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Sample records for causing urinary tract

  1. Urinary tract infection caused by Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Pant, Narayan Dutt; Sharma, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum, a proteobacterium, is a facultative anaerobe, which is generally present as the normal flora of water and soil in tropical and subtropical regions. The infection due to Chromobacterium violaceum is rare but mostly fatal. It is responsible for causing fatal cases of septicemia, visceral abscesses, skin and soft tissue infections, meningitis, diarrhea, and rarely urinary tract infection. The bacteria has high propensity to spread causing sepsis. Delayed proper treatment due to limited awareness related to the C. violaceum infection is responsible for the high mortality rate. Here, we describe a rare case of urinary tract infection by C. violaceum in a chronic kidney disease patient, which was managed with timely proper antimicrobial therapy as per the culture sensitivity report.

  2. Aerococcus Viridans: A Rare Pathogen Causing Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Kamran; Anand, Naveen; Taneja, Neelam

    2017-01-01

    Aerococci are Gram-positive cocci with colony morphology similar to viridans streptococci. Most often these isolates in clinical samples are misidentified and considered insignificant. However, with the use newer techniques like Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass-Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), aerococci have been recognized as significant human pathogens capable of causing a diverse spectrum of infections. Among the different species of aerococci, Aerococcus urinae is the most common agent causing Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) followed by A. sanguinocola. Aerococcus viridans (A. viridans) have been reported rarely in urinary tract infections. The antimicrobial resistance in aerococci in terms of its intrinsic resistance and evolving resistance to penicillin and vancomycin has raised the concern for better understanding of this pathogen. We recently encountered two cases of nosocomial UTI caused by A. viridans which are being reported here.

  3. Resistance patterns of Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Ferdosi-Shahandashti, Elaheh; Javanian, Mostafa; Moradian-Kouchaksaraei, Masoomeh; Yeganeh, Babak; Bijani, Ali; Motevaseli, Elahe; Moradian- Kouchaksaraei, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases and Escherichia coli is its common cause. The aim of this study was to assess the resistance patterns of E.coli in urinary tract infections and to determine the susceptibility of E.coli to commonly used antimicrobials and also to evaluate the options for empirical treatment of UTI. Methods: This study was conducted in the Ayatollah Rouhani Teaching Hospital of Babol Medical Sciences University in North of Iran. Between January of 2013 to December 2013, antimicrobial susceptibility tests were done by disk diffusion and microdilution method. Growth of >=105 cfu/ml was considered as positive urine test. Ten commonly used antibiotics were examined for susceptibility test. Data and the results were collected and analyzed. Results: E.coli grew in 57 urine samples. Imipenem, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin were the most sensitive antibiotics at 87.7%, 87.7% and 78.9% respectively. Whereas, cotrimoxazole, cefexime, cefotaxcime and ceftriaxone were the most resistant antibiotics. Antibiotic sensitivity of disk diffusion compared minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) detected by microdilution had the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 82%, 98%, 99% and 74%, respectively. Conclusion: Imipenem, ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin should be used in empirical therapy of UTI. PMID:26644881

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis is caused by a Proteus urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Ebringer, Alan; Rashid, Taha

    2014-05-01

    Genetic, molecular and biological studies indicate that rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a severe arthritic disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population in developed countries, is caused by an upper urinary tract infection by the microbe, Proteus mirabilis. Elevated levels of specific antibodies against Proteus bacteria have been reported from 16 different countries. The pathogenetic mechanism involves six stages triggered by cross-reactive autoantibodies evoked by Proteus infection. The causative amino acid sequences of Proteus namely, ESRRAL and IRRET, contain arginine doublets which can be acted upon by peptidyl arginine deiminase thereby explaining the early appearance of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies in patients with RA. Consequently, RA patients should be treated early with anti-Proteus antibiotics as well as biological agents to avoid irreversible joint damages.

  5. Neonatal imperforate hymen causing obstruction of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Johal, Navroop S; Bogris, Sotirios; Mushtaq, Imran

    2009-04-01

    An imperforate hymen associated with urinary retention, bilateral hydronephrosis, and bilateral hydrosalpinx is extremely rare in the neonatal period. We present a case of a 2-day-old neonate with a marked interlabial swelling causing urinary retention. Imaging revealed hydrometrocolpos, hydrosalpinx, and bilateral hydronephrosis. Her symptoms resolved after hymenectomy.

  6. Neonatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hanako; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a known pathogen of infective endocarditis, but not of urinary tract infection. We report a previously healthy neonate without congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract who developed urinary tract infection due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis, illustrating that Staphylococcus lugdunensis can cause urinary tract infection even in those with no urinary tract complications.

  7. Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland) can cause lower urinary tract disease in cats. Although they are much less common causes, FLUTD ... your veterinarian about the best diet for your cat. Many commercial diets are acceptable, but some urinary ...

  8. [Urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Hörl, W H

    2011-09-01

    Urinary tract infections occur very frequently in the community and in hospitalized patients and are mainly caused by Escherichia (E.) coli. Depending on virulence determinants of uropathogenic microorganisms and host-specific defense mechanisms, urinary tract infections can manifest as cystitis, pyelonephritis (bacterial interstitial nephritis), bacteremia or urosepsis. Uncomplicated urinary tract infections in otherwise healthy women should be treated for 3-7 days depending on the antibiotic therapy chosen, even if spontaneous remission rates of up to 40% have been reported. Antibiotics of the first choice for empirical treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection are fluoroquinolones, pivmecillinam and fosfomycin. A huge problem is the increasing antimicrobial resistance of uropathogenic microorganisms. Complicated urinary tract infections associated with anatomical and/or functional abnormalities of the urinary tract and/or comorbidities such as diabetes or immunosuppressive therapy, need longer antibiotic treatment (e.g. 10-14 days) as well as interdisciplinary diagnostic procedures. Treatment of community acquired urosepsis includes cephalosporins of the third generation, piperacillin/tazobactam or ciprofloxacin. For nosocomial urosepsis the combination with an aminoglycoside or a carbapenem is recommended.

  9. Could Urinary Tract Infection Cause Female Stress Urinary Incontinence? A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Fatemeh; Motaghed, Zahra; Abbaszadeh, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the most common type of urinary incontinence (UI), is usually defined as leakage of urine during movement or activity which puts pressure on the bladder, such as coughing, sneezing, running or heavy lifting. It is reported in most countries that 15% to 40% of women struggle with SUI and its severe implications for daily life, including social interactions, sexuality, and psychological wellbeing. Objectives The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between urinary tract infection and the severity of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Patients and Methods This research was a cross-sectional study conducted in a public urology clinic in Tehran. The study population was all females with complaints of SUI who visited the clinic during 2014. We compared Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) in two groups of patients, with and without history of urinary tract infection (UTI). Results According to the findings of our study, the mean VLPP was 83.10 cm H2O in the group with UTI history, and 81.29 cm H2O in those without history of UTI. The difference in VLPP between the two groups was not significant (P < 0.05), even after controlling for confounding variables including age, body mass index, history of hysterectomy and number of deliveries. Conclusions Our study did not confirm a significant relationship between UTI and severity of SUI as measured by VLPP. A decisive opinion would require extensive future studies by prospective methods. PMID:26981500

  10. Epidemiology of urinary tract infections caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ena, Javier; Arjona, Francisco; Martínez-Peinado, Carmen; López-Perezagua, Maria Del Mar; Amador, Concepción

    2006-12-01

    To describe the epidemiology of urinary tract infections caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli. We performed three studies: a trend study (1999 to 2004) to assess the evolution and origin of ESBL-producing E. coli isolates from urine samples; a comparison of the susceptibility patterns of ESBL-producing E. coli and a random sample of non-ESBL-producing E. coli isolated in the same interval, and a retrospective chart review to determine the risk factors for acquisition of, and outcomes from, urinary tract infections caused by ESBL-producing E. coli (n = 61) compared with a random sample of non-ESBL-producing E. coli urinary tract infections (n = 61) from patients attending our institution and matched by temporal occurrence. ESBL-producing E. coli significantly increased from 2 (0.20%) to 89 (5.52%) isolates per year (P value for trend = 0.000). Of the 161 patients with urinary tract infections caused by ESBL-producing E. coli, 100 (62%) were attending ambulatory health centers, and 61 (38%) were attending the hospital. ESBL-producing E. coli showed a significant reduction in the susceptibility to most antimicrobials, although carbapenems and fosfomycin retained significant activity. The chart review study showed that previous treatment with fluoroquinolones (odds ratio 12.98, 95% confidence interval 1.81 to 106.51, P = 0.017) and the presence of a urinary catheter (odds ratio 2.64, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 6.88, P = 0.047) were independent risk factors associated with infections caused by ESBL-producing E. coli. ESBL-producing E. coli is a problem of increasing importance. Our study results may help physicians select appropriate antimicrobial therapy in patients suspected of having urinary tract infections caused by ESBL-producing E. coli.

  11. Single-gene causes of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) in humans.

    PubMed

    Vivante, Asaf; Kohl, Stefan; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Dworschak, Gabriel C; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-04-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) cover a wide range of structural malformations that result from defects in the morphogenesis of the kidney and/or urinary tract. These anomalies account for about 40-50 % of children with chronic kidney disease worldwide. Knowledge from genetically modified mouse models suggests that single gene mutations in renal developmental genes may lead to CAKUT in humans. However, until recently, only a handful of CAKUT-causing genes were reported, most of them in familial syndromic cases. Recent findings suggest that CAKUT may arise from mutations in a multitude of different single gene causes. We focus here on single-gene causes of CAKUT and their developmental origin. Currently, more than 20 monogenic CAKUT-causing genes have been identified. High-throughput sequencing techniques make it likely that additional CAKUT-causing genes will be identified in the near future.

  12. [A Case of Hyperammonemia Caused by Urinary Tract Infection Due to Urease-Producing Bacteria].

    PubMed

    Emura, Masahiro; Tsuchihashi, Kazunari; Shimizu, Yosuke; Kanamaru, Sojun; Matoba, Shun; Ito, Noriyuki

    2016-08-01

    We present here a rare case of hyperammonemia without liver dysfunction or portal-systemic shunting. The patient was an 80-year-old woman with a history of neurogenic bladder. She was admitted to a nearby hospital for vomiting, diarrhea and consciousness disturbance. Two days after admission, she was transferred to our hospital because of persistant consciousness disturbance. Laboratory data revealed hyperammonemia, but there was no indication of liver dysfunction. Moreover abdominal computed tomography did not reveal any clear finding of liver disease or portal-systemic shunting, but we noted multiple large bladder diverticula. Antibiotic therapy, tracheal intubation, ventilator management and bladder catheterization were performed. The patient's level of consciousness improved rapidly. Urinary culture revealed Bacteroides ureolyticus (urease-producing bacteria). The patient was diagnosed with hyperammonemia and a urinary tract infection due to urease-producing bacteria. Thus, physicians should be aware that obstructive urinary tract infections due to urease-producing bacteria can also be the cause of hyperammonemia.

  13. Urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2013-07-01

    The urinary tract is a common source for life-threatening infections. Most patients with sepsis or septic shock from a urinary source have complicated urinary tract infection. This article explains the epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment. Effective management, appropriate collection of microbiology specimens, prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy, source control, and supportive therapy are described. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Causes of the excessive rates of perinatal mortality and prematurity in pregnancies complicated by maternal urinary-tract infections.

    PubMed

    Naeye, R L

    1979-04-12

    The study was undertaken to determine the causes of the more frequent pre-term deliveries, fetal and neonatal deaths associated with maternal urinary-tract infections during pregnancy. The combined perinatal mortality rate for eight common placental and fetal disorders was 42 per thousand births in the infected vs. 21 per thousand in the noninfected, owing to a greater mortality from noninfectious placental and fetal disorders in the gestations with the urinary-tract infections (P less than 0.001). All the mortality excess took place when the urinary-tract infections occurred within 15 days of delivery. Death rates were highest when the urinary-tract infections coexisted with maternal hypertension and acetonuria.Hydramnios, amniotic-fluid bacterial infections and abruptio placentae were responsible for two thirds of the more frequent preterm deliveries in the pregnancies complicated by urinary-tract infections.

  15. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and ... To protect the kidneys from damage – By preventing urinary tract infections (UTI) – By identifying and treating vesicoureteral remux (VUR). ...

  16. A case of urinary tract infection caused by Raoultella planticola after a urodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Tuğcu, Murat; Ruhi, Caglar; Gokce, Ali M; Kara, Melih; Aksaray, Sebahat

    Here we report the case of a patient who developed urinary tract infection after a urodynamic study. The causative agent was Raoultella planticola, a rare opportunistic pathogen that usually invades immunocompromised patients. While a urinary tract infection with R. planticola has been previously described, this is the first report in which an R. planticola infection developed after a urodynamic study. We postulate that the mechanism of infection was direct invasion of the urinary tract from contaminated urodynamic study equipment. Here, we discuss the role played by isotonic solutions in facilitating bacterial reproduction.

  17. Urinary tract infections and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract candidiasis is known as the most frequent nosocomial fungal infection worldwide. Candida albicans is the most common cause of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infections; however, a rapid change in the distribution of Candida species is undergoing. Simultaneously, the increase of urinary tract candidiasis has led to the appearance of antifungal resistant Candida species. In this review, we have an in depth look into Candida albicans uropathogenesis and distribution of the three most frequent Candida species contributing to urinary tract candidiasis in different countries around the world. Material and methods For writing this review, Google Scholar –a scholarly search engine– (http://scholar.google.com/) and PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) were used. The most recently published original articles and reviews of literature relating to the first three Candida species causing urinary tract infections in different countries and the pathogenicity of Candida albicans were selected and studied. Results Although some studies show rapid changes in the uropathogenesis of Candida species causing urinary tract infections in some countries, Candida albicans is still the most important cause of candidal urinary tract infections. Conclusions Despite the ranking of Candida albicans as the dominant species for urinary tract candidiasis, specific changes have occurred in some countries. At this time, it is important to continue the surveillance related to Candida species causing urinary tract infections to prevent, control and treat urinary tract candidiasis in future. PMID:25914847

  18. Antiseptic and antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria causing urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Stickler, D J; Thomas, B

    1980-01-01

    A collection of 802 isolates of Gram-negative bacteria causing urinary tract infections was made from general practice, antenatal clinics, and local hospitals. The organisms were tested for their sensitivity to chlorhexidine, cetrimide, glutaraldehyde, phenyl mercuric nitrate, a phenolic formulation, and a proprietary antiseptic containing a mixture of picloxydine, octyl phenoxy polyethoxyethanol, and benzalkonium chloride. Escherichia coli, the major species isolated, proved to be uniformly sensitive to these agents. Approximately 10% of the total number of isolates, however, exhibited a degree of resistance to the cationic agents. These resistant organisms were members of the genera Proteus, Providencia, and Pseudomonas; they were also generally resistant to five, six, or seven antibiotics. It is proposed therefore that an antiseptic policy which involves the intensive use of cationic antiseptics might lead to the selection of a flora of notoriously drug-resistant species. PMID:6769972

  19. An unusual case of urinary tract infection caused by Saprochaete capitata under anidulafungin treatment.

    PubMed

    Hazirolan, G; Aypak, A; Aksu, N

    2017-09-01

    Saprochaete capitata may cause uncommon severe infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Here, we describe a rare case of urinary tract infection by S. capitata in a chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus patient, which occur during anidulafungin therapy. Mycological examinations of urine were positive to S. capitata identified by mass spectrometry and confirmed by ITS sequencing. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the isolate for amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and, anidulafungin were 2, 16, 1, 1, and 8μg/mL, respectively. Presence of S. capitata infection was not known. Clinicians should be aware about these rare opportunistic fungal pathogens, particularly those with intrinsic or variable resistance to antifungals including echinocandins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. [Recurrent urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Pigrau-Serrallach, Carlos

    2005-12-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are a frequent clinical problem in sexually active young women, pregnant or postmenopausal women and in patients with underlying urological abnormalities. The present chapter reviews RUTI based on their classification: relapses, which usually occur early (< 1 month), are caused by the same microorganism and are associated with underlying urological abnormalities, and reinfections, which usually occur later and are caused by a new distinct microorganism (or by the same microorganism usually located in the rectum or uroepithelial cells). The pathogenesis of RUTI is reviewed and the risk factors associated with RUTI in premenopausal women (usually related to sexual activity), postmenopausal women (in whom estrogen deficiency has a significant effect on the vaginal Lactobacillus flora), and in pregnant women are discussed. Likewise, an extensive review of the distinct therapeutic strategies to prevent RUTI is provided: self-treatment of cystitis, continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, postcoital antibiotic prophylaxis, topical vaginal estrogens, Lactobacillus, cranberry juice, intravesical administration of non-virulent E. coli strains and vaccines, among others. Several diagnostic-therapeutic algorithms are included. These algorithms are based on the type of urinary infection (relapse-reinfection), on the type of patient (young, postmenopausal, or pregnant women) and on the number of episodes of RUTI.

  1. [Nocosomial urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Pigrau, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTI) are mainly related to urinary catheterisation. In this paper we review the pathogenic mechanisms, particularly the route by which the microorganisms colonise the urinary tract, their adhesion ability, and their capacity to form biofilms, and are related not only to the microorganism but also to the type of urinary catheter. The aetiology of catheter related UTI is variable, and multiresistant microorganisms are often isolated, making empirical antibiotic therapy complex. Clinical findings are frequently atypical, and its diagnosis is difficult. The therapeutic management of catheter-related UTI should be stratified according to the type of UTI: asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be habitually treated, but patients with septic shock should receive a broad spectrum antibiotic. In this review, the value of the different preventive measures are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Diversity of group B streptococcus serotypes causing urinary tract infection in adults.

    PubMed

    Ulett, Kimberly B; Benjamin, William H; Zhuo, Fenglin; Xiao, Meng; Kong, Fanrong; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Schembri, Mark A; Ulett, Glen C

    2009-07-01

    Serotypes of group B streptococcus (GBS) that cause urinary tract infection (UTI) are poorly characterized. We conducted a prospective study of GBS UTI in adults to define the clinical and microbiological characteristics of these infections, including which serotypes cause disease. Patients who had GBS cultured from urine over a 1-year period were grouped according to symptoms, bacteriuria, and urinalysis. Demographic data were obtained by reviewing medical records. Isolates were serotyped by latex agglutination and multiplex PCR-reverse line blotting (mPCR/RLB). Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by disc diffusion. GBS was cultured from 387/34,367 consecutive urine samples (1.1%): 62 patients had bacteriuria of >10(7) CFU/liter and at least one UTI symptom; of these patients, 31 had urinary leukocyte esterase and pyuria (others not tested), 50 (81%) had symptoms consistent with cystitis, and 12 (19%) had symptoms of pyelonephritis. Compared with controls (who had GBS isolated without symptoms), a prior history of UTI was an independent risk factor for disease. Increased age was also significantly associated with acute infection. Serotyping results were consistent between latex agglutination and mPCR/RLB for 331/387 (85.5%) isolates; 22 (5.7%) and 7 (1.8%) isolates were nontypeable with antisera and by mPCR/RLB, respectively; and 45/56 (80.4%) isolates with discrepant results were typed by mPCR/RLB as belonging to serotype V. Serotypes V, Ia, and III caused the most UTIs; serotypes II, Ib, and IV were less common. Nontypeable GBS was not associated with UTI. Erythromycin (39.5%) and clindamycin (26.4%) resistance was common. We conclude that a more diverse spectrum of GBS serotypes causes UTI than previously recognized, with the exception of nontypeable GBS.

  3. Comparative Prevalence of Virulence Factors in Escherichia coli Causing Urinary Tract Infection in Male Infants with and without Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Houdouin, Véronique; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Mahjoub-Messai, Farah; Bingen, Edouard

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates causing urinary tract infection in 83 male infants younger than 90 days with and without bacteremia were compared for phylogenetic groups and the presence of 10 virulence factors. Our result suggest that the absence of both hemolysin and antigen K1 may be used as a negative predictive factor for bacteremia. PMID:16517919

  4. Mutations in TBX18 Cause Dominant Urinary Tract Malformations via Transcriptional Dysregulation of Ureter Development.

    PubMed

    Vivante, Asaf; Kleppa, Marc-Jens; Schulz, Julian; Kohl, Stefan; Sharma, Amita; Chen, Jing; Shril, Shirlee; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Weiss, Anna-Carina; Kaminski, Michael M; Shukrun, Rachel; Kemper, Markus J; Lehnhardt, Anja; Beetz, Rolf; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Verbitsky, Miguel; Gharavi, Ali G; Stuart, Helen M; Feather, Sally A; Goodship, Judith A; Goodship, Timothy H J; Woolf, Adrian S; Westra, Sjirk J; Doody, Daniel P; Bauer, Stuart B; Lee, Richard S; Adam, Rosalyn M; Lu, Weining; Reutter, Heiko M; Kehinde, Elijah O; Mancini, Erika J; Lifton, Richard P; Tasic, Velibor; Lienkamp, Soeren S; Jüppner, Harald; Kispert, Andreas; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-08-06

    Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the most common cause of chronic kidney disease in the first three decades of life. Identification of single-gene mutations that cause CAKUT permits the first insights into related disease mechanisms. However, for most cases the underlying defect remains elusive. We identified a kindred with an autosomal-dominant form of CAKUT with predominant ureteropelvic junction obstruction. By whole exome sequencing, we identified a heterozygous truncating mutation (c.1010delG) of T-Box transcription factor 18 (TBX18) in seven affected members of the large kindred. A screen of additional families with CAKUT identified three families harboring two heterozygous TBX18 mutations (c.1570C>T and c.487A>G). TBX18 is essential for developmental specification of the ureteric mesenchyme and ureteric smooth muscle cells. We found that all three TBX18 altered proteins still dimerized with the wild-type protein but had prolonged protein half life and exhibited reduced transcriptional repression activity compared to wild-type TBX18. The p.Lys163Glu substitution altered an amino acid residue critical for TBX18-DNA interaction, resulting in impaired TBX18-DNA binding. These data indicate that dominant-negative TBX18 mutations cause human CAKUT by interference with TBX18 transcriptional repression, thus implicating ureter smooth muscle cell development in the pathogenesis of human CAKUT. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mutations in TBX18 Cause Dominant Urinary Tract Malformations via Transcriptional Dysregulation of Ureter Development

    PubMed Central

    Vivante, Asaf; Kleppa, Marc-Jens; Schulz, Julian; Kohl, Stefan; Sharma, Amita; Chen, Jing; Shril, Shirlee; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Weiss, Anna-Carina; Kaminski, Michael M.; Shukrun, Rachel; Kemper, Markus J.; Lehnhardt, Anja; Beetz, Rolf; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Verbitsky, Miguel; Gharavi, Ali G.; Stuart, Helen M.; Feather, Sally A.; Goodship, Judith A.; Goodship, Timothy H.J.; Woolf, Adrian S.; Westra, Sjirk J.; Doody, Daniel P.; Bauer, Stuart B.; Lee, Richard S.; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Lu, Weining; Reutter, Heiko M.; Kehinde, Elijah O.; Mancini, Erika J.; Lifton, Richard P.; Tasic, Velibor; Lienkamp, Soeren S.; Jüppner, Harald; Kispert, Andreas; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the most common cause of chronic kidney disease in the first three decades of life. Identification of single-gene mutations that cause CAKUT permits the first insights into related disease mechanisms. However, for most cases the underlying defect remains elusive. We identified a kindred with an autosomal-dominant form of CAKUT with predominant ureteropelvic junction obstruction. By whole exome sequencing, we identified a heterozygous truncating mutation (c.1010delG) of T-Box transcription factor 18 (TBX18) in seven affected members of the large kindred. A screen of additional families with CAKUT identified three families harboring two heterozygous TBX18 mutations (c.1570C>T and c.487A>G). TBX18 is essential for developmental specification of the ureteric mesenchyme and ureteric smooth muscle cells. We found that all three TBX18 altered proteins still dimerized with the wild-type protein but had prolonged protein half life and exhibited reduced transcriptional repression activity compared to wild-type TBX18. The p.Lys163Glu substitution altered an amino acid residue critical for TBX18-DNA interaction, resulting in impaired TBX18-DNA binding. These data indicate that dominant-negative TBX18 mutations cause human CAKUT by interference with TBX18 transcriptional repression, thus implicating ureter smooth muscle cell development in the pathogenesis of human CAKUT. PMID:26235987

  6. Hyperammonemia in Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kenzaka, Tsuneaki; Kato, Ken; Kitao, Akihito; Kosami, Koki; Minami, Kensuke; Yahata, Shinsuke; Fukui, Miho; Okayama, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The present study investigated the incidence of hyperammonemia in urinary tract infections and explored the utility of urinary obstruction relief and antimicrobial administration to improve hyperammonemia. Methods This was an observational study. Subjects were patients who were diagnosed with urinary tract infection and hospitalized between June 2008 and June 2009. We measured plasma ammonia levels on admission in patients who were clinically diagnosed with urinary tract infection and hospitalized. We assessed each patient's level of consciousness on admission using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and performed urine and blood cultures. We also assessed hearing prior to hospitalization using the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG-PS). In cases with high ammonia levels on admission, plasma ammonia and GCS were measured 24 hours and 5–7 days later. Results Sixty-seven candidates were enrolled; of these, 60 cases (89.6%) with bacterial cell counts ≥104 CFU/mL were studied. Five cases (8.3%) presented with high plasma ammonia levels. Cases with hyperammonemia were significantly more likely to present with low GCS scores and urinary retention rate. All five cases received antimicrobial therapy with an indwelling bladder catheter to relieve urinary retention. The case 5 patient died shortly after admission due to complicated aspiration pneumonia; in the remaining cases, plasma ammonia levels were rapidly normalized and the level of consciousness improved. Conclusions The occurrence of hyperammonemia in urinary tract infections is not rare. The cause of hyperammonemia is urinary retention obstruction. Therefore, along with antimicrobial administration, relief of obstruction is important for the treatment of hyperammonemia caused by this mechanism. PMID:26292215

  7. Urinary Tract Infections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on urinary tract infections is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are…

  8. Urinary Tract Infections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on urinary tract infections is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are…

  9. Candida urinary tract infection: pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John F; Kavanagh, Kevin; Sobel, Jack D; Kauffman, Carol A; Newman, Cheryl A

    2011-05-01

    Candida species are unusual causes of urinary tract infection (UTI) in healthy individuals, but common in the hospital setting or among patients with predisposing diseases and structural abnormalities of the kidney and collecting system. The urinary tract may be invaded in either an antegrade fashion from the bloodstream or retrograde via the urethra and bladder. Candida species employ a repertoire of virulence factors, including phenotypic switching, dimorphism, galvano - and thigmotropism, and hydrolytic enzymes, to colonize and then invade the urinary tract. Antegrade infection occurs primarily among patients predisposed to candidemia. The process of adherence to and invasion of the glomerulus, renal blood vessels, and renal tubules by Candida species was elegantly described in early histopathologic studies. Armed with modern molecular biologic techniques, the various virulence factors involved in bloodborne infection of the kidney are gradually being elucidated. Disturbances of urine flow, whether congenital or acquired, instrumentation of the urinary tract, diabetes mellitus, antimicrobial therapy, and immunosuppression underlie most instances of retrograde Candida UTI. In addition, bacterial UTIs caused by Enterobacteriaceae may facilitate the initial step in the process. Ascending infections generally do not result in candidemia in the absence of obstruction.

  10. Urinary tract infection caused by carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Olaru, Ioana D; Popoiu, Mona; Breuil, J; Aramă, Victoria; Hristea, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    There has been an increase in recent years of antimicrobial resistance of Gram negative bacilli (GNB). Carbapenems, the mainstay for the treatment of multidrug resistant GNB infections, are no longer always effective leaving treatment options limited. We present the case of patient with recurrent, complicated urinary tract infections. The current episode was caused by carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa and carbapenem-susceptible, but MDR E. cloacae. Resistance to carbapenems of K. pneumoniae was conferred by the production of the class B metallo-beta-lactamase, VIM1. Infection control measures were implemented and following a 2-week course of treatment with colistin, the infection resolved and the patient was discharged. We discuss the changes in the epidemiology, the mechanisms involved and the means of detecting carbapenem resistance in GNB. We would also like to stress the role of infection control measures in limiting patient-to-patient spread of MDR organisms which, are of paramount importance in cases when few treatment options are left available.

  11. Understanding the patterns of antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria causing urinary tract infection in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sunayana; Nayak, Sridhara; Bhattacharyya, Indrani; Saha, Suman; Mandal, Amit K; Chakraborty, Subhanil; Bhattacharyya, Rabindranath; Chakraborty, Ranadhir; Franco, Octavio L; Mandal, Santi M; Basak, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infectious diseases at the community level. In order to assess the adequacy of empirical therapy, the susceptibility of antibiotics and resistance pattern of bacteria responsible for UTI in West Bengal, India, were evaluated throughout the period of 2008-2013. The infection reports belonging to all age groups and both sexes were considered. Escherichia coli was the most abundant uropathogen with a prevalence rate of 67.1%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (22%) and Pseudomonas spp. (6%). Penicillin was least effective against UTI-causing E. coli and maximum susceptibility was recorded for the drugs belonging to fourth generation cephalosporins. Other abundant uropathogens, Klebsiella spp., were maximally resistant to broad-spectrum penicillin, followed by aminoglycosides and third generation cephalosporin. The antibiotic resistance pattern of two principal UTI pathogens, E. coli and Klebsiella spp. in West Bengal, appears in general to be similar to that found in other parts of the Globe. Higher than 50% resistance were observed for broad-spectrum penicillin. Fourth generation cephalosporin and macrolides seems to be the choice of drug in treating UTIs in Eastern India. Furthermore, improved maintenance of infection incident logs is needed in Eastern Indian hospitals in order to facilitate regular surveillance of the occurrence of antibiotic resistance patterns, since such levels continue to change.

  12. Understanding the patterns of antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria causing urinary tract infection in West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sunayana; Nayak, Sridhara; Bhattacharyya, Indrani; Saha, Suman; Mandal, Amit K.; Chakraborty, Subhanil; Bhattacharyya, Rabindranath; Chakraborty, Ranadhir; Franco, Octavio L.; Mandal, Santi M.; Basak, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infectious diseases at the community level. In order to assess the adequacy of empirical therapy, the susceptibility of antibiotics and resistance pattern of bacteria responsible for UTI in West Bengal, India, were evaluated throughout the period of 2008–2013. The infection reports belonging to all age groups and both sexes were considered. Escherichia coli was the most abundant uropathogen with a prevalence rate of 67.1%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (22%) and Pseudomonas spp. (6%). Penicillin was least effective against UTI-causing E. coli and maximum susceptibility was recorded for the drugs belonging to fourth generation cephalosporins. Other abundant uropathogens, Klebsiella spp., were maximally resistant to broad-spectrum penicillin, followed by aminoglycosides and third generation cephalosporin. The antibiotic resistance pattern of two principal UTI pathogens, E. coli and Klebsiella spp. in West Bengal, appears in general to be similar to that found in other parts of the Globe. Higher than 50% resistance were observed for broad-spectrum penicillin. Fourth generation cephalosporin and macrolides seems to be the choice of drug in treating UTIs in Eastern India. Furthermore, improved maintenance of infection incident logs is needed in Eastern Indian hospitals in order to facilitate regular surveillance of the occurrence of antibiotic resistance patterns, since such levels continue to change. PMID:25278932

  13. Bacterial Uropathogens Causing Urinary Tract Infection and Their Resistance Patterns Among Children in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Yunus; Tekkanat Tazegun, Zuhal; Aydin, Emsal; Dulger, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common problem in infants and children, as well as adults. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the most common bacterial uropathogens, their susceptibility, and resistance to antibiotics in children with UTI. Materials and Methods This study included 7,365 urine samples sent from various departments to the Kars state hospital microbiology laboratory between January 2012 and May 2014. Bacterial isolation from clinical samples was made using standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by disk diffusion, according to CLSI recommendations. Results Bacterial growth was obtained in 1,373 samples (18.5%). The percentage distributions of the isolates were as follows: Escherichia coli, 940 (68.5%); Proteus spp, 183 (13.3%); Staphylococcus spp, 85 (6.2%); Enterococcus spp, 65 (4.7%); Klebsiella, 62 (4.5%); Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 21 (1.5%); and other Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive bacteria, 17 (1.2%). UTIs were more prevalent, after two years of age, among females than males (P < 0.001). Conclusions The identification of the most common microorganisms causing infectious diseases and regional resistance patterns is important in order to determine the antimicrobial policies and infection control guidelines of hospitals. PMID:27621929

  14. Hemangioma of the prostate - an unusual cause of lower urinary tract symptoms: Case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemangioma of the prostate gland is extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. There have been several cases of hemangioma of posterior urethra, urinary bladder and periprostatic plexus in the literature, all presenting with hematuria or hematospermia. Diagnosis of prostatic hemangioma is difficult due to its rarity and unspecific symptoms such as hematuria, hematospermia or lower urinary tract symptoms. It cannot be detected by conventional examinations such as cystoscopy or standard rectal ultrasonography. Case presentation We present a case of prostatic hemangioma in an 84-year old male presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms. Bleeding has not been a feature in our case and diagnosis was not made until after operation. The patient was treated as a case of bladder neck outflow obstruction with transurethral resection of prostate gland and simultaneous bladder neck incisions. A period of self-catheterization was instituted due to postoperative urinary retention as the result of detrusor insufficiency. Conclusion Hemangioma of prostate gland is extremely rare and symptomatic prostatic hemangioma should be treated either by transurethral resection of prostate or laser evaporation. PMID:21486499

  15. Chronological change of antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Tanaka, Kazushi; Adachi, Masayo; Yamashita, Masuo; Arakawa, Soichi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2011-10-01

    Overuse of antibiotics can cause the emergence of resistant bacterial strains. This study retrospectively investigated recent trends in Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infections (UTIs), focusing on antibiotic use and antibiotic susceptibilities. Patients diagnosed with UTIs caused by E. coli in Akashi Municipal Hospital between April 2004 and March 2010 were enrolled in the study. A total of 858 UTI cases were examined. Antibiotics used in our hospital during that period and the antibiotic susceptibilities of E. coli in UTI cases were assessed. We analyzed the data on a yearly basis, with the year being defined as the period from April to the following March (e.g., in this study the period from April 2004 to March 2005 represents 2004). The first 3 years (2004-2006) were compared to the last 3 years (2007-2009). The use of piperacillin, cephazolin, amikacin, oral cefotiam, and levofloxacin decreased significantly and the use of imipenem, gentamicin (GM), cefcapene, and oral minocycline (MINO) increased significantly in the last 3 years compared to the previous 3 years. The susceptibilities of MINO in complicated cystitis significantly increased and those of GM in uncomplicated pyelonephritis significantly decreased in these 3 years (2007-2009) compared to the previous 3 years (2004-2006) (P < 0.05). Additionally, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli tended to be isolated more often; this was statistically significant in the last 3 years (2007-2009) compared to the previous 3 years (2004-2006) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, we found changes in our pattern of antibiotic use associated with changes in antibiotic susceptibilities and an increase in ESBL-producing E. coli isolated from our UTI cases. Monitoring of antibiotic use and emergence of resistant strains should be continued.

  16. Urinary tract infections in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ovalle, A; Levancini, M

    2001-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are very common during pregnancy. Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen isolated from pregnant women. Ampicillin should not be used because of its high resistance to Escherichia coli. Pyelonephritis can cause morbidity and can be life-threatening to both mother and fetus. Second and third-generation cephalosporins are recommended for treatment, administered initially intravenously during hospitalization. Cultures and the study of virulence factors of uropathogenic Escherichia coli are recommended for the adequate management of pyelonephritis. The lower genital tract infection associated with pyelonephritis is responsible for the failure of antibiotic treatment. Asymptomatic bacteriuria can evolve into cystitis or pyelonephritis. All pregnant women should be routinely screened for bacteriuria using urine culture, and should be treated with nitrofurantoin, sulfixosazole or first-generation cephalosporins. Recurrent urinary infection should be treated with prophylactic antibiotics. Pregnant women who develop urinary tract infections with group B streptococcal infection should be treated with prophylactic antibiotics during labour to prevent neonatal sepsis. Preterm delivery is frequent. Evidence suggests that infection plays a role in the pathogenesis of preterm labour. Experimental models in pregnant mice support the theory that Escherichia coli propagated by the transplacental route, involving bacterial adhesins, induces preterm delivery, but this has not been demonstrated in humans. Ascending lower genital tract infections are the most probable cause of preterm delivery, but this remains to be proved.

  17. [Hospital-acquired urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Adukauskiene, Dalia; Cicinskaite, Ilona; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Macas, Andrius; Tamosiūnas, Ramūnas; Kinderyte, Aida

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are responsible for 40-60% of all hospital-acquired infections. Increased age of patients and comorbid diseases render hospitalized patients more susceptible to infection. Almost 80% of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections are associated with urinary catheters, and only 5-10% of urinary infections are caused by invasive manipulations in the urogenital tract. Pathogens of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections are frequently multi-resistant, and antibiotic therapy can only be successful when the complicating factors are eliminated or urodynamic function is restored. For treatment of complicated hospital-acquired urinary tract infections, the antibiotics must exhibit adequate pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties: high renal clearance of unmetabolized form with good antimicrobial activity in both acidic and alkaline urine. For selection of empirical treatment of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections, it is necessary to evaluate localization of infection, its severity, possible isolates, and the most frequent pathogens in the department where patient is treated. The best choice for the starting the antimicrobial therapy is the cheapest narrow-spectrum effective antibiotic in the treatment of urinary tract infection until microbiological evaluation of pathogens will be received. Adequate management of urinary tract infections lowers the rate of complications, requirements for antibacterial treatment, selection of multi-resistant isolates and is cost effective.

  18. The erratic antibiotic susceptibility patterns of bacterial pathogens causing urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Iftkhar; Sajed, Muhammad; Sultan, Aneesa; Murtaza, Iram; Yousaf, Sohail; Maqsood, Bushra; Vanhara, Petr; Anees, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    Increasing trend of antibiotic resistance and expression of Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamases (ESBLs) are serious threats for public health as they render the treatment ineffective. Present study was designed to elucidate the antibiotic-susceptibility patterns of ESBL and non-ESBL producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae causing urinary tract infections so that the ineffective antibiotics could be removed from the line of treatment. The bacterial isolates obtained from the urine of patients visiting a tertiary health care facility were cultured for strain identification using API20E. Antimicrobial susceptibility and ESBL detection were done by Kirby-bauer diffusion technique. Almost 53.4 % isolates of E. coli and 24.5 % isolates of K. pneumoniae were found to be ESBL producers. The ESBL producing bacteria were found to be more resistant towards various antibiotics. The most effective drugs against E. coli ESBL isolates were imipenem (99.54 %), ampicillin-sulbactam (97.48 %), piperacillin-tazobactam (96.86 %), fosfomycin (94.51 %), amikacin (92.26 %) and nitrofurantoin (90.68 %). The most effective drugs against K. pneumoniae ESBL isolates were imipenem (97.62 %), piperacillin-tazobactam (95.35 %), ampicillin-sulbactam (90.48 %) and amikacin (88.37 %). The antibiotics having the highest resistance, particularly by the ESBL producers were amoxicillin clavulanic acid, sulphamethoxalzole/ trimethoprim, cefuroxime, cefpirome, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. Most of the isolates showed multi drug resistance (MDR). High frequency of ESBL producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae were observed as compared to previous data. Penicillins, cephalosporins and some representatives of fluoroquinolones were least effective against the common UTIs and are recommended to be removed from the line of treatment. PMID:26648826

  19. [Urinary tract infection in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Herráiz, Miguel Angel; Hernández, Antonio; Asenjo, Eloy; Herráiz, Ignacio

    2005-12-01

    Urinary tract infections, asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB), acute cystitis (AC) and acute pyelonephritis (AP), are favored by the morphological and functional changes involved in pregnancy. AB increases the risk of preterm labor, low birth weight and AP. AB should be detected by uroculture (other methods are not sufficiently effective) and treated early. Approximately 80% of cases are caused by Escherichia coli. The risks and effectiveness of the distinct antibiotic regimens should be evaluated: fosfomycin trometamol in monotherapy or as short course therapy is safe and effective for the treatment of AB and AC. AP is the most frequent cause of hospital admission for medical reasons in pregnant women and can lead to complications in 10% of cases, putting the lives of the mother and fetus at risk. Currently outpatient treatment of AP is recommended in selected cases. Adequate follow-up of pregnant women with urinary tract infections is required due to frequent recurrence.

  20. Rapid detection of urinary tract infections caused by Proteus spp. using PNA-FISH.

    PubMed

    Almeida, C; Azevedo, N F; Bento, J C; Cerca, N; Ramos, H; Vieira, M J; Keevil, C W

    2013-06-01

    We developed a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method for the rapid detection of Proteus spp. in urine, using a novel peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe. Testing on 137 urine samples from patients with urinary tract infections has shown specificity and sensitivity values of 98 % (95 % CI, 93.2-99.7) and 100 % (95 % CI, 80,8-100), respectively, when compared with CHROMagar Orientation medium. Results indicate that PNA-FISH is a reliable alternative to traditional culture methods and can reduce the diagnosis time to approximately 2 h.

  1. Antimicrobial resistance among enterobacteriaceae causing uncomplicated urinary tract infections in Mauritius: consequences of past misuse of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Issack, M I; Yee Kin Tet, H Y; Morlat, P

    2007-04-01

    A study was conducted to determine the nature and antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens in Mauritius in order to provide guidance on the empirical treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections. The study was based on urine samples sent for bacteriological investigation at the Central Health Laboratory from unhospitalized patients over a 3-month period. Information on organisms isolated in pure growth and their antibiotic susceptibility was collected and analyzed. Entero - bacteriaceae accounted for over 80% of the 260 isolates obtained during the study period, and showed high rates of resistance to ampicillin (80%), co-trimoxazole (50%), nalidixic acid (34%) and ciprofloxacin (26%). Resistance to mecillinam and fosfomycin were only 2% and 0% respectively. The high rate of antimicrobial resistance in Enterobacteriaceae in urine is cause for concern. Fluoroquinolones may not be very reliable for empirical treatment of urinary tract infections in Mauritius. Alternatives such as pivmecillinam and fosfomycin should be considered.

  2. Urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Litza, Janice A; Brill, John R

    2010-09-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common urologic disorder and one of the most common conditions for which physicians are consulted. Patients at increased risk for UTI include women; diabetics; the immunocompromised; and those with anatomic abnormalities, impaired mobility, incontinence, advanced age, and instrumentation. Antibiotic therapy aims to relieve symptoms and prevent complications such as pyelonephritis and renal scarring. Distinguishing asymptomatic bacteriuria from a UTI can be difficult, especially in those with comorbidities. Most experts do not recommend screening for UTI, except in the first trimester of pregnancy.

  3. Urinary tract infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Orenstein, R; Wong, E S

    1999-03-01

    Urinary tract infections remain a significant cause of morbidity in all age groups. Recent studies have helped to better define the population groups at risk for these infections, as well as the most cost-effective management strategies. Initially, a urinary tract infection should be categorized as complicated or uncomplicated. Further categorization of the infection by clinical syndrome and by host (i.e., acute cystitis in young women, acute pyelonephritis, catheter-related infection, infection in men, asymptomatic bacteriuria in the elderly) helps the physician determine the appropriate diagnostic and management strategies. Uncomplicated urinary tract infections are caused by a predictable group of susceptible organisms. These infections can be empirically treated without the need for urine cultures. The most effective therapy for an uncomplicated infection is a three-day course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complicated infections are diagnosed by quantitative urine cultures and require a more prolonged course of therapy. Asymptomatic bacteriuria rarely requires treatment and is not associated with increased morbidity in elderly patients.

  4. Urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Carol E; Saint, Sanjay

    2011-03-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) account for approximately 40% of all health care-associated infections. Despite studies showing benefit of interventions for prevention of CAUTI, adoption of these practices has not occurred in many healthcare facilities in the United States. As urinary catheters account for the majority of healthcare-associated UTIs, the most important interventions are directed at avoiding placement of urinary catheters and promoting early removal when appropriate. Alternatives to indwelling catheters such as intermittent catheterization and condom catheters should be considered. If indwelling catheterization is appropriate, proper aseptic practices for catheter insertion and maintenance and use of a closed catheter collection system are essential for preventing CAUTI. The use of antimicrobial catheters also may be considered when the rates of CAUTI remain persistently high despite adherence to other evidence-based practices, or in patients deemed to be at high risk for CAUTI or its complications. Attention toward prevention of CAUTI will likely increase as Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services and other third-party payers no longer reimburse for hospital-acquired UTI.

  5. Urinary tract infection in children after cardiac surgery: Incidence, causes, risk factors and outcomes in a single-center study.

    PubMed

    Kabbani, Mohamed S; Ismail, Sameh R; Fatima, Anis; Shafi, Rehana; Idris, Julinar A; Mehmood, Akhter; Singh, Reetam K; Elbarabry, Mahmoud; Hijazi, Omar; Hussein, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infection (UTI) increases hospitalization, cost and morbidity. In this cohort study, we aimed to determine the incidence, risk factors, etiology and outcomes of UTIs in post-operative cardiac children. To this end, we studied all post-operative patients admitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PCICU) in 2012, and we divided the patients into two groups: the UTI (UTI group) and the non-UTI (control group). We compared both groups for multiple peri-operative risk factors. We included 413 children in this study. Of these, 29 (7%) had UTIs after cardiac surgery (UTI group), and 384 (93%) were free from UTIs (control group). All UTI cases were catheter-associated UTIs (CAUTIs). A total of 1578 urinary catheter days were assessed in this study, with a CAUTI density rate of 18 per 1000 catheter days. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following risk factors for CAUTI development: duration of urinary catheter placement (p<0.001), presence of congenital abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) (p<0.0041) and the presence of certain syndromes (Down, William, and Noonan) (p<0.02). Gram-negative bacteria accounted for 63% of the CAUTI. The main causes of CAUTI were Klebsiella (27%), Candida (24%) and Escherichia coli (21%). Resistant organisms caused 34% of CAUTI. Two patients (7%) died in the UTI group compared with the one patient (0.3%) who died in the control group (p<0.05). Based on these findings, we concluded that an increased duration of the urinary catheter, the presence of CAKUT, and the presence of syndromes comprised the main risk factors for CAUTI. Gram-negative organisms were the main causes for CAUTI, and one-third of them found to be resistant in this single-center study. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Urinary tract infections in adults].

    PubMed

    Emonet, Stéphane; Harbarth, Stephan; van Delden, Christian

    2011-04-27

    Urinary tract infections are commonly seen by general practitioners. Quinolones are frequently prescribed in this setting. The emergence of resistance to these antibiotics has led to new guidelines for the management of uncomplicated UTI, based on the use of fosfomycin and furadantine. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and treatment of urinary tract infections in adults.

  7. Isolation and Molecular Detection of Gram Negative Bacteria Causing Urinary Tract Infection in Patients Referred to Shahrekord Hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Tajbakhsh, Elahe; Tajbakhsh, Sara; Khamesipour, Faham

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), and their complications, cause serious health problems, which affect millions of people every year. Infections of the urinary tract are the second most common type of infection in the body and approximately 20% of women are especially prone to UTIs for reasons not yet well understood. Urinary Tract Infections in men are not as common as in women yet can be very serious when they do occur. Accurate identification of bacterial isolates is an essential task of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and variety of the causative microbial agents of UTIs in patients who had referred to a medical laboratory of Kashani and Hajar hospital in Shahrekord, Iran. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study 147 urine samples of patients (urine test results were positive for UTIs) were examined during April to September 2013. A total of 147 urine samples of patients with clinical symptoms of UTI who had been referred to a medical laboratory of Kashani and Hajar hospital in Shahrekord (Iran), were collected and processed immediately for laboratory analysis. Results: Escherichia coli was identified as the most common causative agent of UTIs (51.70% of total isolates in both sexes), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. Pneumoniae) (16.32%). Frequency of Proteus spp., Acinetobacter spp., Entrobacter spp., Citrobacter spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Providencia spp. was 10.88%, 6.12%, 5.44%, 4.08%, 3.40% and 2.04%, respectively. Statistical analysis by Fisher exact test showed that there was no significant relationship between the type of bacteria and gender (P > 0.05). Chi square test showed that there was no significant relationship between the type of bacteria and the use of catheter and age group (P > 0.05). However, there was a significant relationship between the type of bacteria and the history of hospitalization (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Our

  8. Managing urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, Sermin A; Mattoo, Tej K

    2011-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common in childhood. Presence of pyuria and bacteriuria in an appropriately collected urine sample are diagnostic of UTI. The risk of UTI is increased with an underlying urological abnormality such as vesicoureteral reflux, constipation, and voiding dysfunction. Patients with acute pyelonephritis are at risk of renal scarring and subsequent complications such as hypertension, proteinuria with and without FSGS, pregnancy-related complications and even end-stage renal failure. The relevance and the sequence of the renal imaging following initial UTI, and the role of antimicrobial prophylaxis and surgical intervention are currently undergoing an intense debate. Prompt treatment of UTI and appropriate follow-up of those at increased risk of recurrence and/or renal scarring are important.

  9. Evaluation of the antibacterial potential of Petroselinum crispum and Rosmarinus officinalis against bacteria that cause urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Petrolini, Fernanda Villas Boas; Lucarini, Rodrigo; de Souza, Maria Gorete Mendes; Pires, Regina Helena; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes

    2013-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the antibacterial activity of the crude hydroalcoholic extracts, fractions, and compounds of two plant species, namely Rosmarinus officinalis and Petroselinum crispum, against the bacteria that cause urinary tract infection. The microdilution method was used for determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The crude hydroalcoholic extract of R. officinalis displayed in vitro activity against Gram-positive bacteria, with satisfactory MBC for the clinical isolate S. saprophyticus. The fractions and the pure compound rosmarinic acid did not furnish promising results for Gram-negative bacteria, whereas fractions 2, 3, and 4 gave encouraging results for Gram-positive bacteria and acted as bactericide against S. epidermidis as well as E. faecalis (ATCC 29212) and its clinical isolate. R. officinalis led to promising results in the case of Gram-positive bacteria, resulting in a considerable interest in the development of reliable alternatives for the treatment of urinary infections.

  10. Evaluation of the antibacterial potential of Petroselinum crispum and Rosmarinus officinalis against bacteria that cause urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Petrolini, Fernanda Villas Boas; Lucarini, Rodrigo; de Souza, Maria Gorete Mendes; Pires, Regina Helena; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes

    2013-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the antibacterial activity of the crude hydroalcoholic extracts, fractions, and compounds of two plant species, namely Rosmarinus officinalis and Petroselinum crispum, against the bacteria that cause urinary tract infection. The microdilution method was used for determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The crude hydroalcoholic extract of R. officinalis displayed in vitro activity against Gram-positive bacteria, with satisfactory MBC for the clinical isolate S. saprophyticus. The fractions and the pure compound rosmarinic acid did not furnish promising results for Gram-negative bacteria, whereas fractions 2, 3, and 4 gave encouraging results for Gram-positive bacteria and acted as bactericide against S. epidermidis as well as E. faecalis (ATCC 29212) and its clinical isolate. R. officinalis led to promising results in the case of Gram-positive bacteria, resulting in a considerable interest in the development of reliable alternatives for the treatment of urinary infections. PMID:24516424

  11. Lower urinary tract symptoms: thinking beyond the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Akbar; Winkle, David

    2014-07-17

    We present a case of a 54-year-old man with progressive lower urinary tract symptoms over 12 months. Physical examination, urinalysis, serum biochemistry and ultrasound of the renal tract were all unremarkable. Flexible cystoscopy was normal. Urodynamic assessment revealed an overactive bladder of unknown aetiology. The patient went on to have an MRI of the lumbosacral spine which showed a spinal cord tumour of the conus medullaris. The patient underwent a laminectomy and resection of the tumour. Histology showed myxopapillary ependymoma of the spinal cord. This case highlights the need to consider the full spectrum of causes, urological and non-urological, in assessing a patient with voiding dysfunction. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Urinary tract infections in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ky; Sivalingam, N

    2007-01-01

    Urinary tract infections frequently affect pregnant mothers. This problem causes significant morbidity and healthcare expenditure. Three common clinical manifestations of UTIs in pregnancy are: asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis and acute pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli remains the most frequent organism isolated in UTIs. All pregnant mothers should be screened for UTIs in pregnancy and antibiotics should be commenced without delay. Urine culture and sensitivity is the gold standard in diagnosing UTIs. Without treatment, asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy is associated with preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, maternal hypertension, pre-eclampsia and anaemia. Acute pyelonephritis can lead to maternal sepsis. Recurrent UTIs in pregnancy require prophylactic antibiotic treatment.

  13. Microfluidic system for the identification of bacterial pathogens causing urinary tract infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter; Lind, Anders; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbi; Turlej-Rogacka, Agata; Goossens, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections and pose a significant healthcare burden. The growing trend in antibiotic resistance makes it mandatory to develop diagnostic kits which allow not only the determination of a pathogen but also the antibiotic resistances. We have developed a microfluidic cartridge which takes a direct urine sample, extracts the DNA, performs an amplification using batch-PCR and flows the sample over a microarray which is printed into a microchannel for fluorescence detection. The cartridge is injection-molded out of COP and contains a set of two-component injection-molded rotary valves to switch between input and to isolate the PCR chamber during thermocycling. The hybridization probes were spotted directly onto a functionalized section of the outlet microchannel. We have been able to successfully perform PCR of E.coli in urine in this chip and perform a fluorescence detection of PCR products. An upgraded design of the cartridge contains the buffers and reagents in blisters stored on the chip.

  14. Diagnosis and management of fungal urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, Carol A

    2014-03-01

    When the terms funguria or fungal urinary tract infection are used, most physicians are referring to candiduria and urinary tract infections due to Candida species. Other fungi, including yeasts and molds can involve the kidney during the course of disseminated infection, but rarely cause symptoms referable to the urinary tract. Candida species appear to be unique in their ability to both colonize and cause invasive disease in the urinary tract. This overview focuses only on candiduria and Candida urinary tract infection because they are common and many times present perplexing management issues. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Bacterial characteristics of importance for recurrent urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ejrnæs, Karen

    2011-04-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infectious diseases encountered in clinical practice and account for significant morbidity and high medical costs. Escherichia coli is the most predominant pathogen causing 80-90% of community-acquired UTIs and 30-50% of nosocomially-acquired UTIs. Recurrent UTIs (RUTIs) are reported in 25% of women within 6 months of an acute UTI episode and pose a major problem. The aim of the present thesis was to look for bacterial characteristics of importance for recurrence of UTI caused by E. coli. The thesis is based on three papers. The study is based on E. coli from 236 Swedish women with community-acquired symptomatic lower UTI from a large study of 1162 patients treated with one of three different dosing regimens of pivmecillinam or placebo. The women were evaluated clinically and bacteriologically at the initial visit and at two scheduled follow-up visits. According to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and culture results all primary infecting E. coli (initial isolates, pretherapy) were assigned into whether the initial infection was followed by cure, persistence, reinfection or relapse during follow-up. The prevalence of virulence factor genes (VFGs), phylogenetic groups, biofilm formation, plasmids and resistance to antimicrobials among primary infecting E. coli causing persistence or relapse at the follow-up visits were compared with the prevalence of these among E. coli followed by cure or reinfection. Previous studies of RUTI using phenotypically based typing methods or less specific DNA based typing methods have concluded, that RUTIs are mainly attributable to reinfection with new strains. However, applying PFGE showed that 77% of RUTIs were caused by a relapse with the primary infecting E. coli (Paper I). This may support the recent observation that E. coli can invade and replicate within the murine bladder forming biofilm-like intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) and establish

  16. [Mechanisms of urinary tract sterility maintenance].

    PubMed

    Okrągła, Emilia; Szychowska, Katarzyna; Wolska, Lidia

    2014-06-02

    Physiologically, urine and the urinary tract are maintained sterile because of physical and chemical properties of urine and the innate immune system's action. The urinary tract is constantly exposed to the invasion of microorganisms from the exterior environment, also because of the anatomical placement of the urethra, in the vicinity of the rectum. Particularly vulnerable to urinary tract infections (UTI) are women (an additional risk factor is pregnancy), but also the elderly and children. The main pathogens causing UTI are bacteria; in 70-95% of cases it is the bacterium Escherichia coli. Infections caused by viruses and fungi are less common and are associated with decreased immunity, pharmacotherapy, or some diseases. Bacteria have evolved a number of factors that facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract: the cover and cell membrane antigens O and K1, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), fimbriae, pile and cilia. On the other hand, the human organism has evolved mechanisms to hinder colonization of the urinary tract: mechanisms arising from the anatomical structure of the urinary tract, the physicochemical properties of the urine and the activity of the innate immune system, also known as non-specific, which isolates and destroys pathogens using immunological processes, and the mechanisms for release of antimicrobial substances such as Tamm-Horsfall protein, mucopolysaccharides, immunoglobulins IgA and IgG, lactoferrin, lipocalin, neutrophils, cytokines and antimicrobial peptides. This review aims to analyze the state of knowledge on the mechanisms to maintain the sterility of the urinary tract used by the human organism and bacterial virulence factors to facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract.

  17. Urinary tract infections in children.

    PubMed

    Sedberry-Ross, Sherry; Pohl, Hans G

    2008-03-01

    Urinary tract infections can be a significant source of morbidity in the pediatric population. The mainstay of evaluating urinary tract infections in children has been physical examination, urinalysis and culture, and renal and bladder sonography and contrast cystography. However, novel clinical paradigms now consider the importance of various risk factors, such as bacterial virulence and antibiotic-resistance patterns, elimination disorders, and the role of innate immunity and inflammation in determining the likelihood of renal cortical scarring.

  18. Urinary tract infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Evan B; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2004-06-07

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an exceedingly common problem prompting seven million office visits and one million hospitalizations in the United States each year. Advances in the understanding of both host and bacterial factors involved in UTI have led to many improvements in therapy. While there have also been advances in the realm of antimicrobials, there have been numerous problems with multiple drug resistant organisms. Providing economical care while minimizing drug resistance requires appropriate diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of urinary tract infections.

  19. Periurethral fibrosis secondary to prostatic inflammation causing lower urinary tract symptoms: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cantiello, Francesco; Cicione, Antonio; Salonia, Andrea; Autorino, Riccardo; Tucci, Luigi; Madeo, Immacolata; Damiano, Rocco

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the role periurethral fibrosis secondary to chronic prostatic inflammation as a potential contributing factor to the etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in male patients. Periurethral prostate tissue from 30 consecutive patients who underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer was analyzed. We circumferentially performed 16 periurethral core bench biopsies on each radical prostatectomy specimen to evaluate the extent of periurethral inflammatory infiltrate and collagen and elastin amount. The clinical and urodynamic findings and the collagen and elastin periurethral amount in patients with or without inflammation were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test and the Pearson χ(2) test. Spearman correlation analysis tested the association between variables. Of the 30 patients, 21 (70%) presented with inflammatory infiltration and 9 (30%) had no inflammation. A significant difference was found between the 2 groups in International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS; P = .03) and in urodynamics findings by Schafer class (P = .01) and Abrams Griffiths number (P = .002). The histologic evaluation showed a higher collagen quantity (P = .04) and lower, albeit not statistically significant, elastin amount (P = .19) in the inflammation group. A positive association was observed between IPSS with inflammation grading (r = 0.507; P = .004) and collagen content (r = 0.649; P <.001), whereas IPSS was correlated negatively with elastin content (r = -0.565; P = .001). Prostate inflammation may induce fibrotic changes in periurethral prostatic tissues, and this may eventually promote urethral stiffness and LUTS. Patients experiencing prostate-related LUTS could benefit from anti-inflammatory therapies, used alone or combined with the currently prescribed regimen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility of microorganisms that cause urinary tract infections in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Jesús; de Malet, Ana; Cano, María Eliecer; de la Rubia, Luis; Wallmann, Reinhard; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Calvo, Jorge

    2017-10-06

    Cumulative susceptibility reports are a valuable tool for the empirical treatment of urinary tract infections, especially in the current context of increasing resistance rates. Our objective was to analyze the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates in urine cultures of pediatric patients during a five-year period. Retrospective study of urine cultures from 2011 to 2015. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed using the Vitek-2 system (BioMérieux(®)) and categorized according to EUCAST criteria. Antimicrobial susceptibility data were analyzed by gender and age groups (neonates, 1 month to 5 years, 5-15 years) before being compared with data obtained from patients over the age of 15 years. During the study period, 17164 urine cultures were processed from 7924 patients under 16 years of age. Antimicrobial susceptibility rates in these patients were: ampicillin 36.3%, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 75.3%, cefuroxime 83.2%, co-trimoxazole 68.9%, ciprofloxacin 85.3%, fosfomycin 85.5%, nitrofurantoin 84.4% and 3rd generation cephalosporins 89-91%. Aminoglycosides (>92%) and carbapenems (95%) maintained the highest susceptibility rates. The prevalence of ESBL-producing isolates was significantly lower in children under the age of 16 years (1.5% vs. 4.1%). In patients under the age of 16 years, Escherichia coli isolates in girls were significantly more sensitive (p<0.0001) to ampicillin (41% vs. 30%) and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (82% vs. 72%) than in boys. The compilation of cumulative susceptibility reports disaggregated by age or gender reveals significant differences. In our setting, cefuroxime may be considered the first-line empirical treatment in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  1. Approach to urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Najar, M S; Saldanha, C L; Banday, K A

    2009-10-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection experienced by humans after respiratory and gastro-intestinal infections, and also the most common cause of both community-acquired and nosocomial infections for patients admitted to hospitals. For better management and prognosis, it is mandatory to know the possible site of infection, whether the infection is uncomplicated or complicated, re-infection or relapse, or treatment failure and its pathogenesis and risk factors. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common in certain age groups and has different connotations. It needs to be treated and completely cured in pregnant women and preschool children. Reflux nephropathy in children could result in chronic kidney disease; otherwise, urinary tract infections do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of end-stage renal disease. Symptomatic urinary tract infections occur most commonly in women of child-bearing age. Cystitis predominates, but needs to be distinguished from acute urethral syndrome that affects both sexes and has a different management plan than UTIs. The prostatitis symptoms are much more common than bacterial prostatic infections. The treatment needs to be prolonged in bacterial prostatitis and as cure rates are not very high and relapses are common, the classification of prostatitis needs to be understood. The consensus conference convened by National Institute of Health added two more groups of patients, namely, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis, in addition to acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Although white blood cells in urine signify inflammation, they do not always signify UTI. Quantitative cultures of urine provide definitive evidence of UTI. Imaging studies should be done 3-6 weeks after cure of acute infection to identify abnormalities predisposing to infection or renal damage or which may affect management. Treatment of cystitis in women should be a three-day course and if

  2. Approach to urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Najar, M. S.; Saldanha, C. L.; Banday, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection experienced by humans after respiratory and gastro-intestinal infections, and also the most common cause of both community-acquired and nosocomial infections for patients admitted to hospitals. For better management and prognosis, it is mandatory to know the possible site of infection, whether the infection is uncomplicated or complicated, re-infection or relapse, or treatment failure and its pathogenesis and risk factors. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common in certain age groups and has different connotations. It needs to be treated and completely cured in pregnant women and preschool children. Reflux nephropathy in children could result in chronic kidney disease; otherwise, urinary tract infections do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of end-stage renal disease. Symptomatic urinary tract infections occur most commonly in women of child-bearing age. Cystitis predominates, but needs to be distinguished from acute urethral syndrome that affects both sexes and has a different management plan than UTIs. The prostatitis symptoms are much more common than bacterial prostatic infections. The treatment needs to be prolonged in bacterial prostatitis and as cure rates are not very high and relapses are common, the classification of prostatitis needs to be understood. The consensus conference convened by National Institute of Health added two more groups of patients, namely, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis, in addition to acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Although white blood cells in urine signify inflammation, they do not always signify UTI. Quantitative cultures of urine provide definitive evidence of UTI. Imaging studies should be done 3-6 weeks after cure of acute infection to identify abnormalities predisposing to infection or renal damage or which may affect management. Treatment of cystitis in women should be a three-day course and if

  3. [Urinary tract infections and chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Sobotová, D

    2011-01-01

    The paper briefly summarizes issues related to urinary tract infections in adults: predispositions and risk factors, classification, assessment of pathogenicity of bacterial agents, the role of bacteriuria and leucocyturia, interpretation of findings, treatment principles and an association with chronic renal failure. Urinary tract infections are the second most frequent infectious disease in the population. They most often affect women of childbearing potential and then seniors of both sexes who have multiple risk factors. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus saprophyticus are the most pathogenic towards urinary tract; they are responsible for 85% and 10-15% of cases of acute uncomplicated urinary infections, respectively. Chronic pyelonephritis, a chronic interstitial nephritis, is the fourth most frequent cause of chronic renal failure. Chronic renal failure is a risk factor for the development of urinary infections due to metabolic disorders resulting in secondary immunodeficiencywith a disorder of all components of immunity. In patients with chronic renal failure, urinary tract infections occur most frequently after kidney transplantation when graft pyelonephritis is a life-threatening complication. Therefore, urinary tract infection prevention with co-trimoxazole once daily over at least 6 months is recommended in renal allograft recipients.

