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Sample records for cave lava beds

  1. Comparison of bacterial communities from lava cave microbial mats to overlying surface soils from Lava Beds National Monument, USA.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Kathleen H; Winter, Ara S; Read, Kaitlyn J H; Hughes, Evan M; Spilde, Michael N; Northup, Diana E

    2017-01-01

    Subsurface habitats harbor novel diversity that has received little attention until recently. Accessible subsurface habitats include lava caves around the world that often support extensive microbial mats on ceilings and walls in a range of colors. Little is known about lava cave microbial diversity and how these subsurface mats differ from microbial communities in overlying surface soils. To investigate these differences, we analyzed bacterial 16S rDNA from 454 pyrosequencing from three colors of microbial mats (tan, white, and yellow) from seven lava caves in Lava Beds National Monument, CA, USA, and compared them with surface soil overlying each cave. The same phyla were represented in both surface soils and cave microbial mats, but the overlap in shared OTUs (operational taxonomic unit) was only 11.2%. Number of entrances per cave and temperature contributed to observed differences in diversity. In terms of species richness, diversity by mat color differed, but not significantly. Actinobacteria dominated in all cave samples, with 39% from caves and 21% from surface soils. Proteobacteria made up 30% of phyla from caves and 36% from surface soil. Other major phyla in caves were Nitrospirae (7%) followed by minor phyla (7%), compared to surface soils with Bacteroidetes (8%) and minor phyla (8%). Many of the most abundant sequences could not be identified to genus, indicating a high degree of novelty. Surface soil samples had more OTUs and greater diversity indices than cave samples. Although surface soil microbes immigrate into underlying caves, the environment selects for microbes able to live in the cave habitats, resulting in very different cave microbial communities. This study is the first comprehensive comparison of bacterial communities in lava caves with the overlying soil community.

  2. Comparison of bacterial communities from lava cave microbial mats to overlying surface soils from Lava Beds National Monument, USA

    PubMed Central

    Read, Kaitlyn J. H.; Hughes, Evan M.; Spilde, Michael N.

    2017-01-01

    Subsurface habitats harbor novel diversity that has received little attention until recently. Accessible subsurface habitats include lava caves around the world that often support extensive microbial mats on ceilings and walls in a range of colors. Little is known about lava cave microbial diversity and how these subsurface mats differ from microbial communities in overlying surface soils. To investigate these differences, we analyzed bacterial 16S rDNA from 454 pyrosequencing from three colors of microbial mats (tan, white, and yellow) from seven lava caves in Lava Beds National Monument, CA, USA, and compared them with surface soil overlying each cave. The same phyla were represented in both surface soils and cave microbial mats, but the overlap in shared OTUs (operational taxonomic unit) was only 11.2%. Number of entrances per cave and temperature contributed to observed differences in diversity. In terms of species richness, diversity by mat color differed, but not significantly. Actinobacteria dominated in all cave samples, with 39% from caves and 21% from surface soils. Proteobacteria made up 30% of phyla from caves and 36% from surface soil. Other major phyla in caves were Nitrospirae (7%) followed by minor phyla (7%), compared to surface soils with Bacteroidetes (8%) and minor phyla (8%). Many of the most abundant sequences could not be identified to genus, indicating a high degree of novelty. Surface soil samples had more OTUs and greater diversity indices than cave samples. Although surface soil microbes immigrate into underlying caves, the environment selects for microbes able to live in the cave habitats, resulting in very different cave microbial communities. This study is the first comprehensive comparison of bacterial communities in lava caves with the overlying soil community. PMID:28199330

  3. Selected caves and lava-tube systems in and near Lava Beds National Monument, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waters, Aaron Clement; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Rogers, Bruce W.

    1990-01-01

    Much of the north and south flanks of the Medicine Lake shield were built from molten lava transmitted through lava tubes. These tubes formed beneath the congealing surface of basalt flows in somewhat the same way that a brook may continue to flow beneath a cover of its own winter ice. As molten lava emerges from a vent and flows downslope, congealing lava from the top and sides of the central channel often forms a bridge over the lava stream. The sticking together of bits of lava spatter and fragile lava crusts strengthens the bridge in the manner that thin crusts of floating ice raft together to cover a brook during early stages of a winter freeze. Eruption of basalt lava, however, is a much more violent and spasmodic process than the steady gathering of water that feeds a brook. If liquid lava stops rising from its source deep within the earth, the still-molten lava moving beneath the crusted-over top of a lava flow will continue to drain downhill and may ultimately leave an open lavatube cave-often large enough for people to walk through. It is rare, however, to find such a simple scenario recorded intact among the hundreds of lava-tube caves in the monument. Even before the top and walls of a lava flow have time to cool during a pause in lava supply, a new and violent eruption of lava may refill the open tube, overflow its upper end, and spread a new lava flow beside or on top of the first flow. Even if the original tube is large enough to contain the renewed supply of lava, this tube must deliver the new lava beyond the end of its original flow and thus the lava field extends farther and farther downslope. If the gradient of flow flattens, the tube may subdivide into a number of smaller distributaries, which spread laterally over the more gently sloping ground. 

  4. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground.

  5. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground.

  6. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-22

    SL2-04-288 (22 June 1973) --- A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast New Mexico (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground. Photo credit: NASA

  7. Lunar Pit Craters Presumed to be the Entrances of Lava Caves by Analogy to the Earth Lava Tube Pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ik-Seon; Yi, Yu; Kim, Eojin

    2014-06-01

    Lava caves could be useful as outposts for the human exploration of the Moon. Lava caves or lava tubes are formed when the external surface of the lava flows cools more quickly to make a hardened crust over subsurface lava flows. The lava flow eventually ceases and drains out of the tube, leaving an empty space. The frail part of the ceiling of lava tube could collapse to expose the entrance to the lava tubes which is called a pit crater. Several pit craters with the diameter of around 100 meters have been found by analyzing the data of SELENE and LRO lunar missions. It is hard to use these pit craters for outposts since these are too large in scale. In this study, small scale pit craters which are fit for outposts have been investigated using the NAC image data of LROC. Several topographic patterns which are believed to be lunar caves have been found and the similar pit craters of the Earth were compared and analyzed to identify caves. For this analysis, the image data of satellites and aerial photographs are collected and classified to construct a database. Several pit craters analogous to lunar pit craters were derived and a morphological pit crater model was generated using the 3D printer based on this database.

  8. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1982-03-30

    STS003-10-613 (22-30 March 1982) --- A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground. Space shuttle Columbia (STS-3), this mission, landed at the White Sands alternate landing site because of bad weather at Edwards AFB, CA. Photo credit: NASA

  9. Erosion by flowing lava: Geochemical evidence in the Cave Basalt, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, D.A.; Kadel, S.D.; Greeley, R.; Lesher, C.M.; Clynne, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    We sampled basaltic lava flows and underlying dacitic tuff deposits in or near lava tubes of the Cave Basalt, Mount St. Helens, Washington to determine whether the Cave Basalt lavas contain geochemical evidence of substrate contamination by lava erosion. The samples were analyzed using a combination of wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results indicate that the oldest, outer lava tube linings in direct contact with the dacitic substrate are contaminated, whereas the younger, inner lava tube linings are uncontaminated and apparently either more evolved or enriched in residual liquid. The most heavily contaminated lavas occur closer to the vent and in steeper parts of the tube system, and the amount of contamination decreases with increasing distance downstream. These results suggest that erosion by lava and contamination were limited to only the initially emplaced flows and that erosion was localized and enhanced by vigorous laminar flow over steeper slopes. After cooling, the initial Cave Basalt lava flows formed an insulating lining within the tubes that prevented further erosion by later flows. This interpretation is consistent with models of lava erosion that predict higher erosion rates closer to sources and over steeper slopes. A greater abundance of xenoliths and xenocrysts relative to xenomelts in hand samples indicates that mechanical erosion rather than thermal erosion was the dominant erosional process in the Cave Basalt, but further sampling and petrographic analyses must be performed to verify this hypothesis. ?? Springer-Verlag 2003.

  10. Near-IR Reflectance Spectra in a Lava Tube Cave from a Robotic Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, N. J.; Uckert, K.; Voelz, D. G.; Xiao, X.; Hull, R.; Boston, P. J.; Parness, A.; Abcouwer, N.; Willig, A.; Fuller, C.

    2015-10-01

    We present preliminary field measurements of biovermiculations and other mineral deposits made at a lava tube cave in El Malpais National Monument, NM, using a rock climbing robot equipped with a near-infrared point spectrometer.

  11. Comparison of Bacterial Diversity in Azorean and Hawai’ian Lava Cave Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    MARSHALL HATHAWAY, JENNIFER J.; GARCIA, MATTHEW G.; BALASCH, MONICA MOYA; SPILDE, MICHAEL N.; STONE, FRED D.; DAPKEVICIUS, MARIA DE LURDES N. E.; AMORIM, ISABEL R.; GABRIEL, ROSALINA; BORGES, PAULO A. V.; NORTHUP, DIANA E.

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, lava caves host colorful microbial mats. However, little is known about the diversity of these microorganisms, or what role they may play in the subsurface ecosystem. White and yellow microbial mats were collected from four lava caves each on the Azorean island of Terceira and the Big Island of Hawai’i, to compare the bacterial diversity found in lava caves from two widely separated archipelagos in two different oceans at different latitudes. Scanning electron microscopy of mat samples showed striking similarities between Terceira and Hawai’ian microbial morphologies. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed to determine the diversity within these lava caves. Fifteen bacterial phyla were found across the samples, with more Actinobacteria clones in Hawai’ian communities and greater numbers of Acidobacteria clones in Terceira communities. Bacterial diversity in the subsurface was correlated with a set of factors. Geographical location was the major contributor to differences in community composition (at the OTU level), together with differences in the amounts of organic carbon, nitrogen and copper available in the lava rock that forms the cave. These results reveal, for the first time, the similarity among the extensive bacterial diversity found in lava caves in two geographically separate locations and contribute to the current debate on the nature of microbial biogeography. PMID:26924866

  12. Comparison of Bacterial Diversity in Azorean and Hawai'ian Lava Cave Microbial Mats.

    PubMed

    Marshall Hathaway, Jennifer J; Garcia, Matthew G; Balasch, Monica Moya; Spilde, Michael N; Stone, Fred D; Dapkevicius, Maria DE Lurdes N E; Amorim, Isabel R; Gabriel, Rosalina; Borges, Paulo A V; Northup, Diana E

    Worldwide, lava caves host colorful microbial mats. However, little is known about the diversity of these microorganisms, or what role they may play in the subsurface ecosystem. White and yellow microbial mats were collected from four lava caves each on the Azorean island of Terceira and the Big Island of Hawai'i, to compare the bacterial diversity found in lava caves from two widely separated archipelagos in two different oceans at different latitudes. Scanning electron microscopy of mat samples showed striking similarities between Terceira and Hawai'ian microbial morphologies. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed to determine the diversity within these lava caves. Fifteen bacterial phyla were found across the samples, with more Actinobacteria clones in Hawai'ian communities and greater numbers of Acidobacteria clones in Terceira communities. Bacterial diversity in the subsurface was correlated with a set of factors. Geographical location was the major contributor to differences in community composition (at the OTU level), together with differences in the amounts of organic carbon, nitrogen and copper available in the lava rock that forms the cave. These results reveal, for the first time, the similarity among the extensive bacterial diversity found in lava caves in two geographically separate locations and contribute to the current debate on the nature of microbial biogeography.

  13. Explore and Study a Martian Lava Tube or Cave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, S. J.

    2012-06-01

    A rover exploring Martian lava tubes would provide crucial data for geology, exobiology, and human exploration disciplines. It would engage the public and provide valuable data on the history of Mars and on potential sites for human habitats.

  14. Wintering bats of the upper Snake River Plain: occurrence in lava-tube caves

    SciTech Connect

    Genter, D.L.

    1986-04-30

    Distribution and habitat selection of hibernating bats at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and adjacent area are reported. Exploration of over 30 lava-tube caves revealed that two species, Myotis leibii and Plecotus townsendii, hibernate in the upper Snake River Plain. Five species, M. lucifugus, M. evotis, Eptesicus fuscus, Lasionycteris noctivagans, and Lasiurus cinereus are considered migratory. Myotis leibii and P. townsendii hibernate throughout much of the area, occasionally in mixed-species groups. Myotis leibii uses the dark and protected regions of the cave, usually wedged into tiny pockets and crevices near or at the highest portion of the ceiling. Individuals of P. townsendii may be found at any height or depth in the cave. Temperature appears to be primary limiting factor in habitat selection. Myotis leibii was found in significantly cooler air temperatures than P. townsendii. Neither species tolerated continuous temperatures below 1.5 C. Relative humidity does not seem to be a significant factor in the distribution or habitat selection of the two species in lava-tube caves. 18 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  15. Assessing the origin of unusual organic formations in lava caves from Canary Islands (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ana Z.; de la Rosa, Jose M.; Garcia-Sanchez, Angela M.; Pereira, Manuel F. C.; Jurado, Valme; Fernández, Octavio; Knicker, Heike; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2016-04-01

    Lava tubes, like other caves, contain a variety of speleothems formed in the initial stage of a lava tube formation or due to leaching and subsequent precipitation of secondary minerals. Primary and secondary mineral formations in lava caves are mainly composed of silicate minerals, although secondary minerals common in limestone caves have been also reported in this type of caves. In addition, unusual colored deposits have been found on the walls and ceilings of lava tubes, some of them of unknown origin and composition. A brown to black-colored mud-like deposits was observed in "Llano de los Caños" Cave, La Palma Island, Canary Islands, Spain. These black deposits coat the wall and ceiling of the lava tube where sub-horizontal fractures occur. FESEM-EDS, X-ray micro-computed tomography and mineralogical analyses were conducted for morphological, 3D microstructural and compositional characterization of these unusual speleothem samples. These techniques revealed that they are mainly composed of amorphous materials, suggesting an organic carbon composition. Hence, analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS), solid-state 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and stable isotope analysis were applied to assess the nature and origin of the black deposits. The combination of these analytical tools permits the identification of specific biomarkers (di- and triterpenoids) for tracing the potential sources of the organic compounds in the speleothems. For comparison purposes, samples from the topsoil and overlaying vegetation were also analyzed. Chromatograms resulting from the Py-GC/MS showed an abundance of polysaccharides, lipids and terpenoids typically derived from the vegetation of the area (Erica arborea). In addition, levoglucosan, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and N-containing heterocyclic compounds were detected. They probably derived from the leaching of charred vegetation resulting from a wildfire occurred in the area in 2012. The lack of the typical pattern of odd

  16. Angustibacter speluncae sp. nov., isolated from a lava cave stalactite.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dong Hyo; Lee, Soon Dong

    2017-09-01

    Gram-reaction-positive, strictly aerobic, motile coccoid- to rod-shaped actinobacteria, designated strains YC2-20T and YC2-19 were isolated from pieces of stalactites collected at the Yongcheon Cave in Jeju, Republic of Korea. The cells of orange-coloured colonies grew at 20-37 °C, pH 6-10 and in the absence of NaCl. In the neighbour-joining tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, the novel isolates formed a distant sublineage at the base of the radiation of the genus Angustibacter. The novel isolates shared identical 16S rRNA gene sequences to each other and revealed a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 95.6 % to the closest relative, Angustibacter aerolatus and <95 % to other members of the family Kineosporiaceae. Albeit with a low similarity of 16S rRNA gene sequences and a distinct phylogenetic position, most of the chemotaxonomic characteristics were in agreement with those of the genus Angustibacter: meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid in the cell wall; MK-9(H4) as the major menaquinone; polar lipids including diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol mannoside; and a DNA G+C content of 73.1 mol%. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic distinctiveness, the novel isolates are considered to represent members of a novel species of the genus Angustibacter, for which the name Angustibacter speluncae sp. nov. is proposed, with type strain YC2-20T (=KCTC 39842T=DSM 103769T).

