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Sample records for catla catla hamilton

  1. Histological and scanning electron microscopical study of the olfactory epithelium of the Indian major carp, Catla catla (Hamilton).

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, P; Ghosh, S K

    2010-02-01

    The histological and micro-architecture of different cells lining the olfactory epithelium in Catla catla (Hamilton) have been studied by means of light and scanning electron microscopes. The oval olfactory rosette of the fish consists of a rosette of 30 to 32 primary lamellae. Each lamella is provided with restricted area of sensory epithelium in the middle region while the apical and basal part of the lamella consists of non-sensory epithelium. The non-sensory epithelium is made up of patches of ciliated supporting cells, epidermal or stratified epithelial cells with concentrically arranged microridges and scattered mucous cells. The sensory epithelium contains two types of receptor cell (microvillar and flagellated) and mucous cells. The multilayer olfactory organ in C. catla provides an acute sense of smell, and various aspects of their existence are mediated through olfactory cues.

  2. Gene expression in Catla catla (Hamilton) subjected to acute and protracted doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Anbumani, S; Mohankumar, Mary N

    2016-09-01

    Studies on transcriptional modulation after gamma radiation exposure in fish are limited. Cell cycle perturbations and expression of apoptotic genes were investigated in the fish, Catla catla after acute and protracted exposures to gamma radiation over a 90day period. Significant changes in gene expression were observed between day 1 and 90 post-exposure. Gamma radiation induced a significant down-regulation of target genes gadd45α, cdk1 and bcl-2 from day 1 to day 3 after protracted exposure, whereas it persists till day 6 upon acute exposure. From day 12 onwards, Gadd45α, cdk1 and bcl-2 genes were up-regulated following protracted exposure, indicating DNA repair, cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. There exists a linear correlation between these genes (gadd45α - r=0.85, p=0.0073; cdk1 - r=0.86, p=0.0053; bcl-2 - r=0.89, p=0.0026) at protracted exposures. This is the first report on the dual role of bcl-2 gene in fish exposed to acute and protracted radiation and correlation among the aforementioned genes that work in concert to promote 'repair' and 'death' circuitries in fish blood cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic variation in wild and hatchery population of Catla catla (Hamilton, 1822) analyzed through mtDNA cytochrome b region.

    PubMed

    Behera, Bijay Kumar; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Baisvar, Vishwamitra Singh; Meena, Dharmendra Kumar; Panda, Debarata; Pakrashi, Sudip; Paria, Prasenjit; Das, Pronob; Debnath, Dipesh; Parida, Pranaya Kumar; Das, Basanta Kumar; Jena, Joykrushna

    2017-01-10

    Catla (Catla catla) is a one of the most harvested Indian major carps and is widely cultured fish species in Indian subcontinent. In the present study, genetic variability between hatchery and wild stocks of Catla was surveyed using sequence data of mitochondrial DNA of partial 307 bp of cytochrome b region. A total of 174 Catla individuals were examined from three different river basins and hatcheries. Significant genetic heterogeneity was observed for the sequence data (FST = 0.308, p ≤ 0.001). However, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) resulted in insignificant genetic differentiation among the samples of three rivers and culture zones (FCT = -0.10, p = 0.44). The result suggested a significant genetic variation within different riverine system, low genetic differentiation among samples from river basins and a lack of genetic variation in hatchery populations.

  4. Dietary Bacillus subtilis FPTB13 and chitin, single or combined, modulate systemic and cutaneous mucosal immunity and resistance of catla, Catla catla (Hamilton) against edwardsiellosis.

    PubMed

    Sangma, Timothy; Kamilya, Dibyendu

    2015-12-01

    Effects of dietary administration of Bacillus subtilis FPTB13 and chitin, single or combined, on the systemic immunity, mucosal immunity and resistance of catla (Catla catla) against Edwardsiella tarda infection were investigated. The probiotic attributes of B. subtilis was tested by conducting antagonism study, safety in catla, in vitro immunomodulation and dietary immunomodulation. Results of these studies indicated the probiotic potential of the strain. From the preliminary dietary immunomodulation study, a dose of 10(9) B. subtilis cells g(-1) was selected for inclusion into diets for subsequent experiments. Experimental diets were prepared by adding B. subtilis (10(9) cells g(-1)), chitin (2%) and their combination to the basal diet. Different systemic and mucosal immunological parameters viz. oxygen radical production, myeloperoxidase content, lysozyme activity, total protein content and alkaline phosphatase activity showed significant enhancement (p<0.05) after 2 weeks of feeding with the combined diet. B. subtilis and chitin alone also significantly elevated most of the immune responses. All the diets significantly increased the resistance of catla against E. tarda challenge. The highest post-challenge survival was observed in combined group (i.e. 63.33%). In conclusion, B. subtilis and chitin, alone or combined, had a health ameliorating effect in catla. The results also collectively suggest the usefulness of applying a combined probiotic and immunostimulant supplemented diet to achieve greater benefits.

  5. Development and characterization of cell line from the gill tissue of Catla catla (Hamilton, 1822) for toxicological studies.

    PubMed

    Taju, G; Abdul Majeed, S; Nambi, K S N; Sahul Hameed, A S

    2013-02-01

    Catla gill cell line (ICG) was established from gill tissue of Indian major carp (Catla catla), a freshwater fish cultivated in India. The cell line was maintained in Leibovitz's L-15 supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. These cells have been sub-cultured more than 55 passages over a period of 2 years. The ICG cell line consists predominantly of epithelial-like cells. The cells were able to grow at a wide range of temperatures from 24°C to 32°C with an optimum temperature of 28°C. The growth rate of gill cells increased as the fetal bovine serum (FBS) proportion increased from 2% to 20% at 28°C with optimum growth at the concentrations of 10% or 15% FBS. Amplification of mitochondrial gene 12s rRNA using primers specific to C. catla confirmed the origin of this cell line from C. catla. The cells were successfully cryopreserved and revived at passage numbers 25, 35, 45 and 55. The cytotoxicity of three metal salts (ZnCl(2), CuSO(4) and CdCl(2)) was assessed in ICG cell line using multiple endpoints such as MTT, Neutral Red assay, Alamar Blue assay and Coomassie Blue protein assay. Acute toxicity assay on fish were conducted by exposing C. catla for 96 h to three metal salts under static conditions. Statistical analysis revealed good correlation with r(2)=0.908-0.985 for all combinations between endpoints employed. Linear correlations between each in vitro EC(50) and the in vivo LC(50) data were highly significant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Halquinol modulated growth, physiology, and protein profile and halquinol residue withdrawal study in the Indian major carp Catla catla (Hamilton).

    PubMed

    Mushigeri, S B; Saha, S; Somashekar, B N; Nischal, K; Radhakrishna, P M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of halquinol, an antimicrobial used as a growth promotor in poultry, on the fresh water fish Catla catla in terms of growth promotion, protein profile, and physiology as the rate of oxygen consumption. A synergic increment in the free amino acid level and total protein concentration suggested enhanced anabolic metabolism resulting in weight gain. When compared with an untreated control group, fishes treated with 0.1% halquinol (T1) showed a higher weight gain than those treated with 0.2% halquinol (T2). Variations in the rate of oxygen consumption among the three groups (control, T1, T2) expressed the physiological response of the animals toward the chemical along the time factor. After 7 days of treatment, the absence of halquinol revealed by post-withdrawal residual HPLC studies suggests its biosafety.

  7. Haemato-biochemical responses and induction of HSP70 to dietary phosphorus in Catla catla (Hamilton) fingerlings.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, K; Pal, A K; Sahu, N P; Dalvi, R S; Debnath, D

    2008-12-01

    A feeding trial of 120 days was conducted to study the effect of graded levels of dietary phosphorus on haematology, serum protein concentrations and HSP70 expression in fingerlings of the Indian major carp, Catla (Catla catla). Eight isonitrogenous and isoenergetic purified diets were formulated to contain graded levels of dietary phosphorus (dP), i.e., T(1), 0.1%; T(2), 0.3%; T(3), 0.5%; T(4), 0.7%; T(5), 0.9%; T(6), 1.1%; T(7), 1.3%; or T(8), 1.5%. Four hundred and eighty fish (average weight 4.23 +/- 0.016 g) were equally distributed into 24 tanks forming eight treatments with three replicates each. The fish were fed daily at the rate of 3.5% body weight in two instalments. At the end of feeding trial fish were sampled to study total RBC and WBC count, haemoglobin, serum lysozyme activity, serum total protein, albumin (A), globulin (G) concentration and HSP70 expression. Total RBC count, haemoglobin concentration and serum lysozyme activity did not vary significantly in response to different dietary phosphorus concentrations. Total WBC count was found to be significantly (P < 0.05) higher in T(1 )relative to all other treatments. Serum albumin and A/G ratio was found to be significantly lower in fish of T(1) and T(2) in relation to T(7) group (P < 0.05). Serum globulin and total protein levels remained unaffected by variations in dietary phosphorus. HSP70 expression was observed in T(1) group (0.1% dP) in gills and brain tissue, but not in liver and muscle tissues. No HSP70 expression was observed in fish of T(4) (0.7% dP) and T(8) (1.5% dP) treatments. These prima facie results suggest that dietary phosphorus had only minor influence on the haemato-biochemical parameters studied; however dietary phosphorus deficiency caused organ specific induction of HSP70 in catla fingerlings.

  8. Molecular and phylogenetic characterization of Thelohanellus qadrii (Myxozoa, Myxosporea, Bivalvulida) infecting the secondary gill epithelium of Indian major carp, Catla catla (Hamilton, 1822).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sayani; Patra, Avijit; Adikesavalu, Harresh; Joardar, Siddhartha Narayan; Abraham, Thangapalam Jawahar

    2015-06-01

    Myxosporean taxonomy which is traditionally based on the morphology of the myxospore stage, is in a state of flux given new insights provided by the expanding dataset of DNA sequences. To date, more than 40 species of Thelohanellus from India have been described according to morphometric characteristics. Nevertheless, molecular data on these histozoic myxosporean parasites of freshwater fish are scarce. In the present study, molecular characterizations of Thelohanellus qadrii infecting the secondary gill epithelium of Indian major carp Catla catla (Hamilton, 1822) and its phylogenetic relationship is reported. The sub-adult cultured catla were observed to have low to moderate gill myxosporean infections. The morphometry of mature spores was in compliance with original descriptions of T. qadrii. Based on the analysis of 18S rRNA gene, phylogenetic clusters which were established according to a consensus sequence, illustrated the taxonomic placement of a series of myxobolids. The DNA sequence homogeneity of T. qadrii (KF170928) with other Thelohanllus spp. ranged from 78% to 95% and formed a dichotomy with cyprinid gill lamellae infecting T. toyamai (HQ338729). Distance matrix results indicated a high genetic diversity among myxosporeans. The present report is the first on the molecular and phylogenetic characterizations of T. qadrii.

  9. Molecular and phylogenetic characterization of Thelohanellus qadrii (Myxozoa, Myxosporea, Bivalvulida) infecting the secondary gill epithelium of Indian major carp, Catla catla (Hamilton, 1822)

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sayani; Patra, Avijit; Adikesavalu, Harresh; Joardar, Siddhartha Narayan; Abraham, Thangapalam Jawahar

    2015-01-01

    Myxosporean taxonomy which is traditionally based on the morphology of the myxospore stage, is in a state of flux given new insights provided by the expanding dataset of DNA sequences. To date, more than 40 species of Thelohanellus from India have been described according to morphometric characteristics. Nevertheless, molecular data on these histozoic myxosporean parasites of freshwater fish are scarce. In the present study, molecular characterizations of Thelohanellus qadrii infecting the secondary gill epithelium of Indian major carp Catla catla (Hamilton, 1822) and its phylogenetic relationship is reported. The sub-adult cultured catla were observed to have low to moderate gill myxosporean infections. The morphometry of mature spores was in compliance with original descriptions of T. qadrii. Based on the analysis of 18S rRNA gene, phylogenetic clusters which were established according to a consensus sequence, illustrated the taxonomic placement of a series of myxobolids. The DNA sequence homogeneity of T. qadrii (KF170928) with other Thelohanllus spp. ranged from 78% to 95% and formed a dichotomy with cyprinid gill lamellae infecting T. toyamai (HQ338729). Distance matrix results indicated a high genetic diversity among myxosporeans. The present report is the first on the molecular and phylogenetic characterizations of T. qadrii. PMID:27844000

  10. Gut melatonin response to microbial infection in carp Catla catla.

    PubMed

    Pal, Palash Kumar; Hasan, Kazi Nurul; Maitra, Saumen Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of present study was to demonstrate the response of gut melatoninergic system to Aeromonas hydrophila infection for 3 or 6 days and search for its correlation with the activity of different antioxidative and digestive enzymes to focus their interplay under pathophysiological conditions in carp (Catla catla). Microscopic study of gut in infected fish revealed degenerative changes in the tunica mucosa and lamina propria layers with sloughed off epithelial cells in the lumen. The activity of each digestive enzyme was reduced, but the levels of melatonin, arylalkylamine-N-acetyl transferase protein, the key regulator of melatonin biosynthesis, and different enzymatic antioxidants in gut were gradually and significantly increased with the progress of infection. Gut melatonin concentrations in A. hydrophila challenged carp by showing a positive correlation with the activity of each antioxidative enzyme, and a negative correlation with different digestive enzymes argued in favor of their functional relation, at least, during pathological stress. Moreover, parallel changes in the gut and serum melatonin titers indicated possible contribution of gut to circulating melatonin. Collectively, present carp study provided the first data to suggest that endogenous gut melatonin may be implicated to the mechanism of response to microbial infections in any fish species.

  11. Optimization of enzymatic hydrolysis of visceral waste proteins of Catla (Catla catla) for preparing protein hydrolysate using a commercial protease.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, N; Benila, T; Radha, C; Lalitha, R G

    2008-01-01

    Protein hydrolysate was prepared from visceral waste proteins of Catla (Catla catla), an Indian freshwater major carp. Hydrolysis conditions (viz., time, temperature, pH and enzyme to substrate level) for preparing protein hydrolysates from the fish visceral waste proteins were optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) using a factorial design. Model equation was proposed with regard to the effect of time, temperature, pH and enzyme to substrate level. An enzyme to substrate level of 1.5% (v/w), pH 8.5, temperature of 50 degrees C and a hydrolysis time of 135 min were found to be the optimum conditions to obtain a higher degree of hydrolysis close to 50% using alcalase. The amino acid composition of the protein hydrolysate prepared using the optimized conditions revealed that the protein hydrolysate was similar to FAO/WHO reference protein. The chemical scores computed indicated methionine to be the most limiting amino acid. The protein hydrolysate can well be used to meet the amino acid requirements of juvenile common carp and hence has the potential for application as an ingredient in balanced fish diets.

  12. Protein hydrolysate from visceral waste proteins of Catla (Catla catla): optimization of hydrolysis conditions for a commercial neutral protease.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, N; Mahendrakar, N S

    2008-07-01

    Protein hydrolysate was prepared from visceral waste proteins of an Indian freshwater major carp, Catla catla. Hydrolysis conditions (viz., time, temperature and enzyme to substrate level) for preparing protein hydrolysates from the fish visceral waste proteins using in situ pH of the visceral mass were optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) by employing a factorial design. The regression coefficient close to 1.0, observed during both experimental and validation runs, indicated the validity of prediction model. An enzyme to substrate level of 1.25 % (v/w), temperature of 55 degrees C and a hydrolysis time of 165 min were found to be the optimum conditions to obtain a higher degree of hydrolysis of >48% using multifect-neutral. The amino acid composition of the protein hydrolysate prepared using the optimized conditions revealed that the protein hydrolysate was similar to FAO/WHO reference protein. The chemical scores computed indicated methionine to be the most limiting amino acid. The protein hydrolysate has the potential for application as an ingredient in balanced fish diets.

  13. 75 FR 17755 - Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the Offshore Supply Vessel C-ATLAS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the Offshore Supply Vessel C-ATLAS AGENCY... Compliance was issued for the offshore supply vessel C-ATLAS as required by 33 U.S.C. 1605(c) and 33 CFR 81... Regulations, Parts 81 and 89, has been issued for the offshore supply vessel C-ATLAS. Full compliance with...

  14. Isolation and characterization of collagen from fish waste material- skin, scales and fins of Catla catla and Cirrhinus mrigala.

    PubMed

    Mahboob, Shahid

    2015-07-01

    The collagen of skin, scales and fins of Catla catla and Cirrhinus mrigala were isolated and characterised. Nine fishes of each fish species of three weight groups were collected from a commercial fish farm. Collagen characterisation using SDS-PAGE revealed the molecular weights (kDa) of the C. catla skin, scales, and fins which ranged from 120 to 210, 70 to 201, and 68 to 137 kDa, respectively. The size of the collagen of C. mrigala skin, scales and fins ranged from 114 to 201, 77 to 210, and 70 to 147 kDa, respectively. Glycine and alanine were the most abundant amino acid, whereas tryptophan was totally absent in all selected tissues. Thus, significant variation exists in type of collagen and amino acid profile within the weight groups of the two fish species. The imino acid (proline and hydroxyproline) contents estimated in C. catla and C. mrigala skin (161-165 and 160-168), scales (155-159 and 152-161) and fins (162-171 and (152-155) residues/1,000 residues, respectively. The proximate analysis was also performed for skin, scales and fins. The maximum protein content of the skin was determined as 26.10 % and 22.90 % in the C. catla and C. mrigala, respectively, from the W3 weight group. The scales of the W3 weight group exhibited maximum protein contents of 25.90 and 21.77 % for C. catla and C. mrigala, respectively. The maximum protein contents (19.04 % and 18.12 %) were recorded for C. catla and C. mrigala, respectively in the fins.

  15. Assessment of Pesticide Residues in Flesh of Catla catla from Ravi River, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Mobeen; Mahboob, Shahid; Sultana, Salma; Sultana, Tayyaba; Alghanim, Khalid Abdullah; Ahmed, Zubair

    2014-01-01

    The levels of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), endosulfan, endosulfan sulfate, carbofuran, and cartap which were estimated in the flesh of Catla catla sampled from ten sites of Ravi River between its stretches from Shahdara to Head Balloki were studied to know the level of contamination of the selected pesticides by GC-ECD method. All fish samples were found contaminated with different concentrations of DDT, DDE, endosulfan, and carbofuran; however, DDT and DDE concentrations were more than the maximum residue limits (MRLs) about food standards, while endosulfan sulfate and cartap were not detected. Pesticide concentrations in the fish flesh were ranged from 3.240 to 3.389 for DDT, 2.290 to 2.460 for DDE, 0.112 to 0.136 for endosulfan, and 0.260 to 0.370 μg g−1 for carbofuran. The findings revealed that the pesticide concentrations in the fish flesh decreased in the order: DDT > DDE > carbofuran > endosulfan. After Degh fall and After Hudiara nulla fall river sampling sites were found severely contaminated. It is proposed that a constant monitoring programs are needed to be initiated to overcome the present alarming situation. PMID:25003148

  16. Assessment of pesticide residues in flesh of Catla catla from Ravi River, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Mobeen; Mahboob, Shahid; Sultana, Salma; Sultana, Tayyaba; Alghanim, Khalid Abdullah; Ahmed, Zubair

    2014-01-01

    The levels of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), endosulfan, endosulfan sulfate, carbofuran, and cartap which were estimated in the flesh of Catla catla sampled from ten sites of Ravi River between its stretches from Shahdara to Head Balloki were studied to know the level of contamination of the selected pesticides by GC-ECD method. All fish samples were found contaminated with different concentrations of DDT, DDE, endosulfan, and carbofuran; however, DDT and DDE concentrations were more than the maximum residue limits (MRLs) about food standards, while endosulfan sulfate and cartap were not detected. Pesticide concentrations in the fish flesh were ranged from 3.240 to 3.389 for DDT, 2.290 to 2.460 for DDE, 0.112 to 0.136 for endosulfan, and 0.260 to 0.370 μg g(-1) for carbofuran. The findings revealed that the pesticide concentrations in the fish flesh decreased in the order: DDT > DDE > carbofuran > endosulfan. After Degh fall and After Hudiara nulla fall river sampling sites were found severely contaminated. It is proposed that a constant monitoring programs are needed to be initiated to overcome the present alarming situation.

  17. Neuronal regulation of photo-induced pineal photoreceptor proteins in carp Catla catla.

    PubMed

    Seth, Mohua; Maitra, Saumen Kumar

    2010-08-01

    In the present in vitro study on the pineal in carp Catla catla, specific agonist and antagonists of receptors for different neuronal signals and regulators of intra-cellular Ca(++) and cAMP were used to gather basic information on the neuronal signal transduction cascade mechanisms in the photo-induced expression of rod-like opsin and alpha-transducin-like proteins in any fish pineal. Western-blot analysis followed by quantitative analysis of respective immunoblot data for both the proteins revealed that photo-induced expression of each protein was stimulated by cholinergic (both nicotinic and muscarinic) agonists and a dopaminergic antagonist, inhibited by both cholinergic antagonists and a dopaminergic agonist, but not affected by any agonists or antagonists of adrenergic (alpha(1), alpha(2) and beta(1)) receptors. Moreover, expression of each protein was stimulated by voltage gated L type calcium channel blocker, adenylate cyclase inhibitor and phosphodiesterase activator; but suppressed by the activators of both calcium channel and adenylate cyclase, and by phosphodiesterase inhibitor. Collectively, we report for the first time that both cholinergic and dopaminergic signals play an important, though antagonistic, role in the photo-induced expression of photoreceptor proteins in the fish pineal through activation of a signal transduction pathway in which both calcium and cAMP may act as the intracellular messengers.

  18. In Vitro Evaluation of Probiotic Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria from the Gut of Labeo rohita and Catla catla.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Tapasa Kumar; Jena, Prasant Kumar; Nagar, Nidhi; Patel, Amiya Kumar; Seshadri, Sriram

    2015-06-01

    We report the evaluation of probiotic properties of potent lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from the gut of freshwater fishes, Labeo rohita and Catla catla, for eventually developing probiotic strains for the prevention of bacterial infections in aquaculture and food preservation. Five different LAB strains were isolated and characterized for their probiotic properties. Based on physiological, morphological and biochemical characteristics, three isolates from Labeo rohita and two from Catla catla were identified as putative probiotics and were denoted as LR11, LR14 and LR16 and CC3 and CC4, respectively. Isolates CC3 and CC4 were acid (pH 2.5) and bile salt (0.3% oxygall) tolerant and exhibited strong antibacterial activities against all pathogens including Aeromonas hydrophila. In addition, all LAB isolates were susceptible to tested antibiotics, except CC3 and CC4 which were vancomycin resistant. Furthermore, the isolates CC3 and CC4 showed significantly higher in vitro cell surface properties, i.e., hydrophobicity, auto- and co-aggregation. Biochemical tests, PCR detection and 16S rRNA sequence analysis established that LR11, LR14, LR16, CC3 and CC4 are Enterococcus avium TSU11, Enterococcus pseudoavium TSU14, Enterococcus raffinosus TSU16, Lactobacillus gasseri TSU3 and Lactobacillus animalis TSU4, respectively. Studies revealed that, Lactobacillus gasseri TSU3 and Lactobacillus animalis TSU4 are ideal probiotic candidates for its use in aquaculture and require further exploratory in vivo evaluation and safety studies.

  19. Gamma radiation induced cell cycle perturbations and DNA damage in Catla Catla as measured by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Anbumani, S; Mohankumar, Mary N

    2015-03-01

    Gamma radiation induced cell cycle perturbations and DNA damage in Catla catla were analyzed in erythrocytes at different time points using flow cytometry (FCM). Protracted exposure to radiation induced damage between days 12 and 45. Disturbances in cell cycle machinery, i.e., proportional increase and decrease in Gap0 or quiescent/Gap1 (G0/G1), Synthesis (S) and Gap2/Mitotic (G2/M) phases were observed at both acute and protracted treatments. Both acute and protracted exposures induced apoptosis with a notable significance between days 3 and 6 at protracted and on day 45 at acute doses. Fish exposed protractedly avail some DNA repair mechanisms than acutely exposed. This is the first study to analyze radiation induced DNA damage under laboratory conditions and suggests that flow cytometry can also be an alternate tool to screen genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in fish. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Modulation of TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, NOD1 and NOD2 receptor gene expressions and their downstream signaling molecules following thermal stress in the Indian major carp catla (Catla catla).

    PubMed

    Basu, Madhubanti; Paichha, Mahismita; Swain, Banikalyan; Lenka, Saswati S; Singh, Samarpal; Chakrabarti, Rina; Samanta, Mrinal

    2015-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD) receptors are pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and play crucial role in innate immunity. In addition to PAMPs, PRRs recognize endogenous molecules released from damaged tissue or dead cells [damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs)] and activate signaling cascades to induce inflammatory processes. In the aquatic environment, large variation in seasonal and diurnal water temperature causes heat and cold stresses in fish, resulting in tissue injury and mortality of fish. In the Indian subcontinent, catla (Catla catla) is an economically important freshwater fish species and is prone to thermal stresses. To investigate the response of pattern recognition receptors in thermal stress, we analyzed TLRs (TLR2, TLR4 and TLR5) and NOD (NOD1 and NOD2) receptors gene expression in catla following heat and cold stress. Analysis of tissue samples (gill, liver, kidney and blood) of the thermal stressed and control fish by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assay revealed significant (p < 0.05) induction of TLR2, TLR4 and NOD2 gene expression in majority of the tested tissues of the treated fish as compared to the control. The expression of TLR5 and NOD1 gene was also induced in the heat and cold stressed fish, but mostly restricted in the blood. The downstream signaling molecule of TLR and NOD signaling pathway viz., MyD88 (myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88) and RICK (receptor interacting serine-threonine protein kinase-2) was also induced in the thermal stressed fish suggesting the engagement of TLR and NOD signaling pathway during thermal stress.

  1. Functional and health promoting inherent attributes of Enterococcus hirae F2 as a novel probiotic isolated from the digestive tract of the freshwater fish Catla catla

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mitesh; Hadi, Sibte

    2017-01-01

    Background Probiotic microorganisms are gaining global importance because of their use in the preparation of a nutraceutical or in the treatment of infections. As per the health industry demand, there is an urgent need for exploring new indigenous probiotic strains with its specific origin due to variation in gut microflora, different food habits and specific host-microbial interactions. The main objective of the present study was to isolate and identify a novel probiotic Enterococcus strain from the gut of Catla catla fish and evaluate its potentiality as a potent probiotic. Methods The whole study was designed with the isolation of novel lactic acid bacterial strain from the gut of Catla catla fish with their biochemical and molecular identifications. The potentiality of the isolated strain as a potent probiotic was carried out according to the parameters described in FAD/WHO guidelines for the evaluation of probiotics in food. Results The isolated strain was confirmed as Enterococcus hirae F2 on the basis of various biochemical and 16s rRNA gene sequencing methods. Enterococcus hirae F2 was able to survive under highly acidic and bile salt concentration with the ability for the production of lipase and Bsh enzyme. It was also able to survive under simulated gastrointestinal conditions with the inhibition ability of various pathogens. The antioxidant potentiality with the cell surface hydrophobicity and cell aggregation ability confirms its potentiality as a potent probiotic. All the results detail the potency of Enterococcus hirae F2 as a novel probiotic for a safer use. Discussion The isolation of Enterococcus hirae with probiotic potential from the gut of fish is a new approach and done for the first time. However, the whole study concluded that the isolated strain might be used as a novel probiotic in the food industry for the production of new probiotic products which imparts health benefits to the host. PMID:28316889

  2. Impact of UV-B radiation on the digestive enzymes and immune system of larvae of Indian major carp Catla catla.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jaigopal; Rao, Y Vasudeva; Kumar, S; Chakrabarti, Rina

    2010-03-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is a potent threat to the aquatic animals. Exposure to such stressor affects metabolic and immunological processes. The present investigation aims to study the effect of UV-B radiation on digestive enzymes and immunity of larvae of Catla catla. Larvae were exposed to ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280-320 nm) radiation (145 microW/cm(2)) for three different exposure times of 5, 10 and 15 min on every other day. After 55 days, important digestive enzymes were assayed. For immunological study, lysozyme, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) levels were measured. Then the fish were kept for one month without radiation and lysozyme level was measured. Protein concentration varied directly with the duration of exposure and was highest among fish that had received the 15 min UV-B irradiation. Significantly higher amylase, protease, trypsin and chymotrypsin activities were found in 5 min exposed fish compared to others. Lysozyme level was significantly higher in control group compared to the UV-B treated fish. The lysozyme level decreased with the increasing duration of UV-B radiation. When fish were kept without UV-B radiation for one month, lysozyme level was brought to the normal level in all treatments, except 15 min exposed fish. The GOT and GPT levels were significantly higher in the 15 min exposed group than others. The effects of UV-B radiation on the digestive physiology and immune system of catla have been clearly observed in the present study. The decreased enzyme activities in UV-B radiated fish results into improper digestion and poor growth.

  3. Variation in genotoxic susceptibility and biomarker responses in Cirrhinus mrigala and Catla catla from different ecological niches of the Chenab River.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Bilal; Sultana, Tayyaba; Sultana, Salma; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, K A; Nadeem, Shahid

    2016-07-01

    A large number of methods have been applied to evaluate genotoxic damage in different aquatic species. Comet assay, as a method for detecting DNA alterations, and micronucleus test, as an index of chromosomal damage are the most widely used and authentic methods in laboratory and field studies. The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of heavy metals generated by toxic industrial effluents and various kinds of pollutants from urban and agricultural areas and domestic waste on Catla catla and Cirrhinus mrigala due to water pollution in the Chenab River, Pakistan. The heavy metals Cd, Cu, Mn. Zn, Pb, Cr, Sn, and Hg were detected by atomic absorption spectrophotometry from water samples collected from predetermined sampling sites. All the physicochemical parameters and heavy metals were found to exceed the upper limits recommended by various agencies. Comet assays showed significant (p < 0.05) DNA damage in C. mrigala compared to C. catla for tail length and olive tail moment from three different sites. Significant (p < 0.05) differences were reported between fish collected from polluted sites and farmed fish, but only non-significant (p > 0.05) findings were observed between fish collected from farmed and non-polluted upstream waters. Micronucleus assays showed similar findings for single and double micronucleus induction in C. catla and C. mrigala. A significantly (p < 0.05) higher micronuclei induction and percent tail DNA was observed in C. mrigala specimen collected from the polluted site. These findings infer that DNA damage could be used as a biomarker of pollution load and its early monitoring by using simple and reliable techniques such as the comet and micronucleus assays, expedient methods for toxicity screening of aquatic environments. Regular monitoring is necessary to assess eco-health of the Chenab River by choosing perhaps C. mrigala, being a bottom feeder, as a bioindicator that could provide more

  4. Melatonin concentrations in relation to oxidative status and oocyte dynamics in the ovary during different reproductive phases of an annual cycle in carp Catla catla.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Kazi Nurul; Moniruzzaman, Mahammed; Maitra, Saumen Kumar

    2014-11-01

    The present study on carp Catla catla is the first attempt to search for a relationship between the concentrations of melatonin, oxidative status, and oocyte dynamics in the ovary of any fish. We measured the levels of melatonin, different antioxidative agents, and the marker of intracellular stress along with the profiles of different developmental stages of oocyte in the ovary of adult carp during four distinct phases in an annual reproductive cycle. Ovarian melatonin titers displayed significant seasonal variations with a peak during spawning and nadir during post-spawning, and thereby underlined its proximity to the course of ovarian development. A significant positive correlation was found between the ovarian levels of melatonin and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione transferase (GST), although each of them showed a negative correlation with the level of malondialdehyde (MDA)-a faithful indicator of intracellular stress. However, ovarian melatonin titers did not exhibit any correlation with the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Collectively, our findings suggest that melatonin measured in carp ovary may be associated with an enhanced activity/level of selective antioxidative agents for reduction in oxidative stress to augment ovarian functions during the spawning.

  5. Influences of exogenous melatonin on the oocyte growth and oxidative status of ovary during different reproductive phases of an annual cycle in carp Catla catla.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Pradip; Hasan, Kazi Nurul; Pal, Palash Kumar; Maitra, Saumen Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate antioxidant role of melatonin in determining seasonality of ovarian growth in adult carp Catla catla. Accordingly, an identical regimen of exogenous melatonin administration (100 μg/100 g body weight per day for 15 days) was followed during the preparatory, prespawning, and spawning phases of an annual reproductive cycle. The study did not include postspawning phase, when the ovaries were completely regressed and devoid of any healthy growing follicles. The ovarian response was evaluated by determining relative number of developing oocytes as well as measuring the levels of melatonin, oxidative stress (using malondialdehyde [MDA] as the marker), both enzymatic (superoxide dismutase [SOD], catalase [CAT], glutathione peroxidase [GPx], and glutathione S-transferase [GST]) and nonenzymatic (reduced glutathione [GSH]) antioxidants in the ovarian homogenates. Due to melatonin treatment, oocyte growth was accelerated in the preparatory phase but retarded in the prespawning and spawning phases of annual cycle. Conversely, melatonin administration in each reproductive phase led to a significant reduction of MDA and elevations of SOD, CAT, GPx, GST, GSH, as well as melatonin levels in the ovary. As a result, melatonin titers in the ovary always reported a negative correlation with MDA and a positive correlation with SOD, CAT, GST, GPx, as well as GSH levels. However, melatonin content of ovary and the values of gonosomatic index in melatonin-treated carp displayed a positive correlation in the preparatory phase and a negative correlation in the remaining parts of reproductive cycle. Thus, it seems likely that melatonin by acting as an antioxidant reduces intraovarian oxidative stress throughout the seasons of follicular growth, whereas exogenous melatonin administration exerts progonadal influences during the preparatory phase, but antigonadal effects during the prespawning and spawning phases of reproductive cycle. Copyright © 2016

  6. Importance of light in temporal organization of photoreceptor proteins and melatonin-producing system in the pineal of carp Catla catla.

    PubMed

    Seth, Mohua; Maitra, Saumen Kumar

    2010-05-01

    The importance of light in the temporal organization of photoreceptor proteins and melatonin-producing system has been investigated for the first time in the pineal of a tropical fish. In this study, an identical experimental paradigm was followed during the four distinct phases of an annual cycle in adult carps (Catla catla) maintained either under natural photoperiod (NP) or continuous illumination (LL) or darkness (DD) for 30 days. At the end of each experiment, the pineal from fish in each experimental group was collected either at 06:00, 12:00, 18:00, or 24:00 in a daily cycle and assessed by Western blot analysis for pineal rod-like opsin, alpha-transducin, and AANAT. The same animals were also used for measurement of serum melatonin levels, and the serum as well as intra-pineal Ca(++) levels at each timepoint. The study revealed a daily rhythmicity with a peak at 12:00 h and nadir at 24:00 h in the band intensity of pineal rod-like opsin and alpha-transducin in NP fish, while the band intensities of these photo-pigment proteins remained high under LL and low under DD, irrespective of clock hour during the 24 h cycle. The band intensity of pineal AANAT, levels of serum melatonin, and both serum Ca(++) and intra-pineal Ca(++) were maximum at 24:00 h and minimum at 12:00h in NP fish, and they were significantly lower under LL and higher under DD at each point of study. The results showed loss of daily rhythm in each studied variable in both LL and DD carps, suggesting that their circadian organization is dependent on the external light-dark conditions, rather than an endogenous circadian oscillator in the pineal.

  7. Impact of anthropogenic activities on physico-chemical parameters of water and mineral uptake in Catla catla from river Ravi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shakir, Abdullah; Chaudhry, Abdul Shakoor; Qazi, Javed Iqbal

    2013-03-01

    The river Ravi, while passing through Lahore, the second largest city of Pakistan, gets highly polluted owning heavy loads of untreated municipal sewage and industrial effluents of diverse kinds. The fish, Catla catla sampled in two different seasons from three downstream polluted sites were compared with the samples of the same fish from an upstream, a less polluted site, for their physico-chemical parameters. The data were statistically analysed to study the effect of sites, seasons and their interaction on the physico-chemical parameters of waters and mineral uptake in fish muscles. Significant differences (P < 0.001) among the sampling sites and seasons were observed. The river appeared to be polluted as indicated by the high values of total suspended solids (909 mg/l) and sulphate (964 mg/l) in comparison to the respective values of 150 and 600 mg/l being suggested as the safer values of drinking water of the National Environmental Quality Standards. Most trace and macro elements in fish muscles were increased with the increasing pollution loads from the upstream to the downstream sites of this river. The remarkable increases in the levels of all the investigated minerals in fish muscles from the polluted sites raise concerns about the long-term health of the river Ravi ecosystem and consequently the fish and its consumer's health. The results contradict the opinion of the local population that the riverine fish are natural, more health-promoting and precious than the pond fish. Therefore, we strongly argue for the utilization of an effect-based monitoring approach to alleviate the detrimental effects of anthropogenic activities on fish and the fish consumers' health.

  8. Neural regulation of dark-induced abundance of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) and melatonin in the carp (Catla catla) pineal: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Seth, Mohua; Maitra, Saumen Kumar

    2011-08-01

    In all the vertebrates, synthesis of melatonin and its rhythm-generating enzyme arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) reaches its peak in the pineal during the night in a daily light-dark cycle, but the role of different neuronal signals in their regulation were unknown for any fish. Hence, the authors used specific agonist and antagonists of receptors for different neuronal signals and regulators of intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) and adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in vitro to study their effects on the abundance of AANAT and titer of melatonin in the carp (Catla catla) pineal. Western blot analysis followed by quantitative analysis of respective immunoblot data for AANAT protein, radioimmunoassay of melatonin, and spectrophotometric analysis of Ca(2+) in the pineal revealed stimulatory effects of both adrenergic (α(1) and β(1)) and dopaminergic (D(1)) agonists and cholinergic (both nicotinic and muscarinic) antagonists, inhibition by both adrenergic and dopaminergic antagonists and cholinergic agonists, but independent of the influence of any agonists or antagonists of α(2)-adrenergic receptors. Band intensity of AANAT and concentration of melatonin in the pineal were also enhanced by the intracellular calcium-releasing agent, activators of both calcium channel and adenylate cyclase, and phophodiesterase inhibitor, but suppressed by inhibitor of calcium channel and adenylate cyclase as well as activator of phophodiesterase. Moreover, an inhibitory effect of light on the pineal AANAT and melatonin was blocked by both cAMP and proteasomal proteolysis inhibitor MG132. Collectively, these data suggest that dark-induced abundance of AANAT and melatonin synthesis in the carp pineal are a multineuronal function, in which both adrenergic (α(1) and β(1), but not α(2)) and dopaminergic signals are stimulatory, whereas cholinergic signals are inhibitory. This study also provides indications, though arguably not conclusive evidence, that in either case

  9. Effects of starvation, re-feeding and timing of food supply on daily rhythm features of gut melatonin in carp (Catla catla).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Maitra, Saumen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Influences of starvation, re-feeding and time of food supply on daily rhythm features of melatonin (5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine) and its key regulator AANAT (arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase) protein in the gut tissues were separately evaluated in carp Catla catla. The first experiment was aimed at demonstration of duration dependent effects of starvation and re-feeding after starvation on the daily profiles and rhythm features of gut melatonin and AANAT. Accordingly, juvenile carp were randomly distributed in three groups, which were (a) provided with balanced diet daily at a fixed time, that is, 10:00 clock hour or zeitgeber time (ZT) 4 (control), or (b) starved (for 2-, 4-, 6- or 8 days), or (c) initially starved for 8 days and then re-fed (for 2-, 4-, 6-, 8-, 12- or 16 days) daily with the same food and at the time (ZT4) used for control fish. The carp in each group were sampled for collection of gut tissues at six different time points at a regular interval of 4 h in a daily cycle. In another experiment, the influences of timing of food supply were separately examined in four fish groups, which were provided with a fixed amount of food once daily either at 06:00 or 12:00 or 18:00 or 24:00 clock hour corresponding to ZT0 or ZT6 or ZT12 or ZT18, respectively, for 7 days before sampling at 12 different time points with a regular interval of 2 h in a 24-h cycle. The study revealed a gradual increase in the mesor and amplitude values of melatonin and AANAT in gut with the progress of starvation till their values reached maximum at day-6 and remained steady thereafter. In contrast, re-feeding of 8-day starved fish resulted in a sharp decrease in their mesor and amplitude values after 2 days and then followed by a steady-state increase till re-attainment of their values close to control fish at the end of 16 days. The acrophase of these gut variables in each control, starved and re-fed fish was noted mostly at midday or ZT6. However, the results of another

  10. The morpho-anatomy and histology of the pineal complex in a major Indian carp, Catla catla: identification of the pineal photoreceptor cells and their responsiveness to constant light and constant darkness during different phases of the annual reproductive cycle.

    PubMed

    Dey, R; Bhattacharya, S; Maitra, S K; Banerji, T K

    2003-11-01

    In contrast to mammals in which the pineal gland is a discrete structure situated dorsally in the brain, the "pineal gland" in teleost fishes is composed of a number of separate but connected constituent parts, collectively described as the "pineal complex." In this paper, we have described the pineal complex in a common Indian carp, Catla catla, which exhibits an annual reproductive cycle. Attempts have been made to (a) provide an in-depth description of the structure of the pineal complex; and (b) identify the photoreceptor cells of the pineal, by exposing the animals to constant light (LL) and constant darkness (DD). Furthermore, we examined any possible influence of the reproductive status of the fish on the responsiveness of the pineal photoreceptor cells in C. catla following exposure to LL and DD. To this end, a total of four experiments were carried out during the four different phases of the annual reproductive cycle that is characteristic of this species. Each of these four experiments was carried out for a period of 30 days after which the fishes were sacrificed, different parts of the pineal complex were dissected out, and processed for histological and karyometric studies. Our results showed that the pineal complex in this species is composed of three separate but connected parts, (a) an end vesicle (EV); (b) a dorsal sac (DS); and (c) a long and thin pineal stalk (PS) that attaches the EV to the DS. Detailed karyometric and histo-morphologic studies following exposure of the animals to DD and LL showed that constant darkness led to a stimulatory effect on the pineal photoreceptor cells of the EV as evident from a significant increase in the nuclear diameter. In contrast, the nuclear diameter of the photoreceptor cells in animals subjected to constant light showed a significant reduction. Furthermore, the observed cellular changes in the EV of fish exposed either to LL or DD were independent of the stage of the gonadal cycle. The apparent lack of any

  11. Myxozoan infections of the three Indian major carps in fish ponds around Meerut, UP, India, with descriptions of three new species, Myxobolus basuhaldari sp. n., M. kalavatiae sp. n. and M. meerutensis sp. n., and the redescription of M. catlae and M. bhadrensis.

    PubMed

    Székely, Csaba; Cech, Gábor; Chaudhary, Anshu; Borzák, Réka; Singh, Hridaya S; Molnár, Kálmán

    2015-04-01

    New myxosporean species are described from Indian fishes cultured in pond farms of Meerut, Uttar Pradesh (UP) state. Based upon plasmodia found in the Indian major carps (Catla catla, Cirrhinus cirrhosus, Labeo rohita and their hybrids), three new Myxobolus spp., Myxobolus basuhaldari sp. n., Myxobolus kalavatiae sp. n. and Myxobolus meerutensis sp. n., are described, and two species, Myxobolus catlae and Myxobolus bhadrensis, are redescribed. Plasmodia of M. basuhaldari sp. n., M. kalavatiae sp. n., M. meerutensis sp. n. and M. catlae developed in small cysts in the gill lamellae, while plasmodia and scattered spores of M. bhadrensis were found in the muscles and kidney, respectively. Plasmodia and spores found in these fishes differed from each other with respect to their morphology, tissue tropism and 18S ribosomal DNA (18S rDNA) sequence. No major pathological changes were found, but severe infections were observed.

  12. Synthetic pyrethroid effect on blood plasma biomarker enzymes and histological changes in Catla catla.

    PubMed

    Muthuviveganandavel, Veerappan; Hwang, Inho; Anita, Vanattayen; Malarani, Pattabiraman S; Selvam, Chandrasekar; Hemalatha, Moorthy; Pandurangan, Muthuraman

    2013-04-01

    Alpha-cypermethrin is an isoform of cypermethrin; it is an active pyrethroid used extensively to control a wide range of pests in agriculture and animal breeding. In this study four groups of six fish were examined. The first group served as a control in fresh water alone, with no pyrethroid. The second, third and fourth groups were exposed to alpha-cypermethrin for 4, 8 and 96 h respectively. At the end of the each exposure period, the fish were sacrificed, and the required muscle tissues were collected for histological examination. The blood was drawn with heparinized needles and processed for serum enzymatic studies. Serum enzymes such as aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), amylase, acid phosphatase (ACP) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) were measured at 4, 8 and 96 h. AST enzyme activity was significantly increased at 4 h, whereas ALT and amylase enzyme activities were significantly reduced at all the time points. ACP enzyme activity was significantly reduced at 4 and 8 h, whereas GGT enzyme activity was significantly increased at all the time points. Hepatocyte cytoplasmic vacuolisation and degeneration, rupture of blood vessels, and necrosis was found at all time points. Congestion of blood vessels, bulging, distortion of filaments, erosion and disintegration of blood corpuscles and hyperplasia of epithelium were found in treated gills at 4, 8 and 96 h. Breakdown of muscle fibres, vacuolation and accumulation of lipids and melanin in white muscle were observed in treated fish muscle at 4, 8 and 96 h. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2013 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  13. Record of the species of Tripartiella (Lom, 1959) from fishes of Manipur.

    PubMed

    Mohilal, Naorem; Hemananda, Thounaojam

    2012-04-01

    Survey on Trichodinid ciliophorans from the fresh water fishes of Manipur revealed three known species of the genus Tripartiella from the gills of major carps Labeo rohita (Hamilton); Cirrhinus mrigala (Hamilton); Catla catla and Ciprinus carpio. These are redescribed in this communication.

  14. Hamilton College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudy, Julia

    1989-01-01

    A description of Hamilton College's campus computing environment looks at the planning and management of information technology, computing services, the telephone network, faculty and student computing, and computer applications in the library. (MSE)

  15. Hamilton's rule.

    PubMed

    van Veelen, Matthijs; Allen, Benjamin; Hoffman, Moshe; Simon, Burton; Veller, Carl

    2017-02-07

    This paper reviews and addresses a variety of issues relating to inclusive fitness. The main question is: are there limits to the generality of inclusive fitness, and if so, what are the perimeters of the domain within which inclusive fitness works? This question is addressed using two well-known tools from evolutionary theory: the replicator dynamics, and adaptive dynamics. Both are combined with population structure. How generally Hamilton's rule applies depends on how costs and benefits are defined. We therefore consider costs and benefits following from Karlin and Matessi's (1983) "counterfactual method", and costs and benefits as defined by the "regression method" (Gardner et al., 2011). With the latter definition of costs and benefits, Hamilton's rule always indicates the direction of selection correctly, and with the former it does not. How these two definitions can meaningfully be interpreted is also discussed. We also consider cases where the qualitative claim that relatedness fosters cooperation holds, even if Hamilton's rule as a quantitative prediction does not. We furthermore find out what the relation is between Hamilton's rule and Fisher's Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection. We also consider cancellation effects - which is the most important deepening of our understanding of when altruism is selected for. Finally we also explore the remarkable (im)possibilities for empirical testing with either definition of costs and benefits in Hamilton's rule.

  16. Virginia Hamilton: Majestic Storyteller.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses Virginia Hamilton's accomplishments as a writer and storyteller for young people. Suggests activities related to Hamilton's books, including reading aloud, watching a biographical videotape, displaying her books in the library or classroom, and visiting children's and young adult author web sites. Provides an annotated bibliography of 20…

  17. Hamilton's Principle for Beginners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brun, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    I find that students have difficulty with Hamilton's principle, at least the first time they come into contact with it, and therefore it is worth designing some examples to help students grasp its complex meaning. This paper supplies the simplest example to consolidate the learning of the quoted principle: that of a free particle moving along a…

  18. Elizabeth Hamilton: Enlightenment Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Rosalind

    1986-01-01

    Elizabeth Hamilton, an eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Scottish writer on education, was one of the first to advocate the application of educational psychology to teaching. She introduced Pestalozzi's method to the English-reading public and argued for equal education for all children of both sexes and all social backgrounds. (LFL)

  19. Virginia Hamilton: Continuing the Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikkelsen, Nina

    1995-01-01

    Relates the latest installment of a continuing conversation between the author and Virginia Hamilton. Discusses ethnicity and identity, environmental issues, the creative process, and the way heritage, history, and family storytelling affect a writer's work. (RS)

  20. Peeps at William Edwin Hamilton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayman, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    William Edwin Hamilton, 1834-1902, (WEH) was the elder son of Sir William Rowan Hamilton and Helen Hamilton and he inherited many of the characteristics of his famous father. One property that he did not inherit, however, was his father's genius. While the outline of the life of WEH was given by Hankins in his 1980 biography of Sir William, a copy of ``Peeps at My Life'' written by WEH during the last months of his life was not available until recently. A few years ago a copy was sent to me by Herman Berg of Detroit and in this article, the principal items in ``Peeps'' that are relevant to Ireland, and some other facets of the character of WEH, are included as they give an unusual viewpoint of a by-gone age.

  1. Quantum Hamilton-Jacobi theory.

    PubMed

    Roncadelli, Marco; Schulman, L S

    2007-10-26

    Quantum canonical transformations have attracted interest since the beginning of quantum theory. Based on their classical analogues, one would expect them to provide a powerful quantum tool. However, the difficulty of solving a nonlinear operator partial differential equation such as the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation (QHJE) has hindered progress along this otherwise promising avenue. We overcome this difficulty. We show that solutions to the QHJE can be constructed by a simple prescription starting from the propagator of the associated Schrödinger equation. Our result opens the possibility of practical use of quantum Hamilton-Jacobi theory. As an application, we develop a surprising relation between operator ordering and the density of paths around a semiclassical trajectory.

  2. Hamilton׳s Rule in finite populations with synergistic interactions.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Peter

    2016-05-21

    Much debate has appeared in the literature over the generality of the inclusive fitness approach in the modeling of evolutionary behavior. Here I focus on the capacity of the inclusive fitness approach to effectively handle non-additive or synergistic interactions. I work with a binary interaction with the matrix game [abcd] and I restrict attention to transitive (homogeneous) populations with weak selective effects. First of all I observe that the construction of "higher-order" relatedness coefficients permits these synergistic interactions to be analyzed with an inclusive fitness analysis. These coefficients are an immediate generalization of Hamilton׳s original coefficient and can be calculated with exactly the same type of recursive equations. Secondly I observe that for models in which the population is not too large and local genetic renewal is rare (e,g, rare mutation), these higher order coefficients are not needed even with non-additive interactions; in fact the synergistic interaction is entirely equivalent to a closely-related additive one. The overall conclusion is that in the study of synergistic binary social interactions (2-player games) in a finite homogeneous population with weak selection and rare genetic renewal, a standard inclusive-fitness analysis is able to predict the direction of allele-frequency change. I apply this result to analyze a recent model of Allen and Nowak (2015).

  3. Hamilton's principle as inequality for inelastic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Lv, Q. C.; Liu, Y. R.

    2017-05-01

    This paper is concerned with Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies with conservative external forces. Inelasticity is described by internal variable theory by Rice (J Mech Phys Solids 19:433-455, 1971), and the influence of strain change on the temperature field is ignored. Unlike Hamilton's principle for elastic bodies which has an explicit Lagrangian, Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies generally has no an explicit Lagrangian. Based on the entropy inequality, a quasi Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies is established in the form of inequality and with an explicit Lagrangian, which is just the Lagrangian for elastic bodies by replacing the strain energy with free energy. The quasi Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies states that the actual motion is distinguished by making the action an maximum. The evolution equations of internal variables can not be recovered from the quasi Hamilton's principle.

  4. Hamilton's principle as inequality for inelastic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Lv, Q. C.; Liu, Y. R.

    2017-02-01

    This paper is concerned with Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies with conservative external forces. Inelasticity is described by internal variable theory by Rice (J Mech Phys Solids 19:433-455, 1971), and the influence of strain change on the temperature field is ignored. Unlike Hamilton's principle for elastic bodies which has an explicit Lagrangian, Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies generally has no an explicit Lagrangian. Based on the entropy inequality, a quasi Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies is established in the form of inequality and with an explicit Lagrangian, which is just the Lagrangian for elastic bodies by replacing the strain energy with free energy. The quasi Hamilton's principle for inelastic bodies states that the actual motion is distinguished by making the action an maximum. The evolution equations of internal variables can not be recovered from the quasi Hamilton's principle.

  5. An extended Hamilton — Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Valery V.

    2012-11-01

    We develop a new method for solving Hamilton's canonical differential equations. The method is based on the search for invariant vortex manifolds of special type. In the case of Lagrangian (potential) manifolds, we arrive at the classical Hamilton — Jacobi method.

  6. Hamilton's principle in stochastic mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavon, Michele

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we establish three variational principles that provide new foundations for Nelson's stochastic mechanics in the case of nonrelativistic particles without spin. The resulting variational picture is much richer and of a different nature with respect to the one previously considered in the literature. We first develop two stochastic variational principles whose Hamilton-Jacobi-like equations are precisely the two coupled partial differential equations that are obtained from the Schrödinger equation (Madelung equations). The two problems are zero-sum, noncooperative, stochastic differential games that are familiar in the control theory literature. They are solved here by means of a new, absolutely elementary method based on Lagrange functionals. For both games the saddle-point equilibrium solution is given by the Nelson's process and the optimal controls for the two competing players are precisely Nelson's current velocity v and osmotic velocity u, respectively. The first variational principle includes as special cases both the Guerra-Morato variational principle [Phys. Rev. D 27, 1774 (1983)] and Schrödinger original variational derivation of the time-independent equation. It also reduces to the classical least action principle when the intensity of the underlying noise tends to zero. It appears as a saddle-point action principle. In the second variational principle the action is simply the difference between the initial and final configurational entropy. It is therefore a saddle-point entropy production principle. From the variational principles it follows, in particular, that both v(x,t) and u(x,t) are gradients of appropriate principal functions. In the variational principles, the role of the background noise has the intuitive meaning of attempting to contrast the more classical mechanical features of the system by trying to maximize the action in the first principle and by trying to increase the entropy in the second. Combining the two variational

  7. 78 FR 30795 - Airworthiness Directives; Hamilton Standard Division and Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation Propellers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... 14RF, 14SF, 247F, and 568F series propellers. This proposed AD was prompted by the amount of corrosion... corrosion that could result in propeller failure and loss of airplane control. DATES: We must receive... corrosion detected during MIs of Hamilton Standard Division model 6/5500/F and 24PF and Hamilton...

  8. 78 FR 49660 - Airworthiness Directives; Hamilton Standard Division and Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation Propellers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ... and the public interest require adopting this AD as proposed except for minor editorial changes. We... applicable Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation models/ manuals 14RF-9/P5186, revision 12, January 20, 2012; 14RF.../manuals 6/5500/F/P5190 and 24PF/61-12-01, and Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation models/manuals...

  9. Structural aspects of Hamilton-Jacobi theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñena, J. F.; Gràcia, X.; Marmo, G.; Martínez, E.; Muñoz-Lecanda, M. C.; Román-Roy, N.

    2016-12-01

    In our previous papers [J. F. Cariñena, X. Gràcia, G. Marmo, E. Martínez, M. C. Muñoz-Lecanda and N. Román-Roy, Geometric Hamilton-Jacobi theory, Int. J. Geom. Meth. Mod. Phys. 3 (2006) 1417-1458; Geometric Hamilton-Jacobi theory for nonholonomic dynamical systems, Int. J. Geom. Meth. Mod. Phys. 7 (2010) 431-454] we showed that the Hamilton-Jacobi problem can be regarded as a way to describe a given dynamics on a phase space manifold in terms of a family of dynamics on a lower-dimensional manifold. We also showed how constants of the motion help to solve the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Here we want to delve into this interpretation by considering the most general case: a dynamical system on a manifold that is described in terms of a family of dynamics (slicing vector fields) on lower-dimensional manifolds. We identify the relevant geometric structures that lead from this decomposition of the dynamics to the classical Hamilton-Jacobi theory, by considering special cases like fibered manifolds and Hamiltonian dynamics, in the symplectic framework and the Poisson one. We also show how a set of functions on a tangent bundle can determine a second-order dynamics for which they are constants of the motion.

