Science.gov

Sample records for causing cervical myelopathy

  1. One stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy for the treatment of myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Bin; Chen, Bohua; Ma, Xue-Xiao; Xi, Yong-Ming; Xiang, Hong-Fei; Hu, You-Gu; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to introduce a method of one stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy for myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation and to evaluate the clinical efficacy of this surgery. From 1999 to 2008, 18 patients with myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation who underwent this procedure were included. The average age was 63 years (range 48-74 years), and the average follow-up period was 46 months (range 3-108 months). Neurologic status was evaluated using the JOA scoring system. Neurological symptoms improvement was seen in all patients after surgery. The average JOA score was 14.22±1.86 by final follow-up, which was higher than preoperative values (P<0.01), and the average improvement in neurological function was 76.63%. Neurologic examination showed that excellent results had been obtained by 10 patients, good results by 8 patients, with no fair or poor results. 2 patients developed cerebrospinal fluid leakage after surgery and recovered during the follow-up period. One patient with cervical disc herniation developed postoperative C5 palsy on the axle side on the third day after surgery. She completely recovered by 1 month after surgery. No other patients experienced postoperative neurologic complications. Complete anterior and posterior decompression of the spinal cord was achieved after surgery. We concluded that one stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy is an effective, reliable, and safe procedure for the treatment of myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation. PMID:26309625

  2. Cervical myelopathy caused by dropped head syndrome. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Kinya; Taneda, Mamoru; Sumii, Toshihisa; Yabuuchi, Tomonari; Iwakura, Norihiro

    2007-02-01

    The authors present a rare case of cervical myelopathy caused by dropped head syndrome. This 68-year-old woman presented with her head hanging forward. After 1 month, she was admitted to the medical service because of head drop progression. Examination of biopsy specimens from her cervical paraspinal muscles showed nonspecific myopathic features without inflammation, and isolated neck extensor myopathy was diagnosed. The patient's condition did not respond to the administration of corticosteroids. During follow up as an outpatient, the patient's head drop continued to gradually progress. At 1 year after onset, she developed bilateral weakness of the upper and lower extremities, clumsiness of the hands, and gait disturbance. A radiograph of the cervical spine obtained in a standing position showed a pronounced kyphotic deformity and instability at the level of C4-5. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated spinal cord compression at C-3 and C-4. The patient underwent a C3-4 laminectomy and occipitocervicothoracic fixation. Gait and hand coordination gradually improved, and she was able to walk with no support 1 month postoperatively. Surgical fixation was beneficial in this patient with dropped head syndrome, myelopathy, and cervical instability.

  3. Cervical Laminoplasty for Multilevel Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sayana, Murali Krishna; Jamil, Hassan; Poynton, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy can result from degenerative cervical spondylosis, herniated disk material, osteophytes, redundant ligamentum flavum, or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. Surgical intervention for multi-level myelopathy aims to decompress the spinal cord and maintain stability of the cervical spine. Laminoplasty was major surgical advancement as laminectomy resulted in kyphosis and unsatisfactory outcomes. Hirabayashi popularised the expansive open door laminoplasty which was later modified several surgeons. Laminoplasty has changed the way surgeons approach multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. PMID:21991408

  4. Mechanical and cellular processes driving cervical myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Roisin T; Butler, Joseph S; O’Byrne, John M; Poynton, Ashley R

    2016-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy is a well-described clinical syndrome that may evolve from a combination of etiological mechanisms. It is traditionally classified by cervical spinal cord and/or nerve root compression which varies in severity and number of levels involved. The vast array of clinical manifestations of cervical myelopathy cannot fully be explained by the simple concept that a narrowed spinal canal causes compression of the cord, local tissue ischemia, injury and neurological impairment. Despite advances in surgical technology and treatment innovations, there are limited neuro-protective treatments for cervical myelopathy, which reflects an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological processes involved in this disease. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the key pathophysiological processes at play in the development of cervical myelopathy. PMID:26807352

  5. Cervical myelopathy caused by atlas osteochondroma and pseudoarthrosis between the osteochondroma and lamina of the axis: case report.

    PubMed

    Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Hongo, Michio; Kasukawa, Yuji; Shimada, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    A 58-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of progressive cervical myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of the cervical spine revealed a bone tumor arising from the posterior arch of the atlas and osteophytes at a pseudoarthrosis between the tumor and the lamina of the axis, resulting in marked spinal cord compression. The patient's symptoms resolved after en bloc resection of the tumor and removal of the osteophytes. The histological diagnosis was osteochondroma. The primary cause of myelopathy in the present case was osteochondroma arising from the posterior arch of the atlas, but the osteophyte formations appearing at the pseudoarthrosis between the atlas osteochondroma and the lamina of the axis might also have contributed to the symptoms, which appeared when the patient was in his late 50s.

  6. Cervical myelopathy caused by invagination of anomalous lamina of the axis.

    PubMed

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Yasui, Yukihiko; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Ohzono, Kenji; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2013-12-01

    The authors report a case of cervical myelopathy caused by invagination of the bilaterally separated lamina of the axis. They also present a literature review. The patient was a previously healthy 68-year-old man with a 1-year history of slowly progressive gait disturbance, right-hand clumsiness, and right dominant sensory disturbance in his trunk and extremities. Both MRI and CT showed that the spinal cord was markedly compressed at the C2-3 level, on the right side, by a deeply invaginated anomalous lamina of the axis. A bilaterally separated lamina was also visible. The patient underwent removal of the anomalous invaginated fragment of the separated lamina and the spinous process of the axis. One year after surgery, his myelopathic symptoms had almost completely resolved. Here, the authors present the case of a patient with an extremely rare anomaly of the lamina of the axis. The underlying pathogenesis of this anomaly could be the failure of the 2 chondrification centers on either side to fuse into a single ossification center. Surgical removal of the anomalous invaginated lamina produced a satisfactory outcome.

  7. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: What the Neurologist Should Know

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Vilaça, Celmir; Orsini, Marco; Leite, Marco A. Araujo; de Freitas, Marcos R.G.; Davidovich, Eduardo; Fiorelli, Rossano; Fiorelli, Stenio; Fiorelli, Camila; Oliveira, Acary Bulle; Pessoa, Bruno Lima

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is a well-known cause of disability among older people. A significant amount of these patients is asymptomatic. Once the symptoms start, the worsening may follow a progressive manner. We should suspect of spondylotic myelopathy in any individual over 55 years presenting progressive changes in gait or losing fine motor control of the upper limbs. Despite its frequent prevalence, this condition is still neglected and many times confused with other supratentorial lesions regarding diagnostic. Here we address some of most important aspects of this disease, calling attention to pathophysiology, the natural history, presentation, differential diagnosis, clinical assessment, and treatment. PMID:27994827

  8. Amyotrophic cervical myelopathy in adolescence.

    PubMed Central

    Toma, S; Shiozawa, Z

    1995-01-01

    The clinical and radiological features in seven patients who had asymmetric muscular atrophy of the hand and forearm when young are reported and a new hypothesis for its aetiology is proposed. Investigation of body growth curves (a surrogate for velocity of arm growth) showed close relation between (a) the age when the body height increased most rapidly and the onset age of this disorder, and (b) the age when the rapid body growth period ended and the age when symptom progression ceased. Cervical radiological evidence is provided showing asymmetric anterior cord atrophy, disappearance of slackness of dorsal roots in neck extension, and anterior and lateral displacement of the lower cervical cord against the posterior aspects of the vertebral bodies during neck flexion. These results suggest that disproportionate shortening of the dorsal roots is further accentuated during the juvenile growth spurt, which determines the onset and self limited course of the condition, and that repeated neck flexion causes micro-trauma and relative ischaemia of anterior horn cells, which finally results in atrophy of the muscles innervated by motoneurons with long axons. Predisposing anatomical factors are a straight neck due to lack of physiological cervical lordosis and the presence of foreshortened dorsal roots. Images PMID:7823068

  9. Cervical Stenosis, Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical spine refers to that portion of the spinal column that is within our neck. This portion of ... spinal nerves that travel through it. The cervical spinal column is made up of seven vertebrae and the ...

  10. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy: Part I: anatomical and pathomechanical considerations *

    PubMed Central

    Burns, SH; Mior, SA; O’Connor, SM

    1991-01-01

    This two part series reviews the recent literature concerning the etiology and clinical presentation of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). CSM is the most common neurological spinal cord disorder after middle age. It is caused by the compromise of the cervical spinal cord from narrowing of the spinal canal. In Part I, a review of the anatomy and the pathomechanics of the cervical spine pertinent to CSM is discussed. Emphasis is placed upon the intricate relationship between the osseous, neurological and vascular structures. The consequences of degenerative changes upon this relationship is evidenced by the resulting neurovascular compression. In turn, compression may lead to spinal cord ischemia with characteristic clinical results. ImagesFigure 3Figure 5

  11. Scapular winging as a symptom of cervical flexion myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Tashiro, Jun; Tsuji, Sachiko; Yabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2007-01-01

    A 23-year-old man complained of weakness of the right arm that he first noted six years prior to his visit. Neurological examination revealed atrophy and weakness of the triceps and serratus anterior muscle on the right side, which resulted in scapular winging on that side. MRI with neck flexion revealed compression of the cervical cord enabling a diagnosis of flexion myelopathy. Proximal muscle weakness and atrophy in flexion myelopathies including Hirayama disease are extremely rare. Here, we report a case of unilateral, proximal upper limb atrophy with scapular winging, attributed to middle cervical flexion myelopathy.

  12. Ayurvedic management in cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    The age related spondylotic changes may result in direct compressive and ischemic dysfunction of the spinal cord known as cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Symptoms often develop insidiously and are characterized by neck stiffness, unilateral or bilateral deep aching neck, arm and shoulder pain, and possibly stiffness or clumsiness while walking. The management available in current mainstream medicine is not satisfactory. Various Ayurvedic treatments have been in use for these manifestations. We present a case of CSM, which was treated with a combination of Panchakarma procedures and Ayurvedic oral drugs. The patient was considered suffering from Greevastambha (neck stiffness) and was treated with Shalishastika pinda svedana (sudation with medicated cooked bolus of rice) for one month and Mustadi yapana basti (enema with medicated milk) for 16 days along with oral Ayurvedic drugs such as Brihatavata chintamani rasa 50 mg, Ekangaveer ras-250 mg, Ardhangavatari rasa-125 mg Amrita satva (dry extract of Tinospora cordifolia Willd)-500 mg, Muktasukti pisti-500 mg, Ashwagandha churna (powder of Withania somnifera Dunal)-500 mg Dashmool kvatha ghana (solid extract of Dashmool kvatha)-500 mg, Trayodashanga guggulu-575 mg, twice a day with honey and Eranda paka-10 g twice a day with milk. Patient's condition which was assessed for symptoms of CSM and Chile's modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) score for cervical spondylotic myelopathy showed substantial improvement. This study shows that the cases of CSM may be successfully managed with Ayurvedic treatment.

  13. [A case of transverse myelopathy caused by acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Yamane, K; Ezima, M; Sugishita, Y; Nozaki, H

    1991-07-01

    A 54-year-old man received insertion of an acupuncture needle into the region extending from the posterior neck to the back on two occasions for the treatment of shoulder stiffness. Two weeks after the second acupuncture, he developed fever, dysarthria and mictionary disturbance, finally reaching the condition of tetraplegia. He was immediately admitted to an emergency room in our hospital, and was diagnosed as sepsis with DIC, ARDS, heart failure, renal failure, liver failure, and myelitis. After one month, he recovered with transverse myelopathy as a residual deficit. Neurological findings showed transverse myelopathy below the level of Th2 at that time. Cervical CT revealed an irregular low density at the periphery of the cervical vertebra from the C2 to C4 level. Cervical MRI revealed an irregular swelling of his spinal cord from the C2 to C7 level. We explained the mechanism of transverse myelopathy in this case as follows. After the acupuncture, he suffered a focal infection of the region of needle insertion, and then the infection expanded to the cervical vertebra, thus causing osteomyelitis, sepsis, and finally cervical myelitis. Direct injury of the spinal cord and nerve roots as a complication of acupuncture was previously reported, but indirect injury of the spinal cord due to myelitis had not been reported except our present case. Careful attentions should be paid to the complications of acupuncture.

  14. Anterior decompression and fusion versus posterior laminoplasty for multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuzhou; Wang, Hehui; Zhou, Zhilai; Jin, Anmin

    2014-02-01

    The optimal surgical strategy for anterior or posterior approaches remains controversial for multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy caused by multisegment cervical spondylotic myelopathy (MCSM) or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted evaluating the clinical results of anterior decompression and fusion (ADF) compared with posterior laminoplasty for patients with multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials and nonrandomized cohort studies conducted from 1990 to May 2013 comparing ADF with posterior laminoplasty for the treatment of multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy due to MCSM or OPLL. The following outcome measures were extracted: Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, recovery rate, complication rate, reoperation rate, blood loss, and operative time. Subgroup analysis was conducted according to the mean number of surgical segments. Eleven studies were included in the review, all of which were prospective or retrospective cohort studies with relatively low quality indicated by GRADE Working Group assessment. A definitive conclusion could not be reached regarding which surgical approach is more effective for the treatment of multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy. Although ADF was associated with better postoperative neural function than posterior laminoplasty in the treatment of multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy due to MCSM or OPLL, there was no apparent difference in the neural function recovery rate between the 2 approaches. Higher rates of surgery-related complication and reoperation should be taken into consideration when ADF is used for patients with multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy. The surgical trauma associated with corpectomy was significantly higher than that associated with posterior laminoplasty.

  15. Radiation myelopathy of cervical spinal cord simulating intramedullary neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Fogelholm, R.; Haltia, M.; Andersson, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    Radiation myelopathy is a well-known complication of irradiation therapy of neoplasms in the vicinity of the spinal cord. Most earlier authors have stressed the association of a normal myelogram and normal CSF protein level with this condition. One case of radiation myelopathy with a myelogram simulating intramedullary neoplasm and with extremely high CSF protein concentration is presented. Six months after myelography necropsy revealed severe atrophy of the previously thickened lower cervical spinal cord. The pathogenetic mechanisms are discussed. Images PMID:4443812

  16. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy: Part II: clinical and imaging considerations *

    PubMed Central

    Burns, SH; O’Connor, SM; Mior, SA

    1991-01-01

    In this, the second of a two part series, we continue to review the recent literature pertaining to cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Caused by the compromise of the spinal canal resulting from the superimposition of spondylotic changes upon a congenitally narrowed canal, CSM has a predictable radiographic and clinical presentation. The clinical presentation frequently includes both upper and lower motor neuron signs and symptoms. Careful analysis of the plain film images usually reveals a spinal canal measuring 12 mm or less. Additional imaging modalities confirm the diagnosis. This paper presents the clinical and imaging characteristics underlying CSM and stresses the importance of including CSM in the differential diagnosis of patients complaining of neck and leg dysfunctions. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4

  17. Dropped head syndrome associated with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Kei; Sakaguchi, Yasumichi; Nishimoto, Hirofumi; Kodama, Hirotaka; Ohara, Akira; Hosoe, Hideo; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2004-12-01

    We report a case of an 80-year-old woman with dropped head syndrome associated with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. She could not keep her cervical spine in a neutral position for >1 minute. She had a disturbed gait and severe kyphotic deformity in her thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed severe compression of the spinal cord due to cervical spondylotic change. Laminoplasty from C2 through C6 levels was performed. One year after operation, she could keep her cervical spine in a neutral position easily. Her gait was also improved. The symptoms did not recur during 4 years of follow-up. We surmise that to maintain daily activities, she had to extend her cervical spine owing to the thoracic kyphotic deformity, resulting in compression of the spinal cord. The compression led to weakening of the cervical extensor muscles. Cervical laminoplasty was effective.

  18. Clinical Case Report of Expansive Laminoplasty for Cervical Myelopathy Due to Both Disc Herniation and Developmental Cervical Spinal Canal Stenosis in Older Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Fengshan; Dang, Gengting; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reports on adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion are scarce. However, to our knowledge, no cases of expansive laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy associated with progressive neurological deficit after a series of conservative treatment, caused by both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, have been reported. From January 2006 to July 2012, we retrospectively studied 3 patients in late adolescence presenting with cervical myelopathy who underwent expansive unilateral open-door laminoplasty at our hospital. The outcomes after the surgery were evaluated according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Symptoms presented by these patients were due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. No major complications occurred after the surgical procedures. The median follow-up time was 66 months (range 36–112 months). The Japanese Orthopedic Association scores after surgery showed a significant increase. Long-term outcomes after surgery were satisfactory according to the evaluation criteria for the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. However, the ranges of motion of the cervical spine decreased, especially the ranges of motion on flexion after surgery showed a significant decrease. Expansive laminoplasty is helpful for older adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, presenting with progressive neurological deficit after long conservative treatment. PMID:26937923

  19. Current techniques in the management of cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Carter S; O'Toole, John E

    2014-04-01

    Posterior decompressive procedures are a fundamental component of the surgical treatment of symptomatic cervical degenerative disease. Posterior approaches have the appeal of avoiding complications associated with anterior approaches such as esophageal injury, recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis, dysphagia, and adjacent-level disease after fusion. Although open procedures are effective, the extensive subperiosteal stripping of the paraspinal musculature leads to increased blood loss, longer hospital stays, and more postoperative pain, and potentially contributes to instability. Minimally invasive access has been developed to limit approach-related morbidity. This article reviews current techniques in minimally invasive surgical management of cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy.

  20. Compressive myelopathy of the cervical spine in Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis).

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Dawn M; Douglass, Michael; Sutherland-Smith, Meg; Aguilar, Roberto; Schaftenaar, Willem; Shores, Andy

    2009-03-01

    Cervical subluxation and compressive myelopathy appears to be a cause of morbidity and mortality in captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis). Four cases of cervical subluxation resulting in nerve root compression or spinal cord compression were identified. Three were presumptively induced by trauma, and one had an unknown inciting cause. Two dragons exhibited signs of chronic instability. Cervical vertebrae affected included C1-C4. Clinical signs on presentation included ataxia, ambulatory paraparesis or tetraparesis to tetraplegia, depression to stupor, cervical scoliosis, and anorexia. Antemortem diagnosis of compression was only confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography. Treatment ranged from supportive care to attempted surgical decompression. All dragons died or were euthanatized, at 4 days to 12 mo postpresentation. Studies to define normal vertebral anatomy in the species are necessary to determine whether the pathology is linked to cervical malformation, resulting in ligament laxity, subsequent instability, and subluxation.

  1. Successful treatment of cervical myelopathy with minimal morbidity by circumferential decompression and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Mejia, Rene O.; Ben-Haim, Sharona; Ames, Christopher P.

    2007-01-01

    Circumferential cervical decompression and fusion (CCDF) is an important technique for treating patients with severe cervical myelopathy. While circumferential cervical decompression and fusion may provide improved spinal cord decompression and stability compared to unilateral techniques, it is commonly associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients undergoing CCDF at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) between January 2003 and December 2004. We identified 53 patients and reviewed their medical records to determine the effectiveness of CCDF for improving myelopathy, pain, and neurological function. Degree of fusion, functional anatomic alignment, and stability were also assessed. Operative morbidity and mortality were measured. The most common causes of cervical myelopathy, instability, or deformity were degenerative disease (57%) and traumatic injury (34%). Approximately one-fifth of patients had a prior fusion performed elsewhere and presented with fusion failure or adjacent-level degeneration. Postoperatively, all patients had stable (22.6%) or improved (77.4%) Nurick grades. The average preoperative and postoperative Nurick grades were 2.1 ± 1.9 and 0.4 ± 0.9, respectively. Pain improved in 85% of patients. All patients had radiographic evidence of fusion at last follow-up. The most common complication was transient dysphagia. Our average clinical follow-up was 27.5 ± 9.5 months. We present an extensive series of patients and demonstrate that cervical myelopathy can successfully be treated with CCDF with minimal operative morbidity. CCDF may provide more extensive decompression of the spinal cord and may be more structurally stable. Concerns regarding operation-associated morbidity should not strongly influence whether CCDF is performed. PMID:17216528

  2. Cervical spondylotic radiculo-myelopathy in patients with athetoid-dystonic cerebral palsy: clinical evaluation and surgical treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, G; Kadoya, S

    1984-01-01

    The acute onset of symptoms of severe cervical radiculo-myelopathy in four patients with athetoid-dystonic cerebral palsy is reported. Neurological and radiological examination showed that the spondylotic changes of the cervical spine were responsible for new neurological deficits leading to the patients being bedridden. Dystonic-athetoid neck movements may cause excessive axial neck rotation as well as flexion and extension movements of the spine. These repetitive exaggerated movements may result in early degenerative changes of the vertebrae which may enhance the radiculo-myelopathy. The four patients were treated with an anterior discectomy with interbody fusion. They were bedridden pre-operatively but all have since been able to walk with or without a cane. It is concluded that early anterior decompression with interbody fusion is a treatment of choice for cervical spondylotic radiculo-myelopathy in association with athetoid cerebral palsy. Images PMID:6470718

  3. Heterotopic ossification associated with myelopathy following cervical disc prosthesis implantation.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Markus; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

    2016-04-01

    This case report presents a 37-year-old man with clinical signs of myelopathy almost 9 years after implantation of a Bryan disc prosthesis (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) for C5/C6 soft disc herniation. As demonstrated on MRI and CT scan, spinal cord compression was caused by bony spurs due to heterotopic ossification posterior to the still moving prosthesis. The device, as well as the ectopic bone deposits, had to be removed because of myelopathy and its imminent aggravation. Conversion to anterior spondylodesis was performed.

  4. Acute Tetraplegia after Posterior Cervical Laminectomy for Chronic Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Justin A; Jakoi, Andre M; Wetzel, Franklin T

    2015-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) during revision surgery for persistent multilevel cervical myelopathy (MCM) after an initial anterior procedure is rare. However, the pathophysiology of MCM, even prior to surgery, is a risk-factor for neurological deterioration due to the development of a "sick cord", which reflects pathological changes in the spinal cord that lower the threshold for injury. We report a case of persistent MCM despite a three-level ACDF and corpectomy who developed an incomplete C6 tetraplegia during revision cervical laminectomy and posterior instrumentation. Intraoperative neuromonitoring signal-changes occurred in the absence of mechanical trauma. Postoperative MRI of the cervical spine demonstrated increased T2 hyperintensity and cord expansion at C3 and C4 compared to the pre-laminectomy MRI. The patient has not made improvements in her neurological status at 13 months postoperatively. The pathophysiology of MCM is discussed in addition to perioperative imaging, neuromonitoring, and use of steroids.

  5. Addressing Stretch Myelopathy in Multilevel Cervical Kyphosis with Posterior Surgery Using Cervical Pedicle Screws

    PubMed Central

    Mahesh, Bijjawara; Vijay, Shekarappa; Arun, Kumar; Srinivasa, Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Technique description and retrospective data analysis. Purpose To describe the technique of cervical kyphosis correction with partial facetectomies and evaluate the outcome of single-stage posterior decompression and kyphosis correction in multilevel cervical myelopathy. Overview of Literature Kyphosis correction in multilevel cervical myelopathy involves anterior and posterior surgery. With the advent of cervical pedicle screw-rod instrumentation, single-stage posterior kyphosis correction is feasible and can address stretch myelopathy by posterior shortening. Methods Nine patients underwent single-stage posterior decompression and kyphosis correction for multilevel cervical myelopathy using cervical pedicle screw instrumentation from March 2011 to February 2014 and were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively with modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scoring and computed tomography scans for radiological measurements. Kyphosis assessment was made with Ishihara curvature index and C2–C7 Cobb's angle. The linear length of the spinal canal and the actual spinal canal length were also evaluated. The average follow-up was 40.56 months (range, 20 to 53 months). Results The average preoperative C2–7 Cobb's angle of 6.3° (1° to 12°) improved to 2° (10° to −9°). Ishihara index improved from −15.8% (−30.5% to −4.7%) to −3.66% (−14.5% to +12.6%). The actual spinal canal length decreased from 83.64 mm (range, 76.8 to 91.82 mm) to 82.68 mm (range, 75.85 to 90.78 mm). The preoperative mJOA score of 7.8 (range, 3 to 11) improved to 15.0 (range, 13 to 17). Conclusions Single-stage posterior decompression and kyphosis correction using cervical pedicle screws for multilevel cervical myelopathy may address stretch myelopathy, in addition to decompression in the transverse plane. However, cervical lordosis was not achieved with this method as predictably as by the anterior approach. The present study shows evidence of mild

  6. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Secondary to Dropped Head Syndrome: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Rahimizadeh, Abolfazl; Soufiani, Housain F; Rahimizadeh, Saghayegh

    2016-01-01

    The dropped head syndrome (DHS) is a disabling condition caused by severe weakness of the neck extensor muscles causing progressive reducible kyphosis of the cervical spine and the inability to hold the head up. Weakness can occur in isolation or in association with a generalized neuromuscular disorder. Isolated cases are owed to the late onset of noninflammatory myopathy designated as INEM, where persistent chin to chest deformity may gradually cause or aggravate preexisting degenerative changes of the cervical spine and ultimately result in myelopathy. In review of the literature, we could find only 5 cases, with no unique guidelines to address the management of these two concomitant pathologies. Herein, a 69-year-old man who had developed cervical myelopathy 2 years after being affected by isolated dropped head syndrome is presented. Chin to chest deformity and cervical myelopathy were managed through three-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) combined with decompressive cervical laminectomy and stabilization with C2 to C7 pedicle screw-rod construct. At 4-month follow-up, despite recovery in patient's neurological status, flexion deformity reappeared with recurrence of dropped head due to C7 pedicle screws pull-out. However, this was successfully managed with extension of the construct to the upper thoracic levels.

  7. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Secondary to Dropped Head Syndrome: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Soufiani, Housain F.; Rahimizadeh, Saghayegh

    2016-01-01

    The dropped head syndrome (DHS) is a disabling condition caused by severe weakness of the neck extensor muscles causing progressive reducible kyphosis of the cervical spine and the inability to hold the head up. Weakness can occur in isolation or in association with a generalized neuromuscular disorder. Isolated cases are owed to the late onset of noninflammatory myopathy designated as INEM, where persistent chin to chest deformity may gradually cause or aggravate preexisting degenerative changes of the cervical spine and ultimately result in myelopathy. In review of the literature, we could find only 5 cases, with no unique guidelines to address the management of these two concomitant pathologies. Herein, a 69-year-old man who had developed cervical myelopathy 2 years after being affected by isolated dropped head syndrome is presented. Chin to chest deformity and cervical myelopathy were managed through three-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) combined with decompressive cervical laminectomy and stabilization with C2 to C7 pedicle screw-rod construct. At 4-month follow-up, despite recovery in patient's neurological status, flexion deformity reappeared with recurrence of dropped head due to C7 pedicle screws pull-out. However, this was successfully managed with extension of the construct to the upper thoracic levels. PMID:27034870

  8. [The "pseudo-polyneuropathy" type sensory disturbances in cervical spondylotic myelopathy].

    PubMed

    Yoshiyama, Y; Tokumaru, Y; Hattori, T; Hirayama, K

    1995-02-01

    We reported the pseudo-polyneuropathy type sensory disturbances in cervical spondylotic myelopathy. We defined this clinical type by objective superficial sensory deficits of all four distal limbs, and excluded the patients having only subjective sensory disturbances. Ten out of 61 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy had sensory disturbances of this type. Two patients noticed difference of the subjective sensations of the upper and lower limbs. Eight patients developed sensory symptoms initially in the upper limbs. Pin-prick sensation was diminished in the upper limbs more predominantly than in the lower limbs. Vibration sense was affected in the lower limbs predominantly. Motor functions were mildly impaired, and muscle stretch reflex of triceps brachii was preserved in all ten patients. Distribution of sensory disturbances of four patients changed in their course. Nerve conduction studies and F-wave latencies were normal. Electromyography showed mild chronic denervation of the C5-C7 innervated muscles. Somatosensory evoked potentials after median or ulnar nerve stimulation showed delayed latencies or attenuated waveforms of N13 as well as P14 peaks. Spinal cord was compressed mainly at C4/5 and C5/6 intervertebral level, shown by myelography, CT-myelography or magnetic resonance imagings. We conclude that the pseudo-polyneuropathy type sensory disturbance of cervical spondylotic myelopathy indicates the lesion at mid-to-low cervical vertebral level. The anatomical substrates for this type of sensory impairment could be caused by combination of the dorsal horn/anterior comissure lesions for the upper limbs, and the anterolateral funiculi lesions for the lower limbs.

  9. Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula Presenting as Cervical Myelopathy: A Rapid Recovery with Balloon Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, Manish; Bapuraj, J. Rajiv; Lal, Anupam; Prabhakar, S.; Khandelwal, N.

    2010-12-15

    A 24-year-old male presented with progressive cervical myelopathy of 2 months' duration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine and angiography revealed a large arteriovenous fistula arising from the left vertebral artery. The present case highlights the clinical features and dramatic recovery following endovascular balloon occlusion of a giant cervical arteriovenous fistula.

  10. Aggressive vertebral hemangioma as a rare cause of myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Sari, Hidayet; Uludag, Murat; Akarirmak, Ulku; Ornek, Nurettin Irem; Gun, Kerem; Gulsen, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral hemangiomas (VHs) are common lesions in the adult population. They are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally on radiological imaging. New-onset back pain followed by subacute progression of thoracal myelopathy is the most common presentation in patients with neurological deficit. Differential diagnoses would include metastasis, multiple myeloma, lymphoma, Paget disease, osseous tumors such as Ewing sarcoma or hemangioblastoma and blood dyscrasia. We present a 41 year-old-male patient with thoracal VH causing myelopathy that completely improved after rehabilitation program with embolization and vertebroplasty procedures.

  11. Cortical reorganization in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Holly, Langston T.; Dong, Yun; Albistegui-DuBois, Richard; Marehbian, Jonathan; Dobkin, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Object Recent investigations have demonstrated that the cerebral cortex can reorganize as a result of spinal cord injury and may play a role in preserving neurological function. Reorganization of cortical representational maps in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) has not been previously described. The authors sought to determine the feasibility of using functional magnetic resonance (fMR) imaging in patients with CSM to investigate changes in the cortical representation of the wrist and ankle before and after surgical intervention. Methods Four patients with clinical and imaging evidence of CSM were prospectively enrolled in this study. The patients underwent preoperative neurological examination, functional assessment, cervical imaging, and brain fMR imaging. The fMR imaging activation task undertaken was either wrist extension or ankle dorsiflexion, depending on whether the patient's primary impairment was hand dysfunction or gait difficulty. The cohort then underwent further evaluations at 6 weeks and 3 and 6 months postoperatively. In addition, five healthy volunteers underwent fMR imaging at two different time points and served as controls. In the healthy volunteers fMR imaging demonstrated areas of focal cortical activation limited to the contralateral primary motor area for the assigned motor tasks; the activation patterns were stable throughout repeated imaging. In comparison, in patients with CSM fMR imaging demonstrated expansion of the cortical representation of the affected extremity. Surgical decompression resulted in improvements in neurological function and reorganization of the representational map. Conclusions The findings of this preliminary study demonstrate the potential of fMR imaging to assess changes in cortical representation before and after surgical intervention in patients with CSM. A future study involving a larger cohort of patients as well as the stratification of patients with CSM, based on the aforementioned factors

  12. Treatment of cervical myelopathy in patients with the fibromyalgia syndrome: outcomes and implications.

    PubMed

    Heffez, Dan S; Ross, Ruth E; Shade-Zeldow, Yvonne; Kostas, Konstantinos; Morrissey, Mary; Elias, Dean A; Shepard, Alan

    2007-09-01

    Some patients with fibromyalgia also exhibit the neurological signs of cervical myelopathy. We sought to determine if treatment of cervical myelopathy in patients with fibromyalgia improves the symptoms of fibromyalgia and the patients' quality of life. A non-randomized, prospective, case control study comparing the outcome of surgical (n = 40) versus non-surgical (n = 31) treatment of cervical myelopathy in patients with fibromyalgia was conducted. Outcomes were compared using SF-36, screening test for somatization, HADS, MMPI-2 scale 1 (Hypochondriasis), and self reported severity of symptoms 1 year after treatment. There was no significant difference in initial clinical presentation or demographic characteristics between the patients treated by surgical decompression and those treated by non-surgical means. There was a striking and statistically significant improvement in all symptoms attributed to the fibromyalgia syndrome in the surgical patients but not in the non-surgical patients at 1 year following the treatment of cervical myelopathy (P cervical myelopathy due to spinal cord or caudal brainstem compression in patients carrying the diagnosis of fibromyalgia can result in a significant improvement in a wide array of symptoms usually attributed to fibromyalgia with attendant measurable improvements in the quality of life. We recommend detailed neurological and neuroradiological evaluation of

  13. Omovertebral bone associated with Sprengel deformity and Klippel-Feil syndrome leading to cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Füllbier, Lars; Tanner, Philipp; Henkes, Hans; Hopf, Nikolai J

    2010-08-01

    The unusual association of an omovertebral bone with Sprengel deformity and Klippel-Feil syndrome is a complex bone anomaly of unknown incidence and etiology. However, several cases of this rare disease pattern have been reported in the literature. In this paper, the authors present the case of a 34-year-old woman with a 5-month history of progressive gait ataxia and intermittent urinary incontinence, which was found to be caused by aberrant bone growth into the spinal canal from an omovertebral bone that extended from the left scapula pressing into the C-6 vertebral arch and subsequently causing cervical myelopathy. The patient underwent isolated resection of the omovertebral bone and decompression of the spinal canal, and her functional and neurological outcome was favorable.

  14. Metrizamide CT myelography in cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy: correlation with conventional myelography and surgical findings

    SciTech Connect

    Badami, J.P.; Norman, D.; Barbaro, N.M.; Cann, C.E.; Weinstein, P.R.; Sobel, D.F.

    1985-04-01

    Conventional myelography, metrizamide computed tomographic (CT) myelography, and surgical findings were correlated in 30 patients with cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In 60% of patients, metrizamide CT myelography provided significant additional information including better characterization of the abnormality, lateralization if the conventional myelogram was indeterminate, more definitive demonstration of cord atrophy, foraminal narrowing not appreciated on myelography, and demonstration of abnormalities distal to a myelographic block. In no case was a myelographic abnormality not detected on metrizamide CT meyelography. In patients with cervical myelopathy, a cross-sectional diameter of the cord equaling less than 50% of the subarachnoid space is predictive of poor patient response to surgical intervention.

  15. Surgical Treatment of Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Associated Hypertension—A Retrospective Study of 309 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wen-yu; Wang, Xia; Chen, Bin; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Nie, Lin; Cheng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease, and various risk factors are known to be involved in it. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the most common non-traumatic cause of myelopathy, which displays neurological symptoms and may induce systemic symptoms. To date, it is still unknown whether CSM is associated with hypertension, and if so, whether the decompression operations can attenuate CSM associated hypertension. Here, a total of 309 patients with CSM who received anterior or posterior decompression surgery were enrolled as subjects. Blood pressure measurements were performed before and within one week after the surgery. Among the 309 subjects, 144 (46.6%) of them exhibited hypertension before surgery, a significantly higher ratio than that of the whole population. One week after surgery, blood pressure of 106 (73.6%) patients turned back to normal. Blood pressure of another 37(25.7%) patients decreased with different degrees, although still higher than normal. Moreover, it appears that both approaches were effective in improving blood pressure, while the posterior approach was more effective in decreasing systolic blood pressure. We speculate this type of hypertension might result from hyperactivity of sympathetic nervous system as the heart rate of these patients decreased after surgery as well. Collectively, compression of spinal cord in CSM patients might be associated with hypertension, and decompression surgery largely attenuated this type of hypertension. These findings prove CSM to be a potential associated factor of high blood pressure and may shed light on therapies of hypertension in clinics. PMID:26193469

  16. Hybrid Decompression and Fixation Technique for the Treatment of Multisegmental Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Araos-Silva, Walter; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro; Rosales-Olivarez, Luis Miguel; Alpizar-Aguirre, Armando; Melendez, Francisco Lopez

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical spondilotic myelopathy (CSM) is defined as the compromise of the spinal cord due to degenerative changes of the cervical spine. It is the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction in patients over 55 years. An early surgical management it is paramount to achieve better neurological outcome. There is still controversy regarding the appropriate surgical treatment for multisegmental CSM involving three or more levels. The hybrid decompression and fixation technique combines one or two level corpectomy and a single level discectomy in order to obtain optimum decompression and fixation in patients with multilevel cervical myelopathy Methods A prospective case-control study was made between 2011 and 2013. A total of 15 patients with diagnosis of CSM received surgical treatment with an anterior hybrid decompression and fixation technique procedure. Inclusion criteria were myelopathy confirmed by radiographic studies, magnetic resonance image (MRI) and electromyography. Results During the 2010-2013 period 15 patients were managed by hybrid decompression and fixation technique. Average age 64.8 years SD9.4. The follow up period was 29.6 SD ± 9.8 months. The JOA score improved significantly to 13.8 +/- 1.9 points at follow-up (paired t test, P = 0.001), Nurick Scale preoperative was 3.3 and improved to 2.4 mean, was significantly (Wilcoxon signed rank test p=0.006) The mean C2-C7 lordosis angle was 10.8° +/- 8.9 before surgery, and 14.3° +/- 8.8 at follow-up, there was no significant loss of lordosis angle between the preoperative and follow-up measurements (Wilcoxon signed rank test, P =0.149); At follow-up, graft non fusion was seen in 1 patient (7%, k=1); Conclusions In this small number, single surgeon, prospective series the use of a single level corpectomy and an adjacent discectomy was shown to provide similar outcomes and complication rates as alternative surgical techniques. The authors thus consider this a viable surgical alternative with

  17. Laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Liu, Zhong-jun; Wang, Shao-bo; Pan, Sheng-fa; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Feng-shan; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although several studies report various treatment solutions for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy, long-term follow-up studies are very rare. None of the reported treatment solutions represent a gold standard for this disease owing to the small number of cases and lack of long-term follow-up. This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation to treat cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy from a single center. This retrospective study included 15 patients (9 male patients and 6 female patients) with athetoid cerebral palsy who underwent laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation for cervical spondylotic myelopathy at our hospital between March 2006 and June 2010. Demographic variables, radiographic parameters, and pre- and postoperative clinical outcomes determined by the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were assessed. The mean follow-up time was 80.5 months. Developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis (P = 0.02) and cervical lordosis (P = 0.04) were significantly correlated with lower preoperative modified JOA scores. The mean modified JOA scores increased from 7.97 preoperatively to 12.1 postoperatively (P < 0.01). The mean VAS score decreased from 5.30 to 3.13 (P < 0.01), and the mean NDI score decreased from 31.73 to 19.93 (P < 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis and recovery rate of the modified JOA score (P = 0.01). Developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis is significantly related to neurological function in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy. Laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation is an effective treatment for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. PMID:27684879

  18. Arachnoiditis Ossificans - A Rare Cause of Progressive Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Steel, Christopher J; Abrames, Erik L; O'Brien, William T

    2015-01-01

    Arachnoiditis ossificans is a rare cause of chronic, progressive myelopathy. In contrast to the more common benign causes of meningeal calcification, arachnoiditis ossificans results in replacement of portions of the spinal arachnoid by bone as an end-stage complication of adhesive arachnoiditis. It is usually the sequela of prior trauma or interventional procedures. Prognosis and treatment options depend upon the location and degree of spinal stenosis with thoracic involvement being more common and more severe than lumbar spine involvement. The imaging findings on magnetic resonance imaging may be confusing; however, the findings of intraspinal ossification on computed tomography are characteristics and diagnostic. We present a classic case of arachnoiditis ossificans in an elderly man who presented with progressive myelopathy and a recent fall, along with a review of the literature. The imaging in this case not only identified the characteristic findings of arachnoiditis ossificans but also identified secondary findings of the underlying causative etiology.

  19. Arachnoiditis Ossificans – A Rare Cause of Progressive Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Christopher J; Abrames, Erik L; O’Brien, William T

    2015-01-01

    Arachnoiditis ossificans is a rare cause of chronic, progressive myelopathy. In contrast to the more common benign causes of meningeal calcification, arachnoiditis ossificans results in replacement of portions of the spinal arachnoid by bone as an end-stage complication of adhesive arachnoiditis. It is usually the sequela of prior trauma or interventional procedures. Prognosis and treatment options depend upon the location and degree of spinal stenosis with thoracic involvement being more common and more severe than lumbar spine involvement. The imaging findings on magnetic resonance imaging may be confusing; however, the findings of intraspinal ossification on computed tomography are characteristics and diagnostic. We present a classic case of arachnoiditis ossificans in an elderly man who presented with progressive myelopathy and a recent fall, along with a review of the literature. The imaging in this case not only identified the characteristic findings of arachnoiditis ossificans but also identified secondary findings of the underlying causative etiology. PMID:26401174

  20. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy due to the Ochronotic Arthropathy of the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Yuan, Qiang; He, Da

    2016-01-01

    Ochronosis is a musculoskeletal manifestation of alkaptonuria, a rare hereditary metabolic disorder occurs due to the absence of homogentisic acid oxidase and leading to various systemic abnormalities related to deposition of homogentisic acid pigmentation (ochronotic pigmentation). The present case reports the clinical features, radiographic findings, treatments and results of a cervical spondylotic myelopathy woman patient due to the ochronotic arthropathy of the cervical spine. The patient aged 62 years was presented with gait disturbance and hand clumsiness. Physical examination, X-rays, computed tomography and lab results of the urine sample confirmed the presence of ochronosis with the involvement of the cervical spine. The patient underwent a modified cervical laminoplasty due to multi-segment spinal cord compression. The postoperative follow-up showed a good functional outcome with patient satisfaction. The present study concludes the conditions and important diagnostic and surgical aspects of a patient. It is necessary to identify the condition clinically and if cord compression is observed, appropriate surgical interventions needs to be instituted. PMID:26885289

  1. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion in multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Hui; Liu, Sen; An, Huang-Da; Liu, Huan; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Both anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) are used to treat multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy (mCSM); however, which one is better treatment for mCSM remains considerable controversy. A meta-analysis was performed to compare clinical outcomes, radiographic outcomes, and surgical outcomes between ACDF and ACCF in treatment for mCSM. Methods: An extensive search of literature was performed in Pubmed/MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane library, CNKI, and WANFANG databases on ACDF versus ACCF treatment for mCSM from January 2011 to August 2016. The following variables were extracted: length of hospital stay, blood loss, operation time, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores, Neck Disability Index (NDI) score, fusion rate, Cobb angles of C2 to C7, dysphagia, hoarseness, C5 palsy, infection, cerebral fluid leakage, donor site pain, epidural hematoma, graft subsidence, graft dislodgment, pseudoarthrosis, and total complications. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.3 and STATA 12.0. Results: A total of 8 studies containing 878 patients were included in our study. The results showed that ACDF is better than ACCF in the angle of C2 to C7 at the final follow-up (P < 0.00001, standardized mean difference = 4.76 [3.48, 6.03]; heterogeneity: P = 0.17, I2 = 43%), C5 plasy (P = 0.02, odds ratio [OR] 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21, 0.86; heterogeneity: P = 0.52, I2 = 0%), blood loss (P < 0.00001, standardized mean difference = −53.12, 95% CI −64.61, −41.64; heterogeneity: P = 0.29, I2 = 20%), fusion rate (P = 0.04, OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.05, 6.11; heterogeneity: P = 0.29, I2 = 20%), graft subsidence (P = 0.004, OR 0.11, 95% CI 0.02, 0.48; heterogeneity: P = 0.94, I2 = 0%), and total complications (P = 0.0009, OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.40, 0.79; heterogeneity: P = 0.29, I2 = 18%).However, there are no significant differences in length of hospital stay, operation time, JOA

  2. Cervical disc arthroplasty for the treatment of spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Khong, Peter; Bogduk, Nikolai; Ghahreman, Ali; Davies, Mark

    2013-10-01

    The concept of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) for the anterior treatment of cervical pathology has existed for approximately half a decade. In this time, multiple devices have been developed for this purpose, with the ultimate aim to provide an alternative to fusion. Fifty-five patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy underwent CDA over a 5 year period. Data was collected on 46 patients, which included Visual Analogue Scale scores for neck pain and arm pain, Neck Disability Index scores, Short Form-36 v2 (SF-36) and Nurick grades for myelopathy patients. Preoperative data and data obtained at the latest clinical follow-up (median 48 months, range, 10-76 months) were analysed to assess the intermediate term efficacy of the procedure. In patients with radiculopathy, arm pain improved by 88% (p<0.001). In those presenting with myelopathy, the Nurick grades improved from a median of 1 to 0 (p<0.001). In both groups of patients, improvements in pain and neurologic deficit were accompanied by significant improvements in multiple domains of the SF-36. Using a composite system which considered neck pain, arm pain, function and myelopathy, we arrived at an overall success rate of 73%. We concluded that CDA is an effective intervention for improving neurologic deficit, arm pain and local neck symptoms that translated into improvements in physical and social functioning in the intermediate term.

  3. Gait analysis of spastic walking in patients with cervical compressive myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Maezawa, Y; Uchida, K; Baba, H

    2001-01-01

    To assess neurological status and to evaluate the effect of surgical decompression in patients with cervical myelopathy, we performed computerized gait analysis in 24 patients with cervical compressive myelopathy who showed spastic walking. Gait analysis was repeated during neurological follow-up that averaged 32.4 months. The gait pattern in patients with severe myelopathy was characterized by hyperextension of the knee in the stance phase without plantar flexion of the ankle in the swing phase, significantly reduced walking speed and step length, prolonged stance phase duration and decreased single-stance phase duration, and increased step width. The angle of flexion of the knee joint in the stance phase was significantly correlated with the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score. Postoperative neurological improvement was associated with increased walking speed and decreased extension angle of the knee joint (single-stance phase and swing phase). Postoperatively, 12 patients had normalized extension of the knee in stance phase and their walking speed, cadence, stance phase duration, and single-stance phase duration, as well as step length and width, showed nonsignificant differences from these parameters in healthy controls. Our results show that kinesiological gait analysis is clinically useful for the functional assessment of the severity of spastic walking in cervical myelopathy.

  4. Comparison of cervical disc arthroplasty with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chen; Hong, Ying; Liu, Hao; Shi, Rui; Song, Yueming; Li, Tao

    2013-06-01

    The clinical outcome of cervical disc arthroplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is still controversial. The authors retrospectively compared the intermediate term clinical outcome of cervical disc arthroplasty and traditional anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Seventy-six cases of single-level CSM with a minimum follow-up of two years were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty-seven patients underwent single-level cervical disc arthroplasty (Bryan disc: 12 cases; Prestige LP disc: 25 cases), while the other 39 patients underwent single-level ACDF. Significant improvement in SF-36 physical/ mental component scores and NDI score was found in both groups (p < 0.05); however, the arthroplasty group had significantly greater score improvement at each follow-up time point (p < 0.05). The JOA score and Nurick grade improved significantly at each time point in both groups (p < 0.05), but there were no significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05). The range of motion (surgical level and C2C7) remained unchanged in the arthroplasty group (p > 0.05), whereas it decreased significantly in the ACDF group (p < 0.05). The arthroplasty group had a lower incidence of complications than the ACDF group. The intermediate outcomes of cervical disc arthroplasty compared favourably to those of ACDF. Arthroplasty avoids complications from spinal fusion by preserving mobility.

  5. Hemifacial hyperhidrosis associated with ipsilateral/contralateral cervical disc herniation myelopathy. Functional considerations on how compression pattern determines the laterality.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Satoshi; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Sweating is an important mechanism for ensuring constant thermoregulation, but hyperhidrosis may be disturbing. We present five cases of hemifacial hyperhidrosis as a compensatory response to an/hypohidrosis caused by cervical disc herniation. All the patients complained of hemifacial hyperhidrosis, without anisocoria or blepharoptosis. Sweat function testing and thermography confirmed hyperhidrosis of hemifacial and adjacent areas. Neck MRI showed cervical disc herniation. Three of the patients had lateral compression with welldemarcated hypohidrosis below the hyperhidrosis on the same side as the cervical lesion. The rest had paramedian compression with poorly demarcated hyperhidrosis and hypohidrosis on the contralateral side. Although MRI showed no intraspinal pathological signal intensity, lateral dural compression might influence the circulation to the sudomotor pathway, and paramedian compression might influence the ipsilateral sulcal artery, which perfuses the sympathetic descending pathway and the intermediolateral nucleus. Sweat function testing and thermography should be performed to determine the focus of the hemifacial hyperhidrosis, and the myelopathy should be investigated on both sides.

  6. Treatment of cervical myelopathy in patients with the fibromyalgia syndrome: outcomes and implications

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Ruth E.; Shade-Zeldow, Yvonne; Kostas, Konstantinos; Morrissey, Mary; Elias, Dean A.; Shepard, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Some patients with fibromyalgia also exhibit the neurological signs of cervical myelopathy. We sought to determine if treatment of cervical myelopathy in patients with fibromyalgia improves the symptoms of fibromyalgia and the patients’ quality of life. A non-randomized, prospective, case control study comparing the outcome of surgical (n = 40) versus non-surgical (n = 31) treatment of cervical myelopathy in patients with fibromyalgia was conducted. Outcomes were compared using SF-36, screening test for somatization, HADS, MMPI-2 scale 1 (Hypochondriasis), and self reported severity of symptoms 1 year after treatment. There was no significant difference in initial clinical presentation or demographic characteristics between the patients treated by surgical decompression and those treated by non-surgical means. There was a striking and statistically significant improvement in all symptoms attributed to the fibromyalgia syndrome in the surgical patients but not in the non-surgical patients at 1 year following the treatment of cervical myelopathy (P ≤ 0.018–0.001, Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test). At the 1 year follow-up, there was a statistically significant improvement in both physical and mental quality of life as measured by the SF-36 score for the surgical group as compared to the non-surgical group (Repeated Measures ANOVA P < 0.01). There was a statistically significant improvement in the scores from Scale 1 of the MMPI-2 and the screening test for somatization disorder, and the anxiety and depression scores exclusively in the surgical patients (Wilcoxon signed rank, P < 0.001). The surgical treatment of cervical myelopathy due to spinal cord or caudal brainstem compression in patients carrying the diagnosis of fibromyalgia can result in a significant improvement in a wide array of symptoms usually attributed to fibromyalgia with attendant measurable improvements in the quality of life. We recommend detailed neurological and

  7. Compression Angle of Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament and Its Clinical Significance in Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam; Yoon, Do Heum; Kim, Keung Nyun; Shin, Hyun Chul; Shin, Dong Ah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The correction of clinical and radiologic abnormalities in patients with symptomatic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is the current mainstay of treatment. This study aimed to identify radiographic predictors of severity of myelopathy in patients with symptomatic OPLL. Methods Fifty patients with symptomatic cervical OPLL were enrolled. Based on Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores, patients were divided into either the mild myelopathy (n=31) or severe myelopathy (n=19) group. All subjects underwent preoperative plain cervical roentgenogram, computed tomography (CT), and MR imaging (MRI). Radiological parameters (C2–7 sagittal vertical axis, SVA; C2–7 Cobb angle; C2–7 range of motion, ROM; OPLL occupying ratio; and compression angle) were compared. Compression angle of OPLL was defined as the angle between the cranial and caudal surfaces of OPLL at the maximum level of cord compression Results The occupying ratio of the spinal canal, C2–7 Cobb angle, C2–7 SVA, types of OPLL, and C2–7 ROM of the cervical spine were not statistically different between the two groups. However, the OPLL compression angle was significantly greater (p=0.003) in the severe myelopathy group than in the mild myelopathy group and was inversely correlated with JOA score (r=-0.533, p<0.01). Furthermore, multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that the compression angle (B=-0.069, p<0.001) was significantly associated with JOA scores (R=0.647, p<0.005). Conclusion Higher compression angles of OPLL have deleterious effects on the spinal cord and decrease preoperative JOA scores. PMID:27651865

  8. State of the Art in Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: An Update on Current Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jefferson R; Tetreault, Lindsay A; Kim, Jun; Shamji, Mohammed F; Harrop, James S; Mroz, Thomas; Cho, Samuel; Fehlings, Michael G

    2017-03-01

    Degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM) is a common cause of spinal cord dysfunction that confronts clinicians on a daily basis. Research performed over the past few decades has provided improved insight into the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of this disorder. We aim to provide clinicians with an update regarding the state of the art in DCM, focusing on more recent research pertaining to pathophysiology, natural history, treatment, consideration of the minimally symptomatic patient, surgical outcome prediction, and outcome measurement. Current concepts of pathophysiology focus on the combination of static and dynamic elements leading to breakdown of the blood-spinal cord barrier at the site of compression resulting in local inflammation, cellular dysfunction, and apoptosis. With respect to treatment, although there is a dearth of high-quality studies comparing surgical to nonoperative treatment, several large prospective studies have recently associated surgical management with clinically and statistically significant improvement in functional, disability, and quality of life outcome at long-term follow-up. When selecting the specific surgical intervention for a patient with DCM, anterior (discectomy, corpectomy, hybrid discectomy/corpectomy), posterior (laminectomy and fusion, laminoplasty), and combined approaches may be considered as options depending on the specifics of the patient in question; evidence supporting each of these approaches is reviewed in detail. Recently developed clinical prediction models allow for accurate forecasting of postoperative outcomes, permitting enhanced communication and management of patient expectations in the preoperative setting. Finally, an overview of outcome measures recommended for use in the assessment of DCM patients is provided.

  9. A simple performance test for quantifying the severity of cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Hosono, N; Sakaura, H; Mukai, Y; Kaito, T; Makino, T; Yoshikawa, H

    2008-09-01

    We evaluated 30 patients with cervical myelopathy before and after decompressive surgery and compared them with 42 healthy controls. All were asked to grip and release their fingers as rapidly as possible for 15 seconds. Films recorded with a digital camera were divided into three files of five seconds each. Three doctors independently counted the number of grip and release cycles in a blinded manner (N1 represents the number of cycles for the first five-second segment, N2 for the second and N3 for the third). N1 [corrected] N2 and N3 of the pre-operative group were significantly fewer than those of the control group, and the post-operative [corrected] group's results were significantly fewer [corrected] than those of the pre-operative group. In the control group, the numbers decreased significantly with each succeeding five-second interval (fatigue phenomenon). In the pre-operative myelopathy group there was no significant difference between N1 and N2 (freezing phenomenon). The 15-second test is shown to be reliable in the quantitative evaluation of cervical myelopathy. Although it requires a camera and animation files, it can detect small changes in neurological status because of its precise and objective nature.

  10. Clinico-Radiological Correlation in a Cohort of Cervical Myelopathy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kalpana, R.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Though both clinical evaluation and MRI are complimentary in detection and precise localization of the level of lesion in patients with cervical myelopathy, there is paucity of data comparing segment specific clinical features with the MRI abnormalities in cervical myelopathy. Materials and Methods: Thirty one patients with cervical myelopathy and abnormal MRI of the cervical spine (signal changes in the cord) admitted to the neurology and neurosurgery wards during the study period were included in the study. The patients were prospectively evaluated by a detailed neurological examination. Clinically, the site of lesion was determined by highest of the pyramidal, sensory or segmental features of involvement. The MRI lesions were categorized based on the vertebral level at which the abnormalities were seen. The patients were divided into three groups according to the site of lesion on MRI: (1) cervico-medullary (foramen magnum to C1) lesions (2) upper cervical (C2-C4) lesions and (3) lower cervical (C5-T1) lesions. Comparisons of clinical symptoms, signs and level of lesion with MRI abnormalities were done and the level of significance was set at p < 0.05. Results: Clinical evaluation showed limb weakness in all, sensory loss in 90%, sphincter disturbances in 67.7%, scissoring gait in 32.2%, diaphragmatic weakness in 12.9% of patients. Based on clinical examination the site of lesion was cervico-medullary in 9, upper cervical region in 4 and lower cervical region of involvement in five patients. The maximal antero-posterior extent of the lesion and neurological deficits were concordant (p-0.05). As compared to pyramidal signs or sensory abnormalities, segmental features – segmental sensory loss, weakness, wasting or ‘reflex’ loss – were most concordant with the MRI level of lesion (p - 0.03). Among ‘motor’, ‘sensory’ and ‘reflex’ levels, the ‘reflex (DTR)’ levels were most concordant with the MRI level of lesion (p – 0

  11. Cervical flexion myelopathy in a patient showing apparent long tract signs: a severe form of Hirayama disease.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenji; Ono, Kenjiro; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Hideki; Yamada, Masahito

    2011-05-01

    We describe an 18-year-old male with cervical flexion myelopathy with Hirayama disease-like features who showed apparent long tract signs. He first experienced insidious-onset hand muscle weakness and atrophy at the age of 15. Subsequently, he developed sensory disturbance in his lower limb. Neurological examination revealed atrophy and weakness in the right hand and forearm, pyramidal signs in the right lower extremity, and disturbance of superficial sensation in the lower left half of the body. Cervical magnetic resonance images and computed tomographic myelography revealed anterior displacement with compression of the cervical cord in flexion that was more apparent in the right side. The right side of the cervical cord showed severe atrophy. The mechanisms of myelopathy in our patient appeared to be same as that of "tight dural canal in flexion," which has been reported to be the mechanism of juvenile muscular atrophy of the unilateral upper extremity (Hirayama disease). Patients with Hirayama disease generally show minimal sensory signs and no pyramidal signs. An autopsy case of Hirayama disease revealed confined necrosis of the cervical anterior horn without obvious changes in the white matter. Our patient's disease progression suggests that cervical flexion myelopathy patients with severe cervical cord compression in flexion may develop extensive cervical cord injury beyond the anterior horn.

  12. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy presenting as mechanical neck pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin E; Diver, Claire J; Taylor, Alan J

    2014-08-01

    Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy (CSM) is the most common type of myelopathy in adults over 55 years of age. In the early stages symptoms may include local neck pain and stiffness that might mimic the presentation of non-specific mechanical neck pain (NSMNP). The patient was a 79 year old male, who complained of eight weeks of neck pain. He had been referred for physiotherapy by his family physician with a diagnosis of NSMNP. Initial presentation was consistent with the referral, but further assessment by the physiotherapist revealed findings suggestive of CSM. He was referred for an urgent cervical MRI scan, which revealed myelomalacic changes at C3/4 due to spondylotic changes. The patient was unsuitable for manual therapy intervention and was referred to a spinal orthopaedic surgeon who performed a posterior decompression and stabilisation at C3-C5, 2 months after the initial presentation. This case report highlights the importance of considering CSM in adults over 55 years of age presenting with NSMNP, particularly as the prevalence of both increases with age. It demonstrates the need for health professionals to carry out detailed examination where CSM may be a potential differential diagnosis. Outcomes are less favourable for patients over the age of 70, therefore an urgent surgical opinion was required for this patient. Deterioration of symptoms whilst he awaited surgery demonstrates how missed diagnosis may lead to possible long term spinal cord damage, with potential medico-legal concerns for the therapist.

  13. Intrinsic Functional Plasticity of the Sensory-Motor Network in Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, F. Q.; Tan, Y. M.; Wu, L.; Zhuang, Y.; He, L. C.; Gong, H. H.

    2015-01-01

    Several neuroimaging studies have suggested brain reorganisation in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM); however, the changes in spontaneous neuronal activity that are associated with connectedness remain largely unknown. In this study, functional connectivity strength (FCS), a data-driven degree centrality method based on a theoretical approach, was applied for the first time to investigate changes in the sensory-motor network (SMN) at the voxel level. Comparatively, CSM not only showed significantly decreased FCS in the operculum-integrated regions, which exhibited reduced resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) around the Rolandic sulcus, but it also showed increased FCS in the premotor, primary somatosensory, and parietal-integrated areas, which primarily showed an enhanced rsFC pattern. Correlation analysis showed that altered FCS (in the left premotor-ventral/precentral-operculum, right operculum-parietale 4, and right S1) was associated with worsening Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores and that the rsFC pattern was influenced by cervical cord micro-structural damage at the C2 level. Together, these findings suggest that during myelopathy, the intrinsic functional plasticity of the SMN responds to the insufficient sensory and motor experience in CSM patients. This knowledge may improve our understanding of the comprehensive functional defects found in CSM patients and may inspire the development of new therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:25897648

  14. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a review of surgical indications and decision making.

    PubMed Central

    Law, M. D.; Bernhardt, M.; White, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated. The key to the initial diagnosis is a careful neurologic examination. The physical findings may be subtle, thus a high index of suspicion is helpful. Poor prognostic indicators and, therefore, absolute indications for surgery are: 1. Progression of signs and symptoms. 2. Presence of myelopathy for six months or longer. 3. Compression ratio approaching 0.4 or transverse area of the spinal cord of 40 square millimeters or less. Improvement is unusual with nonoperative treatment and almost all patients progressively worsen. Surgical intervention is the most predictable way to prevent neurologic deterioration. The recommended decompression is anterior when there is anterior compression at one or two levels and no significant developmental narrowing of the canal. For compression at more than two levels, developmental narrowing of the canal, posterior compression, and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, we recommend posterior decompression. In order for posterior decompression to be effective there must be lordosis of the cervical spine. If kyphosis is present, anterior decompression is needed. Kyphosis associated with a developmentally narrow canal or posterior compression may require combined anterior and posterior approaches. Fusion is required for instability. Images Figure 1 PMID:8209553

  15. Efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine on patient's satisfaction, comfort and sedation during awake fibre-optic intubation in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy posted for elective cervical fixation

    PubMed Central

    Niyogi, Saikat; Basak, Samir; Acharjee, Amita; Chakraborty, Indrani

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Various anaesthetic drugs, in addition to airway block, are used for producing favourable intubation conditions during awake fibre-optic intubation (AFOI), but most of them cause respiratory depression and hypoxaemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (IV) dexmedetomidine (DEX) on sedation, patient comfort and cardiovascular responses during AFOI in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Methods: This randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, prospective study was conducted on 56 adult patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) undergoing elective cervical fixation, who were randomly allocated into two groups - Group D and Group C. Group D patients received DEX infusion at a rate of 1 μg/kg for the first 10 min followed by 0.5 μg/kg/h and Group C received 0.9% normal saline infusion in the same manner. Airway blocks with lignocaine were given to all patients before undergoing AFOI. Patient's alertness, sedation and cardiorespiratory changes during the procedure were assessed by the Observer Assessment Awareness and Sedation (OAA/S) scale. On the 1st post-operative day, patient's' comfort during AFOI was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: Patients of Group D had an acceptable level of sedation (OAA/S score: 20 to 17 with greater comfort and satisfaction (VAS: 40–60), compared to control group (VAS: 50–90, P < 0.001.). Moreover, haemodynamic parameters were less significantly altered in the DEX group during AFOI. Conclusions: IV DEX infusion during AFOI improves patient's tolerances with an acceptable level of sedation without significant haemodynamic instability and respiratory depression. PMID:28250482

  16. Hemifacial hyperhidrosis associated with ipsilateral/contralateral cervical disc herniation myelopathy. Functional considerations on how compression pattern determines the laterality

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Satoshi; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sweating is an important mechanism for ensuring constant thermoregulation, but hyperhidrosis may be disturbing. We present five cases of hemifacial hyperhidrosis as a compensatory response to an/hypohidrosis caused by cervical disc herniation. All the patients complained of hemifacial hyperhidrosis, without anisocoria or blepharoptosis. Sweat function testing and thermography confirmed hyperhidrosis of hemifacial and adjacent areas. Neck MRI showed cervical disc herniation. Three of the patients had lateral compression with well-demarcated hypohidrosis below the hyperhidrosis on the same side as the cervical lesion. The rest had paramedian compression with poorly demarcated hyperhidrosis and hypohidrosis on the contralateral side. Although MRI showed no intraspinal pathological signal intensity, lateral dural compression might influence the circulation to the sudomotor pathway, and paramedian compression might influence the ipsilateral sulcal artery, which perfuses the sympathetic descending pathway and the intermediolateral nucleus. Sweat function testing and thermography should be performed to determine the focus of the hemifacial hyperhidrosis, and the myelopathy should be investigated on both sides. PMID:25014051

  17. Anterior Cervical Corpectomy with free vascularized fibular graft versus multilevel discectomy and grafting for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Addosooki, Ahmad I; El-deen, Mohamed Alam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A retrospective study to compare the radiologic and clinical outcomes of 2 different anterior approaches, multilevel anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) using autologus ticortical bone graft versus anterior cervical corpectomy with fusion (ACCF) using free vascularized fibular graft (FVFG) for the management of cervical spondylotic myelopathy(CSM). Methods A total of 15 patients who underwent ACDF or ACCF using FVFG for multilevel CSM were divided into two groups. Group A (n = 7) underwent ACDF and group B (n = 8) ACCF. Clinical outcomes using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, perioperative parameters including operation time and hospital stay, radiological parameters including fusion rate and cervical lordosis, and complications were compared. Results Both group A and group B demonstrated significant increases in JOA scores. Patients who underwent ACDF experienced significantly shorter operation times and hospital stay. Both groups showed significant increases in postoperative cervical lordosis and achieved the same fusion rate (100 %). No major complications were encountered in both groups. Conclusion Both ACDF and ACCF using FVFG provide satisfactory clinical outcomes and fusion rates for multilevel CSM. However, multilevel ACDF is associated with better radiologic parameters, shorter hospital stay and shorter operative times. PMID:26767152

  18. Comparison between Radiological and Clinical Outcomes of Laminoplasties with Titanium Miniplates for Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Lee, Ho-Jin; Shin, Byung-Kon

    2016-01-01

    Background Laminoplasty is a surgical procedure frequently performed for cervical myelopathy. We investigated correlations between changes in the anteroposterior diameter (APD) of the spinal canal, spinal canal area (SCA), and laminar angle (LA) and clinical outcomes of laminoplasty. Methods Of the 204 cervical myelopathy patients who underwent laminoplasty from July 2010 to May 2015, 49 patients who were evaluated with pre- and postoperative computed tomography of the cervical vertebrae were included. The average age of the patients was 60.4 years (range, 31 to 82 years), and the average duration of follow-up was 31.6 months (range, 9 to 68 months). Changes in the APD and SCA were measured at the middle of the vertebral body. Changes in LA were measured where both pedicles were clearly visible. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and visual analog scale score for pain preoperatively (1 day before surgery) and postoperatively (last outpatient visit) and examining postoperative complications. Results The APD showed an average of 54.7% increase from 11.5 to 17.8 mm. The SCA showed an average of 57.7% increase from 225.9 to 356.3 mm2. The LA increased from 34.2° preoperatively to 71.9° postoperatively. The JOA score increased from an average of 9.1 preoperatively to 13.4 postoperatively. Three patients were found to have hinge fractures during surgery. Postoperative complications, including two cases of C5 palsy, were recorded. The correlation coefficient between the LA change and JOA score improvement was −0.449 (p < 0.05). Patients with a < 33° (25%) increase in the LA showed the most significant clinical improvement. Conclusions Patients with a < 33° (25%) change in the LA after laminoplasty with a titanium miniplate showed the most significant clinical improvement. Thus, LA changes can be useful in predicting the clinical outcome of laminoplasty. PMID:27904722

  19. [Long-term results of surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy using open-door laminoplasty].

