data were then analyzed to ascertain the barriers to submetering and develop recommendations designed to reduce or eliminate these barriers. The key barriers to submetering implementation were found to be the Public Service Commission (PSC) requirement for a vote of a majority of shareholders (for coops and condos) and the high initial cost that cannot easily be recouped by owners of both rental and shareholder-owned buildings. The key recommendations are to repeal the voting requirement, maintain the utility incentives, adopt a uniform dispute resolution mechanism, and increase awareness through an Ad-hoc Submetering Committee and supporting educational materials. Other funding sources not fully available can also be made available with regulatory agency support.

  16. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hughto, J.; Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.

    2011-07-15

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions ''hop'' in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter {Gamma}=175 to Coulomb parameters up to {Gamma}=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  17. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  18. Combustor diffuser interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Ram; Thorp, Daniel

    1986-01-01

    Advances in gas turbine engine performance are achieved by using compressor systems with high stage loading and low part count, which result in high exit Mach numbers. The diffuser and combustor systems in such engines should be optimized to reduce system pressure loss and to maximize the engine thrust-to-weight ratio and minimize length. The state-of-the-art combustor-diffuser systems do not meet these requirements. Detailed understanding of the combustor-diffuser flow field interaction is required for designing advanced gas turbine engines. An experimental study of the combustor-diffuser interaction (CDI) is being conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of analytical models applicable to a wide variety of diffuser designs. The CDI program consists of four technical phases: Literature Search; Baseline Configuration; Parametric Configurations; and Performance Configurations. Phase 2 of the program is in progress.

  19. Effects of electrode properties and fabricated pressure on Li ion diffusion and diffusion-induced stresses in cylindrical Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Guo, Zhansheng

    2014-03-01

    The effects of electrode properties and fabricated pressure on Li ion diffusion and diffusion-induced stress in a cylindrical Li-ion battery are studied. It is found that hydrostatic pressure or elastic modulus variation in the active layer have little effect on the distribution of Li ions for a higher diffusivity coefficient, but both can facilitate Li ion diffusion for a lower diffusivity coefficient. The elastic modulus variation has a significant effect on the distribution of stress and hydrostatic pressure can reduce the surface stress for the lower diffusivity coefficient. A higher charging rate causes a more transient response in the stress history, but a linear charging history is observed for slow charging rates. A higher charging rate would not inflict extra damage on the electrode for the higher diffusivity coefficient and the stress history becomes highly transient and charging rate dependent for the lower diffusivity coefficient. The effect of fabricated pressure can be neglected.

  20. Empirical models relating viscosity and tracer diffusion in magmatic silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungall, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The Adam-Gibbs equations describing relaxation in silicate melts are applied to diffusion of trace components of multicomponent liquids. The Adam-Gibbs theory is used as a starting point to derive an explicit relation between viscosity and diffusion including non-Arrhenian temperature dependence. The general form of the equation is Diη = Aiexp{Δ( scEi)/ TSc}, where D is diffusivity, η is melt viscosity, T is absolute temperature, Δ( scEi) is the difference between the products of activation energies and local configurational entropies for viscous and diffusive relaxation, Ai is a constant that depends on the characteristics of the diffusing solute particles, and Sc is configurational entropy of the melt. The general equation will be impractical for most predictive purposes due to the paucity of configurational entropy data for silicate melts. Under most magmatic conditions the proposed non-Arrhenian behaviour can be neglected, allowing the general equation to be simplified to a generalized form of the Eyring equation to describe diffusion of solutes that interact weakly with the melt structure: Diη/ T = Qiexp{Δ Ei/ RT}, where Qi and Δ Ei depend on the characteristics of the solute and the melt structure. If the diffusing solute interacts strongly with the melt structure or is a network-forming cation itself, then Δ Ei = 0, and the relation between viscosity and diffusion has the functional form of the classic Eyring and Stokes-Einstein equations; Diη/ T = Qi. If the diffusing solute can make diffusive jumps without requiring cooperative rearrangement of the melt structure, the diffusivity is entirely decoupled from melt viscosity and should be Arrhenian, i.e., Di = Qiexp{ Bi/ T}. A dataset of 594 published diffusivities in melts ranging from the system CAS through diopside, basalt, andesite, anhydrous rhyolite, hydrous rhyolite, and peralkaline rhyolite to albite, orthoclase, and jadeite is compared with the model equations. Alkali diffusion is completely

  1. Controlling Cesium Cation Recognition via Cation Metathesis within and Ion Pair Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Kuk; Vargas-Zuniga, Gabriela; Hay, Benjamin; Young, Neil J; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Lee, Prof. Chang-Hee; Kim, Jong Seung; Lynch, Vincent M.; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    Ion pair receptor 3 bearing an anion binding site and multiple cation binding sites has been synthesized and shown to function in a novel binding-release cycle that does not necessarily require displacement to effect release. The receptor forms stable complexes with the test cesium salts, CsCl and CsNO{sub 3}, in solution (10% methanol-d{sub 4} in chloroform-d) as inferred from {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic analyses. The addition of KClO{sub 4} to these cesium salt complexes leads to a novel type of cation metathesis in which the 'exchanged' cations occupy different binding sites. Specifically, K{sup +} becomes bound at the expense of the Cs{sup +} cation initially present in the complex. Under liquid-liquid conditions, receptor 3 is able to extract CsNO{sub 3} and CsCl from an aqueous D{sub 2}O layer into nitrobenzene-d{sub 5} as inferred from {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic analyses and radiotracer measurements. The Cs{sup +} cation of the CsNO{sub 3} extracted into the nitrobenzene phase by receptor 3 may be released into the aqueous phase by contacting the loaded nitrobenzene phase with an aqueous KClO{sub 4} solution. Additional exposure of the nitrobenzene layer to chloroform and water gives 3 in its uncomplexed, ion-free form. This allows receptor 3 to be recovered for subsequent use. Support for the underlying complexation chemistry came from single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and gas-phase energy-minimization studies.

  2. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

  3. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Pellerin, Patrice J. M.; Warrenfeltz, Dennis; Vidal, Stephane; Darvill, Alan G.; Albersheim, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

  4. Solvation structure and transport properties of alkali cations in dimethyl sulfoxide under exogenous static electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Vijayakumar, M. E-mail: karl.mueller@pnnl.gov; Han, Kee Sung; Mueller, Karl T. E-mail: karl.mueller@pnnl.gov

    2015-06-14

    A combination of molecular dynamics simulations and pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to investigate the role of exogenous electric fields on the solvation structure and dynamics of alkali ions in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and as a function of temperature. Good agreement was obtained, for select alkali ions in the absence of an electric field, between calculated and experimentally determined diffusion coefficients normalized to that of pure DMSO. Our results indicate that temperatures of up to 400 K and external electric fields of up to 1 V nm{sup −1} have minimal effects on the solvation structure of the smaller alkali cations (Li{sup +} and Na{sup +}) due to their relatively strong ion-solvent interactions, whereas the solvation structures of the larger alkali cations (K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, and Cs{sup +}) are significantly affected. In addition, although the DMSO exchange dynamics in the first solvation shell differ markedly for the two groups, the drift velocities and mobilities are not significantly affected by the nature of the alkali ion. Overall, although exogenous electric fields induce a drift displacement, their presence does not significantly affect the random diffusive displacement of the alkali ions in DMSO. System temperature is found to have generally a stronger influence on dynamical properties, such as the DMSO exchange dynamics and the ion mobilities, than the presence of electric fields.

  5. Optimal multi-community network modularity for information diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiaocan; Du, Ruping; Zheng, Yingying; Liu, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Studies demonstrate that community structure plays an important role in information spreading recently. In this paper, we investigate the impact of multi-community structure on information diffusion with linear threshold model. We utilize extended GN network that contains four communities and analyze dynamic behaviors of information that spreads on it. And we discover the optimal multi-community network modularity for information diffusion based on the social reinforcement. Results show that, within the appropriate range, multi-community structure will facilitate information diffusion instead of hindering it, which accords with the results derived from two-community network.

  6. Structure-activity relationship in cationic lipid mediated gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Niculescu-Duvaz, Dan; Heyes, James; Springer, Caroline J

    2003-07-01

    Non-viral synthetic vectors for gene delivery represent a safer alternative to viral vectors. Their main drawback is the low transfection efficiency, especially in vivo. Among the non-viral vectors currently in use, the cationic liposomes composed of cationic lipids are the most common. This review discusses the physicochemical properties of cationic lipids, the formation, macrostructure and specific parameters of the corresponding formulated liposomes, and the effect of all these parameters on transfection efficiency. The optimisation of liposomal vectors requires both the understanding of the biological variables involved in the transfection process, and the effect of the structural elements of the cationic lipids on these biological variables. The biological barriers relevant for in vitro and in vivo transfection are identified, and solutions to overcome them based on rational design of the cationic lipids are discussed. The review focuses on the relationship between the structure of the cationic lipid and the transfection activity. The structure is analysed in a modular manner. The hydrophobic domain, the cationic head group, the backbone that acts as a scaffold for the other domains, the linkers between backbone, hydrophobic domain and cationic head group, the polyethyleneglycol chains and the targeting moiety are identified as distinct elements of the cationic lipids used in gene therapy. The main chemical functionalities used to built these domains, as well as overall molecular features such as architecture and geometry, are presented. Studies of structure-activity relationships of each cationic lipid domain, including the authors', and the trends identified by these studies, help furthering the understanding of the mechanism governing the formation and behaviour of cationic liposomes in gene delivery, and therefore the rational design of new improved cationic lipids vectors capable of achieving clinical significance.

  7. Fully Cationized Gold Clusters: Synthesis of Au25(SR(+))18.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yohei; Narita, Kunihiro; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Whetten, Robert L

    2016-10-06

    Although many thiolate-protected Au clusters with different numbers of Au atoms and a variety of thiolate ligands have been synthesized, to date there has been no report of a fully cationized Au cluster protected with cationic thiolates. Herein, we report the synthesis of the first member of a new series of thiolate-protected Au cluster molecules: a fully cationized Au25(SR(+))18 cluster.

  8. Helium diffusion in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amidon, W. H.; Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Hobbs, D.

    2013-12-01

    The abundance and large grain size of carbonate minerals make them a potentially attractive target for 4He thermochronology and 3He cosmogenic dating, although the diffusive properties of helium in carbonates remain poorly understood. This work characterizes helium diffusion in calcite and dolomite to better understand the crystal-chemical factors controlling He transport and retentivity. Slabs of cleaved natural calcite and dolomite, and polished sections of calcite cut parallel or normal to c, were implanted with 3He at 3 MeV with a dose of 5x1015/cm2. Implanted carbonates were heated in 1-atm furnaces, and 3He distributions following diffusion anneals were profiled with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the reaction 3He(d,p)4He. For 3He transport normal to cleavage surfaces in calcite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation over the temperature range 78-300°C: Dcalcite = 9.0x10-9exp(-55 × 6 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. Diffusion in calcite exhibits marked anisotropy, with diffusion parallel to c about two orders of magnitude slower than diffusion normal to cleavage faces. He diffusivities for transport normal to the c-axis are similar in value to those normal to cleavage surfaces. Our findings are broadly consistent with helium diffusivities from step-heating measurements of calcite by Copeland et al. (2007); these bulk degassing data may reflect varying effects of diffusional anisotropy. Helium diffusion normal to cleavage surfaces in dolomite is significantly slower than diffusion in calcite, and has a much higher activation energy for diffusion. For dolomite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation for He diffusion over the temperature range 150-400°C: Ddolomite = 9.0x10-8exp(-92 × 9 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. The role of crystallographic structure in influencing these differences among diffusivities was evaluated using the maximum aperture approach of Cherniak and Watson (2011), in which crystallographic structures are sectioned along possible diffusion

  9. Extended delivery of an anionic drug by contact lens loaded with a cationic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Bengani, Lokendrakumar C; Chauhan, Anuj

    2013-04-01

    Drug eluding contact lenses can be very effective vehicles for ophthalmic drug delivery, but are incapable of releasing drug for more than a few hours. We propose to optimize the interactions of the polymer matrix of the contact lens with the hydrophobic tails of ionic surfactants to adsorb the surfactant molecules on the polymer with high packing and thus create a high surface charge. Ionic drugs can then adsorb on the charged surfactant coated surfaces with high affinity to reduce the transport rates, leading to extended release. Specifically, we show control release of an anionic drug dexamethasone 21-disodium phosphate from poly-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (p-HEMA) contact lenses by utilizing cationic surfactant (cetalkonium chloride). The partition coefficient of the drug increase exponentially with surfactant loading in the gel in at least qualitative agreement with the Debye-Hückel theory. The drug adsorbs on the surfactant covered polymer, and can also diffuse along the surface with diffusivity lower than that for the free drug, leading to a reduction in the effective diffusivity, which is the weighted combination of the free and surface diffusivities. The addition of surfactant did not impact transparency of lenses, and had additional benefits of increase in wettability and significant reduction in protein absorption. With a surfactant loading of about 10%, the drug release duration was increased from about 2 h to 50 h in 1-day ACUVUE(®) contact lenses, proving the viability of using surfactant for increasing drug release durations.

  10. Cation trapping by cellular acidic compartments: Beyond the concept of lysosomotropic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Marceau, François; Bawolak, Marie-Thérèse; Lodge, Robert; Bouthillier, Johanne; Gagné-Henley, Angélique; Gaudreault, René C.; Morissette, Guillaume

    2012-02-15

    “Lysosomotropic” cationic drugs are known to concentrate in acidic cell compartments due to low retro-diffusion of the protonated molecule (ion trapping); they draw water by an osmotic mechanism, leading to a vacuolar response. Several aspects of this phenomenon were recently reexamined. (1) The proton pump vacuolar (V)-ATPase is the driving force of cationic drug uptake and ensuing vacuolization. In quantitative transport experiments, V-ATPase inhibitors, such as bafilomycin A1, greatly reduced the uptake of cationic drugs and released them in preloaded cells. (2) Pigmented or fluorescent amines are effectively present in a concentrated form in the large vacuoles. (3) Consistent with V-ATPase expression in trans-Golgi, lysosomes and endosomes, a fraction of the vacuoles is consistently labeled with trans-Golgi markers and protein secretion and endocytosis are often inhibited in vacuolar cells. (4) Macroautophagic signaling (accumulation of lipidated and membrane-bound LC3 II) and labeling of the large vacuoles by the autophagy effector LC3 were consistently observed in cells, precisely at incubation periods and amine concentrations that cause vacuolization. Vacuoles also exhibit late endosome/lysosome markers, because they may originate from such organelles or because macroautophagosomes fuse with lysosomes. Autophagosome persistence is likely due to the lack of resolution of autophagy, rather than to nutritional deprivation. (5) Increased lipophilicity decreases the threshold concentration for the vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology, because simple diffusion into cells is limiting. (6) A still unexplained mitotic arrest is consistently observed in cells loaded with amines. An extended recognition of relevant clinical situations is proposed for local or systemic drug administration.