  4. Characteristics of Escherichia coli causing persistence or relapse of urinary tract infections: phylogenetic groups, virulence factors and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Ejrnæs, Karen; Stegger, Marc; Reisner, Andreas; Ferry, Sven; Monsen, Tor; Holm, Stig E; Lundgren, Bettina; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs) pose a major problem but little is known about characteristics of Escherichia coli associated with RUTI. This study includes E. coli from 155 women with community-acquired lower urinary tract infections (UTIs) randomized to one of three dosing regiments of pivmecillinam and aimed to identify associations between the presence of 29 virulence factor genes (VFGs), phylogenetic groups and biofilm formation and the course of infection during follow-up visits at 8-10 and 35-49 days post-inclusion, respectively. E. coli causing persistence or relapse were more often of phylogenetic group B2 and had a significantly higher aggregate VFG score than E. coli that were not detectable at follow-up. Specifically, these E. coli causing persistence or relapse were characterized by a higher prevalence of hemolysis and 12 VFGs (sfa/focDE, papAH, agn43, chuA, fyuA, iroN, kpsM II, kpsM II K2, cnf1, hlyD, malX and usp). KpsM II K2 and agn43a(CFT073) were independently associated with persistence or relapse. No specific combination of presence/absence of VFGs could serve as a marker to predict RUTI. Stratifying for VFGs, seven days of pivmecillinam treatment reduced the prevalence of persistence or relapse of UTI compared with three days. In vitro biofilm formation was not higher among E. coli causing persistence or relapse. The presence of agn43a(CFT073) or agn43b(CFT073) was associated with biofilm forming capacity. In conclusion, our results show potential targets for prevention and treatment of persistence/relapse of UTI and potential markers for selecting treatment lengths and warrant studies of these and new VFGs.

  5. The Pediatric Urinary Tract and Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Penny, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    The pediatric urinary tract often is assessed with medical imaging. Consequently, it is essential for medical imaging professionals to have a fundamental understanding of pediatric anatomy, physiology, and common pathology of the urinary tract to provide optimal patient care. This article provides an overview of fetal development, pediatric urinary anatomy and physiology, and common diseases and conditions of the pediatric urinary tract.

  6. [Temocillin and urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Vallée, M; Bruyère, F; Roblot, F; Brureau, L

    2017-08-28

    Temocillin is an alternative to treat urinary tract infections with bacteria producing extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). The objective is to evaluate the use of temocillin in urinary tract infections. A systematic review of literature was carried out according to PRISMA criteria. All national and international recommendations have been reviewed regarding the indication of the use of temocillin in urology. Data collection on the use of temocillin in urinary tract infection has been performed from the Cochrane, LILACS and the Medline database. The following keywords were used: temocillin, extended spectrum beta-lactamase, urinary tract infections, urine, prostate, epididymis, testis, diffusion, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics. The selection was based on the methodology, language of publication (English/French), relevance to the topic and date of publication of the articles collected. The endpoint was to provide exhaustive scientific information allowing urologists to use this antibiotic in febrile urinary infections. Bacteria producing ESBL has a relatively high susceptible to temocillin, ranging from 61 % to 90 %. These rates would allow its use in probabilistic. The dosage recommended is currently, in the normo-renal patient, 4g per day by intermittent infusion or continuously after a loading dose of 2g. Some studies argue, particularly in case of difficult clinical situations or obese patients, for administration of high doses (6g/24h) rather continuous infusion. There is no evident relationship between high doses and side effects. With an excellent urinary and prostatic diffusion, temocilllin might be recommend for the treatment of ESBL prostatitis. Temocillin is known to have good urinary and prostatic diffusion. According to our results, this antibiotics is now a reliable alternative for the treatment of documented ESBL urinary tract infections. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Fungal infections of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Sobel, J D; Vazquez, J A

    1999-12-01

    Funguria, fungal urinary tract infections, are most commonly caused by Candida species but may also be caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus species, and the endemic mycoses. Candiduria presents as an increasingly common nosocomial infection, which may involve all anatomic levels of the urinary tract, resulting in a spectrum of disease varying from asymptomatic candiduria to clinical sepsis. Although several successful systemic or local therapeutic options exist for the eradication of candiduria, knowledge of the pathogenesis and natural history of candiduria has lagged. This has resulted in confusion among practitioners as to when antifungal therapy is indicated. Treatment guidelines have recently been formulated and are described herein.

  8. Urinary Tract and How It Works

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tract & How It Works The Urinary Tract & How It Works What is the urinary tract and how does it work? The urinary tract is the body’s drainage ... hollow, muscular, balloon-shaped organ that expands as it fills with urine. Although a person does not ...

  9. Reduction of Urinary Tract Infections Caused By Urethral Catheter through the Implementation of Hydrophobic Coating and Geometrical Modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gare, Aya

    2013-11-01

    Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI) is the most common nosocomial infection in the U.S. healthcare system. The obstruction of urine caused by confined air bubbles result in the development of urinary back-flow and stagnation, wherein microbial pathogens could multiply rapidly and colonization within catheters become commonplace. Infections can be prevented by aseptic insertion and the maintenance of a closed drainage system, keeping high infection control standards, and preventing back-flow from the catheter bag. The goal of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a simple, low cost, modification that may be implemented into current catheter designs to reduce the incidence of CAUTI. Using the principle of transmission of fluid-pressure and the Young-Laplace equation for capillary pressure difference, this research focuses on improving the liquid flow in the presence of confined bubbles to prevent stagnation and reflux of bacteria-ridden urine into the body. Preliminary experiments are performed on a variety of tubes with hydrophobic-coating the interior, as well as geometrically modifying the tubes. Proof-of-Concept Prototype tubes are used to represent the drainage system of the catheter structure.

  10. Community-acquired febrile urinary tract infection caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria in hospitalised infants.

    PubMed

    Hernández Marco, Roberto; Guillén Olmos, Elena; Bretón-Martínez, José Rafael; Giner Pérez, Lourdes; Casado Sánchez, Benedicta; Fujkova, Julia; Salamanca Campos, Marina; Nogueira Coito, José Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria are infrequent pathogens of urinary tract infections in children. The objective of our study was to investigate the presence, clinically associated characteristics and risk factors for acquisition of urinary tract infection/acute pyelonephritis (UTI/APN) in hospitalised children <2years old caused by community-acquired ESBL. A case-control study in a second level community hospital in Spain, in which 537 episodes of UTI/APN were investigated in a retrospective study between November 2005 and August 2014. Cases were patients with ESBL strains. For each case, four ESBL-negative controls were selected. A questionnaire with the variables of interest was completed for every patient, and the groups were compared. ESBL-positive strains were found in 19 (3,5%) cultures. Of these 16 (84%) were Escherichia coli. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) of any grade was more frequent in the ESBL group (60 vs. 29%), although without statistical significance. Relapses were more frequent in the ESBL group (42% vs. 18%) (P=.029; OR=3.2; 95%CI: 1.09-9.5). The prevalence of UTI/APN due to ESBL-positive strains increased slightly from 2.7% in the period 2005-2009 to 4.4% in the period 2010-2014. ESBL UTI/APN were associated with more frequent relapses. VUR of any grade was twice more frequent in the ESBL group. Piperacillin/tazobactam, fosfomycin and meropenem showed an excellent activity. Aminoglycosides may be a therapeutic option, and in our patients gentamicin was the antibiotic most used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  11. Urinary tract infections during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gilstrap, L C; Ramin, S M

    2001-09-01

    Urinary tract infections are relatively common in pregnancy and may result in significant morbidity for the pregnant woman and fetus. The authors recommend that all pregnant women be screened for the presence of bacteriuria at their first prenatal visit. Failure to treat bacteriuria during pregnancy may result in as many as 25% of women experiencing acute pyelonephritis. Women with acute pyelonephritis may sustain significant complications, such as preterm labor, transient renal failure, ARDS, sepsis and shock, and hematologic abnormalities. Pregnant women with urinary tract infections should be followed up closely after treatment because as many as one third will experience a recurrence.

  12. Risk factors of all-cause in-hospital mortality among Korean elderly bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI) patients.

    PubMed

    Chin, Bum Sik; Kim, Myung Soo; Han, Sang Hoon; Shin, So Youn; Choi, Hee Kyung; Chae, Yun Tae; Jin, Sung Joon; Baek, Ji-Hyeon; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Kim, Chang Oh; Kim, June Myung

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most frequent cause of bacteremia/sepsis in elderly people and increasing antimicrobial resistance in uropathogens has been observed. To describe the characteristics of bacteremic UTI in elderly patients and to identify the independent risk factors of all-cause in-hospital mortality, a retrospective cohort study of bacteremic UTI patients of age over 65 was performed at a single 2000-bed tertiary hospital. Bacteremic UTI was defined as the isolation of the same organism from both urine and blood within 48 h. Eighty-six elderly bacteremic UTI patients were enrolled. Community-acquired infection was the case for most patients (79.1%), and Escherichia coli accounted for 88.6% (70/79) among Gram-negative organisms. Non-E. coli Gram-negative organisms were more frequent in hospital-acquired cases and male patients while chronic urinary catheter insertion was related with Gram-positive urosepsis. The antibiotic susceptibility among Gram-negative organisms was not different depending on the source of bacteremic UTI, while non-E. coli Gram-negative organisms were less frequently susceptible for cefotaxime, cefoperazone/sulbactam, and aztreonam. All-cause in-hospital mortality was 11.6%, and functional dependency (adjusted hazard ratio=HR=10.9, 95% confidence interval=95%CI=2.2-54.6) and low serum albumin (adjusted HR=27.0, 95%CI=2.0-361.2) were independently related with increased all-cause in-hospital mortality. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mild recessive mutations in six Fraser syndrome-related genes cause isolated congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Stefan; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Dworschak, Gabriel C; Hilger, Alina C; Saisawat, Pawaree; Vivante, Asaf; Stajic, Natasa; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Reutter, Heiko M; Kehinde, Elijah O; Tasic, Velibor; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) account for approximately 40% of children with ESRD in the United States. Hitherto, mutations in 23 genes have been described as causing autosomal dominant isolated CAKUT in humans. However, >90% of cases of isolated CAKUT still remain without a molecular diagnosis. Here, we hypothesized that genes mutated in recessive mouse models with the specific CAKUT phenotype of unilateral renal agenesis may also be mutated in humans with isolated CAKUT. We applied next-generation sequencing technology for targeted exon sequencing of 12 recessive murine candidate genes in 574 individuals with isolated CAKUT from 590 families. In 15 of 590 families, we identified recessive mutations in the genes FRAS1, FREM2, GRIP1, FREM1, ITGA8, and GREM1, all of which function in the interaction of the ureteric bud and the metanephric mesenchyme. We show that isolated CAKUT may be caused partially by mutations in recessive genes. Our results also indicate that biallelic missense mutations in the Fraser/MOTA/BNAR spectrum genes cause isolated CAKUT, whereas truncating mutations are found in the multiorgan form of Fraser syndrome. The newly identified recessive biallelic mutations in these six genes represent the molecular cause of isolated CAKUT in 2.5% of the 590 affected families in this study. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  14. Amikacin therapy for urinary tract infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Yeon; Choi, Su-Mi; Park, Sun Hee; Lee, Dong-Gun; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The number of urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) is increasing. In an outpatient setting, there are limited therapeutic options to treat ESBL-producing pathogens. We evaluated the outcomes of amikacin outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) for UTIs caused by ESBL-EC in patients not pre-treated with carbapenem. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of amikacin OPAT for UTIs caused by ESBL-EC. Results: From November 2011 to October 2012, eight females, who could not be hospitalized for carbapenem treatment, were treated with amikacin OPAT for nine episodes of non-bacteremic ESBL-EC UTIs. Seven of the eight patients had one or more comorbidities. Of the nine UTI cases, three had symptomatic lower UTIs and six had non-bacteremic upper UTIs. In all of the cases, symptomatic and laboratory improvements were observed following amikacin OPAT. One patient showed a delayed relapse with bilateral microabscesses 3 weeks after treatment cessation; however, a clinical and microbiological cure was eventually reached. All of the patients were able to tolerate amikacin OPAT without any significant nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity. Conclusions: Amikacin OPAT represents a feasible therapeutic option for non-bacteremic UTIs caused by ESBL-EC in settings with limited resources. PMID:26767869

  15. In vitro studies on medicinal plants used against bacterial diabetic foot ulcer (BDFU) and urinary tract infected (UTI) causing pathogens.

    PubMed

    Subbu Lakshmi, S; Chelladurai, G; Suresh, B

    2016-09-01

    The pus samples from diabetic foot ulcer patients and urine samples from urinary tract infected patients were collected and inoculated in nutrient agar plates. The colonies showing different morphologies were streaked on selective agar plates. The antibacterial assay of selected commercial antibiotics was tested against the foot ulcer and urinary tract isolates. The result revealed that most of the organisms were found to be resistant against the antibiotics. Screening of antibacterial activity of selected plants, methanol extracts of plants were prepared and tested against foot ulcer pathogens. Among the plants used, the methanolic extract Tragia involucrata was very effective against the foot ulcer pathogens and to separate the compounds present in the methanolic extract of T. involucrata, when it was subjected to column chromatography. The fractions obtained were further checked for their antibacterial property and fraction 1 which inhibited the pathogens, were subjected to thin layer chromatography and the structure of the particular phytochemical compound was elucidated by NMR study. The spices were tested for their antibacterial property against the urinary tract pathogens. Among the spices tested; Allium sativum inhibited the growth of the pathogens isolated from urinary tract infection. It can be concluded that the plants extract can be used to discover natural products that may serve as lead for the development of new pharmaceuticals addressing the major therapeutic needs.

  16. Urinary tract infection in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Chacón-Mora, Natalia; Pachón Díaz, Jerónimo; Cordero Matía, Elisa

    2017-04-01

    Infectious complications remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality among transplant recipients. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infectious complication in kidney transplant recipients with a reported incidence from 25% to 75%, varies widely likely due to differences in definition, diagnostic criteria, study design, and length of observation. We sought reviews the incidence and importance of urinary tract infection on graft survival, the microbiology with special emphasis on multidrug resistant microorganisms, the therapeutic management of UTI and the prophylaxis of recurrent UTI among solid organ transplant recipients, highlighting the need for prospective clinical trials to unify the clinical management in this population.

  17. Urinary tract infections: treatment/comparative therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Olin, Shelly J; Bartges, Joseph W

    2015-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) occurs when there is compromise of host defense mechanisms and a virulent microbe adheres, multiplies, and persists in a portion of the urinary tract. Most commonly, UTI is caused by bacteria, but fungi and viruses are possible. Urine culture and sensitivity are the gold standards for diagnosis of bacterial UTI. Identifying the location of infection (eg, bladder, kidney, prostate) as well as comorbidities (eg, diabetes mellitus, immunosuppression) is essential to guide the diagnostic and therapeutic plan. Antimicrobial agents are the mainstay of therapy for bacterial UTI and selected ideally based on culture and sensitivity.

  18. Urinary tract infection by chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Swain, Bichitrananda; Otta, Sarita; Sahu, Kundan Kumar; Panda, Kirtika; Rout, Subhrajita

    2014-08-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum, a facultative anaerobic proteobacterium, is particularly isolated from water and soil in tropical areas and has been implicated in few infections like septicemia, visceral abscesses, skin and soft tissue infections, meningitis and diarrhea. But urinary tract infection caused by it is very rare. Limited awareness about this pathogen and inappropriate antibiotic therapy contribute to a high mortality rate. Here, we describe an unusual case of urinary tract infection by Chromobacterium violaceum in a young immuno-competent male which was managed aggressively with proper antibiotics as per the culture sensitivity report.

  19. Enterococcus hirae, an unusual pathogen in humans causing urinary tract infection in a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia: first case report in Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Bourafa, N.; Loucif, L.; Boutefnouchet, N.; Rolain, J.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus hirae is a zoonotic pathogen rarely isolated from human infections. This case is the first description of E. hirae causing urinary tract infection in a diabetic man with benign prostatic hyperplasia from Algeria. The clinical isolate was identified by MALDI-TOF MS and displayed a multisensitivity antibiotic profile. PMID:26543562

  20. Treatment and Clinical Outcomes of Urinary Tract Infections Caused by KPC-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in a Retrospective Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Bryan T.; Marschall, Jonas; Tibbetts, Robert J.; Neuner, Elizabeth A.; Dunne, W. Michael; Ritchie, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Background Optimal treatment regimens for infections caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Enterobacteriaceae are not well defined. Objectives This study describes the treatment and outcomes of patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by KPC-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Methods Retrospective cohort study of adult inpatients with bacteriuria caused by KPC-positive organisms at Barnes-Jewish Hospital from June 1, 2006 to February 1, 2008. KPC-positive isolates were identified utilizing disk diffusion susceptibility testing and confirmed to contain blaKPC via molecular methods. Results Twenty-one patients met inclusion criteria and all were classified as having symptomatic UTI. The majority of patients were female (15 of 21 – 71%) with a mean age of 62.4 years (SD ± 15.2). Successful clinical and microbiologic responses were observed in 16 patients (76%) for both outcomes. Patients with urinary catheters had them removed or replaced in 9 of 15 cases (60%). Antibiotics active against the isolated pathogen were provided in 14 of 21 cases (67%), often after considerable delay (median: 72.5 hours, range: 4–312 hours). All seven patients receiving aminoglycoside therapy had successful clinical and microbiological responses, and in vitro testing of an extended antibiotic panel revealed high susceptibility rates for tigecycline (28 of 29 – 97%), minocycline (22 of 29 – 76%), and fosfomycin (25 of 29 – 86%) against the KPC-positive isolates. Conclusions Although delays to receipt of appropriate therapy were often experienced, clinical outcomes investigated revealed high rates of successful response in this limited group of patients. Therapy with aminoglycosides and tetracycline derivatives suggest therapeutic promise in the treatment of KPC-producing Enterobacteriaceae UTI. PMID:22691610

  1. Urinary tract infection in older adults.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Theresa A; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2013-10-01

    Urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria are common in older adults. Unlike in younger adults, distinguishing symptomatic urinary tract infection from asymptomatic bacteriuria is problematic, as older adults, particularly those living in long-term care facilities, are less likely to present with localized genitourinary symptoms. Consensus guidelines have been published to assist clinicians with diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infection; however, a single evidence-based approach to diagnosis of urinary tract infection does not exist. In the absence of a gold standard definition of urinary tract infection that clinicians agree upon, overtreatment with antibiotics for suspected urinary tract infection remains a significant problem, and leads to a variety of negative consequences including the development of multidrug-resistant organisms. Future studies improving the diagnostic accuracy of urinary tract infections are needed. This review will cover the prevalence, diagnosis and diagnostic challenges, management, and prevention of urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria in older adults.

  2. Urinary tract infection in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Theresa A; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria are common in older adults. Unlike in younger adults, distinguishing symptomatic urinary tract infection from asymptomatic bacteriuria is problematic, as older adults, particularly those living in long-term care facilities, are less likely to present with localized genitourinary symptoms. Consensus guidelines have been published to assist clinicians with diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infection; however, a single evidence-based approach to diagnosis of urinary tract infection does not exist. In the absence of a gold standard definition of urinary tract infection that clinicians agree upon, overtreatment with antibiotics for suspected urinary tract infection remains a significant problem, and leads to a variety of negative consequences including the development of multidrug-resistant organisms. Future studies improving the diagnostic accuracy of urinary tract infections are needed. This review will cover the prevalence, diagnosis and diagnostic challenges, management, and prevention of urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria in older adults. PMID:24391677

  3. [Urinary tract infections in adults].

    PubMed

    Ali, Adel Ben; Bagnis, Corinne Isnard

    2014-09-01

    Urinary tract infections in adults are frequent and can induce several septic situations. Their economic cost (drugs, microbiologic samples, consultations and/or hospitalizations and stop working) and ecologic cost (second reasons of antibiotic prescription in winter and first in the rest of the year) are important. A better respect of recommendations can improve the outcome of this different infections and decrease their cost.

  4. Treatment of a lower urinary tract infection in a cat caused by a multi-drug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Pomba, Constança; Couto, Natasha; Moodley, Arshnee

    2010-10-01

    Staphylococci and enterococci are common causes of urinary tract infections in cats. However, both species are rarely implicated together as causes of lower urinary tract infections associated with urethral obstruction. This report describes the first case of a multi-drug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius belonging to spa type t06 and Enterococcus faecalis urinary infection in a cat with pre-existing and recurrent urethral obstruction. Both species were isolated at >10(5)CFU/ml from a cystocentesis urine specimen. Clinical and ultrasound features, results from urinalysis, urine culture, molecular typing and susceptibility testing by minimal inhibitory concentrations determination are described. Oral treatment with nitrofurantoin, the only antimicrobial agent that constituted a viable therapeutic option, had a positive outcome.

  5. Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Caused by Fusarium proliferatum in an Agranulocytosis Patient and a Review of Published Reports.

    PubMed

    Su, Huilin; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Li, Li; Zhao, Ying; Zhu, Junhao; Zhu, Min

    2016-02-01

    Infections caused by Fusarium species are increasing in frequency among immunocompromised hosts, but urinary tract infection (UTI) due to Fusarium proliferatum has not been reported in the literature so far. We describe a case of UTI caused by F. proliferatum in a 47-year-old man who was diagnosed with rectal cancer and metastasis. He underwent radical resection of rectal carcinoma and local resection of hepatic metastases. After the first adjuvant chemotherapy, the patient presented the obvious high fever, severely diarrhea and progressive decline of the white blood cell count. The direct microscopic examination of fungi in urine was positive, and the fungal cultures showed white, cotton-like colony. After the DNA sequencing, it was identified as F. proliferatum. We gave the patient itraconazole and other antibiotics to fight the infection. A month later, the temperature dropped to normal and the results of the direct microscopic examination and culture of fungi in urine turn negative. The itraconazole is effective against F. proliferatum.

  6. The management of urinary tract infections in octogenarian women.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dudley; Giarenis, Ilias; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-07-01

    Urinary Tract Infections are common in women of all ages and the incidence increases with age. Whilst they are a common cause of lower urinary tract symptoms in all women they may be associated with increased morbidity in the elderly. Appropriate investigation and treatment in primary and secondary care are essential to effectively manage urinary tract infection and decrease morbidity and hospitalisation rates. Loss of endogenous oestrogen at the time of the menopause is associated with the urogenital atrophy and an increased incidence of urinary tract infection. Consequently vaginal oestrogen therapy may offer a rationale for treatment and prevent of urinary tract infection. The aim of this paper is to review the clinical management of elderly women presenting with primary and recurrent urinary tract infection.

  7. Management of urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Nassar, N T

    2000-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are commonly encountered in medical practice and range from asymptomatic bacteruria to acute pyelonephritis. Enterobacteriaceae with E. coli being the most prevalent, are responsible for most commonly acquired uncomplicated UTIs and usually respond promptly to oral antibiotics. In contradistinction, more resistant pathogens cause nosocomially acquired infections which often require parenteral antibiotic therapy. Patients with acute bacterial prostatitis, usually caused by Enterobacteriaceae present with a tender prostate gland and respond promptly to antibiotic therapy. Chronic bacterial prostatitis on the other hand, is a subacute infection characterized by recurrent episodes of bacterial UTI where the patient presents with vague symptoms of pelvic pain and voiding problems. Treatment is protracted and may be frustrating. Nonbacterial prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome produce symptoms similar to those of chronic bacterial prostatitis. Treatment is not well defined due to their uncertain etiologies. Most episodes of catheter associated bacteruria are asymptomatic, where less than 5% will be complicated by bacteremia. The use of systemic antibiotics for treatment or prevention of bacteruria is not recommended, particularly in the geriatric age group, since it helps select for resistant organisms. Prevention thus remains the best option to control it. Few patients without catheters who have asymptomatic bacteruria develop serious complications and therefore routine antimicrobial therapy is not justified with only two exceptions : before urologic surgery and during pregnancy.

  8. Epidemiological factors associated with ESBL- and non ESBL-producing E. coli causing urinary tract infection in general practice.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Frederik Boëtius; Schønning, Kristian; Rasmussen, Steen Christian; Littauer, Pia; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate how use of antibiotics precedes the presence of ESBL-producing E.coli in general practice. The authors performed a triple-case-control study where three case groups were individually compared to a single control group of uninfected individuals. Urine samples were prospectively collected and retrospective statistical analyses were done. This study included 98 cases with urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by ESBL-producing E. coli, 174 with antibiotic-resistant (non-ESBL) E. coli, 177 with susceptible E. coli and 200 with culture negative urine samples. Case groups had significantly higher use of antibiotics than the control group within 30 days before infection (p < 0.0001). The ESBL group had significantly more hospital admissions than the other case groups (p < 0.05). Hospital admission was an independent risk factor for community onset UTI by ESBL-producing E. coli. Exposure to antibiotics was a risk factor for UTI with E. coli, while prior antibiotic usage was not an indisputable predictor for infection with ESBL-producing E.coli in general practice.

  9. Community-acquired urinary tract infections caused by Burkholderia cepacia complex in patients with no underlying risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Mamuno; Hani, Osama Bani

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) remain common infections diagnosed in outpatients as well as hospitalized patients. Community-acquired UTIs are generally caused by Escherichia coli and other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Burkholderia cepacia is an opportunistic pathogen mainly affecting immunocompromised and hospitalized patients, particularly those who have received prior broad-spectrum antibacterial therapy. Case presentation. Urine samples were collected from 157 outpatients clinically diagnosed with UTI and from 100 healthy control subjects. Samples were cultured on differential media and non-motile lactose-non-fermentors were identified via the Remel RapID ONE system. The isolates were tested by the disc diffusion method against 17 antimicrobial agents. Burkholderia was isolated as a single organism from four patients having uncomplicated infections, and one from recurrent infection. None of these patients had an underlying risk factor for this pathogen. Identification of these isolates by the Remel-RapID ONE system was confirmed by recA gene amplification. The four isolates were resistant to lincomycin, nalidixic acid, oxacillin and penicillin G. These cases received monotherapy of oral co-trimoxazole. Conclusions. Our findings alert urologists and diagnostic laboratories to the potential of B. cepacia complex infections in similar cases, and that this bacterium should not be ruled out. PMID:28348799

  10. Ampicillin for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections caused by vancomycin resistant enterococcus spp (VRE): a single-center university hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kairav J; Cherabuddi, Kartikeya; Shultz, Joseph; Borgert, Samuel; Ramphal, Reuben; Klinker, Kenneth P

    2017-06-27

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci are a common cause of urinary tract infections and are typically multi-drug resistant, including ampicillin. This retrospective study evaluated outcomes of 84 adult patients hospitalized between January 2007 and December 2015 with ampicillin and vancomycin resistant-enterococcus isolates causing UTI and treated with ampicillin. Treatment response was classified as clinical cure and microbiological eradication. Clinical cure was achieved in 88.1% (74/84) of patients. In patients with follow up cultures, microbiologic eradication was achieved in 86% (50/58) of patients. Cure rates were similar in patients with indwelling urinary catheters (n=45) receiving catheter exchange/removal (90.47%; 19/21) versus catheter retention (87.5%; 21/24). Presence of co-morbidities such as diabetes and CKD were not associated with increased risk of treatment failure. Immunocompromised patients achieved lower cure rates of 78.1% (25/32) compared to 94.2% (49/52) among those without immune impairment (p= 0.038). Presence of an underlying urinary tract abnormality was also associated with a lower cure rate of 71.4% (15/21) compared to 93.7% (59/63) in those without urinary tract abnormalities (p=0.0135). Overall cure rates remained high in all groups providing good evidence supporting ampicillin for the treatment of complicated UTI caused by ampicillin and vancomycin resistant enterococci. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. [Urinary tract infection in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Duarte, Geraldo; Marcolin, Alessandra Cristina; Quintana, Silvana Maria; Cavalli, Ricardo Carvalho

    2008-02-01

    Several factors cause urinary tract infection (UTI) to be a relevant complication of the gestational period, aggravating both the maternal and perinatal prognosis. For many years, pregnancy has been considered to be a factor predisposing to all forms of UTI. Today, it is known that pregnancy, as an isolated event, is not responsible for a higher incidence of UTI, but that the anatomical and physiological changes imposed on the urinary tract by pregnancy predispose women with asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) to become pregnant women with symptomatic UTI. AB affects 2 to 10% of all pregnant women and approximately 30% of these will develop pyelonephritis if not properly treated. However, a difficult-to-understand resistance against the identification of AB during this period is observed among prenatalists. The diagnosis of UTI is microbiological and it is based on two urine cultures presenting more than 10(5) colonies/mL urine of the same germ. Treatment is facilitated by the fact that it is based on an antibiogram, with no scientific foundation for the notion that a pre-established therapeutic scheme is an adequate measure. For the treatment of pyelonephritis, it is not possible to wait for the result of culture and previous knowledge of the resistance profile of the antibacterial agents available for the treatment of pregnant women would be the best measure. Another important variable is the use of an intravenous bactericidal antibiotic during the acute phase, with the possibility of oral administration at home after clinical improvement of the patient. At our hospital, the drug that best satisfies all of these requirements is cefuroxime, administered for 10-14 days. Third-generation cephalosporins do not exist in the oral form, all of them involving the inconvenience of parenteral administration. In view of their side effects, aminoglycosides are considered to be inadequate for administration to pregnant women. The inconsistent insinuation of contraindication of

  12. Urinary tract infection and hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, Hülya; Ozek, Eren; Unver, Tamer; Biyikli, Neşe; Alpay, Harika; Cebeci, Dilşat

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in newborns with asymptomatic, unexplained indirect hyperbilirubinemia in the first two weeks of life. Jaundiced infants, otherwise clinically well, less than two weeks of ages, with a total bilirubin level above 15 mg/dl were eligible for the study. A bilirubin work-up including glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6 PD) level, as well as urinalysis and a urine culture were performed in all patients. Patients with UTI, defined as more than 10,000 colony-forming units per milliliter of a single pathogen obtained by bladder catheterization, were evaluated for sepsis. Renal function tests and renal ultrasound were performed in cases with UTI. During follow-up, voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphy (DMSA) were performed as well. A total of 102 patients were enrolled. The bilirubin work-up of patients did not demonstrate any significant underlying disorder. None of the infants had a high direct bilirubin level. UTI was diagnosed in eight (8%) cases [Enterobacter aerogenes (3/8:38%), Enterococcus faecalis (2/8:25%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (2/8:25%) and Escherichia coli (1/8:12%)]. Of those eight patients, only four (50%) had pyuria. Bacteriuria was present in seven (88%) patients. The sepsis screen was negative in all but one case with a high C-reactive protein (CRP) level. None of the patients had a positive blood culture. Renal function tests were within normal levels in all patients. Renal ultrasound showed urinary tract abnormalities in three (38%) patients (hydronephrosis, n=1 and pelviectasis, n=2). VCUG was performed in all patients during the study period and one had unilateral grade 3-4 reflux, while only one patient had a diverticulum of the bladder. DMSA was performed in seven patients and none had renal scars. It is of importance that UTI can occur in asymptomatic, jaundiced infants even in the first week of life. Although it is well known

  13. Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, David; Morris, Rachel K; Kilby, Mark D

    2007-12-01

    Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction affects 2.2 per 10,000 births. It is a consequence of a range of pathological processes, most commonly posterior urethral valves (64%) or urethral atresia (39%). It is a condition of high mortality and morbidity associated with progressive renal dysfunction and oligohydramnios, and hence fetal pulmonary hypoplasia. Accurate detection is possible via ultrasound, but the underlying pathology is often unknown. In future, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be increasingly used alongside ultrasound in the diagnosis and assessment of fetuses with lower urinary tract obstruction. Fetal urine analysis may provide improvements in prenatal determination of renal prognosis, but the optimum criteria to be used remain unclear. It is now possible to decompress the obstruction in utero via percutaneous vesico-amniotic shunting or cystoscopic techniques. In appropriately selected fetuses intervention may improve perinatal survival, but long-term renal morbidity amongst survivors remains problematic.

  14. Urinary tract infection in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    MacLean, A B

    2001-04-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most frequently seen 'medical' complications in pregnancy. The pioneering work of Edward Kass discovered that 6% of pregnant women had asymptomatic bacteriuria associated with increased prematurity and perinatal mortality compared to women with sterile urine. Screening for bacteriuria in pregnancy has become routine. The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria as well as the associated complications described by Kass in 1962 are higher compared to most data collected in the 1980s and late 1990s in different populations in various parts of the world. Other factors such as vaginal colonization have been recognized as important contributors to preterm labour. The value of screening for bacteriuria has to be re-addressed considering methods, significance and costs. Treatment of urinary tract infection in pregnancy is critically reviewed.

  15. Healthcare costs doubled when children had urinary tract infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Oona; Korppi, Matti; Helminen, Merja

    2017-02-01

    The impact of the emergence of antimicrobial resistant organisms has rarely been studied in children, including the healthcare costs of urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria. We evaluated the effect of ESBL on UTI healthcare costs and risk factors for paediatric UTIs. This retrospective case-control study covered 2005-2014 and focused on children below 16 years of age treated in a University hospital: 22 children with UTIs caused by ESBL-producing bacteria and 56 ESBL-negative UTI controls. The median healthcare costs were 3929 Euros for the 22 ESBL patients and 1705 Euros for the 56 controls (p = 0.015). The mean and standard deviation length of hospital stay was 7.4 (5.9) days for the ESBL group and 3.6 (2.3) days for the controls (p = 0.007), and the figures for antibiotic treatment were 12.3 (5.5) days versus 5.8 (3.0) days (p < 0.001), respectively. The odd ratios for ESBL were underlying disease (6.63, p = 0.013), previous hospitalisation (6.07, p = 0.009) and antibiotic prophylaxis (5.20, p = 0.035). Healthcare costs more than doubled when children had ESBL-related UTIs, mainly due to their increased length of stay. Effective oral antibiotics are urgently needed to treat paediatric infections caused by ESBL-producing bacteria. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Urinary Tract Infections (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... more serious infection that reaches the kidneys. continue Bacteria Are to Blame UTIs are usually caused by ... as soon as possible. previous continue Battling the Bacteria Only your health care provider can treat urinary ...

  17. Mechanisms of pain from urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Rosen, John M; Klumpp, David J

    2014-04-01

    The pain response to urinary tract infection is largely uncharacterized, but the symptomatic response to urinary tract infection contrasts with the lack of pain response among individuals with asymptomatic bacteriuria. Quantifying pelvic pain in a murine urinary tract infection model, uropathogenic Escerichia coli induces transient pelvic pain, whereas an asymptomatic bacteriuria E. coli isolate causes no pain, thus recapitulating the spectrum of clinical responses to intravesical E. coli. These differential pain responses are not correlated with bladder colonization or inflammation, but instead are intrinsic to E. coli lipopolysaccharide and dependent on the lipopolysaccharide receptor, TLR4. Epidemiological data suggest a link between interstitial cystitis and a history of urinary tract infection, so it was evaluated whether repetitive uropathogenic E. coli instillation would result in chronic pain through central sensitization. Although repeated infection with wild type uropathogenic E. coli results in only transient episodes of acute pain, a uropathogenic E. coli mutant lacking O-antigen causes chronic, post-urinary tract infection pelvic pain. Similarly, a K-12 E. coli strain lacking O-antigen induces chronic pain that persisted long after bacterial clearance, and expressing O-antigen nullified the pain phenotype. Spinal cords isolated from mice with post-urinary tract infection chronic pain showed deficits in short-term depression consistent with central sensitization. Deleting O-antigen gene complex from a uropathogenic E. coli strain and subsequent heterologous expression of O-antigen gene clusters shows that a single bacterial isolate can exhibit pain phenotypes ranging from a null phenotype, an acute pain phenotype, to a chronic pain phenotype. Post-urinary tract infection chronic pain is also associated with voiding dysfunction and anxious/depressive behavior. These effects are also mediated by TRPV1 at the level of pain establishment

  18. Urinary tract infection in women - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Most urinary tract infections (UTIs) are caused by bacteria that enter the urethra and travel to the bladder. This can lead ... BATHING AND HYGIENE To prevent future urinary tract infections, you ... make infections more likely. Change your pad each time you ...

  19. Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... This type of UTI is usually caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli), a type of bacteria commonly found in the ... include people who are hospitalized, people with neurological problems that make it difficult to control their ability ...

  20. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections Management in Women

    PubMed Central

    Al-Badr, Ahmed; Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most frequent clinical bacterial infections in women, accounting for nearly 25% of all infections. Around 50–60% of women will develop UTIs in their lifetimes. Escherichia coli is the organism that causes UTIs in most patients. Recurrent UTIs (RUTI) are mainly caused by reinfection by the same pathogen. Having frequent sexual intercourse is one of the greatest risk factors for RUTIs. In a subgroup of individuals with coexisting morbid conditions, complicated RUTIs can lead to upper tract infections or urosepsis. Although the initial treatment is antimicrobial therapy, use of different prophylactic regimens and alternative strategies are available to reduce exposure to antibiotics. PMID:23984019

  1. A Dominant Mutation in Nuclear Receptor Interacting Protein 1 Causes Urinary Tract Malformations via Dysregulation of Retinoic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Vivante, Asaf; Mann, Nina; Yonath, Hagith; Weiss, Anna-Carina; Getwan, Maike; Kaminski, Michael M; Bohnenpoll, Tobias; Teyssier, Catherine; Chen, Jing; Shril, Shirlee; van der Ven, Amelie T; Ityel, Hadas; Schmidt, Johanna Magdalena; Widmeier, Eugen; Bauer, Stuart B; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Gharavi, Ali G; Lu, Weining; Magen, Daniella; Shukrun, Rachel; Lifton, Richard P; Tasic, Velibor; Stanescu, Horia C; Cavaillès, Vincent; Kleta, Robert; Anikster, Yair; Dekel, Benjamin; Kispert, Andreas; Lienkamp, Soeren S; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2017-04-05

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the most common cause of CKD in the first three decades of life. However, for most patients with CAKUT, the causative mutation remains unknown. We identified a kindred with an autosomal dominant form of CAKUT. By whole-exome sequencing, we identified a heterozygous truncating mutation (c.279delG, p.Trp93fs*) of the nuclear receptor interacting protein 1 gene (NRIP1) in all seven affected members. NRIP1 encodes a nuclear receptor transcriptional cofactor that directly interacts with the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) to modulate retinoic acid transcriptional activity. Unlike wild-type NRIP1, the altered NRIP1 protein did not translocate to the nucleus, did not interact with RARα, and failed to inhibit retinoic acid-dependent transcriptional activity upon expression in HEK293 cells. Notably, we also showed that treatment with retinoic acid enhanced NRIP1 binding to RARα RNA in situ hybridization confirmed Nrip1 expression in the developing urogenital system of the mouse. In explant cultures of embryonic kidney rudiments, retinoic acid stimulated Nrip1 expression, whereas a pan-RAR antagonist strongly reduced it. Furthermore, mice heterozygous for a null allele of Nrip1 showed a CAKUT-spectrum phenotype. Finally, expression and knockdown experiments in Xenopus laevis confirmed an evolutionarily conserved role for NRIP1 in renal development. These data indicate that dominant NRIP1 mutations can cause CAKUT by interference with retinoic acid transcriptional signaling, shedding light on the well documented association between abnormal vitamin A levels and renal malformations in humans, and suggest a possible gene-environment pathomechanism in this disease.

  2. [Urinary tract infections in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Naline, Charlotte; Cudennec, Tristan; Teillet, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    In the elderly, urinary tract infections are frequent. Diagnosis is not always evident because symptoms are often absent. In doubt, a urinary strip evaluation must be performed. Prevention begins with simple lifestyle and dietary rules, such as good voiding and adequate fluid intake. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is treated only in certain cases. Other urinary tract infections require antibiotics, which must be adapted to renal function.

  3. Catheter associated urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributable to these infections. Catheter-acquired urinary infection is the source for about 20% of episodes of health-care acquired bacteremia in acute care facilities, and over 50% in long term care facilities. The most important interventions to prevent bacteriuria and infection are to limit indwelling catheter use and, when catheter use is necessary, to discontinue the catheter as soon as clinically feasible. Infection control programs in health care facilities must implement and monitor strategies to limit catheter-acquired urinary infection, including surveillance of catheter use, appropriateness of catheter indications, and complications. Ultimately, prevention of these infections will require technical advances in catheter materials which prevent biofilm formation. PMID:25075308

  4. Preeclampsia: is it because of the asymptomatic, unrecognized renal scars caused by urinary tract infections in childhood that become symptomatic with pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Ozlü, Tülay; Alçelik, Aytekin; Calişkan, Billur; Dönmez, Melahat Emine

    2012-11-01

    Preeclampsia is an important disease of pregnancy whose exact etiology is still unknown despite continuing developments in medicine. Although most commonly it is believed to be caused by a defective placentation, in this paper, we hypothesize that the primary underlying problem in the development of preeclampsia can be in kidneys in a greater proportion of cases than it is believed today. The increased intravascular volume and the increased work load of kidneys together with the resulting glomerular hypertrophy may precipitate nephrotic syndrome, which in this case is called "preeclampsia" in a previously affected kidney. Urinary tract infections in childhood leaving silent, unrecognized small scars in the kidneys may be the underlying renal cause which disrupts its silence with an increased work load of kidneys prominently occurring after the midtrimester. The histopathologic finding in kidneys with renal scars after childhood urinary tract infections and in preeclampsia is focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in the majority of cases and this similarity strengthens our hypothesis.

  5. Recent Advances in Urinary Tract Reconstruction for Neuropathic Bladder in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Roberto I.; Lorenzo, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic bladder usually causes several limitations to patients’ quality of life, including urinary incontinence, recurrent urinary tract infections, and upper urinary tract damage. Its management has significantly changed over the last few years. The aim of our paper is to address some salient features of recent literature dealing with reconstructive procedures in pediatric and adolescent patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26962441

  6. Extended-spectrum ß-Lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae as a Common Cause of Urinary Tract Infections in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Vidanagama, Dhammika; Tippalagama, Rashmi; Lewkebandara, Rashmi; Joyce, Maria; Nicholson, Bradly P.; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Bodinayake, Champica K.; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan; Woods, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extended-spectrum ß-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) are increasingly reported as pathogens in urinary tract infections (UTIs). However, in Sri Lanka, the clinical and molecular epidemiology of ESBL-PE implicated in UTIs has not been well described. Materials and Methods We conducted prospective, laboratory-based surveillance from October to December 2013 at a tertiary care hospital in southern Sri Lanka and enrolled patients ≥1 year of age with clinically relevant UTIs due to ESBL-PE. Isolate identity, antimicrobial drug susceptibility, and ESBL production were determined. Presence of ß-lactamase genes, bla SHV, bla TEM, and bla CTX-M, was identified by polymerase chain reaction. Results During the study period, Enterobacteriaceae were detected in 184 urine samples, with 74 (40.2%) being ESBL producers. Among 47 patients with ESBL-PE who had medical records available, 38 (80.9%) had clinically significant UTIs. Most UTIs (63.2%) were community acquired and 34.2% were in patients with diabetes. Among 36 cultured ESBL-PE isolates, significant susceptibility (>80%) was only retained to amikacin and the carbapenems. The group 1 bla CTX-M gene was present in 90.0% of Escherichia coli isolates and all Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae isolates. The bla SHV and bla TEM genes were more common in K. pneumoniae (75% and 50%) and E. cloacae (50% and 50%) isolates than in E. coli (10% and 20%) isolates, respectively. Conclusion The majority of UTIs caused by ESBL-PE were acquired in the community and due to organisms carrying the group 1 CTX-M ß-lactamase. Further epidemiologic studies of infections due to ESBL-PE are urgently needed to better prevent and treat these infections in South Asia. PMID:27704730

  7. Cranberry for Urinary Tract Infection: From Bench to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Daglia, Maria; Izadi, Morteza; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are common infectious diseases which can occur in any part of the urinary tract such as bladder, kidney, ureters, and urethra. They are commonly caused by bacteria that enter through the urethra. Urinary tract infections commonly develop in the bladder and spread to renal tissues. Up to now, there are different antimicrobial agents which have beneficial role on urinary tract infections. However, most of them cause different adverse effects and therefore, much attention has been paid to the search for effective therapeutic agents with negligible adverse effects. Cranberry is known as one of the most important edible plants, which possesses potent antimicrobial effects against the bacteria responsible for urinary tract infections. Growing evidence has shown that cranberry suppresses urinary tract infections and eradicates the bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study is to critically review the available literature regarding the antimicrobial activities of cranberry against urinary tract infection microorganisms. In addition, we discuss etiology, epidemiology, risk factors, and current drugs of urinary tract infections to provide a more complete picture of this disease.

  8. Oral Treatment Options for Ambulatory Patients with Urinary Tract Infections Caused by Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Simon; Wojna, Alexandra; Hell, Markus

    2010-01-01

    An increase in extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli has been observed in outpatient settings. Consequently, 100 ESBL-positive E. coli isolates from ambulatory patients with clinically confirmed urinary tract infections were collected by a single laboratory between October 2004 and January 2008. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out using the oral antibiotics fosfomycin, pivmecillinam, and nitrofurantoin and the parenteral antibiotic ertapenem. Susceptibility rates indicate that fosfomycin (97%), nitrofurantoin (94%), and pivmecillinam (85%) could be considered important oral treatment options. PMID:20585127

  9. Antimicrobial Stewardship and Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Abbo, Lilian M.; Hooton, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are the most common bacterial infections encountered in ambulatory and long-term care settings in the United States. Urine samples are the largest single category of specimens received by most microbiology laboratories and many such cultures are collected from patients who have no or questionable urinary symptoms. Unfortunately, antimicrobials are often prescribed inappropriately in such patients. Antimicrobial use, whether appropriate or inappropriate, is associated with the selection for antimicrobial-resistant organisms colonizing or infecting the urinary tract. Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant organisms are associated with higher rates of treatment failures, prolonged hospitalizations, increased costs and mortality. Antimicrobial stewardship consists of avoidance of antimicrobials when appropriate and, when antimicrobials are indicated, use of strategies to optimize the selection, dosing, route of administration, duration and timing of antimicrobial therapy to maximize clinical cure while limiting the unintended consequences of antimicrobial use, including toxicity and selection of resistant microorganisms. This article reviews successful antimicrobial stewardship strategies in the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections. PMID:27025743

  10. Neural Control of the Lower Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    de Groat, William C.; Griffiths, Derek; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes anatomical, neurophysiological, pharmacological, and brain imaging studies in humans and animals that have provided insights into the neural circuitry and neurotransmitter mechanisms controlling the lower urinary tract. The functions of the lower urinary tract to store and periodically eliminate urine are regulated by a complex neural control system in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral autonomic ganglia that coordinates the activity of smooth and striated muscles of the bladder and urethral outlet. The neural control of micturition is organized as a hierarchical system in which spinal storage mechanisms are in turn regulated by circuitry in the rostral brain stem that initiates reflex voiding. Input from the forebrain triggers voluntary voiding by modulating the brain stem circuitry. Many neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract exhibit switch-like patterns of activity that turn on and off in an all-or-none manner. The major component of the micturition switching circuit is a spinobulbospinal parasympathetic reflex pathway that has essential connections in the periaqueductal gray and pontine micturition center. A computer model of this circuit that mimics the switching functions of the bladder and urethra at the onset of micturition is described. Micturition occurs involuntarily in infants and young children until the age of 3 to 5 years, after which it is regulated voluntarily. Diseases or injuries of the nervous system in adults can cause the re-emergence of involuntary micturition, leading to urinary incontinence. Neuroplasticity underlying these developmental and pathological changes in voiding function is discussed. PMID:25589273

  11. Congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Toka, Hakan R; Toka, Okan; Hariri, Ali; Nguyen, Hiep T

    2010-07-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract anatomy (CAKUT) are common in children and represent approximately 30% of all prenatally diagnosed malformations. CAKUT is phenotypically variable and can affect the kidney(s) alone and/or the lower urinary tract. The spectrum includes more common anomalies such as vesicoureteral reflux and, rarely, more severe malformations such as bilateral renal agenesis. In young children, congenital anomalies are the leading cause of kidney failure and for kidney transplantation or dialysis. CAKUT can also lead to significant renal problems in adulthood and may present itself with hypertension and/or proteinuria. Congenital renal anomalies can be sporadic or familial, syndromic (also affecting nonrenal or non-urinary tract tissues), or nonsyndromic. Genetic causes have been identified for the syndromic forms and have shed some light into the molecular mechanisms of kidney development in human beings. The genetic causes for the more common nonsyndromic forms of CAKUT are unknown. The role of prenatal interventions and postnatal therapies as well as the benefits of screening affected individuals and their family members are not clear.

  12. [Urinary tract infections in children].

    PubMed

    Lellig, E; Apfelbeck, M; Straub, J; Karl, A; Tritschler, S; Stief, C G; Riccabona, M

    2017-02-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common bacterial infections in children. The symptoms are not very specific and range from abdominal pain, poor feeding to nocturnal urinary incontinence. The technique of collecting urine plays an important role for securing the diagnosis. The best way to obtain urine in non-toilet-trained children is catheterization or suprapubic bladder aspiration. In toilet-trained children midstream urine is an acceptable alternative after cleaning the foreskin or labia. In the case of an infection a prompt empirical antibiotic therapy is necessary to reduce the risk of parenchymal scarring of the kidneys. There are different approaches to diagnose vesicoureteral reflux in different countries. The commonly used standard approach in Germany is voiding cystourethrography. In the case of reflux dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy should be performed additionally to exclude renal scarring (bottom-up approach).

  13. Cranberries and lower urinary tract infection prevention.

    PubMed

    Hisano, Marcelo; Bruschini, Homero; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Srougi, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Lower urinary tract infections are very common diseases. Recurrent urinary tract infections remain challenging to treat because the main treatment option is long-term antibiotic prophylaxis; however, this poses a risk for the emergence of bacterial resistance. Some options to avoid this risk are available, including the use of cranberry products. This article reviews the key methods in using cranberries as a preventive measure for lower urinary tract infections, including in vitro studies and clinical trials.

  14. Cranberries and lower urinary tract infection prevention

    PubMed Central

    Hisano, Marcelo; Bruschini, Homero; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Srougi, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Lower urinary tract infections are very common diseases. Recurrent urinary tract infections remain challenging to treat because the main treatment option is long-term antibiotic prophylaxis; however, this poses a risk for the emergence of bacterial resistance. Some options to avoid this risk are available, including the use of cranberry products. This article reviews the key methods in using cranberries as a preventive measure for lower urinary tract infections, including in vitro studies and clinical trials. PMID:22760907

  15. [Urinary tract infections in elderly].

    PubMed

    Ben Dhaou Hmaidi, Besma; Boussema, Fatma; Aydi, Zohra; Baili, Lilia; Ketari, Sonia; Ben Rhouma, Samir; Lachgar, Ahmed; Cherif, Ouahida; Rokbani, Lilia

    2011-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) in elderly are frequent and polymorphic clinical symptoms. This is a public health problem both in support and cost they generate. To study the epidemiological, clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic aspects of UTI in the elderly. We conducted a retrospective study of 50 cases of UTI in the elderly collected in the Internal Medicine Department at Habib Thameur Hospital between January 2002 and December 2006 (Group I). We compared this group to another group of patients aged below 60 years also explored for UTI in the same service and during the same period (Group II). They were 37 women and 13 men in group I and 41 women and 9 men in the group II. In group I, the average age was 74.10 ± 6.7 years, in group II 43.58 ± 11.26 years. In group I, 35 patients (70%) showed no evidence of suspicion of a UTI on admission. 15 patients (30%) were admitted for suspected UTI. In group II, 36 patients (72%) showed no evidence of suspicion of a UTI on admission. 14 patients (28%) were admitted for suspected UTI. Urological abnormalities underlying the UTI, detected by ultrasound, were more frequent in Group I (40%) than in Group II (12%). Second-line antibiotics, due to the likely resistance of the microorganism, had to be prescribed in 16% cases in Group I vs. 4% of cases in Group II. The evolution under antibiotic treatment was marked by the occurrence of 3 deaths and transition to renal failure in 4 cases for Group I. In Group II, the outcome was favorable in all cases. Urinary tract infection is a significant factor in morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Female is much more concerned than male. Clinical manifestations of UTI are often crude and misleading in a pathological and poly polymedicated patient. The preventive arm accounts for most of the management of urinary tract infection in the elderly.

  16. [Leiomyoma of the urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Fekkak, H; Moufid, K; Joual, A; Bennani, S; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2001-01-01

    Leiomyomas of the urinary tract are benign and uncommon forms of tumor. In the present study, two cases have been described of leiomyomas situated in the bladder. Following this description, the pathological characteristics and the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of these lesions have been examined. The clinical symptomatology depends on the tumor site, and this type of lesion is more frequently found in women.. Treatment mainly consists of endoscopic resection, but may involve cystectomy. The prognosis for patients with this type of tumor is invariably favorable.

  17. Randomized controlled trial of piperacillin-tazobactam, cefepime and ertapenem for the treatment of urinary tract infection caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yu Bin; Lee, Jacob; Kim, Young Keun; Lee, Seung Soon; Lee, Jeong-A; Kim, Hyo Youl; Uh, Young; Kim, Han-Sung; Song, Wonkeun

    2017-06-07

    Due to limited therapeutic options, the spread of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) have become a major public health concern. We conducted a prospective, randomized, open-label comparison of the therapeutic efficacy of piperacillin-tazobactam (PTZ), cefepime, and ertapenem in febrile nosocomial urinary tract infection with ESBL-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC). This study was conducted at three university hospitals between January 2013 and August 2015. Hospitalized adult patients presenting with fever were screened for healthcare-associated urinary tract infection (HA-UTI). When ESBL-EC was solely detected and susceptible to a randomized antibiotic in vitro, the case was included in the final analysis. Participants were treated for 10-14 days with PTZ, cefepime, or ertapenem. A total of 66 participants were evenly assigned to the PTZ and ertapenem treatment groups. After the recruitment of six participants, assignment to the cefepime treatment group was stopped because of an unexpectedly high treatment failure rate. The baseline characteristics of these participants did not differ from participants in other treatment groups. The clinical and microbiological response to PTZ treatment was estimated to be 94% and was similar to the response to ertapenem treatment. The efficacy of cefepime was 33.3%. In the cefepime group, age, Charlson comorbidity index, genotype, and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) did not significantly affect the success of treatment. Similarly, genotype seemed to be irrelevant with respect to clinical outcome in the PTZ group. Expired cases tended to involve septic shock with a high Charlson comorbidity index and high MIC. Results from this study suggest that PTZ is effective in the treatment of urinary tract infection caused by ESBL-EC when the in vitro test indicates susceptibility. In addition, cefepime should not be used as an alternative treatment for urinary tract infection caused by ESBL-EC. The trial was registered with

  18. Urinary tract infection as a preventable cause of pregnancy complications: opportunities, challenges, and a global call to action.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Nicole M; O'Brien, Valerie P; Hultgren, Scott; Macones, George; Lewis, Warren G; Lewis, Amanda L

    2013-09-01

    The urinary tract is a common site of infection in humans. During pregnancy, urinary tract infection (UTI) is associated with increased risks of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality, even when the infection is asymptomatic. By mapping available rates of UTI in pregnancy across different populations, we emphasize this as a problem of global significance. Many countries with high rates of preterm birth and neonatal mortality also have rates of UTI in pregnancy that exceed rates seen in more developed countries. A global analysis of the etiologies of UTI revealed familiar culprits as well as emerging threats. Screening and treatment of UTI have improved birth outcomes in several more developed countries and would likely improve maternal and neonatal health worldwide. However, challenges of implementation in resource-poor settings must be overcome. We review the nature of the barriers occurring at each step of the screening and treatment pipeline and highlight steps necessary to overcome these obstacles. It is our hope that the information compiled here will increase awareness of the global significance of UTI in maternal and neonatal health and embolden governments, nongovernmental organizations, and researchers to do their part to make urine screening and UTI treatment a reality for all pregnant women.

  19. Urinary Tract Infection as a Preventable Cause of Pregnancy Complications: Opportunities, Challenges, and a Global Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Nicole M.; O'Brien, Valerie P.; Hultgren, Scott; Macones, George; Lewis, Warren G.

    2013-01-01

    The urinary tract is a common site of infection in humans. During pregnancy, urinary tract infection (UTI) is associated with increased risks of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality, even when the infection is asymptomatic. By mapping available rates of UTI in pregnancy across different populations, we emphasize this as a problem of global significance. Many countries with high rates of preterm birth and neonatal mortality also have rates of UTI in pregnancy that exceed rates seen in more developed countries. A global analysis of the etiologies of UTI revealed familiar culprits as well as emerging threats. Screening and treatment of UTI have improved birth outcomes in several more developed countries and would likely improve maternal and neonatal health worldwide. However, challenges of implementation in resource-poor settings must be overcome. We review the nature of the barriers occurring at each step of the screening and treatment pipeline and highlight steps necessary to overcome these obstacles. It is our hope that the information compiled here will increase awareness of the global significance of UTI in maternal and neonatal health and embolden governments, nongovernmental organizations, and researchers to do their part to make urine screening and UTI treatment a reality for all pregnant women. PMID:24416696

  20. Urinary tract infections. An overview.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, O B

    1987-06-01

    Urinary tract infection remains the most prevalent infection acquired by hospitalized patients. The association with manipulations of the urinary tract is well known and the etiology of these infections is studied in detail. The excess cost of preventable UTI has not been established. It may be negligible for the single case but a high prevalence of nosocomial UTI could add substantially to hospital expenses. Differences in practices of bladder drainage between hospitals and countries have been identified, and educational efforts would seem effective in the management of incontinent patients when hospitalized. Though the infection is often self-limiting, when the catheter is removed, complications are seen. The lower survival with bacteriuria in old age is best explained by the presence of fatal disease in bacteriuric patients. Prevention of the infection with the catheter in situ is discouraging, and measures intended to interfere with the endogenous source of infection have largely failed or postponed infection. A radical approach to the use of indwelling catheters in hospitalized patients may seem the only way out, requiring highly skilled nursing care instead.

  1. Urinary tract infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chee Wei; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr

    2016-09-01

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a collective term for infections that involve any part of the urinary tract. It is one of the most common infections in local primary care. The incidence of UTIs in adult males aged under 50 years is low, with adult women being 30 times more likely than men to develop a UTI. Appropriate classification of UTI into simple or complicated forms guides its management and the ORENUC classification can be used. Diagnosis of a UTI is based on a focused history, with appropriate investigations depending on individual risk factors. Simple uncomplicated cystitis responds very well to oral antibiotics, but complicated UTIs may require early imaging, and referral to the emergency department or hospitalisation to prevent urosepsis may be warranted. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen in acute community-acquired uncomplicated UTIs and amoxicillin-clavulanate is useful as a first-line antibiotic. Family physicians are capable of managing most UTIs if guided by appropriate history, investigations and appropriate antibiotics to achieve good outcomes and minimise antibiotic resistance.

  2. Urinary tract infections in adults

    PubMed Central

    Wei Tan, Chee; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr

    2016-01-01

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a collective term for infections that involve any part of the urinary tract. It is one of the most common infections in local primary care. The incidence of UTIs in adult males aged under 50 years is low, with adult women being 30 times more likely than men to develop a UTI. Appropriate classification of UTI into simple or complicated forms guides its management and the ORENUC classification can be used. Diagnosis of a UTI is based on a focused history, with appropriate investigations depending on individual risk factors. Simple uncomplicated cystitis responds very well to oral antibiotics, but complicated UTIs may require early imaging, and referral to the emergency department or hospitalisation to prevent urosepsis may be warranted. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen in acute community-acquired uncomplicated UTIs and amoxicillin-clavulanate is useful as a first-line antibiotic. Family physicians are capable of managing most UTIs if guided by appropriate history, investigations and appropriate antibiotics to achieve good outcomes and minimise antibiotic resistance. PMID:27662890

  3. The effect of hormones on the lower urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dudley; Toozs-Hobson, Philip; Cardozo, Linda

    2013-12-01

    The female genital and lower urinary tracts share a common embryological origin, arising from the urogenital sinus and both are sensitive to the effects of the female sex steroid hormones throughout life. Estrogen is known to have an important role in the function of the lower urinary tract and estrogen and progesterone receptors have been demonstrated in the vagina, urethra, bladder and pelvic floor musculature. In addition estrogen deficiency occurring following the menopause is known to cause atrophic change and may be associated with lower urinary tract symptoms such as frequency, urgency, nocturia, urgency incontinence and recurrent infection. These may also co-exist with symptoms of urogenital atrophy such as dyspareunia, itching, vaginal burning and dryness. Epidemiological studies have implicated estrogen deficiency in the aetiology of lower urinary tract symptoms with 70% of women relating the onset of urinary incontinence to their final menstrual period. Whilst for many years systemic and vaginal estrogen therapy was felt to be beneficial in the treatment of lower urinary and genital tract symptoms this evidence has recently been challenged by large epidemiological studies investigating the use of systemic hormone replacement therapy as primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. The aim of this paper is to examine the effect of the sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone, on the lower urinary tract and to review the current evidence regarding the role of systemic and vaginal estrogens in the management of lower urinary tract symptoms and urogenital atrophy.

  4. New markers of urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Masajtis-Zagajewska, Anna; Nowicki, Michal

    2017-08-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common bacterial infection independent of age. It is also one of the most common causes of hospitalizations for infections among elderly people and the most common indication for antibiotic prescriptions in primary care. Both diagnostics and management of lower and upper urinary tract infections provide challenges in clinical practice due to their high prevalence and recurrence, and worldwide increase of antibiotic resistance. The clinical symptoms of UTI are often uncharacteristic or asymptomatic. The accurate diagnosis and early treatment are crucial due to risk of septicaemia and long-term consequences. Currently the diagnosis of urinary tract infection is based on the presence of clinical symptoms in combination with the results of nitrite strip test indicating the presence of bacteria in urine and semi-quantitative measurement of white blood cells count in urine. Although urine culture is the gold standard in UTI diagnostics it is both time-consuming and costly. Searching for novel biomarkers of UTI has attracted much attention in recent years. The article reviews several promising serum and urine biomarkers of UTI such as leukocyte esterase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, interleukins, elastase alpha (1)-proteinase inhibitor, lactofferin, secretory immunoglobulin A, heparin-binding protein, xanthine oxidase, myeloperoxidase, soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1, α-1 microglobulin (α1Mg) and tetrazolium nitroblue test (TNB). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Urinary tract infection by Candida species].

    PubMed

    González-Pedraza Avilés, Alberto; Luís Hernández, Rosalina; Luna Avila, Jesús; Dávila Mendoza, Rocío; Ortiz Zaragoza, Catalina

    2006-01-01

    To determine the frequency and characteristics of urinary tract infection (UTI) by Candida in diabetic patients (with and without symptoms) and to compare them with non-diabetic patients (with and without symptoms). Longitudinal, descriptive, and observational study. Study conducted at the "Dr Ignacio Chavez" Clinic of family medicine, ISSSTE: Mexico. There were 2 kinds of patients; 1 with diabetes mellitus diagnosis (DM) with and without clinical picture of probable urinary tract infection (UTI), and 1 without DM and with and without clinical picture of probable UTI. A urine culture and a confidential questionnaire were administered to find the presence of urinary symptoms and likely risk factors associated with the infection. To associate these risks, the chi2 statistical method was used, with significance at 95% and Fisher's Exact Test for small frequencies, using the EpiInfo V.6.0 program. Two hundred thirty seven patients between 28 and 82 years old were included. The prevalence of urinary infection by Candida was 5.1%, but only 33% of these had C albicans. There was no association between candidiasis and factors like age, sex, or presence of DM, but it was related to previous treatments, previous UTI and the evolution time of DM. The conscious search by both doctor and laboratory for Candida micro-organisms as factors causing UTI is important. This is especially so in those patients with factors of risk that may condition Candida's presence.

  6. Kidneys and Urinary Tract (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Kidneys and Urinary Tract KidsHealth > For Parents > Kidneys and ... en español Los riñones y las vías urinarias Kidneys and Urinary Tract Basics Our bodies produce several ...

  7. Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Citrobacter koseri in a Patient With Spina Bifida, an Ileal Conduit and Renal Caluli Progressing to Peri-nephric Abscess and Empyema.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Zachary E; Shaker, Mohammed; Baxter, J David

    2017-02-01

    Urological problems are common in spina bifida and are often treated with urinary diversions. Spina bifida and ileal conduits put patients at increased risk for ascending urinary tract infections. Here we present a novel case of a Citrobacter koseri urinary tract infection complicated by a perinephric abscess with pleural extension. To our knowledge, no case of an ascending C. koseri UTI progressing to peri-nephric abscess and empyema by direct extension exists in the literature.

  8. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases in urinary tract infections caused by Enterobacteria: understanding and guidelines for action.