    PubMed

    Ryba, L; Chaloupka, R; Repko, M; Cienciala, J

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a serious disease which, in its advanced form, can markedly disable the patient. The aim of the present work was a prospective evaluation of a group of CSM patients treated by open-door laminoplasty. MATERIAL AND METHODS We evaluated 89 patients (59 men and 30 women; average age, 62 years; range, 39 to 81 years) who underwent surgery in the years 2001 to 2011. The average follow-up was 76 months. The patients were examined neurologically, radiologically, by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT. All of them had quadruparetic disability and showed signs of myelopathy on MRI examination. We used a modified Hirabayashi technique of open-door laminoplasty. We evaluated the surgery time, intra-operative blood loss, neurological deficit on the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Society (mJOA) scale, intra- and postoperative complications, neck pain (NP) and extremity pain (EP) on the visual analogue scale (VAS) and a radiographic sagittal profile change after laminoplasty. RESULTS The average operative time was 117 minutes and the average intra-operative blood loss was 330 ml. The average mJOA score of 12.7 before surgery improved to 14.4. Two patients (2.25 %) showed persisting deterioration of neurological symptoms, conditions of six patients (6.75 %) were assessed as stable and the remaining 81 patients (91 %) showed varying degrees of both subjective and objective amelioration/improvement. Infection was recorded as the most frequent complication (7.8 %). C5 paresis reported in the literature did not occur in our group. One patient (1.1 %) had a moderate epidural haemorrhage. The pre-operative VAS NP score of 5.4 improved to 3.2 and the VAS EP score of 7.7 improved to 4.4. The average value for the radiographic sagittal profile changed from -18.2 pre-operatively to -16.5 post-operatively. CONCLUSIONS Laminoplasty remains the basic surgical option for CSM treatment, particularly in progressive cases of the

  20. The reporting of study and population characteristics in degenerative cervical myelopathy: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, M.; Elgheriani, A.; Kolias, Angelos G.; Tetreault, Lindsay; Hutchinson, Peter J. A.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Kotter, Mark R. N.

    2017-01-01

    Object Degenerative cervical myelopathy [DCM] is a disabling and increasingly prevalent condition. Variable reporting in interventional trials of study design and sample characteristics limits the interpretation of pooled outcomes. This is pertinent in DCM where baseline characteristics are known to influence outcome. The present study aims to assess the reporting of the study design and baseline characteristics in DCM as the premise for the development of a standardised reporting set. Methods A systematic review of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases, registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015025497) was conducted in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Full text articles in English, with >50 patients (prospective) or >200 patients (retrospective), reporting outcomes of DCM were deemed to be eligible. Results A total of 108 studies involving 23,876 patients, conducted world-wide, were identified. 33 (31%) specified a clear primary objective. Study populations often included radiculopathy (51, 47%) but excluded patients who had undergone previous surgery (42, 39%). Diagnositic criteria for myelopathy were often uncertain; MRI assessment was specified in only 67 (62%) of studies. Patient comorbidities were referenced by 37 (34%) studies. Symptom duration was reported by 46 (43%) studies. Multivariate analysis was used to control for baseline characteristics in 33 (31%) of studies. Conclusions The reporting of study design and sample characteristics is variable. The development of a consensus minimum dataset for (CODE-DCM) will facilitate future research synthesis in the future. PMID:28249017

  1. Clinical Presentation of Cervical Myelopathy at C1–2 Level

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Tsuneo; Terashima, Yoshinori; Tsuda, Hajime; Yoshimoto, Mitsunori; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Single-center retrospective study. Purpose To clarify the clinical features of cervical myelopathy at the C1–2 level. Overview of Literature Methods for distinguishing the affected level based on myelomere symptoms or dysfunction of the conducting pathway were established. However, no symptoms have been identified as being specific to the C1–2 level segment. Methods We evaluated 24 patients with cervical myelopathy due to spinal cord compression at the C1–2 level. Preoperative neurological assessment were investigated and compared with the rate and site of compression of the spinal cord using computed tomography-myelography. Results Impaired temperature and pain sensation were confirmed in 18 of the 24 patients with that localized to the upper arms (n=3), forearm (n=9), both (n=2), and whole body (n=4). Muscle weakness was observed in 18 patients, muscle weakness extended from the biceps brachii to the abductor digiti minimi in 10 patients, and in the whole body in 8 patients. Deep tendon reflexes were normal in 10 patients, whereas hyperactive deep tendon reflexes were noted in 14 patients. The rate of spinal cord compression was significantly higher in patients with perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness compared with those with no dysfunction. However, no significant difference in the rate and site of compression was identified in those with dysfunction. Conclusions Perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness localized to the upper limbs was observed in 58% and 42% of patients, respectively. Neurological abnormalities, such as perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness, were visualized in patients with marked compression. PMID:27559458

  2. Proximal and proximo-distal bimelic amyotrophy: Evidence of cervical flexion induced myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Preethish-Kumar, Veeramani; Polavarapu, Kiran; Singh, Ravinder Jeet; Vengalil, Seena; Prasad, Chandrajit; Verma, Abha; Nalini, Atchayaram

    This report aims at describing two new clinical phenotypes associated with classical features of cervical flexion induced myelopathy (CFIM). The description is of a prospective case series of six young males presenting with progressive bilateral proximal/proximo-distal amyotrophy of upper limbs and demonstrating the typical MRI characteristics of Hirayama disease. All underwent detailed clinical, electrophysiologcal and imaging studies. The affected muscles were shoulder girdles and arms in proximal form (n = 2) and the entire upper limbs in proximo-distal form (n = 4). The mean age at onset was 21.0 ± 3.3 years, duration of illness was 6.7 ± 3.4 years, period of progression was 39.0 ± 27.3 months followed by a stable phase of 45.0 ± 50.0 months. All had severe wasting and weakness of affected muscles leading to significant disability. Nerve conduction studies revealed grossly reduced compound muscle action potential amplitudes with neurogenic pattern on electromyography of affected muscles. On MRI all revealed evidence of cervical cord atrophy with signal changes, dural detachment and extensive posterior epidural enhancement (variably from C1 to T2 level). Altered cervical curvature was prominent. In conclusion, hitherto unreported, we describe two additional clinical phenotypes (proximal and proximo-distal forms) of Hirayama disease demonstrating the cardinal imaging features of CFIM.

  3. Comparison of Two Reconstructive Techniques in the Surgical Management of Four-Level Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, FengNing; Li, ZhongHai; Huang, Xuan; Chen, Zhi; Zhang, Fan; Shen, HongXing; Kang, YiFan; Zhang, YinQuan; Cai, Bin; Hou, TieSheng

    2015-01-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy and radiological outcome of treating 4-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) with either anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or “skip” corpectomy and fusion, 48 patients with 4-level CSM who had undergone ACDF or SCF at our hospital were analyzed retrospectively between January 2008 and June 2011. Twenty-seven patients received ACDF (Group A) and 21 patients received SCF. Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI) score, and Cobb's angles of the fused segments and C2-7 segments were compared in the two groups. The minimum patient follow-up was 2 years. No significant differences between the groups were found in demographic and baseline disease characteristics, duration of surgery, or follow-up time. Our study demonstrates that there was no significant difference in the clinical efficacy of ACDF and SCF, but ACDF involves less intraoperative blood loss, better cervical spine alignment, and fewer postoperative complications than SCF. PMID:25692140

  4. Long Term Results of Anterior Corpectomy and Fusion for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huajiang; Liu, Yang; Liang, Lei; Yuan, Wen

    2012-01-01

    Background Results showed good clinical outcomes of anterior corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) for patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) during a short term follow-up; however, studies assessing long term results are relatively scarce. In this study we intended to assess the long term clinical and radiographic outcomes, find out the factors that may affect the long term clinical outcome and evaluate the incidence of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Methods This is a retrospective study of 145 consecutive CSM patients on ACCF treatment with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Clinical data were collected from medical and operative records. Patients were evaluated by using the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scoring system preoperatively and during the follow-up. X-rays results of cervical spine were obtained from all patients. Correlations between the long term clinical outcome and various factors were also analyzed. Findings Ninety-three males and fifty-two females completed the follow-up. The mean age at operation was 51.0 years, and the mean follow-up period was 102.1 months. Both postoperative sagittal segmental alignment (SSA) and the sagittal alignment of the whole cervical spine (SACS) increased significantly in terms of cervical lordosis. The mean increase of JOA was 3.8±1.3 postoperatively, and the overall recovery rate was 62.5%. Logistic regression analysis showed that preoperative duration of symptoms >12 months, high-intensity signal in spinal cord and preoperative JOA score ≤9 were important predictors of the fair recovery rate (≤50%). Repeated surgery due to ASD was performed in 7 (4.8%) cases. Conclusions ACCF with anterior plate fixation is a reliable and effective method for treating CSM in terms of JOA score and the recovery rate. The correction of cervical alignment and the repeated surgery rate for ASD are also considered to be satisfactory. PMID:22514669

  5. Does Segmental Kyphosis Affect Surgical Outcome after a Posterior Decompressive Laminectomy in Multisegmental Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarush; Prasad, Gautam; Deore, Tushar; Bhojraj, Shekhar Y.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Purpose To compare results of laminectomy in multisegmental compressive cervical myelopathy (CSM) with lordosis versus segmental kyphosis. Overview of Literature Laminectomy is an established procedure for decompression in CSM with cervical lordosis. However in patients with segmental kyphosis, it is associated with risk of progression of kyphosis and poor outcome. Whether this loss of sagittal alignment affects functional outcome is not clear. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 68 patients who underwent laminectomy for CSM from 1998 to 2009. As per preoperative magnetic resonance images, 36 patients had preoperative lordosis (Group 1) and 32 had segmental kyphosis (Group 2). We studied age at the time of surgery, duration of preoperative symptoms, recovery rate, magnitude of postoperative backward shifting of spinal cord and loss of sagittal alignment. Results Mean follow up was 5.05 years (range, 2–13 years) and mean age at the time of surgery 61.88 years. Group 1 had 20 men and 16 women and Group 2 had 19 men and 13 women. Mean recovery rate in Group 1 was 60.32%, in Group 2 was 63.7% without any statistical difference (p-value 0.21, one tailed analysis of variance). Two patients of Group 1 had loss of cervical lordosis by five degrees. In Group 2 seven patients had progression of segmental kyphosis by 5–10 degrees and two patients by more than 10 degrees. Mean cord shift was more in Group 1 (mean, 2.41 mm) as compared to Group 2 (mean, –1.97 mm) but it had no correlation to recovery rate. Patients with younger age (mean, 57 years) and less duration of preoperative symptoms (mean, 4.86 years) had better recovery rate (75%). Conclusions Clinical outcome in CSM is not related to preoperative cervical spine alignment. Thus, lordosis is not mandatory for planning laminectomy in CSM. Good outcome is expected in younger patients operated earliest after onset of symptoms. PMID:28243365

  6. Characterizing Thalamocortical Disturbances in Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: Revealed by Functional Connectivity under Two Slow Frequency Bands

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fuqing; Wu, Lin; Liu, Xiaojia; Gong, Honghan; Luk, Keith Dip-Kei; Hu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recent advanced MRI studies on cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) revealed alterations of sensorimotor cortex, but the disturbances of large-scale thalamocortical systems remains elusive. The purpose of this study was to characterizing the CSM-related thalamocortical disturbances, which were associated with spinal cord structural injury, and clinical measures. Methods A total of 17 patients with degenerative CSM and well-matched control subjects participated. Thalamocortical disturbances were quantified using thalamus seed-based functional connectivity in two distinct low frequencies bands (slow-5 and slow-4), with different neural manifestations. The clinical measures were evaluated by Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score system and Neck Disability Index (NDI) questionnaires. Results Decreased functional connectivity was found in the thalamo-motor, -somatosensory, and -temporal circuits in the slow-5 band, indicating impairment of thalamo-cortical circuit degeneration or axon/synaptic impairment. By contrast, increased functional connectivity between thalami and the bilateral primary motor (M1), primary and secondary somatosensory (S1/S2), premotor cortex (PMC), and right temporal cortex was detected in the slow-4 band, and were associated with higher fractional anisotropy values in the cervical cord, corresponding to mild spinal cord structural injury. Conclusions These thalamocortical disturbances revealed by two slow frequency bands inform basic understanding and vital clues about the sensorimotor dysfunction in CSM. Further work is needed to evaluate its contribution in central functional reorganization during spinal cord degeneration. PMID:26053316

  7. Feline ischaemic myelopathy with a predilection for the cranial cervical spinal cord in older cats.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Katherine M; De Risio, Luisa; Theobald, Anita; Garosi, Laurent; Lowrie, Mark

    2014-12-01

    All previous studies on feline ischaemic myelopathy (IM) have reported an acute onset of a single event with no recurrence of clinical signs. This study aimed to evaluate clinical and long-term follow-up data in cats presumptively diagnosed with cervical IM in the territory of the ventral spinal artery (VSA). Eight cats (four females and four males) were included with a mean age of 14 years and 2 months. Neurological status at the time of presentation ranged from ambulatory tetraparesis to tetraplegia with nociception present. Six cats had marked cervical ventroflexion. All eight cats were diagnosed with one or more concurrent medical conditions, including chronic kidney disease (n = 2), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 2) and hypertension (n = 6). Median time to ambulation was 5.7 days (range 2-14 days). Long-term follow-up ranged from 7 months to 3 years and 3 months (median 1 year and 2 months). Five cats had no reported recurrence of clinical signs and 3/8 had a chronic relapsing disease course. One cat had an acute recurrence of clinical signs 4 months after the first event and was euthanased. Two cats had acute onsets of suspected intracranial infarctions, one of which had further suspected intracranial infarcts every 3 months and was euthanased after one of these. This study highlights the importance of performing ancillary diagnostic tests in older cats presenting with IM, particularly when VSA embolisation is suspected.

  8. Cervical Klippel-Feil syndrome predisposing an elderly African man to central cord myelopathy following minor trauma.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, A Olufemi; Akinyemi, R Olusola

    2010-09-01

    An otherwise-healthy, active 83-year-old Nigerian man developed reversible central cord myelopathy from a mild fall on a level surface. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed C5, 6, and 7 block vertebrae and marked disc extrusions only at the immediately adjoining upper and lower non-fused segments of the cervical spine. There was no spinal canal stenosis otherwise. We think that the unique presentation of this case of Klippel-Feil syndrome further supports the impression that following fusion (congenital or acquired) of one segment of the spinal column, hypermobility of the non-fused adjoining segments may strongly predispose to more disc extrusions.

  9. Our technique of midsagittal splitting laminoplasty for compressive cervical myelopathy and its short-term results

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Niraj Kumar; Singh, Sunita; Chauhan, Shishu Pal Singh; Gopal, Nitya Nand

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to discuss the technique of midsagittal splitting laminoplasty and to compare its short-term follow-up results with laminectomy in cases of compressive cervical spinal cord myelopathy. Materials and Methods: Exclusion criteria were as follows: Intramedullary compressive lesions, kyphotic cervical spine, previous spinal surgeries, and defective anterior vertebral column. Twenty patients (10 each of laminoplasty and laminectomy groups) were prospectively studied from 2005 to 2008. After clinico-radiological assessment, laminoplasty or laminectomy was performed in patients aged <50 years and >50 years, respectively. The laminoplasty was performed by splitting the excised lamina in midline up to the tip of spinous process. Follow-up was done by neurosurgical cervical spine scoring, Nurick's grading, and the final outcome was determined by Odom's criteria. Results: The mean operative time and blood loss in laminoplasty and laminectomy was 100 ± 0.87 (range 90-140 min), 80 ± 0.67 (range 75-100 min) P = 0.04; and 65 ± 0.07 (range 60-90 ml) and 68 ± 0.61 (range 65-80 ml) P = 0.09, respectively. There were no intraoperative accidents, and no postoperative neurological deterioration/recurrence of symptoms. One patient who underwent laminectomy alone developed progressive kyphosis of the spine, whereas one having rheumatoid arthritis and long symptom duration didn’t improve. 85% (17/20 patients) had sustained excellent to fair outcome (improvement by at least one Nurick's grade). Conclusions: The technique used by us was simple, effective, and inexpensive. There was no minimal postoperative morbidity, although long-term results are awaited. PMID:27366246

  10. Prevalence of complications after surgery in treatment for cervical compressive myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Tian, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Si-Kai; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: We aim to perform a meta-analysis on prevalence of all kinds of operation-related complications following surgery treating cervical compressive myelopathy (CCM) and to provide reference for surgeons making surgical plan. Methods: An extensive search of literature was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane library, CNKI, and WANFANG databases on incidence of operation-related complications from January 2007 to November 2016. Data was calculated and data analysis was conducted with STATA 12.0 and Revman 5.3. Results: A total of 107 studies included 1705 of 8612 patients (20.1%, 95% CI 17.3%–22.8%) on overall complications. The incidence of C5 plasy, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), infection, axial pain, dysphagia, hoarseness, fusion failure, graft subsidence, graft dislodgment, and epidural hematoma is 5.3% (95% CI 4.3%–6.2%), 1.9% (95% CI 1.3%–2.4%), 2.8% (95% CI 1.7%–4.0%), 15.6% (95% CI 11.7%–19.5%), 16.8% (95% CI 13.6%–19.9%), 4.0% (95% CI 2.3%–5.7%), 2.6% (95% CI 0.2%–4.9%), 3.7% (95% CI 2.0%–5.5%), 3.4% (95% CI 2.0%–4.8%), 1.1% (95% CI 0.7%–1.5%), respectively. Patients with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) (6.3%) had a higher prevalence of C5 plasy than those with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) (4.1%), and a similar trend in CSF (12.2% vs 0.9%). Individuals after laminectomy and fusion (LF) had highest rate of C5 plasy (15.2%), while those who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) had the lowest prevalence (2.0%). Compared with patients after other surgical options, individuals after anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) have the highest rate of CSF (4.2%), infection (14.2%), and epidural hematoma (3.1%). Patients after ACDF (4.8%) had a higher prevalence of hoarseness than those with ACCF (3.0%), and a similar trend for dysphagia between anterior corpectomy combined with discectomy (ACCDF) and ACCF (16.8% vs 9.9%). Conclusions: Based on our meta

  11. Clinical predictors of surgical outcome in cervical spondylotic myelopathy: an analysis of 248 patients.

    PubMed

    Pumberger, M; Froemel, D; Aichmair, A; Hughes, A P; Sama, A A; Cammisa, F P; Girardi, F P

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical predictors of surgical outcome in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). We reviewed a consecutive series of 248 patients (71 women and 177 men) with CSM who had undergone surgery at our institution between January 2000 and October 2010. Their mean age was 59.0 years (16 to 86). Medical records, office notes, and operative reports were reviewed for data collection. Special attention was focused on pre-operative duration and severity as well as post-operative persistence of myelopathic symptoms. Disease severity was graded according to the Nurick classification. Our multivariate logistic regression model indicated that Nurick grade 2 CSM patients have the highest chance of complete symptom resolution (p < 0.001) and improvement to normal gait (p = 0.004) following surgery. Patients who did not improve after surgery had longer duration of myelopathic symptoms than those who did improve post-operatively (17.85 months (1 to 101) vs 11.21 months (1 to 69); p = 0.002). More advanced Nurick grades were not associated with a longer duration of symptoms (p = 0.906). Our data suggest that patients with Nurick grade 2 CSM are most likely to improve from surgery. The duration of myelopathic symptoms does not have an association with disease severity but is an independent prognostic indicator of surgical outcome.

  12. Severe cervical spondylotic myelopathy with complete neurological and neuroradiological recovery within a month after surgery

    PubMed Central

    Marios, Th.; Dimitrios, Zevgaridis; Theologos, Th.; Christos, Tsonidis

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is a complex syndrome evolving in the presence of degenerative changes. The choice of care and prognostic factors are controversial. The use of appropriate surgical technique is very important. Posterior approach may be chosen when pathology is present dorsally and/or in the presence of neutral to lordotic alignment. Anterior approach is the golden standard in patients with kyphosis and/or stenosis due to ventral lesions, even with three or more affected levels. A 67-year-old man presented with progressive weakness and clumsiness (mJOA: 5; Nurick: 4). An anterior discectomy, osteophytectomy and bilateral foraminotomy of the C4–C5; C5–C6; C6–C7 were performed. Polyether-Ether-Ketone spacers and a titanium plate were placed. The patient was mobilized 3-hour post-surgery and was released the following day. Medicament therapy and a neck-conditioning program were prescribed. Clinical examinations were normal within a month. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no traces of the preoperatively registered intramedullary focal T2 hyper-intensity. PMID:27887013

  13. Effectiveness of the Laminoplasty in the Elderly Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Son, Doo Kyung; Song, Geun Sung; Lee, Sang Weon

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes analysis of the laminoplasty in the elderly patients, and to compare with the non-elderly patients. Methods A retrospective study of the short term result in patients who had treated with the laminoplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) was performed. From January 2008 to December 2012, total 62 patients were operated with single open-door technique because of CSM; 28 patients were the elderly and 34 patients were the non-elderly. We evaluated some factors including sex, symptom duration, estimated blood loss during operation, operation time, hospitalization day, complications, pre- and postoperative modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (mJOA) score, recovery rate of mJOA score, achieved mJOA score, mean cervical canal width and expansion ratio of antero-posterior diameter in order to identify difference between the two group. Clinical outcomes were calculated with the recovery rate of mJOA score at the time of one year after operation. Results Mean age were 71.9 in the elderly group and 52.9 in the non-elderly group. Although postoperative mJOA score in the elderly group was lower than that of the non-elderly group, achieved mJOA score was statistically same between the two groups. Other clinical and radiological outcomes were also statistically same. Conclusion We conclude that the laminoplasty also assures good clinical outcomes in the elderly patients with CSM, same as in the non-elderly group. PMID:25110481

  14. Voxel-based analysis of grey and white matter degeneration in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Grabher, Patrick; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Trachsler, Aaron; Friedl, Susanne; David, Gergely; Sutter, Reto; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Thompson, Alan J.; Curt, Armin; Freund, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In this prospective study, we made an unbiased voxel-based analysis to investigate above-stenosis spinal degeneration and its relation to impairment in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Twenty patients and 18 controls were assessed with high-resolution MRI protocols above the level of stenosis. Cross-sectional areas of grey matter (GM), white matter (WM), and posterior columns (PC) were measured to determine atrophy. Diffusion indices assessed tract-specific integrity of PC and lateral corticospinal tracts (CST). Regression analysis was used to reveal relationships between MRI measures and clinical impairment. Patients showed mainly sensory impairment. Atrophy was prominent within the cervical WM (13.9%, p = 0.004), GM (7.2%, p = 0.043), and PC (16.1%, p = 0.005). Fractional anisotropy (FA) was reduced in the PC (−11.98%, p = 0.006) and lateral CST (−12.96%, p = 0.014). In addition, radial (+28.47%, p = 0.014), axial (+14.72%, p = 0.005), and mean (+16.50%, p = 0.001) diffusivities were increased in the PC. Light-touch score was associated with atrophy (R2 = 0.3559, p = 0.020) and FA (z score 3.74, p = 0.003) in the PC, as was functional independence and FA in the lateral CST (z score 3.68, p = 0.020). This study demonstrates voxel-based degeneration far above the stenosis at a level not directly affected by the compression and provides unbiased readouts of tract-specific changes that relate to impairment. PMID:27095134

  15. Comparison of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Score and the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire Scores: Time-Dependent Changes in Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy and Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Motoki; Sakaura, Hironobu; Fujimori, Takahito; Nagamoto, Yukitaka; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To identify differences in time-dependent perioperative changes between the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and the JOA Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire (JOACMEQ) score in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) who underwent cervical laminoplasty. Overview of Literature The JOA score does not take into consideration patient satisfaction or quality of life. Accordingly, the JOACMEQ was designed in 2007 as a patient-centered assessment tool. Methods We studied 21 patients who underwent cervical laminoplasty. We objectively evaluated the time-dependent changes in JOACMEQ scores and JOA scores for all patients before surgery and at 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. Results The average total JOA score and the recovery rate improved significantly after surgery in both groups, with a slightly better recovery rate in the OPLL group. Cervical spine function improved significantly in the CSM group but not in the OPLL group. Upper- and lower-extremity functions were more stable in the CSM group than in the OPLL group. The effectiveness rate of the JOACMEQ for measuring quality of life was quite low in both groups. In both groups, the Spearman contingency coefficients were dispersed widely except for upper- and lower-extremity function. Conclusions Scores for upper- and lower-extremity function on the JOACMEQ correlated well with JOA scores. Because the JOACMEQ can also assess cervical spine function and quality of life, factors that cannot be assessed by the JOA score alone, the JOACMEQ is a more comprehensive evaluation tool. PMID:25705334

  16. Regression of anterior disc-osteophyte complex following cervical laminectomy and fusion for cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ashana, Adedayo O.; Cohen, Jeremiah R.; Evans, Brandon; Holly, Langston T.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case control study Objective To investigate whether posterior cervical laminectomy and fusion modifies the natural course of anterior disc-osteophyte complex in patients with multilevel CSM Summary of Background Data Dorsal migration of the spinal cord is the main purported mechanism of spinal cord decompression following cervical laminectomy and fusion but other potential mechanisms have received scant attention in the literature. This study was conducted to investigate whether cervical laminectomy and fusion affects the size of anterior disc osteophyte complex. Methods The medical records and radiographical imaging of 44 patients that underwent cervical laminectomy and fusion for CSM between 2006 and 2013 were analyzed. The size of the anterior disc osteophyte complex was measured pre and postoperatively on MR images taken at an interval of > 3 months apart. A control group consisted of 20 non-operatively treated advanced cervical spondylosis patients. Patients in the control met the same inclusion and exclusion criteria and also had sequential MRI taken at an interval of > 3 months apart. Results The nonoperative and operative groups were statistically similar in the pertinent patient demographics and characteristics including gender, age, time to second MRI, size of anterior disc-osteophyte complex on baseline MRI, mean number of levels affected, and percentage of patients with T2 signal change. As expected the mJOA scores were significantly lower in the operative versus nonoperative cohort (13.6 vs. 16.5, P<0.01). A significant decrease in the size of anterior disc osteophyte was observed in the operative group postoperatively (P<0.01). In comparison, there was no statistically significant change in the size of the anterior disc osteophyte complex in the control group (P > 0.05). The magnitude of the change in disc size between the two groups was statistically significant (P <0.01). Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that

  17. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion in the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy: systematic review and a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhi-qiang; Du, Jing-yu; Ling, Zhi-heng; Xu, Hai-dong; Lin, Xiang-jin

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, the decision to treat multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) remains controversial. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to quantitatively determine the efficacy of ACDF and ACCF in the treatment of multilevel CSM. Methods We searched several databases for related research articles published in English or Chinese. We extracted and assessed the data independently. We determined the pooled data, data heterogeneity, and overall effect, respectively. Results We identified 15 eligible studies with 1,368 patients. We found that blood loss and numbers of complications during surgery in ACDF were significantly less that in ACCF; however, other clinical outcomes, such as operation time, bone fusion failure, post Japanese Orthopedic Association scores, recovery rates, and visual analog scale scores between ACDF and ACCF with multilevel CSM were not significantly different. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that surgical treatments of multilevel CSM are similar in terms of most clinical outcomes using ACDF or ACCF. PMID:25673996

  18. Two Cases of Klippel-Feil Syndrome with Cervical Myelopathy Successfully Treated by Simple Decompression without Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Bum; Lee, Young Seok; Nam, Taek Kyun; Park, Yong Sook; Kim, Young Baeg

    2015-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a congenital developmental disorder of cervical spine, showing short neck with restricted neck motion, low hairline, and high thoracic cage due to multilevel cervical fusion. Radiculopathy or myelopathy can be accompanied. There were 2 patients who were diagnosed as KFS with exhibited radiological and physical characteristics. Both patients had stenosis and cord compression at C1 level due to anterior displacement of C1 posterior arch secondary to kyphotic deformity of upper cervical spine, which has been usually indicative to craniocervical fixation. One patient was referred due to quadriparesis detected after surgery for aortic arch aneurysmal dilatation. The other patient was referred to us due to paraparesis and radiating pain in all extremities developed during gynecological examinations. Decompressive C1 laminectomy was done for one patient and additional suboccipital craniectomy for the other. No craniocervical fixation was done because there was no spinal instability. Motor power improved immediately after the operation in both patients. Motor functions and spinal stability were well preserved in both patients for 2 years. In KFS patients with myelopathy at the C1 level without C1-2 instability, a favorable outcome could be achieved by a simple decompression without spinal fixation. PMID:26512291

  19. Two Cases of Klippel-Feil Syndrome with Cervical Myelopathy Successfully Treated by Simple Decompression without Fixation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Bum; Park, Seung Won; Lee, Young Seok; Nam, Taek Kyun; Park, Yong Sook; Kim, Young Baeg

    2015-09-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a congenital developmental disorder of cervical spine, showing short neck with restricted neck motion, low hairline, and high thoracic cage due to multilevel cervical fusion. Radiculopathy or myelopathy can be accompanied. There were 2 patients who were diagnosed as KFS with exhibited radiological and physical characteristics. Both patients had stenosis and cord compression at C1 level due to anterior displacement of C1 posterior arch secondary to kyphotic deformity of upper cervical spine, which has been usually indicative to craniocervical fixation. One patient was referred due to quadriparesis detected after surgery for aortic arch aneurysmal dilatation. The other patient was referred to us due to paraparesis and radiating pain in all extremities developed during gynecological examinations. Decompressive C1 laminectomy was done for one patient and additional suboccipital craniectomy for the other. No craniocervical fixation was done because there was no spinal instability. Motor power improved immediately after the operation in both patients. Motor functions and spinal stability were well preserved in both patients for 2 years. In KFS patients with myelopathy at the C1 level without C1-2 instability, a favorable outcome could be achieved by a simple decompression without spinal fixation.

  20. Preservation of C7 spinous process does not influence the long-term outcome after laminoplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Higashino, K; Katoh, S; Sairyo, K; Sakai, T; Kosaka, H; Yasui, N

    2006-10-01

    Axial pain is one of the major complications after laminoplasty, and preservation of C7 spinous process during the procedure can reduce the axial pain. However, it has not been elucidated whether laminoplasty preserving the C7 spinous process can maintain neurological improvement for a long time. The purpose of our retrospective study was to investigate the long-term neurological outcome after open-door laminoplasty preserving the C7 spinous process for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Clinical and radiological outcomes were analysed in 42 patients who underwent open-door laminoplasty preserving C7 spinous process and followed up for more than 5 years. Neurological function was evaluated by means of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system for cervical myelopathy. Axial pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) at the last examination. Alignment and motion of the cervical spine were measured from radiographs, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate postoperative compression at C7. The mean JOA score was 9.4 before surgery and 12.0 at the latest follow-up. The mean VAS score in 26 patients score was 9.7/100. No compression of the spinal cord was observed in any MRI at the latest follow-up. Preservation of the C7 spinous process does not influence the long-term outcome of CSM after laminoplasty. Although we did not have a comparative group, the procedure described here should be considered as the solution.

  1. Prognostic Value of Preoperative Coping Strategies for Pain in Patients with Residual Neuropathic Pain after Laminoplasty for Compressive Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Single-center retrospective cohort study. Purpose To clarify the prognostic value of preoperative coping strategies for pain due to compressive cervical myelopathy. Overview of Literature Preoperative physical function, imaging and electrophysiological findings are known predictors of surgical outcomes. However, coping strategies for pain have not been considered. Methods Postoperative questionnaires, concerning health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and daily living activities, were sent to 78 patients with compressive cervical myelopathy who had suffered from neuropathic pain before laminoplasty, and been preoperatively assessed with respect to their physical and mental status and coping strategies for pain. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed to clarify the extent to which the patient's preoperative coping strategies could explain the variance in postoperative HRQOL and activity levels. Results Forty-two patients with residual neuropathic pain after laminoplasty were analyzed by questionnaires (28 men, 14 women; mean age, 62.7±10.2 years; symptom duration, 48.0±66.0 months). The valid response rate was 53.8%. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that preoperative coping strategies, which involved coping self-statements, diverting attention, and catastrophizing, were independently associated with postoperative HRQOL and activity level, and could explain 7% to 11% of their variance. Combinations of the coping strategies for pain and upper/lower motor functions could explain 26% to 36% of the variance in postoperative HRQOL and activity level. Conclusions Preoperative coping strategies for pain are good predictors of postoperative HRQOL and activities of daily living in patients with postoperative residual neuropathic pain due to compressive cervical myelopathy. PMID:26435783

  2. The Change of Range of Motion at Anterior Compression of the Cervical Cord after Laminoplasty in Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective Degenerative diseases of the spine, such as cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), are increasing among the old age population, and surgical treatment of CSM is becoming more and more common. The aim of this study was to investigate how functional recovery can be influenced by anterior compression of the spinal cord (ACS) after laminoplasty for treatment of patients with CSM. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 32 patients admitted to Ewha Womans Mok-Dong Hospital with CSM who underwent open-door laminoplasty from January 2012 to December 2014. We divided patients into 2 groups according to whether ACS was or not preoperatively. Each group was analyzed clinical and radiological parameters which were Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores and its recovery rate, sagittal alignment and range of motion (ROM). Results The mean duration of symptom was 11.2 months (range, 6-22 months). A significant difference in recovery rate of the total JOA score was shown between the 2 groups, especially upper extremity motor function. No difference in preoperative JOA score between the 2 groups, but recovery rate of each group was 20.05%±18.1%, 32.21%±25.4%, statistically significant (p<0.005). Upper motor and sensory function was not significantly different in the 2 groups. Preoperative, postoperative and preservation of ROM was 44.3°±10.1°, 41.8°±15.7°, 87.9%±35.4% each at ACS (-) group. A significant difference in postoperative ROM was identified between ACS (-) and ACS (+) group. Postoperative anterior compression of the spinal cord was recognized 14 cases which were classified from its causes. Conclusion Cervical ROM decreased significantly after laminoplasty, but 85.3% of the preoperative ROM was preserved. The postoperative reduction of ROM in group with anterior compression of spinal cord was identified. PMID:28127374

  3. Outcomes following Laminoplasty or Laminectomy and Fusion in Patients with Myelopathy Caused by Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Singhatanadgige, Weerasak; Limthongkul, Worawat; Valone, Frank; Yingsakmongkol, Wicharn; Riew, K. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objective To compare laminoplasty versus laminectomy and fusion in patients with cervical myelopathy caused by OPLL. Methods A systematic review was conducted using PubMed/Medline, Cochrane database, and Google scholar of articles. Only comparative studies in humans were included. Studies involving cervical trauma/fracture, infection, and tumor were excluded. Results Of 157 citations initially analyzed, 4 studies ultimately met our inclusion criteria: one class of evidence (CoE) II prospective cohort study and three CoE III retrospective cohort studies. The prospective cohort study found no significant difference between laminoplasty and laminectomy and fusion in the recovery rate from myelopathy. One CoE III retrospective cohort study reported a significantly higher recovery rate following laminoplasty. Another CoE III retrospective cohort study reported a significantly higher recovery rate in the laminectomy and fusion group. One CoE II prospective cohort study and one CoE III retrospective cohort study found no significant difference in pain improvement between patients treated with laminoplasty versus patients treated with laminectomy and fusion. All four studies reported a higher incidence of C5 palsy following laminectomy and fusion than laminoplasty. One CoE II prospective cohort and one CoE III retrospective cohort reported that there was no significant difference in axial neck pain between the two procedures. One CoE III retrospective cohort study suggested that there was no significant difference between groups in OPLL progression. Conclusion Data from four comparative studies was not sufficient to support the superiority of laminoplasty or laminectomy and fusion in treating cervical myelopathy caused by OPLL. PMID:27781191

  4. Outcomes following Laminoplasty or Laminectomy and Fusion in Patients with Myelopathy Caused by Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Singhatanadgige, Weerasak; Limthongkul, Worawat; Valone, Frank; Yingsakmongkol, Wicharn; Riew, K Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objective To compare laminoplasty versus laminectomy and fusion in patients with cervical myelopathy caused by OPLL. Methods A systematic review was conducted using PubMed/Medline, Cochrane database, and Google scholar of articles. Only comparative studies in humans were included. Studies involving cervical trauma/fracture, infection, and tumor were excluded. Results Of 157 citations initially analyzed, 4 studies ultimately met our inclusion criteria: one class of evidence (CoE) II prospective cohort study and three CoE III retrospective cohort studies. The prospective cohort study found no significant difference between laminoplasty and laminectomy and fusion in the recovery rate from myelopathy. One CoE III retrospective cohort study reported a significantly higher recovery rate following laminoplasty. Another CoE III retrospective cohort study reported a significantly higher recovery rate in the laminectomy and fusion group. One CoE II prospective cohort study and one CoE III retrospective cohort study found no significant difference in pain improvement between patients treated with laminoplasty versus patients treated with laminectomy and fusion. All four studies reported a higher incidence of C5 palsy following laminectomy and fusion than laminoplasty. One CoE II prospective cohort and one CoE III retrospective cohort reported that there was no significant difference in axial neck pain between the two procedures. One CoE III retrospective cohort study suggested that there was no significant difference between groups in OPLL progression. Conclusion Data from four comparative studies was not sufficient to support the superiority of laminoplasty or laminectomy and fusion in treating cervical myelopathy caused by OPLL.

  5. Age-Related Surgical Outcomes of Laminoplasty for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Maeno, Takafumi; Okuda, Shinya; Yamashita, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Tomiya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Oda, Takenori; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective clinical study. Objective To investigate the age-related surgical outcomes of laminoplasty. Methods One hundred patients who underwent an en bloc laminoplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy from 2004 to 2008 and were followed for at least 1 year were included in this study. The clinical outcomes were assessed with the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score. Acquired points (postoperative JOA score minus preoperative JOA score) were also calculated. To investigate the age-related effect for laminoplasty, two analyses were conducted: (1) the correlation between age and clinical outcome; and (2) the clinical outcomes by decade. Patients were divided into four groups according to their age at the time of operation as follows: group 50s, 50 to 59 years old; group 60s, 60 to 69 years; group 70s, 70 to 79 years; and group 80s, 80 to 89 years. The pre- and postoperative JOA scores, acquired points, preoperative comorbidities, and postoperative complications were then compared among the groups. Results Significant correlations were detected between age and JOA scores at the preoperative (p = 0.03), postoperative maximum (p < 0.0001), and final assessments (p < 0.0001). An age-related decline of JOA scores was observed over all periods. The analysis by decades showed the same results. On the other hand, the significant differences were not found for acquired points over all periods by either method. The preoperative comorbidities of hypertension and diabetes mellitus increased with age. Delirium was more common postoperatively in elderly patients. Conclusions Although an age-related decline of JOA scores was found over all periods, there were no severe sequelae and no differences in the acquired points that were age-related. PMID:25844284

  6. Measuring Surgical Outcomes in Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Patients Undergoing Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: Assessment of Minimum Clinically Important Difference

    PubMed Central

    Auffinger, Brenda M.; Lall, Rishi R.; Dahdaleh, Nader S.; Wong, Albert P.; Lam, Sandi K.; Koski, Tyler; Fessler, Richard G.; Smith, Zachary A.

    2013-01-01

    Object The concept of minimum clinically important difference (MCID) has been used to measure the threshold by which the effect of a specific treatment can be considered clinically meaningful. MCID has previously been studied in surgical patients, however few studies have assessed its role in spinal surgery. The goal of this study was to assess the role of MCID in patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Methods Data was collected on 30 patients who underwent ACDF for CSM between 2007 and 2012. Preoperative and 1-year postoperative Neck Disability Index (NDI), Visual-Analog Scale (VAS), and Short Form-36 (SF-36) Physical (PCS) and Mental (MCS) Component Summary PRO scores were collected. Five distribution- and anchor-based approaches were used to calculate MCID threshold values average change, change difference, receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC), minimum detectable change (MDC) and standard error of measurement (SEM). The Health Transition Item of the SF-36 (HTI) was used as an external anchor. Results Patients had a significant improvement in all mean physical PRO scores postoperatively (p<0.01) NDI (29.24 to 14.82), VAS (5.06 to 1.72), and PCS (36.98 to 44.22). The five MCID approaches yielded a range of values for each PRO: 2.00–8.78 for PCS, 2.06–5.73 for MCS, 4.83–13.39 for NDI, and 0.36–3.11 for VAS. PCS was the most representative PRO measure, presenting the greatest area under the ROC curve (0.94). MDC values were not affected by the choice of anchor and their threshold of improvement was statistically greater than the chance of error from unimproved patients. Conclusion SF-36 PCS was the most representative PRO measure. MDC appears to be the most appropriate MCID method. When MDC was applied together with HTI anchor, the MCID thresholds were: 13.39 for NDI, 3.11 for VAS, 5.56 for PCS and 5.73 for MCS. PMID:23826290

  7. Spinal Cord Kinking in Thoracic Myelopathy Caused by Ossification of the Ligamentum Flavum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Pan, Min; Yin, Chu-Qiang; Zheng, Xiu-Jun; Cong, Ya-Nan; Wang, De-Chun; Li, Shu-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) is being increasingly recognized as a cause of thoracic myelopathy. This study was to describe a rare clinical entity of spinal cord kinking (SK) in thoracic myelopathy secondary to OLF. Methods: The data of 95 patients with thoracic myelopathy secondary to OLF were analyzed retrospectively. The incidence and location of SK were determined using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The clinical presentation and radiological characteristics in patients with SK were analyzed. Posterior en bloc laminectomy with OLF was performed, and the surgical results were evaluated. Results: SK was found in seven patients (7.4%) based on preoperative MRI. The patients included one male and six females with an average age of 55.6 years (range, 48–64 years). Five patients presented with radiculomyelopathy and two presented with typical thoracic myelopathy of spastic paraparesis. In all cases, the kinking was located just above the end of the spinal cord where the conus medullaris (CM) was compressed by the OLF. The degree of SK varied from mild to severe. The tip of the CM was located between the upper third of T11 to the lower third of L1, above the lower edge of L1. With an average follow-up of 30.4 months, the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association score significantly improved from 5.7 ± 1.8 preoperatively to 8.9 ± 1.4 postoperatively (t = 12.05; P < 0.0001) with an improvement rate of 63.1 ± 12.3%. Conclusions: SK is a rare radiological phenomenon. It is typically located at the thoracolumbar junction, where the CM is compressed by the OLF. Our findings indicate that these patients may benefit from a posterior decompressive procedure. PMID:26415796

  8. Surgical outcomes of elderly patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a meta-analysis of studies reporting on 2868 patients.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Karthik; Chieng, Lee Onn; Foong, Hanyao; Wang, Michael Y

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical spondylotic myelopathy usually presents in the 5th decade of life or later but can also present earlier in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. As life expectancy continues to increase in the United States, the preconceived reluctance toward operating on the elderly population based on older publications must be rethought. It is a known fact that outcomes in the elderly cannot be as robust as those in the younger population. There are no publications with detailed meta-analyses to determine an acceptable level of outcome in this population. In this review, the authors compare elderly patients older than 75 years to a nonelderly population, and they discuss some of the relevant strategies to minimize complications. METHODS In accordance with PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines, the authors performed a PubMed database search to identify English-language literature published between 1995 and 2015. Combinations of the following phrases that describe the age group ("elderly," "non-elderly," "old," "age") and the disease of interest as well as management ("surgical outcome," "surgery," "cervical spondylotic myelopathy," "cervical degenerative myelopathy") were constructed when searching for relevant articles. Two reviewers independently assessed the outcomes, and any disagreement was discussed with the first author until it was resolved. A random-effects model was applied to assess pooled data due to high heterogeneity between studies. The mean difference (MD) and odds ratio were calculated for continuous and dichromatic parameters, respectively. RESULTS Eighteen studies comprising elderly (n = 1169) and nonelderly (n = 1699) patients who received surgical treatment for cervical spondylotic myelopathy were included in this meta-analysis. Of these studies, 5 were prospective and 13 were retrospective. Intraoperatively, both groups required a similar amount of operation time (p = 0.35). The elderly

  9. Remote motor system metabolic profile and surgery outcome in cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Craciunas, Sorin C; Gorgan, Mircea R; Ianosi, Bogdan; Lee, Phil; Burris, Joseph; Cirstea, Carmen M

    2017-03-17

    OBJECTIVE In patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), the motor system may undergo progressive functional/structural changes rostral to the lesion, and these changes may be associated with clinical disability. The extent to which these changes have a prognostic value in the clinical recovery after surgical treatment is not yet known. In this study, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to test 2 primary hypotheses. 1) Based on evidence of corticospinal and spinocerebellar, rubro-, or reticulospinal tract degeneration/dysfunction during chronic spinal cord compression, the authors hypothesized that the metabolic profile of the primary motor cortices (M1s) and cerebellum, respectively, would be altered in patients with CSM, and these alterations would be associated with the extent of the neurological disabilities. 2) Considering that damage and/or plasticity in the remote motor system may contribute to clinical recovery, they hypothesized that M1 and cerebellar metabolic profiles would predict, at least in part, surgical outcome. METHODS The metabolic profile, consisting of N-acetylaspartate (NAA; marker of neuronal integrity), myoinositol (glial marker), choline (cell membrane synthesis and turnover), and glutamate-glutamine (glutamatergic system), of the M1 hand/arm territory in each hemisphere and the cerebellum vermis was investigated prior to surgery in 21 patients exhibiting weakness of the upper extremities and/or gait abnormalities. Age- and sex-matched controls (n = 16) were also evaluated to estimate the pre-CSM metabolic profile of these areas. Correlation and regression analyses were performed between preoperative metabolite levels and clinical status 6 months after surgery. RESULTS Relative to controls, patients exhibited significantly higher levels of choline but no difference in the levels of other metabolites across M1s. Cerebellar metabolite levels were indistinguishable from control levels. Certain metabolites-myo-inositol and

  10. Cervical Myelopathy Secondary to Atlanto-occipital Assimilation: The Usefulness of the Simple Decompressive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang Rae; Kim, Young Zoon; Cho, Yong Woon; Kim, Joon Soo; Kim, Kyu Hong; Lee, In Chang

    2013-01-01

    Atlanto-occipital assimilation is one of the most common osseous anomalies observed at the craniocervical junction. Most patients with atlas assimilation show no symptom, but some have neurological problems such as myelopathy that may require surgical treatment. Occipitocervical fusion may be required if atlato-occipital assimilation is accompanied by occipito-axial instability. However, in cases of symptomatic atlas assimilation with minor cord compression without instability, simple decompressive surgery may be the treatment modality. This report describes a case of successful treatment of a patient with myelopathy secondary to atlanto-occipital assimilation without instability, using posterior simple decompressive surgery. PMID:24757486

  11. Cervical Myelopathy Secondary to Atlanto-occipital Assimilation: The Usefulness of the Simple Decompressive Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Rae; Lee, Young Min; Kim, Young Zoon; Cho, Yong Woon; Kim, Joon Soo; Kim, Kyu Hong; Lee, In Chang

    2013-09-01

    Atlanto-occipital assimilation is one of the most common osseous anomalies observed at the craniocervical junction. Most patients with atlas assimilation show no symptom, but some have neurological problems such as myelopathy that may require surgical treatment. Occipitocervical fusion may be required if atlato-occipital assimilation is accompanied by occipito-axial instability. However, in cases of symptomatic atlas assimilation with minor cord compression without instability, simple decompressive surgery may be the treatment modality. This report describes a case of successful treatment of a patient with myelopathy secondary to atlanto-occipital assimilation without instability, using posterior simple decompressive surgery.

  12. Nerve root distribution of deltoid and biceps brachii muscle in cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a potential risk factor for postoperative shoulder muscle weakness after posterior decompression.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Kazuo; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Fujimoto, Hideaki; Toyoda, Kouichiro; Kawai, Shinya

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the nerve root distribution of deltoid and biceps brachii muscle, compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were recorded intraoperatively following nerve root stimulation in cervical spondylotic myelopathy. A total of 19 upper limbs in 12 patients aged 55-72 years (mean, 65.5 years) with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were examined. CMAPs were recorded from deltoid and biceps brachii muscle following C5 and C6 root stimulation. Although both C5 and C6 roots were innervated for deltoid and biceps brachii muscle in all subjects, the amplitude ratio of CMAPs (C5/C6) differed individually depending on the symptomatic intervertebral levels of the spinal cord. The C5 root predominantly innervated both deltoid and biceps brachii in patients with symptomatic cord lesions at the C4-C5 intervertebral level compared to patients with symptomatic cord lesions at the C5-C6 intervertebral level. Although no patients sustained postoperative radiculopathy in our study, severe weakness and unfavorable recovery are expected when the C5 root in patients with C4-C5 myelopathy is damaged. From the electrophysiological aspect, C4-C5 cord lesions are likely to be a potential risk factor for postoperative shoulder muscle weakness in patients with compressive cervical myelopathy.

  13. Surgical results and complications of anterior decompression and fusion as a revision surgery after initial posterior surgery for cervical myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Odate, Seiichi; Shikata, Jitsuhiko; Soeda, Tsunemitsu; Yamamura, Satoru; Kawaguchi, Shinji

    2017-04-01

    main complication was an intraoperative CSF leak in 8 patients (42%). Neurological function worsened in 5 patients (26%). The deterioration was due to spinal cord herniation through a defective dura mater in 1 patient, unidentified in 1 patient, and C-5 palsy that gradually recovered in 3 patients. Reintubation, delirium, and hoarseness were observed in 1 patient each (5%). No patient required reoperation for reconstruction failure, and all patients eventually had a solid bony fusion. CONCLUSIONS ACDF as revision surgery after initial posterior surgery for cervical myelopathy due to OPLL is associated with a high incidence of intraoperative CSF leakage and an extremely low improvement rate. The authors think that while the use of revision ACDF must be limited, it is indispensable in special cases, such as progressing myelopathy following posterior surgery due to a very large beak-type OPLL that exceeds the K-line. Postoperative OPLL progression and/or kyphotic changes can possibly cause later neurological deterioration. Fusion should be recommended at the initial surgery for many cases of cervical OPLL to prevent such a challenging revision surgery.

  14. Laminoplasty and Laminectomy Hybrid Decompression for the Treatment of Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy with Hypertrophic Ligamentum Flavum: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huairong; Xue, Yuan; Tang, Yanming; He, Dong; Li, Zhiyang; Zhao, Ying; Zong, Yaqi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report the outcomes of a posterior hybrid decompression protocol for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) associated with hypertrophic ligamentum flavum (HLF). Background Laminoplasty is widely used in patients with CSM; however, for CSM patients with HLF, traditional laminoplasty does not include resection of a pathological ligamentum flavum. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed 116 CSM patients with HLF who underwent hybrid decompression with a minimum of 12 months of follow-up. The procedure consisted of reconstruction of the C4 and C6 laminae using CENTERPIECE plates with spinous process autografts, and resection of the C3, C5, and C7 laminae. Surgical outcomes were assessed using Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, recovery rate, cervical lordotic angle, cervical range of motion, spinal canal sagittal diameter, bone healing rates on both the hinge and open sides, dural sac expansion at the level of maximum compression, drift-back distance of the spinal cord, and postoperative neck pain assessed by visual analog scale. Results No hardware failure or restenosis was noted. Postoperative JOA score improved significantly, with a mean recovery rate of 65.3±15.5%. Mean cervical lordotic angle had decreased 4.9 degrees by 1 year after surgery (P<0.05). Preservation of cervical range of motion was satisfactory postoperatively. Bone healing rates 6 months after surgery were 100% on the hinge side and 92.2% on the open side. Satisfactory decompression was demonstrated by a significantly increased sagittal canal diameter and cross-sectional area of the dural sac together with a significant drift-back distance of the spinal cord. The dural sac was also adequately expanded at the time of the final follow-up visit. Conclusion Hybrid laminectomy and autograft laminoplasty decompression using Centerpiece plates may facilitate bone healing and produce a comparatively satisfactory prognosis for CSM patients with HLF. PMID:24740151

  15. Laminoplasty versus laminectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical myelopathy: a meta-analysis of clinical and radiological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Jaebong; Kang, James D; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Posterior cervical surgery, expansive laminoplasty (EL) or laminectomy followed by fusion (LF), is usually performed in patients with multilevel (≥ 3) cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). However, the superiority of either of these techniques is still open to debate. The aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes and postoperative kyphosis in patients undergoing EL versus LF by performing a meta-analysis. METHODS Included in the meta-analysis were all studies of EL versus LF in adults with multilevel CSM in MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, and the Cochrane library. A random-effects model was applied to pool data using the mean difference (MD) for continuous outcomes, such as the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) grade, the cervical curvature index (CCI), and the visual analog scale (VAS) score for neck pain. RESULTS Seven studies comprising 302 and 290 patients treated with EL and LF, respectively, were included in the final analyses. Both treatment groups showed slight cervical lordosis and moderate neck pain in the baseline state. Both groups were similarly improved in JOA grade (MD 0.09, 95% CI -0.37 to 0.54, p = 0.07) and neck pain VAS score (MD -0.33, 95% CI -1.50 to 0.84, p = 0.58). Both groups evenly lost cervical lordosis. In the LF group lordosis seemed to be preserved in long-term follow-up studies, although the difference between the 2 treatment groups was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS Both EL and LF lead to clinical improvement and loss of lordosis evenly. There is no evidence to support EL over LF in the treatment of multilevel CSM. Any superiority between EL and LF remains in question, although the LF group shows favorable long-term results.

  16. Long-term results of anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 strut for cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan; Deng, Xu; Jiang, Dianming; Luo, Xiaoji; Tang, Ke; Zhao, Zenghui; Zhong, Weiyang; Lei, Tao; Quan, Zhengxue

    2016-05-01

    To assess the long-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) with a neotype nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (n-HA/PA66) strut in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Fifty patients with CSM who underwent 1- or 2-level ACCF with n-HA/PA66 struts were retrospectively investigated. With a mean follow-up of 79.6 months, the overall mean JOA score, VAS and cervical alignment were improved significantly. At last follow-up, the fusion rate was 98%, and the subsidence rate of the n-HA/PA66 strut was 8%. The “radiolucent gap” at the interface between the n-HA/PA66 strut and the vertebra was further noted to evaluate the osteoconductivity and osseointegration of the strut, and the incidence of it was 62% at the last follow-up. Three patients suffered symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). No significant difference was detected in the outcomes between 1- and 2-level corpectomy at follow-ups. In conclusion, the satisfactory outcomes in this study indicated that the n-HA/PA66 strut was an effective graft for cervical reconstruction. Moreover, the osteoconductivity and osseointegration of the strut is still need to be optimized for future clinical application owing to the notably presence of “radiolucent gap” in present study.

  17. Long-term results of anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 strut for cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Deng, Xu; Jiang, Dianming; Luo, Xiaoji; Tang, Ke; Zhao, Zenghui; Zhong, Weiyang; Lei, Tao; Quan, Zhengxue

    2016-01-01

    To assess the long-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) with a neotype nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (n-HA/PA66) strut in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Fifty patients with CSM who underwent 1- or 2-level ACCF with n-HA/PA66 struts were retrospectively investigated. With a mean follow-up of 79.6 months, the overall mean JOA score, VAS and cervical alignment were improved significantly. At last follow-up, the fusion rate was 98%, and the subsidence rate of the n-HA/PA66 strut was 8%. The “radiolucent gap” at the interface between the n-HA/PA66 strut and the vertebra was further noted to evaluate the osteoconductivity and osseointegration of the strut, and the incidence of it was 62% at the last follow-up. Three patients suffered symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). No significant difference was detected in the outcomes between 1- and 2-level corpectomy at follow-ups. In conclusion, the satisfactory outcomes in this study indicated that the n-HA/PA66 strut was an effective graft for cervical reconstruction. Moreover, the osteoconductivity and osseointegration of the strut is still need to be optimized for future clinical application owing to the notably presence of “radiolucent gap” in present study. PMID:27225189

  18. Tropical myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo C

    2014-01-01

    A large number of causal agents produce spinal cord lesions in the tropics. Most etiologies found in temperate regions also occur in the tropics including trauma, herniated discs, tumors, epidural abscess, and congenital malformations. However, infectious and nutritional disorders occur with higher prevalence in tropical regions. Among the most common infectious etiologies are tuberculous Pott's disease, brucellosis, and neuroborreliosis. Parasitic diseases such as schistosomiasis, neurocysticercosis, and eosinophilic meningitis are frequent causes of nontraumatic paraplegia. The retrovirus HTLV-1 is a cause of tropical spastic paraparesis. Nutritional causes of paraparesis include deficiencies of vitamin B12 and folate; endemic clusters of konzo and tropical ataxic myeloneuropathy are associated in Africa with malnutrition and excessive consumption of cyanide-containing bitter cassava. Other toxic etiologies of tropical paraplegia include lathyrism and fluorosis. Nutritional forms of myelopathy are associated often with optic and sensory neuropathy, hence the name tropical myeloneuropathies. Acute transverse myelopathy is seen in association with vaccination, infections, and fibrocartilaginous embolism of the nucleus pulposus. Multiple sclerosis and optic myelopathy occur in the tropics but with lesser prevalence than in temperate regions. The advent of modern imaging in the tropics, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, has allowed better diagnosis and treatment of these conditions that are a frequent cause of death and disability.

  19. Development and characterization of a novel rat model of cervical spondylotic myelopathy: the impact of chronic cord compression on clinical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, JangBo; Satkunendrarajah, Kajana; Fehlings, Michael G

    2012-03-20

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the most common cause of spinal cord impairment worldwide and is a risk factor for traumatic central cord syndrome. Despite advances in surgery, there are no effective neuroprotective treatments for CSM, which reflects a limited understanding of its pathophysiology. In order to develop therapeutic strategies, we have developed a novel rat model of chronic progressive cervical spinal cord compression that mimics CSM. A titanium-screw-based chronic compression device (CCD) was designed to achieve progressive cord compression at the C6 level. The CCD was fixed to the C2 and T2 spinous processes and a threaded screw was turned to induce compression. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=75) were divided into three groups: (1) sham (no compression, n=6), (2) mild compression (1.4 mm stenosis, n=27), and (3) severe compression (2.6 mm stenosis, n=42). Compression was evaluated using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). The area of spared white matter, extent of cord flattening ratio, and loss of neurons were assessed. Functional deficits were characterized using sensory-evoked potential (SEP) recordings, and with neurobehavioral tests: the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale, inclined plane, paw grip strength, and assessment of mechanical and thermal allodynia. Micro-CT confirmed progressive canal stenosis. The loss of intact white matter and cord flattening were significantly greater in rats with severe cord compression, and the number of neurons was reduced at the epicenter of cord compression. With chronic cord compression there was a significant decline in locomotor function, forelimb function, trunk stability/coordination, an increase in mechanical allodynia, and impaired axonal conduction. The CCD model results in chronic and precise cervical cord compression. The compression is associated with mechanical allodynia and measurable neurobehavioral, neurophysiological, and neuropathological deficits. We anticipate

  20. A comparison of minimally invasive posterior cervical decompression and open anterior cervical decompression and instrumented fusion in the surgical management of degenerative cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Syed F; Spurgas, Morgan P; Szewczyk, Benjamin S; Yim, Benjamin; Ata, Ashar; German, John W

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimally invasive posterior cervical decompression (miPCD) has been described in several case series with promising preliminary results. The object of the current study was to compare the clinical outcomes between patients undergoing miPCD with anterior cervical discectomy and instrumented fusion (ACDFi). METHODS A retrospective study of 74 patients undergoing surgery (45 using miPCD and 29 using ACDFi) for myelopathy was performed. Outcomes were categorized into short-term, intermediate, and long-term follow-up, corresponding to averages of 1.7, 7.7, and 30.9 months, respectively. Mean scores for the Neck Disability Index (NDI), neck visual analog scale (VAS) score, SF-12 Physical Component Summary (PCS), and SF-12 Mental Component Summary (MCS) were compared for each follow-up period. The percentage of patients meeting substantial clinical benefit (SCB) was also compared for each outcome measure. RESULTS Baseline patient characteristics were well-matched, with the exception that patients undergoing miPCD were older (mean age 57.6 ± 10.0 years [miPCD] vs 51.1 ± 9.2 years [ACDFi]; p = 0.006) and underwent surgery at more levels (mean 2.8 ± 0.9 levels [miPCD] vs 1.5 ± 0.7 levels [ACDFi]; p < 0.0001) while the ACDFi patients reported higher preoperative neck VAS scores (mean 3.8 ± 3.0 [miPCD] vs 5.4 ± 2.6 [ACDFi]; p = 0.047). The mean PCS, NDI, neck VAS, and MCS scores were not significantly different with the exception of the MCS score at the short-term follow-up period (mean 46.8 ± 10.6 [miPCD] vs 41.3 ± 10.7 [ACDFi]; p = 0.033). The percentage of patients reporting SCB based on thresholds derived for PCS, NDI, neck VAS, and MCS scores were not significantly different, with the exception of the PCS score at the intermediate follow-up period (52% [miPCD] vs 80% [ACDFi]; p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS The current report suggests that the optimal surgical strategy in patients requiring dorsal surgery may be enhanced by the adoption of a minimally invasive

  1. Cervical angina caused by atlantoaxial instability.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Fujimoto, Yoshinori; Yasunaga, Yuji; Ishida, Osamu; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2004-10-01

    Cervical angina is defined as a paroxysmal precordialgia that resembles true cardiac angina caused by cervical spondylosis. Cervical angina most commonly results from compression of the C7 ventral root. We present here a case of cervical angina caused by atlantoaxial instability. This case had marked atlantoaxial instability but no flexibility of the middle to lower levels of the cervical spine. Although there was mild C7 root compression on the radiologic findings, the chest pain was induced by neck motion, and the precordialgia disappeared after posterior atlantoaxial fusion without C7 root decompression. Therefore, we diagnosed this case as cervical angina caused by spinal cord compression at the C1-C2 level. It was speculated that a perturbation of the sympathetic nervous system or a hypofunction of the pain suppression pathway in the posterior horn of the spinal cord caused the pectoralgia. Although cervical angina is a rare disease, physicians should be aware of it; if there are no abnormal findings on cardiac examinations for angina pectoris, they should examine the cervical spine. Cervical angina due to atlantoaxial instability is one of the differential diagnoses of precordialgia.