  10. Application of Hamilton's law of varying action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.

    1975-01-01

    The law of varying action enunciated by Hamilton in 1834-1835 permits the direct analytical solution of the problems of mechanics, both stationary and nonstationary, without consideration of force equilibrium and the theory of differential equations associated therewith. It has not been possible to obtain direct analytical solutions to nonstationary systems through the use of energy theory, which has been limited for 140 years to the principle of least action and to Hamilton's principle. It is shown here that Hamilton's law permits the direct analytical solution to nonstationary, initial value systems in the mechanics of solids without any knowledge or use of the theory of differential equations. Solutions are demonstrated for nonconservative, nonstationary particle motion, both linear and nonlinear.

  11. Application of Hamilton's law of varying action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.

    1975-01-01

    The law of varying action enunciated by Hamilton in 1834-1835 permits the direct analytical solution of the problems of mechanics, both stationary and nonstationary, without consideration of force equilibrium and the theory of differential equations associated therewith. It has not been possible to obtain direct analytical solutions to nonstationary systems through the use of energy theory, which has been limited for 140 years to the principle of least action and to Hamilton's principle. It is shown here that Hamilton's law permits the direct analytical solution to nonstationary, initial value systems in the mechanics of solids without any knowledge or use of the theory of differential equations. Solutions are demonstrated for nonconservative, nonstationary particle motion, both linear and nonlinear.

  12. Unbiased sampling of lattice Hamilton path ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Marc L.

    2006-10-01

    Hamilton paths, or Hamiltonian paths, are walks on a lattice which visit each site exactly once. They have been proposed as models of globular proteins and of compact polymers. A previously published algorithm [Mansfield, Macromolecules 27, 5924 (1994)] for sampling Hamilton paths on simple square and simple cubic lattices is tested for bias and for efficiency. Because the algorithm is a Metropolis Monte Carlo technique obviously satisfying detailed balance, we need only demonstrate ergodicity to ensure unbiased sampling. Two different tests for ergodicity (exact enumeration on small lattices, nonexhaustive enumeration on larger lattices) demonstrate ergodicity unequivocally for small lattices and provide strong support for ergodicity on larger lattices. Two other sampling algorithms [Ramakrishnan et al., J. Chem. Phys. 103, 7592 (1995); Lua et al., Polymer 45, 717 (2004)] are both known to produce biases on both 2×2×2 and 3×3×3 lattices, but it is shown here that the current algorithm gives unbiased sampling on these same lattices. Successive Hamilton paths are strongly correlated, so that many iterations are required between statistically independent samples. Rules for estimating the number of iterations needed to dissipate these correlations are given. However, the iteration time is so fast that the efficiency is still very good except on extremely large lattices. For example, even on lattices of total size 10×10×10 we are able to generate tens of thousands of uncorrelated Hamilton paths per hour of CPU time.

  13. Hamilton County: A Rural School District Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harned, Catherine

    Using state education agency, census, industry employment and occupational information data, this paper provides a detailed picture of a rural school district in Southern Illinois. Mining and agriculture are the major industries in Hamilton County. The major mining employer closed in February 1988, and the drought of 1988 is likely to adversely…

  14. Measuring Social Capital in Hamilton, Ontario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchen, Peter; Williams, Allison; Simone, Dylan

    2012-01-01

    Social capital has been studied by academics for more than 20 years and within the past decade there has been an explosion of growth in research linking social capital to health. This paper investigates social capital in Hamilton, Ontario by way of a telephone survey of 1,002 households in three neighbourhood groups representing high, mixed and…

  15. Measuring Social Capital in Hamilton, Ontario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchen, Peter; Williams, Allison; Simone, Dylan

    2012-01-01

    Social capital has been studied by academics for more than 20 years and within the past decade there has been an explosion of growth in research linking social capital to health. This paper investigates social capital in Hamilton, Ontario by way of a telephone survey of 1,002 households in three neighbourhood groups representing high, mixed and…

  16. Application of Hamilton's Law of Varying Action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    The application of Hamilton's Law to the direct solution of nonstationary as well as stationary problems in mechanics of solids is discussed. Solutions are demonstrated for conservative and monconservative, stationary and/or nonstationary particle motion. Mathematical models are developed to establish the relationships of the parameters.

  17. 9. INTERIOR VIEW OF BREW HOUSE, STEAM ENGINE READS: HAMILTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTERIOR VIEW OF BREW HOUSE, STEAM ENGINE- READS: HAMILTON CORLISS ENGINES, THE HOOVEN, OWENS & RENTSCHLER CO., BUILDERS, HAMILTON, OHIO, U.S.A. - August Schell Brewing Company, Twentieth Street South, New Ulm, Brown County, MN

  18. GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. Pencil on paper, dated December 4, 1952. Also marked "PWC 103474." By J.Y. Long Company, Engineers, Oakland, California - Hamilton Field, East of Nave Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

  19. An unusual ophthalmic finding in Lane-Hamilton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Victor M; Rachitskaya, Aleksandra V; Lam, Byron L; McKeown, Craig A; Berrocal, Audina M

    2014-12-01

    Lane-Hamilton syndrome is a rare condition that is characterized by idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis and celiac disease. We report the case of an 18-month-old girl with Lane-Hamilton syndrome who had unilateral pigmentary retinopathy.

  20. 65. HAMILTON APPROACH LOOKING TOWARD BRIDGE, SHOWING TRANSFER OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. HAMILTON APPROACH LOOKING TOWARD BRIDGE, SHOWING TRANSFER OF THE HIGHWAY APPROACH TO THE BRIDGE STRUCTURE. PHOTOGRAPHER: ROBERT A. RYAN - Keokuk & Hamilton Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River, Keokuk, Lee County, IA

  1. Conformal invariance and Hamilton Jacobi theory for dissipative systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiehn, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    For certain dissipative systems, a comparison can be made between the Hamilton-Jacobi theory and the conformal invariance of action theory. The two concepts are not identical, but the conformal action theory covers the Hamilton-Jacobi theory.

  2. Conformal invariance and Hamilton Jacobi theory for dissipative systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiehn, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    For certain dissipative systems, a comparison can be made between the Hamilton-Jacobi theory and the conformal invariance of action theory. The two concepts are not identical, but the conformal action theory covers the Hamilton-Jacobi theory.

  3. Hamilton Jacobi method for solving ordinary differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Feng-Xiang; Wu, Hui-Bin; Zhang, Yong-Fa

    2006-08-01

    The Hamilton-Jacobi method for solving ordinary differential equations is presented in this paper. A system of ordinary differential equations of first order or second order can be expressed as a Hamilton system under certain conditions. Then the Hamilton-Jacobi method is used in the integration of the Hamilton system and the solution of the original ordinary differential equations can be found. Finally, an example is given to illustrate the application of the result.

  4. Water resources of Hamilton County, southwestern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lobmeyer, David H.; Sauer, C.G.

    1974-01-01

    According to records of the National Weather Service (formerly the U.S. Weather Bureau) for a station near Syracuse, the average annual precipitation in Hamilton County is about 16 inches. Of this amount, 83 percent occurs during the growing season (March 15 to October 15). A part of the precipitation runs off as surface flow, part is evaporated, part is used by vegetation, and a small part percolates downward to recharge the ground-water reservoir. The average recharge from precipitation for Hamilton County is estimated to be 0.1 inch per year. Owing to the limited supply of water in most of the upland area of the county, dryland farming and grazing are the predominant land uses.

  5. Hamiltonization of Solids of Revolution Through Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balseiro, Paula

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we study the relation between conserved quantities of nonholonomic systems and the hamiltonization problem employing the geometric methods of Balseiro (Arch Ration Mech Anal 214:453-501, 2014) and Balseiro and Garcia-Naranjo (Arch Ration Mech Anal 205(1):267-310, 2012). We illustrate the theory with classical examples describing the dynamics of solids of revolution rolling without sliding on a plane. In these cases, using the existence of two conserved quantities we obtain, by means of gauge transformations and symmetry reduction, genuine Poisson brackets describing the reduced dynamics.

  6. Hamilton-Jacobi Method and Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Criscienzo, R.; Vanzo, L.; Zerbini, S.

    Studying the behaviour of a quantum field in a classical, curved, spacetime is an extraordinary task which nobody is able to take on at present time. Independently by the fact that such problem is not likely to be solved soon, still we possess the instruments to perform exact predictions in special, highly symmetric, conditions. Aim of the present contribution is to show how it is possible to extract quantitative information about a variety of physical phenomena in very general situations by virtue of the so-called Hamilton-Jacobi method. In particular, we shall prove the agreement of such semi-classical method with exact results of quantum field theoretic calculations.

  7. Viscous warm inflation: Hamilton-Jacobi formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtari, L.; Mohammadi, A.; Sayar, K.; Saaidi, Kh.

    2017-04-01

    Using Hamilton-Jacobi formalism, the scenario of warm inflation with viscous pressure is considered. The formalism gives a way of computing the slow-rolling parameter without extra approximation, and it is well-known as a powerful method in cold inflation. The model is studied in detail for three different cases of the dissipation and bulk viscous pressure coefficients. In the first case where both coefficients are taken as constant, it is shown that the case could not portray warm inflationary scenario compatible with observational data even it is possible to restrict the model parameters. For other cases, the results shows that the model could properly predicts the perturbation parameters in which they stay in perfect agreement with Planck data. As a further argument, r -ns and αs -ns are drown that show the acquired result could stand in acceptable area expressing a compatibility with observational data.

  8. Hamilton-Jacobi skeleton on cortical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Thompson, P M; Dinov, I; Toga, A W

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method to construct graphical representations of cortical folding patterns by computing skeletons on triangulated cortical surfaces. In our approach, a cortical surface is first partitioned into sulcal and gyral regions via the solution of a variational problem using graph cuts, which can guarantee global optimality. After that, we extend the method of Hamilton-Jacobi skeleton [1] to subsets of triangulated surfaces, together with a geometrically intuitive pruning process that can trade off between skeleton complexity and the completeness of representing folding patterns. Compared with previous work that uses skeletons of 3-D volumes to represent sulcal patterns, the skeletons on cortical surfaces can be easily decomposed into branches and provide a simpler way to construct graphical representations of cortical morphometry. In our experiments, we demonstrate our method on two different cortical surface models, its ability of capturing major sulcal patterns and its application to compute skeletons of gyral regions.

  9. 78 FR 9001 - Airworthiness Directives; Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation Propellers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... using certain Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation auxiliary pumps and motors (auxiliary feathering pumps... Hamilton Sundstrand investigation revealed some of their auxiliary feathering pump motors had internal corrosion that may cause the stator magnets in the pump motor to fail and rotate into the path of...

  10. Recognizing the Presidents: Was Alexander Hamilton President?

    PubMed

    Roediger, Henry L; DeSoto, K Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Studies over the past 40 years have shown that Americans can recall about half the U.S. presidents. Do people know the presidents even though they are unable to access them for recall? We investigated this question using the powerful cues of a recognition test. Specifically, we tested the ability of 326 online subjects to recognize U.S. presidents when presented with their full names among various types of lures. The hit rate for presidential recognition was .88, well above the proportion produced in free recall but far from perfect. Presidents Franklin Pierce and Chester Arthur were recognized less than 60% of the time. Interestingly, four nonpresidents were falsely recognized at relatively high rates, and Alexander Hamilton was more frequently identified as president than were several actual presidents. Even on a recognition test, knowledge of American presidents is imperfect and prone to error. The false alarm data support the theory that false fame can arise from contextual familiarity. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. 75 FR 24938 - City of Hamilton, Ohio American Municipal Power, Inc.; Notice of Application for Transfer of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... February 26, 2010, City of Hamilton, Ohio (Hamilton) and American Municipal Power, Inc. (AMP) filed an... approval to transfer the license for the Meldahl Project from Hamilton to Hamilton and AMP. Applicants...

  12. CONTEXTUAL VIEW FROM HOTEL; HAMILTON BUNGALOW IN FOREGROUND; BUNGALOW NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXTUAL VIEW FROM HOTEL; HAMILTON BUNGALOW IN FOREGROUND; BUNGALOW NO. 3 DIRECTLY BEHIND; HINDS & CONNER AND "A" BUNGALOWS IN REAR. VISTA DEL ARROYO HOTEL ON RIGHT - Vista del Arroyo Hotel, 125 South Grand Avenue, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. VIEW OF GRIMES STREET, LOOKING ACROSS HAMILTON FIELD AT FACILITIES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF GRIMES STREET, LOOKING ACROSS HAMILTON FIELD AT FACILITIES 737 THROUGH 740 (1918 CORNER-ENTRY SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSING TYPES), VIEW FACING NORTHEAST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Wilikina Drive & Kunia Road, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  14. HAMILTON BUNGALOW (LEFT) AND BUNGALOW NO. 3 (RIGHT) FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HAMILTON BUNGALOW (LEFT) AND BUNGALOW NO. 3 (RIGHT) FROM THE ROOF OF THE VISTA DEL ARROYO HOTEL. THE COLORADO STREET BRIDGE IS VISIBLE IN THE REAR - Vista del Arroyo Hotel, 125 South Grand Avenue, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Hamilton's Store, rear view, with storage building in rear, restaurant ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Hamilton's Store, rear view, with storage building in rear, restaurant to left, officer's row in distance, view southeast - Mammoth Hot Springs-Fort Yellowstone, Grand Loop Road, Mammoth, Park County, WY

  16. Hamilton Jeffers and the Double Star Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Astronomers have long tracked double stars in efforts to find those that are gravitationally-bound binaries and then to determine their orbits. Court reporter and amateur astronomer Shelburne Wesley Burnham (1838-1921) published a massive double star catalogue containing more than 13,000 systems in 1906. The next keeper of the double stars was Lick Observatory astronomer Robert Grant Aitken (1864-1951), who produced a much larger catalogue in 1932. Aitken maintained and expanded Burnham’s records of observations on handwritten file cards, eventually turning them over to Lick Observatory astrometrist Hamilton Moore Jeffers (1893-1976). Jeffers further expanded the collection and put all the observations on punched cards. With the aid of Frances M. "Rete" Greeby (1921-2002), he made two catalogues: an Index Catalogue with basic data about each star, and a complete catalogue of observations, with one observation per punched card. He enlisted Willem van den Bos of Johannesburg to add southern stars, and they published the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0. As Jeffers approached retirement he became greatly concerned about the disposition of the catalogues. He wanted to be replaced by another "double star man," but Lick Director Albert E. Whitford (1905-2002) had the new 120-inch reflector, the world’s second largest telescope, and he wanted to pursue modern astrophysics instead. Jeffers was vociferously opposed to turning over the card files to another institution, and especially against their coming under the control of Kaj Strand of the U.S. Naval Observatory. In the end the USNO got the files and has maintained the records ever since, first under Charles Worley (1935-1997), and, since 1997, under Brian Mason. Now called the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS), it is completely online and currently contains more than 1,000,000 measures of more than 100,000 pairs.

  17. A possible generalization of the field-theoretical Hamilton's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Savchin, V.M. )

    1988-11-01

    The development of classical dynamics as well as many branches of physics shows that the solution or analysis of variety of problems can be greatly simplified if the basic equations admit an analytic representation in terms of Hamilton's equations. The author proposes a generalization of Hamilton's equations in field theory which is applicable to partial differential equations of physical relevance. It is shown that the equations constitute a conceivable basis for the generalization of the theory of contact transformations and of Poisson's method.

  18. Hamilton-Jacobi approach to cosmology with nonlinear sigma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Richard; van Holten, Jan-Willem

    2016-05-01

    We start with a short introduction of the role that constraints and Lagrange multiplers play in variational calculus. After recalling briefly the properties of the nonlinear sigma model, we show how the Hamilton-Jacobi method can be applied to find its solutions. We discuss the importance of the Hamiltonian constraint in the standard cosmological model, and finally, apply the Hamilton-Jacobi method to the solution of coupled gravitational and sigma-field equations.

  19. Impact of exotic carps in the polyculture with indigenous carps: competition for food.

    PubMed

    Siddiquee, M M R; Rahman, M F; Jahan, N; Jalal, K C A; Amin, S M N; Arshad, A

    2012-06-15

    The fingerlings of indigenous carps such as catla (Catla catla), rohu (Labeo rohita) and mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala) with exotic carps such as silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis) and mirror carp (Cyprinus carpio) were cultured together in a fish pond at Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, in order to determine the food electivity, dietary overlap and food competition among indigenous major carps and exotic carps. Phytoplankton (Chlorophyceae, Cyanophyceae), zooplankton (rotifers) were the dominant groups in the cultured pond. Chlorophyceae was dominant in the diet of rohu. Chlorophyceae and rotifers were the preferred food of catla. Mrigal preferred phytoplankton than zooplankton. Rohu showed positive electivity for zooplankton. Silver carp consumed large quantity of phytoplankton and also preferred rotifers. Chlorophyceae was the dominant food group in the diet of bighead. Mirror carp also preferred plant food organisms dominated by Chlorophyceae. Bighead had positive trends towards phytoplankton. Both mrigal and mirror carp had positive electivity towards phytoplankton. The higher level of dietary overlap occurred between rohu and silver carp followed by between rohu and bighead carp and between catla and silver carp. The lowest level of dietary overlaps occurred between rohu and mirror carp.

  20. Hydrology of the Hamilton lakes and vicinity, Polk County, central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Warren G.; Simonds, Edward P.

    1983-01-01

    The Hamilton lakes, headwaters of the eastern arm of the Peace River drainage system, consist of Lake Hamilton, Middle Lake Hamilton, and Little Lake Hamilton. The lakes, which are connected by canals that tend to equalize their levels, probably occupy coalesced sinkhole depressions. The drainage basin of Lake Hamilton contains several water-control structures which can alter the effective size of the area contributing water to the Hamilton lakes according to their gate settings. The chemical and biological conditions in the Hamilton lakes are such that the lakes are not sufficiently enriched to cause problems with excessive weed growth or algae blooms. (USGS)

  1. Geometric Hamilton-Jacobi theory on Nambu-Poisson manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de León, M.; Sardón, C.

    2017-03-01

    The Hamilton-Jacobi theory is a formulation of classical mechanics equivalent to other formulations as Newtonian, Lagrangian, or Hamiltonian mechanics. The primordial observation of a geometric Hamilton-Jacobi theory is that if a Hamiltonian vector field XH can be projected into the configuration manifold by means of a 1-form dW, then the integral curves of the projected vector field XHd Wcan be transformed into integral curves of XH provided that W is a solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Our aim is to derive a geometric Hamilton-Jacobi theory for physical systems that are compatible with a Nambu-Poisson structure. For it, we study Lagrangian submanifolds of a Nambu-Poisson manifold and obtain explicitly an expression for a Hamilton-Jacobi equation on such a manifold. We apply our results to two interesting examples in the physics literature: the third-order Kummer-Schwarz equations and a system of n copies of a first-order differential Riccati equation. From the first example, we retrieve the original Nambu bracket in three dimensions and from the second example, we retrieve Takhtajan's generalization of the Nambu bracket to n dimensions.

  2. Hamilton's rule and the causes of social evolution.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Andrew F G

    2014-05-19

    Hamilton's rule is a central theorem of inclusive fitness (kin selection) theory and predicts that social behaviour evolves under specific combinations of relatedness, benefit and cost. This review provides evidence for Hamilton's rule by presenting novel syntheses of results from two kinds of study in diverse taxa, including cooperatively breeding birds and mammals and eusocial insects. These are, first, studies that empirically parametrize Hamilton's rule in natural populations and, second, comparative phylogenetic analyses of the genetic, life-history and ecological correlates of sociality. Studies parametrizing Hamilton's rule are not rare and demonstrate quantitatively that (i) altruism (net loss of direct fitness) occurs even when sociality is facultative, (ii) in most cases, altruism is under positive selection via indirect fitness benefits that exceed direct fitness costs and (iii) social behaviour commonly generates indirect benefits by enhancing the productivity or survivorship of kin. Comparative phylogenetic analyses show that cooperative breeding and eusociality are promoted by (i) high relatedness and monogamy and, potentially, by (ii) life-history factors facilitating family structure and high benefits of helping and (iii) ecological factors generating low costs of social behaviour. Overall, the focal studies strongly confirm the predictions of Hamilton's rule regarding conditions for social evolution and their causes.

  3. Quantitative genetic versions of Hamilton's rule with empirical applications.

    PubMed

    McGlothlin, Joel W; Wolf, Jason B; Brodie, Edmund D; Moore, Allen J

    2014-05-19

    Hamilton's theory of inclusive fitness revolutionized our understanding of the evolution of social interactions. Surprisingly, an incorporation of Hamilton's perspective into the quantitative genetic theory of phenotypic evolution has been slow, despite the popularity of quantitative genetics in evolutionary studies. Here, we discuss several versions of Hamilton's rule for social evolution from a quantitative genetic perspective, emphasizing its utility in empirical applications. Although evolutionary quantitative genetics offers methods to measure each of the critical parameters of Hamilton's rule, empirical work has lagged behind theory. In particular, we lack studies of selection on altruistic traits in the wild. Fitness costs and benefits of altruism can be estimated using a simple extension of phenotypic selection analysis that incorporates the traits of social interactants. We also discuss the importance of considering the genetic influence of the social environment, or indirect genetic effects (IGEs), in the context of Hamilton's rule. Research in social evolution has generated an extensive body of empirical work focusing--with good reason--almost solely on relatedness. We argue that quantifying the roles of social and non-social components of selection and IGEs, in addition to relatedness, is now timely and should provide unique additional insights into social evolution.

  4. Hamilton's rule and the causes of social evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, Andrew F. G.

    2014-01-01

    Hamilton's rule is a central theorem of inclusive fitness (kin selection) theory and predicts that social behaviour evolves under specific combinations of relatedness, benefit and cost. This review provides evidence for Hamilton's rule by presenting novel syntheses of results from two kinds of study in diverse taxa, including cooperatively breeding birds and mammals and eusocial insects. These are, first, studies that empirically parametrize Hamilton's rule in natural populations and, second, comparative phylogenetic analyses of the genetic, life-history and ecological correlates of sociality. Studies parametrizing Hamilton's rule are not rare and demonstrate quantitatively that (i) altruism (net loss of direct fitness) occurs even when sociality is facultative, (ii) in most cases, altruism is under positive selection via indirect fitness benefits that exceed direct fitness costs and (iii) social behaviour commonly generates indirect benefits by enhancing the productivity or survivorship of kin. Comparative phylogenetic analyses show that cooperative breeding and eusociality are promoted by (i) high relatedness and monogamy and, potentially, by (ii) life-history factors facilitating family structure and high benefits of helping and (iii) ecological factors generating low costs of social behaviour. Overall, the focal studies strongly confirm the predictions of Hamilton's rule regarding conditions for social evolution and their causes. PMID:24686934

  5. Quantitative genetic versions of Hamilton's rule with empirical applications

    PubMed Central

    McGlothlin, Joel W.; Wolf, Jason B.; Brodie, Edmund D.; Moore, Allen J.

    2014-01-01

    Hamilton's theory of inclusive fitness revolutionized our understanding of the evolution of social interactions. Surprisingly, an incorporation of Hamilton's perspective into the quantitative genetic theory of phenotypic evolution has been slow, despite the popularity of quantitative genetics in evolutionary studies. Here, we discuss several versions of Hamilton's rule for social evolution from a quantitative genetic perspective, emphasizing its utility in empirical applications. Although evolutionary quantitative genetics offers methods to measure each of the critical parameters of Hamilton's rule, empirical work has lagged behind theory. In particular, we lack studies of selection on altruistic traits in the wild. Fitness costs and benefits of altruism can be estimated using a simple extension of phenotypic selection analysis that incorporates the traits of social interactants. We also discuss the importance of considering the genetic influence of the social environment, or indirect genetic effects (IGEs), in the context of Hamilton's rule. Research in social evolution has generated an extensive body of empirical work focusing—with good reason—almost solely on relatedness. We argue that quantifying the roles of social and non-social components of selection and IGEs, in addition to relatedness, is now timely and should provide unique additional insights into social evolution. PMID:24686930

  6. Quantum Hamilton-Jacobi Cosmology and Classical-Quantum Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, M.; Jalalzadeh, S.

    2017-07-01

    How the time evolution which is typical for classical cosmology emerges from quantum cosmology? The answer is not trivial because the Wheeler-DeWitt equation is time independent. A framework associating the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi to the minisuperspace cosmological models has been introduced in Fathi et al. (Eur. Phys. J. C 76, 527 2016). In this paper we show that time dependence and quantum-classical correspondence both arise naturally in the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism of quantum mechanics, applied to quantum cosmology. We study the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi cosmology of spatially flat homogeneous and isotropic early universe whose matter content is a perfect fluid. The classical cosmology emerge around one Planck time where its linear size is around a few millimeter, without needing any classical inflationary phase afterwards to make it grow to its present size.

  7. A generalization of Hamilton's rule--love others how much?

    PubMed

    Alger, Ingela; Weibull, Jörgen W

    2012-04-21

    According to Hamilton's (1964a, b) rule, a costly action will be undertaken if its fitness cost to the actor falls short of the discounted benefit to the recipient, where the discount factor is Wright's index of relatedness between the two. We propose a generalization of this rule, and show that if evolution operates at the level of behavior rules, rather than directly at the level of actions, evolution will select behavior rules that induce a degree of cooperation that may differ from that predicted by Hamilton's rule as applied to actions. In social dilemmas there will be less (more) cooperation than under Hamilton's rule if the actions are strategic substitutes (complements). Our approach is based on natural selection, defined in terms of personal (direct) fitness, and applies to a wide range of pairwise interactions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantum Hamilton mechanics: Hamilton equations of quantum motion, origin of quantum operators, and proof of quantization axiom

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.-D. . E-mail: cdyang@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2006-12-15

    This paper gives a thorough investigation on formulating and solving quantum problems by extended analytical mechanics that extends canonical variables to complex domain. With this complex extension, we show that quantum mechanics becomes a part of analytical mechanics and hence can be treated integrally with classical mechanics. Complex canonical variables are governed by Hamilton equations of motion, which can be derived naturally from Schroedinger equation. Using complex canonical variables, a formal proof of the quantization axiom p {sup {yields}} p = -ih{nabla}, which is the kernel in constructing quantum-mechanical systems, becomes a one-line corollary of Hamilton mechanics. The derivation of quantum operators from Hamilton mechanics is coordinate independent and thus allows us to derive quantum operators directly under any coordinate system without transforming back to Cartesian coordinates. Besides deriving quantum operators, we also show that the various prominent quantum effects, such as quantization, tunneling, atomic shell structure, Aharonov-Bohm effect, and spin, all have the root in Hamilton mechanics and can be described entirely by Hamilton equations of motion.

  9. Characterization of MboI satellites in Cirrhina mrigala and Clarias batrachus (Pisces).

    PubMed

    Padhi, B K; Ghosh, S K; Mandal, R K

    1998-02-01

    We have cloned and characterized two highly reiterated, tandemly repeated, and A+T rich MboI DNA fragments, one in Cirrhina mrigala (Cyprinidae), with a monomer size of 266 bp, and one in Clarias batrachus (Clariidae), with a monomer size of 227 bp. The MboI fragment in C. mrigala is species-specific and absent in other carps, such as Catla catla and Labeo rohita. The MboI fragment in C. batrachus was also present in two other catfishes tested, namely Clarias gariepinus and Heteropneustes fossilis. In C, mrigala x C. catla and C. mrigala x L. rohita hybrids, the C. mrigala specific MboI fragment is inherited uniparentally. In the reciprocal hybrids of C. batrachus x H. fossilis, the satellite ladder contains the bands of both parental species. The MboI satellite of carp may be useful in genetic introgression analysis and that of catfish in distinguishing between gynogenetic progeny and true hybrids.

  10. Utilization of fermented silkworm pupae silage in feed for carps.

    PubMed

    Rangacharyulu, P V; Giri, S S; Paul, B N; Yashoda, K P; Rao, R Jagannatha; Mahendrakar, N S; Mohanty, S N; Mukhopadhyay, P K

    2003-01-01

    Fermented silkworm pupae (SWP) silage or untreated fresh SWP pastes were incorporated in carp feed formulations replacing fishmeal. The feed formulations were isonitrogenous (30.2-30.9% protein) and isocaloric (ME = 2905-2935 kcal/kg). Feeding under a polyculture system consisting of 30% each of catla (Catla catla), mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala) and rohu (Labeo rohita) with 10% silver carps (Hypophthalmychthys molitrix) was carried out in ponds to evaluate the nutritive quality of SWP silage. Survival rate, feed conversion ratio and specific growth rate, respectively, were 84.2%, 2.10 and 2.39 for fermented SWP silage, 65.8%, 2.98 and 2.26 for untreated SWP and 67.5%, 3.16 and 2.20 for fishmeal indicating clearly that the fermented SWP silage was nutritionally superior to untreated SWP or fishmeal. The dietary influence on the proximate composition of whole fish was marginal.

  11. Moving the Education Needle: A Conversation with Scott Hamilton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Scott Hamilton is the Forrest Gump of education reform, although with a lot more IQ points and fewer chocolates. He worked for Bill Bennett in the U.S. Department of Education and for Benno Schmidt at the Edison Project. He authorized charter schools in Massachusetts, co-founded the KIPP network, quadrupled the size of Teach For America (TFA), and…

  12. Imagined Community at Hamilton College and in the Residence Halls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Ann

    The "Hamilton College community" (New York) is a term which appears to describe those who are students or staff of the college, who are bound by the close housing (set up on a hill, to be further separated), who share a common philosophy (wanting to learn or to teach), and who are familiar with many members of the "community."…

  13. On Hamilton-Jacobi equation in infinite dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Sritharan, S.S.

    1994-12-31

    A relationship between the notion of viscosity solution in the sense of Crandall and Lions and the generalized solution in the sense of Clarke for the infinite dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation is established. This problem arises in optimal control of fluids.

  14. 78 FR 43838 - Airworthiness Directives; Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation Propellers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    .... The NPRM had applied to those propellers using certain Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation auxiliary pumps and motors (auxiliary feathering pumps). The proposed action would have required removal of certain serial numbers (S/Ns) of auxiliary feathering pumps from service. Since we issued the NPRM, we attended...

  15. Moving the Education Needle: A Conversation with Scott Hamilton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Scott Hamilton is the Forrest Gump of education reform, although with a lot more IQ points and fewer chocolates. He worked for Bill Bennett in the U.S. Department of Education and for Benno Schmidt at the Edison Project. He authorized charter schools in Massachusetts, co-founded the KIPP network, quadrupled the size of Teach For America (TFA), and…

  16. Numerical Solution of Hamilton-Jacobi Equations in High Dimension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-23

    high dimension FA9550-10-1-0029 Maurizio Falcone Dipartimento di Matematica SAPIENZA-Universita di Roma P. Aldo Moro, 2 00185 ROMA AH930...solution of Hamilton-Jacobi equations in high dimension AFOSR contract n. FA9550-10-1-0029 Maurizio Falcone Dipartimento di Matematica SAPIENZA

  17. INTERIOR DETAIL, EASTERN HEMICYCLE, SALOON. WILLIAM HAMILTON PLACED BRONZE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR DETAIL, EASTERN HEMICYCLE, SALOON. WILLIAM HAMILTON PLACED BRONZE AND MARBLE SCULPTURE IN SOME OF THE HEMICYCLE NICHES. ONE OF THE NICHES HOUSED A “CANNON STOVE” FOR HEATING THE ROOM IN THE COLDER MONTHS - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. Molecular cloning of growth hormone encoding cDNA of Indian major carps by a modified rapid amplification of cDNA ends strategy.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, T; Mathavan, S; Pandian, T J

    2002-06-01

    A modified rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) strategy has been developed for cloning highly conserved cDNA sequences. Using this modified method, the growth hormone (GH) encoding cDNA sequences of Labeo rohita, Cirrhina mrigala and Catla catla have been cloned, characterized and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. These sequences show 96-98% homology to each other and are about 85% homologous to that of common carp. Besides, an attempt has been made for the first time to describe a 3-D model of the fish GH protein.

  19. John C. Hamilton Greeted By Astronauts and MSFC Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Aiea, Hawaii high school student, John C. Hamilton, is greeted by (left to right): Astronauts Russell L. Schweickart, and Owen K. Garriott; Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Skylab Program Manager, Leland Belew; and MSFC Director of Administration and Technical Services, David Newby, during a tour of MSFC. Hamilton was among 25 winners of a contest in which some 3,500 high school students proposed experiments for the following year's Skylab mission. The nationwide scientific competition was sponsored by the National Science Teachers Association and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The winning students, along with their parents and sponsor teachers, visited MSFC where they met with scientists and engineers, participated in design reviews for their experiments, and toured MSFC facilities. Of the 25 students, 6 did not see their experiments conducted on Skylab because the experiments were not compatible with Skylab hardware and timelines. Of the 19 remaining, 11 experiments required the manufacture of additional equipment.

  20. Efficient solution for finding Hamilton cycles in undirected graphs.

    PubMed

    Alhalabi, Wadee; Kitanneh, Omar; Alharbi, Amira; Balfakih, Zain; Sarirete, Akila

    2016-01-01

    The Hamilton cycle problem is closely related to a series of famous problems and puzzles (traveling salesman problem, Icosian game) and, due to the fact that it is NP-complete, it was extensively studied with different algorithms to solve it. The most efficient algorithm is not known. In this paper, a necessary condition for an arbitrary un-directed graph to have Hamilton cycle is proposed. Based on this condition, a mathematical solution for this problem is developed and several proofs and an algorithmic approach are introduced. The algorithm is successfully implemented on many Hamiltonian and non-Hamiltonian graphs. This provides a new effective approach to solve a problem that is fundamental in graph theory and can influence the manner in which the existing applications are used and improved.

  1. Central Schemes for Multi-Dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present new, efficient central schemes for multi-dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi equations. These non-oscillatory, non-staggered schemes are first- and second-order accurate and are designed to scale well with an increasing dimension. Efficiency is obtained by carefully choosing the location of the evolution points and by using a one-dimensional projection step. First-and second-order accuracy is verified for a variety of multi-dimensional, convex and non-convex problems.

  2. Optical mechanical analogy and Hamiltonization of a nonholonomic system.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Alberto G; Bloch, Anthony M

    2013-07-01

    It is well known that there is an analogy between optics and mechanics that prompted much of the classical theory of mechanics and indeed extended it to the theory of quantum mechanics. We develop here an optical mechanical analogy for a prototypical nonholonomic mechanical system, a knife edge moving on a plane under the influence of a potential. We show that this approach is related to but different from the classical theory of Hamiltonization of nonholonomic systems.

  3. Existence of viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souganidis, Panagiotis E.

    Equations of Hamilton-Jacobi type arise in many areas of application, including the calculus of variations, control theory and differential games. Recently M. G. Crandall and P.-L. Lions ( Trans. Amer. Math. Soc.277 (1983), 1-42) introduced the class of "viscosity" solutions of these equations and proved uniqueness within this class. This paper discusses the existence of these solutions under assumptions closely related to the ones which guarantee the uniqueness.

  4. Hamilton-Dirac systems for charged particles in gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Fernando

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we use the Sternberg phase space (which may be considered as the classical phase space of particles in gauge fields) in order to explore the dynamics of such particles in the context of Hamilton-Dirac systems and their associated Hamilton-Pontryagin variational principles. For this, we develop an analogue of the Pontryagin bundle in the case of the Sternberg phase space. Moreover, we show the link of this new bundle to the so-called magnetized Tulczyjew triple, which is an analogue of the link between the Pontryagin bundle and the usual Tulczyjew triple. Taking advantage of the symplectic nature of the Sternberg space, we induce a Dirac structure on the Sternberg-Pontryagin bundle which leads to the Hamilton-Dirac structure that we are looking for. We also analyze the intrinsic and variational nature of the equations of motion of particles in gauge fields in regards of the defined new geometry. Lastly, we illustrate our theory through the case of a U(1) gauge group, leading to the paradigmatic example of an electrically charged particle in an electromagnetic field.

  5. Hamilton{close_quote}s principle for quasigeostrophic motion

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, D.D.; Zeitlin, V.

    1998-04-01

    We show that the equation of quasigeostrophic (QG) potential vorticity conservation in geophysical fluid dynamics follows from Hamilton{close_quote}s principle for stationary variations of an action for geodesic motion in the f-plane case or its prolongation in the {beta}-plane case. This implies a new momentum equation and an associated Kelvin circulation theorem for QG motion. We treat the barotropic and two-layer baroclinic cases, as well as the continuously stratified case. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Approximation schemes for viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souganidis, Panagiotis E.

    Equations of Hamilton-Jacobi type arise in many areas of applications, including the calculus of variations, control theory and differential games. Recently M. G. Crandall and P.-L. Lions established the correct notion of generalized solutions for these equations. This article discusses the convergence of general approximation schemes to this solution and gives, under certain hypotheses, explicit error estimates. These results are then applied to obtain various representations as limits of solutions of general explicit and implicit finite difference schemes, with error estimates.

  7. Hamilton and the square root of minus one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Quaternions, objects consisting of a scalar and a vector, sound like a mysterious concept from the past. In the nineteenth century, the theory of quaternions was praised as one of the most brilliant achievements in mathematical physics. The originator of this theory, Hamilton, surely one of the greatest scientists in that area, spent about 18 years in discussing all kinds of algebraic and geometric properties of quaternions. His research was communicated to the Philosophical Magazine in three series of papers comprising a total of 29 contributions. In this commentary, these three series of papers are revisited concentrating primarily on the algebraic properties of quaternions.

  8. Hamilton and Hardy for the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Hamilton and Hardy’s Industrial Toxicology is now 80 years old, and the new sixth edition links us with a pioneer era. This is an impressive book, but the usefulness of the hardback version as a reference book is unfortunately limited by its poor index. There is now an ebook version, and for the practitioner on the move this has the great advantages of searchability and portability. However, Wiley ebooks can apparently only be downloaded when first purchased, so their lifetime is limited to that of the device. The Kindle edition should avoid this shortcoming.

  9. The Hamilton-Jacobi method and Hamiltonian maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaev, S. S.

    2002-03-01

    A method for constructing time-step-based symplectic maps for a generic Hamiltonian system subjected to perturbation is developed. Using the Hamilton-Jacobi method and Jacobi's theorem in finite periodic time intervals, the general form of the symplectic maps is established. The generating function of the map is found by the perturbation method in the finite time intervals. The accuracy of the maps is studied for fully integrable and partially chaotic Hamiltonian systems and compared to that of the symplectic integration method.

  10. Hamilton-Jacobi method for curved domain walls and cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skenderis, Kostas; Townsend, Paul K.

    2006-12-01

    We use Hamiltonian methods to study curved domain walls and cosmologies. This leads naturally to first-order equations for all domain walls and cosmologies foliated by slices of maximal symmetry. For Minkowski and AdS-sliced domain walls (flat and closed FLRW cosmologies) we recover a recent result concerning their (pseudo)supersymmetry. We show how domain-wall stability is consistent with the instability of AdS vacua that violate the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. We also explore the relationship to Hamilton-Jacobi theory and compute the wave-function of a 3-dimensional closed universe evolving towards de Sitter spacetime.

  11. Multimodal electromechanical model of piezoelectric transformers by Hamilton's principle.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Clement; Pigache, Francois

    2009-11-01

    This work deals with a general energetic approach to establish an accurate electromechanical model of a piezoelectric transformer (PT). Hamilton's principle is used to obtain the equations of motion for free vibrations. The modal characteristics (mass, stiffness, primary and secondary electromechanical conversion factors) are also deduced. Then, to illustrate this general electromechanical method, the variational principle is applied to both homogeneous and nonhomogeneous Rosen-type PT models. A comparison of modal parameters, mechanical displacements, and electrical potentials are presented for both models. Finally, the validity of the electrodynamical model of nonhomogeneous Rosen-type PT is confirmed by a numerical comparison based on a finite elements method and an experimental identification.

  12. 77 FR 52058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... Museum of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Colgate University, 13 Oak Dr... Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Colgate University, 13 Oak Dr., Hamilton, NY 13346...

  13. 76 FR 48178 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Colgate University, 13 Oak Dr., Hamilton, NY 13346.... Jordan Kerber, Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Colgate...

  14. Preliminary survey report: control technology for manual transfer of chemical powders at City of Hamilton Municipal Electric Plant, Hamilton, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Godbey, F.W.

    1984-08-01

    Health-hazard control methods, work processes, and existing control technologies used in the manual transfer of chemical powders were surveyed at the City of Hamilton Municipal Electric Site, Hamilton, Ohio in May, 1984. The facility employed 48 workers involved in generating electricity. Soda ash, phosphates, and flake caustic soda were used in water-treatment operations. Water was used to produce steam which in turn was used to drive the electricity-generating rotors. The dry materials were manually removed from drums and sacks and dumped into 75 gallon water tanks. The mixture was manually stirred with a stick until the dry materials were in solution. The solution was then automatically pumped into one of three boiler drums. No ventilation was used in the water treatment area. Workers were encouraged to use good work practices, and were provided with safety glasses, respirators, and gloves. Employees received pre-employment physical examinations and training in first-aid procedures. The author does not recommend an in-depth study of control technologies at the facility since no unique state-of-the-art methods are used.

  15. Analysis of lactate and malate dehydrogenase enzyme profiles of selected major carps of wetland of Calcutta.

    PubMed

    Manna, Madhumita; Chakraborty, Priyanka

    2012-07-01

    The East Calcutta Wetland (ECW), a Ramsar site in India, acts as the only sink for both city sewages as well as effluents from the surrounding small-scale industries and is alarmingly polluted with heavy metals. The three best edible major carp species rohu (Labeo rohita,), catla (Catla catla,) and mrigala (Cirrhinus mrigala) were undertaken to monitor lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) by cellulose acetate electrophoresis (CAE) to assess the effects of pollutants, if any. Crude tissue extracts were prepared from brain, eye, heart, skeletal muscle and kidney tissue respectively from each type of fish. No differences were not found in MDH of catla from both sites for all tissues analyzed in this study. Rohu also showed similar mobility for all tissues except for heart tissue which was distinctly different in fishes from ECW site than that of its counterpart from non ECW site. On the other hand, MDH of two tissues of mrigala, eye and muscle respectively showed different migration patterns. LDH profiles for all tissues of three fish species from both the sites were consistently similar, only the expression levels of muscle LDH of mrigala and kidney LDH of rohu varied little.

  16. The first evidence of cholinesterases in skin mucus of carps and its applicability as biomarker of organophosphate exposure.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Ashwini Kumar; Srivastava, Nidhi; Rai, Amita Kumari; Kumari, Usha; Mittal, Ajay Kumar; Mittal, Swati

    2014-05-01

    The presence of cholinesterase (ChE) activity in skin mucus of three carps, Cirrhinus mrigala, Labeo rohita, and Catla catla and its applicability as biomarker of the organophosphorus insecticide exposure were investigated. Biochemical characterization, using specific substrates and inhibitors, indicated that measured esterase activity in skin mucus was mainly owing to ChEs. Significant difference in the proportion of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activities was observed in skin mucus of three carps. Enzyme kinetic analysis, using the substrate acetylthiocholine iodide revealed significantly high Vmax value in C. catla compared to that in L. rohita and C. mrigala. In contrast, Vmax value using the substrate butyrylthiocholine iodide was significantly high in C. mrigala than in L. rohita and C. catla. In vitro treatment of skin mucus of three carps, with the organophosphorus insecticide Nuvan®, showed strong inhibition of ChE activities. In vivo experiments conducted using C. mrigala and exposing the fish to the sublethal test concentrations (5 and 15 mg/L) of the insecticide also revealed significant inhibition of ChE activity in mucus. In C. mrigala, exposed to the sublethal test concentrations of the insecticide for 4 days and then kept for recovery for 16 days, mucus ChE activity recovered to the control level. Thus, ChE activity in skin mucus could be considered a good biomarker of the organophosphorus insecticide exposure to fish and a useful tool in monitoring environmental toxicity. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  17. Analysis of humoral immune response of animals exposed to bacterial antigens

    PubMed Central

    Pugazhenthi, M.; Valivittan, K.

    2014-01-01

    From the Aeromonas hydrophila strain, five different types of antigens such as heat killed antigen, whole cell antigen, heat killed antigen with antiserum, whole cell antigen with antiserum and nucleotide antigens were prepared and injected into the experimental fish (Catla catla) groups for the study of immunomodulation. Analysis of immunogenicity of antigens against the fish Catla catla was estimated. The A. hydrophila produced β hemolytic pattern on the blood agar plate. B lymphocyte counts using rosette forming assay revealed a significant decrement in pathogens exposed fishes as compared to controls. Fishes exposed to pathogenic strains (1/10th sublethal concentration) for 3 weeks showed a reduction in PFC. The effect or pathogenic antigens in direct spleenic plaque forming cells (1 g M producing cells) showed a reduction in the secondary plaque forming cell in the first 3 weeks and a time- and dose-dependent decrease in primary and secondary PFC response. A remarkable observation enhancement in B cell production due to immune complex of antigens was noted in the present study. The enhancement of this type of immune responses confirms the potential of immune complexes to be used as vaccines. PMID:26155142

  18. Inhibitory effect of Pistia tannin on digestive enzymes of Indian major carps: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sudipta; Ghosh, Koushik

    2010-12-01

    Aquatic weeds are one of the major unconventional feed ingredients tested for aquafeed formulation. Tannin content in the water lettuce, Pistia, has been quantified (26.67 mg g(-1); dry weight) and graded levels of which (12.5-200 μg) have been incorporated in the reaction mixtures to evaluate any change in the in vitro activity of the principal digestive enzymes from the three Indian major carps (IMC), namely rohu (Labeo rohita), catla (Catla catla) and mrigala (Cirrhinus mrigala). Result of the experiment revealed that the Pistia tannin (PT) significantly inhibit/lower the activities of the digestive enzymes from three IMCs in a dose-dependent manner, even at very low concentration. Significant variation in the reduction of the enzyme activities was noticed between the three fish species, as well as between the three enzymes studied. Among the three species studied, digestive enzymes from L. rohita were found to be the most sensitive to the PT, whereas enzymes from C. catla were found to be comparatively least affected. On the other hand, protease and lipase activities were comparatively more affected than the amylase activity. The results of the study suggest that more stress should be given on the elimination of tannin while incorporating feed ingredients of plant origin in fish diets.

  19. Post-harvest loss of farm raised Indian and Chinese major carps in the distribution channel from Mymensingh to Rangpur of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M Motaleb; Rahman, Mahabubur; Hassan, M Nazmul; Nowsad, A A K M

    2013-06-15

    Post-harvest loss of catla (Catla catla), rohu (Labeo rohita), mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala), silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) and sarpunti (Puntius sarana) in a single distribution chain from harvest in Mymensingh to retail sale Rangpur town were determined, in order to obtain information on quality deterioration and existing handling and icing conditions so that suggestions for improving such practices can be made. Quality defect points of the fish at different steps of distribution channels were determined using a sensory based quality assessment tool. Percent quality loss of fish at each step of distribution was calculated from the number of cases that crossed sensory quality cut-off points. Neither of the fish lost their quality when they were in the farm gate, during transportation and in wholesale markets in Rangpur but most of the fishes lost their quality at the retail fish shops. The quality loss was 8, 12, 8, 6, 10 and 14% in case of C. catla, C. mrigala, L. rohita, H. molitrix, C. idella and P. sarana respectively in the retail markets. Fishes were not properly handled, bamboo baskets wrapped with polythene sheet were used as carrying container and inadequate ice was used during transportation. Retailers were found to be more proactive in the use of ice. However, most of the fishes were deteriorated during retail sale. The losses of farmed fishes could be minimized by adopting good handling practices like using insulated container and adequate icing.

  20. Hamilton-Jacobi formalism to warm inflationary scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayar, K.; Mohammadi, A.; Akhtari, L.; Saaidi, Kh.

    2017-01-01

    The Hamilton-Jacobi formalism as a powerful method is being utilized to reconsider the warm inflationary scenario, where the scalar field as the main component driving inflation interacts with other fields. Separating the context into strong and weak dissipative regimes, the goal is followed for two popular functions of Γ . Applying slow-rolling approximation, the required perturbation parameters are extracted and, by comparing to the latest Planck data, the free parameters are restricted. The possibility of producing an acceptable inflation is studied where the result shows that for all cases the model could successfully suggest the amplitude of scalar perturbation, scalar spectral index, its running, and the tensor-to-scalar ratio.

  1. Quantum vortices within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E

    2008-06-21

    Quantum vortices are investigated in the framework of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. A quantum vortex forms around a node in the wave function in the complex space, and the quantized circulation integral originates from the discontinuity in the real part of the complex action. Although the quantum momentum field displays hyperbolic flow around a node, the corresponding Polya vector field displays circular flow. It is shown that the Polya vector field of the quantum momentum function is parallel to contours of the probability density. A nonstationary state constructed from eigenstates of the harmonic oscillator is used to illustrate the formation of a transient excited state quantum vortex, and the coupled harmonic oscillator is used to illustrate quantization of the circulation integral in the multidimensional complex space. This study not only analyzes the formation of quantum vortices but also demonstrates the local structures for the quantum momentum field and for the Polya vector field near a node of the wave function.

  2. Surface modification of ZnO nanorods with Hamilton receptors.

    PubMed

    Zeininger, Lukas; Klaumünzer, Martin; Peukert, Wolfgang; Hirsch, Andreas

    2015-04-13

    A new prototype of a Hamilton receptor suitable for the functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles was synthesized and characterized. The hydrogen bonding receptor was coupled to a catechol moiety, which served as anchor group for the functionalization of metal oxides, in particular zinc oxide. Synthesized zinc oxide nanorods [ZnO] were used for surface functionalization. The wet-chemical functionalization procedure towards monolayer-grafted particles [ZnO-HR] is described and a detailed characterization study is presented. In addition, the detection of specific cyanurate molecules is demonstrated. The hybrid structures [ZnO-HR-CA] were stable towards agglomeration and exhibited enhanced dispersability in apolar solvents. This observation, in combination with several spectroscopic experiments gave evidence of the highly directional supramolecular recognition at the surface of nanoparticles.

  3. Hamilton-Jacobi modelling of relative motion for formation flying.

    PubMed

    Kolemen, Egemen; Kasdin, N Jeremy; Gurfil, Pini

    2005-12-01

    A precise analytic model for the relative motion of a group of satellites in slightly elliptic orbits is introduced. With this aim, we describe the relative motion of an object relative to a circular or slightly elliptic reference orbit in the rotating Hill frame via a low-order Hamiltonian, and solve the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. This results in a first-order solution to the relative motion identical to the Clohessy-Wiltshire approach; here, however, rather than using initial conditions as our constants of the motion, we utilize the canonical momenta and coordinates. This allows us to treat perturbations in an identical manner, as in the classical Delaunay formulation of the two-body problem. A precise analytical model for the base orbit is chosen with the included effect of zonal harmonics (J(2), J(3), J(4)). A Hamiltonian describing the real relative motion is formed and by differing this from the nominal Hamiltonian, the perturbing Hamiltonian is obtained. Using the Hamilton equations, the variational equations for the new constants are found. In a manner analogous to the center manifold reduction procedure, the non-periodic part of the motion is canceled through a magnitude analysis leading to simple boundedness conditions that cancel the drift terms due to the higher order perturbations. Using this condition, the variational equations are integrated to give periodic solutions that closely approximate the results from numerical integration (1 mm/per orbit for higher order and eccentricity perturbations and 30 cm/per orbit for zonal perturbations). This procedure provides a compact and insightful analytic description of the resulting relative motion.

  4. Geometric Hamilton-Jacobi theory for higher-order autonomous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Leonardo; de León, Manuel; Prieto-Martínez, Pedro Daniel; Román-Roy, Narciso

    2014-06-01

    The geometric framework for the Hamilton-Jacobi theory is used to study this theory in the background of higher-order mechanical systems, in both the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms. Thus, we state the corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi equations in these formalisms and apply our results to analyze some particular physical examples.

  5. Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) Report. Hamilton Army Airfield, Novato, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Hamilton Army Airfield, Ecology and Environment, Inc. 16. Remedial Action Plan, Hamilton Army Airfield, International Technology September 1990 USEPA...I Jul 40 37 *Ŗ LEGEND 19424 942 .. 943 ’V 9-43 EXCEPT FOlt THE SECIAL SYMBOLS SHOWN BELOW MAP - 94 SYMOLS ARE STANDARD! I4 ARMYMAP SRVICE _ , #e ,1

  6. Hamilton-Jacobi treatment of QED and Yang-Mills theory as constrained systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rabei, E.M.; Tawfiq, S.

    1997-06-01

    The QED and Yang-Mills theories are treated as constrained systems using the Hamilton-Jacobi approach. The set of Hamilton-Jacobi partial differential equations of these theories is obtained. It is shown that their simultaneous solutions lead to the original action without introducing Lagrange multipliers.

  7. 77 FR 52135 - Hamilton Bank, Baltimore, Maryland; Approval of Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Hamilton Bank, Baltimore, Maryland; Approval of Conversion...) approved the application of Hamilton Bank, Baltimore, Maryland to convert to the stock form of organization...

  8. Alexander Hamilton: Soldier-Statesmen of the Constitution. A Bicentennial Series No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Center of Military History, Washington, DC.

    Alexander Hamilton was among the most intellectually gifted of the Founding Fathers and a brilliant political theorist, but he lacked practical political experience, and his major political contributions occurred only when his specific policies were adopted and carried forward by others with broader vision. This booklet on Hamilton is one in a…

  9. Unified formalism for the generalized kth-order Hamilton-Jacobi problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Leonardo; de Léon, Manuel; Prieto-Martínez, Pedro Daniel; Román-Roy, Narciso

    2014-08-01

    The geometric formulation of the Hamilton-Jacobi theory enables us to generalize it to systems of higher-order ordinary differential equations. In this work we introduce the unified Lagrangian-Hamiltonian formalism for the geometric Hamilton-Jacobi theory on higher-order autonomous dynamical systems described by regular Lagrangian functions.

  10. The World She Dreamed, Generations She Shared, Visions She Wrote: A Tribute to Virginia Hamilton 1936-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muse, Daphne

    2002-01-01

    Presents a tribute to Virginia Hamilton. Notes that at a time when Black people, especially girls, were seriously beginning to struggle with self-acceptance and self-worth, Hamilton's "bold and imaginative writing was nothing short of revolutionary." (SG)

  11. The identity of Hamilton's Ticto Barb, Pethia ticto (Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Katwate, Unmesh; Raghavan, Rajeev; Dahanukar, Neelesh

    2015-06-04

    While describing the fishes of Ganges, Hamilton described Cyprinus ticto (now allocated to Pethia) from south-eastern parts of Bengal. The unavailability of type material and insufficient diagnostic characters in the original description resulted in ambiguities in the identity of this species. In this paper, we clarify the identity of P. ticto through an integrative-taxonomic approach. Pethia ticto can be distinguished from all other known species of the genus by a combination of characters that includes an abbreviated lateral line with 6-12 pored scales; 23-26 scales in lateral-scale row; 9 predorsal scales; ½4/1/3½-4 scales in transverse series; and a pigmentation pattern that includes a small black humeral spot covering the third and fourth lateral-line scales, a prominent spot on the caudal peduncle on the 16th-19th scales of the lateral-line scale row, and two rows of black spots scattered on the dorsal fin.

  12. Quantitative Compactness Estimates for Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, Fabio; Cannarsa, Piermarco; Nguyen, Khai T.

    2016-02-01

    We study quantitative compactness estimates in {W^{1,1}_{loc}} for the map {S_t}, {t > 0} that is associated with the given initial data {u_0in Lip (R^N)} for the corresponding solution {S_t u_0} of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation u_t+Hbig(nabla_{x} ubig)=0, qquad t≥ 0,quad xinR^N, with a uniformly convex Hamiltonian {H=H(p)}. We provide upper and lower estimates of order {1/\\varepsilon^N} on the Kolmogorov {\\varepsilon}-entropy in {W^{1,1}} of the image through the map S t of sets of bounded, compactly supported initial data. Estimates of this type are inspired by a question posed by Lax (Course on Hyperbolic Systems of Conservation Laws. XXVII Scuola Estiva di Fisica Matematica, Ravello, 2002) within the context of conservation laws, and could provide a measure of the order of "resolution" of a numerical method implemented for this equation.

  13. An electromechanical model of neuronal dynamics using Hamilton's principle

    PubMed Central

    Drapaca, Corina S.