    PubMed

    García-Tello, A; Gimbernat, H; Redondo, C; Arana, D M; Cacho, J; Angulo, J C

    2014-12-01

    Beta-lactamases are bacterial enzymes that protect microorganisms from the lethal effects of β-lactam antibiotics. The production of beta-lactamases is the most important mechanism of resistance to these antibiotics, especially in Gram-negative bacteria. Review the magnitude of the problem of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) in the urological setting and present the fundamental action guidelines on the issue, the main risk factors and the prevention strategies. A structured search strategy for patient, problem, intervention, comparison and result was conducted in the PubMed-Medline database to identify the most relevant studies related to the management of patients with urinary tract infection by ESBL-producing microorganisms. We also present a caseload analysis of our center on this issue. ESBL are found in Enterobacteria, mainly Klebsiella sp. and Escherichia coli and are characterized by their hydrolytic ability compared with beta-lactam antibiotics, which entails resistance to penicillin, cephalosporin and aztreonam. They are also associated with resistance to other antibiotics. There is a high risk of infection and colonization by ESBL producers in patients with prolonged hospital stays or who required invasive devices. The prior use of antibiotics and stays in residential care are also risk factors. Prevention programs should focus on preventing nosocomial infection. It is essential that a restrictive policy on the use of antibiotics be implemented. The therapy of choice for severe infections is focused on carbapenems, although their indiscriminate use should be avoided. In uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections, fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin are the best treatment alternatives. ESBL-producing strains constitute a true global health problem. Prevention strategies should focus on nosocomial infection. We should not forget, however, that the appearance of these pathogens in community-acquired infections is increasingly frequent. Therapeutic

  9. [Urinary tract dysfunction in older patients].

    PubMed

    Verdejo, Carlos; Méndez, Santiago; Salinas, Jesús

    2016-11-18

    Urinary tract dysfunction in older patients has a multifactorial aetiology and is not a uniform clinical condition. Changes due to physiological ageing as well as comorbidity and polypharmacy, can produce several dynamic conditions such as urinary incontinence and urinary retention. Lower urinary tract symptoms increase with age in both sexes and are a major problem in older patients due to their medical and psychosocial consequences. For these reasons, in assessing urinary dysfunction in older patients, we should consider external circumstances such as polypharmacy, poor mobility, affective and cognitive disorders and also accessibility to housing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Urinary tract infection in children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Up to 11.3% of girls and 3.6% of boys will have had a urinary tract infection (UTI) by the age of 16 years, and recurrence of infection is common. Vesicoureteric reflux is identified in up to 40% of children being investigated for a first UTI, and is a risk factor for, but weak predictor of, renal parenchymal defects. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatment of acute urinary tract infection in children? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 25 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (short initial intravenous antibiotics, long initial intravenous antibiotics, initial oral antibiotics, single-dose or single-day courses of oral antibiotics, short courses of oral antibiotics, long courses of oral antibiotics, immediate empirical antibiotics, delayed antibiotics, prolonged delay of antibiotics, prophylactic antibiotics); immunotherapy; surgical correction of minor functional abnormalities; and surgical correction of moderate to severe vesicoureteric reflux. PMID:21733199

  11. IN VITRO ACTIVITY OF VACCINIUM MACROCARPON (CRANBERRY) ON URINARY TRACT PATHOGENS IN UNCOMPLICATED URINARY TRACT INFECTION.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Saima; Chiragh, Sadia; Tariq, Sumbal; Alam, Muhammad Adeel; Wazir, Muhammad Salim; Suleman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is the most common bacterial infection in the community, mainly caused by Escherichia coli (E coli). Due to its high incidence and recurrence, problems are faced in the treatment with antibiotics. Cranberry being herbal remedy have long been the focus of interest for their beneficial effects in preventing urinary tract infections. This study was conducted to analyse in vitro activity of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) on uropathogenic E coli in uncomplicated urinary tract infections. In this laboratory based single group experimental study, anti-bacterial activity of Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate on urinary tract E coli was investigated, in vitro. Ninety-six culture positive cases of different uropathogens were identified. Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate at different concentrations was prepared in distilled water and put in wells punched in nutrient agar. E coli isolates were inoculated on the plates and incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours. A citric acid solution of the same pH as that of Vaccinium macrocarpon was used and put in a well on the same plate to exclude the effect of pH. A total of 35 isolates of E coli were identified out of 96 culture positive specimens of urine and found sensitive to Vaccinium macrocarpon (p<0.000). Results revealed that Vaccinium macrocarpon has antibacterial effect against E coli. Furthermore the antibacterial activity of Vaccinium macrocarpon has dose response relationship. Acidic nature of Vaccinium macrocarpon due to its pH is not contributory towards its antibacterial effect. Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate may be used in urinary tract infection caused by E coli.

  12. Prevalence of urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux in children with lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Van Batavia, Jason P; Ahn, Jennifer J; Fast, Angela M; Combs, Andrew J; Glassberg, Kenneth I

    2013-10-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction is a common pediatric urological problem that is often associated with urinary tract infection. We determined the prevalence of a urinary tract infection history in children with lower urinary tract dysfunction and its association, if any, with gender, bowel dysfunction, vesicoureteral reflux and specific lower urinary tract conditions. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of children diagnosed with and treated for lower urinary tract dysfunction, noting a history of urinary tract infection with or without fever, gender, bowel dysfunction and vesicoureteral reflux in association with specific lower urinary tract conditions. Of the 257 boys and 366 girls with a mean age of 9.1 years 207 (33%) had a urinary tract infection history, including 88 with at least 1 febrile infection. A total of 64 patients underwent voiding cystourethrogram/videourodynamics, which revealed reflux in 44 (69%). In 119 of the 207 patients all infections were afebrile and 18 underwent voiding cystourethrogram/videourodynamics, which revealed reflux in 5 (28%). A urinary tract infection history was noted in 53% of girls but only 5% of boys (p <0.001). Patients with detrusor underutilization disorder were statistically more likely to present with an infection history than patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity disorder or primary bladder neck dysfunction (each p <0.01). Females with lower urinary tract dysfunction have a much higher urinary tract infection incidence than males. This association was most often noted for lower urinary tract conditions in which urinary stasis occurs, including detrusor underutilization disorder and dysfunctional voiding. Reflux was found in most girls with a history of febrile infections. Since reflux was identified in more than a quarter of girls with only afebrile infections who were evaluated for reflux, it may be reasonable to perform voiding cystourethrogram or videourodynamics in some of them to identify reflux

  13. The Vaginal Microbiota and Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Ann E

    2016-12-01

    The vagina is a key anatomical site in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) in women, serving as a potential reservoir for infecting bacteria and a site at which interventions may decrease the risk of UTI. The vaginal microbiota is a dynamic and often critical factor in this pathogenic interplay, because changes in the characteristics of the vaginal microbiota resulting in the loss of normally protective Lactobacillus spp. increase the risk of UTI. These alterations may result from the influence of estrogen deficiency, antimicrobial therapy, contraceptives, or other causes. Interventions to reduce adverse effects on the vaginal microbiota and/or to restore protective lactobacilli may reduce the risks of UTI.

  14. Iatrogenic Urinary Tract Injuries: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Esparaz, Anthony M.; Pearl, Jeffrey A.; Herts, Brian R.; LeBlanc, Justin; Kapoor, Baljendra

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic injury to the urinary tract, including the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra, is a potential complication of surgical procedures performed in or around the retroperitoneal abdominal space or pelvis. While both diagnostic and interventional radiologists often play a central and decisive role in the identification and initial management of a variety of iatrogenic injuries, discussions of these injuries are often directed toward specialists such as urologists, obstetricians, gynecologists, and general surgeons whose procedures are most often implicated in iatrogenic urinary tract injuries. Interventional radiologic procedures can also be a source of an iatrogenic urinary tract injury. This review describes the clinical presentation, risk factors, imaging findings, and management of iatrogenic renal vascular and urinary tract injuries, as well as the radiologist's role in the diagnosis, treatment, and cause of these injuries. PMID:26038626

  15. Environmentally related diseases of the urinary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Nephrotoxicity from exposure to therapeutic agents and chemicals in the environment and workplace results in a broad spectrum of clinical renal disease that may mimic disorders from other causes. Nephrotoxic agents may, in fact, be responsible for some fraction of renal disease of undetermined etiology. Specific diagnosis and treatment by removal from exposure to the toxic agent is more likely in the early phase of the disorder. Measurement and characterization of proteinuria provides the most sensitive and reliable method of early detection. Increased urinary excretion of serum proteins with molecular weight in excess of 50,000, such as albumin and transferrin, is an early indicator of glomerular injury. Low-molecular-weight proteinuria (beta 2-microglobulin or retinol-binding protein) and enzymuria, particularly excretion of NAG, are sensitive indicators of renal tubular cell injury. Tests that reflect hypersensitivity reactions are often indicative of immunologically mediated nephrotoxicity but are not specific for the kidney. Cancers of the kidney and urinary bladder appear to be increasing and are most common among the socially active and affluent. Susceptibility of the urinary tract to toxicity and carcinogenicity reflect contact of excreted toxins with the epithelial cells of nephrons and urinary bladder. 45 references.

  16. [Urolithiasis in surgically modified urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Saussine, C; Lechevallier, E; Traxer, O

    2008-12-01

    Urinary tract modifications by surgical treatment of invasive bladder cancer or renovesical reflux will require some technical tricks to treat urolithiasis. Papers illustrating theses specific tricks will be presented.

  17. Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... end of the penis in boys and in front of the vagina in girls. Front view of the urinary tract Side view of ... some children are more prone to getting coughs, colds, or ear infections. Who gets UTIs? Any child ...

  18. [Imaging in urinary tract infections in adults].

    PubMed

    Puech, P; Lagard, D; Leroy, C; Dracon, M; Biserte, J; Lemaître, L

    2004-02-01

    Uncomplicated infection of the urinary tract is frequent and usually resolves rapidly with treatment and imaging is unnecessary. Progression to complex infection often occurs in patients with predisposing factors. Imaging assists in evaluating the extent of disease, plays a role in directing therapy and guides interventional procedures if necessary. This pictorial essay reviews the role of imaging and intervention in infections of the urinary tract.

  19. Congenital Urinary Tract Obstruction: The Long View

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Maldevelopment of the collecting system resulting in urinary tract obstruction (UTO) is the leading identifiable cause of CKD in children. Specific etiologies are unknown; most cases are suspected by discovering hydronephrosis on prenatal ultrasonography. Congenital UTO can reduce nephron number and cause bladder dysfunction, which contribute to ongoing injury. Severe UTO can impair kidney growth in utero, and animal models of unilateral ureteral obstruction show that ischemia and oxidative stress cause proximal tubular cell death, with later development of interstitial fibrosis. Congenital obstructive nephropathy therefore results from combined developmental and obstructive renal injury. Due to inadequacy of available biomarkers, criteria for surgical correction of upper tract obstruction are poorly established. Lower tract obstruction requires fetal or immediate postnatal intervention, and the rate of progression of CKD is highly variable. New biomarkers based on proteomics and determination of glomerular number by MRI should improve future care. Angiotensin inhibitors have not been effective in slowing progression, although avoidance of nephrotoxins and timely treatment of hypertension are important. Because congenital UTO begins in fetal life, smooth transfer of care from perinatologist to pediatric and adult urology and nephrology teams should optimize quality of life and ultimate outcomes for these patients. PMID:26088076

  20. High fluoroquinolone MIC is associated with fluoroquinolone treatment failure in urinary tract infections caused by fluoroquinolone susceptible Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rattanaumpawan, Pinyo; Nachamkin, Irving; Bilker, Warren B; Roy, Jason A; Metlay, Joshua P; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2017-04-08

    Suboptimal clinical response to fluoroquinolone (FQ) therapy has been clearly documented in patients with Salmonella typhi infection with reduced FQ susceptibility. However, the clinical impact of reduced FQ susceptibility on other infections including E. coli urinary tract infections (UTIs) has never been evaluated. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of female patients with fluoroquinolone susceptible E. coli (FQSEC) UTIs who received FQ therapy at outpatient services within University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia. Exposed patients were those with high MIC-FQSEC UTIs (the levofloxacin MIC > 0.12 but ≤ 2 mg/L) while unexposed patients were those with low MIC-FQSEC UTIs (the levofloxacin MIC ≤ 0.12 mg/L). The primary treatment outcome was treatment failure within 10 weeks after initiation of FQ therapy. From May 2008 to April 2011, we enrolled 29 exposed patients and 246 unexposed patients. Two patients in each group experienced treatment failure; exposed vs. unexposed (6.9 vs. 0.8%; p = 0.06). Risk difference and risk ratio (RR) for treatment failure were 0.06 [95% CI -0.03-0.15; exact-p = 0.06] and 8.48 [95% CI 1.24-57.97; exact-p = 0.06], respectively. After adjusting for underlying cerebrovascular disease, the RR was 7.12 (95% CI 1.20-42.10; MH-p = 0.04). Our study demonstrated the negative impact of reduced FQ susceptibility on the treatment response to FQ therapy in FQSEC UTIs. This negative impact may be more intensified in other serious infections. Future studies in other clinical situations should be conducted to fill the gap of knowledge.

  1. In vitro evaluation of a new treatment for urinary tract infections caused by nitrate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, S; Govoni, M; Wiklund, N P; Weitzberg, E; Lundberg, J O

    2003-12-01

    Dietary and endogenous nitrates are excreted in urine, and during infection with nitrate-reducing bacteria they are reduced to nitrite. At a low pH nitrite is converted to a variety of nitrogen oxides that are toxic to bacteria. We hypothesized that acidification of nitrite-rich infected urine would result in the killing of the nitrate-reducing bacteria. An Escherichia coli control strain and a mutant lacking nitrate reductase activity were preincubated in urine supplemented with sodium nitrate (0 to 10 mM) at pH 7.0. Then, the nitrite-containing bacterial culture was transferred (and diluted 1/10) to slightly acidic urine (pH 5 and 5.5) containing ascorbic acid (10 mM) and growth was monitored. The control strain produced nitrite in amounts related to the amount of nitrate added. This strain was killed when the culture was transferred to acidic urine. In contrast, the mutant that did not produce nitrite retained full viability. When control bacteria were grown in acidic urine with nitrate and ascorbic acid present from the start of the experiment, no inhibition of growth was noted. The MICs and minimal bactericidal concentrations of sodium nitrite-ascorbic acid in acidic urine were comparable to those of conventional antibiotics. Preincubation of nitrate-reducing E. coli in nitrate-rich urine leads to the accumulation of nitrite. Subsequent acidification of the urine results in generation of nitrogen oxides that are bactericidal. Killing, however, requires a sequential procedure in which the bacteria are first allowed to grow in a nitrate-rich neutral environment, later followed by acidification. We speculate that ingestion of nitrate followed some hours later by acidification of urine could be a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of urinary tract infections.

  2. In Vitro Evaluation of a New Treatment for Urinary Tract Infections Caused by Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, S.; Govoni, M.; Wiklund, N. P.; Weitzberg, E.; Lundberg, J. O.

    2003-01-01

    Dietary and endogenous nitrates are excreted in urine, and during infection with nitrate-reducing bacteria they are reduced to nitrite. At a low pH nitrite is converted to a variety of nitrogen oxides that are toxic to bacteria. We hypothesized that acidification of nitrite-rich infected urine would result in the killing of the nitrate-reducing bacteria. An Escherichia coli control strain and a mutant lacking nitrate reductase activity were preincubated in urine supplemented with sodium nitrate (0 to 10 mM) at pH 7.0. Then, the nitrite-containing bacterial culture was transferred (and diluted 1/10) to slightly acidic urine (pH 5 and 5.5) containing ascorbic acid (10 mM) and growth was monitored. The control strain produced nitrite in amounts related to the amount of nitrate added. This strain was killed when the culture was transferred to acidic urine. In contrast, the mutant that did not produce nitrite retained full viability. When control bacteria were grown in acidic urine with nitrate and ascorbic acid present from the start of the experiment, no inhibition of growth was noted. The MICs and minimal bactericidal concentrations of sodium nitrite-ascorbic acid in acidic urine were comparable to those of conventional antibiotics. Preincubation of nitrate-reducing E. coli in nitrate-rich urine leads to the accumulation of nitrite. Subsequent acidification of the urine results in generation of nitrogen oxides that are bactericidal. Killing, however, requires a sequential procedure in which the bacteria are first allowed to grow in a nitrate-rich neutral environment, later followed by acidification. We speculate that ingestion of nitrate followed some hours later by acidification of urine could be a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of urinary tract infections. PMID:14638471

  3. Sexually acquired Salmonella Typhi urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Wielding, Sally; Scott, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of isolated urinary Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi in an HIV-positive man who has sex with men. He was clinically well and blood and stool cultures were negative, indicating that this may have been a sexually acquired urinary tract infection.

  4. Urinary tract infections in the elderly population.

    PubMed

    Matthews, S James; Lancaster, Jason W

    2011-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem in the elderly population. The spectrum of disease varies from a relatively benign cystitis to potentially life-threatening pyelonephritis. This review covers the management of asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute uncomplicated cystitis, acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis, antibiotic resistance, catheter-associated bacteriuria/symptomatic UTIs, and antibiotic prophylaxis for recurrent infections in elderly men and women. Literature was obtained from English-language searches of MEDLINE (1966-April 2011), Cochrane Library, BIOSIS (1993-April 2011), and EMBASE (1970-April 2011). Further publications were identified from citations of resulting articles. Search terms included, but were not limited to, urinary tract infections, asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute uncomplicated cystitis, acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis, antibiotic resistance, catheter associated urinary tract infections, recurrent urinary tract infections, and elderly. The prevalence of UTIs in elderly women depends on the location in which these women are living. For elderly women living in the community, UTIs compromise the second most common infection, whereas in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs) and hospitalized subjects, it is the number one cause of infection. The spectrum of patient presentation varies from classic signs and symptoms in the independent elderly population to atypical presentations, including increased lethargy, delirium, blunted fever response, and anorexia. Although there are few guidelines specifically directed toward the management of UTIs in the elderly population, therapy generally mirrors the recommendations for the younger adult age groups. When choosing a treatment regimen, special attention must be given to the severity of illness, living conditions, existing comorbidities, presence of external devices, local antibiotic resistance patterns, and the ability of the patient to comply with therapy. Improved guidelines

  5. Determination of integron frequency by a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method in multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli, which causes urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Fallah, Fatemeh; Karimi, Abdollah; Goudarzi, Mehdi; Shiva, Farideh; Navidinia, Masoumeh; Jahromi, Mana Hadipour; Sajadi Nia, Raheleh Sadat

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of integrons in Escherichia coli, which cause urinary tract infections, and to define the association between integrons and antimicrobial susceptibility. Susceptibility of 200 isolates from urine samples of patients suffering from urinary tract infections to 13 antibiotics was determined by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The existence of class1 and 2 integrons in resistant isolates was assessed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing. Antibiotic resistance patterns were observed as follows: amoxicillin 78%, tetracycline 76.1%, co-trimoxazole 67.7%, cephalotin 60%, nalidixic acid 57.4%, chloramphenicol 49%, gentamicin 46.4%, ceftazidim 38.1%, ciprofloxacin 36.2%, nitrofurantoin 33.5%, amikacin 32.1%, norfloxacin 36.1%, and imipenem 27.1%. Of 200 isolates, 155 (77.5%) were multidrug resistant (MDR). The existence of integrons was confirmed in 50.3% of isolates. Three class 1 integron types, aadA2 being the most frequently found, and four class 2 integron types are described. Significant association between resistance to gentamicin, co-trimoxazole, cephalotin, ceftazidim, imipenem, chloramphenicol, and nalidixic acid with the existence of integrons was observed. Multidrug resistance suggests that the strategy for treatment of patients with E.coli infections needs to be revised. Furthermore, it was shown that integrons may be partly responsible for multidrug resistance. Imipenem and norfloxacin were the most effective antibiotics against isolates.

  6. Cranberry and urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Guay, David R P

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) refers to the presence of clinical signs and symptoms arising from the genitourinary tract plus the presence of one or more micro-organisms in the urine exceeding a threshold value for significance (ranges from 102 to 103 colony-forming units/mL). Infections are localized to the bladder (cystitis), renal parenchyma (pyelonephritis) or prostate (acute or chronic bacterial prostatitis). Single UTI episodes are very common, especially in adult women where there is a 50-fold predominance compared with adult men. In addition, recurrent UTIs are also common, occurring in up to one-third of women after first-episode UTIs. Recurrences requiring intervention are usually defined as two or more episodes over 6 months or three or more episodes over 1 year (this definition applies only to young women with acute uncomplicated UTIs). A cornerstone of prevention of UTI recurrence has been the use of low-dose once-daily or post-coital antimicrobials; however, much interest has surrounded non-antimicrobial-based approaches undergoing investigation such as use of probiotics, vaccines, oligosaccharide inhibitors of bacterial adherence and colonization, and bacterial interference with immunoreactive extracts of Escherichia coli. Local (intravaginal) estrogen therapy has had mixed results to date. Cranberry products in a variety of formulations have also undergone extensive evaluation over several decades in the management of UTIs. At present, there is no evidence that cranberry can be used to treat UTIs. Hence, the focus has been on its use as a preventative strategy. Cranberry has been effective in vitro and in vivo in animals for the prevention of UTI. Cranberry appears to work by inhibiting the adhesion of type I and P-fimbriated uropathogens (e.g. uropathogenic E. coli) to the uroepithelium, thus impairing colonization and subsequent infection. The isolation of the component(s) of cranberry with this activity has been a daunting task, considering the

  7. Congenital anomalies of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Hans G; Belman, A Barry

    2014-01-01

    The upper urinary tract forms as a consequence of the reciprocal inductive signals between the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud. A clue to the timing of events leading to an abnormality of the upper urinary tract can be the presence also of associated anomalies of internal genitalia since separation of these systems occurs at about the 10th week of gestation. Prenatal sonography has facilitated the detection of urological abnormalities presenting with hydronephrosis. Hydronephrosis suggests obstruction, but by itself cannot be equated with it. Instead, further radiographic imaging is required to delineate anatomy and function. Now, moreover, non-surgical management of CAKUT should be considered whenever possible. Despite the widespread use of prenatal screening sonography that usually identifies the majority of congenital anomalies of the urinary tract, many children still present with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI). Regardless of the etiology for the presentation, the goal of management is preservation of renal function through mitigation of the risk for recurrent UTI and/or obstruction. In the past many children underwent surgical repair aimed at normalization of the appearance of the urinary tract. Today, management has evolved such that in most cases surgical reconstruction is performed only after a period of observation - with or without urinary prophylaxis. The opinions presented in this section are not espoused by all pediatric urologists but represent instead the practice that has evolved at Children's National Medical Center (Washington DC) based significantly on information obtained by nuclear renography, in addition to sonography and contrast cystography.

  8. Urinary Tract Infection and Bacteriuria in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Alexander P; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2015-11-01

    Bacteriuria during pregnancy may be classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria, infections of the lower urinary tract (cystitis), or infections of the upper urinary tract (pyelonephritis). Lower tract bacteriuria is associated with an increased risk of developing pyelonephritis in pregnancy, which is itself associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Pregnant women should be screened for the presence of bacteriuria early in pregnancy. All bacteriuria in pregnancy should be treated, and antimicrobial choice in pregnancy should reflect safety for both the mother and the fetus. After treatment of bacteriuria, patients should be followed closely due to risk of recurrent bacteriuria.

  9. Vaccines for Proteus mirabilis in urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Mobley, Harry L T

    2002-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a documented cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) in the complicated urinary tract. Urease-mediated urea hydrolysis is responsible for both virulence of the organism and the ability to cause urolithiasis. A urease-negative mutant of P. mirabilis is unable to initiate stone formation and colonizes the kidney at a significantly lower rate. The considerable pathology caused by P. mirabilis warrants the development of a vaccine. We have initiated the advancement of vaccine studies and have determined that the MR/P fimbria, a surface adhesin of P. mirabilis, is a promising vaccine candidate. Successful vaccination would be expected both to prevent colonization by P. mirabilis and urolithiasis.

  10. Bacteremic Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Are Associated With Severe Sepsis at Admission: Implication for Empirical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Chien; Hsiao, Chih-Yen; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Hung, Sheng-Che; Wang, Hung-Ping; Huang, Yun-Jhong; Wang, Jann-Tay

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical features and treatment outcomes among patients with bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) and non-MDR Enterobacteriaceae and to identify whether MDR pathogens were independently associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation.The clinical data of adult patients visiting and being treated at Chia-Yi Christian Hospital due to bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae from January 2006 to August 2015 were retrospectively analyzed.A total of 585 patients were enrolled. Among them, 220 (37.6%) were caused by the MDR Enterobacteriaceae. A total of 206 patients (35.2%) developed severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation. Patients in the MDR group tend to be male and have a past history of gout, recurrent UTI, prior hospitalization, hydronephrosis, renal stone, ureteral stone, indwelling urinary catheter, newly development of renal dysfunction, severe sepsis or septic shock, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, receipt of ineffective empirical therapy, longer hospital stay, and higher in-hospital mortality (2.7% vs 1.9%, P = 0.569). Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, it is revealed that independent predictors associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation were liver cirrhosis (OR 2.868; 95% CI 1.439-5.716; P = 0.003), indwelling urinary catheter (OR 1.936; 95% CI 1.238-3.027; P = 0.004), and MDR Enterobacteriaceae (OR 1.447; 95% CI 1.002-2.090; P = 0.049).Multidrug resistance was associated with the development of severe sepsis or septic shock upon presentation among patients with bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae. Therefore, empirical antibiotics therapy for patients with UTI presented with severe sepsis and/or septic shock should be more broad-spectrum to effectively cover MDR Enterobacteriaceae.

  11. The nature of immune responses to urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Soman N.; Miao, Yuxuan

    2016-01-01

    The urinary tract is constantly exposed to microorganisms that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract, but generally the urinary tract resists infection by gut microorganisms. This resistance to infection is mainly ascribed to the versatility of the innate immune defences in the urinary tract as the adaptive immune responses are limited, particularly when only the lower urinary tract is infected. In recent years, as the strengths and weaknesses of the immune system of the urinary tract have emerged and as the virulence attributes of uropathogens are recognized, several potentially effective and unconventional strategies to contain or prevent urinary tract infections have emerged. PMID:26388331

  12. Microtomographic analysis of lower urinary tract obstruction.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Joseph R; Smith, Kenneth J; Cox, Liza L; Glass, Ian A; Cox, Timothy C

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal obstruction of the lower urinary tract may result in megacystis, with subsequent development of hydroureter, hydronephrosis, and renal damage. Oligo- or anhydramnios, pulmonary hypoplasia, and prune belly syndrome are lethal consequences. Causes and mechanisms responsible for obstruction remain unclear but might be clarified by anatomic study at autopsy. To this end, we employed 2 methods of tomographic imaging-optical projection tomography and contrast-enhanced microCT scanning-to elucidate the anatomy of the intact urinary bladder and urethra in 10 male fetuses with lower urinary tract obstruction. Images were compared with those from 9 age-matched controls. Three-dimensional images, rotated and sectioned digitally in multiple planes, permitted thorough examination while preserving specimens for later study. Both external and internal features of the bladder and urethra were demonstrated; small structures (ie, urethral crest, verumontanum, prostatic utricle, ejaculatory ducts) were seen in detail. Types of obstruction consisted of urethral atresia (n  =  5), severe urethral stenosis (n  =  2), urethral diaphragm (n  =  2), or physical kinking (n  =  1); classic (Young type I) posterior urethral valves were not encountered. Traditional light microscopy was then used to verify tomographic findings. The prostate gland was hypoplastic or absent in all cases; in 1, prostatic tissue was displaced inferior to the verumontanum. Findings support previous views that dissection may produce valve-like artifacts (eg, bisection of an obstructing diaphragm) and that deformation of an otherwise normal urethra may result in megacystis. The designation "posterior urethral valves" should not be used as a generic expression of urethral obstruction unless actual valves are demonstrated.

  13. [Nosocomial urinary tract infection in adults].

    PubMed

    Hug, B L; Flückiger, U; Widmer, A F

    2006-11-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection in hospitalized adults. Nosocomial UTIs are mainly associated with the use of urinary catheters. Thus, the decision for catheterization should be made carefully and catheters removed in time. In order to prevent unnecessary antibiotic use in patients with urinary catheters correct diagnosis is crucial. Chinolones, broad-spectrum penicillins and third-generation cephalosporins are the mainstay of therapy. Comorbidities should be considered and potential obstructions of urinary flow removed. Economically important are the normally higher prices of i.v. antibiotics compared to oral use.

  14. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria caused less than 5% of urinary tract infections in a paediatric emergency centre.

    PubMed

    Jacmel, Lisa; Timsit, Sandra; Ferroni, Agnès; Auregan, Clémentine; Angoulvant, François; Chéron, Gérard

    2017-01-01

    The last decade has seen a significant increase in extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) secreting organisms responsible for paediatric urinary tract infections (UTIs), particularly in community-acquired infections. These expose patients to the risks of antibiotic treatment failure and renal scarring. This prospective study examined the prevalence and risk factors of febrile ESBL UTIs and their treatment in the paediatric emergency department of a university hospital. In this prospective observational study, all children from 0 to 16 years of age with febrile UTIs were included from May 2012 to April 2013. Cases with and without ESBL involvement were compared. Of the 474 diagnosed febrile UTIs, 22 (4.6%) with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 2.9-6.9 were due to an ESBL-producing organism. Escherichia coli was found in 85% of cases. Significant odds ratios (OR) for ESBL urinary tract infections were prior hospitalisation (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.6-10.8), urinary tract abnormalities (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.5-10.2) and previous antibiotic treatment (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.2-8.8). All ESBL urinary tract infections had positive outcomes. The prevalence of febrile ESBL urinary tract infections was less than 5% in a paediatric emergency department. This low rate was not high enough to justify changing our guidelines. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [A rare cause of urinary obstruction: urogenital tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Fekak, H; Rabii, R; Moufid, K; Joual, A; Debbagh, A; Bennani, A; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2003-04-01

    The authors reported a rare cause of urogenital tuberculosis complicated by an obstructive acute renal failure in 44 years old man with solitary anatomic kidney. The authors insisted of using the upper urinary tract opacification by percutaneous nephrostomy for diagnosis, the urogenital tuberculosis with this exploration, we can suspected the tuberculosis by abnormalities of the radiologic imagine, and confirmed the koch bacilli urinary into urinary tract. The upper chance of positives of finding koch bacilli in higher than urinary bladder.

  16. [Lower urinary tract dysfunction following radical hysterectomy].

    PubMed

    Aoun, F; Roumeguère, T

    2015-12-01

    Radical hysterectomy is associated with a significant amount of urinary functional complications and a negative impact on quality of life. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the neurological etiology of lower urinary tract dysfunction following radical hysterectomy and to establish an optimal postoperative management strategy. We performed a comprehensive overview using the following terms: "radical hysterectomy" and "urologic diseases etiology" or "urologic disease prevention and control". The reported incidence of lower urinary tract dysfunction after radical hysterectomy varies from 12 to 85%. Several animal and clinical urodynamic studies corroborate the neurologic etiology of the dysfunction. Lower urinary tract dysfunction is a common postoperative finding (70-85%) but spontaneous recovery is to be expected within 6-12 months after surgery. The most frequent long term sequela is stress urinary incontinence (40% of cases) and its management is complex and challenging. Postoperative refractory overactive bladder and bladder underactivity can be treated by neuromodulation of sacral roots and superior hypogastric plexus, respectively. In the absence of good clinical predictors, preoperative urodynamic examinations could have a role in understanding the pathophysiology of the dysfunction before such interventions. The pathophysiology of lower urinary tract dysfunction following radical hysterectomy is multifactorial. Its management is complex and should be multidisciplinary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Lower urinary tract development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Rasouly, Hila Milo; Lu, Weining

    2013-01-01

    Congenital Anomalies of the Lower Urinary Tract (CALUT) are a family of birth defects of the ureter, the bladder and the urethra. CALUT includes ureteral anomalies such as congenital abnormalities of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) and ureterovesical junction (UVJ), and birth defects of the bladder and the urethra such as bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), prune belly syndrome (PBS), and posterior urethral valves (PUV). CALUT is one of the most common birth defects and is often associated with antenatal hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infections (UTI), chronic kidney disease and renal failure in children. Here, we discuss the current genetic and molecular knowledge about lower urinary tract development and genetic basis of CALUT in both human and mouse models. We provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the formation of the ureter, bladder, and urethra, and different genes and signaling pathways controlling these developmental processes. Human genetic disorders that affect the ureter, bladder and urethra and associated gene mutations are also presented. As we are entering the post-genomic era of personalized medicine, information in this article may provide useful interpretation for the genetic and genomic test results collected from patients with lower urinary tract birth defects. With evidence-based interpretations, clinicians may provide more effective personalized therapies to patients and genetic counseling for their families. PMID:23408557

  18. Urinary tract infections: children are not little adults.

    PubMed

    Miller, K L

    1996-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a commonly diagnosed condition in pediatric practice caused by a wide variety of organisms and conditions. Presenting with multiple signs and symptoms, UTI is frequently unrecognized and has the potential to cause permanent renal damage if recurrent or untreated. Nurses have a unique opportunity to prevent this condition, assist in the diagnosis, and contribute to management.

  19. Urinary tract infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa among children in Southern Poland: Virulence factors and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Pobiega, M; Maciag, J; Pomorska-Wesolowska, M; Chmielarczyk, A; Romaniszyn, D; Ziolkowski, G; Heczko, P B; Wojkowska-Mach, J; Bulanda, M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze antibiotic resistance and virulence patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAR) isolates from urinary tract infections among children in Southern Poland. This study comprised consecutive, non-repetitive PAR isolates sent from two collaborative laboratories. The study group consisted of children aged up to 17 years from Southern Poland with culture-proven PAR UTIs. Relevant information about patients with UTIs, such as age, sex, and type of infection (polymicrobial or monomicrobial), was collected. Isolates were screened for major virulence factors found in uropathogenic PAR strains. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains were defined as strains not susceptible to one antimicrobial in at least three different antimicrobial classes. Extensively drug resistant (XDR) strains were defined as strains susceptible to no more than two antimicrobial classes. The total prevalence of PAR UTIs was 2.1%, and in children <5 years of age it was 3.0%. A total of 26 isolates was tested: 21 from outpatients and five from inpatients. Most infections (80.8%) occurred in children ≤ 4 years of age. The most prevalent virulence gene was exoY (96.2%). The prevalence of other effector proteins was 88.5% for exoT, 92.3% for exoS, and 19.2% for exoU. The gene for LasB was present in 80.8% of isolates; the gene for AprA in 61.5%; the gene for PilA in 19.2%; and the gene for PilB was not detected. The PAR isolates were generally susceptible to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antimicrobials. All isolates were also susceptible to colistin. A large proportion of isolates were resistant to carbapenems and fluoroquinolones (Fig. 1). No significant differences were found in antimicrobial resistance between males and females or inpatients and outpatients (p > 0.05 for all tested antimicrobials), or in antimicrobial resistance between younger (≤ 5 years old, n = 21) and older (> 5 years old, n = 5) children (p > 0.05 for all tested antimicrobials). Two isolates were

  20. Urinary tract infections in the surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Asher, E F; Oliver, B G; Fry, D E

    1988-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) continues to be a common nosocomial infection. From a 2-year city-county hospital experience, 212 nosocomial UTI were identified in 153 patients from 3747 admissions. Mean age was 54 years; 102 were men. Foley catheterization was an associated factor in 129 patients (84%). UTI was caused by 40 different species of bacteria. In 28 infections (13%), the UTI was polymicrobial. Only nine patients had bacteremia. The bacteriology of the UTI depended on whether the patient had received systemic antibiotics previously during the hospitalization. Prior antibiotic administration increased the probability of Pseudomonas and Serratia as pathogens. Thus, patients that have had antibiotic therapy demonstrate a distribution of pathogens that are different from patients not receiving antibiotics, and a distribution different from the community-acquired UTI. Continued emphasis on the shorter duration and more judicious use of systemic antibiotics for both prophylaxis and therapy is warranted.

  1. Nursing management of urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sara

    2015-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in older people and can lead to serious complications. Infections can worsen underlying medical conditions, adversely affect recovery and be alarming to patients, their families and caregivers. UTIs have a complex pathophysiology but the most common cause is the ascent of bacteria from the periurethral area, which explains their prevalence in older women. As a result of antibiotic resistance, an accurate diagnosis is imperative and should be based on clinical history, presence of typical signs and symptoms and test results. Nurses can assist patients through the diagnostic process, treatment and prevention of UTIs, promoting their wellbeing and empowerment. This article explores the pathophysiology of UTIs and diagnosis, prevention and nursing management in a variety of care settings.

  2. Enterobius vermicularis: an unusual cause of recurrent urinary tract infestation in a 7-year-old girl: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhupeshwari; Sharma, Tanya; Bhatt, Girish Chandra; Dhingra Bhan, Bhavna

    2015-04-01

    Enterobius vermicularis, the pinworm, is one of the most prevalent intestinal parasites in the world. Ectopic infestations in the genital or urinary tracts rarely occur and chronic enterobiasis of the urinary tract has rarely been reported. Here we present such a case in a 7-year-old girl presenting with fever, pain in the abdomen, vomiting and burning micturition. Ultrasonography and micturating cystourethrogram (MCU) studies were normal. The ova were demonstrated from both the patient's urine and stool specimen. This child was treated successfully with Albendazole and Ivermectin. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Urinary tract infections and lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo-Tenorio, C; Jimenez-Alonso, J; de Dios, Luna J; Tallada, M; Martinez-Brocal, A; Mario, S

    2004-01-01

    Background: Infections are one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Objective: To analyse urinary tract infection (UTI) risk factors in lupus patients; the influence of these factors on disease activity, organ damage, and disease development; the type and prevalence of UTI; and the micro-organisms involved. Method: 86 control subjects and 81 lupus patients were studied prospectively over a 12 month period and examined on five occasions. Epidemiological data and information on urinary symptoms, disease activity (SLEDAI), and organ damage (SLICC/ACR) data were collected. Autoantibodies, complement levels, urine culture, and antibiogram were determined; urological studies were also carried out. SPPS 10.0 and STATA 6.0. were used for statistical analysis. Results: The prevalence of UTI in lupus patients was 36%. Lupus influences the onset of UTI (p = 0.001), regardless of other variables. UTI risk factors in lupus patients were age (p = 0.002), previous cases of UTI (p = 0.0001), antinuclear antibodies (ANA) >1/80 IU/ml (p = 0.022), thrombocytopenia (p = 0.02), and admission to hospital due to UTI (p = 0.002). Leucopenia (p = 0.09) and the weekly administration of methotrexate (p = 0.06) had a bearing on the onset of UTI; disease development (p = 0.99), lupus activity (p = 0.32), and organ damage (p = 0.36) do not. The uropathogen most frequently isolated was E coli (60%). Conclusions: Lupus patients are likely to have UTI, usually manifesting in the lower tract. They are community acquired, basically caused by E coli, and favoured by age, previous UTI, admissions to hospital due to UTI, thrombopenia, ANA, leucopenia, and methotrexate treatments. PMID:15020339

  4. [Urinary tract infections in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Becher, Klaus Friedrich; Klempien, Ingo; Wiedemann, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Acute infection of the urinary tract is one of the most commonly encountered bacterial infections in the frail elderly population and is responsible for substantial morbidity and recurrent infections with antibiotic resistance. Although generally considered to be self-limiting without treatment or easily treated with a short antibiotic regime, urinary tract infections (UTIs) often have a dramatic history, associated with incomplete resolution and frequent recurrence. The biological complexity of the infections combined with a dramatic rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens highlight the need for an anticipating strategy for therapy necessary for a rapid recovery. The first crucial step is the classification in asymptomatic bacteriuria or complicated pyelonephritis, on which the decision for the intensity of treatment and diagnostic effort is based. For the selection of empiric antibiotic therapy, knowledge about the predominant uropathogens as well as local resistance patterns is important. In this manner, most urinary tract infections in the elderly can be treated without greater expense.

  5. Mathematical modelling of the lower urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Paya, Antonio Soriano; Fernandez, Daniel Ruiz; Gil, David; Garcia Chamizo, Juan Manuel; Perez, Francisco Macia

    2013-03-01

    The lower urinary tract is one of the most complex biological systems of the human body as it involved hydrodynamic properties of urine and muscle. Moreover, its complexity is increased to be managed by voluntary and involuntary neural systems. In this paper, a mathematical model of the lower urinary tract it is proposed as a preliminary study to better understand its functioning. Furthermore, another goal of that mathematical model proposal is to provide a basis for developing artificial control systems. Lower urinary tract is comprised of two interacting systems: the mechanical system and the neural regulator. The latter has the function of controlling the mechanical system to perform the voiding process. The results of the tests reproduce experimental data with high degree of accuracy. Also, these results indicate that simulations not only with healthy patients but also of patients with dysfunctions with neurological etiology present urodynamic curves very similar to those obtained in clinical studies.

  6. α1-Adrenoceptor subtypes and lower urinary tract symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Schwinn, Debra A; Roehrborn, Claus G

    2008-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common cause of urinary outflow obstruction in aging men leading to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). α1-Adrenoceptors (α1ARs) antagonists (blockers) have become a mainstay of LUTS treatment because they relax prostate smooth muscle and decrease urethral resistance, as well as relieving bladder LUTS symptoms. A review of key recent clinical trials suggests new insights into the role of specific α1AR subtypes in the treatment of LUTS. PMID:18304211

  7. Urinary tract infections in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Duane, Therese M

    2014-12-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are common in surgical patients. CAUTI are associated with adverse patient outcomes, and negatively affects public safety reporting and reimbursement. Inappropriate catheter use and prolonged catheter duration are major risk factors for CAUTI. CAUTI pathogenesis and treatment are complicated by the presence of biofilms. Prevention strategies include accurate identification and tracking of CAUTIs, and the development of institutional guidelines for the appropriate use, duration, alternatives, and removal of indwelling urinary catheters.

  8. Contemporary management of uncomplicated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Guay, David R P

    2008-01-01

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infections (uUTIs) are common in adult women across the entire age spectrum, with mean annual incidences of approximately 15% and 10% in those aged 15-39 and 40-79 years, respectively. By definition, UTIs in males or pregnant females and those associated with risk factors known to increase the risk of infection or treatment failure (e.g. acquisition in a hospital setting, presence of an indwelling urinary catheter, urinary tract instrumentation/interventions, diabetes mellitus or immunosuppression) are not considered herein. The majority of uUTIs are caused by Escherichia coli (70-95%), with Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella spp. and Staphylococcus saprophyticus accounting for 1-2%, 1-2% and 5-10% of infections, respectively. If clinical signs and symptoms consistent with uUTI are present (e.g. dysuria, frequency, back pain or costovertebral angle tenderness) and there is no vaginal discharge or irritation present, the likelihood of uUTI is >90-95%. Laboratory testing (i.e. urinary nitrites, leukocyte esterase, culture) is not necessary in this circumstance and empirical treatment can be initiated. The ever-increasing incidence of antimicrobial resistance of the common uropathogens in uUTI has been and is a continuing focus of intensive study. Resistance to cotrimoxazole (trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) has made the empirical use of this drug problematic in many geographical areas. If local uropathogen resistance rates to cotrimoxazole exceed 10-25%, empirical cotrimoxazole therapy should not be utilized (fluoroquinolones become the new first-line agents). In a few countries, uropathogen resistance rates to the fluoroquinolones now exceed 10-25%, rendering empirical use of fluoroquinolones problematic. With the exception of fosfomycin (a second-line therapy), single-dose therapy is not recommended because of suboptimal cure rates and high relapse rates. Cotrimoxazole and the fluoroquinolones can be administered in 3-day regimens

  9. Diagnostic imaging of lower urinary tract disease.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Silke

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic imaging is routinely performed in small animals with lower urinary tract disease. Survey radiographs allow identification of radiopaque calculi, gas within the urinary tract, and lymph node or bone metastases. Cystography and urethrography remain useful in the evaluation of bladder or urethral rupture, abnormal communication with other organs, and lesions of the pelvic or penile urethra. Ultrasonography is the modality of choice for the diagnosis of most disorders. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful in evaluating the ureterovesical junction and intrapelvic lesions, monitoring the size of lesions, and evaluating lymph nodes and osseous structures for metastases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lower urinary tract infections in women.

    PubMed

    Davis, Cathy; Rantell, Angie

    2017-05-11

    In her lifetime, a woman is highly likely to develop at least one lower urinary tract infection. Early detection and treatment are key. Being aware of predisposing factors for infection and understanding appropriate diagnosis and treatment regimens will help nurses in both primary and acute care manage these patients correctly. This will not only benefit patients but will also help prevent incorrect antimicrobial management and avoid unplanned admissions. This aim of this article is to provide nurses with the information they need to best advise both colleagues and patients on how to manage lower urinary tract infections in women.

  11. Ultrasonography of bovine urinary tract disorders.

    PubMed

    Floeck, Martina

    2009-11-01

    Ultrasonography is a helpful diagnostic tool in cattle with urinary tract disorders. It can be used to diagnose pyelonephritis, urolithiasis, hydronephrosis, renal cysts, renal tumors, amyloidosis, cystitis, bladder paralysis, bladder rupture, bladder neoplasms, and, occasionally, nephrosis, glomerulonephritis, and embolic nephritis. This article describes the anatomy, scanning technique, indications, limitations, normal and pathologic sonographic appearance of the bovine urinary tract. References from horses and humans are included, especially when the sonographic findings in these species may complement the understanding of similar diseases reported in cattle.

  12. [Urinary tract infection in the newborn infant].

    PubMed

    Vilanova Juanola, J M; Canos Molinos, J; Rosell Arnold, E; Figueras Aloy, J; Comas Masmitja, L L; Jiménez González, R

    1989-08-01

    Twenty-eight cases of urinary tract infection in newborns with positive urinoculture and suggestive clinical symptomatology are reviewed. The incidence was 0.24%, being most frequent in preterm and postterm newborns. Male neonates was more affected. Failure to thrive, excessive weight loss, poor feeding, diarrhoea, vomiting and jaundice are the most relevant clinical signs. E. coli and Klebsiella are the most frequent organism isolated, followed by Enterobacter and Candida. The presence of metabolic acidosis and leukocituria using a bag technique were the most accurate laboratory data to suspect a urinary tract infection.

  13. The Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Ertapenem for the Treatment of Complicated Urinary Tract Infections Caused by ESBL-Producing Bacteria in Children

    PubMed Central

    Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Akkoc, Gulsen; Yakut, Nurhayat; Öcal Demir, Sevliya; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Background. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common and important clinical problem in childhood, and extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase- (ESBL-) producing organisms are the leading cause of healthcare-related UTIs. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of ertapenem therapy in children with complicated UTIs caused by ESBL-producing organisms. Methods. Seventy-seven children with complicated UTIs caused by ESBL-producing organisms were included in this retrospective study, and all had been treated with ertapenem between January 2013 and June 2014. Results. Sixty-one (79%) females and sixteen (21%) males with a mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of 76.6 ± 52 months (range 3–204, median 72 months) were enrolled in this study. Escherichia coli (E. coli) (n = 67; 87%) was the most common bacterial cause of the UTIs followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) (n = 9; 11.7%) and Enterobacter cloacae (E. cloacae) (n = 1; 1.3%). The mean duration of the ertapenem therapy was 8.9 ± 1.6 days (range 4–11). No serious drug-related clinical or laboratory adverse effects were observed, and the ertapenem therapy was found to be safe and well tolerated in the children in our study. Conclusion. Ertapenem is a newer carbapenem with the advantage of once-daily dosing and is highly effective for treating UTIs caused by ESBL-producing microorganisms. PMID:26106487

  14. Nosocomial urinary tract infections: A review.

    PubMed

    Iacovelli, Valerio; Gaziev, Gabriele; Topazio, Luca; Bove, Pierluigi; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Finazzi Agrò, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infections are a common complication in healthcare systems worldwide. A review of the literature was performed in June 2014 using the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) database, through either PubMed or Ovid as a search engine, to identify publications regarding nosocomial urinary tract infections (NUTIs) definition, epidemiology, etiology and treatment.According to current definitions, more than 30% of nosocomial infections are urinary tract infections (UTIs). A UTI is defined 'nosocomial' (NUTI) when it is acquired in any healthcare institution or, more generally, when it is related to patient management. The origin of nosocomial bacteria is endogenous (the patient's flora) in two thirds of the cases. Patients with indwelling urinary catheters, those undergoing urological surgery and manipulations, long-stay elderly male patients and patients with debilitating diseases are at high risk of developing NUTIs. All bacterial NUTIs should be treated, whether the patient is harboring a urinary catheter or not. The length of treatment depends on the infection site. There is abundance of important guidance which should be considered to reduce the risk of NUTIs (hand disinfection with instant hand sanitizer, wearing non-sterile gloves permanently, isolation of infected or colonized catheterized patients). Patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria can generally be treated initially with catheter removal or catheter exchange, and do not necessarily need antimicrobial therapy. Symptomatic patients should receive antibiotic therapy. Resistance of urinary pathogens to common antibiotics is currently a topic of concern.

  15. Interventional Radiology of the Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Berent, Allyson C

    2016-05-01

    Minimally invasive treatment options using interventional radiology and interventional endoscopy for urologic disease have become more common over the past decade in veterinary medicine. Urinary tract obstructions and urinary incontinence are the most common reasons for urinary interventions. Ureteral obstructions are underdiagnosed and a common clinical problem in veterinary medicine. Ureteral obstructions should be considered an emergency, and decompression should be performed as quickly as possible. Diagnostic imaging is the mainstay in diagnosing a ureteral obstruction and has changed in the last few years, with ultrasound and radiographs being the most sensitive tools in making this diagnosis preoperatively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Urinary Tract Infections in the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2016-08-01

    Urinary infection is the most common bacterial infection in elderly populations. The high prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in both men and women is benign and should not be treated. A diagnosis of symptomatic infection for elderly residents of long-term care facilities without catheters requires localizing genitourinary findings. Symptomatic urinary infection is overdiagnosed in elderly bacteriuric persons with nonlocalizing clinical presentations, with substantial inappropriate antimicrobial use. Residents with chronic indwelling catheters experience increased morbidity from urinary tract infection. Antimicrobial therapy is selected based on clinical presentation, patient tolerance, and urine culture results.

  17. Escherichia coli sequence type 73 as a cause of community acquired urinary tract infection in men and women in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Souza da-Silva, Ana Paula; de Sousa, Viviane Santos; Martins, Natacha; da Silva Dias, Rubens Clayton; Bonelli, Raquel Regina; Riley, Lee W; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2017-02-07

    Escherichia coli clones ST131, ST69, ST95, and ST73 are frequent causes of urinary tract infections (UTI) and bloodstream infections. Specific clones and virulence profiles of E. coli causing UTI in men has been rarely described. The aim of this study was to characterize patient and clonal characteristics of community-acquired UTI caused by E. coli in men (n=12) and women (n=127) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, complementing a previous work. We characterized isolates in phylogenetic groups, ERIC2-PCR and PFGE types, MLST, genome similarity and virulence gene-profiles. UTI from men were more frequently caused by phylogenetic group B2 isolates (83% versus 42%, respectively, P = 0.01), a group with significantly higher virulence scores compared with women. ST73 was the predominant clone in men (50%) and the second most frequent in women (12%), with the highest virulence score (mean and median=9) among other clones. ST73 gnomes formed at least six clusters. E. coli from men carried significantly higher numbers of virulence genes, such as sfa/focDE (67% versus 27%), hlyA (58% versus 24%), cnf 1 (58% versus 16%), fyuA (100% versus 82%) and MalX (92% versus 44%), compared with isolates from women. These data suggest the predominance and spread of ST73 isolates likely relates to an abundance of virulence determinants.

  18. Urinary Tract Infections in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Lona; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) in older women are commonly encountered in outpatient practice. OBJECTIVE To review management of asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic UTI and review prevention of recurrent UTIs in older community-dwelling women. EVIDENCE REVIEW A search of Ovid (Medline, PsycINFO, Embase) for English-language human studies conducted among adults aged 65 years and older and published in peer-reviewed journals from 1946 to November 20, 2013. RESULTS The clinical spectrum of UTIs ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria, to symptomatic and recurrent UTIs, to sepsis associated with UTI requiring hospitalization. Recent evidence helps differentiate asymptomatic bacteriuria from symptomatic UTI. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is transient in older women, often resolves without any treatment, and is not associated with morbidity or mortality. The diagnosis of symptomatic UTI is made when a patient has both clinical features and laboratory evidence of a urinary infection. Absent other causes, patients presenting with any 2 of the following meet the clinical diagnostic criteria for symptomatic UTI: fever, worsened urinary urgency or frequency, acute dysuria, suprapubic tenderness, or costovertebral angle pain or tenderness. A positive urine culture (≥105 CFU/mL) with no more than 2 uropathogens and pyuria confirms the diagnosis of UTI. Risk factors for recurrent symptomatic UTI include diabetes, functional disability, recent sexual intercourse, prior history of urogynecologic surgery, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence. Testing for UTI is easily performed in the clinic using dipstick tests. When there is a low pretest probability of UTI, a negative dipstick result for leukocyte esterase and nitrites excludes infection. Antibiotics are selected by identifying the uropathogen, knowing local resistance rates, and considering adverse effect profiles. Chronic suppressive antibiotics for 6 to 12 months and

  19. Urinary Biomarkers for Screening for Renal Scarring in Children with Febrile Urinary Tract Infection: Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kitao, Tetsuya; Kimata, Takahisa; Yamanouchi, Sohsaku; Kato, Shogo; Tsuji, Shoji; Kaneko, Kazunari

    2015-09-01

    Recurrent febrile urinary tract infections during infancy cause renal scarring, which is characterized by progressive focal interstitial fibrosis and may lead to renal failure. Renal scarring can be diagnosed through scintigraphy, although it seems impractical to perform renal scintigraphy for all infants with febrile urinary tract infections. Therefore, it is important to search for a biomarker to identify the presence of renal scarring. We hypothesized that urinary biomarkers of nephropathy may increase in infants with renal scarring following febrile urinary tract infections. A total of 49 infants who underwent renal scintigraphy for febrile urinary tract infections were enrolled in the study. Several measurements were performed using urine samples, including total proteins, beta2-microglobulins, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin, liver-type fatty acid binding protein and angiotensinogen. Values were corrected by creatinine and compared between patients with and without renal scarring. Among urinary biomarkers only angiotensinogen in patients with scarring (median 14.6 μg/gm creatinine) demonstrated significantly higher levels than in patients without scarring (3.6 μg/gm creatinine, p <0.001). Urinary angiotensinogen may be useful for diagnosing the presence of renal scarring. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Best pharmacological practice: urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay

    2003-05-01

    Urinary tract infection is the most frequent bacterial infection. Acute uncomplicated urinary infection and acute non-obstructive pyelonephritis occur in young women with normal genitourinary tracts. Empirical short-course therapy is preferred for the management of acute cystitis, but evolving resistance requires continuing reassessment of optimal antimicrobial selection. Empirical trimethoprim or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole has been recommended, but increasing resistance to these agents suggests that pivmecillinam, nitrofurantoin and perhaps fosfomycin trometamol should be considered. Although flouroquinolones are effective as short-course therapy, widespread empirical use of these agents should be discouraged because of potential promotion of resistance. For acute non-obstructive pyelonephritis, flouroquinolones are the empirical oral treatment of choice, although urine culture results should direct continuing therapy. Complicated urinary tract infection occurs in men or women of all ages with underlying abnormalities of the genitourinary tract. Treatment of complicated urinary infection is individualised, taking into consideration the underlying abnormality and susceptibilities of the infecting organism. Asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be treated except in pregnant women, in patients prior to undergoing an invasive surgical procedure, or renal transplant recipients in the early postrenal transplant period.

  1. Management of suspected bacterial urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Beckford-Ball, Jason

    New guidelines on the management of suspected bacterial urinary tract infection in adults have just been released by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). The guidance states that the presence of bacteriuria should lead to antibiotic treatment only when there is definitive evidence that eradicating the bacterial infection will result in a tangible health gain at a reasonable level of risk (SIGN, 2006).

  2. Ureaplasma urealyticum serotypes in urinary tract disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hewish, M J; Birch, D F; Fairley, K F

    1986-01-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum cultures from 124 patients with urinary tract disease were serotyped by indirect immunofluorescence, using antisera to serotypes I to VIII. A similar range of serotypes was recovered from first-voided, midstream, and bladder-aspiration (SPA) urine, upper urinary tract samples, and vaginal swabs. Serotype VI was predominant (44/124) among the samples, whereas serotypes V (1/124 samples) and VII (0/124 samples) were uncommon. Twenty of 124 cultures contained more than one serotype, and three cultures were untypeable. Serotypes cultured from bladder urine were also present in vaginal and urethral samples, although these samples often carried additional serotypes. Consecutive SPA samples from the same patient invariably contained the same serotype, whereas some consecutive midstream urine samples showed a loss or gain of serotypes with time. One patient carried the same serotype in SPA urine over a period of 13 months. The pattern of serotypes recovered from the urinary tract was similar irrespective of the sampling site, the site of infection, the clinical diagnosis and renal function of the patient, and the presence or absence of other microorganisms. Colonization above the urethra and association with urinary tract disease appeared to be serotype independent. PMID:3700599

  3. Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infections in Children.

    PubMed

    Doern, Christopher D; Richardson, Susan E

    2016-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common occurrence in children. The management and laboratory diagnosis of these infections pose unique challenges that are not encountered in adults. Important factors, such as specimen collection, urinalysis interpretation, culture thresholds, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, require special consideration in children and will be discussed in detail in the following review.

  4. Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common occurrence in children. The management and laboratory diagnosis of these infections pose unique challenges that are not encountered in adults. Important factors, such as specimen collection, urinalysis interpretation, culture thresholds, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, require special consideration in children and will be discussed in detail in the following review. PMID:27053673

  5. Novel Approaches to Preventing Urinary Tract Infection in Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    in young women, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus saprophyticus , as well as their interactions with glycosphingolipids (GSLs) on the cell surface of...Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012. 13. -ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Urinary tract infections (UTIs), generally caused by Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus ... saprophyticus , are extremely common among young women and 25% of these patients develop frequent recurrent infections. Although UTIs can be treated, we

  6. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Kline, Kimberly A; Lewis, Amanda L

    2016-04-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary-tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI.

  7. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Kimberly A.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI. PMID:27227294

  8. Cephalothin is not a reliable surrogate marker for oral cephalosporins in susceptibility testing of Enterobacteriaceae causing urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    López, Itziar Angulo; Montes, Jorge Calvo; Álvarez, Mar Justel; Mazarrasa, Carlos Fernández; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Vitek® 2 (bioMérieux) is a widely used commercial antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) system. AST-N244 card includes cephalothin as first-generation cephalosporin. We compared the cephalothin susceptibility results obtained with Vitek® 2 AST-N244 to those obtained by broth microdilution (BMD) and disk diffusion (DD) for 212 urinary Enterobacteriaceae. We also evaluated the differences between cefazolin and cephalothin susceptibility results. The overall performance of Vitek® 2 for cephalothin testing was 74.5% and 76.4% category agreement compared to BMD and DD, respectively; 84.4% essential agreement; very major errors 15.2% and 11.1% compared to BMD and DD; major errors 0% compared to both methods; and minor errors 22.2% and 21.7% compared to BMD and DD. Regarding correlation between cephalothin and cefazolin, the differences observed were statistically significant (P<0.0001) for the 167 Escherichia coli included (39.5% cephalothin susceptible versus 92.2% cefazolin susceptible by BMD; 41.9% cephalothin susceptible versus 93.4% cefazolin susceptible by DD). Vitek® 2 should provide cefazolin instead of cephalothin as a surrogate marker for oral cephalosporins on the urinary AST-244 cards in order to follow the CLSI (2016) recommendations.

  9. Biofabrication and biomaterials for urinary tract reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elsawy, Moustafa M; de Mel, Achala

    2017-01-01

    Reconstructive urologists are constantly facing diverse and complex pathologies that require structural and functional restoration of urinary organs. There is always a demand for a biocompatible material to repair or substitute the urinary tract instead of using patient’s autologous tissues with its associated morbidity. Biomimetic approaches are tissue-engineering tactics aiming to tailor the material physical and biological properties to behave physiologically similar to the urinary system. This review highlights the different strategies to mimic urinary tissues including modifications in structure, surface chemistry, and cellular response of a range of biological and synthetic materials. The article also outlines the measures to minimize infectious complications, which might lead to graft failure. Relevant experimental and preclinical studies are discussed, as well as promising biomimetic approaches such as three-dimensional bioprinting. PMID:28546955

  10. Biofabrication and biomaterials for urinary tract reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Elsawy, Moustafa M; de Mel, Achala

    2017-01-01

    Reconstructive urologists are constantly facing diverse and complex pathologies that require structural and functional restoration of urinary organs. There is always a demand for a biocompatible material to repair or substitute the urinary tract instead of using patient's autologous tissues with its associated morbidity. Biomimetic approaches are tissue-engineering tactics aiming to tailor the material physical and biological properties to behave physiologically similar to the urinary system. This review highlights the different strategies to mimic urinary tissues including modifications in structure, surface chemistry, and cellular response of a range of biological and synthetic materials. The article also outlines the measures to minimize infectious complications, which might lead to graft failure. Relevant experimental and preclinical studies are discussed, as well as promising biomimetic approaches such as three-dimensional bioprinting.

  11. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and treatment failure/short-term relapse of community-acquired urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gagliotti, Carlo; Buttazzi, Rossella; Sforza, Stefano; Moro, Maria Luisa

    2008-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the impact of resistance to fluoroquinolones on the short-term outcome of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by Escherichia coli. Patients were identified and followed, during 2006, using the health care databases of the Emilia-Romagna Region. The outcome of interest was the treatment failure/short-term relapse (the re-isolation of E. coli from urine between 4 and 30 days after the first isolation). Resistance to fluoroquinolones increases the risk of treatment failure/short-term relapse in women with uncomplicated community-acquired UTIs caused by E. coli (Rate Ratio=1.85, 95% CI 1.32-2.60). The efficacy of fluoroquinolones for community-acquired UTIs of men was significantly modified by the resistance status of E. coli. Prescription of these agents was associated with a reduced occurrence of the outcome only in men with a ciprofloxacin sensitive first isolate (Rate Ratio=0.50, 95% CI 0.25-0.99). Resistance to fluoroquinolones of E. coli is a growing problem with a negative impact on the outcome of community-acquired UTIs; therefore, the prescription of these agents should be limited to infections for which they are recommended, avoiding their use in uncomplicated UTIs.

  12. Antimicrobial resistance and beta-lactamase production of Escherichia coli causing canine urinary tract infections: Passive surveillance of laboratory isolates in Saskatoon, Canada, 2014.

    PubMed

    Courtice, Rachel; Sniatynski, Michelle; Rubin, Joseph E

    2016-11-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of canine urinary Escherichia coli (n = 113) isolated by a regional diagnostic laboratory over a 1-year period was determined. Antimicrobial minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined, and those isolates resistant to beta-lactams were screened for broad-spectrum beta-lactamases. Isolates were unexpectedly susceptible, 79.6% were susceptible to all drugs tested and no extended-spectrum beta-lactamases were identified. Our findings indicate that empiric treatment of canine urinary tract infections with first line drugs such as amoxicillin or trimethoprim + sulfamethoxazole is likely to be successful.

  13. Preoperative urinary tract obstruction in scoliosis patients.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Kotani, Toshiaki; Mori, Kazuetsu; Kawamura, Ken; Ohtake, Akira

    2017-01-01

    While the association between scoliosis and cardiac and respiratory function impairments has been well characterized in clinical practice and research, the potential effect of scoliosis on urinary tract structure and renal function has received little attention. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the preoperative clinical characteristics of urinary tract structure and renal function in pediatric patients with idiopathic scoliosis, using a combination of blood tests, urinalysis, and imaging. Preoperative measures of urinary tract structure and renal function were obtained for 16 patients, 13-17 years old, scheduled for corrective surgery for idiopathic scoliosis. Preoperative assessment included blood test and urinalysis, combined with structural imaging on ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance urography (MRU), and radioisotope tracing (RI), using technetium-99 m mercaptoacetyltriglycine ((99m) Tc-MAG3). Differences in blood and urine tests between patients with and without urinary tract obstruction (UTO) were evaluated for significance using Mann-Whitney U test. For all 16 patients, blood tests and MRU were within normal limits. Dilatation of the renal pelvis was identified on US in eight patients (50.0%). UTO was identified on RI in six patients (37.5%). UTO was associated with elevated β2-microglobulin concentration. Urinary β2-microglobulin concentration >0.7 μg/mg Cr differentiated patients with UTO from those without UTO, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 70%. β2-Microglobulin concentration may be a useful marker to screen for asymptomatic UTO in patients with idiopathic scoliosis. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  14. Cold stress induces lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2013-07-01

    Cold stress as a result of whole-body cooling at low environmental temperatures exacerbates lower urinary tract symptoms, such as urinary urgency, nocturia and residual urine. We established a model system using healthy conscious rats to explore the mechanisms of cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. In this review, we summarize the basic findings shown by this model. Rats that were quickly transferred from room temperature (27 ± 2°C) to low temperature (4 ± 2°C) showed detrusor overactivity including increased basal pressure and decreased voiding interval, micturition volume, and bladder capacity. The cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity is mediated through a resiniferatoxin-sensitve C-fiber sensory nerve pathway involving α1-adrenergic receptors. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 channels, which are sensitive to thermal changes below 25-28°C, also play an important role in mediating the cold stress responses. Additionally, the sympathetic nervous system is associated with transient hypertension and decreases of skin surface temperature that are closely correlated with the detrusor overactivity. With this cold stress model, we showed that α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists have the potential to treat cold stress-exacerbated lower urinary tract symptoms. In addition, we showed that traditional Japanese herbal mixtures composed of Hachimijiogan act, in part, by increasing skin temperature and reducing the number of cold sensitive transient receptor potential melastatin channels in the skin. The effects of herbal mixtures have the potential to treat and/or prevent the exacerbation of lower urinary tract symptoms by providing resistance to the cold stress responses. Our model provides new opportunities for utilizing animal disease models with altered lower urinary tract functions to explore the effects of novel therapeutic drugs.