  2. A role for motor and somatosensory evoked potentials during anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for patients without myelopathy: Analysis of 57 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Risheng; Ritzl, Eva K.; Sait, Mohammed; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy F.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Bydon, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although the usage of combined motor and sensory intraoperative monitoring has been shown to improve the surgical outcome of patients with cervical myelopathy, the role of transcranial electric motor evoked potentials (tceMEP) used in conjunction with somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) in patients presenting with radiculopathy but without myelopathy has been less clear. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all patients (n = 57) with radiculopathy but without myelopathy, undergoing anterior cervical decompression and fusion at a single institution over the past 3 years, who had intraoperative monitoring with both tceMEPs and SSEPs. Results: Fifty-seven (100%) patients presented with radiculopathy, 53 (93.0%) with mechanical neck pain, 35 (61.4%) with motor dysfunction, and 29 (50.9%) with sensory deficits. Intraoperatively, 3 (5.3%) patients experienced decreases in SSEP signal amplitudes and 4 (6.9%) had tceMEP signal changes. There were three instances where a change in neuromonitoring signal required intraoperative alteration of the surgical procedure: these were deemed clinically significant events/true positives. SSEP monitoring showed two false positives and two false negatives, whereas tceMEP monitoring only had one false positive and no false negatives. Thus, tceMEP monitoring exhibited higher sensitivity (33.3% vs. 100%), specificity (95.6% vs. 98.1%), positive predictive value (33.3% vs. 75.0%), negative predictive value (97.7% vs. 100%), and efficiency (91.7% vs. 98.2%) compared to SSEP monitoring alone. Conclusions: Here, we present a retrospective series of 57 patients where tceMEP/SSEP monitoring likely prevented irreversible neurologic damage. Though further prospective studies are needed, there may be a role for combined tceMEP/SSEP monitoring for patients undergoing anterior cervical decompression without myelopathy. PMID:22059128

  3. Incidence and Risk Factors for Late Neurologic Deterioration after C3–C6 Laminoplasty for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective We previously reported that the long-term neurologic outcomes of C3–C6 laminoplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) are satisfactory, with reduced frequencies of postoperative axial neck pain and kyphotic deformity. However, only 20 patients were included, which is a limitation in that study. The present study investigated the incidence of late neurologic deterioration (LND) of myelopathic symptoms after C3–C6 laminoplasty for CSM and attempted to identify significant risk factors for LND in a larger patient population. Methods Subjects comprised 137 consecutive patients with CSM who underwent C3–C6 laminoplasty (bilateral open-door laminoplasty, n = 85; unilateral open-door laminoplasty, n = 52) and were followed for >24 months (mean follow-up, 70 months; range, 25 to 124 months). The patients' medical records were examined for evidence of LND due to cervical myelopathy. The age at time of surgery, sex, surgical procedures, anteroposterior spinal canal diameter at the C7 level, type of C6 spinous process, pre- and postoperative C2–C7 angle, C3–C6 range of motion (ROM), and disk height at the C6–C7 level were analyzed to identify risk factors for LND. Results Three patients (2.2%) developed LND of myelopathic symptoms due to caudal segment pathology adjacent to the C3–C6 laminoplasty (LND group). In these three patients, mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score improved from 10.2 before surgery to 12.2 at the time of maximum recovery, and declined to 9.7 just before additional surgery. On the other hand, in 134 patients without LND (non-LND group), the mean JOA score significantly improved from 10.2 before surgery to 13.4 at the time of maximum recovery and was maintained by the final follow-up (13.2). Compared with the non-LND group, the LND group showed significantly smaller anteroposterior spinal canal diameter at C7, more restricted postoperative C3–C6 ROM, and

  4. Signal intensity ratio on magnetic resonance imaging as a prognostic factor in patients with cervical compressive myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Ha, Yoon; Shin, Jun Jae; Cho, Yong Eun; Lee, Ji Hae; Cho, Woo Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with intramedullary signal intensity (SI) changes have a poor prognosis after surgical decompression in cervical compressive myelopathy (CCM); however, some patients show no clear relationship between the SI and postsurgical prognosis. This discrepancy may be because no comprehensive and proper quantitative evaluation exists to assess SI on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was prospectively to evaluate the correlation between the clinical features, neurological outcome of patients with CCM, and the quantitative assessment of SI changes preoperatively and postoperatively, and the correlation with SI severity. A total of 112 patients with CCM at 1 or 2 levels underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. We quantitatively analyzed MR signal changes on T1-weighted MR images (T1WI), gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) contrast-enhanced T1WI, and T2-weighted MR images (T2WI) using the signal intensity ratio (SIR). We evaluated the correlations between various variables and neurological outcome using the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scale, and the severity of SI change by grade (i.e., grade 0 [“none”], grade 1 [“light”], and grade 2 [“bright on T2WI”]). Significant differences between the 3 grades existed in symptom duration, preoperative JOA score, SIR on T2WI, and JOA recovery ratio. The JOA recovery ratio was negatively correlated with symptom duration and the SIR on T2WI, and positively correlated with the preoperative JOA score and cord compression ratio, but not with the SIR on T1WI and contrast-enhanced T1WI. On the postoperative 12-month follow-up MRI, the JOA recovery ratio and SIR on T2WI of the SI reversal patients were better than those of the nonreversal patients. On multiple regression analysis, the SIR on T2WI was the main significant prognostic factor of surgical outcome. The grading system on T2WI provided reliable predictive information for neurological outcome

  5. Comparison of 2 Zero-Profile Implants in the Treatment of Single-Level Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: A Preliminary Clinical Study of Cervical Disc Arthroplasty versus Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li-Li; Liu, Zu-De; Yuan, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with Discover prosthesis or anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with Zero-P cage has been widely used in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). However, little is known about the comparison of the 2 zero-profile implants in the treatment of single-level CSM. The aim was to compare the clinical outcomes and radiographic parameters of CDA with Discover prosthesis and ACDF with Zero-P cage for the treatment of single-level CSM. Methods A total of 128 consecutive patients who underwent 1-level CDA with Discover prosthesis or ACDF with Zero-P cage for single-level CSM between September 2009 and December 2012 were included in this study. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and Neck Disability Index (NDI). For radiographic assessment, the overall sagittal alignment (OSA), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and range of motion (ROM) at the index and adjacent levels were measured before and after surgery. Additionally, the complications were also recorded. Results Both treatments significantly improved all clinical parameters (P < 0.05), without statistically relevant differences between the 2 groups. The OSA and FSU angle increased significantly in both groups (P <0.05). Compared with Zero-P group, ROMs at the index levels were well maintained in the Discover group (P < 0.05). However, there were no statistical differences in the ROMs of adjacent levels between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). Besides, no significant differences existed in dysphagia, subsidence, or adjacent disc degeneration between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). However, significant differences occurred in prosthesis migration in CDA group. Conclusions The results of this study showed that clinical outcomes and radiographic parameters were satisfactory and comparable with the 2 techniques. However, more attention to prosthesis migration of artificial cervical disc should be paid in the

  6. Subacute post-traumatic ascending myelopathy after T12 burst fracture in a 32-year-old male: case report and surgical result of cervical durotomy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Huili; Liu, Haiying; Wang, Guangshun

    2016-01-01

    To draw attention to a rare neurological deterioration after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to discuss evidence supporting an increase in cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), we present an extremely rare case of subacute post-traumatic ascending myelopathy (SPAM) in which the patient sustained a T12 fracture initially resulting in paraplegia and after undergoing posterior fixation and anterior decompression. The patient was a 32-year-old healthy man who sustained a T12 burst fracture with complete paraplegia after a fall injury. The patient underwent a posterior reduction and short-segment fixation 8 h after the injury and an anterior thoracoscopic-assisted decompression on post-traumatic day 8. On post-traumatic day 21, he had a progressive neurological deterioration with dyspnoea and decreased muscle strength of both upper extremities that could not be relieved by conservative intervention. After undergoing a cervical posterior laminectomy and durotomy, the patient exhibited the clinical manifestation of brain herniation. There was no recovery of autonomous respiration, and the patient entered a coma. The patient died on post-traumatic day 25 because of cardiac and respiratory arrest. SPAM is a rare, potentially fatal neurological deterioration after SCI; however, a prompt diagnosis can be made by magnetic resonance imaging. Our observations suggest that an increase in CSFP may be the main cause of SPAM. The paraplegic level should be recorded daily so that neurological deterioration can be recognised as soon as possible.

  7. The Practical Application of Clinical Prediction Rules: A Commentary Using Case Examples in Surgical Patients with Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tetreault, Lindsay; Le, David; Côté, Pierre; Fehlings, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Commentary. Objective This commentary aims to discuss the practical applications of a clinical prediction rule (CPR) developed to predict functional status in patients undergoing surgery for the treatment of degenerative cervical myelopathy. Methods Clinical cases from the AOSpine CSM-North America study were used to illustrate the application of a prediction rule in a surgical setting and to highlight how this CPR can be used to ultimately enhance patient care. Results A CPR combines signs and symptoms, patient characteristics, and other predictive factors to estimate disease probability, treatment prognosis, or risk of complications. These tools can influence allocation of health care resources, inform clinical decision making, and guide the design of future research studies. In a surgical setting, CPRs can be used to (1) manage patients' expectations of outcome and, in turn, improve overall satisfaction; (2) facilitate shared decision making between patient and physician; (3) identify strategies to optimize surgical results; and (4) reduce heterogeneity of care and align surgeons' perceptions of outcome with objective evidence. Conclusions Valid and clinically-relevant CPRs have tremendous value in a surgical setting. PMID:26682095

  8. Multivariate analysis of factors associated with kyphotic deformity after laminoplasty in cervical spondylotic myelopathy patients without preoperative kyphotic alignment

    PubMed Central

    Cao, JunMing; Zhang, JingTao; Yang, DaLong; Yang, Liu; Shen, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The risk factors of post-laminoplasty kyphosis in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) without preoperative kyphotic alignment are not well known. This study aimed to compare clinical and radiological data between patients with or without post-laminoplasty kyphosis and to investigate the factors associated with post-laminoplasty kyphosis in CSM patients without preoperative kyphotic alignment. Patients (n = 194) who received unilateral expansive open-door cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation and completed a 1-year follow-up were enrolled. Patients were grouped according to whether they suffered from postoperative kyphosis (P) or not (NP). Postoperative kyphosis was observed in 21 (10.8%) patients. The recovery rates of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores at the 1-year follow-up in the P group were inferior to those in the NP group (31.9% vs. 65.2%, P < 0.001). Logistic regression with post-laminoplasty kyphosis as the dependent variable showed independent risks associated with an increased C2–7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA, odds ratio [OR] = 1.085, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.025–1.203, P = 0.015), destroyed facet joints (OR = 1.132, 95% CI = 1.068–1.208, P < 0.001), and cephalad vertebral level undergoing laminoplasty (CVLL, OR = 2.860, 95% CI = 1.164–6.847, P = 0.021). These findings suggest that CVLL, C2–7 SVA, and destroyed facet joints are associated with kyphosis after laminoplasty in CSM patients without preoperative kyphotic alignment. PMID:28240309

  9. Symptomatic lumbar disc protrusion causing progressive myelopathy in a low-lying cord.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Shreya; Shetty, Rohit; Collins, Iona

    2012-06-01

    Low-lying cord is an uncommon entity, and cord compression due lumbar disc disease is rarely encountered. We discuss our experience with a case of lumbar cord compression secondary to a large disc protrusion, which caused myelopathy in a low-lying/tethered cord. A 77-year-old woman with known spina bifida occulta presented with 6-week history of severe low back pain and progressive paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a low-lying tethered cord and a large disc prolapse at L2/3 causing cord compression with associated syringomyelia. Medical comorbidities precluded her from anterior decompression, and therefore a posterior decompression was performed. She recovered full motor power in her lower limbs and could eventually walk unaided. She had a deep wound infection, which was successfully treated with debridement, negative pressure therapy (vacuum-assisted closure pump), and antibiotics. Six months after surgery, her Oswestry Disability Index improved from 55% preoperatively to 20%. Posterior spinal cord decompression for this condition has been successful in our case, and we believe that the lumbar lordosis may have helped indirectly decompress the spinal cord by posterior decompression alone.

  10. Texture-based characterization of pre- and post-operative T2-weighted magnetic resonance signals of the cervical spinal cord in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniatis, Ioannis; Klironomos, George; Gatzounis, George; Panayiotakis, George

    2009-10-01

    The utility of texture analysis regarding the provision of quantitative prognostic factors, potentially valuable to the prediction of the post-operative outcome of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) patients, is investigated. The clinical sample of the study comprised six subjects, who had undergone surgical therapeutic intervention for CSM. Following a specific imaging protocol, a pair of MR images of the cervical spine, corresponding to pre- and post-operative MR scans, was obtained for each of the patients. Accordingly, 12 sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images were studied. Employing custom developed software, a Region Of Interest (ROI) within the spinal cord, corresponding to the region of the high-intensity CSM MR signal, was segmented on each image, according to the region growing method. Utilizing custom developed algorithms, the following sets of textural features were generated from the segmented ROIs: (i) gradient features, (ii) mean values of features from co-occurrence matrices (co-occurrence features) and (iii) range values of co-occurrence features. Utilizing each one of these sets of features, as well as the least-squares minimum distance and the quadratic classification algorithms, pattern recognition classification schemes were implemented for the discrimination between pre-operative and post-operative MR signals. Statistical analysis revealed the existence of statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) between textural features generated from pre-operative and post-operative high-intensity MR signals. The classification accuracies accomplished ranged from 75% to 100%. Textural features, descriptive of relevant properties of the high-intensity MR signal in CSM, may be considered as quantitative information of potential value for the prediction of the post-operative outcome of CSM patients.

  11. Myelopathy in adult aortic coarctation: Causes and caveats of an atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mourya, Chandan; Verma, Ashish; Bansal, Anand; Shukla, Ram C; Srivastava, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old female presenting with acute-onset paraplegia was referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cervico-dorsal spine. On MRI, multiple tortuous dilated vessels were noted in the epidural space with long segment cord compression and imaging features of compressive myelopathy. Associated small acute cervico-dorsal epidural hematoma was also noted in the same region. Computed tomography (CT) angiography was performed subsequently which revealed post-ductal coarctation of aorta with multiple arterial collaterals in the chest wall and spinal canal. An extensive review of English language literature pertaining to the clinical presentations of adult aortic coarctation revealed only few reports of acute compressive myelopathy due to spinal epidural collateral vessels. Further, presentation at such a late age has not been reported before. In the present case, apart from a hypertrophied anterior spinal artery and perispinal collaterals, an anterior epidural hematoma was an additional important factor in the causation of myelopathy. PMID:28104936

  12. Increased Low-Frequency Oscillation Amplitude of Sensorimotor Cortex Associated with the Severity of Structural Impairment in Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fuqing; Gong, Honghan; Liu, Xiaojia; Wu, Lin; Luk, Keith Dip-Kei; Hu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Decreases in metabolites and increased motor-related, but decreased sensory-related activation of the sensorimotor cortex (SMC) have been observed in patients with cervical myelopathy (CM) using advanced MRI techniques. However, the nature of intrinsic neuronal activity in the SMC, and the relationship between cerebral function and structural damage of the spinal cord in patients with CM are not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to assess intrinsic neuronal activity by calculating the regional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) using resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI), and correlations with clinical and imaging indices. Nineteen patients and 19 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects underwent rs-fMRI scans. ALFF measurements were performed in the SMC, a key brain network likely to impaired or reorganized patients with CM. Compared with healthy subjects, increased amplitude of cortical low-frequency oscillations (LFO) was observed in the right precentral gyrus, right postcentral gyrus, and left supplementary motor area. Furthermore, increased z-ALFF values in the right precentral gyrus and right postcentral gyrus correlated with decreased fractional anisotropy values at the C2 level, which indicated increased intrinsic neuronal activity in the SMC corresponding to the structural impairment in the spinal cord of patients with CM. These findings suggest a complex and diverging relationship of cortical functional reorganization and distal spinal anatomical compression in patients with CM and, thus, add important information in understanding how spinal cord integrity may be a factor in the intrinsic covariance of spontaneous low-frequency fluctuations of BOLD signals involved in cortical plasticity. PMID:25111566

  13. Use of multivariate linear regression and support vector regression to predict functional outcome after surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Haydn; Lee, Sunghoon Ivan; Garst, Jordan H.; Lu, Derek S.; Li, Charles H.; Nagasawa, Daniel T.; Ghalehsari, Nima; Jahanforouz, Nima; Razaghy, Mehrdad; Espinal, Marie; Ghavamrezaii, Amir; Paak, Brian H.; Wu, Irene; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Lu, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    This study introduces the use of multivariate linear regression (MLR) and support vector regression (SVR) models to predict postoperative outcomes in a cohort of patients who underwent surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Currently, predicting outcomes after surgery for CSM remains a challenge. We recruited patients who had a diagnosis of CSM and required decompressive surgery with or without fusion. Fine motor function was tested preoperatively and postoperatively with a handgrip-based tracking device that has been previously validated, yielding mean absolute accuracy (MAA) results for two tracking tasks (sinusoidal and step). All patients completed Oswestry disability index (ODI) and modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association questionnaires preoperatively and postoperatively. Preoperative data was utilized in MLR and SVR models to predict postoperative ODI. Predictions were compared to the actual ODI scores with the coefficient of determination (R2) and mean absolute difference (MAD). From this, 20 patients met the inclusion criteria and completed follow-up at least 3 months after surgery. With the MLR model, a combination of the preoperative ODI score, preoperative MAA (step function), and symptom duration yielded the best prediction of postoperative ODI (R2 = 0.452; MAD = 0.0887; p = 1.17 × 10−3). With the SVR model, a combination of preoperative ODI score, preoperative MAA (sinusoidal function), and symptom duration yielded the best prediction of postoperative ODI (R2 = 0.932; MAD = 0.0283; p = 5.73 × 10−12). The SVR model was more accurate than the MLR model. The SVR can be used preoperatively in risk/benefit analysis and the decision to operate. PMID:26115898

  14. Sprengel deformity and Klippel-Feil syndrome leading to cervical myelopathy presentation in old age.

    PubMed

    Mirhosseini, Seyyed Ahmad; Mirhosseini, Seyyed Mohammad Mahdy; Bidaki, Reza; Boshrabadi, Ahmad Pourrashidi

    2013-06-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome is a rare condition characterized by the congenital fusion of two of the seventh cervical vertebrae. A 50-year-old woman presented with a 2-year history of neck pain and ataxia for 1 year. She had not urinary incontinence. She was referred to a neurosurgeon by a neurologist because of her progressive gait ataxia. Risk for brachial plexus injury because of compression or stretching by the clavicle accelerate with age. Therefore, the surgical approach of adults' patients with Sprengel's deformity can intend suitable surgical conclusions.

  15. Different Approaches for Treating Multilevel Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: A Retrospective Study of 153 Cases from a Single Spinal Center

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiumao; Jiang, Liang; Liu, Zhongjun; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Hua; Zhou, Hua; Wei, Feng; Yu, Miao; Wu, Fengliang

    2015-01-01

    Objective The optimal surgical treatment for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy (MCSM) remains controversial. This study compared the outcomes of three surgical approaches for MSCM treatment, focusing on the efficacy and safety of a combined approach. Methods This retrospective study included 153 consecutive MCSM patients (100 men, 53 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 55.7 ± 9.4 years) undergoing operations involving ≥3 intervertebral segments. The patients were divided into three groups according to surgical approach: anterior (n = 19), posterior (n = 76), and combined (n = 58). We assessed demographic variables, perioperative parameters, and clinical outcomes ≥12 months after surgery (20.5 ± 7.6 months), including Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, improvement, recovery rate, and complications. Results The anterior group had the most favorable preoperative conditions, including the highest preoperative JOA score (12.95 ± 1.86, p = 0.046). In contrast, the combined group had the highest occupancy ratio (48.0% ± 11.6%, p = 0.002). All groups showed significant neurological improvement at final follow-ups, with JOA recovery rates of 59.7%, 54.6%, and 68.9% in the anterior, posterior, and combined groups, respectively (p = 0.163). After multivariable adjustments, the groups did not have significantly different clinical outcomes (postoperative JOA score, p = 0.424; improvement, p = 0.424; recovery rate, p = 0.080). Further, subgroup analyses of patients with occupancy ratios ≥50% showed similar functional outcomes following the posterior and combined approaches. Overall complication rates did not differ significantly among the three approaches (p = 0.600). Occupancy ratios did not have a significant negative influence on postoperative recovery following the posterior approach. Conclusions If applied appropriately, all three approaches are effective for treating MCSM. All three approaches had equivalent neurological outcomes, even in

  16. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of compressive cervical myelopathy with traumatic intervertebral disc herniation in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Park, Seong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) with nucleus pulposus extrusion, traumatic or not, is a devastating clinical condition accompanied by neurological problems. Here we report a cynomolgus macaque suffering from acute and progressive neurological dysfunction by a blunt trauma due to neck collar, an animal handling device. Tetraplegia, urinary incontinence, decreased proprioception, and imperception of pain were shown on physical and neurological examinations. MRI sagittal T2 weighted sequences revealed an extensive protrusion of disc material between C2 and C3 cervical vertebra, and this protrusion resulted in central stenosis of the spinal cord. Histopathologic findings showed a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated at sites of spinal cord injury (SCI). This case is the first report of compressive cervical SCI caused by IVDH associated with blunt trauma. PMID:28053621

  17. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of compressive cervical myelopathy with traumatic intervertebral disc herniation in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Park, Seong Hoe; Lee, Jae-Il

    2016-12-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) with nucleus pulposus extrusion, traumatic or not, is a devastating clinical condition accompanied by neurological problems. Here we report a cynomolgus macaque suffering from acute and progressive neurological dysfunction by a blunt trauma due to neck collar, an animal handling device. Tetraplegia, urinary incontinence, decreased proprioception, and imperception of pain were shown on physical and neurological examinations. MRI sagittal T2 weighted sequences revealed an extensive protrusion of disc material between C2 and C3 cervical vertebra, and this protrusion resulted in central stenosis of the spinal cord. Histopathologic findings showed a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated at sites of spinal cord injury (SCI). This case is the first report of compressive cervical SCI caused by IVDH associated with blunt trauma.

  18. Prevalence of Klippel-Feil Syndrome in a Surgical Series of Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: Analysis of the Prospective, Multicenter AOSpine North America Study

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Aria; Tetreault, Lindsay; Zamorano, Juan J.; Mohanty, Chandan B.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) in a prospective data set of patients undergoing surgical treatment for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and to evaluate if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features in patients with KFS are more pronounced than those of non-KFS patients with CSM. Methods A retrospective analysis of baseline MRI data from the AOSpine prospective and multicenter CSM-North American study was conducted. All the patients presented with at least one clinical sign of myelopathy and underwent decompression surgery. The MRIs and radiographs were reviewed by three investigators. The clinical and imaging findings were compared with patients without KFS but with CSM. Results Imaging analysis discovered 5 of 131 patients with CSM (∼3.82%) had single-level congenital fusion of the cervical spine. The site of fusion differed for all the patients. One patient underwent posterior surgery and four patients received anterior surgery. Postoperative follow-up was available for four of the five patients with KFS and indicated stable or improved functional status. All five patients demonstrated pathologic changes of adjacent segments and hyperintensity signal changes in the spinal cord on T2-weighted MRI. Multiple MRI features, most notably maximum canal compromise (p = 0.05) and T2 signal hyperintensity area (p = 0.05), were worse in patients with CSM and KFS. Conclusions The high prevalence of KFS in our surgical series of patients with CSM may serve as an indication that these patients are prone to increased biomechanical use of segments adjacent to fused vertebra. This supposition is supported by a tendency of patients with KFS to present with more extensive MRI evidence of degeneration than non-KFS patients with CSM. PMID:26225278

  19. Prevalence of Klippel-Feil Syndrome in a Surgical Series of Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: Analysis of the Prospective, Multicenter AOSpine North America Study.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Aria; Tetreault, Lindsay; Zamorano, Juan J; Mohanty, Chandan B; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) in a prospective data set of patients undergoing surgical treatment for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and to evaluate if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features in patients with KFS are more pronounced than those of non-KFS patients with CSM. Methods A retrospective analysis of baseline MRI data from the AOSpine prospective and multicenter CSM-North American study was conducted. All the patients presented with at least one clinical sign of myelopathy and underwent decompression surgery. The MRIs and radiographs were reviewed by three investigators. The clinical and imaging findings were compared with patients without KFS but with CSM. Results Imaging analysis discovered 5 of 131 patients with CSM (∼3.82%) had single-level congenital fusion of the cervical spine. The site of fusion differed for all the patients. One patient underwent posterior surgery and four patients received anterior surgery. Postoperative follow-up was available for four of the five patients with KFS and indicated stable or improved functional status. All five patients demonstrated pathologic changes of adjacent segments and hyperintensity signal changes in the spinal cord on T2-weighted MRI. Multiple MRI features, most notably maximum canal compromise (p = 0.05) and T2 signal hyperintensity area (p = 0.05), were worse in patients with CSM and KFS. Conclusions The high prevalence of KFS in our surgical series of patients with CSM may serve as an indication that these patients are prone to increased biomechanical use of segments adjacent to fused vertebra. This supposition is supported by a tendency of patients with KFS to present with more extensive MRI evidence of degeneration than non-KFS patients with CSM.

  20. Clinical features and surgical outcomes of cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients aged 80 years or older: a multi-center retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Dokai, Toshiyuki; Hashiguchi, Hirokazu; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kameyama, Yasuhiro; Katae, Yuji; Morio, Yasuo; Morishita, Tsugutake; Murata, Masaaki; Nanjo, Yoshiro; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tanida, Atsushi; Tanishima, Shinji; Yamane, Koji; Teshima, Ryota

    2011-01-01

    With the aging of the population in developed countries, spine surgeons have recently been more likely to encounter elderly patients in need of treatment. This study investigated whether decompression surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) in elderly patients aged 80 years or older would likely be a reasonable treatment. We retrospectively reviewed 605 consecutive patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent decompression surgery between 2004 and 2008. Patients with other conditions that could affect functional status or compression factors other than spondylosis were excluded from this study. Of the remaining 189 patients, 161 with CSM whose condition could be evaluated 6 months after surgery were analyzed. The patients were divided into two age groups: 80 years or older (Group A, 37 patients) and younger than 80 years of age (Group B, 124 patients). We evaluated the differences in symptom duration, clinical data, involved levels, surgical outcome, comorbidities, and postoperative complications between the two groups. The symptom duration was significantly shorter in Group A. The average JOA scores preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively were significantly lower in Group A; however, there was no significant difference in the recovery ratio. There were no significant differences in the percentages of patients with comorbidities or those with postoperative complications. Elderly patients aged 80 years or older regained approximately 40% of their function postoperatively, and the incidence of postoperative complication was similar to that in younger patients. Since this age group shows a rapid deterioration after onset, prompt decompression surgery is required. PMID:21197553

  1. HEREDITARY MYELOPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Fink, John K.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary myelopathies are a diverse group of disorders in which major aspects of the clinical syndrome involve spinal cord structures. Hereditary myelopathic syndromes can be recognized as four clinical paradigms: (1) spinocerebellar ataxia, (2) motor neuron disorder, (3) leukodystrophy, and (4) distal motor-sensory axonopathy. This review illustrates these hereditary myelopathy paradigms with clinical examples with an emphasis on clinical recognition and differential diagnosis. PMID:20148180

  2. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy (CSM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food ... Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well-Being Mental Health Sex and ...

  3. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Eugênia; Álvares, Pâmella; Silva, Luciano; Silva, Leorik; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections. PMID:27375905

  4. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction.

    PubMed

    Arruda, José Alcides; Figueiredo, Eugênia; Álvares, Pâmella; Silva, Luciano; Silva, Leorik; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections.

  5. Long-term outcomes and prognostic analysis of modified open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fusion in treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Nan; Fei, Qi; Wang, Bingqiang; Li, Dong; Li, Jinjun; Meng, Hai; Yang, Yong; Guo, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present study was to explore and analyze the long-term outcomes and factors that affect the prognosis of expansive open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fusion in treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 49 patients with multilevel CSM who had undergone expansive open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screws fixation and fusion in our hospital between February 2008 and February 2012. The average follow-up period was 4.6 years. The clinical data of patients, including age, sex, operation records, pre- and postoperation Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores, cervical spine canal stenosis, and cervical curvature, were collected. Increased signal intensity (ISI) on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament were also observed. Paired t-test was used to analyze the treatment effectiveness and recovery of neuronal function. The prognostic factors were analyzed with multivariable linear regression model. Results Forty-nine patients with CSM with a mean age of 59.44 years were enrolled in this study. The average of preoperative JOA score was 9.14±2.25, and postoperative JOA score was 15.31±1.73. There was significant difference between the pre- and postoperative JOA scores. The clinical improvement rate was 80.27%. On follow-up, five patients had complaints of neck and shoulder pain, but no evidence of C5 nerve palsy was found. Developmental cervical spine canal stenosis was present in all patients before surgery. Before surgery, ISI was observed in eight patients, while ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament was found in 12 patients. The average of preoperative cervical curvature was 21.27°±8.37° and postoperative cervical curvature was 20.09°±1.29°, and there was no significant difference between the pre- and postoperative cervical curvatures. Multivariable linear regression analysis results showed that

  6. [Comparison of the outcomes between anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus posterior laminectomy and fusion for the treatment of multi-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy combined with cervical kyphosis].

    PubMed

    Shen, Q F; Xu, T T; Xia, Y P

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To compare the outcomes between anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and posterior laminectomy and fusion(LF) for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy combined with cervical kyphosis. Methods: From January 2010 to June 2014, 54 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy combined with cervical kyphosis underwent surgical treatment.Among them, 29 patients were underwent ACDF, and 25 patients were underwent LF in Department of spine surgery, Tianjin Union Medical Centre. The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, fusion segments, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA)score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), change of cervical curvature, range of motion(ROM)and complications were recorded and compared between the two groups. Results: Mean operative time was (162.7±21.3)min in the anterior approach group versus (176.3±29.8)min in the posterior group(P>0.05). Mean intraoperative blood loss was (135.6±27.8)ml in the anterior approach group and (255.2±32.3)ml in the posterior approach group(P<0.05). Mean fusion levels are (4.1±0.3)in the anterior approach group and (5.3±0.5) in the posterior approach group(P<0.05). The mean preoperative JOA score were(8.3±2.7)in the anterior approach group and( 8.9±2.1) in the posterior approach group (P>0.05). Mean postoperative JOA score were(13.6±2.5) in the anterior approach group and (14.0±1.7)in the posterior approach group at final follow-up(P>0.05). Mean improvement rate was (55.7%±16.3%)in the anterior approach group and (58.3%±15.7%) in the posterior approach group (P>0.05). Mean preoperative NDI score were(33.8±11.0)in the anterior approach group and (34.4±8.7)in the posterior approach group (P>0.05). Mean postoperative NDI score were (16.9±7.5) in the anterior approach group and (15.5±8.1) in the posterior approach group at final follow-up (P>0.05). Mean VAS score were (2.9±1.5) in the anterior approach group and (2.5±1.0) in the posterior approach group

  7. Solitary spinal epidural cavernous haemangiomas as a rare cause of myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Shamji, Mohammed F

    2015-09-25

    Cavernous haemangiomas rarely occur in the spinal epidural space. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who presented with myelopathy secondary to spinal cord compression from a purely epidural lesion. The imaging characteristics of cavernous haemangiomas are unique, reflecting a highly vascular lesion. Key differentiating features from intracranial or intramedullary lesions include the lack of a surrounding hemosiderin ring and popcorn appearance. An urgent referral to a neurosurgeon is recommended given the possibility of acute neurological deterioration from intralesional haemorrhage, and good recovery from early surgical resection. Preoperative planning with thorough patient counselling and availability of matched blood is important, and an en bloc resection approach should be taken to minimise blood loss. In this case, the patient experienced complete recovery after surgical resection. No recurrence after complete resection has been reported in the literature. This suggests a good long-term outcome for the patient and that no early adjuvant therapy is necessary.

  8. Giant Cervical Osteophyte: An Unusual Cause of Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sudhir Kumar; Bhosale, Sunil Krishna; Aggarwal, Rishi Anil

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia due to skeletal causes is a rare entity. A large cervical osteophyte can cause mechanical compression of the pharyngo-oesophageal segment leading to dysphagia. Large cervical osteophytes can occur in cervical spondylosis, ankylosing spondylitis or Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH). A 60-year-old female came with progressive dysphagia due to a giant cervical osteophyte anterior to C4 and C5 vertebral bodies causing compression of the pharyngo-oesophageal segment. The patient was treated by surgical excision of the osteophyte by orthopaedic surgeons. The patient had complete relief of dysphagia following excision of the osteophyte. PMID:27891363

  9. Large primary leiomyoma causing progressive cervical deformity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habib, Amro; Elgamal, Essam A.; Aldhahri, Saleh; Alokaili, Riyadh; AlShamrani, Rami; Abobotain, Abdulaziz; AlRaddadi, Khulood; Alkhalidi, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas are benign smooth tumors that rarely affect the neck area. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice. Here, we describe a 13-year-old girl with a large leiomyoma of the neck, which increased in size after incomplete resection. The tumor caused progressive cervical kyphotic deformity, difficulty breathing and severe malnourishment. The tumor was resected successfully in a second surgery, and the patient is stable after 3 years of follow-up. Histopathologically, the tumor was consistent with leiomyoma and showed strong reactivity to specific smooth muscle markers, such as desmin and caldesmon. This is the second reported case demonstrating massive growth of a leiomyoma, with emphasis on complete resection from the beginning. PMID:27887011

  10. Radiation myelopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, B; Pant, G C; Subrahmaniyam, K; Agrawal, M S; Mohanty, S

    1979-01-01

    Five cases of radiation myelopathy were found in a total of 10,000 cases given radiotherapy from 1968 to 1977. The clinical presentation and treatment details including the total dose, treatment volume, number of fractionations, overall time, and the RET value at the spinal cord were calculated and compared with other reports on this subject. The total number of fractionations ranged from 20 to 26 with an overall time of 32 days to 37 days. The dose received by four patients ranged from 1030 to 1900 RET, a little higher than the tolerance level of the spinal cord as compared to reported values. Two patients in this series had high blood pressure. The incidence of radiation myelopathy, already acceptably low, could possibly be reduced further by meticulous planning of radiation. PMID:448380

  11. Compression Myelopathy due to Proliferative Changes around C2 Pars Defects without Instability

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Tezuka, Fumitake; Abe, Mitsunobu; Yamashita, Kazuta; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case with compression myelopathy due to proliferative changes around the C2 pars defects without instability. A 69-year-old man presented with progressive clumsy hands and spastic gait. Plain radiographs showed bilateral spondylolysis (pars defects) at C2 and fusion between C2 and C3 spinous processes. Dynamic views revealed mobility through the pars defects, but there was no apparent instability. Computed tomography showed proliferative changes at the pars defects, which protruded into spinal canal. On magnetic resonance imaging, the spinal cord was compressed and intramedullary high signal change was found. A diagnosis of compression myelopathy due to proliferative changes around the C2 pars defects was made. We performed posterior decompression. Postoperatively, symptoms have been alleviated and images revealed sufficient decompression and no apparent instability. In patients with the cervical spondylolysis, myelopathy caused by instability or slippage have been periodically reported. The present case involving C2 spondylolysis is extremely rare. PMID:27340539

  12. Observations on radiation myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Godwin-Austen, R B; Howell, D A; Worthington, B

    1975-12-01

    Three cases of radiation myelopathy are reported. Corticosteroid therapy was associated with worth-while remissions in 2 patients. Two patients showed swelling of the spinal cord in myelograms and in one it extended below the irradiated part of the spinal cord. Demyelination of the dorsal white columns of the spinal cord unaccompanied by vascular abnormality was seen below the irradiated part of the cord. It is suggested that radiation damages the endothelial cell barrier of capillaries and arterioles after a latent interval. Proteinous oedema fluid spreads through the white matter from the capillaries and also into the arteriolar walls narrowing these vessels enough to cause local ischaemia and infarction. It is further suggested that apart from ischaemia and infarction myelin is also damaged by poor nutrition associated with oedema fluid, and that radiation damage to oligodendroglial cells is not the cause of this additional demyelination in patients with radiation myelopathy.

  13. Clinical and radiological profile of Hirayama disease: A flexion myelopathy due to tight cervical dural canal amenable to collar therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, K. M.; Sahni, Hirdesh; Jha, Atul

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hirayama disease (HD) is benign focal amyotrophy of the distal upper limbs, often misdiagnosed as motor neuron disease. Routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often reported normal. Objective: To study the clinicoradiological profile of hand wasting in young males. Materials and Methods: Patients presenting with insidious-onset hand wasting from March 2008 to May 2011 were evaluated electrophysiologically. Cervical MRI in neutral position was done in 11 patients and flexion contrast imaging was done in 10 patients. Results: All patients were males less than 25 years of age, with median age 23 years, except one patient who was 50 years old. Duration of illness was 3 months to 3 years. All (100%) had oblique amyotrophy, four (36%) cold paresis, 10 (91%) minipolymyoclonus and three (27%) had fasciculations. Regional reflexes were variably absent. Two patients (18%) had brisk reflexes of lower limbs with flexor plantars. Electromyography (EMG) showed chronic denervation in the C7-T1 myotomes. Neutral position MRI showed loss of cervical lordosis in 10/11 (91%), localized lower cervical cord atrophy in 9/11 (82%), asymmetric cord flattening in 11/11 (100%) and intramedullary hyperintensity in 2/11 (18%); flexion study showed loss of dural attachment, anterior displacement of dorsal dura, epidural flow voids in 9/10 (90%) and enhancing epidural crescent in 10/10 (100%). Clinical profile, imaging and electrophysiological findings of the patient aged 50 years will be described in detail as presentation at this age is exceptional. Collar therapy slowed progression in most cases. Conclusion: Clinical features of HD corroborated well with electrophysiological diagnosis of anterior horn cell disease of lower cervical cord. While dynamic contrast MRI is characteristic, routine studies have a high predictive value for diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis is important to institute early collar therapy. PMID:22566723

  14. [Medulla and upper cervical cord compression by bilateral vertebral artery presented with myelopathy and drop attack: case report].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Seigo; Maeda, Tsuyoshi; Komine, Akiko

    2002-05-01

    A 51-year-old man had suffered from attacks of quadri-paresis and unconsciousness for previous three years prior to presentation. Prior to admission, he had been received anticonvulsants, but his symptoms showed no improvement. Neurological examination revealed hyper-reflexia of his left lower extremity and moderate decrease of sense of pain, temperature, and tactile sensation in his left extremities and trunk, while vibratory sensation was normal. Magnetic resonance(MR) imaging revealed a flow-void area in the craniocervical junction and marked narrowing of the medulla oblongata and upper cervical cord by compression of the vertebral arteries(VA). CT myelography also showed the compression and narrowing of the spinal cord. Vertebral angiography demonstrated symmetrical running course of the arteries, which curved medially at the level of craniocervical junction. Suboccipital craniectomy and C1 and upper half of C2 laminectomies were performed. After dural opening, the ventrolateral aspects of the lower medulla oblongata and the upper cervical cord were found to be compressed by the VA. The arteries were retracted dorsolaterally by GORE-TEX tapes so as to decompress the medulla oblongata and cervical cord, and the tapes were anchored to the residual part of C1 posterior arch. Postoperative MR imaging and CT myelography showed complete decompression, and the patient was relieved of his previous neurological symptoms.

  15. Lipoprotein(a)-hyperlipoproteinemia as cause of chronic spinal cord ischemia resulting in progressive myelopathy - successful treatment with lipoprotein apheresis.

    PubMed

    Heigl, Franz; Hettich, Reinhard; Mauch, Erich; Klingel, Reinhard; Fassbender, Cordula

    2017-03-01

    High concentrations of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) represent an important independent and causal risk factor associated with adverse outcome in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Effective Lp(a) lowering drug treatment is not available. Lipoprotein apheresis (LA) has been proven to prevent cardiovascular events in patients with Lp(a)-hyperlipoproteinemia (Lp(a)-HLP) and progressive CVD. Here we present the course of a male patient with established peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) at the early age of 41 and coronary artery disease (CAD), who during follow-up developed over 2 years a progressive syndrome of cerebellar and spinal cord deficits against the background of multifactorial cardiovascular risk including positive family history of CVD. Spastic tetraplegia and dependency on wheel chair and nursing care represented the nadir of neurological deficits. All conventional risk factors including LDL-cholesterol had already been treated and after exclusion of other causes, genetically determined Lp(a)-HLP was considered as the major underlying etiologic factor of ischemic vascular disease in this patient including spinal cord ischemia with vascular myelopathy. Treatment with an intensive regimen of chronic LA over 4.5 years now was successful to stabilize PAOD and CAD and led to very impressive neurologic and overall physical rehabilitation and improvement of quality of life.Measurement of Lp(a) concentration must be recommended to assess individual cardiovascular risk. Extracorporeal clearance of Lp(a) by LA should be considered as treatment option for select patients with progressive Lp(a)-associated ischemic syndromes.

  16. Effects of robot-driven gait orthosis treadmill training on the autonomic response in rehabilitation-responsive stroke and cervical spondylotic myelopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Magagnin, Valentina; Bo, Ivano; Turiel, Maurizio; Fornari, Maurizio; Caiani, Enrico G; Porta, Alberto

    2010-06-01

    Body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) assisted with a robotic-driven gait orthosis is utilized in rehabilitation of individuals with lost motor skills. A typical rehabilitation session included: sitting, standing, suspension, robotic-assisted walking at 1.5 and 2.5km/h, respectively with 50% body weight support and recovery. While the effects of robotic-assisted BWSTT on motor performances were deeply studied, the influences on the cardiovascular control are still unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate in stroke (ST) and cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) patients: (1) the autonomic response during a traditional robotic-assisted BWSTT session of motor rehabilitation; (2) the effects of 30 daily sessions of BWSTT on cardiovascular regulation. The autonomic response was assessed through symbolic analysis of short-term heart rate variability in 11 pathologic subjects (5 ST and 6 CSM patients) whose motor skills were improved as a result of the rehabilitation therapy. Results showed variable individual responses to the rehabilitation session in ST patients at the beginning of the therapy. At the end of the rehabilitation process, the responses of ST patients were less variable and more similar to those previously observed in healthy subjects. CSM patients exhibited an exaggerated vagal response to the fastest walking phase during the first rehabilitative session. This abnormal response was limited after the last rehabilitative session. We conclude that robotic-assisted BWSTT is helpful in restoring cardiovascular control in rehabilitation-responsive ST patients and limiting vagal responses in rehabilitation-responsive CSM patients.

  17. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christopher J; Angevine, Peter D; Aulino, Joseph M; Berger, Kevin L; Choudhri, Asim F; Fries, Ian Blair; Holly, Langston T; Kendi, Ayse Tuba Karaqulle; Kessler, Marcus M; Kirsch, Claudia F; Luttrull, Michael D; Mechtler, Laszlo L; O'Toole, John E; Sharma, Aseem; Shetty, Vilaas S; West, O Clark; Cornelius, Rebecca S; Bykowski, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Patients presenting with myelopathic symptoms may have a number of causative intradural and extradural etiologies, including disc degenerative diseases, spinal masses, infectious or inflammatory processes, vascular compromise, and vertebral fracture. Patients may present acutely or insidiously and may progress toward long-term paralysis if not treated promptly and effectively. Noncontrast CT is the most appropriate first examination in acute trauma cases to diagnose vertebral fracture as the cause of acute myelopathy. In most nontraumatic cases, MRI is the modality of choice to evaluate the location, severity, and causative etiology of spinal cord myelopathy, and predicts which patients may benefit from surgery. Myelopathy from spinal stenosis and spinal osteoarthritis is best confirmed without MRI intravenous contrast. Many other myelopathic conditions are more easily visualized after contrast administration. Imaging performed should be limited to the appropriate spinal levels, based on history, physical examination, and clinical judgment. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals, and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  18. Evaluation of Anterior Cervical Reconstruction with Titanium Mesh Cages versus Nano-Hydroxyapatite/Polyamide66 Cages after 1- or 2-Level Corpectomy for Multilevel Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: A Retrospective Study of 117 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Quan, Zhengxue; Zhao, Zenghui; Luo, Xiaoji; Tang, Ke; Li, Jie; Zhou, Xu; Jiang, Dianming

    2014-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively compare the efficacy of the titanium mesh cage (TMC) and the nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide66 cage (n-HA/PA66 cage) for 1- or 2-level anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) to treat multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy (MCSM). Methods A total of 117 consecutive patients with MCSM who underwent 1- or 2-level ACCF using a TMC or an n-HA/PA66 cage were studied retrospectively at a mean follow-up of 45.28±12.83 months. The patients were divided into four groups according to the level of corpectomy (1- or 2-level corpectomy) and cage type used (TMC or n-HA/PA66 cage). Clinical and radiological parameters were used to evaluate outcomes. Results At the one-year follow-up, the fusion rate in the n-HA/PA66 group was higher, albeit non-significantly, than that in the TMC group for both 1- and 2-level ACCF, but the fusion rates of the procedures were almost equal at the final follow-up. The incidence of cage subsidence at the final follow-up was significantly higher in the TMC group than in the n-HA/PA66 group for the 1-level ACCF (24% vs. 4%, p = 0.01), and the difference was greater for the 2-level ACCF between the TMC group and the n-HA/PA66 group (38% vs. 5%, p = 0.01). Meanwhile, a much greater loss of fused height was observed in the TMC group compared with the n-HA/PA66 group for both the 1- and 2-level ACCF. All four groups demonstrated increases in C2-C7 Cobb angle and JOA scores and decreases in VAS at the final follow-up compared with preoperative values. Conclusion The lower incidence of cage subsidence, better maintenance of the height of the fused segment and similar excellent bony fusion indicate that the n-HA/PA66 cage may be a superior alternative to the TMC for cervical reconstruction after cervical corpectomy, in particular for 2-level ACCF. PMID:24789144

  19. Complete paraplegia resulting from surfer's myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Tomokazu; Yokoyama, Osamu; Sakuma, Fujiko; Itoh, Ryousuke; Romero, Ray R

    2013-09-01

    Three patients with diagnoses of surfer's myelopathy (24-31 yrs old; two men, one woman) were admitted to our rehabilitation hospital. All three patients were novice surfers and had a typical clinical course of onset: rapid progression of paraplegia after back pain while taking surfing lessons. Despite months of rehabilitation at our hospital, in all three patients, complete paraplegia (T9-T12) and bladder-bowel dysfunction remained. Our case profiles suggest that the neurologic outcome of surfer's myelopathy is potentially catastrophic, as has been suggested in previous reports. Surfer's myelopathy has been estimated to be an ischemic thoracic myelopathy. From our case profiles and review of the literature, not only the prolonged prone hyperextended posture of paddling but also the repetitive mechanical stress caused by flexion-extension of the spinal column may be related to its pathogenesis. To prevent surfer's myelopathy and to avoid progressive deterioration of neurologic function, increased education and awareness are essential.

  20. Latent period in clinical radiation myelopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, T.E.; Higgins, E.M.; El-Mahdi, A.M.

    1984-07-01

    Seventy-seven papers containing data on more than 300 cases of radiation myelopathy have been analyzed. The data suggest that the latent periods are similar in the cervical and thoracic levels of the spinal cord and are bimodally distributed. Myelopathy of lumbar cord apparently has a shorter latent period. As in controlled animal experiments, the latent period decreases with increasing dose. Furthermore, the variation in latent periods also decreases with dose. It is also seen that retreated patients and pediatric or adolescent patients have greatly reduced latent periods. The implications of these findings as they compare with the animal data are discussed.

  1. Motor conduction measurement in myelopathy hand

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Ryoichi; Wada, Eiji; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yonenobu, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Summary We studied the relationship between intramedullary high signal intensity (IMHSI) on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images and motor conduction in the spinal cords of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) patients. There was no significant difference between the biceps or triceps central motor conduction times (CMCTs) of the patients who did and did not exhibit IMHSI, whereas the abductor pollicis brevis CMCT was significantly longer in the patients who exhibited IMHSI (p<0.05) than in those who did not. The CMCT of the abductor pollicis brevis is sensitive to the degree of damage in the cervical spinal cord. Hand dysfunction is a characteristic of CSM regardless of the cervical level affected by the condition. The motor fibers innervating the intrinsic muscles of the hand in the long tract of the cervical spinal cord are more sensitive than other motor fibers. For this reason, we consider that myelopathy hand is a characteristic impairment of CSM. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the hand motor cortex is useful for the evaluation of cervical myelopathy. PMID:25473737

  2. Inadequate cervical mucus--a cause of "idiopathic" infertility.

    PubMed

    Sher, G; Katz, M

    1976-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and treat a group of patients referred for "idiopathic" infertility in whom no apparent cause for infertility, apart from inadequate cervical mucus, was found. Hormone investigations revealed that these patients could be divided into two groups: those with low sex steroid profiles despite apparent ovulation, and a second group with normal sex steroid profiles. All patients were treated with ovulation-inducing agents in an attempt to produce "controlled" ovarian hyperstimulation and an improved cervical mucus. Four of six patients conceived. The rationale behind the use of ovulation-inducing agents in this situation is discussed.

  3. Cervicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... results from a sexually transmitted infection, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea. Cervicitis can develop from noninfectious causes, ... from common sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including gonorrhea, chlamydia, trichomoniasis and genital herpes. Allergic reactions. An allergy, ...

  4. Cervicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... much growth of normal bacteria in the vagina (bacterial vaginosis) can also cause cervicitis. ... under a microscope (may show candidiasis , trichomoniasis , or bacterial vaginosis) Pap test Tests for gonorrhea or chlamydia Rarely, ...

  5. Transient tetraplegia and vegetative dysfunction depending on cervical positioning caused by a cervical spinal chordoma.

    PubMed

    Schulte, T L; Hammersen, S; Heidenreich, J O; Pietilä, T A

    2006-01-01

    A 39-year-old man with acquired torticollis suffering from cervicobrachialgia and neurological deficits is presented. Due to a change in head position a transient reproducible tetraplegia and severe vegetative dysfunctions were caused. The origin of this uncommon serious combination of symptoms and signs was a chordoma of the upper cervical spine. After surgical decompression the patient was free of neurological deficit and pain. Review of the literature did not reveal any similar case.

  6. Cervical osteophytes: a rare cause of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Eyigor, Hulya; Selcuk, Omer Tarik; Osma, Ustun; Koca, Rahime; Yilmaz, Mustafa Deniz

    2012-09-01

    Uncertain etiology of cervical osteophytes, in particular emerging in geriatric population, is a rare skeletal system disease. Often, the cases are asymptomatic and may lead to symptoms such as dysphagia, cough, dyspnea, and dysphonia. We present a patient who had anterior osteophytes causing symptoms of severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and literature on etiology of OSA has been reviewed. A 57-year-old male patient with complaints of snoring and cessation of breathing during sleep was referred to the ear nose throat clinic. Cervical radiograph and computed tomography showed the osteophytes in the anterior of the vertebral corpus at the level C1-2. In addition, bridging osteophyte was observed between C6 and C7 vertebrae. The patient's neck circumference was 41 cm, body mass index was 29 kg/m2, Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was 11, and apnea hypopnea index was 62. Surgery was recommended, but the patient refused. Continuous positive airway pressure titration was applied with 12.6 cm H2O pressure; apnea control was attained with an AHI of 2.7. One of the rare causes of OSA, a case of cervical vertebral osteophyte, was presented, and we would like to draw attention to the importance of ear nose throat examination in the diagnosis of OSA.

  7. Eagle Syndrome Causing Vascular Compression with Cervical Rotation: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Demirtaş, Hakan; Kayan, Mustafa; Koyuncuoğlu, Hasan Rıfat; Çelik, Ahmet Orhan; Kara, Mustafa; Şengeze, Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Eagle syndrome is a condition caused by an elongated styloid process. Unilateral face, neck and ear pain, stinging pain, foreign body sensation and dysphagia can be observed with this syndrome. Rarely, the elongated styloid process may cause pain by compressing the cervical segment of the internal carotid and the surrounding sympathetic plexus, and that pain spreading along the artery can cause neurological symptoms such as vertigo and syncope. Case Report In this case report we presented a very rare eagle syndrome with neurological symptoms that occurred suddenly with cervical rotation. The symptoms disappeared as suddenly as they occurred, with the release of pressure in neutral position. We also discussed CT angiographic findings of this case. Conclusions Radiological diagnosis of the Eagle syndrome that is manifested with a wide variety of symptoms and causes diagnostic difficulties when it is not considered in the differential diagnosis is easy in patients with specific findings. CT angiography is a fast and effective examination in terms of showing compression in patients with the Eagle syndrome that is considered to be atypical and causes vascular compression. PMID:27354882

  8. Osteochondroma of the cervical spine extending multiple segments with cord compression.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyung-Sub; Lee, Jung-Kil; Kim, Yeon-Seong; Kwak, Hyung-Jun; Joo, Sung-Pil; Kim, In-Young; Kim, Jae-Hyoo; Kim, Soo-Han

    2006-01-01

    Involvement of the cervical spinal cord by a solitary osteochondroma is rare. We describe a case of cervical osteochondroma extending from C5 to C7 in a 16-year-old male. The tumor, arising from the inner aspect of the C6 spinous process, projected longitudinally into the spinal canal and compressed the spinal cord; this caused clinical symptoms associated with myelopathy and radiculopathy. Total excision of the tumor by C5-C7 hemilaminectomy resulted in a good functional recovery.

  9. [Cervicogenic dysphagia: swallowing difficulties caused by functional and organic disorders of the cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2013-01-01

    Cervical spine disorders which can cause swallowing difficulties (cervicogenic dysphagia; CD) are: chronic multisegmental/MS dysfunction (dysfunction=functional blockade) of the facet joints, changes in physiological curvature of the cervical spine, degenerative changes (anterior osteophytes, anterior disc herniation, osteochondrosis, osteoarthritis), inflammatory rheumatic diseases, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, injuries, conditions after anterior cervical spine surgery, congenital malformations and tumors. According to our clinical observations, degenerative changes in the cervical discs and facet joints and chronic MS dysfunction of the cervical spine facet joints are disorders which can cause swallowing difficulties. However, these disorders have not been recognized enough as the causes of dysphagia and they are not even mentioned in differential diagnosis. Because of the close anatomical relationship of cervical spine with the pharynx and cervical part of esophagus, the consequences of the degenerative changes in the cervical discs and facet joints and chronic MS dysfunction of the cervical spine facet joints such as the changes in the physiological curvature of the cervical spine, changes in elasticity and contractility in the neck muscles and decreased mobility of the cervical spine, adversely affect the dimensions of the pharynx and cervical part of esophagus, that is, swallowing capacity which can result in dysphagia. Degenerative changes in the cervical discs and facet joints are common additional cause of dysphagia in elderly people with disorders of the central control of swallowing (stroke, Parkinson's disease, senile dementia etc). The most important therapeutic options in patients with CD are: medicamentous therapy, physical therapy, manual therapy, kinesiotherapy and surgical treatment. The aim of the conservative therapy in patients with CD is to improve the swallowing capacity (for example, soft tissue techniques, stretching of the

  10. Hyperthyroidism caused by a toxic intrathoracic goiter with a normal-sized cervical thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, R.; Lakshmipathi, N.; Jena, A.; Behari, V.; Chopra, M.K.

    1986-09-01

    The rare presentation of hyperthyroidism caused by an intrathoracic goiter with a normal-sized cervical thyroid gland is described. The toxic intrathoracic goiter demonstrated avid uptake of (/sup 131/I) and (99mTc)pertechnetate, with comparatively faint isotopic accumulation seen in the cervical thyroid. A chest roentgenogram and radioisotope scan should be mandatory in cases of hyperthyroidism having no cervical thyroid enlargement to explore the possibility of a toxic intrathoracic goiter.

  11. Anterior Fusion Technique for Multilevel Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: A Retrospective Analysis of Surgical Outcome of Patients with Different Number of Levels Fused

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shunzhi; Li, Fengning; Yan, Ning; Yuan, Chaoqun; He, Shisheng; Hou, Tiesheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective The anterior approach for multilevel CSM has been developed and obtained favorable outcomes. However, the operation difficulty, invasiveness and operative risks increase when multi-level involved. This study was to assess surgical parameters, complications, clinical and radiological outcomes in the treatment of 2-, 3- and 4-level CSM. Methods A total of 248 patients with 2-, 3- or 4-level CSM who underwent anterior decompression and fusion procedures between October 2005 and June 2011 were divided into three groups, the 2-level group (106 patients), the 3-level group (98 patients) and the 4-level group (44 patients). The clinical and Radiographic outcomes including Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI) score, Odom's Scale, hospital stay, blood loss, operation time, fusion rate, cervical lordosis, cervical range of motion (ROM), and complications were compared. Results At a minimum of 2-year follow-up, no statistical differences in JOA score, NDI score, Odom's Scale, hospital stay, fusion rate and cervical lordosis were found among the 3 groups. However, the mean postoperative NDI score of the 4-level group was significantly higher than that in the other two groups (P<0.05), and in terms of postoperative total ROM, the 3-level group was superior to the 4-level group and inferior to 2-level group (P<0.05). The decrease rate of ROM in the 3-level group was significantly higher than that in the 2-level group, and lower than that in the 4-level group (P<0.05). Conclusions As the number of involved levels increased, surgical results become worse in terms of operative time, blood loss, NDI score, cervical ROM and complication rates postoperatively. An appropriate surgical procedure for multilevel CSM should be chosen according to comprehensive clinical evaluation before operation, thus reducing fusion and decompression levels if possible. PMID:24618678

  12. Is cervical disc arthroplasty good for congenital cervical stenosis?

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng-Yuan; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Fay, Li-Yu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2017-03-10

    OBJECTIVE Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has been demonstrated to be as safe and effective as anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in the management of 1- and 2-level degenerative disc disease (DDD). However, there has been a lack of data to address the fundamental discrepancy between the two surgeries (CDA vs ACDF), and preservation versus elimination of motion, in the management of cervical myelopathy associated with congenital cervical stenosis (CCS). Although younger patients tend to benefit more from motion preservation, it is uncertain if CCS caused by multilevel DDD can be treated safely with CDA. METHODS Consecutive patients who underwent 3-level anterior cervical discectomy were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion criteria were age less than 50 years, CCS (Pavlov ratio ≤ 0.82), symptomatic myelopathy correlated with DDD, and stenosis limited to 3 levels of the subaxial cervical (C3-7) spine. Exclusion criteria were ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, previous posterior decompression surgery (e.g., laminoplasty or laminectomy), osteoporosis, previous trauma, or other rheumatic diseases that might have caused the cervical myelopathy. All these patients who underwent 3-level discectomy were divided into 2 groups according to the strategies of management: preservation or elimination of motion (the hybrid-CDA group and the ACDF group). The hybrid-CDA group underwent 2-level CDA plus 1-level ACDF, whereas the ACDF group underwent 3-level ACDF. Clinical assessment was measured by the visual analog scales (VAS) for neck and arm pain, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, and Nurick grades. Radiographic outcomes were measured using dynamic radiographs for evaluation of range of motion (ROM). RESULTS Thirty-seven patients, with a mean (± SD) age of 44.57 ± 5.10 years, were included in the final analysis. There was a male predominance in this series (78.4%, 29 male patients), and the mean follow-up duration was 2.37 ± 1

  13. Stent-Graft Repair of a Large Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm Causing Dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vivek Niranjan, Khandelwal; Rawat, Lokesh; Gupta, A. K.

    2009-05-15

    Pseudoaneurysms of the cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) are rare and most frequently result from trauma, infection, or sometimes spontaneously. They have the potential to cause life-threatening hemorrhage; thus, their immediate management is necessary. Endovascular treatment by stent graft placement in the affected artery appears to be a safe and effective treatment option. We present a case of a child who presented with neck swelling and dysphagia caused by a ruptured cervical ICA pseudoaneurysm which was managed by stent graft placement.

  14. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma as a cause of cervical spinal injury.

    PubMed

    Masmiquel, L; Simó, R; Galofré, P; Mesa, J

    1995-01-01

    Cervical cord compression due to local extension of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is an extremely rare condition and, to our knowledge, only one case has been reported in the literature. Among 256 patients with DTC treated at our hospital, we have observed 3 cases of spinal injury due to local extension of DTC. A Brown-Séquard syndrome was detected at physical examination in 2 cases. In both patients, cervical cord compression precipitated a fatal event. In the remaining patient, a radiculopathy C5-C7 was observed. Magnetic resonance imaging was very successful in outlining the mass, clearly differentiating the extrinsic invasion from a metastasis, and allowing the surgical possibilities to be evaluated. Poor cervical uptake of 131I was observed on scans performed in two cases, suggesting a certain degree of cell dedifferentiation. We suggest that cervical spinal injury due to local extension of DTC may be an underreported complication of DTC that seems to condition the patient's outcome. Careful neurological examination is warranted in patients with DTC at stages III-IV and magnetic resonance imaging must be performed when spinal injury is suspected.

  15. [A Case of Subacute Combined Degeneration Caused by Vitamin B12 Deficiency in a Cervical Spondylosis Surgery Referral].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kunio; Kawanishi, Masahiro; Sugie, Akira; Yamada, Makoto; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Ito, Yutaka; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2016-12-01

    A 62-year-old man with a 1-year history of numbness of the extremities, clumsiness, and gait disorder was diagnosed with cervical spondylotic myelopathy at a neighboring clinic and referred to our institution for surgery. The patient had undergone a total gastrectomy 6 years previously. Flattening of the cervical cord, associated with diffuse cervical spondylosis and intramedullary intensity change, was observed on magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine. Neurological examination revealed decreased vibratory and position sense in all limbs, with posterior funiculus-based neurological symptoms. Blood biochemistry revealed decreased vitamin B12(VB12)levels and megaloblastic anemia. On the basis of these findings, the patient was diagnosed with subacute combined degeneration(SCD). The patient was treated with VB12 for 3 months; the gait disorder resolved and the intramedullary intensity changes in the posterior column of the medulla oblongata, thoracicus, and spinal cord were no longer observed. SCD is a pathological condition in which recovery of neurological function may be achieved through early administration of VB12. In some cases, it is difficult to differentiate between this condition and cervical spondylotic myelopathy because both diseases exhibit progressive spinal symptoms. The medical history and results of neurological evaluations of the patient are important for an accurate diagnosis, and should therefore not be overlooked.

  16. Foreign body ingestion: rare cause of cervical abscess.

    PubMed

    Costa, Liliana; Larangeiro, João; Pinto Moura, Carla; Santos, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    IntroduçÉo: A ingestÉo de corpo estranho é um motivo frequente de recurso à urgência hospitalar. As complicações graves, embora raras, incluem perfuraçÉo faringo-esofágica, fistula aorto-esofágica e infecçÉo cervical profunda.Material e Métodos: Foram analisados, retrospectivamente, os casos de ingestÉo de corpo estranho com internamento num hospital terciário, entre 1989 e 2011. Seleccionaram-se os casos complicados por abcesso cervical profundo, descrevendo-se a semiótica, resultados de meios complementares de diagnóstico, terapêutica efectuada e evoluçÉo clínica.Resultados: Dos 1679 casos, 319 referentes a crianças e 1360 a adultos, reportam-se dois casos (0,12%): uma criança, 13 meses, com abcesso retrofaríngeo após ingestÉo de osso de frango e um adulto, 41 anos, com abcesso parafaríngeo após ingestÉo de espinha de peixe. As complicações manifestaram-se quatro e três dias após remoçÉo do corpo estranho, respectivamente. Em ambos foram efectuadas Tomografias Computorizadas cervicais com contraste e drenagem cirúrgica dos abcessos; a criança foi ainda submetida a esofagoscopia rígida para remoçÉo de corpo estranho residual e encerramento da perfuraçÉo esofágica associada.DiscussÉo: Os abcessos cervicais sÉo uma complicaçÉo possível da ingestÉo de corpo estranho e constituem um desafio diagnóstico, principalmente em idade pediátrica. A manipulaçÉo esofágica prévia por fibroscopia poderá ser considerada um factor de risco. A imagiologia (Tomografia Computorizada cervical com contraste ou Resson'ncia Magnética Cervical) foi essencial para o diagnóstico e o planeamento cirúrgico.ConclusÉo: Embora raros, perante a história recente de ingestÉo/remoçÉo de corpo estranho esofágico e a presença de sintomas compatíveis, os abcessos cervicais devem ser tidos em consideraçÉo, dado o potencial de morbilidade e mortalidade na ausência de uma abordagem terapêutica adequada.

  17. Giant prolactinoma causing cranio-cervical junction instability: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zaben, Malik J A; Harrisson, Stuart E; Mathad, N V

    2011-12-01

    Prolactinomas are common secretory pituitary tumours, usually managed with dopamine agonists. There have previously been case reports of rarer giant prolactinomas causing invasion of surrounding structures. We describe a case report of an exceptionally aggressive giant prolactinoma that eroded the occipital condyles causing cranio-cervical joint instability mandating surgical fixation.