  17. Geologic field-trip guide to Medicine Lake Volcano, northern California, including Lava Beds National Monument

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2017-08-17

    Medicine Lake volcano is among the very best places in the United States to see and walk on a variety of well-exposed young lava flows that range in composition from basalt to rhyolite. This field-trip guide to the volcano and to Lava Beds National Monument, which occupies part of the north flank, directs visitors to a wide range of lava flow compositions and volcanic phenomena, many of them well exposed and Holocene in age. The writing of the guide was prompted by a field trip to the California Cascades Arc organized in conjunction with the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) quadrennial meeting in Portland, Oregon, in August of 2017. This report is one of a group of three guides describing the three major volcanic centers of the southern Cascades Volcanic Arc. The guides describing the Mount Shasta and Lassen Volcanic Center parts of the trip share an introduction, written as an overview to the IAVCEI field trip. However, this guide to Medicine Lake volcano has descriptions of many more stops than are included in the 2017 field trip. The 23 stops described here feature a range of compositions and volcanic phenomena. Many other stops are possible and some have been previously described, but these 23 have been selected to highlight the variety of volcanic phenomena at this rear-arc center, the range of compositions, and for the practical reason that they are readily accessible. Open ground cracks, various vent features, tuffs, lava-tube caves, evidence for glaciation, and lava flows that contain inclusions and show visible evidence of compositional zonation are described and visited along the route.

  18. Diversity of Ammonia Oxidation (amoA) and Nitrogen Fixation (nifH) Genes in Lava Caves of Terceira, Azores, Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, Jennifer J. Marshall; Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Dapkevicius, Maria De Lurdes N. E.; Northup, Diana E.

    2015-01-01

    Lava caves are an understudied ecosystem in the subterranean world, particularly in regard to nitrogen cycling. The diversity of ammonia oxidation (amoA) and nitrogen fixation (nifH) genes in bacterial mats collected from lava cave walls on the island of Terceira (Azores, Portugal) was investigated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). A total of 55 samples were collected from 11 lava caves that were selected with regard to surface land use. Land use types above the lava caves were categorized into pasture, forested, and sea/urban, and used to determine if land use influenced the ammonia oxidizing and nitrogen fixing bacterial communities within the lava caves. The soil and water samples from each lava cave were analyzed for total organic carbon, inorganic carbon, total nitrogen, ammonium, nitrate, phosphate and sulfate, to determine if land use influences either the nutrient content entering the lava cave or the nitrogen cycling bacteria present within the cave. Nitrosospira-like sequences dominated the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community, and the majority of the diversity was found in lava caves under forested land. The nitrogen fixation community was dominated by Klebsiella pneumoniae-like sequences, and diversity was evenly distributed between pasture and forested land, but very little overlap in diversity was observed. The results suggest that land use is impacting both the AOB and the nitrogen fixing bacterial communities. PMID:26778867

  19. Diversity of Ammonia Oxidation (amoA) and Nitrogen Fixation (nifH) Genes in Lava Caves of Terceira, Azores, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, Jennifer J Marshall; Sinsabaugh, Robert L; Dapkevicius, Maria De Lurdes N E; Northup, Diana E

    Lava caves are an understudied ecosystem in the subterranean world, particularly in regard to nitrogen cycling. The diversity of ammonia oxidation (amoA) and nitrogen fixation (nifH) genes in bacterial mats collected from lava cave walls on the island of Terceira (Azores, Portugal) was investigated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). A total of 55 samples were collected from 11 lava caves that were selected with regard to surface land use. Land use types above the lava caves were categorized into pasture, forested, and sea/urban, and used to determine if land use influenced the ammonia oxidizing and nitrogen fixing bacterial communities within the lava caves. The soil and water samples from each lava cave were analyzed for total organic carbon, inorganic carbon, total nitrogen, ammonium, nitrate, phosphate and sulfate, to determine if land use influences either the nutrient content entering the lava cave or the nitrogen cycling bacteria present within the cave. Nitrosospira-like sequences dominated the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community, and the majority of the diversity was found in lava caves under forested land. The nitrogen fixation community was dominated by Klebsiella pneumoniae-like sequences, and diversity was evenly distributed between pasture and forested land, but very little overlap in diversity was observed. The results suggest that land use is impacting both the AOB and the nitrogen fixing bacterial communities.

  20. Lava cave microbial communities within mats and secondary mineral deposits: implications for life detection on other planets.

    PubMed

    Northup, D E; Melim, L A; Spilde, M N; Hathaway, J J M; Garcia, M G; Moya, M; Stone, F D; Boston, P J; Dapkevicius, M L N E; Riquelme, C

    2011-09-01

    Lava caves contain a wealth of yellow, white, pink, tan, and gold-colored microbial mats; but in addition to these clearly biological mats, there are many secondary mineral deposits that are nonbiological in appearance. Secondary mineral deposits examined include an amorphous copper-silicate deposit (Hawai'i) that is blue-green in color and contains reticulated and fuzzy filament morphologies. In the Azores, lava tubes contain iron-oxide formations, a soft ooze-like coating, and pink hexagons on basaltic glass, while gold-colored deposits are found in lava caves in New Mexico and Hawai'i. A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular techniques was used to analyze these communities. Molecular analyses of the microbial mats and secondary mineral deposits revealed a community that contains 14 phyla of bacteria across three locations: the Azores, New Mexico, and Hawai'i. Similarities exist between bacterial phyla found in microbial mats and secondary minerals, but marked differences also occur, such as the lack of Actinobacteria in two-thirds of the secondary mineral deposits. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on extraterrestrial bodies.

  1. Lava Cave Microbial Communities Within Mats and Secondary Mineral Deposits: Implications for Life Detection on Other Planets

    PubMed Central

    Melim, L.A.; Spilde, M.N.; Hathaway, J.J.M.; Garcia, M.G.; Moya, M.; Stone, F.D.; Boston, P.J.; Dapkevicius, M.L.N.E.; Riquelme, C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Lava caves contain a wealth of yellow, white, pink, tan, and gold-colored microbial mats; but in addition to these clearly biological mats, there are many secondary mineral deposits that are nonbiological in appearance. Secondary mineral deposits examined include an amorphous copper-silicate deposit (Hawai‘i) that is blue-green in color and contains reticulated and fuzzy filament morphologies. In the Azores, lava tubes contain iron-oxide formations, a soft ooze-like coating, and pink hexagons on basaltic glass, while gold-colored deposits are found in lava caves in New Mexico and Hawai‘i. A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular techniques was used to analyze these communities. Molecular analyses of the microbial mats and secondary mineral deposits revealed a community that contains 14 phyla of bacteria across three locations: the Azores, New Mexico, and Hawai‘i. Similarities exist between bacterial phyla found in microbial mats and secondary minerals, but marked differences also occur, such as the lack of Actinobacteria in two-thirds of the secondary mineral deposits. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on extraterrestrial bodies. Key Words: Biosignatures—Astrobiology—Bacteria—Caves—Life detection—Microbial mats. Astrobiology 11, 601–618. PMID:21879833

  2. Lava

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-17

    The volcanic flow in this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft appears to have flowed in one layer. The surface texture is blocks of lava which cooled and still moved on molten lava below, producing the plate-like texture.

  3. Conexibacter stalactiti sp. nov., isolated from stalactites in a lava cave and emended description of the genus Conexibacter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Dong

    2017-09-01

    A Gram-positive, strictly aerobic, non-sporulating, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated YC2-25T, was isolated from pieces of stalactites collected from a lava cave in Jeju, Republic of Korea. Colonies were circular, smooth, convex and cream to light yellow in colour. A neighbour-joining tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the organism belonged to the genus Conexibacter with the closest relatives being Conexibacter woesei (99.0 % sequence similarity) and Conexibacter arvalis (98.8 %). Meso-Diaminopimelic acid was the diagnostic diamino acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. The predominant menaquinone was MK-7(H4). The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, two phospholipids and four lipids. The predominant fatty acid was C18 : 1ω9c. The DNA G+C content was 70.3 %. On the basis of distant phenotypic characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization data, strain YC2-25T (=KCTC 39840T=DSM 103719T) represents a novel species of the genus Conexibacter, for which the name Conexibacter stalactiti sp. nov. is proposed.

  4. Cave microbial community composition in oceanic islands: disentangling the effect of different colored mats in diversity patterns of Azorean lava caves.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Cristina; Rigal, François; Hathaway, Jennifer J M; Northup, Diana E; Spilde, Michael N; Borges, Paulo A V; Gabriel, Rosalina; Amorim, Isabel R; Dapkevicius, Maria de Lurdes N E

    2015-12-01

    Processes determining diversity and composition of bacterial communities in island volcanic caves are still poorly understood. Here, we characterized colored microbial mats in 14 volcanic caves from two oceanic islands of the Azores using 16S rRNA gene sequences. Factors determining community diversity (α) and composition (β) were explored, namely colored mats, caves and islands, as well as environmental and chemical characteristics of caves. Additive partitioning of diversity using OTU occurrence showed a greater influence of β-diversity between islands and caves that may relate to differences in rare OTUs (singletons and doubletons) across scales. In contrast, Shannon diversity partitioning revealed the importance of the lowest hierarchical level (α diversity, colored mat), suggesting a dominance of cosmopolitan OTUs (>1%) in most samples. Cosmopolitan OTUs included members involved in nitrogen cycling, supporting the importance of this process in Azorean caves. Environmental and chemical conditions in caves did not show any significant relationship to OTU diversity and composition. The absence of clear differences between mat colors and across scales may be explained by (1) the geological youth of the cave system (cave communities have not had enough time to diverge) or/and (2) community convergence, as the result of selection pressure in extreme environments. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Occurrence and Absence of Lava Tube Caves with Some Other Volcanic Cavities; a Consideration of Human Habitation Sites on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, W. R.; Favre, G.; Stefansson, A.; Whitfield, P.; Banks, N.

    2012-03-01

    Field investigation of Hawaii's Kau Desert pit craters shows that they are not connected to lave tube caves. The Seven Sisters of Arsia Mons are unlikely to contain lave tube caves. Other types of caves on Mars may provide human habitation sites.

  6. Prevalence of rabies specific antibodies in the Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana) at Lava Cave, New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Steece, R; Altenbach, J S

    1989-10-01

    Adult female and juvenile Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana) were collected bimonthly at Lava Cave, New Mexico from May through September. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of active rabies infection as well as to determine individual immune status in these hosts. All bats were bled and examined for rabies antibody (total antibody versus IgM) utilizing a modified serum neutralization test. The brains were removed and examined by the fluorescent rabies antibody (FRA) test. No significant difference was observed in the number of adults with rabies neutralizing antibody (total) over the study period. Significant differences in rabies neutralizing antibody (total) were observed among the juveniles sampled during July and August. The number of adults with IgM specific antibody was low (15 of 750, 2%) and did not fluctuate significantly. However, the number of juveniles with IgM antibody did show increased levels in August and September. The number of adults positive by the FRA was low (4 of 750, less than 1%) and did not appear to fluctuate significantly over the study period. The number of juveniles positive by the FRA was three and one-half times higher than observed for the adults (14 of 600, 2%). These results indicate that the Mexican free-tailed bat appears to be exposed to rabies virus shortly after birth as evident by its immune status. The low prevalence (4 of 750, less than 1%) of active infection as determined by the FRA and mouse inoculation and the high prevalence (514 of 750, 69%) of IgG antibody in the adult females indicate that the Mexican free-tailed bat recovers from rabies virus infection.

  7. High-resolution Digital Mapping of Historical Lava Flows as a Test-bed for Lava Flow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, D. M.; Parks, M.; Nomikou, P.; Mather, T. A.; Simou, E.; Kalnins, L. M.; Paulatto, M.; Watts, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of high-resolution lava flow morphology can improve our understanding of past effusive eruptions by providing insight into eruptive processes and the rheological properties of erupted magmas. We report the results of an ongoing investigation into the young dacite lava flows of the Kameni islands, Santorini volcano, Greece, which were emplaced during both subaerial and shallow submarine eruptions over the past 3000 years. Historical eruptions of the Kameni islands since 1866 have been very carefully documented in contemporaneous scientific reports. Eruptions since 1573 appear to be time-predictable, with a close relationship between eruption length, the size of extruded lava domes, and the time elapsed since the previous eruption. A new NERC - Airborne Survey and Research Facility LiDAR survey of the Kameni islands was completed in May 2012, using a Leica ALS50 Airborne Laser Scanner mounted on a Dornier 228 aircraft. The topographic surface was mapped at an average point density of 2.1 points per square metre, and covers the entire extent of the youngest subaerial lava flow fields on Santorini. A 2-m DEM derived from the 2012 LiDAR dataset was merged with a 5-m resolution bathymetric grid, based on multibeam surveys carried out by the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, during cruises in 2001 and 2006, using a SEABEAM 2120 hull-mounted swath system. The resultant grid provides the first high resolution map of both subaerial and submarine historic lava flows emplaced in the centre of the Santorini caldera, and includes several previously unidentified submarine flows and cones. Attribute maps were used to delineate and identify discrete lava flows both onshore and offshore; and morphometric profiles were used to compute accurate volumetric estimates for each of the historic flows, and to determine bulk rheological properties of the lavas, assuming a Bingham rheology. This ongoing work will improve our analysis of the relationship between

  8. Bald eagle winter roost characteristics in Lava Beds National Monument, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    This study provided a survey of bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) winter roost habitat (in 4 km2 of potential roost areas) in southern Lava Beds National Monument, California. A systematic-clustered sampling design (n=381 plots) was used to compare forest stand characteristics in two primary roost areas (Caldwell Butte and Eagle Nest Butte) and two potential roost areas (Hidden Valley and Island Butte). A 100 percent inventory of roost trees in Caldwell Butte (n=103 trees) and Eagle Nest Butte (n=44 trees) showed they were spatially clumped and restricted to 12.7 percent and 2.8 percent, respectively, of the study areas. Roost trees, primarily ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), averaged 81.1 ± 1.3 cm dbh (mean ± 1 S.E.) compared to non-roost trees (>35 cm dbh) that averaged 52.2 ± 1.0 cm dbh. Roost trees were generally taller and more open-structured than non-roost trees. All four study sites had adequate numbers of mid-sized trees (10 to 50 cm dbh) to replace the current stock of older, larger roost trees. However, seedling and small trees (<10 cm dbh) in the roost areas were spatially clumped and few, suggesting that maintaining a continuous population of roost trees may be a problem in the distant future. Long-term studies of changing winter roost habitat and eagle use are essential to protect the bald eagle in the northwestern US.

  9. Extraterrestrial Subsurface Technology Test Bed: Human Use and Scientific Value of Martian Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, P. J.; Frederick, R. D.; Welch, S. M.; Werker, J.; Meyer, T. R.; Sprungman, B.; Hildreth-Werker, V.; Thompson, S. L.

    2004-02-01

    Caves and subsurface voids on Mars and other bodies can provide significant advantages when used for human habitat and operational space. They are also targets for significant scientific investigations. We have developed a suite of technology concepts to make utilization of extraterrestrial caves feasible. Our goal is to provide a solid foundation of information and options so that mission planners may realistically consider the subsurface option in development of mission scenarios. We have concentrated on identifying the primary challenges to human operation in the extraterrestrial cave environment. Employing concepts like inflatable cave liner habitats, foamed-in-place airlock technologies, and micro-robotic self-deploying communication, mapping, and data transmission networks, we are developing solutions to meet those challenges and demonstrate the feasibility of cave use on Mars. We present the results of field trials of an incave mission simulation in several Earth caves as a proof-of-concept demonstration. These trials during the summer and fall of 2003 culminate in a high fidelity simulation scheduled for January 2004. Concepts and prototypes were developed during a completed Phase I and on-going Phase II NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts (NIAC) study.