  11. Thorium Diffusion in Monazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    Diffusion of thorium has been characterized in synthetic monazite under dry conditions. The synthetic monazites (either pure CePO4, NdPO4, or a mixed LREE phosphate containing Ce, Nd, and Sm) were grown via a Na2CO3-MoO3 flux method. The source of diffusant for the experiments were either synthesized ThSiO4 or CaTh(PO4)2 powders. Experiments were performed by placing source and monazite in Pt capsules and annealing capsules in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 10 days to a few hours, at temperatures from 1400 to 1550C. The Th distributions in the monazite were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation was obtained for diffusion in monazite: DSm = 7.2x103 exp(-814 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1 The diffusivity of Th was similar for monazites containing a single REE and the mixed LREE phosphates. Th diffusion was also similar for experiments run using the Th silicate and Ca-Th phosphate sources, suggesting that the substitutional mechanism for Th in monazite, i.e, Th+4 + Si+4 for REE+3 + P+5 with the ThSiO4 source, and Th+4 + Ca+2 for 2REE+3 with the CaTh(PO4)2 source, does not significantly affect Th diffusivities, and that Th is likely the rate-limiting species. Th diffusion in monazite is about 4 orders of magnitude slower than Pb diffusion (Cherniak et al., 2004). This contrasts with findings of Gardes et al. (2005) who determined that Pb, Th and REE diffusivities in monazite are similar. Th diffusion in zircon (Cherniak et al., 1997) is about an order of magnitude slower than in monazite, but with similar activation energy for diffusion. The smaller diffusivities in zircon may be a consequence of the larger disparity in size between Th and the Zr site in zircon as compared with Th and the REE site in monazite. Nonetheless, Th is essentially immobile in monazite with respect to exchange by volume diffusion under most geologic conditions; these findings may have implications for containment of high- level actinide

  12. Hydroxide Degradation Pathways for Imidazolium Cations. A DFT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Long, H.; Pivovar, B.

    2014-05-15

    Imidazolium cations are promising candidates as covalently tetherable cations for application in anion exchange membranes. They have generated specific interest in alkaline membrane fuel cell applications where ammonium-based cations have been the most commonly applied but have been found to be susceptible to hydroxide attack. In the search for high stability cations, a detailed understanding of the degradation pathways and reaction barriers is required. In this work, we investigate imidazolium and benzimidazolium cations in the presence of hydroxide using density functional theory calculations for their potential in alkaline membrane fuel cells. Moreover, the dominant degradation pathway for these cations is predicted to be the nucleophilic addition–elimination pathway at the C-2 atom position on the imidazolium ring. Steric interferences, introduced by substitutions at the C-2, C-4, and C-5 atom positions, were investigated and found to have a significant, positive impact on calculated degradation energy barriers. Benzimidazolium cations, with their larger conjugated systems, are predicted to degrade much faster than their imidazolium counterparts. Our results provide important insight into designing stable cations for anion exchange membranes. Some of the molecules studied have significantly increased degradation energy barriers suggesting that they could possess significantly improved (several orders of magnitude) durability compared to traditional cations and potentially enable new applications.

  13. Uniformly cationized protein efficiently reaches the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Futami, Midori; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Asama, Takashi; Murata, Hitoshi; Tada, Hiroko; Kosaka, Megumi; Yamada, Hidenori; Futami, Junichiro

    2012-10-17

    Protein cationization techniques are powerful protein transduction methods for mammalian cells. As we demonstrated previously, cationized proteins with limited conjugation to polyethylenimine have excellent ability to enter into cells by adsorption-mediated endocytosis [Futami, J., et al. (2005) J. Biosci. Bioeng. 99, 95-103]. In this study, we show that proteins with extensive and uniform cationization covering the protein surface reach the cytoplasm and nucleus more effectively than proteins with limited cationic polymers or proteins that are fused to cationic peptides. Although extensive modification of carboxylates results in loss of protein function, chicken avidin retains biotin-binding ability even after extensive amidation of carboxylates. Using this cationized avidin carrier system, the protein transduction ability of variously cationized avidins was investigated using biotinylated protein as a probe. The results revealed that cationized avidins bind rapidly to the cell surface followed by endocytotic uptake. Small amounts of uniformly cationized avidin showed direct penetration into the cytoplasm within a 15 min incubation. This penetration route seemed to be energy dependent and functioned under cellular physiological conditions. A biotinylated exogenous transcription factor protein that penetrated cells was demonstrated to induce target gene expression in living cells.

  14. The formation of singly and doubly cationized oligomers in SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcorte, A.; Wojciechowski, I.; Gonze, X.; Garrison, B. J.; Bertrand, P.

    2003-01-01

    The cationization of sputtered organic species via metal particle adduction is investigated using poly-4-methylstyrene molecules in combination with Cu, Pd, Ag and Au substrates. Metal-cationization occurs for these four substrates. The cationized molecule yields vary with the considered substrate and they are not correlated with the metal ion yields. In addition, double cationization with two metal particles is observed with a very significant intensity for Cu, Ag and Au supports. We interpret the results with an emission scheme in which excited molecules and metal atoms recombine above the surface and decay via electron emission, thereby locking the complex in the ionic state.

  15. Infrared spectroscopic investigations of cationic ethanol, propanol, and butanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Harigaya, Hiroyuki; Xie, Min; Takahashi, Kaito; Fujii, Asuka

    2015-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopy of the alcohol cations of ethanol, propanol, and butanol was performed to investigate their structures and hyperconjugation mechanisms. In the ethanol cation, the Csbnd C bond hyperconjugates with the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) at the oxygen atom, so that the Csbnd C bond weakens and the bond length elongates. Multiple hyperconjugations among SOMO, the Csbnd C bond, and the end Csbnd H bond occur in the propanol cation and enhance the acidity of the Csbnd H bond through the delocalization of its bonding σ electron. The butanol cation forms the oxonium-type structure through the proton transfer from the terminal CH bond.

  16. Spectral response of magnetic nanofluid to toxic cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahendran, V.; Philip, John

    2013-04-01

    We probe the spectral response of a magnetically polarizable nanofluid in the presence of different toxic metal cations. In the presence of cations like Ni2+, Mn2+, Pb2+, and Cd2+, the nanofluid shows large blue shift in the diffracted Bragg peak and a visually perceivable color change due to changes in the interparticle spacing of the self-assembled nano-arrays. The observed spectral response of the nanofluid offers the possibility of rapid and selective detections of cations optically. Because the emulsion used is easy to produce and inexpensive, this approach may find several interesting applications in rapid detection of cations.

  17. VUV Photo-processing of PAH Cations: Quantitative Study on the Ionization versus Fragmentation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Junfeng; Rodriguez Castillo, Sarah; Joblin, Christine; Mulas, Giacomo; Sabbah, Hassan; Giuliani, Alexandre; Nahon, Laurent; Martin, Serge; Champeaux, Jean-Philippe; Mayer, Paul M.

    2016-05-01

    Interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are strongly affected by the absorption of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons in the interstellar medium (ISM), yet the branching ratio between ionization and fragmentation is poorly studied. This is crucial for the stability and charge state of PAHs in the ISM in different environments, affecting in turn the chemistry, the energy balance, and the contribution of PAHs to the extinction and emission curves. We studied the interaction of PAH cations with VUV photons in the 7-20 eV range from the synchrotron SOLEIL beamline, DESIRS. We recorded by action spectroscopy the relative intensities of photo-fragmentation and photo-ionization for a set of eight PAH cations ranging in size from 14 to 24 carbon atoms, with different structures. At photon energies below ˜13.6 eV fragmentation dominates for the smaller species, while for larger species ionization is immediately competitive after the second ionization potential (IP). At higher photon energies all species behave similarly; the ionization yield gradually increases, leveling off between 0.8 and 0.9 at ˜18 eV. Among isomers, PAH structure appears to mainly affect the fragmentation cross section but not the ionization cross section. We also measured the second IP for all species and the third IP for two of them; all are in good agreement with theoretical ones, confirming that PAH cations can be further ionized in the diffuse ISM. Determining actual PAH dication abundances in the ISM will require detailed modeling. Our measured photo-ionization yields for several PAH cations provide a necessary ingredient for such models.

  18. VUV photo-processing of PAH cations: quantitative study on the ionization versus fragmentation processes

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Junfeng; Castillo, Sarah Rodriguez; Joblin, Christine; Mulas, Giacomo; Sabbah, Hassan; Giuliani, Alexandre; Nahon, Laurent; Martin, Serge; Champeaux, Jean-Philippe; Mayer, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are strongly affected by the absorption of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons in the interstellar medium (ISM), yet the branching ratio between ionization and fragmentation is poorly studied. This is crucial for the stability and charge state of PAHs in the ISM in different environments, affecting in turn the chemistry, the energy balance, and the contribution of PAHs to the extinction and emission curves. We studied the interaction of PAH cations with VUV photons in the 7 – 20 eV range from the synchrotron SOLEIL beamline, DESIRS. We recorded by action spectroscopy the relative intensities of photo-fragmentation and photo-ionization for a set of eight PAH cations ranging in size from 14 to 24 carbon atoms, with different structures. At photon energies below ~13.6 eV fragmentation dominates for the smaller species, while for larger species ionization is immediately competitive after the second ionization potential (IP). At higher photon energies, all species behave similarly, the ionization yield gradually increases, leveling off between 0.8 and 0.9 at ~18 eV. Among isomers, PAH structure appears to mainly affect the fragmentation cross section, but not the ionization cross section. We also measured the second IP for all species and the third IP for two of them, all are in good agreement with theoretical ones confirming that PAH cations can be further ionized in the diffuse ISM. Determining actual PAH dication abundances in the ISM will require detailed modeling. Our measured photo-ionization yields for several PAH cations provide a necessary ingredient for such models. PMID:27212712

  19. VUV photo-processing of PAH cations: quantitative study on the ionization versus fragmentation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Junfeng; Castillo, Sarah Rodriguez; Joblin, Christine; Mulas, Giacomo; Sabbah, Hassan; Giuliani, Alexandre; Nahon, Laurent; Martin, Serge; Champeaux, Jean-Philippe; Mayer, Paul M

    2016-05-10

    Interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are strongly affected by the absorption of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons in the interstellar medium (ISM), yet the branching ratio between ionization and fragmentation is poorly studied. This is crucial for the stability and charge state of PAHs in the ISM in different environments, affecting in turn the chemistry, the energy balance, and the contribution of PAHs to the extinction and emission curves. We studied the interaction of PAH cations with VUV photons in the 7 - 20 eV range from the synchrotron SOLEIL beamline, DESIRS. We recorded by action spectroscopy the relative intensities of photo-fragmentation and photo-ionization for a set of eight PAH cations ranging in size from 14 to 24 carbon atoms, with different structures. At photon energies below ~13.6 eV fragmentation dominates for the smaller species, while for larger species ionization is immediately competitive after the second ionization potential (IP). At higher photon energies, all species behave similarly, the ionization yield gradually increases, leveling off between 0.8 and 0.9 at ~18 eV. Among isomers, PAH structure appears to mainly affect the fragmentation cross section, but not the ionization cross section. We also measured the second IP for all species and the third IP for two of them, all are in good agreement with theoretical ones confirming that PAH cations can be further ionized in the diffuse ISM. Determining actual PAH dication abundances in the ISM will require detailed modeling. Our measured photo-ionization yields for several PAH cations provide a necessary ingredient for such models.

  20. The Teacher and Town Planner as Facilitator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peel, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of theories of facilitation in teaching focuses on citizen participation and the role of the facilitator in town planning. Highlights include hierarchies of learning; student-centered learning; facilitating community participation; information technology skills and interpersonal skills; and a rationale for participation. (LRW)

  1. Evaluation of the Facilitated Communication Pilot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper-Martin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The Office of Special Education and Student Services asked the Office of Shared Accountability to evaluate the "Facilitated Communication Pilot." In facilitated communication (FC), people with communication impairments express themselves by typing with the aid of a communication partner, called a facilitator, who provides physical (and…

  2. Technologies and Techniques for Supporting Facilitated Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linnell, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, demand for education of all kinds is increasing beyond the capacity to provide it. One approach that shows potential for addressing this demand is facilitated video. In facilitated video, an educator is recorded teaching, and that video is sent to a remote site where it is shown to students by a facilitator who creates interaction…

  3. Fungal phylogenetic diversity drives plant facilitation.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-Navarro, Alicia; Segarra-Moragues, J G; Valiente-Banuet, A; Verdú, M

    2016-06-01

    Plant-plant facilitation is a crucial ecological process, as many plant species (facilitated) require the presence of an established individual (nurse) to recruit. Some plant facilitative interactions disappear during the ontogenetic development of the facilitated plant but others persist, even when the two plants are adults. We test whether the persistence of plant facilitative interactions is explained by the phylogenetic diversity of mutualistic and non-mutualistic fungi that the nurse and the facilitated species add to the shared rhizosphere. We classify plant facilitative interactions as persistent and non-persistent interactions and quantify the phylogenetic diversity of mutualistic and non-mutualistic fungi added by the plant species to the shared rhizosphere. Our results show that the facilitated species add less phylogenetic diversity of non-mutualistic fungi when plant facilitative interactions persist than when they do not persist. However, persistent and non-persistent facilitative interactions did not differ in the phylogenetic diversity of mutualistic fungi added by the facilitated species to the shared rhizosphere. Finally, the fungal phylogenetic diversity added by the nurse to the shared rhizosphere did not differ between persistent and non-persistent interactions. This study suggests that considering the fungal associates of the plant species involved in facilitative interactions can shed light on the mechanisms of persistence for plant-plant interactions.

  4. District Facilitator Project, E.C.I.A. Chapter 2. Final Evaluation Report, 1982-83.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC. Div. of Quality Assurance.