    2015-01-01

    Damage of the brain may be caused by mechanical loads such as penetration, blunt force, shock loading from blast, and by chemical imbalances due to neurological diseases and aging that trigger not only neuronal degeneration but also changes in the mechanical properties of brain tissue. An understanding of the interconnected nature of the electro-chemo-mechanical processes that result in brain damage and ultimately loss of functionality is currently lacking. While modern mathematical models that focus on how to link brain mechanics to its biochemistry are essential in enhancing our understanding of brain science, the lack of experimental data required by these models as well as the complexity of the corresponding computations render these models hard to use in clinical applications. In this paper we propose a unified variational framework for the modeling of neuronal electromechanics. We introduce a constrained Lagrangian formulation that takes into account Newton's law of motion of a linear viscoelastic Kelvin–Voigt solid-state neuron as well as the classic Hodgkin–Huxley equations of the electronic neuron. The system of differential equations describing neuronal electromechanics is obtained by applying Hamilton's principle. Numerical simulations of possible damage dynamics in neurons will be presented. PMID:26236195

  14. An electromechanical model of neuronal dynamics using Hamilton's principle.

    PubMed

    Drapaca, Corina S

    2015-01-01

    Damage of the brain may be caused by mechanical loads such as penetration, blunt force, shock loading from blast, and by chemical imbalances due to neurological diseases and aging that trigger not only neuronal degeneration but also changes in the mechanical properties of brain tissue. An understanding of the interconnected nature of the electro-chemo-mechanical processes that result in brain damage and ultimately loss of functionality is currently lacking. While modern mathematical models that focus on how to link brain mechanics to its biochemistry are essential in enhancing our understanding of brain science, the lack of experimental data required by these models as well as the complexity of the corresponding computations render these models hard to use in clinical applications. In this paper we propose a unified variational framework for the modeling of neuronal electromechanics. We introduce a constrained Lagrangian formulation that takes into account Newton's law of motion of a linear viscoelastic Kelvin-Voigt solid-state neuron as well as the classic Hodgkin-Huxley equations of the electronic neuron. The system of differential equations describing neuronal electromechanics is obtained by applying Hamilton's principle. Numerical simulations of possible damage dynamics in neurons will be presented.

  15. Quantum streamlines within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E

    2008-09-28

    Quantum streamlines are investigated in the framework of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. The local structures of the quantum momentum function (QMF) and the Polya vector field near a stagnation point or a pole are analyzed. Streamlines near a stagnation point of the QMF may spiral into or away from it, or they may become circles centered on this point or straight lines. Additionally, streamlines near a pole display east-west and north-south opening hyperbolic structure. On the other hand, streamlines near a stagnation point of the Polya vector field for the QMF display general hyperbolic structure, and streamlines near a pole become circles enclosing the pole. Furthermore, the local structures of the QMF and the Polya vector field around a stagnation point are related to the first derivative of the QMF; however, the magnitude of the asymptotic structures for these two fields near a pole depends only on the order of the node in the wave function. Two nonstationary states constructed from the eigenstates of the harmonic oscillator are used to illustrate the local structures of these two fields and the dynamics of the streamlines near a stagnation point or a pole. This study presents the abundant dynamics of the streamlines in the complex space for one-dimensional time-dependent problems.

  16. Exactly solvable systems and the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasinariu, Constantin; Dykla, John J.; Gangopadhyaya, Asim; Mallow, Jeffry V.

    2005-05-01

    We connect quantum Hamilton Jacobi theory with supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSYQM). We show that the shape invariance, which is an integrability condition of SUSYQM, translates into fractional linear relations among the quantum momentum functions.

  17. Hamilton-Jacobi method for classical mechanics in Grassmann algebra (in English)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabunshchyk, K. V.

    We present the Hamilton--Jacobi method for the classical mechanics with the constrains in Grassmann algebra. Within the framework of this method the solution for the classical system characterized by the SUSY Lagrangian is obtained.

  18. Some suggested approaches to solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation associated with constrained rigid body motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, P. M.; Harmon, G. R.; Cochran, J. E.; Shaw, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    Some methods of approaching a solution to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation are outlined and examples are given to illustrate particular methods. These methods may be used for cases where the Hamilton-Jacobi equation is not separable and have been particularly useful in solving the rigid body motion of an earth satellite subjected to gravity torques. These general applications may also have usefulness in studying the motion of satellites with aerodynamic torque and in studying space vehicle motion where thrusting is involved.

  19. Yerkes, Hamilton and the experimental study of the ape mind: from evolutionary psychiatry to eugenic politics.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marion

    2006-06-01

    Robert Yerkes is a pivotal figure in American psychology and primatology in the first half of the twentieth century. As is well known, Yerkes first studied ape intelligence in 1915, on a visit to the private California laboratory of the psychiatrist Gilbert Hamilton, a former student. Less widely appreciated is how far the work done at the Hamilton lab, in its aims and ambitions as well as its techniques, served as a template for much of Yerkes's research thereafter. This paper uses the Hamilton-Yerkes relationship to re-examine Yerkes's career and, more generally, that of American psychology in the early twentieth century. Three points especially are emphasized: first, the role of Freudian psychoanalysis as a spur to Hamilton's experimental studies of ape intelligence; second, the importance of Hamilton's laboratory, with its semi-wild population of monkeys and ape, as a model for Yerkes's efforts to create a laboratory of his own; and third, the influence on Yerkes of Hamilton's optimism about experimental psychological studies of nonhuman primates as a source of lessons beneficial to a troubled human world.

  20. Hamilton-Jacobi theorems for regular reducible Hamiltonian systems on a cotangent bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, some of formulations of Hamilton-Jacobi equations for Hamiltonian system and regular reduced Hamiltonian systems are given. At first, an important lemma is proved, and it is a modification for the corresponding result of Abraham and Marsden (1978), such that we can prove two types of geometric Hamilton-Jacobi theorem for a Hamiltonian system on the cotangent bundle of a configuration manifold, by using the symplectic form and dynamical vector field. Then these results are generalized to the regular reducible Hamiltonian system with symmetry and momentum map, by using the reduced symplectic form and the reduced dynamical vector field. The Hamilton-Jacobi theorems are proved and two types of Hamilton-Jacobi equations, for the regular point reduced Hamiltonian system and the regular orbit reduced Hamiltonian system, are obtained. As an application of the theoretical results, the regular point reducible Hamiltonian system on a Lie group is considered, and two types of Lie-Poisson Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the regular point reduced system are given. In particular, the Type I and Type II of Lie-Poisson Hamilton-Jacobi equations for the regular point reduced rigid body and heavy top systems are shown, respectively.

  1. A quantitative test of Hamilton's rule for the evolution of altruism.

    PubMed

    Waibel, Markus; Floreano, Dario; Keller, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    The evolution of altruism is a fundamental and enduring puzzle in biology. In a seminal paper Hamilton showed that altruism can be selected for when rb - c > 0, where c is the fitness cost to the altruist, b is the fitness benefit to the beneficiary, and r is their genetic relatedness. While many studies have provided qualitative support for Hamilton's rule, quantitative tests have not yet been possible due to the difficulty of quantifying the costs and benefits of helping acts. Here we use a simulated system of foraging robots to experimentally manipulate the costs and benefits of helping and determine the conditions under which altruism evolves. By conducting experimental evolution over hundreds of generations of selection in populations with different c/b ratios, we show that Hamilton's rule always accurately predicts the minimum relatedness necessary for altruism to evolve. This high accuracy is remarkable given the presence of pleiotropic and epistatic effects as well as mutations with strong effects on behavior and fitness (effects not directly taken into account in Hamilton's original 1964 rule). In addition to providing the first quantitative test of Hamilton's rule in a system with a complex mapping between genotype and phenotype, these experiments demonstrate the wide applicability of kin selection theory.

  2. On the Hamilton-Jacobi method in classical and quantum nonconservative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, A. de Souza; Correa, R. A. C.; Moraes, P. H. R. S.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we show how to complete some Hamilton-Jacobi solutions of linear, nonconservative classical oscillatory systems which appeared in the literature, and we extend these complete solutions to the quantum mechanical case. In addition, we obtain the solution of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for an electric charge in an oscillating pulsing magnetic field. We also argue that for the case where a charged particle is under the action of an oscillating magnetic field, one can apply nuclear magnetic resonance techniques in order to find experimental results regarding this problem. We obtain all results analytically, showing that the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism is a powerful tool to describe quantum mechanics.

  3. Computational method for the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation: one-dimensional scattering problems.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E

    2006-12-01

    One-dimensional scattering problems are investigated in the framework of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. First, the pole structure of the quantum momentum function for scattering wave functions is analyzed. The significant differences of the pole structure of this function between scattering wave functions and bound state wave functions are pointed out. An accurate computational method for the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for general one-dimensional scattering problems is presented to obtain the scattering wave function and the reflection and transmission coefficients. The computational approach is demonstrated by analysis of scattering from a one-dimensional potential barrier. We not only present an alternative approach to the numerical solution of the wave function and the reflection and transmission coefficients but also provide a computational aspect within the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. The method proposed here should be useful for general one-dimensional scattering problems.

  4. Hamilton and Hardy: Mentoring and Friendship in the Service of Occupational Health.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Marianne

    This article explores the mentoring relationship between Alice Hamilton and Harriet Hardy, two female physician-researchers who had a tremendous impact on the development of the field of occupational health in the United States during the 20th century. The article relies on letters the women wrote to each other. Hamilton, the elder, supported and furthered Hardy's career by asking her to coauthor the second edition of a seminal occupational health text. After beginning this intellectual collaboration, Hamilton remained a mentor to Hardy, and a decades-long friendship ensued. The article explores their relationship within the historical, political, and social context in which the women worked and made remarkable contributions to public health.

  5. A class of Hamilton-Jacobi equations with constraint: Uniqueness and constructive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirrahimi, Sepideh; Roquejoffre, Jean-Michel

    2016-03-01

    We discuss a class of time-dependent Hamilton-Jacobi equations, where an unknown function of time is intended to keep the maximum of the solution to the constant value 0. Our main result is that the full problem has a unique viscosity solution, which is in fact classical. The motivation is a selection-mutation model which, in the limit of small diffusion, exhibits concentration on the zero level set of the solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Uniqueness is obtained by noticing that, as a consequence of the dynamic programming principle, the solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation is classical. It is then possible to write an ODE for the maximum of the solution, and treat the full problem as a nonstandard Cauchy problem.

  6. Hawking radiation of Kerr-de Sitter black holes using Hamilton-Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibungochouba Singh, T.; Ablu Meitei, I.; Yugindro Singh, K.

    2013-05-01

    Hawking radiation of Kerr-de Sitter black hole is investigated using Hamilton-Jacobi method. When the well-behaved Painleve coordinate system and Eddington coordinate are used, we get the correct result of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy before and after radiation but a direct computation will lead to a wrong result via Hamilton-Jacobi method. Our results show that the tunneling probability is related to the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy and the derived emission spectrum deviates from the pure thermal but it is consistent with underlying unitary theory.

  7. Hamilton-Jacobi equation and Poissonian gluing for an inhomogeneous autocatalytic reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaveau, Bernard; Latrémolière, Daniel; Moreau, Michel

    2000-08-01

    The solution to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation which approximates the master equation of a nonlinear chemical system is, in general, impossible to obtain explicitly. In this work, we introduce a natural method for approximating the solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation, called "Poissonian gluing," which has a general range of application. We show on a specific two-dimensional example (autocatalytic reaction in two cells coupled by diffusion) that this new approximation leads to explicit analytic results which are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  8. Obituary: George Hamilton Bowen Jr. (1925-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, Lee Anne; Struck, Curtis

    2011-12-01

    Our colleague and collaborator George Hamilton Bowen, Jr., passed away November 1, 2009 in Ames, Iowa. George was born June 20, 1925 in Tulsa, Oklahoma to George and Dorothy (Huntington) Bowen. He married Marjorie Brown June 19, 1948 in Redondo Beach, California; they had five children, with eight grandchildren and five great-grandchildren at the time of his death. George H. Bowen's third or perhaps his fourth career was in astronomy. He was drafted into the navy in 1944, at the end of his first year as a student at Caltech, and ended his war-time service as an electronic technician on the aircraft carrier Shangri-La. He later said "In just nine months, starting from scratch (Ohm's law!), we learned an amazing amount - not by memorization, of course, but by study and real understanding of the basic function of the most advanced AC circuits then being used for instrumentation, measurements, communications, control systems, and much more." He gained a confidence that he could quickly and accurately diagnose and solve technical problems that stood him well in future work. One accomplishment he took particular pride in was figuring out how the radar control used cams and gears to solve the trigonometry for accurate pointing. He also described how the captain was alarmed when weather conditions changed so that refraction no longer showed them distant, small boats around the curvature of Earth. After the war, George Bowen returned to undergraduate and eventually graduate study at Caltech, where he was recruited to the biophysics research group headed by future Nobel Laureate Max Delbrück. George often described his joy in working with these first-rate scientists and finding himself accepted as a part of the effort. He finished his BS with honors in 1949 and his PhD in 1953 with a thesis on "Kinetic Studies on the Mechanism of Photoreactivation of Bacteriophase T2 Inactivated by Ultraviolet Light" involving work with E Coli. This work was supported by grants from the U

  9. A new pathogen, Myxobolus holzerae (Myxosporea: Myxozoa) causing severe gill disease in an Indian major carp Labeo rohita in a cold water wetland, Punjab (India).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya; Kaur, Harpreet

    2017-09-01

    The Indian major carp, Labeo rohita Hamilton, 1822 is a tropical freshwater cyprinid fish native to inland waters in Asia. Herein, we describe a novel myxozoan forming plasmodia in the gill lamellae of L. rohita from Ranjit Sagar Wetland in Punjab, India. Myxospores were consistent with the genus Myxobolus, round to elliptical in valvular view, lemon shaped in side view with a characteristic protrusion at the anterior end and a round posterior end; length 7.65 ± 0.07 μm, width 4.62 ± 0.09 μm. There were two polar capsules of equal length, pear shaped, length of polar capsule 2.54 ± 0.05 μm, width 1.60 ± 0.02 μm, with 5-6 turns of the polar filament. The 890 bp 18S rDNA sequence was up to 97% similar to M. catlae from other cyprinid fishes in India. In having, unique myxospore morphology and 18S rDNA sequence, we propose Myxobolus holzerae as new to science. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Derivation of the Schrodinger Equation from the Hamilton-Jacobi Equation in Feynman's Path Integral Formulation of Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how the time-dependent Schrodinger equation may be simply derived from the dynamical postulate of Feynman's path integral formulation of quantum mechanics and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation of classical mechanics. Schrodinger's own published derivations of quantum wave equations, the first of which was also based on the Hamilton-Jacobi…

  11. A Characterization of the Existence of Solutions for Hamilton-Jacobi Equations in Ergodic Control Problems with Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arisawa, M.; Ishii, H.; Lions, P.-L.

    2000-07-01

    We give a characterization of the existence of bounded solutions for Hamilton-Jacobi equations in ergodic control problems with state-constraint. This result is applied to the reexamination of the counterexample concerning the existence of solutions for ergodic control problems in infinite-dimensional Hilbert spaces and also establishing results on effective Hamiltonians in periodic homogenization of Hamilton-Jacobi equations.

  12. Derivation of the Schrodinger Equation from the Hamilton-Jacobi Equation in Feynman's Path Integral Formulation of Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how the time-dependent Schrodinger equation may be simply derived from the dynamical postulate of Feynman's path integral formulation of quantum mechanics and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation of classical mechanics. Schrodinger's own published derivations of quantum wave equations, the first of which was also based on the Hamilton-Jacobi…

  13. VIEW SOUTHEAST ACROSS HAMILTON AVENUE LEFTBUILDING 114ELMER STREET ROPE SHOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTHEAST ACROSS HAMILTON AVENUE LEFT-BUILDING 114-ELMER STREET ROPE SHOP NORTH EXTENSION (1929) RIGHT-BUILDING 110-CARPENTER SHOP (1908) - John A. Roebling's Sons Company & American Steel & Wire Company, South Broad, Clark, Elmer, Mott & Hudson Streets, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  14. VIEW SOUTHACROSS HAMILTON AVENUE BY CLARK STREET CENTER REARBUILDING 101CLARK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTH-ACROSS HAMILTON AVENUE BY CLARK STREET CENTER REAR-BUILDING 101-CLARK STREET ROPE SHOP (1917) CLARK STREET WATER TOWER (1908 RIGHT-BUILDING 114 ELMER STREET ROPE SHOP NORTH EXTENSION (1929) - John A. Roebling's Sons Company & American Steel & Wire Company, South Broad, Clark, Elmer, Mott & Hudson Streets, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  15. Enhanced Preliminary Assessment. Task Order 2. Hamilton Army Airfield, Novato, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    that Novato and San Rafael will likely continue to be the population centers of the county. 2.4.2 CIUMATE Hamilton Army Airfield is located...Sacramento Reserve Center (2) Modesto Reserve Center (1) San Pablo Reserve Center (2) Concord Reserve Center (4) Santa Rosa Reserve Center (4) A-7 -4 - IEI

  16. Measuring Depression at the End of Life: Is the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale a Valid Instrument?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olden, Megan; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William

    2009-01-01

    Depression at the end of life is a common mental health issue with serious implications for quality of life and decision making. This study investigated the reliability and validity of one of the most frequently used measures of depression, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) in 422 patients with terminal cancer admitted to a palliative…

  17. Metaphor, Ambiguity, and Motive in Evolutionary Biology: W. D. Hamilton and the "Gene's Point of View"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journet, Debra

    2005-01-01

    This article analyzes the power of ambiguous metaphors to present scientific novelty. Its focus is a series of papers by the prominent population biologist W. D. Hamilton in which he redefined the meaning of biological altruism. In particular, the article draws on Kenneth Burke's dramatistic pentad to examine why suggestions of motive are so…

  18. Light Rail Transit in Hamilton: Health, Environmental and Economic Impact Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topalovic, P.; Carter, J.; Topalovic, M.; Krantzberg, G.

    2012-01-01

    Hamilton's historical roots as an electric, industrial and transportation-oriented city provide it with a high potential for rapid transit, especially when combined with its growing population, developing economy, redeveloping downtown core and its plans for sustainable growth. This paper explores the health, environmental, social and economic…

  19. Measuring Depression at the End of Life: Is the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale a Valid Instrument?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olden, Megan; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William

    2009-01-01

    Depression at the end of life is a common mental health issue with serious implications for quality of life and decision making. This study investigated the reliability and validity of one of the most frequently used measures of depression, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) in 422 patients with terminal cancer admitted to a palliative…

  20. Durand Neighbourhood Heritage Inventory: Toward a Digital Citywide Survey Approach to Heritage Planning in Hamilton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, V.; Garvey, A.; Sydor, M.

    2017-08-01

    In the face of changing economies and patterns of development, the definition of heritage is diversifying, and the role of inventories in local heritage planning is coming to the fore. The Durand neighbourhood is a layered and complex area located in inner-city Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and the second subject area in a set of pilot inventory studies to develop a new city-wide inventory strategy for the City of Hamilton,. This paper presents an innovative digital workflow developed to undertake the Durand Built Heritage Inventory project. An online database was developed to be at the centre of all processes, including digital documentation, record management, analysis and variable outputs. Digital tools were employed for survey work in the field and analytical work in the office, resulting in a GIS-based dataset that can be integrated into Hamilton's larger municipal planning system. Together with digital mapping and digitized historical resources, the Durand database has been leveraged to produce both digital and static outputs to shape recommendations for the protection of Hamilton's heritage resources.

  1. Air Quality in Hamilton: Who Is Concerned? Perceptions from Three Neighbourhoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simone, Dylan; Eyles, John; Newbold, K. Bruce; Kitchen, Peter; Williams, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the factors influencing perceptions of air quality in the industrial city of Hamilton, Canada. The research employs data collected via a telephone survey of 1,002 adult residents in three neighbourhoods. Perceptions in the neighbourhoods were examined by individual socio-demographic factors (age, gender, marital and…

  2. The Code Red Project: Engaging Communities in Health System Change in Hamilton, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Patrick F.; Buist, Steve; Johnston, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The communication of determinants of health and health outcomes normally executed through academic channels often fail to reach lay audiences. In April of 2010, the results of collaboration between academe and mass media were published in the Hamilton Spectator, one of Canada's 10 largest English-language daily newspapers as a 7-day series. The…

  3. Perceptions of Quality Life in Hamilton's Neighbourhood Hubs: A Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eby, Jeanette; Kitchen, Peter; Williams, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines perceptions of quality of life in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada from the perspective of residents and key community stakeholders. A series of eight focus groups were conducted. Six sessions were held with residents of neighbourhood "hubs", areas characterized by high levels of poverty. The following themes were…

  4. Application of Hamilton's Principle to the Study of the Anharmonic Oscillator in Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Gilmartin, Harvey

    1979-01-01

    Presented is a form of Hamilton's principle for classical mechanics appropriate to the study of arbitrary self-sustained vibrations in one dimension. It is applied as an approximate computational tool to the study of several examples of anharmonic oscillation. (Author/GA)

  5. 78 FR 22872 - Hamilton Street Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... (msl); (3) a new 70-foot-long by 40-foot-wide by 35-foot-high powerhouse with three new identical... an annual generation of 18.3 gigawatt-hours. Applicant Contact: Mark Boumansour, Hamilton Street... be paper-filed. To paper-file, mail an original and five copies to: Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary...

  6. Perceptions of Quality Life in Hamilton's Neighbourhood Hubs: A Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eby, Jeanette; Kitchen, Peter; Williams, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines perceptions of quality of life in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada from the perspective of residents and key community stakeholders. A series of eight focus groups were conducted. Six sessions were held with residents of neighbourhood "hubs", areas characterized by high levels of poverty. The following themes were…

  7. Mobile Air Monitoring: Measuring Change in Air Quality in the City of Hamilton, 2005-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Matthew D.; DeLuca, Patrick F.; Corr, Denis; Kanaroglou, Pavlos S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the change in air pollutant concentrations between 2005 and 2010 occurring in the City of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. After analysis of stationary air pollutant concentration data, we analyze mobile air pollutant concentration data. Air pollutants included in the analysis are CO, PM[subscript 2.5], SO[subscript 2], NO,…

  8. A Survey of Environmental Education in Hamilton County Schools (K-12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garver, Janice B.

    Environmental education (EE) courses and programs offered in grades K-12 in Hamilton County (Ohio) public, private, and parochial schools were surveyed by means of a questionnaire mailed to 67 district level administrators, principals, and teachers. Questionnaires were returned from 5 private, 4 parochial, and 27 public schools, representing a 57…

  9. Light Rail Transit in Hamilton: Health, Environmental and Economic Impact Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topalovic, P.; Carter, J.; Topalovic, M.; Krantzberg, G.

    2012-01-01

    Hamilton's historical roots as an electric, industrial and transportation-oriented city provide it with a high potential for rapid transit, especially when combined with its growing population, developing economy, redeveloping downtown core and its plans for sustainable growth. This paper explores the health, environmental, social and economic…

  10. Octavia Butler and Virginia Hamilton: Black Women Writers and Science Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Gregory Jerome; Brooks, Wanda M.

    2003-01-01

    Notes that African American literature has always had science fiction elements in its focus on narratives of the alienated and marginalized "other." Contends that Octavia Butler and Virginia Hamilton are two African American writers of science fiction who examine the connections between the stories of a culture and the genre of science…

  11. Air Quality in Hamilton: Who Is Concerned? Perceptions from Three Neighbourhoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simone, Dylan; Eyles, John; Newbold, K. Bruce; Kitchen, Peter; Williams, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the factors influencing perceptions of air quality in the industrial city of Hamilton, Canada. The research employs data collected via a telephone survey of 1,002 adult residents in three neighbourhoods. Perceptions in the neighbourhoods were examined by individual socio-demographic factors (age, gender, marital and…

  12. Mobile Air Monitoring: Measuring Change in Air Quality in the City of Hamilton, 2005-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Matthew D.; DeLuca, Patrick F.; Corr, Denis; Kanaroglou, Pavlos S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the change in air pollutant concentrations between 2005 and 2010 occurring in the City of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. After analysis of stationary air pollutant concentration data, we analyze mobile air pollutant concentration data. Air pollutants included in the analysis are CO, PM[subscript 2.5], SO[subscript 2], NO,…

  13. A Survey of Environmental Education in Hamilton County Schools (K-12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garver, Janice B.

    Environmental education (EE) courses and programs offered in grades K-12 in Hamilton County (Ohio) public, private, and parochial schools were surveyed by means of a questionnaire mailed to 67 district level administrators, principals, and teachers. Questionnaires were returned from 5 private, 4 parochial, and 27 public schools, representing a 57…

  14. Hamilton County Suburban Athletic Association. Constitution, Policy, and Regulations. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton County Public Schools, Cincinnati, OH.

    Complete procedural outlines for the operation of the Hamilton County (Ohio) interscholastic athletic program are presented. Recommendations for dealing with such eventualities as the energy crisis and wet playing grounds are included. Criteria are set for all-star selection in various school sports, and rules for the award of special recognition…

  15. Application of Hamilton's Principle to the Study of the Anharmonic Oscillator in Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Gilmartin, Harvey

    1979-01-01

    Presented is a form of Hamilton's principle for classical mechanics appropriate to the study of arbitrary self-sustained vibrations in one dimension. It is applied as an approximate computational tool to the study of several examples of anharmonic oscillation. (Author/GA)

  16. 78 FR 3024 - Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge, MS; Intent To Prepare a Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... conservation plan (CCP) and associated National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents for Sam D. Hamilton... information on the scope of issues to consider in the environmental document and during development of the CCP... accordance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (NEPA) (42 U.S...

  17. Helping in cooperatively breeding long-tailed tits: a test of Hamilton's rule

    PubMed Central

    Hatchwell, Ben J.; Gullett, Philippa R.; Adams, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Inclusive fitness theory provides the conceptual framework for our current understanding of social evolution, and empirical studies suggest that kin selection is a critical process in the evolution of animal sociality. A key prediction of inclusive fitness theory is that altruistic behaviour evolves when the costs incurred by an altruist (c) are outweighed by the benefit to the recipient (b), weighted by the relatedness of altruist to recipient (r), i.e. Hamilton's rule rb > c. Despite its central importance in social evolution theory, there have been relatively few empirical tests of Hamilton's rule, and hardly any among cooperatively breeding vertebrates, leading some authors to question its utility. Here, we use data from a long-term study of cooperatively breeding long-tailed tits Aegithalos caudatus to examine whether helping behaviour satisfies Hamilton's condition for the evolution of altruism. We show that helpers are altruistic because they incur survival costs through the provision of alloparental care for offspring. However, they also accrue substantial benefits through increased survival of related breeders and offspring, and despite the low average relatedness of helpers to recipients, these benefits of helping outweigh the costs incurred. We conclude that Hamilton's rule for the evolution of altruistic helping behaviour is satisfied in this species. PMID:24686941

  18. Who Tells "Our" Story: Intersectional Temporalities in "Hamilton: An American Musical"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Andie; Inayatulla, Shereen

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which "Hamilton: An American Musical" can be read less as a historical account and more as a prediction of a future immigrant, who is called upon to (re)define US nationhood. Keeping with the tempo of the musical as well as the broader issues of time, space and identity it attempts to address, this…

  19. The Code Red Project: Engaging Communities in Health System Change in Hamilton, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Patrick F.; Buist, Steve; Johnston, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The communication of determinants of health and health outcomes normally executed through academic channels often fail to reach lay audiences. In April of 2010, the results of collaboration between academe and mass media were published in the Hamilton Spectator, one of Canada's 10 largest English-language daily newspapers as a 7-day series. The…

  20. The Election of 1800: Alexander Hamilton and the Death of the Federalist Party.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook-DeFeo, Gary

    1993-01-01

    Describes the significance of the election of 1800 in the development of political parties in the United States. Contends that Alexander Hamilton's view of the United States Constitution was dangerous for the new nation and led to a permanent split in the Federalist Party. Includes a resource bibliography for teachers wishing to incorporate this…

  1. Helping in cooperatively breeding long-tailed tits: a test of Hamilton's rule.

    PubMed

    Hatchwell, Ben J; Gullett, Philippa R; Adams, Mark J

    2014-05-19

    Inclusive fitness theory provides the conceptual framework for our current understanding of social evolution, and empirical studies suggest that kin selection is a critical process in the evolution of animal sociality. A key prediction of inclusive fitness theory is that altruistic behaviour evolves when the costs incurred by an altruist (c) are outweighed by the benefit to the recipient (b), weighted by the relatedness of altruist to recipient (r), i.e. Hamilton's rule rb > c. Despite its central importance in social evolution theory, there have been relatively few empirical tests of Hamilton's rule, and hardly any among cooperatively breeding vertebrates, leading some authors to question its utility. Here, we use data from a long-term study of cooperatively breeding long-tailed tits Aegithalos caudatus to examine whether helping behaviour satisfies Hamilton's condition for the evolution of altruism. We show that helpers are altruistic because they incur survival costs through the provision of alloparental care for offspring. However, they also accrue substantial benefits through increased survival of related breeders and offspring, and despite the low average relatedness of helpers to recipients, these benefits of helping outweigh the costs incurred. We conclude that Hamilton's rule for the evolution of altruistic helping behaviour is satisfied in this species.

  2. Hamilton-Jacobi formalism for Podolsky's electromagnetic theory on the null-plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, M. C.; Pimentel, B. M.; Valcárcel, C. E.; Zambrano, G. E. R.

    2017-08-01

    We develop the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism for Podolsky's electromagnetic theory on the null-plane. The main goal is to build the complete set of Hamiltonian generators of the system as well as to study the canonical and gauge transformations of the theory.

  3. New computing model helps Hamilton Health Sciences address changing business requirements.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This case study presents the impetus, business case, chronology and benefits of implementing a new server-based computing model at Hamilton Health Sciences that solved a critical desktop management problem while reducing IT costs. The new approach also provided a robust, flexible and scalable technology platform that is helping the hospital address business requirements driven by the emerging virtual healthcare community.

  4. A Perturbation Theory for Hamilton's Principal Function: Applications to Boundary Value Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoa, Oier Penagaricano

    This thesis introduces an analytical perturbation theory for Hamilton's principal function and Hamilton's characteristic function. Based on Hamilton's principle and the research carried out by Sir William Rowan Hamilton, a perturbation theory is developed to analytically solve two-point boundary value problems. The principal function is shown to solve the two-point boundary value problem through simple differentiation and elimination. The characteristic function is related to the principal function through a Legendre transformation, and can also be used to solve two-point boundary value problems. In order to obtain the solution to the perturbed two-point boundary value problem the knowledge of the nominal solution is sufficient. The perturbation theory is applied to the two body problem to study the perturbed dynamics in the vicinity of the Hohmann transfer. It is found that the perturbation can actually offer a lower cost two-impulse transfer to the target orbit than the Hohmann transfer. The numerical error analysis of the perturbation theory is shown for different orders of calculation. Coupling Hamilton's principal and characteristic functions yields an analytical perturbation theory for the initial value problem, where the state of the perturbed system can be accurately obtained. The perturbation theory is applied to the restricted three-body problem, where the system is viewed as a two-body problem perturbed by the presence of a third body. It is shown that the first order theory can be sufficient to solve the problem, winch is expressed in terms of Delaunay elements. The solution to the initial value problem is applied to derive a Keplerian periapsis map that can be used for low-energy space mission design problems.

  5. 'From Man to Bacteria': W.D. Hamilton, the theory of inclusive fitness, and the post-war social order.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Sarah A

    2015-02-01

    W.D. Hamilton's theory of inclusive fitness aimed to define the evolved limits of altruism with mathematical precision. Although it was meant to apply universally, it has been almost irretrievably entwined with the particular case of social insects that featured in his famous 1964 papers. The assumption that social insects were central to Hamilton's early work contradicts material in his rich personal archive. In fact, careful study of Hamilton's notes, letters, diaries, and early essays indicates the extent to which he had humans in mind when he decided altruism was a topic worthy of biological inquiry. For this reason, this article reconsiders the role of extra-scientific factors in Hamilton's early theorizing. In doing so, it offers an alternative perspective as to why Hamilton saw self-sacrifice to be an important subject. Although the traditional narrative prioritizes his distaste for benefit-of-the-species explanations as a motivating factor behind his foundational work, I argue that greater attention ought to be given to Hamilton's hope that science could be used to address social ills. By reconsidering the meaning Hamilton intended inclusive fitness to have, we see that while he was no political ideologue, the socio-political relevance of his theory was nevertheless integral to its development.

  6. The Tunneling Radiation from Non-Stationary Spherical Symmetry Black Holes and the Hamilton-Jacobi Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu-Zheng; Feng, Zhong-Wen; Li, Hui-Ling

    2017-02-01

    We derive the Hamilton-Jacobi equation from the Dirac equation, then, with the help of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the the tunneling radiation behavior of the non-stationary spherical symmetry de Sitter black hole is discussed, at last, we obtained the tunneling rate and Hawking temperature. Our results showed that the Hamilton-Jacobi equation is a fundamental dynamic equation, it can widely be derived from the dynamic equations which describe the particles with any spin. Therefore, people can easy calculate the tunneling behavior from the black holes.

  7. Barriers to Walking: An Investigation of Adults in Hamilton (Ontario, Canada)

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew F.; Scott, Darren M.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates perceived barriers to walking using data collected from 179 randomly-selected adults between the ages of 18 and 92 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. A survey (Hamilton Active Living Study) asked questions about socio-demographics, walking, and barriers to walking. A series of binary logit models are estimated for twenty potential barriers to walking. The results demonstrate that different barriers are associated with different sub-groups of the population. Females, senior citizens, and those with a higher body mass index identify the most barriers to walking, while young adults, parents, driver’s license owners, and bus pass owners identify the fewest barriers. Understanding who is affected by perceived barriers can help policy makers and health promotion agencies target sub-groups of the population in an effort to increase walking. PMID:26840328

  8. Association of Celiac Disease With Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis; Lane Hamilton Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nacaroglu, Hikmet Tekin; Sandal, Ozlem Sarac; Bag, Ozlem; Erdem, Semiha Bahceci; Bekem Soylu, Ozlem; Diniz, Gulden; Ozturk, Aysel; Can, Demet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare cause of alveolar hemorrhage, which is seen primarily in childhood. Celiac disease is defined as a chronic, immune-mediated enteropathy of the small intestine, caused by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically pre-disposed individuals. Association of IPH and celiac disease is known as Lane Hamilton syndrome. There are limited number of case reports of this syndrome in literature. Case Presentation: Although there were no growth and developmental delay and gastrointestinal symptoms like chronic diarrhea, chronic constipation, vomiting, abdominal bloating and pain in the two patients with IPH, they were diagnosed with Lane Hamilton Syndrome. After initiation of gluten-free diet, their IPH symptoms disappeared and hemoglobin levels were observed to return to normal. Conclusions: Even if there were no gastrointestinal symptoms in a patient with IPH, celiac disease should be investigated. These patients may benefit from gluten free diet and IPH symptoms may disappear. PMID:26495097

  9. Computational method for the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation: bound states in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E

    2006-11-07

    An accurate computational method for the one-dimensional quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation is presented. The Mobius propagation scheme, which can accurately pass through singularities, is used to numerically integrate the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the quantum momentum function. Bound state wave functions are then synthesized from the phase integral using the antithetic cancellation technique. Through this procedure, not only the quantum momentum functions but also the wave functions are accurately obtained. This computational approach is demonstrated through two solvable examples: the harmonic oscillator and the Morse potential. The excellent agreement between the computational and the exact analytical results shows that the method proposed here may be useful for solving similar quantum mechanical problems.

  10. Barriers to Walking: An Investigation of Adults in Hamilton (Ontario, Canada).

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew F; Scott, Darren M

    2016-01-30

    This study investigates perceived barriers to walking using data collected from 179 randomly-selected adults between the ages of 18 and 92 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. A survey (Hamilton Active Living Study) asked questions about socio-demographics, walking, and barriers to walking. A series of binary logit models are estimated for twenty potential barriers to walking. The results demonstrate that different barriers are associated with different sub-groups of the population. Females, senior citizens, and those with a higher body mass index identify the most barriers to walking, while young adults, parents, driver's license owners, and bus pass owners identify the fewest barriers. Understanding who is affected by perceived barriers can help policy makers and health promotion agencies target sub-groups of the population in an effort to increase walking.

  11. Deriving the Hamilton equations of motion for a nonconservative system using a variational principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveter, Frank Thomas

    1998-03-01

    The classical derivation of the canonical transformation theory [H. Goldstein, Classical Mechanics, 2nd ed. (Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1981)] is based on Hamilton's principle which is only valid for conservative systems. This paper avoids this principle by using an approach that is basically reversed compared to the classical derivation. The Lagrange equations of motion are formulated in the undefined and general variable set {Q,P}, and the general Hamilton equations of motion are derived from the Lagrange equations by using a variational principle. The undefined general variables {Q,P} are defined through a transformation to a special (defined) variable set {q,p}. The transformation equations connecting the two sets are derived by using the invariants property of the value of the Lagrangian. This approach results in a more general interpretation of the generator function.

  12. Fronts propagating with curvature dependent speed: Algorithms based on Hamilton-Jacobi formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osher, Stanley; Sethian, James A.

    1987-01-01

    New numerical algorithms are devised (PSC algorithms) for following fronts propagating with curvature-dependent speed. The speed may be an arbitrary function of curvature, and the front can also be passively advected by an underlying flow. These algorithms approximate the equations of motion, which resemble Hamilton-Jacobi equations with parabolic right-hand-sides, by using techniques from the hyperbolic conservation laws. Non-oscillatory schemes of various orders of accuracy are used to solve the equations, providing methods that accurately capture the formation of sharp gradients and cusps in the moving fronts. The algorithms handle topological merging and breaking naturally, work in any number of space dimensions, and do not require that the moving surface be written as a function. The methods can be used also for more general Hamilton-Jacobi-type problems. The algorithms are demonstrated by computing the solution to a variety of surface motion problems.

  13. The Wasserstein geometry of nonlinear σ models and the Hamilton-Perelman Ricci flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carfora, Mauro

    Nonlinear sigma models are quantum field theories describing, in the large deviation sense, random fluctuations of harmonic maps between a Riemann surface and a Riemannian manifold. Via their formal renormalization group analysis, they provide a framework for possible generalizations of the Hamilton-Perelman Ricci flow. By exploiting the heat kernel embedding introduced by Gigli and Mantegazza, we show that the Wasserstein geometry of the space of probability measures over Riemannian metric measure spaces provides a natural setting for discussing the relation between nonlinear sigma models and Ricci flow theory. In particular, we analyze the embedding of Ricci flow into a heat kernel renormalization group flow for dilatonic nonlinear sigma models, and characterize a non-trivial generalization of the Hamilton-Perelman version of the Ricci flow. We discuss in detail the monotonicity and gradient flow properties of this extended flow.

  14. Value-oriented citizenship index: New extensions of Kelman and Hamilton's theory to prevent autocracy.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Davide; Passini, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    In Crimes of obedience, Kelman and Hamilton argue that societies can be protected by the degeneration of authority only when citizenship is based on a strong values orientation. This reference to values may be the weakest point in their theory because they do not explicitly define these values. Nevertheless, their empirical findings suggest that the authors are referring to specific democratic principles and universal values (e.g., equality, fairness, harmlessness). In this article, a composite index known as the value-oriented citizenship (VOC) index is introduced and empirically analysed. The results confirm that the VOC index discriminates between people who relate to authority based on values rather than based on their role or on rules in general. The article discusses the utility of the VOC index to develop Kelman and Hamilton's framework further empirically as well as its implications for the analysis of the relationship between individuals and authority. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiple Scale and Hamilton-Jacobi Analysis of Extended Mathieu Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yešiltaš, Özlem; Šimšek, Mehmet

    2005-05-01

    In this study, we use perturbation approximations and semiclassical methods to investigate the boundary solutions of non-linear vibrating systems. The extended Mathieu Equation, related to the perturbed Van der Pol oscillator with periodic coefficients, is solved using multiple time scales. Then, using the Von Zeipel Method, which is based on the Hamilton-Jacobi theory, stability conditions are presented. It is shown that the stability boundaries are the same with those obtained by both methods.

  16. Quadratic Hamilton-Poisson systems on $\\mathfrak{s}\\mathfrak{e}(1, 1)^{*}_{-}$: The homogeneous case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Dennis I.; Biggs, Rory; Remsing, Claudiu C.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we consider quadratic Hamilton-Poisson systems on the semi-Euclidean Lie-Poisson space {s}{e}(1, 1)*-. The homogeneous positive semidefinite systems are classified; there are exactly six equivalence classes. In each case, the stability nature of the equilibrium states is determined. Explicit expressions for the integral curves are found. A characterization of the equivalence classes, in terms of the equilibria, is identified. Finally, the relation of this work to optimal control is briefly discussed.

  17. Compressed Semi-Discrete Central-Upwind Schemes for Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Kurganov, Alexander; Levy, Doron; Petrova, Guergana

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a new family of Godunov-type semi-discrete central schemes for multidimensional Hamilton-Jacobi equations. These schemes are a less dissipative generalization of the central-upwind schemes that have been recently proposed in series of works. We provide the details of the new family of methods in one, two, and three space dimensions, and then verify their expected low-dissipative property in a variety of examples.

  18. Topologically massive Yang-Mills: A Hamilton-Jacobi constraint analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bertin, M. C.; Pimentel, B. M.; Valcárcel, C. E.; Zambrano, G. E. R.

    2014-04-15

    We analyse the constraint structure of the topologically massive Yang-Mills theory in instant-form and null-plane dynamics via the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. The complete set of hamiltonians that generates the dynamics of the system is obtained from the Frobenius’ integrability conditions, as well as its characteristic equations. As generators of canonical transformations, the hamiltonians are naturally linked to the generator of Lagrangian gauge transformations.

  19. A Large Deviation, Hamilton-Jacobi Equation Approach to a Statistical Theory for Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-03

    and its associated compressible Euler equations, Comptes Rendus Mathematique , (09 2011): 973. doi: 10.1016/j.crma.2011.08.013 2012/09/03 14:17:15 6...Hamilton-Jacobi PDE is shown to be well-posed. (joint work with T Nguyen, Journal de Mathematique Pures et Appliquees). Future works focusing on large time behavior for such equations is currently under its way. Technology Transfer

  20. High-Order Central WENO Schemes for 1D Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we derive fully-discrete Central WENO (CWENO) schemes for approximating solutions of one dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) equations, which combine our previous works. We introduce third and fifth-order accurate schemes, which are the first central schemes for the HJ equations of order higher than two. The core ingredient is the derivation of our schemes is a high-order CWENO reconstructions in space.

  1. Gravitation field in the Vaidya problem allowing separation of variables in the Hamilton-Jacobi equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bagrov, V.G.; Obukhov, A.V.; Shapovalov, A.V.

    1987-04-01

    The problem of solving the Einstein equations with an energy-momentum tensor of matter is known in the literature as the Vaidya problem. A solution of the Vaidya problem is considered in this paper under the condition that the Hamilton-Jacobi equation for a test charge averaged over the space-time domain, is integrated in a zero approximation by separation of variables by using isotropic full sets of motion integrals.

  2. A Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Changqing; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for solving the nonlinear Hamilton-Jacobi equations. This method is based on the Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for solving conservation laws. The method has the flexibility of treating complicated geometry by using arbitrary triangulation, can achieve high order accuracy with a local, compact stencil, and are suited for efficient parallel implementation. One and two dimensional numerical examples are given to illustrate the capability of the method.

  3. The nonconvex multi-dimensional Riemann problem for Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osher, Stanley

    1989-01-01

    Simple inequalities for the Riemann problem for a Hamilton-Jacobi equation in N space dimension when neither the initial data nor the Hamiltonian need be convex (or concave) are presented. The initial data is globally continuous, affine in each orthant, with a possible jump in normal derivative across each coordinate plane, x sub i = 0. The inequalities become equalities wherever a maxmin equals a minmax and thus an exact closed form solution to this problem is then obtained.

  4. Variational energy principle for compressible, baroclinic flow. 2: Free-energy form of Hamilton's principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    The first and second variations are calculated for the irreducible form of Hamilton's Principle that involves the minimum number of dependent variables necessary to describe the kinetmatics and thermodynamics of inviscid, compressible, baroclinic flow in a specified gravitational field. The form of the second variation shows that, in the neighborhood of a stationary point that corresponds to physically stable flow, the action integral is a complex saddle surface in parameter space. There exists a form of Hamilton's Principle for which a direct solution of a flow problem is possible. This second form is related to the first by a Friedrichs transformation of the thermodynamic variables. This introduces an extra dependent variable, but the first and second variations are shown to have direct physical significance, namely they are equal to the free energy of fluctuations about the equilibrium flow that satisfies the equations of motion. If this equilibrium flow is physically stable, and if a very weak second order integral constraint on the correlation between the fluctuations of otherwise independent variables is satisfied, then the second variation of the action integral for this free energy form of Hamilton's Principle is positive-definite, so the action integral is a minimum, and can serve as the basis for a direct trail and error solution. The second order integral constraint states that the unavailable energy must be maximum at equilibrium, i.e. the fluctuations must be so correlated as to produce a second order decrease in the total unavailable energy.

  5. Health status and health behaviours in neighbourhoods: A comparison of Glasgow, Scotland and Hamilton, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kathi; Eyles, John; Ellaway, Anne; Macintyre, Sally; Macdonald, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Health status has been demonstrated to vary by neighbourhood socioeconomic status (SES). However, neighbourhood effects may vary between countries. In this study, neighbourhood variations in health outcomes are compared across four socially contrasting neighbourhoods in Glasgow, Scotland and Hamilton, Ontario Canada. Data came from the 2001 wave of the West of Scotland Twenty-07 Longitudinal Study and a 2000/2001 cross-sectional survey conducted in Hamilton. The results of the comparison point to important variations in the relationship between neighbourhood SES and health. While both cities display a socioeconomic gradient with respect to various measures of health and health behaviours, for some outcome measures the high SES neighbourhoods in Glasgow display distributions similar to those found in the low SES neighbourhoods in Hamilton. Our results suggest that a low SES neighbourhood in one country may not mean the same for health as a low SES neighbourhood in another country. As such, country context may explain the distribution of health status and health behaviours among socially contrasting neighbourhoods, and neighbourhood variations in health may be context specific. PMID:20022285

  6. Adaptive dynamics via Hamilton-Jacobi approach and entropy methods for a juvenile-adult model.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, José Antonio; Cuadrado, Sílvia; Perthame, Benoît

    2007-01-01

    We consider a nonlinear system describing a juvenile-adult population undergoing small mutations. We analyze two aspects: from a mathematical point of view, we use an entropy method to prove that the population neither goes extinct nor blows-up; from an adaptive evolution point of view, we consider small mutations on a long time scale and study how a monomorphic or a dimorphic initial population evolves towards an Evolutionarily Stable State. Our method relies on an asymptotic analysis based on a constrained Hamilton-Jacobi equation. It allows to recover earlier predictions in Calsina and Cuadrado [A. Calsina, S. Cuadrado, Small mutation rate and evolutionarily stable strategies in infinite dimensional adaptive dynamics, J. Math. Biol. 48 (2004) 135; A. Calsina, S. Cuadrado, Stationary solutions of a selection mutation model: the pure mutation case, Math. Mod. Meth. Appl. Sci. 15(7) (2005) 1091.] that we also assert by direct numerical simulation. One of the interests here is to show that the Hamilton-Jacobi approach initiated in Diekmann et al. [O. Diekmann, P.-E. Jabin, S. Mischler, B. Perthame, The dynamics of adaptation: an illuminating example and a Hamilton-Jacobi approach, Theor. Popul. Biol. 67(4) (2005) 257.] extends to populations described by systems.

  7. Complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation with Bohmian trajectories: application to the photodissociation dynamics of NOCl.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2014-03-14

    The complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation-Bohmian trajectories (CQHJE-BT) method is introduced as a synthetic trajectory method for integrating the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the complex action function by propagating an ensemble of real-valued correlated Bohmian trajectories. Substituting the wave function expressed in exponential form in terms of the complex action into the time-dependent Schrödinger equation yields the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We transform this equation into the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian version with the grid velocity matching the flow velocity of the probability fluid. The resulting equation describing the rate of change in the complex action transported along Bohmian trajectories is simultaneously integrated with the guidance equation for Bohmian trajectories, and the time-dependent wave function is readily synthesized. The spatial derivatives of the complex action required for the integration scheme are obtained by solving one moving least squares matrix equation. In addition, the method is applied to the photodissociation of NOCl. The photodissociation dynamics of NOCl can be accurately described by propagating a small ensemble of trajectories. This study demonstrates that the CQHJE-BT method combines the considerable advantages of both the real and the complex quantum trajectory methods previously developed for wave packet dynamics.

  8. Hamilton-Jacobi approach to photon wave mechanics: near-field aspects.

    PubMed

    Keller, O

    2008-02-01

    After having briefly reviewed the Hamilton-Jacobi theory of classical point-particle mechanics, its extension to the quantum regime and the formal identity between the Hamilton-Jacobi equation for Hamilton's characteristic function and the eikonal equation of geometrical optics, an eikonal theory for free photons is established. The space-time dynamics of the photon is described on the basis of the six-component Riemann-Silberstein energy wave function. Form-identical eikonal equations are obtained for the positive and negative helicity dynamics. Microscopic response theory is used to describe the linear photon-matter interaction. In the presence of matter the free-photon concept is replaced by a quasi-photon concept, and there is a quasi-photon for each of the two helicity states. After having established integro-differential equations for the wave functions of the two quasi-photons, the eikonal conditions for the quasi-photons are determined. It appears that the eikonal condition contains complicated space integrals of the gradient of the eikonal over volumes of near-field domain size. In these space integrals the dynamics of the electrons (matter particles) appears via transverse transition current densities between pairs of many-body states. Generalized microscopic polarization and magnetization fields are introduced to establish the connection between the quasi-photon and macroscopic eikonal theories.

  9. Complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation with Bohmian trajectories: Application to the photodissociation dynamics of NOCl

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2014-03-14

    The complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation-Bohmian trajectories (CQHJE-BT) method is introduced as a synthetic trajectory method for integrating the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the complex action function by propagating an ensemble of real-valued correlated Bohmian trajectories. Substituting the wave function expressed in exponential form in terms of the complex action into the time-dependent Schrödinger equation yields the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We transform this equation into the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian version with the grid velocity matching the flow velocity of the probability fluid. The resulting equation describing the rate of change in the complex action transported along Bohmian trajectories is simultaneously integrated with the guidance equation for Bohmian trajectories, and the time-dependent wave function is readily synthesized. The spatial derivatives of the complex action required for the integration scheme are obtained by solving one moving least squares matrix equation. In addition, the method is applied to the photodissociation of NOCl. The photodissociation dynamics of NOCl can be accurately described by propagating a small ensemble of trajectories. This study demonstrates that the CQHJE-BT method combines the considerable advantages of both the real and the complex quantum trajectory methods previously developed for wave packet dynamics.

  10. Separability of Hamilton-Jacobi and Klein-Gordon equations in general Kerr-NUT-AdS spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.; Krtous, Pavel; Kubiznák, David

    2007-02-01

    We demonstrate the separability of the Hamilton-Jacobi and scalar field equations in general higher dimensional Kerr-NUT-AdS spacetimes. No restriction on the parameters characterizing these metrics is imposed.

  11. 76 FR 76707 - Brian Hamilton; El Paso Natural Gas and El Paso Western Pipelines; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ...] Brian Hamilton; El Paso Natural Gas and El Paso Western Pipelines; Notice of Complaint Take notice that... complaint against El Paso Natural Gas and El Paso Western Pipelines (Respondents) alleging that...

  12. Noether's theorem for non-conservative Hamilton system based on El-Nabulsi dynamical model extended by periodic laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Zi-Xuan; Zhang, Yi

    2014-11-01

    This paper focuses on the Noether symmetries and the conserved quantities for both holonomic and nonholonomic systems based on a new non-conservative dynamical model introduced by El-Nabulsi. First, the El-Nabulsi dynamical model which is based on a fractional integral extended by periodic laws is introduced, and El-Nabulsi—Hamilton's canonical equations for non-conservative Hamilton system with holonomic or nonholonomic constraints are established. Second, the definitions and criteria of El-Nabulsi—Noether symmetrical transformations and quasi-symmetrical transformations are presented in terms of the invariance of El-Nabulsi—Hamilton action under the infinitesimal transformations of the group. Finally, Noether's theorems for the non-conservative Hamilton system under the El-Nabulsi dynamical system are established, which reveal the relationship between the Noether symmetry and the conserved quantity of the system.

  13. Review of the bioenvironmental methods for malaria control with special reference to the use of larvivorous fishes and composite fish culture in central Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Kant, Rajni; Haq, S; Srivastava, H C; Sharma, V P

    2013-03-01

    Mosquito control with the use of insecticides is faced with the challenges of insecticide resistance in disease vectors, community refusal, their high cost, operational difficulties, and environmental concern. In view of this, integrated vector control strategies with the use of larvivorous fishes such as Guppy (Poecilia reticulata) and Gambusia (G. affinis) as biological control agents were used in controlling mosquito breeding in different types of breeding places such as intradomestic containers, various types of wells, rice-fields, pools, ponds and elsewhere in malaria prone rural areas of central Gujarat. Attempts were also made to demonstrate composite fish culture in unused abandoned village ponds by culturing Guppy along with the food fishes such as Rohu (Labeo rohita), Catla (Catla catla) and Mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala). Income generated from these ponds through sale of fishes was utilized for mosquito control and village development. The technology was later adopted by the villagers themselves and food fish culture was practised in 23 ponds which generated an income of Rs 1,02,50,992 between 1985 and 2008. The number of villages increased from 13 to 23 in 2008 and there was also gradual increase of income from Rs 3,66,245 in 1985-90 to Rs 55,06,127 in 2002-08 block. It is concluded that larvivorous fishes can be useful tool in controlling mosquito breeding in certain situations and their use along with composite fish culture may also generate income to make the programme self-sustainable.

  14. Comparative susceptibility of carp fingerlings to Lernaea cyprinacea infection.

    PubMed

    Hemaprasanth; Singh, Ravinder; Raghavendra, A; Sridhar, N; Raghunath, M R; Eknath, A E

    2011-05-31

    Study was conducted to find out the comparative susceptibility of fingerlings of seven species of carps (Labeo fimbriatus, L. rohita, L. calbasu, Catla catla, Ctenopharyngodon idella, Cyprinus carpio and Hypophthamichthys molitrix) grown under both mono and polyculture to Lernaea cyprinacea infection. Under monoculture, C. carpio, L. rohita and L. calbasu, did not acquire Lernaea infection and were thus considered resistant, whereas C. idella, H. molitrix, C. catla and L. fimbriatus were susceptible. Even challenge with higher infective doses of copepodids under monoculture did not result in infection in the resistant fish species. The resistance of L. rohita and C. carpio to Lernaea infection under monoculture was not sustained when these two fish species were maintained in polyculture along with susceptible fish species. Labeo calbasu, even under polyculture, however, did not acquire Lernaea infection indicating that this fish species is the most resistant and least preferred host for this parasite. Similarly, C. carpio, L. rohita and L. calbasu when grown together in polyculture and exposed to a higher infective dose (120 copepodids/fish) also did not develop the infection. The possible reasons for differences in susceptibility shown by these carp species in monoculture and the loss of resistance by rohu and common carp while in polyculture with susceptible species are discussed. The ability of resistant fish species to prevent establishment of anchor worms on them under monoculture can be utilized to control this parasitic infection commonly encountered in culture ponds.

  15. Validity of the definite and semidefinite questionnaire version of the Hamilton Depression Scale, the Hamilton Subscale and the Melancholia Scale. Part I.

    PubMed

    Bent-Hansen, Jesper; Bech, Per

    2011-02-01

    Instruments for self-rating in depression are available, but their psychometric properties have not been fully explored; discrepancies with clinician ratings have been identified. This study was longitudinal with 85 patients fulfilling the DSM-III-R diagnosis of Seasonal Affective Disorder. Self-reporting versions (definitely and semidefinitely anchored) corresponding to the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), the Hamilton Subscale (HAM₆), and the Bech-Rafaelsen Melancholia Scale (MES) were compared to each other and the clinician-rated version. The unidimensional property of the sum score in each scale was tested by the item-response theory model ad modum Rasch. The scales were also tested for their sensitivity to discriminate between placebo and citalopram therapy. The sum scores and the sum score variances of the definite self-rating versions did not differ significantly from the sum scores of the corresponding observer scales at any of the five time points. The semidefinite scales significantly over-scored at all time points. The convergent validity between corresponding definite self-ratings and observer ratings was very high with correlations exceeding 0.90. Only item responses from the MES, the HAM₆, and their corresponding definite versions of the self-rating questionnaires DMQ and DHAM₆ were accepted by the Rasch analysis, and only these four valid scales discriminated significantly between the effect of citalopram and placebo treatment. Our results are limited to patients with moderate depression. Two new self-report scales with unparalleled construct validity, reliability, sensitivity, and convergent validity have been identified (DMQ and DHAM₆). We have also identified a crucial importance of format for the means and variances of self-rating scales. These findings are of high practical and scientific value.