  18. Outcomes following cervical disc arthroplasty: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Cody, John P; Kang, Daniel G; Tracey, Robert W; Wagner, Scott C; Rosner, Michael K; Lehman, Ronald A

    2014-11-01

    Cervical disc arthroplasty has emerged as a viable technique for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy, with the proposed benefit of maintenance of segmental range of motion. There are relatively few, non-industry sponsored studies examining the outcomes and complications of cervical disc arthroplasty. Therefore, we set out to perform a single center evaluation of the outcomes and complications of cervical disc arthroplasty. We performed a retrospective review of all patients from a single military tertiary medical center undergoing cervical disc arthroplasty from August 2008 to August 2012. The clinical outcomes and complications associated with the procedure were evaluated. A total of 219 consecutive patients were included in the review, with an average follow-up of 11.2 (±11.0)months. Relief of pre-operative symptoms was noted in 88.7% of patients, and 92.2% of patients were able to return to full pre-operative activity. There was a low rate of complications related to the anterior cervical approach (3.2% with recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, 8.9% with dysphagia), with no device/implant related complications. Symptomatic cervical radiculopathy is a common problem in both the civilian and active duty military populations and can cause significant disability leading to loss of work and decreased operational readiness. There exist several surgical treatment options for appropriately indicated patients. Based on our findings, cervical disc arthroplasty is a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy, with a low incidence of complications and high rate of symptom relief.

  19. Flexion myelopathy of the thoracic spine. Case report.

    PubMed

    Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Neo, Masashi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of surgically treated symptomatic thoracic kyphosis caused by dynamic compression in an elderly man. Myelopathy due to thoracic kyphosis has been reported in patients with congenital kyphosis, Scheuermann dorsal kyphosis, and Cushing disease, but to the authors' knowledge this is the first report of dynamic kyphosis in an elderly person. This otherwise healthy 84-year-old man presented with a 2-year history of progressive difficulty in walking and bilateral leg dysesthesia. Despite several cervical and lumbar surgeries, his symptoms gradually worsened. A radiological examination revealed severe thoracic kyphosis, with a lateral Cobb angle of 59 degrees from T-2 to T-12. On a dynamic computed tomography (CT) myelogram, severe thoracic spinal cord draping and stretching on flexion was demonstrated. On extension, however, imaging studies failed to show draping or stretching. Posterior corrective fusion was performed with instrumentation from T-2 to T-9. Postoperative CT myelography demonstrated no significant spinal cord compression with restoration of the cerebrospinal fluid space anterior to the spinal cord, and the successful correction of the kyphosis to 44 degrees. The patient's neurological sequelae gradually resolved throughout 6 months of follow up.

  20. The Natural History and Clinical Syndromes of Degenerative Cervical Spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John C.; Groarke, Patrick J.; Butler, Joseph S.; Poynton, Ashley R.; O'Byrne, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a broad term which describes the age related chronic disc degeneration, which can also affect the cervical vertebrae, the facet and other joints and their associated soft tissue supports. Evidence of spondylitic change is frequently found in many asymptomatic adults. Radiculopathy is a result of intervertebral foramina narrowing. Narrowing of the spinal canal can result in spinal cord compression, ultimately resulting in cervical spondylosis myelopathy. This review article examines the current literature in relation to the cervical spondylosis and describes the three clinical syndromes of axial neck pain, cervical radiculopathy and cervical myelopathy PMID:22162812

  1. Pathology of radiation myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Burns, R. J.; Jones, A. N.; Robertson, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    After nothing the rarity of papers describing the pathology of delayed radiation necrosis of the spinal cord, the clinical and pathological findings from four cases are presented. The main pathological features are asymmetric demyelination of the lateral columns and to a lesser degree the posterior and anterior columns of white matter, with coagulative necrosis at the level of irradiation which affected the grey matter to a lesser degree. There is ascending and descending secondary tract degeneration, and poor glial response in the lesions themselves. Vascular changes, mainly hyalilne thickening of arteriolar walls, are present, but not in degree sufficient to explain the primary lesion. The discussion of the pathogenesis of the myelopathy weighs the merits of a primary vascular lesion against those of a primary effect of the radiation on neural tissue. The latter is favoured. Images PMID:4647860

  2. Two Cases of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type I-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis Caused by Living-Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yasutaka; Matsumura, Mariko; Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Mito, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    In rare instances, recipients of organ transplants from human T-lymphotropic virus type I- (HTLV-I-) positive donors reportedly developed neurologic symptoms due to HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (HAM). We present herein two cases of HAM associated with renal transplantation from HTLV-I seropositive living-donors. The first patient was a 42-year-old woman with chronic renal failure for twelve years and seronegative for HTLV-I. She underwent renal transplantation with her HTLV-I seropositive mother as the donor, and she developed HAM three years after the transplantation. The second patient was a 65-year-old man who had been suffering from diabetic nephropathy. He was seronegative for HTLV-I and underwent renal transplantation one year previously, with his HTLV-I seropositive wife as the donor. He developed HAM eight months after renal transplantation. Both cases showed neurological improvements after the immunomodulating therapies. We tried to shed some light on the understanding of immunological mechanisms of transplantation-associated HAM, focusing on therapeutic strategies based on the immunopathogenesis of the condition.

  3. Two Cases of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type I-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis Caused by Living-Donor Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Mariko; Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Mito, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    In rare instances, recipients of organ transplants from human T-lymphotropic virus type I- (HTLV-I-) positive donors reportedly developed neurologic symptoms due to HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (HAM). We present herein two cases of HAM associated with renal transplantation from HTLV-I seropositive living-donors. The first patient was a 42-year-old woman with chronic renal failure for twelve years and seronegative for HTLV-I. She underwent renal transplantation with her HTLV-I seropositive mother as the donor, and she developed HAM three years after the transplantation. The second patient was a 65-year-old man who had been suffering from diabetic nephropathy. He was seronegative for HTLV-I and underwent renal transplantation one year previously, with his HTLV-I seropositive wife as the donor. He developed HAM eight months after renal transplantation. Both cases showed neurological improvements after the immunomodulating therapies. We tried to shed some light on the understanding of immunological mechanisms of transplantation-associated HAM, focusing on therapeutic strategies based on the immunopathogenesis of the condition. PMID:27777805

  4. Aberrant cervical vasculature anastomosis as cause of neck pain and successful treatment with embolization technique.

    PubMed

    He, Lucy; Ladner, Travis R; Cobb, Mark; Mocco, J

    2016-01-27

    We report a patient with non-dermatomal radiating neck pain without focal neurologic deficit. Traditional workup could not identify an anatomic or biomechanical cause. Imaging showed a deep cervical vessel centered in the region of pain. Angiography later identified an aberrant anastomosis of this vessel with the occipital artery. Subsequent endovascular embolization of this arterial trunk resulted in complete pain relief.

  5. [Acute non-traumatic myelopathy in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Hugo A

    2013-09-06

    The term 'acute myelopathies'--referred to a spinal cord dysfunction--represent a heterogeneous group of disorders with distinct etiologies, clinical and radiologic features, and prognoses. The objective of this review is to discuss the non-traumatic acute myelopathies. Acute myelopathy can be due to several causes as infective agents or inflammatory processes, such as in acute myelitis, compressive lesions, vascular lesions, etc. The clinical presentation is often dramatic with tetraparesis or paraparesis, sensory disturbances and bladder and/or bowel dysfunction. History and physical examination are used to localize the lesion to the root or specific level of the cord, which can guide imaging. Different syndromes are recognized: complete transverse lesion, central grey matter syndrome, anterior horn syndrome, anterior spinal artery syndrome, etc). The first priority is to rule out a compressive lesion. If a myelopathy is suspected, a gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the spinal cord should be obtained as soon as possible. If there is no structural lesion such as epidural blood or a spinal mass, then the presence or absence of spinal cord inflammation should be documented with a lumbar puncture. The absence of pleocytosis would lead to consideration of non inflammatory causes of myelopathy such as arteriovenous malformations, fibrocartilaginous embolism, or possibly early inflammatory myelopathy. In the presence of an inflammatory process (defined by gadolinium enhancement, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, or elevated cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin index), one should determine whether there is an inflammatory or an infectious cause. Different virus, bacterias, parasites and fungi have to be considered as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases that involve the central nervous system.

  6. Degenerative myelopathy in an adult miniature poodle.

    PubMed

    Matthews, N S; de Lahunta, A

    1985-06-01

    Degenerative myelopathy was diagnosed at necropsy of an adult Miniature Poodle with a 33-month history of progressive pelvic limb ataxia and proprioceptive deficit. Microscopic examination of the cord revealed diffuse degenerative myelopathy. Degenerative myelopathy is usually seen in adult, large-breed dogs and progresses over a period of months. In this case, the myelopathy progressed slowly and the degree of paralysis became more extensive than usually seen.

  7. Effects on the maxilla and cranial base caused by cervical headgear: A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Conde, Carmen; Lorenzo-Pernía, José; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Mendoza-Mendoza, Asunción; Solano-Reina, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to test the possible orthopedic effects of cervical headgear on the cranial base and maxilla. Study design: a sample consisting of 79 subjects with skeletal class II malocclusion was divided into two groups. The experimental group was made up of 41 patients all treated with cervical headgear. The control group included a total of 38 non-treated patients. Each one of these groups was then subdivided according to age into one of three groups: prepubescent, pubescent or post-pubescent. Cephalometric parameters were compared in both groups in order to measure the cranial base angle and the vertical and sagittal position of the maxilla. Additionally, cephalometric superimpositions taken at the beginning and end of the study were compared. Results: results revealed significant differences in the cranial base angle and in the SNA angle (p<0.05). However, no differences were observed in the variables that measure the maxillomandibular relationship. While no changes were noted in the palatal plane slope, a flattening of the cranial base was found caused by the cervical headgear, in addition to a retrusion of point A that does not mean there was a reduction in the maxillomandibular relationship. Conclusions: cervical headgear treatment induces cephalometric flattening of the cranial base and a decrease of the SNA angle. Key words:Orthodontics, cervical headgear, class II treatment, cephalometry, superimposition. PMID:22322499

  8. Cervical Intradural Disc Herniation Causing Progressive Quadriparesis After Spinal Manipulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hwan-Seo; Oh, Young-Min; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cervical intradural disc herniation (IDH) is an extremely rare condition, comprising only 0.27% of all disc herniations. Three percent of IDHs occur in the cervical, 5% in the thoracic, and over 92% in the lumbar spinal canal. There have been a total of 31 cervical IDHs reported in the literature. The pathogenesis and imaging characteristics of IDH are not fully understood. A preoperative diagnosis is key to facilitating prompt intradural exploration in patients with ambivalent findings, as well as in preventing reoperation. The purpose of reporting our case is to remind clinicians to consider the possibility of cervical IDH during spinal manipulation therapy in patient with chronic neck pain. The patient signed informed consent for publication of this case report and any accompanying image. The ethical approval of this study was waived by the ethics committee of Chonbuk National University Hospital, because this study was case report and the number of patients was <3. A 32-year-old man was transferred our emergency department with progressive quadriparesis. He had no history of trauma, but had received physical therapy with spinal manipulation for chronic neck pain over the course of a month. The day prior, he had noticed neck pain and tingling in the bilateral upper and lower extremities during the manipulation procedure. The following day, he presented with bilateral weakness of all 4 extremities, which rendered him unable to walk. Neurological examination demonstrated a positive Hoffmann sign and ankle clonus bilaterally, hypoesthesia below the C5 dermatome, 3/5 strength in the bilateral upper extremities, and 2/5 strength in the lower extremities. This motor weakness was progressive, and he further complained of voiding difficulty. Urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine revealed large, central disc herniations at C4–C5 and C5–C6 that caused severe spinal cord compression and surrounding edema. We performed C4–C5–C6

  9. Alcoholic Myelopathy and Nutritional Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Haruki; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Ikeda, Shohei; Takahashi, Mie; Kawagashira, Yuichi; Iijima, Masahiro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen

    2017-01-01

    A patient with chronic alcoholism presented with myelopathy and low serum folate and cobalamin levels. A 42-year-old alcoholic man had gait disturbance for 4 months. A neurological examination revealed marked spasticity with increased deep tendon reflexes and extensor plantar responses of the lower limbs. His cobalamin level was decreased and his serum folate level was particularly low. His plasma ammonia level was not increased. Abstinence and folic acid and cobalamin supplementation stopped the progression of his neurological deficits. This case indicates that nutritional deficiency should be monitored closely in patients with chronic alcoholism who present with myelopathy. PMID:28049986

  10. Ligamentum Flavum Buckling Causing immediate Post-operative neurologic deterioration after an Anterior Cervical Discectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taghvaei, Mohammad; Tayebi Meybodi, Keyvan; Zeinalizadeh, Mehdi

    2016-05-05

    Neurological injury is a potential complication of anterior cervical discectomy (ACDF). Iatrogenic trauma, hypoxic-ischemic damage during surgery or epidural hematoma could cause neurologic deterioration after surgery. This is the first case being reported of neurologic deterioration after an anterior cervical discectomy due to ligamentum flavum buckling. The case illustrated an uncommon cause of cord compression after ACDF. Therefore, ligamentum flavum buckling should be considered as one of the potential causes for acute neurologic deterioration after an anterior cervical discectomy. While keeping this rare complication in mind, obtaining a quick post-operative imaging seems mandatory in early detection and establishing an appropriate management.

  11. Intrathoracic toxic thyroid nodule causing hyperthyroidism with a multinodular normal functional cervical thyroid gland

    PubMed Central

    Serim, Burcu Dirlik; Korkmaz, Ulku; Can, Unal; Altun, Gulay Durmus

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide scintigraphy with I-131 and Tc-99m pertechnetate (99mTc04) has been widely used in detecting toxic nodules. Intrathoracic goiter usually presents as an anterior mediastinal mass. Mostly the connection between intrathoracic mass and the cervical thyroid gland is clearly and easily identified occurring as a result of inferior extension of thyroid tissue in the neck, which is called as secondary intrathoracic goiter. Completely separated, aberrant or in other words primary intrathoracic goiters arise as a result of abnormal embryologic migration of ectopic thyroid closely associated with aortic sac and descend into the mediastinum. Intrathoracic goiters are generally nontoxic nodules existing with mass effect without causing hyperthyroidism. However, mostly reported cases had enlarged thyroid glands in the neck. This report demonstrates the usefulness of I-131 and 99mTc04 scintigraphy for detecting intrathoracic goiter causing hyperthyroidism with a normal functioned cervical thyroid gland. PMID:27385899

  12. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. ...

  13. Dwarf with dual spinal kyphotic deformity at the cervical and dorsal spine unassociated with odontoid hypoplasia: Surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Mankotia, Dipanker Singh

    2016-01-01

    Morquio's syndrome is associated with systemic skeletal hypoplasia leading to generalized skeletal deformation. The hypoplasia of odontoid process is frequent association, which is responsible for atlantoaxial dislocation causing compressive myelopathy. However, development of sub-axial cervical kyphotic deformity unassociated with odontoid hypoplasia is extremely rare, and coexistence of dorsal kyphotic deformity is not reported in the western literature till date and represents first case. Current case is 16-year-old boy, who presented with severe kyphotic deformity of cervical spine with spastic quadriparesis. Interestingly, he also had additional asymptomatic kyphotic deformity of dorsal spine; however, odontoid proves hypoplasia was not observed. He was only symptomatic for cervical compression, accordingly surgery was planned. The patient was planned for correction of cervical kyphotic deformity under general anesthesia, underwent fourth cervical corpectomy with resection of posterior longitudinal ligament and fusion with autologous bone graft derived from right fibula, which was refashioned approximating to the width of the corpectomy size after harvesting and fixed between C3 and C5 vertebral bodies and further secured with anterior cervical plating. He tolerated surgical procedure well with improvement in power with significant reduction in spasticity. Postoperative X-ray, cervical spine revealed complete correction of kyphotic deformity cervical spine. At follow-up 6 months following surgery, he is doing well. Successful surgical correction of symptomatic cervical kyphotic deformity can be achieved utilizing anterior cervical corpectomy, autologous fibular bone graft, and anterior cervical plating. PMID:27857796

  14. Bilateral Vertebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Causing Cervical Spinal Cord Compression in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Rhue, Kathryn E.; Taylor, Amanda R.; Cole, Robert C.; Winter, Randolph L.

    2017-01-01

    A 10-year-old male neutered mixed breed dog was evaluated for cervical hyperesthesia and tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and cervical spinal cord identified an extradural compressive lesion over the body of C2 caused by marked dilation of the vertebral venous sinuses. Following intravenous contrast administration both vertebral sinuses had heterogeneous contrast enhancement consistent with incomplete thrombi formation. An abdominal ultrasound also showed a distal aortic thrombus. A definitive cause for the thrombi formation was not identified, but the patient had several predisposing factors which may have contributed. The patient was treated with a combination of warfarin, clopidogrel, and enoxaparin as well as analgesics. Within 48 h of initiation of warfarin therapy, the tetraparesis and hyperesthesia were markedly improved. Repeat abdominal ultrasound 3 weeks after discharge showed reduction in size of aortic thrombus. Neurologic function remained normal for 6 weeks following initiation of treatment. Seventy-four days following initial diagnosis the patient rapidly declined and passed away at home. Necropsy was declined. This is the first report of vertebral venous sinus enlargement leading to spinal cord compression and tetraparesis in a dog. Additionally, warfarin in combination with clopidogrel and enoxaparin appeared to be a safe and effective treatment for the suspected thrombi reported in this case. Vertebral sinus enlargement secondary to thrombi should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with tetraparesis and cervical hyperesthesia. PMID:28229071

  15. Nontraumatic Myelopathy Associated With Surfing

    PubMed Central

    Avilés-Hernández, Israel; García-Zozaya, Inigo; DeVillasante, Jorge M

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Ischemic nontraumatic spinal cord injury associated with surfing is a novel diagnosis believed to be related to prolonged spine hyperextension while lying prone on the surfboard. Only 9 cases have been documented. This report features possible risk factors, etiology, diagnostic imaging, and outcomes of surfer's myelopathy. Design: Case report. Results: A 37-year-old man developed T11 American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) A paraplegia shortly after surfing. The clinical history and magnetic resonance imaging findings were compatible with an ischemic insult to the distal thoracic spinal cord. Our patient did not have any of the proposed risk factors associated with this condition, and, contrary to most reports, he sustained a complete spinal cord lesion without neurological recovery by 8 weeks post injury. Conclusions: Surfer's myelopathy, because of its proposed mechanism of injury, is amenable to medical intervention. Increased awareness of this condition may lead to early recognition and treatment, which should contribute to improved neurological outcomes. PMID:17684897

  16. Tetraplegia after thyroidectomy in a patient with cervical spondylosis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Li, Feng; Guan, Hanfeng

    2015-02-01

    Cervical spondylosis is degeneration of the cervical spine that occurs during the normal course of aging, and may progress into compression of the spinal cord, or cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), which can cause neurologic dysfunction. Cervical spondylosis can be identified in the majority of people older than 50 years. Many people with cervical spondylosis or CSM are asymptomatic. However, patients with CSM are at higher risk of spinal cord injury (SCI) following minor injury.A 60-year-old woman with asymptomatic cervical spondylosis underwent an elective subtotal thyroidectomy for thyroid nodules. After the surgery, she developed tetraplegia. MRI revealed spinal cord compression and injury. Main diagnoses, therapeutics interventions, and outcomes: Acute cervical SCI was diagnosed. After an emergency anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion surgery, she almost completely recovered.Iatrogenic cervical SCI after nonspinal surgeries that requires neck hyperextension is rarely reported, probably due to underdiagnosis and underreport. Among the 14 cases (including ours) published in the literature, most patients had cervical spondylosis and were senior men. Five patients had diabetes. Four patients had long-term hemodialysis. Seven patients had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery that requires prolonged operative time. Only 3 patients had almost complete recovery. Most patients were disabled. Two patients required tracheostomy for long-term ventilator support. Two patients died. These cases reiterate the potential risk of iatrogenic SCI in people with predisposing conditions such as cervical spondylosis, especially considering the rising prevalence and severity of cervical spondylosis caused by the aging of the population and modern sedentary lifestyle. Surgeries requiring prolonged neck hyperextension put patients with cervical spondylosis at risk for SCI. Failure to recognize the potential occurrence of iatrogenic SCI might endanger patients' lives.

  17. Acute pulmonary edema caused by takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a pregnant woman undergoing transvaginal cervical cerclage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Young; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Park, Sang-Wook; Lee, Yu-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The physiological changes associated with pregnancy may predispose pregnant women to pulmonary edema. Other known causes of pulmonary edema during pregnancy include tocolytic drugs, preeclampsia, eclampsia, and peripartum cardiomyopathy. Methods: We describe a rare case of pulmonary edema caused by takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a pregnant woman at 14 weeks of gestation who was undergoing emergency transvaginal cervical cerclage. Results: Intraoperative chest radiography revealed severe pulmonary edema and echocardiography indicated moderate left ventricular dysfunction with akinesia of the mid to apical left ventricular wall segment, which is reflective of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Conclusion: With early detection and appropriate management, the patient was stabilized in a relatively short period of time. Based on her clinical signs and symptoms, we suspect that the pulmonary edema was caused by takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:28072695

  18. Acute transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Propper, D J; Bucknall, R C

    1989-01-01

    A sixteen year old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus developed acute transverse myelopathy. She was treated with high dose steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange and regained partial neurological function. Previous descriptions of transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus are reviewed, with particular reference to the efficacy of high dose steroid treatment. PMID:2662918

  19. Cervical spinal cord compression caused by cryptococcosis in a dog: successful treatment with surgery and fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, S C; McCarthy, R J; VanSteenhouse, J L; Partington, B P; Taboada, J

    1998-01-01

    A six-year-old, male Doberman pinscher was presented for acute onset of upper motor neuron tetraparesis. An extradural compressive lesion compatible with intervertebral disk rupture at the sixth to seventh cervical (C6-C7) disk space was evident on myelography. A large, gelatinous mass of pure cryptococcal organisms causing spinal cord compression was identified upon exploratory surgery. Removal of the mass caused relief of clinical signs. No evidence of involvement of other organ systems was found; however, serum and cerebrospinal fluid titers were positive for cryptococcal infection. The dog was treated with fluconazole (5.5 mg/kg body weight, per os sid) until serum titers for cryptococcal infection were negative at seven months postsurgery. To the authors' knowledge, this is the only report of a dog with cryptococcosis treated successfully using fluconazole as a sole agent.

  20. Serious myelopathy due to magnetic resonance imaging-occult arteriovenous fistula: Case report of petrous ridge dural arteriovenous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose We present a case of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-occult intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) with serious cervical myelopathy and review the pathophysiological background. Summary of case A 61-year-old man had suffered from progressive neurological deterioration. He had demonstrated swollen spinal cord with diffuse enhancement and no dilated vascularity on MRI. Finally, digital subtraction angiography revealed DAVF at the petrous ridge and it was successfully treated by embolization. Conclusion A slow flow DAVF is not readily recognizable on MRI. Whenever a patient presents with unexplainable progressive myelopathy, a possibility of vascular origin has to be considered. PMID:26116647

  1. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancers are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Cervical cancer is the easiest gynecological cancer to prevent with ... HPV on a woman's cervix. Certain types of HPV can lead to cervical cancer. Your doctor will swab the cervix for cells. ...

  2. Etiological profile of noncompressive myelopathies in a tertiary care hospital of Northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Ashok Kumar; Goswami, Munindra; Das, Marami; Basumatary, Lakhshya Jyoti; Bhowmick, Suvorit Subhas; Synmon, Baiakmenlang

    2017-01-01

    Background: The discovery of antibodies against aquaporin-4 and evolving concepts of noncompressive myelopathies in the 21st century have made a major impact on the etiological profile of these diseases, with few cases turning out to be idiopathic. Objective: To find causes of noncompressive myelopathy in a tertiary care hospital of Northeast India. Materials and Methods: An observational study was carried out in the Neurology Department of Gauhati Medical College, Guwahati, from September 2013 to February 2016. Patients of noncompressive myelopathies who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine were segregated into two categories: acute-to-subacute myelopathy (ASM) and chronic myelopathy (CM). In addition to routine blood tests, chest X-ray, urinalysis, and visual evoked potentials, investigations included MRI of the brain, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and immunological, infectious, and metabolic profile based on the pattern of involvement. Results: The study had 151 patients (96 ASM and 55 CM) with a median age of 35 years and male: female ratio 1.4:1. The causes of ASM were neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (23), multiple sclerosis (MS) (8), systemic lupus erythematosus (1), Hashimoto's disease (1), postinfectious acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (6), postinfectious myelitis (8), infections (9), spinal cord infarct (5), and electrocution (1). The causes of CM were MS (1), probable or possible sarcoidosis (7), mixed connective tissue disease (1), Hashimoto's disease (2), infections (9), Vitamin B12 deficiency (4), folate deficiency (2), hepatic myelopathy (2), radiation (11), and paraneoplastic (1). No etiology could be found in 48 (31.8%) patients (34 ASM and 14 CM). In 21/96 (21.9%) patients of ASM, acute transverse myelitis was idiopathic based on current diagnostic criteria. Conclusion: Underlying etiology (demyelinating, autoimmune, infectious, vascular, metabolic disorder, or physical agent) was found in 68% patients of

  3. Silicone granuloma from ruptured breast implants as a cause of cervical lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Borghol, K; Gallagher, G; Skelly, B L

    2016-09-01

    A 56-year-old woman with a 10-year history of bilateral silicone breast implants presented to the ear, nose and throat outpatient clinic with a 2-month history of a right-sided neck lump. She was found to have a 1.3cm supraclavicular lymph node that gave the clinical impression of being reactive. Ultrasonography guided fine needle aspiration was inconclusive and initial review of subsequent computed tomography failed to identify a cause. This was followed by excisional biopsy of the lymph node, which revealed a silicone granuloma that was linked to a ruptured right-sided breast implant placed ten years previously. This case highlights the importance for otolaryngologists to consider silicone granuloma among the differential diagnoses of cervical lymphadenopathy in patients with a history of silicone breast implants. Recognising this differential diagnosis could avoid undue anxiety for patient and clinician regarding more serious pathology.

  4. Laminoplasty Techniques for the Treatment of Multilevel Cervical Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitsunaga, Lance K.; Klineberg, Eric O.; Gupta, Munish C.

    2012-01-01

    Laminoplasty is one surgical option for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. It was developed to avoid the significant risk of complications associated with alternative surgical options such as anterior decompression and fusion and laminectomy with or without posterior fusion. Various laminoplasty techniques have been described. All of these variations are designed to reposition the laminae and expand the spinal canal while retaining the dorsal elements to protect the dura from scar formation and to preserve postoperative cervical stability and alignment. With the right surgical indications, reliable results can be expected with laminoplasty in treating patients with multilevel cervical myelopathy. PMID:22496982

  5. Pseudarthrosis of the Cervical Spine: Risk Factors, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Leven, Dante

    2016-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy are common pathologies that often improve with spinal decompression and fusion. Postoperative complications include pseudarthrosis, which can be challenging to diagnose and manage. We reviewed the literature with regard to risk factors, diagnosis, controversies, and management of cervical pseudarthrosis. PMID:27559462

  6. Diagnostic Accuracy of Computer-Aided Assessment of Intranodal Vascularity in Distinguishing Different Causes of Cervical Lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Ying, Michael; Cheng, Sammy C H; Ahuja, Anil T

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound is useful in assessing cervical lymphadenopathy. Advancement of computer science technology allows accurate and reliable assessment of medical images. The aim of the study described here was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of computer-aided assessment of the intranodal vascularity index (VI) in differentiating the various common causes of cervical lymphadenopathy. Power Doppler sonograms of 347 patients (155 with metastasis, 23 with lymphoma, 44 with tuberculous lymphadenitis, 125 reactive) with palpable cervical lymph nodes were reviewed. Ultrasound images of cervical nodes were evaluated, and the intranodal VI was quantified using a customized computer program. The diagnostic accuracy of using the intranodal VI to distinguish different disease groups was evaluated and compared. Metastatic and lymphomatous lymph nodes tend to be more vascular than tuberculous and reactive lymph nodes. The intranodal VI had the highest diagnostic accuracy in distinguishing metastatic and tuberculous nodes with a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 73%, positive predictive value of 91%, negative predictive value of 51% and overall accuracy of 68% when a cutoff VI of 22% was used. Computer-aided assessment provides an objective and quantitative way to evaluate intranodal vascularity. The intranodal VI is a useful parameter in distinguishing certain causes of cervical lymphadenopathy and is particularly useful in differentiating metastatic and tuberculous lymph nodes. However, it has limited value in distinguishing lymphomatous nodes from metastatic and reactive nodes.

  7. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy in a solid organ transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Montesdeoca Andrade, Maria Jose; Correa Diaz, Edgar Patricio; Buestán, Maria Eugenia

    2016-06-06

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is endemic in Japan, the Caribbean and in South American countries such as Ecuador. This virus is the cause of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy or tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a myelopathy characterised by chronic progressive paraparesis, spasticity and urinary symptoms. We report the case of a 40-year-old man who received a kidney transplant from a living donor and developed HAM/TSP, 24 months after transplant. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of HTLV-1 in blood and cerebrospinal fluid by the ELISA and Western Blot tests. For myelopathy, the patient was treated with pulse methylprednisolone, but had poor response to treatment. We recommend that all patients receiving transplants and their donors who come from endemic countries be given a mandatory screening for HTLV-1 through an ELISA test, in an effort to inform candidates for renal transplantation of the potential risk of infection and the development of this disease.

  8. Airway management for cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Farag, Ehab

    2016-03-01

    Cervical spine surgery is one of the most commonly performed spine surgeries in the United States, and 90% of the cases are related to degenerative cervical spine disease (the rest to cervical spine trauma and/or instability). The airway management for cervical spine surgery represents a crucial step in the anesthetic management to avoid injury to the cervical cord. The crux for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery is maintaining the neck in a neutral position with minimal neck movement during endotracheal intubation. Therefore, the conventional direct laryngoscopy (DL) can be unsuitable for securing the upper airway in cervical spine surgery, especially in cases of cervical spine instability and myelopathy. This review discusses the most recent evidence-based facts of the main advantages and limitations of different techniques available for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery.

  9. Signs and Symptoms of Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Signs and Symptoms of Cervical Cancer Women with early cervical cancers and pre- ... Ask Your Doctor About Cervical Cancer? More In Cervical Cancer About Cervical Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  10. High-Level Cervical Spinal Cord Stimulation Used to Treat Intractable Pain Arising from Transverse Myelitis Caused by Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Kyung; Hong, Seok Ho

    2010-01-01

    The efficacy of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for treatment of various chronic painful conditions is well established. Very few reports have documented the use of SCS for treatment of chronic pain after spinal cord injury. We present a case showing a good outcome after such treatment, and suggest that high cervical stimulation may be efficacious. A 53-year-old male underwent SCS on the C1-3 level for treatment of intractable neuropathic pain below the T3 level, and in the upper extremities, arising from spinal cord injury resulting from transverse myelitis caused by schistosomiasis. High cervical SCS significantly improved the pain in the upper extremities and at the T3-T10 dermatome level. The patient continues to report excellent pain relief 9 months later. The present case suggests that high cervical stimulation may improve chronic pain in the upper extremities and the T3-T10 dermatome level arising from spinal cord injury. PMID:20224718

  11. What Are the Key Statistics about Cervical Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cervical Cancer What Are the Key Statistics About Cervical Cancer? The American Cancer Society's estimates for cervical ... in Cervical Cancer Research and Treatment? More In Cervical Cancer About Cervical Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  12. Sudden myelopathy secondary to therapeutic total-body hyperthermia after spinal-cord irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, M.A.; Parks, L.C.; Bebin, J.

    1981-03-05

    Hyperthermia is a new method of treatment receiving increasing clinical attention in cancer therapy. Its efficacy has been well demonstrated in animals, but its indications, contraindications, and appropriate place in cancer therapy have yet to be defined. We report three cases of acute myelopathy in patients undergoing hyperthermia after spinal-cord irradiation within the preceding two months. Post-mortem examination in one case revealed findings similar to those seen in myelopathy resulting from long-term irradiation. Several neurologic side effects have been reported previously with total-body hyperthermia - most commonly peripheral neuropathy, but not myelopathy. The mechanism of action of hyperthermia in cancer therapy (with or without prior irradiation) is unknown. The experience reported suggests that in some patients hyperthermia may potentiate radiation-induced damage to the spinal cord or otherwise interact to cause acute spinal-cord necrosis.

  13. Cervical Spondylosis and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Stimulation of sympathetic nerve fibers in pathologically degenerative disc could produce sympathetic excitation, and induce a sympathetic reflex to cause cervical vertigo and hypertension. In addition, chronic neck pain could contribute to hypertension development through sympathetic arousal and failure of normal homeostatic pain regulatory mechanisms. Cervical spondylosis may be one of the causes of secondary hypertension. Early treatment for resolution of symptoms of cervical spondylosis may have a beneficial impact on cardiovascular disease risk in patients with cervical spondylosis. PMID:25761188

  14. 'Crashing' the rugby scrum -- an avoidable cause of cervical spinal injury. Case reports.

    PubMed

    Scher, A T

    1982-06-12

    Deliberate crashing of the opposing packs prior to a rugby scrum is an illegal but commonly practised manoeuvre which can lead to abnormal flexion forces being applied to players in the front row, with resultant cervical spine and spinal cord injury. Two cases of cervical spinal cord injury sustained in this manner are presented. The mechanism of injury, the forces involved and preventive measures are discussed.

  15. Surgical management of cervical spinal epidural abscess caused by Brucella melitensis : report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ekici, Mehmet Ali; Ozbek, Zühtü; Gökoğlu, Abdülkerim; Menkü, Ahmet

    2012-06-01

    Spinal epidural abscess, if especially caused by Brucellosis is a very rare disease which is usually a consequence of spondylodiscitis. The spinal column can be affected at any joint; however, the lumbar spine is the most common region, especially at the level of the L4-5 and L5-S1. The frequency of spinal involvement usually seen at the lumbar, thoracic and cervical spine respectively. As an occupational disease in farmers, veterinaries, butchers, laboratory staff and shepherds, brucellosis can also occur by direct contact to animals and infected materials or ingestion of raw cheese, milk or unpasteurized milk products. In this study, we presented two cases with cervical spinal epidural abscess caused by brucella melitensis, which was successfully treated by surgical approach. Initial treatment was combined with antibiotic therapy after the surgery for 3 months.

  16. Cervical Angina

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Walter I.; Makovitch, Steven A.; Merchant, Shabbir Hussain I.

    2015-01-01

    Cervical angina has been widely reported as a cause of chest pain but remains underrecognized. This series demonstrates the varied clinical presentation of patients with cervical angina, the delay in diagnosis, and the extensive cardiac examinations patients with this condition typically undergo prior to a definitive diagnosis. Recognition of this condition in patients with acute chest pain requires a high index of suspicion and an awareness of the common presenting features and clinical findings of cervical angina. PMID:25553225

  17. Gunshot-caused Facial Injury Combined with Lower Cervical Spine Injury: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Ye, C Y; Zhu, M Y; Yuan, J D; Ten, H L

    2014-08-01

    A 32-year old male patient was wounded by a pistol. As shown in computed tomography (CT) scanning images, there was comminuted fracture of the left mandible and the bullet was found in the left side behind the sixth cervical vertebra. After the patient was hospitalized, the debridement was done in the emergency room and the operation of open reduction and internal fixation for comminuted fracture of left mandible was performed successfully. Eighteen days later, the patient was taken to surgery for anterior cervical decompression and fusion with autogenous iliac bone grafting for the sixth cervical vertebra. Postoperative follow-up of the patient over two years indicated that the left biceps muscle strength was recovered to level 4. Gunshot wound to the face associated with injury of the low cervical spine has the possibility of survival. It is safe to treat facial wounds early in the patient's treatment course, even if the bullet remains in the cervical vertebral body and there is neurological function damage.

  18. Gunshot-caused Facial Injury Combined with Lower Cervical Spine Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Ye, CY; Zhu, MY; Yuan, JD; Ten, HL

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year old male patient was wounded by a pistol. As shown in computed tomography (CT) scanning images, there was comminuted fracture of the left mandible and the bullet was found in the left side behind the sixth cervical vertebra. After the patient was hospitalized, the debridement was done in the emergency room and the operation of open reduction and internal fixation for comminuted fracture of left mandible was performed successfully. Eighteen days later, the patient was taken to surgery for anterior cervical decompression and fusion with autogenous iliac bone grafting for the sixth cervical vertebra. Postoperative follow-up of the patient over two years indicated that the left biceps muscle strength was recovered to level 4. Gunshot wound to the face associated with injury of the low cervical spine has the possibility of survival. It is safe to treat facial wounds early in the patient's treatment course, even if the bullet remains in the cervical vertebral body and there is neurological function damage. PMID:25429487

  19. A rare cause of dysphagia: compression of the esophagus by an anterior cervical osteophyte due to ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Ilknur; Bağcacı, Sinan; Sallı, Ali; Kucuksen, Sami; Uğurlu, Hatice

    2013-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatological disease affecting the axial skeleton with various extra-articular complications. Dysphagia due to a giant anterior osteophyte of the cervical spine in AS is extremely rare. We present a 48-year-old male with AS suffering from progressive dysphagia to soft foods and liquids. Esophagography showed an anterior osteophyte at C5-C6 resulting in esophageal compression. The patient refused surgical resection of the osteophyte and received conservative therapy. However, after 6 months there was no improvement in dysphagia. This case illustrates that a large cervical osteophyte may be the cause of dysphagia in patients with AS and should be included in the diagnostic workup in early stages of the disease.

  20. Cervicitis associated with lateral cervical displacement.

    PubMed

    Gjoni, Indira; Muneyyirci-Delale, Ozgul

    2012-01-01

    Lateral cervical displacement has been recognized as a sign of endometriosis; however, other causes of the finding have not been explored. In our experience, patients without endometriosis are presenting with lateral cervical displacement, mainly towards the left of midline. The common finding in these cases is the presence of cervicitis leading us to hypothesize the role of cervicitis in causing lateral displacement of the cervix. Future research into this area will provide us with a stronger understanding of the role that lateral cervical displacement plays in the development of pelvic pathology and the development of cervical cancer.

  1. [Cervical ischaemic neuronopathy and cardioembolism: another cause of man-in-the-barrel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Usigli, H; Gandarilla, A; Garcia, J J; Serrato, J; Estrada, N

    2016-12-16

    Introduccion. Los infartos de la medula espinal ocurren aproximadamente en el 1% de todos los infartos del sistema nervioso. El cardioembolismo es una causa rara. Las areas comunmente afectadas en infartos medulares son zonas de circulacion limitrofe en la region dorsal o lumbar; sin embargo, se han descrito previamente infartos medulares en la zona cervical asociados a la diseccion de arterias vertebrales. Caso clinico. Se presenta un nuevo caso de sindrome del hombre en el barril asociado con fibrilacion auricular durante un infarto agudo de miocardio, que causo una neuronopatia cervical isquemica (infarto de astas anteriores). Conclusiones. Los hallazgos clasicos de isquemia medular cervical son tetraplejia aguda, disfuncion vesical, intestinal y cardiovascular, asi como perdida de la sensibilidad disociada. La colateralizacion incompleta y las caracteristicas anatomicas de la arteria espinal anterior en la medula cervical hacen de la porcion C3-C5 la region mas vulnerable de daño isquemico, ya que la irrigacion de las arterias radiculares se inicia debajo de C5 y la fisiopatologia de la lisis rapida de un coagulo fresco produce unicamente daño bilateral de las celulas de las astas neuronales.

  2. Comparison of minimally invasive surgery with standard open surgery for vertebral thoracic metastases causing acute myelopathy in patients with short- or mid-term life expectancy: surgical technique and early clinical results.

    PubMed

    Miscusi, Massimo; Polli, Filippo Maria; Forcato, Stefano; Ricciardi, Luca; Frati, Alessandro; Cimatti, Marco; De Martino, Luca; Ramieri, Alessandro; Raco, Antonino

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Spinal metastasis is common in patients with cancer. About 70% of symptomatic lesions are found in the thoracic region of the spine, and cord compression presents as the initial symptom in 5%-10% of patients. Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) has recently been advocated as a useful approach for spinal metastases, with the aim of decreasing the morbidity associated with more traditional open spine surgery; furthermore, the recovery time is reduced after MISS, such that postoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy can begin sooner. METHODS Two series of oncological patients, who presented with acute myelopathy due to vertebral thoracic metastases, were compared in this study. Patients with complete paraplegia for more than 24 hours and with a modified Bauer score greater than 2 were excluded from the study. The first group (n = 23) comprised patients who were prospectively enrolled from May 2010 to September 2013, and who were treated with minimally invasive laminotomy/laminectomy and percutaneous stabilization. The second group (n = 19) comprised patients from whom data were retrospectively collected before May 2010, and who had been treated with laminectomy and stabilization with traditional open surgery. Patient groups were similar regarding general characteristics and neurological impairment. Results were analyzed in terms of neurological recovery (American Spinal Injury Association grade), complications, pain relief (visual analog scale), and quality of life (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-BM22 scales) at the 30-day follow-up. Operation time, postoperative duration of bed rest, duration of hospitalization, intraoperative blood loss, and the need and length of postoperative opioid administration were also evaluated. RESULTS There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of neurological recovery and complications. Nevertheless, the MISS group showed a clear and significant

  3. Tri-level surgical treatment of cervical spinal cord compression in a Thoroughbred yearling

    PubMed Central

    Huggons, Nick

    2007-01-01

    A Thoroughbred yearling was presented with neurological, radiographic, and myelographic abnormalities consistent with cervical vertebral stenotic myelopathy. Surgical correction was performed by using ventral cervical interbody fusion at 3 intervertebral spaces. The patient recovered uneventfully from surgery. The neurological status remained unchanged initially; however, significant improvement was noted 37 weeks postoperatively. PMID:17616065

  4. Oesophageal perforation caused by screw displacement 16 months following anterior cervical spine fixation

    PubMed Central

    Leaver, Nicholas; Colby, Alexandra; Appleton, Nathan; Vimalachandran, Dale

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cervical spine plating is a standard procedure for fixing unstable vertebral fractures. Following surgery, oesophageal perforation has an incidence of 0.25% and this is usually hours following surgery, due to over prominent screws or friction between the oesophagus and the plate. Instrumentation failure of these plates months or years following surgery is very rare but potentially life-threatening. We report a case of microcytic anaemia which was investigated by oesophagogastroduodenoscopy, and subsequently found that a screw from the anterior plate had lifted off and perforated the oesophagus. This is very rare, but emphasises an important lesson. Anyone presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding or infectious signs, with a history of cervical spine plating should be investigated immediately for instrumentation failure as it brings a high mortality. PMID:25796082

  5. Cervical cancer - screening and prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer screening; Dysplasia - cervical cancer screening; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine ... A vaccine is available to protect against the HPV types that cause most cervical cancer in women. The vaccine is: Given as a series of 2 shots. ...

  6. Leiomyosarcoma metastatic to the cervical spine causing a C6 compression fracture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SUN, ZHENZHONG; WANG, HENG; YANG, HUILIN; JIANG, WEIMIN

    2014-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor derived from smooth muscle cells, which commonly metastasizes to the lungs, liver, kidney, brain and skin. The current study presents the case of a 42-year-old male who presented with progressive neck pain and numbness of the left arm. Spinal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed osteolytic lesions of numerous vertebrae (C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, C7, T1 and T2). With regard to the C6 vertebra, total destruction of the vertebral body resulted in vertebral collapse and subsequent spinal cord compression. The patient underwent an anterior C6 corpectomy, reconstruction with a mesh cage filled with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and open PMMA infusion to C5 and C7. The surgical procedure significantly alleviated the symptoms and obtained a reliable reconstruction. The clinical follow-up examination at 13 months was uneventful with the exception of mild numbness of the left hand since the surgery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of leiomyosarcoma recurrence presenting in the cervical spine, and the present study provides insight into the use of a surgical technique that has rarely been used in the cervical spine. PMID:24959258

  7. Cervical Dystonia (Spasmodic Torticollis)

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical dystonia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cervical dystonia, also called spasmodic torticollis, is a painful condition in which your neck muscles contract involuntarily, causing your head to twist or turn ...

  8. Cervical Spondylitis and Epidural Abscess Caused by Brucellosis: a Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Reşorlu, Hatice; Saçar, Suzan; Inceer, Beşir Şahin; Akbal, Ayla; Gökmen, Ferhat; Zateri, Coskun; Savaş, Yilmaz

    2016-12-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease widely seen in endemic regions and that can lead to systemic involvement. The musculoskeletal system is frequently affected, and the disease can exhibit clinical involvements such as arthritis, spondylitis, spondylodiscitis, osteomyelitis, tenosynovitis and bursitis. Spondylitis and spondylodiscitis, common complications of brucellosis, predominantly affect the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae. Epidural abscess may occur as a rare complication of spondylitis. Spinal brucellosis and development of epidural abscess in the cervical region are rare. Development of epidural abscess affects the duration and success of treatment. Spinal brucellosis should be considered in patients presenting with fever and lower back-neck pain in endemic regions, and treatment must be initiated with early diagnosis in order to prevent potential complications.

  9. [Myelopathies in impairment of extravertebral venous blood circulation].

    PubMed

    Tsuladze, I I; Dreval', O N; Kornienko, V N

    2009-01-01

    Development of myelopathies of venous genesis is based on venous hypertension inside vertebral canal which was initially described by J. Aboulker. According to anatomical and functional features of epidural venous system, two factors contribute in development of venous congestion: decreased outflow and increased inflow. Clinical manifestation is presented by spastic movement disorders. Morphological study performed in 18 cadavers allowed to discover so called 'narrow areas' which cause impaired circulation through large feeders of caval veins, which can be discovered by selective phlebography. Main phlebographic features include stenosis, compression, atresia, thrombosis and retrograde flow towards epidural venous plexus. We examined 58 patients with spastic para- and tetraparesis of unknown nature. Phlebographic signs of venous dyscirculation were revealed in 34 cases. 28 surgical operations were performed: 24 on feeders of vena cava superior and 4 on feeders of vena cava inferior. In 18 cases we obtained satisfactory results. This investigation should be continued.

  10. Effect of HIV Infection on Human Papillomavirus Types Causing Invasive Cervical Cancer in Africa

    PubMed Central

    de Vuyst, Hugo; Tenet, Vanessa; Plummer, Martyn; Tully, Stephen; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: HIV infection is known to worsen the outcome of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and may do so differentially by HPV type. Design: Twenty-one studies were included in a meta-analysis of invasive cervical cancers (ICC) among women infected with HIV in Africa. Method: Type-specific HPV DNA prevalence was compared with data from a similar meta-analysis of HIV-negative ICC using prevalence ratios (PR). Results: HPV detection was similar in 770 HIV-positive (91.2%) and 3846 HIV-negative (89.6%) ICC, but HIV-positive ICC harbored significantly more multiple HPV infections (PR = 1.75, 95% confidence intervals: 1.18 to 2.58), which were significantly more prevalent in ICC tested from cells than from biopsies. HPV16 was the most frequently detected type in HIV-positive ICC (42.5%), followed by HPV18 (22.2%), HPV45 (14.4%), and HPV35 (7.1%). Nevertheless, HIV-positive ICC were significantly less frequently infected with HPV16 than HIV-negative ICC (PR = 0.88, 95% confidence intervals: 0.79 to 0.99). Other high-risk types were significantly more prevalent in HIV-positive ICC, but only for HPV18 was there a significantly higher prevalence of both single and multiple infections in HIV-positive ICC. Increases for other high-risk types were primarily accounted for by multiple infections. The proportion of HPV-positive ICC estimated attributable to HPV16/18 (71.8% in HIV positive, 73.4% in HIV negative) or HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58 (88.8%, 89.5%) was not affected by HIV. Conclusions: HIV alters the relative carcinogenicity of HPV types, but prophylactic HPV16/18 vaccines may nevertheless prevent a similar proportion of ICC, irrespective of HIV infection. PMID:27331659

  11. Effect of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion on Patients with Atypical Symptoms Related to Cervical Spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Sun, Yuqing; Yan, Kai; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Shan; Tian, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Background A considerable number of patients with cervical spondylosis complain about one or multiple atypical symptoms such as vertigo, palpitations, headache, blurred vision, hypomnesia, and/or nausea. It remains unclear whether surgical intervention for cervical spondylosis can also effectively alleviate those symptoms. The current study was performed to see if anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) offers such an extra benefit for patients with cervical spondylosis. Objective To investigate if patients who received ACDF for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy can also achieve alleviation of certain atypical symptoms associated with cervical spondylosis after the surgery in the long run. Methods Sixty-seven patients who underwent ACDF for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy were involved in this study. All these patients also complained about various associated atypical symptoms. They were followed up for 26 to 145 months after the surgery. Severity and frequency scores of the atypical symptoms before the surgery and at last follow-up were compared by paired t tests. Results Most patients reported significantly alleviated symptoms at the last follow-up compared with before the surgery. The severity of vertigo, headache, nausea, and palpitations were significantly alleviated at the last follow-up (with p values of p < 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.022, p = 0.004, respectively). There were no significant changes in the severity of tinnitus (p = 0.182), blurred vision (p = 0.260), and hypomnesia (p = 0.821). Conclusion ACDF can significantly alleviate vertigo, headache, nausea, and palpitations in most patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy, but it is not effective in alleviating symptoms such as tinnitus, blurred vision, and hypomnesia. It can be considered for alleviating atypical symptoms when other treatment options prove

  12. Cervical pneumatocyst.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jason M; Wenger, Doris E; Eckel, Laurence J; Krauss, William E

    2011-09-01

    The authors present the case of a 56-year-old right hand-dominant woman who was referred for chronic neck pain and a second opinion regarding a cervical lesion. The patient's pain was localized to the subaxial spine in the midline. She reported a subjective sense of intermittent left arm weakness manifesting as difficulty manipulating small objects with her hands and fingers. She also reported paresthesias and numbness in the left hand. Physical and neurological examinations demonstrated no abnormal findings except for a positive Tinel sign over the left median nerve at the wrist. Electromyography demonstrated bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome with no cervical radiculopathy. Cervical spine imaging demonstrated multilevel degenerative disc disease and a pneumatocyst of the C-5 vertebral body. The alignment of the cervical spine was normal. A review of the patient's cervical imaging studies obtained in 1995, 2007, 2008, and 2010 demonstrated that the pneumatocyst was not present in 1995 but was present in 2007. The lesion had not changed in appearance since 2007. At an outside institution, multilevel fusion of the cervical spine was recommended to treat the pneumatocyst prior to evaluation at the authors' institution. The authors, however, did not think that the pneumatocyst was the cause of the patient's neck pain, and cervical pneumatocysts typically have a benign course. As such, the authors recommended conservative management and repeated MR imaging in 6 months. Splinting was used to treat the patient's carpal tunnel syndrome.

  13. Myelopathy due to Spinal Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in a Patient with Polycythemia Vera

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Shuhei; Hosogane, Naobumi; Nagoshi, Narihito; Yagi, Mitsuru; Iwanami, Akio; Watanabe, Kota; Tsuji, Takashi; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Ishii, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) occasionally occurs in patients exhibiting hematological disorders with decreased hematopoietic efficacy. EMH is rarely observed in the spinal epidural space and patients are usually asymptomatic. In particular, in the patients with polycythemia vera, spinal cord compression due to EMH is extremely rare. We report a case of polycythemia vera, in which operative therapy proved to be an effective treatment for myelopathy caused by spinal EMH. PMID:28133558

  14. Posterior atlantoaxial ‘facetal’ instability associated with cervical spondylotic disease

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Atul

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The association of single or multiple level cervical spondylotic disease with atlantoaxial instability is assessed. The implications of identifying and treating atlantoaxial instability in such an association are highlighted. Materials and Methods: The analysis is based on an experience with 11 patients treated during the period June 2013-June 2014. All patients had single or multilevel cervical spondylotic disease. The spinal canal compromise and evidence of cord compression was evident on imaging in the cervical subaxial spine and was related to disc bulges and osteophytic bars. There was no or relatively insignificant compression of the cervicomedullary cord by the odontoid process. There was no evidence of odontoid process-related instability on dynamic imaging. Apart from presence of features of cervical spondylosis, investigations and surgical exploration and direct manual handling of the facets revealed evidence of Type B (posterior) atlantoaxial ‘facetal’ instability in all patients. Our 5-point clinical grading system and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores were used to monitor the patients both before and after surgery and at follow-up. Surgery involved both at lantoaxial and subaxial cervical fixation. During the average period of follow-up of 9 months (5-17 months), all patients showed remarkable and gratifying neurological recovery. Conclusion: We conclude that atlantoaxial facetal instability can be ‘frequently’ associated with cervical spondylosis and needs surgical stabilization. Our surgical outcome analysis suggests that missing or ignoring the presence of atlantoaxial facetal instability can be an important cause of suboptimal result or failure of surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. PMID:25972708

  15. Acute Clinical Worsening after Steroid Administration in Cervical Myelitis May Reveal a Subdural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Rain, Silvia; Udding, Jan; Broere, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Subdural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is a rare condition characterized by clinical manifestations ranging from mild bilateral sensory deficits to quadriplegia. The diagnosis is often delayed due to unspecific neurological symptoms, initially diagnosed as polyneuropathy or myelopathy. The diagnosis can be delayed for as long as 1–15 years. The following report describes a cervical SDAVF case initially misdiagnosed as myelitis transversa and treated with intravenous steroids. A 56-year-old male presented with sensory deficits and mild leg and right arm weakness. Cervical MRI showed a central medullary hyperintense lesion with contrast enhancement. After metabolic, infectious, and malignant causes were excluded, myelitis transversa was presumed and the patient was treated intravenously with methylprednisolone. Shortly after that, he developed quadriplegia. Cervical MRI imaging showed engorged cervical perimedullary vessels, which were not visible on the initial MRI. The diagnosis was revised and a SDAVF identified. Prompt surgical treatment led to a complete recovery. The effect of intravenous steroids in SDAVF is controversial. Acute clinical worsening after steroid administration is previously reported in several publications; however, due to the paucity of clinical studies on SDAVF, this effect remains mostly overlooked or unknown. The findings in this patient support the causative relation between SDAVF clinical worsening and steroid administration. We propose that acute clinical worsening under steroids in patients initially diagnosed with myelitis should raise suspicion of an SDAVF. PMID:27920716

  16. Mycobacteria causing human cervical lymphadenitis in pastoral communities in the Karamoja region of Uganda

    PubMed Central

    OLOYA, J.; OPUDA-ASIBO, J.; KAZWALA, R.; DEMELASH, A. B.; SKJERVE, E.; LUND, A.; JOHANSEN, T. B.; DJONNE, B.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Mycobacteria from lymph node biopsies of patients with cervical lymphadenitis reporting for tuberculosis treatment in Matany and Moroto Hospitals in the transhumant areas of Karamoja, Uganda were isolated and characterized. The AccuProbe® culture identification kits for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), M. avium complex (MAC) and M. avium were used to identify the isolates. Spoligotyping, IS901 PCR and IS1311 and IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used to characterize the isolates. Of the 43 biopsies, ten M. avium, seven M. tuberculosis, three M. bovis, and two M. intracellulare were isolated. Two isolates could not be identified with AccuProbe® and from 19 samples no mycobacteria could be isolated. Three isolates with the Beijing spoligotype were identified from the seven M. tuberculosis isolates. The spoligopatterns of the M. bovis isolates had previously been detected in cattle in Uganda. Isolation of members of the MAC group reflects the complex interaction between the transhumant communities, water sources and their cattle. None of the M. avium isolates harboured IS901, and all showed several bands on IS1311 and IS1245 RFLP, in accordance with M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Composite dendrograms of IS1311 and IS1245 RFLP showed that the isolates were similar and identical patterns were found. The isolation of M. bovis confirms the human infection with zoonotic mycobacteria in areas where consumption of raw milk and meat is routine. Isolation of environmental mycobacteria also confirms their increasing role in human disease and the occupational risk of infection in the transhumant ecosystem in the absence of safe drinking water and environmental contamination. PMID:17599779

  17. Ectopic cervical thymus as a rare cause of pediatric neck mass: the role of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Alper; Akdur, Pinar Ozdemır; Celebi, Irfan; Karasu, Rabia; Yilmaz, Banu; Basak, Muzaffer

    2015-06-01

    Ectopic cervical thymus (ECT) is an uncommon cause for cervical mass in the pediatric age group. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings of the mass (located along the thymic descent pathway along the thymopharyngeal tract and has identical echostructure and signal intensities to the native thymus in the superior mediastinum) would lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis is confirmed by fine needle aspiration biopsy or histopathology after resection. The management of ECT is a conservative follow up, except in symptomatic cases with tracheal compression and histologically confirmed neoplasia where surgery is indicated. We present the case of ECT presenting as a left upper neck mass in a 12 year old girl.

  18. MRI morphometric characterisation of the paediatric cervical spine and spinal cord in children with MPS IVA (Morquio-Brailsford syndrome).

    PubMed

    Solanki, Guirish A; Lo, William B; Hendriksz, Christian J

    2013-03-01

    Nearly all children with MPS IVA develop skeletal deformities affecting the spine. At the atlanto-axial spine, odontoid hypoplasia occurs. GAG deposition around the dens, leads to peri-odontoid infiltration. Transverse/alar ligament incompetence causes instability. Atlanto-axial instability is associated with cord compression and myelopathy, leading to major morbidity and mortality. Intervention is often required. Does the presence of widened bullet shaped vertebra in platyspondily encroach on the spinal canal and cause spinal stenosis in MPS IVA? So far, there have been no standardised morphometric measurements of the paediatric MPS IVA cervical spine to evaluate whether there is pre-existing spinal stenosis predisposing to compressive myelopathy or whether this is purely an acquired process secondary to instability and compression. This study provides the first radiological quantitative analysis of the cervical spine and spinal cord in a series of affected children. MRI morphometry indicates that the MPS IVA spine is narrower at C1-2 level giving an inverted funnel shape. There is no evidence of a reduction in the Torg ratio (canal-body ratio) in the cervical spine. The spinal canal does not exceed 11 mm at any level, significantly smaller than normal historical cohorts (14 mm). The sagittal diameter and axial surface area of both spinal canal and cord are reduced. C1-2 level cord compression was evident in the canal-cord ratio but the Torg ratio was not predictive of cord compression. In MPS IVA the reduction in the space available for the cord (SAC) is multifactorial rather than due to congenital spinal stenosis.

  19. Cervical Spondylosis: Recognition, Differential Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Voorhies, Rand M.

    2001-01-01

    In contemporary clinical practice, the prevalence of neck pain in the general population is approximately 15%. The challenge for the primary care specialist is to be able to recognize the more serious disorders that require early referral. Additionally, it is important to have the confidence to institute specific treatment for nonurgent conditions in order to avoid unnecessary referral of patients with generally self-limiting conditions. Cervical spondylosis is a general and nonspecific term that encompasses a broad spectrum of afflictions but, for purposes of clarity, can be organized into three clinical syndromes: Type I Syndrome (Cervical Radiculopathy); Type II Syndrome (Cervical Myelopathy); and Type III Syndrome (Axial Joint Pain). It is important to remember that shoulder problems can masquerade as cervical problems, and vice versa (e.g. adhesive capsulitis, recurrent anterior subluxation, impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tear, etc.). A number of management options, including pharmaceutical, physical therapy, and psychological therapies, are available once a diagnosis has been made. PMID:21765723

  20. Surgical treatment of cervical disc protrusion causing intracranial hypotension following chiropractic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David; Steel, Timothy; Sutton, Ian

    2015-09-01

    We describe a woman with intracranial hypotension provoked by a combination of calcified disc protrusion and chiropractic manipulation who required surgical intervention for definitive treatment. Intracranial hypotension is a rare but increasingly well recognized cause of orthostatic headache that arises due to spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakage from meningeal diverticula or dural perforations.

  1. Acute compressive myelopathy due to vertebral haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Macki, Mohamed; Bydon, Mohamad; Kaloostian, Paul; Bydon, Ali

    2014-04-28

    A 47-year-old woman with a history of anaemia presented to the emergency room with an acute onset of leg weakness. Physical examination of the bilateral lower extremities was significant for 0/5 muscle strength in all muscle groups with decreased pinprick and temperature sensation. A sensory level at the umbilicus was appreciated. Fine touch and proprioception were preserved. Bowel and bladder function were intact. CT revealed several thoracic, vertebral haemangiomatas. An MRI was suggestive of an epidural clot at the T8-T10-weighted posterior epidural space. At the level of the lesion, the cerebrospinal fluid space was completely effaced, and the flattened spinal cord exhibited signs of oedema and compressive myelopathy. The patient immediately underwent surgical decompression of the spinal cord. An epidural clot and vessel conglomeration were identified. A postoperative spinal angiogram confirmed the diagnosis of vertebral haemangioma. At 1-month follow-up, the patient regained strength and sensation.

  2. Median Nerve Somatosensory Evoked Potential in HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Boostani, Reza; Poorzahed, Ali; Ahmadi, Zahra; Mellat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a progressive Myelopathy that mainly involves the corticospinal tract. Despite pronounced involvement of the lower limbs, patients also have abnormalities in their upper limbs. So, we studied somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) of the median nerve in HAM/TSP patients to determine the extent of the involvement of the pathway of the central nervous system, especially the cervical spinal cord. Methods In this cross sectional study, 48 patients with HAM/TSP who were referred to Qaem Hospital in Mashhad from October 2010 to October 2011 were evaluated for various indices, including SSEPs of the median nerve for N9, N11, N13, and N20 waveforms and also N11–13 and N13–20 Inter Peak Latency (IPL), severity of disease (based on Osama criteria), disease duration (less or more than 2 years), age, and gender. SPSS software was used for data analysis. The t-test was used for quantitative data, and the chi-squared test was used for the qualitative variables. Results Thirty-four patients (70.2%) were females. The mean age was 45.6 ± 14.2 years. About SSEPs indices of the median nerve, N9 and N11 were normal in all patients, but N13 (50%), N20 (16.7%), IPL11–13 (58.3%), and IPL13–20 (22.9%) were abnormal. No significant relationships were found between age, gender, disease duration, and SSEPs indices (p > 0.05), but IPL11–13 and IPL13–20 had significant relationships with disease disability (p = 0.017 and p = 0.01, respectively). Conclusion Despite the lack of obvious complaints of upper limbs, SSEPs indices of the median nerve from the cervical spinal cord to the cortex were abnormal, which indicated extension of the lesion from the thoracic spinal cord up to the cervical spinal cord and thalamocortical pathways. Also, abnormalities in the cervical spinal cord had a direct correlation with the severity of disability in patients with HAM/TSP. PMID:27382445

  3. Myelopathy following intrathecal chemotherapy in adults: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Cachia, David; Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Pinnix, Chelsea C; Chi, Linda; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Cortes, Jorge E; Daver, Naval; Woodman, Karin

    2015-04-01

    Methotrexate and cytarabine arabinoside are frequently administered intrathecally in the prophylaxis and treatment of patients with hematological malignancies. Myelopathy as a complication of intrathecal (IT) chemotherapy is rare in adults, with most of the cases described in the literature occurring in the pediatric population. Between January 2010 and March 2014, 587 newly diagnosed B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 24 chronic myeloid leukemia lymphoid blast phase patients were seen at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. This case series discusses seven adult cases deemed to have IT chemotherapy-induced myelopathy between 2010 and 2014 at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Five out of the seven patients had T2 abnormalities involving the dorsal columns of the spinal cord. An elevated myelin basic protein level was noted in the two patients in whom it was checked. The wide range of dosage and timing with respect to IT chemotherapy administration suggests an idiosyncratic reaction or individual threshold to the development of myelopathy. By describing the largest case series of myelopathy in adults, we aim to raise awareness about this rare albeit devastating complication. Based on the seven cases described we would recommend-MRI of the spine with T2-weighted imaging in the sagittal and axial planes in leukemia patients with unexplained myelopathy and consideration to delay IT chemotherapy until after an extensive work-up to rule out CNS leukemia. Though more data are needed on the use of folate metabolites, preliminary results have shown some promise in the treatment of methotrexate-induced myelopathy and may be a potential consideration for future patients suspected to have chemotherapy induced myelopathy.