  10. Phreatobacter stygius sp. nov., isolated from pieces of wood in a lava cave and emended description of the genus Phreatobacter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Dong; Joung, Yochan; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2017-09-01

    An aerobic, Gram-negative, catalase-positive, oxidase-positive bacterium, designated strain YC6-17T, was isolated from pieces of wood collected at the bottom of Youngcheon Cave in Jeju, Republic of Korea. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain YC6-17T formed a tight cluster with Phreatobacter oligotrophus DSM 25521T (98.1 % sequence similarity) and was distinctly separate from other taxa of the order Rhizobiales. Cells were motile rods and showed growth at 10-30 °C, pH 6-8 and 2 % NaCl. Colonies were smooth, circular, convex and pale yellow in colour. The predominant ubiquinone was Q-10. The predominant fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c, 11-methyl-C18 : 1ω7c, summed feature 3 and C16 : 0. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, two glycolipids and a lipid. The DNA G+C content was 64.4 mol%. DNA-DNA relatedness between strain YC6-17T and the closest relative was 15.6±7.9 %. Based on combined data from phenotypic characterization and DNA-DNA hybridization as well as phylogenetic analysis, it was suggested that the isolate represents a novel species of the genus Phreatobacter, for which the name Phreatobacter stygius sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain YC6-17T (=KCTC 52518T=DSM 103734T).

  11. Cultivation and complete genome sequencing of Gloeobacter kilaueensis sp. nov., from a lava cave in Kīlauea Caldera, Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Saw, Jimmy H W; Schatz, Michael; Brown, Mark V; Kunkel, Dennis D; Foster, Jamie S; Shick, Harry; Christensen, Stephanie; Hou, Shaobin; Wan, Xuehua; Donachie, Stuart P

    2013-01-01

    The ancestor of Gloeobacter violaceus PCC 7421(T) is believed to have diverged from that of all known cyanobacteria before the evolution of thylakoid membranes and plant plastids. The long and largely independent evolutionary history of G. violaceus presents an organism retaining ancestral features of early oxygenic photoautotrophs, and in whom cyanobacteria evolution can be investigated. No other Gloeobacter species has been described since the genus was established in 1974 (Rippka et al., Arch Microbiol 100:435). Gloeobacter affiliated ribosomal gene sequences have been reported in environmental DNA libraries, but only the type strain's genome has been sequenced. However, we report here the cultivation of a new Gloeobacter species, G. kilaueensis JS1(T), from an epilithic biofilm in a lava cave in Kīlauea Caldera, Hawai'i. The strain's genome was sequenced from an enriched culture resembling a low-complexity metagenomic sample, using 9 kb paired-end 454 pyrosequences and 400 bp paired-end Illumina reads. The JS1(T) and G. violaceus PCC 7421(T) genomes have little gene synteny despite sharing 2842 orthologous genes; comparing the genomes shows they do not belong to the same species. Our results support establishing a new species to accommodate JS1(T), for which we propose the name Gloeobacter kilaueensis sp. nov. Strain JS1(T) has been deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (BAA-2537), the Scottish Marine Institute's Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa (CCAP 1431/1), and the Belgian Coordinated Collections of Microorganisms (ULC0316). The G. kilaueensis holotype has been deposited in the Algal Collection of the US National Herbarium (US# 217948). The JS1(T) genome sequence has been deposited in GenBank under accession number CP003587. The G+C content of the genome is 60.54 mol%. The complete genome sequence of G. kilaueensis JS1(T) may further understanding of cyanobacteria evolution, and the shift from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis.

  12. Cultivation and Complete Genome Sequencing of Gloeobacter kilaueensis sp. nov., from a Lava Cave in Kīlauea Caldera, Hawai'i

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Jimmy H. W.; Schatz, Michael; Brown, Mark V.; Kunkel, Dennis D.; Foster, Jamie S.; Shick, Harry; Christensen, Stephanie; Hou, Shaobin; Wan, Xuehua; Donachie, Stuart P.

    2013-01-01

    The ancestor of Gloeobacter violaceus PCC 7421T is believed to have diverged from that of all known cyanobacteria before the evolution of thylakoid membranes and plant plastids. The long and largely independent evolutionary history of G. violaceus presents an organism retaining ancestral features of early oxygenic photoautotrophs, and in whom cyanobacteria evolution can be investigated. No other Gloeobacter species has been described since the genus was established in 1974 (Rippka et al., Arch Microbiol 100:435). Gloeobacter affiliated ribosomal gene sequences have been reported in environmental DNA libraries, but only the type strain's genome has been sequenced. However, we report here the cultivation of a new Gloeobacter species, G. kilaueensis JS1T, from an epilithic biofilm in a lava cave in Kīlauea Caldera, Hawai'i. The strain's genome was sequenced from an enriched culture resembling a low-complexity metagenomic sample, using 9 kb paired-end 454 pyrosequences and 400 bp paired-end Illumina reads. The JS1T and G. violaceus PCC 7421T genomes have little gene synteny despite sharing 2842 orthologous genes; comparing the genomes shows they do not belong to the same species. Our results support establishing a new species to accommodate JS1T, for which we propose the name Gloeobacter kilaueensis sp. nov. Strain JS1T has been deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (BAA-2537), the Scottish Marine Institute's Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa (CCAP 1431/1), and the Belgian Coordinated Collections of Microorganisms (ULC0316). The G. kilaueensis holotype has been deposited in the Algal Collection of the US National Herbarium (US# 217948). The JS1T genome sequence has been deposited in GenBank under accession number CP003587. The G+C content of the genome is 60.54 mol%. The complete genome sequence of G. kilaueensis JS1T may further understanding of cyanobacteria evolution, and the shift from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis. PMID:24194836

  13. The challenge of pollen analysis in palaeoenvironmental studies of hominid beds: the record from Sterkfontein caves.

    PubMed

    Carrión, J S; Scott, L

    1999-04-01

    The search for pollen in carbonate-rich sediments from the hominid site Sterkfontein has been justified because previous investigations suggested that although pollen contamination is a problem, speleothems (e.g. travertines and stalagmites) are most likely to contain reliable assemblages. The new results confirm that, although they have some potential, most sediment types from the site, even speleothems, are usually not suitable for analysis and that they contain very low concentrations of pollen, if any. The extraction of pollen from them is complicated by the problem of contamination from the modern environment. Such contamination has shown up in many previous investigations at this and similar sites and judging from published literature, its significance has not been fully appreciated. Cave palynology can be a very valuable tool in palaeoenvironmental research but the caveats associated with palynology of different sediment types especially carbonate impregnated sediments must be emphasized.

  14. Olivine-respiring bacteria isolated from the rock-ice interface in a lava-tube cave, a Mars analog environment.

    PubMed

    Popa, Radu; Smith, Amy R; Popa, Rodica; Boone, Jane; Fisk, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The boundary between ice and basalt on Earth is an analogue for some near-surface environments of Mars. We investigated neutrophilic iron-oxidizing microorganisms from the basalt-ice interface in a lava tube from the Oregon Cascades with perennial ice. One of the isolates (Pseudomonas sp. HerB) can use ferrous iron Fe(II) from the igneous mineral olivine as an electron donor and O(2) as an electron acceptor. The optimum growth temperature is ∼12-14°C, but growth also occurs at 5°C. Bicarbonate is a facultative source of carbon. Growth of Pseudomonas sp. HerB as a chemolithotrophic iron oxidizer with olivine as the source of energy is favored in low O(2) conditions (e.g., 1.6% O(2)). Most likely, microbial oxidation of olivine near pH 7 requires low O(2) to offset the abiotic oxidation of iron. The metabolic capabilities of this bacterium would allow it to live in near-surface, icy, volcanic environments of Mars in the present or recent geological past and make this type of physiology a prime candidate in the search for life on Mars.

  15. Olivine-Respiring Bacteria Isolated from the Rock-Ice Interface in a Lava-Tube Cave, a Mars Analog Environment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amy R.; Popa, Rodica; Boone, Jane; Fisk, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The boundary between ice and basalt on Earth is an analogue for some near-surface environments of Mars. We investigated neutrophilic iron-oxidizing microorganisms from the basalt-ice interface in a lava tube from the Oregon Cascades with perennial ice. One of the isolates (Pseudomonas sp. HerB) can use ferrous iron Fe(II) from the igneous mineral olivine as an electron donor and O2 as an electron acceptor. The optimum growth temperature is ∼12–14°C, but growth also occurs at 5°C. Bicarbonate is a facultative source of carbon. Growth of Pseudomonas sp. HerB as a chemolithotrophic iron oxidizer with olivine as the source of energy is favored in low O2 conditions (e.g., 1.6% O2). Most likely, microbial oxidation of olivine near pH 7 requires low O2 to offset the abiotic oxidation of iron. The metabolic capabilities of this bacterium would allow it to live in near-surface, icy, volcanic environments of Mars in the present or recent geological past and make this type of physiology a prime candidate in the search for life on Mars. Key Words: Extremophiles—Mars—Olivine—Iron-oxidizing bacteria—Redox. Astrobiology 12, 9–18. PMID:22165996

  16. Morphogenesis of hypogenic caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchouk, Alexander

    2009-05-01

    Hypogenic speleogenesis is the formation of solution-enlarged permeability structures by waters ascending to a cave-forming zone from below in leaky confined conditions, where deeper groundwaters in regional or intermediate flow systems interact with shallower and more local groundwater flow systems. This is in contrast to more familiar epigenic speleogenesis which is dominated by shallow groundwater systems receiving recharge from the overlying or immediately adjacent surface. Hypogenic caves are identified in various geological and tectonic settings, formed by different dissolutional mechanisms operating in various lithologies. Despite these variations, resultant caves demonstrate a remarkable similarity in patterns and meso-morphology, which strongly suggests that the hydrogeologic settings were broadly identical in their formation. Hypogenic caves commonly demonstrate a characteristic suite of cave morphologies resulting from rising flow across the cave-forming zone with distinct buoyancy-dissolution components. In addition to hydrogeological criteria (hydrostratigraphic position, recharge-discharge configuration and flow pattern viewed from the perspective of the evolution of a regional groundwater flow system), morphogenetic analysis is the primary tool in identifying hypogenic caves. Cave patterns resulting from ascending transverse speleogenesis are strongly guided by the permeability structure in a cave formation. They are also influenced by the discordance of permeability structure in the adjacent beds and by the overall hydrostratigraphic arrangement. Three-dimensional mazes with multiple storeys, or complex 3-D cave systems are most common, although single isolated chambers, passages or crude clusters of a few intersecting passages may occur where fracturing is scarce and laterally discontinuous. Large rising shafts and collapse sinkholes over large voids, associated with deep hydrothermal systems, are also known. Hypogenic caves include many of the

  17. Lava Channels

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-03

    The channels and linear depression in this image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft are located on the western margin of the Elysium Volcanic complex. The channels were created by lava flow.

  18. Geology of Caves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, W. E.; Morgan, I. M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in the study of caves (speleology) with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Separate sections examine types of caves, how caves form, cave features, minerals found in caves, uses of caves, and caves as natural underground laboratories.…

  19. Lava Lamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leif, Todd R.

    2008-01-01

    This past semester I brought a Lava Lite[R] Lamp into my classroom. Why bring such a thing into class? Many of today's students are part of the "retro" movement. They buy clothes from the '60s, they wear their hair like people did in the '60s, and they look for the ideals and themes related to living in the 1960s. Physics education reform is also…

  20. Lava Lamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leif, Todd R.

    2008-01-01

    This past semester I brought a Lava Lite[R] Lamp into my classroom. Why bring such a thing into class? Many of today's students are part of the "retro" movement. They buy clothes from the '60s, they wear their hair like people did in the '60s, and they look for the ideals and themes related to living in the 1960s. Physics education reform is also…

  1. Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03054 Lava Flows

    The lava flows in this image are only a very small part of the voluminous lava erupted from the Arsia Mons volcano.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 19.1S, Longitude 244.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Candidate Cave Entrances on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, Glen

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents newly discovered candidate cave entrances into Martian near-surface lava tubes, volcano-tectonic fracture systems, and pit craters and describes their characteristics and exploration possibilities. These candidates are all collapse features that occur either intermittently along laterally continuous trench-like depressions or in the floors of sheer-walled atypical pit craters. As viewed from orbit, locations of most candidates are visibly consistent with known terrestrial features such as tube-fed lava flows, volcano-tectonic fractures, and pit craters, each of which forms by mechanisms that can produce caves. Although we cannot determine subsurface extents of the Martian features discussed here, some may continue unimpeded for many kilometers if terrestrial examples are indeed analogous. The features presented here were identified in images acquired by the Mars Odyssey's Thermal Emission Imaging System visiblewavelength camera, and by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Context Camera. Select candidates have since been targeted by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment. Martian caves are promising potential sites for future human habitation and astrobiology investigations; understanding their characteristics is critical for long-term mission planning and for developing the necessary exploration technologies.

  3. Candidate cave entrances on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cushing, Glen E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents newly discovered candidate cave entrances into Martian near-surface lava tubes, volcano-tectonic fracture systems, and pit craters and describes their characteristics and exploration possibilities. These candidates are all collapse features that occur either intermittently along laterally continuous trench-like depressions or in the floors of sheer-walled atypical pit craters. As viewed from orbit, locations of most candidates are visibly consistent with known terrestrial features such as tube-fed lava flows, volcano-tectonic fractures, and pit craters, each of which forms by mechanisms that can produce caves. Although we cannot determine subsurface extents of the Martian features discussed here, some may continue unimpeded for many kilometers if terrestrial examples are indeed analogous. The features presented here were identified in images acquired by the Mars Odyssey's Thermal Emission Imaging System visible-wavelength camera, and by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Context Camera. Select candidates have since been targeted by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment. Martian caves are promising potential sites for future human habitation and astrobiology investigations; understanding their characteristics is critical for long-term mission planning and for developing the necessary exploration technologies.

  4. Three long lava flows in north Queensland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, P. J.; Burch-Johnston, A. T.; Stanton, D.; Whitehead, P. W.

    1998-11-01

    The Kinrara, Toomba, and Undara basaltic lava flows are from 55 to 160 km long and range in age from 13 to 190 ka. The lavas were emplaced down low gradients (0.2° to 0.4°) with volumes ranging up to 30 km3. They were not unusually hot at eruption (1130°-1160°) nor unusually fluid. Gentle topography controlled the flows, and shallow drainage lines captured them. Lava tubes operated in places, and some drained to form caves. Injection under surface crust was widespread, producing inflation features ranging from tumuli and low plateaus to extensive ridges. Sustained eruption was essential for the development of the long flows, but each is composite, with pauses between successive pulses that partially covered the earlier, longer flows. The lava structures are mainly pahoehoe but some 'a'a lavas are present. Of the three volcanoes involved, Undara is a simple low-angle lava cone with a 200-m-wide crater, Toomba is a low-angled cone with several eruption centers, and Kinrara has a deep crater with evidence of strong fountaining. Effusion rates are not known but may have been relatively low, similar to those observed in Hawaiian volcanoes. Lava tubes, most of which remained undrained, are believed to have been of major importance in flow emplacement. Given the evidence of successive flows and the time needed to develop widespread inflation, it is suggested that the two long flows over 100 km involved many decades of eruption.

  5. CAVE WINDOW

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, M.

    1960-10-25

    A cave window is described. It is constructed of thick glass panes arranged so that interior panes have smaller windowpane areas and exterior panes have larger areas. Exterior panes on the radiation exposure side are remotely replaceable when darkened excessively. Metal shutters minimize exposure time to extend window life.

  6. Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03658 Lava Flows

    These relatively young lava flows are part of Arsia Mons.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -22.5N, Longitude 242.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Caving in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Holly

    2010-01-01

    During Cave Week, more than 200 students explore a simulated cave environment and participate in cave-related activities. Active cavers from a local club bring in equipment and photos and speak about their caving experiences. As student groups explore the simulated cave, other groups participate in different activities where they can create bat…

  8. Caving in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Holly

    2010-01-01

    During Cave Week, more than 200 students explore a simulated cave environment and participate in cave-related activities. Active cavers from a local club bring in equipment and photos and speak about their caving experiences. As student groups explore the simulated cave, other groups participate in different activities where they can create bat…

  9. Lava Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Todd R.

    2008-04-01

    This past semester I brought a Lava Lite® Lamp into my classroom. Why bring such a thing into class? Many of today's students are part of the "retro" movement. They buy clothes from the '60s, they wear their hair like people did in the '60s, and they look for the ideals and themes related to living in the 1960s. Physics education reform is also examining ideas from the "retro" world of science. This was the post-Sputnik era, a time when science was done by actually doing it and not necessarily by lecturing about it. Cliff Swartz, former TPT editor, once mentioned during a presentation at a Texas AAPT meeting, "The world of physics teaching is cyclic, like a swinging pendulum. We as physics teachers jump from `new ideas' back to our old ones, each generation testing what works best for them."