    The District Facilitator Project (DFP) works through the National Diffusion Network (NDN) to assist local schools in improving their programs by linking them with exemplary projects from around the country. Evaluation of the project in operation in the District of Columbia public schools in 1982-83 showed that all the project's objectives were…

  5. Cation Intermixing And Electronic Deviations At The Insulating LaCrO3/SrTiO3(001) Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, Robert J.; Qiao, Liang; Zhang, Hongliang; Shutthanandan, V.; Ciston, Jim; Kabius, Bernd C.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2013-10-29

    The interface between polar perovskite LaCrO3 (LCO) and non-polar SrTiO3(001) (STO), grown by molecular beam epitaxy, is examined using a combination of electron microscopy, spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The LCO/STO(001) interface is insulating, a potential counter example for the claim that polar/nonpolar perovskite interfaces should be conductive by virtue of an electronic reconstruction to alleviate the polar discontinuity. The A-site cations of these ABO3 perovskites are found to diffuse across the interface to a greater extent than the B-site cations, based on high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The B-site cation valences are shown to be partially reduced near the interface by analysis of EELS near-edge structures. The location and direction of these electronic modifications do not intuitively compensate the charge imbalance imposed by uneven cation inter-diffusion, and yet both the film and interface are insulating. These results highlight the importance of both the physical and electronic structure of such complex interfaces in determining their characteristics. Furthermore, the extent of inter-diffusion is shown to increase with increasing LCO film thickness, suggesting a potential mechanism behind the critical thickness for interfacial conductivity in other polar/non-polar oxide systems, and a fundamental limitation on the formation of abrupt interfaces in LCO/STO(001).

  6. Tungsten diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B.; Portavoce, A.; Grosjean, C.

    2014-01-07

    Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960 °C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

  7. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  8. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  9. Improved chemical and electrochemical stability of perovskite oxides with less reducible cations at the surface.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Nikolai; Lu, Qiyang; Sun, Lixin; Crumlin, Ethan J; Yildiz, Bilge

    2016-09-01

    Segregation and phase separation of aliovalent dopants on perovskite oxide (ABO3) surfaces are detrimental to the performance of energy conversion systems such as solid oxide fuel/electrolysis cells and catalysts for thermochemical H2O and CO2 splitting. One key reason behind the instability of perovskite oxide surfaces is the electrostatic attraction of the negatively charged A-site dopants (for example, ) by the positively charged oxygen vacancies () enriched at the surface. Here we show that reducing the surface concentration improves the oxygen surface exchange kinetics and stability significantly, albeit contrary to the well-established understanding that surface oxygen vacancies facilitate reactions with O2 molecules. We take La0.8Sr0.2CoO3 (LSC) as a model perovskite oxide, and modify its surface with additive cations that are more and less reducible than Co on the B-site of LSC. By using ambient-pressure X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy, we proved that the dominant role of the less reducible cations is to suppress the enrichment and phase separation of Sr while reducing the concentration of and making the LSC more oxidized at its surface. Consequently, we found that these less reducible cations significantly improve stability, with up to 30 times faster oxygen exchange kinetics after 54 h in air at 530 °C achieved by Hf addition onto LSC. Finally, the results revealed a 'volcano' relation between the oxygen exchange kinetics and the oxygen vacancy formation enthalpy of the binary oxides of the additive cations. This volcano relation highlights the existence of an optimum surface oxygen vacancy concentration that balances the gain in oxygen exchange kinetics and the chemical stability loss.

  10. Improved chemical and electrochemical stability of perovskite oxides with less reducible cations at the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Nikolai; Lu, Qiyang; Sun, Lixin; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Yildiz, Bilge

    2016-09-01

    Segregation and phase separation of aliovalent dopants on perovskite oxide (ABO3) surfaces are detrimental to the performance of energy conversion systems such as solid oxide fuel/electrolysis cells and catalysts for thermochemical H2O and CO2 splitting. One key reason behind the instability of perovskite oxide surfaces is the electrostatic attraction of the negatively charged A-site dopants (for example, ) by the positively charged oxygen vacancies () enriched at the surface. Here we show that reducing the surface concentration improves the oxygen surface exchange kinetics and stability significantly, albeit contrary to the well-established understanding that surface oxygen vacancies facilitate reactions with O2 molecules. We take La0.8Sr0.2CoO3 (LSC) as a model perovskite oxide, and modify its surface with additive cations that are more and less reducible than Co on the B-site of LSC. By using ambient-pressure X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy, we proved that the dominant role of the less reducible cations is to suppress the enrichment and phase separation of Sr while reducing the concentration of and making the LSC more oxidized at its surface. Consequently, we found that these less reducible cations significantly improve stability, with up to 30 times faster oxygen exchange kinetics after 54 h in air at 530 °C achieved by Hf addition onto LSC. Finally, the results revealed a `volcano' relation between the oxygen exchange kinetics and the oxygen vacancy formation enthalpy of the binary oxides of the additive cations. This volcano relation highlights the existence of an optimum surface oxygen vacancy concentration that balances the gain in oxygen exchange kinetics and the chemical stability loss.

  11. Cation-π interaction of the univalent silver cation with meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole: Experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polášek, Miroslav; Kvíčala, Jaroslav; Makrlík, Emanuel; Křížová, Věra; Vaňura, Petr

    2017-02-01

    By using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), it was proven experimentally that the univalent silver cation Ag+ forms with meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole (abbrev. 1) the cationic complex species 1·Ag+. Further, applying quantum chemical DFT calculations, four different conformations of the resulting complex 1·Ag+ were derived. It means that under the present experimental conditions, this ligand 1 can be considered as a macrocyclic receptor for the silver cation.

  12. Electrodialytic matrix isolation for metal cations.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Hiroyama, Yuri; Nakamura, Koretaka; Koda, Takumi; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Toda, Kei

    2015-01-01

    Electrodialytic ion transfer was studied as a matrix isolation tool for heavy metal determinations. An ion transfer device (ITD) was used for the transfer of heavy metal cations. Under optimized flow rates applied voltage and receptor composition, heavy metal ions were quantitatively transferred at concentrations spanning µg L(-1) to mg L(-1). As long as the sample pH was acidic, there was no significant sample pH effect on the transfer efficiencies. Significant salt concentrations (>1 mM NaCl), however, decreased the transfer efficiency. This could be ameliorated (up to 5 mM NaCl) by transient instead of continuous sample introduction. The device was applied to the determination of Fe, Cu and Zn in equine and bovine serum; the reproducibility was better than conventional digestion method.

  13. Retention of Cationic Starch onto Cellulose Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missaoui, Mohamed; Mauret, Evelyne; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur

    2008-08-01

    Three methods of cationic starch titration were used to quantify its retention on cellulose fibres, namely: (i) the complexation of CS with iodine and measurement of the absorbency of the ensuing blue solution by UV-vis spectroscopy; (ii) hydrolysis of the starch macromolecules followed by the conversion of the resulting sugars to furan-based molecules and quantifying the ensuing mixture by measuring their absorbance at a Ι of 490 nm, using the same technique as previous one and; finally (iii) hydrolysis of starch macromolecules by trifluoro-acetic acid and quantification of the sugars in the resulting hydrolysates by high performance liquid chromatography. The three methods were found to give similar results within the range of CS addition from 0 to 50 mg per g of cellulose fibres.

  14. Structures of small bismuth cluster cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelting, Rebecca; Baldes, Alexander; Schwarz, Ulrike; Rapps, Thomas; Schooss, Detlef; Weis, Patrick; Neiss, Christian; Weigend, Florian; Kappes, Manfred M.

    2012-04-01

    The structures of bismuth cluster cations in the range between 4 and 14 atoms have been assigned by a combination of gas phase ion mobility and trapped ion electron diffraction measurements together with density functional theory calculations. We find that above 8 atoms the clusters adopt prolate structures with coordination numbers between 3 and 4 and highly directional bonds. These open structures are more like those seen for clusters of semiconducting-in-bulk elements (such as silicon) rather than resembling the compact structures typical for clusters of metallic-in-bulk elements. An accurate description of bismuth clusters at the level of density functional theory, in particular of fragmentation pathways and dissociation energetics, requires taking spin-orbit coupling into account. For n = 11 we infer that low energy isomers can have fragmentation thresholds comparable to their structural interconversion barriers. This gives rise to experimental isomer distributions which are dependent on formation and annealing histories.

  15. Computational study of cation substitutions in apatites

    SciTech Connect

    Tamm, Toomas . E-mail: tamm@yki.ttu.ee; Peld, Merike

    2006-05-15

    Density-functional theory plane-wave modeling of fluor- and hydroxyapatites has been performed, where one or two calcium ions per unit cell were replaced with cadmium or zinc cations. It was found that cadmium ions favor Ca(1) positions in fluorapatites and Ca(2) positions in hydroxyapatites, in agreement with experiment. A similar pattern is predicted for zinc substitutions. In the doubly substituted cases, where only hydroxyapatites were modeled, a preference for the substituting ions to be located in Ca(2) position was also observed. Displacement of the hydroxide ions from their symmetrical positions on the hexagonal axis can be used to explain the preferred configurations of substituting ions around the axis. -- Deformation of the hydroxide ion chain due to substitutions around the ion channel in substituted hydroxyapatites.

  16. Voltage-dependent facilitation of Cx46 hemichannels

    PubMed Central

    Yin, ShengYong; Altenberg, Guillermo A.; Reuss, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Gap junction channels are formed by two hemichannels in series (one from each neighboring cell), which are in turn connexin hexamers. Under normal conditions, hemichannels at the plasma membrane are mostly closed but can be opened by changes in membrane voltage, extracellular divalent ion concentration, phosphorylation, pH, and redox potential. Recently, interactions between channels have been found to modulate the activity of several ion channels, including gap junction channels. Here, we studied whether connexin46 (Cx46) hemichannels display such behavior. We studied the response of the Cx46 hemichannels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes to consecutive depolarization pulses. Hemichannels formed by wild-type Cx46 and a COOH-terminal domain truncation mutant (Cx46ΔCT) were activated by voltage pulses. When the hemichannels were depolarized repeatedly from −60 mV to +80 mV, the amplitude of the outward and tail currents increased progressively with successive pulses. This phenomenon (“current facilitation”) depended on the amplitude of the depolarization, reaching a maximum at approximately +60 mV in oocytes expressing Cx46, and on the interval between pulses, disappearing with intervals longer than about 20 s. The current facilitation was also present in oocytes expressing Cx46ΔCT, ruling out a primary role of this domain in the facilitation. Nominal removal of divalent cations from the extracellular side caused maximal current activation of Cx46 and Cx46ΔCT hemichannels and prevented facilitation. The results suggest that Cx46 hemichannels show a cooperative activation independent of their COOH-terminal domain. PMID:19889966

  17. Theoretical study of the electronically excited radical cations of naphthalene and anthracene as archetypal models for astrophysical observations. Part II. Dynamics consequences.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, S; Reddy, V Sivaranjana; Mahapatra, S

    2011-08-28

    Nuclear dynamics is investigated theoretically from first principles by employing the ab initio vibronic models of the prototypical naphthalene and anthracene radical cations developed in Part I. This Part is primarily aimed at corroborating a large amount of available experimental data with a specific final goal to establish an unambiguous link with the current observations in astrophysics and astronomy. The detailed analyses presented here perhaps establish that these two prototypical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations are indeed potential carriers of the observed diffuse interstellar bands.

  18. Non-classical diffusion in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alasdair W; Licence, Peter; Abbott, Andrew P

    2011-06-07

    In this study the diffusion coefficient of neutral and cationic ferrocenyl-derivatives have been characterised in a range of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids of the general form [C(n)C(1)Im](+)[X](-). The electrochemistry of ferrocene, 1-ferrocenylmethylimidazole (FcC(1)Im), 1-ferrocenylmethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([FcC(1)C(1)Im][Tf(2)N]) and N,N,N,N-trimethylferrocenyl-methylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([FcC(1)NMe(3)][Tf(2)N]), in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([C(2)C(1)Im][Tf(2)N]) was investigated. It was shown that the diffusion coefficients of each were not significantly affected by the presence and location of a positive charge on the ferrocenyl-derivative, suggesting that coulombic solvent-solute interactions did not hinder motion of these species in ionic liquids. The diffusion coefficients for [FcC(1)C(1)Im][Tf(2)N] in five [C(n)C(1)Im][X] ionic liquids were determined as a function of temperature and the data shown to disobey the Stokes-Einstein equation. This observation is consistent with the fact that ionic liquids are glass formers, systems in which non-Stokesian behaviour is well documented. Measured diffusion coefficient data was used to determine correlation length in the ionic liquid and was found to correlate with the average size of holes, or voids, within the ionic liquid. This interpretation suggests that a model by which a migrating species can jump between voids or holes within the liquid is highly appropriate and is consistent with the observed behaviour measured across a range of temperatures.

  19. Solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation: Application to ionic diffusion in cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.; Kosson, D.S.; Garrabrants, A.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Sloot, H.A. van der

    2013-02-15

    A robust numerical solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation for asymmetric polyelectrolyte solutions in discrete pore geometries is presented. Comparisons to the linearized approximation of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation reveal that the assumptions leading to linearization may not be appropriate for the electrochemical regime in many cementitious materials. Implications of the electric double layer on both partitioning of species and on diffusive release are discussed. The influence of the electric double layer on anion diffusion relative to cation diffusion is examined.

  20. Bubble-Facilitated VOC Transport from LNAPL Smear Zones and Its Potential Effect on Vapor Intrusion.

    PubMed

    Soucy, Nicole C; Mumford, Kevin G

    2017-02-10

    Most conceptual and mathematical models of soil vapor intrusion assume that the transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a source toward a building is limited by diffusion through the soil gas. Under conditions where advection occurs, transport rates are higher and can lead to higher indoor air concentrations. Advection-dominated conditions can be created by gas bubble flow in the saturated zone. A series of laboratory column experiments were conducted to measure mass flux due to bubble-facilitated VOC transport from light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) smear zones. Smear zones that contained both LNAPL residual and trapped gas, as well as those that contained only LNAPL residual, were investigated. Results showed that the VOC mass flux due to bubble-facilitated transport was orders-of-magnitude higher than under diffusion-limited conditions. Results also showed that the mass flux due to bubble-facilitated transport was intermittent, and increased with an increased supply of dissolved gases.

  1. Crystal structure of channelrhodopsin, a light-gated cation channel - all cations lead through the monomer.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideaki E; Nureki, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Channelrhodopsin (ChR) is a light-gated cation channel derived from green algae. Since the inward flow of cations triggers the neuron firing, neurons expressing ChRs can be optically controlled even within freely moving mammals. Although ChR has been broadly applied to neuro-science research, little is known about its molecular mechanisms. We determined the crystal structure of chimeric ChR at 2.3 Å resolution and revealed its molecular architecture. The integration of structural, electrophysio-logical, and computational analyses provided insight into the molecular basis for the channel function of ChR, and paved the way for the principled design of ChR variants with novel properties.