  16. The method of Ritz applied to the equation of Hamilton. [for pendulum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.

    1976-01-01

    Without any reference to the theory of differential equations, the initial value problem of the nonlinear, nonconservative double pendulum system is solved by the application of the method of Ritz to the equation of Hamilton. Also shown is an example of the reduction of the traditional eigenvalue problem of linear, homogeneous, differential equations of motion to the solution of a set of nonhomogeneous algebraic equations. No theory of differential equations is used. Solution of the time-space path of the linear oscillator is demonstrated and compared to the exact solution.

  17. On the regularizing effect for unbounded solutions of first-order Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barles, Guy; Chasseigne, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    We give a simplified proof of regularizing effects for first-order Hamilton-Jacobi Equations of the form ut + H (x , t , Du) = 0 in RN × (0 , + ∞) in the case where the idea is to first estimate ut. As a consequence, we have a Lipschitz regularity in space and time for coercive Hamiltonians and, for hypo-elliptic Hamiltonians, we also have an Hölder regularizing effect in space following a result of L.C. Evans and M.R. James.

  18. The nonconvex multi-dimensional Riemann problem for Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardi, Martino; Osher, Stanley

    1991-01-01

    Simple inequalities are presented for the viscosity solution of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation in N space dimensions when neither the initial data nor the Hamiltonian need be convex (or concave). The initial data are uniformly Lipschitz and can be written as the sum of a convex function in a group of variables and a concave function in the remaining variables, therefore including the nonconvex Riemann problem. The inequalities become equalities wherever a 'maxmin' equals a 'minmax', and thus a representation formula for this problem is obtained, generalizing the classical Hopi formulas.

  19. Effective nonlinear Neumann boundary conditions for 1D nonconvex Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerand, Jessica

    2017-09-01

    We study Hamilton-Jacobi equations in [ 0 , + ∞) of evolution type with nonlinear Neumann boundary conditions in the case where the Hamiltonian is not necessarily convex with respect to the gradient variable. In this paper, we give two main results. First, we prove for a nonconvex and coercive Hamiltonian that general boundary conditions in a relaxed sense are equivalent to effective ones in a strong sense. Here, we exhibit the effective boundary conditions while for a quasi-convex Hamiltonian, we already know them (Imbert and Monneau, 2016). Second, we give a comparison principle for a nonconvex and nonnecessarily coercive Hamiltonian where the boundary condition can have constant parts.

  20. Hyperbolicity of Minimizers and Regularity of Viscosity Solutions for a Random Hamilton-Jacobi Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanin, Konstantin; Zhang, Ke

    2017-10-01

    We show that for a large class of randomly kicked Hamilton-Jacobi equations, the unique global minimizer is almost surely hyperbolic. Furthermore, we prove that the unique forward and backward viscosity solutions, though in general only Lipshitz, are smooth in a neighborhood of the global minimizer. Related results in the one-dimensional case were obtained by E, Khanin et al. (Ann Math (2) 151(3):877-960, 2000). However, the methods in the above paper are purely one-dimensional and cannot be extended to the case of higher dimensions. Here we develop a completely different approach.

  1. The method of Ritz applied to the equation of Hamilton. [for pendulum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.

    1976-01-01

    Without any reference to the theory of differential equations, the initial value problem of the nonlinear, nonconservative double pendulum system is solved by the application of the method of Ritz to the equation of Hamilton. Also shown is an example of the reduction of the traditional eigenvalue problem of linear, homogeneous, differential equations of motion to the solution of a set of nonhomogeneous algebraic equations. No theory of differential equations is used. Solution of the time-space path of the linear oscillator is demonstrated and compared to the exact solution.

  2. Numerical Schemes for the Hamilton-Jacobi and Level Set Equations on Triangulated Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Sethian, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Borrowing from techniques developed for conservation law equations, we have developed both monotone and higher order accurate numerical schemes which discretize the Hamilton-Jacobi and level set equations on triangulated domains. The use of unstructured meshes containing triangles (2D) and tetrahedra (3D) easily accommodates mesh adaptation to resolve disparate level set feature scales with a minimal number of solution unknowns. The minisymposium talk will discuss these algorithmic developments and present sample calculations using our adaptive triangulation algorithm applied to various moving interface problems such as etching, deposition, and curvature flow.

  3. Scalar particles emission from black holes with topological defects using Hamilton-Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusufi, Kimet

    2015-11-01

    We study quantum tunneling of charged and uncharged scalar particles from the event horizon of Schwarzschild-de Sitter and Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter black holes pierced by an infinitely long spinning cosmic string and a global monopole. In order to find the Hawking temperature and the tunneling probability we solve the Klein-Gordon equation by using the Hamilton-Jacobi method and WKB approximation. We show that Hawking temperature is independent of the presence of topological defects in both cases.

  4. Coordinates Used in Derivation of Hawking Radiation via Hamilton-Jacobi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; He, Xiaokai; Liu, Wenbiao

    2009-05-01

    Coordinates used in derivation of Hawking radiation via Hamilton-Jacobi method are investigated more deeply. In the case of a 4-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole, a direct computation leads to a wrong result. In the meantime, making use of the isotropic coordinate or invariant radial distance, we can get the correct conclusion. More coordinates including Painleve and Eddington-Finkelstein are tried to calculate the semi-classical Hawking emission rate. The reason of the discrepancy between naive coordinate and well-behaved coordinates is also discussed.

  5. On a Hamilton-Poisson Approach of the Maxwell-Bloch Equations with a Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lăzureanu, Cristian

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we consider the 3D real-valued Maxwell-Bloch equations with a parametric control given by \\dot {x}=y+az+byz,\\dot {y}=xz,\\dot {z}=-xy (a,b\\in R). We give two Lie-Poisson structures of this system that are related with well-known Lie algebras. Moreover, we construct infinitely many Hamilton-Poisson realizations of this system. We also analyze the stability of the equilibrium points, as well as the existence of periodic orbits. In addition, we emphasize some connections between the energy-Casimir mapping of the considered system and the above-mentioned dynamical elements.

  6. Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations and approximate dynamic programming on time scales.

    PubMed

    Seiffertt, John; Sanyal, Suman; Wunsch, Donald C

    2008-08-01

    The time scales calculus is a key emerging area of mathematics due to its potential use in a wide variety of multidisciplinary applications. We extend this calculus to approximate dynamic programming (ADP). The core backward induction algorithm of dynamic programming is extended from its traditional discrete case to all isolated time scales. Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations, the solution of which is the fundamental problem in the field of dynamic programming, are motivated and proven on time scales. By drawing together the calculus of time scales and the applied area of stochastic control via ADP, we have connected two major fields of research.

  7. Abandoning nature: swimming pools and clean, healthy recreation in Hamilton, Ontario, c. 1930s-1950s.

    PubMed

    Bouchier, Nancy B; Cruikshank, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Municipal swimming pools arose as a technological fix for an urban public health and recreation crisis in Hamilton when its bay became a polluted sink for residential and industrial wastes. Until World War II, city leaders and medical authorities believed that they could identify, delineate, and construct safe natural swimming areas along the bay's shore, supplemented by a few public artificial swimming pools. After the war, the pollution situation worsened. For those who couldn't travel to cleaner lakeshores elsewhere, local authorities created swimming pools, thus abandoning the natural waters of the bay to the "constructive power of the profit motive".

  8. Thompson and Hamilton type IV Freiberg's disease with involvement of multiple epiphyses of both feet.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-02-26

    A 17-year-old boy reported left second and third toe pain after axial loading injury to his left foot. Radiographs showed collapse of the second metatarsal heads and epiphysial irregularities of the fifth metatarsal heads and the condyle of the proximal phalanx of the hallux of both feet. The patient was diagnosed to have Thompson and Hamilton type IV Freiberg's disease. He was screened for epiphysial dysplasia of the other sites. He had on and off bilateral hip and knee pain. Radiographs showed bilateral symmetrical epiphysial abnormalities with morphological change as focal concavity in bilateral femoral heads and fragmentation of the patellar articular surface with preservation of the patellofemoral joint space.

  9. Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the least-action/least-time dynamical path based on fast marching method.

    PubMed

    Dey, Bijoy K; Janicki, Marek R; Ayers, Paul W

    2004-10-08

    Classical dynamics can be described with Newton's equation of motion or, totally equivalently, using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Here, the possibility of using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation to describe chemical reaction dynamics is explored. This requires an efficient computational approach for constructing the physically and chemically relevant solutions to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation; here we solve Hamilton-Jacobi equations on a Cartesian grid using Sethian's fast marching method. Using this method, we can--starting from an arbitrary initial conformation--find reaction paths that minimize the action or the time. The method is demonstrated by computing the mechanism for two different systems: a model system with four different stationary configurations and the H+H(2)-->H(2)+H reaction. Least-time paths (termed brachistochrones in classical mechanics) seem to be a suitable chioce for the reaction coordinate, allowing one to determine the key intermediates and final product of a chemical reaction. For conservative systems the Hamilton-Jacobi equation does not depend on the time, so this approach may be useful for simulating systems where important motions occur on a variety of different time scales.

  10. Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the least-action/least-time dynamical path based on fast marching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Bijoy K.; Janicki, Marek R.; Ayers, Paul W.

    2004-10-01

    Classical dynamics can be described with Newton's equation of motion or, totally equivalently, using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Here, the possibility of using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation to describe chemical reaction dynamics is explored. This requires an efficient computational approach for constructing the physically and chemically relevant solutions to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation; here we solve Hamilton-Jacobi equations on a Cartesian grid using Sethian's fast marching method [J. A. Sethian, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 1591 (1996)]. Using this method, we can—starting from an arbitrary initial conformation—find reaction paths that minimize the action or the time. The method is demonstrated by computing the mechanism for two different systems: a model system with four different stationary configurations and the H+H2→H2+H reaction. Least-time paths (termed brachistochrones in classical mechanics) seem to be a suitable chioce for the reaction coordinate, allowing one to determine the key intermediates and final product of a chemical reaction. For conservative systems the Hamilton-Jacobi equation does not depend on the time, so this approach may be useful for simulating systems where important motions occur on a variety of different time scales.

  11. Polycyclic aromatic compound profiles from extracts of Dreissenid mussels and gammarid amphipods coexisting in Hamilton Harbor

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin, C.H.; McCarry, B.E.; Allan, L.; Bryant, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    Aggregates of dreissenid mussels were collected in Hamilton Harbour (western Lake Ontario) from a south shore site (Randle Reef) in an area characterized by coal tar-contaminated sediments, and from a site on the north shore exposed to particulates circulating in the harbour water column. Samples were separated into three components: dreissend mussels, gammarid amphipods (Gammarus fasciatus), and particulate material. The samples were freeze-dried, and extracted using ultrasonication in dichloromethane. The organic solvent extracts were subjected to an open-column alumina and Sephadex LH-20 gel column clean-up procedure, and characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The chromatographic profiles of all sample extracts were dominated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The concentrations of the individual compounds were normalized for contaminant profile comparison of the extracts of dreissenids, amphipods, and particulates associated with aggregates of dreissenid mussels. These profiles were also compared with extracts of coal tar-contaminated sediment from the Randle Reef area, and extracts of suspended particulates obtained from sediment traps. The similarities in the PAH profiles provide evidence of exposure to a common source of contaminants. These data also show that PAH associated with suspended particulates obtained from sediment traps. The similarities in the PAH profiles provide evidence of exposure to a common source of contaminants. These data also show that PAH associated with suspended particulates in Hamilton Harbour are being accumulated by dreissenid mussels and gammarid amphipods.

  12. Ecological structuring of yeasts associated with trees around Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Maganti, Harinad; Bartfai, David; Xu, Jianping

    2012-02-01

    This study seeks to determine the distribution and diversity of yeasts in and around the Hamilton area in Canada. In light of the increasing number of fungal infections along with rising morbidity and mortality rates, especially among the immunocompromised, understanding the diversity and distribution of yeasts in natural environments close to human habitations has become an increasingly relevant topic. In this study, we analyzed 1110 samples obtained from the hollows of trees, shrubs and avian droppings at 8 geographical sites in and around Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. A total of 88 positive yeast strains were isolated and identified belonging to 20 yeast species. Despite the relative proximity of the sampling sites, our DNA fingerprinting results showed that the yeast populations were highly heterogenous. Among the 14 tree species sampled, cedar, cottonwood and basswood hollows had relatively high yeast colonization rates. Interestingly, Candida parapsilosis was isolated almost exclusively from Pine trees only. Our results are consistent with microgeographic and ecological differentiation of yeast species in and around an urban environment. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic polymorphisms between altruism and selfishness close to the Hamilton threshold rb = c

    PubMed Central

    Curnow, Robert N.

    2017-01-01

    Genes that in certain conditions make their carriers altruistic are being identified, and altruism and selfishness have shown to be heritable in man. This raises the possibility that genetic polymorphisms for altruism/selfishness exist in man and other animals. Here we characterize some of the conditions in which genetic polymorphisms may occur. We show for dominant or recessive alleles how the positions of stable equilibria depend on the benefit to the recipient, b, and the cost to the altruist, c, for diploid altruists helping half or full sibs, and haplodiploid altruists helping sisters. Stable polymorphisms always occur close to the Hamilton threshold rb = c. The position of the stable equilibrium moves away 0 or 1 with both increases in c, the cost paid by the altruist, and increasing divergence from the Hamilton threshold, and alleles for selfishness can reach frequencies around 50%. We evaluate quantitative estimates of b, c and r from field studies in the light of these predictions, but the values do not fall in the regions where genetic polymorphisms are expected. Nevertheless, it will be interesting to see as genes for altruism are discovered whether they are accompanied by alternate alleles for selfishness. PMID:28386424

  14. MHC, parasites and antler development in red deer: no support for the Hamilton & Zuk hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Buczek, M; Okarma, H; Demiaszkiewicz, A W; Radwan, J

    2016-03-01

    The Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis proposes that the genetic benefits of preferences for elaborated secondary sexual traits have their origins in the arms race between hosts and parasites, which maintains genetic variance in parasite resistance. Infection, in turn, can be reflected in the expression of costly sexual ornaments. However, the link between immune genes, infection and the expression of secondary sexual traits has rarely been investigated. Here, we explored whether the presence and identity of functional variants (supertypes) of the highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC), which is responsible for the recognition of parasites, predict the load of lung and gut parasites and antler development in the red deer (Cervus elaphus). While we found MHC supertypes to be associated with infection by a number of parasite species, including debilitating lung nematodes, we did not find support for the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis. On the contrary, we found that lung nematode load was positively associated with antler development. We also found that the supertypes that were associated with resistance to certain parasites at the same time cause susceptibility to others. Such trade-offs may undermine the potential genetic benefits of mate choice for resistant partners.

  15. Orthogonal Separation of the Hamilton-Jacobi Equation on Spaces of Constant Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaratnam, Krishan; McLenaghan, Raymond G.; Valero, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    We review the theory of orthogonal separation of variables of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation on spaces of constant curvature, highlighting key contributions to the theory by Benenti. This theory revolves around a special type of conformal Killing tensor, hereafter called a concircular tensor. First, we show how to extend original results given by Benenti to intrinsically characterize all (orthogonal) separable coordinates in spaces of constant curvature using concircular tensors. This results in the construction of a special class of separable coordinates known as Kalnins-Eisenhart-Miller coordinates. Then we present the Benenti-Eisenhart-Kalnins-Miller separation algorithm, which uses concircular tensors to intrinsically search for Kalnins-Eisenhart-Miller coordinates which separate a given natural Hamilton-Jacobi equation. As a new application of the theory, we show how to obtain the separable coordinate systems in the two dimensional spaces of constant curvature, Minkowski and (Anti-)de Sitter space. We also apply the Benenti-Eisenhart-Kalnins-Miller separation algorithm to study the separability of the three dimensional Calogero-Moser and Morosi-Tondo systems.

  16. Structure and metamorphism of the Franciscan Complex, Mt. Hamilton area, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blake, M.C.; Wentworth, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    Truncation of metamorphic isograds and fold axes within coherent terranes of Franciscan metagraywacke by intervening zones of melange indicate that the melange is tectonic and formed after the subduction-related metamorphism and folding. These relations are expressed in two terranes of blueschist-facies rocks of the Franciscan Complex in the Mt. Hamilton area, northern California-the Jurassic Yolla Bolly terrane and the structurally underlying Cretaceous Burnt Hills terrane. Local preservation in both terranes of basal radiolarian chert and oceanic basalt beneath continent-derived metagraywacke and argillite demonstrates thrust repetition within the coherent terranes, although these relations are scarce near Mt. Hamilton. The metagraywackes range from albite-pumpellyite blueschists to those containing well-crystallized jadeitic pyroxene, and a jadeite-in isograd can be defined in parts of the area. Primary bedding defines locally coherent structural orientations and folds within the metagraywacke units. These units are crosscut by thin zones of tectonic melange containing blocks of high-grade blueschist, serpentinite, and other exotic rocks, and a broader, but otherwise identical melange zone marks the discordant boundary between the two terranes.

  17. Source apportionment of PAH in Hamilton Harbour suspended sediments: comparison of two factor analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Uwayemi M. Sofowote; Brian E. McCarry; Christopher H. Marvin

    2008-08-15

    A total of 26 suspended sediment samples collected over a 5-year period in Hamilton Harbour, Ontario, Canada and surrounding creeks were analyzed for a suite of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and sulfur heterocycles. Hamilton Harbour sediments contain relatively high levels of polycyclic aromatic compounds and heavy metals due to emissions from industrial and mobile sources. Two receptor modeling methods using factor analyses were compared to determine the profiles and relative contributions of pollution sources to the harbor; these methods are principal component analyses (PCA) with multiple linear regression analysis (MLR) and positive matrix factorization (PMF). Both methods identified four factors and gave excellent correlation coefficients between predicted and measured levels of 25 aromatic compounds; both methods predicted similar contributions from coal tar/coal combustion sources to the harbor (19 and 26%, respectively). One PCA factor was identified as contributions from vehicular emissions (61%); PMF was able to differentiate vehicular emissions into two factors, one attributed to gasoline emissions sources (28%) and the other to diesel emissions sources (24%). Overall, PMF afforded better source identification than PCA with MLR. This work constitutes one of the few examples of the application of PMF to the source apportionment of sediments; the addition of sulfur heterocycles to the analyte list greatly aided in the source identification process. 41 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Sense of Place and Health in Hamilton, Ontario: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Allison; Kitchen, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The concept of sense of place has received considerable attention by social scientists in recent years. Research has indicated that a person's sense of place is influenced by a number of factors including the built environment, socio-economic status (SES), well-being and health. Relatively few studies have examined sense of place at the neighbourhood level, particularly among communities exhibiting different levels of SES. This article investigates sense of place among three neighbourhood groups in Hamilton, Ontario representing areas of low, mixed and high SES. It analyses data from a 16-point sense of place scale derived from the Hamilton Household Quality of Life Survey carried out in 2010-2011 among 1,002 respondents. The paper found that sense of place was highest among residents of the high SES neighbourhood group as well as among home owners, people residing in single-detached homes, retired residents and those living in their neighbourhood for more than 10 years. From a health perspective, the paper found that a strong association existed between sense of place and self-perceived mental health across the three neighbourhood groups. Furthermore, by way of regression modeling, the paper examined the factors influencing health-related sense of place. Among the sample of respondents, a strong connection was found between housing, particularly home ownership, and high levels of health-related sense of place.

  19. From classical Lagrangians to Hamilton operators in the standard model extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this article we investigate whether a theory based on a classical Lagrangian for the minimal Standard Model Extension (SME) can be quantized such that the result is equal to the corresponding low-energy Hamilton operator obtained from the field-theory description. This analysis is carried out for the whole collection of minimal Lagrangians found in the literature. The upshot is that the first quantization can be performed consistently. The unexpected observation is made that at first order in Lorentz violation and at second order in the velocity, the Lagrangians are related to the Hamilton functions by a simple transformation. Under mild assumptions, it is shown that this holds universally. That result is used successfully to obtain classical Lagrangians for two complicated sectors of the minimal SME that have not been considered in the literature so far. Therefore, it will not be an obstacle anymore to derive such Lagrangians even for involved sets of coefficients—at least to the level of approximation stated above.

  20. Solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi Equations and Scalar Conservation Laws with Discontinuous Space-Time Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrov, Daniel N.

    2002-06-01

    We establish a unique stable solution to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation ut+H(K(x,t),ux)=0, x∈(-∞,∞), t∈[0,∞) with Lipschitz initial condition, where K(x,t) is allowed to be discontinuous in the (x,t) plane along a finite number of (possibly intersecting) curves parameterized by t. We assume that for fixed k, H(k,p) is convex in p and limp→±∞∣{H(k,p)}/{p}∣=∞. The solution is determined by showing that if K is made smooth by convolving K in the x direction with the standard mollifier, then the control theory representation of the viscosity solution to the resulting Hamilton-Jacobi equation must converge uniformly as the mollification decreases to a Lipschitz continuous solution with an explicit control theory representation. This also defines the unique stable solution to the corresponding scalar conservation law ut+(f(K(x,t),u))x=0, x∈(-∞,∞), t∈[0,∞) with K discontinuous.

  1. Simple derivations of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and the eikonal equation without the use of canonical transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Alex; Lam, Kai S.

    2011-06-01

    The Hamilton-Jacobi equation in classical mechanics and the related eikonal equation in geometrical optics are often described as the "point of closest approach" between classical and quantum mechanics. Most textbook treatments of Hamilton-Jacobi theory are aimed at graduate students and derive the equation only after a long introduction to canonical transformations. Most treatments of the eikonal equation only emphasize its use in geometrical optics. We show that both the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and the eikonal equation can be derived by a common procedure using only elementary aspects of the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms introduced in undergraduate classical mechanics courses. Through this common approach, we hope to highlight to undergraduates the deep connections between classical mechanics, classical wave theory, and Schrödinger's wave mechanics.

  2. Hamilton's rule, inclusive fitness maximization, and the goal of individual behaviour in symmetric two-player games.

    PubMed

    Okasha, S; Martens, J

    2016-03-01

    Hamilton's original work on inclusive fitness theory assumed additivity of costs and benefits. Recently, it has been argued that an exact version of Hamilton's rule for the spread of a pro-social allele (rb > c) holds under nonadditive pay-offs, so long as the cost and benefit terms are defined as partial regression coefficients rather than pay-off parameters. This article examines whether one of the key components of Hamilton's original theory can be preserved when the rule is generalized to the nonadditive case in this way, namely that evolved organisms will behave as if trying to maximize their inclusive fitness in social encounters. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  3. The climate's long-term impact on New Zealand infrastructure (CLINZI) project - a case study of Hamilton City, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Jollands, N; Ruth, M; Bernier, C; Golubiewski, N

    2007-06-01

    Infrastructure systems and services (ISS) are vulnerable to changes in climate. This paper reports on a study of the impact of gradual climate changes on ISS in Hamilton City, New Zealand. This study is also the first of its kind to be applied to New Zealand ISS. In the future, the CLINZI project will extend to other areas of New Zealand. Using historical climate data and four climate change scenarios, we modelled the impact of climate change on aspects of water supply and quality, transport, energy demand, public health and air quality. Our analysis reveals that many of Hamilton City's infrastructure systems demonstrated greater responsiveness to population changes than to gradual climate change.

  4. A list of tantalum lines for the wavelength calibration of the Hamilton echelle spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Yu. V.

    2015-10-01

    A solution to the problem of wavelength calibration for Hamilton echelle spectrographs using a hollow cathode lamp operating at the Lick Observatory Shane telescope until June 9, 2011 is presented. The spectrum of the nominally thorium—argon lamp also contains, in addition to lines of thorium and argon, a number of unknown lines identified with tantalum. Atomic data for measured lines of tantalum and thorium are used to estimate the temperature of the gas in the lamp, T = 3120 ± 60 K. All all lines of TaI and TaII visible in the lamp spectrum have been selected from the VALD3 atomic line database, and a list compiled for use in the processing of spectral observations. The accuracy of this calibration approach is limited by the influence of hyperfine line splitting.

  5. Numerical Schemes for the Hamilton-Jacobi and Level Set Equations on Triangulated Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Sethian, James A.

    1997-01-01

    Borrowing from techniques developed for conservation law equations, numerical schemes which discretize the Hamilton-Jacobi (H-J), level set, and Eikonal equations on triangulated domains are presented. The first scheme is a provably monotone discretization for certain forms of the H-J equations. Unfortunately, the basic scheme lacks proper Lipschitz continuity of the numerical Hamiltonian. By employing a virtual edge flipping technique, Lipschitz continuity of the numerical flux is restored on acute triangulations. Next, schemes are introduced and developed based on the weaker concept of positive coefficient approximations for homogeneous Hamiltonians. These schemes possess a discrete maximum principle on arbitrary triangulations and naturally exhibit proper Lipschitz continuity of the numerical Hamiltonian. Finally, a class of Petrov-Galerkin approximations are considered. These schemes are stabilized via a least-squares bilinear form. The Petrov-Galerkin schemes do not possess a discrete maximum principle but generalize to high order accuracy.

  6. Calculation of Hamilton energy and control of dynamical systems with different types of attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Wu, Fuqiang; Jin, Wuyin; Zhou, Ping; Hayat, Tasawar

    2017-05-01

    Strange attractors can be observed in chaotic and hyperchaotic systems. Most of the dynamical systems hold a finite number of attractors, while some chaotic systems can be controlled to present an infinite number of attractors by generating infinite equilibria. Chaos can also be triggered in some dynamical systems that can present hidden attractors, and the attractors in these dynamical systems find no equilibria and the basin of attraction is not connected with any equilibrium (the equilibria position meets certain restriction function). In this paper, Hamilton energy is calculated on the chaotic systems with different types of attractors, and energy modulation is used to control the chaos in these systems. The potential mechanism could be that negative feedback in energy can suppress the phase space and oscillating behaviors, and thus, the chaotic, periodical oscillators can be controlled. It could be effective to control other chaotic, hyperchaotic and even periodical oscillating systems as well.

  7. Hamilton-Jacobi approach for quasi-exponential inflation: predictions and constraints after Planck 2015 results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videla, Nelson

    2017-03-01

    In the present work we study the consequences of considering an inflationary universe model in which the Hubble rate has a quasi-exponential dependence in the inflaton field, given by H(φ )=H_{inf}\\exp [{φ /m_p}/{p( 1+φ /m_p) }]. We analyze the inflation dynamics under the Hamilton-Jacobi approach, which allows us to consider H(φ ), rather than V(φ ), as the fundamental quantity to be specified. By comparing the theoretical predictions of the model together with the allowed contour plots in the n_s-r plane and the amplitude of primordial scalar perturbations from the latest Planck data, the parameters charactering this model are constrained. The model predicts values for the tensor-to-scalar ratio r and for the running of the scalar spectral index dn_s/ d ln k consistent with the current bounds imposed by Planck, and we conclude that the model is viable.

  8. Neumann-Type Boundary Conditions for Hamilton-Jacobi Equations in Smooth Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Martin V.

    2006-05-15

    Neumann or oblique derivative boundary conditions for viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations are considered. As developed by P.L. Lions, such boundary conditions are naturally associated with optimal control problems for which the state equations employ 'Skorokhod' or reflection dynamics to ensure that the state remains in a prescribed set, assumed here to have a smooth boundary. We develop connections between the standard formulation of viscosity boundary conditions and an alternative formulation using a naturally occurring discontinuous Hamiltonian which incorporates the reflection dynamics directly. (This avoids the dependence of such equivalence on existence and uniqueness results, which may not be available in some applications.) At points of differentiability, equivalent conditions for the boundary conditions are given in terms of the Hamiltonian and the geometry of the state trajectories using optimal controls.

  9. Potential for energy cost reductions in 'Hamilton Class' cutters through fuel modification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Plank, G.; Weidner, F.

    1981-09-01

    A review of all pertinent and available literature on the use of blended fuel and water-in-fuel emulsions in marine power plants was accomplished with special attention paid to the use of this technique with gas turbines. Telephone contact was made with the engineering officers on all of the available (in-port) 'Hamilton Class' cutters and 'Polar Class' icebreakers to determine the operating schedules of the gas turbines on these vessels as well as fuel consumption and maintenance history. The opinions of the engineering officers were solicited with respect to any special problems which may exist, either with the hardware or operations of the vessels that would act to prevent or impede the use of a water-in-fuel emulsion. A cost/benefit analysis was performed for the case of a blended fuel for the diesels and a water-in-blended fuel emulsion for the gas turbines.

  10. Healing in places of decline: (re)imagining everyday landscapes in Hamilton, Ontario.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Sarah; McMullan, Colin

    2005-12-01

    Ongoing interest in therapeutic landscapes has contributed noticeably to the development of a "post-medical geography of health" (Kearns, R.A., Professional Geographer 45 (1993) 139). Drawing on a variety of sources, including in-depth interviews and newspaper coverage from Hamilton, Canada, this paper explores the processes by which ordinary places are characterised as healthy or unhealthy, and investigates how health-affirming and health-denying places exist together in everyday life. We argue that it is possible for places to simultaneously hurt and heal, and that the therapeutic effect of place is largely contingent on individuals' physical and social locations. Further, we attempt to illustrate how these meanings are negotiated at a variety of different geographic scales.

  11. Hamilton-Jacobi approach for first order actions and theories with higher derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Bertin, M.C. Pimentel, B.M. Pompeia, P.J.

    2008-03-15

    In this work, we analyze systems described by Lagrangians with higher order derivatives in the context of the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism for first order actions. Two different approaches are studied here: the first one is analogous to the description of theories with higher derivatives in the hamiltonian formalism according to [D.M. Gitman, S.L. Lyakhovich, I.V. Tyutin, Soviet Phys. J. 26 (1983) 730; D.M. Gitman, I.V. Tyutin, Quantization of Fields with Constraints, Springer-Verlag, New York, Berlin, 1990] the second treats the case where degenerate coordinate are present, in an analogy to reference [D.M. Gitman, I.V. Tyutin, Nucl. Phys. B 630 (2002) 509]. Several examples are analyzed where a comparison between both approaches is made.

  12. On a Lagrange-Hamilton formalism describing position and momentum uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuch, Dieter

    1993-01-01

    According to Heisenberg's uncertainty relation, in quantum mechanics it is not possible to determine, simultaneously, exact values for the position and the momentum of a material system. Calculating the mean value of the Hamiltonian operator with the aid of exact analytic Gaussian wave packet solutions, these uncertainties cause an energy contribution additional to the classical energy of the system. For the harmonic oscillator, e.g., this nonclassical energy represents the ground state energy. It will be shown that this additional energy contribution can be considered as a Hamiltonian function, if it is written in appropriate variables. With the help of the usual Lagrange-Hamilton formalism known from classical particle mechanics, but now considering this new Hamiltonian function, it is possible to obtain the equations of motion for position and momentum uncertainties.

  13. Variation in helper effort among cooperatively breeding bird species is consistent with Hamilton's Rule.

    PubMed

    Green, Jonathan P; Freckleton, Robert P; Hatchwell, Ben J

    2016-08-24

    Investment by helpers in cooperative breeding systems is extremely variable among species, but this variation is currently unexplained. Inclusive fitness theory predicts that, all else being equal, cooperative investment should correlate positively with the relatedness of helpers to the recipients of their care. We test this prediction in a comparative analysis of helper investment in 36 cooperatively breeding bird species. We show that species-specific helper contributions to cooperative brood care increase as the mean relatedness between helpers and recipients increases. Helper contributions are also related to the sex ratio of helpers, but neither group size nor the proportion of nests with helpers influence helper effort. Our findings support the hypothesis that variation in helping behaviour among cooperatively breeding birds is consistent with Hamilton's rule, indicating a key role for kin selection in the evolution of cooperative investment in social birds.

  14. Hamilton-Jacobi method for molecular distribution function in a chemical oscillator.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hiizu; Sakaue, Takahiro; Wakou, Jun'ichi

    2013-12-07

    Using the Hamilton-Jacobi method, we solve chemical Fokker-Planck equations within the Gaussian approximation and obtain a simple and compact formula for a conditional probability distribution. The formula holds in general transient situations, and can be applied not only to a steady state but also to an oscillatory state. By analyzing the long time behavior of the solution in the oscillatory case, we obtain the phase diffusion constant along the periodic orbit and the steady distribution perpendicular to it. A simple method for numerical evaluation of these formulas are devised, and they are compared with Monte Carlo simulations in the case of Brusselator as an example. Some results are shown to be identical to previously obtained expressions.

  15. Matched asymptotic expansion of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation for aeroassisted plane-change maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, Anthony J.; Melamed, Nahum

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we develop a general procedure for constructing a matched asymptotic expansion of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation based on the method of characteristics. The development is for a class of perturbation problems whose solution exhibits two-time-scale behavior. A regular expansion for problems of this type is inappropriate since it is not uniformly valid over a narrow range of the independent variable. Of particular interest here is the manner in which matching and boundary conditions are enforced when the expansion is carried out to first order. Two cases are distinguished - one where the left boundary condition coincides with or lies to the right of the singular region and one where the left boundary condition lies to the left of the singular region. A simple example is used to illustrate the procedure, and its potential application to aeroassisted plane change is described.

  16. A Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman approach for termination of seizure-like bursting.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2014-10-01

    We use Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman methods to find minimum-time and energy-optimal control strategies to terminate seizure-like bursting behavior in a conductance-based neural model. Averaging is used to eliminate fast variables from the model, and a target set is defined through bifurcation analysis of the slow variables of the model. This method is illustrated for a single neuron model and for a network model to illustrate its efficacy in terminating bursting once it begins. This work represents a numerical proof-of-concept that a new class of control strategies can be employed to mitigate bursting, and could ultimately be adapted to treat medically intractible epilepsy in patient-specific models.

  17. Finite difference Hermite WENO schemes for the Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Feng; Shu, Chi-Wang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a new type of finite difference Hermite weighted essentially non-oscillatory (HWENO) schemes are constructed for solving Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) equations. Point values of both the solution and its first derivatives are used in the HWENO reconstruction and evolved via time advancing. While the evolution of the solution is still through the classical numerical fluxes to ensure convergence to weak solutions, the evolution of the first derivatives of the solution is through a simple dimension-by-dimension non-conservative procedure to gain efficiency. The main advantages of this new scheme include its compactness in the spatial field and its simplicity in the reconstructions. Extensive numerical experiments in one and two dimensional cases are performed to verify the accuracy, high resolution and efficiency of this new scheme.

  18. Hamilton-Jacobi formalism for inflation with non-minimal derivative coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhahmadi, Haidar; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.; Aghamohammadi, Ali; Saaidi, Khaled

    2016-10-01

    In inflation with nonminimal derivative coupling there is not a conformal transformation to the Einstein frame where calculations are straightforward, and thus in order to extract inflationary observables one needs to perform a detailed and lengthy perturbation investigation. In this work we bypass this problem by performing a Hamilton-Jacobi analysis, namely rewriting the cosmological equations considering the scalar field to be the time variable. We apply the method to two specific models, namely the power-law and the exponential cases, and for each model we calculate various observables such as the tensor-to-scalar ratio, and the spectral index and its running. We compare them with 2013 and 2015 Planck data, and we show that they are in a very good agreement with observations.

  19. Variation in helper effort among cooperatively breeding bird species is consistent with Hamilton's Rule

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jonathan P.; Freckleton, Robert P.; Hatchwell, Ben J.

    2016-01-01

    Investment by helpers in cooperative breeding systems is extremely variable among species, but this variation is currently unexplained. Inclusive fitness theory predicts that, all else being equal, cooperative investment should correlate positively with the relatedness of helpers to the recipients of their care. We test this prediction in a comparative analysis of helper investment in 36 cooperatively breeding bird species. We show that species-specific helper contributions to cooperative brood care increase as the mean relatedness between helpers and recipients increases. Helper contributions are also related to the sex ratio of helpers, but neither group size nor the proportion of nests with helpers influence helper effort. Our findings support the hypothesis that variation in helping behaviour among cooperatively breeding birds is consistent with Hamilton's rule, indicating a key role for kin selection in the evolution of cooperative investment in social birds. PMID:27554604

  20. Matched asymptotic expansion of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation for aeroassisted plane-change maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, Anthony J.; Melamed, Nahum

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we develop a general procedure for constructing a matched asymptotic expansion of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation based on the method of characteristics. The development is for a class of perturbation problems whose solution exhibits two-time-scale behavior. A regular expansion for problems of this type is inappropriate since it is not uniformly valid over a narrow range of the independent variable. Of particular interest here is the manner in which matching and boundary conditions are enforced when the expansion is carried out to first order. Two cases are distinguished - one where the left boundary condition coincides with or lies to the right of the singular region and one where the left boundary condition lies to the left of the singular region. A simple example is used to illustrate the procedure, and its potential application to aeroassisted plane change is described.

  1. Classification of Hamilton-Jacobi separation in orthogonal coordinates with diagonal curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Rajaratnam, Krishan McLenaghan, Raymond G.

    2014-08-15

    We find all orthogonal metrics where the geodesic Hamilton-Jacobi equation separates and the Riemann curvature tensor satisfies a certain equation (called the diagonal curvature condition). All orthogonal metrics of constant curvature satisfy the diagonal curvature condition. The metrics we find either correspond to a Benenti system or are warped product metrics where the induced metric on the base manifold corresponds to a Benenti system. Furthermore, we show that most metrics we find are characterized by concircular tensors; these metrics, called Kalnins-Eisenhart-Miller metrics, have an intrinsic characterization which can be used to obtain them on a given space. In conjunction with other results, we show that the metrics we found constitute all separable metrics for Riemannian spaces of constant curvature and de Sitter space.

  2. Calculation of Hamilton energy and control of dynamical systems with different types of attractors.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Wu, Fuqiang; Jin, Wuyin; Zhou, Ping; Hayat, Tasawar

    2017-05-01

    Strange attractors can be observed in chaotic and hyperchaotic systems. Most of the dynamical systems hold a finite number of attractors, while some chaotic systems can be controlled to present an infinite number of attractors by generating infinite equilibria. Chaos can also be triggered in some dynamical systems that can present hidden attractors, and the attractors in these dynamical systems find no equilibria and the basin of attraction is not connected with any equilibrium (the equilibria position meets certain restriction function). In this paper, Hamilton energy is calculated on the chaotic systems with different types of attractors, and energy modulation is used to control the chaos in these systems. The potential mechanism could be that negative feedback in energy can suppress the phase space and oscillating behaviors, and thus, the chaotic, periodical oscillators can be controlled. It could be effective to control other chaotic, hyperchaotic and even periodical oscillating systems as well.

  3. Nice to kin and nasty to non-kin: revisiting Hamilton's early insights on eusociality

    PubMed Central

    Boomsma, Jacobus J.; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    When helping behaviour is costly, Hamiltonian logic implies that animals need to direct helpful acts towards kin, so that indirect fitness benefits justify the costs. We revisit inferences about nepotism and aggression in Hamilton's 1964 paper to argue that he overestimated the general significance of nepotism, but that other issues that he raised continue to suggest novel research agendas today. We now know that nepotism in eusocial insects is rare, because variation in genetic recognition cues is insufficient. A lower proportion of individuals breeding and larger clutch sizes selecting for a more uniform colony odour may explain this. Irreversible worker sterility can induce both the fiercest possible aggression and the highest likelihood of helping random distant kin, but these Hamiltonian contentions still await large-scale testing in social animals. PMID:24132094

  4. Recent extensions of Hamilton's law of varying action with applications - The integral variation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzl, D. L.; Zele, F.

    Recently, the application of Hamilton's law of varying action to initial value problems in dynamics has been generalized and simplified. Using the Hitzl et al. (1984) new integral variation method, approximate solutions can be constructed to arbitrary initial value problems involving systems of first-order ordinary differential equations. The new constructive technique is briefly described, and the method is illustrated with two example problems: (1) the damped oscillator (two linear differential equations), and (2) the Lagrange planetary equations with zonal harmonics and drag (a highly nonlinear system of six coupled first-order differential equations). Numerical results confirm that the integral variation method indeed provides accurate approximate analytical solutions over a specified finite time interval.

  5. Clinical and tree hollow populations of human pathogenic yeast in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada are different.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Chris; Yang, Jiaqi; Vogan, Aaron; Maganti, Harinad; Yamamura, Deborah; Xu, Jianping

    2014-05-01

    Yeast are among the most frequent pathogens in humans. The dominant yeast causing human infections belong to the genus Candida and Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated species. However, several non-C. albicans species are becoming increasingly common in patients worldwide. The relationships between yeast in humans and the natural environments remain poorly understood. Furthermore, it is often difficult to identify or exclude the origins of disease-causing yeast from specific environmental reservoirs. In this study, we compared the yeast isolates from tree hollows and from clinics in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Our surveys and analyses showed significant differences in yeast species composition, in their temporal dynamics, and in yeast genotypes between isolates from tree hollows and hospitals. Our results are inconsistent with the hypothesis that yeast from trees constitute a significant source of pathogenic yeast in humans in this region. Similarly, the yeast in humans and clinics do not appear to contribute to yeast in tree hollows.

  6. Back-Reaction of Black Hole Radiation from Hamilton-Jacobi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chikun

    2013-10-01

    In the frame of Hamilton-Jacobi method, the back-reactions of the radiating particles together with the total entropy change of the whole system are investigated. The emission probability from this process is found to be equivalent to the null geodesic method. However its physical picture is more clear: the negative energy one of a virtual particle pair is absorbed by the black hole, resulting in the temperature, electric potential and angular velocity increase; then the black hole amount of heat, electric charge and angular momentum can spontaneously transfer to the positive energy particle; when obtaining enough energy, it can escape away to infinity, visible to distant observers. And this method can be applied to any sort of horizons and particles without a specific choice of (regular-across-the-horizon) coordinates.

  7. Hawking radiation from a Vaidya black hole by Hamilton-Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Han; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2011-03-01

    Using the Hamilton-Jacobi method, Hawking radiation from the apparent horizon of a dynamical Vaidya black hole is calculated. The black hole thermodynamics can be built successfully on the apparent horizon. If a relativistic perturbation is given to the apparent horizon, a similar calculation can also lead to a purely thermal spectrum, which corresponds to a modified temperature from the former. The first law of thermodynamics can also be constructed successfully at a new supersurface which has a small deviation from the apparent horizon. When the event horizon is thought as such a deviation from the apparent horizon, the expressions of the characteristic position and temperature are consistent with the previous result that asserts that thermodynamics should be built on the event horizon. It is concluded that the thermodynamics should be constructed on the apparent horizon exactly while the event horizon thermodynamics is just one of the perturbations near the apparent horizon.

  8. Hamilton-Jacobi method for molecular distribution function in a chemical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Hiizu; Sakaue, Takahiro; Wakou, Jun'ichi

    2013-12-01

    Using the Hamilton-Jacobi method, we solve chemical Fokker-Planck equations within the Gaussian approximation and obtain a simple and compact formula for a conditional probability distribution. The formula holds in general transient situations, and can be applied not only to a steady state but also to an oscillatory state. By analyzing the long time behavior of the solution in the oscillatory case, we obtain the phase diffusion constant along the periodic orbit and the steady distribution perpendicular to it. A simple method for numerical evaluation of these formulas are devised, and they are compared with Monte Carlo simulations in the case of Brusselator as an example. Some results are shown to be identical to previously obtained expressions.

  9. Holographic renormalization and Ward identities with the Hamilton-Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, Dario; Mück, Wolfgang

    2003-03-01

    A systematic procedure for performing holographic renormalization, which makes use of the Hamilton-Jacobi method, is proposed and applied to a bulk theory of gravity interacting with a scalar field and a U(1) gauge field in the Stückelberg formalism. We describe how the power divergences are obtained as solutions of a set of "descent equations" stemming from the radial Hamiltonian constraint of the theory. In addition, we isolate the logarithmic divergences, which are closely related to anomalies. The method allows to determine also the exact one-point functions of the dual field theory. Using the other Hamiltonian constraints of the bulk theory, we derive the Ward identities for diffeomorphisms and gauge invariance. In particular, we demonstrate the breaking of U(1) R current conservation, recovering the holographic chiral anomaly recently discussed in hep-th/0112119 and hep-th/0202056.

  10. The classical limit of minimal length uncertainty relation: revisit with the Hamilton-Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaobo; Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang

    2016-05-01

    The existence of a minimum measurable length could deform not only the standard quantum mechanics but also classical physics. The effects of the minimal length on classical orbits of particles in a gravitation field have been investigated before, using the deformed Poisson bracket or Schwarzschild metric. In this paper, we first use the Hamilton-Jacobi method to derive the deformed equations of motion in the context of Newtonian mechanics and general relativity. We then employ them to study the precession of planetary orbits, deflection of light, and time delay in radar propagation. We also set limits on the deformation parameter by comparing our results with the observational measurements. Finally, comparison with results from previous papers is given at the end of this paper.

  11. High-Order Central WENO Schemes for Multi-Dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present new third- and fifth-order Godunov-type central schemes for approximating solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) equation in an arbitrary number of space dimensions. These are the first central schemes for approximating solutions of the HJ equations with an order of accuracy that is greater than two. In two space dimensions we present two versions for the third-order scheme: one scheme that is based on a genuinely two-dimensional Central WENO reconstruction, and another scheme that is based on a simpler dimension-by-dimension reconstruction. The simpler dimension-by-dimension variant is then extended to a multi-dimensional fifth-order scheme. Our numerical examples in one, two and three space dimensions verify the expected order of accuracy of the schemes.

  12. Lie-Hamilton systems on the plane: applications and superposition rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasco, Alfonso; Herranz, Francisco J.; de Lucas, Javier; Sardón, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    A Lie-Hamilton (LH) system is a nonautonomous system of first-order ordinary differential equations describing the integral curves of a t-dependent vector field taking values in a finite-dimensional real Lie algebra of Hamiltonian vector fields with respect to a Poisson structure. We provide new algebraic/geometric techniques to easily determine the properties of such Lie algebras on the plane, e.g., their associated Poisson bivectors. We study new and known LH systems on {{{R}}}2 with physical, biological and mathematical applications. New results cover Cayley-Klein Riccati equations, the here defined planar diffusion Riccati systems, complex Bernoulli differential equations and projective Schrödinger equations. Constants of motion for planar LH systems are explicitly obtained which, in turn, allow us to derive superposition rules through a coalgebra approach.

  13. Space-time relatedness and Hamilton's rule for long-lasting behaviors in viscous populations.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Genes affect not only the behavior and fitness of their carriers but also that of other individuals. According to Hamilton's rule, whether a mutant gene will spread in the gene pool depends on the effects of its carrier on the fitness of all individuals in the population, each weighted by its relatedness to the carrier. However, social behaviors may affect not only recipients living in the generation of the actor but also individuals living in subsequent generations. In this note, I evaluate space-time relatedness coefficients for localized dispersal. These relatedness coefficients weight the selection pressures on long-lasting behaviors, which stem from a multigenerational gap between phenotypic expression by actors and the resulting environmental feedback on the fitness of recipients. Explicit values of space-time relatedness coefficients reveal that they can be surprisingly large for typical dispersal rates, even for hundreds of generations in the future.

  14. Hamilton Jacobi approach for first order actions and theories with higher derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, M. C.; Pimentel, B. M.; Pompeia, P. J.

    2008-03-01

    In this work, we analyze systems described by Lagrangians with higher order derivatives in the context of the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism for first order actions. Two different approaches are studied here: the first one is analogous to the description of theories with higher derivatives in the hamiltonian formalism according to [D.M. Gitman, S.L. Lyakhovich, I.V. Tyutin, Soviet Phys. J. 26 (1983) 730; D.M. Gitman, I.V. Tyutin, Quantization of Fields with Constraints, Springer-Verlag, New York, Berlin, 1990] the second treats the case where degenerate coordinate are present, in an analogy to reference [D.M. Gitman, I.V. Tyutin, Nucl. Phys. B 630 (2002) 509]. Several examples are analyzed where a comparison between both approaches is made.

  15. Nice to kin and nasty to non-kin: revisiting Hamilton's early insights on eusociality.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, Jacobus J; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    When helping behaviour is costly, Hamiltonian logic implies that animals need to direct helpful acts towards kin, so that indirect fitness benefits justify the costs. We revisit inferences about nepotism and aggression in Hamilton's 1964 paper to argue that he overestimated the general significance of nepotism, but that other issues that he raised continue to suggest novel research agendas today. We now know that nepotism in eusocial insects is rare, because variation in genetic recognition cues is insufficient. A lower proportion of individuals breeding and larger clutch sizes selecting for a more uniform colony odour may explain this. Irreversible worker sterility can induce both the fiercest possible aggression and the highest likelihood of helping random distant kin, but these Hamiltonian contentions still await large-scale testing in social animals.

  16. Hybrid massively parallel fast sweeping method for static Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detrixhe, Miles; Gibou, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    The fast sweeping method is a popular algorithm for solving a variety of static Hamilton-Jacobi equations. Fast sweeping algorithms for parallel computing have been developed, but are severely limited. In this work, we present a multilevel, hybrid parallel algorithm that combines the desirable traits of two distinct parallel methods. The fine and coarse grained components of the algorithm take advantage of heterogeneous computer architecture common in high performance computing facilities. We present the algorithm and demonstrate its effectiveness on a set of example problems including optimal control, dynamic games, and seismic wave propagation. We give results for convergence, parallel scaling, and show state-of-the-art speedup values for the fast sweeping method.

  17. On the Geometry of the Hamilton-Jacobi Equation and Generating Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Sebastián; de León, Manuel; Marrero, Juan Carlos; Martín de Diego, David; Vaquero, Miguel

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we develop a geometric version of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the Poisson setting. Specifically, we "geometrize" what is usually called a complete solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We use some well-known results about symplectic groupoids, in particular cotangent groupoids, as a keystone for the construction of our framework. Our methodology follows the ambitious program proposed by Weinstein (In Mechanics day (Waterloo, ON, 1992), volume 7 of fields institute communications, American Mathematical Society, Providence, 1996) in order to develop geometric formulations of the dynamical behavior of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems on Lie algebroids and Lie groupoids. This procedure allows us to take symmetries into account, and, as a by-product, we recover results from Channell and Scovel (Phys D 50(1):80-88, 1991), Ge (Indiana Univ. Math. J. 39(3):859-876, 1990), Ge and Marsden (Phys Lett A 133(3):134-139, 1988), but even in these situations our approach is new. A theory of generating functions for the Poisson structures considered here is also developed following the same pattern, solving a longstanding problem of the area: how to obtain a generating function for the identity transformation and the nearby Poisson automorphisms of Poisson manifolds. A direct application of our results gives the construction of a family of Poisson integrators, that is, integrators that conserve the underlying Poisson geometry. These integrators are implemented in the paper in benchmark problems. Some conclusions, current and future directions of research are shown at the end of the paper.

  18. Respiratory medicine at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario: 1968 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Norman L; O’Byrne, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The medical school at McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario) was conceived in 1965 and admitted the first class in 1969. John Evans became the founding Dean and he invited Moran Campbell to be the first Chairman of the Department of Medicine. Moran Campbell, already a world figure in respiratory medicine and physiology, arrived at McMaster in September 1968, and he invited Norman Jones to be Coordinator of the Respiratory Programme. At that time, Hamilton had a population of 300,000, with two full-time respirologists, Robert Cornett at the Hamilton General Hospital and Michael Newhouse at St Joseph’s Hospital. From the clinical perspective, the aim of the Respiratory Programme was to develop a network approach to clinical problems among the five hospitals in the Hamilton region, with St Joseph’s Hospital serving as a regional referral centre, and each hospital developing its own focus: intensive care and burns units at the Hamilton General Hospital; cancer at the Henderson (later Juravinski) Hospital; tuberculosis and rehabilitation at the Chedoke Hospital; pediatrics and neonatal intensive care at the McMaster University Medical Centre; and community care at the Joseph Brant Hospital in Burlington (Ontario). The network provided an ideal base for a specialty residency program. There was also the need to establish viable research. These objectives were achieved through collaboration, support of hospital administration, and recruitment of clinicians and faculty, mainly from our own trainees and research fellows. By the mid-1970s the respiratory group numbered more than 25; outpatient clinic visits and research had grown beyond our initial expectations. The international impact of the group became reflected in the clinical and basic research endeavours. ASTHMA: Freddy Hargreave and Jerry Dolovich established methods to measure airway responsiveness to histamine and methacholine. Allergen inhalation was shown to increase airway responsiveness for several weeks

  19. Reappearing Fathers, Reappearing Pasts: History, Gender, and Identity in Hamilton's "Plain City" and Myers'"Somewhere in the Darkness."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apol, Laura

    2002-01-01

    Considers Virginia Hamilton's "Plain City" and Walter Dean Myers'"Somewhere in the Darkness." Compares the similarities and differences in the authors and the books and considers many aspects of "coming of age." Notes that when the fathers in these stories reappear, the simple fact of their presence is a catalyst for the protagonist's self…

  20. Charles Hamilton Houston: The Legal Scholar Who Laid the Foundation for Integrated Higher Education in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blight, David W.

    2002-01-01

    Presents the story of Charles Hamilton Houston, an African American legal scholar who led a crusade focused on equal educational opportunities and facilities for African American students. He used the courts to force Americans to listen to his message about racial subjugation, segregation, and lynch law. (SM)

  1. Hamilton/Jacobi perturbation methods applied to the rotational motion of a rigid body in a gravitational field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, P. M.; Harmon, G. R.; Liu, J. J. F.; Cochran, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    The formalism for studying perturbations of a triaxial rigid body within the Hamilton-Jacobi framework is developed. The motion of a triaxial artificial earth satellite about its center of mass is studied. Variables are found which permit separation, and the Euler angles and associated conjugate momenta are obtained as functions of canonical constants and time.

  2. 76 FR 77994 - Brian Hamilton v. El Paso Natural Gas, El Paso Western Pipelines; Notice Announcing Docket Number...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Brian Hamilton v. El Paso Natural Gas, El Paso Western Pipelines; Notice Announcing Docket Number Change On December 2, 2011, the Commission issued a notice in docket number...

  3. Fort Hamilton High School Project SPEED: Special Education to Eliminate Dropouts. O.E.E. Evaluation Report, 1982-1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolaidis, Mary; Sica, Michael

    The major goal of Project SPEED (at Fort Hamilton High School, Brooklyn, New York) was dropout prevention. In its first year of operation, 1982-83, the project provided English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction, bilingual instruction in basic skills required for graduation, and guidance services to approximately 300 limited English proficient…

  4. Chaos M-ary modulation and demodulation method based on Hamilton oscillator and its application in communication.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yongqing; Li, Xingyuan; Li, Yanan; Yang, Wei; Song, Hailiang

    2013-03-01

    Chaotic communication has aroused general interests in recent years, but its communication effect is not ideal with the restriction of chaos synchronization. In this paper a new chaos M-ary digital modulation and demodulation method is proposed. By using region controllable characteristics of spatiotemporal chaos Hamilton map in phase plane and chaos unique characteristic, which is sensitive to initial value, zone mapping method is proposed. It establishes the map relationship between M-ary digital information and the region of Hamilton map phase plane, thus the M-ary information chaos modulation is realized. In addition, zone partition demodulation method is proposed based on the structure characteristic of Hamilton modulated information, which separates M-ary information from phase trajectory of chaotic Hamilton map, and the theory analysis of zone partition demodulator's boundary range is given. Finally, the communication system based on the two methods is constructed on the personal computer. The simulation shows that in high speed transmission communications and with no chaos synchronization circumstance, the proposed chaotic M-ary modulation and demodulation method has outperformed some conventional M-ary modulation methods, such as quadrature phase shift keying and M-ary pulse amplitude modulation in bit error rate. Besides, it has performance improvement in bandwidth efficiency, transmission efficiency and anti-noise performance, and the system complexity is low and chaos signal is easy to generate.

  5. Killing tensors, warped products and the orthogonal separation of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajaratnam, Krishan McLenaghan, Raymond G.

    2014-01-15

    We study Killing tensors in the context of warped products and apply the results to the problem of orthogonal separation of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. This work is motivated primarily by the case of spaces of constant curvature where warped products are abundant. We first characterize Killing tensors which have a natural algebraic decomposition in warped products. We then apply this result to show how one can obtain the Killing-Stäckel space (KS-space) for separable coordinate systems decomposable in warped products. This result in combination with Benenti's theory for constructing the KS-space of certain special separable coordinates can be used to obtain the KS-space for all orthogonal separable coordinates found by Kalnins and Miller in Riemannian spaces of constant curvature. Next we characterize when a natural Hamiltonian is separable in coordinates decomposable in a warped product by showing that the conditions originally given by Benenti can be reduced. Finally, we use this characterization and concircular tensors (a special type of torsionless conformal Killing tensor) to develop a general algorithm to determine when a natural Hamiltonian is separable in a special class of separable coordinates which include all orthogonal separable coordinates in spaces of constant curvature.