  10. Monitoring the Environment in a Lava Tube with a Wireless Sensor Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Wilson, J. L.; Rendon, N. M.

    2010-12-01

    Monitoring cave environments is important for several reasons. For instance, through the studies of cave environments, we can better protect cave ecology. Past experiments have monitored cave environments, although most of those were based on individual sensor nodes such as data loggers. In this paper we introduce and discuss a ZigBee wireless sensor network-based platform used for cave environment monitoring. The platform is based on a Freescale ZigBee evaluation kit. We carried out a proof-of-concept experiment in Junction Cave, a lava tube, at El Malpais National Monument in New Mexico. That experiment monitored temperature, humidity, and air turbulence inside the cave. The instrumentation consisted of a turbulence tower with five thermocouple-based sensors, reaching from the floor to the ceiling of the cave, temperature/humidity sensors distributed throughout the cave, and a low-power embedded Linux computer for data collection and storage. The experiment measured interesting air turbulence variations at different heights, which we related to to weather changes outside the cave and human activities inside the cave. The experiment also observed variations of air temperature at different locations inside the cave. In this presentation we will discuss the instrumentation as well as interpretations of the observations. The experiment demonstrated that a ZigBee wireless sensor network-based monitoring system is a potentially feasible platform for a cave environment monitoring system. We also found that network reliability, node cost, and power consumption need to be improved for future systems.

  11. Cave Rings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...Literature The ‘splash ring’ conjecture is described in [5]. It is claimed that 45◦ is the most probable angle for secondary drops to be ejected at, and that...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by

  12. Geologic controls on cave development in Burnsville Cove, Bath and Highland Counties, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swezey, Christopher; Haynes, John T.; Lucas, Philip C.; Lambert, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Burnsville Cove in Bath and Highland Counties (Virginia, USA) is a karst region in the Valley and Ridge Province of the Appalachian Mountains. The region contains many caves in Silurian to Devonian limestone, and is well suited for examining geologic controls on cave location and cave passage morphology. In Burnsville Cove, many caves are located preferentially near the axes of synclines and anticlines. For example, Butler Cave is an elongate cave where the trunk channel follows the axis of Sinking Creek syncline and most of the side passages follow joints at right angles to the syncline axis. In contrast, the Water Sinks Subway Cave, Owl Cave, and Helictite Cave have abundant maze patterns, and are located near the axis of Chestnut Ridge anticline. The maze patterns may be related to fact that the anticline axis is the site of the greatest amount of flexure, leading to more joints and (or) greater enlargement of joints. Many of the larger caves of Burnsville Cove (e.g., Breathing Cave, Butler Cave–Sinking Creek Cave System, lower parts of the Water Sinks Cave System) are developed in the Silurian Tonoloway Limestone, the stratigraphic unit with the greatest surface exposure in the area. Other caves are developed in the Silurian to Devonian Keyser Limestone of the Helderberg Group (e.g., Owl Cave, upper parts of the Water Sinks Cave System) and in the Devonian Shriver Chert and (or) Licking Creek Limestone of the Helderberg Group (e.g., Helictite Cave). Within the Tonoloway Limestone, the larger caves are developed in the lower member of the Tonoloway Limestone immediately below a bed of silica-cemented sandstone. In contrast, the larger caves in the Keyser Limestone are located preferentially in limestone beds containing stromatoporoid reefs, and some of the larger caves in the Licking Creek Limestone are located in beds of cherty limestone below the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone. Geologic controls on cave passage morphology include joints, bedding planes, and

  13. Founder effects initiated rapid species radiation in Hawaiian cave planthoppers

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Andreas; Hoch, Hannelore; Asche, Manfred; von Rintelen, Thomas; Stelbrink, Björn; Heck, Volker; Stone, Fred D.; Howarth, Francis G.

    2013-01-01

    The Hawaiian Islands provide the venue of one of nature’s grand experiments in evolution. Here, we present morphological, behavioral, genetic, and geologic data from a young subterranean insect lineage in lava tube caves on Hawai‘i Island. The Oliarus polyphemus species complex has the potential to become a model for studying rapid speciation by stochastic events. All species in this lineage live in extremely similar environments but show strong differentiation in behavioral and morphometric characters, which are random with respect to cave age and geographic distribution. Our observation that phenotypic variability within populations decreases with increasing cave age challenges traditional views on founder effects. Furthermore, these cave populations are natural replicates that can be used to test the contradictory hypotheses. Moreover, Hawaiian cave planthoppers exhibit one of the highest speciation rates among animals and, thus, radically shift our perception on the evolutionary potential of obligate cavernicoles. PMID:23696661

  14. Founder effects initiated rapid species radiation in Hawaiian cave planthoppers.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Andreas; Hoch, Hannelore; Asche, Manfred; von Rintelen, Thomas; Stelbrink, Björn; Heck, Volker; Stone, Fred D; Howarth, Francis G

    2013-06-04

    The Hawaiian Islands provide the venue of one of nature's grand experiments in evolution. Here, we present morphological, behavioral, genetic, and geologic data from a young subterranean insect lineage in lava tube caves on Hawai'i Island. The Oliarus polyphemus species complex has the potential to become a model for studying rapid speciation by stochastic events. All species in this lineage live in extremely similar environments but show strong differentiation in behavioral and morphometric characters, which are random with respect to cave age and geographic distribution. Our observation that phenotypic variability within populations decreases with increasing cave age challenges traditional views on founder effects. Furthermore, these cave populations are natural replicates that can be used to test the contradictory hypotheses. Moreover, Hawaiian cave planthoppers exhibit one of the highest speciation rates among animals and, thus, radically shift our perception on the evolutionary potential of obligate cavernicoles.

  15. Observations of actively forming lava tubes and associated structures, Hawaii.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.

    1971-01-01

    Fluid basalts were erupted in August, 1970, from a vent near Alae Crater and flowed southeast. Forming exclusively in pahoehoe basalt, tubes in general evolve from lava channels by crustal formation, although some tubes develop directly from the vent. The observation discussed shows that channel crusts and tube roofs form in several ways. Lava channels usually form along the axis of highest velocity within the flow and are often centered along older lava channels, stream beds, rifts, grabens, or fracture zones.

  16. The Science of Exploring Caves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Frank S.

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the science of speleology is presented. Discussed is why people explore caves--for the physical challenge, the thrill of discovery, and the joy of viewing their beauty. Cave conservation, cave biology, caving safety, and caving equipment are topics of discussion. A reading list on caves is included. (KR)

  17. The Science of Exploring Caves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Frank S.

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the science of speleology is presented. Discussed is why people explore caves--for the physical challenge, the thrill of discovery, and the joy of viewing their beauty. Cave conservation, cave biology, caving safety, and caving equipment are topics of discussion. A reading list on caves is included. (KR)

  18. Biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria from Canadian and Azorean volcanic caves.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Cristina; Enes Dapkevicius, Maria de Lurdes; Miller, Ana Z; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean; Mason, Cohord; Cheeptham, Naowarat

    2017-01-01

    Caves are regarded as extreme habitats with appropriate conditions for the development of Actinobacteria. In comparison with other habitats, caves have not yet been the target of intensive screening for bioactive secondary metabolites produced by actinomycetes. As a primary screening strategy, we conducted a metagenomic analysis of the diversity and richness of a key gene required for non-ribosomal peptide (NRP) biosynthesis, focusing on cave-derived sediments from two Canadian caves (a lava tube and a limestone cave) to help us predict whether different types of caves may harbor drug-producing actinobacteria. Using degenerate PCR primers targeting adenylation domains (AD), a conserved domain in the core gene in NRP biosynthesis, a number of amplicons were obtained that mapped back to biomedically relevant NRP gene cluster families. This result guided our culture-dependent sampling strategy of actinomycete isolation from the volcanic caves of Canada (British Columbia) and Portugal (Azores) and subsequent characterization of their antibacterial and enzymatic activities. Multiple enzymatic and antimicrobial activities were identified from bacterial of the Arthrobacter and Streptomyces genera demonstrating that actinomycetes from volcanic caves are promising sources of antibacterial, antibiofilm compounds and industrially relevant enzymes.

  19. Lava Flows On Ascraeus Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Ascraeus Mons Volcano: Like Earth, Mars has many volcanoes and volcanic features. This high-resolution view shows some of the lava flows near the summit of Ascraeus Mons, one of the three giant shield volcanoes known as the 'Tharsis Montes'. Volcanoes form when magma (molten rock) erupts out onto the surface of a planet. Based on Viking-era observations, Ascraeus Mons is considered to be one of the tallest volcanoes on Mars... its summit is more than 11 km (6.8 miles) above the surrounding plain. The summit is more than 23 km (14 miles) higher in elevation than the place where Mars Pathfinder landed in July 1997.

    Description of MOC Image: This picture shows an area that is about 20 km (12 miles) higher in elevation than the Mars Pathfinder landing site. The picture shows three main features: (1) a crater at the center-right, (2) a sinuous, discontinuous channel across the upper half, and (3) a rough and pitted, elevated surface across the lower half of the image.

    (1) Crater at center right. Distinguishing meteor craters from volcanic craters can sometimes be a challenge on Mars. This particular crater was most likely formed by meteor impact because it has a raised rim and a faint radial ejecta pattern around the outside of it. This crater is 600 m (2000 feet) across, about 3/4 the size of the famous 'Meteor Crater' near Winslow, Arizona.

    (2) Sinuous channel. The type of discontinuous channel running across the upper half of the image is sometimes referred to as a 'sinuous rille'. These are common on the volcanic plains of the Moon and among volcanoes and volcanic plains on Earth. Such a channel was once a lava tube. It is running down the middle of an old lava flow. The 'tube' looks like a 'channel' because its roof has collapsed. The discontinuous nature of this channel is the result of the collapse, or 'cave-in' of what was once the roof of the lava tube. It is common for certain types of relatively fluid lavas to form

  20. Lava Flows On Ascraeus Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Ascraeus Mons Volcano: Like Earth, Mars has many volcanoes and volcanic features. This high-resolution view shows some of the lava flows near the summit of Ascraeus Mons, one of the three giant shield volcanoes known as the 'Tharsis Montes'. Volcanoes form when magma (molten rock) erupts out onto the surface of a planet. Based on Viking-era observations, Ascraeus Mons is considered to be one of the tallest volcanoes on Mars... its summit is more than 11 km (6.8 miles) above the surrounding plain. The summit is more than 23 km (14 miles) higher in elevation than the place where Mars Pathfinder landed in July 1997.

    Description of MOC Image: This picture shows an area that is about 20 km (12 miles) higher in elevation than the Mars Pathfinder landing site. The picture shows three main features: (1) a crater at the center-right, (2) a sinuous, discontinuous channel across the upper half, and (3) a rough and pitted, elevated surface across the lower half of the image.

    (1) Crater at center right. Distinguishing meteor craters from volcanic craters can sometimes be a challenge on Mars. This particular crater was most likely formed by meteor impact because it has a raised rim and a faint radial ejecta pattern around the outside of it. This crater is 600 m (2000 feet) across, about 3/4 the size of the famous 'Meteor Crater' near Winslow, Arizona.

    (2) Sinuous channel. The type of discontinuous channel running across the upper half of the image is sometimes referred to as a 'sinuous rille'. These are common on the volcanic plains of the Moon and among volcanoes and volcanic plains on Earth. Such a channel was once a lava tube. It is running down the middle of an old lava flow. The 'tube' looks like a 'channel' because its roof has collapsed. The discontinuous nature of this channel is the result of the collapse, or 'cave-in' of what was once the roof of the lava tube. It is common for certain types of relatively fluid lavas to form

  1. BELLE STARR CAVE WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, ARKANSAS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haley, Boyd R.; Stroud, Raymond B.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Belle Starr Cave Wilderness Study Area in Arkansas concluded that there is little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources in the area. There is a probable resource potential for small quantities of natural gas. A coal bed that underlies the area contains demonstrated coal resources of about 22. 5 million tons in a bed that averages less than 28 in. thick. Despite its contained coal, this area is not shown as having a coal resource potential.

  2. Come to our Cave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Joan

    2001-01-01

    Describes an activity for first-grade students in which they learn about cave paintings and become spelunkers, or people who explore caves as a hobby, making their own paper head-lanterns. Explains that students draw animals on the walls of their "cave" (a dark hallway lined with brown kraft paper). (CMK)

  3. Come to our Cave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Joan

    2001-01-01

    Describes an activity for first-grade students in which they learn about cave paintings and become spelunkers, or people who explore caves as a hobby, making their own paper head-lanterns. Explains that students draw animals on the walls of their "cave" (a dark hallway lined with brown kraft paper). (CMK)

  4. Lunar Lava Tube Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Cheryl Lynn; Walden, Bryce; Billings, Thomas L.; Reeder, P. Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Large (greater than 300 m diameter) lava tube caverns appear to exist on the Moon and could provide substantial safety and cost benefits for lunar bases. Over 40 m of basalt and regolith constitute the lava tube roof and would protect both construction and operations. Constant temperatures of -20 C reduce thermal stress on structures and machines. Base designs need not incorporate heavy shielding, so lightweight materials can be used and construction can be expedited. Identification and characterization of lava tube caverns can be incorporated into current precursor lunar mission plans. Some searches can even be done from Earth. Specific recommendations for lunar lava tube search and exploration are (1) an Earth-based radar interferometer, (2) an Earth-penetrating radar (EPR) orbiter, (3) kinetic penetrators for lunar lava tube confirmation, (4) a 'Moon Bat' hovering rocket vehicle, and (5) the use of other proposed landers and orbiters to help find lunar lava tubes.

  5. Kaumana lava tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.

    1974-01-01

    The entrance to Kaumana Lava Tube is in a picnic ground next to Highway 20 (Kaumana Drive) about 6.5 km southwest of Hilo. The area is passed on the way to the Kona Coast via the Saddle Road and is identified by a Hawaii Visitors Bureau sign. Although it is not the largest lava tube in the islands, Kaumana Lava Tube is an interesting geological formation, displaying many of the features typical of lava tube interiors. It is accessible, relatively easy to walk through, and is in an excellent state of preservation. The tube developed in a historic lava flow (1881, from Mauna Loa), and many aspects of lava tube activity are observed.

  6. Introducing Kansas Lava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Andy; Bull, Tristan; Kimmell, Garrin; Perrins, Erik; Komp, Ed; Werling, Brett

    Kansas Lava is a domain specific language for hardware description. Though there have been a number of previous implementations of Lava, we have found the design space rich, with unexplored choices. We use a direct (Chalmers style) specification of circuits, and make significant use of Haskell overloading of standard classes, leading to concise circuit descriptions. Kansas Lava supports both simulation (inside GHCi), and execution via VHDL, by having a dual shallow and deep embedding inside our Signal type. We also have a lightweight sized-type mechanism, allowing for MATLAB style matrix based specifications to be directly expressed in Kansas Lava.