  15. Treatment of urinary tract stones.

    PubMed Central

    Wickham, J E

    1993-01-01

    Replacement of open surgery with minimally invasive techniques for treating stones in the renal tract has greatly reduced patients' morbidity and mortality and the period of hospitalisation and convalescence. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy does not require anaesthesia and requires little analgesia so that treatment can be given on an outpatient basis, and there is no wound to heal. Only a small puncture site is needed for percutaneous endoscopic lithotomy, and with the advent of prophylactic antibiotics there are few complications. Of renal stones, about 85% can now be successfully treated by extracorporeal lithotripsy alone, and almost all of the stones too large or hard for lithotripsy can be treated endoscopically, with ultrasonic or electrohydraulic probes being used to fragment the stone. Stones in the upper and lower thirds of the ureter can be treated by extracorporeal lithotripsy, but stones in the middle third, which cannot normally be visualised to allow focusing of the shockwaves, usually require ureteroscopy. Nearly all bladder stones can be treated by transurethral endoscopy with an electrohydraulic probe. Only the largest renal tract stones still require open surgery. Images FIG 10 p1415-a p1415-b p1416-a p1416-b p1417-a PMID:8274898

  16. Urinary tract infections in inpatients: that challenge.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, V; Ampuero, D; Padilla, B

    2017-09-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the major nosocomial infections. In more than 80% of cases it is related to the use of urological devices, especially linked to the misuse of urinary catheters. Empirical treatment should be based on local epidemiology, severity criteria and risk of multiresistant bacteria. This review shows the most important aspects of nosocomial UTI, as well as the recommendations for correct treatment adjustment; both empirical and definitive, that is the great challenge to avoid multiresistance, as well as to avoid unnecessary treatments.

  17. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical and economic impact of urinary tract infections caused by ESBL-producing Escherichia coli requiring hospitalization: A matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Palau, E; Solande, G; Sánchez, F; Sorlí, L; Montero, M; Güerri, R; Villar, J; Grau, S; Horcajada, J P

    2015-12-01

    To analyze the clinical and economic impact of urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli requiring hospitalization. Matched cohort study including adults with UTI caused by ESBL-producing E. coli admitted to a tertiary care hospital in Barcelona, Spain, between August 2010 and July 2013. Demographic, clinical and economic data were analyzed. One hundred and twenty episodes of UTI were studied: 60 due to ESBL-producing E. coli and 60 due to non-ESBL-producing E. coli. Bivariate analysis showed that prior antimicrobial treatment (p = 0.007) and ESBL production (p < 0.001) were related to clinical failure during the first 7 days. Multivariate analysis selected ESBL as the sole risk factor for clinical failure (p = 0.002). Regarding the economic impact of infections caused by ESBL-producing E. coli, an ESBL-producing infection cost more than a non-ESBL-producing E. coli infection (mean €4980 vs. €2612). Looking at hospital expenses separately, the total pharmacy costs and antibiotic costs of ESBL infections were considerably higher than for non-ESBL infections (p < 0.001), as was the need for outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) and its related costs. Multivariate analysis performed for the higher costs of UTI episodes found statistically significant differences for males (p = 0.004), chronic renal failure (p = 0.025), ESBL production (p = 0.008) and OPAT (p = 0.009). UTIs caused by EBSL-producing E. coli requiring hospital admission are associated with worse clinical and economic outcomes. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Intranasal immunization with fusion protein MrpH·FimH and MPL adjuvant confers protection against urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mehri; Asadi Karam, Mohammad Reza; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Oloomi, Mana; Jafari, Anis; Bouzari, Saeid

    2015-04-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and Proteus mirabilis are among the most common infections in the world. Currently there are no vaccines available to confer protection against UTI in humans. In this study, the immune responses and protection of FimH of UPEC with MrpH antigen of P. mirabilis in different vaccine formulations with and without MPL adjuvant were assessed. Mice intranasally immunized with the novel fusion protein MrpH·FimH induced a significant increase in IgG and IgA in serum, nasal wash, vaginal wash, and urine samples. Mice immunized with fusion MrpH·FimH also showed a significant boost in cellular immunity. Addition of MPL as the adjuvant enhanced FimH and MrpH specific humoral and cellular responses in both systemic and mucosal samples. Vaccination with MrpH·FimH alone or in combination with MPL showed the highest efficiency in clearing bladder and kidney infections in mice challenged with UPEC and P. mirabilis. These findings may indicate that the protection observed correlates with the systemic, mucosal and cellular immune responses induced by vaccination with these preparations. Our data suggest MrpH·FimH fusion protein with or without MPL as adjuvant could be potential vaccine candidates for elimination of UPEC and P. mirabilis. These data altogether are promising and these formulations are good candidates for elimination of UPEC and P. mirabilis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bacteriophage-Mediated Control of a Two-Species Biofilm Formed by Microorganisms Causing Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections in an In Vitro Urinary Catheter Model

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms from a patient or their environment may colonize indwelling urinary catheters, forming biofilm communities on catheter surfaces and increasing patient morbidity and mortality. This study investigated the effect of pretreating hydrogel-coated silicone catheters with mixtures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis bacteriophages on the development of single- and two-species biofilms in a multiday continuous-flow in vitro model using artificial urine. Novel phages were purified from sewage, characterized, and screened for their abilities to reduce biofilm development by clinical isolates of their respective hosts. Our screening data showed that artificial urine medium (AUM) is a valid substitute for human urine for the purpose of evaluating uropathogen biofilm control by these bacteriophages. Defined phage cocktails targeting P. aeruginosa and P. mirabilis were designed based on the biofilm inhibition screens. Hydrogel-coated catheters were pretreated with one or both cocktails and challenged with approximately 1 × 103 CFU/ml of the corresponding pathogen(s). The biofilm growth on the catheter surfaces in AUM was monitored over 72 to 96 h. Phage pretreatment reduced P. aeruginosa biofilm counts by 4 log10 CFU/cm2 (P ≤ 0.01) and P. mirabilis biofilm counts by >2 log10 CFU/cm2 (P ≤ 0.01) over 48 h. The presence of P. mirabilis was always associated with an increase in lumen pH from 7.5 to 9.5 and with eventual blockage of the reactor lines. The results of this study suggest that pretreatment of a hydrogel urinary catheter with a phage cocktail can significantly reduce mixed-species biofilm formation by clinically relevant bacteria. PMID:25487795

  1. Imaging in childhood urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Riccabona, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common query in pediatric radiology. Imaging for and after UTI is still a heavily debated topic with different approaches, as thorough evidence to decide upon a definite algorithm is scarce. This review article tries to address the clinical rational of the various approaches (general imaging, top-down or bottom-up, selected and individualized imaging concepts…), describes the available imaging modalities and the respective findings in imaging children with UTI, and proposes an imaging algorithm for the work-up of children during and after UTI discussing the "pros and cons" of the different attitudes. In summary, imaging by US is generally considered for all infants and children with a febrile or complicated (upper) UTI, particularly without previously known urinary tract anatomy. The further work-up (searching for renal scarring and assessment of vesico-ureteric reflux) is then decided according to these initial findings as well as the clinical presentation, course, and scenario.

  2. Urinary tract infections; problems in medical management.

    PubMed

    JAWETZ, E

    1953-08-01

    The lesion principally responsible for chronic, or recurrent, urinary tract infection is a focus in the interstitial tissue of the kidney. Most cursory antimicrobial therapy suppresses the manifestations of lower urinary tract involvement but does not eradicate the renal focus. In order to cure rather than merely suppress the infection, it is imperative that, as early as possible, steps be taken to isolate and identify the etiologic microorganism and to determine its sensitivity to antimicrobial agents. Based on this information sufficient amounts of drug should be given for an adequate period (probably at least two weeks) to eradicate the infection within the renal tissue. Such a program would tend to reduce the number of cases in which irreversible renal failure develops from chronic pyelonephritis.

  3. Azithromycin-Ciprofloxacin-Impregnated Urinary Catheters Avert Bacterial Colonization, Biofilm Formation, and Inflammation in a Murine Model of Foreign-Body-Associated Urinary Tract Infections Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Saini, Hina; Vadekeetil, Anitha; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a multifaceted pathogen causing a variety of biofilm-mediated infections, including catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs). The high prevalence of CAUTIs in hospitals, their clinical manifestations, such as urethritis, cystitis, pyelonephritis, meningitis, urosepsis, and death, and the associated economic challenges underscore the need for management of these infections. Biomaterial modification of urinary catheters with two drugs seems an interesting approach to combat CAUTIs by inhibiting biofilm. Previously, we demonstrated the in vitro efficacy of urinary catheters impregnated with azithromycin (AZM) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) against P. aeruginosa Here, we report how these coated catheters impact the course of CAUTI induced by P. aeruginosa in a murine model. CAUTI was established in female LACA mice with uncoated or AZM-CIP-coated silicone implants in the bladder, followed by transurethral inoculation of 10(8) CFU/ml of biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. AZM-CIP-coated implants (i) prevented biofilm formation on the implant's surface (P ≤ 0.01), (ii) restricted bacterial colonization in the bladder and kidney (P < 0.0001), (iii) averted bacteriuria (P < 0.0001), and (iv) exhibited no major histopathological changes for 28 days in comparison to uncoated implants, which showed persistent CAUTI. Antibiotic implants also overcame implant-mediated inflammation, as characterized by trivial levels of inflammatory markers such as malondialdehyde (P < 0.001), myeloperoxidase (P < 0.05), reactive oxygen species (P ≤ 0.001), and reactive nitrogen intermediates (P < 0.01) in comparison to those in uncoated implants. Further, AZM-CIP-coated implants showed immunomodulation by manipulating the release of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and IL-10 to the benefit of the host. Overall, the study demonstrates long-term in vivo effectiveness of AZM-CIP-impregnated catheters, which may

  4. Urinary tract infection in renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Giessing, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract infection (UTI), especially recurrent UTI, is a common problem, occurring in >75% of kidney transplant (KTX) recipients. UTI degrades the health-related quality of life and can impair graft function, potentially reducing graft and patient survival. As urologists are often involved in treating UTI after KTX, previous reports were searched to elucidate underlying causes, risk factors and treatment options, as well as recommendations for prophylaxis of UTI after KTX. Methods Pubmed/Medline was searched and international guidelines and recommendations for prevention and treatment of UTI after KTX were also assessed. Results Most studies on UTI after KTX have a small sample, and are descriptive and retrospective. Many transplant- and recipient-related risk factors have been identified. While asymptomatic bacteriuria is often treated, even though some studies advise against it, symptomatic UTI should be treated empirically after collecting urine for microbiological analysis, to avoid the development of transplant pyelonephritis with a high chance of urosepsis. The duration of treatment has not been determined in studies and recommendations refer to the treatment of complicated UTI in the non-transplant population. Prophylaxis has not been the focus of studies either. Conclusion UTI after KTX is still largely an under-represented field of study, despite many recipients developing UTI after KTX. Prospective studies on this topic are urgently needed. PMID:26558020

  5. Febrile urinary tract infections: pyelonephritis and urosepsis.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Holleman, Frits; Geerlings, Suzanne E

    2016-02-01

    Complicated infections of the urinary tract (UTI) including pyelonephritis and urosepsis are also called febrile UTI. This review describes insights from the literature on this topic since July 2014. Recent studies regarding risk factors and consequences of febrile UTI confirmed existing knowledge. It remains difficult to obtain insight into the epidemiology of febrile UTI because urine and blood cultures are frequently missing. The relationship between host and virulence factors of Escherichia coli was further explored showing that less virulent strains can cause infection in immunocompromised patients. In contrast to obstructive uropathy, diabetes, and being older, neutropenia was not a risk factor for lower UTI or urosepsis. A randomized controlled trial revealed that ceftolozane-tazobactam was marginally superior to levofloxacin as treatment for complicated UTI. Case series supported the notion that xanthogranulomatous and emphysematous pyelonephritis are more common in diabetic patients and that drainage or surgery is often required. Neutropenia was not a risk factor for lower UTI or urosepsis. When local resistance percentages to the frequently prescribed fluoroquinolones are high, the combination of ceftolozane-tazobactam may be an alternative as treatment for complicated UTI. Xanthogranulomatous and emphysematous pyelonephritis need to be considered in diabetic patients presenting with UTI symptoms.

  6. THE TREATMENT OF URINARY TRACT CALCULI

    PubMed Central

    Leadbetter, Wyland F.

    1958-01-01

    From review of recent information relative to calculus formation in the kidney, the conclusion reached that we do not yet understand, despite much effort, the basic physicochemical mechanisms involved. Since this is so, it has seemed best to the author for the present to rely, in treating patients with renal stones, on simple therapeutic concepts, which, if carefully and conscientiously applied, produce good results. The concepts are the elimination of known causes such as parathyroid adenomas and obstructive lesions, elimination or at least treatment of infections, diminution of urinary components which form the basis of calculi by limiting the oral intake or absorption from the gastrointestinal tract and maintenance of a dilute urine of desired pH. A plan for preoperative study is suggested to allow planned therapy. Indications for operative removal of calculi as well as some points of technique are discussed. It is emphasized that surgical removal of a calculus is but an incident in the care of patients with calculi and that treatment during the postoperative period and followup therapy is most important if success is to be achieved. Reports of cases to illustrate the application of these concepts are presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16 PMID:13523394

  7. Audit of cytology of upper urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Malta, F; Lenos, M; Leotsakos, I; Katafigiotis, I; Gakiopoulou, H; Constantinides, C; Mikou, P

    2016-10-01

    Cytology is an essential tool for the investigation of urinary tract malignancy. In this audit, we aimed to assess our laboratory performance in the diagnosis of upper urinary tract malignancy and to use the information provided to improve our service. We retrieved cytology reports of upper urinary tract specimens from two periods, re-evaluated the cases, compared the reports with histology data and estimated the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV). In the time interval between the two periods, we adopted new terminology, established better communication with clinicians and gained experience in the field. Finally, the data from the two periods were compared. In phase A, we estimated a sensitivity of 73%, specificity of 86% and PPV of 84.6%. As a result of the cytological re-evaluation, correlation with histology and clinical follow-up, plus communication with the clinicians during the audit, we established new terminology and a new request form. A three tiered grading system of atypia (mild, moderate and severe) was replaced by a two tiered grading system. The first category "atypia probably benign" corresponded to "mild atypia" while the second category "atypia, not otherwise specified" corresponded to "moderate atypia". The cases diagnosed as "severe atypia" were reclassified as "suspicious for malignancy". In phase B, the sensitivity, specificity and PPV were 75%, 89% and 90%, respectively. Our laboratory performance is in concordance with reported data and has been improved through this study. The audit process is extremely valuable for the identification of problems, for taking action and, finally, for the improvement of the clinical cytology service in the field of upper urinary tract malignancy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Urinary tract infection in infants caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli: comparison between urban and rural hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming-Fang; Chen, Wan-Ling; Huang, I-Fei; Chen, Jung-Ren; Chiou, Yee-Hsuan; Chen, Yao-Shen; Lee, Susan Shin-Jung; Hung, Wan-Yu; Hung, Chih-Hsin; Wang, Jiun-Ling

    2016-08-01

    Community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli is an emerging problem. Compared with urban infants, rural infants may encounter different distributions of community-acquired resistant strains and various barriers to efficient management. A retrospective survey and comparison was conducted for infants with UTI caused by ESBL-producing E. coli admitted to an urban hospital (n = 111) and a rural hospital (n = 48) in southern Taiwan from 2009 to 2012. Compared with 2009 and 2010, the total number of cases at both hospitals significantly increased in 2011 and 2012 (p < 0.001). Compared with the rural patients, the urban patients were significantly younger, and they had fewer days of fever before and after admission, fewer presentations of poor activity and poor appetite, and a lower serum creatinine level. Most of the patients had no prior history of illness, and we could not identify any significant different risk factors for acquiring ESBL-producing E. coli, such as past antimicrobial use, hospitalization, UTI, and underlying renal diseases, between the urban and rural populations. The increase in community-acquired UTI in infants caused by ESBL-producing E. coli was similar between the urban and rural populations. Our preliminary data suggest that the rural-urban disparities were probably related to easy access to health care by the urban population. ESBL complicates disease management, and the increase in the prevalence of ESBL producers is a major health concern and requires further healthy carrier and environmental surveillance.

  9. Chateter-associated Urinary Tract Infections in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Piljic, Dilista; Porobic-Jahic, Humera; Piljic, Dragan; Ahmetagic, Sead; Jahic, Rahima

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hospital-acquired Urinary tract infections make 35% of all the hospital-acquired infections, and about 80% of them are related to the catheterization of the urinary bladder Purpose: To determine clinical characteristics and dominant etiologic factors of Urinary Tract Infections associated with urinary catheter (C-UTIs). Methods: Determined clinical characteristics of C-UTIs were prospectively analyzed on 38 hospitalized patients in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases at the University Clinical Centre Tuzla, from January 1st 2011 to December 31st 2011. The control group constituted of 200 patients with community-acquired Urinary Tract Infections (Co-UTIs) hospitalized in the same period. Results: It was registered on 22 (57.89%) of symptomatic infections, 14 (36.84%) asymptomatic bacteriuria and 2 (5.26%) other C-UTIs. Dominant etiologic factors were: E. coli, caused 14 (36.84%), Extended-Spectrum Beta-lactamase producing (ESBL) Klebsiella pneumoniae 7 (18.42%), Enterococcus faecium and Candida spp. 3 (7.89%) of C-UTIs. E. coli was significantly most common etiologic factor of C-UTIs in younger women (p=0.04). E. coli from C-UTIS showed significantly higher resistance to antimicrobial drugs. Inadequate antimicrobial therapy was significantly more common prescribed to patients from C-UTIs. Lethal outcome was significantly most common associated with certain clinical and laboratory findings. Conclusion: Initial antimicrobial therapy of those serious infections should be based on data from those research. PMID:24167432

  10. Acute renal damage in infants after first urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Cascio, Salvatore; Chertin, Boris; Yoneda, Akihiro; Rolle, Udo; Kelleher, Jeremiah; Puri, Prem

    2002-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common causes of unexplained fever in neonates. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of urinary tract anomalies and acute renal damage in neonates who presented with first urinary tract infection in the first 8 weeks of life. We reviewed the records of 95 infants, who were hospitalised with UTI during a 6-year period (1994-1999). Patients with antenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis and incomplete radiological investigations were excluded from the study. Of the remaining 57 patients, 42 were boys and 15 girls. The mean age at diagnosis was 32 days (range 5-60 days). All patients underwent renal ultrasonography (US), voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan. Urinary tract abnormalities were detected in 20 (35%) patients. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was found in 19 (33%) neonates, 7 girls and 12 boys. Acute cortical defects on DMSA scan were present in 19 kidneys of patients with VUR and in 25 of those without reflux. Only one-third of neonates after first symptomatic UTI had VUR. We recommend that US, VCUG, and DMSA scan should be routinely performed after the first UTI in infants younger than 8 weeks.

  11. [Treatment of uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Horcajada, Juan Pablo; García-Palomo, Daniel; Fariñas, M Carmen

    2005-12-01

    Empirical antibiotic treatment of lower urinary tract infections should be based on the patient's clinical data and on local sensitivity data. Because of the increase in resistance among uropathogens, recommendations on the empirical treatment of urinary tract infections have been modified. Currently, the empirical use of co-trimoxazole, ampicillin, and first-generation cephalosporins and quinolones is not recommended. Fluoroquinolones have been demonstrated to be highly effective in comparative studies but, because of the increase in resistance, the type of patient who can benefit from these antimicrobial agents must be selected. Second- and third-generation cephalosporins still have high sensitivity rates, although the higher recurrence rates associated with their use and the emergence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing enterobacterial in the community should be taken into account. Amoxicillin-clavulanate is less effective in eradicating infections than quinolones. Fosfomycin-trometamol has resistance rates of below 2% and single-dose therapy has been demonstrated to be safe and effective. Nitrofurantoin is also currently active, although it must be administered for 7 days and can produce toxicity. Both agents are currently recommended as alternative therapeutic options to fluoroquinolones in uncomplicated infections of the lower urinary tract.

  12. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Pearson, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium which is well-known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls’-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  13. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Jessica N; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium and is well known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls'-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition, which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis.

  14. Urinary Tract Infections in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Kidney Stones Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Kidney Stones in Children Penile Curvature (Peyronie's Disease) Perineal Injury ...

  15. Urinary proteins in children with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Lena; Preda, Iulian; Hahn-Zoric, Mirjana; Hanson, Lars A; Jodal, Ulf; Sixt, Rune; Barregard, Lars; Hansson, Sverker

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test our hypothesis that the urinary excretion of C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha 1-microglobulin (A1M), retinol-binding protein (RBP) and Clara cell protein (CC16) is increased in children with urinary tract infection (UTI) and relates to renal damage as measured by acute dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy. Fifty-two children <2 years of age with UTI were enrolled in the study, 44 of whom were febrile. The control group consisted of 23 patients with non-UTI infection and elevated serum CRP (s-CRP) levels. Thirty-six patients had abnormal DMSA uptake, classified as mild, moderate or severe damage (DMSA class 1, 2, 3, respectively). There was a significant association between DMSA class and the excretion of urinary RBP (u-RBP) and u-CC16. There was also a significant difference in u-CRP levels between children with UTI and control children with non-UTI infections, although u-CRP excretion was not significantly correlated to DMSA class. In conclusion, the urinary excretion of the low-molecular-weight proteins RBP and CC16 showed a strong association with uptake defects on renal DMSA scans. The urinary level of CRP seems to distinguish between children with UTI and other febrile conditions. A combination of these biomarkers may be useful in the clinical assessment of children with UTI.

  16. Clinical and bacteriological efficacy of amikacin in the treatment of lower urinary tract infection caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Ipekci, Tumay; Seyman, Derya; Berk, Hande; Celik, Orcun

    2014-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria have become a growing problem limiting therapeutic options. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and microbiological efficacy of amikacin treatment in adult patients with lower UTIs due to ESBL-producing Escherichia coli (Ec) or Klebsiella pneumonia (Kp). We conducted a retrospective study of 36 outpatients aged >18 years with dysuria or problems with frequency or urgency in passing urine; pyuria and a positive urine culture (10(5) cfu/ml) for ESBL producing Ec or Kp which is also resistant to nitrofurantoin, fosfomycin, quinolones and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, between January 2013 and February 2014. Patients received intramuscular amikacin 15 mg/kg/day for 10 days. Clinical success was defined as disappearance of symptoms. Bacteriological success was defined as sterile control urine cultures. 58.3% of patients were female. Age range was 18-89 years. All of the patients had at least one complicating factor. 77.8% of the isolates were E. coli. Clinical success rate was 97.2%. Overall bacteriological success rates were 91.7% on the 3 day of treatment, 97.1% at the end of the treatment and 94.1% on the 7-10 days after treatment. After 28-32 days following the treatment, reinfection was found in 12% whereas relapse was not determined. Nephrotoxicity was developed in one patient. The clinicians should keep in mind that amikacin treatment is an efficient and safe alternative treatment option before the carbapenem treatment especially in patients with lower UTIs caused by ESBL-producing Ec or Kp that are resistant to all oral antibiotics.

  17. Long-term outcomes of urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E U; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-10-01

    The advent of specialized spinal units and better understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction has made long-term survival of these patients a reality. This has, in turn, led to an increase in quality and choice of management modalities offered to these patients including complex anatomic urinary tract reconstructive procedures tailored to the unique needs of each individual with variable outcomes. We performed a literature review evaluating the long-term outcomes of these reconstructive procedures. To achieve this, we conducted a world-wide electronic literature search of long-term outcomes published in English. As the premise of this review is long-term outcomes, we have focused on pathologies where evidence of long-term outcome is available such as patients with spinal injuries and spina bifida. Therapeutic success following urinary tract reconstruction is usually measured by preservation of renal function, improvement in quality-of-life, the satisfactory achievement of agreed outcomes and the prevention of serious complications. Prognostic factors include neuropathic detrusor overactivity; sphincter dyssynergia; bladder over distension; high pressure storage and high leak point pressures; vesicoureteric reflex, stone formation and urinary tract infections. Although, the past decade has witnessed a reduction in the total number of bladder reconstructive surgeries in the UK, these procedures are essentially safe and effective; but require long-term clinical and functional follow-up/monitoring. Until tissue engineering and gene therapy becomes more mainstream, we feel there is still a place for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  18. Long-term outcomes of urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E. U.; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-01-01

    The advent of specialized spinal units and better understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction has made long-term survival of these patients a reality. This has, in turn, led to an increase in quality and choice of management modalities offered to these patients including complex anatomic urinary tract reconstructive procedures tailored to the unique needs of each individual with variable outcomes. We performed a literature review evaluating the long-term outcomes of these reconstructive procedures. To achieve this, we conducted a world-wide electronic literature search of long-term outcomes published in English. As the premise of this review is long-term outcomes, we have focused on pathologies where evidence of long-term outcome is available such as patients with spinal injuries and spina bifida. Therapeutic success following urinary tract reconstruction is usually measured by preservation of renal function, improvement in quality-of-life, the satisfactory achievement of agreed outcomes and the prevention of serious complications. Prognostic factors include neuropathic detrusor overactivity; sphincter dyssynergia; bladder over distension; high pressure storage and high leak point pressures; vesicoureteric reflex, stone formation and urinary tract infections. Although, the past decade has witnessed a reduction in the total number of bladder reconstructive surgeries in the UK, these procedures are essentially safe and effective; but require long-term clinical and functional follow-up/monitoring. Until tissue engineering and gene therapy becomes more mainstream, we feel there is still a place for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:24235796

  19. The Genetics of Urinary Tract Infections and the Innate Defense of the Kidney and Urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Ambite, Ines; Rydstrom, Gustav; Schwaderer, Andrew L.; Hains, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The urinary tract is a sterile organ system. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common and often serious infections. Research has focused on uropathogen, environment, and host factors leading to UTI pathogenesis. A growing body of evidence exists implicating genetic factors that can contribute to UTI risks. In this review, we highlight genetic variations in aspects of the innate immune system critical to the host response to uropathogens. This overview includes genetic variations in pattern recognition receptor molecules, chemokines/cytokines, and neutrophil activation. We also comprehensively cover murine knockout models of UTI, genetic variations involved in renal scarring as a result of ascending UTIs, and asymptomatic bacteriuria. PMID:27617139

  20. Study on Bacterial Strains Causing Blood and Urinary Tract Infections in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Determination of Their Antibiotic Resistance Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Zahra; Soltan Dallal, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infections are considered as one of the main factors of neonatal mortality, especially in developing countries. Blood and urine infections are one of the most prevalent infectious factors among the infants. On the other hand, resistance against antimicrobial factors is one of the major problems in the world, and it is important to be informed about antibiotic resistance pattern of microorganisms for treatment of infections. Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the bacterial strains causing blood and urinary tract infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and determine their antibiotic resistance pattern. Materials and Methods: In this study, the microorganisms of 150 blood and urine samples of infants hospitalized in NICUs of Imam Hussein Hospital, Children Hospital Center and Bahrami Hospital in Tehran, Iran, were collected during seven months, and the antimicrobial resistance patterns of the isolates were studied by the Kirby-Bauer test. Results: During the seven-month study on 105 samples, including 85 (81%) urine samples and 20 (19%) blood samples, 81 samples (77.1%) were Gram-negative and 24 (22.9%) were Gram-positive organisms. Klebsiella pneumoniae (30.5%) was the most common Gram-negative microorganisms and Staphylococcus epidermidis (11.4%) was the most prevalent Gram-positive microorganisms. The most antimicrobial susceptibility in Gram-negative microorganisms was shown to ciprofloxacin (84.2%) and in Gram- positive ones was shown to vancomycin (83.3%). Conclusions: This results of the study show that the most contamination in NICUs is from Gram-negative bacteria and ciprofloxacin is the most effective antibiotic for treatment. Thus, the control of infections in NICUs in hospitals is very important. PMID:26468359

  1. Resistance profile for pathogens causing urinary tract infection in a pediatric population, and antibiotic treatment response at a University Hospital, 2010-2011

    PubMed Central

    Vélez Echeverri, Catalina; Serrano, Ana Katherina; Ochoa-García, Carolina; Rojas Rosas, Luisa; María Bedoya, Ana; Suárez, Margarita; Hincapié, Catalina; Henao, Adriana; Ortiz, Diana; Vanegas, Juan José; Zuleta, John Jairo; Espinal, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections in childhood and causes acute and chronic morbidity and long-term hypertension and chronic kidney disease. Objectives: To describe the demographic characteristics, infectious agents, patterns of antibiotic resistance, etiologic agent and profile of susceptibility and response to empirical treatment of UTI in a pediatric population. Methods: This is a descriptive, retrospective study. Results: Included in the study were 144 patients, 1:2.06 male to female ratio. The most common symptom was fever (79.9%) and 31.3% had a history of previous UTI. 72.0% of the patients had positive urine leukocyte count (>5 per field), urine gram was positive in 85.0% of samples and gram negative bacilli accounted for 77.8% for the total pathogens isolated. The most frequent uropathogens isolated were Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our E.coli isolates had a susceptibility rate higher than 90% to most of the antibiotics used, but a resistance rate of 42.6% to TMP SMX and 45.5% to ampicillin sulbactam. 6.3% of E. coli was extended-spectrum beta-lactamases producer strains. The most frequent empirical antibiotic used was amikacin, which was used in 66.0% of the patients. 17 of 90 patients who underwent voiding cistouretrography (VCUG) had vesicoureteral reflux. Conclusion: This study revealed that E. coli was the most frequent pathogen of community acquired UTI. We found that E. coli and other uropathogens had a high resistance rate against TMP SMX and ampicillin sulbactam. In order to ensure a successful empirical treatment, protocols should be based on local epidemiology and susceptibility rates. PMID:24970958

  2. Urinary Metabolic Phenotyping of Women with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bray, Rhiannon; Cacciatore, Stefano; Jiménez, Beatriz; Cartwright, Rufus; Digesu, Alex; Fernando, Ruwan; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Bennett, Phillip R; MacIntyre, David A; Khullar, Vik

    2017-10-04

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), including urinary incontinence, urgency and nocturia, affect approximately half of women worldwide. Current diagnostic methods for LUTS are invasive and costly, while available treatments are limited by side effects leading to poor patient compliance. In this study, we aimed to identify urine metabolic signatures associated with LUTS using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy. A total of 214 urine samples were collected from women attending tertiary urogynecology clinics (cases; n = 176) and healthy control women attending general gynecology clinics (n = 36). Despite high variation in the urine metabolome across the cohort, associations between urine metabolic profiles and BMI, parity, overactive bladder syndrome, frequency, straining, and bladder storage were identified using KODAMA (knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization). Four distinct urinary metabotypes were identified, one of which was associated with increased urinary frequency and low BMI. Urine from these patients was characterized by increased levels of isoleucine and decreased levels of hippurate. Our study suggests that metabolic profiling of urine samples from LUTS patients offers the potential to identify differences in underlying etiology, which may permit stratification of patient populations and the design of more personalized treatment strategies.

  3. Lower urinary tract symptoms in men

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, John M

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a highly prevalent and costly condition that affects older men worldwide. Many affected men develop lower urinary tract symptoms, which can have a negative impact on their quality of life. In the past, transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was the mainstay of treatment. However, several efficacious drug treatments have been developed, which have transformed BPH from an acute surgical entity to a chronic medical condition. Specifically, multiple clinical trials have shown that α adrenoceptor antagonists can significantly ameliorate lower urinary tract symptoms. Moreover, 5α reductase inhibitors, alone or combined with an α adrenoceptor antagonist, can reverse the natural course of BPH, reducing the risk of urinary retention and the need for surgical intervention. Newer medical regimens including the use of antimuscarinic agents or phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, have shown promise in men with predominantly storage symptoms and concomitant erectile dysfunction, respectively. For men who do not adequately respond to conservative measures or pharmacotherapy, minimally invasive surgical techniques (such as transurethral needle ablation, microwave thermotherapy, and prostatic urethral lift) may be of benefit, although they lack the durability of TURP. A variety of laser procedures have also been introduced, whose improved hemostatic properties abrogate many of the complications associated with traditional surgery. PMID:25125424

  4. Urinary tract infections in adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ronald, A; Ludwig, E

    2001-04-01

    Urinary tract (UTI) is a major disease burden for many patients with diabetes. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is several-fold more common among women and acute plyelonephritis is five to ten times more common in both sexes. The complications of pyelonephritis are also more common in patients with diabetes. These complications include acute papillary necrosis, emphysematous pyelonephritis, and bacteremia with metastatic localization to other sites. The management of urinary infection in patients with diabetes is essentially the same as patients without diabetes. Most infections should be managed as uncomplicated except when they occur in a milieu with obstruction or other factors that merit a diagnosis of complicated UTI. Strategies to prevent these infections and reduce morbidity should be a priority for research.

  5. Sex hormones and the female urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Miodrag, A; Castleden, C M; Vallance, T R

    1988-10-01

    Symptomatic clinical changes and urodynamic changes are apparent in the female urinary tract system during pregnancy, the menstrual cycle and following the menopause. The sex hormones exert physiological effects on the female urinary tract, from the ureters to the urethra, with oestrogens having an additional influence on the structures of the pelvic floor. High affinity oestrogen receptors have been identified in bladder, trigone, urethra and pubococcygeus muscle of women. Oestrogen pretreatment enhances the contractile response of animal detrusor muscle to alpha-adrenoceptor agonists, cholinomimetics and prostaglandins, as well as enhancing the contractile response to alpha-agonists in ureter and urethra. Progesterone on the other hand decreases tone in the ureter, bladder and urethra by enhancing beta-adrenergic responses. The dependence on oestrogens of the tissues of the lower urinary tract contributes to increased urinary problems in postmenopausal women. Urinary symptoms due to atrophic mucosal changes respond well to oestrogen replacement therapy. However, because they recur when treatment is stopped, continuous therapy with low dose natural oestrogens is recommended. Oestrogens may be of benefit in postmenopausal women with stress incontinence, but the doses necessary for clinical effect are higher than for the treatment of atrophic urethritis. The practice of adding a progestagen to long term oestrogen therapy to reduce the risk of endometrial carcinoma may, however, exacerbate stress incontinence by decreasing urethral pressure. Cyclical therapy with oestrogens may therefore be more appropriate particularly in women who are not suitable for surgery or have a mild degree of stress incontinence, along with other conservative measures such as pelvic floor exercises and alpha-adrenoceptor agonists. The place of oestrogen therapy in motor urge incontinence has not been determined. The risk of developing endometrial carcinoma as a result of long term high dose

  6. Urinary tract infections in the infant.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Mehreen; Seed, Patrick C

    2015-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) in an infant may be the first indication of an underlying renal disorder. Early recognition and initiation of adequate therapy for UTI is important to reduce the risk of long-term renal scarring. Ampicillin and gentamicin are traditionally the empiric treatment of choice; however, local antibiotic resistance patterns should be considered. Maternal antibiotics during pregnancy also increase the risk of resistant pathogens during neonatal UTI. Long-term management after the first UTI in infants remains controversial because of lack of specific studies in this age group and the risk-benefit issues for antibiotic prophylaxis between reduced recurrent disease and emergent antibiotic resistance.

  7. Reducing urinary tract infections in catheterised patients.

    PubMed

    Howe, Pam; Adams, John

    2015-01-20

    Urinary tract infections in catheterised patients continue to present a challenge in reducing healthcare-associated infection. In this article, an infection prevention and control team in one NHS trust reports on using audit results to focus attention on measures to reduce bacterial infections. Educational initiatives have an important role in reducing infection, but there is no single solution to the problem. Practice can be improved using a multi-targeted approach, peer review and clinical audit to allow for shared learning and experiences. These, along with informal education in the clinical area and more formal classroom lectures, can ultimately lead to improved patient outcomes.

  8. Urinary Tract Infection: Pathogenesis and Outlook.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Lisa K; Hunstad, David A

    2016-11-01

    The clinical syndromes comprising urinary tract infection (UTI) continue to exert significant impact on millions of patients worldwide, most of whom are otherwise healthy women. Antibiotic therapy for acute cystitis does not prevent recurrences, which plague up to one fourth of women after an initial UTI. Rising antimicrobial resistance among uropathogenic bacteria further complicates therapeutic decisions, necessitating new approaches based on fundamental biological investigation. In this review, we highlight contemporary advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis and how these might inform both our clinical perspective and future scientific priorities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nontyphoidal salmonella urinary tract infection in a case of hyperparathyroidism and nephrocalcinosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-P; Shi, Z-Y; Chen, C-H; Chen, W-M; Lin, Y-H; Tsai, C-A; Lin, S-P; Huang, S-R; Liu, P-Y

    2014-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infections often present with self-limited gastroenteritis. Extraintestinal focal infections are uncommon but have high mortality and morbidity. Urinary tract infection caused by nontyphoidal Salmonella is usually associated with structural abnormalities of the urinary tract. Nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis are the major risk factors. Although primary hyperparathyroidism has been reported to increase the risk of nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis, little is known about the association between hyperparathyroidism and Salmonella urinary tract infection. We report the case of a 37-year old man who had a history of primary hyperparathyroidism and bilateral nephrocalcinosis and who developed urinary tract infection. Salmonella Group D was isolated from his urine specimen. Salmonella should be considered as a possible causality organism in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and nephrocalcinosis who develop urinary tract infection. These patients need to be aware of the potential risks associated with salmonellosis.

  10. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy in patients with urinary tract abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Violette, Philippe D; Dion, Marie; Tailly, Thomas; Denstedt, John D; Razvi, Hassan

    2014-12-01

    Patients with urinary tract abnormalities are at an increased risk of stone formation. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) plays an important role in the treatment of this patient population; however, outcomes are less well defined compared with patients with normal urinary tract anatomy. Our objective was to evaluate the influence of urinary tract abnormalities on intraoperative and postoperative outcomes with PCNL. We report on a single-center prospective database of 2284 consecutive PCNLs in 1935 patients from 1990 to 2012. For the purposes of this analysis, patients were categorized by the presence or absence of a urinary tract abnormality. Multivariable analyses were used to identify independent predictors of the length of hospital stay, operative time, complications, and residual stones at discharge and 3 months. A urinary tract abnormality was present in 14.4% (n=330) of the cohort. On univariable analysis, patients with urinary tract abnormalities were more likely to present with urinary tract infection (28% vs 19%, P<0.001) and less likely to present with hematuria (13% vs 19%, P<0.02). On multivariable regression, a urinary tract abnormality was predictive of residual stone at discharge, need for a secondary procedure, but did not increase the risk of residual stone at 3 months or the development of complications. Operative time and hospital stay were only moderately prolonged. Patients with urinary tract abnormalities who undergo PCNL have a higher risk of residual stones at discharge and need for secondary procedures, but comparable complication rates, operative time, and hospital stay.

  11. Urinary ATP as an indicator of infection and inflammation of the urinary tract in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kiren; Horsley, Harry; Kupelian, Anthony S; Baio, Gianluca; De Iorio, Maria; Sathiananamoorthy, Sanchutha; Khasriya, Rajvinder; Rohn, Jennifer L; Wildman, Scott S; Malone-Lee, James

    2015-02-21

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is a neurotransmitter and inflammatory cytokine implicated in the pathophysiology of lower urinary tract disease. ATP additionally reflects microbial biomass thus has potential as a surrogate marker of urinary tract infection (UTI). The optimum clinical sampling method for ATP urinalysis has not been established. We tested the potential of urinary ATP in the assessment of lower urinary tract symptoms, infection and inflammation, and validated sampling methods for clinical practice. A prospective, blinded, cross-sectional observational study of adult patients presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and asymptomatic controls, was conducted between October 2009 and October 2012. Urinary ATP was assayed by a luciferin-luciferase method, pyuria counted by microscopy of fresh unspun urine and symptoms assessed using validated questionnaires. The sample collection, storage and processing methods were also validated. 75 controls and 340 patients with LUTS were grouped as without pyuria (n = 100), pyuria 1-9 wbc μl(-1) (n = 120) and pyuria ≥10 wbc μl(-1) (n = 120). Urinary ATP was higher in association with female gender, voiding symptoms, pyuria greater than 10 wbc μl(-1) and negative MSU culture. ROC curve analysis showed no evidence of diagnostic test potential. The urinary ATP signal decayed with storage at 23°C but was prevented by immediate freezing at ≤ -20°C, without boric acid preservative and without the need to centrifuge urine prior to freezing. Urinary ATP may have a role as a research tool but is unconvincing as a surrogate, clinical diagnostic marker.

  12. Congenital urinary tract obstruction: defining markers of developmental kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Trnka, Peter; Hiatt, Michael J; Tarantal, Alice F; Matsell, Douglas G

    2012-11-01

    Congenital urinary tract obstruction (diagnosed antenatally by ultrasound screening) is one of the main causes of end-stage kidney disease in children. The extent of kidney injury in early gestation and the resultant abnormality in kidney development determine fetal outcome and postnatal renal function. Unfortunately, the current approach to diagnostic evaluation of the severity of injury has inherently poor diagnostic and prognostic value because it is based on the assessment of fetal tubular function from fetal urine samples rather than on estimates of the dysplastic changes in the injured developing kidney. To improve the outcome in children with congenital urinary tract obstruction, new biomarkers reflecting these structural changes are needed. Genomic and proteomic techniques that have emerged in the past decade can help identify the key genes and proteins from biological fluids, including amniotic fluid, that might reflect the extent of injury to the developing kidney.

  13. Pseudomonas quinolone signalling system: a component of quorum sensing cascade is a crucial player in the acute urinary tract infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bala, Anju; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2014-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which employs quorum sensing system to regulate several genes required for its survival and pathogenicity within the host. Besides acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) mediated las and rhl systems, this organism possesses Pseudomonas quinolone signalling (PQS) system based on alkyl quinolone signal molecules. The quinolone system represents another layer of sophistication in the complex quorum sensing cascade. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated the contribution of the PQS system in the establishment of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in the mouse model. For this, wild-type parent strain of P. aeruginosa MPAO1 and its isogenic single transposon mutant strains pqsH and pqsA were employed to induce UTI in mice. PQS molecules in the tissue homogenates of mice were detected by high performance thin layer chromatography (HP-TLC) method. Virulence of strains was assessed in terms of bacteriological count, histopathological lesions in the renal and bladder tissue and generation of pathological index markers like reactive nitrogen intermediates and malondialdehyde. HP-TLC analysis showed presence of PQS molecules in the renal and bladder tissue of mice infected with MPAO1 while no PQS was detected in case of pqsH and pqsA mutant strains. Results indicated that MPAO1 possessing fully functional PQS biosynthetic genes was highly virulent and caused acute pyelonephritis with severe inflammation and tissue destruction. On the contrary, significant reduction in the log count, mild tissue damage and declined levels of pathological markers were observed in mice infected with mutant strains as compared to MPAO1. Further among mutants, all these parameters were maximally impaired in the pqsA mutant in which synthesis of alkyl quinolones was completely abolished due to the transposon mutation in respective gene. Virulence of the pqsH mutant strain was lesser than that of the MPAO1 but higher than pqsA mutant. In addition, the

  14. Urinary Tract Infection/Vaginitis Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Conte, John E.

    1978-01-01

    A process, outcome and salary-cost analysis was made of the use of a urinary tract infection/vaginitis protocol. Three nurse practitioners, in a university-based, walk-in clinic, cared for 128 women presenting with complaints of dysuria or vaginal discharge, or both. There were no significant differences among the nurse practitioners in data collection, diagnostic accuracy or patient outcome. The diagnoses were correct in 92 percent, incorrect in 6 percent and indeterminate in 2 percent of the patients. Incorrect diagnoses were due to presumption of urinary tract infection in patients with the urethral syndrome or vaginitis. Of the patients, 78 percent were actually sent home without seeing a physician. Concordance with the nurse practitioners' physical examination was 100 percent in those patients examined by a physician. In 82 percent of the patients there was alleviation of symptoms. Patient satisfaction with this method of care was extraordinary, with 98 percent of the patients giving favorable reports. True physician extension was achieved with a reduction in physician time per patient from 20 minutes to 6 minutes. In contrast to previously reported data, only a modest reduction in salary cost savings (10 percent) could be shown. The author concludes that nurse practitioners working in an acute care clinic or emergency department can see the patients defined in the study and provide high-quality care at a reasonable cost. PMID:706355

  15. Estrogens and Male Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wynder, Jalissa L.; Nicholson, Tristan M.; DeFranco, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology and affect the majority of men at some time during their lives. The development of BPH/LUTS is associated with an increased ratio of estrogen to androgen levels, and this ratio, when mimicked in a variety of animals, induces BPH and lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, estrogens have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Numerous endogenous and exogenous estrogens exist in humans. These estrogens act via multiple estrogen receptors to promote or inhibit prostatic hyperplasia and other BPH-associated processes. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue, and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of estrogen action directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area and remains to be elucidated. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation illustrating their potential roles in the development of BPH as therapy. More work will be required to identify estrogen signaling pathways associated with LUTD in order to develop more efficacious drugs for BPH treatment and prevention. PMID:26156791

  16. Anatomy and Physiology of the Urinary Tract: Relation to Host Defense and Microbial Infection

    PubMed Central

    HICKLING, DUANE R.; SUN, TUNG-TIEN; WU, XUE-RU

    2015-01-01

    The urinary tract exits to a body surface area that is densely populated by a wide range of microbes. Yet, under most normal circumstances, it is typically considered sterile, i.e., devoid of microbes, a stark contrast to the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts where many commensal and pathogenic microbes call home. Not surprisingly, infection of the urinary tract over a healthy person’s lifetime is relatively infrequent, occurring once or twice or not at all for most people. For those who do experience an initial infection, the great majority (70% to 80%) thankfully do not go on to suffer from multiple episodes. This is a far cry from the upper respiratory tract infections, which can afflict an otherwise healthy individual countless times. The fact that urinary tract infections are hard to elicit in experimental animals except with inoculum 3–5 orders of magnitude greater than the colony counts that define an acute urinary infection in humans (105 cfu/ml), also speaks to the robustness of the urinary tract defense. How can the urinary tract be so effective in fending off harmful microbes despite its orifice in a close vicinity to that of the microbe-laden gastrointestinal tract? While a complete picture is still evolving, the general consensus is that the anatomical and physiological integrity of the urinary tract is of paramount importance in maintaining a healthy urinary tract. When this integrity is breached, however, the urinary tract can be at a heightened risk or even recurrent episodes of microbial infections. In fact, recurrent urinary tract infections are a significant cause of morbidity and time lost from work and a major challenge to manage clinically. Additionally, infections of the upper urinary tract often require hospitalization and prolonged antibiotic therapy. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the basic anatomy and physiology of the urinary tract with an emphasis on their specific roles in host defense. We also highlight the

  17. Anatomy and Physiology of the Urinary Tract: Relation to Host Defense and Microbial Infection.

    PubMed

    Hickling, Duane R; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2015-08-01

    The urinary tract exits to a body surface area that is densely populated by a wide range of microbes. Yet, under most normal circumstances, it is typically considered sterile, i.e., devoid of microbes, a stark contrast to the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts where many commensal and pathogenic microbes call home. Not surprisingly, infection of the urinary tract over a healthy person's lifetime is relatively infrequent, occurring once or twice or not at all for most people. For those who do experience an initial infection, the great majority (70% to 80%) thankfully do not go on to suffer from multiple episodes. This is a far cry from the upper respiratory tract infections, which can afflict an otherwise healthy individual countless times. The fact that urinary tract infections are hard to elicit in experimental animals except with inoculum 3-5 orders of magnitude greater than the colony counts that define an acute urinary infection in humans (105 cfu/ml), also speaks to the robustness of the urinary tract defense. How can the urinary tract be so effective in fending off harmful microbes despite its orifice in a close vicinity to that of the microbe-laden gastrointestinal tract? While a complete picture is still evolving, the general consensus is that the anatomical and physiological integrity of the urinary tract is of paramount importance in maintaining a healthy urinary tract. When this integrity is breached, however, the urinary tract can be at a heightened risk or even recurrent episodes of microbial infections. In fact, recurrent urinary tract infections are a significant cause of morbidity and time lost from work and a major challenge to manage clinically. Additionally, infections of the upper urinary tract often require hospitalization and prolonged antibiotic therapy. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the basic anatomy and physiology of the urinary tract with an emphasis on their specific roles in host defense. We also highlight the

  18. [Prevalence and risk factors for extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli causing community-onset urinary tract infections in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Blanco, Victor M; Maya, Juan J; Correa, Adriana; Perenguez, Marcela; Muñoz, Juan S; Motoa, Gabriel; Pallares, Christian J; Rosso, Fernando; Matta, Lorena; Celis, Yamile; Garzon, Martha; Villegas, María V

    2016-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common in the community. However, information of resistant isolates in this context is limited in Latin America. This study aims to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with community-onset UTI (CO-UTI) caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-Producing Escherichia coli in Colombia. A case-control study was conducted between August and December of 2011 in three Colombian tertiary-care institutions. All patients who were admitted to the Emergency Department with a probable diagnosis of CO-UTI were invited to participate. All participating patients were asked for a urine sample. ESBL confirmatory test, antibiotic susceptibility, and molecular epidemiology were performed in these E.coli isolates (Real Time-PCR for bla genes, repetitive element palindromic PCR [rep-PCR], multilocus sequence typing [MLST] and virulence factors by PCR). Clinical and epidemiological information was recorded, and a statistical analysis was performed. Of the 2124 recruited patients, 629 had a positive urine culture, 431 of which grew E.coli; 54 were positive for ESBL, of which 29 were CTX-M-15. The majority of ESBL isolates were susceptible to ertapenem, phosphomycin and amikacin. Complicated UTI was strongly associated with ESBL-producing E.coli infections (OR=3.89; 95%CI: 1.10-13.89; P=.03). CTX-M-15-producing E.coli showed 10 different pulsotypes, 65% were PT1 or PT4, and corresponded to ST131. Most of these isolates had 8 out of the 9 analysed virulence factors. E.coli harbouring blaCTX-M-15 associated with ST131 is still frequent in Colombia. The presence of complicated CO-UTI increases the risk of ESBL-producing E.coli, and must be taken into account in order to provide an adequate empirical therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative in vitro activity of cefditoren and other antimicrobials against Enterobacteriaceae causing community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women: a Spanish nationwide multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Oscar; Cercenado, Emilia; Gimeno, Mercedes; Marín, Mercedes; Coronel, Pilar; Bouza, Emilio

    2010-07-01

    Cefditoren is a third-generation orally administered cephalosporin with a broad spectrum of activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species. After an oral 400-mg single dose, the mean concentrations in urine are 186.5 mg/L at 2 to 4 h and 12.7 mg/L at 8 to 12 h, and it is a potential drug to be used in the treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI). We performed a multicenter nationwide study in Spain in order to determine the in vitro activity of cefditoren and other comparative agents against Enterobacteriaceae causing community-acquired uncomplicated UTI in women. From June 2008 to March 2009, 89 institutions participated in the study. A total of 2152 Enterobacteriaceae were collected and sent to a coordinating laboratory where identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed against 20 antimicrobials using an automated microdilution method (MicroScan; Siemens, Sacramento, CA). Cefditoren MICs were determined by the broth microdilution method (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines) using the same inoculum. Microorganisms isolated were Escherichia coli (81.8%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.9%), Proteus mirabilis (5.2%), and others (5.1%). A total of 51 isolates (2.4%) were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers, 3 (0.1%) produced plasmidic AmpC enzymes, and 64 (2.9%) produced chromosomal AmpC. The MIC(50)/MIC(90) (mg/L) of cefditoren against all isolates was 0.12/0.5. Cefditoren inhibited 96.5% of isolates at 1 mg/L and was uniformly active against all isolates with the exception of strains producing ESBLs or AmpC enzymes. The MIC(50)/MIC(90) of other antimicrobials were ampicillin (AMP) >16/>16, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (A/C) 2, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SxT) 4/76, and fosfomycin (FOS)

  20. Risk factors for ambulatory urinary tract infections caused by high-MIC fluoroquinolone-susceptible Escherichia coli in women: results from a large case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Rattanaumpawan, Pinyo; Nachamkin, Irving; Bilker, Warren B.; Roy, Jason A.; Metlay, Joshua P.; Zaoutis, Theoklis E.; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The prevalence of high-MIC fluoroquinolone-susceptible Escherichia coli (FQSEC) has been increasing. These isolates are one step closer to full fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance and may lead to delayed response to FQ therapy. Our study aimed to investigate the epidemiology of high-MIC FQSEC in ambulatory urinary tract infections (UTIs). Patients and methods A case–control study was conducted at outpatient services within the University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia. All female subjects with non-recurrent UTI caused by FQSEC (levofloxacin MIC < 4 mg/L) were enrolled. Cases were subjects with high-MIC FQSEC UTI (levofloxacin MIC >0.12 but < 4 mg/L) and controls were subjects with low-MIC FQSEC UTI (levofloxacin MIC ≤0.12 mg/L). Data on microbiology results and baseline characteristics were extracted from electronic medical records. Results During the 3 year study period (May 2008–April 2011), 11 287 episodes of E. coli bacteriuria were identified. The prevalence of FQSEC, FQ-intermediate susceptible E. coli and FQ-resistant E. coli was 75.0%, 0.4% and 24.6%, respectively. A total of 2001 female subjects with FQSEC UTI were enrolled into our study (165 cases and 1836 controls). Independent risk factors for high-MIC FQ susceptibility included Asian race (OR = 2.92; 95% CI = 1.29–6.58; P = 0.02), underlying renal disease (OR = 2.18; 95% CI = 1.15–4.14; P = 0.02) and previous nitrofurantoin exposure (OR = 8.86; 95% CI = 1.95–40.29; P = 0.005). Conclusions Asian race, underlying renal disease and previous exposure to nitrofurantoin were identified as independent risk factors for high-MIC FQSEC. There may be some factors that are more common in Asians, which may result in the selection of high-MIC FQSEC. Further studies are necessary to explore these findings. PMID:25630645

  1. [Genetics of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Zwolińska, Danuta; Polak-Jonkisz, Dorota; Makulska, Irena

    2011-12-15

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) occur at a frequency of 1 in 500 live births and are a common cause of renal insufficiency in childhood. CAKUT encompass a wide spectrum of malformations including anomalies of the kidney, collecting system, bladder and urethra. Most cases of CAKUT are sporadic and limited to the urinary tract, but some of them are syndromic or associated with positive family history. To understand the basis of human renal anomalies, knowledge of kidney and urinary tract development is necessary. This process is very complicated, requires precise integration of a variety of progenitor cell populations of diverse embryonic origins and is controlled by many factors at every stage of development. This review focuses on the genetic factors leading to developmental errors of important morphogenetic processes, particularly in metanephric kidney induction and ureteric bud branching. The essential results of genetic studies in regard to CAKUT, performed on experimental models and in humans, are presented. However, further investigations are required to complete understanding of the complex molecular network, which will help us to determine novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for CAKUT.

  2. Significance and characterisation of pseudomonads from urinary tract specimens.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Neelam; Meharwal, S K; Sharma, S K; Sharma, Meera

    2004-03-01

    Pseudomonads are commonly encountered in clinical samples. Usually ignored as contaminants, these organisms are known to cause nosocomial opportunistic infections like urinary tract infections (UTI). One hundred and two pseudomonads obtained in pure culture and significant numbers from 8400 consecutive urinary tract (UT) specimens were biochemically characterised upto species level by a battery of biochemical tests. Modified Stoke's disk diffusion method was followed for testing antibiotic susceptibility. Beta-lactamase production was checked by nitrocefin disk method. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration for some of these strains against imipenem was done by agar dilution method of NCCLS. Etiological significance of isolating these organisms from UT specimens was also assessed. P. aeruginosa was the commonest (76) followed by B. pickettii (10), P. putida (6), P.fluorescence (2), P. stutzeri (20) P. vesicularis (2), S. putrefaciens (2) and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (2). Seventy six per cent of P. aeruginosa produced beta-lactamases as compared to 45% of other pseudomonads. The frequency of antibiotic resistance was gentamicin and ciprofloxacin (68.6%) followed by netilmicin (60.7%), ceftazidime (58.8%), amikacin (43.1%) and piperacillin (39.2%). In 42 patients (51.2%) the etiological significance of isolating a pseudomonad could be confirmed. Risk factors for development of UTI were present in 62(75%). Obstructive uropathy (20) followed by post operative period and surgery on urinary tract were the commonest risk factors involved. A high level of resistance was observed for imipenem (P. aeruginosa 43.7% and other pseudomonads 25%).

  3. Mutations in DSTYK and dominant urinary tract malformations.

    PubMed

    Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Sampogna, Rosemary V; Papeta, Natalia; Burgess, Katelyn E; Nees, Shannon N; Perry, Brittany J; Choi, Murim; Bodria, Monica; Liu, Yan; Weng, Patricia L; Lozanovski, Vladimir J; Verbitsky, Miguel; Lugani, Francesca; Sterken, Roel; Paragas, Neal; Caridi, Gianluca; Carrea, Alba; Dagnino, Monica; Materna-Kiryluk, Anna; Santamaria, Giuseppe; Murtas, Corrado; Ristoska-Bojkovska, Nadica; Izzi, Claudia; Kacak, Nilgun; Bianco, Beatrice; Giberti, Stefania; Gigante, Maddalena; Piaggio, Giorgio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Vukic, Durdica Kosuljandic; Vukojevic, Katarina; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Saraga, Marijan; Gucev, Zoran; Allegri, Landino; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Casu, Domenica; State, Matthew; Scolari, Francesco; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Al-Awqati, Qais; D'Agati, Vivette D; Drummond, Iain A; Tasic, Velibor; Lifton, Richard P; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Gharavi, Ali G

    2013-08-15

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and the urinary tract are the most common cause of pediatric kidney failure. These disorders are highly heterogeneous, and the etiologic factors are poorly understood. We performed genomewide linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing in a family with an autosomal dominant form of congenital abnormalities of the kidney or urinary tract (seven affected family members). We also performed a sequence analysis in 311 unrelated patients, as well as histologic and functional studies. Linkage analysis identified five regions of the genome that were shared among all affected family members. Exome sequencing identified a single, rare, deleterious variant within these linkage intervals, a heterozygous splice-site mutation in the dual serine-threonine and tyrosine protein kinase gene (DSTYK). This variant, which resulted in aberrant splicing of messenger RNA, was present in all affected family members. Additional, independent DSTYK mutations, including nonsense and splice-site mutations, were detected in 7 of 311 unrelated patients. DSTYK is highly expressed in the maturing epithelia of all major organs, localizing to cell membranes. Knockdown in zebrafish resulted in developmental defects in multiple organs, which suggested loss of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. Consistent with this finding is the observation that DSTYK colocalizes with FGF receptors in the ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme. DSTYK knockdown in human embryonic kidney cells inhibited FGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the principal signal downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases. We detected independent DSTYK mutations in 2.3% of patients with congenital abnormalities of the kidney or urinary tract, a finding that suggests that DSTYK is a major determinant of human urinary tract development, downstream of FGF signaling. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.).

  4. Mutations in DSTYK and Dominant Urinary Tract Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Nees, Shannon N.; Perry, Brittany J.; Choi, Murim; Bodria, Monica; Liu, Yan; Weng, Patricia L.; Lozanovski, Vladimir J.; Verbitsky, Miguel; Lugani, Francesca; Sterken, Roel; Paragas, Neal; Caridi, Gianluca; Carrea, Alba; Dagnino, Monica; Materna-Kiryluk, Anna; Santamaria, Giuseppe; Murtas, Corrado; Ristoska-Bojkovska, Nadica; Izzi, Claudia; Kacak, Nilgun; Bianco, Beatrice; Giberti, Stefania; Gigante, Maddalena; Piaggio, Giorgio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Vukic, Durdica Kosuljandic; Vukojevic, Katarina; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Saraga, Marijan; Gucev, Zoran; Allegri, Landino; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Casu, Domenica; State, Matthew; Scolari, Francesco; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Al-Awqati, Qais; D'Agati, Vivette D.; Drummond, Iain A.; Tasic, Velibor; Lifton, Richard P.; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and the urinary tract are the most common cause of pediatric kidney failure. These disorders are highly heterogeneous, and the etiologic factors are poorly understood. METHODS We performed genomewide linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing in a family with an autosomal dominant form of congenital abnormalities of the kidney or urinary tract (seven affected family members). We also performed a sequence analysis in 311 unrelated patients, as well as histologic and functional studies. RESULTS Linkage analysis identified five regions of the genome that were shared among all affected family members. Exome sequencing identified a single, rare, deleterious variant within these linkage intervals, a heterozygous splice-site mutation in the dual serine–threonine and tyrosine protein kinase gene (DSTYK). This variant, which resulted in aberrant splicing of messenger RNA, was present in all affected family members. Additional, independent DSTYK mutations, including nonsense and splice-site mutations, were detected in 7 of 311 unrelated patients. DSTYK is highly expressed in the maturing epithelia of all major organs, localizing to cell membranes. Knockdown in zebrafish resulted in developmental defects in multiple organs, which suggested loss of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. Consistent with this finding is the observation that DSTYK colocalizes with FGF receptors in the ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme. DSTYK knockdown in human embryonic kidney cells inhibited FGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the principal signal downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases. CONCLUSIONS We detected independent DSTYK mutations in 2.3% of patients with congenital abnormalities of the kidney or urinary tract, a finding that suggests that DSTYK is a major determinant of human urinary tract development, downstream of FGF signaling. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and

  5. Prophylactic antibiotics for children with recurrent urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Joan L; Finlay, Jane C; Lang, Mia Eileen; Bortolussi, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Prophylactic antibiotics for urinary tract infections are no longer routinely recommended. A large number of children must be given prophylaxis to prevent one infection and antibiotic resistance is a major concern when treating community-acquired urinary tract infections. The results of three recent significant studies are examined, with focus on the efficacy of prophylaxis, and recommendations are made.

  6. Urinary tract infection in men with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    De Pinho, A M; Lopes, G S; Ramos-Filho, C F; Santos, O da R; De Oliveira, M P; Halpern, M; Gouvea, C A; Schechter, M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate whether bacteriuria and, specifically, symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) occur with increased frequency in men with HIV infection. METHODS--In this cross-sectional study we investigated three groups of men, aged from 18 to 50 years. Group A was composed of patients with a diagnosis of AIDS; Group B, of patients without HIV infection, and group C of patients with asymptomatic HIV infection. Patients with any known predisposing factor for UTI were excluded from the study. A clean-catch midstream urine sample was collected from each patient on the first day of hospital admission (groups A and B) or during a visit to the outpatient clinic (group C). Bacteriuria was diagnosed when > or = 100,000 colony forming units/ml, urine were grown. RESULTS--There were 415 patients, 151 in group A, 170 in group B and 94 in group C. Bacteriuria was significantly more frequently in group A (20 cases, 13.3%) than in groups B (3 cases, 1.8%, p = 0.00007) and C (3 cases, 3.2%, p = 0.009). Ten cases of bacteriuria in group A (6.6%) were symptomatic while no case of symptomatic UTI was seen in groups B (p = 0.0004) and C (p = 0.008). The frequency of UTI in homosexual men with AIDS (7 cases, 6.7%) was not significantly different from that observed in men with AIDS who denied homosexuality (3 cases, 6.5%). E coli was the predominant pathogen associated with UTI. Although adequate response to a two-week course of antibiotics was observed in most cases, an in-hospital mortality rate of 20% was found among AIDS patients with symptomatic UTI. CONCLUSIONS--In the present study, the frequency of bacteriuria and symptomatic UTI was found to be increased in men with AIDS. E coli was the predominant pathogen in these cases. These data suggest that symptomatic UTI may represent a relevant cause of morbidity for men with AIDS. PMID:8300097

  7. The innate immune response during urinary tract infection and pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Spencer, John David; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Becknell, Brian; Watson, Joshua; Hains, David S

    2014-07-01

    Despite its proximity to the fecal flora, the urinary tract is considered sterile. The precise mechanisms by which the urinary tract maintains sterility are not well understood. Host immune responses are critically important in the antimicrobial defense of the urinary tract. During recent years, considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying immune homeostasis of the kidney and urinary tract. Dysfunctions in these immune mechanisms may result in acute disease, tissue destruction and overwhelming infection. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the innate immune response in the urinary tract in response to microbial assault. In doing so, we focus on the role of antimicrobial peptides-a ubiquitous component of the innate immune response.