  2. Tuning the LSPR in copper chalcogenide nanoparticles by cation intercalation, cation exchange and metal growth.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Andreas; Kodanek, Torben; Dorfs, Dirk

    2015-12-14

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) of degenerately doped copper chalcogenide nanoparticles (NPs) (Cu2-xSe berzelianite and Cu1.1S covellite) have been modified applying different methods. The comparison of the cation exchange (Cu2-xSe) and intercalation (Cu1.1S) of Ag(I) and Cu(I) has shown that Ag(I) causes a non reversible, air stable shift of the LSPR. This was compared to the influence of Au(I) cation exchange into Cu1.1S platelets under the formation of Cu1.1S-Au2S mixed nanoplatelets. Furthermore, we show the growth of Au domains on Cu2-xSe, and discuss the interaction of the two plasmonic parts of the obtained dual plasmonic Cu2-xSe-Au hybrid particles.

  3. Mastocytosis, diffuse cutaneous (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a picture of diffuse, cutaneous mastocytosis. Abnormal collections of cells in the skin (mast cells) produce this rash. Unlike bullous mastocytosis, rubbing will not lead to formation of blisters ( ...

  4. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation.

    PubMed

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework.

  5. Novel Diffusivity Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser

    2001-01-01

    A common-path interferometer (CPI) system was developed to measure the diffusivity of liquid pairs. The CPI is an optical technique that can be used to measure changes in the gradient of the refraction index of transparent materials. This system uses a shearing interferometer that shares the same optical path from a laser light source to the final imaging plane. Hence, the molecular diffusion coefficient of liquids can be determined using the physical relations between changes in the optical path length and the liquid phase properties. The data obtained with this interferometer were compared with similar results from other techniques and demonstrated that the instrument is superior in measuring the diffusivity of miscible liquids while keeping the system very compact and robust. CPI can also be used for studies in interface dynamics and other diffusion-dominated-process applications.

  6. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation

    PubMed Central

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework. PMID:25309676

  7. Diffusion of eccentric microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Pulak K; Li, Yunyun; Marchesoni, Fabio; Li, Baowen

    2016-02-21

    We model the two-dimensional diffusive dynamics of an eccentric artificial microswimmer in a highly viscous medium. We assume that the swimmer's propulsion results from an effective force applied to a center distinct from its center of mass, both centers resting on a body's axis parallel to its average self-propulsion velocity. Moreover, we allow for angular fluctuations of the velocity about the body's axis. We prove, both analytically and numerically, that the ensuing active diffusion of the swimmer is suppressed to an extent that strongly depends on the model parameters. In particular, the active diffusion constant undergoes a transition from a quadratic to a linear dependence on the self-propulsion speed, with practical consequences on the interpretation of the experimental data. Finally, we extend our model to describe the diffusion of chiral eccentric swimmers.

  8. Determining diffusion coefficients of ionic liquids by means of field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Meier, R; Rachocki, A; Korpała, A; Singh, R K; Rössler, E A

    2014-06-28

    Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FC NMR) relaxation studies are reported for three ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMIM-SCN, 220-258 K), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM-BF4, 243-318 K), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF6, 258-323 K). The dispersion of (1)H spin-lattice relaxation rate R1(ω) is measured in the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz, and the studies are complemented by (19)F spin-lattice relaxation measurements on BMIM-PF6 in the corresponding frequency range. From the (1)H relaxation results self-diffusion coefficients for the cation in EMIM-SCN, BMIM-BF4, and BMIM-PF6 are determined. This is done by performing an analysis considering all relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation contributions to the (1)H spin-lattice relaxation as well as by benefiting from the universal low-frequency dispersion law characteristic of Fickian diffusion which yields, at low frequencies, a linear dependence of R1 on square root of frequency. From the (19)F relaxation both anion and cation diffusion coefficients are determined for BMIM-PF6. The diffusion coefficients obtained from FC NMR relaxometry are in good agreement with results reported from pulsed- field-gradient NMR. This shows that NMR relaxometry can be considered as an alternative route of determining diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions in ionic liquids.

  9. U(VI) uranyl cation-cation interactions in framework germanates.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; Moore-Shay, Laura J; Burns, Peter C

    2011-03-21

    The isomorphous compounds NH(4)[(UO(6))(2)(UO(2))(9)(GeO(4))(GeO(3)(OH))] (1), K[(UO(6))(2)(UO(2))(9)(GeO(4))(GeO(3)(OH))] (2), Li(3)O[(UO(6))(2)(UO(2))(9)(GeO(4))(GeO(3)(OH))] (3), and Ba[(UO(6))(2)(UO(2))(9)(GeO(4))(2)] (4) were synthesized by hydrothermal reaction at 220 °C. The structures were determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction and refined to R(1) = 0.0349 (1), 0.0232 (2), 0.0236 (3), 0.0267 (4). Each are trigonal, P(3)1c. 1: a = 10.2525(5), c = 17.3972(13), V = 1583.69(16) Å(3), Z = 2; 2: a = 10.226(4), c = 17.150(9), V = 1553.1(12) Å(3), Z = 2; 3: a = 10.2668(5), c = 17.0558(11), V = 1556.94(15) Å(3), Z = 2; 4: a = 10.2012(5), c = 17.1570(12), V = 1546.23(15) Å(3), Z = 2. There are three symmetrically independent U sites in each structure, two of which correspond to typical (UO(2))(2+) uranyl ions and the other of which is octahedrally coordinated by six O atoms. One of the uranyl ions donates a cation-cation interaction, and accepts a different cation-cation interaction. The linkages between the U-centered polyhedra result in a relatively dense three-dimensional framework. Ge and low-valence sites are located within cavities in the framework of U-polyhedra. Chemical, thermal, and spectroscopic characterizations are provided.

  10. Guide tube flow diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Berringer, R.T.; Myron, D.L.

    1980-11-04

    A nuclear reactor upper internal guide tube has a flow diffuser integral with its bottom end. The guide tube provides guidance for control rods during their ascent or descent from the reactor core. The flow diffuser serves to divert the upward flow of reactor coolant around the outside of the guide tube thereby limiting the amount of coolant flow and turbulence within the guide tube, thus enhancing the ease of movement of the control rods.

  11. Anomalous diffusion of water in [BMIM][TFSI] room-temperature ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Rollet, Anne-Laure; Porion, Patrice; Vaultier, Michel; Billard, Isabelle; Deschamps, Michael; Bessada, Catherine; Jouvensal, Laurence

    2007-10-18

    We have studied the self-diffusion properties of butyl-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide ([BMIM][TFSI]) + water system. The self-diffusion coefficients of cations, anions, and water molecules were determined by pulsed field gradient NMR. These measures were performed with increased water quantity up to saturation (from 0.3 to 30 mol %). Unexpected variations have been observed. The self-diffusion coefficient of every species increases with the quantity of water but not in the same order of magnitude. Whereas very similar evolutions are observed for the anion and cation, the increase is 25 times greater for water molecules. We interpret our data by the existence of phase separation at microscopic scale.

  12. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  13. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1982-05-18

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  14. Tubular cationized pullulan hydrogels as local reservoirs for plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Aurélie; Ducrocq, Grégory; Hlawaty, Hanna; Bataille, Isabelle; Guénin, Erwann; Letourneur, Didier; Feldman, Laurent J

    2007-12-01

    In the present study, we measured the ability of various cationized pullulan tubular hydrogels to retain plasmid DNA, and tested the ability of retained plasmid DNA to transfect vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Cationized pullulans were obtained by grafting at different charge densities ethylamine (EA) or diethylaminoethylamine (DEAE) on the pullulan backbone. Polymers were characterized by elemental analysis, acid-base titration, size exclusion chromatography, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The complexation of cationized pullulans in solution with plasmid DNA was evidenced by fluorescence quenching with PicoGreen. Cationized pullulans were then chemically crosslinked with phosphorus oxychloride to obtain tubular cationized pullulan hydrogels. Native pullulan tubes did not retain loaded plasmid DNA. In contrast, the ability of cationized pullulan tubes to retain plasmid DNA was dependent on both the amine content and the type of amine. The functional integrity of plasmid DNA in cationized pullulan tubes was demonstrated by in vitro transfection of VSMCs. Hence, cationized pullulan hydrogels can be designed as tubular structures with high affinity for plasmid DNA, which may provide new biomaterials to enhance the efficiency of local arterial gene transfer strategies.

  15. CATION EXCHANGE METHOD FOR THE RECOVERY OF PROTACTINIUM

    DOEpatents

    Studier, M.H.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1959-07-14

    A cation exchange prccess is described for separating protactinium values from thorium values whereby they are initially adsorbed together from an aqueous 0.1 to 2 N hydrochloric acid on a cation exchange resin in a column. Then selectively eluting the thorium by an ammonium sulfate solution and subsequently eluting the protactinium by an oxalate solution.

  16. Effects of cationic hydroxyethyl cellulose on glucose tolerance and obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cholestyramine is a cationic polymer prescribed to lower cholesterol in humans. We investigated the effects of cationic hydroxyethyl cellulose (cHEC) on weight loss and metabolic disorders associated with obesity using both hamster and diet-induced obese mouse models. Golden Syrian hamsters and ob...

  17. Solid Solutions of Rare Earth Cations in Mesoporous Anatase Beads and Their Performances in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallo, Carmen; Salleo, Alberto; Gozzi, Daniele; di Pascasio, Francesco; Quaranta, Simone; Panetta, Riccardo; Latini, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Solid solutions of the rare earth (RE) cations Pr3+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Gd3+, Er3+ and Yb3+ in anatase TiO2 have been synthesized as mesoporous beads in the concentration range 0.1-0.3% of metal atoms. The solid solutions were have been characterized by XRD, SEM, diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectroscopy, BET and BJH surface analysis. All the solid solutions possess high specific surface areas, up to more than 100 m2/g. The amount of adsorbed dye in each photoanode has been determined spectrophotometrically. All the samples were tested as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using N719 as dye and a nonvolatile, benzonitrile based electrolyte. All the cells were have been tested by conversion efficiency (J-V), quantum efficiency (IPCE), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and dark current measurements. While lighter RE cations (Pr3+, Nd3+) limit the performance of DSSCs compared to pure anatase mesoporous beads, cations from Sm3+ onwards enhance the performance of the devices. A maximum conversion efficiency of 8.7% for Er3+ at a concentration of 0.2% has been achieved. This is a remarkable efficiency value for a DSSC employing N719 dye without co-adsorbents and a nonvolatile electrolyte. For each RE cation the maximum performances are obtained for a concentration of 0.2% metal atoms.

  18. Solid Solutions of Rare Earth Cations in Mesoporous Anatase Beads and Their Performances in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Carmen; Salleo, Alberto; Gozzi, Daniele; Di Pascasio, Francesco; Quaranta, Simone; Panetta, Riccardo; Latini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Solid solutions of the rare earth (RE) cations Pr3+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Gd3+, Er3+ and Yb3+ in anatase TiO2 have been synthesized as mesoporous beads in the concentration range 0.1–0.3% of metal atoms. The solid solutions were have been characterized by XRD, SEM, diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectroscopy, BET and BJH surface analysis. All the solid solutions possess high specific surface areas, up to more than 100 m2/g. The amount of adsorbed dye in each photoanode has been determined spectrophotometrically. All the samples were tested as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using N719 as dye and a nonvolatile, benzonitrile based electrolyte. All the cells were have been tested by conversion efficiency (J–V), quantum efficiency (IPCE), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and dark current measurements. While lighter RE cations (Pr3+, Nd3+) limit the performance of DSSCs compared to pure anatase mesoporous beads, cations from Sm3+ onwards enhance the performance of the devices. A maximum conversion efficiency of 8.7% for Er3+ at a concentration of 0.2% has been achieved. This is a remarkable efficiency value for a DSSC employing N719 dye without co-adsorbents and a nonvolatile electrolyte. For each RE cation the maximum performances are obtained for a concentration of 0.2% metal atoms. PMID:26577287

  19. Influence of BH3 and alkaline cation released from the reduction agent on a tandem reduction/acylation reaction-A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Nevena I.; Nikolova, Rositca D.; Bojilova, Anka G.; Vayssilov, Georgi N.

    When an alkaline boron hydride is used as reduction reagent two byproducts are released, BH3 and alkaline cation, and both of them could influence the following reaction steps if a multi-step reaction is performed in tandem one-pot fashion. We report a theoretical study on the stability of possible complexes of the Lewis acids, BH3 and alkaline cations, with reaction intermediate, solvent molecules and basic additives in a tandem hydride reduction/acylation reaction of 3-diethylphosphonocoumarin. Both chelate complexes of the intermediate anion with the alkali cations (Li+, Na+, or K+) and complexes of BH3 bound to C or O center of the ambident anionic intermediate have been investigated. Since the formation of the latter complexes blocks the intermediate for further acylation, the reaction could take place only if BH3 is bound in a complex with a strong base as DMAP. The binding energy of BH3 to DMAP was found higher than to the intermediate for Li+ and Na+ as counter cations, while for K+ BH3 is bound to the intermediate stronger than to DMAP. Formation of the intermediate is facilitated in presence of Li+ cations, but the alteration of the alkali cation does not influence the selectivity of the reaction-C-acylations is preferred in all cases.

  20. Diffusion in natural ilmenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenhouse, Iona; O'Neill, Hugh; Lister, Gordon

    2010-05-01

    Diffusion rates in natural ilmenite of composition Fe0.842+ Fe0.163+Mn0.07Mg0.01Ti 0.92O3 from the Vishnevye Mountains (Urals, Russia) have been measured at 1000° C. Experiments were carried out in a one atmosphere furnace with oxygen fugacity controlled by flow of a CO-CO2 gas mixture, over a period of four hours. The diffusant source was a synthetic ilmenite (FeTiO3) powder doped with trace amounts of Mg, Co, Ni, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Al, Cr, Ga and Y. Since, the natural ilmenite crystal contained Mn it was also possible to study diffusion of Mn from the ilmenite crystal. The experiments were analysed using the electron microprobe and scanning laser ablation ICP-MS. Diffusion profiles were measured for Al, Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, Ga, and Y. Diffusion of Cr, Hf, Zr, V, Nb and Ta was too slow to allow diffusion profiles to be accurately measured for the times and temperatures studied so far. The preliminary results show that diffusion in ilmenite is fast, with the diffusivity determined in this study on the order of 10-13 to 10-16 m2s-1. For comparison, Chakraborty (1997) found interdiffusion of Fe and Mg in olivine at 1000° C on the order of 10-17 to 10-18m2s-1 and Dieckmann (1998) found diffusivity of Fe, Mg, Co in magnetite at 1200° C to be on the order of 10-13 to 10-14 m2s-1. The order in which the diffusivity of the elements decreases is Mn > Co > Mg ≥ Ni > Al ≥ Y ≥ Ga, that is to say that Mn diffuses the fastest and Ga the slowest. Overall, this study intends to determine diffusion parameters such as frequency factor, activation energy and activation volume as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity. This research is taking place in the context of a larger study focusing on the use of the garnet-ilmenite system as a geospeedometer. Examination of the consequences of simultaneous diffusion of multiple elements is a necessity if we are to develop an understanding of the crystal-chemical controls on diffusion (cf Spandler & O'Neill, in press). Chakraborty

  1. Unsteady planar diffusion flames: Ignition, travel, burnout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fendell, F.; Wu, F.