  7. Wind and Lava

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-11-27

    In this image wind seems to be the dominant process, but lava flows are still recognizable from the surface texture. It appears that the lava flow top left is relatively thin, and the material below is easily eroded by the wind

  8. Lava That Once Flowed

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-19

    This image shows some beautiful lava flows in Amazonis Planitia. Lava isn't moving around on Mars today, but it certainly once did, and images like this one are evidence of that. A thick lava flow came in from the west, and you can see the cooled flow lobes and wrinkled upper surface. East of the flow margin, this most recent flow also coursed over an older lava surface which shows some long, north-south breaks, and in the southeast corner, an arrowhead-shaped set of ridges. These textures are most likely from rafted slabs of lava. Under certain conditions, a large piece of lava can cool, but then detach and move like an iceberg over a cushion of still-molten lava. The long, narrow north-south smooth areas are probably where two of these plates rafted away from one another exposing the lava below. The arrowhead-shaped ridges are probably from when one of these plates pushed up against another one and caused a pile-up before cooling. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21113

  9. Olympus Mons Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 05 April 2002) Olympus Mons stands 26 km above the surrounding plains, which is three times taller than Mt. Everest, and is the tallest volcano in the solar system. Olympus Mons is also wider (585 km) than the state of Arizona. Although these are impressive dimensions an astronaut would find walking these slopes easy, as they are typically only 2 to 5 degrees. This image contains numerous lava flows, leveed lava channels, a discontinuous sinuous rille (thought to be a collapsed lava tube) and lava plains. Close examination of the sinuous rille reveals that portions of the roof of the lava tube have not completely collapsed. All of these features can be seen in basaltic (iron and magnesium rich black rock) volcanic regions on Earth like Hawaii and Iceland. Impact craters are scarce, indicating a relatively young age (several hundred million years old) for these surfaces.

  10. Prehispanic (Guanches) mummies and natrium salts in burial caves of Las Cañadas del Teide (Tenerife).

    PubMed

    Arnay-de-la-Rosa, Matilde; González-Reimers, Emilio; Pou-Hernández, Sergio; Marrero-Salas, Efraím; García-Avila, Carlos

    2017-07-01

    The prehispanic population of Tenerife (Guanches) buried their dead in caves. Many corpses are totally or partially mummified. Embalming procedures are largely unknown, besides some information recorded by chroniclers and the general idea that environmental conditions in some areas may favour natural mummification. Detailed observation of burial caves containing mummified corpses revealed the presence of a white mineral in form of crusts or powder that was not present in the vast majority of non-burial caves, especially in basaltic and trachybasaltic lava flows. We analysed these crusts and they consist of natrium carbonate salts. Therefore, we conducted a search visiting 30 caves, 3 of them harbouring mummified corpses, and made analyses if there were natrium salts in these caves and their amount. One burial cave was located in trachyphonolitic lava flow, and two further caves in trachybasaltic and basaltic lava flows. There was a significant association between presence of natrium salts and use of the cave as a burial site (χ(2) = 9.37; p = 0.0259). The semiquantitatively assessed amount of natrium salts was also by far higher in burial caves than in non-burial ones (Z = 2.58, p = 0.01). There are no reports that support the use of natrium salts in the embalming process among the Guanches, but we found a clear-cut relationship between the presence and/or amount of natrium salts in caves and their use as burial sites by the prehispanic population buried in the central highlands, suggesting an intentional use of caves containing this mineral as burial caves, based perhaps on the observation of the ability of natrium salts to preserve corpses.

  11. Geology of caves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, I.M.

    1991-01-01

    A cave is a natural opening in the ground extending beyond the zone of light and large enough to permit the entry of man. Occurring in a wide variety of rock types and caused by widely differing geological processes, caves range in size from single small rooms to intercorinecting passages many miles long. The scientific study of caves is called speleology (from the Greek words spelaion for cave and logos for study). It is a composite science based on geology, hydrology, biology, and archaeology, and thus holds special interest for earth scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey.

  12. Lava Flow Near the Base of Olympus Mons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-18

    This image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a lava channel, which lies just to the east of the largest volcano in the solar system: Olympus Mons. The channel appears to be discontinuous, meaning it disappears several times throughout its length, but in fact, it is likely that the channel continues underground as a lava tube. These are relatively common features at terrestrial volcanic centers, such as the Big Island of Hawai'i. The channel appears to have been infilled with dust and sand, so that the entrance to a lava tube cave is no longer visible at this particular location; fortunately this has been observed elsewhere on Mars. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19299

  13. Cave Water Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, Elizabeth S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a comparative study project where seventh grade students tested water samples from 10 cave sites that had been tested 24 years ago in a study that had attempted to determine if pollution in the environment had reached cave water. Discusses lab skills and some results of the study. (JRH)

  14. Empowering Women through Caving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabert, Julie

    1997-01-01

    Describes an introductory horizontal caving experience for college-age women who were uncomfortable with their bodies, insecure with movement, and unwilling to take big risks. The darkness and quiet of the cave released inhibitions and promoted group cohesion, feelings of intimacy and safety, self-discovery, and self-confidence. (SV)

  15. Cave Water Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, Elizabeth S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a comparative study project where seventh grade students tested water samples from 10 cave sites that had been tested 24 years ago in a study that had attempted to determine if pollution in the environment had reached cave water. Discusses lab skills and some results of the study. (JRH)

  16. Martian Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    19 October 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows lava flows at the southeast base of the giant volcano, Olympus Mons. The flat plain in the south-southeast (bottom/lower right) portion of the image is younger than and cuts off the ends of many of the lava flows that came from the northwest (upper left). Many of the lava flows in this image exhibit channels with levees bounding their margins. As each lava flow was advancing, its outer margins cooled and hardened, forming a channel or tube through which the molten rock continued to advance.

    Location near: 17.2oN, 129.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Winter

  17. Extra Terrestrial Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes-Gautier, R.

    1993-01-01

    Volcanism has been one of the major processes shaping the surfaces of the terrestrial planets. Lava flows have been identified on the Moon, Mars, Venus, and on Juptier's moon Io. The study of extra-terrestrial lavas has largely relied on the interpretation of remotely acquired imaging, topographic and spectroscopic data. Models relating the final flow morpohology to eruption characteristics and magma chemistry have been important tools in the interpretation of these data.

  18. Lava flows and domes

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J. )

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses emplacement of silicic domes and mafic lava flows. The authors have utilized the combination of field, experimental and theoretical methods to constrain various characteristics of recently-emplaced lavas, including dimensions, growth rates, surface morphology, deformation styles, rheology, and volatile contents. Filed measurements from numerous volcanoes are presented. Focus is on data from Mount St. Helens. The value of such investigations is addressed.

  19. Lava Flow Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    1996-01-01

    This grant originally had four major tasks, all of which were addressed to varying extents during the course of the research: (1) Measure the fractal dimensions of lava flows as a function of topography, substrate, and rheology; (2) The nature of lava tube systems and their relation to flow fields; (3) A quantitative assessment of lava flow dynamics in light of the fractal nature of lava flow margins; and (4) Development and application of a new remote sensing tool based on fractal properties. During the course of the research, the project expanded to include the following projects: (1) A comparison of what we can-learn from remote sensing studies of lava flow morphology and from studies of samples of lava flows; (2) Study of a terrestrial analog of the nakhlites, one of the groups of meteorites from Mars; and (3) Study of the textures of Hawaiian basalts as an aid in understanding the dynamics (flow rates, inflation rates, thermal history) of flow interiors. In addition, during the first year an educational task (development and writing of a teacher's guide and activity set to accompany the lunar sample disk when it is sent to schools) was included.

  20. New Species of Campodeidae (Diplura) from Mexican caves.

    PubMed

    Sendra, Alberto; Palacios, Jose; Garcia, Arturo; Montejo, Maira

    2016-02-04

    Six new taxa of Campodeidae (Diplura) are described in the genera Litocampa, Juxtlacampa, Oncinocampa, and Tachycampa. We also redescribe the interesting species Juxtlacampa juxtlahucensis Wygodzinsky, 1944 from Juxtlahuaca cave in Guerrero, Mexico. All of these taxa are cave-dwelling species with more or less noticeable troglobiomorphic features They inhabit the subterranean ecosystem in six limestone massifs and one lava tube cave in the central states of Mexico. Four of these species are included in the "tachycampoide" group and one species in the "podocampoide" group (sensu Bareth & Conde). Nine species already known in Central and South America of the "tachycampoide" group, in such poorly-sampled regions compared with the eight species in the well-sampled Mediterranean region (Ibero-Sardinia and north Africa), suggest an American origin for this group.

  1. Carroll Cave: a Missouri legend

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carroll Cave is one of the premiere caves of Missouri and the Ozarks region. At over 20 miles of surveyed passage, it is the 2nd longest cave in the state and 33rd longest in the nation. It is also the largest known cave formed in the Ordovician aged (443-485 million years ago) Gasconade Dolomite o...

  2. Basaltic Lava Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Griffiths, R. W.; Kerr, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    In Hawaii, the mode of lava transport - through open channels or through insulating lava tubes - determines the thermal, rheological, and emplacement history of a lava flow. Most Hawaiian lavas are erupted at near-liquidus temperatures and are therefore crystal-poor; lava transport through open channels allows rapid cooling and consequent rapid increases in lava crystallinity. Solidified aa flows resulting from channelized flow are typically fine-grained throughout their thickness, indicating cooling of the entire flow thickness during transport. In contrast, transport of lava through insulating tubes permits flow over long distances with little cooling. Flows emerging from such tubes typically have pahoehoe flow surfaces with glassy crusts. Groundmass textures that coarsen from the flow rind to the interior reflect rates of post-emplacement, rather than syn-emplacement, cooling. To distinguish eruption conditions that result in lava channels from those that allow formation of lava tubes, we have performed a series of laboratory experiments involving injection of PEG 600 (a wax with a Newtonian rheology and freezing temperature of 19ºC) into cold water through both uniform and non-uniform sloping channels. In uniform channels, tube formation can be distinguished from open channel flow using a dimensionless parameter based on a solidification time scale, an advection time scale, and a Rayleigh number that describes convection by heat loss from crust-free shear zones. Theoretical analysis predicts that in the open channel regime, the width of the crust (dc) will vary with the channel width (W) as dc = W5/3. Crustal coverage of non-uniform channels in both laboratory experiments and field examples from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is consistent with this prediction. However, experiments in non-uniform channels illustrate additional controls on the surface coverage of lava channels. Most important is crustal extension resulting from flow acceleration through constrictions

  3. Gas discharges in fumarolic ice caves of Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, T. P.; Curtis, A. G.; Kyle, P. R.; Sano, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Fumarolic ice caves and towers on Erebus are the surface expression of flank degassing on the world's southernmost active volcano. The caves are formed by warm gases and steam escaping from small vents on the lava flow floors that melts the overlying ice and snow. Extremophiles in the caves may be analogues for extraterrestrial environments. Over the past four Austral summers, mapping, gas and thermal monitoring conducted under the Erebus Caves Project has provided insights into the ice cave formation processes and the relationships between cave structures, magmatic processes, and weather. Gas samples were collected during the 2012 - 2013 field season in 4 ice caves (Warren, Harry's Dream, Sauna, Haggis Hole) as well as the thermal ground at Tramway Ridge. The vents at all of these sites are characterized by diffuse degassing through loose lava or cracks in the lava flow floor. Vent temperatures ranged from 5 to 17°C in most caves and at Tramway Ridge. In Sauna cave the temperature was 40°C. Gases were sampled by inserting a perforated 1 m long, 5 mm diameter stainless steel tube, into the vents or hot ground. Giggenbach bottles, copper tubes and lead glass bottles were connected in series. The gases were pumped at a slow rate (about 20 ml per minute) using a battery pump for 12-24 hours to flush the system. After flushing samples were collected for later analyses. All samples are dominated by atmospheric components, however, carbon dioxide (0.1 to 1.9%), methane (0.005 to 0.01%), hydrogen (0.002 to 0.07%), and helium (0.0009 to 0.002 %) are above air background. Nitrogen (average 74%) and oxygen (23.5%) are slightly below and above air values, respectively. Helium isotopes show minor input of mantle derived helium-3 with 3He4He ratios ranging from 1.03 to 1.18 RA (where RA is the ratio of air). This represents the first detection of hydrogen and helium in the caves. Methane could be produced by anaerobic respiration of subsurface microbes or hydrothermal

  4. Cave speleothems as repositories of microbial biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ana Z.; Jurado, Valme; Pereira, Manuel F. C.; Fernández, Octavio; Calaforra, José M.; Dionísio, Amélia; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2015-04-01

    The need to better understand the biodiversity, origins of life on Earth and on other planets, and the wide applications of the microbe-mineral interactions have led to a rapid expansion of interest in subsurface environments. Recently reported results indicated signs of an early wet Mars and rather recent volcanic activity which suggest that Mars's subsurface can house organic molecules or traces of microbial life, making the search for microbial life on Earth's subsurface even more compelling. Caves on Earth are windows into the subsurface that harbor a wide variety of mineral-utilizing microorganisms, which may contribute to the formation of biominerals and unusual microstructures recognized as biosignatures. These environments contain a wide variety of redox interfaces and stable physicochemical conditions, which enhance secondary mineral precipitation and microbial growth under limited organic nutrient inputs. Enigmatic microorganisms and unusual mineral features have been found associated with secondary mineral deposits or speleothems in limestone caves and lava tubes. In this study, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were conducted on cave speleothem samples to assess microbe-mineral interactions, evaluate biogenicity, as well as to describe unusual mineral formations and microbial features. Microbial mats, extracellular polymeric substances, tubular empty sheaths, mineralized cells, filamentous fabrics, as well as "cell-sized" etch pits or microborings produced by bacterial cells were observed on minerals. These features evidence microbe-mineral interactions and may represent mineralogical signatures of life. We can thus consider that caves on Earth are plausible repositories of terrestrial biosignatures where we can look for microbial signatures. Acknowledgments: AZM acknowledges the support from the Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework

  5. The foaming of lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.; Walton, W.

    1976-01-01

    Foaming is of great practical and theoretical significance for volcanic processes on the earth, the moon, and perhaps the meteorite parent bodies. The theory of foams agrees with steelmaking experience to indicate that their presence depends on the existence of solutes in the lavas which reduce the surface tension, and are not saturated. These solutes concentrate at the surface, and are called surfactants. The surfactant responsible for the formation of volcanic ash was not identified; it appears to be related to the oxygen partial pressure above the lava. This fact may explain why lunar and meteoritic melts are not observed to foam. Experimental studies are needed to clarify the process.

  6. Energy expenditure in caving

    PubMed Central

    Antoni, Giorgia; Marini, Elisabetta; Curreli, Nicoletta; Tuveri, Valerio; Comandini, Ornella; Cabras, Stefano; Gabba, Silvia; Madeddu, Clelia; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the energy expenditure of a group of cavers of both genders and different ages and experience during a 10 hour subterranean exploration, using portable metabolimeters. The impact of caving activity on body composition and hydration were also assessed through bioelectrical impedance, and nutritional habits of cavers surveyed. During cave activity, measured total energy expenditure (TEE) was in the range 225–287 kcal/h for women-men (MET = 4.1), respectively; subjects had an energy intake from food in the range 1000–1200 kcal, thus inadequate to restore lost calories. Bayesian statistical analysis estimated the effect of predictive variables on TEE, revealing that experienced subjects had a 5% lower TEE than the less skilled ones and that women required a comparatively larger energy expenditure than men to perform the same task. BIVA (bioelectrical impedance vector analysis) showed that subjects were within the range of normal hydration before and after cave activity, but bioelectrical changes indicated a reduction of extracellular water in men, which might result in hypo-osmolal dehydration in the case of prolonged underground exercise. All these facts should be considered when planning cave explorations, preparing training programs for subjects practising caving, and optimizing a diet for cavers. Further, information gathered through this study could be of value to reduce accidents in caves related to increase in fatigue. PMID:28158208

  7. LAVA Applications to Open Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Housman, Jeff; Barad, Mike; Brehm, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Outline: LAVA (Launch Ascent Vehicle Aerodynamics); Introduction; Acoustics Related Applications; LAVA Applications to Open Rotor; Structured Overset Grids; Cartesian Grid with Immersed Boundary; High Speed Case; High Speed Case with Plate Low Speed Case.

  8. Lava Flows of Daedalia Planum

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-19

    This NASA Mars Odyssey image captures a portion of several lava flows in Daedalia Planum southwest of the Arsia Mons shield volcano. Textures characteristic of the variable surface roughness associated with different lava flows in this region are easily s

  9. Lava Flows around Olympus Mons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-16

    This image from NASA Mars Odyssey of lava flows around the large scarp of Olympus Mons reveals textures characteristic of the variable surface roughness associated with different lava flows in this region.