  6. Hamilton study: distribution of factors confounding the relationship between air quality and respiratory health

    SciTech Connect

    Pengelly, L.D.; Kerigan, A.T.; Goldsmith, C.H.; Inman, E.M.

    1984-10-01

    Hamilton, Ontario is an industrial city with a population of 300,000 which is situated at the western end of Lake Ontario. Canada's two largest iron and steel mills are located here; the city historically has had relatively poor air quality, which has improved markedly in the last 25 years. Concern about the health effects of current air quality recently led us to carry out an epidemiological study of the effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of over 3500 school children. Respiratory health was measured by pulmonary function testing of each child, and by an assessment of each child's respiratory symptoms via a questionnaire administered to the parents. Previous studies had shown that other environmental factors (e.g. parental smoking, parental cough, socioeconomic level, housing, and gas cooking) might also affect respiratory health, and thus confound any potential relationships between health and air pollution. The questionnaire also collected information on many of these confounding factors. For the purposes of initial analysis, the city was divided into five areas in which differences in air quality were expected. In general, factors which have been associated with poor respiratory health were observed to be more prevalent in areas of poorer air quality.

  7. The Montgomery Äsberg and the Hamilton Ratings of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Carmody, Thomas; Rush, A. John; Bernstein, Ira; Warden, Diane; Brannan, Stephen; Burnham, Daniel; Woo, Ada; Trivedi, Madhukar

    2007-01-01

    The 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) and the Montgomery Äsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) are two widely used clinicianrated symptom scales. A 6-item version of the HRSD (HRSD6) was created by Bech to address the psychometric limitations of the HRSD17. The psychometric properties of these measures were compared using classical test theory (CTT) and item response theory (IRT) methods. IRT methods were used to equate total scores on any two scales. Data from two distinctly different outpatient studies of nonpsychotic major depression: a 12-month study of highly treatment-resistant patients (n=233) and an 8-week acute phase drug treatment trial (n=985) were used for robustness of results. MADRS and HRSD6 items generally contributed more to the measurement of depression than HRSD17 items as shown by higher item-total correlations and higher IRT slope parameters. The MADRS and HRSD6 were unifactorial while the HRSD17 contained 2 factors. The MADRS showed about twice the precision in estimating depression as either the HRSD17 or HRSD6 for average severity of depression. An HRSD17 of 7 corresponded to an 8 or 9 on the MADRS and 4 on the HRSD6. The MADRS would be superior to the HRSD17 in the conduct of clinical trials. PMID:16769204

  8. Symptom Frequency Characteristics of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale of Major Depressive Disorder in Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wiglusz, Mariusz S; Landowski, Jerzy; Michalak, Lidia; Cubała, Wiesław J

    2015-09-01

    Depressive disorders are common among patients with epilepsy (PWE). The aim of this study was to explore symptom frequencies of 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and recognize the clinical characteristics of Major Depressive Disorder in PWE. A sample of 40 adults outpatients with epilepsy and depression was diagnosed using SCID-I for DSM-IV-TR and HDRS-17. The total HDRS-17 score was analysed followed by the exploratory analysis based on the hierarchical model. The frequencies of HDRS-17 items varied widely in this study. Insomnia related items and general somatic symptoms items as well as insomnia and somatic factors exhibited constant and higher frequency. Feeling guilty, suicide, psychomotor retardation and depressed mood showed relatively lower frequencies. Other symptoms had variable frequencies across the study population. Depressive disorders are common among PWE. In the study group insomnia and somatic symptoms displayed highest values which could represent atypical clinical features of mood disorders in PWE. There is a need for more studies with a use of standardized approach to the problem.

  9. Husbandry stress exacerbates mycobacterial infections in adult zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsay, J.M.; Watral, V.; Schreck, C.B.; Kent, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacteria are significant pathogens of laboratory zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton). Stress is often implicated in clinical disease and morbidity associated with mycobacterial infections but has yet to be examined with zebrafish. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of husbandry stressors on zebrafish infected with mycobacteria. Adult zebrafish were exposed to Mycobacterium marinum or Mycobacterium chelonae, two species that have been associated with disease in zebrafish. Infected fish and controls were then subjected to chronic crowding and handling stressors and examined over an 8-week period. Whole-body cortisol was significantly elevated in stressed fish compared to non-stressed fish. Fish infected with M. marinum ATCC 927 and subjected to husbandry stressors had 14% cumulative mortality while no mortality occurred among infected fish not subjected to husbandry stressors. Stressed fish, infected with M. chelonae H1E2 from zebrafish, were 15-fold more likely to be infected than non-stressed fish at week 8 post-injection. Sub-acute, diffuse infections were more common among stressed fish infected with M. marinum or M. chelonae than non-stressed fish. This is the first study to demonstrate an effect of stress and elevated cortisol on the morbidity, prevalence, clinical disease and histological presentation associated with mycobacterial infections in zebrafish. Minimizing husbandry stress may be effective at reducing the severity of outbreaks of clinical mycobacteriosis in zebrafish facilities. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Social determinants of older adults' awareness of community support services in Hamilton, Ontario.

    PubMed

    Tindale, J; Denton, M; Ploeg, J; Lillie, J; Hutchison, B; Brazil, K; Akhtar-Danesh, N; Plenderleith, J

    2011-11-01

    Community support services (CSSs) have been developed in Canada and other Western nations to enable persons coping with health or social issues to continue to live in the community. This study addresses the extent to which awareness of CSSs is structured by the social determinants of health. In a telephone interview conducted in February-March 2006, 1152 community-dwelling older adults (response rate 12.4%) from Hamilton, Ontario, Canada were made to read a series of four vignettes and were asked whether they were able to identify a CSS they may turn to in that situation. Across the four vignettes, 40% of participants did name a CSS as a possible source of assistance. Logistic regression was used to determine factors related to awareness of CSSs. Respondents most likely to have awareness of CSS include the middle-aged and higher-income groups. Being knowledgeable about where to look for information about CSSs, having social support and being a member of a club or voluntary organisations are also significant predictors of awareness of CSSs. Study results suggest that efforts be made to improve the level of awareness and access to CSSs among older adults by targeting their social networks as well as their health and social care providers.

  11. Equation of motion of canonical tensor model and Hamilton-Jacobi equation of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua; Sasakura, Naoki; Sato, Yuki

    2017-03-01

    The canonical tensor model (CTM) is a rank-three tensor model formulated as a totally constrained system in the canonical formalism. The constraint algebra of CTM has a similar structure as that of the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner formalism of general relativity, and it is studied as a discretized model for quantum gravity. In this paper, we analyze the classical equation of motion (EOM) of CTM in a formal continuum limit through a derivative expansion of the tensor of CTM up to the fourth order, and we show that it is the same as the EOM of a coupled system of gravity and a scalar field derived from the Hamilton-Jacobi equation with an appropriate choice of an action. The action contains a scalar field potential of an exponential form, and the system classically respects a dilatational symmetry. We find that the system has a critical dimension, given by six, over which it becomes unstable due to the wrong sign of the scalar kinetic term. In six dimensions, de Sitter spacetime becomes a solution to the EOM, signaling the emergence of a conformal symmetry, while the time evolution of the scale factor is a power law in dimensions below six.

  12. Excellent reliability of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-21) in Indonesia after training.

    PubMed

    Istriana, Erita; Kurnia, Ade; Weijers, Annelies; Hidayat, Teddy; Pinxten, Lucas; de Jong, Cor; Schellekens, Arnt

    2013-09-01

    The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) is the most widely used depression rating scale worldwide. Reliability of HDRS has been reported mainly from Western countries. The current study tested the reliability of HDRS ratings among psychiatric residents in Indonesia, before and after HDRS training. The hypotheses were that: (i) prior to the training reliability of HDRS ratings is poor; and (ii) HDRS training can improve reliability of HDRS ratings to excellent levels. Furthermore, we explored cultural validity at item level. Videotaped HDRS interviews were rated by 30 psychiatric residents before and after 1 day of HDRS training. Based on a gold standard rating, percentage correct ratings and deviation from the standard were calculated. Correct ratings increased from 83% to 99% at item level and from 70% to 100% for the total rating. The average deviation from the gold standard rating improved from 0.07 to 0.02 at item level and from 2.97 to 0.46 for the total rating. HDRS assessment by psychiatric trainees in Indonesia without prior training is unreliable. A short, evidence-based HDRS training improves reliability to near perfect levels. The outlined training program could serve as a template for HDRS trainings. HDRS items that may be less valid for assessment of depression severity in Indonesia are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Canonical equations of Hamilton for the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guo; Guo, Qi; Ren, Zhanmei

    2015-09-01

    We define two different systems of mathematical physics: the second order differential system (SODS) and the first order differential system (FODS). The Newton's second law of motion and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) are the exemplary SODS and FODS, respectively. We obtain a new kind of canonical equations of Hamilton (CEH), which exhibit some kind of symmetry in form and are formally different from the conventional CEH without symmetry [H. Goldstein, C. Poole, J. Safko, Classical Mechanics, third ed., Addison- Wesley, 2001]. We also prove that the number of the CEHs is equal to the number of the generalized coordinates for the FODS, but twice the number of the generalized coordinates for the SODS. We show that the FODS can only be expressed by the new CEH, but not introduced by the conventional CEH, while the SODS can be done by both the new and the conventional CEHs. As an example, we prove that the nonlinear Schrödinger equation can be expressed with the new CEH in a consistent way.

  14. Wave front-ray synthesis for solving the multidimensional quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Robert E; Chou, Chia-Chun

    2011-08-21

    A Cauchy initial-value approach to the complex-valued quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation (QHJE) is investigated for multidimensional systems. In this approach, ray segments foliate configuration space which is laminated by surfaces of constant action. The QHJE incorporates all quantum effects through a term involving the divergence of the quantum momentum function (QMF). The divergence term may be expressed as a sum of two terms, one involving displacement along the ray and the other incorporating the local curvature of the action surface. It is shown that curvature of the wave front may be computed from coefficients of the first and second fundamental forms from differential geometry that are associated with the surface. Using the expression for the divergence, the QHJE becomes a Riccati-type ordinary differential equation (ODE) for the complex-valued QMF, which is parametrized by the arc length along the ray. In order to integrate over possible singularities in the QMF, a stable and accurate Möbius propagator is introduced. This method is then used to evolve rays and wave fronts for four systems in two and three dimensions. From the QMF along each ray, the wave function can be easily computed. Computational difficulties that may arise are described and some ways to circumvent them are presented. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  15. Eckart ro-vibrational Hamiltonians via the gateway Hamilton operator: Theory and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, Viktor

    2017-03-01

    Recently, a general expression for Eckart-frame Hamilton operators has been obtained by the gateway Hamiltonian method [V. Szalay, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 174107 (2015) and V. Szalay, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 064104 (2015)]. The kinetic energy operator in this general Hamiltonian is nearly identical to that of the Eckart-Watson operator even when curvilinear vibrational coordinates are employed. Its different realizations correspond to different methods of calculating Eckart displacements. There are at least two different methods for calculating such displacements: rotation and projection. In this communication, the application of Eckart Hamiltonian operators constructed by rotation and projection, respectively, is numerically demonstrated in calculating vibrational energy levels. The numerical examples confirm that there is no need for rotation to construct an Eckart ro-vibrational Hamiltonian. The application of the gateway method is advantageous even when rotation is used since it obviates the need for differentiation of the matrix rotating into the Eckart frame. Simple geometrical arguments explain that there are infinitely many different methods for calculating Eckart displacements. The geometrical picture also suggests that a unique Eckart displacement vector may be defined as the shortest (mass-weighted) Eckart displacement vector among Eckart displacement vectors corresponding to configurations related by rotation. Its length, as shown analytically and demonstrated by numerical examples, is equal to or less than that of the Eckart displacement vector one can obtain by rotation to the Eckart frame.

  16. The Montgomery Asberg and the Hamilton ratings of depression: a comparison of measures.

    PubMed

    Carmody, Thomas J; Rush, A John; Bernstein, Ira; Warden, Diane; Brannan, Stephen; Burnham, Daniel; Woo, Ada; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2006-12-01

    The 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD(17)) and the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) are two widely used clinician-rated symptom scales. A 6-item version of the HRSD (HRSD(6)) was created by Bech to address the psychometric limitations of the HRSD(17). The psychometric properties of these measures were compared using classical test theory (CTT) and item response theory (IRT) methods. IRT methods were used to equate total scores on any two scales. Data from two distinctly different outpatient studies of nonpsychotic major depression: a 12-month study of highly treatment-resistant patients (n=233) and an 8-week acute phase drug treatment trial (n=985) were used for robustness of results. MADRS and HRSD(6) items generally contributed more to the measurement of depression than HRSD(17) items as shown by higher item-total correlations and higher IRT slope parameters. The MADRS and HRSD(6) were unifactorial while the HRSD(17) contained 2 factors. The MADRS showed about twice the precision in estimating depression as either the HRSD(17) or HRSD(6) for average severity of depression. An HRSD(17) of 7 corresponded to an 8 or 9 on the MADRS and 4 on the HRSD(6). The MADRS would be superior to the HRSD(17) in the conduct of clinical trials.

  17. Killing tensors, warped products and the orthogonal separation of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaratnam, Krishan; McLenaghan, Raymond G.

    2014-01-01

    We study Killing tensors in the context of warped products and apply the results to the problem of orthogonal separation of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. This work is motivated primarily by the case of spaces of constant curvature where warped products are abundant. We first characterize Killing tensors which have a natural algebraic decomposition in warped products. We then apply this result to show how one can obtain the Killing-Stäckel space (KS-space) for separable coordinate systems decomposable in warped products. This result in combination with Benenti's theory for constructing the KS-space of certain special separable coordinates can be used to obtain the KS-space for all orthogonal separable coordinates found by Kalnins and Miller in Riemannian spaces of constant curvature. Next we characterize when a natural Hamiltonian is separable in coordinates decomposable in a warped product by showing that the conditions originally given by Benenti can be reduced. Finally, we use this characterization and concircular tensors (a special type of torsionless conformal Killing tensor) to develop a general algorithm to determine when a natural Hamiltonian is separable in a special class of separable coordinates which include all orthogonal separable coordinates in spaces of constant curvature.

  18. Wave front-ray synthesis for solving the multidimensional quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, Robert E.; Chou, Chia-Chun

    2011-08-21

    A Cauchy initial-value approach to the complex-valued quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation (QHJE) is investigated for multidimensional systems. In this approach, ray segments foliate configuration space which is laminated by surfaces of constant action. The QHJE incorporates all quantum effects through a term involving the divergence of the quantum momentum function (QMF). The divergence term may be expressed as a sum of two terms, one involving displacement along the ray and the other incorporating the local curvature of the action surface. It is shown that curvature of the wave front may be computed from coefficients of the first and second fundamental forms from differential geometry that are associated with the surface. Using the expression for the divergence, the QHJE becomes a Riccati-type ordinary differential equation (ODE) for the complex-valued QMF, which is parametrized by the arc length along the ray. In order to integrate over possible singularities in the QMF, a stable and accurate Moebius propagator is introduced. This method is then used to evolve rays and wave fronts for four systems in two and three dimensions. From the QMF along each ray, the wave function can be easily computed. Computational difficulties that may arise are described and some ways to circumvent them are presented.

  19. Directly solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equations by Hermite WENO Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Feng; Qiu, Jianxian

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present a class of new Hermite weighted essentially non-oscillatory (HWENO) schemes based on finite volume framework to directly solve the Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) equations. For HWENO reconstruction, both the cell average and the first moment of the solution are evolved, and for two dimensional case, HWENO reconstruction is based on a dimension-by-dimension strategy which is the first used in HWENO reconstruction. For spatial discretization, one of key points for directly solving HJ equation is the reconstruction of numerical fluxes. We follow the idea put forward by Cheng and Wang (2014) [3] to reconstruct the values of solution at Gauss-Lobatto quadrature points and numerical fluxes at the interfaces of cells, and for neither the convex nor concave Hamiltonian case, the monotone modification of numerical fluxes is added, which can guarantee the precision in the smooth region and converge to the entropy solution when derivative discontinuities come up. The third order TVD Runge-Kutta method is used for the time discretization. Extensive numerical experiments in one dimensional and two dimensional cases are performed to verify the efficiency of the methods.

  20. Communication and relationship skills for rapid response teams at hamilton health sciences.

    PubMed

    Cziraki, Karen; Lucas, Janie; Rogers, Toni; Page, Laura; Zimmerman, Rosanne; Hauer, Lois Ann; Daniels, Charlotte; Gregoroff, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Rapid response teams (RRT) are an important safety strategy in the prevention of deaths in patients who are progressively failing outside of the intensive care unit. The goal is to intervene before a critical event occurs. Effective teamwork and communication skills are frequently cited as critical success factors in the implementation of these teams. However, there is very little literature that clearly provides an education strategy for the development of these skills. Training in simulation labs offers an opportunity to assess and build on current team skills; however, this approach does not address how to meet the gaps in team communication and relationship skill management. At Hamilton Health Sciences (HHS) a two-day program was developed in collaboration with the RRT Team Leads, Organizational Effectiveness and Patient Safety Leaders. Participants reflected on their conflict management styles and considered how their personality traits may contribute to team function. Communication and relationship theories were reviewed and applied in simulated sessions in the relative safety of off-site team sessions. The overwhelming positive response to this training has been demonstrated in the incredible success of these teams from the perspective of the satisfaction surveys of the care units that call the team, and in the multi-phased team evaluation of their application to practice. These sessions offer a useful approach to the development of the soft skills required for successful RRT implementation.

  1. Measuring motor activity in major depression: the association between the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and actigraphy.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Nadja; Horn, Helge; Koschorke, Philipp; Hügli, Simone; Höfle, Oliver; Müller, Thomas; Strik, Werner; Walther, Sebastian

    2011-12-30

    Despite the use of actigraphy in depression research, the association of depression ratings and quantitative motor activity remains controversial. In addition, the impact of recurring episodes on motor activity is uncertain. In 76 medicated inpatients with major depression (27 with a first episode, 49 with recurrent episodes), continuous wrist actigraphy for 24h and scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) were obtained. In addition, 10 subjects of the sample wore the actigraph over a period of 5 days, in order to assess the reliability of a 1-day measurement. Activity levels were stable over 5 consecutive days. Actigraphic parameters did not differ between patients with a first or a recurrent episode, and quantitative motor activity failed to correlate with the HAMD total score. However, of the motor-related single items of the HAMD, the item activities was associated with motor activity parameters, while the items agitation and retardation were not. Actigraphy is consistent with clinical observation for the item activities. Expert raters may not correctly rate the motor aspects of retardation and agitation in major depression.

  2. Validating the Hamilton Anatomy of Risk Management-Forensic Version and the Aggressive Incidents Scale.

    PubMed

    Cook, Alana N; Moulden, Heather M; Mamak, Mini; Lalani, Shams; Messina, Katrina; Chaimowitz, Gary

    2016-07-14

    The Hamilton Anatomy of Risk Management-Forensic Version (HARM-FV) is a structured professional judgement tool of violence risk developed for use in forensic inpatient psychiatric settings. The HARM-FV is used with the Aggressive Incidents Scale (AIS), which provides a standardized method of recording aggressive incidents. We report the findings of the concurrent validity of the HARM-FV and the AIS with widely used measures of violence risk and aggressive acts, the Historical, Clinical, Risk Management-20, Version 3 (HCR-20(V3)) and a modified version of the Overt Aggression Scale. We also present findings on the predictive validity of the HARM-FV in the short term (1-month follow-up periods) for varying severities of aggressive acts. The results indicated strong support for the concurrent validity of the HARM-FV and AIS and promising support for the predictive accuracy of the tool for inpatient aggression. This article provides support for the continued clinical use of the HARM-FV within an inpatient forensic setting and highlights areas for further research. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Preliminary Psychometric Evaluation of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale in Methamphetamine Dependence.

    PubMed

    Hellem, Tracy; Scholl, Lindsay; Ferguson, Hayden; McGlade, Erin; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah; Renshaw, Perry; Hildreth, Laura

    2017-08-18

    The purpose of this study was to test the initial psychometric properties of the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) in individuals with and without major depressive disorder who use methamphetamine. We used data from two completed studies and two ongoing clinical trials. The HAM-D has well established reliability and validity in a variety of populations. However, there are no published reports of reliability and validity of the HAM-D in a methamphetamine using population. HAM-D and depression status data were extracted from four separate studies for this psychometric assessment. Using these data, we evaluated three measures of construct validity: internal consistency, contrasted groups validity and factorial validity. We found potential concerns with the construct validity of the HAM-D in users of methamphetamine. Intercorrelations between items were primarily less than 0.20 and the Cronbach's alpha value in this sample was 0.58 indicating potential issues with internal consistency. The results of a two sample t-tests suggest concerns with contrasted group validity, as no significant difference in average scores were found for nine items. Consistent with previous studies, a principal component analysis indicates that the HAM-D is multidimensional. The 17-item HAM-D might not reliably and validly measure depression severity in a methamphetamine using population. Given our small sample, additional research is needed, though, to further test the psychometric properties of the HAM-D in individuals who use methamphetamine.

  4. Husbandry stress exacerbates mycobacterial infections in adult zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton)

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, J M; Watral, V; Schreck, C B; Kent, M L

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacteria are significant pathogens of laboratory zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton). Stress is often implicated in clinical disease and morbidity associated with mycobacterial infections but has yet to be examined with zebrafish. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of husbandry stressors on zebrafish infected with mycobacteria. Adult zebrafish were exposed to Mycobacterium marinum or Mycobacterium chelonae, two species that have been associated with disease in zebrafish. Infected fish and controls were then subjected to chronic crowding and handling stressors and examined over an 8-week period. Whole-body cortisol was significantly elevated in stressed fish compared to non-stressed fish. Fish infected with M. marinum ATCC 927 and subjected to husbandry stressors had 14% cumulative mortality while no mortality occurred among infected fish not subjected to husbandry stressors. Stressed fish, infected with M. chelonae H1E2 from zebrafish, were 15-fold more likely to be infected than non-stressed fish at week 8 post-injection. Sub-acute, diffuse infections were more common among stressed fish infected with M. marinum or M. chelonae than non-stressed fish. This is the first study to demonstrate an effect of stress and elevated cortisol on the morbidity, prevalence, clinical disease and histological presentation associated with mycobacterial infections in zebrafish. Minimizing husbandry stress may be effective at reducing the severity of outbreaks of clinical mycobacteriosis in zebrafish facilities. PMID:19531062

  5. Hamilton's turns as a visual tool kit for designing single-qubit unitary gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, B. Neethi; Chandrashekar, C. M.; Simon, Sudhavathani

    2012-02-01

    Unitary evolutions of a qubit are traditionally represented geometrically as rotations of the Bloch sphere, but the composition of such evolutions is handled algebraically through matrix multiplication [of SU(2) or SO(3) matrices]. Hamilton's construct, called turns, provides for handling the latter pictorially through the addition of directed great circle arcs on the unit sphere S2⊂R3, resulting in a non-Abelian version of the parallelogram law of vector addition of the Euclidean translation group. This construct is developed into a visual tool kit for handling the design of single-qubit unitary gates. As an application, it is shown, in the concrete case wherein the qubit is realized as polarization states of light, that all unitary gates can be realized conveniently through a universal gadget consisting of just two quarter-wave plates (QWP) and one half-wave plate (HWP). The analysis and results easily transcribe to other realizations of the qubit: The case of NMR is obtained by simply substituting π/2 and π pulses respectively for QWPs and HWPs, the phases of the pulses playing the role of the orientation of fast axes of these plates.

  6. Analysis of transcription-factor binding-site evolution by using the Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancliff, Mark; Park, Jeong-Man

    2016-12-01

    We investigate a quasi-species mutation-selection model of transcription-factor binding-site evolution. By considering the mesa and the crater fitness landscapes designed to describe these binding sites and point mutations, we derive an evolution equation for the population distribution of binding sequences. In the long-length limit, the evolution equation is replaced by a Hamilton-Jacobi equation which we solve for the stationary state solution. From the stationary solution, we derive the population distributions and find that an error threshold, separating populations in which the binding site does or does not evolve, only exists for certain values of the fitness parameters. A phase diagram in this parameter space is derived and shows a critical line below which no error threshold exists. We also investigate the evolution of multiple binding sites for the same transcription factor. For two binding sites, we perform an analysis similar to that for a single site and determine a phase diagram showing different phases with both, one, or no binding sites selected. In the phase diagram, the phase boundary between the one-or-two selected site phases is qualitatively different for the mesa and the crater fitness landscapes. As fitness benefits for a second bound transcription factor tend to zero, the minimum mutation rate at which the two-site phase occurs diverges in the mesa landscape whereas the mutation rate at the phase boundary tends to a finite value for the crater landscape.

  7. No senescence despite declining selection pressure: Hamilton's result in broader perspective.

    PubMed

    Wensink, Maarten J; Wrycza, Tomasz F; Baudisch, Annette

    2014-04-21

    Theory predicts that senescence should inevitably evolve because selection pressure declines with age. Yet, data show that senescence is not a universal phenomenon. How can these observations peacefully coexist? Evolution of any trait hinges on its impact on fitness. A complete mathematical description of change in fitness, the total fitness differential, involves selection pressure along with a perturbation function that describes how the vital rates, mortality and fecundity, are affected across ages. We propose that the perturbation function can be used to model trade-offs when vital rates are perturbed in different directions and magnitude at different ages. We find that for every trade-off we can identify parameter values for which senescence does evolve and others for which it does not. We argue that this reconciles the apparent contradiction between data and theory. The total fitness differential is also instrumental in deriving mathematical relationships between alternative indicators of selection pressure. We show examples and highlight that any indicator combined with the right perturbation function can be used to parameterize a specific biological change. Biological considerations should motivate what perturbation functions are used. We interpret the relevance of Hamilton's finding that selection pressure declines for the evolution of senescence: declining selection pressure is a necessary but not a sufficient condition.

  8. Deformed Hamilton-Jacobi Equations and the Tunneling Radiation of the Higher-Dimensional RN-(A)dS Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhongwen; Li, Guoping; Jiang, Pengying; Pan, Yang; Zu, Xiaotao

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we derive the deformed Hamilton-Jacobi equations from the generalized Klein-Gordon equation and generalized Dirac equation. Then, we study the tunneling rate, Hawking temperature and entropy of the higher-dimensional Reissner-Nordström de Sitter black hole via the deformed Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Our results show that the deformed Hamilton-Jacobi equations for charged scalar particles and charged fermions have the same expressions. Besides, the modified Hawking temperatures and entropy are related to the mass and charge of the black hole, the cosmology constant, the quantum number of emitted particles, and the term of GUP effects β.

  9. High-Order Semi-Discrete Central-Upwind Schemes for Multi-Dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present the first fifth order, semi-discrete central upwind method for approximating solutions of multi-dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi equations. Unlike most of the commonly used high order upwind schemes, our scheme is formulated as a Godunov-type scheme. The scheme is based on the fluxes of Kurganov-Tadmor and Kurganov-Tadmor-Petrova, and is derived for an arbitrary number of space dimensions. A theorem establishing the monotonicity of these fluxes is provided. The spacial discretization is based on a weighted essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction of the derivative. The accuracy and stability properties of our scheme are demonstrated in a variety of examples. A comparison between our method and other fifth-order schemes for Hamilton-Jacobi equations shows that our method exhibits smaller errors without any increase in the complexity of the computations.

  10. The role of interfacial layers in the enhanced thermal conductivity of nanofluids : a renovated Hamilton-Crosser model.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; Choi, S. U.-S.; Energy Technology

    2004-08-01

    We previously developed a renovated Maxwell model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids and determined that the solid/liquid interfacial layers play an important role in the enhanced thermal conductivity of nanofluids. However, this renovated Maxwell model is limited to suspensions with spherical particles. Here, we extend the Hamilton--Crosser model for suspensions of nonspherical particles to include the effect of a solid/liquid interface. The solid/liquid interface is described as a confocal ellipsoid with a solid particle. The new model for the three-phase suspensions is mathematically expressed in terms of the equivalent thermal conductivity and equivalent volume fraction of anisotropic complex ellipsoids, as well as an empirical shape factor. With a generalized empirical shape factor, the renovated Hamilton-Crosser model correctly predicts the magnitude of the thermal conductivity of nanotube-in-oil nanofluids. At present, this new model is not able to predict the nonlinear behavior of the nanofluid thermal conductivity.

  11. [The "shoeleather epidemiology" or the reinvention of medical survey. Alice Hamilton and industrial medicine in early 20th century America].

    PubMed

    Rainhorn, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Alice Hamilton (1869-1970) was a pioneer in industrial medicine, a new discipline that emerged with a new interest in working conditions and occupational hazards within an era of unprecedented industrial growth. From various sources, including her reports after she visited Arizona copper belt in 1919, my paper emphasizes the innovation of Hamilton's approach,"shoeleather epidemiology". She went to the source of information in workshops, plants and construction sites, observed the very concrete part of industrial work, interviewed many stakeholders in and around the workplace, making a methodological toolbox for industrial surveys. Her method combined an old medical practice (the medical inquiry) and a new clinical field (the plant) and placed the worker as a patient in the core of the issue of occupational health and safety.

  12. Self-gravitation interaction of IR deformed Hořava-Lifshitz gravity via new Hamilton-Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Molin; Xu, Yin; Lu, Junwang; Yang, Yuling; Lu, Jianbo; Wu, Yabo

    2014-06-01

    The apparent discovery of logarithmic entropies has a significant impact on IR deformed Hořava-Lifshitz (IRDHL) gravity in which the original infrared (IR) property is improved by introducing three-geometry's Ricci scalar term "μ4 R" in action. Here, we reevaluate the Hawking radiation in IRDHL by using recent new Hamilton-Jacobi method (NHJM). In particular, a thorough analysis is considered both in asymptotically flat Kehagias-Sfetsos and asymptotically non-flat Park models in IRDHL. We find the NHJM offers simplifications on the technical side. The modification in the entropy expression is given by the physical interpretation of self-gravitation of the Hawking radiation in this new Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) perspectives.

  13. Design of wide-area time-delay supplementary controller for interconnected Network based on Hamilton function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailati, G.; Hu, Z. H.

    2016-08-01

    The transient stability of interconnected network with supplementary time-delay controller for generator excitations and static var compensator (SVC) has been investigated in this paper. Firstly, a delay-dependent stability criterion based on Hamilton function method is derived, and the criterion is in term of matrix inequalities. Secondly, a nonlinear time-delay Hamilton function model of interconnected network with SVCs is constructed. Thirdly, the wide-area time-delay supplementary controller (WATSC) for the interconnected network is designed and converted into the form of Hamiltonian system. The delay-dependent stability of the closed-loop power system is analysed. The gains of the WATSC are determined by using the theoretical analysis results. It is effective for the designed WATSC installed in the 16- machine, 68-bus power system for damping the inter-area modes. Then simulation results show that the method of the controller is effective.

  14. Exact solutions of the Dirac equation for Makarov potential by means of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touloum, S.; Gharbi, A.; Bouda, A.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the exact solutions of the Dirac equation for Makarov potential under the condition of equal vector and scalar potentials in the context of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. We present the spinor wave function for bound states. The radial part is given in terms of generalized Laguerre polynomials and the angular part is expressed using Jacobi polynomials. The relativistic energy spectrum is also derived.

  15. Hamilton and Zuk meet heterozygosity? Song repertoire size indicates inbreeding and immunity in song sparrows (Melospiza melodia).

    PubMed

    Reid, Janem; Arcese, Peter; Cassidy, Alicel E V; Marr, Amyb; Smith, Jamesn M; Keller, Lukasf

    2005-03-07

    Hamilton and Zuk's influential hypothesis of parasite-mediated sexual selection proposes that exaggerated secondary sexual ornaments indicate a male's addictive genetic immunity to parasites. However, genetic correlated of ornaments and immunity have rarely been explicitly identified. Evidence supporting Hamilton and Zuk's hypothesis has instead been gathered by looking for positive phenotypic correlations between ornamentation and immunity; such correlations are assumed to reflect causal, addictive relationships between these traits. We show that in a song sparrows, Melospiza melodia, male's song repertoire size, a secondary sexual trait, increased with his cell-mediated immune response (CMI) to an experimental challenge. However, this phenotypic correlation could be explained because both repertoire size and CMI declined with a male's inbreeding level. Repertoire size therefore primarily indicated a male's relative heterozygosity, a non-addictive genetic predictor of immunity. Caution may therefore be required when interpreting phenotypic correlations as support for Hamilton and Zuk's addictive model of sexual selection. However, our results suggest that female song sparrows choosing with large repertoires would on average acquire more outbred and therefore more heterozygous mates. Such genetic dominance effects on ornamentation are likely to influence evolutionary trajectories of female choice, and should be explicitly incorporated into genetic models of sexual selection.

  16. Lake-based magnetic mapping of contaminated sediment distribution, Hamilton Harbour, Lake Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozza, M. R.; Boyce, J. I.; Morris, W. A.

    2004-12-01

    The remediation of toxic sediment in harbours and urban waterways requires detailed mapping of contaminated sediment distribution and thickness. Conventional methods rely on interpolation of pollutant concentrations from widely spaced core samples but can lead to significant errors in estimating sediment distribution. An improved approach, as demonstrated by recent work in Hamilton Harbour in Lake Ontario, is to estimate pollutant levels from proxy measurements of sediment magnetic properties. Measurements from 40 core samples collected within the harbour show that the magnetic susceptibility of a contaminated upper layer of sediment is one to two orders of magnitude greater than in the underlying uncontaminated 'pre-colonial' sediments. The susceptibility contrast results from elevated levels of urban-source magnetic oxides and is sufficient to generate a total field anomaly (ca. 5-40 nT) that can be measured with a towed magnetometer. Systematic lake-based magnetic surveying (>500 line km) of the harbour using an Overhauser marine magnetometer identifies well-defined positive magnetic anomalies that coincide with mapped accumulations of contaminated sediments on the harbour bottom. Forward modelling of the anomalies shows that the magnetic response is consistent with a contaminated upper layer thickness of up to 5 m. Apparent susceptibility maps calculated from magnetic survey data show a close spatial correspondence with core-derived magnetic susceptibilities and provide a rapid means for classifying contaminated sediments. Detection of shallow magnetic anomalies is dependent upon a closely spaced survey grid (<75 m line spacing) and careful post-cruise processing to remove diurnal, regional and water-depth related variations in the magnetic field intensity.

  17. Non-discriminating flash pyrolysis and thermochemolysis of heavily contaminated sediments from the Hamilton Harbor (Canada).

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, J; Parsi, Z; Gorecki, T

    2008-04-04

    Analytical pyrolysis of sediments contaminated with pollutants of medium to high molecular weights (up to approximately 500 Da) is very challenging when using conventional pyrolysis systems due to discrimination of high molecular weight analytes. In the framework of this contribution, non-discriminating pyrolysis and thermochemolysis using rapid heating in a Silcosteel capillary were applied to study organic pollutants in heavily contaminated sediments taken from the Hamilton Harbor. The novel pyrolysis approach, requiring very small amounts of sample, turned out to be very useful as a rapid screening method, e.g. for risk assessment studies, proving superior to commonly used solvent extraction. Main pollutants in the sediments under study included aromatic hydrocarbons, chiefly originating from coal tar and petroleum. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) beyond six-rings, including coronene and truxene, could be detected. Sequential tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide-induced thermochemolysis performed at 500 and 750 degrees C enabled the differentiation between organic pollutants sorbed onto the sediment matrix on the one hand, and structural moieties of the condensed polymeric humic sediment matrix along with bound residues on the other hand. Thermochemolysis at 500 degrees C removed sorbates quantitatively, leaving only bare polymeric humic matrix. Significant PAH source indicators provided evidence that the lipidic fraction sorbed onto the sediments originated from PAHs formed chiefly in coal combustion processes. The polymeric humic organic matter network of the less polluted sediment was mainly of petrogenic origin, whereas black carbon, kerogen, etc. contributed to the organic carbon of the heavily polluted sediment. Thermochemolysis at 500 degrees C was also used to study fatty acid profiles of the sediments. The fatty acid methyl ester patterns obtained for the two sites under study differed significantly, with strong indications that microbial attenuation

  18. Hydrology of the Cave Springs area near Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradfield, Arthur D.

    1992-01-01

    The hydrology of Cave Springs, the second largest spring in East Tennessee,was investigated from July 1987 to September 1989. Wells near the spring supply about 5 million gallons per day of potable water to people in Hamilton County near Chattanooga. Discharge from the spring averaged about 13.5 cubic feet per second (8.72 million gallons per day) during the study period. Withdrawals by the Hixson Utility District from wells upgradient from the outflow averaged 8.6 cubic feet per second (5.54 million gallons per day). Aquifer tests using wells intersecting a large solution cavity supplying water to the spring showed a drawdown of less than 3 feet with a discharge of 9,000 gallons per minute or 20 cubic feet per second. Temperature and specific conductance of ground water near the spring outflow were monitored hourly. Temperatures ranged from 13.5 to 18.2 degrees celsius, and fluctuated seasonally in response to climate. Specific-conductance values ranged from 122 to 405 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius, but were generally between 163 to 185 microsiemensper centimeter. The drainage area of the basin recharging the spring system was estimated to be 1O squaremiles. A potentiometric map of the recharge basin was developed from water levels measured at domestic and test wells in August 1989. Aquifer tests at five test wells in the study area indicated that specific-capacity values for these wells ranged from 4.1 to 261 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown. Water-quality characteristics of ground water in the area were used in conjunction with potentiometric-surface maps to delineate the approximate area contributing recharge to Cave Springs.

  19. Urdu translation of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression: Results of a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Ali M.; Naz, Shahana; Asif, Aftab; Khawaja, Imran S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop a standardized validated version of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) in Urdu. Methods: After translation of the HAM-D into the Urdu language following standard guidelines, the final Urdu version (HAM-D-U) was administered to 160 depressed outpatients. Inter-item correlation was assessed by calculating Cronbach alpha. Correlation between HAM-D-U scores at baseline and after a 2-week interval was evaluated for test-retest reliability. Moreover, scores of two clinicians on HAM-D-U were compared for inter-rater reliability. For establishing concurrent validity, scores of HAM-D-U and BDI-U were compared by using Spearman correlation coefficient. The study was conducted at Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from May to December 2014. Results: The Cronbach alpha for HAM-D-U was 0.71. Composite scores for HAM-D-U at baseline and after a 2-week interval were also highly correlated with each other (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.83, p-value < 0.01) indicating good test-retest reliability. Composite scores for HAM-D-U and BDI-U were positively correlated with each other (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.01) indicating good concurrent validity. Scores of two clinicians for HAM-D-U were also positively correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.82, p-value < 0.01) indicated good inter-rater reliability. Conclusion: The HAM-D-U is a valid and reliable instrument for the assessment of Depression. It shows good inter-rater and test-retest reliability. The HAM-D-U can be a tool either for clinical management or research. PMID:28083049

  20. Disaggregate demand for conventional and alternative fuelled vehicles in the Census Metropolitan Area of Hamilton, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potoglou, Dimitrios

    The focus of this thesis is twofold. First, it offers insight on how households' car-ownership behaviour is affected by urban form and availability of local-transit at the place of residence, after controlling for socio-economic and demographic characteristics. Second, it addresses the importance of vehicle attributes, household and individual characteristics as well as economic incentives and urban form to potential demand for alternative fuelled vehicles. Data for the empirical analyses of the aforementioned research activities were obtained through an innovative Internet survey, which is also documented in this thesis, conducted in the Census Metropolitan Area of Hamilton. The survey included a retrospective questionnaire of households' number and type of vehicles and a stated choices experiment for assessing the potential demand for alternative fuelled vehicles. Established approaches and emerging trends in automobile demand modelling identified early on in this thesis suggest a disaggregate approach and specifically, the estimation of discrete choice models both for explaining car ownership and vehicle-type choice behaviour. It is shown that mixed and diverse land uses as well as short distances between home and work are likely to decrease the probability of households to own a large number of cars. Regarding the demand for alternative fuelled vehicles, while vehicle attributes are particularly important, incentives such as free parking and access to high occupancy vehicle lanes will not influence the choice of hybrids or alternative fuelled vehicles. An improved understating of households' behaviour regarding the number of cars as well as the factors and trade-offs for choosing cleaner vehicles can be used to inform policy designed to reduce car ownership levels and encourage adoption of cleaner vehicle technologies in urban areas. Finally, the Internet survey sets the ground for further research on implementation and evaluation of this data collection method.

  1. Mixed siliciclastic and carbonate sedimentation within Spar Mountain Member of Ste. Genevieve Limestone, Hamilton County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.J.; Pryor, W.A.

    1985-02-01

    The Spar Mountain Member of the Ste. Genevieve Limestone (middle Mississippian) in Hamilton County, Illinois, consists of 40-60 ft (12-18 m) of interbedded limestones, shales, and sandstones. Five cores and 1400 electric logs were used to delineate two shallowing-upward carbonate cycles and 2 major clastic pulses within the Spar Mountain. Eight lithofacies representing 6 depositional environments were identified. They are: (A) echinoderm-brachiopod dolostone to packstone (outer ramp), (B) ooid-peloidal grainstone (intermediate ramp), (C) skeletal grainstone (intermediate ramp), (D) ooid-molluscan-intraclastic wackestone to grainstone (inner ramp), (E) pelletal-skeletal wackestone (inner ramp), (F) quartzarenite (channelized nearshore), (G) quartz-sublithic arenite to wacke (delta platform), and (H) quartz mudstone (prodelta, delta platform). Deposition occurred on a southwest-dipping carbonate ramp, with siliciclastic sediments originating from the northeast. The sequence of facies and their inferred depositional environments record 2 major progradational episodes. Oolitic facies are interpreted to be of tidal-bar belt origin and quartzarenite facies are interpreted to be of delta-distributary channel origin. Their distribution is partially controlled by antecedent and syndepositional topography. Many of these paleotopographic highes are positive features today and yield pinch-out stratigraphic relationships. Paleogeographic reconstructions demonstrate that the primary control on facies distribution was the position of the delta proper along strike. However, depositional topography also influenced sedimentation, particularly in the sand-sized fraction. Using this concept, better prediction of underlying porous buildups (ooid shoals) is possible if thickness of the overlying siliciclastic is known. Within buildups, a complex diagenetic history complicates the distribution of porosity.

  2. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression: The making of a "gold standard" and the unmaking of a chronic illness, 1960-1980.

    PubMed

    Worboys, Michael

    2013-09-01

    To show why and how the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression became the 'Gold Standard' for assessing therapies from the mid-1960s and how it was used to frame depression as a short-term and curable illness rather than a chronic one. My approach is that of the social construction of knowledge, identifying the interests, institutional contexts and practices that produce knowledge claims and then mapping the social processes of their circulation, validation and acceptance. The circulation and validation of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was relatively slow and it became a 'Gold Standard' 'from below', from an emerging consensus amongst psychiatrists undertaking clinical trials for depression, which from the 1960s were principally with psychopharmaceuticals for short-term illness. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, drug trials and the construction of depression as non-chronic were mutually constituted. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression framed depression and its sufferers in new ways, leading psychiatrists to understand illness as a treatable episode, rather than a life course condition. As such, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression served the interests of psychiatrists and psychiatry in its new era of drug therapy outside the mental hospital. However, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was a strange kind of 'standard', being quite non-standard in the widely varying ways it was used and the meanings given to its findings.

  3. "How complex and even perverse the real world can be": W.D. Hamilton's early work on social wasps (1964-1968).

    PubMed

    Caniglia, Guido

    2017-08-01

    William D. Hamilton's name is often connected to important theoretical accomplishments, from the theory of inclusive fitness and kin selection to the so-called Hamilton's rule and the haplodiploidy hypothesis. This article asks: How did Hamilton attempt to test his theory and hypothesis against the complexity of the biological world? The article reconstructs Hamilton's empirical work with social wasps between 1963 and 1968, the years before and after the publication of the groundbreaking "The Genetical Evolution of Social Behavior" in 1964. It points out the centrality of Hamilton's work on wasps and shows how the British scientist attempted to test theories and hypotheses with naturalistic, developmental, and physiological observations as well as, at times, with experimental manipulations. The article offers a new perspective on the history of the scientific understanding of the evolution of social behavior. In contrast to existing narratives, this perspective emphasizes the importance of empirical work-e.g. natural history, physiology, comparative anatomy-which is often obscured by a nearly exclusive focus on theoretical developments in this field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. William D. Hamilton's Brazilian lectures and his unpublished model regarding Wynne-Edwards's idea of natural selection. With a note on 'pluralism' and different philosophical approaches to evolution.

    PubMed

    Coco, Emanuele

    2016-12-01

    In 1975, the English evolutionist William Donald Hamilton (1936-2000) held in Brazil a series of lectures entitled "Population genetics and social behaviour". The unpublished notes of these conferences-written by Hamilton and recently discovered at the British Library-offer an opportunity to reflect on some of the author's ideas about evolution. The year of the conference is particularly significant, as it took place shortly after the applications of the Price equation with which Hamilton was able to build a model that included several levels of selection. In this paper I mainly analyse the inaugural lecture in which Hamilton proposes a simple model to disprove the hypothesis supported by the British zoologist C. Vero Wynne-Edwards (1906-1997) regarding mechanisms to prevent "over-exploitation of the food supply" in "the interests of the survival of the group". The document presented here is of great historical interest. Not only because manuscript offers a model that-since it was intended for teaching purposes-had never before appeared in the published version, but also because of the general index of the lectures that accompanies it. The latter allows us to make some hypothetical considerations on the relationship and differences between kin-selection, group-selection and inclusive fitness that Hamilton wanted to present to the attentive, well-prepared audience of the foreign university that had invited him.

  5. Restoration of four-dimensional diffeomorphism covariance in canonical general relativity: An intrinsic Hamilton-Jacobi approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, Donald; Renn, Jürgen; Sundermeyer, Kurt

    2016-02-01

    Classical background independence is reflected in Lagrangian general relativity through covariance under the full diffeomorphism group. We show how this independence can be maintained in a Hamilton-Jacobi approach that does not accord special privilege to any geometric structure. Intrinsic space-time curvature-based coordinates grant equal status to all geometric backgrounds. They play an essential role as a starting point for inequivalent semiclassical quantizations. The scheme calls into question Wheeler’s geometrodynamical approach and the associated Wheeler-DeWitt equation in which 3-metrics are featured geometrical objects. The formalism deals with variables that are manifestly invariant under the full diffeomorphism group. Yet, perhaps paradoxically, the liberty in selecting intrinsic coordinates is precisely as broad as is the original diffeomorphism freedom. We show how various ideas from the past five decades concerning the true degrees of freedom of general relativity can be interpreted in light of this new constrained Hamiltonian description. In particular, we show how the Kuchař multi-fingered time approach can be understood as a means of introducing full four-dimensional diffeomorphism invariants. Every choice of new phase space variables yields new Einstein-Hamilton-Jacobi constraining relations, and corresponding intrinsic Schrödinger equations. We show how to implement this freedom by canonical transformation of the intrinsic Hamiltonian. We also reinterpret and rectify significant work by Dittrich on the construction of “Dirac observables.”

  6. Outbreak of salmonellosis associated with consumption of pulled pork at a church festival - Hamilton County, Ohio, 2010.

    PubMed

    2014-01-03

    On June 18, 2010, Hamilton County Public Health (HCPH), a local health department in Ohio, began receiving reports of gastrointestinal illness from persons who attended a church festival held during June 11-13 in a suburban community of Hamilton County. HCPH investigated and confirmed the existence of a foodborne outbreak associated with consumption of pulled pork prepared in a private home and sold at the church festival. Sixty-four attendees with gastroenteritis were identified. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) was found in stool specimens from three patients; no other pathogen was found. Because the outbreak was identified after the church festival had concluded, the environmental investigation was limited to interviews of food handlers. The primary public health interventions consisted of 1) active surveillance for additional cases of salmonellosis associated with the festival, 2) consultation with the festival organizers and food vendors to ensure the pork product was not resold or consumed elsewhere, 3) education of the festival organizers and food vendors about relevant public health regulations and food safety practices, 4) traceback of the implicated product to the retailer in Indiana, and 5) notification of the Indiana State Department of Health. The results of the investigation call attention to the public health implications of unregulated food service at events such as church festivals, which generally are exempt from public health inspection and licensure in Ohio. Food sold in such environments might place populations at risk for foodborne illness.

  7. Cooperativity and tunable excited state deactivation: modular self-assembly of depsipeptide dendrons on a Hamilton receptor modified porphyrin platform.

    PubMed

    Gnichwitz, Jan-Frederik; Wielopolski, Mateusz; Hartnagel, Kristine; Hartnagel, Uwe; Guldi, Dirk M; Hirsch, Andreas

    2008-07-02

    A series of novel supramolecular architectures were built around a tin tetraphenyl porphyrin platform 6--functionalized by a 2-fold 1-ethyl-3-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) promoted condensation reaction--and chiral depsipeptide dendrons of different generations 1-4. Here, implementation of a Hamilton receptor provided the necessary means to keep the constituents together via strong hydrogen bonding. Characterization of all architectures has been performed, including 4 which is the fourth generation, on the basis of NMR and photophysical methods. In particular, several titration experiments were conducted suggesting positive cooperativity, an assessment that is based on association constants that tend to be higher for the second binding step than for the first step. Importantly, molecular modeling calculations reveal a significant deaggregation of the intermolecular network of 6 during the course of the first binding step. As a consequence, an improved accessibility of the second Hamilton receptor unit in 6 emerges and, in turn, facilitates the higher association constants. The features of the equilibrium, that is, the dynamic exchange of depsipeptide dendrons 1-4 with fullerene 5, was tested in photophysical reference experiments. These steady-state and time-resolved measurements showed the tunable excited-state deactivations of these complexes upon photoexcitation.

  8. Contaminant and genotoxicity profiles of sediments and zebra mussels as indicators of chemical contamination in Hamilton Harbour

    SciTech Connect

    McCarry, B.E.; Allan, L.M.; Marvin, C.H.; Villella, J.; Bryant, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Samples of bottom sediments, suspended sediments and Zebra mussels were collected from Hamilton Harbour, an embayment of western Lake Ontario. In addition, sediment samples were collected from creeks which flow into the Harbour. These sediment samples were extracted with dichloromethane and the organic extract was cleaned up prior to analysis for PAH and thia-arenes by GC-MS. These extracts were also subjected to genotoxicity bioassays (Ames assays) in two strains of Salmonella typhimurium (a TA98-like strain, YG1024-S9 and a TA100-like strain, YG1025 + S9). The sediment and Zebra mussels samples collected near sites of heavy coal tar contamination showed PAH, thia-arene and genotoxicity profiles that are very similar to the corresponding profiles for coal tar. These observations are consistent with the resuspension and distribution of coal tar-contaminated bottom sediments in the water column. The sediment samples collected in a major creek entering the Harbor and the sediment and Zebra mussels samples collected in Windemere Arm near the mouth of this creek showed very different chemical and genotoxicity profiles. Thus, the chemical and genotoxicity burdens on Hamilton Harbour posed by the resuspension of coal tar-contaminated sediments and the inputs from urban activity into a major creek and the Harbor can be differentiated.

  9. Risk and efficacy of human-enabled interspecific hybridization for climate-change adaptation: Response to Hamilton and Miller (2016)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kovach, Ryan P.; Luikart, Gordon; Lowe, Winsor H.; Boyer, Matthew C.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.

    2016-01-01

    Hamilton and Miller (2016) provide an interesting and provocative discussion of how hybridization and introgression can promote evolutionary potential in the face of climate change. They argue that hybridization—mating between individuals from genetically distinct populations—can alleviate inbreeding depression and promote adaptive introgression and evolutionary rescue. We agree that deliberate intraspecific hybridization (mating between individuals of the same species) is an underused management tool for increasing fitness in inbred populations (i.e., genetic rescue; Frankham 2015; Whiteley et al. 2015). The potential risks and benefits of assisted gene flow have been discussed in the literature, and an emerging consensus suggests that mating between populations isolated for approximately 50–100 generations can benefit fitness, often with a minor risk of outbreeding depression (Frankham et al. 2011; Aitken & Whitlock 2013; Allendorf et al. 2013).

  10. Effect of the refractive index on the hawking temperature: an application of the Hamilton-Jacobi method

    SciTech Connect

    Sakalli, I. Mirekhtiary, S. F.

    2013-10-15

    Hawking radiation of a non-asymptotically flat 4-dimensional spherically symmetric and static dilatonic black hole (BH) via the Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) method is studied. In addition to the naive coordinates, we use four more different coordinate systems that are well-behaved at the horizon. Except for the isotropic coordinates, direct computation by the HJ method leads to the standard Hawking temperature for all coordinate systems. The isotropic coordinates allow extracting the index of refraction from the Fermat metric. It is explicitly shown that the index of refraction determines the value of the tunneling rate and its natural consequence, the Hawking temperature. The isotropic coordinates in the conventional HJ method produce a wrong result for the temperature of the linear dilaton. Here, we explain how this discrepancy can be resolved by regularizing the integral possessing a pole at the horizon.

  11. Canonical averaging in the second order quantized Hamilton dynamics by extension of the coherent state thermodynamics of the harmonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Heatwole, Eric; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2007-05-28

    A conceptually simple approximation to quantum mechanics, quantized Hamilton dynamics (QHD) includes zero-point energy, tunneling, dephasing, and other important quantum effects in a classical-like description. The hierarchy of coupled differential equations describing the time evolution of observables in QHD can be mapped in the second order onto a classical system with double the dimensionality of the original system. While QHD excels at dynamics with a single initial condition, the correct method for generating thermal initial conditions in QHD remains an open question. Using the coherent state representation of thermodynamics of the harmonic oscillator (HO) [Schnack, Europhys. Lett. 45, 647 (1999)], we develop canonical averaging for the second order QHD [Prezhdo, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 2995 (2002)]. The methodology is exact for the free particle and HO, and shows good agreement with quantum results for a variety of quartic potentials.

  12. High-Order Semi-Discrete Central-Upwind Schemes for Multi-Dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron; Biegel, Bran R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present high-order semi-discrete central-upwind numerical schemes for approximating solutions of multi-dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) equations. This scheme is based on the use of fifth-order central interpolants like those developed in [1], in fluxes presented in [3]. These interpolants use the weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) approach to avoid spurious oscillations near singularities, and become "central-upwind" in the semi-discrete limit. This scheme provides numerical approximations whose error is as much as an order of magnitude smaller than those in previous WENO-based fifth-order methods [2, 1]. Thee results are discussed via examples in one, two and three dimensions. We also pregnant explicit N-dimensional formulas for the fluxes, discuss their monotonicity and tl!e connection between this method and that in [2].

  13. Notes on the p-spin glass studied via Hamilton-Jacobi and smooth-cavity techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliari, Elena; Barra, Adriano; Burioni, Raffaella; Di Biasio, Aldo

    2012-06-01

    In these notes, we continue our investigation of classical toy models of disordered statistical mechanics, through techniques recently developed and tested mainly on the paradigmatic Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass. Here, we consider the p-spin-glass model with Ising spins and interactions drawn from a normal distribution N[0,1]. After a general presentation of its properties (e.g., self-averaging of the free energy, existence of a suitable thermodynamic limit), we study its equilibrium behavior within the Hamilton-Jacobi framework and the smooth cavity approach. Through the former we find both the RS and the 1-RSB expressions for the free-energy, coupled with their self-consistent relations for the overlaps. Through the latter, we recover these results as irreducible expression, and we study the generalization of the overlap polynomial identities suitable for this model; a discussion on their deep connection with the structure of the internal energy and the entropy closes the investigation.

  14. A survey of the attitudes and perceptions of food service operators in the Hamilton-Wentworth Region.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, C J

    1993-01-01

    Questionnaires were mailed to 500 food service operators in the Hamilton-Wentworth Region: 271 operators responded to the survey. The survey assessed the operators' perception of health inspection services; their knowledge of food handling procedures; their attitude toward evening inspections and their understanding of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point inspections. The results indicate that the majority of the operators perceive the Public Health Inspector (PHI) to be helpful and informed. Overall, the operators appear informed on correct food handling procedures. The findings also suggest that the operators did not support night time inspections and knew nothing about Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point inspections. Lastly, operators reported that they consider PHIs to be health educators and monitors as opposed to law enforcers.