  4. From less to maximally invasiveness in cervical spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Visocchi, M.; Conforti, G.; Roselli, R.; La Rocca, G.; Spallone, A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multilevel cervical myelopathy without surgical treatment is generally poor in the neurological deficit without surgical decompression. The two main surgical strategies used for the treatment of multilevel cervical myelopathy are anterior decompression via anterior corpectomy or posterior decompression via laminctomy/laminoplasty. Presentation of case We present the case of a 62 year-old lady, harboring rheumatoid artritis (RA) with gait disturbances, pain, and weakness in both arms. A C5 and C6 somatectomy, C4–C7 discectomy and, instrumentation and fusion with telescopic distractor “piston like”, anterior plate and expandable screws were performed. Two days later the patient complained dysfagia, and a cervical X-ray showed hardware dislocation. So a C4 somatectomy, telescopic extension of the construct up to C3 with expandible screws was performed. After one week the patient complained again soft dysfagia. New cervical X-ray showed the pull out of the cranial screws (C3). So the third surgery “one stage combined” an anterior decompression with fusion along with posterior instrumentation, and fusion was performed. Discussion There is a considerable controversy over which surgical approach will receive the best clinical outcome for the minimum cost in the compressive cervical myelopathy. However, the most important factors in patient selection for a particular procedure are the clinical symptoms and the radiographic alignment of the spine. the goals of surgery for cervical multilevel stenosis include the restoration of height, alignment, and stability. Conclusion We stress the importance of a careful patients selection, and invocated still the importance for 360° cervical fixation. PMID:25734320

  5. Delayed myelopathy secondary to stab wound with a retained blade tip within the laminae: case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Delayed neurologic deficit after a stab wound with a retained foreign body near the spinal canal is unusual, adequate radiological examination is fundamental in detecting retained foreign bodies, especially the CT scan, surgical extraction of the foreign body is the primary task and the surgical outcome is satisfactory. Here, we report a rare case of delayed myelopathy caused by spinal stenosis secondary to broken blade tip within thoracic laminae in an old man, who was injured in a knife attack 39 years ago. The incidence, clinical presentation, diagnosis and prognosis are discussed. PMID:26629221

  6. [Evoked somatosensory plexus and cervical evoked potentials in cervicobrachialgia].

    PubMed

    Rossi, L; Ubiali, E; Merli, R; Rottoli, M R

    1983-01-01

    The authors study the sensitive potential evoked from point of Erb and from cervical spine in C6-C7, obtained by stimulation of median nerve in a control group (normals) and in a greater group of 40 cases from patients affected by radiculopathie with or without discal protrusion and by myelopathie spondiloartrosic. The date supply significant informations and are (obicurred in analytique) analyzed with accuracy.

  7. Comparative Sensitivity of Intraoperative Motor Evoked Potential Monitoring in Predicting Postoperative Neurologic Deficits: Nondegenerative versus Degenerative Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Aaron J.; Safaee, Michael; Chou, Dean; Weinstein, Philip R.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Clark, John P.; Mummaneni, Praveen V.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  Retrospective review. Objective  Intraoperative motor evoked potential (MEP) monitoring in spine surgery may assist surgeons in taking corrective measures to prevent neurologic deficits. The efficacy of monitoring MEPs intraoperatively in patients with myelopathy from nondegenerative causes has not been quantified. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of intraoperative MEP monitoring in patients with myelopathy caused by nondegenerative processes to patients with degenerative cervicothoracic spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Methods  We retrospectively reviewed our myelopathy surgical cases during a 1-year period to identify patients with degenerative CSM and CSM of nondegenerative causes and collected data on intraoperative MEP changes and postoperative new deficits. Categorical variables were analyzed by Fisher exact test. Receiver operator curves assessed intraoperative MEP monitoring performance in the two groups. Results  In all, 144 patients were identified: 102 had degenerative CSM and 42 had CSM of nondegenerative causes (24 extra-axial tumors, 12 infectious processes, 5 traumatic fractures, and 1 rheumatoid arthritis). For degenerative CSM, there were 11 intraoperative MEP alerts and 7 new deficits (p < 0.001). The corresponding sensitivity was 71% and the specificity was 94%. In the nondegenerative group, there were 11 intraoperative MEP alerts and 3 deficits, which was not significant (p > 0.99). The sensitivity (33%) and specificity (74%) were lower. Among patients with degenerative CSM, the model performed well for predicting postoperative deficits (area under the curve [AUC] 0.826), which appeared better than the nondegenerative group, although it did not reach statistical significance (AUC 0.538, p = 0.16). Conclusions  Based on this large retrospective analysis, intraoperative MEP monitoring in surgery for nondegenerative CSM cases appears to be less sensitive to cord injury and less predictive of postoperative

  8. METHANOL EXPOSURE DURING GASTRULATION CAUSES HOLOPROSENCEPHALY, FACIAL DYSGENESIS AND CERVICAL VERTEBRAL MALFORMATIONS IN C57BL/6J MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of pregnant CD-1 mice to methanol during the period of gastrulation results in exencephaly, cleft palate, and cervical vertebra malformations (Rogers and Mole, 1997, Teratology 55, 364). C57BL/6J mice are sensitive to the teratogenicity of ethanol; fetuses of this strai...

  9. A Broken Drill-bit Fragment Causing Severe Radiating Pain after Cervical Total Disc Replacement: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Chung, Sung-Soo; Park, Jae-Chul; Shin, Seong-Kee; Park, Yong-Serk; Kang, Kyung-Chung

    2011-06-01

    This is a case report of a 38-year-old man with severe radiating pain on upper extremity after cervical total disc replacement (TDR). We faced an unusual complication that has not been reported yet. He underwent cervical TDR for left central disc protrusion on C5-6. After the surgery, preoperative symptom disappeared. However, at postoperative 1 year, he complained severe right-sided radiating pain that had a sudden onset. On postoperative X-ray, a metal fragment which seemed like a broken drill bit was shown within the spinal canal. To remove that, right-sided anterior microforaminotomy on C5-6 was performed and the metal fragment was removed successfully. After that, anterior fusion was done because the motion of the artificial disc was minimal and the removed structure seemed to attenuate stability during cervical motion. The operation resulted in prompt symptomatic relief. During cervical TDR, particular attention should be paid to the procedures that require using drill-bits.

  10. Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Childress, Marc A; Becker, Blair A

    2016-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding. The Spurling test, shoulder abduction test, and upper limb tension test can be used to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging is not required unless there is a history of trauma, persistent symptoms, or red flags for malignancy, myelopathy, or abscess. Electrodiagnostic testing is not needed if the diagnosis is clear, but has clinical utility when peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity is a likely alternate diagnosis. Patients should be reassured that most cases will resolve regardless of the type of treatment. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy involving strengthening, stretching, and potentially traction, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and massage. Epidural steroid injections may be helpful but have higher risks of serious complications. In patients with red flag symptoms or persistent symptoms after four to six weeks of treatment, magnetic resonance imaging can identify pathology amenable to epidural steroid injections or surgery.

  11. Arachnoiditis ossificans associated with syringomyelia: An unusual cause of myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, George M.; Kamali-Nejad, Tara; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The pathophysiology of arachnoiditis ossificans (AO) and its association with syringomyelia remains a rare and poorly understood phenomenon. Here, we present a case of AO associated with syringomyelia, a review of literature, and a discussion of current understanding of disease pathophysiology. Methods: A literature review was performed using MEDLINE (January 1900–May 2010) and Embase (January 1900–May 2010) to identify all English-language studies that described AO with syringomyelia. The current report was added to published cases. Results: Over 50 cases of AO are reported in literature, of which only eight are associated with syringomyelia. The various presumptive etiologies of syrinx formation include abnormalities in blood circulation, ischemia, hydrodynamic alternations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow, tissue damage, or incidental coexistence. Changing CSF dynamics related to decreased compliance of the subarachnoid space and subsequent paracentral dissection of the spinal cord may be implicated in the disease process. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning may identify the syrinx but fail to diagnose the calcified arachnoid. Five patients, including the current case, improved clinically following laminectomy and decompression. Conclusions: Syringomyelia in association in AO is a rare phenomenon. A high index of suspicion is required and both MRI and computed tomography (CT) are recommended for diagnosis. The pathophysiology of syringomyelia in AO remains an area of ongoing research. PMID:23637667

  12. Cervical Cerclage

    MedlinePlus

    ... or more second trimester pregnancy losses related to painless cervical dilation and in the absence of labor ... history-indicated cervical cerclage) Prior cerclage due to painless cervical dilation in the second trimester Upon physical ...

  13. Spontaneous Cervical Epidural Hematoma Presenting as Brown-Sequard Syndrome Following Repetitive Korean Traditional Deep Bows

    PubMed Central

    Seon, Hyo-Jeong; Song, Min-Keun; Han, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma (SCEH) is an uncommon cause of acute nontraumatic myelopathy. SCEH presenting as Brown-Sequard syndrome is extremely rare. A 65-year-old man had motor weakness in the left extremities right after his mother's funeral. He received thrombolytic therapy under the impression of acute cerebral infarction at a local hospital. However, motor weakness of the left extremities became aggravated without mental change. After being transferred to our hospital, he showed motor weakness in the left extremities with diminished pain sensation in the right extremities. Diagnosis of SCEH was made by cervical magnetic resonance imaging. He underwent left C3 to C5 hemilaminectomy with hematoma removal. It is important for physicians to be aware that SCEH can be considered as one of the differential diagnoses of hemiplegia, since early diagnosis and management can influence the neurological outcome. We think that increased venous pressure owing to repetitive Korean traditional deep bows may be the cause of SCEH in this case. PMID:23526134

  14. Cox Decompression Manipulation and Guided Rehabilitation of a Patient With a Post Surgical C6-C7 Fusion With Spondylotic Myelopathy and Concurrent L5-S1 Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Joachim, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe combined treatment utilizing Cox distraction manipulation and guided rehabilitation for a patient with spine pain and post-surgical C6-7 fusion with spondylotic myelopathy and L5-S1 radiculopathy. Clinical features A 38-year-old man presented to a chiropractic clinic with neck pain and a history of an anterior cervical spine plate fusion at C6-7 after a work related accident 4 years earlier. He had signs and symptoms of spondolytic myelopathy and right lower back, right posterior thigh pain and numbness. Intervention and outcome The patient was treated with Cox technique and rehabilitation. The patient experienced a reduction of pain on a numeric pain scale from 8/10 to 3/10. The patient was seen a total of 12 visits over 3 months. No adverse effects were reported. Conclusions A patient with a prior C6-7 fusion with spondylotic myelopathy and concurrent L5-S1 radiculopathy improved after a course of rehabilitation and Cox distraction manipulation. Further research is needed to establish its efficiency. PMID:25685119

  15. Past, present, and future of cervical arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hyun Oh, Chang; Hwan Yoon, Seung

    2013-01-01

    Cervical arthroplasty was developed in an attempt to maintain cervical motion and potentially to avoid or minimize adjacent-segment degeneration. If cervical arthroplasty is successful, the long-term results of surgery for cervical disc disease should improve. However, problems associated with cervical arthroplasty have been reported: these include kyphosis, heterotopic ossification-induced motion limitation, no motion preservation even at the index level, and a higher revision rate in a limited number of cases compared with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). In addition, for degenerative cervical disc disorders, the risk of developing adjacent segment degeneration more than 2 years after surgery is reportedly similar for ACDF and cervical arthroplasty. Cervical disc arthroplasty is an emerging motion-sparing technology and is currently undergoing evaluation in many countries as an alternative to arthrodesis for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy. The decision whether to use arthrodesis or arthroplasty is a difficult one. The achievement of good prosthetic performance demands exacting implantation techniques to ensure correct placement. This fact underlines the increasing importance of special instrumentation and surgical skills that involve an understanding of prosthetic lubrication, wear, and biologic effects and familiarity with currently available information regarding kinematics, basic science, testing, and early clinical results. Fortunately, a number of devices are at the late preclinical study stage or at the early clinical trial stage, and results in many cases are promising. In the near future, it is likely that new designs will be produced to replace spinal discs totally or partially in a pathologic entity-specific manner.

  16. Cidofovir is active against human papillomavirus positive and negative head and neck and cervical tumor cells by causing DNA damage as one of its working mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Barbara; Nogueira, Tatiane; Stranska, Ruzena; Naesens, Lieve; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer and a large fraction of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Cidofovir (CDV) proved efficacious in the treatment of several HPV-induced benign and malignant hyper proliferations. To provide a better insight into how CDV selectively eradicates transformed cells, HPV+ and HPV− cervical carcinoma and HNSCC cell lines were compared to normal cells for antiproliferative effects, CDV metabolism, drug incorporation into cellular DNA, and DNA damage. Incorporation of CDV into cellular DNA was higher in tumor cells than in normal cells and correlated with CDV antiproliferative effects, which were independent of HPV status. Increase in phospho-ATM levels was detected following CDV exposure and higher levels of γ-H2AX (a quantitative marker of double-strand breaks) were measured in tumor cells compared to normal cells. A correlation between DNA damage and CDV incorporation into DNA was found but not between DNA damage and CDV antiproliferative effects. These data indicate that CDV antiproliferative effects result from incorporation of the drug into DNA causing DNA damage. However, the anti-tumor effects of CDV cannot be exclusively ascribed to DNA damage. Furthermore, CDV can be considered a promising broad spectrum anti-cancer agent, not restricted to HPV+ lesions. PMID:27331622

  17. Cervical cyst of the ligamentum flavum and C7-T1 subluxation: case report.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Galarza, Marcelo; Gorgoglione, Leonardo; Bisceglia, Michele; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    2005-10-01

    A patient with progressive gait disturbance resulting from a cyst of the cervical ligamentum flavum associated with C7-T1 listhesis is reported. Surgical removal of the cyst improved the patient's myelopathy. Intraspinal degenerative cysts are preferentially located in the lumbar region:unusual is the cervical localization. Differential diagnosis includes ligamentum flavum cyst, synovial and ganglion cysts. Association between degenerative intraspinal cysts and listhesis is discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first case of cyst of the ligamentum flavum associated with cervical subluxation.

  18. Effect of Pulsed Methylprednisolone on Pain, in Patients with HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Buell, Kevin G.; Puri, Aiysha; Demontis, Maria Antonietta; Short, Charlotte L.; Adonis, Adine; Haddow, Jana; Martin, Fabiola; Dhasmana, Divya

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is an immune mediated myelopathy caused by the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The efficacy of treatments used for patients with HAM/TSP is uncertain. The aim of this study is to document the efficacy of pulsed methylprednisolone in patients with HAM/TSP. Data from an open cohort of 26 patients with HAM/TSP was retrospectively analysed. 1g IV methylprednisolone was infused on three consecutive days. The outcomes were pain, gait, urinary frequency and nocturia, a range of inflammatory markers and HTLV-1 proviral load. Treatment was well tolerated in all but one patient. Significant improvements in pain were: observed immediately, unrelated to duration of disease and maintained for three months. Improvement in gait was only seen on Day 3 of treatment. Baseline cytokine concentrations did not correlate to baseline pain or gait impairment but a decrease in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) concentration after pulsed methylprednisolone was associated with improvements in both. Until compared with placebo, treatment with pulsed methylprednisolone should be offered to patients with HAM/TSP for the treatment of pain present despite regular analgesia. PMID:27077747

  19. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancer in women aged 30–65 years. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Human Papillomavirus ( ...

  20. Treatment of Portosystemic Shunt Myelopathy with a Stent Graft Deployed through a Transjugular Intrahepatic Route

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Deepak Arora, Ankur; Deka, Pranjal; Mukund, Amar Bhatnagar, Shorav; Jindal, Deepti Kumar, Niteen Pamecha, Viniyendra

    2013-08-01

    A case of surgically created splenorenal shunt complicated with shunt myelopathy was successfully managed by placement of a stent graft within the splenic vein to close the portosystemic shunt and alleviate myelopathy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of shunt myelopathy in a patient with noncirrhotic portal fibrosis without cirrhosis treated by a novel technique wherein a transjugular intrahepatic route was adopted to deploy the stent graft.

  1. Congestive myelopathy (Foix-Alajouanine Syndrome) due to intradural arteriovenous fistula of the filum terminale fed by anterior spinal artery: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Prasad; Banerjee, Tapas Kumar; Saha, Manash

    2013-07-01

    Spinal arteriovenous fistulas are rare entities. They often present with congestive myelopathy but are infrequently diagnosed as the cause of the patients' symptoms. Only one such case has been described previously in Indian literature. We describe one such case who presented to us after a gap of 3 years since symptom onset and following a failed laminectomy where the cause was later diagnosed to be an intradural fistula in the filum terminale fed by the anterior spinal artery and review the available literature.

  2. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cervical osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Sujeet Kumar; Jain, Harsh; Tripathy, Laxmi Narayan; Basu, Sunandan

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine and is usually seen in the background of intravenous drug use and immunocompromised state. Very few cases of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa have been reported in otherwise healthy patients. This is a case presentation of a young female, who in the absence of known risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis presented with progressively worsening neurological signs and symptoms. PMID:27891039

  3. A Brazilian Portuguese cross-cultural adaptation of the modified JOA scale for myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pratali, Raphael R.; Smith, Justin S.; Motta, Rodrigo L.N.; Martins, Samuel M.; Motta, Marcel M.; Rocha, Ricardo D.; Herrero, Carlos Fernando P.S.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a version of the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale that had been translated into Portuguese and cross-culturally adapted for the Brazilian population. METHODS: The well-established process of forward-backward translation was employed along with cross-cultural adaptation. RESULTS: Three bilingual translators (English and native Portuguese) performed the forward translation of the mJOA scale from English to Portuguese based on iterative discussions used to reach a consensus translation. The translated version of the mJOA scale was then back-translated into English by a native English-speaking translator unaware of the concepts involved with the mJOA scale. The original mJOA scale and the back-translated version were compared by a native North American neurosurgeon, and as they were considered equivalent, the final version of the mJOA scale that had been translated into Portuguese and cross-culturally adapted was defined. CONCLUSION: To facilitate global and cross-cultural comparisons of the severity of cervical myelopathy, this study presents a version of the mJOA scale that was translated into Portuguese and cross-culturally adapted for the Brazilian population. PMID:28273233

  4. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Cancer.gov

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  5. Cervical Cap

    MedlinePlus

    ... check the cervical cap's position before sex. Squat, bear down, insert your finger into your vagina and ... two days. To remove the cervical cap, squat, bear down and rotate the cap. Relax your muscles ...

  6. Cervical polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001494.htm Cervical polyps To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cervical polyps are fingerlike growths on the lower part ...

  7. Cervical spine fracture in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis causing a C2-T9 spinal epidural hematoma- Treatment resulted in a rapid and complete recovery from tetraplegia: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wong, Albert Sii Hieng; Yu, Denis Hee Youg

    2015-01-01

    Full recovery from tetraplegia is uncommon in cervical spine injury. This has not being reported for cervical spine fracture in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis causing spinal epidural hematoma. We report on a case of cervical spine fracture in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis who came with tetraplegia. He underwent a two stage fixation and fusion. He had a complete recovery. Two hours after the operation he regained full strength in all the limbs while in the Intensive Care Unit. He went back to full employment. There are only two other reports in the literature where patients with ankylosing spondylitis and extradural hematoma who underwent treatment within 12 h and recovered completely from tetraparesis and paraplegia respectively. Patient with ankylosing spondylitis has a higher incidence of spinal fracture and extradural hematoma. Good outcome can be achieved by early diagnosis and treatment. This can ensure not only a stable spine, but also a rapid and complete recovery in a tetraplegic patient.

  8. [Cervical pregnancy. Three cases].

    PubMed

    Plascencia Moncayo, Norberto; Hernández, María de la Paz; Guadarrama Sánchez, Rafael; Guerra Becerra, Leticia; Salmón Vélez, J Fernando G; Galván Aguilera, Alejandro

    2008-12-01

    We describe cervical pregnancy concept and its rareness. Its frequency is one in 2,550 to 98,000 intrauterine pregnancies. Predisposing factors are related with endometrial damage due to uterine curettages and previous cesarian section. Clinical picture was nonspecific and diagnosis was based in endovaginal ultrasonography. It can cause massive bleeding and put life in risk. During 2007 we attend 829 intrauterine pregnancies at Hospital San José de Querétaro: 11 tubal, and 3 cervical, this represents an extraordinarily high frequency of cervical pregnancy. Here we report three cases of cervical pregnancies treated with total hysterectomy, two as urgency and one elective. We remark early diagnosis importance to perform conservative treatment and maintain reproductive function.

  9. Flexitouch® Home Maintenance Therapy or Standard Home Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With Lower-Extremity Lymphedema Caused by Treatment for Cervical Cancer, Vulvar Cancer, or Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Lymphedema; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  10. Characteristics of spondylotic myelopathy on 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo and 2D fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Abdulhadi, Mike A; Perno, Joseph R; Melhem, Elias R; Nucifora, Paolo G P

    2014-01-01

    In patients with spinal stenosis, magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine can be improved by using 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences to provide a high-resolution assessment of osseous and ligamentous structures. However, it is not yet clear whether 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences adequately evaluate the spinal cord itself. As a result, they are generally supplemented by additional 2D fast spin echo sequences, adding time to the examination and potential discomfort to the patient. Here we investigate the hypothesis that in patients with spinal stenosis and spondylotic myelopathy, 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences can characterize cord lesions equally well as 2D fast spin echo sequences. We performed a retrospective analysis of 30 adult patients with spondylotic myelopathy who had been examined with both 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences and 2D fast spin echo sequences at the same scanning session. The two sequences were inspected separately for each patient, and visible cord lesions were manually traced. We found no significant differences between 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo and 2D fast spin echo sequences in the mean number, mean area, or mean transverse dimensions of spondylotic cord lesions. Nevertheless, the mean contrast-to-noise ratio of cord lesions was decreased on 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences compared to 2D fast spin echo sequences. These findings suggest that 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences do not need supplemental 2D fast spin echo sequences for the diagnosis of spondylotic myelopathy, but they may be less well suited for quantitative signal measurements in the spinal cord.

  11. Management of adjacent segment disease after cervical spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Hilibrand, Alan S

    2012-01-01

    Adjacent segment disease (ASD) was described after long-term follow-up of patients treated with cervical fusion. The term describes new-onset radiculopathy or myelopathy referable to a motion segment adjacent to previous arthrodesis and often attributed to alterations in the biomechanical environment after fusion. Evidence suggests that ASD affects between 2% and 3% of patients per year. Although prevention of ASD was one major impetus behind the development of motion-sparing surgery, the literature does not yet clearly distinguish a difference in the rate of ASD between fusion and disk replacement. Surgical techniques during index surgery may reduce the rate of ASD.

  12. Venous Congestive Myelopathy due to Chronic Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis Treated with Endovascular Stenting: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Diego Z.; Hughes, Joshua D.; Liebo, Greta B.; Bendel, Emily C.; Bjarnason, Haraldur; Klaas, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Impaired inferior vena cava (IVC) outflow can lead to collateralization of blood to the valveless epidural venous plexus, causing epidural venous engorgement and venous congestion. Herein we describe a case of chronic IVC thrombosis presenting as venous congestive myelopathy treated with angioplasty and endovascular stenting. The pathophysiological mechanisms of cord injury are hypothesized, and IVC stenting application is evaluated. Methods Case report and review of the literature. Results IVC outflow obstruction has only rarely been associated with neurologic dysfunction, with reports of lumbosacral nerve root compression in the cases of IVC agenesis, compression, or occlusion. Although endovascular angioplasty with stenting is emerging as a leading treatment option for chronic IVC thrombosis, its use to treat neurologic complications is limited to one case report for intractable sciatica. Our case is the first description of IVC thrombosis presenting with venous congestive myelopathy, and treated successfully with IVC stenting. Conclusion Venous congestive myelopathy should be seen as a broader clinical condition, including not only typical dural arteriovenous fistulas, but also disorders of venous outflow. Therefore, identifying a rare, but potentially treatable, etiology is important to avoid permanent neurologic deficits. IVC stenting is proposed as a novel and effective treatment approach. PMID:25825633

  13. Remote Cervical Pseudomeningocele Following Anterior Cervical Corpectomy and Fusion: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Soufiani, Housain; Rahimizadeh, Shaghayegh

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic cervical pseudomeningocele is a rare event and majority are located posteriorly as a delayed complication of inadvertent dural tear after decompressive laminectomy. However, iatrogenic anterior cervical pseudomeningocele subsequent to discectomy or corpectomy is a rare pathology. The time necessary for formation of pseudomeningocele varies and depend on the width of the dural tear and the flow of cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Large tears with high CSF flow usually result in early collection of the cerebrospinal fluid in anterior compartment of the neck designated acute pseudomeningoceles. Micro-tears of dura mater, with low flow of cerebrospinal fluid may lead to late formation of a pseudomeningocele known as chronic ones. Herein a 49- year-old woman in whom cervical pseudomeningocele appeared clinically as a mass on the anterior aspect of the neck, six months after anterior cervical corpectomy for cervical spondylotic myelopathy is presented. Otherwise, she was neurologically stable. Cystoperitoneal shunt was proposed which she refused. Surprisingly, at 2-year follow-up, the cyst had remained of the same size. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of post-operative chronic cervical pseudomeningocele in the literature, the event that might propose the self-limited natural course of this rare pathology in chronic cases. PMID:27909657

  14. Atlanto-axial approach for cervical myelography in a Thoroughbred horse with complete fusion of the atlanto-occipital bones

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Monica; Dimock, Abigail N.; Wisner, Erik R.; Prutton, Jamie W.; Madigan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    A 2-year-old Thoroughbred gelding with clinical signs localized to the first 6 spinal cord segments (C1 to C6) had complete fusion of the atlanto-occipital bones which precluded performing a routine myelogram. An ultrasound-assisted myelogram at the intervertebral space between the atlas and axis was successfully done and identified a marked extradural compressive myelopathy at the level of the atlas and axis, and axis and third cervical vertebrae. PMID:25392550

  15. Dysphagia due to cervical osteophytes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Saeed; Bansal, Meghana; Agarwal, Abhishek

    2012-05-01

    Cervical bony outgrowths or osteophytes are common and usually asymptomatic. In some cases, they may be associated with dysphagia, dysphonia, dyspnea and pulmonary aspiration. The most common causes of cervical osteophytes are osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and ankylosing hyperostosis or Diffuse Idiopathic Spinal Hyperostosis (DISH), also known as Forestier's Disease. Other causes are hypoparathyroidism, trauma, acromegaly, ochronosis and flourosis. However, while dysphagia due to osteophytes is reported in the setting of DISH, it is very rare with osteoarthritis. We report a case of a patient who developed dysphagia due to anterior cervical osteophytes in the setting of osteoarthritis.

  16. Screening for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes cervical cancer. To learn more about these tests and what happens during them, visit the Web sites listed at the end of this fact ... evidence about the benefits and harms of the test. The grades are explained in the box at ... Web site to read the full recommendation statement on ...

  17. Clinical and radiologic comparison of dynamic cervical implant arthroplasty and cervical total disc replacement for single-level cervical degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Shichang, Liu; Yueming, Song; Limin, Liu; Lei, Wang; Zhongjie, Zhou; Chunguang, Zhou; Xi, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, to date the most successful spine procedure for the surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy, has limitations that have led to the development of non-fusion cervical procedures, such as cervical total disc replacement (TDR) and dynamic cervical implant (DCI) arthroplasty. We compared the clinical and radiological results of DCI and cervical TDR for the treatment of single-level cervical degenerative disc disease in Chinese patients. A retrospective review of 179 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy who underwent DCI or TDR between April 2010 and October 2012 was conducted, and 152 consecutive patients (67 patients single-level DCI and 85 single-level TDR) who completed at least 2years of follow-up were included. Clinical and radiological assessments were performed preoperatively and at 1week and 3, 6, 12, and 24months postoperatively. The most common operative level was C5/C6 (49.3%). The differences in blood loss, duration of surgery, and duration of hospitalization were not statistically significant. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale, Visual Analog Scale, Neck Disability Index, and Short Form-36 scores improved significantly after surgery in both the DCI and TDR groups (P<0.05), but the differences were not statistically significant at the final follow-up. The rate of occurrence of heterotopic ossification was 22.4% and 28.2% in the DCI and TDR groups, respectively. As an effective non-fusion technique, DCI is a more economical procedure. Further prospective, randomized studies with long-term follow-up periods are needed to determine the long-term effects.

  18. Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    SUGAWARA, Taku

    Anterior cervical spine surgery is an established surgical intervention for cervical degenerative disease and high success rate with excellent long-term outcomes have been reported. However, indications of surgical procedures for certain conditions are still controversial and severe complications to cause neurological dysfunction or deaths may occur. This review is focused mainly on five widely performed procedures by anterior approach for cervical degenerative disease; anterior cervical discectomy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, anterior cervical foraminotomy, and arthroplasty. Indications, procedures, outcomes, and complications of these surgeries are discussed. PMID:26119899

  19. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cases of cervical cancer and the number of deaths due to cervical cancer since 1950. Cervical dysplasia ... for cervical cancer helps decrease the number of deaths from the disease. Regular screening of women between ...

  20. Cervical Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Interest (Quiz) Breast Cancer (Video) Overview of the Female Reproductive System (News) Study: Plenty of IV Fluids May Make Childbirth Safer, Easier (News) Zejula Approved for Certain Female Cancers Additional Content Medical News Cervical Stenosis By S. ...

  1. Cervical Myomas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Interest (Quiz) Breast Cancer (Video) Overview of the Female Reproductive System (News) Study: Plenty of IV Fluids May Make Childbirth Safer, Easier (News) Zejula Approved for Certain Female Cancers Additional Content Medical News Cervical Myomas By S. ...

  2. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pap test results are not normal. • Get the HPV vaccine. It protects against the types of HPV that ... for cervical cancer. To learn more about the HPV vaccine visit www. cdc. gov/ hpv . • D on’t ...

  3. Cervical dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... by your provider. Make sure to get the HPV vaccine when it is offered to you. This vaccine ... Ask your provider about the HPV vaccine . Girls who receive this ... their chance of getting cervical cancer. You can reduce your ...

  4. Cervical cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors for cervical cancer include: Not getting the HPV vaccine Being economically disadvantaged Having a mother who took ... be prevented by doing the following: Get the HPV vaccine . The vaccine prevents most types of HPV infection ...

  5. Cervical spondylosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical osteoarthritis; Arthritis - neck; Neck arthritis; Chronic neck pain; Degenerative disk disease ... nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDs) for long-term pain control. Opioids may be prescribed if the pain is severe ...

  6. Kinematic Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of the Degenerative Cervical Spine: Changes after Anterior Decompression and Cage Fusion.

    PubMed

    Obradov, Marina; Bénard, Menno R; Janssen, Michiel M A; Anderson, Patricia G; Heesterbeek, Petra J C; Spruit, Maarten

    2016-11-01

    Study Design A prospective cohort study. Objective Decompression and fusion of cervical vertebrae is a combined procedure that has a high success rate in relieving radicular symptoms and stabilizing or improving cervical myelopathy. However, fusion may lead to increased motion of the adjacent vertebrae and cervical deformity. Both have been postulated to lead to adjacent segment pathology (ASP). Kinematic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly used to evaluate range of motion (ROM) of the cervical spine and ASP. Our objective was to measure ASP, cervical curvature, and ROM of individual segments of the cervical spine using kinematic MRI before and 24 months after monosegmental cage fusion. Methods Eighteen patients who had single-level interbody fusion were included. ROM (using kinematic MRI) and degeneration, spinal stenosis, and cervical curvature were measured preoperatively and 24 months postoperatively. Results Using kinematic MRI, segmental motion of the cervical segments was measured with a precision of less than 3 degrees. The cervical fusion did not affect the ROM of adjacent levels. However, pre- and postoperative ROM was higher at the levels immediately adjacent to the fusion level compared with those further away. In addition, at 24 months postoperatively, the number of cases with ASP was higher at the levels immediately adjacent to fusion level. Conclusions Using kinematic MRI, ROM after spinal fusion can be measured with high precision. Kinematic MRI can be used not only in clinical practice, but also to study intervention and its effect on postoperative biomechanics and ASP of cervical vertebrae.

  7. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for Cervical Cancer Browse Sections The Basics Overview Cervical Cancer ... Cervical Cancer 1 of 5 sections The Basics: Cervical Cancer What is cervical cancer? Cervical cancer is ...

  8. Fractures of the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, Raphael Martus; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Teixeira, William Jacobsen; Narasaki, Douglas Kenji; Oliveira, Reginaldo Perilo; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to review the literature on cervical spine fractures. METHODS: The literature on the diagnosis, classification, and treatment of lower and upper cervical fractures and dislocations was reviewed. RESULTS: Fractures of the cervical spine may be present in polytraumatized patients and should be suspected in patients complaining of neck pain. These fractures are more common in men approximately 30 years of age and are most often caused by automobile accidents. The cervical spine is divided into the upper cervical spine (occiput-C2) and the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), according to anatomical differences. Fractures in the upper cervical spine include fractures of the occipital condyle and the atlas, atlanto-axial dislocations, fractures of the odontoid process, and hangman's fractures in the C2 segment. These fractures are characterized based on specific classifications. In the lower cervical spine, fractures follow the same pattern as in other segments of the spine; currently, the most widely used classification is the SLIC (Subaxial Injury Classification), which predicts the prognosis of an injury based on morphology, the integrity of the disc-ligamentous complex, and the patient's neurological status. It is important to correctly classify the fracture to ensure appropriate treatment. Nerve or spinal cord injuries, pseudarthrosis or malunion, and postoperative infection are the main complications of cervical spine fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Fractures of the cervical spine are potentially serious and devastating if not properly treated. Achieving the correct diagnosis and classification of a lesion is the first step toward identifying the most appropriate treatment, which can be either surgical or conservative. PMID:24270959

  9. Delayed diagnosed intermuscular lipoma causing a posterior interosseous nerve palsy in a patient with cervical spondylosis: the “priceless” value of the clinical examination in the technological era

    PubMed Central

    COLASANTI, R.; IACOANGELI, M.; DI RIENZO, A.; DOBRAN, M.; DI SOMMA, L.; NOCCHI, N.; SCERRATI, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy may present with various symptoms, and may resemble cervical spondylosis. Case report We report about a 59-year-old patient with cervical spondylosis which delayed the diagnosis of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy due to an intermuscular lipoma. Initial right hand paraesthesias and clumsiness, together with MR findings of right C5–C6 and C6–C7 foraminal stenosis, misled the diagnostic investigation. The progressive loss of extension of all right hand fingers brought to detect a painless mass compressing the PIN. Electrophysiological studies confirmed a right radial motor neuropathy at the level of the forearm. Results Surgical tumor removal and nerve decompression resulted in a gradual motor deficits recovery. Conclusions A thorough clinical examination is paramount, and electrophysiology may differentiate between cervical and peripheral nerve lesions. Ultrasonography and MR offer an effective evaluation of lipomas, which represent a rare cause of PIN palsy. Surgical decompression and lipoma removal generally determine excellent prognoses, with very few recurrences. PMID:27142825

  10. [Central nervous system leukemia mimicking rapidly progressive HTLV-1 associated myelopathy].

    PubMed

    Haruki, Hiroyo; Tanaka, Shinichiro; Koga, Michiaki; Kawai, Motoharu; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Kanda, Takashi

    2009-03-01

    A 79-year-old woman was suffered from rapidly progressive paresthesia of lower limbs and gait disturbance. After one month, she showed flaccid paraplegia and hyperreflexia in the lower limbs with positive Babinski signs. Anti-HTLV-1 antibody titer was elevated in the serum, but negative in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF examination showed mild pleocytosis, elevated protein, and normal glucose content. Adult T cell lymphoma (ATL)-like cells were seen in the CSF. MRI showed no abnormal intensity in the spinal cord and brain. Two months later, she showed rapid worsening of the paraplegia and she became unable to stand. A tentative diagnosis of rapidly progressive HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (HAM) was given, but intravenous methylprednisolone was ineffective. Six months later, she developed pneumonia, and abundant ATL cells were seen in the peripheral blood, suggesting a diagnosis of ATL. Direct infiltration of ATL cells to central nervous system was therefore suggested to have caused neurological abnormalities in this case. One may consider central nervous system leukemia when rapidly progressive HAM-like symptoms and signs are recognized, especially without positive anti-HTLV-1 antibody in the CSF.

  11. Clinical, imaging, and pathologic characteristics of Gurltia paralysans myelopathy in domestic cats from Chile.

    PubMed

    Mieres, Marcelo; Gómez, Marcelo A; Lillo, Carla; Rojas, Marcela A; Moroni, Manuel; Muñoz, Pamela; Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo; Wiegand, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Gurltia paralysans is a rare metastrongylid nematode of domestic cats that is found mainly in the veins of the spinal cord subarachnoid space and parenchyma. Endemic regions for G. paralysans mainly include Chile and Argentina. The ante mortem diagnosis of gurltiosis is difficult and based primarily on neurological signs, epidemiological factors, and the exclusion of other causes of feline myelopathies. The purpose of this retrospective case series was to describe clinical, imaging, and pathologic characteristics in nine domestic cats naturally infected with G. paralysans. Imaging tests included radiography, myelography, computed tomographic myelography (myelo-CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Neurological signs included paraparesis, paraplegia, pelvic limb ataxia and proprioceptive deficits, pelvic limb tremors, lumbosacral hyperesthesia, and tail trembling or atony. Complete blood count findings included a decrease in the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration value in eight cats. Eosinophilia in peripheral blood was observed in three cats, and thrombocytopenia was observed in three cats. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed mononuclear pleocytosis in five cases. Myelo-CT showed diffuse enlargement of the spinal cord at the midthoracic, lumbar, and sacral regions in all cats. Magnetic resonance image findings in the thoracic and lumbar region demonstrated multiple small nodular areas of T2 hyperintensity in the periphery of the spinal cord parenchyma. Localized intraparenchymal areas of increased T2 intensity were also observed in the thoracolumbar spinal cord and lumbosacral conus medullaris. In conclusion, G. paralysans should be considered as a differential diagnosis for domestic cats in endemic regions that have this combination of clinical and imaging characteristics.

  12. Relationship of Specific Bacteria in the Cervical and Vaginal Microbiotas with Cervicitis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fiedler, Tina L.; Morgan, Martin T.; Balkus, Jennifer E.; McClelland, R. Scott; Fredricks, David N.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervicitis is an inflammatory condition of the cervix associated with upper genital tract infection and reproductive complications. Although cervicitis can be caused by several known pathogens, the etiology frequently remains obscure. Here we investigate vaginal bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis as potential causes of cervicitis. Methods Associations between vaginal bacteria and cervicitis were assessed in a retrospective case control study of women attending a Seattle STD clinic. Individual bacterial species were detected using two molecular methods: quantitative PCR (qPCR) and broad range 16S rRNA gene PCR with pyrosequencing. The primary finding from this initial study was evaluated using qPCR in a second cohort of Kenyan women. Results The presence of Mageeibacillus indolicus, formerly BVAB3, in the cervix was associated with cervicitis, while the presence of Lactobacillus jensenii was inversely associated. Quantities of these bacteria did not differ between cervicitis cases and controls, though in a model inclusive of presence and abundance, M. indolicus remained significantly associated with cervicitis after adjustment for other cervicitis-causing pathogens. M. indolicus was not associated with cervicitis in our study of Kenyan women, possibly due to differences in the clinical definition of cervicitis. Conclusions Colonization of the endocervix with M. indolicus may contribute to the clinical manifestations of cervicitis, but further study is needed to determine whether this finding is repeatable and applicable to diverse groups of women. Colonization of the cervix with L. jensenii could be a marker of health, perhaps reducing inflammation or inhibiting pathogenic infection. PMID:26267872

  13. Night blindness due to vitamin A deficiency associated with copper deficiency myelopathy secondary to bowel bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    AlHassany, Ali Abdul Jabbar

    2014-04-29

    We present an interesting case of combined vitamin A and copper deficiency after a history of gastric bypass surgery where symptoms improved after parenteral copper and vitamin A treatment. Gastric bypass surgery as a cause of fat soluble vitamin deficiency is generally under-reported. Copper deficiency has been reported after gastric bypass surgery. Vitamin A deficiency after gastric bypass surgery has also been reported in the literature, but the reported cases again fall below the actual figures. B12 and folate deficiencies can produce a type of myelopathy similar to that produced by copper deficiency, and differentiation on the basis of laboratory tests, neurophysiology and improvement of symptoms after replacement therapy might be the hallmark of diagnosis. Combinations of vitamin deficiencies were previously reported, but no cases of combined vitamin A and copper deficiency could be found in the literature.

  14. [Calcification of the cervical ligamentum flavum. Case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Guesmi, H; Lamouchi, T; Mlaiki, A; Ksira, I; Tlili, K; Krifa, H

    2005-12-01

    Calcification of the cervical ligamentum flavum is a rare entity observed exclusively in Japanese people. We report a new case in a 65-year-old man from Tunisia who presented with symptoms of cervical myelopathy with mild tetra paresis, sensory abnormalities and dysuria. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a posterior compression of the spinal cord at C3-C4. CT-scan showed a calcification of the ligamentum flavum at level C3-C4, compressing the left postero-lateral aspect of the spinal cord. C3-C4 laminectomy was performed with removal of abnormal ligamentum flavum tissue. The postoperative course was uneventful and all symptoms resolved. Calcification of the cervical ligamentum flavum is a rare entity; the diagnosis is easy but the pathogenesis remains unclear. Literature regarding this pathology is reviewed.

  15. Multilevel cervical arthroplasty: current evidence. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment modality for single-level cervical radiculopathy or myelopathy. Its advantages over an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) include motion preservation and decreased reoperations at the index and adjacent segments up to 7 years postoperatively. Considering the fact that many patients have multilevel cervical disc degeneration (CDD), the authors performed a systematic review of the clinical studies evaluating patients who underwent multilevel CDA (2 or more levels). METHODS A systematic review in the MEDLINE database was performed. Clinical studies including patients who had multilevel CDA were selected and included. Case reports and literature reviews were excluded. Articles were then grouped according to their main study objective: 1) studies comparing multilevel CDA versus ACDF; 2) studies comparing single-level CDA versus multilevel CDA; and 3) multilevel CDA after a previous cervical spine surgery. RESULTS Fourteen articles met all inclusion criteria. The general conclusions were that multilevel CDA was at least as safe and effective as ACDF, with preservation of cervical motion when compared with ACDF and potentially with fewer reoperations expected in most of the studies. Multilevel CDAs are clinically effective as single-level surgeries, with good clinical and radiological outcomes. Some studies reported a higher incidence of heterotopic ossification in multilevel CDA when compared with single-level procedures, but without clinical relevance during the follow-up period. A CDA may be indicated even after a previous cervical surgery in selected cases. CONCLUSIONS The current literature supports the use of multilevel CDA. Caution is necessary regarding the more restrictive indications for CDA when compared with ACDF. Further prospective, controlled, multicenter, and randomized studies not sponsored by the device manufactures are desirable to prove the

  16. Missed upper cervical spine fracture: clinical and radiological considerations

    PubMed Central

    Hadida, Camille; Lemire, Joe J

    1997-01-01

    Objective: This report presents a case of missed upper cervical spine fracture following a motor vehicle accident and illustrates various clinical and radiographic considerations necessary in the evaluation of post traumatic cervical spine injuries. Specific clinical signs and symptoms, as well as radiographic clues should prompt the astute clinician to suspect a fracture even when plain film radiographs have been reported as normal. Clinical features: A 44-year-old male was referred for an orthopaedic consultation for assessment of headaches following a high speed head-on motor vehicle accident eleven weeks prior to his presentation. Cervical spine radiographs taken at an emergency ward the day of the collision were reported as essentially normal. Subsequent radiographs taken eleven weeks later revealed a fracture through the body of axis with anterior displacement of atlas. A review of the initial radiographs clearly demonstrated signs suggesting an upper cervical fracture. Intervention and outcome: Initially the patient was prescribed a soft collar which he wore daily until an orthopaedic consultation eleven weeks later. Fifteen weeks following trauma, the patient was considered for surgical intervention, due to persistent headaches associated with the development of neurological signs suggestive of early onset of cervical myelopathy. Conclusion: Cervical spine fractures can have disastrous consequences if not detected early. A thorough clinical and radiological evaluation is essential in any patient presenting with a history of neck or head trauma. Repeated plain film radiographs are imperative in the event of inadequate visualization of the cervical vertebrae. When in doubt, further imaging studies such as computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging are required to rule out a fracture. ImagesFigure 1AFigure 1BFigure 2Figure 3

  17. Canine degenerative myelopathy: a model of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Taylor, Alexandra C; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-02-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (CDM) represents a unique naturally occurring animal model for human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) because of similar clinical signs, neuropathologic findings, and involvement of the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutation. A definitive diagnosis can only be made postmortem through microscopic detection of axonal degeneration, demyelination and astroglial proliferation, which is more severe in the dorsal columns of the thoracic spinal cord and in the dorsal portion of the lateral funiculus. Interestingly, the muscle acetylcholine receptor complexes are intact in CDM prior to functional impairment, thus suggesting that muscle atrophy in CDM does not result from physical denervation. Moreover, since sensory involvement seems to play an important role in CDM progression, a more careful investigation of the sensory pathology in ALS is also warranted. The importance of SOD1 expression remains unclear, while oxidative stress and denatured ubiquinated proteins appear to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of CDM. In this updated narrative review we performed a systematic search of the published studies on CDM that may shed light on the pathophysiological mechanisms of human ALS. A better understanding of the factors that determine the disease progression in CDM may be beneficial for the development of effective treatments for ALS.

  18. Quantitative evaluation of cervical cord compression by computed tomographic myelography in Thoroughbred foals

    PubMed Central

    YAMADA, Kazutaka; SATO, Fumio; HADA, Tetsuro; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; IKEDA, Hiroki; NISHIHARA, Kahori; SASAKI, Naoki; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu; NAMBO, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Five Thoroughbred foals (age, 8–33 weeks; median age, 31 weeks; weight, 122–270 kg; median weight, 249 kg) exhibiting ataxia with suspected cervical myelopathy (n=4) and limb malformation (n=1) were subjected to computed tomographic (CT) myelography. The areas of the subarachnoid space and cervical cord were measured on transverse CT images. The area of the cervical cord was divided by the area of subarachnoid space, and stenosis ratios were quantitatively evaluated and compared on the basis of histopathological examination. The sites with a ratio above 52.8% could have been primary lesion sites in the histopathological examination, although one site with a ratio of 54.1% was not a primary lesion site. Therefore, in this study, a ratio between 52.8–54.1% was suggested to be borderline for physical compression that damages the cervical cord. All the cervical vertebrae could not be scanned in three of the five cases. Therefore, CT myelography is not a suitable method for locating the site of compression, but it should be used for quantitative evaluation of cervical stenosis diagnosed by conventional myelography. In conclusion, the stenosis ratios determined using CT myelography could be applicable for detecting primary lesion sites in the cervical cord. PMID:27974873

  19. The application of a zero-profile implant in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-dong; Zhu, Ruo-fu; Yang, Hui-lin; Gan, Min-feng; Zhang, Shi-kai; Shen, Min-jie; Chen, Chao; Yuan, Quan

    2014-03-01

    We analyzed the clinical efficacy of the Zero-P implant (Synthes GmbH Switzerland, Oberdorf, Switzerland) in the treatment of single level cervical spondylotic myelopathy. The clinical data of 47 patients with single level cervical spondylotic myelopathy were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-two patients were treated with a Zero-P implant (Group A) and 25 with a titanium plate with cage (Group B) between January 2009 and September 2010. Operative time, intraoperative blood loss, preoperative and postoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores and JOA recovery rate, dysphagia incidence and adjacent segment degeneration rate were measured. The mean operative time in Group A and Group B was 98.18 minutes and 105.4 minutes, respectively. The average intraoperative blood loss in Group A and Group B was 87.95 ml and 92.4 ml, respectively. There were no statistical differences in operation time and intraoperative blood loss between the two groups (p>0.05). The JOA score was significantly improved in the two groups (p<0.001), and the recovery rate was similar (60.86% for Group A versus 62.95% for Group B, p>0.05). Dysphagia was experienced by one (4.5%) patient in Group A and eight (32%) patients in Group B, which was significantly different (p=0.044). There was no statistical significance found in the adjacent level degeneration rates between Group A and Group B (p=0.330). The Zero-P implant and traditional titanium plate with cage are effective treatments for single level cervical spondylotic myelopathy, but the Zero-P implant has a lower dysphagia incidence.

  20. Human papilloma virus and cervical preinvasive disease

    PubMed Central

    Bari, M; Iancu, G; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer lesions represent a major threat to the health of the women worldwide. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for 99.7% of cervical cancer cases, the infectious etiology giving the possibility of preventing cervical cancer by vaccination. The most aggressive HPV types are 16 and 18, which cause about 70% of cases of invasive cancer. The vaccination is recommended to the girls aged 11–12. The diagnosis and the treatment of cervical preinvasive disease allow the doctor to prevent the development of the invasive disease. PMID:20108750

  1. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; ...

  2. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; ...

  3. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; ...

  4. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; ...

  5. Anticancer effects of the engineered stem cells transduced with therapeutic genes via a selective tumor tropism caused by vascular endothelial growth factor toward HeLa cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Sun; Yi, Bo-Rim; Hwang, Kyung-A; Kim, Seung U; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of genetically engineered stem cells (GESTECs) expressing bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD) and/or human interferon-beta (IFN-β) gene against HeLa cervical cancer and the migration factors of the GESTECs toward the cancer cells. Anticancer effect of GESTECs was examined in a co-culture with HeLa cells using MTT assay to measure cell viability. A transwell migration assay was performed so as to assess the migration capability of the stem cells to cervical cancer cells. Next, several chemoattractant ligands and their receptors related to a selective migration of the stem cells toward HeLa cells were determined by real-time PCR. The cell viability of HeLa cells was decreased in response to 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), a prodrug, indicating that 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a toxic metabolite, was converted from 5-FC by CD gene and it caused the cell death in a co-culture system. When IFN-β was additionally expressed with CD gene by these GESTECs, the anticancer activity was significantly increased. In the migration assay, the GESTECs selectively migrated to HeLa cervical cancer cells. As results of real-time PCR, chemoattractant ligands such as MCP-1, SCF, and VEGF were expressed in HeLa cells, and several receptors such as uPAR, VEGFR2, and c-kit were produced by the GESTECs. These GESTECs transduced with CD gene and IFN-β may provide a potential of a novel gene therapy for anticervical cancer treatments via their selective tumor tropism derived from VEGF and VEGFR2 expressions between HeLa cells and the GESTECs.

  6. Preoperative opioid strength may not affect outcomes of anterior cervical procedures: a post hoc analysis of 2 prospective, randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael P.; Anderson, Paul A.; Sasso, Rick C.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Object The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between preoperative opioid strength and outcomes of anterior cervical decompressive surgery. Methods A retrospective cohort of 1004 patients enrolled in 1 of 2 investigational device exemption studies comparing cervical total disc arthroplasty (TDA) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for single-level cervical disease causing radiculopathy or myelopathy was selected. At a preoperative visit, opioid use data, Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores, 36-ltem Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores, and numeric rating scale scores for neck and arm pain were collected. Patients were divided into strong (oxycodone/morphine/meperidine), weak (codeine/propoxyphene/ hydrocodone), and opioid-naïve groups. Preoperative and postoperative (24 months) outcomes scores were compared within and between groups using the paired t-test and ANCOVA, respectively. Results Patients were categorized as follows: 226 strong, 762 weak, and 16 opioid naïve. The strong and weak groups were similar with respect to age, sex, race, marital status, education level, Worker's Compensation status, litigation status, and alcohol use. At 24-month follow-up, no differences in change in arm or neck pain scores (arm: strong –52.3, weak –50.6, naïve –54.0, p = 0.244; neck: strong –52.7, weak –50.8, naïve –44.6, p = 0.355); NDI scores (strong –36.0, weak –33.3, naïve –32.3, p = 0.181); or SF-36 Physical Component Summary scores (strong: 14.1, weak 13.3, naïve 21.7, p = 0.317) were present. Using a 15-point improvement in NDI to determine success, the authors found no between-groups difference in success rates (strong 80.6%, weak 82.7%, naïve 73.3%, p = 0.134). No difference existed between treatment arms (TDA vs ACDF) for any outcome at any time point. Conclusions Preoperative opioid strength did not adversely affect outcomes in this analysis. Careful patient selection can yield good results in this patient

  7. [Primary cervical cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel; Tovar-Rodríguez, José María

    2015-01-01

    Cervico-uterine cancer screening with cytology decrease incidence by more than 50%. The cause of this cancer is the human papilloma virus high risk, and requires a sensitive test to provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection and greater interval period when the results are negative. The test of the human papilloma virus high risk, is effective and safe because of its excellent sensitivity, negative predictive value and optimal reproducibility, especially when combined with liquid-based cytology or biomarkers with viral load, with higher sensitivity and specificity, by reducing false positives for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater injury, with excellent clinical benefits to cervical cancer screening and related infection of human papilloma virus diseases, is currently the best test for early detection infection of human papillomavirus and the risk of carcinogenesis.

  8. Cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, John H

    2012-06-01

    Standard treatment for invasive cervical cancer involves either radical surgery or radiotherapy. Childbearing is therefore impossible after either of these treatments. A fertility-sparing option, however, by radical trachelectomy has been shown to be effective, provided that strict criteria for selection are followed. Fertility rates are high, whereas recurrence is low, indicating that a more conservative approach to dealing with early small cervical tumours is feasible. Careful preoperative assessment by magnetic resonance imaging scans allows accurate measurement of the tumour with precise definition to plan surgery. This will ensure an adequate clear margin by wide excision of the tumour excising the cervix by radical vaginal trachelectomy with surrounding para-cervical and upper vaginal tissues. An isthmic cerclage is inserted to provide competence at the level of the internal orifice. A primary vagino-isthmic anastomosis is conducted to restore continuity of the lower genital tract. Subsequent pregnancies require careful monitoring in view of the high risk of spontaneous premature rupture of the membranes. Delivery by classical caesarean section is necessary at the onset of labour or electively before term. Over 1100 such procedures have been carried out vaginally or abdominally, resulting in 240 live births. Radical vaginal trachelectomy with a laparoscopic pelvic-node dissection offers the least morbid and invasive route for surgery, provided that adequate surgical skills have been obtained.

  9. Cervical lymphadenopathy: Unwinding the hidden truth

    PubMed Central

    Ramadas, Athira Aruna; Jose, Renju; Varma, Beena; Chandy, Marina Lazar

    2017-01-01

    Lymphadenopathy is a common clinical finding in a patient seeking oral health care. It may be in a localized, limited, or generalized form. Malignancies, infections, autoimmune disorders, iatrogenic, and other miscellaneous conditions are considered as the causes for cervical lymphadenopathy. Unexplained cervical lymphadenopathy is a cause of concern for physician and patient because sometimes it could be the manifestation of an underlying malignancy. However, a methodological approach to lymphadenopathy can disclose the accurate diagnosis causing minimal discomfort for the patient and in a short time. This paper reports the significance of cervical lymph node examination and ensuing investigations, which led to a diagnosis of non-Hodgkins lymphoma. PMID:28348622

  10. Congenital stenosis and adjacent segment disease in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Jason David; Belding, Jon; Schnaser, Erik; Rowan, Andrew; Moffitt, Gable; Weaver, John; Reich, Michael S; Bechtel, Chris; Xie, Ke; Gande, Abhiram; Hohl, Justin; Braly, Brett; Hilibrand, Alan; Kang, James D

    2013-10-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment disease (ASD) after anterior cervical fusion (ACF) is reported in 25% of patients at 10 years postoperatively. Debate continues as to whether this degeneration is due to the natural history of the disk or the changed biomechanics after ACF. This study explored whether congenital stenosis predisposes patients to an increased incidence of ASD after ACF. A retrospective review of 635 patients with myelopathy or radiculopathy was performed; 364 patients had complete records for review. Patients underwent 1- to 5-level ACF (94 one-level, 145 two-level, 79 three-level, 45 four-level, and 1 five-level). Radiographs were evaluated for bony congenital stenosis using validated parameters, and ASD was measured according to Hilibrand's criteria and correlated with symptomatic ASD. Congenital stenosis was found in 21.7% of patients and radiographic ASD in 33.5%, with a significant association between these parameters. However, symptomatic ASD occurred in 11.8% of patients; no association between congenital stenosis and symptomatic ASD or myelopathy and ASD was found. Clinical results demonstrated excellent or good Robinson scores in 86.2% of patients and Odom scores in 87% of patients. Despite mostly excellent to good outcomes, symptomatic ASD is common after ACF. Although congenital stenosis appears to increase the incidence of radiographic ASD, it does not appear to predict symptomatic ASD.

  11. Posterolateral approach to ruptured median and paramedian cervical disk.

    PubMed

    Fager, C A

    1983-12-01

    The trend toward anterior diskectomy for median and paramedian cervical disk rupture has tended to obscure progressive development of the posterolateral approach to these lesions. Modifications of surgical technique from the classic posterior approach have allowed direct access to these lesions, provided for satisfactory decompression of the spinal cord, especially when there is associated spondylosis, and avoided all of the disadvantages of anterior disk surgery. Of 28 patients operated on since 1950, 26 have had significant preoperative myelopathy or myeloradiculopathy. Two patients with obvious spinal cord compression and massive myelographic defects had no neurologic deficit. Improvement has been observed in every patient; 16 patients have had full recovery, and 8 others have had minor residual symptoms and asymptomatic signs. Although four patients have been lost to follow-up, they were all seen at least once after operation. No instance of increased deficit has been seen postoperatively, in contrast to the author's experience with spondylotic myelopathy. Postoperative contrast studies, which have now been performed on eight patients, confirm satisfactory excision of these lesions and decompression.

  12. Cardiovascular risk profile in patients with myelopathy associated with HTLV-1.

    PubMed

    Prado, Fabio Luís Silva do; Oliveira, Renata Prado de Fuccio; Ladeia, Ana Marice Teixeira

    2017-03-07

    HAM/TSP (HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis) is a slowly progressive disease, characterized by a chronic spastic paraparesis. It is not known if the disease carries an independent risk for cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cardiovascular risk profile related to HAM/TSP and compare it with the general population.

  13. Brachioradial pruritus and cervical spine manipulation.

    PubMed

    Tait, C P; Grigg, E; Quirk, C J

    1998-08-01

    Brachioradial pruritus (BRP) causes significant morbidity in the majority of patients for whom no effective treatment is found. Chronic ultraviolet radiation exposure has usually been cited as the cause, but nerve damage from cervical spine disease has also been implicated. We report on a small retrospective exploratory study, conducted by questionnaire, of a group of patients who were treated with a specific cervical spine manipulation. Ten of 14 patients reported resolution of symptoms following manipulative treatment. All six patients who had had previous cervical spine disease responded to manipulation, as did half the remaining eight patients who had no previous history of neck symptoms. Although patients with BRP, by definition, share similar symptoms, the aetiology is almost certainly multifactorial. Prospective studies looking for cervical spine disease, as well as assessment of this particular method of cervical spine manipulation as a treatment modality for BRP, should be considered.

  14. Minimally invasive posterior cervical decompression using tubular retractor: The technical note and early clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jung-Woo; Kim, Jin-Sung; Shin, Myeong-Hoon; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this work is to present a novel decompression technique that approaches cervical spine posteriorly, but through minimal invasive method using tubular retractor avoiding detachment of posterior musculature. Methods: Six patients underwent minimally invasive posterior cervical decompression using the tubular retractor system and surgical microscope. Minimally invasive access to the posterior cervical spine was performed with exposure through a paramedian muscle-splitting approach. With the assistance of a specialized tubular retraction system and deep soft tissue expansion mechanism, multilevel posterior cervical decompression could be accomplished. This approach also allows safe docking of the retractor system on the lateral mass, thus avoiding the cervical spinal canal during exposure. A standard operating microscope was used with ×10 magnification and 400 mm focal length. The hospital charts, magnetic resonance imaging studies, and follow-up records of all the patients were reviewed. Outcome was assessed by neurological status and visual analog scale (VAS) for neck and arm pain. Results: There was no significant complication related to operation. The follow-up time was 4-12 months (mean, 9 months). Muscle weakness improved in all patients; sensory deficits resolved in four patients and improved in two patients. Analysis of the mean VAS for radicular pain and VAS for neck pain showed significant improvement. Conclusions: The preliminary experiences with good clinical outcome seem to promise that this minimally invasive technique is a valid alternative option for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy. PMID:24778922

  15. Nanotechnology in the management of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Shao, Renfu; Xu, Kewei; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a major disease with high mortality. All cervical cancers are caused by infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Although preventive vaccines for cervical cancer are successful, treatment of cervical cancer is far less satisfactory because of multidrug resistance and side effects. In this review, we summarize the recent application of nanotechnology to the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer as well as the development of HPV vaccines. Early detection of cervical cancer enables tumours to be efficiently removed by surgical procedures, leading to increased survival rate. The current method of detecting cervical cancer by Pap smear can only achieve 50% sensitivity, whereas nanotechnology has been used to detect HPVs with greatly improved sensitivity. In cervical cancer treatment, nanotechnology has been used for the delivery of anticancer drugs to increase treatment efficacy and decrease side effects. Nanodelivery of HPV preventive and therapeutic vaccines has also been investigated to increase vaccine efficacy. Overall, these developments suggest that nanoparticle-based vaccine may become the most effective way to prevent and treat cervical cancer, assisted or combined with some other nanotechnology-based therapy.

  16. Severity score system for progressive myelopathy: development and validation of a new clinical scale

    PubMed Central

    Castilhos, R.M.; Blank, D.; Netto, C.B.O.; Souza, C.F.M.; Fernandes, L.N.T.; Schwartz, I.V.D.; Giugliani, R.; Jardim, L.B.

    2012-01-01

    Progressive myelopathies can be secondary to inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) such as mucopolysaccharidosis, mucolipidosis, and adrenomyeloneuropathy. The available scale, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, was validated only for degenerative vertebral diseases. Our objective is to propose and validate a new scale addressing progressive myelopathies and to present validating data for JOA in these diseases. A new scale, Severity Score System for Progressive Myelopathy (SSPROM), was constructed covering motor disability, sphincter dysfunction, spasticity, and sensory losses. Inter-and intra-rater reliabilities were measured. External validation was tested by applying JOA, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), the Barthel index, and the Osame Motor Disability Score. Thirty-eight patients, 17 with adrenomyeloneuropathy, 3 with mucopolysaccharidosis I, 3 with mucopolysaccharidosis IV, 2 with mucopolysaccharidosis VI, 2 with mucolipidosis, and 11 with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy participated in the study. The mean ± SD SSPROM and JOA scores were 74.6 ± 11.4 and 12.4 ± 2.3, respectively. Construct validity for SSPROM (JOA: r = 0.84, P < 0.0001; EDSS: r = −0.83, P < 0.0001; Barthel: r = 0.56, P < 0.002; Osame: r = −0.94, P < 0.0001) and reliability (intra-rater: r = 0.83, P < 0.0001; inter-rater: r = 0.94, P < 0.0001) were demonstrated. The metric properties of JOA were similar to those found in SSPROM. Several clinimetric requirements were met for both SSPROM and JOA scales. Since SSPROM has a wider range, it should be useful for follow-up studies on IEM myelopathies. PMID:22570090

  17. Delayed anterior cervical plate dislodgement with pharyngeal wall perforation and oral extrusion of cervical plate screw after 8 years: A very rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Kapu, Ravindranath; Singh, Manish; Pande, Anil; Vasudevan, Matabushi Chakravarthy; Ramamurthi, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    We report a patient with congenital anomaly of cervical spine, who presented with clinical features suggestive of cervical compressive spondylotic myelopathy. He underwent C3 median corpectomy, graft placement, and stabilization from C2 to C4 vertebral bodies. Postoperative period was uneventful and he improved in his symptoms. Eight years later, he presented with a difficulty in swallowing and occasional regurgitation of feeds of 2 months duration and oral extrusion of screw while having food. On oral examination, there was a defect in the posterior pharyngeal wall through which the upper end of plate with intact self-locking screw and socket of missed fixation screw was seen. This was confirmed on X-ray cervical spine. He underwent removal of the plate system and was fed through nasogastric tube and managed with appropriate antibiotics. This case is presented to report a very rare complication of anterior cervical plate fixation in the form of very late-onset dislodgement, migration of anterior cervical plate, and oral extrusion of screw through perforated posterior pharyngeal wall. PMID:23741125

  18. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Douglas Lowy (left) and John Schiller developed the vaccine to prevent HPV infection in women, the cause ...

  19. Congenital Stenosis of the Cervical Spine: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Countee, Roger W.; Vijayanathan, Thurairasah

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of 11 cases of congenital stenosis of the cervical spine seen over the past three years is reported. The authors' experiences at an urban community hospital, as well as a large Veterans Administration Hospital, lead them to conclude that this disorder is a neurologically significant anomaly which is probably more common than published reports would imply. It can be clinically and radiographically distinguished from “pure” cervical spondylosis, to which it is related, and its treatment should be appropriately modified. It appears to have a predilection for young adult black males, and cervical myelopathy is the predominant clinical feature. Varying degrees of trauma, a disease endemic to the inner city, plays a major role in precipitating the neurological catastrophes associated with this potentially correctable disorder. Proper management of this entity demands a heightened awareness of its existence as well as a high standard of neurological and roentgenographic diagnosis, and operative performance. A flexible operative strategy which takes into account the specific biomechanical factors involved in this disorder as well as the patient's individual physiological and social status is imperative. Surgery offers a good opportunity for improving neurological function. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:439156

  20. Stepwise illustration of teeth-fixation semi-constrained cervical disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Chang; Wu, Jau-Ching; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Yeh, Mei-Yin; Kuo, Yi-Hsuan; Fay, Li-Yu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich

    2017-01-01

    There are many kinds of artificial discs available for cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA), with various designs of fixation and articulation mechanisms. Each of these designs has different features and theoretically fits most optimally in selected types of patients. However, there has been insufficient literature to guide individualized selection among these CDA devices. Since CDA aims to restore the joint function rather than arthrodesis, tailor-made size, shape, and mechanical properties should be taken into account for each candidate's target disc. Despite several large-scale prospective randomized control trials that have demonstrated the effectiveness and durability of CDA for up to 8 years, none of them involved more than one kind of artificial disc. In this video the authors present detailed steps and technical aspects of the newly introduced ProDisc-C Vivo (DePuy Synthes Spine), which has the same ball-and-socket design for controlled, predictable motion as the ProDisc-C. The newly derived teeth fixation provides high primary stability and multilevel capability by avoidance of previous keel-related limitations and complications (e.g., split vertebral fracture). Please note that the ProDisc-C Vivo is currently not available on the US market. The authors present the case of a 53-year-old woman who had symptoms of both radiculopathy and myelopathy caused by a large, calcified disc herniation at C4-5. There was no improvement after 4 months of medical treatment and rehabilitation. A single-level CDA was successfully performed with the ProDisc-C Vivo, and her symptoms were completely ameliorated afterward. The follow-up images demonstrated preservation of motion at the indexed level. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/4DSES1xgvQU .