  10. Role of Tectonics in Forming of the Kalahrood Cave, North Isfahan, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadimi, A.; Sohrabi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Caves are perhaps the most spectacular examples of the combined effects of weathering and erosion by groundwater. As groundwater percolate through carbonate rocks, it dissolves and enlarges fractures and openings to form a complex interconnecting system of crevices, caves, caverns and underground streams. Caves and caverns form as a result of the dissolution of carbonate rocks by weakly acidic groundwater. Groundwater percolating through the zone of aeration slowly dissolves the carbonate rock and enlarges its fractures and bedding planes. During dissolving and deposition of calcite, many various dripstone deposits, stalactite and stalagmite structures form. There are many caves in Iran that have formed with the above procedure. Opposite of the procedure, the Kalahrood Cave, in the north of Isfahan has another scenario for its forming. The cave located in southwestern boundary of high mountains of the Urumieh-Dokhtar Magmatic Belt of Central Iran. It has formed in Lower Cretaceous grey limestones. There are many NW-SE-trending faults in the study area. The faults have thrust and dextral strike-slip motions. The Kalahrood cave formed in footwall of the Kalahrood thrust. Structural studies and filed observations in the Kalahrood area and in the cave indicated that the Kalahrood cave has formed during thrusting and dropping the cave roof in footwall and littering the floor with fallen debris. We have considered three episodes for forming the Kalahrood cave: 1- Thrusting and motion of hangingwall. There are many traces of faulting on the walls and roofs of the cave. 2- Dropping of crushed rocks and separated blocks of the roof in footwall and creating the cave space. Maximum distance between floor and roof has measured about 15 m. 3- Affect of groundwater on the rock units and increase of disbandment and enlarging the fractures. Some small stalagmite and stalactite structures have formed in internal part of the cave.

  11. Flow direction determination of lava flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. I.; Rhodes, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    The flow direction technique, previously applied to ash-flow sheets, can be used to determine direction of movement and locate eruptive centers for lava flows. The method provides statistically stronger and more consistent flow direction data for lava than ash-flow tuff. The accuracy and reliability of the technique was established on the porphyritic basaltic andesite of Mount Taylor, New Mexico, which erupted from a known center, the Mount Taylor Amphitheater. The technique was then applied to volcanic units with unknown sources: the John Kerr Peak Quartz Latite and mid-Tertiary andesite flows in the Mogollon Mountains, both in southwestern New Mexico. The flow direction technique indicated flow patterns and suggested source areas for each rock unit. In the Mogollon Mountains flow direction measurements were supported by independent directional criteria such as dips of cross beds, stratigraphic thickening, facies changes, and megascopic textures.-

  12. Bubble-induced cave collapse.

    PubMed

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned "natural" instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a "collapse". We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor.

  13. Bubble-Induced Cave Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned “natural” instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a “collapse”. We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor. PMID:25849088

  14. Loess Cave Habitats on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Hon, R. A.

    2015-10-01

    Excavation of artificial caves or alcoves offers an alternative to finding natural caves. Loess and loess-like materials have the unique properties of ease of excavation and the ability to support stable excavated spaces.

  15. Winter distribution and use of high elevation caves as foraging sites by the endangered Hawaiian hoary bat, Lasiurus cinereus semotus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonaccorso, Frank; Montoya-Aiona, Kristina; Pinzari, Corinna A.; Todd, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    We examine altitudinal movements involving unusual use of caves by Hawaiian hoary bats, Lasiurus cinereus semotus, during winter and spring in the Mauna Loa Forest Reserve (MLFR), Hawai‘i Island. Acoustic detection of hoary bat vocalizations, were recorded with regularity outside 13 lava tube cave entrances situated between 2,200 to 3,600 m asl from November 2012 to April 2013. Vocalizations were most numerous in November and December with the number of call events and echolocation pulses decreasing through the following months. Bat activity was positively correlated with air temperature and negatively correlated with wind speed. Visual searches found no evidence of hibernacula nor do Hawaiian hoary bats appear to shelter by day in these caves. Nevertheless, bats fly deep into caves as evidenced by numerous carcasses found in cave interiors. The occurrence of feeding buzzes around cave entrances and visual observations of bats flying in acrobatic fashion in cave interiors point to the use of these spaces as foraging sites. Peridroma moth species (Noctuidae), the only abundant nocturnal, flying insect sheltering in large numbers in rock rubble and on cave walls in the MLFR, apparently serve as the principal prey attracting hoary bats during winter to lava tube caves in the upper MLFR. Caves above 3,000 m on Mauna Loa harbor temperatures suitable for Pseudogymnoascus destructansfungi, the causative agent of White-nose Syndrome that is highly lethal to some species of North American cave-dwelling bats. We discuss the potential for White-nose Syndrome to establish and affect Hawaiian hoary bats.

  16. Biofilter performance of pine nuggets and lava rock as media.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Neslihan; Janni, Kevin A; Salnikov, Ilya A

    2011-04-01

    Wood chips and bark mulch are commonly used biofilter media because they are generally locally available and inexpensive. Nevertheless, these organic materials degrade and require replacement every 2-5 years. In this study, airflow characteristics and gas reduction efficiencies of two alternative biofilter media (pine nuggets and lava rock) with high porosity and potentially longer service lives were evaluated at three empty bed contact times (1, 3, and 5s) and two moisture levels (82% and 90% relative humidity). The lava rock had a lower pressure drop across the media and maintained higher media depth. Gas reduction efficiencies were highest for lava rock at 5s empty bed contact time and 90% humidity. The reduction efficiencies at these conditions were 56%, 88%, 87%, 25%, and 0.7% for ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, total reduced sulfur, methane and nitrous oxide, respectively. Odor reduction up to 48% was observed but was not consistent.

  17. Lava Tube Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found in the southern hemisphere of Mars. They are likely lava tube collapse pits related to flows from Hadriaca Patera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -36.8, Longitude 89.6 East (270.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space

  18. Lava Tube Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found in the southern hemisphere of Mars. They are likely lava tube collapse pits related to flows from Hadriaca Patera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -36.8, Longitude 89.6 East (270.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space

  19. Lava tubes and aquifer vulnerability in the upper Actopan River basin, Veracruz, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinasa-Pereña, R.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2011-12-01

    Rapid infiltration leads to very dry conditions on the surface of some volcanic terrains, with large allogenic streams sometimes sinking underground upon reaching a lava flow. Aquifers in lava flows tend to be heterogeneous and discontinuous, generally unconfined and fissured, and have high transmissivity. Springs associated with basalts may be very large but are typically restricted to lava-flow margins. Concern has been expressed regarding the potential for lava-tube caves to facilitate groundwater contamination similar to that afflicting some karst aquifers (Kempe et al., 2003; Kiernan et al., 2002; Halliday 2003). The upper Actopan River basin is a series of narrow valleys excavated in Tertiary volcanic brechias. Several extensive Holocene basaltic tube-fed lava flows have partially filled these valleys. The youngest and longest flow originates at El Volcancillo, a 780 ybP monogenetic volcano. It is over 50 km long, and was fed through a major master tube, the remains of which form several lava-tube caves (Gassos and Espinasa-Pereña, 2008). Another tube-fed flow initiates at a vent at the bottom of Barranca Huichila and can be followed for 7 km to where it is covered by the Volcancillo flow. The Huichila River is captured by this system of lava tubes and can be followed through several underground sections. In dry weather the stream disappears at a sump in one of these caves, although during hurricanes it overflows the tube, floods the Tengonapa plain, and finally sinks through a series of skylights into the master tube of the Volcancillo flow. Near villages, the cave entrances are used as trash dumps, which are mobilized during floods. These include household garbage, organic materials associated with agriculture and even medical supplies. This is a relatively recent phenomenon, caused by population growth and the building of houses above the lava flows. The water resurges at El Descabezadero, gushing from fractures in the lava above the underlying brechias

  20. High-Resolution Imaging of Lava Flow Terrains on Mars by MRO HiRISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Jaeger, W. L.; McEwen, A. S.; HiRISE Team

    2007-12-01

    Lava flows account for a significant fraction of the surface of Mars and HiRISE has imaged a diverse selection of these areas at resolutions comparable to "air photos" on Earth. Although some lava are extensively impact "gardened" or mantled, many areas retain primary geomorphologic information at meter-scale. Primary characteristics similar to that of late Cenozoic lava flows in arid areas of Earth are visible in the HiRISE images of even some Hesperian lava plains. The extensive mantling by wind-blown deposits in some of the more youthful volcanic terrains (e.g., Tharsis) may, like terrestrial counterparts, be a result of the excessively rough surface trapping mobilized sand. Evidence for lava flow inflation, including lava-rise plateaus and pits and deformation both vertically and laterally of lava crusts, is documented in areas of flood lavas. Other lava flows are clearly fed from surface channels resulting in dispersive flow surface pattern. Lava flows with hummocky surface textures are comparable to terrestrial flows with auto-brecciated and disturbed surfaces, but the Martian flows are often much larger than typical terrestrial examples. Kilometer-scale areas of puzzle-work plates characterize some flood lava flows. The abundance of plate-like and rubbly deformation styles observed at many localities on Mars is consistent with examples of rubbly pahoehoe seen in situ by the Spirit rover. Rubbly pahoehoe may be a common primary surface texture for many areas of plains-like lava flow emplacement such as the Hesperian lava plains. Sinuous rill-like channels headed at distinct vents and collapse pits suggest significant lava erosion and correspondingly high effusion rates. While the Athabasca Valles channel bed forms appear to be associated with major aqueous outflows, the entire region is draped with lava.

  1. Lava Lakes on Io?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, R. M. C.; Kamp, L. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Howell, R.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Kargel, J. S.; Radebaugh, J.; Turtle, E. P.; Perry, J.; Williams, D. A.; Carlson, R. W.; Doute, S.; Galileo NIMS Team

    2003-05-01

    At least 152 active volcanic centers have been identified on Jupiter's moon Io [Lopes et al., 2003, submitted to Icarus]. Eruptions at these centers include lava flows (``Promethean" type eruptions), explosive ``Pillanian" eruptions [Keszthelyi et al., 2001, JGR 106, 33,025-52] and volcanism confined within patera walls (``Lokian", Lopes et al., 2003). Understanding the Lokian eruption mechanism is particularly important because paterae are the most ubiquitous volcanic constructs on Io's surface [Radebaugh et al. 2001, JGR, 106, 33,005-33,020] and patera volcanism is the most common eruption type on Io. We use observations from Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) and compare them with images from Galileo's Solid State Imaging system (SSI) to map the distribution of thermal emission at several Ionian paterae. This allows us to examine how thermal emission correlates with visible features, and to investigate how thermal emission varies with time. Galileo's close fly-bys of Io from 1999 to 2001 allowed NIMS to observe the volcanoes at relatively high spatial resolution (1-30 km pixel). At these scales, observations of the several paterae reveal that the greatest thermal emission occurs at the edges. This can be explained as the crust of a lava lake breaking up against the base of the patera (caldera) walls, similar to what has been observed at lava lakes on Earth. Comparison with terrestrial analogs shows that several Ionian active paterae, such as Loki, Tupan, and Emakong, have thermal properties consistent with relatively inactive lava lakes on Earth. We discuss these results and their implications for eruption styles and resurfacing on Io. This work was supported in part by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program.

  2. Sandstone caves on Venezuelan tepuis: Return to pseudokarst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, R.; Lánczos, T.; Gregor, M.; Schlögl, J.; Šmída, B.; Liščák, P.; Brewer-Carías, Ch.; Vlček, L.

    2011-09-01

    Venezuelan table mountains (tepuis) host the largest arenite caves in the world. The most frequently used explanation of their origin so far was the "arenization" theory, involving dissolution of quartz cement around the sand grains and subsequent removing of the released grains by water. New research in the two largest arenite cave systems - Churi-Tepui System in Chimanta Massif and Ojos de Cristal System in Roraima Tepui showed that quartz dissolution plays only a minor role in their speleogenesis. Arenites forming the tepuis are not only quartzites but they display a wide range of lithification and breakdown, including also loose sands and sandstones. Speleogenetic processes are mostly concentrated on the beds of unlithified sands which escaped from diagenesis by being sealed by the surrounding perfectly lithified quartzites. Only the so-called "finger-flow" pillars testify to confined diagenetic fluids which flowed in narrow channels, leaving the surrounding arenite uncemented. Another factor which influenced the cave-forming processes by about 30% was lateritization. It affects beds formed of arkosic sandstones and greywackes which show strong dissolution of micas, feldspars and clay minerals, turning then to laterite ("Barro Rojo"). The main prerequisite to rank caves among karst phenomena is dissolution. As the dissolution of silicate minerals other than quartz appears to play not only a volumetrically important role but even a trigger role, these arenitic caves may be ranked as karst.

  3. Lava-Filled Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 June 2003

    Craters and hills form high standing streamlined plateaus or islands in a channeled area. The plateaus are rounded in the upstream direction and taper to a point in the downstream direction, indicating that the direction of flow in this area was roughly south to north, or bottom to top. The channels appear to be filled with lava flow deposits that are raised above the channel in some areas. A lava flow diverges around a small streamlined hill near the bottom of the image and then merges again around the northern end of it. Near the top of the image is a crater with a breach on the east (right) side that allowed the lava to flow in, leaving a lobate, high standing deposit. The channels may have been formed by the lava flows that currently fill them or there may have been flow of liquid water that created them before the lava was emplaced.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16, Longitude 183 East (177 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built

  4. Lava-Filled Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 June 2003

    Craters and hills form high standing streamlined plateaus or islands in a channeled area. The plateaus are rounded in the upstream direction and taper to a point in the downstream direction, indicating that the direction of flow in this area was roughly south to north, or bottom to top. The channels appear to be filled with lava flow deposits that are raised above the channel in some areas. A lava flow diverges around a small streamlined hill near the bottom of the image and then merges again around the northern end of it. Near the top of the image is a crater with a breach on the east (right) side that allowed the lava to flow in, leaving a lobate, high standing deposit. The channels may have been formed by the lava flows that currently fill them or there may have been flow of liquid water that created them before the lava was emplaced.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16, Longitude 183 East (177 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built

  5. The Hypothesis of Caves on Mars Revisited Through MGS Data; Their Potential as Targets for the Surveyor Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grin, E. A.; Cabrol, N. A.; McKay, C. P.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous publication, we proposed the formation of caves at mega and microscale on Mars and emphasized their potential for the exobiology exploration. The recent MOC images have shown promising indicators that caves are actually existing on Mars. In the first section, we develop the theoretical potential formation of martian caves. Then, we show how MOC is supporting this hypothesis of their formation and the new types of environments it suggests. The existence of caves on Mars from microscale to microscale structures can be predicted according to the Mars geological and climatic history. A first global approach is to consider caves as a result of underground water activity combined with tectonic movement. They can be formed by: (1) diversion of channel courses in underground conduits; (2) fractures of surface drainage patterns; chaotic terrain and collapsed areas in general; (4) seepage face in valley walls and/or headwaters; (5) inactive hydrothermal vents and lava tubes.

  6. The Hypothesis of Caves on Mars Revisited Through MGS Data; Their Potential as Targets for the Surveyor Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grin, E. A.; Cabrol, N. A.; McKay, C. P.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous publication, we proposed the formation of caves at mega and microscale on Mars and emphasized their potential for the exobiology exploration. The recent MOC images have shown promising indicators that caves are actually existing on Mars. In the first section, we develop the theoretical potential formation of martian caves. Then, we show how MOC is supporting this hypothesis of their formation and the new types of environments it suggests. The existence of caves on Mars from microscale to microscale structures can be predicted according to the Mars geological and climatic history. A first global approach is to consider caves as a result of underground water activity combined with tectonic movement. They can be formed by: (1) diversion of channel courses in underground conduits; (2) fractures of surface drainage patterns; chaotic terrain and collapsed areas in general; (4) seepage face in valley walls and/or headwaters; (5) inactive hydrothermal vents and lava tubes.