  15. Hawking non-thermal and thermal radiations of Schwarzschild anti-de Sitter black hole by Hamilton-Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. Atiqur; Hossain, M. Ilias

    2013-06-01

    The massive particles tunneling method has been used to investigate the Hawking non-thermal and purely thermal radiations of Schwarzschild Anti-de Sitter (SAdS) black hole. Considering the spacetime background to be dynamical, incorporate the self-gravitation effect of the emitted particles the imaginary part of the action has been derived from Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Using the conservation laws of energy and angular momentum we have showed that the non-thermal and purely thermal tunneling rates are related to the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy and the derived emission spectrum deviates from the pure thermal spectrum. The result obtained for SAdS black hole is also in accordance with Parikh and Wilczek's opinion and gives a correction to the Hawking radiation of SAdS black hole.

  16. Effect of the refractive index on the hawking temperature: an application of the Hamilton-Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Mirekhtiary, S. F.

    2013-10-01

    Hawking radiation of a non-asymptotically flat 4-dimensional spherically symmetric and static dilatonic black hole (BH) via the Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) method is studied. In addition to the naive coordinates, we use four more different coordinate systems that are well-behaved at the horizon. Except for the isotropic coordinates, direct computation by the HJ method leads to the standard Hawking temperature for all coordinate systems. The isotropic coordinates allow extracting the index of refraction from the Fermat metric. It is explicitly shown that the index of refraction determines the value of the tunneling rate and its natural consequence, the Hawking temperature. The isotropic coordinates in the conventional HJ method produce a wrong result for the temperature of the linear dilaton. Here, we explain how this discrepancy can be resolved by regularizing the integral possessing a pole at the horizon.

  17. Hamilton-Jacobi method and effective actions of D-brane and M-brane in supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Matsuo; Tsuchiya, Asato

    2003-11-01

    We show that the effective actions of D-brane and M-brane are solutions to the Hamilton-Jacobi (H-J) equations in supergravities. This fact means that these effective actions are on-shell actions in supergravities. These solutions to the H-J equations reproduce the supergravity solutions that represent D-branes in a B2 field, M2 branes and the M2-M5 bound states. The effective actions in these solutions are those of a probe D-brane and a probe M-brane. Our findings can be applied to the study of the gauge/gravity correspondence, especially the holographic renormalization group, and a search for new solutions of supergravity.

  18. Determinants of variation in food cost and availability in two socioeconomically contrasting neighbourhoods of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Latham, Jim; Moffat, Tina

    2007-03-01

    This study addresses links between economic and nutritional variation in an urban North American setting. We employed a mixed-methods approach including mapping, semi-structured interviews, and food outlet surveys to investigate the public health impact of variation in the cost and availability of food between two socioeconomically distinct neighbourhoods of the City of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Food cost in supermarkets was not found to be higher in the low-income neighbourhood, though it was much higher in the variety stores that predominate in the low-income neighbourhood. Moreover, there was a very low availability of produce in the variety stores. Reduced fresh produce availability and lower incomes have the potential to negatively influence public health in the less-affluent study area by increasing the difficulty of acquiring healthy foods.

  19. Light propagation in a plasma on Kerr spacetime: Separation of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and calculation of the shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlick, Volker; Tsupko, Oleg Yu.

    2017-05-01

    We consider light propagation in a nonmagnetized pressureless plasma around a Kerr black hole. We find the necessary and sufficient condition the plasma electron density has to satisfy to guarantee that the Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the light rays is separable, i.e., that a generalized Carter constant exists. For all cases where this condition is satisfied we determine the photon region; i.e., the region in the spacetime where spherical light rays exist. A spherical light ray is a light ray that stays on a sphere r =constant (in Boyer-Lindquist coordinates). Based on these results, we calculate the shadow of a Kerr black hole under the influence of a plasma that satisfies the separability condition. More precisely, we derive an analytical formula for the boundary curve of the shadow on the sky of an observer that is located anywhere in the domain of outer communication. Several examples are worked out.

  20. Analytical Mechanics in Stochastic Dynamics: Most Probable Path, Large-Deviation Rate Function and Hamilton-Jacobi Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Hong

    2012-09-01

    Analytical (rational) mechanics is the mathematical structure of Newtonian deterministic dynamics developed by D'Alembert, Lagrange, Hamilton, Jacobi, and many other luminaries of applied mathematics. Diffusion as a stochastic process of an overdamped individual particle immersed in a fluid, initiated by Einstein, Smoluchowski, Langevin and Wiener, has no momentum since its path is nowhere differentiable. In this exposition, we illustrate how analytical mechanics arises in stochastic dynamics from a randomly perturbed ordinary differential equation dXt = b(Xt)dt+ɛdWt, where Wt is a Brownian motion. In the limit of vanishingly small ɛ, the solution to the stochastic differential equation other than ˙ {x} = b(x) are all rare events. However, conditioned on an occurrence of such an event, the most probable trajectory of the stochastic motion is the solution to Lagrangian mechanics with L = \\Vert ˙ {q}-b(q)\\Vert 2/4 and Hamiltonian equations with H(p, q) = \\dvbr p\\dvbr2+b(q)ṡp. Hamiltonian conservation law implies that the most probable trajectory for a "rare" event has a uniform "excess kinetic energy" along its path. Rare events can also be characterized by the principle of large deviations which expresses the probability density function for Xt as f(x, t) = e-u(x, t)/ɛ, where u(x, t) is called a large-deviation rate function which satisfies the corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi equation. An irreversible diffusion process with ∇×b≠0 corresponds to a Newtonian system with a Lorentz force ḋ {q} = (∇ × b)× ˙ {q}+({1}/{2})∇ \\Vert b\\Vert 2. The connection between stochastic motion and analytical mechanics can be explored in terms of various techniques of applied mathematics, for example, singular perturbations, viscosity solutions and integrable systems.

  1. Prevalence of the Lyme Disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, in Blacklegged Ticks, Ixodes scapularis at Hamilton-Wentworth, Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John D.; Anderson, John F.; Durden, Lance A.; Smith, Morgan L.; Manord, Jodi M.; Clark, Kerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease has emerged as a major health concern in Canada, where the etiological agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), a spirochetal bacterium, is typically spread by the bite of certain ticks. This study explores the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. in blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis, collected at Dundas, Ontario (a locality within the region of Hamilton-Wentworth). Using passive surveillance, veterinarians and pet groomers were asked to collect blacklegged ticks from dogs and cats with no history of travel. Additionally, I. scapularis specimens were submitted from local residents and collected by flagging. Overall, 12 (41%) of 29 blacklegged ticks were infected with B. burgdorferi s.l. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing, two borrelial amplicons were characterized as B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), a genospecies pathogenic to humans and certain domestic animals. Notably, three different vertebrate hosts each had two engorged I. scapularis females removed on the same day and, likewise, one cat had three repeat occurrences of this tick species. These multiple infestations suggest that a population of I. scapularis may be established in this area. The local public health unit has been underreporting the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l.-infected I. scapularis in the area encompassing Dundas. Our findings raise concerns about the need to erect tick warning signs in parkland areas. Veterinarians, medical professionals, public health officials, and the general public must be vigilant that Lyme disease-carrying blacklegged ticks pose a public health risk in the Dundas area and the surrounding Hamilton-Wentworth region. PMID:27226771

  2. Developing an EMS to the ISO 14001 standard for municipal government -- The experiences of Hamilton-Wentworth, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Bekkering, M.H.; McCallum, D.

    1999-07-01

    In March 1997, the Regional Environmental Department of the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth initiated a project to develop an environmental management system (EMS) and seek registration to the ISO 14001 Standard. The development of management systems following the ISO 14001 environmental management standard is seen as the next step in the Region's Sustainable Community and Pollution Prevention Initiatives and as a key tool for improving the quality and structure of its services. With an annual budget of $100 million and over 220 employees, the Department is responsible for the delivery of the Region's: water treatment and distribution services, wastewater collection and treatment services, solid waste disposal and management services, regional planning and development services, and collection of storm water in the City of Hamilton. The goal of the ISO 14001 Initiative is to develop an EMS for these five core businesses of the Department. Although there are a number of reasons why the Department started this initiative, the key reason for the project is to establish creditability with the community and throughout the Regional Corporation that their environmental issues of concern are being addressed in the delivery of municipal services. It creates a structured process for ongoing consideration of community concerns about environmental and service delivery issues by: regular identification and prioritization of the issues of concern; establishing measurable objectives and targets to address the concerns; allocating the resources and defining the structures and responsibilities required to achieve the objectives and targets; and communicating with the community on how their concerns are reflected in the objectives and targets and being addressed through the allocation of departmental resources.

  3. Relations between rainfall amount, soil moisture and landslides in Hamilton County, Ohio, measured by strain survey and tensiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, B.; Mayer, L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The movement of water through fill material and natural colluvium in a cut slope is being monitored at two sites with past landslide activity adjacent to I-275 in Hamilton County, Ohio. Quadrilaterals and an array of wooden stakes were placed immediately adjacent to the slide area to monitor movement of the slope at Site 1. To correlate any movement with soil moisture levels, rain gauges were installed. Changes in line-length measurements over a 3-month period are < 14 mm, and most differences average about 4 mm. Since measurement errors of up to 5--6 mm can be expected using a steel tape, more measurements over time will be needed to determine if significant displacement is occurring. Tensiometers were placed at 12 and 36 inches depth in the soil from mid-September through early November 1992, in order to measure matric suction. The 36 inch tensiometer indicated that the soil remained saturated at that depth. The 12 inch tensiometer measured 8 centibars, which occurred following a week of rain-free weather. Gravimetric measurements of soil samples show that surface soil moisture ranges from 14--39% immediately following a storm to 7--29% following at least 10 days of dry weather. At Site 2, quadrilaterals were set up in mid-August 1992; resurveys of the quadrilaterals shows very little, if any, movement. Movement of 38 mm occurred in one quadrilateral; movement in other quadrilaterals averaged close to 5 mm. The slide is not steadily moving, and may be following a pattern, where slides in Hamilton County were more likely to move in late winter or early spring.

  4. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 5): Feed Materials Production Center, (USDOE) operable unit 5, AKA Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Hamilton County, OH, January 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for Operable Unit 5 of the FEMP site in Hamilton and Butler Counties, Ohio. Operable Unit 5 consists of impacted environmental media including groundwater in the underlying Great Miami Aquifer, perched groundwater, surface water, soil, sediment, flora, and fauna.

  5. Negative correlation between nuptial throat colour and blood parasite load in male European green lizards supports the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, Orsolya; Bajer, Katalin; Mészáros, Boglárka; Török, János; Herczeg, Gábor

    2013-06-01

    During female mate choice, conspicuous male sexual signals are used to infer male quality and choose the best sire for the offspring. The theory of parasite-mediated sexual selection (Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis) presumes that parasite infection can influence the elaboration of sexual signals: resistant individuals can invest more energy into signal expression and thus advertise their individual quality through signal intensity. By preferring these males, females can provide resistance genes for their offspring. Previous research showed that nuptial throat colour of male European green lizard, Lacerta viridis, plays a role in both inter- and intrasexual selections as a condition-dependent multiple signalling system. The aim of this study was to test the predictions of the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis on male European green lizards. By blood sampling 30 adult males during the reproductive season, we found members of the Haemogregarinidae family in all but one individual (prevalence = 96 %). The infection intensity showed strong negative correlation with the throat and belly colour brightness in line with the predictions of the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis. In addition, we found other correlations between infection intensity and other fitness-related traits, suggesting that parasite load has a remarkable effect on individual fitness. This study shows that throat patch colour of the European green lizards not only is a multiple signalling system but also possibly acts as an honest sexual signal of health state in accordance with the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis.

  6. Negative correlation between nuptial throat colour and blood parasite load in male European green lizards supports the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Orsolya; Bajer, Katalin; Mészáros, Boglárka; Török, János; Herczeg, Gábor

    2013-06-01

    During female mate choice, conspicuous male sexual signals are used to infer male quality and choose the best sire for the offspring. The theory of parasite-mediated sexual selection (Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis) presumes that parasite infection can influence the elaboration of sexual signals: resistant individuals can invest more energy into signal expression and thus advertise their individual quality through signal intensity. By preferring these males, females can provide resistance genes for their offspring. Previous research showed that nuptial throat colour of male European green lizard, Lacerta viridis, plays a role in both inter- and intrasexual selections as a condition-dependent multiple signalling system. The aim of this study was to test the predictions of the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis on male European green lizards. By blood sampling 30 adult males during the reproductive season, we found members of the Haemogregarinidae family in all but one individual (prevalence = 96%). The infection intensity showed strong negative correlation with the throat and belly colour brightness in line with the predictions of the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis. In addition, we found other correlations between infection intensity and other fitness-related traits, suggesting that parasite load has a remarkable effect on individual fitness. This study shows that throat patch colour of the European green lizards not only is a multiple signalling system but also possibly acts as an honest sexual signal of health state in accordance with the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis.

  7. 'Morals can not be drawn from facts but guidance may be': the early life of W.D. Hamilton's theory of inclusive fitness.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Sarah A

    2015-12-01

    W.D. Hamilton's theory of inclusive fitness saw the evolution of altruism from the point of view of the gene. It was at heart a theory of limits, redefining altruistic behaviours as ultimately selfish. This theory inspired two controversial texts published almost in tandem, E.O. Wilson's Sociobiology: The New Synthesis (1975) and Richard Dawkins's The Selfish Gene (1976). When Wilson and Dawkins were attacked for their evolutionary interpretations of human societies, they claimed a distinction between reporting what is and declaring what ought to be. Can the history of sociobiological theories be so easily separated from its sociopolitical context? This paper draws upon unpublished materials from the 1960s and early 1970s and documents some of the ways in which Hamilton saw his research as contributing to contemporary concerns. It pays special attention to the 1969 Man and Beast Smithsonian Institution symposium in order to explore the extent to which Hamilton intended his theory to be merely descriptive versus prescriptive. From this, we may see that Hamilton was deeply concerned about the political chaos he perceived in the world around him, and hoped to arrive at a level of self-understanding through science that could inform a new social order.

  8. Aquivalence revisited--new model formulation and application to assess environmental fate of ionic pharmaceuticals in Hamilton Harbour, Lake Ontario.

    PubMed

    Csiszar, Susan A; Gandhi, Nilima; Alexy, Radka; Benny, Donald T; Struger, John; Marvin, Chris; Diamond, Miriam L

    2011-07-01

    A model formulation based on "aquivalence", as defined in terms of activity is presented to estimate the multimedia fate of ionizing chemicals. The aquivalence approach is analogous to fugacity but aquivalence is applicable to neutral and ionizing compounds, and has been applied previously to speciating chemicals, notably metals. The new aquivalence-based mass-balance model treats ionizing organic compounds that exist as interconverting neutral and ionic species which are subject to fate processes at differing rates. The model is illustrated by application to four ionizing pharmaceuticals in Hamilton Harbour, Lake Ontario. At the system pH of 7.9-8.5, ibuprofen, gemfibrozil, and naproxen are expected to be almost entirely ionic and triclosan split between ionic and neutral forms. Measured seasonal surface water concentrations, which were 2-10 times lower in the late summer and fall than during spring, were used to solve for unknown values of chemical half-life in the water column due to degradation (photo- and bio-) of the ionizing and neutral forms and secondarily, ionic sorption coefficients of the ionizing forms. Model estimates of half-lives in the habour's water ranged from 11 to 77, 11 to 147 and 10 to 37 for ionic ibuprofen, gemfibrozil, and naproxen, respectively; and 4-22 days and 2-9 days for ionic and neutral triclosan, respectively, with the shortest half-lives in spring and the longest in summer.

  9. Neil Hamilton Fairley KBE FRCP FRS (1891-1966): an outstanding tropical physician in the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Cook, G C

    2014-11-01

    In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, British physicians led the way in tropical medicine research. Several years later scientific advances had slowed, and Fairley's numerous contributions were thus most welcome. Neil Hamilton Fairley was born of Scottish parents at Victoria, Australia. After qualification at Melbourne, he joined the Australian Army Medical Service (AAMS) and after several minor research projects, made valuable contributions to the understanding of tropical sprue at Bombay (now Mumbai), India. However, Fairley's major researches were carried out during World War II (1939-45). Together with J S K Boyd he demonstrated the great value of sulphaguanidine in bacillary dysentery. Working in northern Australia and the south-Pacific region, he both contributed to elucidation of the Plasmodium vivax life-cycle, and more importantly demonstrated the value of alternative anti-malarial compounds to quinine (which was not readily available). Back in London after the war, Fairley briefly occupied the Wellcome Chair of Tropical Medicine, strongly supported London's clinical tropical medicine, and was subsequently knighted in 1950.

  10. Two new species of philometrid nematodes (Nematoda: Philometridae) in Epinephelus coioides (Hamilton, 1822) from the South Bali Sea, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Kartika; Palm, Harry W

    2013-01-25

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopy, two new species of philometrid nematodes, Spirophilometra endangae sp. nov. and Philometra epinepheli sp. nov. (Nematoda: Dracunculoidea: Philometridae) are described from Epinephelus coioides (Hamilton, 1822) (Perciformes: Serranidae) from the South Bali Sea, Indonesia. Spirophilometra endangae sp. nov. was isolated from the fins of E. coioides. The new species can be distinguished from the most closely related S. eichleri Parukhin, 1971 by a larger total body length and the site of infection in the host. The new species differs from S. centropomi (Caballero, 1974) also in the larger body size of the gravid females and the site of infection in the host. S. en-dangae sp. nov. differs from S. pacifica (Moravec, Santana-Pineros, Gonzales-Solis & Torres-Huerta, 2007) in the struc-ture and arrangement of the spines on the middle part of the body, the infection site of the worm, the type host and the zoogeographical host distribution. Philometra epinepheli sp. nov. differs from all other Philometra spp. congeners so far recorded from Ephinepelus groupers in the total body length and the site of infection. This is the first opercula-infecting species of Philometra described from the fish family Serranidae.

  11. Characterization of mitochondrial ATPase 6/8 genes in wild Labeo calbasu (Hamilton, 1822) and mapping of natural genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajeev K; Lal, Kuldeep K; Mohindra, Vindhya; Sah, Rama S; Kumar, Rajesh; Jena, J K

    2016-09-01

    We characterized mitochondrial ATP synthase (ATPase) 6 and 8 genes in Labeo calbasu (Hamilton, 1822) and determined genetic variation in wild populations across the natural distribution in Indian rivers. A total of 206 individuals were sampled from 11 riverine sites belonging to distinct geographical locations covering five major river basins. Sequencing of 842 base pairs of ATPase 6/8 revealed 21 haplotypes with haplotype diversity ranging from 0.1250 (River Satluj) to 0.8846 (River Bhagirathi). Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) data revealed significant genetic differentiation among sites (FST = 0.192, p < 0.0001) which was indicative of moderate level of genetic structuring in the wild L. calbasu populations. The patterns of genetic divergence and haplotype network of mtDNA revealed distinct clades present in Indian rivers. The analysis of data demonstrated the potential of ATPase 6/8 genes in determining the genetic diversity and indicated considerable sub-structuring in wild calbasu populations present in different rivers.

  12. Interactive visualization of volumetric white matter connectivity in DT-MRI using a parallel-hardware Hamilton-Jacobi solver.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Won-Ki; Fletcher, P Thomas; Tao, Ran; Whitaker, Ross

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a method to compute and visualize volumetric white matter connectivity in diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) using a Hamilton-Jacobi (H-J) solver on the GPU (Graphics Processing Unit). Paths through the volume are assigned costs that are lower if they are consistent with the preferred diffusion directions. The proposed method finds a set of voxels in the DTI volume that contain paths between two regions whose costs are within a threshold of the optimal path. The result is a volumetric optimal path analysis, which is driven by clinical and scientific questions relating to the connectivity between various known anatomical regions of the brain. To solve the minimal path problem quickly, we introduce a novel numerical algorithm for solving H-J equations, which we call the Fast Iterative Method (FIM). This algorithm is well-adapted to parallel architectures, and we present a GPU-based implementation, which runs roughly 50-100 times faster than traditional CPU-based solvers for anisotropic H-J equations. The proposed system allows users to freely change the endpoints of interesting pathways and to visualize the optimal volumetric path between them at an interactive rate. We demonstrate the proposed method on some synthetic and real DT-MRI datasets and compare the performance with existing methods.

  13. Impact of environmental and genetic factors on the scale shape of zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton 1822): a geometric morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Staszny, A; Havas, Enikő; Kovács, R; Urbányi, B; Paulovits, G; Bencsik, Dóra; Ferincz, A; Müller, T; Specziár, A; Bakos, Katalin; Csenki, Zs

    2013-12-01

    Intraspecific morphological variability may reflect either genetic divergence among groups of individuals or response of individuals to environmental circumstances within the frame of phenotypic plasticity. Several studies were able to discriminate wild fish populations based on their scale shape. Here we examine whether the variations in the scale shape in fish populations could be related to genetic or environmental factors, or to both of them. In the first experiment, two inbred lines of zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton 1822) reared under identical environmental conditions were compared. Secondly, to find out what effect environmental factors might have, offsprings were divided into two groups and reared on different diets for 12 weeks. Potential recovery of scales from an environmental effect was also assessed. Experimental groups could successfully be distinguished according to the shape of scales in both experiments, and the results showed that both genetic and environmental factors may notably influence scale shape. It was concluded that scale shape analysis might be used as an explanatory tool to detect potential variability of environmental influences impacting genetically homogeneous groups of fish. However, due to its sensitivity to environmental heterogeneity, the applicability of this technique in identifying intraspecific stock membership of fish could be limited.

  14. Performance on the Hamilton search task, and the influence of lateralization, in captive orange-winged Amazon parrots (Amazona amazonica).

    PubMed

    Cussen, Victoria A; Mench, Joy A

    2014-07-01

    Psittacines are generally considered to possess cognitive abilities comparable to those of primates. Most psittacine research has evaluated performance on standardized complex cognition tasks, but studies of basic cognitive processes are limited. We tested orange-winged Amazon parrots (Amazona amazonica) on a spatial foraging assessment, the Hamilton search task. This task is a standardized test used in human and non-human primate studies. It has multiple phases, which require trial and error learning, learning set breaking, and spatial memory. We investigated search strategies used to complete the task, cognitive flexibility, and long-term memory for the task. We also assessed the effects of individual strength of motor lateralization (foot preference) and sex on task performance. Almost all (92%) of the parrots acquired the task. All had significant foot preferences, with 69% preferring their left foot, and showed side preferences contralateral to their preferred limb during location selection. The parrots were able to alter their search strategies when reward contingencies changed, demonstrating cognitive flexibility. They were also able to remember the task over a 6-month period. Lateralization had a significant influence on learning set acquisition but no effect on cognitive flexibility. There were no sex differences. To our knowledge, this is the first cognitive study using this particular species and one of the few studies of cognitive abilities in any Neotropical parrot species.

  15. Measurement of bridge scour at the SR-32 crossing of the Sacramento River at Hamilton City, California, 1987-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, J.C.; Harris, Carroll D.; ,

    1993-01-01

    A study of the State Route 32 crossing of the Sacramento River near Hamilton City, California, is being made to determine those channel and bridge factors that contribute to scour at the site. Three types of scour data have been measured-channel bed (natural) scour, constriction (general) scour, and local (bridge-pier induced) scour. During the years 1979-93, a maximum of 3.4 ft of channel bed scour, with a mean of 1.4 ft, has been measured. Constriction scour, which may include channel bed scour, has been measured at the site nine times during the years 1987-92. The calculated amount of constriction scour ranged from 0.2 to 3.0 ft, assuming the reference is the mean bed elevation. Local scour was measured four times at the site in 1991 and 1992 and ranged from -2.1 (fill) to 11.6 ft , with the calculated amounts dependent on the bed reference elevation and method of computation used. Surveys of the channel bed near the bridge piers indicate the horizontal location of lowest bed elevation (maximum depth of scour) may vary at least 17 ft between different surveys at the same pier and most frequently is located downstream from the upstream face of the pier.

  16. The effects of environmental enrichment and age-related differences on inhibitory avoidance in zebrafish (Danio rerio Hamilton).

    PubMed

    Manuel, Remy; Gorissen, Marnix; Stokkermans, Mitchel; Zethof, Jan; Ebbesson, Lars O E; van de Vis, Hans; Flik, Gert; van den Bos, Ruud

    2015-04-01

    The inhibitory avoidance paradigm allows the study of mechanisms underlying learning and memory formation in zebrafish (Danio rerio Hamilton). For zebrafish, the physiology and behavior associated with this paradigm are as yet poorly understood. We therefore assessed the effects of environmental enrichment and fish age on inhibitory avoidance learning. Fish raised in an environmentally enriched tank showed decreased anxiety-like behavior and increased exploration. Enrichment greatly reduced inhibitory avoidance in 6-month (6M)- and 12-month (12 M)-old fish. Following inhibitory avoidance, telencephalic mRNA levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (pcna), neurogenic differentiation (neurod), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript 4 (cart4), and cannabinoid receptor 1 (cnr1) were lower in enriched-housed fish, while the ratios of mineralocorticoid receptor (nr3c2)/glucocorticoid receptor α [nr3c1(α)] and glucocorticoid receptor β [nr3c1(β)]/glucocorticoid receptor α [nr3c1(α)] were higher. This was observed for 6M-old fish only, not for 24-month (24 M) old fish. Instead, 24 M-old fish showed delayed inhibitory avoidance, no effects of enrichment, and reduced expression of neuroplasticity genes. Overall, our data show strong differences in inhibitory avoidance behavior between zebrafish of different ages and a clear reduction in avoidance behavior following housing under environmental enrichment.

  17. A new algorithm to find fuzzy Hamilton cycle in a fuzzy network using adjacency matrix and minimum vertex degree.

    PubMed

    Nagoor Gani, A; Latha, S R

    2016-01-01

    A Hamiltonian cycle in a graph is a cycle that visits each node/vertex exactly once. A graph containing a Hamiltonian cycle is called a Hamiltonian graph. There have been several researches to find the number of Hamiltonian cycles of a Hamilton graph. As the number of vertices and edges grow, it becomes very difficult to keep track of all the different ways through which the vertices are connected. Hence, analysis of large graphs can be efficiently done with the assistance of a computer system that interprets graphs as matrices. And, of course, a good and well written algorithm will expedite the analysis even faster. The most convenient way to quickly test whether there is an edge between two vertices is to represent graphs using adjacent matrices. In this paper, a new algorithm is proposed to find fuzzy Hamiltonian cycle using adjacency matrix and the degree of the vertices of a fuzzy graph. A fuzzy graph structure is also modeled to illustrate the proposed algorithms with the selected air network of Indigo airlines.

  18. Skin immune response in the zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton), to Aeromonas hydrophila infection: a transcriptional profiling approach.

    PubMed

    Lü, A-J; Hu, X-C; Wang, Y; Zhu, A-H; Shen, L-L; Tian, J; Feng, Z-Z; Feng, Z-J

    2015-02-01

    Skin plays an important role in innate immune responses to bacterial infection, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear in fish. The transcriptional profiling of the skin immune response to Aeromonas hydrophila infection of the zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton), was performed by Affymetrix microarray analysis. The results showed that 538 genes were differentially expressed, of which 388 genes were up-regulated and 150 genes were down-regulated. The expression patterns for 106 representative genes were observed to be up-regulated in zebrafish skin at 24 and 36 h post-infection, and gene expression changes were clearly greater at 36 h. Gene Ontology classification indicated that 222 genes were significantly associated with the skin immunity, including complement activation, acute-phase response, stress response, chemotaxis and apoptosis. Further Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis showed that the significant pathways included MAPK, p53, Wnt, TGF-β, Notch, ErbB, JAK-STAT, VEGF, mTOR and Calcium signalling in skin immune responses, and several genes (e.g. akt2l, frap1, nras, rac1, xiap) were found to be involved in signalling networks. Moreover, expression changes in nine selected genes were verified by real-time qPCR analysis. This is the first known report on transcriptome analysis in the skin of zebrafish against the pathogen A. hydrophila. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Fish scales as a non-lethal tool of the toxicity of wastewater from the River Chenab.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Tayyaba; Siddique, Amir; Sultana, Salma; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid; Ahmed, Z

    2017-01-01

    Water pollution is gradually increasing in natural waters through anthropogenic activities. This study aimed to use fish scales as a bio-indicator of pollution, along with water quality parameters, and the assessment and detection of selected heavy metals in water samples collected from the River Chenab, including the Chakbandi drain that gathers domestic sewage waste and industrial effluents from Faisalabad and deposits it into this freshwater body. All water quality parameters (pH, total dissolved solids (TDS), total suspended solids (TSS), salinity, conductivity, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), phenols and sulphates) and concentrations of selected heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb and Cr) were found to be considerably higher than permissible limits as defined by the WHO, and therefore capable of causing ill health effects in aquatic organisms. Specimens of fish scales from selected fish were described qualitatively and observed quantitatively. In Catla catla, Labeo rohita and Cirrhinus mrigala, the scales showed several deformities in shape and different scale structures such as circuli, radii and annuli. In each of the three types of fish, considerable variation in the morphology of their scales was observed in specimens collected from polluted sites.

  20. Nutrients budget and effluents characteristics in polyculture of scampi (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) and Indian major carps ponds using organic inputs.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Subhendu; Sahu, Bharat Chandra; Dey, Lambodar

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were conducted for the study of nutrient budget in farmers' ponds (0.4-0.6 ha) in Orissa, India, at stocking densities of 0.30-0.38/m(2) for scampi (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) and 0.60-0.70/m(2) for Indian major carps (Catla catla, Labeo rohita and Cirrhinus mrigala). The average initial body weights of scampi and the major carps were 0.02 and 8-10 g, respectively. The culture period was 272-292 days. Feed was the main input. The FCR (feed conversion ratio) varied from 1.78 to 1.83. Feed and cow dung were applied to these ponds as organic inputs. At harvest time, the average weight of scampi and carps varied from 73 to 92 g and from 718 to 820 g, respectively. Among all the inputs, feed alone accounted for 97.60% total nitrogen (N), 97.90% total phosphorus (P) and 94.72% total organic carbon (OC), respectively. The harvest of scampi and carps accounted for recovery of 52.45% N, 19.43% P and 18.12% OC, respectively. N, P and OC accumulated in sediment were 38.31, 71.40 and 69.50%, respectively. The median nutrient loads in the fish pond effluents were equivalent to 0.58 kg of inorganic N, 0.135 kg of P and 8.83 kg of total OC per ton of Indian major carps and scampi production.

  1. Metal concentrations in water, sediment, and fish from sewage-fed aquaculture ponds of Kolkata, India.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, S; Ghosh, L; Rai, S P; Ayyappan, S

    2009-12-01

    The concentrations of lead, cadmium, chromium, copper, and zinc were investigated in the sewage-fed pond water, sediment, and the various organs of Labeo rohita, Catla catla, Cirrhinus mrigala, Oreochromis mossambicus, and Cyprinus carpio cultured in sewage-fed ponds, Kolkata, India. Among the metals, cadmium, lead, and zinc were detected in water and, except lead, were below the water quality guideline levels for the protection of freshwater aquatic life proposed by CEQG (Canadian Environmental Quality Guidelines) and AENV (Alberta Environment). Therefore, lead could pose danger to aquatic organisms. All the five metals were detected in the sediment and, except cadmium and lead, were below the sediment quality guideline levels for aquatic life proposed by EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). Therefore, these two metals could be toxic to aquatic organisms. Significant (P > 0.05) differences were observed among the five fish species for all these metals accumulation. Also, significant (P > 0.05) differences were noticed among these metals accumulation in fish organs. Cadmium showed the least bioaccumulation, while zinc showed the highest bioaccumulation in all the fish species. Though the metal concentration in the different fish tissues was variable, the highest concentration was found in kidney and the lowest in the muscle. Concentrations of these metals in the muscle tissue of all the fish species were well below the consumption safety tolerance in fish set by WHO/FAO, and thus, so far as these metals are concerned, these sewage-fed cultured fishes are safe and suitable for human consumption.

  2. Genetic fragmentation in India's third longest river system, the Narmada.

    PubMed

    Khedkar, Gulab D; Jamdade, Rahul; Kalyankar, Amol; Tiknaik, Anita; Ron, Tetsuzan Benny; Haymer, David

    2014-01-01

    India's third longest river, the Narmada, is studied here for the potential effects on native fish populations of river fragmentation due to various barriers including dams and a waterfall. The species we studied include a cyprinid fish, Catla catla, and a mastacembelid, Mastacembelus armatus, both of which are found in the Narmada. Our goal was to use DNA sequence information from the D-loop region of the mitochondrial DNA to explore how this fragmentation could impact the genetic structure of these fish populations. Our results clearly show that these barriers can contribute to the fragmentation of the genetic structure of these fish communities, Furthermore, these barriers enhance the effects of natural isolation by distance and the asymmetry of dispersal flows. This may be a slow process, but it can create significant isolation and result in genetic disparity. In particular, populations furthest upstream having low migration rates could be even more subject to genetic impoverishment. This study serves as a first report of its kind for a river system on the Indian subcontinent. The results of this study also emphasize the need for appropriate attention towards the creation of fish passages across the dams and weirs that could help in maintaining biodiversity.

  3. Separation of variables in the special diagonal Hamilton-Jacobi equation: Application to the dynamical problem of a particle constrained on a moving surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, D. L.; Chan, F. K.

    1973-01-01

    For a time-dependent, n-dimensional, special diagonal Hamilton-Jacobi equation a necessary and sufficient condition for the separation of variables to yield a complete integral of the form was established by specifying the admissible forms in terms of arbitrary functions. A complete integral was then expressed in terms of these arbitrary functions and also the n irreducible constants. As an application of the results obtained for the two-dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi equation, analysis was made for a comparatively wide class of dynamical problems involving a particle moving in Euclidean three-dimensional space under the action of external forces but constrained on a moving surface. All the possible cases in which this equation had a complete integral of the form were obtained and these are tubulated for reference.

  4. National Dam Safety Program. Hamilton City Water Plant Dam (M0 10261), Grand - Chariton Basin, Caldwell County, Missouri. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    End Of Main Dam Show- ing Erosion And Deterioration Of Riprap Plate B-1l Photo No. 20 View Upstream With Intake Tower To Water Treatment Plant In... Water Treatment Plant Plate B-13 Photo No. 24 Vertical Drop And Erosion Of Upstream Face Near Right End Photo No. 25 View Upstream In Emergency Spillway...dam. Within the damage zone are the City of Hamilton water treatment plant and Highway 36 Business Route (immediately downstream), Highway 36 (0.3

  5. Variations in Sense of Place Across Immigrant Status and Gender in Hamilton, Ontario; Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; and, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gallina, Melissa; Williams, Allison

    Past research in Hamilton, Ontario has found that age and longevity of residence are positively associated with evaluations of sense of place (SoP); further, evaluations of SoP between immigrants and Canadian-born individuals have shown no clear pattern (Williams et al. 2010; Williams and Kitchen 2012). This paper builds on this work by further examining evaluations of SoP among both immigrants and Canadian-born residents and across gender in Hamilton, while expanding the study to two other small-to-medium sized cities: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. This paper has two objectives: (1) to establish measures of SoP across immigrant status and gender in Hamilton, Saskatoon, and Charlottetown; and, (2) to determine how SoP varies according to immigrant status, length of residence in Canada, age, income, and neighbourhood length of residence across the three city sites. Telephone survey data (n = 1,132) was used to compare evaluations of SoP across various groups and to construct an ordered logistic regression model for SoP. Results suggest that immigrants tended to rate their SoP lower than their Canadian-born counterparts. Hamilton residents were found to rate their SoP lowest, followed by Saskatoon residents and, finally, Charlottetown residents. Younger individuals, those with lower income levels, and those with shorter neighbourhood residency in the cities concerned were more likely to have lower evaluations of SoP. This research suggests that greater attention is needed to nurture immigrants' connection with their new home.

  6. Microelectrophoretic study of environmentally induced DNA damage in fish and its use for early toxicity screening of freshwater bodies.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Bilal; Sultana, Tayyaba; Sultana, Salma; Al-Ghanim, K A; Masood, Shahreef; Ali, Muhammad; Mahboob, Shahid

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates the potential of the comet and micronucleus assays of fish DNA as a means of screening the toxicity of aquatic environments. Catla catla and Cirrhinus mrigala collected from the River Chenab in Pakistan were used as a case study for the application of comet and micronucleus techniques. Comet and micronucleus assays were used to compare DNA damage in C. catla and C. mrigala collected from polluted areas of the River Chenab and farmed fish. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry showed an acute level of toxicity from Cd, Cu, Mn, Zn, Pb, Cr, Sn, and Hg in river water. Comet assay showed significant (p < 0.05) DNA damage in C. catla representing 17.33 ± 2.42, 11.53 ± 2.14, and 14.17% DNA in the comet tail, averaged from three sites of the polluted area of the river. Tail moment was observed as 10.06 ± 2.71, 3.11 ± 0.74, and 14.70 ± 1.89, while olive moment was 8.85 ± 1.84, 3.83 ± 0.76, and 7.11 ± 0.73, respectively. Highly significant (p < 0.01) damage was reported in C. mrigala as 37.29 ± 2.51, 34.96 ± 2.53, and 38.80 ± 2.42% DNA in comet tail, tail moment was 23.48 ± 3.90, 19.78 ± 4.26, and 14.30 ± 1.82, and olive moment was 16.22 ± 2.04, 13.83 ± 1.96, and10.99 ± 0.90. Significant (p < 0.05) differences were observed in genotoxicity between farmed and polluted area fish. Micronucleus assay showed a similar picture of significant difference in respect to single and double micronucleus induction: i.e., 23.20 ± 4.19 and 2.80 ± 1.07‰ in C. catla and 44.80 ± 3.73 and 06.20 ± 0.97‰, respectively, in C. mrigala. Nuclear abnormalities were found as 6.00 ± 0.84 and 09.60 ± 1.72/thousand cells, respectively, in both species. The results of this study suggest that these novel fish DNA damage assays can be used as an expedient toxicity screening for aquatic environments.

  7. Population genetic structure and phylogeography of cyprinid fish, Labeo dero (Hamilton, 1822) inferred from allozyme and microsatellite DNA marker analysis.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Anshumala; Mohindra, Vindhya; Singh, Rajeev K; Lal, Kuldeep K; Punia, Peyush; Bhaskar, Ranjana; Mandal, Anup; Narain, Lalit; Lakra, W S

    2011-06-01

    We examined population structure of Labeo dero (Hamilton, 1822) from different riverine locations in India using 10 polymorphic allozyme and eight microsatellite loci. For analysis, 591 different tissue samples were obtained from commercial catches covering a wide geographic range. Allozyme variability (An = 1.28-1.43, Ho = 0.029-0.071) was much lower than for microsatellites (An = 4.625-6.125, Ho = 0.538-0.633). Existence of rare alleles was found at three allozyme (MDH-2, GPI and PGDH) and at two microsatellite loci (R-3 and MFW-15). Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P < 0.05, after the critical probability levels were adjusted for sequential Bonferroni adjustment) could be detected at three loci (EST-1, -2 and XDH) whereas, after correction for null alleles, two microsatellite loci (MFW-1,-15) deviated from HWE in the river Yamuna. Fst for all the samples combined over all allozyme loci was found to be 0.059 suggesting that 5.9% of the total variation was due to genetic differentiation while microsatellite analysis yielded 0.019 which was concordant to mean Rst (0.02). Hierarchical partition of genetic diversity (AMOVA) showed that greater variability (approx. 95%) was due to within population component than between geographical regions. Based on distribution of genetic differentiation detected by both markers, at least five different genetic stocks of L. dero across its natural distribution could be identified. These results are useful for the evaluation and conservation of L. dero in natural water bodies.

  8. Examining the utility of the Hamilton early warning scores (HEWS) at triage: Retrospective pilot study in a Canadian emergency department.

    PubMed

    Skitch, Steven; Tam, Benjamin; Xu, Michael; McInnis, Laura; Vu, Anthony; Fox-Robichaud, Alison

    2017-05-10

    Early warning scores use vital signs to identify patients at risk of critical illness. The current study examines the Hamilton Early Warning Score (HEWS) at emergency department (ED) triage among patients who experienced a critical event during their hospitalization. HEWS was also evaluated as a predictor of sepsis. The study population included admissions to two hospitals over a 6-month period. Cases experienced a critical event defined by unplanned intensive care unit admission, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or death. Controls were randomly selected from the database in a 2-to-1 ratio to match cases on the burden of comorbid illness. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate HEWS as a predictor of the likelihood of critical deterioration and sepsis. The sample included 845 patients, of whom 270 experienced a critical event; 89 patients were excluded because of missing vitals. An ROC analysis indicated that HEWS at ED triage had poor discriminative ability for predicting the likelihood of experiencing a critical event 0.62 (95% CI 0.58-0.66). HEWS had a fair discriminative ability for meeting criteria for sepsis 0.77 (95% CI 0.72-0.82) and good discriminative ability for predicting the occurrence of a critical event among septic patients 0.82 (95% CI 0.75-0.90). This study indicates that HEWS at ED triage has limited utility for identifying patients at risk of experiencing a critical event. However, HEWS may allow earlier identification of septic patients. Prospective studies are needed to further delineate the utility of the HEWS to identify septic patients in the ED.

  9. Hamilton College Usability Lab

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-12

    Levendowski, EEG Correlates of Task Engagement and Mental Workload in Vigilance, Learning and Memory Tasks. Aviation Space and Environmental...unit 1 $5,000 http://www.b-alert.com/ eeg /b-alert.html b-alert ERP analysis software 1 $5,000 http://www.b-alert.com/ eeg /b-alert.html b-alert memory ...suggestions about ways to improve (or further impair) the design. We use EEG and fNIRS to acquire measures of users’ mental states. Unlike other brain

  10. Hamilton Way Community Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-20

    This case study describes an energy efficient showcase community in the Hartford, Connecicut, area, aiming for a minimum 40% source energy savings focusing on the thermal enclosure and air tightness of the homes.

  11. Evaluation of anhedonia with the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS) in adult outpatients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Nakonezny, Paul A; Morris, David W; Greer, Tracy L; Byerly, Matthew J; Carmody, Thomas J; Grannemann, Bruce D; Bernstein, Ira H; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2015-06-01

    Anhedonia or inability to experience pleasure not only is a core symptom of major depressive disorder (MDD), but also is identified as an important component of the positive valence system in the NIMH Research Domain Criteria. The Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS) has been developed for the assessment of hedonic experience or positive valence, but has not been well-studied in depressed outpatient populations. The current study examined the reliability and validity of the SHAPS using a sample of adult outpatients with treatment resistant MDD. Data for the current study were obtained from 122 adult outpatients with a diagnosis of MDD and non-response to adequate treatment with an SSRI and who participated in Project TReatment with Exercise Augmentation for Depression (TREAD). A Principal Components Analysis was used to define the dimensionality of the SHAPS. Convergent and discriminant validity were evaluated via correlations of the SHAPS total score with "gold standard" measures of depression severity and quality of life. The SHAPS was found to have high internal consistency (Cronbach's coefficient α = .82). A Principal Components Analysis suggests that the SHAPS is mainly "unidimensional" and limited to hedonic experience among adult outpatients with MDD. Convergent and discriminant validity were assessed by examining the Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient between the SHAPS total score and the HRSD17 (rs = 0.22, p < .03), IDS-C30 (rs = 0.26, p < .01), IDS-SR30 (rs = 0.23, p < .02), QIDS-C16 (rs = 0.22, p < .03), QIDS-SR16 (rs = 0.17, p < .10), QLES-Q (rs = -0.32, p < .002), and the pleasure/enjoyment item (sub-item 21) of the IDS-C (rs = 0.44, p < .0001) and IDS-SR (rs = 0.38, p < .0002). The self-administered SHAPS showed modest sensitivity (76%) and specificity (54%) with the self-administered pleasure/enjoyment single item (sub-item 21) of IDS-SR30. The current study shows that the SHAPS is a reliable and valid

  12. Career, collections, reports and publications of Dr Francis Buchanan (later Hamilton), 1762-1829: natural history studies in Nepal, Burma (Myanmar), Bangladesh and India. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Watson, Mark F; Noltie, Henry J

    2016-10-01

    During his 20-year career as a surgeon-naturalist with the British East India Company, Francis Buchanan (later Hamilton, known in botany as Buchanan-Hamilton and in ichthyology as Hamilton-Buchanan) undertook pioneering survey explorations in several diverse regions of the Indian subcontinent. A naturalist at heart, his collections of plants and animals are often the first from such regions, notably Nepal, Burma (Myanmar) and Bangladesh. Buchanan had wide-ranging interests beyond natural history, using his talent for observation and meticulous recording to amass a huge body of information on the lands and peoples he encountered. However, much of this information remains unpublished in his survey reports, journals and other manuscripts, and so his role in the building of knowledge for these areas has been under-appreciated. Although a keen and able botanist, it is ironic that his multitudinous botanical discoveries are particularly poorly known, with the vast majority of his material on this subject languishing unpublished in archival collections. These include his original records and working notes which show the methods he used when dealing with 'information overload' and arranging his syntheses ready for publication. Notable is his experimentation with Jussieu's Natural System for classifying his Nepalese plants, and his recognition of biogeographic links of the Nepalese flora with Europe and Japan - both ahead of his fellow countrymen in Britain and India. The life of Francis Buchanan awaits the attention of a biographer who can do justice to his many interests, activities and influences. This is the first of two papers covering his life, providing an empirical baseline for future research and correcting misinformation that abounds in the literature. These papers outline Buchanan's professional career, concentrating on his activities in the exploration of natural history, and placing them in the wider context of botanical research in India.

  13. New examples of Hamilton-minimal and minimal Lagrangian manifolds in \\mathbb C^n and \\mathbb C\\mathrm P^n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A. E.

    2004-02-01

    A new method is proposed for constructing Hamilton-minimal and minimal Lagrangian immersions and embeddings of manifolds in \\mathbb C^n and in \\mathbb C\\mathrm P^n. In particular, using this method it is possible to construct embeddings of manifolds such as the (2n+1)-dimensional generalized Klein bottle \\mathscr K^{2n+1}, S^{2n+1}\\times S^1, \\mathscr K^{2n+1}\\times S^1, S^{2n+1}\\times S^1\\times S^1, and others.

  14. Large Deviations for Finite State Markov Jump Processes with Mean-Field Interaction Via the Comparison Principle for an Associated Hamilton-Jacobi Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraaij, Richard

    2016-07-01

    We prove the large deviation principle (LDP) for the trajectory of a broad class of finite state mean-field interacting Markov jump processes via a general analytic approach based on viscosity solutions. Examples include generalized Ehrenfest models as well as Curie-Weiss spin flip dynamics with singular jump rates. The main step in the proof of the LDP, which is of independent interest, is the proof of the comparison principle for an associated collection of Hamilton-Jacobi equations. Additionally, we show that the LDP provides a general method to identify a Lyapunov function for the associated McKean-Vlasov equation.

  15. Highly elevated levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate and other perfluorinated acids found in biota and surface water downstream of an international airport, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    de Solla, S R; De Silva, A O; Letcher, R J

    2012-02-01

    Per- and poly-fluorinated compounds (PFCs), which include perfluorinated carboxylates (PFCAs) and sulfonates (PFSAs) and various precursors, are used in a wide variety of industrial, commercial and domestic products. This includes aqueous film forming foam (AFFF), which is used by military and commercial airports as fire suppressants. In a preliminary assessment prior to this study, very high concentrations (>1 ppm wet weight) of the PFSA, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), were discovered in the plasma of snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) collected in 2008 from Lake Niapenco in southern Ontario, Canada. We presently report on a suite of C(6) to C(15) PFCAs, C(4), C(6), C(8) and C(10) PFSAs, several PFC precursors (e.g. perfluorooctane sulfonamide, PFOSA), and a cyclic perfluorinated acid used in aircraft hydraulic fluid, perfluoroethylcyclohexane sulfonate (PFECHS) in surface water from the Welland River and Lake Niapenco, downstream of the John C. Munro International Airport, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Amphipods, shrimp, and water were sampled from the Welland River and Lake Niapenco, as well as local references. The same suite of PFCs in turtle plasma from Lake Niapenco was compared to those from other southern Ontario sites. PFOS dominated the sum PFCs in all substrates (e.g., >99% in plasma of turtles downstream the Hamilton Airport, and 72.1 to 94.1% at all other sites). PFOS averaged 2223(±247.1SE) ng/g in turtle plasma from Lake Niapenco, and ranged from 9.0 to 171.4 elsewhere. Mean PFOS in amphipods and in water were 518.1(±83.8)ng/g and 130.3(±43.6) ng/L downstream of the airport, and 19.1(±2.7) ng/g and 6.8(±0.5) ng/L at reference sites, respectively. Concentrations of selected PFCs declined with distance downstream from the airport. Although there was no known spill event or publicly reported use of AFFF associated with a fire event at the Hamilton airport, the airport is a likely major source of PFC contamination in the Welland River. Crown

  16. Ground-water flow directions and estimation of aquifer hydraulic properties in the lower Great Miami River Buried Valley aquifer system, Hamilton Area, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheets, Rodney A.; Bossenbroek, Karen E.

    2005-01-01

    The Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System is one of the most productive sources of potable water in the Midwest, yielding as much as 3,000 gallons per minute to wells. Many water-supply wells tapping this aquifer system are purposely placed near rivers to take advantage of induced infiltration from the rivers. The City of Hamilton's North Well Field consists of 10 wells near the Great Miami River, all completed in the lower Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System. A well-drilling program and a multiple-well aquifer test were done to investigate ground-water flow directions and to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties in the lower part of the Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System. Descriptions of lithology from 10 well borings indicate varying amounts and thickness of clay or till, and therefore, varying levels of potential aquifer confinement. Borings also indicate that the aquifer properties can change dramatically over relatively short distances. Grain-size analyses indicate an average bulk hydraulic conductivity value of aquifer materials of 240 feet per day; the geometric mean of hydraulic conductivity values of aquifer material was 89 feet per day. Median grain sizes of aquifer material and clay units were 1.3 millimeters and 0.1 millimeters, respectively. Water levels in the Hamilton North Well Field are affected by stream stage in the Great Miami River and barometric pressure. Bank storage in response to stream stage is evident. Results from a multiple-well aquifer test at the well field indicate, as do the lithologic descriptions, that the aquifer is semiconfined in some areas and unconfined in others. Transmissivity and storage coefficient of the semiconfined part of the aquifer were 50,000 feet squared per day and 5x10-4, respectively. The average hydraulic conductivity (450 feet per day) based on the aquifer test is reasonable for glacial outwash but is higher than calculated from grain-size analyses, implying a scale effect

  17. Randomised controlled cross-over comparison of continuous positive airway pressure through the Hamilton Galileo ventilator with a Dräger CF 800 device.

    PubMed

    Sutton, P J; Perkins, C L; Giles, S P; McAuley, D F; Gao, F

    2005-01-01

    In this controlled, randomised cross-over trial on 26 intensive care patients, we compared the effects on haemodynamic and respiratory profiles of continuous positive airway pressure delivered through the Hamilton Galileo ventilator or a Drager CF 800 device. We also compared the nursing time saved using the two approaches when weaning patients from mechanical ventilation. We did not find significant differences in haemodynamics, respiratory rate, physiological dead space, oxygen saturation and carbon dioxide production between the continuous positive airway pressure generated by the Galileo and Drager machines. However, there was a 10-fold reduction in nursing time using the Galileo ventilator compared with the Drager generator. We conclude that continuous positive airway pressure delivered through the Galileo ventilator is as efficient as a Drager device but consumes less nursing time.

  18. Hawking non-thermal and thermal radiations of Reissner Nordström anti-de Sitter black hole by Hamilton-Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilias Hossain, M.; Atiqur Rahman, M.

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated Hawking non-thermal and purely thermal Radiations of Reissner Nordström anti-de Sitter (RNAdS) black hole by massive particles tunneling method. The spacetime background has taken as dynamical, incorporate the self-gravitation effect of the emitted particles the imaginary part of the action has derived from Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We have supposed that energy and angular momentum are conserved and have shown that the non-thermal and thermal tunneling rates are related to the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy and the derived emission spectrum deviates from the pure thermal spectrum. The results for RNAdS black hole is also in the same manner with Parikh and Wilczek's opinion and explored the new result for Hawking radiation of RNAdS black hole.

  19. Revised diagnosis of the genus Gonorhynchus McClelland (Teleostei: Cyprinidae: Labeonini) with redescription of G. latius (Hamilton) and revalidation of G. wattanah (Sykes).

    PubMed

    Ciccotto, Patrick J; Page, Lawrence M

    2016-06-24

    A new diagnosis of the genus Gonorhynchus McClelland 1838 from South Asia is proposed. Seven species are contained in the genus: G. latius (Hamilton 1822), G. diplochilus (Heckel 1838), G. wattanah (Sykes 1839), G. macmahoni (Zugmayer 1912), G. burmanicus (Hora 1936), G. bicornis (Wu 1977), and G. periyarensis (Menon & Jacob 1996). Gonorhynchus latius, a senior synonym of the type species G. brevis M'Clelland 1839 is redescribed. Crossocheilus gohama (M'Clelland 1839) and Crossochilus rostratus Günther 1868 are considered junior synonyms of G. latius, and a neotype is designated for G. latius. Gonorhynchus wattanah (Sykes 1839) from the Krishna and Godavari River basins in western India is revalidated and redescribed with the designation of a neotype. Akrokolioplax Zhang & Kottelat 2006 is a junior synonym of Gonorhynchus.

  20. A Protocol for the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression: Item Scoring Rules, Rater Training, and Outcome Accuracy with Data on its Application in a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rohan, Kelly J.; Rough, Jennifer N.; Evans, Maggie; Ho, Sheau-Yan; Meyerhoff, Jonah; Roberts, Lorinda M.; Vacek, Pamela M.

    2016-01-01

    Background We present a fully articulated protocol for the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), including item scoring rules, rater training procedures, and a data management algorithm to increase accuracy of scores prior to outcome analyses. The latter involves identifying potentially inaccurate scores as interviews with discrepancies between two independent raters on the basis of either scores (≥ 5-point difference) or meeting threshold for depression recurrence status, a long-term treatment outcome with public health significance. Discrepancies are resolved by assigning two new raters, identifying items with disagreement per an algorithm, and reaching consensus on the most accurate scores for those items. Methods These methods were applied in a clinical trial where the primary outcome was the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression—Seasonal Affective Disorder version (SIGH-SAD), which includes the 21-item HAM-D and 8 items assessing atypical symptoms. 177 seasonally depressed adult patients were enrolled and interviewed at 10 time points across treatment and the 2-year followup interval for a total of 1,589 completed interviews with 1,535 (96.6%) archived. Results Inter-rater reliability ranged from ICCs of .923 to .967. Only 86 (5.6%) interviews met criteria for a between-rater discrepancy. HAM-D items “Depressed Mood,” “Work and Activities,” “Middle Insomnia,” and “Hypochondriasis” and Atypical items “Fatigability” and “Hypersomnia” contributed most to discrepancies. Limitations Generalizability beyond well-trained, experienced raters in a clinical trial is unknown. Conclusions Researchers might want to consider adopting this protocol in part or full. Clinicians might want to tailor it to their needs. PMID:27130960

  1. The Efficacy of Paroxetine and Placebo in Treating Anxiety and Depression: A Meta-Analysis of Change on the Hamilton Rating Scales

    PubMed Central

    Sugarman, Michael A.; Loree, Amy M.; Baltes, Boris B.; Grekin, Emily R.; Kirsch, Irving

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous meta-analyses of published and unpublished trials indicate that antidepressants provide modest benefits compared to placebo in the treatment of depression; some have argued that these benefits are not clinically significant. However, these meta-analyses were based only on trials submitted for the initial FDA approval of the medication and were limited to those aimed at treating depression. Here, for the first time, we assess the efficacy of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) in the treatment of both anxiety and depression, using a complete data set of all published and unpublished trials sponsored by the manufacturer. Methods and Findings GlaxoSmithKline has been required to post the results for all sponsored clinical trials online, providing an opportunity to assess the efficacy of an SSRI (paroxetine) with a complete data set of all trials conducted. We examined the data from all placebo-controlled, double-blind trials of paroxetine that included change scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HRSA) and/or the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). For the treatment of anxiety (k = 12), the efficacy difference between paroxetine and placebo was modest (d = 0.27), and independent of baseline severity of anxiety. Overall change in placebo-treated individuals replicated 79% of the magnitude of paroxetine response. Efficacy was superior for the treatment of panic disorder (d = 0.36) than for generalized anxiety disorder (d = 0.20). Published trials showed significantly larger drug-placebo differences than unpublished trials (d’s = 0.32 and 0.17, respectively). In depression trials (k = 27), the benefit of paroxetine over placebo was consistent with previous meta-analyses of antidepressant efficacy (d = 0.32). Conclusions The available empirical evidence indicates that paroxetine provides only a modest advantage over placebo in treatment of anxiety and depression. Treatment implications are

  2. Measuring anxiety in depressed patients: A comparison of the Hamilton anxiety rating scale and the DSM-5 Anxious Distress Specifier Interview.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Martin, Jacob; Clark, Heather; McGonigal, Patrick; Harris, Lauren; Holst, Carolina Guzman

    2017-10-01

    DSM-5 included criteria for an anxious distress specifier for major depressive disorder (MDD). In the present report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project we examined whether a measure of the specifier, the DSM-5 Anxious Distress Specifier Interview (DADSI), was as valid as the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) as a measure of the severity of anxiety in depressed patients. Two hundred three psychiatric patients with MDD were interviewed by trained diagnostic raters who administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) supplemented with questions to rate the DADSI, HAMA, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD). The patients completed self-report measures of depression, anxiety, and irritability. Sensitivity to change was examined in 30 patients. The DADSI and HAMA were significantly correlated (r = 0.60, p < 0.001). Both the DADSI and HAMA were more highly correlated with measures of anxiety than with measures of the other symptom domains. The HAMD was significantly more highly correlated with the HAMA than with the DADSI. For each anxiety disorder, patients with the disorder scored significantly higher on both the DADSI and HAMA than did patients with no current anxiety disorder. A large effect size of treatment was found for both measures (DADSI: d = 1.48; HAMA: d = 1.37). Both the DADSI and HAMA were valid measures of anxiety severity in depressed patients, though the HAMA was more highly confounded with measures of depression than the DADSI. The DADSI is briefer than the HAMA, and may be more feasible to use in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Contrasts in Structural and Bonding Representations among Polar Intermetallic Compounds. Strongly Differentiated Hamilton Populations for Three Related Condensed Cluster Halides of the Rare-Earth Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shalabh; Meyer, Gerd; Corbett, John D.