  1. [Disphagia secondary to cervical osteophytes].

    PubMed

    Torres Muros, B; Serrano, J A; Meschian Coretti, S

    2006-01-01

    Disphagia is a common cause of medical query in the ENT field, in which could be involved a variety of medical reason. One of those is the extrinsic compression of the digestive tract due to a tumoral process, or as the case we report, secundary to a large osteophyte at the anterior side of the cervical spine, after a surgical intervention in this area.

  2. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-01-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5. PMID:24324319

  3. No carious cervical lesions: abfraction.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-10-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5.

  4. Remarkable recovery in an infant presenting with extensive perinatal cervical cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ul Haq, Israr; Gururaj, A K

    2012-12-10

    Cervical-cord damage is a complication of a difficult delivery, and results in spinal shock with flaccidity progressing to spastic paralysis. Conventionally, outlook for such patients is extremely poor and most will recover only slightly from quadriplegia and autonomic dysfunction. Here, we report a case in which the extent of damage considerably contrasted with the outcome and recovery. A full-term baby girl born by difficult vaginal delivery displayed bilateral flaccid paralysis of the lower limbs with absent spontaneous movements, weakness of both upper limbs, hyporeflexia in all limbs and axial hypotonia. MRI of cervicothoracic spine exhibited raised signal intensity in the dorsal aspects of C7 to T1 signifying myelopathy. MRI at 4 months revealed a near-total transection of the cervical cord. However, at 6 months, the child could move all lower limbs independently with a marked increase in power. There was no spasticity, wasting or incontinence. Reflexes had also returned.

  5. Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuation (ALFF) in the Cervical Spinal Cord with Stenosis: A Resting State fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojia; Qian, Wenshu; Jin, Richu; Li, Xiang; Luk, Keith DK; Wu, Ed. X.; Hu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a common spinal cord dysfunction disease with complex symptoms in clinical presentation. Resting state fMRI (rsfMRI) has been introduced to study the mechanism of neural development of CSM. However, most of those studies focused on intrinsic functional connectivity rather than intrinsic regional neural activity level which is also frequently analyzed in rsfMRI studies. Thus, this study aims to explore whether the level of neural activity changes on the myelopathic cervical cord and evaluate the possible relationship between this change and clinical symptoms through amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF). Eighteen CSM patients and twenty five healthy subjects participated in rsfMRI scanning. ALFF was investigated on each patient and subject. The results suggested that ALFF values were higher in the CSM patients at all cervical segments, compared to the healthy controls. The severity of myelopathy was associated with the increase of ALFF. This finding would enrich our understanding on the neural development mechanism of CSM. PMID:27907060

  6. Outcomes of single-level cervical disc arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Robert W; Kang, Daniel G; Cody, John P; Wagner, Scott C; Rosner, Michael K; Lehman, Ronald A

    2014-11-01

    Several studies have established the short-term safety and efficacy of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) as compared to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). However, few single-center comparative trials have been performed, and current studies do not contain large numbers of patients. We retrospectively reviewed all patients from a single military tertiary medical center between August 2008 to August 2012 who underwent single-level CDA or single-level ACDF and compared their clinical outcomes and complications. A total of 259 consecutive patients were included in the study, 171 patients in the CDA group with an average follow-up of 9.8 (±9.9)months and 88 patients in the ACDF group with an average follow-up of 11.8 (±9.6)months. Relief of pre-operative symptoms was 90.1% in the CDA group and 86.4% in the ACDF group with rates of return to full pre-operative activity of 93.0% and 88.6%, respectively. Patients who underwent CDA had a higher rate of persistent posterior neck pain (15.8% versus 12.5%), and patients who underwent ACDF were at risk for symptomatic pseudarthrosis at a rate of 3.4%. Reoperation rates were higher in the ACDF group (5.7% versus 3.5%). To our knowledge, this review is the largest, non-funded, comparison study between single-level CDA and single-level ACDF. This study demonstrates that CDA is a safe and reliable alternative to ACDF in the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy resulting from spondylosis and acute disc herniation.

  7. ‘Abnormal’ cervical imaging?: Cervical pneumatocysts – A case report of a cervical spine pneumatocyst

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Hanna; Patel, Amit; Boctor, Daniel Sherif Zakaria Matta; Hakmi, Mohamed Atef

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge there are only 15 reported cases of pneumatocysts in the cervical spine, but awareness of their existence should help the clinician when diagnosing abnormalities in radiological images. When faced with intravertebral gas, in addition to considering more sinister causes, one should consider the differentials including pneumatocysts. Despite our relative lack of understanding of these benign lesions the knowledge that they can change over time should prevent unnecessary testing or treating. We present a patient who fell down stairs and was found to have cervical intravertebral gas, on computed tomography imaging, with the typical appearance of a pneumatocyst. PMID:26719615

  8. Giant anterior cervical osteophyte leading to Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jin Seop; Chough, Chung Kee; Joo, Won Il

    2013-09-01

    Large anterior cervical osteophytes can occur in degeneration of the cervical spine or in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis(DISH). Large osteophytes can produce otolaryngological symptoms such as dysphagia, dysphonia, and foreign body sensation. We describe a DISH patient with giant anterior cervical osteophyte causing chronic dysphagia and dysphonia. A 56-year-old man presented with increasing dysphagia, dysphonia, neck pain and neck stiffness. Physical examination of the neck showed a non-tender and hard mass on the left side at the level of C4-5. Radiography showed extensive ossification of anterior longitudinal ligament along the left anterolateral aspect of vertebral bodies from C2 to T1. The ossification was espe cially prominent at the level of C4-5 and linear breakage was noted at same level. Esophagogram revealed a filling defect along the pharynx and lateral displacement of the esophagus. Giant anterior cervical osteophyte was removed through the leftsided anterolateral cervical approach to the spine. Anterior cervical interbody fusion at C4-5 was followed by posterior cervical fixation using lateral mass screws from C3 to C6. After surgery, dysphagia and dysphonia improved immediately. One year later, cervical CT showed bone fusion at C4-5 bodies and no recurrence of osteophyte. DISH is a common cause of anterior cervical osteophyte leading to progressive dysphagia. Keeping this clinical entity in the differential diagnosis is important in patients with progressive neck stiffness, dysphagia or dysphonia. And surgical treatment of symptomatic anterior cervical osteophyte due to DISH should be considered with a solid fusion procedure preventing postoperative instability or osteophyte progress.

  9. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cases of cervical cancer and the number of deaths due to cervical cancer since 1950. Cervical dysplasia ... for cervical cancer helps decrease the number of deaths from the disease. Regular screening of women between ...

  10. Bilateral cervical ribs in a Dobermann Pinscher.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, M; De Simone, A; Gernone, F; Giannuzzi, P

    2015-01-01

    An 11-year-old intact female Doberman Pinscher was presented with the complaint of non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Clinical and neurological examination revealed a caudal cervical spinal cord disfunction (C6-T2 spinal cord segments). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic (CT) findings of the cervical spine were consistent with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM). During the diagnostic work-up for the cervical spine, bilateral bone anomalies involving the seventh cervical vertebra and the first ribs were found on radiographs and CT examination. The rib anomalies found in this dog appear similar to cervical ribs widely described in human medicine. In people, cervical ribs are associated with a high rate of stillbirth, early childhood cancer, and can cause the thoracic outlet syndrome, characterized by neurovascular compression at level of superior aperture of the chest. In dogs, only some sporadic anatomopathological descriptions of cervical ribs exist. In this report the radiographic and CT findings of these particular vertebral and rib anomalies along with their relationships with adjacent vasculature and musculature are shown intravitam in a dog. Specific radiographic and CT findings described in this report may help in reaching a presumptive diagnosis of this anomaly. Finally, their clinical and evolutionary significance are discussed.

  11. [An autopsy case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with cervical syringomyelia].

    PubMed

    Hamada, K; Sudoh, K; Fukaura, H; Yanagihara, T; Hamada, T; Tashiro, K; Isu, T

    1990-06-01

    An autopsied case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis complicated by cervical syringomyelia was reported. The case was a 59-year-old man, who first noticed weakness of both lower extremities at 54-year-old. The weakness spread to both upper extremities within 2 years. Cervical myelography revealed multi-level cervical spondylosis and anterior fusion of C5-C7 was done. But the weakness and atrophy of proximal muscle, diminished deep tendon reflex on upper extremities, hyperreflexia and pathological reflexes on both legs, tongue fasciculation and respiratory muscle weakness developed successively, and the patient died of respiratory distress at 59-year-old. Autopsy revealed multiple independent four syrinxes located at the level between C2-C7. One of these syrinxes had ependymal cell lining and thought to be idiopathic syringomyelia. The other three syrinxes were considered to be the cavitation in association with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Degeneration and decreasing of spinal anterior horn cells, atrophy of medullary pyramis and Bunina bodies were observed as features of typical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Cervical spondylosis as causative lesion of multiple syrinxes was discussed, and relationship between ALS and the syrinxes was not indicated clearly.

  12. Single-Level Degenerative Cervical Disc Disease and Driving Disability: Results from a Prospective, Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael P.; Mitchell, M. David; Hacker, Robert J.; Riew, K. Daniel; Sasso, Rick C.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Post hoc analysis of prospective, randomized trial. Objective To investigate the disability associated with driving and single-level degenerative, cervical disc disease and to investigate the effect of surgery on driving disability. Methods Post hoc analysis of data obtained from three sites participating in a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial comparing cervical disc arthroplasty (TDA) with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The driving subscale of the Neck Disability Index (NDI) was analyzed for all patients. A dichotomous severity score was created from the NDI. Statistical comparisons were made within and between groups. Results Two-year follow-up was available for 118/135 (87%) patients. One half of the study population (49.6%) reported moderate or severe preoperative driving difficulty. This disability associated with driving was similar among the two groups (ACDF: 2.5 ± 1.1, TDA: 2.6 ± 1.0, p = 0.646). The majority of patients showed improvement, with no or little driving disability, at the sixth postoperative week (ACDF: 75%, TDA: 90%, p = 0.073). At no follow-up point did a difference exist between groups according to the severity index. Conclusions Many patients suffering from radiculopathy or myelopathy from cervical disc disease are limited in their ability to operate an automobile. Following anterior cervical spine surgery, most patients are able to return to comfortable driving at 6 weeks. PMID:24436875

  13. Anterior cervical discectomy, fusion and stabilization by plate and screw--early experience.

    PubMed

    Islam, M A; Islam, M A; Habib, M A; Sakeb, N

    2012-08-01

    Anterior cervical plating is commonly performed to stabilize anterior cervical fusion. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical and functional outcome, radiological fusion and operative complications in cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy who underwent Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) by autograft and stabilized with plate and screw. We evaluated 16 consecutive patients (M: F = 10:6) from January 2008 to December 2010 in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and different private hospitals in Dhaka, in cases where adequate conservative treatment failed. Single level ACDF by autograft and stabilization by plate and screw was done in 10 patients and 06 patients had two levels fusion. The mean follow up period was 18 months. The patients improved significantly (p < 0.05) and the recovery rate was 87.50%. All patients showed radiological fusion (p < 0.001). There was no hardware failure, graft extrusion or plate breakage. ACDF with plate and screw is fairly safe and effective therapy for cervical disc degeneration leading to myelo-radiculopathy where major post operative complications are uncommon.

  14. The spinal cord in rheumatoid arthritis with clinical myelopathy: a computed myelographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, J M; Kendall, B E; Crockard, H A

    1986-01-01

    Thirty one patients with suspected myelopathy due to rheumatoid arthritis were examined by plain radiography and 27 had computed myelography. Clinical features and radiological findings were compared. Deformity of the spinal cord could occur in the absence of combined anterior and posterior compression and correlated closely with clinical features only when considered in combination with skeletal and adjacent soft tissue abnormalities. The best surgical results were achieved by transoral odontoidectomy. Images PMID:3950633

  15. HTLV-1-associated infective dermatitis and probable HTLV-1- associated myelopathy in an adolescent female*

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Raquel Bisacotti; Tonoli, Renata Elise; Souza, Paulo Ricardo Martins; Pinto, Giselle Martins; Riesgo, Rudimar dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated infective dermatitis (ID) is a chronic, severe and recurrent eczema occurring during childhood in patients vertically infected with HTLV-1. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesia (HAM/ TSP) is slow and progressive. We report the case of an adolescent female from a non-endemic area for HTLV-1 who presents ID and, most likely, associated HAM/TSP. PMID:26312674

  16. Postural hypotension and abnormalities of salt and water metabolism in myelopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Frisbie, J H; Steele, D J

    1997-05-01

    To describe the clinical manifestations of postural hypotension (PH) in myelopathy patients a standardized interview and chart review were carried out. Of 232 myelopathy patients with more than 2 years of paralysis seen during a 2 year period, 30 had been treated for PH. All PH patients were paralysed at levels higher than thoracic 7. The highest risk patients were tetraplegic, motor complete, 24 of 73 (33%). The common symptoms of PH were those of reduced consciousness (100%), strength (75%), vision (56%) and breath (53%). Precipitating factors were hot weather (77%) bowel care (33%) and meals (30%). Symptoms worsened with the duration of paralysis in 12 patients. Chronic hyponatremia was found in 54% of the PH patients and 16% of those without, P < 0.001. Of five PH-hyponatremic patients with urine sodium and osmolality determinations, five continued to retain water (> 150 mOsm/kg) while four failed to conserve salt (> 19 mmol Na/L). PH is common among myelopathy patients with higher levels of paralysis, symptoms are variable, and abnormal salt and water metabolism often coexist.

  17. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  18. Prevent Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Inside Knowledge Campaign What CDC Is Doing Research AMIGAS Fighting Cervical Cancer Worldwide Stay Informed ... Prevent Cervical Cancer with the Right Test at the Right Time Screening tests can find abnormal cells so they ...

  19. Cervical spondylosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical spondylosis is a disorder that results from abnormal growth of the bones of the neck and ... Progressive neck pain is a key indication of cervical spondylosis. It may be the only symptom in ...

  20. Cervical dysplasia - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100080.htm Cervical dysplasia - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Cervical Cancer Cervix Disorders A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  1. Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma with intralesional hemorrhage: a rare cause of thoracic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Donghwan; Kim, Choonghyo; Lee, Seung Jin; Ryu, Young-Joon; Kim, Jiha

    2014-06-01

    Although cavernous hemangiomas occur frequently in the intracranial structures, they are rare in the spine. Most of spinal hemangiomas are vertebral origin and "pure" epidural hemangiomas not originating from the vertebral bone are very rare. Our spinal hemangioma case is extremely rare because of its "pure" epidural involvement and intralesional hemorrhage. A 64-year-old man presented with progressive paraparesis from two months ago. His motor weakness was rated as grade 4/5 in bilateral lower extremities. He also complained of decreased sensation below the T4 sensory dermatome, which continuously progressed to the higher dermatome level. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated thoracic spinal tumor at T3-T4 level. The tumor was located epidural space compressing thoracic spinal cord ventrally. The tumor was not involved with the thoracic vertebral bone. We performed T3-5 laminectomy and removed the tumor completely. The tumor was not infiltrating into intradural space or vertebral bone. The histopathologic study confirmed the epidural tumor as cavernous hemangioma. Postoperatively, his weakness improved gradually. Four months later, his paraparesis recovered completely. Here, we present a case of pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma, which has intralesional hemorrhage. We believe cavernous hemangioma should be included in the differential diagnosis of the spinal epidural tumors.

  2. Update knowledge on cervical cancer incidence and prevalence in Asia.

    PubMed

    Daniyal, Muhammad; Akhtar, Naheed; Ahmad, Saeed; Fatima, Urooj; Akram, Muhammad; Asif, Hafiz Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death among women worldwide, with over 500,000 new cases diagnosed annually and 50% mortality rate in Asia. In the United States, approximately 10,370 new cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed annually, and estimated 3,710 deaths occur from the disease, making it the sixth most common cause of malignancy among American women. This study aims to provide awareness about cervical cancer as well as an updated knowledge about the prevalence and incidence of cervical cancer in Asia.

  3. Increased levels of soluble Fas ligand in CSF of rapidly progressive HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis patients.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Nakamura, N; Nagai, M; Shirakawa, K; Sato, H; Kawahigashi, N; Furukawa, Y; Usuku, K; Nakagawa, M; Izumo, S; Osame, M

    1999-08-03

    The interaction of Fas ligand (FasL) with Fas-bearing cells induces apoptosis and contributes to the negative regulation of peripheral T-cell responses. Membrane-bound FasL is cleaved by a matrix metalloproteinase-like enzyme and converted to a soluble form (sFasL). Recent studies suggest that such sFasL can cause systemic tissue damage. Here we report that serum and CSF levels of soluble FasL (sFasL) are markedly higher in three active phase patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). All of these patients showed higher sFasL levels in CSF than in serum. Although the HTLV-1 proviral load of patients showed no correlation with serum or with CSF sFasL, CSF sFasL levels of 14 HAM/TSP patients correlated with the anti-HTLV-1 antibody titer and neopterin concentration in CSF. These results indicate that sFasL mediated mechanisms may contribute to the inflammatory process and subsequent spinal tissue damage seen in HAM/TSP patients.

  4. On the etiology of tropical spastic paraparesis and human T-cell lymphotropic virus-I-associated myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Zaninovic, V

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present some concepts on the etiology of tropical spastic paraparesis or human T-cell lymphotropic virus-I (HTLV-I)-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). The large number of syndromes that have been associated with HTLV-I (60 to date), the existence of TSP/HAM cases associated with other retroviruses (human immunodeficiency virus-2 [HIV-2], HTLV-II), the existence of many TSPs without HTLV-I, and the evidence of clear epidemiologic contradictions in TSP/HAM indicate that the etiopathogenesis of TSP/HAM is not yet clear. Tropical spastic paraparesis/HAM affects patients of all human ethnic groups, but usually in well localized and relatively isolated geographic regions where HTLV-I has been endemic for a long time. Environmental factors and geographic locations appear to be critical factors. Because the neuropathology of TSP/HAM suggests a toxometabolic, rather than a viral cause, it is proposed that an intoxication similar to neurolathyrism could account for some of TSP/HAM cases, mainly in tropical and subtropical countries. If this were the case, HTLV-I could be a cofactor or act as a bystander. it is possible that co-infection with another agent is necessary to produce TSP/HAM and most of the syndromes associated with HTLV-I.

  5. Human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated myelopathy and tax gene expression in CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Moritoyo, T; Reinhart, T A; Moritoyo, H; Sato, E; Izumo, S; Osame, M; Haase, A T

    1996-07-01

    Infection by human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is associated with adult T-cell leukemia and a slowly progressive disease of the central nervous system (CNS), HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, characterized pathologically by inflammation and white matter degeneration in the spinal cord. One of the explanations for the tissue destruction is that HTLV-I infects cells in the CNS, or HTLV-I-infected CD4+ T lymphocytes enter the CNS, and this drives local expansion of virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which along with cytokines cause the pathological changes. Because both in the circulation and in the cerebrospinal fluid, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes are primarily reactive to the product of the HTLV-I tax gene, we sought evidence of expression of this gene within cells in the inflammatory lesions. After using double-label in situ hybridization techniques, we now report definitive localization of HTLV-I tax gene expression in CD4+ T lymphocytes in areas of inflammation and white matter destruction. These findings lend support to a hypothetical scheme of neuropathogenesis in which HTLV-I tax gene expression provokes and sustains an immunopathological process that progressively destroys myelin and axons in the spinal cord.

  6. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-07

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  7. Cervical cancer in India and HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kaarthigeyan, K

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer, mainly caused by Human Papillomavirus infection, is the leading cancer in Indian women and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Though there are several methods of prevention of cervical cancer, prevention by vaccination is emerging as the most effective option, with the availability of two vaccines. Several studies have been published examining the vaccine's efficacy, immunogenicity and safety. Questions and controversy remain regarding mandatory vaccination, need for booster doses and cost-effectiveness, particularly in the Indian context.

  8. Cervical extravasation of bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Dréanic, Johann; Coriat, Romain; Mir, Olivier; Perkins, Géraldine; Boudou-Rouquette, Pascaline; Brezault, Catherine; Dhooge, Marion; Goldwasser, François; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2013-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab are widely used in medical oncology, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy. No specific recommendations on the management of monoclonal antibodies extravasation exist. Incidence rates vary considerably. Estimates of 0.5-6% have been reported in the literature. Also, patient-associated and procedure-associated risk factors of extravasation are multiple, such as bolus injections or poorly implanted central venous access. We report on an 86-year-old woman with colon cancer with liver metastasis who was treated with 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid, and bevacizumab. Extravasation occurred during chemotherapy infusion because of a catheter migration of the port outside of the superior vena cava, causing cervical pain without skin modifications. Diagnosis was confirmed with the appearance of clinical right cervical tumefaction and cervicothoracic computed tomography scan indicated a perijugular hypodense collection, corresponding to the extravasation. Conservative management was proposed. The patient recovered within 3 weeks from all symptoms. Physicians should be aware that in cases of bevacizumab extravasation, a nonsurgical approach might be effective.

  9. Cervical angina: an overlooked source of noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Walter I; Makovitch, Steven A; Merchant, Shabbir Hussain I; Phadke, Jayant

    2015-01-01

    Cervical angina has been widely reported as a cause of chest pain but remains underrecognized. This series demonstrates the varied clinical presentation of patients with cervical angina, the delay in diagnosis, and the extensive cardiac examinations patients with this condition typically undergo prior to a definitive diagnosis. Recognition of this condition in patients with acute chest pain requires a high index of suspicion and an awareness of the common presenting features and clinical findings of cervical angina.

  10. Head and Cervical Spine Evaluation for the Pediatric Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Arbuthnot, Mary K; Mooney, David P; Glenn, Ian C

    2017-02-01

    This article is designed to guide pediatric surgeons in the evaluation and stabilization of blunt head and cervical spine injuries in pediatric patients. Trauma remains the number one cause of morbidity and mortality among children, and the incidence of head injuries continues to rise. Cervical spine injuries, on the other hand, are unusual but can be devastating if missed. This article highlights the pathophysiology unique to pediatric head and cervical spine trauma as well as keys to clinical and diagnostic evaluation.

  11. Genetic events in cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, S.; Tai, C.C.; Mowatt, J.

    1994-09-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the fifth most common cancer world-wide and the second major cause of cancer related death in women. Recent studies have suggested that chromosome 10, particularly the short arm, may be significant in the pathogenesis of the disease. The relationship has not, however, been investigated directly in cervical tumor material. We analyzed 21 paired blood and tumor samples from patients with cervical carcinoma for allele loss on chromosome 10. Ten polymorphic loci spanning the length of chromosome 10 were used including 4 RFLPs and 4 microsatellite markers. Tumor samples were carefully dissected to remove the majority of contaminating normal tissue. Twenty of the 21 pairs were heterozygous for at least one locus. Loss of heterozygosity for one or more chromosome 10 loci was observed in 5 out of the 20 informative cases (25%). One sample showed the apparent loss of an entire copy of chromosome 10. In 3 cases allele loss was confined to loci on the short arm of chromosome 10. We are currently using further markers mapped to chromosome 10p to define the shortest consistent region of allele loss. We suggest that this region may contain one or more tumor suppressor genes involved in the development and/or progression of cervical carcinoma.

  12. Cervical cancer in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Eluf-Neto, J; Nascimento, C M

    2001-04-01

    Cervical cancer is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In Latin America, the incidence rates in several cities are among the highest worldwide, probably due to a high frequency of risk factors and/or a low screening coverage for cervical cancer. Epidemiologic studies conducted in Latin America (and some in the Caribbean), that have investigated the main risk factors for the disease, as well as screening coverage by Papanicolaou (Pap) smear, were reviewed. The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among women with negative Pap smears does not seem to explain the risk observed in Latin American countries. Results of some studies have suggested that reproductive factors and male sexual behavior might be responsible, at least partially, for the high occurrence of cervical cancer in Latin America. Concerning cytology screening, many women have a smear taken regularly (some every year). However, a significant proportion of women, probably those with a high risk of cancer of the cervix, have never had a Pap test. To reduce cervical cancer in these countries, screening programs in Latin America should have a wider coverage, especially reaching those women at higher risk. Semin Oncol 28:188-197.

  13. ADXS11-001 High Dose HPV+ Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Effects of Immunotherapy; Metastatic/Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  14. Surgical resection of neoplastic cervical spine lesions in relation to the vertebral artery V2 segment

    PubMed Central

    Al Barbarawi, Mohamed; Odat, Ziad; Alheis, Mwaffaq; Qudsieh, Suhair; Qudsieh, Tareq

    2010-01-01

    Neoplastic cervical spine lesions are seen infrequently by the spinal surgeon. The surgical management of these tumors, particularly with associated neurovascular compromise, is challenging in terms of achieving proper resection and spinal stabilization and ensuring no subsequent recurrence or failure of fixation. In this report we highlight some of the problems encountered in the surgical management of tumors involving the cervical spine with techniques applied for gross total resection of the tumor without compromising the vertebral arteries. Ten patients with neoplastic cervical spine lesions were managed in our study. The common cardinal presentation was neck and arm pain with progressive cervical radiculo-myelopathy. All patients had plain X-rays, computer tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine. Digital subtraction or magnetic resonance angiograms were performed on both vertebral arteries when the pathology was found to be in proximity to the vertebral artery. When a tumor blush with feeders was evident, endovascular embolization to minimize intraoperative bleeding was also considered. A single approach or a combined anterior cervical approach for corpectomy and cage-with-plate fixation and posterior decompression for resection of the rest of the tumor with spinal fixation was then accomplished as indicated. All cases made a good neurological recovery and had no neural or vascular complications. On the long-term follow-up of the survivors there was no local recurrence or surgical failure. Only three patients died: two from the primary malignancy and one from pulmonary embolism. This report documents a safe and reliable way to deal with neoplastic cervical spine lesions in proximity to vertebral arteries with preservation of both arteries. PMID:21577335

  15. Vaccines against cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Kathrin U

    2004-11-01

    Cervical cancer and precancerous lesions of the genital tract are a major threat to women's health worldwide. Although the introduction of screening tests to detect cervical cancer and its precursor lesions has reduced overall cervical cancer rates in the developed world, the approach was largely unsuccessful for developing countries, primarily due to a lack of appropriate infrastructures and high costs. Annually, 470,000 cervical cancer cases are diagnosed worldwide, of which 80% occur in developing countries. Despite advances in treatment of cervical cancer, approximately half of the women afflicted with the disease will die. Over 20 years of dedicated research has provided conclusive evidence that a subset of human papillomaviruses are the aetiological agents for cervical cancer. Finding a viral origin for this disease provided the basis to fight cervical cancer using prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination. Both vaccine approaches are reviewed here, with an emphasis on recent clinical data.

  16. Spondylotic myelopathy mimicking myelitis: diagnostic clues by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Rua, Adriana; Blanco, Yolanda; Sepúlveda, María; Sola-Valls, Núria; Martínez-Hernández, Eugenia; Llufriu, Sara; Berenguer, Joan; Graus, Francesc; Saiz, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Introduccion. La mielopatia espondilotica es la causa mas frecuente de mielopatia no traumatica. Sus caracteristicas radiologicas en ocasiones son indistinguibles de las de una mielopatia inflamatoria, y pueden ocasionar retrasos diagnosticos o llevar a un diagnostico y tratamiento incorrectos. La descripcion reciente de un patron caracteristico de realce de gadolinio puede ayudar a diferenciar la mielopatia espondilotica de la causa inflamatoria. Casos clinicos. Caso 1: varon de 38 años que consulto por historia de dos años de evolucion de parestesias en las extremidades superiores, a las que se añadieron un año mas tarde calambres en las extremidades derechas y acorchamiento en los dermatomas C5 y C6 en relacion con los movimientos del cuello. Caso 2: varon de 44 años que consulto por historia de un año de evolucion de alteracion progresiva de la marcha con trastorno sensitivo en las manos y disfuncion vesical reciente. En ambos casos, la resonancia magnetica medular mostro en las secciones sagitales una hiperseñal cervical fusiforme en T2, asociada a una banda transversa de realce de gadolinio en forma de barra (pancakelike) justo por debajo de la zona de maxima estenosis, y un realce circunferencial o hemimedular en los cortes axiales. Conclusiones. Las caracteristicas radiologicas de la mielopatia espondilotica pueden parecerse a las de origen inflamatorio. El reconocimiento de un realce transverso en barra inmediatamente por debajo del lugar de maxima compresion como signo radiologico tipico de la mielopatia espondilotica es importante para reducir el riesgo de errores diagnosticos, y de utilidad para el manejo de estos pacientes.

  17. Surfer’s myelopathy: a rare presentation in a non-surfing setting and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Hariswamy, Soumya; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Surfers myelopathy can be a rapidly devastating disease and little is known surrounding the pathophysiology of the condition. Although the classical pattern of illness has been well reported, it has never been observed in a non-surfing setting. Methods A 51-year-old demolition worker presented with acute non-traumatic myelopathy. Clinical examination revealed sensory loss to the level of L2. T2-MRI and MRI-DWI revealed a hyperintense signal suggestive of an ischaemic event. A diagnosis of surfer’s myelopathy was made and he was commenced on steroid therapy. Results Following steroid therapy and fluid management the patient was discharged after 6 days with minor anaethesia but significant overall neurological improvement. Conclusions Diagnosis of SM requires a thorough history, clinical examination and imaging (MRI, MRI-DWI). The patient should be admitted early and investigated. The use of rehabilitation services may be useful if available. PMID:27757436

  18. Epidemiology of cervical cancer in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Nubia

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women, and the first or second most common in developing countries. Cervical cancer remains in Colombia the first cause of cancer mortality and the second cause of cancer incidence among women, despite the existence of screening programs during the last 3 decades. Bucaramanga, Manizales and Cali reported rates around 20 per 100,000and Pasto 27 per 100,000. The Cali cancer registry has reported a progressive decrease in the age standardized incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer over the past 40 years. Reasons for the decline in incidence and mortality of cervical cancer are multiple and probably include: improvement in socio-economic conditions, decrease in parity rates and some effect of screening programs. Human papilloma Virus is the main cause of cervical cancer, HPV natural history studies have now revealed that HPVs are the commonest of the sexually transmitted infections in most populations. Most HPV exposures result in spontaneous clearance without clinical manifestations and only a small fraction of the infected persons, known as chronic or persistent carriers, will retain the virus and progress to precancerous and cancer. HPV 16 and 18 account for 70% of cervical cancer and the 8 most common types. (HPV 16, 18, 45, 33, 31, 52, 58 and 35) account for about 90% of cervical cancer. Case-control studies also allowed the identification of the following cofactors that acting together with HPV increase the risk of progression from HPV persistent infection to cervical cancer: tobacco, high parity, long term use of oral contraceptives and past infections with herpes simplex type 2 and Chlamydia trachomatis. The demonstration that infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is not only the main cause but also a necessary cause of cervical cancer has led to great advances in the prevention of this disease on two fronts: (i) Primary prevention by the use of prophylactic HPV

  19. Epidemiology of cervical cancer in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Nubia; Bravo, Luis Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    Worldwide, cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women, and the first or second most common in developing countries. Cervical cancer remains in Colombia the first cause of cancer mortality and the second cause of cancer incidence among women, despite the existence of screening programs during the last 3 decades. Bucaramanga, Manizales and Cali reported rates around 20 per 100,000and Pasto 27 per 100,000. The Cali cancer registry has reported a progressive decrease in the age standardized incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer over the past 40 years. Reasons for the decline in incidence and mortality of cervical cancer are multiple and probably include: improvement in socio-economic conditions, decrease in parity rates and some effect of screening programs. Human papilloma Virus is the main cause of cervical cancer, HPV natural history studies have now revealed that HPVs are the commonest of the sexually transmitted infections in most populations. Most HPV exposures result in spontaneous clearance without clinical manifestations and only a small fraction of the infected persons, known as chronic or persistent carriers, will retain the virus and progress to precancerous and cancer. HPV 16 and 18 account for 70% of cervical cancer and the 8 most common types. (HPV 16, 18, 45, 33, 31, 52, 58 and 35) account for about 90% of cervical cancer. Case-control studies also allowed the identification of the following cofactors that acting together with HPV increase the risk of progression from HPV persistent infection to cervical cancer: tobacco, high parity, long term use of oral contraceptives and past infections with herpes simplex type 2 and Chlamydia trachomatis. The demonstration that infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is not only the main cause but also a necessary cause of cervical cancer has led to great advances in the prevention of this disease on two fronts: (i) Primary prevention by the use of prophylactic HPV

  20. [Injury of upper cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Ryba, Luděk; Cienciala, Jan; Chaloupka, Richard; Repko, Martin; Vyskočil, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Injuries of the upper cervical spine represent 1/3 of all cervical spine injuries and approximately 40 % result by the death. Every level of the cervical spine can be injured - fractures of condyles of the occipital bone (CO), atlantooccipital dislocation (AOD), fractures of the Atlas (C1), atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) and fractures of the axis (C2). Most of cases in younger patients are caused by high-energy trauma, while by elderly people, because of the osteoporosis, is needed much less energy and even simple falls can cause the injury of the cervical spine. That´s why the etiology of injuries can be different. In younger patients are caused mainly by car accidents, motorcycle and bicycle accidents and pedestrian crashes by car and in elderly populations are the main reason falls. The mechanism of the injury is axial force, hyperflexion, hyperextension, latero-flexion, rotation and combination of all. The basic diagnostic examination is X ray in AP, lateral and transoral projection. But in the most of cases is CT examination necessary and in the suspicion of the ligamentous injury and neurological deterioration must be MRI examination added. Every injury of the upper cervical spine has its own classification. Clinical symptoms can vary from the neck pain, restricted range of motion, antalgic position of the head, injury of the cranial nerves and different neurologic symptoms from the irritation of nerves to quadriplegia. A large percentage of deaths is at the time of the injury. Therapy is divided to conservative treatment, which is indicated in bone injuries with minimal dislocation. In more severe cases, with the dislocation and ligamentous injury, when is high chance of the instability, is indicated the surgical treatment. We can use anterior or posterior approach, make the osteosynthesis, stabilisation and fusion of the spine. Complex fractures and combination of different types of injuries are often present in this part of the spine. Correct and early

  1. A patient with progressive myelopathy and antibodies to human T-cell leukemia virus type I and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in serum and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Aboulafia, D M; Saxton, E H; Koga, H; Diagne, A; Rosenblatt, J D

    1990-04-01

    A 52-year-old human immunodeficiency virus type 1-seropositive bisexual black man was evaluated at UCLA because of the recent onset of progressive lower-extremity weakness. Initial neurologic examination showed that the patient's distal weakness was greater than his proximal weakness, with bilateral foot drop and electrophysiologic evidence of denervation in the distal lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord disclosed no abnormalities. Subsequent neurologic evaluation 8 months later showed a myelopathy, with progression of lower-extremity weakness, spasticity, and flexor spasms, and urinary incontinence, as well as the peripheral neuropathy noted previously. A second magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain showed patchy foci of increased signal intensity in white matter and cortex, with mild generalized cerebral and cerebellar atrophy and no lesions in the spinal cord. Specimens of the patient's serum and cerebrospinal fluid contained antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Additionally, specimens of his serum and cerebrospinal fluid were tested for antibody to human T-cell leukemia virus type I by Western blotting and radioimmunoprecipitation, and found to be positive for human T-cell leukemia virus type I gag, env, and tax antibodies. The primary cause of severe myelopathy in this patient may be infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type I rather than with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Treatment with prednisolone resulted in improvement of the lower-extremity weakness, reduction in flexor spasms, and slower but significant improvement in urinary symptoms. Patients who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and have unusual motor findings should be tested for concomitant human T-cell leukemia virus type I infection.

  2. Neurogenic bladder in Hunter's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, K; Moda, Y; Sone, A; Tanaka, H; Hino, Y

    1994-01-01

    We encountered a rare patient with Hunter's syndrome who exhibited urinary retention as a result of a neurogenic bladder, uninhibited detrusor contractions, and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Neurological findings were consistent with cervical myelopathy and cervical MR imaging showed very narrow segments at the cord level C2-4. We speculate that this Hunter's syndrome patient has cervical myelopathy and that this neurological dysfunction causes the neurogenic bladder. PMID:8014981

  3. Late prevertebral abscess following anterior cervical plating: the missing screw.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lage, J F; Felipe-Murcia, M; Martínez-Lage Azorín, L

    2007-04-01

    A 51-year-old man underwent a C5-C7 anterior decompression and fusion. Six years later the patient complained of dysphagia caused by displacement of the cervical plate. One week after the scheduled removal of the implanted material, the patient developed a painful cervical swelling and fever. His cervical radiographs showed that a screw was missing compared to previous studies. Computerized tomography showed a large prevertebral abscess anterior to C4-C7. He underwent emergency surgical drainage of the abscess that was followed by total recovery. This report is aimed at describing this unusual complication of cervical instrumentation and to briefly review its pathogenesis and management options.

  4. Cervical cancer screening in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Ditzian, Lauren R; David-West, Gizelka; Maza, Mauricio; Hartmann, Beatrix; Shirazian, Taraneh; Cremer, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of death among women in the developing world. Conventional cytology-based cervical cancer screening programs have been largely ineffectual at reducing the cervical cancer burden in low-resource settings. In response, alternative strategies have been tested, such as visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) screening and human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA-based testing. This manuscript reviews literature addressing the programmatic approaches to implementing cervical cancer screening programs in low-resource settings, highlighting the challenges, barriers, and successes related to the use of cytology, VIA, and HPV-DNA based screening programs.

  5. Cervical disc arthroplasty with the Prestige LP disc versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, at 2 levels: results of a prospective, multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial at 24 months.

    PubMed

    Gornet, Matthew F; Lanman, Todd H; Burkus, J Kenneth; Hodges, Scott D; McConnell, Jeffrey R; Dryer, Randall F; Copay, Anne G; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E

    2017-03-17

    OBJECTIVE The authors compared the efficacy and safety of arthroplasty using the Prestige LP cervical disc with those of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of degenerative disc disease (DDD) at 2 adjacent levels. METHODS Patients from 30 investigational sites were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: investigational patients (209) underwent arthroplasty using a Prestige LP artificial disc, and control patients (188) underwent ACDF with a cortical ring allograft and anterior cervical plate. Patients were evaluated preoperatively, intraoperatively, and at 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Efficacy and safety outcomes were measured according to the Neck Disability Index (NDI), Numeric Rating Scales for neck and arm pain, 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), gait abnormality, disc height, range of motion (investigational) or fusion (control), adverse events (AEs), additional surgeries, and neurological status. Treatment was considered an overall success when all 4 of the following criteria were met: 1) NDI score improvement of ≥ 15 points over the preoperative score, 2) maintenance or improvement in neurological status compared with preoperatively, 3) no serious AE caused by the implant or by the implant and surgical procedure, and 4) no additional surgery (supplemental fixation, revision, or nonelective implant removal). Independent statisticians performed Bayesian statistical analyses. RESULTS The 24-month rates of overall success were 81.4% for the investigational group and 69.4% for the control group. The posterior mean for overall success in the investigational group exceeded that in the control group by 0.112 (95% highest posterior density interval = 0.023 to 0.201) with a posterior probability of 1 for noninferiority and 0.993 for superiority, demonstrating the superiority of the investigational group for overall success. Noninferiority of the investigational group was demonstrated for all individual components of overall

  6. Importance of the Radicular Syndrome in Cervical Migraine (O Znachenii Radikulyarnogo Sindroma pri Sheinoi Migreni),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The direct causes of cerebral disorders in cervical migraine are compression of the vertebral artery and irritation of the vertebral nerve by... cervical osteophytes, deformed uncinate processes, as well as the pathological afferentation which occurs here. One hundred ten patients suffering from... cervical migraine were observed. The most characteristic symptoms are constant dull, frequently unilateral headaches with typical irradiation from the

  7. [Transverse myelopathy in an adult with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: case report].

    PubMed

    Brito, J C; da Nóbrega, P V; Guedes Filho, G E; Santos, F J; Souto, M G

    2001-06-01

    We report a case of transverse myelopathy in a 31 year old white man with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, subtype L3 (ALL-L3). This is a severe form of leukemia that affects children more often than adults. Less than 1% of leukemic patients develop neurologic complication in the spinal cord. The symptomatology in the present case started with back pain, flaccid paraplegia, and loss of sensibility and vegetative functions below the lesion. The etiologic diagnostic was obtained through peripheral blood study, bone marrow cytology, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and magnetic resonance image of the dorsal cord. The antileukemic treatment with specific drugs had no influence on the fatal outcome of the disease.

  8. Subacute posttraumatic ascending myelopathy in a 15-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Kovanda, Timothy J; Horn, Eric M

    2014-09-01

    Secondary injury following initial spinal cord trauma is uncommon and frequently attributed to mismanagement of an unprotected cord in the acute time period after injury. Subacute posttraumatic ascending myelopathy (SPAM) is a rare occurrence in the days to weeks following an initial spinal cord injury that is unrelated to manipulation of an unprotected cord and involves 4 or more vertebral levels above the original injury. The authors present a case of SPAM occurring in a 15-year-old boy who sustained a T3-4 fracture-dislocation resulting in a complete spinal cord injury, and they highlight the imaging findings and optimum treatment for this rare event.

  9. Neuroimmunological aspects of human T cell leukemia virus type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mineki

    2014-04-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a human retrovirus etiologically associated with adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Only approximately 0.25-4 % of infected individuals develop HAM/TSP; the majority of infected individuals remain lifelong asymptomatic carriers. Recent data suggest that immunological aspects of host-virus interactions might play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of HAM/TSP. This review outlines and discusses the current understanding, ongoing developments, and future perspectives of HAM/TSP research.

  10. Outcome of posterior decompression with instrumented fusion surgery for K-line (-) cervical ossification of the longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Saito, Junya; Maki, Satoshi; Kamiya, Koshiro; Furuya, Takeo; Inada, Taigo; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Iijima, Yasushi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Aramomi, Masaaki; Mannoji, Chikato; Koda, Masao

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the outcome of posterior decompression and instrumented fusion (PDF) surgery for patients with K-line (-) ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) of the cervical spine, who may have a poor surgical prognosis. We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of a series of 27 patients who underwent PDF without correction of cervical alignment for K-line (-) OPLL and were followed-up for at least 1 year after surgery. We had performed double-door laminoplasty followed by posterior instrumented fusion without excessive correction of cervical spine alignment. The preoperative Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score for cervical myelopathy was 8.0 points and postoperative JOA score was 11.9 points on average. The mean JOA score recovery rate was 43.6%. The average C2-C7 angle was 2.2° preoperatively and 3.1° postoperatively. The average maximum occupation ratio of OPLL was 56.7%. In conclusion, PDF without correcting cervical alignment for patients with K-line (-) OPLL showed moderate neurological recovery, which was acceptable considering K-line (-) predicts poor surgical outcomes. Thus, PDF is a surgical option for such patients with OPLL.

  11. Relief of Lumbar Symptoms After Cervical Decompression in Patients with Tandem Spinal Stenosis Presenting with Primarily Lumbar Pain

    PubMed Central

    Felbaum, Daniel R; Stewart, Jeffrey J; Sandhu, Faheem A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Tandem cervical and lumbar spinal stenosis (TSS) is classically described as intermittent claudication, gait disturbance, and clinical findings of mixed myelopathy and polyradiculopathy. Rarely, patients can present with TSS manifesting in isolated lumbar pain. Several reports have demonstrated improved lumbar back pain and radiculopathy after decompressive cervical spine procedures. We present six patients with dramatic resolution of lumbar spine related symptoms after decompression of the cervical spinal cord despite presenting solely with lower back complaints. Methods: Clinical records of the senior author (F.A.S.) gathered from April 2006 to March 2013 were retrospectively reviewed identifying six patients presenting solely with lumbar symptoms and diagnosed with TSS based on history and physical examination. Results: Six patients with a mean age of 55 (range 39 to 60) presented with solely lower back symptoms and clinical findings suspicious for TSS. Mean follow-up time for all patients was 12 months (range three to 27 months, median 11.5 months). Three patients underwent a cervical procedure as the principal operation, while the remainder had the lumbar spine decompressed initially. All patients that underwent a cervical procedure initially experienced a dramatic decrease or complete resolution of their preoperative lower back pain and radiculopathy (mean preoperative VAS of 6.7 vs. 3.7 postoperative). The remainder of patients with persistent lumbar symptoms resolved after a subsequent cervical operation. Conclusion: Patients presenting with lumbar symptoms out of proportion to imaging require further investigation. We highlight the resolution of lumbar symptoms after a cervical procedure in a select group of patients presenting with lone lower back complaints. In patients presenting with symptoms disproportionate to lumbar imaging, treatment of cervical pathology may provide robust long-term relief of the initial lumbar-related presentation

  12. Automated image analysis of uterine cervical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Gu, Jia; Ferris, Daron; Poirson, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and the leading cause of cancer mortality of women in developing countries. If detected early and treated adequately, cervical cancer can be virtually prevented. Cervical precursor lesions and invasive cancer exhibit certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician with a Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system. In colposcopy, epithelium that turns white after application of acetic acid is called acetowhite epithelium. Acetowhite epithelium is one of the major diagnostic features observed in detecting cancer and pre-cancerous regions. Automatic extraction of acetowhite regions from cervical images has been a challenging task due to specular reflection, various illumination conditions, and most importantly, large intra-patient variation. This paper presents a multi-step acetowhite region detection system to analyze the acetowhite lesions in cervical images automatically. First, the system calibrates the color of the cervical images to be independent of screening devices. Second, the anatomy of the uterine cervix is analyzed in terms of cervix region, external os region, columnar region, and squamous region. Third, the squamous region is further analyzed and subregions based on three levels of acetowhite are identified. The extracted acetowhite regions are accompanied by color scores to indicate the different levels of acetowhite. The system has been evaluated by 40 human subjects' data and demonstrates high correlation with experts' annotations.

  13. Cervical cancer: screening and therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Thara, Somanathan; Esmy, Pulikottil Okkuru; Basu, Partha

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of mortality and premature death among women in their most productive years in low- and medium-resourced countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America, despite the fact that it is an eminently preventable cancer. While cytology screening programmes have resulted in a substantial reduction of cervical cancer mortality in developed countries, they have been shown to have a wide range of sensitivity in most routine settings including in developing countries. Although liquid-based cytology improves sample adequacy, claims on improved sensitivity remain controversial. Human papillomavirus testing is more sensitive than cytology, but whether this gain represents protection against future cervical cancer is not clear. Recently, in a randomized trial, the use of visual inspection with 4% acetic acid was shown to reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality. Cryotherapy and large loop excision of the transformation zone are effective and safe treatment methods for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The clinical stage of cancer is the single most important prognostic factor and should be carefully evaluated in choosing optimal treatment between surgery and radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy. At the public health level, health care infrastructure, affordability and capacity for initiating and sustaining vaccination and screening programmes are critical factors in cervical cancer control. On the other hand, an informed practitioner can utilize the multiple opportunities in routine primary care interactions for prevention, screening, early detection and prompt referral for treatment.

  14. Comparison of Radiologic Outcomes of Different Methods in Single-Level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, O Ik; Lee, Sang Weon; Song, Geun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a choice of surgical procedure for cervical degenerative diseases associated with radiculopathy or myelopathy. However, the patients undergoing ACDF still have problems. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the radiologic results of 3 different methods in single-level ACDF. Methods We conducted a retrospective collection of radiological data from January 2011 to December 2014. A total of 67 patients were included in this study. The patients were divided into 3 groups by operation procedure: using stand-alone cage (group cage, n=20); polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK)-titanium combined anchored cage (group AC, n=21); and anterior cervical cage-plate (group CP, n=26). Global cervical lordosis (C2-C7 Cobb angle), fused segment height, fusion rate, and cervical range of motion (ROM) were measured and analyzed at serial preoperative, postoperative, 6-month, and final 1-year follow-up. Results Successful bone fusion was achieved in all patients at the final follow-up examination; however, the loss of disc height over 3 mm at the surgical level was observed in 6 patients in group cage. Groups AC and CP yielded significantly better outcomes than group cage in fused segment height and cervical ROM(p=0.01 and p=0.02, respectively). Furthermore, group AC had similar radiologic outcomes to those of group CP. Conclusion The PEEK-titanium combined anchored cage may be a good alternative procedure in terms of reducing complications induced by plate after ACDF. PMID:27799985

  15. An Outcome Study of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion among Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Haghnegahdar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. First-line treatment strategy for managing cervical disc herniation is conservative measures. In some cases, surgery is indicated either due to signs/symptoms of severe/progressive neurological deficits, or because of persistence of radicular pain despite 12 weeks of conservative treatment. Success for treatment of cervical disc herniation using ACDF has been successfully reported in the literature. We aim to determine the outcome of ACDF in treatment of cervical disc herniation among Iranians. Methods and Materials/Patients. In a retrospective cohort study, we evaluated 68 patients who had undergone ACDF for cervical disc herniation from March 2006 to March 2011. Outcome tools were as follows: (1) study-designed questionnaire that addressed residual and/or new complaints and subjective satisfaction with the operation; (2) recent (one week prior to the interview) postoperative VAS for neck and upper extremity radicular pain; (3) Japanese Orthopaedic Association Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire (JOACMEQ) (standard Persian version); and (4) follow-up cervical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and lateral X-ray. Results. With mean follow-up time of 52.93 (months) ± 31.89 SD (range: 13–131 months), we had success rates with regard to ΔVAS for neck and radicular pain of 88.2% and 89.7%, respectively. Except QOL functional score of JOAMEQ, 100% success rate for the other 4 functional scores of JOAMEQ was achieved. Conclusion. ACDF is a successful surgical technique for the management of cervical disc herniation among Iranian population. PMID:27635392

  16. Bevacizumab, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-22

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer

  17. Rehabilitation and long-term course of nontraumatic myelopathy associated with surfing.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masahiro; Moriizumi, Shigehiro; Toki, Megumi; Murakami, Takanori; Ishiai, Sumio

    2013-09-01

    A nontraumatic spinal cord injury related to surfing is called surfer's myelopathy. The case of a 26-yr-old man who became paraplegic after surfing without apparent traumatic events is described. Physical examination revealed a spinal cord injury at T12 according to the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale A. The initial magnetic resonance image revealed a fusiform swelling of the spinal cord from T7-8 to the conus, which was hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 6 mos of rehabilitation, the patient was followed for more than 1 yr after onset. He became able to walk with knee-ankle-foot-orthoses without assistance. A magnetic resonance image obtained 1 yr after the onset of paraplegia showed an atrophic spinal cord from T7-8 to the conus. The course of the neurologic findings and the imaging studies suggest that the pathogenesis of surfer's myelopathy may be ischemia of the anterior spinal artery territory induced by the abnormal trunk posture while surfing.

  18. Tentorial dural arteriovenous fistula presenting as myelopathy: Case series and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Robert; Ali, Rushna; Kole, Max; Dorbeistein, Curtis; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Khan, Muhib

    2014-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) is a rare type of cerebral arteriovenous malformation. Common presenting symptoms are related to hemorrhage. However, rarely these patients may present with myelopathy. We present two cases of DAVF presenting as rapidly progressive myelopathy. Two treatment options are available: microsurgical interruption of the fistula and endovascular embolization. These treatment options of DAVFs have improved significantly in the last decade. The optimal treatment of DAVFs remains controversial, and there is an ongoing debate as to whether primary endovascular or primary microsurgical treatment is the optimal management for these lesions. However, despite treatment a high percentage of patients are still left with severe disability. The potential for functional ambulation in patients with DAVF is related to the time of intervention. This emphasizes the important of early diagnosis and early intervention in DAVF. The eventual outcome may depend on several factors, such as the duration of symptoms, the degree of disability before treatment, and the success of the initial procedure to close the fistula. The usage of magnetic resonance imaging and selective angiography has significantly improved the ability to characterize DAVFs, however, these lesions remain inefficiently diagnosed. If intervention is delayed even prolonged time in rehabilitation does not change the grave prognosis. This review outlines the presentation, classication and management of DAVF as well as discussing patient outcomes. PMID:25516869

  19. A Review of Fibrocartilaginous Embolic Myelopathy and Different Types of Peracute Non-Compressive Intervertebral Disk Extrusions in Dogs and Cats

    PubMed Central

    De Risio, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses terminology, pathological, clinical, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, treatment, outcome, and prognostic factors of fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy (FCEM), acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion (ANNPE), and intradural/intramedullary intervertebral disk extrusion (IIVDE). FCEM, ANNPE, and IIVDE have a similar clinical presentation characterized by peracute onset of neurological dysfunction that is generally non-progressive after the initial 24–48 h. Differentiating between these conditions can be challenging, however, certain clinical and imaging findings can help. FCEM can occur in both adult and immature animals, whereas ANNPE or IIVDE have been reported only in animals older than 1 year. In dogs, ANNPE and IIVDE most commonly occur in the intervertebral disk spaces between T12 and L2, whereas FCEM has not such site predilection. In cats, FCEM occurs more frequently in the cervical spinal cord than in other locations. Data on cats with ANNPE and IIVDE are limited. Optimal MRI definition and experience in neuroimaging can help identify the findings that allow differentiation between FCEM, ANNPE, and IIVDE. In animals with ANNPE and IIVDE, the affected intervertebral disk space is often narrowed and the focal area of intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted images is located above the affected intervertebral disk space. In dogs with ANNPE signal changes associated with the extruded nucleus pulposus and epidural fat disruption can be identified in the epidural space dorsal to the affected intervertebral disk. Identification of a linear tract (predominantly hyperintense on T2-weighted images, iso to hypointense on T1-weighted images and hypointense on T2*-weighted gradient recall echo images) extending from the intervertebral disk into the spinal cord parenchyma is highly suggestive of IIVDE. Treatment of FCEM and ANNPE is conservative. Dogs reported with IIVDE have been managed either conservatively or

  20. A Review of Fibrocartilaginous Embolic Myelopathy and Different Types of Peracute Non-Compressive Intervertebral Disk Extrusions in Dogs and Cats.

    PubMed

    De Risio, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses terminology, pathological, clinical, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, treatment, outcome, and prognostic factors of fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy (FCEM), acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion (ANNPE), and intradural/intramedullary intervertebral disk extrusion (IIVDE). FCEM, ANNPE, and IIVDE have a similar clinical presentation characterized by peracute onset of neurological dysfunction that is generally non-progressive after the initial 24-48 h. Differentiating between these conditions can be challenging, however, certain clinical and imaging findings can help. FCEM can occur in both adult and immature animals, whereas ANNPE or IIVDE have been reported only in animals older than 1 year. In dogs, ANNPE and IIVDE most commonly occur in the intervertebral disk spaces between T12 and L2, whereas FCEM has not such site predilection. In cats, FCEM occurs more frequently in the cervical spinal cord than in other locations. Data on cats with ANNPE and IIVDE are limited. Optimal MRI definition and experience in neuroimaging can help identify the findings that allow differentiation between FCEM, ANNPE, and IIVDE. In animals with ANNPE and IIVDE, the affected intervertebral disk space is often narrowed and the focal area of intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted images is located above the affected intervertebral disk space. In dogs with ANNPE signal changes associated with the extruded nucleus pulposus and epidural fat disruption can be identified in the epidural space dorsal to the affected intervertebral disk. Identification of a linear tract (predominantly hyperintense on T2-weighted images, iso to hypointense on T1-weighted images and hypointense on T2*-weighted gradient recall echo images) extending from the intervertebral disk into the spinal cord parenchyma is highly suggestive of IIVDE. Treatment of FCEM and ANNPE is conservative. Dogs reported with IIVDE have been managed either conservatively or

  1. Nonodontogenic Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Sialadenitis

    PubMed Central

    Veyseller, Bayram; Vural, Omer; Ozturan, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive infectious disease of the soft tissue with high mortality and morbidity rates. Necrotizing fasciitis is occasionally located in the head and neck region and develops after odontogenic infections. Factors affecting treatment success rates are early diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic treatment, and surgical debridement. We present a necrotizing fasciitis case located in the neck region that developed after sialoadenitis. It is important to emphasize that necrotizing fasciitis to be seen in the neck region is very rare. Nonodontogenic necrotizing fasciitis is even more rare. PMID:27822398

  2. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Infection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chi-Woong; Yoon, Hyun-Joong; Jung, Da-Woon; Lee, Sang-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is defined as rapidly progressive necrosis of subcutaneous fat and fascia. Although NF of the face is rare, its mortality rate is nearly 30%. It usually originates from dental infection and can lead to involvement of the neck, mediastinum, and chest wall. Complications resulting from pre-existing systemic diseases can increase the mortality rate. Known complication factors for NF include diabetes, malnutrition, advanced age, peripheral vascular disease, renal failure, and obesity. Here, we report a case of NF originating from dental infection in an 88-year-old woman already diagnosed with hypertension, thoracic aortic aneurysm, and renal diseases. Such conditions limited adequate surgical and antibiotic treatment. However, interdisciplinary treatment involving multiple departments was implemented with good results. PMID:27489813

  3. Sagittal alignment of the cervical spine after neck injury.

    PubMed

    Beltsios, Michail; Savvidou, Olga; Mitsiokapa, Evanthia A; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kaspiris, Angelos; Efstathopoulos, Nikolaos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2013-07-01

    The normal sagittal alignment of the cervical spine is lordotic and is affected by the posture of the head and neck. The question of whether loss of cervical lordosis is the result of muscle spasm after injury or a normal variation, and the clinical significance of such changes in sagittal profile of the cervical spine has been an issue of several studies. The purpose of this paper is to study the incidence of normal cervical lordosis and its changes after neck injury compared to the healthy population. We studied the lateral radiographs of the cervical spine of 60 patients with neck injury compared to 100 patients without a neck injury. Lateral radiographs were obtained in the standing or sitting position, and the curvature of the cervical spine was measured using the angle formed between the inferior end plates of the C2 and C7 vertebrae. In the patients without neck injury, lordotic and straight cervical spine sagittal alignment was observed in 36.5% each, double curvature in 17%, and kyphotic in 10%. In the patients with neck injury, lordotic sagittal alignment was observed in 36%, straight in 34%, double curvature in 26% and kyphotic in 4%. No significant difference between the two groups regarding all types of sagittal alignment of the cervical spine was found (p > 0.100). The alterations in normal cervical lordosis in patients with neck injury must be considered coincidental. These alterations should not be associated with muscle spasm caused by neck pain.

  4. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 ...

  5. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 ...

  6. Idiopathic acute onset myelopathy in cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) cubs.

    PubMed

    Walzer, Christian; Url, Angelika; Robert, Nadia; Kübber-Heiss, Anna; Nowotny, Norbert; Schmidt, Peter

    2003-03-01

    Numerous cases of ataxia, hind limb paresis, and paralysis have occurred in cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) cubs over the past 10 yr within the European Endangered Species Program population, including 12 in mainland Europe, two in the British Isles, one in Namibia, and one in Dubai. The condition is the most important medical factor limiting European cheetah population growth. Eight cubs at the Salzburg Zoo, Austria, were affected. They demonstrated upper motor neuron lesions when alive and bilateral, symmetrical myelin degeneration of the spinal cord on necropsy. Ballooning of myelin sheaths surrounded mostly preserved axons, and no spheroids, characteristic of acute axonal degeneration, were found. Myelin loss markedly exceeded axonal degeneration. The syndrome's etiology is unclear, although viral, bacterial, parasitic, genetic, nutritional-metabolic, toxic, and physical causes have been considered.

  7. Multivariate Analysis of Factors Associated With Axial Symptoms in Unilateral Expansive Open-Door Cervical Laminoplasty With Miniplate Fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Liu, Hao; Deng, Yuxiao; Gong, Quan; Li, Tao; Song, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective case-control study.Unilateral expansive open-door cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation is an efficient and increasing popular surgery for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Axial symptoms are the most frequent complaints after cervical laminoplasty. But the mechanisms have not been fully clarified yet.The objective of this study is to compare the clinical and radiologic data between patients with or without axial symptoms and to investigate the factors associated with axial symptoms by multivariate analysis in cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation.A total of 129 patients who underwent cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation were comprised from August 2009 to March 2014. Patients were grouped according to whether they suffered from postoperative axial symptoms (PA) or not (NA). The clinical data including gender, age, duration of symptoms, diagnosis type, medical comorbidity, operative level, blood loss, operative time, pre- and post-Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, JOA recovery rates, and other complications were recorded. The radiologic data including cervical canal diameter, C2-7 Cobb angle, cervical range of motion (ROM), cross-sectional area, open angle, hinge union, and facet joint destroyed would be measured according to X-ray plain and CT scan images. The univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed.There were 39 patients in PA group and 90 patients in NA group. Both groups gained significant JOA improvement postoperatively (P < 0.05). The preoperative neck pain (P = 0.048), negative change of cervical ROM (P = 0.018), and facet joints destroyed (P = 0.022) were significant different between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences for other clinical and radiography parameters between the groups (P > 0.05). The multivariate analysis showed that the negative change of cervical ROM (OR = 1.062, P = 0.047) and facet joints

  8. Osteoradionecrosis of the subaxial cervical spine following treatment for head and neck carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Khorsandi, A S; Mourad, W F; Urken, M L; Persky, M S; Lazarus, C L; Jacobson, A S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study MRI and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the subaxial cervical spine, a serious long-term complication of radiation therapy (RT) for head and neck cancers that can lead to pain, vertebral instability, myelopathy and cord compression. Methods: This is a single-institution retrospective review of patients diagnosed and treated for ORN of the subaxial cervical spine following surgery and radiation for head and neck cancer. Results: We report PET/CT imaging and MRI for four patients, each with extensive treatment for recurrent head and neck cancer. Osteomyelitis (OM) and discitis are the end-stage manifestations of ORN of the subaxial spine. Conclusion: ORN of the subaxial spine has variable imaging appearance and needs to be differentiated from recurrent or metastatic disease. Surgical violation of the posterior pharyngeal wall on top of the compromised vasculature in patients treated heavily with RT may pre-dispose the subaxial cervical vertebrae to ORN, with possible resultant OM and discitis. MRI and PET/CT imaging are complimentary in this setting. PET/CT images may be misinterpreted in view of the history of head and neck cancer. MRI should be utilized for definitive diagnosis of OM and discitis in view of its imaging specificity. Advances in knowledge: We identify the end-stage manifestation of ORN in the sub-axial spine on PET/CT and MRI to facilitate its correct diagnosis. PMID:25375626

  9. The effect of rheumatoid arthritis on the anatomy of the female cervical spine: a radiological study.

    PubMed

    Higashino, K; Sairyo, K; Katoh, S; Nakano, S; Enishi, T; Yasui, N

    2009-08-01

    The effect of rheumatoid arthritis on the anatomy of the cervical spine has not been clearly documented. We studied 129 female patients, 90 with rheumatoid arthritis and 39 with other pathologies (the control group). There were 21 patients in the control group with a diagnosis of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and 18 with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. All had plain lateral radiographs taken of the cervical spine as well as a reconstructed CT scan. The axial diameter of the width of the pedicle, the thickness of the lateral mass, the height of the isthmus and internal height were measured. The transverse diameter of the transverse foramen (d1) and that of the spinal canal (d2) were measured, and the ratio d1/d2 calculated. The width of the pedicles and the thickness of the lateral masses were significantly less in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in those with other pathologies. The area of the transverse foramina in patients with rheumatoid arthritis was significantly greater than that in the other patients. The ratio of d1 to d2 was not significantly different. A high-riding vertebral artery was noted in 33.9% of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in 7.7% of those with other pathologies. This difference was statistically significant. In the rheumatoid group there was a significant correlation between isthmus height and vertical subluxation and between internal height and vertical subluxation.