  8. The innate immune response during urinary tract infection and pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, John David; Schwaderer, Andrew L.; Becknell, Brian; Watson, Joshua; Hains, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Despite its proximity to the fecal flora, the urinary tract is considered sterile. The precise mechanisms by which the urinary tract maintains sterility are not well understood. Host immune responses are critically important in the antimicrobial defense of the urinary tract. During recent years, considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying immune homeostasis of the kidney and urinary tract. Dysfunctions in these immune mechanisms may result in acute disease, tissue destruction and overwhelming infection. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the innate immune response in the urinary tract in response to microbial assault. In doing so, we focus on the role of antimicrobial peptides – a ubiquitous component of the innate immune response. PMID:23732397

  9. Toilet habits of children evaluated for urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Wan, J; Kaplinsky, R; Greenfield, S

    1995-08-01

    The toilet habits of 77 girls and 24 boys who were evaluated after having a urinary tract infection were examined prospectively. Children with known urological conditions that can predispose to urinary tract infections were excluded. A voiding cystourethrogram and renal ultrasound were performed, and a diary of toilet habits was obtained for all patients. Six children were lost to followup. Of the remaining 95 children imaging studies were negative in 60 (negative imaging group) and positive in 35 (positive imaging group). Only 10% of the negative imaging group were without constipation or abnormal voiding compared to 60% of the positive imaging group (p = 0.0001). Toilet habits can affect the development of urinary tract infections. Our data suggest that the evaluation of urinary tract infection should include an inquiry into these habits. Among children with negative imaging studies there may be functional problems that promote the development of urinary tract infections.

  10. Visualization of Proteus mirabilis morphotypes in the urinary tract: the elongated swarmer cell is rarely observed in ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Angela M; Lockatell, C Virginia; Johnson, David E; Mobley, Harry L T

    2003-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common cause of nosocomial and catheter-associated urinary tract infection, colonizes the bladder and ascends the ureters to the proximal tubules of the kidneys, leading to the development of acute pyelonephritis. P. mirabilis is capable of swarming, a form of multicellular behavior in which bacteria differentiate from the short rod typical of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, termed the swimmer cell, into hyperflagellated elongated bacteria capable of rapid and coordinated population migration across surfaces, called the swarmer cell. There has been considerable debate as to which morphotype predominates during urinary tract infection. P. mirabilis(pBAC001), which expresses green fluorescent protein in both swimming and swarming morphotypes, was constructed to quantify the prevalence of each morphotype in ascending urinary tract infection. Transurethral inoculation of P. mirabilis(pBAC001) resulted in ascending urinary tract infection and kidney pathology in mice examined at both 2 and 4 days postinoculation. Using confocal microscopy, we were able to investigate the morphotypes of the bacteria in the urinary tract. Of 5,087 bacteria measured in bladders, ureters, and kidneys, only 7 (0.14%) were identified as swarmers. MR/P fimbria expression, which correlates with the swimmer phenotype, is prevalent on bacteria in the ureters and bladder. We conclude that, by far, the predominant morphotype present in the urinary tract during ascending infection is the short rod-the swimmer cell.

  11. Visualization of Proteus mirabilis Morphotypes in the Urinary Tract: the Elongated Swarmer Cell Is Rarely Observed in Ascending Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Angela M.; Lockatell, C. Virginia; Johnson, David E.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2003-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common cause of nosocomial and catheter-associated urinary tract infection, colonizes the bladder and ascends the ureters to the proximal tubules of the kidneys, leading to the development of acute pyelonephritis. P. mirabilis is capable of swarming, a form of multicellular behavior in which bacteria differentiate from the short rod typical of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, termed the swimmer cell, into hyperflagellated elongated bacteria capable of rapid and coordinated population migration across surfaces, called the swarmer cell. There has been considerable debate as to which morphotype predominates during urinary tract infection. P. mirabilis(pBAC001), which expresses green fluorescent protein in both swimming and swarming morphotypes, was constructed to quantify the prevalence of each morphotype in ascending urinary tract infection. Transurethral inoculation of P. mirabilis(pBAC001) resulted in ascending urinary tract infection and kidney pathology in mice examined at both 2 and 4 days postinoculation. Using confocal microscopy, we were able to investigate the morphotypes of the bacteria in the urinary tract. Of 5,087 bacteria measured in bladders, ureters, and kidneys, only 7 (0.14%) were identified as swarmers. MR/P fimbria expression, which correlates with the swimmer phenotype, is prevalent on bacteria in the ureters and bladder. We conclude that, by far, the predominant morphotype present in the urinary tract during ascending infection is the short rod-the swimmer cell. PMID:12761147

  12. An in vitro urinary tract catheter system to investigate biofilm development in catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Dohnt, Katrin; Sauer, Marie; Müller, Maren; Atallah, Karin; Weidemann, Marina; Gronemeyer, Petra; Rasch, Detlev; Tielen, Petra; Krull, Rainer

    2011-12-01

    Biofilm development in urinary tract catheters is an often underestimated problem. However, this form of infection leads to high mortality rates and causes significant costs in health care. Therefore, it is important to analyze these biofilms and establish avoiding strategies. In this study a continuous flow-through system for the cultivation of biofilms under catheter-associated urinary tract infection conditions was established and validated. The in vitro urinary tract catheter system implies the composition of urine (artificial urine medium), the mean volume of urine of adults (1 mL min(-1)), the frequently used silicone catheter (foley silicon catheter) as well as the infection with uropathogenic microorganisms like Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Three clinical isolates from urine of catheterized patients were chosen due to their ability to form biofilms, their mobility and their cell surface hydrophobicity. As reference strain P. aeruginosa PA14 has been used. Characteristic parameters as biofilm thickness, specific biofilm growth rate and substrate consumption were observed. Biofilm thicknesses varied from 105±16 μm up to 246±67 μm for the different isolates. The specific biofilm growth rate could be determined with a non invasive optical biomass sensor. This sensor allows online monitoring of the biofilm growth in the progress of the cultivation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. A vision for the paediatrician].

    PubMed

    Palacios Loro, M L; Segura Ramírez, D K; Ordoñez Álvarez, F A; Santos Rodríguez, F

    2015-12-01

    The congenital abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are disorders with a high prevalence in the general population, with urinary tract dilations being the most frequent. CAKUT also account for the most important cause of chronic kidney disease in childhood. This paper focuses on the role of the primary care paediatrician in the diagnosis, assessment, and follow-up of children with CAKUT, with special emphasis on the associated urinary tract infections, the progression toward chronic renal failure, and the genetic basis. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Warren, J W

    2001-04-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection acquired in both hospitals and nursing homes and is usually associated with catheterization. This infection would be even more common but for the use of the closed catheter system. Most modifications have not improved on the closed catheter itself. Even with meticulous care, this system will not prevent bacteriuria. After bacteriuria develops, the ability to limit its complications is minimal. Once a catheter is put in place, the clinician must keep two concepts in mind: keep the catheter system closed in order to postpone the onset of bacteriuria, and remove the catheter as soon as possible. If the catheter can be removed before bacteriuria develops, postponement becomes prevention.

  15. Review of adolescent urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Mark; Cohen, Jacob

    2007-07-01

    The diagnosis and management of adolescent urinary tract infection (UTI) share some of the clinical features seen in infections of the young and old. Whereas most infections in the young patient demand an extensive radiologic work-up, the teenager with a UTI is not so straightforward. The clinician must balance being too aggressive with being too conservative in the diagnosis and management of these patients. UTIs occur most frequently among adolescent females and are usually uncomplicated and not associated with underlying anatomic abnormalities. Smaller numbers of adolescent males suffer from UTIs, and the need to search for underlying abnormalities is not clear. Adolescent UTI is associated with nascent sexual activity and is also more common in voiding/elimination syndromes. Future studies examining UTI, specifically in the adolescent age group, will help provide clinicians with a more focused algorithm in the diagnosis and management of adolescent UTIs.

  16. Imaging in upper urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Ifergan, J; Pommier, R; Brion, M-C; Glas, L; Rocher, L; Bellin, M-F

    2012-06-01

    Most infections of the upper urinary tract are straightforward and do not require any emergency radiological investigations. A sonogram carried out within 48 hours will in most cases be sufficient to eliminate obstructed pyelonephritis requiring emergency drainage of urine. In complicated cases, or those affecting already weakened areas, an urgent CT scan is necessary, preferably after injection of iodinated contrast medium if renal function permits. CT scanning is far better at diagnosis than sonography as well as at investigating whether there are complications. Furthermore, it is essential that the radiologist is aware of unusual and rare forms of pyelonephritis, especially pseudotumoural forms, so that clinicians can be pointed towards the appropriate treatment, avoiding unnecessary and invasive interventions.

  17. [Urinary tract infections in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Mirsaidov, N; Wagenlehner, F M E

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) and asymptomatic bacteriuria are frequent in elderly patients. Distinguishing UTI from asymptomatic bacteriuria in older adults, particularly those living in long-term care facilities, might be a challenge for physicians due to the presence of confounding factors, such as an overactive bladder, prostate enlargement, and an indwelling bladder catheter. The absence of standards in the definition and treatment of UTI in the elderly frequently leads to overtreatment. Consequently, antibiotic selection pressure increases and as a result multidrug-resistant organisms might arise. On the other hand, insufficient treatment can result in prolonged and complicated courses of infections or increased morbidity. This review covers the definition, prevalence, diagnosis and management of UTI in older adults.

  18. Urinary tract infection in febrile convulsions.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, P; Verrier Jones, K

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective review of the casenotes of 403 children admitted to hospital with febrile convulsions was performed to estimate the frequency of symptomatic urinary tract infection and examine medical practice in making this diagnosis. A total of 228 (56%) children had urine cultured: 150 bag specimens, 76 clean voided samples, and two suprapubic aspirates. There were 13 'probable' and six 'possible' infected urine samples together representing 5% of the whole study population (n = 403), 8% of those having urine cultured (n = 228), and 12% of those providing uncontaminated urine samples (n = 155). Those with first febrile convulsions and those aged under 18 months were more likely to have urine examined. Practices varied significantly between different hospitals. These results suggest that there has indeed been a need for practice guidelines, and that further audit of practice is required to assess their impact. PMID:1755639

  19. Do cranberries help prevent urinary tract infections?

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Janet

    Cranberries are widely used in the treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and for those at risk of such infections. With the growing resistance to antibiotics, cranberries can be viewed as a useful non-pharmaceutical remedy (Lavender, 2000). The initial studies that looked at the effects of cranberries on urine showed that the excretion of hippuric acid from the berries helped the urine to remain acidic, which could explain why they could be used to treat and prevent infection (Harkin, 2000). Recent studies argue that cranberries prevent Escherichia coli (E. coli) from adhering to uroepithelial cells in the bladder (Howell and Foxman, 2002). Cranberries contain a group of compounds, called proanthocyanidins, which are condensed tannins (Gray, 2002; Lowe and Fagelman, 2001; Kuzminski, 1996). These are thought to be the key factors in inhibiting E. coli adherence.

  20. Antibiotic Resistance in Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Stultz, Jeremy S; Doern, Christopher D; Godbout, Emily

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem in pediatric patients. Resistance to common antibiotic agents appears to be increasing over time, although resistance rates may vary based on geographic region or country. Prior antibiotic exposure is a pertinent risk factor for acquiring resistant organisms during a first UTI and recurrent UTI. Judicious prescribing of antibiotics for common pediatric conditions is needed to prevent additional resistance from occurring. Complex pediatric patients with histories of hospitalizations, prior antibiotic exposure, and recurrent UTIs are also at high risk for acquiring UTIs due to extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organisms. Data regarding the impact of in vitro antibiotic susceptibility testing interpretation on UTI treatment outcomes is lacking.

  1. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  2. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Humberto R; Hickling, Duane R

    2016-02-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥10(3) CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5-14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required.

  3. Value of Ultrasound in Detecting Urinary Tract Anomalies After First Febrile Urinary Tract Infection in Children.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, Emad E; Abdelaziz, Doaa M; Sheba, Maha F; Abdel-Azeem, Yasser S

    2016-05-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract. Ultrasound is a noninvasive test that can demonstrate the size and shape of kidneys, presence of dilatation of the ureters, and the existence of anatomic abnormalities. The aim of the study is to estimate the value of ultrasound in detecting urinary tract anomalies after first attack of UTI. Methods This study was conducted at the Nephrology Clinic, New Children's Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, from August 2012 to March 2013, and included 30 children who presented with first attack of acute febrile UTI. All patients were subjected to urine analysis, urine culture and sensitivity, serum creatinine, complete blood count, and imaging in the form of renal ultrasound, voiding cysto-urethrography, and renal scan. Results All the patients had fever with a mean of 38.96°C ± 0.44°C and the mean duration of illness was 6.23 ± 5.64 days. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had an ultrasound abnormality. The commonest abnormalities were kidney stones (15.8%). Only 2 patients who had abnormal ultrasound had also vesicoureteric reflux on cystourethrography. Sensitivity of ultrasound was 66.7%, specificity was 37.5%, positive predictive value was 21.1%, negative predictive value was 81.8%, and total accuracy was 43.33%. Conclusion We concluded that ultrasound alone was not of much value in diagnosing and putting a plan of first attack of febrile UTI. It is recommended that combined investigations are the best way to confirm diagnosis of urinary tract anomalies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Antibiotic prophylaxis at urinary catheter removal prevents urinary tract infections: a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Pfefferkorn, Urs; Lea, Sanlav; Moldenhauer, Jörg; Peterli, Ralph; von Flüe, Markus; Ackermann, Christoph

    2009-04-01

    To assess whether antibiotic prophylaxis at urinary catheter removal reduces the rate of urinary tract infections. Urinary tract infections are among the most common nosocomial infections. Antibiotic prophylaxis at urinary catheter removal is used as a measure to prevent them, albeit without supporting evidence. A prospective randomized study enrolled 239 patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery, who were randomized either for receiving 3 doses of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole at urinary catheter removal, or not. Urinary tract infections were diagnosed according to Center of Disease Control definitions. Urinary cultures were obtained before and 3 days after catheter removal. Subjective symptoms were assessed by an independent study-blind urologist. Patients who received antibiotic prophylaxis showed significantly fewer urinary tract infections (5/103, 4.9%) than those without prophylaxis (22/102, 21.6%), P < 0.001. The absolute risk reduction for the occurrence of a urinary tract infection was 16.7%; the relative risk reduction was 77.5%, and the number needed to treat was 6. Patients with antibiotic prophylaxis also had less significant bacteriuria 3 days after catheter removal (17/103, 16.5%) than those without (42/102, 41.2%), P < 0.001. Antibiotic prophylaxis with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole on urinary catheter removal significantly reduces the rate of symptomatic urinary tract infections and bacteriuria in patients undergoing abdominal surgery with perioperative transurethral urinary catheters.

  5. [Urinary tract infections in internal medicine].

    PubMed

    García Viejo, M A; Noguerado Asensio, A

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of characteristics of patients in internal medicine (IM) hospital wards in Spain with the diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI). Observational, descriptive, retrospective study of a population of inpatients with UTI diagnosis (October-December, 2007). Recorded variables included personal data, risk factors for complicated UTI, diagnosis criteria, microbiological results and antibiotics used. A total of 992 patients (61.8% women), from 57 hospitals, were recruited. Mean age was 75.3 years old (SD 16.5), with 18.1% from nursing homes and with some physical dependence in 53.5%. The majority (78.3 %) had some risk factors (diabetes mellitus 33.6%, vesical catheterization 24.1%). Non-specific UTI was the most frequent diagnosis (38.1%). UTI was diagnosed in 46%, based exclusively on urinary sediment alterations and/or positive cultures. E. coli was the most frequent pathogen (64.17%), with intermediate sensitivity or resistance of 22.8% to amoxicillin-clavunanic, 34.8% to levofloxacin and 40.6% to ciprofloxacin. Amoxicillin-clavulanic was the most used antibiotic (30.9%). UTI delayed hospital discharge in a 13.3%. Intrahospital-UTI was statistically more frequent (23%) with vesical catheterization (50.5 vs 16.2%) and mortality (3.4%) in older patients (81.2 vs. 75.1 years old.), in patients with P. aeruginosa cultures (11.8 vs 4.1%) and in those with urinary sepsis (41.4 vs 16.2%). Patients in internal medicine wards with a UTI diagnosis are older and with risk factors. Frequently, UTI is diagnosed based on non-specific criteria. E. coli is the most frequent pathogen. Quinolones should not be the first-line treatment in complicated or severe UTI, due to the high percentages of resistance. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of upper urinary tract anomalies in hospitalized premature infants with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Vachharajani, A; Vricella, G J; Najaf, T; Coplen, D E

    2015-05-01

    The 2011 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines address imaging after initial febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) in infants >2 months of age. We sought to determine the frequency of upper urinary tract anomalies (hydronephrosis and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR)) in hospitalized premature infants with UTI. We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical records of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions at a tertiary care children's hospital between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2010. We queried the records for UTI, renal ultrasound (US) and voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG). We identified 3518 unique admissions. UTI occurred in 118 infants (3%). Sixty-nine (60%) had a normal US. Renal dilation was predominantly renal pelvic dilation (12%) and isolated caliectasis (22%). VUR was identified in 15 (14%) infants evaluated with a VCUG. VUR was identified in nine (12%) infants without and in seven (16%) with an abnormality on US. Reflux was identified in 7% of male and 38% of female infants with a UTI. Anatomic abnormalities of the upper urinary tract are uncommon in premature infants with a UTI that occurs during neonatal hospitalization. In concordance with the AAP guidelines, a VCUG may not be required in all NICU infants under age 2 months after a single UTI.

  7. Enterococcal urinary tract infections in a university hospital: clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Barros, Milton; Martinelli, Reinaldo; Rocha, Heonir

    2009-08-01

    Although urinary tract infections (UTI) represent the most common infection caused by enterococci, some aspects remain to be fully clarified. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics present in UTI caused by Enterococcus spp. in patients followed up at the Prof. Edgard Santos Teaching Hospital of the Federal University of Bahia. All patients consecutively examined between 1997 and 2005, who received a diagnosis of UTI caused by Enterococcus spp. were included in the study. UTI was defined as the presence of > or = 10(5) colony-forming units per mL of urine. Standard microbiological techniques were used. During the study period, 6.2% of the urine cultures were positive for Enterococcus spp. The mean age of the patients was 48.9 years and 57% were male. At initial evaluation, 13% of the patients had complaints suggestive of UTI. Nineteen patients had a history consistent with obstructive uropathy and 26 with neurogenic bladder. At final evaluation, UTI was the diagnosis in 48 patients. In 36 patients (29%), the primary diagnosis was related to urogenital diseases, consisting of obstructive uropathy in 23 of these cases, while in 32 patients (25.8%) primary diagnosis was related to neurologic diseases, frequently neurogenic bladder. UTI caused by Enterococcus spp. is not infrequent, is usually associated with few or no symptoms and occurs in sick patients who have anatomical or functional obstructive uropathy associated or not with urinary tract catheterization or instrumentation. The diagnosis of enterococcal UTI may indicate a urinary tract abnormality yet to be diagnosed.

  8. Survey on hospital-acquired urinary tract infection in neurological intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Xing, Tao; Li, Junhui; He, Yingzi; Bai, Mei; Wang, Niansong

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to explore the causes, incidence, and risk factors of urinary tract infection patients in neurological intensive care unit (ICU). Patients (n = 916) admitted to the neurological ICU from January 2005 to December 2010 were retrospectively surveyed for urinary tract infections. There were 246 patients in neurological ICU who were diagnosed with hospital-acquired urinary tract infection during that period of time (26.9%). Forty-three cases were upper urinary tract infection, and 203 cases were lower urinary tract infection. The top three strains were Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Older age (UTI rate, 22.6%), female patients (21.7%), hospital stay for more than 7 days (16.7%), diabetes (11.7%), and catheterization (21.1%) were the risk factors for hospital-acquired urinary tract infection. There is a high incidence of nosocomial urinary tract infection in the neurological intensive care unit. Active prevention program and surveillance need to be carried out in neurological ICU, especially in those with risk factors.

  9. Metabolomics of urinary tract infection: a new uroscope in town.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Bansal, Navneeta; Houston, Brian

    2012-05-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a potentially life-threatening infectious disease. For rapid directed therapy of UTIs, it is essential to determine the causative microorganism. To date, there is no single test that has been proven to reliably, rapidly and accurately identify the etiologic organism in UTI. The molecular methods for diagnosing the cause of UTI and prognostic development of clinically important metabolomic evaluations and their limitations for use in the diagnosis and monitoring of infections are discussed in this review article. The application of the emerging investigative device NMR spectroscopy as a surrogate method for the diagnosis of UTI is also addressed.

  10. [Urinary tract infections. Therapeutic failures and course monitoring (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Abdou, M A

    1979-10-19

    The proportion of reinfections and relapses in urinary tract infections amounts to about 35-70%. Hydrokinetic conditions (e.g. size of bladder, frequency of micturition, rate of multiplication of the pathogens, adhesiveness of bacteria) not seldom lead to a discrepancy between the in vivo response of the pathogen to the chemotherapeutic agent and the corresponding MIC determined in vitro. Ten causes for the therapeutic failure are discussed in greater detail. Monitoring the course in good time with due regard to the risks is essential. A scheme for microbiological monitoring investigations before beginning therapy, during treatment and after discontinuing the medicament, as well as for long term therapy is suggested.

  11. Urinary tract infections: epidemiology, mechanisms of infection and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Flores-Mireles, Ana L; Walker, Jennifer N; Caparon, Michael; Hultgren, Scott J

    2015-05-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a severe public health problem and are caused by a range of pathogens, but most commonly by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. High recurrence rates and increasing antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens threaten to greatly increase the economic burden of these infections. In this Review, we discuss how basic science studies are elucidating the molecular details of the crosstalk that occurs at the host-pathogen interface, as well as the consequences of these interactions for the pathophysiology of UTIs. We also describe current efforts to translate this knowledge into new clinical treatments for UTIs.

  12. Urinary tract infections: epidemiology, mechanisms of infection and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Mireles, Ana L.; Walker, Jennifer N.; Caparon, Michael; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a severe public health problem and are caused by a range of pathogens, but most commonly by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. High recurrence rates and increasing antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens threaten to greatly increase the economic burden of these infections. In this Review, we discuss how basic science studies are elucidating the molecular details of the crosstalk that occurs at the host–pathogen interface, as well as the consequences of these interactions for the pathophysiology of UTIs. We also describe current efforts to translate this knowledge into new clinical treatments for UTIs. PMID:25853778

  13. A current perspective on geriatric lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ha Bum; Kim, Hyung Jee

    2015-01-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction-such as urinary incontinence (UI), detrusor overactivity, and benign prostatic hyperplasia-is prevalent in elderly persons. These conditions can interfere with daily life and normal functioning and lead to negative effects on health-related quality of life. UI is one of the most common urologic conditions but is poorly understood elderly persons. The overall prevalence of UI increases with age in both men and women. Elderly persons often neglect UI or dismiss it as part of the normal aging process. However, UI can have significant negative effects on self-esteem and has been associated with increased rates of depression. UI also affects quality of life and activities of daily living. Although UI is more common in elderly than in younger persons, it should not be considered a normal part of aging. UI is abnormal at any age. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the cause, classification, evaluation, and management of geriatric lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:25874039

  14. Urinary tract infections in adult general practice patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Kochen, Michael M

    2002-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are symptomatic infections of the urinary tract, mainly caused by the bacterium Escherichia coli. One in two women suffers from a UTI at least once in her life. The young and sexually active are particulaly affected, but it is also seen in elderly, postmenopausal women. The likelihood of recurrence is high. Diagnosis is made with regard to typical complaints and the presence of leucocytes and nitrites in the urine. A culture is unnecessary in most cases. Uncomplicated UTI should be distinguished from complicated UTI, which has a risk of severe illness. The treatment of choice--short-term therapy with trimethoprim or nitrofurantoin--is successful in over 80% of the cases. Co-trimoxazol fluoroquinolones or cephalsporins are not considered first-choice drugs. There are indications that general practitioners' (GPs') management of UTI is not always optimal, specifically concerning diagnostic tests, the application of second-choice antibiotics, and the length of prescribed treatment courses. Many points relevant to GPs requirefurther research, such as epidemiology and resistance of urinary pathogens in the community and natural history of UTI, as well as optimal management in elderly or complicated patients and men. PMID:12236281

  15. Kidney and Urinary Tract Involvement in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis and can develop multiple organ injuries including kidney and urinary tract involvement. These disorders include pyuria, prerenal acute kidney injury (AKI), renal AKI caused by tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN), hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), and immune-complex mediated nephropathy, renal AKI associated with either Kawasaki disease shock syndrome or unknown causes, acute nephritic syndrome (ANS), nephrotic syndrome (NS), renal tubular abnormalities, renal abnormalities in imaging studies, and renal artery lesions (aneurysms and stenosis). Pyuria is common in KD and originates from the urethra and/or the kidney. TIN with AKI and renal tubular abnormalities probably result from renal parenchymal inflammation caused by T-cell activation. HUS and renal artery lesions are caused by vascular endothelial injuries resulting from vasculitis. Some patients with ANS have immunological abnormalities associated with immune-complex formation. Nephromegaly and renal parenchymal inflammatory foci are detected frequently in patients with KD by renal ultrasonography and renal scintigraphy, respectively. Although the precise pathogenesis of KD is not completely understood, renal vasculitis, immune-complex mediated kidney injuries, or T-cell immune-regulatory abnormalities have been proposed as possible mechanisms for the development of kidney and urinary tract injuries. PMID:24288547

  16. Surgical management of recurrent urinary tract infections: a review

    PubMed Central

    Bergamin, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    There are many causes of recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTI) which are amenable to surgical management. This usually follows a lengthy trial of conservative management. Aetiological classification of rUTI requiring surgical management may be divided into congenital or acquired. Predisposing factors are classified into two groups; those providing a source for organisms, or by maintaining favourable conditions for the proliferation of organisms. Sources of infections include calculi, fistulae or abscesses. Conditions which predispose to bacterial proliferation include malignancies, foreign bodies, high post void residuals, and neuropathic bladders. Removal of identified sources, treating the obstruction, and improving urinary drainage, are all goals of surgical management. Surgical options for rUTI management can range from minimally invasive procedures such as endoscopic or percutaneous, through to more invasive requiring laparoscopic or an open approach. Surgery remains a very important and viable solution. PMID:28791234

  17. Predictive value of urinary interleukin-6 for symptomatic urinary tract infections in a nursing home population.

    PubMed

    Sundén, Fredrik; Wullt, Björn

    2016-02-01

    To study urinary interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and pyuria during episodes of asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infection in the institutionalized elderly, and to investigate the role of interleukin-6 as a biomarker for differential diagnosis. Levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and pyuria were assessed in 35 older adults with asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infection to define possible diagnostic thresholds. In a two-phase intervention study, the antibiotic treatment for urinary tract infection before and after introduction of urinary interleukin-6 as a biomarker was then assessed. Asymptomatic bacteriuria patients had no or low levels of interleukin-6, and low levels of interleukin-8 and pyuria. Women had lower interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 than men (P = 0.05). Interleukin-6 was the only marker showing significant increases during urinary tract infection episodes in patients with both asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infection, in pooled (P = 0.042) and in paired intra-individual (P = 0.017) comparisons. In the intervention study lectures, the increased use of urine cultures and the introduction of interleukin-6 as a biomarker reduced antibiotic treatments by 20%. Antibiotic-treated urinary tract infection episodes had increased interleukin-6 as compared with urinary tract infection episodes not treated (P = 0.02), and as compared with asymptomatic bacteriuria patients (P < 0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of interleukin-6 (cut-off 25 pg/mL) differentiating asymptomatic bacteriuria from urinary tract infection was 57% and 80%, respectively. Urinary interleukin-6 shows promise as a biomarker to detect the transition from asymptomatic bacteriuria to symptomatic urinary tract infection in older adults. Further larger studies with robust methodology are warranted to determine whether development for near to patient testing would be worthwhile. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  18. The predictive factors of α1-D/A adrenoceptor antagonist, naftopidil, dose increase therapy for male lower urinary tract symptoms caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia: INFORM study.

    PubMed

    Tanuma, Yasushi; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Takeyama, Ko; Okamoto, Tomoshi

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the predictive factors which affect the efficacy of naftopidil 50 mg/day therapy and dose increase therapy to administration of 75 mg/day after an initial dose of 50 mg/day. A total of 92 patients with male lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia were administrated naftopidil 50 mg/day for 4 weeks (50 mg therapy). At week 4, the patients were divided into an effective and an ineffective group (Group E and Group I, respectively). For further 4 weeks, the dosage of naftopidil was increased to 75 mg/day in all patients. At week 8, the patients of Group E and Group I were divided into an effective and an ineffective group (Group EE, Group EI, Group IE, and Group II, respectively). Postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume at baseline was a predictive factor for efficacy of 50 mg therapy. In Group E, change in International Prostate Symptom Score storage symptoms subscore from baseline to week 4 was a predictive factor for efficacy of this dose increase therapy. In Group I, change in maximum flow rate from baseline to week 4 was a predictive factor for efficacy of this dose increase therapy. The short term of naftopidil 50 mg therapy was ineffective for the patients who had large PVR. The predictive factor of this dose increase therapy might be a dynamic variable in 50 mg/day of dose period, but not a baseline variable at the time of 75 mg/day dosage starts.

  19. Antibiotic resistance patterns of bacteria causing urinary tract infections in the elderly living in nursing homes versus the elderly living at home: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Mark; Lindbæk, Morten; Grude, Nils; Reiso, Harald; Romøren, Maria; Skaare, Dagfinn; Berild, Dag

    2015-08-04

    Antibiotic resistance is a problem in nursing homes. Presumed urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common infection. This study examines urine culture results from elderly patients to see if specific guidelines based on gender or whether the patient resides in a nursing home (NH) are warranted. This is a cross sectional observation study comparing urine cultures from NH patients with urine cultures from patients in the same age group living in the community. There were 232 positive urine cultures in the NH group and 3554 in the community group. Escherichia coli was isolated in 145 urines in the NH group (64%) and 2275 (64%) in the community group. There were no clinically significant differences in resistance. Combined, there were 3016 positive urine cultures from females and 770 from males. Escherichia coli was significantly more common in females 2120 (70%) than in males 303 (39%) (p < 0.05). Enterococcus faecalis was significantly less common in females 223 (7%) than males 137 (18%) (p < 0.05). For females, there were lower resistance rates to ciprofloxacin among Escherichia coli (7% vs 12%; p < 0.05) and to mecillinam among Proteus mirabilis (3% vs 12%; p < 0.05). Differences in resistance rates for patients in the nursing home do not warrant separate recommendations for empiric antibiotic therapy, but recommendations based on gender seem warranted.

  20. Antimicrobial resistance pattern of Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infections, and that of human fecal flora, in the southeast of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Shahla; Shareifi, Sorreia

    2002-01-01

    Sensitivity of 500 Escherichia coli isolates from urinary tract infections (UTIs, 311 isolate) and fecal samples (189 isolates) was tested against 12 antimicrobial agents using the standard disk diffusion method. Although the rate of resistance to antimicrobial agents was higher in the UTIs, in comparison with the fecal samples, the only significant difference was found in cases of tetracycline (p = 0.008), nalidixic acid (p = 0.038), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Sxt,p = 0.05). The pattern of sensitivity to antimicrobial agents with respect to statistically significant difference in the number of sensitive isolates (p < or = 0.01) was: ceftizoxime (99.4%) and ceftriaxone (99.2%) > gentamicin (97.8%), ciprofloxacin (93%) and nitrofurantoin (92%) > cefazoline (85.2%) and nalidixic acid (84.6%) > chloramphenicol (71.6%), cephradine (69.6%) and tetracycline (63.2%) > Sxt (41.6%) > ampicillin (23.2%). Sensitivity of the isolates in respect to sex and age was also determined and compared during this study. Resistance to three or more antimicrobial agents (multidrug resistance, MDR) was found in 209 (41.8%) of the isolates. The high rate of resistance to Sxt and the presence of a high rate of MDR isolates in this area suggest that a reevaluation of the first-line therapeutic may be necessary for the treatment of UTIs in this area.

  1. Urinary Tract Infections Due to Nontyphoidal Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Yuri; Paul, Mical; Geffen, Yuval; Khamaisi, Mogher

    2017-06-01

    We sought to establish the characteristics of symptomatic nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) urinary tract infection (UTI) without concomitant gastroenteritis (GE) as a separate clinical entity. We conducted a retrospective cohort single-center study and reviewed all cases of NTS bacteriuria between 1995 and 2016. Patients were assigned to a group according to their clinical presentation, namely, symptomatic NTS UTI without GE, GE with NTS bacteriuria or isolated asymptomatic NTS bacteriuria. We compared the characteristics of patients in the NTS UTI group to those of the latter 2 groups. NTS bacteriuria was found in 77 patients, of which 61 had records available for review. Twenty-one patients (including 17 adults) presented with NTS UTI, 30 patients presented with features of GE with NTS bacteriuria and 10 patients had asymptomatic NTS bacteriuria. NTS UTI was not significantly associated with older age, male sex, diabetes, immunosuppressive states or urologic abnormalities. There was a significant difference in the proportion of patients with an underlying urologic malignancy in the NTS UTI group (4 of 17 patients [23.5%]) as compared to those in the other groups (0 of 24 patients), P = 0.023. A unique group of patients with symptomatic NTS UTI without GE was identified. A significant association with urologic malignancies was demonstrated in patients with NTS UTI compared to those with GE and NTS bacteriuria or asymptomatic NTS bacteriuria. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of antioxidants in urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Allameh, Zahra; Salamzadeh, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Pyelonephritis is an inflammatory process, and oxidative stress plays a major role in it. Anti-inflammatory or antioxidant therapy given concomitantly with antibiotics should lower the risk of postpyelonephritic scarring. As the lack of review studies in the use of antioxidants in urinary tract infections was detected, this study was designed. We conducted a review of available articles in PubMed and Google Scholar with a simple review, using keywords of “antioxidant” and “pyelonephritis” with all their possible synonyms and combinations. Only interventional studies were collected. There were neither limitations on time, nor the location of the study, type of subjects, administration rout of the antioxidant drug, and the antioxidant drug used. After studying the abstracts or in some cases the full text of articles, they were categorized based on the type of antioxidant, type and number of subjects, rout of administration, dosing, duration of treatment, year of publication of the paper, and the results. A total of 66 articles published from 1991 to 2015 were found by studying just the title of the papers. Studying the abstracts reduced this number to 51 studies. Antioxidants used for this condition were Vitamins A, E, and C, cytoflavin, caffeic acid phenethyl ester, ebselen, allopurinol, melatonin, N-acetylcysteine, oleuropein, montelukast, oxytocin, ozon, dapsone, pentoxifyllin, tadalafil, bilirubin, cranberry, meloxicam, L-carnitine, colchicine, perfluoran, methylprednisolone, and dexamethasone. Studies show that antioxidants are capable of reducing oxidative stress and can be used effectively along with antibiotics to reduce the scar formation. PMID:27162800

  3. Use of antioxidants in urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Allameh, Zahra; Salamzadeh, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Pyelonephritis is an inflammatory process, and oxidative stress plays a major role in it. Anti-inflammatory or antioxidant therapy given concomitantly with antibiotics should lower the risk of postpyelonephritic scarring. As the lack of review studies in the use of antioxidants in urinary tract infections was detected, this study was designed. We conducted a review of available articles in PubMed and Google Scholar with a simple review, using keywords of "antioxidant" and "pyelonephritis" with all their possible synonyms and combinations. Only interventional studies were collected. There were neither limitations on time, nor the location of the study, type of subjects, administration rout of the antioxidant drug, and the antioxidant drug used. After studying the abstracts or in some cases the full text of articles, they were categorized based on the type of antioxidant, type and number of subjects, rout of administration, dosing, duration of treatment, year of publication of the paper, and the results. A total of 66 articles published from 1991 to 2015 were found by studying just the title of the papers. Studying the abstracts reduced this number to 51 studies. Antioxidants used for this condition were Vitamins A, E, and C, cytoflavin, caffeic acid phenethyl ester, ebselen, allopurinol, melatonin, N-acetylcysteine, oleuropein, montelukast, oxytocin, ozon, dapsone, pentoxifyllin, tadalafil, bilirubin, cranberry, meloxicam, L-carnitine, colchicine, perfluoran, methylprednisolone, and dexamethasone. Studies show that antioxidants are capable of reducing oxidative stress and can be used effectively along with antibiotics to reduce the scar formation.

  4. Work up of Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Copp, Hillary L.; Schmidt, Bogdana

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric UTI costs the healthcare system upwards of 180 million dollars annually, and accounts for over 1.5 million clinician visits per year. Accurate and timely diagnosis of these infections is important for determining appropriate treatment and preventing long-term complications such as renal scarring, hypertension, and end-stage renal disease. Outside of the first 12 months, girls are more likely to be diagnosed with a UTI. About half of boys with UTI will be diagnosed within the first 12 months of life. The prevalence and incidence of pediatric UTI varies by age, race/ethnicity, sex and circumcision status. Diagnosis of UTI is made based on history and exam findings and confirmed with appropriately collected urine. If a bag specimen is negative, this can be used to rule out UTI without the need for confirmatory culture; however positive urinalysis tests from bag specimen warrant further investigation with a catheterized specimen or suprapubic aspiration. Urine culture is the gold standard for diagnosing UTI: Greater than 50,000 CFU on a catheterized specimen or suprapubic aspiration indicate presence of a UTI. Greater than 100,000 CFU on a voided specimen is considered a positive culture. There is no consensus on the need and optimal strategy for imaging in the setting of urinary tract infection in the pediatric population. Prompt recognition of UTI and antibiogram-based, empiric treatment or culture-based, targeted treatment should be initiated within 72 of presentation. PMID:26475948

  5. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to help prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections if I have a catheter? • Always clean your hands before and after doing catheter care. • Always keep your urine bag below the level ...

  6. Biotypes of Gardnerella vaginalis isolated from urinary tract.

    PubMed

    González-Pedraza Avilés, A; Ortíz-Zaragoza, M C; Inzunza-Montiel, A E; Ponce-Rosas, E R

    1996-01-01

    A modified scheme is proposed for biotyping Gardnerella vaginalis isolated from urinary tract of symptomatic and asymptomatic women based on detection of hippurate hydrolysis, beta-galactosidase (ONPG) and lipase, and fermentation of arabinose, galactose and xylose. Thirty biotypes were found among 73 strains. The distribution of biotypes was similar in both populations but the biotypes 1H, 5G and 7G were found more frequently in women without symptoms of urinary tract infection.

  7. Concomitant Bacterial Meningitis in Infants With Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Joanna; Cruz, Andrea T; Nigrovic, Lise E; Freedman, Stephen B; Garro, Aris C; Ishimine, Paul T; Kulik, Dina M; Uspal, Neil G; Grether-Jones, Kendra L; Miller, Aaron S; Schnadower, David; Shah, Samir S; Aronson, Paul L; Balamuth, Fran

    2017-09-01

    To determine age-stratified prevalence of concomitant bacterial meningitis in infants ≤60 days with a urinary tract infection, we performed a 23-center, retrospective study of 1737 infants with urinary tract infection. Concomitant bacterial meningitis was rare, but more common in infants 0-28 days of age [0.9%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.4%-1.9%) compared with infants 29-60 days of age (0.2%; 95% CI: 0%-0.8%).

  8. Salmonella-related urinary tract infection in an elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Klosterman, Scott Anthony

    2014-09-05

    An elderly female patient with an uncomplicated urinary tract infection from Salmonella newport is presented. Radiological and laboratory studies were performed because of her systemic and exposure risk factors as well as prior urinary tract abnormalities. While this patient was successfully treated as an outpatient with oral antibiotics, complications and recurrence are common and deserve close follow-up with repeat urine cultures at a minimum. Further laboratory and radiological testing should be guided by patient gender, risk factors and recurrence.

  9. Catheter-related urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2005-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are used frequently in older populations. For either short- or long-term catheters, the infection rate is about 5% per day. Escherichia coli remains the most common infecting organism, but a wide variety of other organisms may be isolated, including yeast species. Bacteria tend to show increased resistance because of the repeated antimicrobial courses. Urinary tract infection (UTI) usually follows formation of biofilm on both the internal and external catheter surface. The biofilm protects organisms from both antimicrobials and the host immune response. Morbidity from UTI with short-term catheter use is limited if appropriate catheter care is practised. In patients with long-term catheters, fever from a urinary source is common with a frequency varying from 1 per 100 to 1 per 1000 catheter days. Long-term care facility residents with chronic indwelling catheters have a much greater risk for bacteraemia and other urinary complications than residents without catheters. Asymptomatic catheter-acquired UTI should not be treated with antimicrobials. Antimicrobial treatment does not decrease symptomatic episodes but will lead to emergence of more resistant organisms. For treatment of symptomatic infection, many antimicrobials are effective. Wherever possible, antimicrobial selection should be delayed until culture results are available. Whether to administer initial treatment by an oral or parenteral route is determined by clinical presentation. If empirical therapy is required, antimicrobial selection is based on variables such as route of administration, anticipated infecting organism and susceptibility, and patient tolerance. Renal function, concomitant medications, local formulary and cost may also be considered in selection of the antimicrobial agent. The duration of therapy is usually 10-14 days, but patients who respond promptly and in whom the catheter must remain in situ may be treated with a shorter 7-day course to reduce

  10. Group d salmonella urinary tract infection in an immunocompetent male.

    PubMed

    Jehangir, Asad; Poudel, Dilli; Fareedy, Shoaib Bilal; Salman, Ahmed; Qureshi, Anam; Jehangir, Qasim; Alweis, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old male with past medical history of benign prostatic hyperplasia presented to the emergency department with complaints of decreased urinary flow, inability to fully empty his bladder, and gross hematuria. Physical examination was unremarkable. Urinalysis revealed large amount of blood and more than 700 white blood cells suggesting a urinary tract infection. Urine culture grew group D Salmonella greater than 100,000 colony-forming units per mL. He was prescribed 6 weeks of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and had resolution of symptoms. Retrospectively, he reported a 3-day history of watery diarrhea about a week prior to onset of urinary symptoms that was presumed to be the hematogenous source in this case. Urinary tract infection from nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) is rare and is usually associated with immunosuppression, chronic diseases, such as diabetes or structural abnormalities of the genitourinary tract. Genitourinary tract abnormalities previously reported in the literature that predispose to nontyphoidal Salmonella urinary tract infection include nephrolithiasis, chronic pyelonephritis, retrovesicular fistula, urethrorectal fistula, hydrocele, and post-TURP. We present an exceedingly uncommon case of 62-year-old male with group D Salmonella urinary tract infection predisposed by his history of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  11. The human urine virome in association with urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Ly, Melissa; Bonilla, Natasha; Pride, David T.

    2014-01-01

    While once believed to represent a sterile environment, the human urinary tract harbors a unique cellular microbiota. We sought to determine whether the human urinary tract also is home to viral communities whose membership might reflect urinary tract health status. We recruited and sampled urine from 20 subjects, 10 subjects with urinary tract infections (UTIs) and 10 without UTIs, and found viral communities in the urine of each subject group. Most of the identifiable viruses were bacteriophage, but eukaryotic viruses also were identified in all subjects. We found reads from human papillomaviruses (HPVs) in 95% of the subjects studied, but none were found to be high-risk genotypes that are associated with cervical and rectal cancers. We verified the presence of some HPV genotypes by quantitative PCR. Some of the HPV genotypes identified were homologous to relatively novel and uncharacterized viruses that previously have been detected on skin in association with cancerous lesions, while others may be associated with anal and genital warts. On a community level, there was no association between the membership or diversity of viral communities based on urinary tract health status. While more data are still needed, detection of HPVs as members of the human urinary virome using viral metagenomics represents a non-invasive technique that could augment current screening techniques to detect low-risk HPVs in the genitourinary tracts of humans. PMID:25667584

  12. Management of non-catheter-associated complicated urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Dielubanza, Elodi J; Mazur, Daniel J; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2014-03-01

    This article presents an overview of non-catheter-associated complicated urinary tract infection (UTI) from a urologic point of view. Discussion includes the evaluation and workup a complicated UTI through history, physical examination, laboratory analysis, and radiographic studies. Specific types of complicated UTI, such as urinary obstruction and renal abscess, are reviewed.

  13. The predictive factors of α1-D/A adrenoceptor antagonist, naftopidil, dose increase therapy for male lower urinary tract symptoms caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia: INFORM study

    PubMed Central

    Tanuma, Yasushi; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Takeyama, Ko; Okamoto, Tomoshi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluated the predictive factors which affect the efficacy of naftopidil 50 mg/day therapy and dose increase therapy to administration of 75 mg/day after an initial dose of 50 mg/day. Materials and Methods: A total of 92 patients with male lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia were administrated naftopidil 50 mg/day for 4 weeks (50 mg therapy). At week 4, the patients were divided into an effective and an ineffective group (Group E and Group I, respectively). For further 4 weeks, the dosage of naftopidil was increased to 75 mg/day in all patients. At week 8, the patients of Group E and Group I were divided into an effective and an ineffective group (Group EE, Group EI, Group IE, and Group II, respectively). Results: Postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume at baseline was a predictive factor for efficacy of 50 mg therapy. In Group E, change in International Prostate Symptom Score storage symptoms subscore from baseline to week 4 was a predictive factor for efficacy of this dose increase therapy. In Group I, change in maximum flow rate from baseline to week 4 was a predictive factor for efficacy of this dose increase therapy. Conclusions: The short term of naftopidil 50 mg therapy was ineffective for the patients who had large PVR. The predictive factor of this dose increase therapy might be a dynamic variable in 50 mg/day of dose period, but not a baseline variable at the time of 75 mg/day dosage starts. PMID:28794594

  14. Nosocomial urinary tract infections caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase uropathogens: Prevalence, pathogens, risk factors, and strategies for infection control

    PubMed Central

    Bouassida, Khaireddine; Jaidane, Mehdi; Bouallegue, Olfa; Tlili, Ghassen; Naija, Habiba; Mosbah, Ali Tahar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Our goal was to investigate the prevalence and antibiogram pattern of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production among uropathogens using isolates from urine samples collected at the Department of Urology in the Sahloul Hospital, Tunisia We also aimed to identify the risk factors for nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and the measures for infection control. Methods: Laboratory records of a five-year period from January 2004 to December 2008 were submitted for retrospective analysis to determine the incidence of ESBL infections. A total of 276 isolates were collected. A case-control study involving comparisons between two groups of patients who underwent TURP was performed to determine the risk factors for ESBL infection. Group 1, designated case subjects, included 51 patients with nosocomial UTI after TURP. Group 2, designated control subjects, consisted of 58 randomly selected patients who underwent TURP without nosocomial UTI in the same period. Factors suspected to be implicated in the emergence of ESBL infection were compared between the two groups in order to identify risk factors for infection. A univariate regression analysis was performed, followed by a multivariate one. Results: The annual prevalence of ESBL infection ranged from 1.3–2.5%. After performing univariate and multivariate regression analysis, the main risk factors for ESBL infections were identified as: use of antibiotics the year preceding the admission, duration of catheter use, and bladder washout (p=0.012, p=0.019, and p<0.001. Conclusions: Urologists have to perform a good hemostasis, especially in endoscopic resections, in order to avoid bladder irrigation and bladder washout and to reduce the time of bladder catheterization, which is a strong risk factor of nosocomial UTIs. PMID:27330585

  15. Evaluation of the in vitro growth of urinary tract infection-causing gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria in a proposed synthetic human urine (SHU) medium.

    PubMed

    Ipe, Deepak S; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Bacteriuria is a hallmark of urinary tract infection (UTI) and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which are among the most frequent infections in humans. A variety of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria are associated with these infections but Escherichia coli contributes up to 80% of cases. Multiple bacterial species including E. coli can grow in human urine as a means to maintain colonization during infections. In vitro bacteriuria studies aimed at modeling microbial growth in urine have utilized various compositions of synthetic human urine (SHU) and a Composite SHU formulation was recently proposed. In this study, we sought to validate the recently proposed Composite SHU as a medium that supports the growth of several bacterial species that are known to grow in normal human urine and/or artificial urine. Comparative growth assays of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus faecalis were undertaken using viable bacterial count and optical density measurements over a 48h culture period. Three different SHU formulations were tested in various culture vessels, shaking conditions and volumes and showed that Composite SHU can support the robust growth of gram-negative bacteria but requires supplementation with 0.2% yeast extract to support the growth of gram-positive bacteria. Experiments are also presented that show an unexpected but major influence of P. mirabilis towards the ability to measure bacterial growth in generally accepted multiwell assays using absorbance readings, predicted to have a basis in the release of volatile organic compound(s) from P. mirabilis during growth in Composite SHU medium. This study represents an essential methodological validation of a more chemically defined type of synthetic urine that can be applied to study mechanisms of bacteriuria and we conclude will offer a useful in vitro model to investigate the

  16. Nosocomial Urinary Tract Aspergilloma in an Immunocompetent Host: An Unusual Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Singal, Archana; Grover, Chander; Pandhi, Deepika; Das, Shukla; Jain, Bhupinder Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Fungal infections of the urinary tract are usually encountered following prolonged antibiotic use, instrumentation and indwelling urinary catheters. Candida is the most frequent causative fungus. However, infections with Aspergillus flavus have been reported previously in immune-compromised hosts. We, hereby, report a 32-year-old immunocompetent man diagnosed to have urinary tract infection caused by Aspergillus flavus following instrumentation for the removal of a ureteric stone. The infection was symptomatic, associated with abdominal pain and subsequent passage of fungal masses per urethra. Patient was treated successfully with a prolonged course of broad spectrum antifungal agent itraconazole. PMID:24082213

  17. Specific pharmacokinetic aspects of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Korstanje, Cees; Krauwinkel, Walter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter reviews the evidence for "specific" pharmacokinetics playing a role in currently marketed drugs intended to treat lower urinary tract (LUT) symptoms. Principles of drug targeting include intrinsic properties of drugs or organs as well as drug formulations to modify drug release or to create confinement of drug presence. Prodrugs and specific formulations to deliver high drug concentrations at the site(s) of action as well as other ways to manipulate drug distribution to achieve enrichment in target tissues are considered. In overactive bladder (OAB), specific formulations for oxybutynin have been introduced to reduce the level of side effects of the active drug. Extended release tablet formulations and a topical gel formulation have been introduced, with efficacy similar to immediate release (IR) tablets, but with a reduction in anticholinergic adverse effects. However, these modifications have not led to outstanding performance parameters compared to other anticholinergic drugs marketed as IR formulations. Urinary excretion is discussed as potential mechanism for targeting LUT symptoms, but no strong indications appear to exist that this mechanism would contribute for currently available drugs. Intravesical administration of drugs is not a preferred option and only considered for drugs like botulinum toxin, where the inconvenient application compensates for a reasonable degree of long-term efficacy in severe refractory OAB. Alpha acid glycoprotein binding is discussed as a potential factor to influence drug tissue distribution, and it is concluded that there is reasonable evidence that for tamsulosin this mechanism is responsible for the difference in free fraction of the drug observed in plasma and prostate, which could contribute to its relative absence of blood pressure effects in patients with LUT symptoms related to benign prostate hyperplasia (LUTS-BPH). The principle of irreversible inhibition of type II 5α-reductase as a tool to develop drugs

  18. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glossary For Patients Common Illnesses Bronchitis (Chest Cold) Common Cold & Runny Nose Ear Infection Influenza (Flu) Sinus Infection (Sinusitis) Sore Throat Urinary Tract Infection Symptom Relief For Healthcare ... tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infections in people, and antibiotic treatment is usually ...

  19. [Case of urinary mycobacterium fortuitum in a patient with urinary tract tuberculosis posttreatment].

    PubMed

    Maehana, Takeshi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Hirobe, Megumi; Taguchi, Keisuke

    2008-11-01

    A 70-year-old male who complained of urinary frequency and a feeling of incomplete emptying was admitted to our hospital. Imaging findings showed dilation of the left renal pelvis and ureter. He was diagnosed as having urinary tuberculosis because a positive urinary Mycobacterium tuberculosis result was obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). He was treated with a combination of the antituberculosis agents isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol for six months. The symptoms and pyuria disappeared and M. tuberculosis was negative by PCR; however, Mycobacterium fortuitum was isolated by culture. Due to asymptomatic urinary tract infection by the multidrug resistant M. fortuitum, he was followed up with observation. Currently, he remains unchanged with regard to symptoms and imaging examination. M. fortuitum is a nontubercular mycobacterium, and clinical relevance between urinary tract infection and M. fortuitum has rarely emerged. However, we should be aware that nontubercular mycobacteria such as M. fortuitum can infect the urinary tract, especially in immunocompromised patients.

  20. Role of scintigraphy in urinary tract infection

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J.J.

    1988-10-01

    There is controversy regarding the role of radiological imaging for urinary tract infection (UTI). The gold standard has been the intravenous pyelogram (IVP). Yet, the IVP has a very limited value with only about 25% of children with pyelonephritis demonstrating abnormalities. Ultrasound (US) has recently been advocated as a replacement for the poorly sensitive and poorly specific IVP. However, comparative studies between US and IVP indicate only an equivalent sensitivity and specificity. Cortical scintigraphy with Technetium-99m glucoheptonate (99mTc GH) or 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc DMSA) has also been advocated as a means of differentiating parenchymal (pyelonephritis) from nonparenchymal (lower UTI) involvement in UTI. The clinical presentation may be misleading especially in the infant and child in whom an elevated temperature, flank pain, shaking chills, or an elevated sedimentation rate are often lacking. The clinician attempts to localize the site of infection for it has a direct bearing upon the therapy. A collecting system infection can often be eradicated with a single oral dose of an appropriate antibiotic, whereas renal parenchymal involvement requires IV therapy for an extended interval. Cortical scintigraphy can localize the site of infection with a high degree of accuracy. Recent studies report a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 81% of pyelonephritis. This is in contrast to the IVP with a sensitivity of only 24% and US with a sensitivity of only 42%. The scintigraphic appearance of parenchymal infection of the kidney is a spectrum of minimal to gross defects reflecting the degree of histologic involvement that spans from a mild infection to frank abscess. Cortical scintigraphy can be used to monitor the evolution of scarring following infection. Cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc DMSA or 99mTc GH is the method of choice for the initial evaluation of UTI. 37 references.

  1. Multidrug resistance in pediatric urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Dickson, Eric; Karlowsky, James; Doern, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent a common infection in the pediatric population. Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen in children, and antimicrobial resistance in this species complicates the treatment of pediatric UTIs. Despite the impact of resistance on empiric antibiotic choice, there is little data on multidrug resistance in pediatric patients. In this paper, we describe characteristics of multidrug-resistant E. coli in pediatric patients using a large national database of uropathogens antimicrobial sensitivities. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to commonly prescribed antibiotics were performed on uropathogens isolated from children presenting to participating hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data were analyzed separately for four pediatric age groups. Single and multidrug resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) were performed on all specimens. There were a total of 11,341 E. coli urine cultures from 343 infants (0-4 weeks), 1,801 toddlers (5 weeks-24 months), 6,742 preteens (2-12 years), and 2,455 teens (13-17 years). E. coli resistance to ampicillin peaked in toddlers (52.8%) but was high in preteens (52.1%), infants (50.4%), and teens (40.6%). Resistance to two or more antibiotics varied across age groups, with toddlers (27%) leading preteens (23.1%), infants (21%), and teens (15.9%). Resistance to three or more antibiotics was low in all age groups (range 3.1-5.2%). The most common co-resistance in all age groups was ampicillin/TMP-SMZ. In conclusion, less than half of all pediatric UTIs are susceptible to all commonly used antibiotics. In some age groups, there is a significant percentage of co-resistance between the two most commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin and TMP-SMZ).

  2. [Urinary tract abnormalities with anorrectal malformations (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Nogués, A; Ceres, M L; Olagüe, R; Andrés, V; Lanuza, A

    1978-01-01

    Thirty five patients with anorrectal malformations are reviewed. These are divided in high and low anomalies according to some simple clinical data, better than the drawing of reference lines to determinate the height of puborrectalis muscle. Malformations were associated in 13 cases with urinary tract estructural anomalies and in four cases with isolated vesico-ureteral reflux. Diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made in 14 patients, 12 of them with recto-urinary fistula. A point is made about the complete and early exploration of all these patients to prevent irreparable renal damage that could be developed.

  3. Global prevalence of antibiotic resistance in paediatric urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and association with routine use of antibiotics in primary care: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Ashley; Hay, Alastair D; Lane, Isabel F; Thornton, Hannah V; Wootton, Mandy; Costelloe, Céire

    2016-03-15

    To systematically review studies investigating the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli in children and, when appropriate, to meta-analyse the relation between previous antibiotics prescribed in primary care and resistance. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Pooled percentage prevalence of resistance to the most commonly used antibiotics in children in primary care, stratified by the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) status of the study country. Random effects meta-analysis was used to quantify the association between previous exposure to antibiotics in primary care and resistance. Observational and experimental studies identified through Medline, Embase, Cochrane, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases, searched for articles published up to October 2015. Studies were eligible if they investigated and reported resistance in community acquired urinary tract infection in children and young people aged 0-17. Electronic searches with MeSH terms and text words identified 3115 papers. Two independent reviewers assessed study quality and performed data extraction. 58 observational studies investigated 77,783 E coli isolates in urine. In studies from OECD countries, the pooled prevalence of resistance was 53.4% (95% confidence interval 46.0% to 60.8%) for ampicillin, 23.6% (13.9% to 32.3%) for trimethoprim, 8.2% (7.9% to 9.6%) for co-amoxiclav, and 2.1% (0.8 to 4.4%) for ciprofloxacin; nitrofurantoin was the lowest at 1.3% (0.8% to 1.7%). Resistance in studies in countries outside the OECD was significantly higher: 79.8% (73.0% to 87.7%) for ampicillin, 60.3% (40.9% to 79.0%) for co-amoxiclav, 26.8% (11.1% to 43.0%) for ciprofloxacin, and 17.0% (9.8% to 24.2%) for nitrofurantoin. There was evidence that bacterial isolates from the urinary tract from individual children who had received previous prescriptions for antibiotics in primary care were more likely to be resistant to antibiotics, and

  4. Global prevalence of antibiotic resistance in paediatric urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and association with routine use of antibiotics in primary care: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Alastair D; Lane, Isabel F; Thornton, Hannah V; Wootton, Mandy; Costelloe, Céire

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To systematically review studies investigating the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli in children and, when appropriate, to meta-analyse the relation between previous antibiotics prescribed in primary care and resistance. Design and data analysis Systematic review and meta-analysis. Pooled percentage prevalence of resistance to the most commonly used antibiotics in children in primary care, stratified by the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) status of the study country. Random effects meta-analysis was used to quantify the association between previous exposure to antibiotics in primary care and resistance. Data sources Observational and experimental studies identified through Medline, Embase, Cochrane, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases, searched for articles published up to October 2015. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Studies were eligible if they investigated and reported resistance in community acquired urinary tract infection in children and young people aged 0-17. Electronic searches with MeSH terms and text words identified 3115 papers. Two independent reviewers assessed study quality and performed data extraction. Results 58 observational studies investigated 77 783 E coli isolates in urine. In studies from OECD countries, the pooled prevalence of resistance was 53.4% (95% confidence interval 46.0% to 60.8%) for ampicillin, 23.6% (13.9% to 32.3%) for trimethoprim, 8.2% (7.9% to 9.6%) for co-amoxiclav, and 2.1% (0.8 to 4.4%) for ciprofloxacin; nitrofurantoin was the lowest at 1.3% (0.8% to 1.7%). Resistance in studies in countries outside the OECD was significantly higher: 79.8% (73.0% to 87.7%) for ampicillin, 60.3% (40.9% to 79.0%) for co-amoxiclav, 26.8% (11.1% to 43.0%) for ciprofloxacin, and 17.0% (9.8% to 24.2%) for nitrofurantoin. There was evidence that bacterial isolates from the urinary tract from individual children who had received

  5. Urinary tract infection and antibiotic sensitivity pattern among diabetics.

    PubMed

    Simkhada, R

    2013-03-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a major health problem of today's world. Urinary tract infection is its common complication. A descriptive, cross sectional study was designed to know the prevalence of culture positive Urinary Tract Infection in diabetic patients, to know their common clinical features and to find out the proportion of asymptomatic bacteriuria, to know the causative organisms and pattern of antibiotic sensitivity. Mid stream urine sample was collected using full aseptic precaution. Among 100 patients included, 53 were female and 47 were male. In total, 21% of them had culture positive Urinary Tract Infection. Urinary Tract Infection was more in female (P = 0.047). Asymptomatic bacteriuria was found more common in female as compared to male. Common clinical features in symptomatic were burning micturation (90%), frequency of micturation (80%), suprapubic pain (60%), urgency (70%), loin pain (30%), and fever and vomiting (20%). Urinary Tract Infection was common among those who had prolong duration of diabetes (P = 0.039) and among those receiving insulin as compared to those under oral medications (P = 0.08). Escherichia-coli was most common organism followed by klebsiella, proteus and pseudomonas. Most of the urinary isolates were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, cotrimoxazole and ceftriaxone, where as resistance was high for ampicillin.

  6. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Macejko, Amanda M; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2007-02-01

    Urinary tract infections are common complications of pregnancy; upper tract infections in particular may lead to significant morbidity for both the mother and fetus. Bacteriuria is a significant risk factor for developing pyelonephritis in pregnant women. Therefore, proper screening and treatment of bacteriuria during pregnancy is necessary to prevent complications. All women should be screened for bacteriuria in the first trimester, and women with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections or anomalies should have repeat bacteriuria screening throughout pregnancy. Treatment of bacteriuria should include 3-day therapy with appropriate antimicrobials, and women should be followed closely after treatment because recurrence may occur in up to one third of patients.

  7. Urinary tract infection in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fünfstück, Reinhard; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Hanefeld, Markolf; Naber, Kurt G

    2012-01-01

    Urinary tract infection occurs with increased frequency and severity in patients with diabetes mellitus. General host factors enhancing risk for urinary tract infection in diabetics include age, metabolic control, and long term complications, primarily diabetic nephropathy and cystopathy. Alterations in the innate immune system have been described and may also contribute. Treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in diabetic patients is not indicated. Early diagnosis and prompt intervention is recommended to limit morbidity of symptomatic infection. Clinical studies comparing management of urinary tract infection in persons with diabetes compared to those without as well as diabetic patients with good or poor glucose control will be necessary to improve care of urinary infection in persons with diabetes mellitus.