    2010-10-01

    The crystal and electronic structures of three related R{sub 3}TnX{sub 3} phases (R = rare-earth metal, Tn = transition metal, X = Cl, I) containing extended mixed-metal chains are compared and contrasted: (1) Pr{sub 3}RuI{sub 3} (P2{sub 1}/m), (2) Gd{sub 3}MnI{sub 3} (P2{sub 1}/m), and (3) Pr{sub 3}RuCl{sub 3} (Pnma). The structures all feature double chains built of pairs of condensed R{sub 6}(Tn) octahedral chains encased by halogen atoms. Pr{sub 3}RuI{sub 3} (1) lacks significant Ru-Ru bonding, evidently because of packing restrictions imposed by the large closed-shell size of iodine. However, the vertex Pr2 atoms on the chain exhibit a marked electronic differentiation. These are strongly bound to the central Ru (and to four I), but very little to four neighboring Pr in the cluster according to bond populations, in contrast to Pr2-Pr 'bond' distances that are very comparable to those elsewhere. In Gd{sub 3}MnI{sub 3} (2), the smaller metal atoms allow substantial distortions and Mn-Mn bonding. Pr{sub 3}RuCl{sub 3} (3), in contrast to the iodide (1), can be described in terms of a more tightly bound superstructure of (2) in which both substantial Ru-Ru bonding and an increased number of Pr-Cl contacts in very similar mixed-metal chains are favored by the smaller closed-shell contacts of chlorine. Local Spin Density Approximation (LSDA) Linearized Muffin-Tin Orbital (LMTO)-ASA calculations and Crystal Orbital Hamilton Population (COHP) analyses show that the customary structural descriptions in terms of condensed, Tn-stuffed, R-R bonded polyhedral frameworks are poor representations of the bonding in all. Hamilton bond populations (-ICOHP) for the polar mixed-metal R-Tn and the somewhat smaller R-X interactions account for 75-90% of the total populations in each of these phases, together with smaller contributions and variations for R-R and Tn-Tn interactions. The strength of such R-Tn contributions in polar intermetallics was first established or anticipated by

  4. Development of a standardized training program for the Hamilton Depression Scale using internet-based technologies: results from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kobak, Kenneth A; Lipsitz, Joshua D; Feiger, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Poor inter-rater reliability is a major concern, contributing to error variance, which decreases power and increases the risk for failed trials. This is particularly problematic with the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), due to lack of standardized questions or explicit scoring procedures. Establishing standardized procedures for administering and scoring the HAMD is typically done at study initiation meetings. However, the format and time allotted is usually insufficient, and evaluation of the trainee's ability to actually conduct a clinical interview is limited. To address this problem, we developed a web-based, interactive rater education program for standardized training to diverse sites in multi-center trials. The program includes both didactic training on scoring conventions and live, remote observation of trainees applied skills. The program was pilot tested with nine raters from a single site. Results found a significant increase in didactic knowledge pre-to-post testing, with the mean number of incorrect answers decreasing from 6.5 (S.D.=1.64) to 1.3 (S.D.=1.03), t(5)=7.35, P=0.001 (20 item exam). Seventy-five percent of the trainees' interviews were within two points of the trainer's score. Inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation) (based on trainees actual interviews) was 0.97, P<0.0001. Results support the feasibility of this methodology for improving rater training. An NIMH funded study is currently underway examining this methodology in a multi-site trial.

  5. Hamilton-Jacobi and quantum theory formulations of thermal-wave propagation under the dual-phase lagging model of heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ordonez-Miranda, J.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Zambrano-Arjona, Miguel A.

    2010-02-15

    Dual-phase lagging model is one of the most promising approaches to generalize the Fourier heat conduction equation, and it can be reduced in the appropriate limits to the hyperbolic Cattaneo-Vernotte and to the parabolic equations. In this paper it is shown that the Hamilton-Jacobi and quantum theory formulations that have been developed to study the thermal-wave propagation in the Fourier framework can be extended to include the more general approach based on dual-phase lagging. It is shown that the problem of solving the heat conduction equation can be treated as a thermal harmonic oscillator. In the classical approach a formulation in canonical variables is presented. This formalism is used to introduce a quantum mechanical approach from which the expectation values of observables such as the temperature and heat flux are obtained. These formalisms permit to use a methodology that could provide a deeper insight into the phenomena of heat transport at different time scales in media with inhomogeneous thermophysical properties.

  6. Projected effects of ground-water withdrawals in the Arkansas River Valley, 1980-99, Hamilton and Kearny counties, southwestern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunlap, L.E.; Lindgren, Richard J.; Carr, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A study was made, in cooperation with the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, to determine the effects that additional ground-water development would have on streamflow and water levels on an area along the Arkansas River in Hamilton and Kearny Counties, southwestern Kansas. A computer model was used to simulate the changes in streamflow and water levels from 1980 through 1999. Six pumpage options were tested using variations in pumpage rate and number of wells pumping in the model area. If the full amount appropriated by water rights were pumped rather than actual 1979 conditions of pumpage, annual pumpage would be reduced 24 percent, but net annual river loss would be reduced only 1 percent. A pumpage increase of approximately 19 percent over 1979 pumpage conditions would cause an increase of net annual river loss from 5 to 9 percent. Increased pumpage, in the form of additional wells in the model area, would cause additional ground water to be removed from storage in the aquifer and an increase in net annual river loss. (USGS)

  7. Rating the raters: assessing the quality of Hamilton rating scale for depression clinical interviews in two industry-sponsored clinical drug trials.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Nina; Feiger, Alan D; Cogger, Kenneth O; Sikich, Dawn; DeBrota, David J; Lipsitz, Joshua D; Kobak, Kenneth A; Evans, Kenneth R; Potter, William Z

    2006-02-01

    The quality of clinical interviews conducted in industry-sponsored clinical drug trials is an important but frequently overlooked variable that may influence the outcome of a study. We evaluated the quality of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) clinical interviews performed at baseline in 2 similar multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled depression trials sponsored by 2 pharmaceutical companies. A total of 104 audiotaped HAM-D clinical interviews were evaluated by a blinded expert reviewer for interview quality using the Rater Applied Performance Scale (RAPS). The RAPS assesses adherence to a structured interview guide, clarification of and follow-up to patient responses, neutrality, rapport, and adequacy of information obtained. HAM-D interviews were brief and cursory and the quality of interviews was below what would be expected in a clinical drug trial. Thirty-nine percent of the interviews were conducted in 10 minutes or less, and most interviews were rated fair or unsatisfactory on most RAPS dimensions. Results from our small sample illustrate that the clinical interview skills of raters who administered the HAM-D were below what many would consider acceptable. Evaluation and training of clinical interview skills should be considered as part of a rater training program.

  8. Myxobolus nanokiensis sp. nov. (Myxozoa: Bivalvulidae), a new pathogenic myxosporean parasite causing haemorrhagic gill disease in cultured Indian major carp fish, Labeo rohita (Hamilton 1822) in Punjab, India.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harpreet; Katoch, Anu; Dar, Shoaib Ali; Singh, Ranjeet

    2015-09-01

    The plasmodia of Myxobolus nanokiensis sp. nov. were found infecting gills of Labeo rohita (Hamilton 1822) The infection rate was found to be 36.67 % (30 fishes were examined and 11 fishes were infected) in the Nanoki pond in Patiala district Punjab. Numerous minute plasmodia each filled with 150-200 spores were detected. Smear of scrapped blood-tinged mucous from gills exhibited millions of spores. Histological sections also indicated numerous plasmodia measuring 38.33-40.33 μm in diameter in the blood vessels of gill filaments. Spores of M. nanokiensis sp. nov. were elongate pyriform in shape and morphologically unique in having sharply pointed beak-like anterior end. Spores measured 9.28 μm × 5.71 μm in size. Polar capsules were equal, pyriform, 5.71 × 2.73 μm in size, each having polar filament with 7-9 coils. The present species has been proposed as new on the basis of its peculiar shape and morphometrics. This is the first report of any myxobolid infection in the farmland fishes in Punjab (India). The plasmodia in the gill filaments were of intralamellar vascular type (LV) and were present within the entire length of the filament. These plasmodia caused hemorrhage, necrosis of the blood vessels and cellular infiltration.

  9. A comparison of face-to-face and remote assessment of inter-rater reliability on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale via videoconferencing.

    PubMed

    Kobak, Kenneth A; Williams, Janet B W; Engelhardt, Nina

    2008-02-28

    Poor inter-rater reliability (IRR) is an important methodological factor that may contribute to failed trials. The sheer number of raters at diverse sites in multicenter trials presents a formidable challenge in calibration. Videoconferencing allows for the evaluation of IRR of raters at diverse sites by enabling raters at different sites to each independently interview a common patient. This is a more rigorous test of IRR than passive rating of videotapes. To evaluate the potential impact of videoconferencing on IRR, we compared IRR obtained via videoconference to IRR obtained using face-to-face interviews. Four raters at three different locations were paired using all pair-wise combinations of raters. Using videoconferencing, each paired rater independently conducted an interview with the same patient, who was at a third, central location. Raters were blind to each others' scores. ICC from this cohort (n=22) was not significantly different from the ICC obtained by a cohort using two face-to-face interviews (n=21) (0.90 vs. 0.93, respectively) nor from a cohort using one face-to-face interview and one remote interview (n=21) (0.88). The mean Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) scores obtained were not significantly different. There appears to be no loss of signal using remote methods of calibration compared with traditional face-to-face methods.

  10. Tetracycline-resistant coliforms in the effluent of the main sewage treatment plant in Hamilton, Ontario - do they have a common ancestral strain?

    PubMed

    Sorger, George J; Quinn, James S

    2010-07-01

    Sewage, a major source of bacterial contamination of the environment, can be an important health hazard. The presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in sewage can exacerbate this problem. The sources of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in sewage are, for this reason, worth identifying and addressing. The bacterial flora in the effluent of the Woodward Avenue Wastewater Treatment Plant (WAWTP) in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, contains many antibiotic-resistant coliforms. Here we ask, are the antibiotic resistance genes in the coliforms in the effluent of WAWTP descended from a recent common ancestor strain? If so, the source could be identified and eliminated. If, on the other hand, the antibiotic resistance genes in the bacterial flora of the WAWTP have more than one origin, identification and elimination of the source(s) could be difficult. There was considerable diversity of antibiotic resistance patterns and antibiotic resistance genes among the effluent and influent coliform isolates of the WAWTP, suggesting multiple genetic ancestry. The patterns of horizontal transmissibility and sequence differences in the genes tetA and tetE among these coliform isolates also suggest that they have no one predominant ancestral strain. Using the same logic, the evidence presented here is not compatible with a single ancestral origin of the antibiotic resistance genes in the isolates described herein.

  11. The degree of depression in Hamilton rating scale is correlated with the density of presynaptic serotonin transporters in 23 patients with Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Eggers, B; Hermann, W; Barthel, H; Sabri, O; Wagner, A; Hesse, S

    2003-05-01

    One of the most frequent psychiatric symptoms in patients with Wilson's disease (WD) is depression. It has been suggested that depression is associated with deficits in serotonergic neurotransmission, but, hitherto, no measurements have been performed in WD. We prospectively examined 23 adult patients (12 women, 11 men, mean age 40 years) with WD for symptoms of depression using the Hamilton rating scale for depression (HAMD). We correlated the data with the presynaptic serotonin transporter density (SERT density) in the thalamus-hypothalamus and the midbrain-pons regions measured with high resolution single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) 24 hours after the application of 180 MBq 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4 [(123)I]iodophenyl)tropane ( [(123)I]b-CIT). The regions of interest were determined by coregistration with a standard MRI dataset. A significant negative correlation was found between HAMD and SERT density in the thalamus-hypothalamus region (r = -0.49, p = 0.02), but not in the midbrain-pons (r = -0.31, p = 0.15). We conclude that depression in patients with Wilson's disease is correlated with alterations of serotonergic neurotransmission in the thalamus-hypothalamus region.

  12. Sensitivity to detect change and the correlation of clinical factors with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory in depressed inpatients.

    PubMed

    Schneibel, Rebecca; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Wilbertz, Gregor; Dykierek, Petra; Zobel, Ingo; Schramm, Elisabeth

    2012-06-30

    Discrepancies between scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), as well as differences regarding their sensitivity to detect change, have been reported. This study investigates discrepancies and their potential prediction on the basis of demographic, personality, and clinical factors in depressed inpatients and analyzes the sensitivity to change. The HAMD and the BDI were administered to 105 inpatients with major depressive disorder randomized to 5 weeks of either interpersonal psychotherapy or clinical management. Personality was assessed with the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Low extraversion and high neuroticism were associated with relatively higher endorsement of depressive symptoms on the BDI compared with the HAMD. The HAMD presented a greater reduction of symptom scores than the BDI. Patients with high BDI scores, high HAMD scores or both revealed the greatest change, possibly due to a statistical effect of regression to the mean. Restricted by sample size, analyses were not differentiated by treatment condition. Regression to the mean cannot be tested directly, but it might be considered as a possible explanation. The HAMD and the BDI should be regarded as two complementary rather than redundant or competing instruments as the discrepancy is associated with personality characteristics. Attributing large effect sizes solely to effective treatment and a sensitive measure may be misleading.

  13. A mineralogical and geochemical investigation of street sediment near a coal-fired power plant in Hamilton, Ohio: an example of complex pollution and cause for community health concerns.

    PubMed

    LeGalley, Erin; Krekeler, Mark P S

    2013-05-01

    The Hamilton Municipal Electric Plant is a 125 MW coal-fired power plant, owned and operated by the City of Hamilton in Butler County, Ohio. The plant is located within 110 m of 50 homes. Bulk chemical investigation of street sediment near these homes indicates average concentrations of 25 ppm Cr, 40 ppm Cu, 15 ppm Ni, 215 ppm Pb, and 500 ppm Zn. Lead and Zn have maximum concentrations of 1207 ppm and 1512 ppm, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy indicates coal ash spherules are present in the street sediment as well as a variety of Pb, Ni, Cr, W, and BaSO4 particulates. Transmission electron microscopy indicates heavy metals are sorbed onto clay particles with some preference for illite over chlorite. This investigation shows bulk chemistry and electron microscopy approaches are very effective tools to investigate particulate pollutants and identify contexts in complex urban settings involving coal pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of monoclonal antibodies to rohu [Labeo rohita] immunoglobulins for use in immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Gaurav; Kumar, Gokhlesh; Sood, Neeraj; Kapoor, D; Lakra, W S

    2008-12-01

    Serum immunoglobulins [Ig] of rohu [Labeo rohita] were purified by affinity chromatography using bovine serum albumin as capture ligand. The purified rohu Ig [r-Ig] had a molecular weight [MW] of 880 kDa as determined with gel filtration chromatography. The heavy chain of r-Ig had an MW of 77.8 kDa and that of light chain was 26.4 kDa in SDS-PAGE. Purified r-Ig was used for the production of two anti-rohu Ig monoclonal antibodies [D7 and H4] that belonged to subclass IgG2b and IgG1, respectively. Both the MAbs were specific to heavy chain of r-Ig as seen in Western blotting. Anti-rohu Ig MAb was used as a diagnostic reagent in ELISA and immunocytochemical assays to demonstrate its application for sero-surveillance and for immunological studies in rohu. A competitive ELISA was used to demonstrate the antigenic relatedness of r-Ig with whole serum Ig of other fish species. Cross reactivity of anti-rohu Ig MAb was observed with serum Ig of Catla catla and Cirrihinus mrigala. No reactivity to serum Ig of Ophiocephalus striatus and Clarias gariepinus was seen. Anti-rohu Ig MAb was found to be suitable for the detection of pathogen specific [Edwardsiella tarda] antibodies in serum of immunized rohu by an indirect ELISA. In flow cytometry using D7 MAb, the mean percentage [+/-SE] of Ig positive cells in spleen and blood of rohu were found to be 64.85% [+/-2.34] and 51.84% [+/-2.55] of gated lymphocytes, respectively. Similarly, D7 MAb also stained 52.84% [+/-1.30] and 10.5% of gated lymphocytes in kidney and thymus, respectively. The anti-rohu Ig MAbs also showed specific staining of Ig bearing cells in spleen sections by the indirect immunoperoxidase test.

  15. New host record of five Flavobacterium species associated with tropical fresh water farmed fishes from North India.

    PubMed

    Verma, Dev Kumar; Rathore, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Yellow pigmented, filamentous, Gram-negative bacteria belonging to genus Flavobacterium are commonly associated with infections in stressed fish. In this study, inter-species diversity of Flavobacterium was studied in apparently healthy freshwater farmed fishes. For this, ninety one yellow pigmented bacteria were isolated from skin and gill samples (n = 38) of three farmed fish species i.e. Labeo rohita, Catla catla and Cyprinus carpio. Among them, only twelve bacterial isolates (13.18%) were identified as Flavobacterium spp. on the basis of morphological, biochemical tests, partial 16S rDNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. On the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequencing, all the 12 isolates were 97.6-100% similar to six different formally described species of genus Flavobacterium. The 16S rDNA based phylogenetic analysis grouped these strains into six different clades. Of the 12 isolates, six strains (Fl9S1-6) grouped with F. suncheonense, two strains (Fl6I2, Fl6I3) with F. indicum and the rest four strains (Fl1A1, Fl2G1, Fl3H1 and Fl10T1) clustered with F. aquaticum, F. granuli, F. hercynium and F. terrae, respectively. None of these species except, F. hercynium were previously reported from fish. All the isolated Flavobacterium species possessed the ability of adhesion and biofilm formation to colonize the external surface of healthy fish. The present study is the first record of tropical freshwater farmed fishes as hosts to five environmentally associated species of the Flavobacterium.

  16. Application of fish cell lines for evaluating the chromium induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Taju, G; Abdul Majeed, S; Nambi, K S N; Sahul Hameed, A S

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, we hypothesize that cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress play a key role in chromium induced toxicity in SISS, SISK, IEE, IEK, IEG, SICH and ICG cell lines after 24 h exposure. Three fish species namely Lates calcarifer, Etroplus suratensis and Catla catla were exposed to the concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mg/L of chromium for 96 h under static conditions for conducting acute toxicity tests. LC50 was then calculated. The percentage cell survival was assessed by multiple endpoints such as MTT, NR, AB and CB assays in the seven fish cell lines exposed to different concentrations of chromium and EC50 values of all the four endpoints were calculated. High significances were noted in the correlations between each in vitro cytotoxicity assays and in vivo mortality data. Cell shrinkage, cell detachment, vacuolations and cell swelling at the highest concentration of chromium (50 mg/L) were seen on microscopic examination of cell morphology. Comet assay and Hoechst staining were carried out to assess DNA damage and nuclear fragmentation in the seven fish lines exposed to chromium. The results of antioxidant parameters obtained indicate a significant reduction in the level of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase and Glutathione peroxidase, and increased level of lipid peroxidation in all the cell lines exposed to chromium. These results confirm that fish cell lines could be used as an alternative to whole fish for cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress assessment in chromium toxicity studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. New host record of five Flavobacterium species associated with tropical fresh water farmed fishes from North India

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Dev Kumar; Rathore, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Yellow pigmented, filamentous, Gram-negative bacteria belonging to genus Flavobacterium are commonly associated with infections in stressed fish. In this study, inter-species diversity of Flavobacterium was studied in apparently healthy freshwater farmed fishes. For this, ninety one yellow pigmented bacteria were isolated from skin and gill samples (n = 38) of three farmed fish species i.e. Labeo rohita, Catla catla and Cyprinus carpio. Among them, only twelve bacterial isolates (13.18%) were identified as Flavobacterium spp. on the basis of morphological, biochemical tests, partial 16S rDNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. On the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequencing, all the 12 isolates were 97.6-100% similar to six different formally described species of genus Flavobacterium. The 16S rDNA based phylogenetic analysis grouped these strains into six different clades. Of the 12 isolates, six strains (Fl9S1-6) grouped with F. suncheonense, two strains (Fl6I2, Fl6I3) with F. indicum and the rest four strains (Fl1A1, Fl2G1, Fl3H1 and Fl10T1) clustered with F. aquaticum, F. granuli, F. hercynium and F. terrae, respectively. None of these species except, F. hercynium were previously reported from fish. All the isolated Flavobacterium species possessed the ability of adhesion and biofilm formation to colonize the external surface of healthy fish. The present study is the first record of tropical freshwater farmed fishes as hosts to five environmentally associated species of the Flavobacterium. PMID:26691454

  18. Human exposure to trace metals and arsenic via consumption of fish from river Chenab, Pakistan and associated health risks.

    PubMed

    Alamdar, Ambreen; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Hanif, Nida; Ali, Syeda Maria; Fasola, Mauro; Bokhari, Habib; Katsoyiannis, Ioannis A; Shen, Heqing

    2017-02-01

    This study provided the first hand data of trace elements into fish muscles (N = 65) collected from river Chenab in Pakistan during 2013, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We monitored the health risk associated with consumption of contaminated fish of river Chenab, by the local population. The mean concentrations (μg/g, wet weight), in descending order were: Zn (35.5-54.4), Cu (1.38-4.57), Mn (2.43-4.5), As (0.23-1.21), Cr (0.21-0.67), Ni (0.14-0.34), Pb (0.14-0.31), Co (0.09-0.12), Cd (0.07-0.12) with higher concentration to be observed in the herbivore fish species (i.e., Cirrhinus reba and Catla catla). The levels of trace elements in different fish species found in this study were compared with similar data worldwide, and with the international standards for consumption. The concentration (μg/g) of arsenic in many cases (>65%) exceeded the FAO/WHO expert committee on food additives permissible limits. From the human health point of view, this study highlights that the local inhabitants, (i.e., fisher folk communities and population frequently consuming fish at about 100 g/day) along the river Chenab are exposed chronically to arsenic pollution with carcinogenic (10(-4) to 10(-6)) and non-carcinogenic (THQ>1) risks, especially from the intake of Cirrhinus reba. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cross-priming of microsatellite loci in subfamily cyprininae (family Cyprinidae): their utility in finding markers for population genetic analysis in three Indian major carps.

    PubMed

    Masih, Prachi; Luhariya, Rupesh K; Das, Rakhi; Gupta, Arti; Mohindra, Vindhya; Singh, Rajeev K; Srivastava, Rohit; Chauhan, U K; Jena, J K; Lal, Kuldeep K

    2014-08-01

    This study is aimed to identify polymorphic microsatellite markers and establish their potential for population genetics studies in three carp (family cyprinidae; subfamily cyprininae) species, Labeo rohita, Catla catla and Cirrhinus mrigala through use of cyprinid primers. These species have high commercial value and knowledge of genetic variation is important for management of farmed and wild populations. We tested 108 microsatellite primers from 11 species belonging to three different cyprinid subfamilies, Cyprininae, Barbinae and Leuciscinae out of which 63 primers (58.33%) successfully amplified orthologous loci in three focal species. Forty-two loci generated from 29 primers were polymorphic in these three carp species. Sequencing of amplified product confirmed the presence of SSRs in these 42 loci and orthologous nature of the loci. To validate potential of these 42 polymorphic loci in determining the genetic variation, we analyzed 486 samples of three focal species collected from Indus, Ganges and Brahmaputra river systems. Results indicated significant genetic variation, with mean number of alleles per locus ranging from 6.80 to 14.40 and observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.50 to 0.74 in the three focal species. Highly significant (P < 0.00001) allelic homogeneity values revealed that the identified loci can be efficiently used in population genetics analysis of these carp species. Further, thirty-two loci from 19 primers were useful for genotyping in more than one species. The data from the present study was compiled with cross-species amplification data from previous results on eight species of subfamily cyprininae to compare cross-transferability of microsatellite loci. It was revealed that out of 226 heterologous loci amplified, 152 loci that originated from 77 loci exhibited polymorphism and 45 primers were of multispecies utility, common for 2-7 species.

  20. Detecting and managing elder abuse: challenges in primary care. The Research Subcommittee of the Elder Abuse and Self-Neglect Task Force of Hamilton-Wentworth.

    PubMed

    Krueger, P; Patterson, C

    1997-10-15

    To determine family physicians' perceptions of barriers and strategies in the effective detection and appropriate management of abused elderly people. Questionnaire survey; the protocol included an advance notification letter and 3 follow-up mailings. Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth, Ont. All active nonspecialist physicians who reported seeing elderly patients in their practices were eligible for inclusion. Fifty health service organization (HSO) physicians were randomly selected from among those listed with the HSO Mental Health Program, and 200 fee-for-service physicians were randomly selected from the Canadian Medical Directory. Of the 189 eligible physicians 122 returned completed questionnaires, a response rate of 65%. Physicians' ratings of the importance of potential barriers in assisting older people experiencing abuse and of the usefulness of strategies for dealing with elder abuse. Physicians identified the following barriers as fairly or very important: denial of abuse, resistance to intervention, not knowing where to call for help, lack of protocols to assess and respond to abuse, lack of guidelines about confidentiality, fear of reprisal, and lack of knowledge of the prevalence and definition of elder abuse. Strategies deemed to be helpful included a single agency to call, a directory of services, a list of resource people, an educational package, guidelines for detection and management, reimbursement for time spent on legal matters, continuing education, revision of fee structure and a central library of resources on elder abuse. Although the physicians perceived numerous barriers to their detection and management of elder abuse, they identified many strategies that could be implemented at a local level. Preparation of an algorithm to help physicians is the next phase of this work.

  1. The Major Depressive Disorder Hierarchy: Rasch Analysis of 6 items of the Hamilton Depression Scale Covering the Continuum of Depressive Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Melancholic features of depression (MFD) seem to be a unidimensional group of signs and symptoms. However, little importance has been given to the evaluation of what features are related to a more severe disorder. That is, what are the MFD that appear only in the most depressed patients. We aim to demonstrate how each MFD is related to the severity of the major depressive disorder. Methods We evaluated both the Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS-17) and its 6-item melancholic subscale (HAM-D6) in 291 depressed inpatients using Rasch analysis, which computes the severity of each MFD. Overall measures of model fit were mean (±SD) of items and persons residual = 0 (±1); low χ2 value; p>0.01. Results For the HDRS-17 model fit, mean (±SD) of item residuals = 0.35 (±1.4); mean (±SD) of person residuals = -0.15 (±1.09); χ2 = 309.74; p<0.00001. For the HAM-D6 model fit, mean (±SD) of item residuals = 0.5 (±0.86); mean (±SD) of person residuals = 0.15 (±0.91); χ2 = 56.13; p = 0.196. MFD ordered by crescent severity were depressed mood, work and activities, somatic symptoms, psychic anxiety, guilt feelings, and psychomotor retardation. Conclusions Depressed mood is less severe, while guilt feelings and psychomotor retardation are more severe MFD in a psychiatric hospitalization. Understanding depression as a continuum of symptoms can improve the understanding of the disorder and may improve its perspective of treatment. PMID:28114341

  2. The neuroanatomical correlates of anxiety in a healthy population: differences between the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale.

    PubMed

    Donzuso, Giulia; Cerasa, Antonio; Gioia, Maria C; Caracciolo, Manuela; Quattrone, Aldo

    2014-07-01

    The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Hamilton scale for anxiety (HARS) are two of the most important scales employed in clinical and psychological realms for the evaluation of anxiety. Although the reliability and sensibility of these scales are widely demonstrated there is an open debate on what exactly their scores reflect. Neuroimaging provides the potential to validate the quality and reliability of clinical scales through the identification of specific biomarkers. For this reason, we evaluated the neural correlates of these two scales in a large cohort of healthy individuals using structural neuroimaging methods. Neuroimaging analysis included thickness/volume estimation of cortical and subcortical limbic structures, which were regressed on anxiety inventory scores with age and gender used for assessing discriminant validity. A total of 121 healthy subjects were evaluated. Despite the two anxiety scales, at a behavioral level, displaying significant correlations among them (HARS with STAI-state (r = 0.24; P = 0.006) and HARS with STAI-trait (r = 0.42; P < 0.001)), multivariate neuroimaging analyses demonstrated that anatomical variability in the anterior cingulate cortex was the best predictor of the HARS scores (all β's ≥ 0.31 and P's ≤ 0.01), whereas STAI-related measures did not show any significant relationship with regions of limbic circuits, but their scores were predicted by gender (all β's ≥ 0.23 and P's ≤ 0.02). Although the purpose of HARS and STAI is to quantify the degree and characteristics of anxiety-like behaviors, our neuroimaging data indicated that these scales are neurobiologically different, confirming that their scores might reflect different aspects of anxiety: the HARS is more related to subclinical expression of anxiety disorders, whereas the STAI captures sub-dimensions of personality linked to anxiety.

  3. Feynman formulae and phase space Feynman path integrals for tau-quantization of some Lévy-Khintchine type Hamilton functions

    SciTech Connect

    Butko, Yana A. E-mail: kinderknecht@math.uni-sb.de; Grothaus, Martin; Smolyanov, Oleg G.

    2016-02-15

    Evolution semigroups generated by pseudo-differential operators are considered. These operators are obtained by different (parameterized by a number τ) procedures of quantization from a certain class of functions (or symbols) defined on the phase space. This class contains Hamilton functions of particles with variable mass in magnetic and potential fields and more general symbols given by the Lévy-Khintchine formula. The considered semigroups are represented as limits of n-fold iterated integrals when n tends to infinity. Such representations are called Feynman formulae. Some of these representations are constructed with the help of another pseudo-differential operator, obtained by the same procedure of quantization; such representations are called Hamiltonian Feynman formulae. Some representations are based on integral operators with elementary kernels; these are called Lagrangian Feynman formulae. Langrangian Feynman formulae provide approximations of evolution semigroups, suitable for direct computations and numerical modeling of the corresponding dynamics. Hamiltonian Feynman formulae allow to represent the considered semigroups by means of Feynman path integrals. In the article, a family of phase space Feynman pseudomeasures corresponding to different procedures of quantization is introduced. The considered evolution semigroups are represented as phase space Feynman path integrals with respect to these Feynman pseudomeasures, i.e., different quantizations correspond to Feynman path integrals with the same integrand but with respect to different pseudomeasures. This answers Berezin’s problem of distinguishing a procedure of quantization on the language of Feynman path integrals. Moreover, the obtained Lagrangian Feynman formulae allow also to calculate these phase space Feynman path integrals and to connect them with some functional integrals with respect to probability measures.

  4. High levels of perfluoroalkyl acids in sport fish species downstream of a firefighting training facility at Hamilton International Airport, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gewurtz, Sarah B; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Petro, Steve; Mahon, Chris G; Zhao, Xiaoming; Morse, Dave; Reiner, Eric J; Tittlemier, Sheryl A; Braekevelt, Eric; Drouillard, Ken

    2014-06-01

    A recent study reported elevated concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and other perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in surface water, snapping turtles, and amphipods in Lake Niapenco, downstream of Hamilton International Airport, Ontario, Canada. Here, our goals were to 1) determine the extent of PFAA contamination in sport fish species collected downstream of the airport, 2) explore if the airport could be a potential source, and 3) compare fish PFOS concentrations to consumption advisory benchmarks. The PFOS levels in several sport fish collected from the three locations closest to the airport (<40km) were among the highest previously published in the peer-reviewed literature and also tended to exceed consumption benchmarks. The only other fish that had comparable concentrations were collected in a region affected by inputs from a major fluorinated chemical production facility. In contrast, PFOS concentrations in the two most downstream locations (>70km) were comparable to or below the average concentrations in fish as observed in the literature and were generally below the benchmarks. With regards to perfluorocarboxylates (PFCAs), there was no significant decrease in concentrations in fish with distance from the airport and levels were comparable to or below the average concentrations observed in the literature, suggesting that the airport is not a significant source of PFCAs in these fish species. PFOS-based aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) was used at a firefighting training facility at the airport in the 1980s to mid-1990s. Taken together, our results provide evidence that the historical use of AFFF at the airport has resulted in fish PFOS concentrations that exceed the 95th percentile concentration of values reported in the literature to date. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Three-year cohort study of the role of environmental factors in the respiratory health of children in Hamilton, Ontario. Epidemiologic survey design, methods, and description of cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Kerigan, A.T.; Goldsmith, C.H.; Pengelly, L.D.

    1986-06-01

    The relative importance of the effect of outdoor environmental factors (suspended particulates, sulphur dioxide) and indoor environmental factors (parental smoking, gas cooking), on the respiratory health of children is still unclear. To answer these questions, a 3-yr cohort analytic study has been conducted in Hamilton, Ontario between 1978 and 1981. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms and indoor environmental factors was determined by an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Pulmonary function measures included both the forced expiratory maneuver and the single- and multiple-breath nitrogen washouts. Outdoor air quality was measured by a comprehensive network of suspended particulate and sulphur dioxide monitors. There were 3345 children 7 to 10 yr of age studied in the first year, a response rate of 95.4%, 3,727 in the second year, and 3168 in the third year; 75.6% of the initial cohort were studied in both Year 2 and Year 3. Comprehensive quality control in the study included measurement of the repeatability of both the questionnaire and pulmonary function data. Repeatability was acceptable except for variables derived from the single-breath nitrogen washout (correlation between initial and repeat closing volume vital capacity was 0.14). Cigarette smoking in Year 3 was reported in 4.8% of the children. The distribution of other covariables was not uniform, and the prevalence of parental smoking and gas cooking was greatest in the industrial area with the highest particulate pollution. Future analysis of these data will require the effect of these covariables to be distinguished from that caused by outdoor air pollution.

  6. An identification in fish of the genus Puntius Hamilton 1822 (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) of some wetlands in northeast Thailand with the use of random amplified polymorphic DNA technique.

    PubMed

    Champasri, T; Rapley, R; Duangjinda, M; Suksri, A

    2008-02-15

    The experiment was carried out during the 2003 to 2006 at the Department of Fisheries, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand in collaboration with the Department of Biosciences, the University of Hertfordshire, College Land, Hatfield, Herts, UK. Molecular RAPD technique was used for the determinations of DNA patterns of the fish genus Puntius Hamilton 1822. The fish samples of 1,500 individual fish were collected from fifteen wetlands in Northeast Thailand and they were used for DNA extraction. Before the experiment was carried out the fish samples were morphologically identified and it was found that the collected fish consisted of 9 species i.e., Puntius altus, P. aurotaeniatus, P. binotatus, P. gonionotus, (e) P. leiacanthus, P. orphoides, P. partipentazona, P. schwanenfeldi and P. wetmorei. Genomic DNAs were extracted from 5 mg of muscle tissues (skeleton muscles) with the use of PUREGENE DNA Isolation Kit for Laboratory Use, Gentra Systems, USA. Eighty decamer primers from four kits were subjected to a preliminary test. It was found that only 10 decamer primers were most suited for this PCR amplification. The results showed that genetic distant values being established among and between pairs of the fishes of the 9 fish species ranged from 0.191 to 0.456 for a pair between Puntius gonionotus and Puntius altus and a pair between Puntius schwanenfeldi and Puntius leiacanthus, respectively. Similarity coefficient values within the 9 fish species ranged from 0.109 to 0.231. The results on a Dendrogram of clusters showed that there were 5 minor groups of the 9 fish species but the 9 species could not be split or shifted into other genera of the fish due to small differences found within the values of similarity coefficients.

  7. The neuroanatomical correlates of anxiety in a healthy population: differences between the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale

    PubMed Central

    Donzuso, Giulia; Cerasa, Antonio; Gioia, Maria C; Caracciolo, Manuela; Quattrone, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Hamilton scale for anxiety (HARS) are two of the most important scales employed in clinical and psychological realms for the evaluation of anxiety. Although the reliability and sensibility of these scales are widely demonstrated there is an open debate on what exactly their scores reflect. Neuroimaging provides the potential to validate the quality and reliability of clinical scales through the identification of specific biomarkers. For this reason, we evaluated the neural correlates of these two scales in a large cohort of healthy individuals using structural neuroimaging methods. Case report Neuroimaging analysis included thickness/volume estimation of cortical and subcortical limbic structures, which were regressed on anxiety inventory scores with age and gender used for assessing discriminant validity. A total of 121 healthy subjects were evaluated. Despite the two anxiety scales, at a behavioral level, displaying significant correlations among them (HARS with STAI-state (r = 0.24; P = 0.006) and HARS with STAI-trait (r = 0.42; P < 0.001)), multivariate neuroimaging analyses demonstrated that anatomical variability in the anterior cingulate cortex was the best predictor of the HARS scores (all β's ≥ 0.31 and P's ≤ 0.01), whereas STAI-related measures did not show any significant relationship with regions of limbic circuits, but their scores were predicted by gender (all β's ≥ 0.23 and P's ≤ 0.02). Conclusion Although the purpose of HARS and STAI is to quantify the degree and characteristics of anxiety-like behaviors, our neuroimaging data indicated that these scales are neurobiologically different, confirming that their scores might reflect different aspects of anxiety: the HARS is more related to subclinical expression of anxiety disorders, whereas the STAI captures sub-dimensions of personality linked to anxiety. PMID:25161817

  8. On the Numerical Discretization in Space and Time: Part 1 - Hamilton's Law of Varying Action Involving Lagrangian/Hamiltonian/Total Energy Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Har, Jason; Tamma, K. K.

    2010-08-01

    The focus in Part 1 of this exposition is strictly restricted to holonomic-sceleronomic systems, and the applications of interest are elastodynamics, which are routinely encountered in a wide class of structural dynamics problems in engineering. Restricting attention to these considerations, new and different perspectives and equivalences are described which deal with finite element space discretization aspects employing three distinctly different frameworks with scalar formalism. It encompasses the Lagrangian mechanics, the Hamiltonian mechanics, and as an alternative, the framework with a built-in measurable quantity based on the Total Energy. Historically, traditional practices routinely employ the weighted residual method or equivalently the principle of virtual work in dynamics for developing finite element formulations. In contrast, the present developments stem from Hamilton's law of varying action (HLVA) as a starting point and involve distinctly different scalar descriptive functions (the Lagrangian [ℒ( q , [qdot] ) : TQ →ℝ], the Hamiltonian [ℋ( p , q ) : T* Q →ℝ], or the Total Energy [ℰ( q , [qdot] ):TQ →ℝ]). These developments naturally embody the weak form in space and the statement of the weighted residual in time. Complicated structural dynamical systems such as a rotating bar and the Timoshenko beam are particularly shown here simply for illustration. In Part 2, we describe the satisfaction of conservation properties of the fully discretized equations of motion in space and time with particular attention to the Total Energy framework (in contrast to the Lagrangian and the Hamiltonian), primarily because it is very natural and is computationally attractive and meaningful to conducting the time discretization [1] process. Instead of starting from the continuous form of representations, the particular focus is upon directly employing the discrete formulations for enabling algorithmic designs for the class of LMS methods for linear

  9. Hamiltonization of elementary nonholonomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizyaev, I. A.; Borisov, A. V.; Mamaev, I. S.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we develop the method of Chaplygin's reducing multiplier; using this method, we obtain a conformally Hamiltonian representation for three nonholonomic systems, namely, for the nonholonomic oscillator, for the Heisenberg system, and for the Chaplygin sleigh. Furthermore, in the case of oscillator and nonholonomic Chaplygin sleigh, we show that the problem reduces to the study of motion of a mass point (in a potential field) on a plane and, in the case of Heisenberg system, on the sphere. Moreover, we consider an example of a nonholonomic system (suggested by Blackall) to which one cannot apply the method of reducing multiplier.

  10. Population structure and genetic diversity of Indian Major Carp, Labeo rohita (Hamilton, 1822) from three phylo-geographically isolated riverine ecosystems of India as revealed by mtDNA cytochrome b region sequences.

    PubMed

    Behera, Bijay Kumar; Baisvar, Vishwamitra Singh; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Meena, Dharmendra Kumar; Panda, Debarata; Pakrashi, Sudip; Paria, Prasenjit; Das, Pronob; Bhakta, Dibakar; Debnath, Dipesh; Roy, Suvra; Suresh, V R; Jena, J K

    2016-12-26

    The population structure and genetic diversity of Rohu (Labeo rohita Hamilton, 1822) was studied by analysis of the partial sequences of mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b region. We examined 133 samples collected from six locations in three geographically isolated rivers of India. Analysis of 11 haplotypes showed low haplotype diversity (0.00150), nucleotide diversity (π) (0.02884) and low heterogeneity value (0.00374). Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed the genetic diversity of L. rohita within population is very high than between the populations. The Fst scores (-0.07479 to 0.07022) were the indication of low genetic structure of L. rohita populations of three rivers of India. Conspicuously, Farakka-Bharuch population pair Fst score of 0.0000, although the sampling sites are from different rivers. The phylogenetic reconstruction of unique haplotypes revealed sharing of a single central haplotype (Hap_1) by all the six populations with a point mutations ranging from 1-25 nucleotides.

  11. The Hamilton-Jacobi theory for solving two-point boundary value problems: Theory and numerics with application to spacecraft formation flight, optimal control and the study of phase space structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guibout, Vincent M.

    This dissertation has been motivated by the need for new methods to address complex problems that arise in spacecraft formation design. As a direct result of this motivation, a general methodology for solving two-point boundary value problems for Hamiltonian systems has been found. Using the Hamilton-Jacobi theory in conjunction with the canonical transformation induced by the phase flow, it is shown that generating functions solve two-point boundary value problems. Traditional techniques for addressing these problems are iterative and require an initial guess. The method presented in this dissertation solves boundary value problems at the cost of a single function evaluation, although it requires knowledge of at least one generating function. Properties of this method are presented. Specifically, we show that it includes perturbation theory and generalizes it to nonlinear systems. Most importantly, it predicts the existence of multiple solutions and allows one to recover all of these solutions. To demonstrate the efficiency of this approach, an algorithm for computing the generating functions is proposed and its convergence properties are studied. As the method developed in this work is based on the Hamiltonian structure of the problem, particular attention must be paid to the numerics of the algorithm. To address this, a general framework for studying the discretization of certain dynamical systems is developed. This framework generalizes earlier work on discretization of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems on tangent and cotangent bundles respectively. In addition, it provides new insights into some symplectic integrators and leads to a new discrete Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Most importantly, it allows one to discretize optimal control problems. In particular, a discrete maximum principle is presented. This dissertation also investigates applications of the proposed method to solve two-point boundary value problems. In particular, new techniques for designing

  12. Validation of the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale definition of response for adults with major depressive disorder using equipercentile linking to Clinical Global Impression scale ratings: analysis of Pharmacogenomic Research Network Antidepressant Medication Pharmacogenomic Study (PGRN-AMPS) data.

    PubMed

    Bobo, William V; Angleró, Gabriela C; Jenkins, Gregory; Hall-Flavin, Daniel K; Weinshilboum, Richard; Biernacka, Joanna M

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed to define thresholds of clinically significant change in 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) scores using the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) Scale as a gold standard. We conducted a secondary analysis of individual patient data from the Pharmacogenomic Research Network Antidepressant Medication Pharmacogenomic Study, an 8-week, single-arm clinical trial of citalopram or escitalopram treatment of adults with major depression. We used equipercentile linking to identify levels of absolute and percent change in HDRS-17 scores that equated with scores on the CGI-I at 4 and 8 weeks. Additional analyses equated changes in the HDRS-7 and Bech-6 scale scores with CGI-I scores. A CGI-I score of 2 (much improved) corresponded to an absolute decrease (improvement) in HDRS-17 total score of 11 points and a percent decrease of 50-57%, from baseline values. Similar results were observed for percent change in HDRS-7 and Bech-6 scores. Larger absolute (but not percent) decreases in HDRS-17 scores equated with CGI-I scores of 2 in persons with higher baseline depression severity. Our results support the consensus definition of response based on HDRS-17 scores (>50% decrease from baseline). A similar definition of response may apply to the HDRS-7 and Bech-6. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Total mercury, methylmercury, and selected elements in soils of the Fishing Brook watershed, Hamilton County, New York, and the McTier Creek watershed, Aiken County, South Carolina, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, Laurel G.; Cannon, William F.; Knightes, Christopher D.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Bradley, Paul M.; Burns, Douglas A.; Brigham, Mark E.; Lowery, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is an element of on-going concern for human and aquatic health. Mercury sequestered in upland and wetland soils represents a source that may contribute to mercury contamination in sensitive ecosystems. An improved understanding of mercury cycling in stream ecosystems requires identification and quantification of mercury speciation and transport dynamics in upland and wetland soils within a watershed. This report presents data for soils collected in 2008 from two small watersheds in New York and South Carolina. In New York, 163 samples were taken from multiple depths or soil horizons at 70 separate locations near Fishing Brook, located in Hamilton County. At McTier Creek, in Aiken County, South Carolina, 81 samples from various soil horizons or soil depths were collected from 24 locations. Sample locations within each watershed were selected to characterize soil geochemistry in distinct land-cover compartments. Soils were analyzed for total mercury, selenium, total and carbonate carbon, and 42 other elements. A subset of the samples was also analyzed for methylmercury.

  14. Effect of ambient storage on the quality characteristics of aerobically packaged fish curls incorporated with different flours.

    PubMed

    Raja, Waseem Hussain; Kumar, Sunil; Bhat, Zuhaib Fayaz; Kumar, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of ambient storage on the quality attributes of aerobically packaged fish curls incorporated with optimum levels of different flours. The curls were developed by extrusion technology using fish meat (Catla catla). The fish curls containing optimum levels of different flours viz. 20 percent corn flour, 10 percent black gram flour and 10 percent peanut flour were compared with the control snacks containing 30 percent rice flour and assessed for storage quality and shelf life at ambient temperature. The curls were aerobically packaged in LDPE (low density polyethylene) pouches and evaluated for various physicochemical, microbiological and sensory parameters. Mean values of pH of all the curls showed significantly (p < 0.05) decreasing trend with increasing days of storage (6.34 ± 0.01 on day 0 and 5.90 ± 0.005 on day 28 for control samples, 6.41 ± 0.009 on day 0 and 6.11 ± 0.02 on day 28 for corn flour incorporated samples, 6.36 ± 0.01 on day 0 and 6.14 ± 0.01 on day 28 for black gram flour incorporated samples, 6.57 ± 0.007 on day 0 and 6.34 ± 0.01 on day 28 for peanut flour incorporated samples). TBARS (mg malonaldehyde/kg), total plate count (log cfu/g) and yeast and mould count (log cfu/g) for the control as well as treatment samples showed significantly (p < 0.05) increasing trend with storage. Coliform counts (log cfu/g) were not detected until day 28 in all the products. The mean scores of sensory parameters i.e. appearance and colour, flavor, crispiness, texture and overall acceptability for control as well as treatment samples showed significantly (p < 0.05) decreasing trend with storage period. The decrease was significantly (p < 0.05) highest on 21(st) and 28(th) day of storage. The mean values for all the quality and storage parameters up to the day 21 of the storage were within the acceptable limits. Thus, based on various physicochemical and

  15. Development of Canonical Transformations from Hamilton's Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quade, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    The theory of canonical transformations and its development are discussed with regard to its application to Hutton's principle. Included are the derivation of the equations of motion and a lack of symmetry in the formulaion with respect to Lagrangian and the fundamental commutator relations of quantum mechanics. (Author/SA)

  16. Hamilton Happening: A Creative Writing Scoop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lux, Katy; Nobel, Marcia

    A practical, low-cost plan that involves teacher workshops and noon-hour workshops for students to encourage creative activity in an elementary school program for kindergarten through grade five is described in this booklet. Included is a sample of a monthly newsletter that suggests activities for creative involvement that are seasonal, centered…

  17. Viscosity Solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi Equations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    C + 0 . This is known in some particular cases via arguments using considerations of control theory or differential games (W. H. Fleming (14,15], A...uniqueness theory . It is akin to the standard distribution theory , but "integration by parts" is replaced by "differentiation by parts" M; • (t) BUC(iil...done "inside" the nonlinearity. It is extremely convenient (as is the distribution theory ) for passages to limits. The only somewhat related ideas we

  18. 78 FR 45956 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Hamilton County Department of Parks and Recreation, Hamilton...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... lot of formal uniface; 1 lot of hammer stone; 1 lot of hammer stone with ochre residue; 1 lot of...; 1 pitted stone with ochre residue; 4 lots of pottery sherds; 1 lot of ] quartzite biface fragments... loop handle; 1 slate debitage; 4 lots of soil and soil samples; 1 stone anvil with ochre residue; 3...

  19. 78 FR 63852 - Airworthiness Directives; Hamilton Standard Division and Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation Propellers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... October 25, 2013. The effective date for AD 2013-16-10 (78 FR 49660, August 15, 2013) remains September 19... 2013-16-10, Amendment 39-17548 (78 FR 49660, August 15, 2013), currently requires incorporating... published in the Federal Register. The effective date for AD 2013-16-10 (78 FR 49660, August 15,...

  20. Evaluation of Fluoride Retention Due to Most Commonly Consumed Estuarine Fishes Among Fish Consuming Population of Andhra Pradesh as a Contributing Factor to Dental Fluorosis: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ganta, Shravani; Nagaraj, Anup; Pareek, Sonia; Sidiq, Mohsin; Singh, Kushpal; Vishnani, Preeti

    2015-01-01

    Background Fluoride in drinking water is known for both beneficial and detrimental effects on health. The principal sources of fluoride include water, some species of vegetation, certain edible marine animals, dust and industrial processes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fluoride retention of most commonly consumed estuarine fishes among fish consuming population of Andhra Pradesh. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the amount of fluoride retention due to ten most commonly consumed estuarine fishes as a contributing factor to Fluorosis by SPADNS Spectrophotometric method. The presence and severity of dental fluorosis among fish consuming population was recorded using Community Fluorosis Index. Statistical analysis was done using MedCalc v12.2.1.0 software. Results For Sea water fishes, the fluoride levels in bone were maximum in Indian Sardine (4.22 ppm). Amongst the river water fishes, the fluoride levels in bone were maximum in Catla (1.51 ppm). Also, the mean total fluoride concentrations of all the river fishes in skin, muscle and bone were less (0.86 ppm) as compared to the sea water fishes (2.59 ppm). It was unveiled that sea fishes accumulate relatively large amounts of Fluoride as compared to the river water fishes. The mean Community Fluorosis Index was found to be 1.06 amongst a sampled fish consuming population. Evaluation by Community Index for Dental fluorosis (CFI) suggested that fluorosis is of medium public health importance. Conclusion It was analysed that bone tends to accumulate more amount of fluoride followed by muscle and skin which might be due to the increased permeability and chemical trapping of fluoride inside the tissues. The amount of fluoride present in the fishes is directly related to the severity of fluorosis amongst fish consuming population, suggesting fishes as a contributing factor to fluorosis depending upon the dietary consumption. PMID:26266208

  1. Evaluation of Fluoride Retention Due to Most Commonly Consumed Estuarine Fishes Among Fish Consuming Population of Andhra Pradesh as a Contributing Factor to Dental Fluorosis: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Ganta, Shravani; Yousuf, Asif; Nagaraj, Anup; Pareek, Sonia; Sidiq, Mohsin; Singh, Kushpal; Vishnani, Preeti

    2015-06-01

    Fluoride in drinking water is known for both beneficial and detrimental effects on health. The principal sources of fluoride include water, some species of vegetation, certain edible marine animals, dust and industrial processes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fluoride retention of most commonly consumed estuarine fishes among fish consuming population of Andhra Pradesh. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the amount of fluoride retention due to ten most commonly consumed estuarine fishes as a contributing factor to Fluorosis by SPADNS Spectrophotometric method. The presence and severity of dental fluorosis among fish consuming population was recorded using Community Fluorosis Index. Statistical analysis was done using MedCalc v12.2.1.0 software. For Sea water fishes, the fluoride levels in bone were maximum in Indian Sardine (4.22 ppm). Amongst the river water fishes, the fluoride levels in bone were maximum in Catla (1.51 ppm). Also, the mean total fluoride concentrations of all the river fishes in skin, muscle and bone were less (0.86 ppm) as compared to the sea water fishes (2.59 ppm). It was unveiled that sea fishes accumulate relatively large amounts of Fluoride as compared to the river water fishes. The mean Community Fluorosis Index was found to be 1.06 amongst a sampled fish consuming population. Evaluation by Community Index for Dental fluorosis (CFI) suggested that fluorosis is of medium public health importance. It was analysed that bone tends to accumulate more amount of fluoride followed by muscle and skin which might be due to the increased permeability and chemical trapping of fluoride inside the tissues. The amount of fluoride present in the fishes is directly related to the severity of fluorosis amongst fish consuming population, suggesting fishes as a contributing factor to fluorosis depending upon the dietary consumption.

  2. Evaluation of possible health risks of heavy metals by consumption of foodstuffs available in the central market of Rajshahi City, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Saha, Narottam; Zaman, M R

    2013-05-01

    Considering the human health risk due to the consumption of foodstuffs, the concentrations of heavy metals (lead, manganese, chromium, cadmium, and arsenic) are investigated in vegetables, fruits, and fish species collected from the central market (called Shaheb Bazar) of Rajshahi City, Bangladesh. The foodstuffs examined for metal constituents are the basis of human nutrition in the study area. The highest concentrations of Mn and As in vegetables (onion and pointed gourd, respectively), Cr and Cd in fruits (black berry and mango, respectively), and Pb in fish (catla) are recorded. Health risks associated with these heavy metals are evaluated due to dietary intake. Target hazard quotient (THQ) and hazard index (HI) are calculated to evaluate the non-carcinogenic health risk from individual and combined heavy metals. The THQ values for individual heavy metals are below 1, suggesting that people would not experience significant health risks if they ingest a single heavy metal from one kind of foodstuff (e.g., vegetables). However, consumption of several of the foodstuffs could lead a potential health risk to human population since HI value is higher than 1. The relative contributions of vegetables, fishes, and fruits to HI are 49.44, 39.07, and 11.53 %, respectively. Also, the relative contributions of Pb, Cd, As, Mn, and Cr to HI are 51.81, 35.55, 11.73, 0.85, and 0.02 %, respectively. The estimation shows that the carcinogenic risk of arsenic exceeds the accepted risk level of 1 × 10(-6). Thus, the carcinogenic risk of arsenic for consumers is a matter of concern.

  3. Hamilton's Magic Sunflower Garden: An Approach to Urban Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houts, Mary D.

    1973-01-01

    Describes an urban environmental education program in which an overgrown vacant lot has been used for environmental study and for the development of a productive garden. The program has been successful in providing elementary school children with positive experiences in their own urban environment. (JR)

  4. A bioenergetic model for zebrafish Danio rerio (Hamilton)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, C.J.; Sharma, Bibek; Pope, K.L.; Patino, R.