    1995-01-01

    In microgravity, a thin planar diffusion flame is created and thenceforth travels so that the flame is situated at all times at an interface at which the hydrogen and oxygen meet in stoichiometric proportion. If the initial amount of hydrogen is deficient relative to the initial amount of oxygen, then the planar flame will travel further and further into the half volume initially containing hydrogen, until the hydrogen is (virtually) fully depleted. Of course, when the amount of residual hydrogen becomes small, the diffusion flame is neither vigorous nor thin; in practice, the flame is extinguished before the hydrogen is fully depleted, owing to the finite rate of the actual chemical-kinetic mechanism. The rate of travel of the hydrogen-air diffusion flame is much slower than the rate of laminar flame propagation through a hydrogen-air mixture. This slow travel facilitates diagnostic detection of the flame position as a function of time, but the slow travel also means that the time to burnout (extinction) probably far exceeds the testing time (typically, a few seconds) available in earth-sited facilities for microgravity-environment experiments. We undertake an analysis to predict (1) the position and temperature of the diffusion flame as a function of time, (2) the time at which extinction of the diffusion flame occurs, and (3) the thickness of quench layers formed on side walls (i.e., on lateral boundaries, with normal vectors parallel to the diffusion-flame plane), and whether, prior to extinction, water vapor formed by burning will condense on these cold walls.

  2. Diffusion and partition coefficients of minor and trace elements in San Carlos olivine at 1,300°C with some geochemical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spandler, Carl; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.

    2009-11-01

    Lattice diffusion coefficients have been determined for 19 elements (Li, Be, Na, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Y, Zr, Eu, Gd, Lu and Hf) in a single crystal of San Carlos olivine as a function of crystallographic orientation, at 1,300°C, 1 bar and fO2 = 10-8.3 bars, by equilibration with a synthetic silicate melt. Results for Li, Na, V, Cr, Fe and Zn are from diffusion of these elements out of the olivine, starting from their indigenous concentrations; those for all other elements are from diffusion into the olivine, from the silicate melt reservoir. Our 25-day experiment produced diffusion profiles 50 to > 700 μm in length, which are sufficiently long that precise analyses could be achieved by scanning laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, even at concentration levels well below 1 μg g-1. For the divalent cations Ca, Mn, Fe and Ni, profiles were also obtained by electron microprobe analysis. The results of the two methods agree well with each other, and are consistent with divalent cation diffusion coefficients previously determined using different experimental methodologies. Olivine/melt partition coefficients retrieved from the data are also consistent with other published partitioning data, indicating that element incorporation and transport in olivine in our experiment occurred via mechanisms appropriate to natural conditions. Most of the examined trace elements diffuse through olivine at similar rates to the major octahedral cations Fe and Mg, showing that cation charge and radius have little direct influence on diffusion rates. Aluminium and P remain low and constant in the olivine, implying negligible transport at our analytical scale, hence Al and P diffusion rates that are at least two orders of magnitude slower than the other cations studied here. All determined element diffusivities are anisotropic, with diffusion fastest along the [001] axis, except Y and the REEs, which diffuse isotropically. The results suggest that

  3. Stokes-flow computation of the diffusion coefficient and rotational diffusion tensor of lysozyme, a globular protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    2002-07-01

    Based on a closed surface of triangles fitted to atomic coordinates determined crystallographically, Brune and Kim [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90, 3835-3839 (1993)] proposed a boundary-element Stokes-flow technique for ab initio computation of a translational diffusion coefficient and the rotational diffusion tensor Dr of globular proteins. They applied their approach to atomic coordinates for a tetragonal structure of hen egg-white lysozyme, and reported that computed values of a translational diffusion coefficient and Dr=tr(Dr)/3 agreed well with experiment. After establishing the identity between the infinite-dilution tracer diffusion coefficient of the protein macroion (D+ for lysozyme cation) and the "translational diffusion coefficient" computed by Brune and Kim, we adopt a somewhat different computational approach and show how convergence of D+ and Dr for tetragonal lysozyme depends on two computational parameters characterizing the fidelity of the geometric approximation to the protein surface and two others characterizing the accuracy of the Stokes-flow computations. We then compute D+ and Dr for lysozyme using atomic coordinates for the triclinic crystal structure, three structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the liquid phase (presumably corresponding more closely to in vivo structures), the solvated tetragonal structure (with 108 water molecules) considered by Brune and Kim, and a "dry" version of the same structure. These computations show that D+ and Dr computed for all of the dry crystal structures are in excellent agreement with those for the liquid-phase conformations. Values of D+ and Dr computed for the solvated structure are lower, consistent with the larger volume and area of the corresponding polyhedral surface. We also show that several choices of the origin of the force system [discussed by Brenner, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 23, 407-436 (1967)] give rise to nearly identical translational diffusion coefficients

  4. The pi-Cation Radical of Chlorophyll a.

    PubMed

    Borg, D C; Fajer, J; Felton, R H; Dolphin, D

    1970-10-01

    Chlorophyll a undergoes reversible one-electron oxidation in dichloromethane and butyronitrile. Removal of the electron by controlled potential electrolysis or by stoichiometric charge transfer to a known cation radical yields a radical (epr line width = 9 gauss, g = 2.0025 +/- 0.0001) whose optical spectrum is bleached relative to that of chlorophyll. Upon electrophoresis this bleached species behaves as a cation. By comparison with the known properties of pi-cation radicals of porphyrins and chlorins, the chlorophyll radical is also identified as a pi-cation. Further correlation of optical and epr properties with published studies on photosynthesis leads to the conclusion that oxidized P700, the first photochemical product of photosystem I in green plants, contains a pi-cation radical of the chlorin component of chlorophyll a. This radical is the likely source of the rapidly-decaying, narrow epr signal of photosynthesis.

  5. Design and Evaluation of a Prompting Instrument to Support Learning within the Diffusion Simulation Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Seolim; Lara, Miguel; Enfield, Jake; Frick, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    Conducting an iterative usability testing, a set of prompts used as a form of instructional support was developed in order to facilitate the comprehension of the diffusion of innovations theory (Rogers, 2003) in a simulation game called the Diffusion Simulation Game (DSG) (Molenda & Rice, 1979). The six subjects who participated in the study…

  6. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II is promoted in vitro by cationic chaperones, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Fry, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron cross-links contributes to the assembly and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Pure RG-II is efficiently dimerized by boric acid (B(OH)3 ) in vitro only if nonbiological agents for example Pb(2+) are added. By contrast, newly synthesized RG-II domains dimerize very rapidly in vivo. We investigated biological agents that might enable this. We tested for three such agents: novel enzymes, borate-transferring ligands and cationic 'chaperones' that facilitate the close approach of two polyanionic RG-II molecules. Dimerization was monitored electrophoretically. Parsley shoot cell-wall enzymes did not affect RG-II dimerization in vitro. Borate-binding ligands (apiose, dehydroascorbic acid, alditols) and small organic cations (including polyamines) also lacked consistent effects. Polylysine bound permanently to RG-II, precluding electrophoretic analysis. However, another polycation, polyhistidine, strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 without irreversible polyhistidine-RG-II complexation. Likewise, partially purified spinach extensins (histidine/lysine-rich cationic glycoproteins), strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 in vitro. Thus certain polycations, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins, can chaperone RG-II, manoeuvring this polyanionic polysaccharide domain such that boron-bridging is favoured. These chaperones dissociate from RG-II after facilitating its dimerization, indicating that they act catalytically rather than stoichiometrically. We propose a natural role for extensin-RG-II interaction in steering cell-wall assembly.

  7. Computational study of the energetics of charge and cation mixing in U1-xCexO₂

    DOE PAGES

    Hanken, B. E.; Stanek, C. R.; Grønbech-Jensen, N.; ...

    2011-08-26

    The formalism of electronic density-functional theory (DFT), with Hubbard-U corrections (DFT+U), is employed in a computational study of the energetics of fluorite-structured U1-xCexO₂ mixtures. The computational approach makes use of a procedure which facilitates convergence of the calculations to multiple self-consistent DFT+U solutions for a given cation arrangement, corresponding to different charge states for the U and Ce ions in several prototypical cation arrangements. Results indicate a significant dependence of the structural and energetic properties on the nature of both charge and cation ordering. With the effective Hubbard-U parameters that reproduce well the measured oxidation-reduction energies for urania and ceria,more » we find that charge transfer between U⁴⁺ and Ce⁴⁺ ions, leading to the formation of U⁵⁺ and Ce³⁺, gives rise to an increase in the mixing energy in the range of 4–14 kJ/mol of the formula unit, depending on the nature of the cation ordering. The results suggest that although charge transfer between uranium and cerium ions is disfavored energetically, it is likely to be entropically stabilized at the high temperatures relevant to the processing and service of urania-based solid solutions.« less

  8. New Chorus Diffusion Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Kersten, Tobias; Glauert, Sarah A.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Boscher, Daniel; Sicard, Angelica; Maget, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Whistler mode chorus waves play a major role in the loss and acceleration of electrons in the Earth's radiation belts. While high time resolution satellite data show that these waves are highly structured in frequency and time, at present their effects on the electron distribution can only be assessed on a global scale by using quasi-linear diffusion theory. Here we present new quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for upper and lower band chorus waves for use in global radiation belt models. Using data from DE 1 CRRES, Cluster 1, Double Star TC1 and THEMIS, we have constructed a database of wave properties and used this to construct new diffusion coefficients for L* = 1.5 to 10 in steps of 0.5, 10 latitude bins between 0o and 60o ,8 bins in MLT and 5 levels of geomagnetic activity as measured by Kp. We find that the peak frequency of lower band chorus is close to 0.2 fce, which is lower than that used in previous models. The combined upper and lower band chorus diffusion shows structure that should result in an energy dependent pitch angle anisotropy, particularly between 1 keV and 100 keV. The diffusion rates suggest that wave-particle interactions should still be very important outside geostationary orbit, out to at least L* = 8. We find significant energy diffusion near 1 keV near the loss cone, consistent with wave growth. By including the new chorus diffusion matrix into the BAS radiation belt (BRB) model we compare the effects on the evolution of the radiation belts against previous models.

  9. The Diffusion Process of Patient Education in Dutch Community Pharmacy: An Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pronk, M. C. M.; Blom, A. Th. G.; Van Burg, A.; Jonkers, R.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies barriers and facilitators to the implementation of patient education in community pharmacies and classifies these barriers and facilitators into the diffusion stages of Rogers'"Innovations in Organizations" model. Discusses the implementation of patient education activities that require individual and organizational change in…

  10. Radical cation cyclization of 1,5-hexadiene to cyclohexene via the cyclohexane-2,5-diyl radical cation intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Q.X.; Qin, X.Z.; Wang, J.T.; Williams, F.

    1988-03-16

    The classical example of a neutral carbon-centered radical cyclization reaction is the regioselective 1,5-ring closure (exocyclization) of the 5-hexenyl radical to the cyclopentylcarbinyl radical. Here the authors report the title reaction, a comparable addition process whereby an ..cap alpha.., omega-diene radical cation reacts by endocyclization and hydrogen shift(s) to produce a cycloolefin radical cation.

  11. Effect of the structure of imidazolium cations in [BF4](-)-type ionic liquids on direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of horseradish peroxidase in Nafion films.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Huang, Xirong; Qu, Yinbo

    2011-10-01

    The direct electrochemistry and bioelectrocatalysis of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in Nafion films at glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was investigated in three [BF(4)](-)-type room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) to understand the structural effect of imidazolium cations. The three ILs are 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Emim][BF(4)]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Bmim][BF(4)]) and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Hmim][BF(4)]). A small amount of water in the three ILs is indispensable for maintaining the electrochemical activity of HRP in Nafion films, and the optimum water contents decrease with the increase of alkyl chain length on imidazole ring. Analysis shows that the optimum water contents are primarily determined by the hydrophilicity of ILs used. In contrast to aqueous medium, ILs media facilitate the direct electron transfer of HRP, and the electrochemical parameters obtained in different ILs are obviously related to the nature of ILs. The direct electron transfer between HRP and GCE is a surface-confined quasi-reversible single electron transfer process. The apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant decreases gradually with the increase of alkyl chain length on imidazole ring, but the changing extent is relatively small. The electrocatalytic reduction current of H(2)O(2) at the present electrode decreases obviously with the increase of alkyl chain length, and the mass transfer of H(2)O(2) via diffusion in ILs should be responsible for the change. In addition, the modified electrode has good stability and reproducibility; the ability to tolerate high levels of F(-) has been greatly enhanced due to the use of Nafion film. When an appropriate mediator is included in the sensing layer, a sensitive nonaqueous biosensor could be fabricated.

  12. Hydrogen motion in proton sponge cations: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Horbatenko, Yevhen; Vyboishchikov, Sergei F

    2011-04-18

    This work presents a study of intramolecular NHN hydrogen bonds in cations of the following proton sponges: 2,7-bis(trimethylsilyl)-1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (1), 1,6-diazabicyclo[4.4.4.]tetradecane (2), 1,9-bis(dimethylamino)dibenzoselenophene (3), 1,9-bis(dimethylamino)dibenzothiophene (4), 4,5-bis(dimethylamino)fluorene (5), quino[7,8-h]quinoline (6) 1,2-bis(dimethylamino)benzene (7), and 1,12-bis(dimethylamino)benzo[c]phenantrene (8). Three different patterns were found for proton motion: systems with a single-well potential (cations 1-2), systems with a double-well potential and low proton transfer barrier, ΔEe (cations 3-5), and those with a double-well potential and a high barrier (cations 6-8). Tests of several density functionals indicate that the PBEPBE functional reproduces the potential-energy surface (PES) obtained at the MP2 level well, whereas the B3LYP, MPWB1K, and MPW1B95 functionals overestimate the barrier. Three-dimensional PESs were constructed and the vibrational Schrödinger equation was solved for selected cases of cation 1 (with a single-well potential), cation 4 (with a ΔEe value of 0.1 kcal mol(-1) at the MP2 level), and cations 6 (ΔEe = 2.4 kcal mol(-1)) and 7 (ΔEe=3.4 kcal mol(-1)). The PES is highly anharmonic in all of these cases. The analysis of the three-dimensional ground-state vibrational wave function shows that the proton is delocalized in cations 1 and 4, but is rather localized around the energy minima for cation 7. Cation 6 is an intermediate case, with two weakly pronounced maxima and substantial tunneling. This allows for classification of proton sponge cations into those with localized and those with delocalized proton behavior, with the borderline between them at ΔEe values of about 1.5 kcal mol(-1). The excited vibrational states of proton sponge cations with a low barrier can be described within the framework of a simple particle-in-a-box model. Each cation can be assigned an effective box width.