  7. Egyptian Sea Cave

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This brief article describes an archaeological expedition to the Red Sea coast area of Egypt in 2004. Kathryn Bard, an associate professor of archaeology at Boston University, along with her team, discovered the well-preserved cedar timbers of an ancient Egyptian seafaring vessel near the entrance to a large man-made cave. Limestone tablets with…

  8. Egyptian Sea Cave

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This brief article describes an archaeological expedition to the Red Sea coast area of Egypt in 2004. Kathryn Bard, an associate professor of archaeology at Boston University, along with her team, discovered the well-preserved cedar timbers of an ancient Egyptian seafaring vessel near the entrance to a large man-made cave. Limestone tablets with…

  9. Karst and Caves in Post orogenetic carbonate breccias in Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garasic, M.

    2009-04-01

    In Croatian karst area there are several places where post orogenetic carbonate breccias are present. Coarse carbonate clastics of Lika, Velebit, Mala Kapela and Hrvatsko Primorje were first considered and described as a facies of the Paleogene Promina beds. However, because of their indistinct relation or sporadically mutual connections as well as the great difference in composition, were the reasons for the introduction of the term «Jelar beds». Their genesis is later connected with significant tectonic disturbances (inverse faulting and overthrusting), followed by younger predominantly vertical faults. Promina beds found in Ravni Kotari and Mt. Promina area, as well as Jelar bed areas, are at all times in transgressive contact with older beds (carbonate clastics estimated to date from Palaeogene -Neogene). Karstification in these beds is very intensive. Additionally, spring of river Gacka (length of third sinking river in the World), is situated in Jelar beds area, and river Zrmanja is partly breaking through Promina beds. Jelar carbonate breccias is present in Northern and Southern Velebit mountain. Maybe their genesis is connected with glaciation too, but the most important is that these rocks are very soluble. In an area of approx. 25 km2 on North Velebit Mt. more than 400 caves were discovered and explored. The systems Lukina jama - Trojama (-1392 m), Slovacka jama (-1301 m) and Velebita - Dva javora (-1026 m) are the deepest caves in Croatia. Furthermore, significant depth was reached at Meduza (-679 m), Patkov gust (-553 m), Ledena jama (-536 m) and Jama Olimp (-531 m). Theses caves are really vertical and inner vertical step in Valeria (518 me) is the deepest in the World, and outer vertical step in Patkov Gust (553 me) is the second vertical entrance in the World. All these caves are located in post or carbonate Jelar breccias. In an area of approx 30 km2 on South Velebit Mt. There are more than 300 caves discovered and explored. Well known Cerova

  10. A new millipede, Austrotyla awishoshola n. sp., (Diplopoda, Chordeumatida, Conotylidae) from New Mexico, USA, and the importance of cave moss gardens as refugial habitats.

    PubMed

    Wynne, J Judson; Shear, William A

    2016-02-25

    Austrotyla awishoshola n. sp. is described from the moss gardens of one lava tube cave in El Malpais National Monument, Cibola Co., New Mexico. Most chordeumatidans require mesic conditions, and these environments are limited to moss gardens in several cave entrances and beneath cave skylights in El Malpais. Presently, this species is known from the moss gardens of a single of cave in the monument. We suggest A. awishoshola may be a climatic relict, having become restricted to the cave environment following the end of the Pleistocene. We discuss the importance of cave moss gardens as refugial and relictual habitats. Recommendations are provided to aid in the conservation and management of A. awishoshola and these habitats.

  11. Studies of Young Hawai'ian Lava Tubes: Implications for Planetary Habitability and Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, Amy; Bleacher, Jacob; Young, Kelsey; Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Needham, Debra; Schmerr, Nicholas; Shiro, Brian; Garry, Brent; Whelley, Patrick; Knudson, Christine; hide

    2017-01-01

    Habitability: Subsurface environments may preserve records of habitability or biosignatures, with more stable environmental conditions compared to surface (e.g., smaller variations in temperature and humidity) and reduced exposure to radiation; Lava tubes are expected on Mars, and candidates are observed from orbit; Few detailed studies of microbial populations in terrestrial lava caves; Also contain a variety of secondary minerals; Microbial activity may play a role in mineral formation or be preserved in these minerals; Minerals can provide insight into fluids (e.g., pH, temperature).

  12. Glacioclimatological study of Perennial Ice in the Fuji Ice Cave, Japan. Part I. Seasonal variation and mechanism of maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Ohata, Tetsuo; Furukawa, Teruo; Higuchi, Keiji )

    1994-08-01

    Perennial cave ice in a cave located at Mt. Fuji in central Japan was studied to investigate the basic characteristics and the cause for existence of such ice under warm ground-level climate considering the ice cave as a thermal and hydrological system. Fuji Ice Cave is a lava tube cave 150 m in length with a collapsed part at the entrance. Measurements from 1984 to 1986 showed that the surface-level change of floor ice occurred due to freezing and melting at the surface and that melting at the bottom of the ice was negligible. The annual amplitude of change in surface level was larger near the entrance. Meterological data showed that the cold air inflow to the cave was strong in winter, but in summer the cave was maintained near 0[degrees]C with only weak inflow of warm air. The predominant wind system was from the entrance to the interior in both winter and summer, but the spatial scale of the wind system was different. Heat budget consideration of the cave showed that the largest component was the strong inflow of subzero dry air mass in winter. Cooling in winter was compensated for by summer inflow of warm air, heat transport from the surrounding ground layer, and loss of sensible heat due to cooling of the cave for the observed year. Strong inflow of cold air and weak inflow of warm air, which is extremely low compared to the ground level air, seemed to be the most important condition. Thus the thermal condition of the cave is quasi-balanced at the presence condition below 0[degrees]C with ice. It can be said that the interrelated result of the climatological and special structural conditions makes this cave very cold, and allows perennial ice to exist in the cave. Other climatological factors such as precipitation seem to be minor factors. 17 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Phenocryst fragments in rhyolitic lavas and lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, S. R.; McPhie, J.

    2003-08-01

    Although rhyolitic lavas and lava domes are characterised by evenly porphyritic textures, not all the phenocrysts are whole euhedra. We undertook image analysis of 46 rhyolitic lava and lava dome samples to determine the abundance and shape of quartz and feldspar phenocryst fragments. Phenocryst fragments were identified in nearly all samples. On average, fragments amount to ˜5% of the total phenocryst population, or ˜0.5 modal%. The abundance of fragments in lavas and lava domes is not related to the groundmass texture (whether vesicular, flow banded, massive, glassy or crystalline), nor to distance from source. Fragments are, however, more abundant in samples with higher phenocryst contents. The phenocryst fragments in rhyolitic lavas and lava domes are mainly medium to large (0.5-3.5 mm), almost euhedral crystals with only a small portion removed, or chunky, equant, subhedral fragments, and occur in near-jigsaw-fit or clast-rotated pairs or groups. The fragments probably formed in response to decompression of large melt inclusions. Shear during laminar flow then dismembered the phenocrysts; continued laminar shear separated and rotated the fragments. Fractures probably formed preferentially along weaknesses in the phenocrysts, such as zones of melt inclusions, cleavage planes and twin composition planes. Rare splintery fragments are also present, especially within devitrified domains. Splinters are attributed to comminution of solid lava adjacent to fractures that were later healed. For comparison, we measured crystal abundance in a further 12 rhyolite samples that include block and ash flow deposits and ignimbrite. Phenocryst fragments within clasts in the block and ash flow samples showed similar shapes and abundances to those fragments within the lava and lava domes. Crystal fragments are much more abundant in ignimbrite (exceeding 67% of the crystal population) however, and dominated by small, equant, anhedral chunks or splinters. The larger crystals in

  14. The microbiology of Lascaux Cave.

    PubMed

    Bastian, F; Jurado, V; Nováková, A; Alabouvette, C; Saiz-Jimenez, C

    2010-03-01

    Lascaux Cave (Montignac, France) contains paintings from the Upper Paleolithic period. Shortly after its discovery in 1940, the cave was seriously disturbed by major destructive interventions. In 1963, the cave was closed due to algal growth on the walls. In 2001, the ceiling, walls and sediments were colonized by the fungus Fusarium solani. Later, black stains, probably of fungal origin, appeared on the walls. Biocide treatments, including quaternary ammonium derivatives, were extensively applied for a few years, and have been in use again since January 2008. The microbial communities in Lascaux Cave were shown to be composed of human-pathogenic bacteria and entomopathogenic fungi, the former as a result of the biocide selection. The data show that fungi play an important role in the cave, and arthropods contribute to the dispersion of conidia. A careful study on the fungal ecology is needed in order to complete the cave food web and to control the black stains threatening the Paleolithic paintings.

  15. Lava Flow at Kilauea, Hawaii

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-31

    On July 21, 2007, the world most active volcano, Kilauea on Hawaii Big Island, produced a fissure eruption from the Puu Oo vent, which fed an open lava channel and lava flows toward the east. This image is from NASA Terra satellite.

  16. Genesis, types and evolution of crevice-type caves in the flysch belt of the Western Carpathians (Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenart, Jan; Pánek, Tomáš; Dušek, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Crevice-type caves are among the least investigated natural phenomena connected with the development of slope failures. These caves present complex and peculiar underground systems with their own development and resulting landforms. We investigated eight caves in the Czech part of the Outer Western Carpathians to determine their genesis, types and evolution. Crevice formation is predisposed according to the lithological, tectonic and morphological characteristics of the landslide body, including the position and location of bedding planes, joints and faults. We performed several analyses, including speleological mapping, evaluation of high-resolution topography above the caves, geophysical (ERT) measurements and structural investigations within cave passages. In accordance with these analyses, various mechanisms responsible for cave development were revealed. An intra-bed translation is responsible for the creation of regularly shaped passages with flat ceilings. Toppling as well as back and horizontal rotation of rock blocks determine the specific morphology and shapes of passages. A relatively novel aspect of the current study is the identification of the subsidence of massive rock wedges due to the widening of cracks. All of these mechanisms control the specific morphological characteristics within crevices, e.g., typical shapes of passages, cave level ordering and ceiling types. Some of these processes also influence topography above the caves. Finally, the different phases of evolution of these caves were determined.

  17. Hawaii Lava Flows

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-22

    This sequence of ASTER nighttime thermal images shows the Pu'u O'o lava flows entering the sea at Kamokuna on the southeast side of the Island of Hawaii. Each image covers an area of 9 x 12 km. The acquisition dates are April 4 2000, May 13 2000, May 22 2000 (upper row) and June 30 2000, August 1 2000 and January 1 2001 (lower row). Thermal band 14 has been color coded from black (coldest) through blue, red, yellow and white (hottest). The first 5 images show a time sequence of a single eruptive phase; the last image shows flows from a later eruptive phase. The images are located at 19.3 degrees north latitude, 155 degrees west longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11093

  18. Eroding Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Today's image illustrates how radically the wind can affect the surface of Mars. The lava flows in this region have been covered by fine materials, and eroded by the sand blasting action of the wind. In this region the winds are blowing to the west, eroding the lava surface to form small east/west ridges and bumps. Given enough time the winds will change the appearance of the surface to such a large extent that all flow features will be erased.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -11.7, Longitude 220 East (140 West). 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Nighttime Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This nighttime IR image is of lava flows from Arsia Mons, the southernmost of the three Tharsis Montes. Lava flow surfaces are generally rough, and trap sand and dust with time. The addition of sand/dust will affect the nighttime IR appearance of the surface [dust cools quickly and is darker than slow cooling rocks in the nighttime IR]. The rough, rockier surface of young flows are brighter than the older dust covered flows.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -14, Longitude 247.4 East (112.6 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Caves: A Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Jan

    Middle school students from The College School, a private school in Webster Groves (Missouri) have completed a class called "Caves and Crystallography." A thematic approach was used in the course in which students and teachers read books telling how caves were formed, saw movies which explained the delicate balance of life underground,…

  1. Caves: A Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Jan

    Middle school students from The College School, a private school in Webster Groves (Missouri) have completed a class called "Caves and Crystallography." A thematic approach was used in the course in which students and teachers read books telling how caves were formed, saw movies which explained the delicate balance of life underground,…

  2. Environmental management of tourist caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigna, A. A.

    1993-06-01

    In terms of the flow of energy or mass, caves may be nearly closed systems. From the perspective of environmental protection and tourist cave management there are three categories: (1) caves where the natural energy fluxes far exceed those created by visitors, with the consequence that their environmental parameters are not affected by development (e.g., caves subject to frequent flooding); (2) caves where natural and tourist energy fluxes are of similar magnitude, where environmental parameters respond to visitors but return to their natural equilibrium afterwards; and (3) caves where visitor fluxes far exceed the natural fluxes, so that natural environmental equilibrium may be destroyed. The aim of responsible management is to limit the introduced fluxes to those that will not destroy the natural equilibrium established in such parameters as temperature, relative humidity, CO2 concentration, etc. A visitor capacity criterion is defined, and measured effects of visitors are demonstrated at Grotte di Castellana and Grotta Grande del Vento, category 2 caves that are the principal tourist caves of Italy.

  3. Bony anomaly of Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Salter, E George; Oakes, W Jerry

    2006-01-01

    This study describes the seemingly rare occurrence of bone formation within the proximal superior aspect of Meckel's cave thus forming a bony foramen for the proximal trigeminal nerve to traverse. The anatomy of Meckel's cave is reviewed and the clinical potential for nerve compression from this bony anomaly discussed.

  4. Meningiomas of Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Delfini, R; Innocenzi, G; Ciappetta, P; Domenicucci, M; Cantore, G

    1992-12-01

    A series of 16 patients with meningiomas of Meckel's cave is reported. Trigeminal neuralgia, typical or atypical, was the initial symptom in 10 patients (62.5%). At admission, trigeminal signs and symptoms were present in 15 patients (93.7%); in 7 patients (43.7%), trigeminal dysfunction was combined with the impairment of other cranial nerves. On retrospective analysis, these patients fall into two clinical groups that differ also in prognosis. Group 1 comprises eight patients with trigeminal signs and symptoms only. These patients had small meningiomas strictly affecting Meckel's cave. Total removal of the tumor was achieved in seven of eight patients, without adjunctive postoperative neurological deficits. In this group, there were no tumor recurrences. Group 2 comprises the other eight patients in whom trigeminal dysfunction was combined with impairment of other cranial nerves. These patients had large tumors arising from Meckel's cave and secondarily invading the cavernous sinus (five patients) or extending into the posterior fossa (two patients) or largely growing into the middle fossa (one patient). Total removal was achieved in only one patient, and a worsening of the preoperative neurological status was observed in four patients; there were three cases of tumor progression. A subtemporal intradural approach (used in the past in every case) is still used for the small tumors of Group 1 with good results. Since 1985, for tumors involving the cavernous sinus, we have employed a frontotemporal craniotomy with extradural clinoidectomy and superior and lateral approach to the cavernous sinus. When the tumor extends toward the posterior fossa, we use a combined temporosuboccipital-transpetrosal approach.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. The Unicorn Cave, Southern Harz Mountains, Germany: From known passages to unknown extensions with the help of geophysical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Nielbock, Ralf; Romanov, Douchko

    2015-12-01

    In soluble rocks (limestone, dolomite, anhydrite, gypsum, …), fissures and bedding partings can be enlarged with time by both physical and chemical dissolution of the host rock. With time, larger cavities evolve, and a network of cave passages can evolve. If the enlarged cave voids are not too deep under the surface, geophysical measurements can be used to detect, identify and trace these karst structures, e.g.: (i) gravity revealing air- and sediment-filled cave voids through negative Bouguer anomalies, (ii) electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) mapping different infillings of cavities either as high resistivities from air-filled voids or dry soft sediments, or low resistivities from saturated sediments, and (iii) groundwater flow through electrical potential differences (SP) arising from dislocated ionic charges from the walls of the underground flow paths. We have used gravity, ERI, and SP methods both in and above the Unicorn Cave located in the southern Harz Mountains in Germany. The Unicorn Cave is a show cave developed in the Werra dolomite formation of the Permian Zechstein sequence, characterised by large trunk passages interrupted by larger rooms. The overburden of the cave is only around 15 m, and passages are filled with sediments reaching infill thicknesses up to 40 m. We present results from our geophysical surveys above the known cave and its northern and southern extension, and from the cave interior. We identify the cave geometry and its infill from gravity and ERI measurements, predict previously unknown parts of the cave, and subsequently confirm the existence of these new passages through drilling. From the wealth of geophysical data acquired we derive a three-dimensional structural model of the Unicorn Cave and its surrounding, especially the cave infill.