  10. Knowledge and Awareness of Cervical Cancer among HIV-Infected Women in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Mohamad I.; Salvador-Davila, Graciela; Lonsako, Shumet; Kassahun, Konjit; Ansel, Jodi; Osakwe, Chidude; Weldegebreal, Teklu; Ahmed, Ismael; Asnake, Mengistu; Blumenthal, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among Ethiopian women. Low awareness of cervical cancer, in combination with low health care seeking behavior, is a key challenge for cervical cancer prevention. This study assessed the knowledge of cervical cancer among HIV-infected women in Ethiopia. Methods. A facility-based cross-sectional survey was conducted from August to September 2012 among HIV-infected women between 21 and 49 years of age. Basic descriptive statistics were performed using SPSS. Results. A total of 432 HIV-infected women participated in this study. About 71% of participants had ever heard of cervical cancer. Among women who had ever heard of cervical cancer, 49% did not know the cause while 74% were able to identify at least one risk factor for cervical cancer. Only 33% of women were able to correctly address when women should seek care and 33% identified at least one treatment option for cervical cancer. Conclusion. This study revealed that knowledge about cervical cancer was generally low, in particular for health care seeking behavior and treatment of cervical cancer. Health awareness programs should be strengthened at both community and health facility levels with emphasis highlighting the causes, risk factors, care seeking behaviors, and treatment options for cervical cancer. PMID:27867397

  11. Cervical cancer in India and HPV vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Kaarthigeyan, K.

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer, mainly caused by Human Papillomavirus infection, is the leading cancer in Indian women and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Though there are several methods of prevention of cervical cancer, prevention by vaccination is emerging as the most effective option, with the availability of two vaccines. Several studies have been published examining the vaccine's efficacy, immunogenicity and safety. Questions and controversy remain regarding mandatory vaccination, need for booster doses and cost-effectiveness, particularly in the Indian context. PMID:22754202

  12. Operative stabilization of the remaining mobile segment in ankylosed cervical spine in systemic onset - juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Suhodolčan, Lovro; Mihelak, Marko; Brecelj, Janez; Vengust, Rok

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 19-year-old young man with oligoarthritis type of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, who presented with several month duration of lower neck pain and progressive muscular weakness of all four limbs. X-rays of the cervical spine demonstrated spontaneous apophyseal joint fusion from the occipital condyle to C6 and from C7 to Th2 with marked instability between C6 and C7. Surgical intervention began with anterolateral approach to the cervical spine performing decompression, insertion of cage and anterior vertebral plate and screws, followed by posterior approach and fixation. Care was taken to restore sagittal balance. The condition was successfully operatively managed with multisegmental, both column fixation and fusion, resulting in pain cessation and resolution of myelopathy. Postoperatively, minor swallowing difficulties were noted, which ceased after three days. Patient was able to move around in a wheelchair on the sixth postoperative day. Stiff neck collar was advised for three months postoperatively with neck pain slowly decreasing in the course of first postoperative month. On the follow-up visit six months after the surgery patient exhibited no signs of spastic tetraparesis, X-rays of the cervical spine revealed solid bony fusion at single mobile segment C6-C7. He was able to gaze horizontally while sitting in a wheelchair. Signs of myelopathy with stiff neck and single movable segment raised concerns about intubation, but were successfully managed using awake fiber-optic intubation. Avoidance of tracheostomy enabled us to perform an anterolateral approach without increasing the risk of wound infection. Regarding surgical procedure, the same principles are obeyed as in management of fracture in ankylosing spondylitis or Mb. Forestrier. PMID:27458558

  13. [Isolated anterior cervical hypertrichosis].

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, B; Cabanillas, M; de las Heras, C; Cacharrón, J M

    2009-01-01

    Anterior cervical hypertrichosis was described by Trattner and coworkers in 1991. It consists of a of hair at the anterior cervical level just above the laryngeal prominence. To date, only 28 cases of anterior cervical hypertrichosis have been reported. Although it is normally an isolated finding, it may be associated with mental retardation, hallux valgus, retinal disorders, other hair disorders, facial dysmorphism, or sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy. We report the case of a 27-year-old woman who presented with this condition as an isolated finding.

  14. Anterior cervical fusion with interbody cage containing beta-tricalcium phosphate augmented with plate fixation: a prospective randomized study with 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li-Yang; Jiang, Lei-Sheng

    2008-05-01

    A variety of bone graft substitutes, interbody cages, and anterior plates have been used in cervical interbody fusion, but no controlled study was conducted on the clinical performance of beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) and the effect of supplemented anterior plate fixation. The objective of this prospective, randomized clinical study was to evaluate the effectiveness of implanting interbody fusion cage containing beta-TCP for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy, and the fusion rates and outcomes in patients with or without randomly assigned plate fixation. Sixty-two patients with cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy due to soft disc herniation or spondylosis were treated with one- or two-level discectomy and fusion with interbody cages containing beta-TCP. They were randomly assigned to receive supplemented anterior plate (n = 33) or not (n = 29). The patients were followed up for 2 years postoperatively. The radiological and clinical outcomes were assessed during a 2-year follow-up. The results showed that the fusion rate (75.0%) 3 months after surgery in patients treated without anterior cervical plating was significantly lower than that (97.9%) with plate fixation (P < 0.05), but successful bone fusion was achieved in all patients of both groups at 6-month follow-up assessment. Patients treated without anterior plate fixation had 11 of 52 (19.2%) cage subsidence at last follow-up. No difference (P > 0.05) was found regarding improvement in spinal curvature as well as neck and arm pain, and recovery rate of JOA score at all time intervals between the two groups. Based on the findings of this study, interbody fusion cage containing beta-TCP following one- or two-level discectomy proved to be an effective treatment for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. Supplemented anterior plate fixation can promote interbody fusion and prevent cage subsidence but do not improve the 2-year outcome when compared with those treated

  15. The prevalence of cervical ribs in a London population.

    PubMed

    Brewin, James; Hill, Martin; Ellis, Harold

    2009-04-01

    Cervical ribs are an important cause of neurovascular compression at the thoracic outlet. Previous studies have shown the prevalence of cervical ribs to be between 0.05 and 3%, depending on the sex and race of the population studied. We examined 1,352 chest radiographs to determine the prevalence of cervical ribs in a London population of mixed sex and ethnicity. Our study found that the overall prevalence of cervical ribs was 0.74% with a higher rate in females compared with males (1.09 and 0.42%, respectively). Of the 10 individuals with a cervical rib, five were on the left, three were on the right and two were bilateral. The presence of elongated C7 transverse processes (transverse apophysomegaly) was also noted. We found a total of 30 elongated transverse processes with an overall prevalence of 2.21%. They were also more common in females (3.43%) than males (1.13%).

  16. Management of surgical splenorenal shunt-related hepatic myelopathy with endovascular interventional techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao-Qiang; Liu, Feng-Yong; Duan, Feng

    2012-12-21

    We present a case with hepatic myelopathy (HM) due to a surgical splenorenal shunt that was successfully treated by endovascular interventional techniques. A 39-year-old man presented with progressive spastic paraparesis of his lower limbs 14 mo after a splenorenal shunt. A portal venogram identified a widened patent splenorenal shunt. We used an occlusion balloon catheter initially to occlude the shunt. Further monitoring of the patient revealed a decrease in his serum ammonia level and an improvement in leg strength. We then used an Amplatzer vascular plug (AVP) to enable closure of the shunt. During the follow up period of 7 mo, the patient experienced significant clinical improvement and normalization of blood ammonia, without any complications. Occlusion of a surgically created splenorenal shunt with AVP represents an alternative therapy to surgery or coil embolization that can help to relieve shunt-induced HM symptoms.

  17. Immunohistochemical screening for viral agents in cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) with myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Shibly, S; Schmidt, P; Robert, N; Walzer, C; Url, A

    2006-10-21

    Numerous cases of acute-onset progressive ataxia, hindlimb paresis and paralysis of unknown aetiology occurred during 1993 to 2003 in cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) within the European Endangered Species Programme (eep). This study describes the immunohistochemical investigation of a possible viral aetiology of the "cheetah myelopathy". Antibodies to feline herpesvirus type 1, canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus and Borna disease virus were applied to formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded brain and spinal cord sections from 25 affected cheetahs aged between three-and-a-half months and 13 years. Using the avidin-biotin complex technique, none of the antibodies gave positive immunosignals in either the brain or the spinal cord tissue.

  18. [Wnt signalling pathway and cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Ramos-Solano, Moisés; Álvarez-Zavala, Monserrat; García-Castro, Beatriz; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is a pathology that arises in the cervical epithelium, whose major cause of risk is human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Due to the fact that HPV infection per se is not enough to generate a carcinogenic process, it has been proposed that alterations in the Wnt signaling pathway are involved in cervical carcinogenesis. The Wnt family consists of 13 receptors and 19 ligands, and it is highly conserved phylogenetically due to its contribution in different biological processes, such as embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Additionally, this signaling pathway modulates various cellular functions, for instance: cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and cell polarity. This paper describes the Wnt signaling pathways and alterations that have been found in members of this family in different cancer types and, especially, in CC.

  19. [Epigenetic alterations in cervical cancer progression].

    PubMed

    Ríos-Romero, Magdalena; Soto-Valladares, Ana Guadalupe; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Despite the use of the screening test, such as Papanicolaou, and the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV), cervical cancer remains as a public health problem in México and it is the second leading cause of death for malignant neoplasias among women. High-risk HPV infection is the main risk factor for the development of premalignant lesions and cervical cancer; however, HPV infection is not the only factor; there are various genetic and epigenetic alterations required for the development of neoplasias; some of them have been described and even in some cases they have been suggested as biomarkers for prognosis. However, in contrast with other cancer types, such as breast cancer, in cervical cancer the use of biomarkers has not been established for clinical applications. Unlike genetic alterations, epigenetic alterations are potentially reversible; in this sense, their characterization is important, since they have not only a potential use as biomarkers, but they also could represent new therapeutic targets for treatment of cervical cancer. This review describes some of the more common epigenetic alterations in cervical cancer and its potential use in routine clinical practice.

  20. Curcumin Nanoformulation for Cervical Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Mohd S.; Chauhan, Neeraj; Yallapu, Murali M.; Gara, Rishi K.; Maher, Diane M.; Kumari, Sonam; Sikander, Mohammed; Khan, Sheema; Zafar, Nadeem; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide. Current standards of care for cervical cancer includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Conventional chemotherapy fails to elicit therapeutic responses and causes severe systemic toxicity. Thus, developing a natural product based, safe treatment modality would be a highly viable option. Curcumin (CUR) is a well-known natural compound, which exhibits excellent anti-cancer potential by regulating many proliferative, oncogenic, and chemo-resistance associated genes/proteins. However, due to rapid degradation and poor bioavailability, its translational and clinical use has been limited. To improve these clinically relevant parameters, we report a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) based curcumin nanoparticle formulation (Nano-CUR). This study demonstrates that in comparison to free CUR, Nano-CUR effectively inhibits cell growth, induces apoptosis, and arrests the cell cycle in cervical cancer cell lines. Nano-CUR treatment modulated entities such as miRNAs, transcription factors, and proteins associated with carcinogenesis. Moreover, Nano-CUR effectively reduced the tumor burden in a pre-clinical orthotopic mouse model of cervical cancer by decreasing oncogenic miRNA-21, suppressing nuclear β-catenin, and abrogating expression of E6/E7 HPV oncoproteins including smoking compound benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) induced E6/E7 and IL-6 expression. These superior pre-clinical data suggest that Nano-CUR may be an effective therapeutic modality for cervical cancer. PMID:26837852

  1. Cervical Microbiome and Cytokine Profile at Various Stages of Cervical Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bahena-Román, Margarita; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Cortina-Ceballos, Bernardo; López-Estrada, Guillermina; Delgado-Romero, Karina; Burguete-García, Ana I.; Cantú, David; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is caused by high-risk human papillomavirus persistence due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines. Vaginal microbiota determines the presence of certain cytokines locally. We assessed the association between cervical microbiota diversity and the histopathological diagnosis of each stage of CC, and we evaluated mRNA cervical expression levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, TNF-α and IFN-γ across the histopathological diagnosis and specific bacterial clusters. We determined the cervical microbiota by high throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons and classified it in community state types (CST). Mean difference analyses between alpha-diversity and histopathological diagnosis were carried out, as well as a β-diversity analysis within the histological diagnosis. Cervical cytokine mRNA expression was analyzed across the CSTs and the histopathological diagnoses. We found a significant difference in microbiota's diversity in NCL-HPV negative women vs those with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and CC(p = 0.006, p = 0.036).When β-diversity was evaluated, the CC samples showed the highest variation within groups (p<0.0006) and the largest distance compared to NCL-HPV negative ones (p<0.00001). The predominant bacteria in women with normal cytology were L. crispatus and L. iners, whereas for SIL, it was Sneathia spp. and for CC, Fusobacterium spp. We found higher median cervical levels of IL-4 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the CST dominated by Fusobacterium spp. These results suggest that the cervical microbiota may be implicated in cervical cancer pathology. Further cohort studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:27115350

  2. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

    PubMed

    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  3. Is There an Association between Body Mass Index and Cervical Length? Implications for Obesity and Cervical Length Management in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Kartik K; Cantonwine, David E; Zera, Chloe; Arjona, Melanie; Smith, Nicole A; Robinson, Julian N; McElrath, Thomas F

    2016-11-24

    Objective Obesity and cervical insufficiency are leading causes of morbidity in pregnancy. We assess the relationship between maternal body mass index (BMI) and second-trimester cervical length. Methods A secondary analysis of a nested case-control study of women with singleton gestations enrolled from 2006 to 2008. The primary exposure was first-trimester BMI, categorized per World Health Organization criteria: normal (18.5 to ≤ 25 kg/m(2)), overweight (25 to ≤ 30 kg/m(2)), and obese (> 30 kg/m(2)). The primary outcome was cervical length > 75th percentile. Results Among 391 pregnant women observed, the median cervical length was 3.6 cm, and the median BMI was 24.8 kg/m(2). In multivariable analyses, after adjusting for BMI, age, race, parity, smoking, and gestational age at delivery, women who were overweight (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.18; 95% CI: 1.20-3.96) and obese (AOR: 2.83; 95% CI: 1.47-5.43) were more than two times more likely to have a cervical length > 75th percentile. When cervical length and BMI were assessed linearly, for each 1.0 kg/m(2) increase in BMI, cervical length increased by 0.25 mm. These results were robust to utilizing different cutoffs of cervical length and pre-pregnancy BMI. Conclusion This study demonstrates a relationship between BMI and cervical length suggesting that obesity may be associated with longer cervical length. These results will need to be replicated in larger cohorts undergoing universal cervical length assessment.

  4. Cervical Radiculopathy (Pinched Nerve)

    MedlinePlus

    ... help relieve pain, strengthen neck muscles, and improve range of motion. In some cases, traction can be used to ... Learn more about surgery for radiculopathy online at Cervical ... a wide range of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries. All articles are ...

  5. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  6. Integration of human papillomavirus type 16 in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanopiene, Daiva; Stumbryte, Ausra; Bausyte, Raminta; Kirvelaitis, Edgaras; Simanaviciene, Vaida; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer remains an important cause of women morbidity and mortality. The progression of cervical pathology correlates with the HPV integration into the host genome. However, the data on the viral integration status in cervical dysplasias are controversial. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the status of HPV integration in two types of cervical pathology – invasive and non invasive cervical cancer (e.g. carcinoma in situ). 156 women were included in the study: 66 women were diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer (CC) and 90 with non invasive cervical cancer (carcinoma in situ, CIS). 74.2% [95% PI: 63.64÷84.76] of specimens collected from women with diagnosed CC and 85.6% [95% PI: 85.53÷92.85] of CIS specimens were positive for HPV. The most prevalent HPV genotype in both groups was HPV16. To evaluate HPV integration, three selected HPV16 E2 gene fragments were analyzed by PCR. In the majority of CC and CIS specimens the amplification of all three HPV16 E2 gene fragments was observed. The episomal HPV16 form was detected in the majority of CC and CIS specimens. The deletion of all three HPV16 E2 gene fragments was detected in 9.4% of CC specimens and 2.2% of CIS specimens. Finally, integration status could not be used as diagnostical additional test to distinguish between invasive and non invasive cervical cancer. PMID:28352670

  7. Sexually Transmitted Cervicitis

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Barbara

    1989-01-01

    Cervical infections with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Herpes simplex virus are some of the most common sexually transmitted infections. They are often asymptomatic, and therefore the patient is at risk of developing complications, such as pelvic inflammatory disease. It is important to recognize cervicitis, investigate it appropriately, and provide early treatment. Sexual partners must also be located and offered therapy to prevent re-infection in the index patient. PMID:21248969

  8. Minimum 2-year outcome of cervical laminoplasty with deep extensor muscle-preserving approach: impact on cervical spine function and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Yoshihisa; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Ito, Manabu; Sudo, Hideki; Takahata, Masahiko; Ohshima, Shigeki; Hojo, Yoshihiro; Minami, Akio

    2009-05-01

    In this retrospective cohort study, two surgical methods of conventional open-door laminoplasty and deep extensor muscle-preserving laminoplasty were allocated for the treatment of cervical myelopathy, and were specifically compared in terms of axial pain, cervical spine function, and quality of life (QOL) with a minimum follow-up period of 2 years. Eighty-four patients were divided into two groups and received either a conventional open-door laminoplasty (CL group) or laminoplasty using a deep extensor muscle-preserving approach (MP group). The latter approach was performed by preserving multifidus and semispinalis cervicis attachments followed by open-door laminoplasty and re-suture of the bisected spinous processes at each decompression level. The average follow-up period was 38 months (25-53 months). The preoperative and follow-up evaluations included the original Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, the new tentative JOA score including cervical spine function and QOL, and the visual analogue scale (VAS) of axial pain. Radiological analyses included cervical lordosis and flexion-extension range of motion (flex-ext ROM) (C2-7), and deep extensor muscle areas on MR axial images. The JOA recovery rates were statistically equivalent between two groups. The MP group demonstrated a statistically superior cervical spine function (84% vs 63%) and QOL (61% vs 45%) when compared to the CL group at final follow-up (P < 0.05). The average VAS scores at final follow-up were 2.3 and 4.9 in MP and CL groups (P < 0.05). The cervical lordosis and flex-ext ROM were statistically equivalent. The percent deep muscle area on MRI demonstrated a significant atrophy in CL group compared to that in MP group (56% vs 88%; P < 0.01). Laminoplasty employing the deep extensor muscle-preserving approach appeared to be effective in reducing the axial pain and deep muscle atrophy as well as improving cervical spine function and QOL when compared to conventional open-door laminoplasty.

  9. Minimum 2-year outcome of cervical laminoplasty with deep extensor muscle-preserving approach: impact on cervical spine function and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Ito, Manabu; Sudo, Hideki; Takahata, Masahiko; Ohshima, Shigeki; Hojo, Yoshihiro; Minami, Akio

    2009-01-01

    In this retrospective cohort study, two surgical methods of conventional open-door laminoplasty and deep extensor muscle-preserving laminoplasty were allocated for the treatment of cervical myelopathy, and were specifically compared in terms of axial pain, cervical spine function, and quality of life (QOL) with a minimum follow-up period of 2 years. Eighty-four patients were divided into two groups and received either a conventional open-door laminoplasty (CL group) or laminoplasty using a deep extensor muscle-preserving approach (MP group). The latter approach was performed by preserving multifidus and semispinalis cervicis attachments followed by open-door laminoplasty and re-suture of the bisected spinous processes at each decompression level. The average follow-up period was 38 months (25–53 months). The preoperative and follow-up evaluations included the original Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, the new tentative JOA score including cervical spine function and QOL, and the visual analogue scale (VAS) of axial pain. Radiological analyses included cervical lordosis and flexion–extension range of motion (flex–ext ROM) (C2–7), and deep extensor muscle areas on MR axial images. The JOA recovery rates were statistically equivalent between two groups. The MP group demonstrated a statistically superior cervical spine function (84% vs 63%) and QOL (61% vs 45%) when compared to the CL group at final follow-up (P < 0.05). The average VAS scores at final follow-up were 2.3 and 4.9 in MP and CL groups (P < 0.05). The cervical lordosis and flex–ext ROM were statistically equivalent. The percent deep muscle area on MRI demonstrated a significant atrophy in CL group compared to that in MP group (56% vs 88%; P < 0.01). Laminoplasty employing the deep extensor muscle-preserving approach appeared to be effective in reducing the axial pain and deep muscle atrophy as well as improving cervical spine function and QOL when compared to conventional open

  10. INTERFERON BETA-1A TREATMENT IN HTLV-1-ASSOCIATED MYELOPATHY/TROPICAL SPASTIC PARAPARESIS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Graça Maria de Castro; da Silva, Marcos Antonio Custódio Neto; Souza, Victor Lima; Lopes, Natália Barbosa da Silva; da Silva, Diego Luz Felipe; Nascimento, Maria do Desterro Soares Brandão

    2014-01-01

    Here a young patient (< 21 years of age) with a history of infective dermatitis is described. The patient was diagnosed with myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis and treated with interferon beta-1a. The disease was clinically established as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), and laboratory tests confirmed the presence of antibodies to HTLV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Mumps, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, schistosomiasis, herpes virus 1 and 2, rubella, measles, varicella-zoster toxoplasmosis, hepatitis, HIV, and syphilis were excluded by serology. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder and presented with nocturia, urinary urgency, paresthesia of the lower left limb, a marked reduction of muscle strength in the lower limbs, and a slight reduction in upper limb strength. During the fourth week of treatment with interferon beta-1a, urinary urgency and paresthesia disappeared and clinical motor skills improved. PMID:25229227

  11. Eight years of follow-up after laminectomy of calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition in the cervical yellow ligament of patient with Coffin–Lowry syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Tadao; Ogata, Tadanori; Horiuchi, Hideki; Yamaoka, Shintaro; Fukuda, Mitsumasa; Miura, Hiromasa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We report 8 years of follow-up after decompression to treat cervical myelopathy in a patient with Coffin–Lowry syndrome (CLS). CLS is a rare X-linked semidominant syndrome associated with growth and psychomotor retardation, general hypotonia, and skeletal abnormalities. In this patient, the spinal cord was compressed by calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition in the cervical yellow ligament (YL). To date, only 1 report has described clinical features after surgery for calcified cervical YL in CLS. Methods: A 15-year-old male with tetraplegia secondary to compression of the cervical spinal cord induced by a hypoplastic posterior arch of C1 and calcification of the YL from C2 to C7 was treated surgically with laminectomy from C1 to C7. The patient's history, clinical examination, imaging findings, and treatment are reported. The patient was incapable of speech because of mental retardation, so he could not describe his symptoms. Gait disturbance worsened over the 2 months before admission to our hospital. At admission, the patient could not move his extremities, and tendon reflexes of the upper and lower extremities were significantly increased. Computed tomography of the cervical spine showed YL calcification from C2 to C7. Magnetic resonance imaging showed consecutive compression of the cervical spinal cord. We diagnosed quadriplegia secondary to cervical cord damage and performed emergency surgery. Results: During C1–C7 laminectomy, YL calcification in C2–C7 was observed. The calcification was confirmed as calcium pyrophosphate by crystal analysis. Quadriplegia gradually resolved, and almost disappeared by 2 weeks after the operation. Cervical hyperlordosis was observed in radiographs starting from 1 month after the operation, but it has not progressed and is not associated with any symptoms. Conclusions: The efficacy of decompression continued, and no postoperative complications have occurred during at least 8 years of follow-up. PMID

  12. Synovial chondromatosis of the lumbar spine with compressive myelopathy: a case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Ibrahim Fikry; Contractor, Daniel; Bianchi, Stefano; Hermann, George; Hoch, Benjamin

    2008-09-01

    Synovial chondromatosis has been rarely reported to occur in the spine with only one case found in the lumbar spine. We describe another case of synovial chondromatosis in the lumbar spine in a 41-year-old man who presented with compressive myelopathy. The tumor was located in the left ventrolateral corner of the epidural space just below the L(4)-L(5) intervertebral space. Besides being extremely rare, our case was unusual in that the juxtaposed facet joint was radiologically normal.

  13. HPV vaccination: The most pragmatic cervical cancer primary prevention strategy.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy

    2015-10-01

    The evidence that high-risk HPV infections cause cervical cancers has led to two new approaches for cervical cancer control: vaccination to prevent HPV infections, and HPV screening to detect and treat cervical precancerous lesions. Two vaccines are currently available: quadrivalent vaccine targeting oncogenic HPV types 16, 18, 6, and 11, and bivalent vaccine targeting HPV 16 and 18. Both vaccines have demonstrated remarkable immunogenicity and substantial protection against persistent infection and high-grade cervical cancer precursors caused by HPV 16 and 18 in HPV-naïve women, and have the potential to prevent 70% of cervical cancers in adequately vaccinated populations. HPV vaccination is now implemented in national programs in 62 countries, including some low- and middle-income countries. The early findings from routine national programs in high-income countries are instructive to encourage low- and middle-income countries with a high risk of cervical cancer to roll out HPV vaccination programs and to introduce resource-appropriate cervical screening programs.

  14. Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Persistent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  15. EMT in cervical cancer: its role in tumour progression and response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Rehana; Arora, Himanshu; Rizvi, M A

    2015-01-28

    The prognosis of cervical patients significantly decreases as the cancer metastasizes to other parts of the body. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in cervical cancer progression and metastasis. Recurrence is the primary cause of the increased number of deaths due to cervical cancer. Oncogenes, such as AEG1, Sam-68, FTS and miR-361-5p, induce EMT in cervical cancer. Tumour suppressors, such as LMX-1, SFRP1, klotho, and miR-155, suppress EMT in cervical cancer. Factors such as hypoxia, the radiation dose, cytokines, proteins, transcription factors, and signalling pathways also play an important role in the induction, progression and maintenance of EMT in cervical cancer. Overall, this review describes a wide range of factors with potential roles in EMT that have been identified to date, and this information could be important for the development of new and more effective therapeutics that ameliorate the negative impact of cervical pathogenesis via EMT.

  16. Chiari malformation, cervical disc prolapse and syringomyelia--always think twice.

    PubMed

    Ball, Jonathon R; Little, Nicholas S

    2008-04-01

    We present the case of a 36-year-old man with neck pain and parasthesia of both upper limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cervical disc protrusion with spinal cord compression, a Chiari I malformation and cervical syringomyelia. On clinical grounds it was suspected that the cervical stenosis was the symptomatic pathology and an anterior cervical decompression was performed, followed by arthroplasty. Post-operative imaging demonstrated adequate canal decompression, preserved cervical mobility and near-complete resolution of the syrinx. Syringomyelia has a multitude of causes and synchronous pathology can occur. Cervical spondylosis is infrequently associated with syringomyelia. Chiari I malformations are increasingly incidentally detected and asymptomatic. This first report of arthroplasty for cervical spondylosis associated with syringomyelia adds to the growing body of experience with this new technology.

  17. External cervical resorption: diagnostic and treatment tips

    PubMed Central

    Consolaro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT External cervical resorption is caused, almost exclusively, by dental trauma - especially those characterized by concussion - and is a dental disease to be diagnosed and treated accurately by endodontists. However, the vast majority of the cases is initially diagnosed by an orthodontist, due to the imaging possibilities in standardized documentations. Among the causes of external cervical resorption, it is common to mistakenly attribute it to orthodontic treatment, traumatic occlusion or even to chronic inflammatory periodontal disease. External cervical resorption is associated to dental trauma in several situations mentioned in this paper. In old cases, and eventually still nowadays, it may have been induced by internal tooth bleaching, which is increasingly less frequent in endodontically treated teeth. There are some tips to be followed and some care that must be taken during the diagnosis and treatment of external cervical resorption clinical cases. The present study lists foundations that will allow the professional to perform safely and accurately in each specific case. Some of these tips and care measures are of orthodontic nature. PMID:27901225

  18. The role of phonophoresis in dyshpagia due to cervical osteophytes

    PubMed Central

    Unlu, Zeliha; Orguc, Sebnem; Eskiizmir, Gorkem; Aslan, Asim; Tasci, Saliha

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of patients with anterior cervical osteophytes causing dysphagia includes conservative treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, antibiotics, and an appropriate soft diet. Physical therapy with its advantages may be an alternative method in the treatment, which was not reported previously. Case description: Phonophoresis therapy is applied in nine patients with dysphagia due to cervical osteophytes. Results: The symptom of dysphagia regressed in various degrees in all patients after phonophoresis therapy. Conclusions: Phonophoresis might be an alternative method for the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) treatment in patients with dysphagia due to cervical osteophytes. PMID:20428400

  19. Complications of Anterior and Posterior Cervical Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spine surgery performed for the correct indications yields good results. However, surgeons need to be mindful of the many possible pitfalls. Complications may occur starting from the anaesthestic procedure and patient positioning to dura exposure and instrumentation. This review examines specific complications related to anterior and posterior cervical spine surgery, discusses their causes and considers methods to prevent or treat them. In general, avoiding complications is best achieved with meticulous preoperative analysis of the pathology, good patient selection for a specific procedure and careful execution of the surgery. Cervical spine surgery is usually effective in treating most pathologies and only a reasonable complication rate exists. PMID:27114784

  20. Cervical perineural cyst masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha; Agrawal, Amit

    2014-04-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor.

  1. Cervical Perineural Cyst Masquerading as a Cervical Spinal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor. PMID:24761204

  2. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The cervical spinal column is made up of vertebral bodies which protect the spinal cord. ... spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine ...

  3. Physalin F, a seco-steroid from Physalis angulata L., has immunosuppressive activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with HTLV1-associated myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Lorena A; Meira, Cássio S; Villarreal, Cristiane F; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A; de Souza, Claudia V C; Ribeiro, Ivone M; Tomassini, Therezinha C B; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Soares, Milena B P; Grassi, Maria F R

    2016-04-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) induces a strong activation of the immune system, especially in individuals with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Physalin F is a secosteroid with potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of physalin F on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of HAM/TSP subjects. A concentration-dependent inhibition of spontaneous proliferation of PBMC from HAM/TSP subjects was observed in the presence of physalin F, as evaluated by (3)H-thymidine uptake. The IC50 for physalin F was 0.97 ± 0.11 μM. Flow cytometry analysis using Cytometric Bead Array (CBA) showed that physalin F (10 μM) significantly reduced the levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ, but not IL-17A, in supernatants of PBMC cultures. Next, apoptosis induction was addressed by using flow cytometry to evaluate annexin V expression. Treatment with physalin F (10 μM) increased the apoptotic population of PBMC in HAM/TSP subjects. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of PBMC showed that physalin F induced ultrastructural changes, such as pyknotic nuclei, damaged mitochondria, enhanced autophagic vacuole formation, and the presence of myelin-like figures. In conclusion, physalin F induces apoptosis of PBMC, decreasing the spontaneous proliferation and cytokine production caused by HTLV-1 infection.

  4. Cervical Spinal Motion During Intubation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Ten fresh human cadavers were intubated while recording cervical motion using a cinefluoroscopic technique. Segmental cervical motion from the...performed using no external stabilization, Gardner-Wells traction and manual in-line cervical immobilization. The data are currently being analyzed. A...paper entitled Segmental cervical spine motion during orotracheal intubation of the intact and injured spine with and without external stabilization was published in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

  5. Data Analysis in Cervical Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    The cervical spine in lateral view is discussed and a method based on digital statistical analysis is used to reproduce quantitative data of the... cervical lordosis. (2) Marked straightening of the cervical spine. (3) Segmental straightening with reversal of the curve. Part II discusses the use of...the digital analysis to determine the displacement in subjects that have sustained ligamentous injuries of the cervical spine following whiplash injury.

  6. Cervical ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sunil Kumar; Rathod, Setu

    2015-01-01

    Cervical pregnancy is a rare type of ectopic pregnancy and it represents <1% of all ectopic pregnancies. Early diagnosis and medical management with systemic or local administration of methotrexate is the treatment of choice. If the pregnancy is disturbed, it may lead to massive hemorrhage, which may require hysterectomy to save the patient. We report three cases of cervical pregnancy managed successfully with different approaches of management. Our first case, 28 years old G3P2L2 with previous two lower segment cesarean sections, presented with bleeding per vaginum following 6 weeks of amenorrhea. Clinical examination followed by transvaginal ultrasound confirmed the diagnosis of cervical pregnancy. Total abdominal hysterectomy was done in view of intractable bleeding to save the patient. The second case, a 26-year-old second gravida with previous normal vaginal delivery presented with pain abdomen and single episode of spotting per vaginum following 7 weeks of amenorrhea. Transvaginal ultrasound revealed empty endometrial cavity, closed internal os with gestational sac containing live fetus of 7 weeks gestational age in cervical canal and she was treated with intra-amniotic potassium chloride followed by systemic methotrexate. Follow up with serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin level revealed successful outcome. Our third case, a 27-year-old primigravida with history of infertility treatment admitted with complaints of bleeding per vaginum for 1 day following 8 weeks amenorrhea. She was diagnosed as cervical pregnancy by clinical examination, confirmed by transvaginal ultrasonography and subsequently managed by dilation and curettage with intracervical Foleys' ballon tamponade.

  7. Cervical Cancer Knowledge, Perceptions and Screening Behaviour Among Female University Students in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Binka, Charity; Nyarko, Samuel H; Doku, David T

    2016-06-01

    Cervical cancer is becoming a leading cause of death among women in developing countries. Nevertheless, little is known regarding knowledge and perception of cervical cancer and screening behaviour particularly among female tertiary students in Ghana. This study sought to examine the knowledge and perceptions of cervical cancer and screening behaviour among female students in the University of Cape Coast and Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration in Ghana. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted for the study. Systematic and stratified random sampling techniques were used to select 410 participants for the study. The study found that the participants lacked knowledge on specific risk factors and symptoms of cervical cancer. Also, even though the participants had a fair perception of cervical cancer, they had a poor cervical cancer screening behaviour. Awareness of cervical cancer was significantly influenced by religious affiliation while cervical cancer screening was significantly determined by the working status of the participants. Specific knowledge on cervical cancer and its risk factors as well as regular screening behaviour is paramount to the prevention of cervical cancer. Consequently, the University Health Services should focus on promoting regular cervical cancer awareness campaigns and screening among the students particularly, females.

  8. Cervical plexus anesthesia versus general anesthesia for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Yang, Dalong; Wang, Tao; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Lijun; Ding, Wenyuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Both general anesthesia (GA) and cervical plexus anesthesia (CPA) can be used for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of anesthetic techniques on perioperative mortality and morbidity in patients undergoing cervical surgery. From January 2008 to December 2015, 356 patients who underwent 1-level ACDF for cervical spinal myelopathy were prospectively reviewed. They were assigned to receive GA (group A) and CPA (group B). The analgesic efficacy of the block was assessed by anesthesia preparation time, the maximum heart rate, and mean arterial blood pressure changes compared with the baseline, time of postoperative revival, and duration of recovery stay. Duration of surgery, blood loss, and anesthesia medical cost were also recorded. Numerical rating scale (NRS) was used to evaluate pain at different time points. Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) was assessed, and postoperative average administered dosages of meperidine and metoclopramide were also recorded. The spinal surgeon satisfaction, anesthetist satisfaction, and patient satisfaction were assessed. Both the anesthesia induction time and postoperative revival time were longer in group A than that in group B; both the duration of surgery and recovery stay were also longer in group A than that in group B, whereas there was no difference in blood loss between the 2 groups. The average dosage of both meperidine and metoclopramide was more in group A than that in group B, and the anesthesia medical cost was greater in group A than that in group B. There were no significant differences in baseline data of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate between the 2 groups. But the intraoperative data of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were higher/larger in group B than that in group A. In group A, there was no complaint of pain in the surgery procedure, but the pain increased

  9. Anterior cervical corpectomy: review and comparison of results using titanium mesh cages and carbon fibre reinforced polymer cages.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Syed M R; Alabi, J; Rezajooi, Kia; Casey, Adrian T H

    2010-10-01

    Different types of cages have recently become available for reconstruction following anterior cervical corpectomy. We review the results using titanium mesh cages (TMC) and stackable CFRP (carbon fibre reinforced polymer) cages. Forty-two patients who underwent anterior cervical corpectomy between November 2001 and September 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Pathologies included cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), cervical radiculopathy, OPLL (ossified posterior longitudinal ligament), metastasis/primary bone tumour, rheumatoid arthritis and deformity correction. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically. Outcome was assessed on the basis of the Odom's criteria, neck disability index (NDI) and myelopathy disability index (MDI). Mean age was 60 years and mean follow-up was 1½ years. Majority of the patients had single-level corpectomy. Twenty-three patients had TMC cages while 19 patients had CFRP cages. The mean subsidence noted with TMC cage was 1.91 mm, while with the stackable CFRP cage it was 0.5 mm. This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). However, there was no statistically significant correlation noted between subsidence and clinical outcome (p > 0.05) or between subsidence and post-operative sagittal alignment (p > 0.05) in either of the groups. Three patients had significant subsidence (> 3 mm), one of whom was symptomatic. There were no hardware-related complications. On the basis of the Odom's criterion, 9 patients (21.4%) had an excellent outcome, 14 patients (33.3%) had a good outcome, 9 patients (21.4%) had a fair outcome and 5 patients (11.9%) had a poor outcome, i.e. symptoms and signs unchanged or exacerbated. Mean post-operative NDI was 26.27% and mean post-operative MDI was 19.31%. Fusion was noted in all 42 cases. Both TMC and stackable CFRP cages provide solid anterior column reconstruction with good outcome following anterior cervical corpectomy. However, more subsidence is noted with TMC cages though

  10. Network Topologies Decoding Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, Sarika; Kanhaiya, Krishna; Rai, Aparna; Bandapalli, Obul Reddy; Yadav, Alok

    2015-01-01

    According to the GLOBOCAN statistics, cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women worldwide. It is found to be gradually increasing in the younger population, specifically in the developing countries. We analyzed the protein-protein interaction networks of the uterine cervix cells for the normal and disease states. It was found that the disease network was less random than the normal one, providing an insight into the change in complexity of the underlying network in disease state. The study also portrayed that, the disease state has faster signal processing as the diameter of the underlying network was very close to its corresponding random control. This may be a reason for the normal cells to change into malignant state. Further, the analysis revealed VEGFA and IL-6 proteins as the distinctly high degree nodes in the disease network, which are known to manifest a major contribution in promoting cervical cancer. Our analysis, being time proficient and cost effective, provides a direction for developing novel drugs, therapeutic targets and biomarkers by identifying specific interaction patterns, that have structural importance. PMID:26308848

  11. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management.

  12. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc arthroplasty devices have come onto the market and completed Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption trials. Though some of the early results demonstrate equivalency of arthroplasty to fusion, compelling evidence of benefits in terms of symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration are lacking. In addition, non-industry-sponsored studies indicate that these devices are equivalent to fusion in terms of adjacent segment degeneration. Longer-term studies will eventually provide the definitive answer. PMID:24353955

  13. Cervical Cancer Stigma in Rural Kenya: What Does HIV Have to Do with It?

    PubMed

    Rosser, Joelle I; Njoroge, Betty; Huchko, Megan J

    2016-06-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death amongst women in sub-Saharan Africa, largely due to the lack of early screening and treatment. In addition to poor access to screening services, inadequate uptake of available services is a barrier to early identification of precancerous lesions. Given that cervical cancer is caused by a sexually transmitted virus and is associated with HIV positivity, stigma is one of the potential barriers to the utilization of cervical cancer programs in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 419 women attending health facilities in rural western Kenya to measure levels of cervical cancer and HIV stigma and to measure the associations between cervical cancer stigma, HIV stigma, and HIV status. Women who qualified for cervical cancer screening were asked to complete an oral questionnaire using a modified 9-point HIV stigma scale. Low cervical cancer stigma was reported in this study, with only 85/419 (20.3 %) of respondents answering yes to at least one cervical cancer stigma question. However, cervical cancer stigma was highly correlated with HIV stigma (correlation coefficient 0.72) and was significantly lower in HIV-positive women (p < 0.001). Reducing cervical cancer stigma in the general population is an important part of promoting screening in sub-Saharan Africa.

  14. [Anterior spinal artery syndrome due to cervical spondylosis presenting as cervical angina].

    PubMed

    Odaka, Masaaki; Hirata, Koichi

    2004-11-01

    A 54-year-old woman developed acute progressive paraparesis after repeated precordial pain. Neurological examination revealed bilateral four-limb weakness predominant in the distal part of the upper limbs, upper limbs brisk tendon reflexes, superficial sensory impairment below the C8 level, and atonic bladder. T2-weighted cervical MRI disclosed hyperintense lesion with disc herniation in gray matter of spinal cord between C5 and C7. No vertebral artery abnormalities were detected. We hypothesized that she developed anterior spinal artery syndrome after cervical angina caused by cervical spondylosis. We conclude that physicians need to be aware of patients who experience chest pain without evidence of cardiac disease and that they take into consideration spinal cord infarction.

  15. Update on prevention and screening of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Shaniqua L; Ferrante, Jeanne M

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cause of cancer in women in the world. During the past few decades tremendous strides have been made toward decreasing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer with the implementation of various prevention and screening strategies. The causative agent linked to cervical cancer development and its precursors is the human papillomavirus (HPV). Prevention and screening measures for cervical cancer are paramount because the ability to identify and treat the illness at its premature stage often disrupts the process of neoplasia. Cervical carcinogenesis can be the result of infections from multiple high-risk HPV types that act synergistically. This imposes a level of complexity to identifying and vaccinating against the actual causative agent. Additionally, most HPV infections spontaneously clear. Therefore, screening strategies should optimally weigh the benefits and risks of screening to avoid the discovery and needless treatment of transient HPV infections. This article provides an update of the preventative and screening methods for cervical cancer, mainly HPV vaccination, screening with Pap smear cytology, and HPV testing. It also provides a discussion of the newest United States 2012 guidelines for cervical cancer screening, which changed the age to begin and end screening and lengthened the screening intervals. PMID:25302174

  16. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  17. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Tirapazamine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  18. Effect of steroid use in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jeyamohan, Shiveindra B; Kenning, Tyler J; Petronis, Karen A; Feustel, Paul J; Drazin, Doniel; DiRisio, Darryl J

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is an effective procedure for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy; however, postoperative dysphagia is a significant concern. Dexamethasone, although potentially protective against perioperative dysphagia and airway compromise, could inhibit fusion, a generally proinflammatory process. The authors conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, controlled study of the effects of steroids on swallowing, the airway, and arthrodesis related to multilevel anterior cervical reconstruction in patients who were undergoing ACDF at Albany Medical Center between 2008 and 2012. The objective of this study was to determine if perioperative steroid use improves perioperative dysphagia and airway edema. METHODS A total of 112 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive saline or dexamethasone. Data gathered included demographics, functional status (including modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association myelopathy score, neck disability index, 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey score, and patient-reported visual analog scale score of axial and radiating pain), functional outcome swallowing scale score, interval postoperative imaging, fusion status, and complications/reoperations. Follow-up was performed at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months, and CT was performed 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery for fusion assessment. RESULTS Baseline demographics were not significantly different between the 2 groups, indicating adequate randomization. In terms of patient-reported functional and pain-related outcomes, there were no differences in the steroid and placebo groups. However, the severity of dysphagia in the postoperative period up to 1 month proved to be significantly lower in the steroid group than in the placebo group (p = 0.027). Furthermore, airway difficulty and a need for intubation trended toward significance in the placebo group (p = 0.057). Last, fusion rates at 6 months proved to be

  19. Analysis of the Determinants of Low Cervical Cancer Screening Uptake Among Nigerian Women

    PubMed Central

    Nwobodo, Humphrey; Ba-Break, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer causes an estimated 266,000 deaths globally, 85% of which occurs in developing countries. It is a preventable disease, if detected and treated early via screen and treat, yet its burden is still huge in Nigeria. In 2012, 21.8% cases of cervical cancer and 20.3% deaths due to cervical cancer were recorded in Nigeria. This review, therefore, aims at indentifying the determinants of low cervical cancer screening in Nigeria in order to contribute in reducing the burden of the disease. Literature were obtained from Global Health, Popline and PubMed databases; WHO and other relevant websites using Eldis search engine; and from libraries in the University of Leeds and WHO in Geneva. Conceptual framework for analyzing the determinants of cervical cancer screening uptake among Nigerian women was formed by inserting service delivery component of the WHO health system framework into a modified Health Belief Model. Wrong perception of cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening due to low level of knowledge about the disease and inadequate cervical cancer prevention were identified as the major determinants of low cervical cancer screening uptake in Nigeria. Among women, belief in being at risk and/or severity of cervical cancer was low just as belief on benefits of cervical cancer screening, unlike high belief in barriers to screening. Support from the community and screening skills among health-workers were inadequate. Improving uptake of cervical cancer screening will reduce the burden of the disease. Therefore, researchers and other stakeholders interested in prevention of cervical cancer should carryout studies to identify interventions that could address the key determinants of low cervical cancer screening among Nigerian women. PMID:28299143

  20. Variants within the SP110 nuclear body protein modify risk of canine degenerative myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ivansson, Emma L.; Kozyrev, Sergey V.; Murén, Eva; Körberg, Izabella Baranowska; Swofford, Ross; Koltookian, Michele; Tonomura, Noriko; Zeng, Rong; Kolicheski, Ana L.; Hansen, Liz; Katz, Martin L.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Johnson, Gary S.; Coates, Joan R.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a naturally occurring neurodegenerative disease with similarities to some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Most dogs that develop DM are homozygous for a common superoxide dismutase 1 gene (SOD1) mutation. However, not all dogs homozygous for this mutation develop disease. We performed a genome-wide association analysis in the Pembroke Welsh Corgi (PWC) breed comparing DM-affected and -unaffected dogs homozygous for the SOD1 mutation. The analysis revealed a modifier locus on canine chromosome 25. A haplotype within the SP110 nuclear body protein (SP110) was present in 40% of affected compared with 4% of unaffected dogs (P = 1.5 × 10−5), and was associated with increased probability of developing DM (P = 4.8 × 10−6) and earlier onset of disease (P = 1.7 × 10−5). SP110 is a nuclear body protein involved in the regulation of gene transcription. Our findings suggest that variations in SP110-mediated gene transcription may underlie, at least in part, the variability in risk for developing DM among PWCs that are homozygous for the disease-related SOD1 mutation. Further studies are warranted to clarify the effect of this modifier across dog breeds. PMID:27185954

  1. A 66-Year-Old Woman with a Progressive, Longitudinally Extensive, Tract Specific, Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Schwetye, Katherine E.; Perrin, Richard; Schmidt, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman presented with progressive lancinating pain and sensory deficits attributable to a myelopathy of unclear etiology. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging showed a longitudinally extensive T2-hyperintense lesion of the dorsal columns. Comprehensive serum, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid analyses failed to identify an etiology. Empiric intravenous methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin were of no benefit and serial screens for an occult malignancy were negative. She developed dysesthesias and allodynia affecting her entire body and lost the use of her arms and legs due to severe sensory ataxia that was steadily progressive from onset. She opted against additional aggressive medical management of her condition and passed away on hospice eleven months after symptom onset. Autopsy revealed findings most consistent with polyphasic spinal cord ischemia affecting the dorsal and lateral white matter tracts and, to a lesser extent, adjacent gray matter. The underlying etiology for the progressive vasculopathy remains unknown. Spinal cord ischemia affecting the posterior spinal cord is rare and to our knowledge this case represents the only instance of a progressive spinal cord tractopathy attributable to chronic spinal cord ischemia. PMID:27990305

  2. Etanercept-Induced Myelopathy in a Pediatric Case of Blau Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Caracseghi, Fabiola; Izquierdo-Blasco, Jaume; Sanchez-Montanez, Angel; Melendo-Perez, Susana; Roig-Quilis, Manuel; Modesto, Consuelo

    2011-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a rare autoinflammatory disorder within the group of pediatric granulomatous diseases. Mutations in nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2/CARD15) are responsible for this condition, which has an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and variable expressivity. The clinical picture includes arthritis, uveitis, skin rash, and granulomatous inflammation. Central nervous system involvement is seldom reported, although some isolated cases of seizures, neurosensorial hearing loss, and transient cranial nerve palsy have been described. Treatment consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and immunosuppressive agents, among which anti-tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha (TNF-α) biologic agents, such as etanercept, play an important role. Among the major adverse effects of TNF-α inhibitors, demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis, and acute transverse myelitis have been reported in adults. We describe a case of pediatric Blau syndrome affected by etanercept-induced myelopathy, manifesting as a clinical syndrome of transverse myelitis. The patient experienced rapid recovery after etanercept was discontinued. To our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature and, possibly, the one with the latest onset, following 8 years of treatment. We discuss the etiopathogenic mechanisms of this reaction and possible explanations for the imaging findings. PMID:22937436

  3. Characterization of Intercostal Muscle Pathology in Canine Degenerative Myelopathy: A Disease Model for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Brandie R.; Coates, Joan R.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Bujnak, Alyssa C.; Katz, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Dogs homozygous for missense mutations in the SOD1 gene develop a late-onset neuromuscular disorder called degenerative myelopathy (DM) that has many similarities to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Both disorders are characterized by widespread progressive declines in motor functions accompanied by atrophic changes in the descending spinal cord tracts , and some forms of ALS are also associated with SOD1 mutations. In end-stage ALS, death usually occurs as a result of respiratory failure due to severe functional impairment of respiratory muscles. The mechanisms that lead to this loss of function are not known. Dogs with DM are euthanized at all stages of disease progression providing an opportunity to characterize the onset and progression of any pathological changes in the respiratory muscles that may precede respiratory failure. To characterize such potential disease-related pathology we evaluated intercostal muscles from Boxer and Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs that were euthanized at various stages of DM disease progression. DM was found to result in intercostal muscle atrophy, fibrosis, increased variability in muscle fiber size and shape, and an alteration in muscle fiber type composition. This pathology was not accompanied by retraction of the motor neuron terminals from the muscle acetylcholine receptor complexes, suggesting that the muscle atrophy did not result from physical denervation. These findings provide a better understanding of the mechanisms that likely lead to respiratory failure in at least some forms of ALS and will be useful in the development and evaluation of potential therapeutic interventions using the DM model. PMID:24043596

  4. Characterization of intercostal muscle pathology in canine degenerative myelopathy: a disease model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brandie R; Coates, Joan R; Johnson, Gayle C; Bujnak, Alyssa C; Katz, Martin L

    2013-12-01

    Dogs homozygous for missense mutations in the SOD1 gene develop a late-onset neuromuscular disorder called degenerative myelopathy (DM) that has many similarities to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Both disorders are characterized by widespread progressive declines in motor functions, accompanied by atrophic changes in the descending spinal cord tracts. Some forms of ALS are also associated with SOD1 mutations. In end-stage ALS, death usually occurs as a result of respiratory failure from severe functional impairment of respiratory muscles. The mechanisms that lead to this loss of function are not known. Dogs with DM are euthanized at all stages of disease progression, providing an opportunity to characterize the onset and progression of any pathological changes in the respiratory muscles that may precede respiratory failure. To characterize such potential disease-related pathology, we evaluated intercostal muscles from Boxer and Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs that were euthanized at various stages of DM disease progression. DM was found to result in intercostal muscle atrophy, fibrosis, increased variability in muscle fiber size and shape, and alteration in muscle fiber type composition. This pathology was not accompanied by retraction of the motor neuron terminals from the muscle acetylcholine receptor complexes, suggesting that the muscle atrophy did not result from physical denervation. These findings provide a better understanding of the mechanisms that likely lead to respiratory failure in at least some forms of ALS and will be useful in the development and evaluation of potential therapeutic interventions using the DM model.

  5. Application of the Carolina Framework for Cervical Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jennifer L.; McCarthy, Schatzi H.; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Carolina Framework for Cervical Cancer Prevention describes 4 main causes of cervical cancer incidence: human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, lack of screening, screening errors, and not receiving follow-up care. We present 2 applications of the Carolina Framework in which we identify high-need counties in North Carolina and generate recommendations for improving prevention efforts. Methods We created a cervical cancer prevention need index (CCPNI) that ranked counties on cervical cancer mortality, HPV vaccine initiation and completion, Pap smear screening, and provision of Pap tests to rarely- or never-screened women. In addition, we conducted in-depth interviews with 19 key informants from programs and agencies involved in cervical cancer prevention in North Carolina. Results North Carolina’s 100 counties varied widely on individual CCPNI components, including annual cervical cancer mortality (median 2.7/100,000 women; range 0.0–8.0), adolescent girls’ HPV vaccine initiation (median 42%; range 15%–62%), and Pap testing in the previous 3 years among Medicaid-insured adult women (median 59%; range 40%–83%). Counties with the greatest prevention needs formed 2 distinct clusters in the northeast and south-central regions of the state. Interviews generated 9 recommendations to improve cervical cancer prevention in North Carolina, identifying applications to specific programs and policies in the state. Conclusions This study found striking geographic disparities in cervical cancer prevention need in North Carolina. Future prevention efforts in the state should prioritize high-need regions as well as recommended strategies and applications in existing programs. Other states can use the Carolina Framework to increase the impact of their cervical cancer prevention efforts. PMID:24333357

  6. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, Timothy D.

    1997-01-24

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  7. Comparison of hemodynamic responses to intubation: Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope versus McCoy laryngoscope in presence of rigid cervical collar simulating cervical immobilization for traumatic cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Nitesh; Purohit, Shobha; Kalra, Poonam; Lall, Tarun; Khare, Avneesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intubation is known to cause an exaggerated hemodynamic response in the form of tachycardia, hypertension, and dysrhythmias. In cervical spine instability, intubation has to be performed using cervical immobilization to prevent exacerbation of spinal cord injuries. Application of rigid cervical collar may reduce cervical spine movements, but it hinders tracheal intubation with a standard laryngoscope. The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic responses to fiberoptic bronchoscope (FOB) and McCoy laryngoscope in patients undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia with rigid cervical collar simulating cervical spine immobilization in the situation of cervical trauma. Methods: Thirty-two patients in the age range 20–50 years, of American Society of Anaesthesiologist I-II, and of either sex undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomly allocated into each group. There were two groups according to the technique used for intubation: Group A (flexible FOB) and Group B (McCoy laryngoscope). Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were recorded at baseline, intraoperatively, immediately before and after induction, and immediately after intubation. Thereafter, every min for next 5 min. Statistical Analysis: Intergroup comparison of categorical data was done by Chi-square test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Intergroup comparison of quantitative data was done by the parametric test (unpaired t-test), and probability was considered to be significant if <0.05. Results: Due to intubation response, HR and blood pressure increased significantly (P < 0.05) above preoperative values in McCoy group as compared to the fiberoptic group. Conclusion: We suggest that the flexible FOB is an effective and better method of intubation in a situation like traumatic cervical spine injury and provides stable hemodynamics. PMID:26712970

  8. Cervical ectopic pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sunil Kumar; Rathod, Setu

    2015-01-01

    Cervical pregnancy is a rare type of ectopic pregnancy and it represents <1% of all ectopic pregnancies. Early diagnosis and medical management with systemic or local administration of methotrexate is the treatment of choice. If the pregnancy is disturbed, it may lead to massive hemorrhage, which may require hysterectomy to save the patient. We report three cases of cervical pregnancy managed successfully with different approaches of management. Our first case, 28 years old G3P2L2 with previous two lower segment cesarean sections, presented with bleeding per vaginum following 6 weeks of amenorrhea. Clinical examination followed by transvaginal ultrasound confirmed the diagnosis of cervical pregnancy. Total abdominal hysterectomy was done in view of intractable bleeding to save the patient. The second case, a 26-year-old second gravida with previous normal vaginal delivery presented with pain abdomen and single episode of spotting per vaginum following 7 weeks of amenorrhea. Transvaginal ultrasound revealed empty endometrial cavity, closed internal os with gestational sac containing live fetus of 7 weeks gestational age in cervical canal and she was treated with intra-amniotic potassium chloride followed by systemic methotrexate. Follow up with serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin level revealed successful outcome. Our third case, a 27-year-old primigravida with history of infertility treatment admitted with complaints of bleeding per vaginum for 1 day following 8 weeks amenorrhea. She was diagnosed as cervical pregnancy by clinical examination, confirmed by transvaginal ultrasonography and subsequently managed by dilation and curettage with intracervical Foleys’ ballon tamponade. PMID:25810679

  9. Developmental biomechanics of the human cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Nuckley, David J; Linders, David R; Ching, Randal P

    2013-04-05

    Head and neck injuries, the leading cause of death for children in the U.S., are difficult to diagnose, treat, and prevent because of a critical void in our understanding of the biomechanical response of the immature cervical spine. The objective of this study was to investigate the functional and failure biomechanics of the cervical spine across multiple axes of loading throughout maturation. A correlational study design was used to examine the relationships governing spinal maturation and biomechanical flexibility curves and tolerance data using a cadaver human in vitro model. Eleven human cadaver cervical spines from across the developmental spectrum (2-28 years) were dissected into segments (C1-C2, C3-C5, and C6-C7) for biomechanical testing. Non-destructive flexibility tests were performed in tension, compression, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. After measuring their intact biomechanical responses, each segment group was failed in different modes to measure the tissue tolerance in tension (C1-C2), compression (C3-C5), and extension (C5-C6). Classical injury patterns were observed in all of the specimens tested. Both the functional (p<0.014) and failure (p<0.0001) mechanics exhibited significant relationships with age. Nonlinear flexibility curves described the functional response of the cervical spine throughout maturation and elucidated age, spinal level, and mode of loading specificity. These data support our understanding of the child cervical spine from a developmental perspective and facilitate the generation of injury prevention or management schema for the mitigation of child spine injuries and their deleterious effects.

  10. Effects of occlusal load on cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Litonjua, L A; Bush, P J; Andreana, S; Tobias, T S; Cohen, R E

    2004-03-01

    Toothbrush abrasion has been considered to cause cervical lesions. However, some investigators have proposed that occlusal loading factors direct tensile stresses at the cervical area, resulting in wedge-shaped abfraction defects. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of axial and non-axial load on the development of cervical lesions. Matched paired premolars, extracted for orthodontic purposes, were used in a custom-fabricated toothbrushing apparatus. A periodontal sulcus width of 0b1 mm with 1 mm gingival recession was simulated with denture base resin. In phase 1, eight matched premolar pairs were subjected to 80 h (1b4 million strokes) of brushing and 300 g of toothbrush force. Toothpaste slurry was applied continuously through the toothbrush. One specimen in each pair was subjected to 250 h and 45 kg of continuous axial load, while the other unloaded tooth served as a negative control. In phase 2, 10 matched premolar pairs were subjected to the same conditions; however, the experimental teeth were subjected to 250 h and 45 kg of intermittent non-axial load, directed at a 45 degrees angle to the buccal cusp. Rubber impressions were made of the cervical lesions, then trimmed, weighed, and compared to determine the amount of tooth material lost. When teeth were loaded axially, there was significantly less tooth material loss (P < 0b02); however, when teeth were loaded non-axially, there was no significant difference (P =0b80) when compared with controls. Optical and scanning electron microscopy did not reveal any significant differences in the morphology between pairs. Our data suggest that the application of occlusal load may not necessarily play a significant role in the progression of cervical tooth wear commonly referred to as abfraction.

  11. HPV-Based Screening, Triage, Treatment, and Followup Strategies in the Management of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Deas, Jessica; Gómez-Cerón, Claudia; García-Suastegui, Wendy Argelia; Fierros-Zárate, Geny del Socorro; Jacobo-Herrera, Nadia Judith

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer in women worldwide, and the development of new diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment strategies merits special attention. Many efforts have been made to design new drugs and develop immunotherapy and gene therapy strategies to treat cervical cancer. HPV genotyping has potentially valuable applications in triage of low-grade abnormal cervical cytology, assessment of prognosis and followup of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and in treatment strategies for invasive cervical cancer. It is known that during the development of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection, a cascade of abnormal events is induced, including disruption of cellular cycle control, alteration of gene expression, and deregulation of microRNA expression. Thus, the identification and subsequent functional evaluation of host proteins associated with HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins may provide useful information in understanding cervical carcinogenesis, identifying cervical cancer molecular markers, and developing specific targeting strategies against tumor cells. Therefore, in this paper, we discuss the main diagnostic methods, management strategies, and followup of HPV-associated cervical lesions and review clinical trials applying gene therapy strategies against the development of cervical cancer. PMID:23690785

  12. Perspective for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Cervical Cancer: An Immunological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Marjorie; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Mirandola, Leonardo; Tonroy, Catherine; Tedjarati, Sean S.; Davis, Nicole; D’Cunha, Nicholas; Tijani, Lukman; Hardwick, Fred; Nguyen, Diane; Kast, W. Martin; Cobos, Everardo

    2014-01-01

    As the second most common cause of cancer-related death in women, human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines have been a major step in decreasing the morbidity and mortality associated with cervical cancer. An estimated 490,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year. Increasing knowledge of the HPV role in the etiology of cervical cancer has led to the development and introduction of HPV-based vaccines for active immunotherapy of cervical cancer. Immunotherapies directed at preventing HPV-persistent infections. These vaccines are already accessible for prophylaxis and in the near future, they will be available for the treatment of preexisting HPV-related neoplastic lesions. PMID:22251005

  13. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  14. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  15. Dermatological findings of human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Maria E R; Cuzzi-Maya, Tullia; Oliveira, André L A; Andrada-Serpa, Maria J; Araújo, Abelardo Q-C

    2003-02-15

    Dermatological findings for patients with human T lymphotropic virus type 1(HTLV-I)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) were investigated and were compared with dermatological findings for a control group. Only xerosis, cutaneous candidiasis, and palmar erythema were significantly associated with HAM/TSP. Histopathological patterns of cutaneous lymphoma were seen in 25% of 32 patients who underwent biopsy, and, thus, the cutaneous alterations in HAM/TSP can be classified into nonspecific lesions, infectious lesions, immune-inflammatory-mediated lesions, and premalignant or malignant lesions.

  16. Subacute post-traumatic ascending myelopathy (SPAM): two cases of SPAM following surgical treatment of thoracolumbar fractures.

    PubMed

    Farooque, Kamran; Kandwal, Pankaj; Gupta, Ankit

    2014-01-01

    To report two cases of traumatic paraplegia who developed Sub-acute Post-Traumatic Ascending Myelopathy (SPAM) following surgical decompression.We hereby report two cases (both 35yr old male) with traumatic paraplegia that developed ascending weakness at 3rd and 5th Post-Op day respectively following surgical decompression. Both the patients experienced remarkable improvement in Neurology after treatment with steroids. The authors conclude by emphasizing on minimum cord handling during surgical decompression of the spinal cord to avoid this potentially life threatening complication.

  17. Tropical spastic paraparesis and HTLV-1 associated myelopathy: clinical, epidemiological, virological and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Gessain, A; Mahieux, R

    2012-03-01

    In 1980, Human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was the first oncogenic human retrovirus to be discovered. HTLV-1 belongs to the Retroviridae family, the Orthoretrovirinae subfamily and to the deltaretrovirus genus. HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4(+) lymphoid cells in vivo. Three molecules have been identified for binding and/or entry of HTLV-1: heparan sulfate proteoglycans, neuropilin-1, and glucose transporter 1. An efficient transfer of the virus from an infected cell to a target cell can occur through the formation of a viral synapse and/or by virofilm structure. As for all retroviruses, HTLV-1 genome possesses three major ORFs (gag, pol and env) encoding the structural and enzymatic proteins. HTLV-1 encodes also some regulatory and auxillary proteins including the tax protein with transforming activities and the HBZ protein which plays a role in the proliferation and maintenance of the leukemic cells. HTLV-1 is present throughout the world with clusters of high endemicity including mainly Southern Japan, the Caribbean region, areas in South America and in intertropical Africa. The worldwide HTLV-1 infected population is estimated to be around 10-20 million. HTLV-1 has three modes of transmission: (1): mother to child, mainly linked to prolonged breast-feeding; (2): sexual, mainly occurring from male to female and (3): contaminated blood products. HTLV-1 possesses a remarkable genetic stability. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of mainly two severe diseases: a malignant T CD4(+) cell lymphoproliferation, of very poor prognosis, named Adult T cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL), and a chronic neuro-myelopathy named Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy (TSP/HAM). The lifetime risk among HTLV-1 carriers is estimated to be around 0.25 to 3%. TSP/HAM mainly occurs in adults, with a mean age at onset of 40-50 years and it is more common in women than in men. Blood transfusion is a major risk factor for TSP/HAM development. Clinically

  18. Os Odontoideum: Rare Cervical Lesion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    the articulation between C1 and the os odontoideum on flexion imaging. The remainder of his cervical vertebral bodies had normal alignment with no...appears normal. Figure 3. Flexion view of plain cervical spine. This image shows abnormal translation of the articulation between C1 and the C2 os...worldwide. Peer Reviewed Title: Os Odontoideum: Rare Cervical Lesion Journal Issue: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, 12(4) Author: Robson

  19. Probabilities of Radiation Myelopathy Specific to Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to Guide Safe Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Weinberg, Vivian; Ma, Lijun; Chang, Eric; Chao, Sam; Muacevic, Alexander; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Soltys, Scott; Gerszten, Peter C.; Ryu, Sam; Angelov, Lilyana; Gibbs, Iris; Wong, C. Shun; Larson, David A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) results for 9 cases of post spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) radiation myelopathy (RM) are reported and compared with a cohort of 66 spine SBRT patients without RM. Methods and Materials: DVH data were centrally analyzed according to the thecal sac point maximum (Pmax) volume, 0.1- to 1-cc volumes in increments of 0.1 cc, and to the 2 cc volume. 2-Gy biologically equivalent doses (nBED) were calculated using an {alpha}/{beta} = 2 Gy (units = Gy{sub 2/2}). For the 2 cohorts, the nBED means and distributions were compared using the t test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Significance (P<.05) was defined as concordance of both tests at each specified volume. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the probability of RM using the dose distribution for a given volume. Results: Significant differences in both the means and distributions at the Pmax and up to the 0.8-cc volume were observed. Concordant significance was greatest for the Pmax volume. At the Pmax volume the fit of the logistic regression model, summarized by the area under the curve, was 0.87. A risk of RM of 5% or less was observed when limiting the thecal sac Pmax volume doses to 12.4 Gy in a single fraction, 17.0 Gy in 2 fractions, 20.3 Gy in 3 fractions, 23.0 Gy in 4 fractions, and 25.3 Gy in 5 fractions. Conclusion: We report the first logistic regression model yielding estimates for the probability of human RM specific to SBRT.