  13. Li diffusion and substitution in chemically diverse synthetic zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trail, D.

    2015-12-01

    Li concentrations and 7Li/6Li ratios in zircon may potentially trace crustal recycling because continental and mantle-derived zircons yield distinct values (Ushikubo et al. 2008; Bouvier et al. 2012). To some extent, the usefulness of these differences may depend upon the retentively of Li in zircon. Cherniak and Watson (2010) measured relatively high diffusivities for Li; here we sought to discover the scenarios under which Li mobility might be inhibited by charge compensating cations. We conducted "in" diffusion experiments in synthetic Lu-doped (~5000 ppm), P-doped (~250 ppm), and nearly pure zircon following the procedure in Cherniak and Watson (2010). In separate experiments, Li was ion implanted at depth within polished Mud Tank zircon slabs to form a Gaussian Li concentration profile; the relaxed concentration profile was measured after heating the zircon slabs. In all experiments, which ranged from 920 to 650 oC, calculated diffusivities were in agreement with a previously established Arrhenius relationship calibrated on trace element poor Mud Tank zircon (Cherniak and Watson, 2010). We also conducted complementary LA-ICP-MS mapping on the surfaces of P- and Lu-doped synthetic zircon crystals after the Li diffusion results were obtained. This revealed heterogeneous though patterned correlation between Li+Lu in the near surface of the crystal (no strong patterns emerged for P+Li). And finally, we observed that synthetic sector-zoned zircon exhibits near step function Li concentration profiles - correlating with changes in the rare earth element concentrations across these sectors - which allowed us to examine Li diffusion in yet another manner. Re-heating these grains followed by LA-ICP-MS analysis revealed significant Li migration, with no detectable migration of the rare earth elements. While our experiments cannot be considered exhaustive, we have yet to find a scenario where Li mobility in synthetic zircon depends on charge compensating cations.

  14. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  15. Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ju Hyung; Kim, Se Hoon; Kim, Eui Hyun; Kang, Seok-Gu; Chang, Jong Hee

    2015-04-01

    Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis (PDLG) is a rare condition with a fatal outcome, characterized by diffuse infiltration of the leptomeninges by neoplastic glial cells without evidence of primary tumor in the brain or spinal cord parenchyma. In particular, PDLG histologically diagnosed as gliosarcoma is extremely rare, with only 2 cases reported to date. We report a case of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis. A 68-year-old man presented with fever, chilling, headache, and a brief episode of mental deterioration. Initial T1-weighted post-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement without a definite intraparenchymal lesion. Based on clinical and imaging findings, antiviral treatment was initiated. Despite the treatment, the patient's neurologic symptoms and mental status progressively deteriorated and follow-up MRI showed rapid progression of the disease. A meningeal biopsy revealed gliosarcoma and was conclusive for the diagnosis of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis. We suggest the inclusion of PDLG in the potential differential diagnosis of patients who present with nonspecific neurologic symptoms in the presence of leptomeningeal involvement on MRI.

  16. Multidimensional diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Principles from multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, and in particular solid-state NMR, have recently been transferred to the field of diffusion MRI, offering non-invasive characterization of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, such as the human brain, at an unprecedented level of detail. Here we revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to pinpoint the origin of the somewhat unexpected analogy between the two fields, and provide an overview of current diffusion MRI acquisition protocols and data analysis methods to quantify the composition of heterogeneous materials in terms of diffusion tensor distributions with size, shape, and orientation dimensions. While the most advanced methods allow estimation of the complete multidimensional distributions, simpler methods focus on various projections onto lower-dimensional spaces as well as determination of means and variances rather than actual distributions. Even the less advanced methods provide simple and intuitive scalar parameters that are directly related to microstructural features that can be observed in optical microscopy images, e.g. average cell eccentricity, variance of cell density, and orientational order - properties that are inextricably entangled in conventional diffusion MRI. Key to disentangling all these microstructural features is MRI signal acquisition combining isotropic and directional dimensions, just as in the field of multidimensional solid-state NMR from which most of the ideas for the new methods are derived.

  17. Antiendotoxin activity of cationic peptide antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Gough, M; Hancock, R E; Kelly, N M

    1996-12-01

    The endotoxin from gram-negative bacteria consists of a molecule lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which can be shed by bacteria during antimicrobial therapy. A resulting syndrome, endotoxic shock, is a leading cause of death in the developed world. Thus, there is great interest in the development of antimicrobial agents which can reverse rather than promote sepsis, especially given the recent disappointing clinical performance of antiendotoxin therapies. We describe here two small cationic peptides, MBI-27 and MBI-28, which have both antiendotoxic and antibacterial activities in vitro and in vivo in animal models. We had previously demonstrated that these peptides bind to LPS with an affinity equivalent to that of polymyxin B. Consistent with this, the peptides blocked the ability of LPS and intact cells to induce the endotoxic shock mediator, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), upon incubation with the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. MBI-28 was equivalent to polymyxin B in its ability to block LPS induction of TNF by this cell line, even when added 60 min after the TNF stimulus. Furthermore, MBI-28 offered significant protection in a galactosamine-sensitized mouse model of lethal endotoxic shock. This protection correlated with the ability of MBI-28 to reduce LPS-induced circulating TNF by nearly 90% in this mouse model. Both MBI-27 and MBI-28 demonstrated antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria in vitro and in vivo against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in neutropenic mice.

  18. Antiendotoxin activity of cationic peptide antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Gough, M; Hancock, R E; Kelly, N M

    1996-01-01

    The endotoxin from gram-negative bacteria consists of a molecule lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which can be shed by bacteria during antimicrobial therapy. A resulting syndrome, endotoxic shock, is a leading cause of death in the developed world. Thus, there is great interest in the development of antimicrobial agents which can reverse rather than promote sepsis, especially given the recent disappointing clinical performance of antiendotoxin therapies. We describe here two small cationic peptides, MBI-27 and MBI-28, which have both antiendotoxic and antibacterial activities in vitro and in vivo in animal models. We had previously demonstrated that these peptides bind to LPS with an affinity equivalent to that of polymyxin B. Consistent with this, the peptides blocked the ability of LPS and intact cells to induce the endotoxic shock mediator, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), upon incubation with the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. MBI-28 was equivalent to polymyxin B in its ability to block LPS induction of TNF by this cell line, even when added 60 min after the TNF stimulus. Furthermore, MBI-28 offered significant protection in a galactosamine-sensitized mouse model of lethal endotoxic shock. This protection correlated with the ability of MBI-28 to reduce LPS-induced circulating TNF by nearly 90% in this mouse model. Both MBI-27 and MBI-28 demonstrated antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria in vitro and in vivo against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in neutropenic mice. PMID:8945527

  19. Is Iodate a Strongly Hydrated Cation?

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Pham, Thai V.; Fulton, John L.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2011-10-06

    We show, through a combination of density function theory based molecular dynamics simulations (DFTMD) and experimental x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) studies, that the iodate ion (IO3-) is a zwitterion in solution. The local region adjoining the I atom is sufficiently electropositive that three hydrating waters are oriented with their O’s atoms directly interacting with the iodine atom at an I-OH2O distance of 2.95 Å. This is the orientation of water hydrating a cation. Further, approximately 2-3 water molecules hydrate each O of IO3 - through a single H atom in an orientation of the water that is expected for an anion at an IOH2O distance of 3.85 Å. We predict that this structure persists, although to a much lesser degree, for BrO3 -, and ClO3 -. This type of local microstructure profoundly affects the behavior of the "anion" at interfaces and how it interacts with other ionic species in solution.

  20. A phosphotyrosine switch regulates organic cation transporters.

    PubMed

    Sprowl, Jason A; Ong, Su Sien; Gibson, Alice A; Hu, Shuiying; Du, Guoqing; Lin, Wenwei; Li, Lie; Bharill, Shashank; Ness, Rachel A; Stecula, Adrian; Offer, Steven M; Diasio, Robert B; Nies, Anne T; Schwab, Matthias; Cavaletti, Guido; Schlatter, Eberhard; Ciarimboli, Giuliano; Schellens, Jan H M; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Sali, Andrej; Chen, Taosheng; Baker, Sharyn D; Sparreboom, Alex; Pabla, Navjotsingh

    2016-03-16

    Membrane transporters are key determinants of therapeutic outcomes. They regulate systemic and cellular drug levels influencing efficacy as well as toxicities. Here we report a unique phosphorylation-dependent interaction between drug transporters and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which has uncovered widespread phosphotyrosine-mediated regulation of drug transporters. We initially found that organic cation transporters (OCTs), uptake carriers of metformin and oxaliplatin, were inhibited by several clinically used TKIs. Mechanistic studies showed that these TKIs inhibit the Src family kinase Yes1, which was found to be essential for OCT2 tyrosine phosphorylation and function. Yes1 inhibition in vivo diminished OCT2 activity, significantly mitigating oxaliplatin-induced acute sensory neuropathy. Along with OCT2, other SLC-family drug transporters are potentially part of an extensive 'transporter-phosphoproteome' with unique susceptibility to TKIs. On the basis of these findings we propose that TKIs, an important and rapidly expanding class of therapeutics, can functionally modulate pharmacologically important proteins by inhibiting protein kinases essential for their post-translational regulation.

  1. Cationic Hydrophobic Peptides with Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Margareta; Liu, Li-Ping; Deber, Charles M.

    2002-01-01

    The MICs of cationic, hydrophobic peptides of the prototypic sequence KKAAAXAAAAAXAAWAAXAAAKKKK-amide (where X is one of the 20 commonly occurring amino acids) are in a low micromolar range for a panel of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, with no or low hemolytic activity against human and rabbit erythrocytes. The peptides are active only when the average segmental hydrophobicity of the 19-residue core is above an experimentally determined threshold value (where X is Phe, Trp, Leu, Ile, Met, Val, Cys, or Ala). Antimicrobial activity could be increased by using peptides that were truncated from the prototype length to 11 core residues, with X being Phe and with 6 Lys residues grouped at the N terminus. We propose a mechanism for the interaction between these peptides and bacterial membranes similar to the “carpet model,” wherein the Lys residues interact with the anionic phospholipid head groups in the bacterial membrane surface and the hydrophobic core portion of the peptide is then able to interact with the lipid bilayer, causing disruption of the bacterial membrane. PMID:12384369

  2. Cationic Noncovalent Interactions: Energetics and Periodic Trends.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, M T; Armentrout, P B

    2016-05-11

    In this review, noncovalent interactions of ions with neutral molecules are discussed. After defining the scope of the article, which excludes anionic and most protonated systems, methods associated with measuring thermodynamic information for such systems are briefly recounted. An extensive set of tables detailing available thermodynamic information for the noncovalent interactions of metal cations with a host of ligands is provided. Ligands include small molecules (H2, NH3, CO, CS, H2O, CH3CN, and others), organic ligands (O- and N-donors, crown ethers and related molecules, MALDI matrix molecules), π-ligands (alkenes, alkynes, benzene, and substituted benzenes), miscellaneous inorganic ligands, and biological systems (amino acids, peptides, sugars, nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides). Hydration of metalated biological systems is also included along with selected proton-based systems: 18-crown-6 polyether with protonated peptides and base-pairing energies of nucleobases. In all cases, the literature thermochemistry is evaluated and, in many cases, reanchored or adjusted to 0 K bond dissociation energies. Trends in these values are discussed and related to a variety of simple molecular concepts.

  3. Anaerobic Toxicity of Cationic Silver Nanoparticles | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag+ under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNps) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10-15 nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5 mg L-1, the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100 mg L-1 as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag+. Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100 mg L-1 as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. The current

  4. Simple scale interpolator facilitates reading of graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterman, D. E., Jr.

    1965-01-01

    Simple transparent overlay with interpolation scale facilitates accurate, rapid reading of graph coordinate points. This device can be used for enlarging drawings and locating points on perspective drawings.

  5. Diffuser for wellhead isolation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Surjaatmadja, J.B.

    1981-04-21

    An improved diffuser for a wellhead isolation tool which employs a combination of angles in its bore. This improvement reduces the incidence of erosion caused by the flow of fluids through the diffuser, in both the well production tubing adjacent the end of the diffuser and in the diffuser itself.

  6. The influence of cationic lipid type on in-vitro release kinetic profiles of antisense oligonucleotide from cationic nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Hagigit, Tal; Nassar, Taher; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Lambert, Gregory; Benita, Simon

    2008-09-01

    Novel formulations of cationic nanoemulsions based on three different lipids were developed to strengthen the attraction of the polyanionic oligonucleotide (ODN) macromolecules to the cationic moieties on the oil nanodroplets. These formulations were developed to prolong the release of the ODN from the nanoemulsion under appropriate physiological dilutions as encountered in the eye following topical application. Increasing the concentration of the new cationic lipid exhibiting two cationic amine groups (AOA) in the emulsion from 0.05% to 0.4% did not alter markedly the particle size or zeta potential value of the blank cationic nanoemulsion. The extent of ODN association did not vary significantly when the initial concentration of ODN remained constant at 10 microM irrespective of the cationic lipid nature. However, the zeta potential value dropped consistently with the low concentrations of 0.05% and 0.1% of AOA in the emulsions suggesting that an electrostatic attraction occurred between the cationic lipids and the polyanionic ODN molecules at the o/w interface. Only the nanoemulsion prepared with N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium salts (DOTAP) remained physically stable over time. DOTAP cationic lipid nanoemulsion was the most efficient formulation capable of retaining the ODN despite the high dilution of 1:100 with simulated tear solution (STS). Less than 10% of the ODN was exchanged in contrast to 40-50% with the other cationic nanoemulsions. The in-vitro release kinetic behavior of ODN exchange with physiological anions present in the STS appears to be complex and difficult to characterize using mathematical fitting model equations. Further pharmacokinetic studies are needed to verify our kinetic assumptions and confirm the in-vitro ODN release profile from DOTAP cationic nanoemulsions.