    2008-01-01

    A bioenergetics model was developed from observed consumption, respiration and growth rates for zebrafish Danio rerio across a range (18-32?? C) of water temperatures, and evaluated with a 50 day laboratory trial at 28?? C. No significant bias in variable estimates was found during the validation trial; namely, predicted zebrafish mass generally agreed with observed mass. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  5. Hermann-Bernoulli-Laplace-Hamilton-Runge-Lenz Vector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramanian, P. R.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A way for students to refresh and use their knowledge in both mathematics and physics is presented. By the study of the properties of the "Runge-Lenz" vector the subjects of algebra, analytical geometry, calculus, classical mechanics, differential equations, matrices, quantum mechanics, trigonometry, and vector analysis can be reviewed. (KR)

  6. Hermann-Bernoulli-Laplace-Hamilton-Runge-Lenz Vector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramanian, P. R.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A way for students to refresh and use their knowledge in both mathematics and physics is presented. By the study of the properties of the "Runge-Lenz" vector the subjects of algebra, analytical geometry, calculus, classical mechanics, differential equations, matrices, quantum mechanics, trigonometry, and vector analysis can be reviewed. (KR)

  7. Hamilton's Principle and Approximate Solutions to Problems in Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlitt, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Shows how to use the Ritz method for obtaining approximate solutions to problems expressed in variational form directly from the variational equation. Application of this method to classical mechanics is given. (MLH)

  8. Hamilton's Principle and Approximate Solutions to Problems in Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlitt, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Shows how to use the Ritz method for obtaining approximate solutions to problems expressed in variational form directly from the variational equation. Application of this method to classical mechanics is given. (MLH)

  9. Non-Hamiltonian systems separable by Hamilton Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciniak, Krzysztof; Błaszak, Maciej

    2008-05-01

    We show that with every separable classical Stäckel system of Benenti type on a Riemannian space one can associate, by a proper deformation of the metric tensor, a multi-parameter family of non-Hamiltonian systems on the same space, sharing the same trajectories and related to the seed system by appropriate reciprocal transformations. These systems are known as bi-cofactor systems and are integrable in quadratures as the seed Hamiltonian system is. We show that with each class of bi-cofactor systems a pair of separation curves can be related. We also investigate the conditions under which a given flat bi-cofactor system can be deformed to a family of geodesically equivalent flat bi-cofactor systems.

  10. Hamilton's Magic Sunflower Garden: An Approach to Urban Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houts, Mary D.

    1973-01-01

    Describes an urban environmental education program in which an overgrown vacant lot has been used for environmental study and for the development of a productive garden. The program has been successful in providing elementary school children with positive experiences in their own urban environment. (JR)

  11. Present status and approaches for the sustainable development of community based fish culture in seasonal floodplains of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M F; Jalal, K C A; Jahan, Nasrin; Kamaruzzaman, B Y; Ara, R; Arshad, A

    2012-06-15

    Coordination among the different stakeholders at policy planning, implementation and target beneficiary level, particularly among the agencies responsible for development and management of water resources, agriculture and fisheries, is essential for overall sustainable development. Stocking of larger fingerlings at suitable stocking densities of endemic (rohu, catla, mrigal) and exotic (silver carp, bighead carp, common carp/mirror carp) species should be stocked at varying proportion. Floodplain fish production depends only on the natural fertility of the water bodies. Technological interventions should include the installation of low cost bamboo fencing at water inlet and outlet points and setting of ring culverts for maintaining suitable levels of water for fish culture without hampering the production of rice and other crops in the intervention areas, selective stocking with native and exotic carps, restricted fishing for certain period of time and guarding. It is expected to exert positive influences in enhancing the standing crop and biodiversity of non-stocked species of fishes in the intervention seasonal floodplain. Entry of fish larvae, hatchlings and young fry of wild non-stocked fishes into the seasonal floodplains because of large fence spacing (approximately 1.0 cm), could restrict fishing for certain period, undisturbed habitat and guarding could contribute to higher productivity and enhancement of fish biodiversity in the seasonal floodplains. Proper motivation and effective cooperation of the beneficiaries are extremely important to culture fish in the seasonal floodplains under community based management system. Institutional support and constant vigilance from the Department of Fisheries (DoF) and local administrations are indispensable to ensure the sustainability of fish culture initiatives in the seasonal floodplains. Active participation and involvement of the local community people in all stages of fish culture operation beginning from

  12. Fast Sweeping Algorithms for a Class of Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-06

    the above type with variable coefficients. 1.1. Solving eikonal equations. In geometrical optics [10], the eikonal equa- tion √ φ2x + φ 2 y = r(x, y...of iterations for isotropic, homogeneous eikonal equations. This points out a future research direction of bounding the number of sweeping iterations...difficult cases. Key words. Hamilton–Jacobi equations, fast marching, fast sweeping, upwind finite differen- cing, eikonal equations AMS subject

  13. Dynamic Programming Algorithms for Planning and Robotics in Continuous Domains and the Hamilton-Jacobi Equation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-22

    of British Columbia 15 Dynamic Programming Principle • Value function ϑ(x) is “cost to go” from x to the nearest target • Value ϑ(x) at a point x is...the minimum over all points y in the neighborhood N(x) of the sum of – the value ϑ(y) at point y – the cost c(x) to travel through x • Dynamic...corresponding to edges leading to neighboring states • Interpolation of actions to points that are not grid nodes may not lead to actions optimal

  14. Application of the Kano-Hamilton multiangle inversion method in clear atmospheres

    Treesearch

    Mariana Adam; Vladimir A. Kovalev; Cyle Wold; Jenny Newton; Markus Pahlow; Wei M. Hao; Marc B. Parlange

    2007-01-01

    An improved measurement methodology and a data-processing technique for multiangle data obtained with an elastic scanning lidar in clear atmospheres are introduced. Azimuthal and slope scans are combined to reduce the atmospheric heterogeneity. Vertical profiles of optical depth and intercept (proportional to the logarithm of the backscatter coefficient) are determined...

  15. Polynomial in momenta invariants of Hamilton's equations, divergent series and generalized functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. V.

    2013-03-01

    We consider the problem of the motion of two identical interacting particles on a circle in a potential force field. We study conditions for the existence of an additional first integral in the form of a polynomial of degree 4 in momenta with periodic coefficients. These conditions are reduced to the solvability of a certain nonlinear functional-differential equation for the potential of the external force and the interaction potential. If the potentials are smooth, this equation has only trivial solutions: at least one of the potentials is a constant function. We classify generalized solutions of this equation when the interaction potential is a distribution while the external potential is a smooth function. Formal Fourier series for the interaction potential can be summed up by the (C, 2)-Cesaro method to periodic functions with singularities.

  16. In vivo tissue enzyme activities in the rosy barb (Barbus conchonius Hamilton) experimentally exposed to lead

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, T.S. ); Tewari, H.; Pande, J.; Lal, S. )

    1991-12-01

    Lead (Pb) is biologically nonessential and if present in excessive levels in the body, it can cause clinical disorders both in humans and animals. Pathologies associated with experimental Pb poisoning have been described in fishes, and several markers have been utilized to monitor effects of short- and long-term exposures. The specific aim of this study was to examine the effects of acute Pb poisoning on the enzymes concerned with membrane transport, neurotransmission, and energy metabolism in selected tissues of the rosy barb, Barbus conchonius, a freshwater fish.

  17. Sampling Design Plan. Data Item A004. Hamilton Army Airfield, Novato, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    downgradient (north and east) of AST-2 to determine whether leaks from AST-2 have impacted shallow groundwater. 3. Install two water table monitoring wells...tidal study to determine the influence of the tides on groundwater levels at the site. Changes in water levels will be measured versus time in each of the... determination of purgeable organics in environmental water samples. The parameters determined by this method are shown in Appendix A-2. This method is

  18. Health and Safety Plan Data Item A009. Hamilton Army Airfield, Novato, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    100 SLWASpn JUNE 1N5 -~pw iw om CNN Sma L FM NIliM N’ MAI ASSMIMET COK Su~t~mLI rakm aUa CrC. 1gp 0.f- Oft mud M AMO PANOm M WARING ONW VOW 0. 00000...Serviced By 9.85.185 0079.0.0 STANDARD RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROCEDURE NO. 1 RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PRINCIPLES 1. 1 INTRODUCTION Since the lungs are not...up to 75 I/min (a 12-fold increase). Air is inhaled through the nose and mouth and travels an extremely turbulent path to the lungs . This turbulency

  19. Molecular characterization of Myxoboluscatmrigalae (Myxosporea: Myxobolidae) infecting the gill lamellae of carp Cirrhinusmrigala (Hamilton).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sayani; Patra, Avijit; Mondal, Anjan; Adikesavalu, Harresh; Ramudu, Kurva Raghu; Dash, Gadadhar; Joardar, Siddhartha Narayan; Abraham, Thangapalam Jawahar

    2017-03-01

    The present study attempted sequencing the 18S rRNA gene of Myxoboluscatmrigalae infecting the gill lamellae of carp, Cirrhinusmrigala and compared its genetic homology and phylogenetic characteristics with 18S rRNA genes of other Myxobolus spp. The infected fish had up to 3 small, creamy white plasmodia per gill filament with 30-50 spores each. The spore size was 17.90 ± 0.70 × 7.40 ± 0.40 μm. The sporoplasm contained two large nuclei of size 0.57 ± 0.09 μm and no iodinophilous vacuole. The DNA sequence of M.catmrigalae was clustered phylogenetically with other Myxobolus spp. infecting the gills of cyprinids available in GenBank, which showed 77-87 % homogeneity. On the phylogenetic tree, M.catmrigalae (KC933944) was clustered with M.pavlovskii (HM991164) infecting the gill lamellae of silver carp, Hypophthalmichthysmolitrix. The species most closely related to M.catmrigalae in GenBank was M.pavlovskii (AF507973) infecting the gill lamellae of big head carp, Aristichthysnobilis with 87 % homogeneity. This is the first report on molecular characterization of gill lamellae infecting M. catmrigalae.

  20. Efficient High Order Central Schemes for Multi-Dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi Equations: Talk Slides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron; Biegel, Brian R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation presents information on the attempt to produce high-order, efficient, central methods that scale well to high dimension. The central philosophy is that the equations should evolve to the point where the data is smooth. This is accomplished by a cyclic pattern of reconstruction, evolution, and re-projection. One dimensional and two dimensional representational methods are detailed, as well.

  1. Numerical computation of exponential matrices using the Cayley-Hamilton theorem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walden, H.; Roelof, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    A method for computing exponential matrices, which often arise naturally in the solution of systems of linear differential equations, is developed. An exponential matrix is generated as a linear combination of a finite number (equal to the matrix order) of matrices, the coefficients of which are scalar infinite sums. The method can be generalized to apply to any formal power series of matrices. Attention is focused upon the exponential function, and the matrix exponent is assumed tri-diagonal in form. In such cases, the terms in the coefficient infinite sums can be extracted, as recursion relations, from the characteristic polynomial of the matrix exponent. Two numerical examples are presented in some detail: (1) the three dimensional infinitesimal rotation rate matrix, which is skew symmetric, and (2) an N-dimensional tri-diagonal and symmetric finite difference matrix which arises in the numerical solution of the heat conduction partial differential equation. In the second example, the known eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the finite difference matrix permit an analytical solution for the exponential matrix, through the theory of diagonalization and similarity transformations, which is used for independent verification. The convergence properties of the scalar infinite summations are investigated for finite difference matrices of various orders up to ten, and it is found that the number of terms required for convergence increases slowly with the order of the matrix.

  2. 78 FR 22873 - Hamilton Street Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... feet mean sea level (msl); (3) a new 60-foot-long by 30-foot-wide by 30-foot-high powerhouse with two...: Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street NE., Washington, DC... printed on the ``eLibrary'' link of the Commission's Web site at http://www.ferc.gov/docs-filing/elibrary...

  3. Gauge Symmetry of the N-body Problem in the Hamilton-Jacobi Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-12

    Mechanics. Springer- Verlag, NY. [29] Subbotin, M. F. 1958. ” Leonhard Euler and the Astronomical Problems of his Time.” In: Voprosy Istorii...space. It coincides with the regular Lagrange gauge when the perturbation is velocity-independent. 1 Euler and Lagrange 1.1 The history The planetary...exerted upon one another by Saturn and Jupiter. In the publication on the Lunar motion, dated by 1753, Euler derived the equations for the longitude of the

  4. 78 FR 73750 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Hamilton, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    .../Airspace Docket No. 13- AGL-22, at the beginning of your comments. You may also submit comments through the... 6005 Class E Airspace areas extending upward from 700 feet or more above the surface of the earth...

  5. In vivo genotoxicity and cytotoxicity assessment of cadmium chloride in peripheral erythrocytes of Labeo rohita (Hamilton).

    PubMed

    Jindal, Rajinder; Verma, Sakshi

    2015-08-01

    Cadmium chloride (CdCl2) induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity has been assessed in the peripheral blood erythrocytes of freshwater fish Labeo rohita exposed to 0.37 and 0.62mg/L of CdCl2 in water for 100 days. The blood samples of the fish were collected at different intervals (days 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, 30, 60 and 100) of exposure period to analyze DNA damage using comet assay and the occurrence of micronuclei and other cellular anomalies. The results of comet assay showed a significant increase in the mean percentage of tail DNA at both the concentrations. Exposure to CdCl2 also induced micronuclei in addition to many nuclear abnormalities such as nuclear bud, binucleates, lobed, notched and vacuolated nuclei. Cytoplasmic abnormalities like echinocytes, acanthocytes, notched, microcytes and cells with vacuolated cytoplasm were also observed. The metal exposed groups showed significant variation in the frequency of cellular abnormalities as well as the extent of DNA damage in comparison to controls. These frequencies increased significantly (p<0.05) in concentration dependent manner, peaking on 10th day while a decreasing trend was observed after 15 days of the exposure period.

  6. M2-F1 fabrication by Grierson Hamilton, Bob Green, and Ed Browne

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Flight Research Center discretionary funds paid for the M2-F-1's construction. NASA mechanics, sheet-metal smiths, and technicians did much of the work in a curtained-off area of a hangar called the 'Wright Bicycle Shop.' The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C-47 aircraft and released. These initial car-tow tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind the C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to l20 mph. A small solid landing rocket, referred to as the 'instant L/D rocket,' was installed in the rear base of the M2-F1. This rocket, which could be ignited by the pilot, provided about 250 pounds of thrust for about 10 seconds. The rocket could be used to extend the flight time near landing if needed. More than 400 ground tows and 77 aircraft tow flights were carried out with the M2-F1. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at NASA's Ames and Langley research centers--the M2-F2 and the HL-10, both built by the Northrop Corporation, and the U.S. Air Force's X-24 program, with an X-24A and -B built by Martin. The Lifting Body program also heavily influenced the Space Shuttle program. The M2-F1 program demonstrated the feasibility of the lifting body concept for horizontal landings of atmospheric entry vehicles. It also demonstrated a procurement and management concept for prototype flight test vehicles that produced rapid results at very low cost (approximately $50,000, excluding salaries of government employees assigned to the project).

  7. A Case Study: Environmental Impact of the Hamilton AFB, California Base Closure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    214 vi LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1 ADCOM Impact Prediction Scale. • . .... 9 2 Natural and Physical Environmental Indicators...for Joint Surveillance System (JSS)." The ADCOM report stated that individuals should apply * subjective judgments regarding the par- ticular level...Values are to be assigned to the subjective evaluations in regard to the degree of significance of the impact. An 7 ADCOM impact prediction scale was

  8. Toxic Effects of Zinc Chloride on the Bone Development in Danio rerio (Hamilton, 1822)

    PubMed Central

    Salvaggio, Antonio; Marino, Fabio; Albano, Marco; Pecoraro, Roberta; Camiolo, Giuseppina; Tibullo, Daniele; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Lombardo, Bianca M.; Saccone, Salvatore; Mazzei, Veronica; Brundo, Maria V.

    2016-01-01

    The increase of heavy metals in the environment involves a high exposure of aquatic organisms to these pollutants. The present study is planned to investigate the effects of zinc chloride (ZnCl2) on the bone embryonic development of Danio rerio and confirm the use of zebrafish as a model organism to study the teratogenic potential of this pollutant. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to different ZnCl2 concentrations and analyzed by ICP-MS. The skeletal anomalies were evaluated to confocal microscope after staining with calcein solution and RhodZinTM-3,AM. The data show a delay in hatching compared with the controls, malformations in the process of calcification and significant defects in growth. In conclusion, the current work demonstrates for the first time the Zn toxic effects on calcification process and confirm zebrafish (Danio rerio) as suitable alternative vertebrate model to study the causes and the mechanisms of the skeletal malformations. PMID:27199768

  9. The kids at Hamilton Elementary School: Purposes and practices for co-opting science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Loaiza

    The purpose of this study was to explore youth's purposes and motivations for engaging in science through the lens of science practices. The construct of science practices allowed me to see science in youths' lives in a holistic way, shaped by social, political, historical, economic and cultural forces. The framework for understanding urban youths' science practices is grounded in the intersections of critical and feminist theory, sociocultural learning theories, especially as applied in research in urban science education, and recent work in critical literacy studies. As I explored the answers to my research questions---(1) When 5th grade youth, living in predominantly Latino communities struggling with urban poverty, engage in science how and why do they co-opt science in ways that result in changes in participation in science? (2) What are the science practices that facilitate youths' coopting of science? And how are those practices framed by context (school, out-of-school), content (LiFE curriculum), and funds of knowledge? (3) In what ways are science practices expressions of youths' scientific literacy? And (4) In what ways do youth use science practices as tools for expressing identities and agency?---I engaged in feminist ethnography with embedded case studies. Data were collected in 2004 in school and in out of school settings. I recorded numerous informal conversations, interviews, and observations both during after-school and students' regular science and non-science classes. Findings describe how and why students co-opted science for purposes that make sense for their lives. These purposes included gaining and activating resources, building and maintaining social relationships, bridging home and school knowledge, positioning themselves with authority, and constructing science identities. Findings also explored what practices facilitated youth's co-opting of science. I highlighted three practices: making ideas public, storytelling and prioritizing and using evidence. Finally, I present an in-depth analysis of the science practice of storytelling. Analysis revealed that students engaged in storytelling to facilitate co-opting of science by: allowing them to change the discourse of the science classroom, to seek legitimacy, and to position themselves with authority. I end with implications for urban science education, teacher education and for future research.

  10. Proposed Bak Stabilization Tennessee River, River Mile 466.2 - 466.5 Hamilton County, Tennessee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Salinity Determinations: Water chemistry, odor, taste, dissolved oxygen levels, nutrients, and eutrophication would not be significantly affected...h) Eutrophication : No significant impacts are expected. (2) Current

  11. Hamilton Standard Q-fan demonstrator dynamic pitch change test program, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demers, W. J.; Nelson, D. J.; Wainauski, H. S.

    1975-01-01

    Tests of a full scale variable pitch fan engine to obtain data on the structural characteristics, response times, and fan/core engine compatibility during transient changes in blade angle, fan rpm, and engine power is reported. Steady state reverse thrust tests with a take off nozzle configuration were also conducted. The 1.4 meter diameter, 13 bladed controllable pitch fan was driven by a T55 L 11A engine with power and blade angle coordinated by a digital computer. The tests demonstrated an ability to change from full forward thrust to reverse thrust in less than one (1) second. Reverse thrust was effected through feather and through flat pitch; structural characteristics and engine/fan compatibility were within satisfactory limits.

  12. Hamilton's Equations with Euler Parameters for Rigid Body Dynamics Modeling. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivarama, Ravishankar; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2004-01-01

    A combination of Euler parameter kinematics and Hamiltonian mechanics provides a rigid body dynamics model well suited for use in strongly nonlinear problems involving arbitrarily large rotations. The model is unconstrained, free of singularities, includes a general potential energy function and a minimum set of momentum variables, and takes an explicit state space form convenient for numerical implementation. The general formulation may be specialized to address particular applications, as illustrated in several three dimensional example problems.

  13. Inhibition of ATPase activity in the freshwater fish Labeo rohita (Hamilton) exposed to sodium cyanide.

    PubMed

    Dube, Praveen N; Hosetti, Basaling B

    2011-10-01

    Present study concerns the effect of sodium cyanide on the Indian major carp, Labeo rohita. Fishes were exposed to lethal (0.32 mg/L) and sublethal (0.064 mg/L) concentrations of sodium cyanide. The effect of intoxication was studied on Na(+)K(+)ATPase, Mg(+2)ATPase and Ca(2+)ATPase in various physiological tissues (gill, liver, and muscle) at the end of 1, 2, 3 and 4 days of lethal and 5, 10 and 15 days of sublethal exposure periods. Sodium cyanide induced significant inhibitory effects on the ATPase activity of the fish. Inhibition of the ATPase blocked the active transport system of the gill epithelial as well as chloride cells, and thus altered the osmo-regulatory mechanism of the fish. The value of the measured responses as an indicator of stress caused by water contamination discussed. The results confirm that ATPase levels significantly decreased in treated fish, indicating that ATPases could be used as sensitive and useful biomarkers for cyanide pollution.

  14. Toxic Effects of Zinc Chloride on the Bone Development in Danio rerio (Hamilton, 1822).

    PubMed

    Salvaggio, Antonio; Marino, Fabio; Albano, Marco; Pecoraro, Roberta; Camiolo, Giuseppina; Tibullo, Daniele; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Lombardo, Bianca M; Saccone, Salvatore; Mazzei, Veronica; Brundo, Maria V

    2016-01-01

    The increase of heavy metals in the environment involves a high exposure of aquatic organisms to these pollutants. The present study is planned to investigate the effects of zinc chloride (ZnCl2) on the bone embryonic development of Danio rerio and confirm the use of zebrafish as a model organism to study the teratogenic potential of this pollutant. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to different ZnCl2 concentrations and analyzed by ICP-MS. The skeletal anomalies were evaluated to confocal microscope after staining with calcein solution and RhodZin(TM)-3,AM. The data show a delay in hatching compared with the controls, malformations in the process of calcification and significant defects in growth. In conclusion, the current work demonstrates for the first time the Zn toxic effects on calcification process and confirm zebrafish (Danio rerio) as suitable alternative vertebrate model to study the causes and the mechanisms of the skeletal malformations.

  15. M2-F1 fabrication by Grierson Hamilton, Bob Green, and Ed Browne

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Flight Research Center discretionary funds paid for the M2-F-1's construction. NASA mechanics, sheet-metal smiths, and technicians did much of the work in a curtained-off area of a hangar called the 'Wright Bicycle Shop.' The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C-47 aircraft and released. These initial car-tow tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind the C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to l20 mph. A small solid landing rocket, referred to as the 'instant L/D rocket,' was installed in the rear base of the M2-F1. This rocket, which could be ignited by the pilot, provided about 250 pounds of thrust for about 10 seconds. The rocket could be used to extend the flight time near landing if needed. More than 400 ground tows and 77 aircraft tow flights were carried out with the M2-F1. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at NASA's Ames and Langley research centers--the M2-F2 and the HL-10, both built by the Northrop Corporation, and the U.S. Air Force's X-24 program, with an X-24A and -B built by Martin. The Lifting Body program also heavily influenced the Space Shuttle program. The M2-F1 program demonstrated the feasibility of the lifting body concept for horizontal landings of atmospheric entry vehicles. It also demonstrated a procurement and management concept for prototype flight test vehicles that produced rapid results at very low cost (approximately $50,000, excluding salaries of government employees assigned to the project).

  16. URBAN: Development of a Citizen Science Biomonitoring Program Based in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Lyndsay A.; Cvetkovic, Maja; Graham, Spencer; Tozer, Douglas; Chow-Fraser, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Due to increasing urbanization, wetlands and streams within city limits are being altered, filled in, and degraded. The habitat that remains is critical for providing urban areas with ecosystem services and maintaining biodiversity, yet is often insufficiently monitored by environmental agencies due to a lack of resources. To help fill this void,…

  17. 77 FR 27272 - Environmental Impact Statement: Hamilton and Clermont Counties, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... to reduce congestion, improve safety and efficiency, provide operational capacity for bus transit, accommodate bike and pedestrian ways, and support economic development and community revitalization consistent... expanded bus network, establish stations that effectively link to bus, bike, pedestrian, and roadway...

  18. Use of RAPD fingerprinting for delineating populations of hilsa shad Tenualosa ilisha (Hamilton, 1822).

    PubMed

    Brahmane, M P; Das, M K; Sinha, M R; Sugunan, V V; Mukherjee, A; Singh, S N; Prakash, S; Maurye, P; Hajra, A

    2006-10-31

    RAPD was used to delineate the hilsa populations sampled from the Ganga, Yamuna, Hooghly, and Narmada Rivers at six different locations. Six degenerate primers were used to generate the fragment patterns from the samples collected. All primers were highly polymorphic and generated high numbers of amplification products. Nei's genetic distances were calculated between locations. The overall average genetic distance among all the six locations was 0.295. The Fst value within the Ganga was 0.469 and within the Hooghly it was 0.546. The overall Fst value for the six populations analyzed was 0.590. The UPGMA dendrogram clustered the hilsa into two distinct clusters: Ganga and Yamuna populations and the Hooghly and Narmada populations.

  19. Sense of Place and Health in Hamilton, Ontario: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Allison; Kitchen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The concept of sense of place has received considerable attention by social scientists in recent years. Research has indicated that a person's sense of place is influenced by a number of factors including the built environment, socio-economic status (SES), well-being and health. Relatively few studies have examined sense of place at the…

  20. Psychosocial challenges of young people affected by HIV: experiences from Hamilton County, Chattanooga, Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Chama, Samson; Ramirez, Octavio

    2015-01-01

    The number of young people affected by HIV and AIDS in Tennessee has steadily grown over the last few years. As a response to this situation, several organizations are working hard to address the needs of families impacted by HIV and AIDS. However, a close examination of some of the services provided suggests that young people within these families are ignored. Most of the services are geared toward HIV and AIDS-infected adult members of these families. Young people within these household are not targeted, and little is known about psychosocial challenges they experience in living with HIV-positive parents or guardians. In an attempt to address this gap, this small-scale qualitative study investigated the psychosocial challenges of young people affected by HIV and AIDS as a result of living with HIV-positive parents or guardians. Perceived sense of depression, experiencing stigma, self-blame, and lack of communication and loneliness were challenges that young people faced regularly.

  1. Errors, correlations and fidelity for noisy Hamilton flows. Theory and numerical examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetti, G.; Sinigardi, S.; Servizi, G.; Panichi, F.; Vaienti, S.

    2017-02-01

    We analyse the asymptotic growth of the error for Hamiltonian flows due to small random perturbations. We compare the forward error with the reversibility error, showing their equivalence for linear flows on a compact phase space. The forward error, given by the root mean square deviation σ (t) of the noisy flow, grows according to a power law if the system is integrable and according to an exponential law if it is chaotic. The autocorrelation and the fidelity, defined as the correlation of the perturbed flow with respect to the unperturbed one, exhibit an exponential decay as \\exp ≤ft(-2{π2}{σ2}(t)\\right) . Some numerical examples such as the anharmonic oscillator and the Hénon Heiles model confirm these results. We finally consider the effect of the observational noise on an integrable system, and show that the decay of correlations can only be observed after a sequence of measurements and that the multiplicative noise is more effective if the delay between two measurements is large.

  2. Transient behavior in absorptive optical bistability by the Hamilton-Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S.; Satchell, J. S.

    1986-04-01

    One-, two-, and five-dimensional Fokker-Planck equations for absorptive bistability are solved with use of small-noise asymptotic expansions, which are different from Gaussian linearized analysis. The cases studied are the bifurcation point for the start of hysteresis, where there is critical slowing down and the fluctuations are large, and the evolution of a steady-state distribution when the input field has a step change. The time evolution of the probability distribution is calculated.

  3. Hawking radiation of Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole by Hamilton-Jacobi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. Atiqur; Hossain, M. Ilias

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the Hawking radiation of Schwarzschild-de Sitter (SdS) black hole by massive particles tunneling method. We consider the spacetime background to be dynamical, incorporate the self-gravitation effect of the emitted particles and show that the tunneling rate is related to the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy and the derived emission spectrum deviates from the pure thermal spectrum when energy and angular momentum are conserved. Our result is also in accordance with Parikh and Wilczek's opinion and gives a correction to the Hawking radiation of SdS black hole.

  4. Noether's theorem and Lie symmetries for time-dependent Hamilton-Lagrange systems.

    PubMed

    Struckmeier, Jürgen; Riedel, Claus

    2002-12-01

    Noether and Lie symmetry analyses based on point transformations that depend on time and spatial coordinates will be reviewed for a general class of time-dependent Hamiltonian systems. The resulting symmetries are expressed in the form of generators whose time-dependent coefficients follow as solutions of sets of ordinary differential ("auxiliary") equations. The interrelation between the Noether and Lie sets of auxiliary equations will be elucidated. The auxiliary equations of the Noether approach will be shown to admit invariants for a much broader class of potentials, compared to earlier studies. As an example, we work out the Noether and Lie symmetries for the time-dependent Kepler system. The Runge-Lenz vector of the time-independent Kepler system will be shown to emerge as a Noether invariant if we adequately interpret the pertaining auxiliary equation. Furthermore, additional nonlocal invariants and symmetries of the Kepler system will be isolated by identifying further solutions of the auxiliary equations that depend on the explicitly known solution path of the equations of motion. Showing that the invariants remain unchanged under the action of different symmetry operators, we demonstrate that a unique correlation between a symmetry transformation and an invariant does not exist.

  5. Simulation of a Moving Elastic Beam Using Hamilton’s Weak Principle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    technique was used by Hopkins and Ormiston [30] to model nonlinear deformation of a helicopter rotor blade. Nonlinear beam elements are formed with a...converge. However, when the basic units are changed so that the state vector is of a consistent magnitude, the algorithm will perform well. For...parameter 2- from rho bar r3=X0((42*n-36),1); %rotation parameter 3 - from rho bar V1 =X0((42*n-11),1); %velocity 1 V2=X0((42*n-10),1); %velocity 2 V3=X0

  6. 75 FR 62333 - Airworthiness Directives; Hamilton Sundstrand Propellers Model 247F Propellers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ...) blades. That proposed AD would require removing affected propeller blades from service. That proposed AD resulted from reports of blades with corrosion pits in the tulip area of the blades. This supplemental NPRM... proposing this AD to prevent cracks from developing in the tulip area of the blade, which could result...

  7. 76 FR 7101 - Airworthiness Directives; Hamilton Sundstrand Propellers Model 247F Propellers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... requires removing affected propeller blades from service. This AD was prompted by reports of blades with corrosion pits in the tulip area of the blades. We are issuing this AD to prevent cracks from developing in the tulip area of the blade, which could result in separation of the blade and possible loss...

  8. Sense of Place and Health in Hamilton, Ontario: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Allison; Kitchen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The concept of sense of place has received considerable attention by social scientists in recent years. Research has indicated that a person's sense of place is influenced by a number of factors including the built environment, socio-economic status (SES), well-being and health. Relatively few studies have examined sense of place at the…

  9. Higher water temperature enhances dietary carbohydrate utilization and growth performance in Labeo rohita (Hamilton) fingerlings.

    PubMed

    Alexander, C; Sahu, N P; Pal, A K; Akhtar, M S; Saravanan, S; Xavier, B; Munilkumar, S

    2011-10-01

    A 60-day experiment was conducted to delineate the effect of three dietary levels of gelatinized carbohydrate (GC) on growth, nutrient-utilization and body composition of Labeo rohita fingerlings (avg. wt 6.5 ± 0.3 g) reared at two water temperatures (ambient-AT (26 ± 0.8 °C) and 32 °C). Two hundred and sixteen fingerlings were randomly distributed into six treatments in triplicates. Three semi-purified isonitrogenous diets were prepared with graded levels of GC viz. D(1) : 40%, D(2) : 50% and D(3) : 58%. Growth rate, feed efficiency and protein efficiency ratio were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in 50% GC and 32 °C reared groups than their AT counterparts. Hepato Somatic Index was higher in AT reared groups compared to 32 °C reared counterparts. Apparent digestibility co-efficient of carbohydrate was significantly (p < 0.05) higher at 32 °C reared groups but decreased with increasing carbohydrate (GC) levels. Fish reared at 32 °C showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher amylase, protease and hexokinase activities while glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphatse were significantly (p < 0.05) higher at ambient temperatures. The results obtained in present study indicated that L. rohita could utilize higher level (50%) of dietary carbohydrate at 32 °C.

  10. Singular Lagrangian, Hamiltonization and Jacobi last multiplier for certain biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Partha; Ghose Choudhury, Anindya

    2013-07-01

    We study the construction of singular Lagrangians using Jacobi's last multiplier (JLM). We also demonstrate the significance of the last multiplier in Hamiltonian theory by explicitly constructing the Hamiltonian of the Host-Parasite model and a Lotka-Volterra mutualistic system, both of which are well known first-order systems of differential equations arising in biology.

  11. Transmission of fish parasites into grouper mariculture (Serranidae: Epinephelus coioides (Hamilton, 1822)) in Lampung Bay, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rückert, Sonja; Klimpel, Sven; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Palm, Harry W

    2009-02-01

    Differently fed groupers Epinephelus coioides from an Indonesian finfish mariculture farm were studied for ecto- and endohelminth parasites. Pellet-fed E. coioides were infested with 13 parasite species/taxa of which six had a monoxenous and seven a heteroxenous life cycle. A total of 14 parasite species/taxa were found in the fish that were fed with different trash fish species, four of them with a monoxenous and ten with a heteroxenous life cycle. The use of pellet food significantly reduced the transfer of endohelminths and the number of parasites with a heteroxenous life cycle. Out of ten studied trash fish species, 62 parasite species were isolated (39% ectoparasitic and 61% endoparasitic), four of them also occurring in the cultured E. coioides and 14 in different groupers from Balai Budidaya Laut Lampung. The trash fish is held responsible for the transmission of these parasites into the mariculture fish. Endohelminth infestation of pellet fed fish demonstrates that parasite transfer also occurs via organisms that naturally live in, on, and in the surroundings of the net cages. Seventeen recorded invertebrates from the net cages might play an important role as intermediate hosts and hence parasite transmitters. The risk of parasite transfer can be considerably reduced by feeding selected trash fish species with a lower parasite burden, using only trash fish musculature or minimizing the abundance of invertebrates (fouling) on the net cages. These methods can control the endoparasite burden of cultivated fish without medication. The control of ectoparasites requires more elaborate techniques. Once they have succeeded in entering a mariculture farm, it is almost impossible to eliminate them from the system.

  12. Conversion efficiency and nutrient digestibility of certain seaweed diets by laboratory reared Labeo rohita (Hamilton).

    PubMed

    Bindu, M S; Sobha, V

    2004-12-01

    Impact of three different types of seaweed diets on growth, feed utilization and nutrient digestibility of L. rohita was studied for 120 days. The seaweed diet fed fishes, especially Ulva based diet showed comparatively higher growth and weight increment. Good food conversion ratio, food assimilation efficiency, protein efficiency ratio and better nutrient digestibility were recorded for seaweed diet fed fishes. The results suggests the suitability of utilizing seaweeds, Ulva fasciata, Spyridia insignis and Sargassum wightii as partial substitute for fishmeal in formulated diets of L. rohita.

  13. 78 FR 28838 - Hamilton Street Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... existing 10.5-foot-high rock fill gravity dam with a 655-foot-long spillway and a fish ladder; (2) an... powerhouse with three turbine-generator units having a combined capacity of 1,500 kilowatts and...

  14. Literacy and the Right To Know. A Workshop (Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, April 18-19, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, Hamilton (Ontario).

    A workshop on Literacy and the Right to Know discussed the problems of illiteracy on the job, especially in the context of teaching workers about job hazards. Participants approached the topic from a number of angles: the dimensions of the problem of literacy in workplaces; the impact of Right-to-Know legislation; the role of training and…

  15. Remarks on the Existence and Uniqueness of Unbounded Viscosity Solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi Equations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    many more resu -s of this kind, including existence results in cases where nonuniqueness is possible and the existence of minimal solutions. We also...in these works. -4- . .. . . . . . . . . * .. ..-.. .. ... . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . . H CONTENTS I. Lipschitz Hamiltonians and the stationary...condition~s at infinity VII. Further remarks on the Cauchy problem V -5-r 1. LIPSCHITZ HAMILTONIANS AN-D THE STATIONARY PROBLEM. wilIn this section we

  16. Hamilton flow generated by field lines near a toroidal magnetic surface

    SciTech Connect

    Skovoroda, A. A.

    2013-07-15

    A method is described for obtaining the Hamiltonian of a vacuum magnetic field in a given 3D toroidal magnetic surface (superconducting shell). This method is used to derive the expression for the integrable surface Hamiltonian in the form of the expansion of a rotational transform of field lines on embedded near-boundary magnetic surfaces into a Taylor series in the distance from the boundary. This expansion contains the value of the rotational transform and its shear at the boundary surface. It is shown that these quantities are related to the components of the first and second quadratic forms of the boundary surface.

  17. Application of Lean Six Sigma for patients presenting with ST-elevation myocardial infarction: the Hamilton Health Sciences experience.

    PubMed

    Aldarrab, Ayad

    2006-01-01

    Most patients with symptomatic acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the leading cause of death in western industrialized nations, use the emergency department (ED) as their point of entry. Yet, one identified barrier to early recognition of patients with AMI is ED overcrowding. In this paper, the author presents a quality improvement model that applies Lean Six Sigma guidelines to the clinical setting.

  18. Complete mitochondrial genome of threatened mahseer Tor tor (Hamilton 1822) and its phylogenetic relationship within Cyprinidae family.

    PubMed

    Pavan-Kumar, A; Raman, Sudhanshu; Koringa, Prakash G; Patel, Namrata; Shah, Tejas; Singh, Rajeev K; Krishna, Gopal; Joshi, C G; Gireesh-Babu, P; Chaudhari, Aparna

    2016-12-01

    The mahseers (Tor, Neolissochilus and Naziritor) are an important group of fishes endemic to Asia with the conservation status of most species evaluated as threatened. Conservation plans to revive these declining wild populations are hindered by unstable taxonomy. Molecular phylogeny studies with mitochondrial genome have been successfully used to reconstruct the phylogenetic tree and to resolve taxonomic ambiguity. In the present study, complete mitochondrial genome of Tor tor has been sequenced using ion torrent next-generation sequencing platform with coverage of more than 1000 x. Comparative mitogenome analysis shows higher divergence value at ND1 gene than COI gene. Further, occurrence of a distinct genetic lineage of T. tor is revealed. The phylogenetic relationship among mahseer group has been defined as Neolissochilus hexagonolepis ((T. sinensis (T. putitora, T. tor), (T. khudree, T. tambroides)).

  19. Bel Marin Keys Unit V Expansion of the Hamilton Wetland Restoration Project. General Reevaluation Report. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    goldenrod, sheep sorrel, 6-weeks fescue, tall fescue, sedge, rush, andcreeping wild rye (Environmental Science Associates 1993). Seasonal wetlands...total) is ruderal (i.e., grows in disturbed areas) and is dominated by weedy, non-native annual grasses and forbs, such as ripgut brome, wild oats...A USC 403, et seq. Watershed Protection & Flood Full Control Act of 1954. 16 USC 1001, et seq. I Wild & Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. N/A 16 USC 1271, et

  20. Blood flow dynamics reflect degree of outflow tract banding in Hamburger–Hamilton stage 18 chicken embryos

    PubMed Central

    Midgett, Madeline; Goenezen, Sevan; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Altered blood flow during embryonic development has been shown to cause cardiac defects; however, the mechanisms by which the resulting haemodynamic forces trigger heart malformation are unclear. This study used heart outflow tract banding to alter normal haemodynamics in a chick embryo model at HH18 and characterized the immediate blood flow response versus the degree of band tightness. Optical coherence tomography was used to acquire two-dimensional longitudinal structure and Doppler velocity images from control (n = 16) and banded (n = 25, 6–64% measured band tightness) embryos, from which structural and velocity data were extracted to estimate haemodynamic measures. Peak blood flow velocity and wall shear rate (WSR) initially increased linearly with band tightness (p < 0.01), but then velocity plateaued between 40% and 50% band tightness and started to decrease with constriction greater than 50%, whereas WSR continued to increase up to 60% constriction before it began decreasing with increased band tightness. Time of flow decreased with constriction greater than 20% (p < 0.01), while stroke volume in banded embryos remained comparable to control levels over the entire range of constriction (p > 0.1). The haemodynamic dependence on the degree of banding reveals immediate adaptations of the early embryonic cardiovascular system and could help elucidate a range of cardiac adaptations to gradually increased load. PMID:25165602

  1. Retina Image Analysis and Ocular Telehealth: The Oak Ridge National Laboratory-Hamilton Eye Institute Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Giancardo, Luca; Li, Yaquin; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Chaum, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Automated retina image analysis has reached a high level of maturity in recent years, and thus the question of how validation is performed in these systems is beginning to grow in importance. One application of retina image analysis is in telemedicine, where an automated system could enable the automated detection of diabetic retinopathy and other eye diseases as a low-cost method for broad-based screening. In this work we discuss our experiences in developing a telemedical network for retina image analysis, including our progression from a manual diagnosis network to a more fully automated one. We pay special attention to how validations of our algorithm steps are performed, both using data from the telemedicine network and other public databases.

  2. Genetic divergence in wild population of endangered yellowtail catfish Pangasius pangasius (Hamilton-Buchanan, 1822) revealed by mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Mohindra, Vindhya; Singh, Rajeev K; Kumar, Rajesh; Sah, R S; Lal, Kuldeep K

    2015-04-01

    Pangasius pangasius, an endangered freshwater fish species, is an important component of capture fishery from Indian rivers. Samples collected through commercial catches from three riverine populations were analyzed with cytb (307 bp) and ATPase6&8 (842 bp) regions for population variation and differentiation. The sequences of the both the mitochondrial regions revealed high haplotype and low nucleotide diversity. Shallow genetic diversity based on ATPase6&8 was observed, however its haplotypes network clearly indicated two distinct mitochondrial lineages. Mismatch distribution suggested population bottlenecks followed by expansion in Mahanadi population. The present study indicated the ATPase6&8 to be a potential mitochondrial marker for studying the population sub-structuring in the wild population of P. pangasius.

  3. 77 FR 5501 - City of Hamilton, Ohio; American Municipal Power, Inc.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To Intervene and Protests, Ready for Environmental... hydroelectric application has been filed with the Commission and is available for public inspection: a. Application Type: Amendment of license to change transmission line route. b. Project No.: 12667-031. c....

  4. Podcasts: Are They an Effective Tool to Enhance Student Learning? A Case Study from McMaster University, Hamilton Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vajoczki, Susan; Watt, Susan; Marquis, Nick; Holshausen, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    As universities turn to technology to become more learner-centred and address challenges created by increasing class sizes, changing consumer expectations, and increasing numbers of disability accommodation requests it is important to test the utility of technology solutions. This presentation describes a study to determine the effects of…

  5. Effects of water-borne copper and lead on the peripheral blood in the rosy barb, Barbus (Puntius) conchonius Hamilton

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, T.S. ); Tewari, H.; Pande, J. )

    1991-04-01

    The Pb-induced abnormalities of hematopoiesis are primarily confined to the erythrocytes the leucocytes and platelets do not appear to be altered during chronic exposure. Pb effects in fishes show responses similar to those in mammals. The absence of erythrocyte {delta}-ALAD inhibition in fish exposed to Cd, Cu, Zn, and Hg indicated that this enzyme is quite specific for Pb. The objective of this work was to examine the effects of chronically sublethal concentrations of Cu and Pb on the peripheral blood parameters in the rosy barb, Barbus (Puntius) conchonius, a widely distributed freshwater bony fish.

  6. Podcasts: Are They an Effective Tool to Enhance Student Learning? A Case Study from McMaster University, Hamilton Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vajoczki, Susan; Watt, Susan; Marquis, Nick; Holshausen, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    As universities turn to technology to become more learner-centred and address challenges created by increasing class sizes, changing consumer expectations, and increasing numbers of disability accommodation requests it is important to test the utility of technology solutions. This presentation describes a study to determine the effects of…

  7. Ground-water hydrology of the lower Wolftever Creek basin, with emphasis on the Carson Spring area, Hamilton County, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, D.A.; Carmichael, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of the ground-water-flow system that supplies Carson Spring and the surrounding lower Wolftever Creek basin northeast of Chattanooga, Tennessee, was conducted from September 1986 through December 1989. About two-thirds of the lower basin is underlain by the Chepultepec Dolomite of Ordovician age. Test drilling within a few miles of the spring showed that numerous solution cavities have developed in this formation; many are partly or completely plugged with cherty gravels and mud. In the recharge area to the spring, the formation can provide yields of 100 to perhaps 600 gallons of water per minute to bedrock wells. A well that penetrated a well-integrated cavity system underlying Carson Spring was tested at 2,000 gallons per minute. From May 1987 through December 1989, mean daily withdrawals from four wells at Carson Spring ranged from 4.78 to 5.83 cubic feet per second; mean daily spring discharge, which includes withdrawals, ranged from 5.53 to 5.79 cubic feet per second. For a 16-month drought period during 1987 and 1988, withdrawals from these wells exceeded natural spring discharge, and demonstrates that for a period of many consecutive months, the aquifer supplying the spring is capable of yielding more water than the spring would have discharged under natural conditions. Although the lower basin encompasses 17 square miles, the Carson Spring recharge area probably is not greater than 9 square miles. Most water not captured by cavities supplying the spring is discharged to Wolftever Creek. In the lower basin, the rate of ground-water discharge to the creek is about twice the average rate of discharge (0.25 cubic foot per second per square mile of drainage area) to area streams. Principal constituents in ground water in the lower basin are calcium and bicarbonate, or calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate. Specific conductance commonly ranges from 100 to 700 microsiemens per centimeter, and pH usually ranges from about 7 to 8. Overall, the ground water is of good quality and suitable for most uses. Several potential sources of degradation are present and arise from industrial, municipal, and domestic activities.

  8. Experienced Based Career Education. Hamilton High School, Memphis, Tennessee. Final Evaluation Report, September 1976, to September 12, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Melvin D.; Wilkins, Sandra

    A third-party evaluation was designed to document the processes undertaken to implement a Memphis, Tennessee, experience-based career education (EBCE) program. It also intended to assess project effects on student outcomes. Evaluation included pre- and post-testing of a control group and experimental group of tenth grade students enrolled in the…

  9. Atmospheric pollen and fungal spores in Hamilton in 1972 estimated by the Hirst automatic volumetric spore trap

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, J.; Hargreave, F. E.

    1974-01-01

    A knowledge of the atmospheric pollen and fungal spores is necessary for the diagnosis and management of extrinsic rhinitis and asthma. The Hirst automatic volumetric spore trap has been used for the first time in Canada to identify the quantitative and seasonal incidence of these particles. The trap is easy to operate and has several advantages over the previously used gravity samplers. Tree, grass and ragweed pollens occurred in short, well-defined seasons. Fungal spores greatly outnumbered pollen by 120 to one, and occurred in long, ill-defined seasons. They included large numbers of small basidiospores and ascospores which have previously not been detected in Canada. The latter have not been considered as potential allergens; their clinical importance requires investigation. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:4817211

  10. Parasite fauna of Epinephelus coioides (Hamilton, 1822) (Epinephelidae) as environmental indicator under heavily polluted conditions in Jakarta Bay, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Kilian; Yulianto, Irfan; Theisen, Stefan; Kleinertz, Sonja; Palm, Harry W

    2016-09-30

    The objective of this study was to assess the environmental conditions of a heavily polluted marine habitat using descriptors of fish parasites. Epinephelus coioides from Jakarta Bay as well as off Jakarta Bay was studied for metazoan parasites. Based on 70 fish and considering previous studies (230 fish), an environmental indicator system was designed. Including the recent study, a total of 51 parasite species have been recorded for E. coioides in Indonesian waters. Seven of them combined with five parasitological indices are useful descriptors for the environmental status of marine ecosystems. The results are visualized in a star graph. A significant different parasite infection between nine analyzed localities demonstrates the negative influence of the megacity Jakarta onto the coastal environment. We herewith complete a parasite based indicator system for Indonesian coastal waters, and suggest that it can be used in other marine habitats as well as for further epinephelids.

  11. A resolution commemorating the 200th anniversary of the chartering of Hamilton College in Clinton, New York.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Schumer, Charles E. [D-NY

    2012-06-05

    06/05/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S3736-3637; text as passed Senate: CR S3736; text of measure as introduced: CR S3732-3733) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Mercuric chloride induced toxicity responses in the olfactory epithelium of Labeo rohita (Hamilton): a light and electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debasree; Mandal, Dipak Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Bioaccumulation of mercury and histomorphological changes in the olfactory epithelium of Labeo rohita were investigated after exposing the fish to two sublethal concentrations of HgCl₂ (66 and 132 μg/L) for 15 and 30 days. Mercury deposition increased in the tissue significantly (p < 0.05) with dose- and duration-dependent manner. Severe damage to the olfactory epithelium was evident. When fish exposed to 66 μg/L for 15 days, the histology of olfactory epithelium exhibited that mucous cell proliferation was upregulated and cell size was significantly increased from the control. Similar trends were found in 30 days exposure in both treated groups. Histology showed that mercury induced degeneration of columnar sensory cells, supporting cells and ciliated non-sensory cells and induced basal cell proliferation. Basal cell hyperplasia led to form intraepithelial proliferative lesion, thickening of epithelium, basal lamina disruption and cyst formation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that mercury exposure at 66 μg/L caused clumping and loss of cilia, erosion in microridges on the supporting cells and proliferation of mucous cell opening. Complete degeneration of ciliated cells and cyst formation was observed in the fish when exposed to 132 μg/L HgCl₂. This result suggests that prolonged exposure to mercury might cause irreversible damage to the olfactory epithelium and impair the olfactory function of fish.

  13. A resolution commemorating the 200th anniversary of the chartering of Hamilton College in Clinton, New York.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Schumer, Charles E. [D-NY

    2012-06-05

    06/05/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Effect of dietary Spirulina level on growth and chemical composition of carcass in rohu, Labeo rohita (Hamilton).

    PubMed

    Chandra, Gyan; Saxena, Amita

    2012-07-01

    An experiment was conducted in three different tanks for 45 days (T1, T2 and T3) to investigate the effect of dietary Spirulina level on growth and chemical composition of carcass in rohu, Labeo rohita. A diet having de-oiled rice bran(30%), rice polish (15%), de-oiled mustard oil cake(25%), Soya bean oil cake(10%) and de-oiled groundnut cake(20%) was provided to the control (i.e. 100% formulated feed), whereas in T2 95% formulated feed with 5% Spirulina and in T3 90% formulated feed with 10% Spirulina. Data were analysed with ANOVA (P < 0.05) and found significant. There was significant difference in the average final weight of the fish among treatments with highest in the T3 (11.28g) followed by T2 (8.32g) and T1 (7.51g). The higher SGR was recorded in T3 (2.17) followed by T2 (1.52) and T1 (1.28). There was significant difference in the average carcass composition of the fish among treatments with highest level in T3 followed by T2 and T1.

  15. Three new species in the leafhopper genus Pedionis Hamilton (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Macropsinae) from China, with a key to Chinese species.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liyuan; Zhang, Yalin

    2014-02-04

    Three new species, Pedionis (Pedionis) tribrachyblasta, P. (P.) dentiforma and P. (P.) dinghuensis spp. nov. are recorded from China. Images of adults and genitalia of the three species are provided, with a key to distinguish all male species in this genus from China. 

  16. Installation, checkout, and early operational testing of the Hamilton Standard 4-megawatt wind turbine system (WTS-4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasbrouck, T. M.; Young, P.

    The WTS-4 is a 4-megawatt, downwind, horizontal axis wind turbine system which is currently being operated in Medicine Bow, Wyoming, to evaluate the technical and environmental feasibility of wind energy systems. The rotor has a diameter of 78.17 meters, and a speed of 30 RPM. There are two blades, made of filament-wound fiberglass. The tower has a height of 80 meters. The WTS-4 utilizes pitch angle control over its entire operating envelope in order to extract maximum energy from the wind. Power is allowed to increase from cut-in wind speed to rated wind speed by scheduling blade angle as a function of wind speed. At rated wind speed, the mode of control shifts to power control and blade angles are adjusted to control power output at a steady 4-megawatts.

  17. Modulation in the protein metabolism by subacute sodium cyanide intoxication in the freshwater fish, Labeo rohita (Hamilton).

    PubMed

    Dube, Praveen N; Hosetti, B B

    2012-01-01

    The effects of exposure to one-third and one-fifth sublethal concentrations (0.106 and 0.064 mg/L) of sodium cyanide on protein metabolism on freshwater carp, Labeo rohita, was studied. Three functionally different tissues, namely, the liver, muscle, and gills, were studied after 5, 10, and 15 days. Exposures produced marked changes in protein metabolic profile in all tissues studied. These changes were more pronounced in the one-third sublethal concentration, suggesting a cumulative action of toxicant. This investigation revealed that the total, structural, and soluble proteins and urea content in all the three tissues were decreased, whereas free amino acids, ammonia, and enzyme activity (i.e., protease, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase) exhibited elevated levels at both sublethal concentrations. Variation in protein metabolism in the fish, induced by sodium cyanide, demonstrated its toxic effects on cellular metabolism, thereby leading to impaired protein synthetic machinery. The results of the present study indicate that a mechanism of impaired energy transformation has direct action on the fish, L. rohita, and its impact is clearly evident from the change in the nutritional content of the fish.

  18. Hamilton AFB, San Rafael, California. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A through F

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-11-03

    8217 67.0 7. 71, 7 72.1 73. 74 74. 7o 7 5 (L 900 T2 s, &0, 63, 68.’ 69. 772, 7 .7 74. 74. 75. 75. 76. 77.1 42, 556, 6. 67 6 70t 71.. 4, 73. 76, 72a 73. 78...63.5 74,6 7 t2 704. 8:2 8, 0,9 81s2 1.6 816 82 2 62,5 $2, 6 83, 834,21 83,4 $3,6 Z 10 > oo 6 5,8 7 9 68 7, 8051 aZ,3 38. 03, 84, 80 92., ) 3 . 1 85...76o4 76,8 76,R 77.1 77.4 � 78,6 ( -> t2 1 00 55*1 67. 7 71.1l l *? 75. 26,. .*2 3 73.2 _. 79.. 6 79. 6 79*9 8n..2 Qt.b 81.4 120 o 6.7 693 73.1 75.5

  19. Preliminary evidence of the contribution of the intestinal microflora to biotin supply in zebrafish Danio rerio (Hamilton-Buchanan).

    PubMed

    Yossa, Rodrigue; Sarker, Pallab K; Vandenberg, Grant W

    2011-12-01

    A study was conducted to preliminarily assess the contribution of the intestinal microflora to biotin supply in zebrafish. Biotin and avidin were added to three isonitrogenous and isocaloric purified diets to provide molar avidin: biotin ratios of 0:0 (basal diet), 0:1 (biotin-supplemented diet), and 120:0. Another diet was made by supplementing the antibiotic succinylsulfathiazole (1%, wt/wt) to the basal diet. A fifth diet was the Zeigler commercial diet for zebrafish. Each diet was fed to a triplicate group of fish (mean initial mass 0.266 g) for 8 weeks. The condition factor, feed conversion ratio (FCR), percentage weight gain, and survival were similar in fish groups fed the commercial and the biotin-supplemented diets, but energy conversion efficiency and whole-body biotin content were highest in the fish fed the commercial diet (p<0.05). Reduced growth and survival, and increased FCR were noted in fish fed basal diet compared with those fed biotin-supplemented diet. The supplementation of avidin in diet led to lower survival and condition factor, and higher FCR than that observed with basal diet. Intestinal microbial synthesis is assumed to be a significant source of biotin to the zebrafish, as fish fed the antibiotic-supplemented diet showed the lowest growth, health condition, and feed utilization.

  20. Enrichment of Zebrafish Danio rerio (Hamilton, 1822) Diet with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Improves Fecundity and Larvae Quality.

    PubMed

    Nowosad, Joanna; Kucharczyk, Dariusz; Targońska, Katarzyna

    2017-08-01

    The zebrafish is a freshwater fish of the Cyprinidae family, which is frequently used in scientific research. It owes its popularity to its genome, whose structure is comparable to the human genome and, for this reason, this species is often used in human medical research. However, such research requires high-quality material to conduct tests producing repeatable results. This study examines the effect of providing feed enriched with essential fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid, to zebrafish spawners on fertility as well as the survival rate and growth of their offspring. The experiments revealed a significant (p < 0.05) effect of feeding spawners with feed enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids on all tested parameters: their fertility (30% higher compared to the control group), survival rate, and the posthatching size of larvae, which were larger by 13% and 4%, respectively, compared to the control group.