  8. Lower Blood Glucose and Variability Are Associated with Earlier Recovery from Renal Injury Caused by Episodic Urinary Tract Infection in Advanced Type 2 Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Ping-Fang; Wu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Ching-Hui; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Chang, Chirn-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In our previous study, type 2 diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with glomerular filtration rates of <30 mL/min upon hospitalization for urinary tract infection (UTI) were at a risk for acute kidney injury. This study aimed to clarify the effect of glucose and its variability on renal outcomes during admission for the treatment of UTI. Materials and Methods Based on the date of renal recovery (RIFLE criteria: acute kidney injury occurred within 1–7 days and was sustained over 1 day), we divided these patients into early- (≤9 days, Group A) and late-recovery (>9 days, Group B) groups. The differences in the continuous and categorical variables of the two groups were assessed separately. The mean glucose levels and their variability (using the standard deviation and the coefficient of standard deviation) were compared at the fasting, midday pre-meal, evening pre-meal, and evening post-meal time points during hospitalization. We have organized the manuscript in a manner compliant with the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) statement. Results Acute kidney injury occurred within the two groups (p = 0.007 and p = 0.001, respectively). The early-morning blood glucose levels (149.7±44.0 mg/dL) and average blood glucose levels (185.6±52.0 mg/dL) were better in Group A (p = 0.01, p = 0.02). Group A patients also had lower glucose variability than Group B at the different time points (p<0.05). Group A also had earlier renal recovery. More relevant pathogens were identified from blood in Group B (p = 0.038). Conclusions Early-morning fasting and mean blood glucose levels and their variability can be good indicators of severe infection and predictors of renal outcome in type 2 diabetic patients with CKD and UTI. PMID:25259806

  9. Comparing between results and complications of doing voiding cystourethrogram in the first week following urinary tract infection and in 2-6 weeks after urinary tract infection in children referring to a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Dorreh, Fatemeh; Shahsavari, Someyeh; Pakniyat, Abdolghader

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Urinary tract infection is the most common genitourinary disease in children so about 40% of the children with urinary tract infection suffering from reflux that caused some consequences such as pyelonephritis and kidney parenchymal injury. Objectives: This research was conducted to compare the timing of voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) in children with urinary tract infection in first week and after the first week of urinary tract infection. Patients and Methods: This research is a case-control study that both case and control groups include 208 children from 1 month to 12 years old with the complain of urinary tract infection. In case group, the VCUG was performed at the first week of infection and in control group, the VCUG was performed after the first week of infection. Results: complication such as dysuria was observed in two-thirds of children who VCUG was performed during first week after urinary tract infection. Parents stress in case group was more than the other (P=0.015). For overall, the incidence of reflux in case and control groups was 49.5% and 50%, respectively. The mean of reflux grading in right kidney in case group was lower than control group resulting in significant differences between two groups. Conclusion: According to higher grade of stress in parents and complications due to VCUG at the first week of urinary tract infection, it is suggested that VCUG be conducted on selective patients in the hospital at the first week of urinary tract infection and during hospitalization. PMID:27689111

  10. Comparing between results and complications of doing voiding cystourethrogram in the first week following urinary tract infection and in 2-6 weeks after urinary tract infection in children referring to a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Dorreh, Fatemeh; Shahsavari, Someyeh; Pakniyat, Abdolghader

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is the most common genitourinary disease in children so about 40% of the children with urinary tract infection suffering from reflux that caused some consequences such as pyelonephritis and kidney parenchymal injury. This research was conducted to compare the timing of voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) in children with urinary tract infection in first week and after the first week of urinary tract infection. This research is a case-control study that both case and control groups include 208 children from 1 month to 12 years old with the complain of urinary tract infection. In case group, the VCUG was performed at the first week of infection and in control group, the VCUG was performed after the first week of infection. complication such as dysuria was observed in two-thirds of children who VCUG was performed during first week after urinary tract infection. Parents stress in case group was more than the other (P=0.015). For overall, the incidence of reflux in case and control groups was 49.5% and 50%, respectively. The mean of reflux grading in right kidney in case group was lower than control group resulting in significant differences between two groups. According to higher grade of stress in parents and complications due to VCUG at the first week of urinary tract infection, it is suggested that VCUG be conducted on selective patients in the hospital at the first week of urinary tract infection and during hospitalization.

  11. Antimicrobial Resistance and Urinary Tract Infection Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Caleb P; Hoberman, Alejandro; Shaikh, Nader; Keren, Ron; Mathews, Ranjiv; Greenfield, Saul P; Mattoo, Tej K; Gotman, Nathan; Ivanova, Anastasia; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Carpenter, Myra A; Chesney, Russell W

    2016-04-01

    The Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR) trial found that recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTI) with resistant organisms were more common in the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis (TSP) arm. We describe factors associated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) resistance of rUTIs in RIVUR. Children aged 2 to 71 months with first or second UTI (index UTI) and grade I to IV vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) were randomized to TSP or placebo and followed for 2 years. Factors associated with TMP-SMX-resistant rUTI were evaluated. Among 571 included children, 48% were <12 months old, 43% had grade II VUR, and 38% had grade III VUR. Recurrent UTI occurred in 34 of 278 children receiving TSP versus 67 of 293 children receiving placebo. Among those with rUTI, 76% (26/34) of subjects receiving TSP had TMP-SMX-resistant organisms versus 28% (19/67) of subjects receiving placebo (P < .001). The proportion of TMP-SMX-resistant rUTI decreased over time: in the TSP arm, 96% were resistant during the initial 6 months versus 38% resistant during the final 6 months; corresponding proportions for the placebo arm were 32% and 11%. Among children receiving TSP, 7 (13%) of 55 with TMP-SMX-resistant index UTI had rUTI, whereas 27 (12%) of 223 with TMP-SMX-susceptible index UTI had rUTI (adjusted hazard ratio 1.38, 95% confidence interval 0.54-3.56). Corresponding proportions in placebo arm were 17 (26%) of 65 and 50 (22%) of 228 (adjusted hazard ratio 1.33, 95% confidence interval 0.74-2.38). Although TMP-SMX resistance is more common among children treated with TSP versus placebo, resistance decreased over time. Among children treated with TSP, there was no significant difference in UTI recurrence between those with TMP-SMX-resistant index UTI versus TMP-SMX-susceptible UTI. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Quinolones in the treatment of complicated urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Graninger, W; Wenisch, C; Presterl, E

    1994-07-01

    Complicated and recurrent urinary tract infections present intriguing clinical management problems. The underlying conditions in patients with complicated urinary tract infections are anatomical abnormalities of the genitourinary tract, neurologic disorders resulting in urinary stasis, obstruction, instrumentation, surgery, diabeters mellitus, renal transplantation, and renal calculi. In comparative studies the quinolones have been shown to be effective in 7-14-day treatment courses in complicated urinary tract infection. Several comparative trials which compare the fluoroquinolones with beta-lactam antibiotics or cotrimoxazole yielded equal or better results for the quinolones. A cost-saving option is given with some of the fluoroquinolones that can be administered parenterally and orally which enables the patient to be discharged from the hospital earlier. There are few differences in antimicrobial activity between the newer quinolones, but differences in the pharmacokinetic properties are evident. The fluoroquinolones are suitable therapeutics for complicated urinary tract infection, because they offer rapid oral absorption, high tissue concentration, broad activity against most Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms, the possibility of a once-a-day administration, and relatively few side effects.

  13. In Vitro Activity of Ceftazidime-Avibactam against Isolates in a Phase 3 Open-Label Clinical Trial for Complicated Intra-Abdominal and Urinary Tract Infections Caused by Ceftazidime-Nonsusceptible Gram-Negative Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregory G; Bradford, Patricia A; Newell, Paul; Wardman, Angela

    2017-02-01

    The in vitro activity of ceftazidime-avibactam was evaluated against 341 Gram-negative isolates from 333 patients in a randomized, phase 3 clinical trial of patients with complicated urinary tract or intra-abdominal infections caused by ceftazidime-nonsusceptible pathogens (NCT01644643). Ceftazidime-avibactam MIC90 values against Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (including several class B or D enzyme producers that avibactam does not inhibit) were 1 and 64 μg/ml, respectively. Overall, the ceftazidime-avibactam activity against ceftazidime-nonsusceptible isolates was comparable to the activity of ceftazidime-avibactam previously reported against ceftazidime-susceptible isolates. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01644643.).

  14. Detection of CTX-M-15 beta-lactamases in Enterobacteriaceae causing hospital- and community-acquired urinary tract infections as early as 2004, in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Manyahi, Joel; Moyo, Sabrina J; Tellevik, Marit Gjerde; Ndugulile, Faustine; Urassa, Willy; Blomberg, Bjørn; Langeland, Nina

    2017-04-17

    The spread of Extended Spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) among Enterobacteriaceae and other Gram-Negative pathogens in the community and hospitals represents a major challenge to combat infections. We conducted a study to assess the prevalence and genetic makeup of ESBL-type resistance in bacterial isolates causing community- and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections. A total of 172 isolates of Enterobacteriaceae were collected in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, from patients who met criteria of community and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections. We used E-test ESBL strips to test for ESBL-phenotype and PCR and sequencing for detection of ESBL genes. Overall 23.8% (41/172) of all isolates were ESBL-producers. ESBL-producers were more frequently isolated from hospital-acquired infections (32%, 27/84 than from community-acquired infections (16%, 14/88, p < 0.05). ESBL-producers showed high rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin (85.5%), doxycycline (90.2%), gentamicin (80.5%), nalidixic acid (84.5%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (85.4%). Furthermore, 95% of ESBL-producers were multi-drug resistant compared to 69% of non-ESBL-producers (p < 0.05). The distribution of ESBL genes were as follows: 29/32 (90.6%) bla CTX-M-15, two bla SHV-12, and one had both bla CTX-M-15 and bla SHV-12. Of 29 isolates carrying bla CTX-M-15, 69% (20/29) and 31% (9/29) were hospital and community, respectively. Bla SHV-12 genotypes were only detected in hospital-acquired infections. bla CTX-M-15 is a predominant gene conferring ESBL-production in Enterobacteriaceae causing both hospital- and community-acquired infections in Tanzania.

  15. Development of an Intranasal Vaccine To Prevent Urinary Tract Infection by Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Lockatell, C. Virginia; Johnson, David E.; Lane, M. Chelsea; Warren, John W.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2004-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis commonly infects the complicated urinary tract and is associated with urolithiasis. Stone formation is caused by bacterial urease, which hydrolyzes urea to ammonia, causing local pH to rise, and leads to the subsequent precipitation of magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) and calcium phosphate (apatite) crystals. To prevent these infections, we vaccinated CBA mice with formalin-killed bacteria or purified mannose-resistant, Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae, a surface antigen expressed by P. mirabilis during experimental urinary tract infection, via four routes of immunization: subcutaneous, intranasal, transurethral, and oral. We assessed the efficacy of vaccination using the CBA mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. Subcutaneous or intranasal immunization with formalin-killed bacteria and intranasal or transurethral immunization with purified MR/P fimbriae significantly protected CBA mice from ascending urinary tract infection by P. mirabilis (P < 0.05). To investigate the potential of MrpH, the MR/P fimbrial tip adhesin, as a vaccine, the mature MrpH peptide (residues 23 to 275, excluding the signal peptide), and the N-terminal receptor-binding domain of MrpH (residues 23 to 157) were overexpressed as C-terminal fusions to maltose-binding protein (MBP) and purified on amylose resins. Intranasal immunization of CBA mice with MBP-MrpH (residues 23 to 157) conferred effective protection against urinary tract infection by P. mirabilis (P < 0.002). PMID:14688082

  16. Urinary tract infections in patients with diabetes treated with dapagliflozin.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Kristina M; Ptaszynska, Agata; Schmitz, Bridget; Sugg, Jennifer; Parikh, Shamik J; List, James F

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is common in patients with type 2 diabetes. Possible causative factors include glucosuria, which is a result of treatment with sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Dapagliflozin is an investigative SGLT2 inhibitor with demonstrated glycemic benefits in patients with diabetes. Data from dapagliflozin multi-trial safety data were analyzed to clarify the association between glucosuria and urinary tract infection. Safety data from 12 randomized, placebo-controlled trials were pooled to evaluate the relationship between glucosuria and urinary tract infection in patients with inadequately controlled diabetes (HbA1c >6.5%-12%). Patients were treated with dapagliflozin (2.5, 5, or 10mg) or placebo once daily, either as monotherapy or add-on to metformin, insulin, sulfonylurea, or thiazolidinedione for 12-24weeks. The incidence of clinical diagnoses and events suggestive of urinary tract infection were quantified. This analysis included 3152 patients who received once-daily dapagliflozin (2.5mg [n=814], 5mg [n=1145], or 10mg [n=1193]) as monotherapy or add-on treatment, and 1393 placebo-treated patients. For dapagliflozin 2.5mg, 5mg, 10mg, and placebo, diagnosed infections were reported in 3.6%, 5.7%, 4.3%, and 3.7%, respectively. Urinary glucose levels, but not the incidence of urinary tract infection, increased progressively with dapagliflozin dosage. Most identified infections were those considered typical for patients with diabetes. Discontinuations due to urinary tract infection were rare: 8 (0.3%) dapagliflozin-treated patients and 1 (0.1%) placebo-treated patient. Most diagnosed infections were mild to moderate and responded to standard antimicrobial treatment. Treatment of type 2 diabetes with once-daily dapagliflozin 5 or 10mg is accompanied by a slightly increased risk of urinary tract infection. Infections were generally mild to moderate and clinically manageable. This analysis did not demonstrate a definitive dose

  17. Update on childhood urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Bell, Lorraine E; Mattoo, Tej K

    2009-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a leading cause of serious bacterial infection in young children. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), a common pediatric urologic disorder, is believed to predispose to UTI, and both are associated with renal scarring. The complex interaction of bacterial virulence factors and host defense mechanisms influence renal damage. However, some renal parenchymal abnormalities associated with VUR are noninfectious in origin. Long-term, renal parenchymal injury may be associated with hypertension, pregnancy complications, proteinuria, and renal insufficiency. Optimal management of VUR and UTI is controversial because of the paucity of appropriate randomized controlled trials; there is a need for well-designed studies. The recently launched Randomized Intervention for children with VesicoUreteral Reflux (RIVUR) study hopefully will provide insight into the role of antimicrobial prophylaxis of UTI in children with VUR.

  18. Urinary tract infections in women: etiology and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Minardi, Daniele; d’Anzeo, Gianluca; Cantoro, Daniele; Conti, Alessandro; Muzzonigro, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common among the female population. It has been calculated that about one-third of adult women have experienced an episode of symptomatic cystitis at least once. It is also common for these episodes to recur. If predisposing factors are not identified and removed, UTI can lead to more serious consequences, in particular kidney damage and renal failure. The aim of this review was to analyze the factors more commonly correlated with UTI in women, and to see what possible solutions are currently used in general practice and specialized areas, as well as those still under investigation. A good understanding of the possible pathogenic factors contributing to the development of UTI and its recurrence will help the general practitioner to interview the patient, search for causes that would otherwise remain undiscovered, and to identify the correct therapeutic strategy. PMID:21674026

  19. Urinary tract infection in vaginitis: a condition often overlooked.

    PubMed

    Amatya, R; Bhattarai, S; Mandal, P K; Tuladhar, H; Karki, B M S

    2013-03-01

    Despite the differences between the organisms that cause vaginitis and urinary tract infections (UTI), it is possible that women with vaginitis develop UTI. The main objective of the study was to find the association of the common types of infectious vaginitis with UTI. Cross sectional study was conducted for six months in a referral hospital at Lalitpur, Nepal. Three hundred and sixmid-stream urine samples and high vaginal swabs (HVS) collected from non pregnant women were investigated by standard microbiological techniques. Among the women with bacterial vaginosis (BV), 75% also had UTI. Similarly, 46% and 13% of those with vaginal candidiasis and trichomoniasis respectively had concurrent UTI. Considering this strong association of UTI and vaginitis, women with either of these conditions should be tested for the other.

  20. Urinary tract infections: bacteriology and antibiotic resistance patterns.

    PubMed

    Mashouf, Rasoul Yousefi; Babalhavaeji, Hooshang; Yousef, Javad

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the bacteria causing community acquired urinary tract infections (UTI) and detection of antibiotics resistance of isolates in 912 children below 18 years in the west of Iran. Data were analyzed for 4 age groups: infants, toddlers, preteens and teens. Fourteen antibiotics were tested by gel-diffusion method. Of 912 patients, 34.2% had positive bacterial cultures. The most common isolates were E. coli (57.4 %), K. pneumoniae (9.7 %), S. aureus (5.8%) and A. baumannii (2.2%). Most isolates showed high resistance against ampicillin, cotrimoxazole, nalidixic acid, tobramycin and nitrofurantoin. Klebsiella isolates showed more resistance against tested antibiotics than E. coli isolates.

  1. [Fungal infections of the lower urinary tracts in urological patients].

    PubMed

    Karabak, B I; Popov, S V; Shmel'kov, I Iu

    2007-01-01

    To examine etiological structure of fungal infections of the lower urinary tract (LUTI) in urological patients. The mycological screening of the urine in 52 patients (36 males and 16 females aged 21-83 years (mean age 63.6 years) was made by a E. W. Koneman modified technique, bacteriological analysis was standard. Ten strains of fungal agents were identified. Fungal LUTI was detected in 3, mixed infection (fungal and bacterial) was in 7 patients. Seven Candida strains, one Cryptococcus unigutulatus and two Trichosporon asahii strains were isolated. Previous long-term antimicrobial therapy and drainage of the lower urinary tract predisposed to fungal infection most frequently. High occurrence offungal LUTI in etiological structure of hospital urinary tract infections dictates the necessity of mycological diagnosis in urological patients. Prevalence of Candida non-albicans strains and isolation of rare fungi C. unigutulatus and T. asahii were registered. Most of fungal strains were sensitive in vitro to fluconasol.

  2. Urinary tract infections in children: EAU/ESPU guidelines.

    PubMed

    Stein, Raimund; Dogan, Hasan S; Hoebeke, Piet; Kočvara, Radim; Nijman, Rien J M; Radmayr, Christian; Tekgül, Serdar

    2015-03-01

    In 30% of children with urinary tract anomalies, urinary tract infection (UTI) can be the first sign. Failure to identify patients at risk can result in damage to the upper urinary tract. To provide recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, and imaging of children presenting with UTI. The recommendations were developed after a review of the literature and a search of PubMed and Embase. A consensus decision was adopted when evidence was low. UTIs are classified according to site, episode, symptoms, and complicating factors. For acute treatment, site and severity are the most important. Urine sampling by suprapubic aspiration or catheterisation has a low contamination rate and confirms UTI. Using a plastic bag to collect urine, a UTI can only be excluded if the dipstick is negative for both leukocyte esterase and nitrite or microscopic analysis is negative for both pyuria and bacteriuria. A clean voided midstream urine sample after cleaning the external genitalia has good diagnostic accuracy in toilet-trained children. In children with febrile UTI, antibiotic treatment should be initiated as soon as possible to eradicate infection, prevent bacteraemia, improve outcome, and reduce the likelihood of renal involvement. Ultrasound of the urinary tract is advised to exclude obstructive uropathy. Depending on sex, age, and clinical presentation, vesicoureteral reflux should be excluded. Antibacterial prophylaxis is beneficial. In toilet-trained children, bladder and bowel dysfunction needs to be excluded. The level of evidence is high for the diagnosis of UTI and treatment in children but not for imaging to identify patients at risk for upper urinary tract damage. In these guidelines, we looked at the diagnosis, treatment, and imaging of children with urinary tract infection. There are strong recommendations on diagnosis and treatment; we also advise exclusion of obstructive uropathy within 24h and later vesicoureteral reflux, if indicated. Copyright © 2014 European

  3. Prevention of indwelling catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Sue

    2011-03-01

    The use of indwelling urethral catheters has become a common aspect of patient care, but they can be a source of infection. Nurses can help to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections by using aseptic technique on insertion, following best practice in ongoing care and promptly removing catheters. The urinary catheter assessment and monitoring form (UCAM) is used at the Royal Hampshire County Hospital, Winchester, to remind staff of best practice and promote their early removal.

  4. Paediatric Urinary Tract Infection: A Hospital Based Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Khursheed Ahmed; Bhat, Javaid Ahmed; Parry, Nazir Ahmed; Shaheen, Lubna; Bhat, Sartaj Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paediatric Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is one of the commonly encountered entities by paediatricians. Studies have shown easy vulnerability of paediatric urinary tract in any acute febrile illness and a miss in diagnosis could have long term consequences like renal scaring with its adverse effects. Bearing these evidence based preludes in view we designed our study to know the prevalence of UTI in Kashmir province. Aim Aim of the present study was to know the prevalence of UTI in febrile children and to know the sensitivity of different imaging modalities like Renal and Urinary Bladder Ultrasonography (RUS), Voiding Cystourethrography (VCUG) and Dimercaptosuccinic Acid (DMSA) scan in diagnosing UTI. Materials and Methods A total of 304 patients, between 2 months to 10 years, with axillary temperature of ≥ 100.4oF (38oC), who did not have a definite source for their fever and who were not on antibiotics were included in the study. Detailed history and through clinical examination was done to rule out any potential or definite focus of infection as per the predesigned proforma. Routine urine examination with culture and sensitivity, followed by RUS and VCUG was done in all patients where routine urine examination was suggestive of UTI. DMSA was done in only culture proven cases after 6 months to document the renal scarring. Results Out of 304 children, 140 were males and 164 were females, UTI was present in 40 patients who had fever without any apparent cause giving a prevalence of 13.2%. Escherichia coli (E. coli) were the commonest isolated organism, followed by Klebsiella and Citrobacter species. Renal and Urinary Bladder Ultrasonography (RUS) detected Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR) in 25% (10/40) while VCUG showed VUR in 55% (22/40) giving a RUS sensitivity of 45% for detecting VUR. DMSA done only after 6 months in UTI diagnosed patients showed a renal scarring in 25% (10/40) patients. Conclusion Missing a febrile paediatric UTI, can prove a future

  5. Two-picture urography in urinary tract infections

    SciTech Connect

    Laehde, S.; Standertskjoeld-Nordenstam, C.G.; Suoranta, H.; Pyhtinen, J.

    1981-06-01

    Researchers analyzed separately from a urographic series 1 radiograph of the kidneys, ureters and bladder after releasing compression. The diagnosis was compared to that of the complete series in 230 consecutive urographic studies performed for recurrent urinary tract infections. The findings were in agreement in 88 per cent of the cases and no therapeutically significant change was overlooked owing to the decrease in the number of exposures. A urographic series with 2 films is described and recommended for the screening of recurrent urinary tract infections in young patients.

  6. [Urodynamics of upper urinary tracts after intestinal plastic surgery on urinary bladder (experimental study)].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Mudraia, I S; David'iants, A A; Zaĭtsev, A V

    1999-01-01

    In dog experiments, the urinary bladder was replaced for an isolated intestinal segment to test upper urinary tract function as regards configuration of the established urine reservoir early and late after the surgery. Intestinal plastic surgery of the bladder changes parameters of ureteral function in unchanged potential reserve of ureteral contraction. Postileocystoplasty urodynamics of the upper urinary tracts is characterized by lowering of intraureteral pressure, decreased amplitude of ureteral contractions, enhanced tonicity and motility. Plastic replacement of the bladder with isolated intestinal segment is not contraindicated in the solitary kidney.

  7. Association between urinary symptoms at 7 years old and previous urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hellström, A; Hanson, E; Hansson, S; Hjälmås, K; Jodal, U

    1991-01-01

    The association between current micturition habits and previous urinary tract infection was analysed among 3553 school entrants aged 7 years by means of a questionnaire. A high incidence of urinary infection, confirmed by urine culture, was found (145 (8.4%) in the 1719 girls and 32 (1.7%) in the 1834 boys). There was a significant association between current symptoms that were suggestive of disturbed bladder function and previous urinary tract infection, but only among girls who were over 3 years of age at the time the first episode was diagnosed. PMID:2001110

  8. Urinary tract infections in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: review of prevalence, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Nitzan, Orna; Elias, Mazen; Chazan, Bibiana; Saliba, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are more common, more severe, and carry worse outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. They are also more often caused by resistant pathogens. Various impairments in the immune system, poor metabolic control, and incomplete bladder emptying due to autonomic neuropathy may all contribute to the enhanced risk of urinary tract infections in these patients. The new anti-diabetic sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors have not been found to significantly increase the risk of symptomatic urinary tract infections. Symptoms of urinary tract infection are similar to patients without diabetes, though some patients with diabetic neuropathy may have altered clinical signs. Treatment depends on several factors, including: presence of symptoms, severity of systemic symptoms, if infection is localized in the bladder or also involves the kidney, presence of urologic abnormalities, accompanying metabolic alterations, and renal function. There is no indication to treat diabetic patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria. Further studies are needed to improve the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes and urinary tract infections. PMID:25759592

  9. Virulence factors in Escherichia coli urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J R

    1991-01-01

    Uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli are characterized by the expression of distinctive bacterial properties, products, or structures referred to as virulence factors because they help the organism overcome host defenses and colonize or invade the urinary tract. Virulence factors of recognized importance in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) include adhesins (P fimbriae, certain other mannose-resistant adhesins, and type 1 fimbriae), the aerobactin system, hemolysin, K capsule, and resistance to serum killing. This review summarizes the virtual explosion of information regarding the epidemiology, biochemistry, mechanisms of action, and genetic basis of these urovirulence factors that has occurred in the past decade and identifies areas in need of further study. Virulence factor expression is more common among certain genetically related groups of E. coli which constitute virulent clones within the larger E. coli population. In general, the more virulence factors a strain expresses, the more severe an infection it is able to cause. Certain virulence factors specifically favor the development of pyelonephritis, others favor cystitis, and others favor asymptomatic bacteriuria. The currently defined virulence factors clearly contribute to the virulence of wild-type strains but are usually insufficient in themselves to transform an avirulent organism into a pathogen, demonstrating that other as-yet-undefined virulence properties await discovery. Virulence factor testing is a useful epidemiological and research tool but as yet has no defined clinical role. Immunological and biochemical anti-virulence factor interventions are effective in animal models of UTI and hold promise for the prevention of UTI in humans. Images PMID:1672263

  10. [Bacterial urovirulence factors and their association with functional and anatomical abnormalities and recurrence of urinary tract infections in children].

    PubMed

    Lagos, R; Herrera, P; Sepúlveda, A; Muñoz, A; Benavente, C; Bravo, I; Lamberg, T

    1996-10-01

    Urinary tract infections in children are associated with functional and anatomical abnormalities of the urinary tract, they tend to recur and can cause permanent kidney damage. To study in children with urinary tract infections, microbiological factors associated to recurrence, functional and anatomical abnormalities of the urinary tract. A prospective sample of children was incorporated into a follow-up protocol after their first episode of bacteriologically-demonstrated urinary tract infection. In all patients an abdominal ultrasound examination and a mictional urethrocystography were done and the presence of fimbriae was studied in isolated strains of Escherichia coli. Two hundred fifteen cases bad an adequate adherence to the study protocol, 190 caused by E coli. Fimbriated E coli strains were isolated with greater frequency from children with pyelonephritis than from those with a low urinary tract infection (50 and 28% respectively). The absence of fimbriae in E coli strains was associated with a higher risk of recurrent infections (odds ratio = 3, confidence intervals = 2-9.2) and an abnormal urethrocystography (odds ratio = 3, confidence intervals = 1.1-10.2). These data are consistent with foreign reports and support the need to study adhesins in E coli strains isolated from children with urinary tract infections.

  11. The Prevalence, Etiologic Agents and Risk Factors for Urinary Tract Infection Among Spinal Cord Injury Patients

    PubMed Central

    Togan, Turhan; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Durukan, Elif; Arslan, Hande

    2014-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with spinal cord injury and 22% of patients with acute spinal cord injury develop UTI during the first 50 days. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, etiologic agents and risk factors for asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections in patients with spinal cord injury. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective investigation of spinal cord injury patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections in Baskent University Medical Faculty Ayas Rehabilitation Center and Ankara Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Center between January 2008 and December 2010. The demographic status, clinical and laboratory findings of 93 patients with spinal cord injury were analyzed in order to determine the risk factors for asymptomatic or symptomatic bacteriuria Results: Sixty three (67.7%) of 93 patients had asymptomatic bacteriuria and 21 (22.6%) had symptomatic urinary tract infection. Assessment of the frequency of urinary bladder emptying methods revealed that 57 (61.3%) of 93 patients employed permanent catheters and 24 (25.8%) employed clean intermittent catheterization. One hundred and thirty-five (48.0%) of 281 strains isolated form asymptomatic bacteriuria attacks and 16 (66.6%) of 24 strains isolated from symptomatic urinary tract infection attacks, totaling 151 strains, had multidrug resistance (P > 0.05). One hundred (70.4%) of 142 Escherichia coli strains and 19 (34.5%) of 55 Klebsiella spp strains proliferated in patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria; 8 (80%) of 10 E. coli strains and 4 (80%) of 5 Klebsiella spp. strains were multidrug resistant. Conclusions: The most common infectious episode among spinal cord injury patients was found to be urinary tract ınfection. E. coli was the most common microorganism isolated from urine samples. Antibiotic use in the previous 2 weeks or 3 months

  12. Biofilm formation by asymptomatic and virulent urinary tract infectious Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Viktoria; Ferrières, Lionel; Klemm, Per

    2007-02-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) in humans. In contrast to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) that cause symptomatic urinary tract infection, very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the urinary tract. Here, we have investigated the biofilm-forming capacity on abiotic surfaces of groups of ABU strains and UPEC strains in human urine. We found that there is a strong bias; ABU strains were significantly better biofilm formers than UPEC strains. Our data suggest that biofilm formation in urinary tract infectious E. coli seems to be associated with ABU strains and appears to be an important strategy used by these strains for persistence in this high-flow environment.

  13. Urinary tract infection in the newborn and the infant: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Luigi; Zaffanello, Marco; Gnarra, Maria; Fanos, Vassilios

    2010-10-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most common causes of infection in newborns. Obtaining a urinary tract infections (UTIs) diagnosis just on the basis of the clinical findings is frequently difficult, however, being the pediatrician's goal to reduce the risk of renal scarring, a prompt diagnosis and treatment is of extreme importance. The key instrument for the diagnosis of UTIs is represented today by urine culture. However, in reality, the caregivers and investigators are increasingly demanding fast and cheap methods for a rapid and effective diagnosis.

  14. Bioactive compounds in cranberries and their role in prevention of urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Howell, Amy B

    2007-06-01

    Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) ingestion has long been associated with prevention of urinary tract infections. The beneficial mechanism was historically thought to be due to the fruit acids causing a bacteriostatic effect in the urine. However, recently, a group of proanthocyanidins (PACs) with A-type linkages were isolated from cranberry which exhibit bacterial antiadhesion activity against both antibiotic susceptible and resistant strains of uropathogenic P-fimbriated Escherichia coli bacteria. The link between cranberry ingestion and maintenance of urinary tract health as well as the structural diversity, pharmacokinetics, quantification, and bacterial antiadhesion bioactivity of the A-linked cranberry PACs are reviewed.

  15. The antenatal urinary tract dilation classification system accurately predicts severity of kidney and urinary tract abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, C D W; Lo, M; Bunchman, T E; Xiao, N

    2017-04-21

    Urinary tract dilation (UTD) is a commonly diagnosed prenatal condition; however, it is currently unknown which features lead to benign and resolving or pathologic abnormalities. A consensus UTD classification system (antenatal UTD classification, UTD-A) was created by Nguyen et al. in 2014 [1], but has not yet been validated. To evaluate the ability of the UTD-A system to identify kidney and urinary tract (KUT) abnormalities, assess whether UTD-A can predict severity of KUT conditions, and perform a cost analysis of screening ultrasound (US). A retrospective single-center study was conducted at an academic medical center. Inclusion criteria were: neonates in the well or sick nursery who had a complete abdominal or limited renal US performed in the first 30 days of life between January 01, 2011 and December 31, 2013. Data were collected on prenatal US characteristics from which UTD-A classification was retrospectively applied, and postnatal data were collected up to 2 years following birth. A total of 203 patients were identified. Of the 36 abnormal postnatal KUT diagnoses, 90% were identified prenatally as UTD A1 or UTD A2-3. The remaining 10% developed postnatal KUT abnormalities due to myelomeningocele, such as VUR or UTD, which were not evident prenatally. Overall sensitivity and specificity of the UTD-A system was 0.767 (95% CI 0.577, 0.901) and 0.836 (95% CI 0.758, 0.897), respectively, when resolved UTD was counted as a normal diagnosis. Postnatal diagnoses differed by UTD-A classification as shown in the Summary fig. Of all the obstructive uropathies, 90.9% occurred in the UTD A2-3 class and none occurred in UTD-A Normal. Rate of postnatally resolved UTD was significantly higher in the UTD A1 group (78%) compared with UTD A2-3 (31%) or UTD-A Normal (12%, all P < 0.001). There was a notable trend towards more UT surgeries, UTI, and positive VUR among UTD A2-3 patients, but statistical significance was limited by a small number of patients. This study

  16. 77 FR 11133 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... guidance for industry entitled ``Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment... treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs). Specifically, this guidance addresses...

  17. Microbial diversity in biofilm infections of the urinary tract with the use of sonication techniques.

    PubMed

    Holá, Veronika; Ruzicka, Filip; Horka, Marie

    2010-08-01

    Infections of the urinary tract account for >40% of nosocomial infections; most of these are infections in catheterized patients. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only the particular infection but also a number of complications, for example blockage of catheters with crystallic deposits of bacterial origin, generation of gravels and pyelonephritis. Infections of urinary catheters are only rarely single-species infections. The longer a patient is catheterized, the higher the diversity of biofilm microbial communities. The aims of this study were to investigate the microbial diversity on the catheters and to compare the ability to form biofilm among isolated microbial species. The next aim was to discriminate particular causative agents of infections of the urinary tract and their importance as biofilm formers in the microbial community on the urinary catheter. We examined catheters from 535 patients and isolated 1555 strains of microorganisms. Most of the catheters were infected by three or more microorganisms; only 12.5% showed monomicrobial infection. Among the microorganisms isolated from the urinary catheters, there were significant differences in biofilm-forming ability, and we therefore conclude that some microbial species have greater potential to cause a biofilm-based infection, whereas others can be only passive members of the biofilm community.

  18. Cranberries for preventing urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Jepson, Ruth G; Williams, Gabrielle; Craig, Jonathan C

    2012-10-17

    Cranberries have been used widely for several decades for the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). This is the third update of our review first published in 1998 and updated in 2004 and 2008. To assess the effectiveness of cranberry products in preventing UTIs in susceptible populations. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library) and the Internet. We contacted companies involved with the promotion and distribution of cranberry preparations and checked reference lists of review articles and relevant studies.Date of search: July 2012 All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs of cranberry products for the prevention of UTIs. Two authors independently assessed and extracted data. Information was collected on methods, participants, interventions and outcomes (incidence of symptomatic UTIs, positive culture results, side effects, adherence to therapy). Risk ratios (RR) were calculated where appropriate, otherwise a narrative synthesis was undertaken. Quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. This updated review includes a total of 24 studies (six cross-over studies, 11 parallel group studies with two arms; five with three arms, and two studies with a factorial design) with a total of 4473 participants. Ten studies were included in the 2008 update, and 14 studies have been added to this update. Thirteen studies (2380 participants) evaluated only cranberry juice/concentrate; nine studies (1032 participants) evaluated only cranberry tablets/capsules; one study compared cranberry juice and tablets; and one study compared cranberry capsules and tablets. The comparison/control arms were placebo, no treatment, water, methenamine hippurate, antibiotics, or lactobacillus. Eleven studies were not included in the meta-analyses because either the design was a cross-over study and data were not reported separately for the first phase, or there was a

  19. Cranberries for preventing urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Freire, Geraldo de Campos

    2013-01-01

    Cranberries have been used widely for several decades for the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). This is the third update of our review first published in 1998 and updated in 2004 and 2008. To assess the effectiveness of cranberry products in preventing UTIs in susceptible populations. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library) and the Internet. We contacted companies involved with the promotion and distribution of cranberry preparations and checked reference lists of review articles and relevant studies. Date of search: July 2012. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs of cranberry products for the prevention of UTIs. Two authors independently assessed and extracted data. Information was collected on methods, participants, interventions and outcomes (incidence of symptomatic UTIs, positive culture results, side effects, adherence to therapy). Risk ratios (RR) were calculated where appropriate, otherwise a narrative synthesis was undertaken. Quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. This updated review includes a total of 24 studies (six cross-over studies, 11 parallel group studies with two arms; five with three arms, and two studies with a factorial design) with a total of 4473 participants. Ten studies were included in the 2008 update, and 14 studies have been added to this update. Thirteen studies (2380 participants) evaluated only cranberry juice/concentrate; nine studies (1032 participants) evaluated only cranberry tablets/capsules; one study compared cranberry juice and tablets; and one study compared cranberry capsules and tablets. The comparison/control arms were placebo, no treatment, water, methenamine hippurate, antibiotics, or lactobacillus. Eleven studies were not included in the meta-analyses because either the design was a cross-over study and data were not reported separately for the first phase, or there was a

  20. Lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Aubin, Melissa St; Shridharani, Anand; Barboi, Alexandru C; Guralnick, Michael L; Jaradeh, Safwan S; Prieto, Thomas E; O'Connor, R Corey

    2015-12-01

    With the goal of better defining the types of bladder dysfunction observed in this population, we present the chief urologic complaints, results of urodynamic studies, and treatments of patients with dysautonomia-related urinary symptoms. All patients with dysautonomia referred to our neurourology clinic between 2005 and 2015 for management of lower urinary tract dysfunction were retrospectively reviewed. Each patient's chief urologic complaint was recorded and used to initially characterize the bladder storage or voiding symptoms. Patient evaluation included history and physical examination, urinalysis, post void bladder ultrasound, and urodynamic studies. Successful treatment modalities that subjectively or objectively improved symptoms were recorded. Of 815 patients with the diagnosis of dysautonomia, 82 (10 %) were referred for evaluation of lower urinary tract dysfunction. Mean age was 47 years (range 12-83) and 84 % were female. The chief complaint was urinary urgency ± incontinence in 61 % and hesitancy in 23 % of patients. Urodynamic findings demonstrated detrusor overactivity ± incontinence in 50 % of patients, although chief complaint did not reliably predict objective findings. Successful objective and subjective treatments were multimodal and typically non-operative. Lower urinary tract dysfunction may develop in at least 10 % of patients with dysautonomia, predominantly females. Bladder storage or voiding complaints do not reliably predict urodynamic findings. Urodynamically, most patients exhibited detrusor overactivity. The majority of patients were successfully managed with medical or physical therapy.

  1. Healthcare practices among blacks and whites with urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Daniel L.; Edwards, Bennett G.; Whitehead, Kimberly; Amamoo, M. Ahinee; Godley, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: The reasons for African-American men to seek care for lower urinary care symptoms has not been determined due to sparse population-based data. OBJECTIVE: Our study examines the solicitation and receipt of medical care for urinary symptoms among racially oversampled elderly urban and rural cohort of African Americans and whites. DESIGN: Longitudinal analyses were conducted on five North Carolina counties through the Piedmont Health Survey of the Elderly Established Populations for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly. In 1994, the analytic cohort included 482 African Americans and 407 whites; by 1998, 249 and 222, respectively. RESULTS: In 1994, 49.4% of African Americans presented with lower urinary tract symptoms compared to 56.8% of whites. By 1998, these percentages increased to 60.6% and 70.3%, respectively. African Americans reported more interference with activities of daily living than whites. African Americans were less likely than whites to have regular digital rectal exams (DRE) and were more likely to have never received a DRE at all. Additionally, elders with less educational attainment, those who smoked, those who delayed care quite often and those who used less-experienced physicians were less likely to receive regular DREs. CONCLUSION: Poor health behavior has the greatest impact on healthcare seeking for lower urinary tract symptoms. These health behavior risk factors are systemic of a lack of health education. Increases in health education among African Americans regarding lower urinary tract symptoms may close the racial disparity in healthcare-seeking behaviors. PMID:17444430

  2. Antibiotic Resistance in Urinary Tract Infections in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Ronald P.; Haith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine resistance to antibiotics of "Escherichia coli" in uncomplicated urinary tract infections (uUTIs) in female college students. Participants: Symptomatic patients presenting to a student health service from September 2008 to December 2009. Methods: Clean catch midstream urine samples were tested for urinalysis (UA) and…

  3. [The clinical course of fungal urinary tract infection in neonates].

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, B; Wierzba, J; Irga, N; Czarniak, P; Kosiak, W; Samet, A; Chabior, M

    1996-04-01

    The authors present the clinical course of 8 cases of fungal infection of the urinary tract in newborns. Three of the investigated children were premature or with intrauterine hypotrophy, a congenital defect of the urinary tract was detected in one child. In 5 cases the fungal infection followed bacterial septicaemia. Two of the 8 children required peritoneal dialysis, another two required insertion of intravenous catheters for parenteral feeding, and four required bladder catheterisation. The diagnosis of fungal urinary tract infection was established on the basis of urine culture, the presence of specific serum anti-candida antibodies and results of ultrasonographic examination (vs). In 7 of 8 cases the possibility of fungal infection was suggested by US examination. Seven children were treated with fluconazole combined with 5-fluorocytosine, one was treated with fluconazole. Pyelostomy was performed, in two of the patients all of them received supportive treatment. Our clinical observations point to the necessity of prophylaxis in case of predisposing factors to fungal infection and the use of abdominal ultrasonography for detection of early stages of fungal urinary tract infection.

  4. Antibiotic Resistance in Urinary Tract Infections in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Ronald P.; Haith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine resistance to antibiotics of "Escherichia coli" in uncomplicated urinary tract infections (uUTIs) in female college students. Participants: Symptomatic patients presenting to a student health service from September 2008 to December 2009. Methods: Clean catch midstream urine samples were tested for urinalysis (UA) and…

  5. [How Does Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Affekt Female Sexuality?].

    PubMed

    Anding, R; Kirschner-Hermanns, R; Rantell, A; Wiedemann, A

    2016-08-01

    With increasing age many women suffer from lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) and female sexual dysfunction. An increasing body of evidence supports an association between the 2 conditions. Especially women with urodynamically proved detrusor hyperactivity suffer from sexual dysfunction and there is some evidence that in patients with stress incontinence sexual health improves after successful surgery.

  6. Diagnosis, management, and prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Carol E; Gould, Carolyn V; Saint, Sanjay

    2014-03-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is common, costly, and causes significant patient morbidity. CAUTIs are associated with hospital pathogens with a high propensity toward antimicrobial resistance. Treatment of asymptomatic patients with CAUTI accounts for excess antimicrobial use in hospitals and should be avoided. Duration of urinary catheterization is the predominant risk for CAUTI; preventive measures directed at limiting placement and early removal of urinary catheters have an impact on decreasing CAUTI rates. The use of bladder bundles and collaboratives, coupled with the support and active engagement from both hospital leaders and followers, seem to help prevent this common problem.

  7. Bactericidal antibody response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa by adults with urinary tract infections.

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, D L; Ourth, D D

    1979-01-01

    In this investigation we found that adults with upper urinary tract infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa produced serum antibodies with bactericidal activity against the bacterium. Seventeen of 20 infected adults showed bactericidal activity with a titer range of 1:10 to 1:10,000. PMID:117024

  8. Isolation and characterization of an atypical Listeria monocytogenes associated with a canine urinary tract infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Listeria monocytogenes, a well-described cause of encephalitis and abortion in ruminants and of food-borne illness in humans, is rarely associated with disease in companion animals. A case of urinary tract infection associated with an atypical, weakly hemolytic L. monocytogenes strain is described i...

  9. Urinary tract infection due to salmonella in an otherwise healthy child.

    PubMed

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Yosefi, Parsa; Dorreh, Fatemeh

    2014-03-01

    Salmonella species are a rare cause of urinary tract infection in children. They are associated with a high incidence of structural abnormalities or immunosuppressive status. We report the case of a healthy 7-year-old boy with pyelonephritis due to Salmonella group. He did not have a history of recent gastroenteritis.

  10. The Diagnosis, Evaluation and Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Becknell, Brian; Schober, Megan; Korbel, Lindsey; Spencer, John David

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most common bacterial infections encountered by pediatricians. Currently, the diagnosis and management of acute urinary tract infection and recurrent urinary tract infection in children remains controversial. Recently published guidelines and large clinical trials have attempted to clarify UTI diagnostic and management strategies. In this manuscript, we review the diagnosis and management of acute and recurrent urinary tract infection in the pediatric population. PMID:25421102

  11. Urinary complications of gynecologic surgery: iatrogenic urinary tract system injuries in obstetrics and gynecology operations.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, E; Ozturk, U; Celen, S; Sucak, A; Gunel, M; Guney, G; Imamoglu, M A; Danisman, A N

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate iatrogenic urinary tract system injuries in obstetrics and gynecology operations and compare the results with the literature. We examined the records of patients who had obstetric and gynecology operations at the Ministry of Health, Dr. Zekai Tahir Burak Women's Health, Training and Research Hospital between June 2007 and June 2010. All the patients who were diagnosed as having urinary system injuries in either the intraoperative or postoperative period were determined. During this period, 25,998 gynecologic and obstetrical operations were performed, 0.03% ureteric, 0.20% bladder, and one case of urethral injury, in a total of 0.24% urinary tract injuries were observed. The bladder was the most frequently injured organ. Total urinary tract injury rates were 0.79% (0.49% bladder, 0.24% ureteral) in gynecologic operations and 0.19% (0.18% bladder and 0.01% ureteral) in obstetric operations. Urinary system injuries are seen in approximately 1% of all gynecologic and obstetric surgeries. The complication rates observed in our patients were comparable with the other studies in the literature. A gynecologic surgeon must become familiar with the anatomy of the urinary tract and must be aware of common intraoperative and postoperative complications to decrease the risk of morbidity.

  12. [Tumor markers of urinary tract carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Haruhito

    2004-04-01

    The tumor markers for malignant tumors arisen from urinary system including prostate cancer were reviewed. As for renal cell carcinoma there was no good marker used in routine test level at present. In the diagnosis of urothelial (transitional cell) carcinoma, mainly bladder cancer, 3 methods (urinary BTA, NMP22 and BFP) are used now in Japan. They all seem to be not fully sufficient in respect of the specificity. In foreign countries, new tests such as urinary telomerase and BLCA-4 are used and have been evaluated. On the diagnosis of prostate cancer, serum total PSA is well established and used. Various PSA relation markers have been advocated for the differentiation between benign prostate hypertrophy and carcinoma in so called "gray zone" level of total PSA. In methods based on the molecular forms of PSA, the ratio of free PSA to total PSA (f/T) is widely use, and proPSA is a test that is expected. Other approaches such as volume of index PSA, age specific PSA reference range and PSA velocity are also in practical application. Human glandular kallikrein 2, which belong to the human kallikrein family as well as PSA, is expected as a tumor specific marker.

  13. [Gynaecological and obstetrical aspects of recurrent urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Hoyme, U B; Schneede, P

    2006-04-01

    The microbial colonization of vulva, vagina and cervix uteri represents the reservoir for recurrent urinary tract infection. All bacterial species of normal cutaneous or gastrointestinal flora can be found in the external genital tract even under physiological conditions. The higher concentration of microbes adds to the predisposition for urinary tract infection in cases of dysbiosis or inflammation, apart from specific infection by Trichomonas vaginalis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Chlamydia trachomatis. The specific immunological interaction between bacteria and host, i.e. between virulence factors and intrinsic defense, appears to be the major mechanism paving the way for recurrent infection. The elimination of predisposing factors is the clue for successful therapy as well as for prevention of recurrence.

  14. Metabolic Adaptations of Uropathogenic E. coli in the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Riti; Mediati, Daniel G.; Duggin, Iain G.; Harry, Elizabeth J.; Bottomley, Amy L.

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli ordinarily resides in the lower gastrointestinal tract in humans, but some strains, known as Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), are also adapted to the relatively harsh environment of the urinary tract. Infections of the urine, bladder and kidneys by UPEC may lead to potentially fatal bloodstream infections. To survive this range of conditions, UPEC strains must have broad and flexible metabolic capabilities and efficiently utilize scarce essential nutrients. Whole-organism (or “omics”) methods have recently provided significant advances in our understanding of the importance of metabolic adaptation in the success of UPECs. Here we describe the nutritional and metabolic requirements for UPEC infection in these environments, and focus on particular metabolic responses and adaptations of UPEC that appear to be essential for survival in the urinary tract. PMID:28642845

  15. [Fistulas of the lower urinary tract in children].

    PubMed

    Tonegatti, Luca; Scarpa, Maria-Grazia; Goruppi, Ilaria; Olenik, Damiana; Rigamonti, Waifro

    2015-01-01

    A lower urinary tract fistula consist in an abnormal connection between bladder, urethra and adjacent abdominal organs or skin. There are several types of urinary fistulas in paediatric age and they may be congenital or acquired. Etiology may be due to embriological defects, infectious processes, malignant tumours, pelvic irradiation as well as complications following surgical procedures, especially postsurgical repair of hypospadia or epispadia. Clinical presentation depends on the type of fistula and diagnosis is based on signs, symptoms and radiological or endoscopic examinations. We performed PubMed research using terms such as lower urinary fistulae, urology and paediatrics and we consulted medical texts. We reviewed selected articles and used the relevant ones to perform our study concentrating on classification, diagnosis and treatment of different types of fistulas. Paediatric lower urinary fistulas are an uncommon pathology, but the knowledge of their etiology and classification is important to recognise them and lead the physician to an appropriate treatment, which is surgical in most cases.

  16. [The etiology of urinary tract infections and the antimicrobial susceptibility of urinary pathogens].

    PubMed

    Ochoa Sangrador, C; Eiros Bouza, J M; Mendez, C Pérez; Inglada Galiana, L

    2005-06-01

    Antibiotic treatment of urinary tract infections in adults is usually empirical, and use of urine culture is an exception. The choice of antibiotic is normally made based on the results of published case studies (positive urine cultures), which are used to determine the most probable etiology and likely antimicrobial susceptibility. The results of studies published in recent years were reviewed, detailing the differences in relation to the place of residence and characteristics of the patients, and any temporary trends. In lower urinary tract infections in patients without risk factors, treatment must mainly cover Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, in complicated urinary tract infections or in patients with risk factors, the available clinical epidemiological data do not provide for safe empirical choice of antibiotic without the use of urine culture. There has been a reduction in the susceptibility of E. coli to various antibiotics, and this shows wide geographic variations; the reduction in the activity of fluoroquinolones could limit its empirical use in the future.

  17. Outcomes of Aminopenicillin Therapy for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcal Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Kelli A.; Perri, Mary Beth; Dumkow, Lisa E.; Samuel, Linoj P.; Zervos, Marcus J.; Davis, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant urinary tract infections are often challenging to treat. This retrospective cohort study compared outcomes between patients treated for vancomycin-resistant enterococcal urinary tract infection with an aminopenicillin and those treated with a non-β-lactam antibiotic. Inpatients treated with an enterococcus-active agent for their first symptomatic vancomycin-resistant enterococcal urinary tract infection between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013 were considered for inclusion. Patients with colonization, on hospice, or receiving comfort care only were excluded. The primary endpoint of clinical cure was defined as resolution of clinical symptoms, or symptom improvement to the extent that no additional antibacterial drug therapy was necessary, and lack of microbiologic persistence. Secondary endpoints of 30-day readmission or retreatment and 30-day all-cause mortality were also compared. A total of 316 urinary isolates were screened, and 61 patients with symptomatic urinary tract infection were included. Twenty (35%) of the 57 isolates tested were ampicillin susceptible. Thirty-one patients received an aminopenicillin, and 30 received a non-β-lactam. Rates of clinical cure for aminopenicillin versus non-β-lactam treatment were 26/31 (83.9%) and 22/30 (73.3%) (P = 0.315), respectively. Rates of 30-day readmission (6/31, or 19.4%, versus 9/30, or 30%, respectively; P = 0.334), 30-day retreatment (4/31, or 12.9%, versus 4/30, 13.3%, respectively; P = 0.960), and 30-day all-cause mortality (2/31, or 6.5%, versus 1/30, or 3.3%, respectively; P = 0.573) were also not significantly different between groups. Aminopenicillins may be a viable option for treating vancomycin-resistant urinary tract infection regardless of the organism's ampicillin susceptibility. Prospective validation with larger cohorts of patients should be considered. PMID:26369973

  18. [Villous adenoma of the urinary tract: a clinicopathological study].

    PubMed

    Yin, Wu; Mo, Xiang-lan; Wen, Zong-hua; Zhou, Xiang-zhen; Zhou, Min-yan; Wei, Hai-ming

    2013-07-01

    To explore the clinicopathological features, immunophenotype, differential diagnosis, pathogenesis and prognosis of villous adenoma with poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the urinary tract. Clinical and pathologic findings of 3 cases of villous adenoma with poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the urinary tract were analyzed by gross examination, microscopic investigation and immunohistochemical staining. The related literatures were reviewed. All of the three cases were middle-aged or elderly patients. Three cases all presented with hematuria and mucusuria. Endoscopic examination identified that case 1 had a polyp with broad attachment in the dome of bladder, case 2 had a solid mass in the ureter, and case 3 had a exophytic fungating tumor in the renal pelvis. Microscopically, case 1 revealed a papillary lesion with finger-like processes lined by pseudostratified columnar epithelium with abundant goblet cells. The cells demonstrated moderate degree dysplasia. In case 2 and case 3, both villous adenomas and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma were observed, the adenoma cells arranged in a cribriform pattern, and the tumor cells showed severe atypia, mitotic activity, and transition with invasive poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells in three cases were positive for CK20, CEA,EMA and MUC-1; none of them expressed cdx-2 and PSA; In case 2 and 3, the same immunophenotype of villous adenomas and their associated adenocarcinomas was observed, but the number of the positive cells of p53 and Ki-67 staining were significantly increased in the area of adenocarcinomas than in that of the villous adenomas. Villous adenoma of the urinary tract is rare. It can occur in the urinary bladder, urachus, renal pelvis, ureter and urethra. These lesions may have malignant potential and frequently coexist with other malignant tumors. So, villous adenoma of the urinary tract should be removed completely and sampled thoroughly to avoid

  19. Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable. 136 references.

  20. Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Velchik, M G

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable.

  1. [Diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections in children on the basis of various recommendations].

    PubMed

    Załęska-Ponganis, Joanna; Jackowska, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial diseases of childhood. Early diagnosis infection is extremely important because it is often the first clinical manifestation of a serious pathology of the urinary tract. In the case of coexistence of urinary tract defects it can lead to end-stage renal failure and the need for implementation of renal replacement therapy. In children with a history of traveling at least one episode of UTI is the most common drawback of vesicoureteral reflux. Until recently, the predominant view that chronic pharmacological used antimicrobial prophylaxis and early treatment will allow the implementation of the inhibition of progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This was based on the assumption that there is a causal relationship between vesicoureteral reflux, especially a high grade (III-V), and recurrent UTIs, which was regarded as the immediate cause of kidney damage and the development of the so-called reflux nephropathy. In the last decade we observe a significant change of views on the root causes damage to the renal parenchyma, and the consequences of previous UTI pathogenesis vesicoureteral reflux. For this reason, in many countries modified existing recommendations for diagnostic and therapeutic agent in children with urinary tract infections.

  2. Imaging after urinary tract infection in older children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Michael P; Chow, Jeanne S; Johnson, Emilie K; Rosoklija, Ilina; Logvinenko, Tanya; Nelson, Caleb P

    2015-05-01

    There are few guidelines and little data on imaging after urinary tract infections in older children. We determined the clinical yield of renal and bladder ultrasound, and voiding cystourethrogram in older children and adolescents after urinary tract infection. We analyzed findings on voiding cystourethrogram, and renal and bladder ultrasound as well as the clinical history of patients who underwent the 2 studies on the same day between January 2006 and December 2010. We selected for study patients 5 to 18 years old who underwent imaging for urinary tract infection. Those with prior postnatal genitourinary imaging or prenatal hydronephrosis were excluded from analysis. We identified a cohort of 153 patients, of whom 74% were 5 to 8 years old, 21% were 8 to 12 years old and 5% were 12 to 18 years old. Of the patients 77% were female, 78% had a febrile urinary tract infection history and 55% had a history of recurrent urinary tract infections. Renal and bladder ultrasound findings revealed hydronephrosis in 7.8% of patients, ureteral dilatation in 3.9%, renal parenchymal findings in 20% and bladder findings in 12%. No patient had moderate or greater hydronephrosis. Voiding cystourethrogram showed vesicoureteral reflux in 34% of cases and bladder or urethral anomalies in 12%. Reflux was grade I, II-III and greater than III in 5.9%, 26% and 2% of patients, respectively. For any voiding cystourethrogram abnormality the sensitivity and specificity of any renal and bladder ultrasound abnormality were 0.49 (95% CI 0.37-0.62) and 0.76 (95% CI 0.66-0.84), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 0.58 (95% CI 0.44-0.71) and 0.69 (0.59-0.77), respectively. In older children with a history of urinary tract infection the imaging yield is significant. However, imaging revealed high grade hydronephrosis or high grade vesicoureteral reflux in few patients. Renal ultrasound is not reliable for predicting voiding cystourethrogram findings such as vesicoureteral

  3. Bacteruria and Urinary Tract Infections in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Detweiler, Keri; Mayers, Daniel; Fletcher, Sophie G

    2015-11-01

    Both urinary tract infection (UTI) and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) are common problems among elderly adults and represent a significant health care burden. Despite their frequency, differentiating between ASB and true UTI remains controversial among health care providers. Several challenges exist in the evaluation of urinary symptoms in the elderly patient. Symptoms of UTI are variable; problems are encountered in the collection, testing, and interpretation of urine specimens; and results of urinalysis are often misinterpreted and mishandled. Multiple studies have shown no morbidity or mortality benefit to antibiotic therapy in either community or long-term care facility residents with ASB.

  4. An overview of the literature on congenital lower urinary tract obstruction and introduction to the PLUTO trial: percutaneous shunting in lower urinary tract obstruction.

    PubMed

    Morris, R Katie; Kilby, Mark D

    2009-02-01

    Congenital lower urinary tract obstruction (LUTO) comprises a heterogeneous group of pathologies causing obstruction to the urethra, the most common being posterior urethral valves. Such pathology is often associated with high perinatal mortality and varying degrees of perinatal and infant morbidity. A high proportion of LUTO may be visualised during routine second trimester (and first trimester) ultrasound giving rise to the possibility of determining individual fetal prognosis and treatments such as vesico-amniotic shunting, with a view to altering pathogenesis. The aims of the percutaneous shunting in low urinary tract obstruction (PLUTO) trial are to determine the effectiveness of these treatments and accuracy of the investigations with the primary outcome measures being perinatal mortality and postnatal renal function.

  5. Direct identification of bacteria causing urinary tract infections by combining matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry with UF-1000i urine flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, X-H; Zhang, G; Fan, Y-Y; Yang, X; Sui, W-J; Lu, X-X

    2013-03-01

    Rapid identification of bacterial pathogens from clinical specimens is essential to establish an adequate empirical antibiotic therapy to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs). We used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) combined with UF-1000i urine flow cytometry of urine specimens to quickly and accurately identify bacteria causing UTIs. We divided each urine sample into three aliquots for conventional identification, UF-1000i, and MALDI-TOF MS, respectively. We compared the results of the conventional method with those of MALDI-TOF MS combined with UF-1000i, and discrepancies were resolved by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We analyzed 1456 urine samples from patients with UTI symptoms, and 932 (64.0%) were negative using each of the three testing methods. The combined method used UF-1000i to eliminate negative specimens and then MALDI-TOF MS to identify the remaining positive samples. The combined method was consistent with the conventional method in 1373 of 1456 cases (94.3%), and gave the correct result in 1381 of 1456 cases (94.8%). Therefore, the combined method described here can directly provide a rapid, accurate, definitive bacterial identification for the vast majority of urine samples, though the MALDI-TOF MS software analysis capabilities should be improved, with regard to mixed bacterial infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A

    2012-11-14

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be pharmacological (antibiotics) or non-pharmacological (cranberry products, acupuncture, probiotics and behavioural modifications). So far little is known about the best way to prevent RUTI in pregnant women. To assess the effects of interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infections in pregnant women.The primary maternal outcomes were RUTI before birth (variously defined) and preterm birth (before 37 weeks). The primary infant outcomes were small-for-gestational age and total mortality. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (8 June 2012) and reference lists of retrieved articles. Published, unpublished and ongoing randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs, clustered-randomised trials and abstracts of any intervention (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) for preventing RUTI during pregnancy (compared with another intervention, placebo or with usual care). Two review authors independently evaluated the one identified trial for inclusion and assessed trial quality. Two review authors extracted data. Data were checked for accuracy. The review included one trial involving 200 women. The trial compared a daily dose of nitrofurantoin and close surveillance (regular clinic visit, urine cultures and antibiotics when a positive culture was found) with close surveillance only. No significant differences were found for the primary outcomes: recurrent pyelonephritis (risk ratio (RR) 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31 to 2.53, one study, 167 women), recurrent urinary tract infection before birth (RR 0.30, 95% CI 0.06 to 1.38; one study 167 women) and preterm birth (before 37 weeks) (RR 1.18, 95% CI 0.42 to 3.35; one study 147 women). The

  7. Urinary tract infections during pregnancy - an updated overview.

    PubMed

    Szweda, Hanna; Jóźwik, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common type of infection during pregnancy, affecting up to 10% of pregnant women. They are also recognized as the second most common ailment of pregnancy, after anemia. Three clinical types of pregnancy-related UTI are distinguished: asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), cystitis, and pyelonephritis. A particular form of ASB is the presence of Group B streptococci in the urinary tract of the pregnant woman. All clinical types of UTI may lead to serious maternal and fetal complications. Therefore, unlike in the nonpregnant female patient, all UTIs during pregnancy, including the asymptomatic infection, require treatment. In some patients, antibiotic prophylaxis should also be introduced. In the present work, we collectively summarize current practical recommendations from a number of international bodies and organizations.

  8. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Tudor, Katarina Ivana; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Panicker, Jalesh N

    2016-12-01

    The lower urinary tract (LUT) in health is regulated by coordinated multi-level neurological inputs which require an intact central and peripheral nervous system. Lower urinary tract dysfunction is, therefore, a common sequelae of neurological disease and the patterns of bladder storage and voiding dysfunction depend upon the level of neurological lesion. Evaluation includes history taking, bladder diary, urological examination when relevant, ultrasonography and urodynamic testing when indicated. Antimuscarinic agents are the first line treatment for patients with storage dysfunction. Alternative treatments include intradetrusor injection of onabotulinumtoxinA, which has been shown to be of benefit in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), and neuromodulation. Intermittent catheterization remains the option of choice in patients with significant voiding dysfunction resulting in high post-void residual volumes.

  9. [Tumor of upper urinary tract in renal polycystic disease].

    PubMed

    Rabii, Redouane; el Mejjad, Amine; Fekak, Hamid; Querfani, Baderdine; Joual, Abdenbi; el Mrini, Mohamed

    2003-09-01

    Upper urinary tract tumours are exceptional in the context of renal polycystic disease. The authors report the case of Mrs B. F., 56 years old, who presented with left loin pain associated with haematuria. Clinical examination was normal and ultrasound examination revealed bilateral renal polycystic disease with a mass in the left renal sinus. CT urography showed a tumour arising from the renal pelvis suggestive of an upper urinary tract tumour. The laboratory assessment revealed normal renal function and normal urine cytology. Treatment consisted of radical nephroureterectomy with resection of a bladder cuff. Histological examination revealed a urothelial tumour of the renal pelvis with negative surgical margins. In the light of this case, the authors discuss the diagnostic difficulties and specificities, the treatment and the outcome of this unusual clinical association.

  10. URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS—Problems in Medical Management

    PubMed Central

    Jawetz, Ernest

    1953-01-01

    The lesion principally responsible for chronic, or recurrent, urinary tract infection is a focus in the interstitial tissue of the kidney. Most cursory antimicrobial therapy suppresses the manifestations of lower urinary tract involvement but does not eradicate the renal focus. In order to cure rather than merely suppress the infection, it is imperative that, as early as possible, steps be taken to isolate and identify the etiologic microorganism and to determine its sensitivity to antimicrobial agents. Based on this information sufficient amounts of drug should be given for an adequate period (probably at least two weeks) to eradicate the infection within the renal tissue. Such a program would tend to reduce the number of cases in which irreversible renal failure develops from chronic pyelonephritis. PMID:13067022

  11. Male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. 1: Assessment.

    PubMed

    Dorey, G

    Male lower urinary tract symptoms include frequency, nocturia, urgency, urge incontinence, stress incontinence, post-micturition dribble and post-prostatectomy incontinence. All of these symptoms can be treated conservatively. In this article, the first of two parts, a detailed subjective and objective assessment is provided based on a Delphi study undertaken by the author. The objective assessment includes a digital rectal examination to assess the pelvic floor muscle strength in order to provide a patient-specific exercise programme. The diagnosis of stress incontinence, urge incontinence, post-prostatectomy incontinence, post-micturition dribble and functional incontinence is made from the assessment. Men with lower urinary tract symptoms need a detailed subjective and objective assessment before a diagnosis is made and individual treatment is planned.

  12. Assessment and management of male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).

    PubMed

    Abdelmoteleb, Haitham; Jefferies, Edward R; Drake, Marcus J

    2016-01-01

    Male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common, causing significant bother and impair quality of life. LUTS are a spectrum of symptoms that may or may not be due to benign prostatic obstruction (BPO). LUTS are divided into storage, voiding or post micturition symptoms, which each need to be considered in terms of impact, mechanism and treatment options. In most patients, a mixture of symptoms is present. In order to have a better insight about which symptoms are affecting quality of life, a thorough evaluation should include medical history, examination, validated symptom questionnaires, bladder diary, and flow rate (with post void residual measurement). Other tests, particularly urodynamic tests may be needed to guide treatment selection, particularly for surgery. Management of male LUTS is tailored according to the underlying mechanisms. Different treatment modalities are available according to individual patient preference. These range from watchful waiting, behavioral and dietary modifications, and/or medications - either as monotherapy or in combination. Surgery to relieve BPO may be needed where patients have significant bothersome voiding LUTS, and are willing to accept risks associated with irreversible treatment. Interventions for storage LUTS are available, but must be selected judiciously, using particular caution if nocturia is prominent. In order to achieve better outcomes, a rational stepwise approach to decision making is needed. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. T-Box Genes in the Kidney and Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Kispert, A

    2017-01-01

    T-box (Tbx) genes encode an ancient group of transcription factors that play important roles in patterning, specification, proliferation, and differentiation programs in vertebrate organogenesis. This is testified by severe organ malformation syndromes in mice homozygous for engineered null alleles of specific T-box genes and by the large number of human inherited organ-specific diseases that have been linked to mutations in these genes. One of the organ systems that has not been associated with loss of specific T-box gene function in human disease for long is the excretory system. However, this has changed with the finding that mutations in TBX18, a member of a vertebrate-specific subgroup within the Tbx1-subfamily of T-box transcription factor genes, cause congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, predominantly hydroureter and ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Gene expression analyses, loss-of-function studies, and lineage tracing in the mouse suggest a primary role for this transcription factor in specifying the ureteric mesenchyme in the common anlage of the kidney, the ureter, and the bladder. We review the function of Tbx18 in ureterogenesis and discuss the body of evidence that Tbx18 and other members of the T-box gene family, namely, Tbx1, Tbx2, Tbx3, and Tbx20, play additional roles in development and homeostasis of other components of the excretory system in vertebrates.