  7. Diffusion of Li in olivine. Part I: Experimental observations and a multi species diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohmen, Ralf; Kasemann, Simone A.; Coogan, Laurence; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    until now indicates that the fast (interstitial) mechanism of Li diffusion is unlikely to be dominant in most natural systems; Li rich, oxidizing environments (e.g., fluids?) may be exceptions. However, when it operates it can decouple the equilibration of Li isotopic gradients from the time scale of equilibration of overall Li concentrations. Diffusion dominated by the slower mechanism will occur on the average at a rate that is about an order of magnitude faster than diffusion of Fe, Mg and most other divalent cations in olivine; such diffusion of Li in olivine will be much slower than the rates of diffusion in clinopyroxene and plagioclase crystals at the same conditions. Fractionation of isotopes of Li by diffusion is likely to be a transient phenomenon and is more likely to be observed in crystals showing zoning of Li concentrations.

  8. Determination of the zincate diffusion coefficient and its application to alkaline battery problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Kautz, Harold E.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient for the zincate ion at 24 C was found to be 9.9 X 10 to the minus 7th power squared cm per sec + or - 30 percent in 45 percent potassium hydroxide and 1.4 x 10 to the minus 7 squared cm per sec + or - 25 percent in 40 percent sodium hydroxide. Comparison of these values with literature values at different potassium hydroxide concentrations show that the Stokes-Einstein equation is obeyed. The diffusion coefficient is characteristic of the zincate ion (not the cation) and independent of its concentration. Calculations with the measured value of the diffusion coefficient show that the zinc concentration in an alkaline zincate half cell becomes uniform throughout in tens of hours by diffusion alone. Diffusion equations are derived which are applicable to finite size chambers. Details and discussion of the experimental method are also given.

  9. Theoretical study of electronically excited radical cations of naphthalene and anthracene as archetypal models for astrophysical observations. Part I. Static aspects.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, S; Reddy, V Sivaranjana; Mahapatra, S

    2011-08-28

    Motivated by the recent discovery of new diffuse interstellar bands and results from laboratory experiments, ab initio quantum chemistry calculations are carried out for the lowest six electronic states of naphthalene and anthracene radical cations. The calculated adiabatic electronic energies are utilized to construct suitable diabatic electronic Hamiltonians in order to perform nuclear dynamics studies in Part II. Complex entanglement of the electronic states is established for both the radical cations and the coupling surfaces among them are also derived in accordance with the symmetry selection rules. Critical examination of the coupling parameters of the Hamiltonian suggests that 29 (out of 48) and 31 (out of 66) vibrational modes are relevant in the nuclear dynamics in the six lowest electronic states of naphthalene and anthracene radical cations, respectively.

  10. Cation exchange properties of zeolites in hyper alkaline aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; de Blochouse, Benny; Dom, Dirk; Vancluysen, Jacqueline; Snellings, Ruben; Martens, Johan A; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Maes, André; Breynaert, Eric

    2015-02-03

    Construction of multibarrier concrete based waste disposal sites and management of alkaline mine drainage water requires cation exchangers combining excellent sorption properties with a high stability and predictable performance in hyper alkaline media. Though highly selective organic cation exchange resins have been developed for most pollutants, they can serve as a growth medium for bacterial proliferation, impairing their long-term stability and introducing unpredictable parameters into the evolution of the system. Zeolites represent a family of inorganic cation exchangers, which naturally occur in hyper alkaline conditions and cannot serve as an electron donor or carbon source for microbial proliferation. Despite their successful application as industrial cation exchangers under near neutral conditions, their performance in hyper alkaline, saline water remains highly undocumented. Using Cs(+) as a benchmark element, this study aims to assess the long-term cation exchange performance of zeolites in concrete derived aqueous solutions. Comparison of their exchange properties in alkaline media with data obtained in near neutral solutions demonstrated that the cation exchange selectivity remains unaffected by the increased hydroxyl concentration; the cation exchange capacity did however show an unexpected increase in hyper alkaline media.

  11. Evaluation of the emulsifying properties of some cationic starches.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, A; Kiekens, F; Corveleyn, S; Remon, J P

    1999-03-01

    Different cationic potato, maize, and waxy maize starches were evaluated for their emulsifying properties. Emulsions were prepared using 20% (w/w) arachidic oil and 80% (w/w) water. Emulsions with the cationic starches as emulsifier in a concentration ranging from 1% to 5% (w/w) were prepared and characterized by droplet size and viscosity measurements, and the stability was evaluated visually and by electrical conductance measurements. None of the cationic potato, waxy maize starches, and maize starches with a low degree of substitution (DS) showed adequate emulsifying properties. Emulsions prepared using non-pregelatinized (C [symbol: see text] bond 05914, 2% and 5% w/w; C [symbol: see text] bond 05907, 5% w/w) and pregelatinized (C [symbol: see text] bond 12504, 5% w/w) cationic maize starches with high-DS were visually stable. The initial mean droplet volume diameter of the emulsions prepared with these cationic starches in a 5% (w/w) concentration was similar and ranged from 2.40 to 2.84 microns; however, there was an important difference in droplet size distribution. The droplet size distribution of the emulsions prepared using the non-pregelatinized high-DS cationic starches was markedly narrower than in the case of the emulsions prepared using the pregelatinized high-DS cationic starches. The droplet size of the emulsions remained almost constant during 120 days of storage. Visual inspection and electrical conductance measurements showed that these emulsions were stable for at least 120 days.

  12. Lipopolysaccharide Neutralization by Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers through Pseudoaggregate Formation.

    PubMed

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-03-14

    Synthetic polymers incorporating the cationic charge and hydrophobicity to mimic the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been developed. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind to bacterial membranes that generally contain negatively charged phospholipids and cause membrane disintegration resulting in cell death; however, cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with endotoxin neutralization properties, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported. Bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause sepsis that is responsible for a great amount of mortality worldwide. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers can also bind to negatively charged and hydrophobic LPS and cause detoxification. Hence, we envisaged that cationic-amphiphilic polymers can have both antibacterial as well as LPS binding properties. Here we report synthetic amphiphilic polymers with both antibacterial as well as endotoxin neutralizing properties. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes caused by LPS stimulation were inhibited by >80% when coincubated with these polymers. These reductions were found to be dependent on concentration and, more importantly, on the side-chain chemical structure due to variations in the hydrophobicity profiles of these polymers. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind and cause LPS neutralization and detoxification. Investigations of polymer interaction with LPS using fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that these polymers bind but neither dissociate nor promote LPS aggregation. We show that polymer binding to LPS leads to sort of a pseudoaggregate formation resulting in LPS neutralization/detoxification. These findings provide an unusual mechanism of LPS neutralization using novel synthetic cationic-amphiphilic polymers.

  13. Efficient preparation of cationized gelatin for gene transduction.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Naoto; Onuma, Tsuyoshi; Jujo, Shio; Tamai, Yoshifumi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Myojin, Kazunori; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Ishihara, Yoshimi; Takano, Jiro; Mori, Hidezo

    2006-07-20

    We previously reported gene therapy using cationized gelatin microspheres of φ20-32 μm, prepared from pig skin, as a transducing agent, but although the gelatin offered various advantages, its yield was extremely low (only 0.1%). In this study, we markedly improved the yield of φ20-32 μm cationized gelatin microspheres and prepared a newly less than φ20 μm cationized gelatin. Conventionally, cationized gelatin is prepared by cationization, particulation by agitation, and cross-linking. The yield is determined by the particulation step, for which we had used a three-necked distillation flask of 500 mL and an agitation speed of 420 rpm. The yield was significantly increased from 0.13 ± 0.02% to 8.80 ± 1.90% by using a smaller flask of 300 mL and an agitation speed of 25000 rpm (p < 0.01). We could also prepare cationized gelatin of less than φ20 μm, which had not been possible previously. We confirmed that efficient gene introduction into peritoneal macrophages could be achieved with the new cationized gelatin.

  14. Triggering protein adsorption on tailored cationic cellulose surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Tamilselvan; Niegelhell, Katrin; Zarth, Cíntia Salomão Pinto; Kargl, Rupert; Köstler, Stefan; Ribitsch, Volker; Heinze, Thomas; Spirk, Stefan; Stana-Kleinschek, Karin

    2014-11-10

    The equipment of cellulose ultrathin films with BSA (bovine serum albumin) via cationization of the surface by tailor-made cationic celluloses is described. In this way, matrices for controlled protein deposition are created, whereas the extent of protein affinity to these surfaces is controlled by the charge density and solubility of the tailored cationic cellulose derivative. In order to understand the impact of the cationic cellulose derivatives on the protein affinity, their interaction capacity with fluorescently labeled BSA is investigated at different concentrations and pH values. The amount of deposited material is quantified using QCM-D (quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, wet mass) and MP-SPR (multi-parameter surface plasmon resonance, dry mass), and the mass of coupled water is evaluated by combination of QCM-D and SPR data. It turns out that adsorption can be tuned over a wide range (0.6-3.9 mg dry mass m(-2)) depending on the used conditions for adsorption and the type of employed cationic cellulose. After evaluation of protein adsorption, patterned cellulose thin films have been prepared and the cationic celluloses were adsorbed in a similar fashion as in the QCM-D and SPR experiments. Onto these cationic surfaces, fluorescently labeled BSA in different concentrations is deposited by an automatized spotting apparatus and a correlation between the amount of the deposited protein and the fluorescence intensity is established.

  15. Successfully Improving Ocular Drug Delivery Using the Cationic Nanoemulsion, Novasorb

    PubMed Central

    Lallemand, Frederic; Daull, Philippe; Benita, Simon; Buggage, Ronald; Garrigue, Jean-Sebastien

    2012-01-01

    Topical ophthalmic delivery of active ingredients can be achieved using cationic nanoemulsions. In the last decade, Novagali Pharma has successfully developed and marketed Novasorb, an advanced pharmaceutical technology for the treatment of ophthalmic diseases. This paper describes the main steps in the development of cationic nanoemulsions from formulation to evaluation in clinical trials. A major challenge of the formulation work was the selection of a cationic agent with an acceptable safety profile that would ensure a sufficient ocular surface retention time. Then, toxicity and pharmacokinetic studies were performed showing that the cationic emulsions were safe and well tolerated. Even in the absence of an active ingredient, cationic emulsions were observed in preclinical studies to have an inherent benefit on the ocular surface. Moreover, clinical trials demonstrated the efficacy and safety of cationic emulsions loaded with cyclosporine A in patients with dry eye disease. Ongoing studies evaluating latanoprost emulsion in patients with ocular surface disease and glaucoma suggest that the beneficial effects on reducing ocular surface damage may also extend to this patient population. The culmination of these efforts has been the marketing of Cationorm, a preservative-free cationic emulsion indicated for the symptomatic treatment of dry eye. PMID:22506123

  16. Positron diffusion in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G.; Vehanen, A.; Schultz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    Positron diffusion in Si(100) and Si(111) has been studied using a variable energy positron beam. The positron diffusion coefficient is found to be D/sub +/ = 2.7 +- 0.3 cm/sup 2//sec using a Makhov-type positron implantation profile, which is demonstrated to fit the data more reliably than the more commonly applied exponential profile. The diffusion related parameter, E/sub 0/, which results from the exponential profile, is found to be 4.2 +- 0.2 keV, significantly longer than previously reported values. A drastic reduction in E/sub 0/ is found after annealing the sample at 1300 K, showing that previously reported low values of E/sub 0/ are probably associated with the thermal history of the sample.

  17. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of /sup 137/Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of /sup 137/Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000/sup 0/C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ..delta..E of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon)/sub 0/ exp (-..delta..E/RT) are about 4 x 10/sup -2/ cm/sup 2//s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively.

  18. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    DOEpatents

    Nierenberg, William A.; Pontius, Rex B.

    1976-08-10

    1. The method of testing the separation efficiency of porous permeable membranes which comprises causing a stream of a gaseous mixture to flow into contact with one face of a finely porous permeable membrane under such conditions that a major fraction of the mixture diffuses through the membrane, maintaining a rectangular cross section of the gaseous stream so flowing past said membrane, continuously recirculating the gas that diffuses through said membrane and continuously withdrawing the gas that does not diffuse through said membrane and maintaining the volume of said recirculating gas constant by continuously introducing into said continuously recirculating gas stream a mass of gas equivalent to that which is continuously withdrawn from said gas stream and comparing the concentrations of the light component in the entering gas, the withdrawn gas and the recirculated gas in order to determine the efficiency of said membrane.

  19. Influence of liquid structure on diffusive isotope separation in molten silicates and aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, James M.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Ryerson, Frederick J.; Peterson, Brook T.

    2011-06-01

    Molecular diffusion in natural volcanic liquids discriminates between isotopes of major ions (e.g., Fe, Mg, Ca, and Li). Although isotope separation by diffusion is expected on theoretical grounds, the dependence on mass is highly variable for different elements and in different media. Silicate liquid diffusion experiments using simple liquid compositions were carried out to further probe the compositional dependence of diffusive isotopic discrimination and its relationship to liquid structure. Two diffusion couples consisting of the mineral constituents anorthite (CaAl 2Si 2O 8; denoted AN), albite (NaAlSi 3O 8; denoted AB), and diopside (CaMgSi 2O 6; denoted DI) were held at 1450 °C for 2 h and then quenched to ambient pressure and temperature. Major-element as well as Ca and Mg isotope profiles were measured on the recovered quenched glasses. In both experiments, Ca diffuses rapidly with respect to Si. In the AB-AN experiment, D Ca/ D Si ≈ 20 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Ca is much greater than in natural liquid experiments where D Ca/ D Si ≈ 1. In the AB-DI experiment, D Ca/ D Si ≈ 6 and the efficiency of isotope separation is between that of the natural liquid experiments and the AB-AN experiment. In the AB-DI experiment, D Mg/ D Si ≈ 1 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Mg is smaller than it is for Ca yet similar to that observed for Mg in natural liquids. The results from the experiments reported here, in combination with results from natural volcanic liquids, show clearly that the efficiency of diffusive separation of Ca isotopes is systematically related to the solvent-normalized diffusivity - the ratio of the diffusivity of the cation ( D Ca) to the diffusivity of silicon ( D Si). The results on Ca isotopes are consistent with available data on Fe, Li, and Mg isotopes in silicate liquids, when considered in terms of the parameter D cation/ D Si. Cations diffusing in aqueous solutions display a similar relationship

  20. Transverse Spin Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, William

    2014-05-01

    Transverse spin diffusion is a relatively new transport coefficient and a review of its history and physical basis will be presented. In NMR spin diffusion is often measured by spin echo techniques, which involve spin currents perpendicular to the direction of the magnetization, in contrast with the usual longitudinal case where the current is parallel to the magnetization. The first indication that this involved new physics was the Leggett-Rice effect (1970) in which spin waves, new spin-echo behavior, and an altered spin diffusion coefficient were predicted in liquid 3He. This effect gave the possibility of the first measurement of F1a, the parameter of the Landau Fermi-liquid theory mean-field responsible for the effect. In 1982 Lhuillier and Laloe found a transport equation very similar to the Leggett equation, but valid for highly-polarized dilute Boltzmann Bose and Fermi gases, and describing the ``identical spin rotation effect'' (ISRE), the analog of a Landau mean field. Coincidentally Bashkin and Meyerovich had also given equivalent descriptions of transport in polarized Boltzmann gases. That a mean-field effect could exists in dilute Boltzmann gases was theoretically surprising, but was confirmed experimentally. At low polarization the basic transverse diffusion constant D⊥ coincides with the longitudinal value D∥ however Meyerovich first pointed out that they could differ in highly polarized degenerate gases. Indeed detailed calculations (Jeon and Mullin) showed that, while D∥ is proportional to T-2, D⊥ approaches a constant (depending on polarization) at low T. Considerable controversy existed until experimental verification was achieved in 2004. The importance of ISRE again arose in 2008 as the basis of ``anomalous spin-state segregation'' in Duke and JILA experiments. More recently application of the ideas of transverse spin diffusion to strongly interacting Fermi gases has resulted in the observation of the diffusion constants at the quantum

  1. Effect of cationic charge and hydrophobic index of cellulose-based polymers on the semipermanent dyestuff process for hair.