  20. Osteotomies in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Nemani, Venu M.; Derman, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Rigid cervical deformities are difficult problems to treat. The goals of surgical treatment include deformity correction, achieving a rigid fusion, and performing a thorough neural decompression. In stiff and ankylosed cervical spines, osteotomies are required to restore sagittal and coronal balance. In this chapter, we describe the clinical and radiographic workup for patients with cervical deformities, and delineate the various factors that must be considered when planning surgical treatment. We also describe in detail the various types of cervical osteotomies, along with their surgical technique, advantages, and potential complications. PMID:26949476

  1. Cervical split: A pseudofracture

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.P.; Vine, H.S.; Sacks, B.A.; Ellison, H.P.

    1982-01-01

    A horizontal lucent line projecting over a cervical vertebral body on lateral radiographs and simulating a fracture is described. This pseudofracture line results from the lucency between contiguous proliferative osteophytes at the uncinate process/vertebral articulation. Associated disc space narrowing was seen in all of our eleven cases. The origin of this pseudofracture line, cases illustrating this phenomenon, and additional projections helpful for clarification are presented.

  2. Preinduction cervical ripening.

    PubMed

    Thiery, M

    1983-01-01

    This work reviews the evolution of cervical ripening procedures and discusses the most effective current techniques. Current knowledge of the process of spontaneous ripening of the cervix is briefly assessed, but the review concentrates on methodological aspects and the clinical results of preinduction cervical ripening. The historical development of mechanical and pharmacologic ripening procedures is examined, including enzymes, oxytocin, relaxin, corticosteriods, estrogens administered parenterally or locally, and prostaglandins (PGs) administered intravenously, orally, locally, and intravaginally. 3 effective procedures for preinduction cervical ripening are identified and described in greater detail: the catheter technique and local and vaginal administration of PGs. The extraamniotic catheter technique is simple, effective, and safe and is recommended for patients with not totally unripe cervixes and for whom PGs are unavailable or contraindicated. Single-dose extraamniotic instillation of PGE2 in Tylose gel was found to be highly effective for priming the unfavorable cervix before conventional labor induction. In some patients the procedure induces labor. The technique is easy to use, well accepted by the woman, and safe when applied appropriately to carefully selected patients. PGF2alpha gel has been less thoroughly studied. Electronic monitoring at the ripening stage is recommended for patients at risk, and even in low-risk cases much larger series will require study before conclusions can be reached about safety. Injection of PG gel into the cervical canal is less invasive than extraamniotic instillation, but no definite conclusions about its safety are possible due to small series and dissimilar clinical protocols. Pericervical administration of PGE2 and PGF2 alpha and intracervical and intraamniotic tablets of PGE2 are briefly assessed. Adoption of the intravaginal route has been a major step in the development of ripening techniques. 3 types of media

  3. CERVICAL CONTRIBUTION TO FUNCTIONAL SHOULDER IMPINGEMENT: TWO CASE REPORTS

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Subacromial impingement is a common condition among overhead athletes. The cause of subacromial impingement can be multifactorial and often involves impaired rotator cuff function. Case Description The following cases outline the presentation, examination and intervention of two overhead athletes, a high school football quarterback and a collegiate swimmer, each presenting with signs and symptoms of subacromial impingement. The unique feature in each case was the manifestation of the cervical spine as the apparent source of rotator cuff weakness, which contributed to functional subacromial impingement although other overt signs of cervical or associated nerve root involvement were absent. Outcome Subsequent to this finding, the athletes demonstrated a rapid recovery of rotator cuff strength and resolution of impingement symptoms in response to cervical retraction and retraction with extension range of motion exercises along with posture correction. They both returned to unrestricted sporting activities within a week, with maintenance of strength and without reoccurrence of symptoms. Discussion The signs of functional subacromial impingement often include weakness of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus. The cause of the weakness in the two cases appeared to be the result of stresses associated with forward head posture contributing to a possible intermittent C5 nerve root compression. The findings in the two cases would suggest the cervical spine should be considered as a potential cause of rotator cuff weakness in individuals presenting with subacromial impingement. Future research should examine the influence of cervical postures and shoulder muscle strength. Level of Evidence 4 PMID:27904800

  4. In vivo detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia by multimodal colposcopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wenqi; Qu, Yingjie; Pei, Jiaojiao; Xiao, Linlin; Zhang, Shiwu; Chang, Shufang; Smith, Zachary J.; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for women in developing countries. Colposcopy plays an important role in early screening and detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). In this paper, we developed a multimodal colposcopy system that combines multispectral reflectance, autofluorescence, and RGB imaging for in vivo detection of CIN, which is capable of dynamically recording multimodal data of the same region of interest (ROI). We studied the optical properties of cervical tissue to determine multi-wavelengths for different imaging modalities. Advanced algorithms based on the second derivative spectrum and the fluorescence intensity were developed to differentiate cervical tissue into two categories: squamous normal (SN) and high grade (HG) dysplasia. In the results, the kinetics of cervical reflectance and autofluorescence characteristics pre and post acetic acid application were observed and analyzed, and the image segmentation revealed good consistency with the gold standard of histopathology. Our pilot study demonstrated the clinical potential of this multimodal colposcopic system for in vivo detection of cervical cancer.

  5. Integrated genomic and molecular characterization of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    2017-03-16

    Cervical cancer remains one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Here we report the extensive molecular characterization of 228 primary cervical cancers, one of the largest comprehensive genomic studies of cervical cancer to date. We observed notable APOBEC mutagenesis patterns and identified SHKBP1, ERBB3, CASP8, HLA-A and TGFBR2 as novel significantly mutated genes in cervical cancer. We also discovered amplifications in immune targets CD274 (also known as PD-L1) and PDCD1LG2 (also known as PD-L2), and the BCAR4 long non-coding RNA, which has been associated with response to lapatinib. Integration of human papilloma virus (HPV) was observed in all HPV18-related samples and 76% of HPV16-related samples, and was associated with structural aberrations and increased target-gene expression. We identified a unique set of endometrial-like cervical cancers, comprised predominantly of HPV-negative tumours with relatively high frequencies of KRAS, ARID1A and PTEN mutations. Integrative clustering of 178 samples identified keratin-low squamous, keratin-high squamous and adenocarcinoma-rich subgroups. These molecular analyses reveal new potential therapeutic targets for cervical cancers.

  6. Survival analysis of cervical cancer using stratified Cox regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnami, S. W.; Inayati, K. D.; Sari, N. W. Wulan; Chosuvivatwong, V.; Sriplung, H.

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the mostly widely cancer cause of the women death in the world including Indonesia. Most cervical cancer patients come to the hospital already in an advanced stadium. As a result, the treatment of cervical cancer becomes more difficult and even can increase the death's risk. One of parameter that can be used to assess successfully of treatment is the probability of survival. This study raises the issue of cervical cancer survival patients at Dr. Soetomo Hospital using stratified Cox regression based on six factors such as age, stadium, treatment initiation, companion disease, complication, and anemia. Stratified Cox model is used because there is one independent variable that does not satisfy the proportional hazards assumption that is stadium. The results of the stratified Cox model show that the complication variable is significant factor which influent survival probability of cervical cancer patient. The obtained hazard ratio is 7.35. It means that cervical cancer patient who has complication is at risk of dying 7.35 times greater than patient who did not has complication. While the adjusted survival curves showed that stadium IV had the lowest probability of survival.

  7. [Two cases with dropped head syndrome caused by hypokalemic myopathy].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Koichiro; Okino, Iwao; Yamamoto, Nobuaki; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Tachibana, Naoko; Hamano, Toshiaki

    2011-02-01

    We reported two women (78 and 85 years of age) with dropped head syndrome caused by hypokalemic myopathy restricted to the posterior cervical muscles. Both presented with relatively rapid onset of severe neck extensor weakness. Needle EMG demonstrated myogenic changes in the cervical paraspinal muscles and there were high intensity signals in the posterior cervical muscles on the neck MRI. Dropped head syndrome resolved in both patients as potassium normalized. One of the patients relapsed 11 months later with recurrent hypokalemia, but recovered rapidly with supplementation of potassium. Focal myopathy localized in the posterior cervical muscles due to hypokalemia should be considered as one of the possible causes of dropped head syndrome.

  8. Hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Jau-Ching; Cheng, Henrich; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2017-01-01

    For patients with multilevel cervical stenosis at nonadjacent segments, one of the traditional approaches has included a multilevel fusion of the abnormal segments as well as the intervening normal segment. In this video we demonstrate an alternative treatment plan with tailored use of a combination of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with an intervening skipped level. The authors present the case of a 72-year-old woman with myeloradiculopathy and a large disc herniation with facet joint degeneration at C3-4 and bulging disc at C5-6. After nonoperative treatment failed, she underwent a single-level ACDF at C3-4 and single-level arthroplasty at C5-6, which successfully relieved her symptoms. No intervention was performed at the normal intervening C4-5 segment. By using ACDF combined with arthroplasty, the authors have avoided a 3-level fusion for this patient and maintained the range of motion of 2 disc levels. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/OrxcPUBvqLk .

  9. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  10. [Papillomavirus and cervical cancer in Chile].

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Valenzuela, María Teresa

    2008-11-01

    Molecular, clinical and epidemiological studies have established beyond doubt that human papiloma viruses (HPV) cause cervical cancer. The virus is also associated with genital warts and other less common cancers in oropharynx, vulva, vagina and penis. Worldwide, VPH genotypes 16 and 18 are the most common high risk genotypes, detected in near 70% of women with cervical cancer. The discovery of a cause-effect relationship between several carcinogenic microorganisms and cancer open avenues for new diagnostic, treatment and prevention strategies. In this issue of Revista Médica de Chile, two papers on HPV are presented. Guzman and colleagues demonstrate that HPV can be detected in 66% to 77% of healthy male adolescents bypolymerase chain reaction and that positivity depends on the site of the penis that is sampled. These results support the role of male to female transmission of high risk HPVs in Chile and should lead to even more active educational campaigns. The second paper provides recommendations for HPV vaccine use in Chile, generated by the Immunization Advisory Committee of the Chilean Infectious Disease Society. To issue these recommendations, the Committee analyzes the epidemiological information available on HPV infection and cervical cancer in Chile, vaccine safety and effectiveness data, and describes cost-effectiveness studies. Taking into account that universal vaccination is controversial, the Committee favors vaccine use in Chile and it's incorporation into a national program. However, there is an indication that the country requires the implementation of an integrated surveillance approach including cross matching of data obtained from HPV genotype surveillance, monitoring of vaccination coverage, and surveillance of cervical cancer. The final decision of universal vaccine use in Chile should be based on a through analysis of information.ev Mid Chile

  11. Up-regulation of CB2 receptors in reactive astrocytes in canine degenerative myelopathy, a disease model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Trapero, María; Espejo-Porras, Francisco; Rodríguez-Cueto, Carmen; Coates, Joan R; Pérez-Díaz, Carmen; de Lago, Eva; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier

    2017-01-09

    Targeting the CB2 receptor afforded neuroprotection in SOD1(G93A) mutant mice, a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The neuroprotective effects of CB2 receptors were facilitated by their up-regulation in the spinal cord in SOD1(G93A) mutant mice. Herein, we have investigated whether a similar CB2 receptor up-regulation, as well as parallel changes in other endocannabinoid elements, are evident in the spinal cord of dogs with degenerative myelopathy (DM), caused from mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 gene (SOD1). We used well-characterized post-mortem spinal cords from unaffected and DM-affected dogs. Tissues were used first to confirm the loss of motor neurons using Nissl staining, which was accompanied by glial reactivity (elevated GFAP and Iba-1 immunoreactivity). Next, we investigated possible differences in the expression of endocannabinoid genes measured by qPCR between DM-affected and control dogs. We found no changes in the CB1 receptor (also found with CB1 receptor immunostaining) as well as in NAPE-PLD, DAGL, FAAH and MAGL enzymes. In contrast, CB2 receptor levels were significantly elevated in DM-affected dogs determined by qPCR and Western-blotting, results reconfirmed in the grey matter using CB2 receptor immunostaining. Using double-labelling immunofluorescence, CB2 receptor immunolabelling co-localized with GFAP but not Iba-1, indicating up-regulation of CB2 receptors on astrocytes in DM-affected dogs. In summary, our results demonstrated a marked up-regulation of CB2 receptors occurring in the spinal cord in canine DM, which was concentrated in activated astrocytes. Such receptors may be used as a potential target to enhance the neuroprotective effects exerted by these glial cells.

  12. Modulatory effects of curcumin on apoptosis and cytotoxicity-related molecules in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) patients.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Asadollah; Fazeli, Bahare; Taheri, Marzieh; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Poursina, Zohreh; Vakili, Vida; Yazdi, Shadi Zamanian; Keramati, Zahra; Boostani, Reza; Hampson, Ian; Rafatpanah, Houshang

    2017-01-01

    Apoptosis is a universal cellular defense mechanism against viral infection. Curcumin, an anti-inflammatory phytochemical, induces apoptosis through mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways, as well as activation of caspase cascades. Here, we investigated the impact of supplementation with curcumin on the expression of a panel of apoptosis- and cytotoxicity-related genes in patients suffering from HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a progressive demyelinating neuroinflammatory disease caused by HTLV-1 infection. Twenty-one HAM/TSP patients enrolled in this study. Curcumin nanomicelles (80mg/day, orally) were administered once a day for 12 weeks. The mRNA levels of total Fas (tFas), membrane-bound Fas (mFas), Fas-Ligand (FasL), TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), perforin, granzyme A, granzyme B and granulysin were analyzed before and after treatment in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Protein levels of Fas, FasL, TRAIL and granulysin were also measured in serum using ELISA. Curcumin supplementation inhibited FasL mRNA production and up-regulated the expression of pro-apoptotic molecules granzyme A (at the mRNA level) and granulysin (at the protein level), suggesting degranulation of granulysin-bearing cells following curcumin supplementation. Conversely, Curcumin did not affect Fas, TRAIL, perforin, granzyme B at the mRNA level, and anti-apoptotic molecules sFas, sFasL and sTRAIL at the protein level. The present results suggest that curcumin supplementation increases cytotoxicity-related molecules granzyme A and granulysin in patients with HAM/TSP.

  13. Ultrastructural pathology of a Chilean case of tropical spastic paraparesis/human T-cell lymphotropic type I-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM).

    PubMed

    Liberski, P P; Buczyński, J; Yanagihara, R; Mora, C; Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, C; Cartier, L; Verdugo, A; Araya, F; Castillo, L

    1999-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I), is the cause of endemic tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) or HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (HAM). Because TSP/HAM is not a fatal disease, the neuropathology of this disease, albeit relatively well understood, is based on the examination of just a few incidental cases. Previously, we demonstrated peculiar lamellated structures, called "multilamellar bodies" (MLB). In this report, we present the ultrastructural neuropathology of a TSP/HAM case from Chile, with further detailed descriptions of MLB. It is tempting to suggest that MLB may represent specific ultrastructural markers of TSP/HAM. The pathology of the anterior and posterior horns was similar and was comprised of axonal degeneration, accompanied by extensive astrocytic gliosis. Lymphocytic infiltration, particularly observed as "cuffs" around blood vessels, was scattered among other cellular elements. Ultrastructurally, myelin sheaths were relatively well preserved, and some demyelinated but not remyelinated fibers were observed. Moreover, axons with abnormal accumulations of neurofilaments, suggestive of axonal degeneration, were detected. Several axons contained Hirano bodies. In many samples, glial processes replaced most of the remaining neuropil. In a few specimens of the anterior and posterior horns of the spinal cord, MLB were observed. These structures consisted of stacks of 30 to 40 electron-dense lamellae, which were interrupted by narrow electron-lucent spaces. All of the lamellae were immersed within an amorphous substance of intermediate density. Neurons of the dorsal root ganglia were basically normal except for increased lipofuscin accumulation. As in the spinal cord, myelinated axons were well preserved, but a few were demyelinated and surrounded by concentric arrays of Schwann cell membranes. Also, axons of the dorsal roots accumulated increased number of neurofilaments. Mast cells and Schwann cells were increased in number, the latter

  14. Cervical Cancer Working Group report.

    PubMed

    Konno, Ryo; Sagae, Satoru; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Basu, Partha Sarathi; Hanley, Sharon J B; Tan, Jeffrey H J; Shin, Hai-Rim

    2010-09-01

    Disease burden of cervical cancer in Asia was summarized. Human papillomavirus 16 is the most oncogenic human papillomavirus type. Korea's national cervical cancer screening program targets women aged 30 or over, with coverage of almost 80%. Japan has a long history (50 years) of cervical cancer screening, and cytological screening programs have reduced the incidence/mortality of cervical cancer by 70%. But, recent cervical cancer screening coverage is ∼24%. Modeling suggested that vaccination of all 12-year-old girls would reduce cervical cancer cases by 73% in Japan. India has no cervical cancer screening program, as well as a serious lack of awareness in the general population, medical professionals and policy-makers. A realistic, affordable approach would be a low-volume, once-in-a-lifetime human papillomavirus-based screening program. In Australia, the national cervical cancer program has been very successful in reducing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer. Australia was the first country to implement free, national human papillomavirus immunization (April 2007), expected to reduce human papillomavirus 16 infections by 56% in 2010 and 92% in 2050. A comparison of the UK and Japan was demonstrated that in the UK, cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus vaccination uptakes are high because the government provides adequate education/funding. The Japanese government needs to put more emphasis on women's health and preventative medicine. Our conclusion and recommendations are that heightened public awareness of cervical cancer prevention, focusing on screening and vaccination will lead to improved survival and a better quality of life.

  15. Cervical disc herniation as a trigger for temporary cervical cord ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Güliz; Schneider, Ulf C.; Grozdanovic, Zarko; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Disc herniations are only reported in few case reports as a rare cause of acute spinal ischemia. A surgical treatment has not been described so far in these reports with analysis of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI/MRI) before and after surgery. The aim of our study is to report a case of cervical spinal cord ischemia caused by cervical disc herniation and discuss the literature concerning diagnostic and treatment options. Methods A 72-year-old female patient developed an acute progressive tetraparesis with emphasis on the upper extremities. MRI showed a disc herniation at the cervical segment 5/6 (C5/6) with consecutive spinal canal stenosis and additional signs of spinal cord ischemia in T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and DWI reaching from C3 to C5 level. With the MRI being highly suggestive for anterior spinal cord ischemia, we hypothesized that this might be caused by compression of the anterior spinal artery through the significant disc herniation. Therefore, we decided to perform an anterior discectomy and fusion at C5/6 level. Results Following surgery, the patient’s symptoms showed immediate regression with complete recovery after two months in correspondence with the normalization in the control MRI scan of cervical cord. Conclusions Assumedly our patient suffered from a partial anterior spinal artery syndrome, possibly caused by a disc herniation-related compression that was reversible following surgery. This was accompanied by a complete resolution of spinal cord signal abnormalities in T2WI and DWI. PMID:27683710

  16. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  17. [Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Gutiérrez, Mario H; Sánchez-Corona, José; García-Ortiz, José E; Castañeda-Cisneros, Gema; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory O; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; García-Cruz, Diana

    2016-10-01

    The non-syndromic anterior cervical hypertrichosis (OMIM N° 600457) is a genetic disorder characterized by a patch of hair at the level of the laryngeal prominence. We present a 12-year-old boy with anterior cervical hypertrichosis and mild generalized hypertrichosis. He has no neurological, ophthalmological or skeletal anomalies. The clinical follow up is 10 years.

  18. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, Emma J; Einstein, Mark H; Franceschi, Silvia; Kitchener, Henry C

    2013-09-07

    Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus infection. Most human papillomavirus infection is harmless and clears spontaneously but persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (especially type 16) can cause cancer of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and oropharynx. The virus exclusively infects epithelium and produces new viral particles only in fully mature epithelial cells. Human papillomavirus disrupts normal cell-cycle control, promoting uncontrolled cell division and the accumulation of genetic damage. Two effective prophylactic vaccines composed of human papillomavirus type 16 and 18, and human papillomavirus type 16, 18, 6, and 11 virus-like particles have been introduced in many developed countries as a primary prevention strategy. Human papillomavirus testing is clinically valuable for secondary prevention in triaging low-grade cytology and as a test of cure after treatment. More sensitive than cytology, primary screening by human papillomavirus testing could enable screening intervals to be extended. If these prevention strategies can be implemented in developing countries, many thousands of lives could be saved.

  19. Myelopathy mimicking subacute combined degeneration in a Down syndrome patient with methotrexate treatment for B lymphoblastic leukemia: report of an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Satomi, Kaishi; Yoshida, Mari; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Okita, Hajime; Hosoya, Yosuke; Shioda, Yoko; Kumagai, Masa-Aki; Mori, Tetsuya; Morishita, Yukio; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nakazawa, Atsuko

    2014-08-01

    We report clinicopathological features of a 23-year-old woman with Down syndrome (DS) presenting with subacute myelopathy treated with chemotherapy, including intravenous and intrathecal administration of methotrexate (MTX), and with allogenic bone-marrow transplantation for B lymphoblastic leukemia. Autopsy revealed severe demyelinating vacuolar myelopathy in the posterior and lateral columns of the spinal cord, associated with macrophage infiltration, marked axonal loss and some swollen axons. Pathological changes of posterior and lateral columns were observed from the medulla oblongata to lumbar cord. Proximal anterior and posterior roots were preserved. Cerebral white matter was relatively well preserved. There were no vascular lesions or meningeal dissemination of leukemia. Longitudinal extension of cord lesions was extensive, unlike typical cases of subacute combined degeneration (SACD), but distribution of lesions and histological findings were similar to that of SACD. DS patients show heightened sensitivity to MTX because of their genetic background. Risk factors for toxic myelopathy of DS are discussed, including delayed clearance of MTX despite normal renal function, alterations in MTX polyglutamation and enhanced folic acid depletion due to gene dosage effects of chromosome 21. Alteration of folate metabolism and/or vitamin B12 levels through intravenous or intrathecal administration of MTX might exist, although vitamin B12 and other essential nutrients were managed using intravenous hyperalimentation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an autopsy case that shows myelopathy mimicking SACD in a DS patient accompanied by B lymphoblastic leukemia. The case suggests a pathophysiological mechanism of MTX-related myelopathy in DS patients with B lymphoblastic leukemia mimicking SACD.

  20. Fra-1 is downregulated in cervical cancer tissues and promotes cervical cancer cell apoptosis by p53 signaling pathway in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Songshu; Zhou, Yanhong; Yi, Wei; Luo, Guijuan; Jiang, Bin; Tian, Qi; Li, Yueran; Xue, Min

    2015-04-01

    Cervical cancer is a potentially preventable disease; however, it is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide. Cervical cancer is thought to develop through a multistep process involving virus, tumor suppressor genes, proto-oncogenes and immunological factors. It is known that human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is necessary but insufficient to cause malignancy. At present, the etiology of cervical carcinoma remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that the expression of FOS-like antigen-1 (Fra-1) gene was downregulated in cervical cancer compared with the adjacent non-cancerous tissues by RT-qPCR, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and western blotting techniques. To uncover the effect of Fra-1 on cervical cancer, we tested and confirmed that Fra-1 significantly inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells by MMT assays in vitro. At the same time, overexpression of Fra-1 promoted apoptosis of HeLa cells. To explore the possible mechanism of Fra-1 in cervical cancer, we tested the expression levels of key molecules in p53 signaling pathway by western blotting technology. The results showed that p53 was downregulated in cervical cancer compared with the adjacent non-cancerous tissues, but MDM2 proto-oncogene, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (MDM2) was upregulated in cervical cancer. In vitro, the p53 was upregulated and MDM2 was downregulated in HeLa cells with Fra-1 overexpression. In summary, our results suggested that Fra-1 expression is low in cervical cancer tissues and promotes apoptosis of cervical cancer cells by p53 signaling pathway.

  1. Distribution of HPV Genotypes and Involvement of Risk Factors in Cervical Lesions and Invasive Cervical Cancer: A Study in an Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shikha; Shahi, U P; Dibya, Arti; Gupta, Sadhana; Roy, Jagat K

    2014-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is considered as the main sexually transmitted etiological agent for the cause and progression of preneoplastic cervical lesions to cervical cancer. This study is discussing the prevalence of HPV and its genotypes in cervical lesions and invasive cervical cancer tissues and their association with various risk factors in women from Varanasi and its adjoining areas in India. A total of 122 cervical biopsy samples were collected from SS Hospital and Indian Railways Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Varanasi and were screened for HPV infection by PCR using primers from L1 consensus region of the viral genome. HPV positive samples were genotyped by type-specific PCR and sequencing. The association of different risk factors with HPV infection in various grades of cervical lesion was evaluated by chi-square test. A total of 10 different HPV genotypes were observed in women with cervicitis, CIN, invasive squamous cell cervical carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Increased frequency of HPV infection with increasing lesion grade (p=0.002) was observed. HPV16 being the predominant type was found significantly associated with severity of the disease (p=0.03). Various socio- demographic factors other than HPV including high parity (p<0.0001), rural residential area (p<0.0001), elder age (p<0.0001), low socio-economic status (p<0.0001) and women in postmenopausal group (p<0.0001) were also observed to be associated with cervical cancer.These findings show HPV as a direct cause of cervical cancer suggesting urgent need of screening programs and HPV vaccination in women with low socio-economic status and those residing in rural areas. PMID:25035855

  2. Full-endoscopic technique for anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion: 5-year follow-up results of 67 cases.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nuzhao; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Lushan

    2011-06-01

    With minimally invasive technique becoming more popular, endoscopic operations such as arthroscopy or laparoscopy have become the standard of care in several other areas. In this study, we evaluated the 5-year follow-up outcomes of anterior cervical (Ahn et al. in Photomed Laser Surg 23:362-368, 2005) discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) performed via endoscopic approach. Sixty-seven patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and cage fusion performed using endoscopic technique were followed for at least 5 years. We reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of these patients. The postoperative radiographic measures accessed were the anterior intervertebral height (AIH) and the lordosis angle (LDA). Clinical outcomes were determined using the previously validated Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) and the pain visual analog scale (VAS). Patients included had a minimal follow-up period of 5 years and based on the outcomes criteria (JOA, VAS), 86.6% of patients reported excellent or good results. The AIH increased on average 18.7% of the original height (p < 0.01), and the LDA were more physiologic at final follow-up. Of the 67 cases, there was no segmental instability, and the bone fusion rate was 100%. One patient required revision open ACDF due to adjacent segment disc herniation 6 years postoperatively. There were no intraoperative complications, dysphasia or esophageal injury in this study group. It indicated endoscopic technique for ACDF can obtain satisfactory results in patients with cervical disc herniation, cervical myelopathy, or radiculopathy. Compared with a traditional approach, this technique may be associated with less morbidity while improving cosmesis and postoperative recovery. Prospective randomized control trials are needed to directly compare these two procedures.

  3. Chlamydia trachomatis cervicitis in gynecologic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Ripa, K T; Svensson, L; Mårdh, P A; Weström, L

    1978-12-01

    Symptoms suggestive of a lower genital tract infection (LGTI) are common complaints in women who consult gynecologists. Sexually transmitted microorganisms, such as Chlamydia trachomatis. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis, are responsible for a substantial proportion of LGTI. This study was performed to establish the frequency of LGTI caused by C trachomatis in women attending a gynecologic outpatient clinic. Of 170 women with LGTI, 32.9% harbored one or more of these organisms: C trachomatis was found in 19.3%, N gonorrhoeae in 4.7%, and T vaginalis in 25.9%. The results of the isolation studies were correlated with clinical signs and symptoms. In women under 25 years of age, chlamydial cervicitis was found significantly more often in users of oral contraceptives than in nonusers. In women not taking such drugs, cervical erosion was found more often in Chlamydia-positive than Chlamydia-negative women. Since clinical examination failed to reveal any characteristic signs in cases of chlamydial infection, it was not possible to distinguish a chlamydial from a gonococcal infection. This study also reports the successful treatment of 15 women affected by chlamydial cervicitis with doxycycline or trimethoprim sulphamethoxazole.

  4. Cervical carcinoma: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Cowan, M E; Skinner, G R

    1988-01-01

    A mouse model system was used to investigate the preventive efficacy of a subunit herpes simplex virus (HSV) vaccine on the development of HSV induced cervical carcinoma. Ten groups of mice were vaccinated before receiving repeated intravaginal exposure to HSV-type 2 inactivated by ultraviolet irradiation. At 20 months postvaccination, neutralizing antibody activity to herpes simplex viruses was detected in the sera of the mice which had received the highest vaccine dose. Although three experimental mice and one control mouse developed cervical tumours and five mice developed preinvasive malignant changes, 87% of cervices were of normal or koilocytotic appearance on histological examination. There was therefore no evidence from this study that repeated exposure of mouse cervices to inactivated HSV-2 induced a significant incidence of preinvasive or invasive cervical carcinoma.

  5. The cervical cap.

    PubMed

    1988-10-07

    The US Food and Drug Administration has approved marketing of the Prentif cavity-rim cervical cap. This contraceptive device is being distributed in the US and Canada by Cervical Cap Ltd, Los Gatos, California. The Prentif cap is available in 4 sizes: 22, 25, 28, and 31 mm inside diameter, with a length of 1 1/4-1 1/2 inches. In a multicenter trial involving 522 diaphragm users and 581 cap users followed for 2 years, the cap was 82.6% effective and the diaphragm was 83.3% effective in preventing pregnancy. When pregnancies attributable to user failure were excluded, these rates were increased to 93.6% for the cap and 95.4% for the diaphragm. 4% of cap users compared with only 1.7% of diaphragm users in this study developed abnormal Pap smears after 3 months of use; in addition, a higher proportion of cap users became infected with Gardnerella vaginalis and Monilia. Theoretical hazards include toxic shock syndrome and endometriosis due to backflow of menstrual fluids. Cap users are advised to undergo a Pap test after 3 months of use and discontinue cap use if the results are abnormal. The cap should not be used during menstruation. Although the cap can be left in place for up to 48 hours, its position should be checked before and after each episode of intercourse. The cervical cap requires less spermicide than the diaphragm and is not as messy. In addition, it can be left in the vagina twice as long as the diaphragm, without additional spermicide. Since the cap is smaller than the diaphragm and does not cover the vaginal wall, some women find intercourse more pleasurable with this device.

  6. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine A A A What's in this article? What ... Radiografía: columna cervical What It Is A cervical spine X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  7. [Subcutaneous cervical emphysema secondary to tooth extraction].

    PubMed

    Calvo Boizas, E; Sancipriano Hernández, J A; Rincón Esteban, L; Diego Pérez, C; Santiago Andrés, J; Hermosa Finamor, P; Gómez Toranzo, F

    1997-01-01

    Cervical emphysema is rare and its diagnosis involves the ENT specialist. A case of cervical subcutaneous emphysema secondary to lower molar extraction is reported. The patient had no signs or symptoms other than cervical emphysema. Simple radiography and CT are recommended for early diagnosis. The etiopathogenic mechanisms of subcutaneous cervical emphysema are reviewed. Recent literature contains few cases of dental origin.

  8. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine Print A A A What's in this article? ... Radiografía: columna cervical What It Is A cervical spine X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  9. Lysophosphatidic Acid Inhibits Apoptosis Induced by Cisplatin in Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yanxia; Yang, Ya; Wang, Ji; Li, Yi; Ma, Hongbing; Cai, Hui; Liu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Shufeng; Li, Zongfang; Zhang, Xiaozhi; Wang, Jiansheng; Liu, Rui; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Shi, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Ren, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) level has been found significantly increased in the serum of patients with ovarian, cervical, and colon cancers. LPA level in cervical cancer patients is significantly higher than in healthy controls. LPA receptors were found highly expressed in cervical cancer cells, suggesting LPA may play a role in the development of cervical cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of LPA on the apoptosis induced by cisplatin (DDP) in cervical cancer cell line and the underlying changes in signaling pathways. Our study found that cisplatin induced apoptosis of Hela cell through inhibiting expression of Bcl-2, upregulating the expression of Bax, Fas-L, and the enzyme activity of caspase-3 (p < 0.05); LPA significantly provided protection against the apoptosis induced by cisplatin by inhibiting the above alterations in apoptotic factor caused by cisplatin (p < 0.05). Moreover, PI3K/AKT pathway was found to be important for the LPA antiapoptosis effect, and administration of PI3K/AKT partially reversed the LPA-mediated protection against cisplatin-induced apoptosis (p < 0.05). These findings have shed new lights on the LPA bioactivity in cervical cancer cells and pointed to a possible sensitization scheme through combined administration of PI3K inhibitor and cisplatin for better treatment of cervical cancer patients, especially those with elevated LPA levels. PMID:26366416

  10. CLDN1 expression in cervical cancer cells is related to tumor invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-li; Hu, Zheng; Zhu, Da; Ding, Wen-cheng; Liu, Dan; Li, Ke-zhen; Ma, Ding; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Even though infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV) is very important, it is not the sole cause of cervical cancer. Because it is known that genetic variations that result from HPV infection are probably the most important causes of cervical cancer, we used human whole genome array comparative genomic hybridization to detect the copy number variations of genes in cervical squamous cell carcinoma. The results of the array were validated by PCR, FISH and immunohistochemistry. We find that the copy number and protein expression of claudin-1 (CLDN1) increase with the progression of cervical cancer. The strong positive staining of CLDN1 in the cervical lymph node metastasis group received a significantly higher score than the staining in the group with no lymph node metastasis of cervical cancer tissues. The overexpression of CLDN1 in SiHa cells can increase anti-apoptosis ability and promote invasive ability of these cells accompanied by a decrease in expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin as well as an increase in the expression of the mesenchymal marker vimentin. CLDN1 induces the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through its interaction with SNAI1. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CLDN1 overexpression has significant effects on the growth and metastasis of xenografted tumors in athymic mice. These data suggest that CLDN1 promotes invasion and metastasis in cervical cancer cells via the expression of EMT/invasion-related genes. Therefore, CLDN1 could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:27974683

  11. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients.

  12. The EXIT for Prenatally Diagnosed Cervical Cystic Teratoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cansaran, Sabri; Cerrah Celayir, Ayşenur; Moralıoğlu, Serdar; Ayvacı, Habibe; Tuğrul, Semih; Ovalı, Fahri; Çetiner, Handan

    2015-01-01

    The Ex-utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) is a procedure performed during caesarean section while on fetal-placental circulation. We present a prenatally diagnosed cervical cystic mass causing tracheal compression which was managed successfully with the EXIT procedure.

  13. Health systems challenges in cervical cancer prevention program in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Maseko, Fresier C.; Chirwa, Maureen L.; Muula, Adamson S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death among women in sub-Saharan Africa. In Malawi, very few women have undergone screening and the incidence of cervical cancer is on the increase as is the case in most developing countries. We aimed at exploring and documenting health system gaps responsible for the poor performance of the cervical cancer prevention program in Malawi. Design The study was carried out in 14 randomly selected districts of the 29 districts of Malawi. All cervical cancer service providers in these districts were invited to participate. Two semi-structured questionnaires were used, one for the district cervical cancer coordinators and the other for the service providers. The themes of both questionnaires were based on World Health Organization (WHO) health system frameworks. A checklist was also developed to audit medical supplies and equipment in the cervical cancer screening facilities. The two questionnaires together with the medical supplies and equipment checklist were piloted in Chikwawa district before being used as data collection tools in the study. Quantitative data were analyzed using STATA and qualitative in NVIVO. Results Forty-one service providers from 21 health facilities and 9 district coordinators participated in the study. Our findings show numerous health system challenges mainly in areas of health workforce and essential medical products and technologies. Seven out of the 21 health facilities provided both screening and treatment. Results showed challenges in the management of the cervical cancer program at district level; inadequate service providers who are poorly supervised; lack of basic equipment and stock-outs of basic medical supplies in some health facilities; and inadequate funding of the program. In most of the health facilities, services providers were not aware of the policy which govern their work and that they did not have standards and guidelines for cervical cancer screening and

  14. Differences between Cervical Schwannomas of the Anterior and Posterior Nerve Roots in Relation to the Incidence of Postoperative Radicular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Ninomiya, Koshi; Moriwaki, Takashi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose To assess the case files of patients who underwent surgery for cervical dumbbell schwannoma for determining the differences between schwannomas of the anterior and posterior nerve roots with respect to the incidence of postoperative radicular dysfunction. Overview of Literature The spinal roots giving origin to schwannoma are frequently nonfunctional, but there is a risk of postoperative neurological deficit once these roots are resected during surgery. Methods Fifteen patients with cervical dumbbell schwannomas were treated surgically. Ten men and 5 women, who were 35-79 years old (mean age, 61.5 years), presented with neck pain (n=6), radiculopathy (n=10), and myelopathy (n=11). Results Fourteen patients underwent gross total resection and exhibited no recurrence. Follow-ups were performed for a period of 6-66 months (mean, 28 months). Preoperative symptoms resolved in 11 patients (73.3%) but they persisted partially in 4 patients (26.7%). Six patients had tumors of anterior nerve root origin, and 9 patients had tumors of posterior nerve root origin. Two patients who underwent total resection of anterior nerve root tumors (33.3%) displayed minor postoperative motor weakness. One patient who underwent total resection of a posterior nerve root tumor (11.1%) showed postoperative numbness. Conclusions Appropriate tumor removal improved the neurological symptoms. In this study, the incidence of radicular dysfunction was higher in patients who underwent resection of anterior nerve root tumors than in patients who underwent resection of posterior nerve root tumors. PMID:25901239

  15. Trends in cervical cancer mortality in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Robles, S C; White, F; Peruga, A

    1996-12-01

    This article presents an assessment of cervical cancer mortality trends in the Americas based on PAHO data. Trends were estimated for countries where data were available for at least 10 consecutive years, the number of cervical cancer deaths was considerable, and at least 75% of the deaths from all causes were registered. In contrast to Canada and the United States, whose general populations had been screened for many years and where cervical cancer mortality has declined steadily (to about 1.4 and 1.7 deaths per 100,000 women, respectively, as of 1990), most Latin American and Caribbean countries with available data have experienced fairly constant levels of cervical cancer mortality (typically in the range of 5-6 deaths per 100,000 women). In addition, several other countries (Chile, Costa Rica, and Mexico) have exhibited higher cervical cancer mortality as well as a number of noteworthy changes in this mortality over time. Overall, while actual declining trends could be masked by special circumstances in some countries, cervical cancer mortality has not declined in Latin America as it has in developed countries. Correlations between declining mortality and the intensity of screening in developed countries suggest that a lack of screening or screening program shortcomings in Latin America could account for this. Among other things, where large-scale cervical cancer screening efforts have been instituted in Latin America and Caribbean, these efforts have generally been linked to family planning and prenatal care programs serving women who are typically under 30; while the real need is for screening of older women who are at substantially higher risk.

  16. Roles of plant extracts and constituents in cervical cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kma, Lakhan

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major health problem worldwide and is the most frequent cause of cancer in women in India. Early detection and affordable drugs with clinical efficacy have to go hand-in-hand in order to comprehensibly address this serious health challenge. Plant-based drugs with potent anticancer effects should add to the efforts to find a cheap drug with limited clinical side effects. Keeping this very purpose in mind, an attempt has been made in this review to explore the potential of plant extracts or constituents known to exhibit antitumorigenic activity or exert cytotoxic effect in human cervical carcinoma cells. Alkaloids such as those isolated from C. vincetoxicum and T. Tanakae, naucleaorals A and B, isolated from the roots of N. orientalis, (6aR)-normecambroline, isolated from the bark of N. dealbata appear promising in different human cervical carcinoma cells with the IC50 of 4.0-8 μg/mL. However, other compounds such as rhinacanthone and neolignans isolated from different plants are not far behind and kill cervical cancer cells at a very low concentrations. Among plant extracts or its constituents that enhance the effect of known anticancer drugs, noni, derived from the plant M. citrifolia perhaps is the best candidate. The cytotoxic potency and apoptotic index of cisplatin was found to significantly enhanced in combination with noni in different human cervical carcinoma cells and it therefore holds significance as promising herbal-based anticancer agent. However, efficacy needs to be further investigated in various cervical cell lines and more importantly, in in vivo cervical cancer models for possible use as an alternative and safe anticancer drug.

  17. Role of Cervical Cerclage and Vaginal Progesterone in the Treatment of Cervical Incompetence with/without Preterm Birth History

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shao-Wei; Ma, Lin-Lin; Huang, Shuai; Liang, Lin; Zhang, Jun-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide, and its prevention is an important health-care priority. The cervical incompetence is a well-known risk factor for PTB and its incidence is about 0.1–2.0%, while there is no ideal optimum treatment recommended currently. The cervical incompetence causes about 15% of habitual abortion in 16–28 weeks. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of cervical cerclage and vaginal progesterone in the treatment of cervical incompetence with/without PTB history. Methods: We retrospectively observed the pregnancy outcome of 198 patients diagnosed with cervical incompetence from January 2010 to October 2015 in Beijing Hospital. Among the 198 women involved, women who had at least one PTB before 32 weeks (including abortion in the second trimester attributed to the cervical competence) were assigned to the PTB history cohort, and others were assigned to the non-PTB history cohort. All women underwent cerclage placement (cervical cerclage group) or administrated with vaginal progesterone (vaginal progesterone group) until delivery. The outcomes of interest were the differences in gestational age at delivery, the rate of premature delivery, neonatal outcome, complications, and route of delivery between the two treatment groups. Results: Among the 198 patients with cervical incompetence, 116 patients in PTB history cohort and 80 patients in non-PTB history cohort were included in the final analysis. In the PTB history cohort, cervical cerclage group had significantly longer cervical length at 2 weeks after the start of treatment (23.1 ± 4.6 mm vs. 12.4 ± 9.1 mm, P = 0.002), higher proportion of delivery ≥37 weeks’ gestation (63.4% vs. 33.3%, P = 0.008), bigger median birth weight (2860 g vs. 2250 g, P = 0.031), and lower proportion of neonates whose 1-min Apgar score <7 (5.9% vs. 33.3%, P = 0.005), compared with vaginal progesterone group. No significant

  18. Interscapular pharyngocutaneous fistula: an extreme complication of cervical stabilization surgery.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Hakan; Saylam, Guleser; Bayir, Omer; Tatar, Emel Cadalli; Ozdek, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Pharyngeal and esophageal perforations are rare during cervical spine surgery but can cause significant morbidity. Pharyngeal or eosephageal perforations can occur by several mechanisms and the management of pharyngeal or eosephageal perforation's treatment may become difficult. We report a 41-year-old paraplegic man with an interscapular pharyngocutaneous fistula secondary to cervical vertebral surgery. The diagnosis of posterior fistula was delayed for several months as it was an extremely rare complication. We explored the anterior neck and repaired the perforation on the right pyriform sinus primarily. The fistula tract on the back of the patient was completely healed and the patient started oral feeding in the second week after surgery.

  19. Primary herpes simplex virus infection mimicking cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Andrew; White, Catherine; Higgins, Stephen Peter

    2015-06-02

    We report the case of an 18-year-old woman presenting with ulceration of the cervix caused by primary type 2 herpes simplex infection in the absence of skin lesions. The differential diagnosis included cervical cancer and we referred the patient for urgent colposcopy. However, laboratory tests proved the viral aetiology of the cervical ulceration and the cervix had healed completely 3 weeks later. The case highlights the need to consider herpes simplex infection in the differential diagnosis of ulceration of the cervix even when there are no cutaneous signs of herpes.

  20. Effect of pillow height on the biomechanics of the head-neck complex: investigation of the cranio-cervical pressure and cervical spine alignment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background While appropriate pillow height is crucial to maintaining the quality of sleep and overall health, there are no universal, evidence-based guidelines for pillow design or selection. We aimed to evaluate the effect of pillow height on cranio-cervical pressure and cervical spine alignment. Methods Ten healthy subjects (five males) aged 26 ± 3.6 years were recruited. The average height, weight, and neck length were 167 ± 9.3 cm, 59.6 ± 11.9 kg, and 12.9 ± 1.2 cm respectively. The subjects lay on pillows of four different heights (H0, 110 mm; H1, 130 mm; H2, 150 mm; and H3, 170 mm). The cranio-cervical pressure distribution over the pillow was recorded; the peak and average pressures for each pillow height were compared by one-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Cervical spine alignment was studied using a finite element model constructed based on data from the Visible Human Project. The coordinate of the center of each cervical vertebra were predicted for each pillow height. Three spine alignment parameters (cervical angle, lordosis distance and kyphosis distance) were identified. Results The average cranial pressure at pillow height H3 was approximately 30% higher than that at H0, and significantly different from those at H1 and H2 (p < 0.05). The average cervical pressure at pillow height H0 was 65% lower than that at H3, and significantly different from those at H1 and H2 (p < 0.05). The peak cervical pressures at pillow heights H2 and H3 were significantly different from that at H0 (p < 0.05). With respect to cervical spine alignment, raising pillow height from H0 to H3 caused an increase of 66.4% and 25.1% in cervical angle and lordosis distance, respectively, and a reduction of 43.4% in kyphosis distance. Discussion Pillow height elevation significantly increased the average and peak pressures of the cranial and cervical regions, and increased the extension and lordosis of the cervical spine. The cranio-cervical pressures and cervical spine alignment

  1. [Cervical neuroblastoma in an infant].

    PubMed

    Arvai, Krisztina; Tóth, Judit; Németh, Tamás; Kiss, Csongor; Molnár, Péter; Oláh, Eva

    2004-01-01

    The case of a one-month-old patient admitted to the Department of Pediatrics (Medical and Health Science Center, Debrecen University) because of respiratory distress caused by a cervical mass compressing the upper respiratory pathways is presented. The mass could only be partially removed, the histological diagnosis proved to be neuroblastoma (SBCT: "small blue cell tumor"). Despite the fact that the DNA index of tumor cells (ploidy measurements) and the age of the patient suggested a favourable prognosis, the tumor continued to grow and metastases appeared. Because of symptoms of compression exerted on the respiratory system by the tumor, chemotherapy had to be applied. Since a standard OPEC/OJEC chemotherapeutic protocol proved to be not entirely effective and a residual tumor was still present, retinoic acid and interferon treatment was introduced. Presently, 4 years after the diagnosis, the patient is in complete remission and can be considered to be cured. The case presented here demonstrates that despite the favorable prognosis of the majority of infant neuroblastomas, in some cases the anatomic location of the tumor, leading to disturbance of vital functions, may serve as indication of chemotherapy. Our experience also proved the efficacy of retinoic acid and interferon treatment in relapsed neuroblastoma.

  2. Cervical disc arthroplasty with PRESTIGE LP disc versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a prospective, multicenter investigational device exemption study.

    PubMed

    Gornet, Matthew F; Burkus, J Kenneth; Shaffrey, Mark E; Argires, Perry J; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E

    2015-07-31

    OBJECT This study compared the safety and efficacy of treatment with the PRESTIGE LP cervical disc versus a historical control anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). METHODS Prospectively collected PRESTIGE LP data from 20 investigational sites were compared with data from 265 historical control ACDF patients in the initial PRESTIGE Cervical Disc IDE study. The 280 investigational patients with single-level cervical disc disease with radiculopathy and/or myelopathy underwent arthroplasty with a low-profile artificial disc. Key safety/efficacy outcomes included Neck Disability Index (NDI), Neck and Arm Pain Numerical Rating Scale scores, 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) score, work status, disc height, range of motion, adverse events (AEs), additional surgeries, and neurological status. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were completed preoperatively, intraoperatively, and at 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Predefined Bayesian statistical methods with noninformative priors were used, along with the propensity score technique for controlling confounding factors. Analysis by independent statisticians confirmed initial statistical findings. RESULTS The investigational and control groups were mostly similar demographically. There was no significant difference in blood loss (51.0 ml [investigational] vs 57.1 ml [control]) or hospital stay (0.98 days [investigational] vs 0.95 days [control]). The investigational group had a significantly longer operative time (1.49 hours vs 1.38 hours); 95% Bayesian credible interval of the difference was 0.01-0.21 hours. Significant improvements versus preoperative in NDI, neck/arm pain, SF-36, and neurological status were achieved by 1.5 months in both groups and were sustained at 24 months. Patient follow-up at 24 months was 97.1% for the investigational group and 84.0% for the control group. The mean NDI score improvements versus preoperative exceeded 30 points in both groups at 12 and 24 months. SF

  3. Cervical plexus anesthesia versus general anesthesia for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion surgery: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Yang, Dalong; Wang, Tao; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Lijun; Ding, Wenyuan

    2017-02-01

    Both general anesthesia (GA) and cervical plexus anesthesia (CPA) can be used for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of anesthetic techniques on perioperative mortality and morbidity in patients undergoing cervical surgery.From January 2008 to December 2015, 356 patients who underwent 1-level ACDF for cervical spinal myelopathy were prospectively reviewed. They were assigned to receive GA (group A) and CPA (group B). The analgesic efficacy of the block was assessed by anesthesia preparation time, the maximum heart rate, and mean arterial blood pressure changes compared with the baseline, time of postoperative revival, and duration of recovery stay. Duration of surgery, blood loss, and anesthesia medical cost were also recorded. Numerical rating scale (NRS) was used to evaluate pain at different time points. Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) was assessed, and postoperative average administered dosages of meperidine and metoclopramide were also recorded. The spinal surgeon satisfaction, anesthetist satisfaction, and patient satisfaction were assessed.Both the anesthesia induction time and postoperative revival time were longer in group A than that in group B; both the duration of surgery and recovery stay were also longer in group A than that in group B, whereas there was no difference in blood loss between the 2 groups. The average dosage of both meperidine and metoclopramide was more in group A than that in group B, and the anesthesia medical cost was greater in group A than that in group B. There were no significant differences in baseline data of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate between the 2 groups. But the intraoperative data of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were higher/larger in group B than that in group A. In group A, there was no complaint of pain in the surgery procedure, but the pain increased after GA, with

  4. Cervical Disc Arthroplasty with Prestige LP Disc Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: Seven-Year Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Burkus, J. Kenneth; Shaffrey, Mark E.; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has emerged as an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of cervical pathologies. Studies are on-going to assess the long term outcomes of CDA. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of the Prestige® LP Disc at 84-months follow up. Methods Prospective data from 280 CDA patients with single-level cervical disc disease with radiculopathy or myelopathy were compared with 265 historical control ACDF patients. Clinical and radiographic follow up was completed pre-operatively, intraoperatively, and at intervals up to 84 months. Results Follow-up rate was 75.9% for CDA and 70.0% for ACDF patients. Statistical improvements (p < 0.001) in Neck Disability Index (NDI), neck/arm pain, and SF-36 were achieved by 1.5 months in both groups and maintained through 84 months. At 84 months, 86.1% of CDA versus 80.1% of ACDF patients achieved NDI success, (≥15-point improvement over baseline). Mean NDI score improvements exceeded 30 points in both groups. SF-36 PCS/MCS mean improvements were 13.1±11.9/8.2±12.3 points for CDA and 10.7±11.8/8.3±13.6 points for ACDF. Neurological success was 92.8% for CDA and 79.7% for ACDF patients. The rate of Overall Success was 74.9% for CDA and 63.2% for ACDF. At 84 months, 17.5% of CDA and 16.6% of ACDF patients had a possibly implant- or implant-surgical procedure-related adverse event. Eighteen (6.4%) CDA and 29 (10.9%) ACDF patients had a second surgery at the index level. In CDA patients, mean angular motion at the target level was maintained at 24 (7.5°) and 84 (6.9°) months. Bridging bone was reported in 5.9%/9.5%/10.2%/13.0% of CDA patients at 24/36/60/84 months. Change in mean preoperative angulation of the adjacent segment above/below the index level was1.06±4.39/1.25±4.06 for CDA and (-0.23)±5.37/1.25±5.07 for ACDF patients. At 84 months, 90.9% of CDA and 85.6% of ACDF patients were satisfied with the results of their treatment

  5. Impact of 2-, 4- and 9-valent HPV vaccines on morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Luckett, Rebecca; Feldman, Sarah

    2016-06-02

    Cervical cancer causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Most cervical cancers are associated with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV), and vaccination with any of 3 available HPV vaccines is anticipated to greatly reduce the burden of cervical cancer. This review provides an overview of the burden of HPV, the efficacy and clinical effectiveness of the bivalent (HPV 16, 18), quadrivalent (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18) and 9vHPV (HPV 6, 11, 16, 1831, 33, 45, 52, 58) vaccines in order to assess the anticipated impact on cervical cancer. All three vaccines show high efficacy in prevention of vaccine-specific HPV-type infection and associated high-grade cervical dysplasia in HPV-naïve women. Early clinical effectiveness data for the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccine demonstrate reduced rates of HPV 16 and 18 prevalence in vaccinated cohorts; data evaluating cervical dysplasia and cervical procedures as outcomes will shed further light on the clinical effectiveness of both vaccines. The bivalent vaccine has demonstrated cross-protection to non-vaccine HPV types, including the types in the 9vHPV vaccine. No clinical effectiveness data is yet available for the 9vHPV vaccine.  While HPV vaccination has great promise to reduce cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, estimated benefits are largely theoretical at present. Large population-based clinical effectiveness studies will provide long-term immunogenicity and effectiveness, as well as assessment of cervical cancer as an endpoint, particularly as young vaccinated women enter the appropriate age range to initiate screening for cervical cancer. Strengthening screening and treatment programs will likely have the greatest impact in the short-term on cervical cancer morbidity and mortality.

  6. Carcinoma of the cervical esophagus: diagnosis, management, and results

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.J.; Harris, A.; Gillette, A.; Munoz, L.; Kashima, H.

    1984-11-01

    Nine of 168 patients (5.3%) with carcinoma of the esophagus had primary tumors in the cervical esophagus. The principal symptoms and signs of carcinoma of the cervical esophagus were dysphagia, hoarseness, neck mass, and weight loss. The esophagogram was a very reliable study, revealing the abnormality in all nine patients. The true extent of the disease was better delineated by computerized tomography which demonstrated not only the intraluminal mass but also the extraesophageal spread. Endoscopic examination of the cervical esophagus was the definitive procedure to establish the diagnosis. All nine patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy, three surviving two to five years. The major cause of death was the failure to control local disease. 14 references, 3 tables.

  7. Cervical Cancer Along with Unknown Cirrhosis: A Misdiagnosed Case

    PubMed Central

    Aminimoghaddam, Soheila; Mahmoudzadeh, Fatemeh; Maghsoudnia, Andisheh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Vaginal bleeding and vaginal discharge are the most common symptoms. Although ascites has been reported in cases with cervical cancer, it is due to other causes such as ovarian metastasis. Case Presentation: A 78-year-old diabetic woman who presented with ascites and abdominopelvic mass was misdiagnosed with ovarian cancer and treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical hysterectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. However, pathology confirmed locally advanced cervical cancer stage IV in this patient. She was discharged from the hospital three weeks after surgery with no serious complications. Discussion: Considering all signs and symptoms to reach a verdict would reduce such malpractices and consequently lead to select the best management and treatment. PMID:26913238

  8. The epidemiology of hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertesteanu, SVG; Mirea, D; Grigore, R; Ionescu, D; Popescu, B

    2010-01-01

    At the beginning of the 21st century hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer represents a major issue for all countries of the world. The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer deals with the spread of the disease in human population in regards to sex, age, profession, time and space, as well as risk factors that contribute to these phenomena. The main goal is to investigate the causes and the factors involved in the development of the tumors at the pharyngo–esophageal junction, knowledge that contributes to latest therapeutic assessment through interdisciplinary collaboration (E.N.T. surgeon, general surgeon, radiation oncologist, chemotherapist, nutritionist). The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer includes three major areas of interest: descriptive (the study of the spread in mass population), analytical (the study of causal risk factors on the disease) and experimental (that verifies by experiments on animals the prior identified hypothesis). PMID:21254737

  9. Paraplegia by acute cervical disc protrusion after lumbar spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Huan; Hui, Yu-Ling; Yu, Chong-Ming; Niu, Chi-Chien; Lui, Ping-Wing

    2005-04-01

    Non-traumatic paraplegia caused by herniation of the cervical intervertebral disc is an uncommon postoperative complication. A patient with claudication and radiculopathy was scheduled for lumbar laminectomy due to spinal stenosis. Postoperatively, numbness below T6 was found in his both legs of the patient. MRI showed a protruded intervertebral disc between C6 and C7. Despite urgent disectomy, the patient's lower extremities remained paralyzed without significant improvement for 3 months. Loss of muscle support during general anesthesia, excessive neck extension during endotracheal intubation and positioning, as well as bucking and agitation are believed as triggering factors for the protrusion of the cervical disc. We suggest that a complete history taking and physical examination be accomplished in patients scheduled for lumbar spine surgery in order to exclude coexisting cervical spine disorders. In addition, skillful endotracheal intubation and careful neck positioning are mandatory for patients receiving surgery in the prone position.

  10. Young women's perspectives on cervical cancer prevention in Appalachian Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Head, Katharine J; Cohen, Elisia L

    2012-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coupled with routine Papanicolaou (Pap) tests can prevent pervasive HPV infections causing cervical cancer. However, both HPV vaccination rates and Pap testing rates in Appalachian Kentucky are lower among all age groups than the rest of the United States. We recruited 19 young women residing in Appalachian Kentucky from university-based and rural clinical settings for group and individual interviews. After considering an integrated behavioral framework, we illustrate these women's perspectives by detailing five themes, including (a) experiential beliefs pose barriers to performing behaviors, (b) three vaccine doses complicate vaccination intention, (c) women have misunderstandings about HPV and the HPV vaccination function, (d) normative influences cue action (and inaction), and (e) specific environmental and contextual barriers exist to performing cervical cancer prevention behaviors in Appalachian Kentucky. These findings related to cervical cancer prevention in Appalachian Kentucky have implications for health-message design and clinical practice.

  11. Percutaneous techniques for cervical pain of discal origin.

    PubMed

    Gangi, Afshin; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Buy, Xavier; Cabral, Jose Facundo; Garnon, Julien

    2011-04-01

    Cervical discogenic pain is an important cause of suffering and disability in the adult population. Pain management in cervical disc herniation relies initially on conservative care (rest, physiotherapy, and oral medications). Once conservative treatment has failed, different percutaneous minimally invasive radiological procedures can be applied to relief pain. This article offers a systematic review on the percutaneous minimally invasive techniques that can be advocated for the treatment of cervical pain of discal origin. Periradicular steroid injection under image guidance (computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) is the first technique to be considered. The steroid injection aims at reducing the periradicular inflammation and thus relieves the radicular pain. The steroid injections present satisfying short-term results, but pain can recur in the long term. Whenever the steroid injections fail to relieve pain from a contained cervical disc herniation, the more invasive percutaneous disc decompression techniques should be proposed. Percutaneous radiofrequency nucleoplasty is the most often applied technique on the cervical level with a low risk of thermal damage. When the indications and instructions are respected, radiofrequency nucleoplasty presents accepted safety and efficacy levels.

  12. Ursolic acid nanoparticles inhibit cervical cancer growth in vitro and in vivo via apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoguang; Meng, Xiaomei; Dong, Yaozhong

    2017-04-01

    Cervical cancer is a cause of cancer death, making it one of the most common causes of death among women globally. Previously, a variety of studies have revealed the molecular mechanisms by which cervical cancer develops. However, there are still limitations in treatment for cervical cancer. Ursolic acid is a naturally derived pentacyclic triterpene acid, exhibiting broad anticancer effects. Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems have been known to better the bioavailability of drugs on intranasal administration compared with only drug solutions. Administration of ursolic acid nanoparticles is thought to be sufficient to lead to considerable suppression of cervical cancer progression. We loaded gold-ursolic acid into poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles to cervical cancer cell lines due to the properties of ursolic acid in altering cellular processes and the easier absorbance of nanoparticles. In addition, in this study, ursolic acid nanoparticles were administered to cervical cancer cells to find effective treatments for cervical cancer inhibition. In the present study, ELISA, western blotting, flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry assays were carried out to calculate the molecular mechanism by which ursolic acid nanoparticles modulated cervical cancer progression. Data indicated that ursolic acid nanoparticles, indeed, significantly suppress cervial cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration compared to the control group, and apoptosis was induced by ursolic acid nanoparticles in cervical cancer cells through activating caspases, p53 and suppressing anti-apoptosis-related signals. Furthermore, tumor size was reduced by treatment of ursolic acid nanoparticles in in vivo experiments. In conclusion, this study suggests that ursolic acid nanoparticles inhibited cervical cancer cell proliferation via apoptosis induction, which could be a potential target for future therapeutic strategy clinically.

  13. Glycoprotein and Glycan in Tissue and Blood Samples of Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer Undergoing Surgery to Remove Pelvic and Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  14. Cervical Dysplasia: Is It Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... showed cervical dysplasia. What does that mean? Is it cancer? Answers from Shannon K. Laughlin-Tommaso, M. ... the abnormal cells. Dysplasia could go away on its own or, rarely, it could develop into cancer. ...

  15. Advocating for cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Sherris, J; Agurto, I; Arrossi, S; Dzuba, I; Gaffikin, L; Herdman, C; Limpaphayom, K; Luciani, S

    2005-05-01

    Cervical cancer is a significant health problem among women in developing countries. Contributing to the cervical cancer health burden in many countries is a lack of understanding and political will to address the problem. Broad-based advocacy efforts that draw on research and program findings from developing-country settings are key to gaining program and policy support, as are cost-effectiveness analyses based on these findings. The Alliance for Cervical Cancer Prevention (ACCP) has undertaken advocacy efforts at the international, regional, national, and local levels to raise awareness and understanding of the problem (and workable solutions), galvanize funders and governments to take action, and engage local stakeholders in ensuring program success. ACCP experience demonstrates the role that evidence-based advocacy efforts play in the ultimate success of cervical cancer prevention programs, particularly when new screening and treatment approaches-and, ultimately, radically new approaches such as a human papillomavirus vaccine-are available.

  16. Cervical spine injuries in football.

    PubMed

    Breslow, M J; Rosen, J E

    2000-01-01

    The game of football, as it is played today, poses serious risk of injury for players of all ages. Injury may occur to any structure of the spinal column, including its bony, ligamentous and soft tissue components. The majority of cervical spine injuries occurring in football are self limited, and a full recovery can be expected. While these injuries are relatively uncommon, cervical spine injuries represent a significant proportion of athletic injuries that can produce permanent disability. The low incidence of cervical spine injuries has lead to a lack of emergency management experience of on-site medical staff. This paper will review the numerous injuries sustained by the cervical spine in football players and provide insights into prevention and guidelines for return to play.

  17. History of the use of HPV testing in cervical screening and in the management of abnormal cervical screening results.

    PubMed

    Cox, J Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Twenty years have passed since the first studies using human papillomavirus (HPV) testing began in clinical settings. At that time controversy regarding the role of HPV in cervical carcinogenesis still divided the scientific world. Epidemiological and natural history studies on HPV and cervical cancer in the ensuing two decades secured the necessary role of high-risk (carcinogenic) HPV in the genesis of cervical cancer, providing the rationale for testing for its cause. Subsequently, cross sectional studies and large randomized trials have provided clinical validation for high-risk HPV testing in triage of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US), in postcolposcopy management of women referred for ASC-US, atypical squamous cells "cannot rule out high grade" (ASC-H), atypical glandular cells "not otherwise specified" (AGC NOS) and low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) and not found to have cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2+ or adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) at initial colposcopy, in post-treatment of CIN 2+ surveillance, and in cotesting with the Papanicolaou (Pap) test of women age 30 and over. This is the story of the road traveled that brought the clinical use of HPV testing from its genesis only a few years after Dr. zur Hausen's discovery to its present eminent role in both primary cervical cancer screening and abnormal Pap management.