  14. A Murine Model for Escherichia coli Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Thomas J.; Hunstad, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections of humans. The mouse provides an excellent and tractable model system for cystitis and pyelonephritis caused by Escherichia coli and other uropathogens. Using a well-established model of experimental cystitis in which the bladders of female mice are infected via transurethral catheterization, the molecular details of the pathogenesis of bacterial cystitis have been substantially illuminated in the last decade. Uropathogenic E. coli attach to bladder epithelium (both in human and mouse) via adhesive type 1 pili, establish a replicative niche within epithelial cell cytoplasm, and form intracellular bacterial communities that are protected from antibiotic effects and immune clearance. The use of different inbred and mutant mouse strains offers the opportunity to study outcomes of infection, including resolution, formation of quiescent intracellular bacterial reservoirs, chronic bacterial cystitis, and recurrent infections. Urine, bladder, and kidney tissues can be analyzed by bacterial culture, histology, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescent and confocal microscopy, electron microscopy, and flow cytometry, while a broad array of soluble markers (e.g., cytokines) can also be profiled in serum, urine, and tissue homogenates by ELISA, Western blotting, multiplex bead array, and other approaches. This model promises to afford continued opportunity for discovery of pathogenic mechanisms and evaluation of therapeutic and preventive strategies for acute, chronic, and recurrent UTI. PMID:26468108

  15. Translational Research for Pediatric Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This review provides a comprehensive view of translational research aimed at elucidating the pathophysiology of pediatric lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). A web search was conducted according to combinations of keywords, and the significance of each article was defined by the author. The dramatic evolution of the mass analysis method of genomes, transcripts, and proteins has enabled a comprehensive analysis of molecular events underlying diseases, and these methodologies have also been applied to pediatric LUTD. In genetic analyses of syndromes underlying daytime incontinence, urofacial (Ochoa) syndrome may be creating a prototype of a new research approach. Nocturnal enuresis has long been studied genetically, and several candidate loci have been reported. However, the pursuit for enuresis genes has been abandoned partly because genetic association and enuresis phenotype (bladder or renal type) could not be linked. Enuresis associated with diabetes insipidus has provided new insights into the etiology of the diseases. A chronobiological approach may shed new light on this area. Posterior urethral valves and neurogenic bladders have attracted the interest of pediatric urologists to the smooth muscle biology of the bladder. Bladder exstrophy and cloacal anomalies are rare but major anomalies caused by defective urorectal development and have recently been studied from a genetic standpoint. Translational studies for pediatric LUTD may be extended to adult bladder disease, or to application of precision medicine for diseased children. PMID:27915476

  16. Urinary Tract Infection among Renal Transplant Recipients in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Gondos, Adnan S; Al-Moyed, Khaled A; Al-Robasi, Abdul Baki A; Al-Shamahy, Hassan A; Alyousefi, Naelah A

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common complication following kidney transplantation (KT), which could result in losing the graft. This study aims to identify the prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen and to determine the predisposing factors associated with post renal transplantation UTI. A cross sectional study included of 150 patients, who underwent KT was conducted between June 2010 and January 2011. A Morning mid-stream urine specimen was collected for culture and antibiotic susceptibility test from each recipient. Bacterial UTI was found in 50 patients (33.3%). The prevalence among females 40.3% was higher than males 29%. The UTI was higher in the age group between 41-50 years with a percentage of 28% and this result was statistically significant. Predisposing factors as diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder and polycystic kidney showed significant association. High relative risks were found for polycystic kidney = 13.5 and neurogenic bladder = 13.5. The most prevalent bacteria to cause UTI was Escherichia coli represent 44%, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus 34%. Amikacin was the most effective antibiotic against gram-negative isolates while Ciprofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against Staphylococcus saprophyticus. In conclusion, there is high prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen. Diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder, polycystic kidney and calculi were the main predisposing factors.

  17. Urinary Tract Infection among Renal Transplant Recipients in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Gondos, Adnan S.; Al-Moyed, Khaled A.; Al-Robasi, Abdul Baki A.; Al-Shamahy, Hassan A.; Alyousefi, Naelah A.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common complication following kidney transplantation (KT), which could result in losing the graft. This study aims to identify the prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen and to determine the predisposing factors associated with post renal transplantation UTI. A cross sectional study included of 150 patients, who underwent KT was conducted between June 2010 and January 2011. A Morning mid-stream urine specimen was collected for culture and antibiotic susceptibility test from each recipient. Bacterial UTI was found in 50 patients (33.3%). The prevalence among females 40.3% was higher than males 29%. The UTI was higher in the age group between 41–50 years with a percentage of 28% and this result was statistically significant. Predisposing factors as diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder and polycystic kidney showed significant association. High relative risks were found for polycystic kidney = 13.5 and neurogenic bladder = 13.5. The most prevalent bacteria to cause UTI was Escherichia coli represent 44%, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus 34%. Amikacin was the most effective antibiotic against gram-negative isolates while Ciprofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against Staphylococcus saprophyticus. In conclusion, there is high prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen. Diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder, polycystic kidney and calculi were the main predisposing factors. PMID:26657128

  18. A Murine Model for Escherichia coli Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Thomas J; Hunstad, David A

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections of humans. The mouse provides an excellent and tractable model system for cystitis and pyelonephritis caused by Escherichia coli and other uropathogens. Using a well-established model of experimental cystitis in which the bladders of female mice are infected via transurethral catheterization, the molecular details of the pathogenesis of bacterial cystitis have been substantially illuminated in the last decade. Uropathogenic E. coli attach to bladder epithelium (both in human and mouse) via adhesive type 1 pili, establish a replicative niche within epithelial cell cytoplasm, and form intracellular bacterial communities that are protected from antibiotic effects and immune clearance. The use of different inbred and mutant mouse strains offers the opportunity to study outcomes of infection, including resolution, formation of quiescent intracellular bacterial reservoirs, chronic bacterial cystitis, and recurrent infections. Urine, bladder, and kidney tissues can be analyzed by bacterial culture, histology, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescent and confocal microscopy, electron microscopy, and flow cytometry, while a broad array of soluble markers (e.g., cytokines) can also be profiled in serum, urine, and tissue homogenates by ELISA, Western blotting, multiplex bead array, and other approaches. This model promises to afford continued opportunity for discovery of pathogenic mechanisms and evaluation of therapeutic and preventive strategies for acute, chronic, and recurrent UTI.

  19. Urinary tract infection due to Chryseobacterium gleum, an uncommon pathogen.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Prabha; Muthusamy, Swapna; Balaji, Vignesh K; Rakesh, Gerard J; Easow, Joshy M

    2016-01-01

    Chryseobacterium species are gaining importance as an emerging opportunistic nosocomial pathogen. Limited availability of clinical data necessitates reporting of such isolates. We report a case of nosocomial urinary tract infection by metallo-β-lactamase-producing Chryseobacterium gleum in an elderly diabetic male with chronic renal disease. Identification and antibiotic sensitivity test performed by conventional methods were confirmed by Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight and VITEK-2 systems, respectively. The patient responded well to intravenous ciprofloxacin therapy.

  20. Diagnosis and management of urinary tract infection in older adults.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Theresa Anne; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2014-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a commonly diagnosed infection in older adults. Despite consensus guidelines developed to assist providers in diagnosing UTI, distinguishing symptomatic UTI from asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in older adults is problematic, as many older adults do not present with localized genitourinary symptoms. This article summarizes the recent literature and guidelines on the diagnosis and management of UTI and ASB in older adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Uncomplicated urinary tract infection in adults including uncomplicated pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2008-02-01

    Acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection and acute pyelonephritis are very common infections affecting many women throughout their lives. The determinants of infection have been well described and current strategies to prevent recurrent infections are highly effective. While antimicrobial management is straightforward for most episodes, the evolution of antimicrobial susceptibility of E. coli in community-acquired infection requires continuing re-evaluation of appropriate empiric therapy.

  2. Does Stone Removal Help Patients with Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections?

    PubMed

    Omar, Mohamed; Abdulwahab-Ahmed, Abdullahi; Chaparala, Hemant; Monga, Manoj

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the impact of surgical extraction of nonobstructing asymptomatic stones on recurrent urinary tract infections and identified predictors of patients who may be rendered infection-free. We retrospectively reviewed charts to identify patients with recurrent urinary tract infections who underwent surgical stone extraction and were rendered stone-free. Demographic variables as well as procedure, infectious etiology, stone composition and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome rate were also recorded. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 had no evidence of recurrent infection following surgery while recurrent infection developed in group 2. Univariate analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon signed rank and Fisher exact tests. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. We identified 120 patients with recurrent urinary tract infections and a nonobstructive renal stone. Surgical management included shock wave lithotripsy in 32% of cases, ureteroscopy in 7% and percutaneous nephrolithotomy in 61%. Of the 120 patients 58 (48%) remained infection-free after surgery while 62 (52%) experienced recurrent infection. Factors associated with a higher risk of recurrent infections included type 2 diabetes mellitus (OR 1.73, p = 0.01), hypertension (OR 2.8, p = 0.007) and black ethnicity (OR 13.7, p = 0.009). Escherichia coli infections were more likely to resolve (OR 0.34, p = 0.01). In contrast, Enterococcus infections were more likely to persist (OR 2.5, p = 0.04). On multiple logistic regression analysis only race, hypertension and E. coli infections were significant predictors of infection clearance. Of patients with recurrent urinary tract infections and asymptomatic renal calculi 50% may be rendered infection-free following stone extraction. Patients with risk factors for recurrent infections after surgery should be counseled that stone extraction might not eradicate the infection. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association

  3. Male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. 2: Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dorey, G

    The first part of this article (Dorey, 2000) described the subjective and objective assessment of men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This article will examine treatment protocols for stress incontinence, urge incontinence, post-prostatectomy incontinence, post-micturition dribble, overflow incontinence, reflex incontinence and functional incontinence. Pelvic floor muscle exercises, biofeedback, electrical stimulation, urge suppression techniques, and fluid intake are discussed. It is concluded that men with LUTS can benefit from conservative treatment.

  4. Efficacy of ceftolozane/tazobactam versus levofloxacin in the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs) caused by levofloxacin-resistant pathogens: results from the ASPECT-cUTI trial.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Jennifer A; Sakoulas, George; Umeh, Obiamiwe; Cloutier, Daniel J; Steenbergen, Judith N; Bliss, Caleb; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2016-07-01

    Empirical fluoroquinolone therapy is widely used in treating complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs), even in areas of high fluoroquinolone resistance. While it is believed that high antibiotic concentrations in urine might be sufficient to overcome and effectively treat infections caused by resistant bacteria, clinical trial data validating this assumption are limited. This post hoc analysis evaluated the efficacy of ceftolozane/tazobactam versus levofloxacin in the subgroup of patients with cUTIs caused by levofloxacin-resistant pathogens in a randomized, controlled trial (NCT01345929/NCT01345955). Hospitalized adults with cUTI/pyelonephritis were randomized to 7 days of 1.5 g of ceftolozane/tazobactam every 8 h or 750 mg of levofloxacin once daily, before availability of culture and susceptibility data. A composite of microbiological eradication and clinical cure 5 to 9 days post-therapy was assessed in the microbiological modified ITT (mMITT; n = 800) and microbiologically evaluable (ME; n = 694) populations. In the mMITT population, there were 212 patients (26.5%) with at least one baseline uropathogen that was resistant to levofloxacin. The majority of uropathogens in this subgroup were Enterobacteriaceae (n = 186) that were susceptible to ceftolozane/tazobactam [MIC ≤2 mg/L, 88.7% (165/186)]. Among patients with levofloxacin-resistant pathogens, ceftolozane/tazobactam demonstrated significantly higher composite cure rates than levofloxacin in both the mMITT [60.0% (60/100) versus 39.3% (44/112); 95% CI for the treatment difference, 7.2%-33.2%] and ME [64.0% (57/89) versus 43.4% (43/99); 95% CI for the treatment difference, 6.3%-33.7%] populations, respectively. High urinary levels of levofloxacin did not reliably cure cUTIs. Seven day treatment with ceftolozane/tazobactam was more effective than high-dose levofloxacin treatment in patients with cUTI caused by levofloxacin-resistant bacteria, and it may be an alternative treatment in

  5. Identification of urinary tract pathogens after 3-hours urine culture by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haiko, Johanna; Savolainen, Laura E; Hilla, Risto; Pätäri-Sampo, Anu

    2016-10-01

    Complicated urinary tract infections, such as pyelonephritis, may lead to sepsis. Rapid diagnosis is needed to identify the causative urinary pathogen and to verify the appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy. We describe here a rapid identification method for urinary pathogens: urine is incubated on chocolate agar for 3h at 35°C with 5% CO2 and subjected to MALDI-TOF MS analysis by VITEK MS. Overall 207 screened clinical urine samples were tested in parallel with conventional urine culture. The method, called U-si-MALDI-TOF (urine short incubation MALDI-TOF), showed correct identification for 86% of Gram-negative urinary tract pathogens (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and other Enterobacteriaceae), when present at >10(5)cfu/ml in culture (n=107), compared with conventional culture method. However, Gram-positive bacteria (n=28) were not successfully identified by U-si-MALDI-TOF. This method is especially suitable for rapid identification of E. coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infections and urosepsis. Turnaround time for identification using U-si-MALDI-TOF compared with conventional urine culture was improved from 24h to 4-6h.

  6. The role of toll-like receptors (TLRs) in urinary tract infections (UTIs)

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are caused by different types of microbial agents such as uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and Candida albicans. The presence of strong physical barriers may prevent the breach of pathogens into the urinary tract. However, sometimes the pathogenic microorganisms may pass through the barriers and stimulate the innate and adaptive responses. Among a variety of innate immune responses, Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) are one of the most unique and interesting molecules regarding UTIs. Thus, the authors have focused their attention on the role of TLRs in urinary tract defense against pathogenic microbial agents such as UPEC and C.albicans through this literature review. Material and methods Several papers regarding UTIs and TLRs including original and review articles were searched by PubMed and Google Scholar. They were studied and the most important aspects in association with the role of TLRs in UTIs were extracted. Additionally, this paper was prepared using the experience of the authors. Results The TLRs 2, 4 and 5 are the most functional molecules that contribute to urinary tract defense system and UTIs. It is incredible that TLRs are able to detect and recognize different parts of microbial components relating to the same pathogen. Besides, the flexibility of the TLR molecules may lead to identification of different types of microorganisms with different signaling pathways. Conclusions Our knowledge associated with TLRs and their activities against microbial causative agents of UTIs may help us to prevent, control and treat UTIs at a higher quality level. PMID:28127459

  7. Species Identification and Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Coagulase- Negative Staphylococci Isolated from Urinary Tract Infection Specimens.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Asra; Abdullah, Farhan Essa; Abdullah, Nihal Essa; Kazmi, Shahana Urooj

    2016-07-01

    To determine the incidence of Coagulase- negative S. aureusin urinary tract infections and sensitivities of these isolates to antimicrobial agents. Cohort study. Dr. Essa Laboratory and Immunology and Infectious Disease Research Laboratory (IIDRL), Microbiology Department, University of Karachi, from January 2009 to January 2010. Urine specimens, suggestive of urinary tract infection (UTI), were identified. Speciation of isolates was done using API-20 Staph.system. Screening of extracellular products was done using SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and Hemolysin on blood-agar plates. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs) of antibiotics was estimated by microtiter well plate method. Frequency and percentages were determined and chi-square test was used for comparing proportions with significance at p < 0.05. Coagulase - negative S. aureus(CONS) were the cause of urinary tract infection in 56 out of 1866 outpatient (3%) and 164 of 1261 inpatient (13%), urinary tract infections (p < 0.001). Two hundred and twenty CONS isolates were identified. The most common CONS identified was S. saprophyticus (31%, 68 strains). The relative frequency of Coagulase - negative S. aureuswas 6% (13 strains). All isolates were sensitive to Vancomycin and Linezolid. Resistance was 69% to Ampicillin, 53% to Methicillin, and 37.5% to Ciprofloxacin. CONS are a potential uropathogens, with capability of slime production and resistance to common empirical prescriptions. This also warrants formulation of an appropriate antibiotic policy that covers CONS.

  8. Pre- and post-treatment urinary tract findings in children with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Caletti, María Gracia; Balestracci, Alejandro; Di Pinto, Diana

    2014-03-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is characterized by the kidney's inability to concentrate urine, which causes intense polyuria that may lead to urinary tract dilation. We report the morphological findings of the urinary tract in ten boys with NDI specifically addressing the presence and changes of urinary tract dilation during treatment. Patients were diagnosed at a median age of 1.6 years (range, 0.16-6.33 years) and treated with a low osmotic diet, hydrochlorothiazide-amiloride and indomethacin, which decreased the diuresis from a median of 10.5 ml/kg/h to 4.4 ml/kg/h (p < 0.001). Three patients showed normal renal ultrasound before treatment until last control, while the remaining seven showed urinary tract dilation. In this second group, dilation was reduced with treatment in four patients and disappeared in the remaining three. Children without dilation or in whom the dilation disappeared were diagnosed and treated earlier than those with persistent dilation (median 1.66 versus 4.45 years, respectively). After a median of 10.4 (range, 2.3-20.3) years of follow-up, no patients showed urological complications. Medical treatment of the disease improved the dilation in all cases, preventing its potential complications. Regardless of the good outcome of our patients, periodic urologic follow-up is recommended in NDI patients.

  9. Housestaff Knowledge Related to Urinary Catheter Utilization and Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTIs)

    PubMed Central

    Paras, Molly L.; Shenoy, Erica S.; Hsu, Heather E.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Hooper, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite published catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) prevention guidelines, inappropriate catheter use is common. We surveyed housestaff about their knowledge of CAUTIs at a teaching hospital and found the majority is aware of prevention guidelines; however, their application to clinical scenarios and catheter practices fall short of national goals. PMID:26278269

  10. [Urinary tract colonization and infection in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    López, M J; Cortés, J A

    2012-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) account for 20-50% of all hospital-acquired infections occurring in the intensive care unit (ICU). In some reports UTI was found to be more frequent than hospital-acquired pneumonia and intravascular device bacteremia, with a greater incidence in developing countries. The risk factors associated with the appearance of UTI include the severity of illness at the time of admission to the ICU, female status, prolonged urinary catheterization or a longer ICU stay and poor urinary catheter management - mainly disconnection of the closed system. about the present study offers data on the epidemiology of UTI in the ICU, the identified risk factors, etiology, diagnosis, impact upon morbidity and mortality, and the measures to prevent its appearance.

  11. Pathogenesis of urinary tract infections with normal female anatomy.

    PubMed

    Finer, Gal; Landau, Daniel

    2004-10-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common among girls and young women who are healthy and have anatomically normal urinary tracts. These infections are a main source of morbidity and health-care costs in this population. The interaction between specific infecting bacteria and urinary tract epithelium characteristics underlies the pathogenesis of this disease. Several pathogen-related factors predispose people to recurrent UTI, including periurethral bacterial colonisation and Escherichia coli virulence. Host behavioural risk factors include voiding dysfunction, high intercourse frequency, and oral contraceptive and spermicide use. The role of vesicoureteral reflux in recurrent childhood UTI is probably overestimated in the medical literature and is important only in a small group of children with high-grade reflux. Family pedigree analysis suggests a familial genetic predisposition for UTI among young females. Animal models show the multigenic nature of recurrent UTI. Putative candidate genes for the disease include ABH blood groups, interleukin-8 receptor (CXCR1), the human leucocyte antigen locus, toll-like receptors, tumour necrosis factor, and Tamm-Horsfall protein.

  12. Escherichia coli isolates from commercial chicken meat and eggs cause sepsis, meningitis and urinary tract infection in rodent models of human infections.

    PubMed

    Mellata, M; Johnson, J R; Curtiss, R

    2017-07-13

    The zoonotic potential of Escherichia coli from chicken-source food products is important to define for public health purposes. Previously, genotypic and phenotypic screening of E. coli isolates from commercial chicken meat and shell eggs identified some E. coli strains that by molecular criteria resembled human-source extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Here, to clarify the zoonotic risk of such chicken-source E. coli, we compared selected E. coli isolates from chicken meat and eggs, stratified by molecularly defined ExPEC status, to human-source ExPEC and to laboratory E. coli for virulence in rodent models of sepsis, meningitis and UTI, and evaluated whether specific bacterial characteristics predict experimental virulence. Multiple chicken-source E. coli resembled human-source ExPEC in their ability to cause one or multiple different ExPEC-associated infections. Swimming ability corresponded with urovirulence, K1 capsule corresponded with ability to cause neonatal meningitis, and biofilm formation in urine corresponded with ability to cause sepsis. In contrast, molecularly defined ExPEC status and individual genotypic traits were uncorrelated with ability to cause sepsis, and neither complement sensitivity nor growth in human urine corresponded with virulence in any infection model. These findings establish that chicken-derived food products contain E. coli strains that, in rodent models of multiple human-associated ExPEC infections, are able to cause disease comparably to human-source E. coli clinical isolates, which suggests that they may pose a significant food safety threat. Further study is needed to define the level of risk they pose to human health, which if appreciable would justify efforts to monitor for and reduce or eliminate them. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Role of pelvic floor in lower urinary tract function.

    PubMed

    Chermansky, Christopher J; Moalli, Pamela A

    2016-10-01

    The pelvic floor plays an integral part in lower urinary tract storage and evacuation. Normal urine storage necessitates that continence be maintained with normal urethral closure and urethral support. The endopelvic fascia of the anterior vaginal wall, its connections to the arcus tendineous fascia pelvis (ATFP), and the medial portion of the levator ani muscles must remain intact to provide normal urethral support. Thus, normal pelvic floor function is required for urine storage. Normal urine evacuation involves a series of coordinated events, the first of which involves complete relaxation of the external urethral sphincter and levator ani muscles. Acquired dysfunction of these muscles will initially result in sensory urgency and detrusor overactivity; however, with time the acquired voiding dysfunction can result in intermittent urine flow and incomplete bladder emptying, progressing to urinary retention in severe cases. This review will start with a discussion of normal pelvic floor anatomy and function. Next various injuries to the pelvic floor will be reviewed. The dysfunctional pelvic floor will be covered subsequently, with a focus on levator ani spasticity and stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Finally, future research directions of the interaction between the pelvic floor and lower urinary tract function will be discussed.

  14. Urinary nerve growth factor levels in overactive bladder syndrome and lower urinary tract disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsin-Tzu; Chen, Chia-Yen; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2010-12-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a syndrome based on self-reported symptoms of urgency and frequency with or without urge incontinence. Although urgency is the core symptom of OAB, patients might have difficulty to distinguish urgency from the urge to void. Urodynamic study is a useful diagnostic tool to discover detrusor overactivity (DO) in patients with OAB; however, not all OAB patients have DO. Therefore, a more objective and non-invasive way to diagnose and assess OAB including DO is needed. Recent research has focused on urinary biomarkers in assessment of OAB. Urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) level increases in patients with OAB-wet, bladder outlet obstruction, mixed urinary incontinence and urodynamic DO. Urinary NGF levels are correlated with severity of OAB symptoms. In patients with OAB and DO who have been well treated with antimuscarinics or botulinum toxin injection, urinary NGF levels have been shown to decrease significantly in association with reduction of urgency severity. However, not all patients with OAB have an elevated urinary NGF level. It might also be increased in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, cerebrovascular accident and lower urinary tract diseases such as urinary tract stone, bacterial infection and urothelial tumor. It is possible to use urinary NGF levels as a bio-marker for diagnosis of OAB as well as for the assessment of therapeutic outcome in patients with OAB or DO. Here, we review the latest medical advances in this field. Copyright © 2010 Formosan Medical Association & Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Copper Is a Host Effector Mobilized to Urine during Urinary Tract Infection To Impair Bacterial Colonization.

    PubMed

    Hyre, Amanda N; Kavanagh, Kylie; Kock, Nancy D; Donati, George L; Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan

    2017-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a major global infectious disease affecting millions of people annually. Human urinary copper (Cu) content is elevated during UTI caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). UPEC upregulates the expression of Cu efflux genes during clinical UTI in patients as an adaptive response to host-derived Cu. Whether Cu is mobilized to urine as a host response to UTI and its role in protection against UTI remain unresolved. To address these questions, we tested the hypothesis that Cu is a host effector mobilized to urine during UTI to limit bacterial growth. Our results reveal that Cu is mobilized to urine during UTI caused by the major uropathogens Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae, in addition to UPEC, in humans. Ceruloplasmin, a Cu-containing ferroxidase, is found at higher levels in UTI urine than in healthy control urine and serves as the molecular source of urinary Cu during UTI. Our results demonstrate that ceruloplasmin decreases the bioavailability of iron in urine by a transferrin-dependent mechanism. Experimental UTI with UPEC in nonhuman primates recapitulates the increased urinary Cu content observed during clinical UTI. Furthermore, Cu-deficient mice are highly colonized by UPEC, indicating that Cu is involved in the limiting of bacterial growth within the urinary tract. Collectively, our results indicate that Cu is a host effector that is involved in protection against pathogen colonization of the urinary tract. Because urinary Cu levels are amenable to modulation, augmentation of the Cu-based host defense against UTI represents a novel approach to limiting bacterial colonization during UTI.

  16. Purulent pericarditis as a complication of bacteraemic Enterococcus faecalis urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nehme, Fredy; Gitau, Jane; Liu, Jing

    2017-03-15

    Purulent pericarditis is a rare clinical entity in the modern antibiotic era. The most common portal of entry is thought to be direct extension from a primary lung source and is usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae or Haemophilus influenzae We report the case of a man aged 69 years who presented with purulent pericarditis due to Enterococcus faecalis likely caused by haematogenous spread from a urinary tract source. Urgent pericardiocentesis was vital and restored his haemodynamic stability. He was treated for a total duration of 4 weeks with susceptible antibiotics. Echocardiography 3 weeks later showed persistent resolution of the pericardial effusion. This case shows that prompt diagnosis and drainage of the pericardial effusion are vital to achieve a positive outcome in purulent pericarditis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of purulent pericarditis caused by E. faecalis from a urinary tract source. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  17. Potential Misclassification of Urinary Tract-Related Bacteremia Upon Applying the 2015 Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Surveillance Definition From the National Healthcare Safety Network.

    PubMed

    Greene, M Todd; Ratz, David; Meddings, Jennifer; Fakih, Mohamad G; Saint, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently updated the surveillance definition of catheter-associated urinary tract infection to include only urine culture bacteria of at least 1 × 10(5) colony-forming units/mL. Our findings suggest that the new surveillance definition may fail to capture clinically meaningful catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

  18. Epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of pathogens causing urinary tract infections in the Asia-Pacific region: Results from the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART), 2010-2013.

    PubMed

    Jean, Shio-Shin; Coombs, Geoffrey; Ling, Thomas; Balaji, V; Rodrigues, Camilla; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Kim, Min-Ja; Rajasekaram, Datin Ganeswrie; Mendoza, Myrna; Tan, Thean Yen; Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Ni, Yuxing; Weinman, Barry; Xu, Yingchun; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2016-04-01

    A total of 9599 isolates of Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) were collected from 60 centres in 13 countries in the Asia-Pacific region from 2010-2013. These isolates comprised Enterobacteriaceae species (mainly Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter cloacae and Morganella morganii) and non-fermentative GNB species (predominantly Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii). In vitro susceptibilities were determined by the agar dilution method and susceptibility profiles were determined using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) interpretive breakpoints recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute in 2015. Production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) amongst E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. mirabilis and K. oxytoca isolates was determined by the double-disk synergy test. China, Vietnam, India, Thailand and the Philippines had the highest rates of GNB species producing ESBLs and the highest rates of cephalosporin resistance. ESBL production and hospital-acquired infection (isolates obtained ≥48 h after admission) significantly compromised the susceptibility of isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae to ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and most β-lactams, with the exception of imipenem and ertapenem. However, >87% of ESBL-producing E. coli strains were susceptible to amikacin and piperacillin/tazobactam, indicating that these antibiotics might be appropriate alternatives for treating UTIs due to ESBL-producing E. coli. Fluoroquinolones were shown to be inappropriate as empirical therapy for UTIs. Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem in the Asia-Pacific region. Therefore, continuous monitoring of evolutionary trends in the susceptibility profiles of GNB causing UTIs in Asia is crucial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. C-reactive protein levels in girls with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Tarhan, H; Ekin, R G; Can, E; Cakmak, O; Yavascan, O; Mutlubas Ozsan, F; Helvaci, M; Zorlu, F

    2016-04-01

    Daytime lower urinary tract (LUT) conditions are identified as daytime incontinence problems for children in whom any cause of neuropathy and uropathy has been excluded. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a common marker of acute or chronic inflammation and infection. Increased CRP levels have been detected in the studies conducted on adults diagnosed with overactive bladders and interstitial cystitis. This study aimed to investigate the role of serum CRP levels in girls suffering from daytime LUT conditions. Out of the 752 patients who presented to the outpatient clinics with lower urinary tract symptoms, 709 were excluded due to: being boys, having previous urinary tract surgery, an active urinary tract infection, a neurological anomaly, a urinary system anomaly, having rheumatic disease, any chronic disease, any febrile infection over the past week, a history of constipation, and enuresis nocturna. Forty-three girls with LUT conditions and aged 8-10 years were included in the study as the patient group. Forty girls who attended the urology outpatient clinic without LUT conditions, or active urinary tract infections and any chronic disease requiring follow-up constituted the control group. Under the control of the parents, all subjects were asked to fill out 3-day voiding diaries. The voiding diaries identified frequency, urgency, urgency urinary incontinence, and functional bladder capacity data. All subjects also completed a dysfunctional voiding scoring system (DVSS). The serum CRP levels of all subjects were measured. There was a significant difference in serum CRP levels and DVSS between the patient group and the control group (P = 0.001, P = 0.001). The mean serum CRP levels showed a significant increase when frequency and urgency scores were ≥8, the urge incontinence score was ≥2 and the DVS score DVSS was ≥14 in the voiding diaries of the patient group (Table). Lower urinary tract dysfunction is defined as a condition involving abnormalities of filling and

  20. Urinary tract infection among fistula patients admitted at Hamlin fistula hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Dereje, Matifan; Woldeamanuel, Yimtubezinesh; Asrat, Daneil; Ayenachew, Fekade

    2017-02-16

    Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) causes a serious health problem and affects millions of people worldwide. Patients with obstetric fistula usually suffer from incontinence of urine and stool, which can predispose them to frequent infections of the urinary tract. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine the etiologic agents, drug resistance pattern of the isolates and associated risk factor for urinary tract infection among fistula patients in Addis Ababa fistula hospital, Ethiopia. Across sectional study was conducted from February to May 2015 at Hamlin Fistula Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Socio-demographic characteristics and other UTI related risk factors were collected from study participants using structured questionnaires. The mid-stream urine was collected and cultured on Cysteine lactose electrolyte deficient agar and blood agar. Antimicrobial susceptibility was done by using disc diffusion method and interpreted according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Data was entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 20. Out of 210 fistula patients investigated 169(80.5%) of the patient were younger than 25 years. Significant bacteriuria was observed in 122/210(58.1%) and 68(55.7%) of the isolates were from symptomatic cases. E.coli 65(53.7%) were the most common bacterial pathogen isolated followed by Proteus spp. 31(25.4%). Statistical Significant difference was observed with history of previous UTI (P = 0.031) and history of catheterization (P = 0.001). Gram negative bacteria isolates showed high level of resistance (>50%) to gentamicin and ciprofloxacin, while all gram positive bacteria isolated were showed low level of resistance (20-40%) to most of antibiotic tested. The overall prevalence of urinary tract infection among fistula patient is 58.1%. This study showed that the predominant pathogen of UTI were E.coli followed by Proteus spp. It also showed that amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was a drug of choice for urinary tract

  1. Triggered Urine Interleukin-6 Correlates to Severity of Symptoms in Nonfebrile Lower Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Sundén, Fredrik; Butler, Daniel; Wullt, Björn

    2017-07-01

    Objective diagnosis of symptomatic urinary tract infections in patients prone to asymptomatic bacteriuria is compromised by local host responses that are already present and the positive urine culture. We investigated interleukin-6 as a biomarker for nonfebrile urinary tract infection severity and diagnostic thresholds for interleukin-6 and 8, and neutrophils to differentiate between asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infection. Patients with residual urine and neurogenic bladders due to spinal lesions included in a long-term Escherichia coli 83972 asymptomatic bacteriuria inoculation trial were monitored for 2 years. Symptom scoring and urine sampling to estimate interleukin-6 and 8, and neutrophils were performed regularly monthly and at urinary tract infection episodes. Patients were followed in the complete study for a mean of 19 months (range 10 to 27) and those with asymptomatic bacteriuria with E. coli 83972 were followed a mean of 11 months (range 4 to 19). A total of 37 nonfebrile urinary tract infection episodes with complete data on interleukin-6 and 8, neutrophils and symptom scoring were documented. Interleukin-6 was the only marker that persistently increased during urinary tract infection compared to asymptomatic bacteriuria in pooled and paired intra-individual comparisons (p <0.05). Interleukin-6 above the threshold (greater than 25 ng/l) correlated to more severe urinary tract infection symptoms (p <0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of all biomarkers were poor/moderate when differentiating asymptomatic bacteriuria vs all urinary tract infection episodes. However, in urinary tract infections with worse symptoms interleukin-6 and neutrophils demonstrated equal good/excellent outcomes. Triggered interleukin-6 correlated to urinary tract infection symptom severity and demonstrated a promising differential diagnostic capacity to discriminate urinary tract infection from asymptomatic bacteriuria. Future studies should explore interleukin-6

  2. "Urinary Tract Infection"-Requiem for a Heavyweight.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Thomas E

    2017-08-01

    "Urinary tract infection" ("UTI") is an ambiguous, expansive, overused diagnosis that can lead to marked, harmful antibiotic overtreatment. "Significant bacteriuria," central to most definitions of "UTI," has little significance in identifying individuals who will benefit from treatment. "Urinary symptoms" are similarly uninformative. Neither criterion is well defined. Bacteriuria and symptoms remit and recur spontaneously. Treatment is standard for acute uncomplicated cystitis and common for asymptomatic bacteriuria, but definite benefits are few. Treatment for "UTI" in older adults with delirium and bacteriuria is widespread but no evidence supports the practice, and expert opinion opposes it. Sensitive diagnostic tests now demonstrate that healthy urinary tracts host a ubiquitous, complex microbial community. Recognition of this microbiome, largely undetectable using standard agar-based cultures, offers a new perspective on "UTI." Everyone is bacteriuric. From this perspective, most people who are treated for a "UTI" would probably be better off without treatment. Elderly adults, little studied in this regard, face particular risk. Invasive bacterial diseases such as pyelonephritis and bacteremic bacteriuria are also "UTIs." Mindful decisions about antibiotic use will require a far better understanding of how pathogenicity arises within microbial communities. It is likely that public education and meaningful informed-consent discussions about antibiotic treatment of bacteriuria, emphasizing potential harms and uncertain benefits, would reduce overtreatment. Emphasizing the microbiome's significance and using the term "urinary tract dysbiosis" instead of "UTI" might also help and might encourage mindful study of the relationships among host, aging, microbiome, disease, and antibiotic treatment. © 2017, Copyright the Author Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Staphylococcus saprophyticus Bacteremia originating from Urinary Tract Infections: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jaehyung; Lee, Anna; Hong, Jeongmin; Jo, Won-Yong; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Kim, Sunjoo; Bae, In-Gyu

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common pathogen of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in young females. However, S. saprophyticus bacteremia originating from UTI is very rare and has not been reported in Korea. We report a case of S. saprophyticus bacteremia from UTI in a 60-year-old female with a urinary stone treated successfully with intravenous ciprofloxacin, and review the cases of S. saprophyticus bacteremia reported in the literature. Thus, the microorganism may cause invasive infection and should be considered when S. saprophyticus is isolated from blood cultures in patients with UTI.

  4. Staphylococcus saprophyticus Bacteremia originating from Urinary Tract Infections: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna; Hong, Jeongmin; Jo, Won-yong; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Kim, Sunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common pathogen of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in young females. However, S. saprophyticus bacteremia originating from UTI is very rare and has not been reported in Korea. We report a case of S. saprophyticus bacteremia from UTI in a 60-year-old female with a urinary stone treated successfully with intravenous ciprofloxacin, and review the cases of S. saprophyticus bacteremia reported in the literature. Thus, the microorganism may cause invasive infection and should be considered when S. saprophyticus is isolated from blood cultures in patients with UTI. PMID:27433385

  5. Can Urinary Nitrite Results Be Used to Conduct Antimicrobial Option for Urinary Tract Infection in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Mahyar, Abolfazl; Ayazi, Parviz; Froozesh, Mahta; Daneshi-Kohan, Mohammad-Mahdi; Barikani, Ameneh

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to determine the relationship between urinary nitrite results and bacterial resistance to antimicrobial drugs in urinary tract infection of children. Methods In a cross-section study 119 children younger than 12 years with urinary tract infection were evaluated in Qazvin children's hospital. Patients were divided into negative and positive nitrite groups depending on urinary nitrite test result. Rates of antibiotic resistance in the two groups were compared. Findings Sixty seven patients were in the negative nitrite group and 52 in the positive nitrite group. Resistance rates to ceftriaxone, trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, gentamicin, amikacin, nalidixic acid, cephalothin and nitrofurantoin in the nitrite negative group were 7.5%, 31.3%, 50.7%, 11.9%, 9%, 3%, 14.9% and 11.9%, respectively. These values in the nitrite positive group were 21.2%, 28.8%, 63.5%, 7.7%, 5.8%, 1.9%, 9.6%, and 3.8%, respectively (P>0.05). Conclusion This study showed that there is no correlation between urinary nitrite results and bacterial resistance to antimicrobial drugs. Therefore, it seems that physicians should not adjust antibiotic therapy for UTI based on nitrite results. PMID:23056892

  6. Anatomy and histology of the lower urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Pradidarcheep, Wisuit; Wallner, Christian; Dabhoiwala, Noshir F; Lamers, Wouter H

    2011-01-01

    The function of the lower urinary tract is basically storage of urine in the bladder and the at-will periodic evacuation of the stored urine. Urinary incontinence is one of the most common lower urinary tract disorders in adults, but especially in the elderly female. The urethra, its sphincters, and the pelvic floor are key structures in the achievement of continence, but their basic anatomy is little known and, to some extent, still incompletely understood. Because questions with respect to continence arise from human morbidity, but are often investigated in rodent animal models, we present findings in human and rodent anatomy and histology. Differences between males and females in the role that the pelvic floor plays in the maintenance of continence are described. Furthermore, we briefly describe the embryologic origin of ureters, bladder, and urethra, because the developmental origin of structures such as the vesicoureteral junction, the bladder trigone, and the penile urethra are often invoked to explain (clinical) observations. As the human pelvic floor has acquired features in evolution that are typical for a species with bipedal movement, we also compare the pelvic floor of humans with that of rodents to better understand the rodent (or any other quadruped, for that matter) as an experimental model species. The general conclusion is that the "Bauplan" is well conserved, even though its common features are sometimes difficult to discern.

  7. Urinary tract infections in infants and children: Diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Joan L; Finlay, Jane C; Lang, Mia Eileen; Bortolussi, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have resulted in major changes in the management of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children. The present statement focuses on the diagnosis and management of infants and children >2 months of age with an acute UTI and no known underlying urinary tract pathology or risk factors for a neurogenic bladder. UTI should be ruled out in preverbal children with unexplained fever and in older children with symptoms suggestive of UTI (dysuria, urinary frequency, hematuria, abdominal pain, back pain or new daytime incontinence). A midstream urine sample should be collected for urinalysis and culture in toilet-trained children; others should have urine collected by catheter or by suprapubic aspirate. UTI is unlikely if the urinalysis is completely normal. A bagged urine sample may be used for urinalysis but should not be used for urine culture. Antibiotic treatment for seven to 10 days is recommended for febrile UTI. Oral antibiotics may be offered as initial treatment when the child is not seriously ill and is likely to receive and tolerate every dose. Children <2 years of age should be investigated after their first febrile UTI with a renal/bladder ultrasound to identify any significant renal abnormalities. A voiding cystourethrogram is not required for children with a first UTI unless the renal/bladder ultrasound reveals findings suggestive of vesicoureteral reflux, selected renal anomalies or obstructive uropathy.

  8. Inflammasomes in the urinary tract: a disease-based review.

    PubMed

    Purves, J Todd; Hughes, F Monty

    2016-10-01

    Inflammasomes are supramolecular structures that sense molecular patterns from pathogenic organisms or damaged cells and trigger an innate immune response, most commonly through production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, but also through less understood mechanisms independent of these cytokines. Great strides have been made in understanding these structures and their dysfunction in various inflammatory diseases, lending new insights into urological and renal problems. From a clinical perspective, benign urinary pathology almost universally involves the inflammatory process, and understanding how inflammasomes translate etiological conditions (diabetes, obstruction, stones, urinary tract infections, etc.) into acute and chronic inflammatory responses is critical to understanding these diseases at a molecular level. To date, inflammasome components have been found in the bladder, prostate, and kidney and have been shown to be activated in response to several infectious and noninfectious insults. In this review, we summarize what is known regarding inflammasomes in both the upper and lower urinary tract and describe several common disease states where they potentially play critical roles.

  9. Urinary tract infections in infants and children: Diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Joan L; Finlay, Jane C; Lang, Mia Eileen; Bortolussi, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have resulted in major changes in the management of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children. The present statement focuses on the diagnosis and management of infants and children >2 months of age with an acute UTI and no known underlying urinary tract pathology or risk factors for a neurogenic bladder. UTI should be ruled out in preverbal children with unexplained fever and in older children with symptoms suggestive of UTI (dysuria, urinary frequency, hematuria, abdominal pain, back pain or new daytime incontinence). A midstream urine sample should be collected for urinalysis and culture in toilet-trained children; others should have urine collected by catheter or by suprapubic aspirate. UTI is unlikely if the urinalysis is completely normal. A bagged urine sample may be used for urinalysis but should not be used for urine culture. Antibiotic treatment for seven to 10 days is recommended for febrile UTI. Oral antibiotics may be offered as initial treatment when the child is not seriously ill and is likely to receive and tolerate every dose. Children <2 years of age should be investigated after their first febrile UTI with a renal/bladder ultrasound to identify any significant renal abnormalities. A voiding cystourethrogram is not required for children with a first UTI unless the renal/bladder ultrasound reveals findings suggestive of vesicoureteral reflux, selected renal anomalies or obstructive uropathy. PMID:25332662

  10. Activities of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid combinations against urinary tract infections.

    PubMed Central

    Crokaert, F; van der Linden, M P; Yourassowsky, E

    1982-01-01

    Urinary tract infection caused by beta-lactamase-producing bacteria were treated with 500 mg of amoxicillin three times daily plus either 250 or 125 mg of clavulanic acid three times daily. The overall cure rate was 63.6%, 77.7% with the high dose of clavulanic acid and 53.8% with the low dose. Gastrointestinal intolerance was common in the high-dose clavulanic acid regimen. PMID:6765418

  11. Colonization with Escherichia coli Strains among Female Sex Partners of Men with Febrile Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Torsten; Scheutz, Flemming; Clabots, Connie; Johnston, Brian D.; Thuras, Paul; Johnson, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Of 23 unique Escherichia coli strains from 10 men with febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs) and their female sex partners, 6 strains (all UTI causing) were shared between partners. Molecularly, the 6 shared strains appeared more virulent than the 17 nonshared strains, being associated with phylogenetic group B2, sequence types ST73 and ST127, and multiple specific virulence genes. This indicates that UTIs are sometimes sexually transmitted. PMID:25832302

  12. The potential of photo-deposited silver coatings on Foley catheters to prevent urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ian Richard; Pollini, Mauro; Paladini, Federica

    2016-12-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) represents one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality. The resistance demonstrated by many microorganisms to conventional antibiotic therapies and the increasing health-care costs have recently encouraged the definition of alternative preventive strategies, which can have a positive effect in the management of infections. Antimicrobial urinary catheters have been developed through the photo-chemical deposition of silver coatings on the external and luminal surfaces. The substrates are exposed to ultraviolet radiation after impregnation into a silver-based solution, thus inducing the in situ synthesis of silver particles. The effect of the surface treatment on the material was investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and silver ion release measurements. The ability of microorganisms commonly associated with urinary tract infections was investigated in terms of bacterial viability, proliferation and biofilm development, using Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis as target organisms. The silver coatings demonstrated good distribution of silver particles to the substrate, and proved an effective antibacterial capability in simulated biological conditions. The low values of silver ion release demonstrated the optimum adhesion of the coating. The results indicated a good potential of silver-based antimicrobial materials for prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infection. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation in Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    YOUSEFI, Masoud; POURMAND, Mohammad Reza; FALLAH, Fatemeh; HASHEMI, Ali; MASHHADI, Rahil; NAZARI-ALAM, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the antibiotic susceptibility pattern as well as the phenotypic and genotypic biofilm formation ability of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from patients with urinary tract infection (UTI). Methods: A total of 39 isolates of S. aureus were collected from patients with UTI. The antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the isolates were determined by the Kirby-Bauer disk-diffusion. We used the Modified Congo red agar (MCRA) and Microtiter plate methods to assess the ability of biofilm formation. All isolates were examined for determination of biofilm related genes, icaA, fnbA, clfA and bap using PCR method. Results: Linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin and chloramphenicol were the most effective agents against S. aureus isolates. Overall, 69.2% of S. aureus isolates were biofilm producers. Resistance to four antibiotics such as nitrofurantoin (71.4% vs. 28.6%, P=0.001), tetracycline (57.7% vs. 42.3%, P=0.028), erythromycin and ciprofloxacin (56% vs. 44%, P=0.017) was higher among biofilm producers than non-biofilm producers. The icaA, fnbA and clfA genes were present in all S. aureus isolates. However, bap gene was not detected in any of the isolates. Conclusion: Our findings reinforce the role of biofilm formation in resistance to antimicrobial agents. Trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole and doxycycline may be used as an effective treatment for UTI caused by biofilm producers S. aureus. Our results suggest that biofilm formation is not dependent to just icaA, fnbA, clfA and bap genes harbor in S. aureus strains. PMID:27252918

  14. [Molecular biological researches of the lower urinary tract function].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Masayuki; Araki, Isao

    2003-05-01

    Adrenergic alpha1 and beta receptors are present in the target organs of sympathetic nerve and they participate in the signal transduction mechanism of the lower urinary tract. Adrenergic alpha1 receptors are present in urethral and prostatic smooth muscles, and contract these muscles. Among these receptor subtypes, the alpha1-A receptor has the most important role, and mRNA expression of the corresponding alpha1-a subtype is predominant. In the human urinary bladder detrusor smooth muscle, the expression of adrenergic beta3 receptor subtype mRNA is predominant, and relaxation of detrusor smooth muscle is mediated mainly via beta3 receptor. Afferent nerve with lower threshold can easily transmit bladder sensation and takes an important role in the pathophysiology of urge urinary incontinence. Successful molecular cloning of vanilloid receptors, which are present in these afferent nerves, revealed that vanilloid receptors are ion-channels, sensitive for heat and pH, and termed VR1 and VRL1. Among purinergic receptors, ion channel type P2X3 receptor is found in afferent nerve fibers and plays some roles in the signal transduction of bladder sensation. In the near future, agonist for the adrenergic beta3 receptor and selective antagonists for VR1, VRL1, or P2X3 will possibly become drugs for pollakisuria and urge urinary incontinence.

  15. Development of a Vaccine against Escherichia coli Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Harry L. T.; Alteri, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the second most common infection in humans after those involving the respiratory tract. This results not only in huge annual economic costs, but in decreased workforce productivity and high patient morbidity. Most infections are caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Antibiotic treatment is generally effective for eradication of the infecting strain; however, documentation of increasing antibiotic resistance, allergic reaction to certain pharmaceuticals, alteration of normal gut flora, and failure to prevent recurrent infections represent significant barriers to treatment. As a result, approaches to prevent UTI such as vaccination represent a gap that must be addressed. Our laboratory has made progress toward development of a preventive vaccine against UPEC. The long-term research goal is to prevent UTIs in women with recurrent UTIs. Our objective has been to identify the optimal combination of protective antigens for inclusion in an effective UTI vaccine, optimal adjuvant, optimal dose, and optimal route of delivery. We hypothesized that a multi-subunit vaccine elicits antibody that protects against experimental challenge with UPEC strains. We have systematically identified four antigens that can individually protect experimentally infected mice from colonization of the bladder and/or kidneys by UPEC when administered intranasally with cholera toxin (CT) as an adjuvant. To advance the vaccine for utility in humans, we will group the individual antigens, all associated with iron acquisition (IreA, Hma, IutA, FyuA), into an effective combination to establish a multi-subunit vaccine. We demonstrated for all four vaccine antigens that antigen-specific serum IgG represents a strong correlate of protection in vaccinated mice. High antibody titers correlate with low colony forming units (CFUs) of UPEC following transurethral challenge of vaccinated mice. However, the contribution of cell-mediated immunity cannot be ruled out and

  16. [Nitrofurantoin--clinical relevance in uncomplicated urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2014-07-01

    The nitrofuran derivative nitrofurantoin has been used for more than 60 years for the antibacterial therapy of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). Despite its long application, this antibiotic retained good activity against Escherichia coli and some other pathogens of uncomplicated urinary tract infections such as Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus species. Nitrofurantoin therapy has been shown to be accompanied by numerous adverse drug effects. Among these, there are also serious side effects such as pulmonary reactions and polyneuropathy, which mainly occur in long-term use. Recent studies, however, have shown a good efficacy and tolerability of short-term nitrofurantoin therapy comparable to previous established standard therapeutic regimens applying cotrimoxazole or quinolones. Because of these data and the alarming resistance rates of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to cotrimoxazole and quinolones that have been increased markedly in several countries, the clinical significance ofnitrofurantoin has been raised again. In many current treatment guidelines, e. g., the international clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, nitrofurantoin has been recommended as one first-line antibiotic of empiric antibacterial treatment of uncomplicated cystitis in otherwise healthy women. In Germany, however, nitrofurantoin should only be applied if more effective and less risky antibiotics cannot be used. Nitrofurantoin is contraindicated in the last three months of pregnancy and in patients suffering from renal impairment of each degree. Despite compatibility concerns, nitrofurantoin has also been recommended for the re-infection prophylaxis of recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in Germany and several other countries.

  17. Risk Factors for Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection and Renal Scarring.

    PubMed

    Keren, Ron; Shaikh, Nader; Pohl, Hans; Gravens-Mueller, Lisa; Ivanova, Anastasia; Zaoutis, Lisa; Patel, Melissa; deBerardinis, Rachel; Parker, Allison; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Haralam, Mary Ann; Pope, Marcia; Kearney, Diana; Sprague, Bruce; Barrera, Raquel; Viteri, Bernarda; Egigueron, Martina; Shah, Neha; Hoberman, Alejandro

    2015-07-01

    To identify risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and renal scarring in children who have had 1 or 2 febrile or symptomatic UTIs and received no antimicrobial prophylaxis. This 2-year, multisite prospective cohort study included 305 children aged 2 to 71 months with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) receiving placebo in the RIVUR (Randomized Intervention for Vesicoureteral Reflux) study and 195 children with no VUR observed in the CUTIE (Careful Urinary Tract Infection Evaluation) study. Primary exposure was presence of VUR; secondary exposures included bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD), age, and race. Outcomes were recurrent febrile or symptomatic urinary tract infection (F/SUTI) and renal scarring. Children with VUR had higher 2-year rates of recurrent F/SUTI (Kaplan-Meier estimate 25.4% compared with 17.3% for VUR and no VUR, respectively). Other factors associated with recurrent F/SUTI included presence of BBD at baseline (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.07 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09-3.93]) and presence of renal scarring on the baseline (99m)Tc-labeled dimercaptosuccinic acid scan (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.88 [95% CI: 1.22-6.80]). Children with BBD and any degree of VUR had the highest risk of recurrent F/SUTI (56%). At the end of the 2-year follow-up period, 8 (5.6%) children in the no VUR group and 24 (10.2%) in the VUR group had renal scars, but the difference was not statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio: 2.05 [95% CI: 0.86-4.87]). VUR and BBD are risk factors for recurrent UTI, especially when they appear in combination. Strategies for preventing recurrent UTI include antimicrobial prophylaxis and treatment of BBD. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Risk Factors for Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection and Renal Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nader; Pohl, Hans; Gravens-Mueller, Lisa; Ivanova, Anastasia; Zaoutis, Lisa; Patel, Melissa; deBerardinis, Rachel; Parker, Allison; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Haralam, Mary Ann; Pope, Marcia; Kearney, Diana; Sprague, Bruce; Barrera, Raquel; Viteri, Bernarda; Egigueron, Martina; Shah, Neha; Hoberman, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and renal scarring in children who have had 1 or 2 febrile or symptomatic UTIs and received no antimicrobial prophylaxis. METHODS: This 2-year, multisite prospective cohort study included 305 children aged 2 to 71 months with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) receiving placebo in the RIVUR (Randomized Intervention for Vesicoureteral Reflux) study and 195 children with no VUR observed in the CUTIE (Careful Urinary Tract Infection Evaluation) study. Primary exposure was presence of VUR; secondary exposures included bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD), age, and race. Outcomes were recurrent febrile or symptomatic urinary tract infection (F/SUTI) and renal scarring. RESULTS: Children with VUR had higher 2-year rates of recurrent F/SUTI (Kaplan-Meier estimate 25.4% compared with 17.3% for VUR and no VUR, respectively). Other factors associated with recurrent F/SUTI included presence of BBD at baseline (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.07 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09–3.93]) and presence of renal scarring on the baseline 99mTc-labeled dimercaptosuccinic acid scan (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.88 [95% CI: 1.22–6.80]). Children with BBD and any degree of VUR had the highest risk of recurrent F/SUTI (56%). At the end of the 2-year follow-up period, 8 (5.6%) children in the no VUR group and 24 (10.2%) in the VUR group had renal scars, but the difference was not statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio: 2.05 [95% CI: 0.86–4.87]). CONCLUSIONS: VUR and BBD are risk factors for recurrent UTI, especially when they appear in combination. Strategies for preventing recurrent UTI include antimicrobial prophylaxis and treatment of BBD. PMID:26055855

  19. Antibiotic prophylaxis in children with relapsing urinary tract infections: review.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, P; Pizzini, C; Fanos, V

    2000-04-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are observed in 30-50% of children after the first UTI. Of these, approximately 90% occur within 3 months of the initial episode. The basic aim of antibiotic prophylaxis in children with malformative uropathy and/or recurrent UTIs, is to reduce the frequency of UTIs. The bacteria most frequently responsible for UTI are gram-negative organisms, with Escherichia coli accounting for 80% of urinary tract pathogens. In children with recurrent UTIs and in those treated with antibiotic prophylaxis there is a greater incidence of UTI due to Proteus spp., Klebsiella spp. and Enterobacter spp., whereas Pseudomonas spp., Serratia spp. and Candida spp. are more frequent in children with urogenital abnormalities and/or undergoing invasive instrumental investigations. Several factors are involved in the pathogenesis of UTI, the main ones being circumcision, periurethral flora, micturition disorders, bowel disorders, local factors and hygienic measures. Several factors facilitate UTI relapse: malformative uropathies, particularly of the obstructive type; vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR); previous repeated episodes of cystitis and/or pyelonephritis (3 or more episodes a year), even in the absence of urinary tract abnormalities; a frequently catheterized neurogenic bladder; kidney transplant. The precise mechanism of action of low-dose antibiotics is not yet fully known. The characteristics of the ideal prophylactic agent are presented in this review, as well as indications, dosages, side effects, clinical data of all molecules. While inappropriate use of antibiotic prophylaxis encourages the emergence of microbial resistance, its proper use may be of great value in clinical practice, by reducing the frequency and clinical expression of UTIs and, in some cases such as VUR, significantly helping to resolve the underlying pathology.

  20. Use of urinary gram stain for detection of urinary tract infection in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Sükrü; Caksen, Hüseyin; Rastgeldi, Levent; Uner, Abdurrahman; Oner, Ahmet Faik; Odabaş, Dursun

    2002-01-01

    In this study, urinary culture, urinary Gram stain, and four tests within the urinalysis, leukocyte esterase, nitrite, microscopyfor bacteria, and microscopyforpyuria, were examined in 100 children with symptoms suggesting urinary tract infection. Our purpose was to determine the validity of the urinary Gram stain compared with a combination of pyuria plus Gram stain and overall urinalysis (positiveness of nitrite, leukocyte esterase, microscopy for bacteria, or microscopy for white blood cell). Of 100 children, aged two days to 15 years, 70 (70 percent) had a positive urinary culture: 40 girls (57 percent) and 30 boys (43 percent). Escherichia coli was the most common isolated agent. The sensitivity and specificity of the urinary Gram stain were 80 percent and 83 percent, and that of the combination of pyuria plus Gram stain 42 percent and 90 percent, and that of the overall urinalysis 74 percent and 3.5 percent respectively. Our findings revealed that neither method of urine screen should substitute for a urine culture in the symptomatic patients in childhood. PMID:12230312

  1. Genomic diversity and fitness of E. coli strains recovered from the intestinal and urinary tracts of women with recurrent urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Swaine L.; Wu, Meng; Henderson, Jeffrey P.; Hooton, Thomas M.; Hibbing, Michael E.; Hultgren, Scott J.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in women and recurrence is a major clinical problem. Most UTIs are caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). UPEC are generally thought to migrate from the gut to the bladder to cause UTI. UPEC strains form specialized intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) in the bladder urothelium as part of a pathogenic mechanism to establish a foothold during acute stages of infection. Evolutionarily, such a specific adaptation to the bladder environment would be predicted to result in decreased fitness in other habitats, such as the gut. To examine this concept, we characterized 45 E. coli strains isolated from the feces and urine of four otherwise healthy women with recurrent UTIs. Multi-locus sequence typing revealed that two of the patients maintained a clonal population in both of these body habitats throughout their recurrent UTIs, whereas the other two manifested a wholesale shift in the dominant UPEC strain colonizing their urinary tract and gut between UTIs. These results were confirmed when we subjected 26 isolates from two patients, one representing the persistent clonal pattern and the other representing the dynamic population shift, to whole genome sequencing. In vivo competition studies conducted in mouse models of bladder and gut colonization, using isolates taken from one of the patients with a wholesale population shift, and a newly developed SNP-based method for quantifying strains, revealed that the strain that dominated in her last UTI episode had increased fitness in both body habitats relative to the one that dominated in the preceding episodes. Furthermore, increased fitness was correlated with differences in the strains’ gene repertoires and their in vitro carbohydrate and amino acid utilization profiles. Thus, UPEC appear capable of persisting in both the gut and urinary tract without a fitness tradeoff. Determination of all of the potential reservoirs for UPEC strains that cause recurrent UTI will

  2. Urinary tract infection in the setting of vesicoureteral reflux

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Roig, Michael L.; Kirsch, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common underlying etiology responsible for febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs) or pyelonephritis in children. Along with the morbidity of pyelonephritis, long-term sequelae of recurrent renal infections include renal scarring, proteinuria, and hypertension. Treatment is directed toward the prevention of recurrent infection through use of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis during a period of observation for spontaneous resolution or by surgical correction. In children, bowel and bladder dysfunction (BBD) plays a significant role in the occurrence of UTI and the rate of VUR resolution. Effective treatment of BBD leads to higher rates of spontaneous resolution and decreased risk of UTI. PMID:27408706

  3. Management of Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections in Healthy Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, Duane R; Nitti, Victor W

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence after urinary tract infection (rUTI) is common in adult women. The majority of recurrences are believed to be reinfection from extraurinary sources such as the rectum or vagina. However, uropathogenic Escherichia coli are now known to invade urothelial cells and form quiescent intracellular bacterial reservoirs. Management of women with frequent symptomatic rUTI can be particularly vexing for both patients and their treating physicians. This review addresses available and promising management strategies for rUTI in healthy adult women. PMID:24082842

  4. [Update on current care guidelines: urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Wuorela, Maarit; Kouri, Timo; Laato, Matti; Lipponen, Pertti; Sammalkorpi, Kari; Uhari, Matti; Uusitalo, Leena; Vuento, Risto

    2011-01-01

    This guideline is focused on the diagnostics and treatment of acute, recurrent and relapsing urinary tract infections in adults and children. Sexually transmitted diseases are not addressed, but must be considered in differential diagnostics. The resistance prevalence of the causative microbes and the ecological adverse effects of antimicrobial agents were considered important factors in selecting optimal therapeutic choices for the guideline. Diagnosis and management of cystitis in otherwise healthy women aged 18-65 years can be based on structured telephone interviews. Primary antimicrobiotic drugs are nitrofurantoin, pivmesillinam and trimetoprim for three days.

  5. Management of recurrent urinary tract infections in healthy adult women.

    PubMed

    Hickling, Duane R; Nitti, Victor W

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence after urinary tract infection (rUTI) is common in adult women. The majority of recurrences are believed to be reinfection from extraurinary sources such as the rectum or vagina. However, uropathogenic Escherichia coli are now known to invade urothelial cells and form quiescent intracellular bacterial reservoirs. Management of women with frequent symptomatic rUTI can be particularly vexing for both patients and their treating physicians. This review addresses available and promising management strategies for rUTI in healthy adult women.

  6. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infection in older adults.

    PubMed

    Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2007-08-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and urinary tract infection (UTI) are common in older community dwellers (ages 65 and older) and nursing home residents. The challenge involved in distinguishing ASB from UTI in this population results from other comorbid illnesses that may present with symptoms similar to UTI and from elderly adults who have cognitive impairment not being able to report their symptoms. This article reviews the most updated information on diagnosis, microbiology, management, and prevention of ASB and UTI as they pertain to older community dwellers and nursing home residents.

  7. [Endoscopic management of urothelial tumours of the upper urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Tomatis, Laurent; Neuzillet, Yann; Carcenac, Aurélien; Nahon, Olivier; Lay, Franck; Lechevallier, Eric; Coulange, Christian

    2006-04-01

    The reference treatment for filling defects of the upper urinary tract is nephroureterectomy with excision of a perimeatal bladder segment. The authors evaluated the role of endoscopy and laser in the management of filling defects of the upper urinary tract. Filling defects of the upper urinary tract were evaluated by biopsies performed during ureteroscopy followed by 10 Watt Holmium-YAG laser vaporisation. High-grade or incompletely vaporised tumours or multifocal tumours or tumours more than 2 cm in diameter received complementary treatment. Low-grade and completely vaporised tumours were followed by ureteroscopy at 3 months and then every 6 months. The authors conducted a prospective study from March 2002 to September 2004. Fifteen consecutive patients were managed according to this protocol. The mean age was 70 years (range: 53 to 85 years). Thirty nine tumours were treated. The mean tumour diameter was 1.05 cm (range: 0.3 to 2.5 cm). In this series of 15 patients treated according to this protocol, 39 tumours were diagnosed and treated. The grade was determined by biopsy in 66% of cases. Seven patients have a median recurrence-free survival of 18 months (range: 12 to 34 months). Overall, conservative management was able to be performed in twelve patients, corresponding to a 22-month kidney preservation rate of 80%. Two patients died during follow-up, one from prostatic cancer and the other from invasive urothelial bladder tumour. One patient who had had recurrence ans had been re-treated was lost for report. Filling defects of the upper urinary tract can be investigated by ureteroscopy to obtain a histological diagnosis and to perform treatment by laser vaporisation. Complementary treatment is then performed depending on the histological results, either by complementary vaporisation or by nephroureterectomy. Laser treatment ensures a high kidney preservation rate but with a recurrence risk. Conservative endoscopic treatment, which is considered to be

  8. The effects of cranberries on preventing urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Shin, Cha-Nam

    2014-02-01

    Despite considerable controversy about their effects, cranberries in various forms have been used widely for several decades to prevent as well as treat urinary tract infections (UTIs). The purpose of this article is to present a review of research-based information regarding the ability of cranberries to prevent UTIs in adults at risk for UTIs. Current evidence suggests that cranberries decrease bacterial adherence to uroepithelial cells and thus decrease the incidence of UTIs without adverse effects in most individuals. Thus clinicians may safely advise patients that cranberries are helpful in preventing UTIs. Cranberries may be a viable adjunct to antibiotics for patients with repeated UTIs.