    PubMed

    Ballarin, B; Galli, S; Mogavero, F; Morigi, M

    2011-06-01

    In this work, the effects of a new class of polymers generally used in hair and skin cleansing products, the SoftCAT (SofCAT SL and SoftCAT SX), on the dye uptake on the hair fibre and the fading effects has been studied. These polymers, based on quaternary ammonium salts of hydroxyethylcellulose, are cationic products that differ in viscosity, hydrophobic substitution index (HS) and/or cationic substitution (CS, % N). UV-Vis spectroscopy has been used to analyse the extracted dyes from the hair cuticle and the cortex. The results indicate that the presence of polymers in the dye bath improve both the quality of the dyeing process and the anti-fading effect during the washing cycles. This phenomenon is postulated to be attributable to the polymers hydrophobically bonding with the dyes and so facilitating their increased penetration into the hair.

  2. Cationic Membrane Peptides: Atomic-Level Insight of Structure-Activity Relationships from Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yongchao; Li, Shenhui; Hong, Mei

    2012-01-01

    Many membrane-active peptides, such as cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), conduct their biological functions by interacting with the cell membrane. The interactions of charged residues with lipids and water facilitate membrane insertion, translocation or disruption of these highly hydrophobic species. In this mini-review we will summarize high-resolution structural and dynamic findings towards the understanding of the structure-activity relationship of lipid membrane-bound CPPs and AMPs, as examples of the current development of solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for studying membrane peptides. We will present the most recent atomic-resolution structure of the guanidinium-phosphate complex, as constrained from experimentally measured site-specific distances. These SSNMR results will be valuable specifically for understanding the intracellular translocation pathway of CPPs and antimicrobial mechanism of AMPs, and more generally broaden our insight into how cationic macromolecules interact with and cross the lipid membrane. PMID:23108593

  3. [Microbial diffusion and antibiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Vilain, R

    1982-01-01

    Cleaning leg ulcers depends on tissular and microbial enzymes, the production of which depends on good vascularization. When an aetiological treatment is started, the microbes ensure sufficient cleaning, leading to granulation and epidermization. Antibiotherapy is pointless. Sometimes it can be detrimental, replacing a natural growth with alien strains which cause diffusion. Very exceptionally, a short course of antibiotherapy may be necessary to cope with signs of diffusion, usually signifying a Group A streptococcal infection, with seasonal recrudescence. The Blue Pus Microbe has no special pathological significance. It merely indicates that the case has become chronic.

  4. Hydrogen diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrin, Jannick; Zhang, Peipei

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen mobility in gem quality zircon single crystals from Madagascar was investigated through H-D exchange experiments. Thin slices were annealed in a horizontal furnace flushed with a gas mixture of Ar/D2(10%) under ambient pressure between 900 ° C to 1150 ° C. FTIR analyses were performed on oriented slices before and after each annealing run. H diffusion along [100] and [010] follow the same diffusion law D = D0exp[-E /RT], with log D0 = 2.24 ± 1.57 (in m2/s) and E = 374 ± 39 kJ/mol. H diffusion along [001] follows a slightly more rapid diffusion law, with log D0 = 1.11 ± 0.22 (in m2/s) and E = 334 ± 49 kJ/mol. H diffusion in zircon has much higher activation energy and slower diffusivity than other NAMs below 1150 ° C even iron-poor garnets which are known to be among the slowest (Blanchard and Ingrin, 2004; Kurka et al. 2005). During H-D exchange zircon incorporates also deuterium. This hydration reaction involves uranium reduction as it is shown from the exchange of U5+ and U4+ characteristic bands in the near infrared region during annealing. It is the first time that a hydration reaction U5+ + OH- = U4+ + O2- + 1/2H2, is experimentally reported. The kinetics of deuterium incorporation is slightly slower than hydrogen diffusion, suggesting that the reaction is limited by hydrogen mobility. Hydrogen isotopic memory of zircon is higher than other NAMs. Zircons will be moderately retentive of H signatures at mid-crustal metamorphic temperatures. At 500 ° C, a zircon with a radius of 300 μm would retain its H isotopic signature over more than a million years. However, a zircon is unable to retain this information for geologically significant times under high-grade metamorphism unless the grain size is large enough. Refrences Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2004) Hydrogen diffusion in Dora Maira pyrope. Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, 31, 593-605. Kurka, A., Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2005) Kinetics of hydrogen extraction and deuteration in

  5. NIR determination of Cation Exchange Capacity and Exchangeable Cations of Italian Corn Areas Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabassi, G.; Piombino, M.; Orfeo, D.; Marino Gallina, P.

    2009-04-01

    The determinations of cation exchange capacity (CSC ) and exchangeable cations of soils using conventional wet methods are time consuming and require skilled analysts in order to obtain both precise and accurate results. Aim of this work was to evaluate NIR reflectance spectroscopy in order to obtain a rapid estimate of these soil parameters. A representative and heterogeneous set of 250 soil samples was selected from a population of soils sampled in all the northern Italy corn areas for which the organic carbon content and the texture were known. In order to maximize CSC variability the model of Courtin et al. (1979, CSC=23+3680*Organic Carbon+510*Clay) was used to estimate the CSC of selected samples. The true CSC was determined using the Barium Chloride-Triethanolamine at pH 8.1 method, and the the exchangeable cations were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The results are summarized in table 1: MinMax meanStandard deviationAnalytical error CSC (meq(+)/kg)3.5 90.9 20.6 14.3 0.75 Ca (mg/kg) 220 215933366 2689 97.5 Mg (mg/kg) 18 1483 300 240 7.8 K (mg/kg) 61 1058 273 169 7.9 The NIR spectra on dry soil ground at 0.5 mm were acquired using a FOSS 5000 spectrometer. In order to maximize the calibration performances and to select the smallest calibration set were tested two multivariate design of experiment techniques: Kennard-Stone algorithm (KS) and Neighborhood Mahlanobis Distance (NMD). The regression model built with using NMD design and a Neighborhood distance of 0.5 gave a standard error of prediction of 4.6 cmol(+)/kg and a R2 of 0.853 using 139 sample in calibration set and 111 samples in validation set. For exchangeable Ca, Mg and K the standard error of prediction were 738, 98 and 136 mg/kg and the R2 were 0.837, 0.714 and 0.230 respectively. These results demonstrated the usefulness of the NIR technique for rough determination of CSC and divalent exchangeable cations on heterogeneous soils.

  6. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous numerical description of multispecies diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication in imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multispecies diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multispecies diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multispecies U(VI) diffusion under a steady state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that for multispecies U(VI) diffusion under transient chemical conditions, a fully coupled diffusion model could be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model when the diffusion coefficient for each chemical component was properly selected. The component-based diffusion model considers the difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be enforced, if necessary, by adding a secondary migration term resulting from model simplification. The effect of ion activity coefficient gradients on multispecies diffusion is also discussed. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford 300A

  7. Topochemical synthesis of cation ordered double perovskite oxynitrides.

    PubMed

    Ceravola, Roberta; Oró-Solé, Judith; Black, Ashley P; Ritter, Clemens; Puente Orench, Inés; Mata, Ignasi; Molins, Elies; Frontera, Carlos; Fuertes, Amparo

    2017-03-27

    Topochemical nitridation in ammonia at moderate temperatures of cation ordered Sr2FeWO6 produces new antiferromagnetic double perovskite oxynitrides Sr2FeWO6-xNx with 0 < x ≤ 1. Nitrogen introduction induces the oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+) and decreases TN from 38 K (x = 0) to 13 K for Sr2FeWO5N which represents the first example of a double perovskite oxynitride with both high cationic order and nitrogen content. This synthetic approach can be extended to other cation combinations expanding the possibility of new materials in the large group of double perovskites.

  8. Pyridine radical cation and its fluorine substituted derivatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bondybey, V.E.; English, J.H.; Shiley, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The spectra and relaxation of the pyridine cation and of several of its fluorinated derivatives are studied in low temperature Ne matrices. The ions are generated by direct photoionization of the parent compounds. Of the compounds studied, laser induced → and → fluorescence is observed only for the 2, 6‐difluoropyridine cation. The analysis of the spectrum indicates that the ion is planar both in the and states. The large variety in the spectroscopic and relaxation behavior of fluoropyridine radical cations is explained in terms of their electronic structure and of the differential shifts of the individual electronic states caused by the fluorine substitution.

  9. Contribution of cation-π interactions in iminium catalysis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yukie; Yamada, Shinji

    2012-02-21

    Ab initio calculations were carried out for a benzyl-substituted iminium cation derived from (E)-crotonaldehyde and a chiral imidazolidinone that was developed as an organocatalyst by MacMillan et al. At the MP2 level of theory it is predicted that the phenyl group is close to the iminium moiety in the most stable conformer, suggesting that the cation-π interaction contributes to the stabilization of this conformer. Energy decomposition analyses on model systems indicate that the electrostatic and polarization terms make significant contribution to the attractive interactions between the benzene ring and the iminium cation.

  10. Radical cations of sulfides and disulfides: An ESR study

    SciTech Connect

    Bonazzola, L.; Michaut, J.P.; Roncin, J.

    1985-09-15

    Exposure of dilute solutions of dimethylsulfide, methanethiol, tetrahydrothiophene, terbutyl and diterbutyl-sulfides, dimethyl-disulfide, and diterbutyldisulfide, in freon at 77 K to /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays gave the corresponding cations. From the reported ESR spectra, g tensors were obtained. It was found that both sulfide and disulfide cations exhibit the same g tensor: (g/sub max/ = 2.034 +- 0.002, g/sub int/ = 2.017 +- 0.001, g/sub min/ = 2.001 +- 0.005). From this result it has been shown that the disulfide cation is planar. This finding was supported by fully optimized geometry ab initio calculations.

  11. In vivo application of chitosan to facilitate intestinal acyclovir absorption in rats.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Ayumi; Goto, Yuko; Kurosaki, Yuji; Aiba, Tetsuya

    2012-07-01

    The effect of chitosan on the intestinal absorption of acyclovir (ACV) was evaluated in rats, and factors influencing its facilitative effect on the ACV absorption were examined. When ACV solution containing 1% chitosan with an average molecular weight of 150 kDa was administered into the upper jejunum, a significant increase in the plasma ACV concentration was observed, with the peak ACV concentration being eight times greater than that observed with the chitosan-free solution. The chitosan-free ACV solution, whose viscosity was adjusted to remain unchanged with polyethylene glycol, did not cause an increase in the plasma concentration, and neither did the chitosan-free solutions substitutionally containing low molecular cationic compounds, triethanolamine and kanamycin. When chitosan was digested with chitosanase to shorten its polycationic polysaccharide structure, chitosan subjected to 150-min digestion retained its facilitative effect on ACV absorption, but that subjected to 420-min digestion no longer caused facilitation, in which its average molecular weight was reduced to around 10 kDa. It is therefore indicated that intestinal ACV absorption can be facilitated with chitosan, and that it is necessary for chitosan to have a certain length of polycationic polysaccharide structure to exert such facilitation.

  12. The Role of Touch in Facilitated Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezuka, Emiko

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated the role of touch in the use of facilitated communication with Japanese individuals with autism. Five experiments were conducted involving a "telepathy game" using a rod with an attached strain gauge. Results found the facilitator's contact controlled the motor responses of the subjects. (Author/CR)

  13. Caring and Sharing: Becoming a Peer Facilitator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myrick, Robert D.; Erney, Tom

    This book contains information and skill-building activities designed to train adolescents as peer facilitators. The first chapter describes peer facilitation and provides an overview of the book. The second chapter discusses principles, concepts, and ideas to help better understand how people learn, make decisions, change, and develop their own…

  14. Facilitated Communication: The Clinical and Social Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shane, Howard C., Ed.

    This text explains the phenomenon of facilitated communication (FC) from an empirical, data-based, and/or clinical perspective. It is not a how-to-facilitate text, but one that explores the clinical and sociological reality of FC. A common theme running through each of the papers in the book is the question of FC's legitimacy. The papers reveal…

  15. Interaction Patterns and Facilitation of Peer Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Marvin E.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Data show that giving information to members of a group is more important in determining the perception by others that the person is facilitating group performance. Asking for information and opinions is more important in actual facilitation of group learning. Social-emotional support becomes important after initial phases of group interaction.…

  16. 49 CFR 38.2 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Equivalent facilitation. 38.2 Section 38.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES General § 38.2 Equivalent facilitation. Departures from...

  17. 49 CFR 38.2 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Equivalent facilitation. 38.2 Section 38.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES General § 38.2 Equivalent facilitation. Departures from...

  18. 49 CFR 38.2 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Equivalent facilitation. 38.2 Section 38.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES General § 38.2 Equivalent facilitation. Departures from...

  19. 49 CFR 38.2 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Equivalent facilitation. 38.2 Section 38.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES General § 38.2 Equivalent facilitation. Departures from...

  20. A Dialogic Approach to Online Facilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swann, Jennie

    2010-01-01

    Social construction of understanding has long been a significant underlying principle of learning and teaching, and while there are many models for the design of online activities to promote this, there are considerably fewer models for the facilitation of such dialogue. This paper examines some of these facilitation models from the point of view…