  9. Drug and Vaccine Development for the Treatment and Prevention of Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Valerie P.; Hannan, Thomas J.; Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans, affecting millions of people every year. UTI cause significant morbidity in women throughout their lifespan, in infant boys, in older men, in individuals with underlying urinary tract abnormalities, and in those that require long-term urethral catheterization, such as patients with spinal cord injuries or incapacitated individuals living in nursing homes. Serious sequelae include frequent recurrences, pyelonephritis with sepsis, renal damage in young children, pre-term birth, and complications of frequent antimicrobial use including high-level antibiotic resistance and Clostridium difficile colitis. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) cause the vast majority of UTI, but less common pathogens such as Enterococcus faecalis and other enterococci frequently take advantage of an abnormal or catheterized urinary tract to cause opportunistic infections. While antibiotic therapy has historically been very successful in controlling UTI, the high rate of recurrence remains a major problem, and many individuals suffer from chronically recurring UTI, requiring long-term prophylactic antibiotic regimens to prevent recurrent UTI. Furthermore, the global emergence of multi-drug resistant UPEC in the past ten years spotlights the need for alternative therapeutic and preventative strategies to combat UTI, including anti-infective drug therapies and vaccines. In this chapter, we review recent advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis, with an emphasis on the identification of promising drug and vaccine targets. We then discuss the development of new UTI drugs and vaccines, highlighting the challenges these approaches face and the need for a greater understanding of urinary tract mucosal immunity. PMID:26999391

  10. Drug and Vaccine Development for the Treatment and Prevention of Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Valerie P; Hannan, Thomas J; Nielsen, Hailyn V; Hultgren, Scott J

    2016-02-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans, affecting millions of people every year. UTI cause significant morbidity in women throughout their lifespan, in infant boys, in older men, in individuals with underlying urinary tract abnormalities, and in those that require long-term urethral catheterization, such as patients with spinal cord injuries or incapacitated individuals living in nursing homes. Serious sequelae include frequent recurrences, pyelonephritis with sepsis, renal damage in young children, pre-term birth, and complications of frequent antimicrobial use including high-level antibiotic resistance and Clostridium difficile colitis. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) cause the vast majority of UTI, but less common pathogens such as Enterococcus faecalis and other enterococci frequently take advantage of an abnormal or catheterized urinary tract to cause opportunistic infections. While antibiotic therapy has historically been very successful in controlling UTI, the high rate of recurrence remains a major problem, and many individuals suffer from chronically recurring UTI, requiring long-term prophylactic antibiotic regimens to prevent recurrent UTI. Furthermore, the global emergence of multi-drug resistant UPEC in the past ten years spotlights the need for alternative therapeutic and preventative strategies to combat UTI, including anti-infective drug therapies and vaccines. In this chapter, we review recent advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis, with an emphasis on the identification of promising drug and vaccine targets. We then discuss the development of new UTI drugs and vaccines, highlighting the challenges these approaches face and the need for a greater understanding of urinary tract mucosal immunity.

  11. [Urinary tract infection in elderly residents of long-term care facilities].

    PubMed

    Stærkind, Mette; Dalager-Pedersen, Michael; Nielsen, Henrik

    2015-03-16

    Urinary tract infection is the most prevalent bacterial infection among residents in Danish long-term care facilities, and it is the most common reason for antibiotic therapy as prevention or treatment in this population. Diagnosis and management of urinary tract infection in the elderly is challenging because of benign asymptomatic bacteriuria, chronic indwelling urinary tract catheters, cognitive impairment and other co-morbidities. This review covers updated information on diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of urinary tract infection in elderly residents of long-term care facilities.

  12. Prevention of bacterial resistance in urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, E J

    1991-01-01

    Recurrences of urinary tract infection (UTI) are frequent in many segments of the population. Most women with recurrent UTI have normal genitourinary tracts, and infection is thought to emanate from the fecal bacterial reservoir, with subsequent vaginal and periurethral colonization. The fluoroquinolones, e.g., norfloxacin, work by inhibiting the A-subunit of DNA gyrase, an essential bacterial enzyme. Plasmid-mediated resistance to the fluoroquinolones has not been reported to occur, but bacterial persistence, which is often an unstable form of resistance, may occur. Norfloxacin is able to decontaminate the anal area selectively and, while being administered, remove potential pathogens from the periurethral area for periods of up to 1 year. Additionally, preliminary data suggest that norfloxacin may prevent catheter-associated gram-negative bacilluria for an average of 17 days. Data concerning 1,130 infected patients treated with norfloxacin showed the development of resistance to be infrequent (1.7%).

  13. Enterobius vermicularis in the male urinary tract: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zahariou, Athanasios; Karamouti, Maria; Papaioannou, Polyanthi

    2007-01-01

    Enterobius vermicularis is an intestinal nematode of humans. Adults usually have low worm burdens and are asymptomatic. Ectopic infections in the pelvic area or urinary tract rarely occur in women. We report a case of the patient with mild voiding difficulties such as urgency, frequency, nocturia, dysuria, mild low back pain or perineal discomfort. The patient's prostatic secretions showed a large number of inflammatory cells and several eggs. The size and the shape of the eggs identified them as a group of E. vermicularis. On examination we found a soft palpable material which was 5 mm diameter in size and spherical shape. Palpation gave the impression of a tissue than a stone. An incision was performed and a 4 mm long living worm was found. The microscopic examination identified the worm as E- vermicularis. It is an extremely rare manifestation of enterobius vermicularis infection since an intestinal-breeding worm is rarely found in the male genital tract. PMID:18001478

  14. What is a urodynamics study of upper urinary tract?

    PubMed

    Vela-Navarrete, R

    1980-01-01

    The urodynamic study of the upper urinary tract is a urologic procedure whose objective is to complement the information obtained by excretion urography in selected cases of documented or suspected upper tract obstruction. The procedure has several steps, all of which can be done by antegrade transcutaneous puncture of the kidney. The first and most important step consists of the simultaneous analysis of resting pelvic pressure, solute concentration in aspirated urine from the renal pelvis, and antegrade pyelogram. This set of data makes up the basic urodynamic evaluation and will be sufficient in many cases for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. However, in selected circumstances of equivocal dilatation or severe kidney atrophy, more complementary information can be gained using antegrade flow studies or temporary diversion by needle nephrostomy, respectively. These conclusions have been based on more than 300 urodynamic evaluations done by the author.

  15. The urinary microbiome and its contribution to lower urinary tract symptoms; ICI-RS 2015.

    PubMed

    Drake, Marcus J; Morris, Nicola; Apostolidis, Apostolos; Rahnama'i, Mohammad S; Marchesi, Julian R

    2017-04-01

    The microbiome is the term used for the symbiotic microbial colonisation of healthy organs. Studies have found bacterial identifiers within voided urine which is apparently sterile on conventional laboratory culture, and accordingly there may be health and disease implications. The International Consultation on Incontinence Research Society (ICI-RS) established a literature review and expert consensus discussion focussed on the increasing awareness of the urinary microbiome, and potential research priorities. The consensus considered the discrepancy between findings of conventional clinical microbiology methods, which generally rely on culture parameters predisposed towards certain "expected" organisms. Discrepancy between selective culture and RNA sequencing to study species-specific 16S ribosomal RNA is increasingly clear, and highlights the possibility that protective or harmful bacteria may be overlooked where microbiological methods are selective. There are now strong signals of the existence of a "core" urinary microbiome for the human urinary tract, particularly emerging with ageing. The consensus reviewed the potential relationship between a patient's microbiome and lower urinary tract dysfunction, whether low-count bacteriuria may be clinically significant and mechanisms which could associate micro-organisms with lower urinary tract symptoms. Key research priorities identified include the need to establish the scope of microbiome across the range of normality and clinical presentations, and gain consensus on testing protocols. Proteomics to study enzymatic and other functions may be necessary, since different bacteria may have overlapping phenotype. Longitudinal studies into risk factors for exposure, cumulative risk, and emergence of disease need to undertaken. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:850-853, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Follow-up after infants younger than 2 months of age with urinary tract infection in Southern Israel: epidemiologic, microbiologic and disease recurrence characteristics.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, Evgenia; Tchernin, Dov; Schreyber, Ruth; Muller, Robert; Leibovitz, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The timing of most recurrences after neonatal urinary tract infection is during the first year of life, with peak incidence 2-6 months after the initial infection. Information on the microbiologic characteristics of recurrent urinary tract infection episodes in relation to the microbiology of the initial episodes is limited. To analyze the epidemiologic/microbiological characteristics of 1st and recurrent urinary tract infection in infants <2 months of age. A retrospective study including all infants <2 months of age with urinary tract infection admitted during 2005-2009 and followed till the age of 1 year. 151 neonates were enrolled (2.7% of all 5617 febrile infants <2 months of age admitted). The overall incidence of urinary tract infection occurring during the first 2 months of life was 151/73,480 (0.2%) live births during 2005-2009 in southern Israel (2.1 cases/1000 live births). One pathogen was isolated in 133 (88.1%); Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Enterococcus spp., Morganella morganii, Proteus spp., and Enterobacter spp. represented the most common pathogens (57.9%, 12.2%, 7.9%, 6.7%, 6.1%, and 5%, respectively). Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, and cefuroxime-axetil were the most commonly recommended prophylactic antibiotics (45%, 13.2%, and 8%, respectively). Twenty-three recurrent urinary tract infection episodes were recorded in 20 (13.2%) patients; 6/23 (26%) were diagnosed within one month following 1st episode. E. coli was the most frequent recurrent urinary tract infection pathogen (12/23, 52.2%). No differences were recorded in E. coli distribution between first urinary tract infection vs. recurrent urinary tract infection. Seventeen (74%) recurrent urinary tract infection episodes were caused by pathogens different (phenotypically) from those isolated in 1st episode. Recurrent urinary tract infection occurred in 25.0%, 8.3%, and 0 patients recommended trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, cefuroxime-axetil, or amoxicillin prophylaxis

  17. Renal function in congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Kemper, M J; Müller-Wiefel, D E

    2001-11-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract are a major cause of chronic and end-stage renal failure in children. The molecular mechanisms having been elaborated, there is now growing evidence that kidney function is to a large extent determined genetically at an early stage. Assessment of kidney function is an important tool in clinical medicine and is feasible in utero. Postnatally, determination of absolute glomerular filtration rate and also of split and excretory renal function play an important role in the determination of treatment and prognosis. This is supplemented by other biochemical, molecular and interventional prognostic factors, which are of help in preservation of kidney survival by minimizing modulating factors. If chronic or terminal renal failure ensues in childhood or even in early infancy, however, improved medical care has led to encouraging results, ultimately influencing the motivation in the care of children with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

  18. Neuromodulation for the Treatment of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Tomonori; Kaga, Kanya; Fuse, Miki; Shibata, Chiharu; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki

    2015-09-01

    Neuromodulation therapy incorporates electrical stimulation to target specific nerves that control lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The objectives of this article are to review the mechanism of action, the type of neuromodulation, and the efficacy of neuromodulation mainly according to the results of randomized controlled trials. Neuromodulation includes pelvic floor electrical stimulation (ES) using vaginal, anal and surface electrodes, interferential therapy (IF), magnetic stimulation (MS), percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation, and sacral nerve stimulation (SNS). The former four stimulations are used for external periodic (short-term) stimulation, and SNS are used for internal, chronic (long-term) stimulation. All of these therapies have been reported to be effective for overactive bladder or urgency urinary incontinence. Pelvic floor ES, IF, and MS have also been reported to be effective for stress urinary incontinence. The mechanism of neuromodulation for overactive bladder has been reported to be the reflex inhibition of detrusor contraction by the activation of afferent fibers by three actions, i.e., the activation of hypogastric nerve, the direct inhibition of the pelvic nerve within the sacral cord and the supraspinal inhibition of the detrusor reflex. The mechanism of neuromodulation for stress incontinence is contraction of the pelvic floor muscles through an effect on the muscle fibers as well as through the stimulation of pudendal nerves. Overall, cure and improvement rates of these therapies for urinary incontinence are 30-50, and 60-90% respectively. MS has been considered to be a technique for stimulating nervous system noninvasively. SNS is indicated for patients with refractory overactive bladder and urinary retention.

  19. Vesicoureteral reflux and other urinary tract malformations in mice compound heterozygous for Pax2 and Emx2.

    PubMed

    Boualia, Sami K; Gaitan, Yaned; Murawski, Inga; Nadon, Robert; Gupta, Indra R; Bouchard, Maxime

    2011-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the most common cause of chronic kidney disease in children. This disease group includes a spectrum of urinary tract defects including vesicoureteral reflux, duplex kidneys and other developmental defects that can be found alone or in combination. To identify new regulators of CAKUT, we tested the genetic cooperativity between several key regulators of urogenital system development in mice. We found a high incidence of urinary tract anomalies in Pax2;Emx2 compound heterozygous mice that are not found in single heterozygous mice. Pax2⁺/⁻;Emx2⁺/⁻ mice harbor duplex systems associated with urinary tract obstruction, bifid ureter and a high penetrance of vesicoureteral reflux. Remarkably, most compound heterozygous mice refluxed at low intravesical pressure. Early analysis of Pax2⁺/⁻;Emx2⁺/⁻ embryos point to ureter budding defects as the primary cause of urinary tract anomalies. We additionally establish Pax2 as a direct regulator of Emx2 expression in the Wolffian duct. Together, these results identify a haploinsufficient genetic combination resulting in CAKUT-like phenotype, including a high sensitivity to vesicoureteral reflux. As both genes are located on human chromosome 10q, which is lost in a proportion of VUR patients, these findings may help understand VUR and CAKUT in humans.

  20. Particular Distribution of Enterobacter cloacae Strains Isolated from Urinary Tract Infection within Clonal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Majid; Bakhshi, Bita; Najar Peerayeh, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Based on biochemical properties, Enterobacter cloacae represents a large complex of at least 13 variant species, subspecies, and genotypes that progressively identified as the most species causing hospital-acquired infections. The aim of this study was to determine the relevance between phylogenetically related strains within the E. cloacae complex and the frequency of urinary tract infection caused by them. Methods: A 268-bp fragment was obtained from hsp60 gene for 50 clinical E. cloacae isolates from urine cultures of inpatients that admitted to six hospitals in Tehran, Iran during December 2012 to November 2013. The 107 nucleotide sequences were analyzed and the evolutionary distances of sequences were computed and neighbor-joining tree was calculated. Results: It showed that all of the genetic clusters have not an equal involvement in pathogenesis of urinary tract infections. Three superior clusters were found, together representing more than two third (80%) of the isolates (cluster VI with 25 members; clusters III and VIII with 9 and 6 members, respectively) and some genetic clusters were absent (IV, X, XII, and xiii), some of which are supposed to be associated with plants and no human infection has been reported. Conclusions: This study, for the first time, reports the unequal contribution of E. cloacae complex subspecies and clusters in urinary tract infections in Iran and together with studies from other countries suggest that the subspecies of E.hormaechei subsp. Oharae is the most prevalent E. cloacae complex subspecies regardless of country under study. PMID:26498349

  1. Particular Distribution of Enterobacter cloacae Strains Isolated from Urinary Tract Infection within Clonal Complexes.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Majid; Bakhshi, Bita; Najar Peerayeh, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    Based on biochemical properties, Enterobacter cloacae represents a large complex of at least 13 variant species, subspecies, and genotypes that progressively identified as the most species causing hospital-acquired infections. The aim of this study was to determine the relevance between phylogenetically related strains within the E. cloacae complex and the frequency of urinary tract infection caused by them. A 268-bp fragment was obtained from hsp60 gene for 50 clinical E. cloacae isolates from urine cultures of inpatients that admitted to six hospitals in Tehran, Iran during December 2012 to November 2013. The 107 nucleotide sequences were analyzed and the evolutionary distances of sequences were computed and neighbor-joining tree was calculated. It showed that all of the genetic clusters have not an equal involvement in pathogenesis of urinary tract infections. Three superior clusters were found, together representing more than two third (80%) of the isolates (cluster VI with 25 members; clusters III and VIII with 9 and 6 members, respectively) and some genetic clusters were absent (IV, X, XII, and xiii), some of which are supposed to be associated with plants and no human infection has been reported. This study, for the first time, reports the unequal contribution of E. cloacae complex subspecies and clusters in urinary tract infections in Iran and together with studies from other countries suggest that the subspecies of E.hormaechei subsp. Oharae is the most prevalent E. cloacae complex subspecies regardless of country under study.

  2. Epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Gram-negative bacteria causing urinary tract infections in the Asia-Pacific region: 2009-2010 results from the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART).

    PubMed

    Lu, Po-Liang; Liu, Yung-Ching; Toh, Han-Siong; Lee, Yu-Lin; Liu, Yuag-Meng; Ho, Cheng-Mao; Huang, Chi-Chang; Liu, Chun-Eng; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wang, Jen-Hsien; Tang, Hung-Jen; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Chen, Yao-Shen; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Xu, Yingchun; Ni, Yuxing; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-06-01

    In 2009, the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART) was expanded to include surveillance of Gram-negative pathogens causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in the Asia-Pacific region. A total of 1762 isolates were collected from 38 centers in 11 countries from patients with UTIs in 2009 and 2010. In vitro susceptibilities were determined by the broth microdilution method and susceptibility profiles were determined using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) interpretive criteria, as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) in 2010 (M100-S20), in 2011 (M100-S21), and in 2012 (M100-S22). Enterobacteriaceae comprised 86.0% of the isolates, of which Escherichia coli (56.5%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (13.8%) were the two most common species. Amikacin was the most effective antibiotic (91.7%), followed by ertapenem (86.9%), imipenem (86.6%), and piperacillin-tazobactam (84.9%). Rates of susceptibility were 50.3% for cefoxitin and ranged from 50.3% to 74.2% for the third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins. For ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, the susceptibility rates were 51.4% and 54.4%, respectively. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae comprised 28.2% of all isolates. We also found a high rate of resistance to carbapenems among Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing UTI. Interestingly, according to 2012 CLSI breakpoints, approximately 33.4% of ESBL producers were still susceptible to ceftazidime. However, this in vitro efficacy of ceftazidime needs to be validated in vivo by clinical data. The lowered CLSI interpretive breakpoints for piperacillin-tazobactam, carbapenems, and some cephalosporins in 2011-2012 for Enterobacteriaceae resulted in an approximate 5% drop in susceptibility rates for each drug, with the exception of imipenem for which the susceptibility rate dropped from 99.4% according to 2010 criteria to 91.2% according to 2011 criteria. With the updated

  3. Fosfomycin versus meropenem in bacteraemic urinary tract infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (FOREST): study protocol for an investigator-driven randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rosso-Fernández, Clara; Sojo-Dorado, Jesús; Barriga, Angel; Lavín-Alconero, Lucía; Palacios, Zaira; López-Hernández, Inmaculada; Merino, Vicente; Camean, Manuel; Pascual, Alvaro; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Kindelán, Natera

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Finding therapeutic alternatives to carbapenems in infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) is imperative. Although fosfomycin was discovered more than 40 years ago, it was not investigated in accordance with current standards and so is not used in clinical practice except in desperate situations. It is one of the so-called neglected antibiotics of high potential interest for the future. Methods and analysis The main objective of this project is to demonstrate the clinical non-inferiority of intravenous fosfomycin with regard to meropenem for treating bacteraemic urinary tract infections (UTI) caused by ESBL-EC. This is a ‘real practice’ multicentre, open-label, phase III randomised controlled trial, designed to compare the clinical and microbiological efficacy, and safety of intravenous fosfomycin (4 g/6 h) and meropenem (1 g/8 h) as targeted therapy for this infection; a change to oral therapy is permitted after 5 days in both arms, in accordance with predetermined options. The study design follows the latest recommendations for designing trials investigating new options for multidrug-resistant bacteria. Secondary objectives include the study of fosfomycin concentrations in plasma and the impact of both drugs on intestinal colonisation by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from the Andalusian Coordinating Institutional Review Board (IRB) for Biomedical Research (Referral Ethics Committee), which obtained approval from the local ethics committees at all participating sites in Spain (22 sites). Data will be presented at international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. Discussion This project is proposed as an initial step in the investigation of an orphan antimicrobial of low cost with high potential as a therapeutic alternative in common infections such as UTI in selected patients. These results may have a

  4. Fosfomycin versus meropenem in bacteraemic urinary tract infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (FOREST): study protocol for an investigator-driven randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rosso-Fernández, Clara; Sojo-Dorado, Jesús; Barriga, Angel; Lavín-Alconero, Lucía; Palacios, Zaira; López-Hernández, Inmaculada; Merino, Vicente; Camean, Manuel; Pascual, Alvaro; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús

    2015-03-31

    Finding therapeutic alternatives to carbapenems in infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) is imperative. Although fosfomycin was discovered more than 40 years ago, it was not investigated in accordance with current standards and so is not used in clinical practice except in desperate situations. It is one of the so-called neglected antibiotics of high potential interest for the future. The main objective of this project is to demonstrate the clinical non-inferiority of intravenous fosfomycin with regard to meropenem for treating bacteraemic urinary tract infections (UTI) caused by ESBL-EC. This is a 'real practice' multicentre, open-label, phase III randomised controlled trial, designed to compare the clinical and microbiological efficacy, and safety of intravenous fosfomycin (4 g/6 h) and meropenem (1 g/8 h) as targeted therapy for this infection; a change to oral therapy is permitted after 5 days in both arms, in accordance with predetermined options. The study design follows the latest recommendations for designing trials investigating new options for multidrug-resistant bacteria. Secondary objectives include the study of fosfomycin concentrations in plasma and the impact of both drugs on intestinal colonisation by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli. Ethical approval was obtained from the Andalusian Coordinating Institutional Review Board (IRB) for Biomedical Research (Referral Ethics Committee), which obtained approval from the local ethics committees at all participating sites in Spain (22 sites). Data will be presented at international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. This project is proposed as an initial step in the investigation of an orphan antimicrobial of low cost with high potential as a therapeutic alternative in common infections such as UTI in selected patients. These results may have a major impact on the use of antibiotics and the development of new projects

  5. Efficacy of ceftolozane/tazobactam against urinary tract and intra-abdominal infections caused by ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae: a pooled analysis of Phase 3 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Popejoy, Myra W; Paterson, David L; Cloutier, Daniel; Huntington, Jennifer A; Miller, Benjamin; Bliss, Caleb A; Steenbergen, Judith N; Hershberger, Ellie; Umeh, Obiamiwe; Kaye, Keith S

    2017-01-01

    The increase in infections caused by drug-resistant ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-ENT) is a global concern. The characteristics and outcomes of patients infected with ESBL-ENT were examined in a pooled analysis of Phase 3 clinical trials of ceftolozane/tazobactam in patients with complicated urinary tract infections (ASPECT-cUTI) and complicated intra-abdominal infections (ASPECT-cIAI). Trials were randomized and double blind. The ASPECT-cUTI regimen was 7 days of either intravenous ceftolozane/tazobactam (1.5 g) every 8 h or levofloxacin (750 mg) once daily. The ASPECT-cIAI regimen was 4-14 days of either intravenous ceftolozane/tazobactam (1.5 g) plus metronidazole (500 mg) or meropenem (1 g) every 8 h. Baseline cultures were obtained in both indications. Enterobacteriaceae were selected for ESBL characterization based on predefined criteria and were verified genotypically. Outcomes were assessed at the test-of-cure visit 5-9 days post-therapy in ASPECT-cUTI and 24-32 days post-randomization in ASPECT-cIAI among microbiologically evaluable (ME) patients. Of 2076 patients randomized, 1346 were included in the pooled ME population and 150 of 1346 (11.1%) had ESBL-ENT at baseline. At US FDA/EUCAST breakpoints of ≤2/≤1 mg/L, 81.8%/72.3% of ESBL-ENT (ESBL-Escherichia coli, 95%/88.1%; ESBL-Klebsiella pneumoniae, 56.7%/36.7%) were susceptible to ceftolozane/tazobactam versus 25.3%/24.1% susceptible to levofloxacin and 98.3%/98.3% susceptible to meropenem at CLSI/EUCAST breakpoints. Clinical cure rates for ME patients with ESBL-ENT were 97.4% (76/78) for ceftolozane/tazobactam [ESBL-E. coli, 98.0% (49 of 50); ESBL-K. pneumoniae, 94.4% (17 of 18)], 82.6% (38 of 46) for levofloxacin and 88.5% (23 of 26) for meropenem. Randomized trial data demonstrated high clinical cure rates with ceftolozane/tazobactam treatment of cIAI and cUTI caused by ESBL-ENT. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial

  6. Review of the current management of lower urinary tract injuries by the EAU Trauma Guidelines Panel.

    PubMed

    Lumen, Nicolaas; Kuehhas, Franklin E; Djakovic, Nenad; Kitrey, Noam D; Serafetinidis, Efraim; Sharma, Davendra M; Summerton, Duncan J

    2015-05-01

    The most recent European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on urologic trauma were published in 2014. To present a summary of the 2014 version of the EAU guidelines on urologic trauma of the lower urinary tract with an emphasis on diagnosis and treatment. The EAU Trauma Panel reviewed the English-language literature via a Medline search for lower urinary tract injury (LUTI) up to November 2013. The focus was on newer publications and reviews, although older key references could be included. A full version of the guidelines is available in print (EAU Guidelines 2014 edition, ISBN/EAN 978-90-79754-65-6) and online (www.uroweb.org). Blunt trauma is the main cause of LUTI. The preferred diagnostic modality for bladder and urethral injury is cystography and urethrography, respectively. In the treatment of bladder injuries, it is important to distinguish between extra- and intraperitoneal ruptures. Treatment of male anterior urethral injuries depends on the cause (blunt vs penetrating vs penile-fracture-related injury). Blunt posterior urethral injuries can be corrected by immediate/early endoscopic realignment. If this is not possible, such injuries are managed by suprapubic urinary diversion and deferred (>3 mo) urethroplasty. Treatment of female urethral injuries depends on the location of the injury and is usually surgical. Correct treatment of LUTIs is important to minimise long-term urinary symptoms and sexual dysfunction. This review performed by the EAU trauma panel summarises the current management of LUTIs. Patients with trauma to the lower urinary tract benefit from accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment according to the nature and severity of their injury. Copyright © 2014 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Genomic diversity and fitness of E. coli strains recovered from the intestinal and urinary tracts of women with recurrent urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Swaine L; Wu, Meng; Henderson, Jeffrey P; Hooton, Thomas M; Hibbing, Michael E; Hultgren, Scott J; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2013-05-08

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in women, and recurrence is a major clinical problem. Most UTIs are caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). UPEC are generally thought to migrate from the gut to the bladder to cause UTI. UPEC form specialized intracellular bacterial communities in the bladder urothelium as part of a pathogenic mechanism to establish a foothold during acute stages of infection. Evolutionarily, such a specific adaptation to the bladder environment would be predicted to result in decreased fitness in other habitats, such as the gut. To examine this prediction, we characterized 45 E. coli strains isolated from the feces and urine of four otherwise healthy women with recurrent UTI. Multilocus sequence typing and whole genome sequencing revealed that two patients maintained a clonal population in both these body habitats throughout their recurrent UTIs, whereas the other two exhibited a wholesale shift in the dominant UPEC strain colonizing both sites. In vivo competition studies in mouse models, using isolates taken from one of the patients with a wholesale population shift, revealed that the strain that dominated her last UTI episode had increased fitness in both the gut and the bladder relative to the strain that dominated in preceding episodes. Increased fitness correlated with differences in the strains' gene repertoires and carbohydrate and amino acid utilization profiles. Thus, UPEC appear capable of persisting in both the gut and urinary tract without a fitness trade-off, emphasizing the need to widen our consideration of potential reservoirs for strains causing recurrent UTI.

  8. Detection of urinary tract infections by rapid methods.

    PubMed Central

    Pezzlo, M

    1988-01-01

    A review of rapid urine screens for detection of bacteriuria and pyuria demonstrates a number of available alternatives to the culture method. Selection of one or more of these systems for routine use is dependent upon the laboratory and the patient population being tested. The laboratory approach to the diagnosis of urinary tract infection should consider the clinical diagnosis of the patient whenever possible. Keeping in mind that quantitative urine cultures alone cannot be used to detect infection in some patient populations unless lower colony counts are considered, a rapid screen may be a more practical approach. It has become accepted that 10(5) CFU/ml can no longer be used as the standard for all patient groups, that pyuria often is important in making the diagnosis of a urinary tract infection, and that most of the rapid screens are more sensitive than the culture method at 10(5) CFU/ml. Presently, no one approach can be recommended for all laboratories and all patient groups. However, each diagnostic laboratory should select one approach which is best for its situation. It is not practical, efficient, or cost effective to define a protocol for each possible clinical condition; however, all should be considered when developing a protocol. This protocol should be compatible with the patient population and communicated to the physicians. Use of a rapid screen should be beneficial to the patient, the physician, and the laboratory. PMID:3058296

  9. Urinalysis and Urinary Tract Infection: Update for Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jennifer L.

    2001-01-01

    Dysuria is a common presenting complaint of women and urinalysis is a valuable tool in the initial evaluation of this presentation. Clinicians need to be aware that pyuria is the best determinate of bacteriuria requiring therapy and that values significant for infection differ depending on the method of analysis. A hemocytometer yields a value of ≥ 10 WBC/ mm3 significant for bacteriuria, while manual microscopy studies show ≥ 8 WBC/high-power field reliably predicts a positive urine culture. In cases of uncomplicated symptomatic urinary tract infection, a positive value for nitrites and leukocyte esterase by urine dipstick can be treated without the need for a urine culture. Automated urinalysis used widely in large volume laboratories provides more sensitive detection of leukocytes and bacteria in the urine.With automated microscopy, a value of > 2 WBC/hpf is significant pyuria indicative of inflammation of the urinary tract. In complicated cases such as pregnancy, recurrent infection or renal involvement, further evaluation is necessary including manual microscopy and urine culture with sensitivities. PMID:11916184

  10. Diagnosis and management of pediatric urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Zorc, Joseph J; Kiddoo, Darcie A; Shaw, Kathy N

    2005-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is among the most commonly diagnosed bacterial infections of childhood. Although frequently encountered and well researched, diagnosis and management of UTI continue to be a controversial issue with many challenges for the clinician. Prevalence studies have shown that UTI may often be missed on history and physical examination, and the decision to screen for UTI must balance the risk for missed infections with the cost and inconvenience of testing. Interpretation of rapid diagnostic tests and culture is complicated by issues of contamination, false test results, and asymptomatic colonization of the urinary tract with nonpathogenic bacteria. The appropriate treatment of UTI has been controversial and has become more complex with the emergence of resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Finally, the anatomic evaluation and long-term management of a child after a UTI have been based on limited evidence, and newer studies question some of the tenets of prior recommendations. The goal of this review is to provide an up-to-date summary of the literature with particular attention to practical questions about diagnosis and management for the clinician.

  11. Water consumption and urinary tract infections: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Cai, Xiang; Wazir, Romel; Wang, Kunjie; Li, Hong

    2016-06-01

    To address to a better understanding of whether increased water consumption is associated with beneficial effects of urinary tract infections prophylaxis and treatment, and if so, the mechanism involved in this process. Models of the catheterized bladder were infected with Escherichia coli. Artificial urine was supplied at various flow rates and various concentrations to separately assess the "flushing effect" and "dilution effect" of increased water consumption on catheter blockage time, encrustation formation, and bacterial growth. There were no statistical significances regarding catheter blockage time (P = 0.92), encrustation formation, and bacterial growth among bladder models supplied with various flow rates. When the flow rate was set as 1 ml/min, however, there showed significant decrease trend of the time to blockage (P = 0.0005), encrustation formation, and bacterial growth as the concentration of the artificial urine increased except the twofold-concentration urine group. Increased water consumption is associated with beneficial effects of urinary tract infection prophylaxis and treatment, and dilution effect of bacteria nutrition in the urine is at least partly involved in this process if not all, rather than the "flushing effect". Considering the flaws and the in vitro design of the current study, however, an in vivo study is warranted.

  12. [Modern imaging technology for childhood urinary tract infection].

    PubMed

    Riccabona, M; Fotter, R

    2005-12-01

    Imaging in childhood urinary tract infection (UTI) is still a matter of debate. There are established guidelines, however new knowledge and the changed medical environment have enhanced this ongoing discussion. These new insights have impacted therapy and consequently the imaging algorithm. Modern imaging methods -- particularly MRI and modern ultrasound (US) -- are less invasive with a lower radiation burden. Additionally, it has been shown that VUR is a poor predictor for renal scarring out, which affects long-term results. Furthermore, the majority of UT malformations is depicted by prenatal US. The most crucial aspect of improving long-term outcome appears to be the early and reliable depiction of UTI and effective treatment to prevent renal scarring. This review tries to present this new knowledge and to discuss the potential of modern imaging. Recent changes in imaging algorithms are highlighted and an outcome-oriented algorithm that addresses these recent developments is proposed, without lightly abandoning established standards. It consists of an orienting US and -- for depiction of renal involvement -- amplitude coded color Doppler sonography or renal static scintigraphy (considered the gold standard, particularly for evaluating scars); in future MRI may play a role. Based on this concept, only patients with renal damage as well as patients with complex urinary tract malformations or intractable recurrent UTI may have to undergo VCUG.

  13. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole compared with sulfamethoxazole in urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Guy

    1974-01-01

    Thirty-nine subjects with active non-obstructive urinary tract infection due to common pathogens were treated in a randomized fashion either with sulfamethoxazole alone (22 patients) or a combination of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (17 patients) during four consecutive weeks in the course of a controlled study. The combination trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole appeared more effective than sulfamethoxazole alone in eradicating infection. Complete disappearance of urinary tract infection was obtained in 82% of subjects treated with the combination versus 59% in those treated with sulfamethoxazole alone. Recurrence of infection averaged 43% in the group treated with the combination and 54% in those treated with sulfamethoxazole alone. The mean time interval between successful response and recurrence of infection was 17 weeks for the combination and 20 weeks for sulfamethoxazole alone. When the comparison of the results between sulfamethoxazole alone and the combination trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is restricted to the subjects with E. coli infection (69% of all cases), no important difference between the two groups can be demonstrated. A skin rash which sometimes disappeared spontaneously despite continued medication was the only side effect noted with the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole combination. PMID:4596406

  14. Advances in intravesical therapy for urinary tract disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Kashyap, Mahendra; Hensley, Harvey; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intravesical therapy is a valuable option in the clinical management of urinary tract disorders such as interstitial cystitis/ painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and refractory overactive bladder. This review will cover the latest advances in this field using polymer and liposomes as delivery platform for drugs, protein and nucleic acids. Areas covered This review summarizes the significance of intravesical therapy for lower urinary tract disorders. The recent advancement of liposomes as a drug delivery platform for botulinum toxin, tacrolimus and small interfering RNA is discussed. The importance of polymers forming indwelling devices and hydrogels are also discussed, where all preparations improved efficacy parameters in rodent models. Clinical experience of treating IC/PBS with indwelling devices and liposomes are summarized and preclinical evidence about the downregulation of target gene expression in rodent bladder with liposomes complexed with siRNA is also reviewed. Expert opinion There have been several advances in the field of intravesical therapy for improving clinical outcomes. One of the most promising research avenues is the repurposing of drugs, given previously by other routes of administration, such as tacrolimus. Intravesical therapy also opens up novel therapeutic targets with improved efficacy and safety for underactive bladder. PMID:26479968

  15. Measuring Escherichia coli Gene Expression during Human Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Escherichia coli (E. coli) evolved by acquisition of pathogenicity islands, phage, plasmids, and DNA segments by horizontal gene transfer. Strains are heterogeneous but virulent uropathogenic isolates more often have specific fimbriae, toxins, and iron receptors than commensal strains. One may ask whether it is the virulence factors alone that are required to establish infection. While these virulence factors clearly contribute strongly to pathogenesis, bacteria must survive by metabolizing nutrients available to them. By constructing mutants in all major metabolic pathways and co-challenging mice transurethrally with each mutant and the wild type strain, we identified which major metabolic pathways are required to infect the urinary tract. We must also ask what else is E. coli doing in vivo? To answer this question, we examined the transcriptome of E. coli CFT073 in the murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) as well as for E. coli strains collected and analyzed directly from the urine of patients attending either a urology clinic or a university health clinic for symptoms of UTI. Using microarrays and RNA-seq, we measured in vivo gene expression for these uropathogenic E. coli strains, identifying genes upregulated during murine and human UTI. Our findings allow us to propose a new definition of bacterial virulence. PMID:26784237

  16. Multi-detector CT in the paediatric urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Damasio, M B; Darge, K; Riccabona, M

    2013-07-01

    The use of paediatric multi-slice CT (MSCT) is rapidly increasing worldwide. As technology advances its application in paediatric care is constantly expanding with an increasing need for radiation dose control and appropriate utilization. Recommendations on how and when to use CT for assessment of the paediatric urinary tract appear to be an important issue. Therefore the European Society of Paediatric Radiology (ESPR) uroradiology task force and European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) paediatric working groups created a proposal for performing renal CT in children that has recently been published. The objective of this paper is to discuss paediatric urinary tract CT (uro-CT) in more detail and depth. The specific aim is not only to offer general recommendations on clinical indications and optimization processes of paediatric CT examination, but also to address various childhood characteristics and phenomena that facilitate understanding the different approach and use of uro-CT in children compared to adults. According to ALARA principles, paediatric uro-CT should only be considered for selected indications provided high-level comprehensive US is not conclusive and alternative non-ionizing techniques such as MR are not available or appropriate. Optimization of paediatric uro-CT protocols (considering lower age-adapted kV and mAs) is mandatory, and the number of phases and acquisition series should be kept as few as possible.

  17. [Cranberries for prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Nergård, Cecilie Sogn; Solhaug, Vigdis

    2009-02-12

    Cranberries have been used for prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections for decades. The berries contain proanthocyanidins that may reduce the susceptibility to infection by preventing bacteria from attaching to uroepithelial cells. Several clinical trials have been published during recent years. This article reviews documentation of cranberries on clinical effect, adverse events, drug interactions and use during pregnancy and lactation. Clinical effects of cranberries have been assessed based on the Cochrane review from January 2007 and literature on clinical trials retrieved from a systematic search of PubMed and Embase (from 1 January 2007 to 29 October 2008) with the search terms "cranberry", "Vaccinium macrocarpon", "Vaccinium oxycoccus". Some evidence exists on cranberries' preventive effect on recurrent symptomatic urinary tract infections in women. The evidence is inconclusive for children, men and older people (both men and women). Studies of people with neuropathic bladder are contradictory. Most of the clinical trials published have several flaws and have not used standardised products. More evidence is needed to determine the optimum dosage, method of administration and the minimum length of treatment. Cranberries should not be used during pregnancy and lactation due to lack of safety data. Further, properly designed studies with standardised products and relevant outcomes are needed.

  18. Are ultrasound renal aspects associated with urinary biochemistry in fetuses with lower urinary tract obstruction?

    PubMed

    Nassr, Ahmed A; Koh, Chester Koh; Shamshirsaz, Alireza A; Espinoza, Jimmy; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Sharhan, Dina; Welty, Stephen; Angelo, Joseph; Roth, David; Belfort, Michael A; Braun, Michael; Ruano, Rodrigo

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the association between ultrasonographic renal parameters and urine biochemistry in fetuses with lower urinary tract obstruction (LUTO). Data were collected prospectively from 31 consecutive fetuses with LUTO that underwent vesicocentesis for fetal urinary biochemistry between April 2013 and September 2015. The following renal ultrasound markers were assessed immediately before the vesicocentesis: renal echogenicity, presence of cortical cysts, presence of findings suggestive of 'renal dysplasia' (hyperechogenic cystic kidneys with no cortical-medullary differentiation) and severe oligohydramnios (amniotic fluid < 5th percentile). The association of these parameters to the fetal urinary concentration of sodium, chloride, calcium, osmolality and beta2-microglobulin was investigated by logistic regression analysis. There was no relationship between any of the ultrasonographic fetal renal characteristics and fetal urinary biochemistry. In LUTO, the ultrasound appearance of the fetal kidneys and urinary biochemistry are not correlated. It may be better to take both ultrasound and biochemistry into account when evaluating fetuses with fetal LUTO. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Urinary Tract Stones and Osteoporosis: Findings From the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Laura D; Hovey, Kathleen M; Andrews, Christopher A; Thomas, Fridtjof; Sorensen, Mathew D; Crandall, Carolyn J; Watts, Nelson B; Bethel, Monique; Johnson, Karen C

    2017-01-01

    Kidney and bladder stones (urinary tract stones) and osteoporosis are prevalent, serious conditions for postmenopausal women. Men with kidney stones are at increased risk of osteoporosis; however, the relationship of urinary tract stones to osteoporosis in postmenopausal women has not been established. The purpose of this study was to determine whether urinary tract stones are an independent risk factor for changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and incident fractures in women in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). Data were obtained from 150,689 women in the Observational Study and Clinical Trials of the WHI with information on urinary tract stones status: 9856 of these women reported urinary tract stones at baseline and/or incident urinary tract stones during follow-up. Cox regression models were used to determine the association of urinary tract stones with incident fractures and linear mixed models were used to investigate the relationship of urinary tract stones with changes in BMD that occurred during WHI. Follow-up was over an average of 8 years. Models were adjusted for demographic and clinical factors, medication use, and dietary histories. In unadjusted models there was a significant association of urinary tract stones with incident total fractures (HR 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.17). However, in covariate adjusted analyses, urinary tract stones were not significantly related to changes in BMD at any skeletal site or to incident fractures. In conclusion, urinary tract stones in postmenopausal women are not an independent risk factor for osteoporosis. PMID:25990099

  20. Neurotrophins in the Lower Urinary Tract: Becoming of Age

    PubMed Central

    Frias, Bárbara; Lopes, Tiago; Pinto, Rui; Cruz, Francisco; Cruz, Célia Duarte

    2011-01-01

    The lower urinary tract (LUT) comprises a storage unit, the urinary bladder, and an outlet, the urethra. The coordination between the two structures is tightly controlled by the nervous system and, therefore, LUT function is highly susceptible to injuries to the neuronal pathways involved in micturition control. These injuries may include lesions to the spinal cord or to nerve fibres and result in micturition dysfunction. A common trait of micturition pathologies, irrespective of its origin, is an upregulation in synthesis and secretion of neurotrophins, most notably Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF). These neurotrophins are produced by neuronal and non-neuronal cells and exert their effects upon binding to their high-affinity receptors abundantly expressed in the neuronal circuits regulating LUT function. In addition, NGF and BDNF are present in detectable amounts in the urine of patients suffering from various LUT pathologies, suggesting that analysis of urinary NGF and BDNF may serve as likely biomarkers to be studied in tandem with other factors when diagnosing patients. Studies with experimental models of bladder dysfunction using antagonists of NGF and BDNF receptors as well as scavenging agents suggest that those NTs may be key elements in the pathophysiology of bladder dysfunctions. In addition, available data indicates that NGF and BDNF might constitute future targets for designing new drugs for better treatment of bladder dysfunction. PMID:22654715

  1. ROPE Registry Project to Determine the Safety and Efficacy of Prostate Artery Embolisation (PAE) for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Secondary to Benign Prostatic Enlargement (LUTS BPE).

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Caused by Benign Prostatic Enlargement (LUTS BPE); Prostate Artery Embolisation (PAE); Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP); Open Prostatectomy; Laser Enucleation or Ablation of the Prostate

  2. Isolation and antibiotic susceptibility of E. coli from urinary tract infections in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Sumera; Ahmad Anjum, Aftab; Ijaz, Tayyaba; Asad Ali, Muhammad; Ur Rehman Khan, Muti; Nawaz, Muhammad

    2014-03-01

    The study was conducted to isolate and determine the antibiotic resistance in E. coli from urinary tract infections in a tertiary care hospital, Lahore. Urine samples (n=500) were collected from patients with signs and symptoms of Urinary tract infections. Bacteria were isolated and identified by conventional biochemical profile. Antibiotic resistance pattern of E. coli against different antibiotic was determined by Kirby-Baur method. Bacterial etiological agent was isolated from 402 samples with highest prevalence of E. coli (321, 80%) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (9.4%), Proteus species (5.4%) and Pseudomonas species (5.2%). The E. coli were highly resistant to penicillin (100%), amoxicillin (100%) and cefotaxime (89.7%), followed by intermediate level of resistance to ceftazidime (73.8%), cephradine (73.8%), tetracycline (69.4%), doxycycline (66.6%), augmentin (62.6%), gentamycin (59.8%), cefuroxime (58.2%), ciprofloxacin (54.2%), cefaclor (50%), aztreonam (44.8%), ceftriaxone (43.3%), imipenem (43.3%), and low level of resistance to streptomycin (30%), kanamycin (19.9%), tazocin (14%), amikacin (12.7%) and lowest to norfloxacin (11.2%). Out of 321 E. coli isolates, 261 (81%) were declared as multiple drug resistant and 5 (1.5%) were extensive drug resistant. It is concluded that most of the urinary tract infections in human are caused by multiple drug resistant E. coli.

  3. Isolation and antibiotic susceptibility of E. coli from urinary tract infections in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Sumera; Ahmad Anjum, Aftab; Ijaz, Tayyaba; Asad Ali, Muhammad; ur Rehman Khan, Muti; Nawaz, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study was conducted to isolate and determine the antibiotic resistance in E. coli from urinary tract infections in a tertiary care hospital, Lahore. Methods: Urine samples (n=500) were collected from patients with signs and symptoms of Urinary tract infections. Bacteria were isolated and identified by conventional biochemical profile. Antibiotic resistance pattern of E. coli against different antibiotic was determined by Kirby-Baur method. Results: Bacterial etiological agent was isolated from 402 samples with highest prevalence of E. coli (321, 80%) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (9.4%), Proteus species (5.4%) and Pseudomonas species (5.2%). The E. coli were highly resistant to penicillin (100%), amoxicillin (100%) and cefotaxime (89.7%), followed by intermediate level of resistance to ceftazidime (73.8%), cephradine (73.8%), tetracycline (69.4%), doxycycline (66.6%), augmentin (62.6%), gentamycin (59.8%), cefuroxime (58.2%), ciprofloxacin (54.2%), cefaclor (50%), aztreonam (44.8%), ceftriaxone (43.3%), imipenem (43.3%), and low level of resistance to streptomycin (30%), kanamycin (19.9%), tazocin (14%), amikacin (12.7%) and lowest to norfloxacin (11.2%). Out of 321 E. coli isolates, 261 (81%) were declared as multiple drug resistant and 5 (1.5%) were extensive drug resistant. Conclusion: It is concluded that most of the urinary tract infections in human are caused by multiple drug resistant E. coli. PMID:24772149

  4. Escherichia coli, fimbriae, bacterial persistence and host response induction in the human urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Bergsten, Göran; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2005-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans. Symptomatic UTIs may be acute, recurrent or chronic but the most frequent form of UTI is asymptomatic bacteruria (ABU). In ABU, the mucosa remains inert, despite the presence of large bacterial numbers in urine. The difference in disease severity reflects the virulence of the infecting strain and the propensity of the host to respond to infection. It is essential to understand the molecular basis of disease diversity and the molecular interactions between bacteria and host that determine asymptomatic carriage and the transition to disease. We discuss the initial interactions between bacteria and the mucosal surfaces in the human urinary tract, and the bacterial factors involved in the breach of mucosal inertia. Specifically, the contribution of P and type 1 fimbriae to bacterial establishment and host response induction are investigated. The results show that P fimbriae serve as independent virulence factors when expressed by an ABU strain, by promoting the establishment of bacteriuria and the innate host response, which is the cause of symptoms and tissue damage. P fimbriae thus fulfil the molecular Koch postulates as independent virulence factors in the human urinary tract. Type 1 fimbriae, in contrast, did not act as virulence factors in this model, and thus appear to serve a different function in man than in the murine model.

  5. Comparative evaluation of two commercial chromogenic media for detection and presumptive identification of urinary tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Scarparo, C; Piccoli, P; Ricordi, P; Scagnelli, M

    2002-04-01

    The performance of two commercial chromogenic media for the isolation and presumptive identification of urinary tract pathogens, the CPS ID2 (bioMérieux, France) and the CHROMagar Orientation (BBL Becton Dickinson, USA), was evaluated and compared with that of cystine-lactose-electrolyte-deficient agar and tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood. The detection, determination of bacterial counts, and presumptive identification of bacteria causing urinary tract infections were evaluated in 3,000 urine specimens. The two chromogenic media showed excellent correlation with the standard media for the detection and the bacterial count of urinary pathogens. The Escherichia coli strains produced the expected colour on the CHROMagar Orientation and the CPS ID2 media in 99% and 90% of the cases, respectively. The Klebsiella-Enterobacter-Citrobacter and the Proteus-Morganella-Providencia groups were easily identified on both chromogenic media, but further biochemical tests were needed to differentiate them to a species level. Both media enabled the differentiation, with varying degrees of difficulty, of Pseudomonas spp. strains from members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. All isolates of Enterococcus spp. were correctly identified and were easily distinguished from the Streptococcus agalactiae isolates. Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolates were easy to identify only on the CHROMagar Orientation medium. No substantial difference was observed when comparing the results of the susceptibility tests, which were performed according to the standardized disk diffusion method as described by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, for colonies recovered from the blood agar versus those recovered from the chromogenic media. In conclusion, the CPS ID2 and CHROMagar Orientation media enabled excellent detection, count determination, and presumptive identification of urinary pathogens, both in pure and mixed cultures, and reliable and accurate antimicrobial

  6. Urinary tract infection: a cohort of older people with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Melo, Laís Samara de; Ercole, Flávia Falci; Oliveira, Danilo Ulisses de; Pinto, Tatiana Saraiva; Victoriano, Mariana Avendanha; Alcoforado, Carla Lúcia Goulart Constant

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate epidemiological aspects of urinary tract infection in older patients with urinary incontinence living in long-term care institutions in Belo Horizonte. Method: Concurrent cohort held from April 1st to October 1st, 2015. The study was conducted in two long-term care institutions in the city of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, with 84 incontinent older people. Cumulative incidence of urinary tract infection was 19% (95% CI: 7.83-23.19) and the incidence density was 3.6 cases/100 people-month of follow-up period. The variables Bacteriuria and Institution presented statistical association with the occurrence of urinary tract infection. It is observed that the incidence of urinary tract infection in the study was smaller than in other similar international and national studies, however this is an important world health problem for the older population, with impact on mortality of these individuals. Avaliar aspectos epidemiológicos da infecção do trato urinário em pacientes idosos com incontinência urinária, residentes em instituições de longa permanência, de Belo Horizonte. Coorte concorrente realizada no período de 01 de abril a 01 de outubro de 2015. O estudo foi realizado em duas instituições de longa permanência, na cidade de Belo Horizonte, MG, com 84 idosos incontinentes. A incidência acumulada de infecção do trato urinário foi de 19% (IC 95%: 7,83-23,19) e a densidade de incidência foi de 3,6 casos/100 pessoas-mês de seguimento. As variáveis Bacteriúria e Instituição apresentaram associação estatística com a ocorrência de infecção do trato urinário. Observa-se que a incidência de infecção do trato urinário no estudo foi menor que em outros estudos nacionais e internacionais semelhantes, no entanto trata-se de um importante problema de saúde mundial para os idosos, com impacto na mortalidade desses indivíduos.

  7. Diagnostic performance of the urinary canine calgranulins in dogs with lower urinary or urogenital tract carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Romy M; McNiel, Elizabeth A; Grützner, Niels; Lanerie, David J; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2017-04-21

    Onset of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and prostatic carcinoma (PCA) is usually insidious with dogs presenting at an advanced stage of the disease. A biomarker that can facilitate early detection of TCC/PCA and improve patient survival would be useful. S100A8/A9 (calgranulin A/B or calprotectin) and S100A12 (calgranulin C) are expressed by cells of the innate immune system and are associated with several inflammatory disorders. S100A8/A9 is also expressed by epithelial cells after malignant transformation and is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and metastasis. S100A8/A9 is up-regulated in human PCA and TCC, whereas the results for S100A12 have been ambiguous. Also, the urine S100A8/A9-to-S100A12 ratio (uCalR) may have potential as a marker for canine TCC/PCA. Aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the urinary S100/calgranulins to detect TCC/PCA in dogs by using data and urine samples from 164 dogs with TCC/PCA, non-neoplastic urinary tract disease, other neoplasms, or urinary tract infections, and 75 healthy controls (nested case-control study). Urine S100A8/A9 and S100A12 (measured by species-specific radioimmunoassays and normalized against urine specific gravity [S100A8/A9USG; S100A12USG], urine creatinine concentration, and urine protein concentration and the uCalR were compared among the groups of dogs. S100A8/A9USG had the highest sensitivity (96%) and specificity (66%) to detect TCC/PCA, with specificity reaching 75% after excluding dogs with a urinary tract infection. The uCalR best distinguished dogs with TCC/PCA from dogs with a urinary tract infection (sensitivity: 91%, specificity: 60%). Using a S100A8/A9USG ≥ 109.9 to screen dogs ≥6 years of age for TCC/PCA yielded a negative predictive value of 100%. S100A8/A9USG and uCalR may have utility for diagnosing TCC/PCA in dogs, and S100A8/A9USG may be a good screening test for canine TCC/PCA.

  8. Excessive urinary tract dilatation and proteinuria in pregnancy: a common and overlooked association?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteinuria and dilatation of the urinary tract are both relatively common in pregnancy, the latter with a spectrum of symptoms, from none to severe pain and infection. Proteinuria is a rare occurrence in acute obstructive nephropathy; it has been reported in pregnancy, where it may pose a challenging differential diagnosis with pre-eclampsia. The aim of the present study is to report on the incidence of proteinuria (≥0.3; ≥0.5 g/day) in association with symptomatic-severe urinary tract dilatation in pregnancy. Methods Case series. Setting: Nephrological-Obstetric Unit dedicated to pregnancy and kidney diseases (January 2000-April 2011). Source: database prospectively updated since the start of the Unit. Retrospective review of clinical charts identified as relevant on the database, by a nephrologist and an obstetrician. Results From January 2000 to April 2011, 262 pregnancies were referred. Urinary tract dilatation with or without infection was the main cause of referral in 26 cases (predominantly monolateral in 19 cases): 23 singletons, 1 lost to follow-up, 1 twin and 1 triplet. Patients were referred for urinary tract infection (15 cases) and/or renal pain (10 cases); 6 patients were treated by urologic interventions (“JJ” stenting). Among them, 11 singletons and 1 triple pregnancy developed proteinuria ≥0.3 g/day (46.1%). Proteinuria was ≥0.5 g/day in 6 singletons (23.1%). Proteinuria resolved after delivery in all cases. No patient developed hypertension; in none was an alternative cause of proteinuria evident. No significant demographic difference was observed in patients with renal dilatation who developed proteinuria versus those who did not. An association with the presence of “JJ” stenting was present (5/6 cases with proteinuria ≥0.5 g/day), which may reflect both severer obstruction and a role for vescico-ureteral reflux, induced by the stent. Conclusions Symptomatic urinary tract dilatation may be associated with

  9. Medical management of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2003-10-01

    Renal damage in children has been found to be more congenital in origin than was previously thought. Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) involve renal dysplasia, renal hypoplasia, urinary tract obstruction and vesicoureteral reflux. CAKUT are sometimes bilateral and different types often coexist. Depending on their types and severity, children with CAKUT often have varying degrees of a reduced number of nephrons at birth. CAKUTare now the leading cause of renal failure in children. Children with renal dysplasia or obstructive uropathy may have abnormal renal tubules, and tend to lose essential water and sodium in urine. This can lead to poor body growth unless they are supplemented with water and sodium. Children with severe ureteric reflux often develop urinary infection and renal scarring. Renal scarring can further increase the risk of renal failure in children who already have other CAKUTand fewer nephrons than normal. Hypertension and proteinuria may develop in children with renal dysplasia and further aggravate renal function unless they are treated. Recent advances in the understanding and management of CAKUT make it possible for children with CAKUT to grow normally, have fewer complications such as urinary infection, have longer renal survival, and survive even with end-stage renal diseases through renal replacement therapy.

  10. Catheter-related urinary tract infection in patients suffering from spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Dedeić-Ljubović, Amela; Hukić, Mirsada

    2009-02-01

    Urinary tract infection is commoner in patients with spinal cord injuries because of incomplete bladder emptying and the use of catheters that can result in the introduction of bacteria into the bladder. 145 patients suffering from spinal cord injuries, admitted to the Institute for physical medicine and rehabilitation, Centre for paraplegia of the Clinical Centre of the University of Sarajevo, were included. The patients were divided in three groups according to the method of bladder drainage: Group A (n=61) consisted of patients on clean intermittent catheterization; Group B (n=54) consisted of patients with indwelling catheters; Group C (n=30) consisted of patients who had performed self-catheterization. From a total of 4539 urine samples, 3963 (87,3%) were positive and 576 (12,7%) were sterile. More than 90% of the infected patients were asymptomatic. The overall rate of urinary infection amounted to about 2,1 episodes, and bacteriuria to 8,1 episodes per patient. 77% of infections (113/145) were acquired within seven days from catheterization. Infection was usually polymicrobial; the greatest number of urine samples 1770/3943 (44,9%) included more than one bacterium. The vast majority of cases of urinary tract infection and bacteriuria are caused by Gram-negative bacilli and enterococci, commensal organisms of the bowel and perineum, representative of those from the hospital environment. Providencia stuarti (18,9%) being the most common, followed by Proteus mirabilis (16,3%), Escherichia coli (11,8%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10,2%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (8,1%), Morganella morgani (5,4%), Acinetobacter baumannii (4,6%), Providencia rettgeri (3,5%). 15,7% of isolates were Gram-positive with Enterococcus faecalis (8,6%) as the most common. 55,3% of isolates were multidrug-resistant, and the highest rates of resistance were found among Acinetobacter baumannii (87,8%), Providencia rettgeri (86,7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85,4%), Providencia stuarti (84,3%) and

  11. [Application of sinusoidal modulated currents and radon therapy in patients with uroliths in upper urinary tracts].

    PubMed

    Karpukhin, I V; Li, A A; Gusarov, I I; Slepushkina, T G; Dubovskoĭ, A V; Derevnina, N A

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes the method of elimination of the upper urinary tract uroliths using a combination of the following modalities: sinusoidal modulated currents, drinking of artificial radon water, radon water baths and no-spa medication. Evacuation of the concrements or their fragments from the upper urinary tracts reached 80%.

  12. Frequency and risk factors for urinary tract infection in cats with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bailiff, N L; Nelson, R W; Feldman, E C; Westropp, J L; Ling, G V; Jang, S S; Kass, P H

    2006-01-01

    Identification and control of infections are important in the management of diabetic cats. Urinary tract infections have not been well characterized in diabetic cats. This retrospective study was performed to review and characterize urinary tract infections in diabetic cats. Urinary tract infections are common in diabetic cats. A review was made of the medical records of 141 diabetic cats that had had urine obtained for culture by antepubic cystocentesis and that had not been treated with antibiotics, undergone urinary tract catheterization or urinary tract surgery within 2 weeks of urine collection or had urethral obstruction at the time of urine collection. A review of medical records. Urinary tract infection was identified in 18 of 141 diabetic cats. Escherichia coli was the most common isolate (67%). Female cats were at increased risk (prevalence odds ratios [POR], 3.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 10.2; P = .013). Clinical signs of lower urinary tract disease and findings on urine sediment examination were good predictors of positive urine cultures. Urinary tract infections are common in diabetic cats regardless of status of diabetic control, suggesting routine monitoring with urine sediment exams or urine culture is warranted.

  13. The Prevention and Management of Urinary Tract Infection among People with Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NIDRR Consensus Statement, 1992

    1992-01-01

    A 1992 Urinary Tract Infection Consensus Validation Conference brought together researchers, clinicians, and consumers to arrive at consensus on the best practices for preventing and treating urinary tract infections (UBI) in people with spinal cord injuries; the risk factors and diagnostic studies that should be done; indications for antibiotic…

  14. Detection of Intracellular Bacterial Communities in Human Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, David A; Hooton, Thomas M; Stamm, Walter E; Humphrey, Peter A; Hultgren, Scott J

    2007-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections and are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). While UTIs are typically considered extracellular infections, it has been recently demonstrated that UPEC bind to, invade, and replicate within the murine bladder urothelium to form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs). These IBCs dissociate and bacteria flux out of bladder facet cells, some with filamentous morphology, and ultimately establish quiescent intracellular reservoirs that can seed recurrent infection. This IBC pathogenic cycle has not yet been investigated in humans. In this study we sought to determine whether evidence of an IBC pathway could be found in urine specimens from women with acute UTI. Methods and Findings We collected midstream, clean-catch urine specimens from 80 young healthy women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and 20 asymptomatic women with a history of UTI. Investigators were blinded to culture results and clinical history. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy for evidence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria. Evidence of IBCs was found in 14 of 80 (18%) urines from women with UTI. Filamentous bacteria were found in 33 of 80 (41%) urines from women with UTI. None of the 20 urines from the asymptomatic comparative group showed evidence of IBCs or filaments. Filamentous bacteria were present in all 14 of the urines with IBCs compared to 19 (29%) of 66 samples with no evidence of IBCs (p < 0.001). Of 65 urines from patients with E. coli infections, 14 (22%) had evidence of IBCs and 29 (45%) had filamentous bacteria, while none of the gram-positive infections had IBCs or filamentous bacteria. Conclusions The presence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria in the urines of women with acute cystitis suggests that the IBC pathogenic pathway characterized in the murine model may occur in humans. The findings

  15. The Hedgehog Signal Induced Modulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling: An Essential Signaling Relay for Urinary Tract Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakagata, Naomi; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Suzuki, Kentaro; Kitazawa, Sohei; Yamada, Gen

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital diseases of the urinary tract are frequently observed in infants. Such diseases present a number of developmental anomalies such as hydroureter and hydronephrosis. Although some genetically-modified mouse models of growth factor signaling genes reproduce urinary phenotypes, the pathogenic mechanisms remain obscure. Previous studies suggest that a portion of the cells in the external genitalia and bladder are derived from peri-cloacal mesenchymal cells that receive Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in the early developmental stages. We hypothesized that defects in such progenitor cells, which give rise to urinary tract tissues, may be a cause of such diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings To elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of upper urinary tract malformations, we analyzed a series of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) deficient mice. Shh−/− displayed hydroureter and hydronephrosis phenotypes and reduced expression of several developmental markers. In addition, we suggested that Shh modulation at an early embryonic stage is responsible for such phenotypes by analyzing the Shh conditional mutants. Tissue contribution assays of Hh-responsive cells revealed that peri-cloacal mesenchymal cells, which received Hh signal secreted from cloacal epithelium, could contribute to the ureteral mesenchyme. Gain- and loss-of-functional mutants for Hh signaling revealed a correlation between Hh signaling and Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) signaling. Finally, a conditional ablation of Bmp receptor type IA (BmprIA) gene was examined in Hh-responsive cell lineages. This system thus made it possible to analyze the primary functions of the growth factor signaling relay. The defective Hh-to-Bmp signaling relay resulted in severe urinary tract phenotypes with a decrease in the number of Hh-responsive cells. Conclusions/Significance This study identified the essential embryonic stages for the pathogenesis of urinary tract phenotypes. These results suggested that Hh

  16. Designing a protocol to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections among hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Gokula, Murthy; Smolen, Dianne; Gaspar, Phyllis M; Hensley, Sandra J; Benninghoff, Mary C; Smith, Mindy

    2012-12-01

    Hospital-acquired urinary tract infections comprise 40% of hospital-acquired infections with over 80% of these hospital-acquired urinary tract infections associated with the use of urinary catheters. The process that was used to establish a new hospital protocol using the "IAIMS" (identifying, assessing, implementing, modifying/maintaining, spread/surveillance) model to reduce the incidence of catheter-associated urinary tract infections is described. The example is intended to serve as a framework for the development of protocols to address other hospital-acquired infections.

  17. [Ciprofloxacin and therapy of urinary tract infections, including those due to Staphylococcus saprophyticus].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, D V; Budanov, S V

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is one of the main pathogens of cystitis in young women. The human biotopes are contaminated by the staphylococcus on direct contacts with domestic animals or after using not properly cooked food of animal origin. Young women are more susceptible to colonization of the urinary tract by S. saprophyticus vs. the other contingents. Sexual intercourse is conducive to the colonization and infection. Shifts in the urinary tract microflora due to the use of spermicide, as well as candidiasis promote colonization of the urinary tract by S. saprophyticus. At present fluoroquinolones are considered as a significant independent group of chemotherapeutics within the class of quinolones, inhibitors of DNA gyrase, characterized by high clinical efficacy in the treatment of urinary tract infections. Especially significant clinical experience with ciprofloxacin in the therapy of urinary tract infections is available.

  18. Effect of craniosacral therapy on lower urinary tract signs and symptoms in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Raviv, Gil; Shefi, Shai; Nizani, Dalia; Achiron, Anat

    2009-05-01

    To examine whether craniosacral therapy improves lower urinary tract symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. A prospective cohort study. Out-patient clinic of multiple sclerosis center in a referral medical