  6. Lava lamp optics.

    PubMed

    Clark, Thomas Alan

    2011-10-01

    An interesting optical focusing effect occurred in the early heating phases of a simple model of a lava lamp that was constructed to demonstrate convection effects. During this early heating phase, the interface between the two immiscible liquids was found to form a surface of rotation with a conic cross section that acted as a mirror to produce an excellent image of the filament of the bulb within the lower liquid. The relevant features of the lamp construction are discussed briefly, and photographs of this focusing effect are shown. A simple analysis is presented that transforms the photographed cross section of the liquid interface into the true cross section by removing the effect of the cylindrical lens formed by the fluid-filled bottle, and the resulting cross section is then fitted to the shape of an ellipse. The possible cause for the shape of this liquid interface is discussed and compared and contrasted with the somewhat analogous situation of a stretched circular membrane that is subjected to different gas pressures on either side of the membrane.

  7. Lava crusts and flow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilburn, C. R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Lava flows can be considered as hot viscous cores within thinner, solidified crusts. Interaction between crust and core determines a flow's morphological and dynamical evolution. When the lava core dominates, flow advance approaches a steady state. When crusts are the limiting factor, advance is more irregular. These two conditions can be distinguished by a timescale ratio comparing rates of core deformation and crustal formation. Aa and budding pahoehoe lavas are used as examples of core- and crustal-dominated flows, respectively. A simple model describes the transition between pahoehoe and aa flow in terms of lava discharge rate, underlying slope, and either the thickness or velocity of the flow front. The model shows that aa morphologies are characterized by higher discharge rates and frontal velocities and yields good quantitative agreement with empirical relations distinguishing pahoehoe and aa emplacement on Hawaii.

  8. Survey and hydrogeology of Carroll Cave

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carroll Cave, located in Camden County, Missouri, is the largest known cave formed in the Gasconade Dolomite of the Salem Plateau. Despite extensive visitation over the last 50 years and multiple survey efforts, a comprehensive map of the cave has never been produced. In 2002, the Carroll Cave Conse...

  9. Lava flows and volcanic landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquini, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Lava flows constitute a large portion of the edifice of basaltic volcanoes. The substantial difference existing between the emplacement dynamics of different basaltic lava flows suggests a relation between the dominant flow dynamic and the overall shape of the ensuing volcano. Starting from the seminal works of Walker (1971, 1973) it is proposed that the rate of heat dissipation per unit volume of lava can be the founding principium at the roots of the emplacement dynamics of lava flows. Within the general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes, a conceptual model is presented, in which the dynamic of lava flows can evolve in a linear or in a nonlinear regime on the basis of the constraint active on the system: a low constraint promotes a linear dynamic (i.e. fluctuations are damped), a high constraint a nonlinear one (i.e. fluctuations are enhanced). Two cases are considered as end-members for a linear and a nonlinear dynamic in lava flows: the typical "Hawaiian" sheet flow and the classic "Etnean" channelized flow (respectively). In lava flows, the active constraint is directly proportional to the slope of the topography and to the thermal conductivity and thermal capacity of the surrounding environment, and is inversely proportional to the lava viscosity and to the supply rate. The constraint indicates the distance from the equilibrium conditions of the system, and determines the rate of heat dissipation per unit volume. In subaerial flows, the heat dissipated during the emplacement is well approximated by the heat lost through radiation, which can be retrieved through remote-sensing techniques and can be used to correlate dynamic and dissipation. The model presented recombines previously unrelated concepts regarding the dynamics and the thermal regimes observed in different lava flows, providing a global consistent picture. References Walker GPL (1971) Compound and simple lava flows and flood basalts. Bull Volcanol 35:579-590 Walker GPL (1973

  10. Radon and thoron in cave dwellings (Yan'an, China)

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegand, J.; Feige, S.; Xie Quingling; Schreiber, U.; Wieditz, K.; Wittmann, C.; Luo Xiarong

    2000-04-01

    {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn concentrations were measured in cave dwellings and brick houses in the region of Yan'an (China) during summer 1997. The underground dwellings are built into Quaternary loess, and all investigated houses are founded on it. The median values of indoor {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn concentrations are 42 (n = 18) and 77Bq m{sup {minus}3} (n = 15) for brick houses and 92 (n = 23) and 215 (n = 17) Bq m{sup {minus}3} for cave dwellings. To classify the dwellings in respect to their cave-character, the fraction of walls having a direct contact to the loess is calculated for each dwelling. While the {sup 222}Rn concentrations are increasing with higher fractions, the {sup 220}Rn concentrations are not correlated with this fraction. On the other hand, due to the short half-life of {sup 220}Rn the distance from the measuring point to the walls is negatively correlated with the {sup 220}Rn concentration, while there is no correlation with the {sup 222}Rn concentration. Therefore, concentric isolines of {sup 220}Rn concentrations showing a strong gradient were detected in cave dwellings. An influence of the ventilation rate is distinct for {sup 222}Rn but weak for {sup 220}Rn. The effective dose rates for {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn and their progenies are calculated for brick houses (2.7 mSv y{sup {minus}1}), cave dwellings (7.1 mSv y{sup {minus}1}), and for traditional cave dwellings with a bed foundation built with loess (16.7 mSv y{sup {minus}1}). These calculations are based on summer measurements only. It is expected that the true effective dose rates will be significantly higher.

  11. Ecomorphological convergence of cave communities.

    PubMed

    Trontelj, Peter; Blejec, Andrej; Fišer, Cene

    2012-12-01

    Extreme selective environments are commonly believed to funnel evolution toward a few predictable outcomes. Caves are well-known extreme environments with characteristically adapted faunas that are similar in appearance, physiology, and behavior all over the world, even if not closely related. Morphological diversity between closely related cave species has been explained by difference in time since colonization and different ecological influence from the surface. Here, we tested a more classical hypothesis: morphological diversity is niche-based, and different morphologies reflect properties of microhabitats within caves. We analyzed seven communities with altogether 30 species of the subterranean amphipod (crustacean) genus Niphargus using multivariate morphometrics, multinomial logit models cross-validation, and phylogenetic reconstruction. Species clustered into four distinct ecomorph classes-small pore, cave stream, cave lake, and lake giants-associated with specific cave microhabitats and of multiple independent phylogenetic origins. Traits commonly regarded as adaptations to caves, such as antenna length, were shown to be related to microhabitat parameters, such as flow velocity. These results demonstrate that under the selection pressure of extreme environment, the ecomorphological structure of communities can converge. Thus, morphological diversity does not result from adaptive response to temporal and ecological gradients, but from fine-level niche partitioning. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Wind, Water, and Lava

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 18 June 2003

    The three main geological agents acting on the Martian surface are visible in this image, within an outflow channel to the east of the Tharsis volcanos and north of Valles Marineris. In a wide channel previously eroded by water, linear features have been eroded into the rock by the wind. Later, lava flows embayed the streamlined rocks. A second, younger flow lobe is visible at the bottom of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 17, Longitude 283.6 East (76.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Spiders in caves

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    World experts of different disciplines, from molecular biology to macro-ecology, recognize the value of cave ecosystems as ideal ecological and evolutionary laboratories. Among other subterranean taxa, spiders stand out as intriguing model organisms for their ecological role of top predators, their unique adaptations to the hypogean medium and their sensitivity to anthropogenic disturbance. As the description of the first eyeless spider (Stalita taenaria), an array of papers on subterranean spider biology, ecology and evolution has been published, but a comprehensive review on these topics is still lacking. We provide a general overview of the spider families recorded in hypogean habitats worldwide, we review the different adaptations of hypogean spiders to subterranean life, and we summarize the information gathered so far about their origin, population structure, ecology and conservation status. Finally, we point out the limits of the knowledge we currently have regarding hypogean spiders, aiming to stimulate future research. PMID:28446696

  14. Meningiomas of Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Nijensohn, D E; Araujo, J C; MacCarty, C S

    1975-08-01

    A retrospective review of 12 cases of meningioma of Meckel's cave involving the Gasserian ganglion or the trigeminal posterior root (or both) seen at the Mayo Clinic during a 20-year period suggested three clearly defined clinical groups. One group (the largest) had typical trigeminal neuralgia and an excellent prognosis after the removal of the easily detachable mass that was impinging on the ganglion. A second group, with meningiomas en plaque embedded in the ganglion, had a history of atypical trigeminal face pain without neurological deficit, but the prognosis for pain relief was not as good as in the previous group. A third group had a history of face dysesthesias and pain, objective trigeminal sensory loss, and multiple cranial nerve deficit; these patients had meningiomas with histological signs of mitotic activity and a poor prognosis, with return of intractable pain and recurrence of the tumor.

  15. Origin and Evolution of Limestone Caves of Chhattisgarh and Orissa, India: Role of Geomorphic, Tectonic and Hydrological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, P. K.; Allu, N. C.; Ramesh, R.; Yadava, M. G.; Panigrahi, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate rocks undergo karstic process and karst morphology is a key to understand the nature and genesis of caves. The primary energy source for the formation of karst landforms is hydrological cycle. Geomorphic features along with hydrological characteristics provide important information not only on karst formation but also climate and environmental conditions. In this paper, we present the tectonic and geomorphic features that played a role in evolution of caves located in Chhattisgarh and Orissa States of India. The geomorphic and tectonic aspects of Kotumsar, Kailash, and Gupteshwar caves are discussed in relation to the origin and evolution of these caves. Caves are located near the water falls. The area is folded and faulted along the Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt (EGMB) due to tectonic reactivation. Shaly-limestone beds exhibit vertical dipping near Gupteshwar cave, and steeply inclined near Kotumsar and Kailash caves. Indrāvati and Sabari/Kolab tributaries of the Godavari River drain the area. The landscape evolution and the origin of caves in the region is a multistage process, where the lithology, orogeny, fluvial action, and monsoon are the main agents, which is similar to the four state model (Ford and Ewers, 1978). The river basin evolution and regional tectonism also caused the initiation of karstification in the region. The evolution of caves is believed to have taken place in Pre-Pliocene under more humid conditions that coincided with the initiation of monsoon in India. Further, during the Quaternary wet-dry/cold-warm phases altered physical and chemical weathering of limestone rocks. Contrasting relief features of Bastar plateau have also helped the extensive cave formation in the region. The dissolution along weak planes initiated the openings of caves, further enlarged by geomorphic agents. Both monsoon and tectonics have caused fluctuations in water levels along river courses, which acted as active agents in evolution of caves.

  16. Obstacles and Wakes in Lava

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-21

    Amazonis Planitia is a broad plain on Mars, covered with ancient lava. This image shows an interesting feature of an old lava flow. When it was mostly liquid, the lava had a crust of cooled debris floating on the surface. Here, the crust just barely scraped over some hills. The flow was able to make it past the hills, but the rubble crust was caught and piled up, forming thick masses of debris. Downstream from the hills, there was no crust left and the lava formed a smoother, fresh surface. Observations like this tell us about the scale of the lava flow (which must have been a huge sheet) and also which direction it was moving at the time when the crust interacted with the hills. The map is projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.7 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 59.0 centimeters (23.2 inches) per pixel (with 2 x 2 binning); objects on the order of 177 centimeters (69.7 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21460

  17. LAVA Pressure Transducer Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oltman, Samuel B.

    2016-01-01

    The Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload will transport the (LAVA) subsystem to hydrogen-rich locations on the moon supporting NASA's in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) programs. There, the LAVA subsystem will analyze volatiles that evolve from heated regolith samples in order to quantify how much water is present. To do this, the system needs resilient pressure transducers (PTs) to calculate the moles in the gas samples. The PT trade study includes a comparison of newly-procured models to a baseline unit with prior flight history in order to determine the PT model with the best survivability in flight-forward conditions.

  18. Leveed Channel in Lava Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 December 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a leveed channel running down the middle of a lava flow in Daedalia Planum, the southern plains of the Tharsis volcanic region. Transport of fluid lava through a channel such as this helps insulate the molten rock, keeping it hot longer, and thus permits the flow to extend to greater distances than it otherwise might. This example is located near 23.6oS, 123.2oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  19. Quantitatively structural control of the karst based on speleological cave survey data: Cabeza Llerosos massif (Picos de Europa, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, D.; Jiménez-Sánchez, M.; García-Sansegundo, J.; Borreguero, M.; Sendra, G.

    2012-04-01

    Speleological cave survey characterizes each cave passage by a 3D line (called shot survey) defined by its length, direction and dipping. This line represents the three-dimensional geometry of the karst system and cave passage scale and can be statistically analyzed and compared with the geometry of the massif discontinuities. The aim of this work is to establish the quantitative influence of the structural geology in caves based on the comparison between cave survey data, joint and bedding measurements with stereographic projection. 15 km of cave surveys from Cabeza Llerosos massif (Picos de Europa, Northern Spain) were chosen to illustrate the method. The length of the cavities range between 50 to 4,438 m and their depth is up to 738 m. The methodology of work includes: 1) cave survey collection from caving reports; 2) geological mapping and cross-sections with cavities projection;3) data collection of bedding and joints in caves and near outcrops;4) definition of families of joints and bedding planes by stereographic projection; 5) definition of groups of cave passages from stereographic projection (based on their directions and dipping) and 6) comparison between bedding, families of joints and cave survey data by stereographic projection. Seven families of joints have been defined in all the area of study. The joint families are: J1) sub-vertical, J2) N63/68SE, J3) N29E/46NW, J4) N52E/72NW, J5) N129E/17NE, J6) N167E/57NE and J7) N180E/26E; the bedding is N30-55/60-80NE. Five groups of cave passages have been defined. "A" group of cave passage is formed by sub-vertical series; it is represented by the 61 % of all the cave passages and is conditioned by the joint families J1, J3, J4 and J6, as well as their intersections. "B" group is formed by N10W-N10E/3-20N galleries; it corresponds with the 13 % of the series and is controlled by the intersection between families J5 and J6. "C" group is defined by N20-70E/0-50NE passages; it is represented by the 13 % of the

  20. Cave development by frost weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberender, Pauline; Plan, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the description and genesis of a special type of shelter cave. In German they are termed Auswitterungshöhlen which goes back to the 19th century and the genesis is supposed to be related to frost weathering, but to our knowledge, detailed studies are missing so far. This type of cave is very common in the area of investigation that comprises pre-Alpine and Alpine regions in the north-eastern part of the Eastern Alps: They make up 32% of the 5138 registered caves but surprisingly they entirely developed in carbonate rocks. Although most of them are smaller than a dozen metres, some have lengths of more than 50 m and entrances can be more than 100 m wide or similarly high. Besides general observations that lead to a list of characteristics for these caves, two of them in a pre-Alpine setting were studied in-depth. A detailed map, descriptions, and measurements concerning cave morphology, host rock geology, and climate are given. The thickness and composition of clastic sediments were investigated by small trenches and electric resistivity measurements. Sediment thicknesses reach up to 2 m inside the caves and below the entrances. For one year nets were installed to measure rockfall in both caves. In warm periods generally less than 5 g/month of debris could be collected, but a few 100 g/month for frost periods. This strong correlation and the significant amount of debris together with other observations suggest that frost weathering is an on-going and very important process for the formation of these caves. Grain-size distribution of the collected debris argues for the activity of both microgelivation and ice segregation. Therefore we suggest that the term frost weathering caves should be used for shelter caves whose genesis is related to frost weathering. As dissolution seems to be of marginal importance for the genesis they are a paradox as they develop in karstic rock but have pseudokarst features.

  1. Compositionally Constraining Elysium Lava Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunatillake, S.; Button, N. E.; Skok, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical provinces of Mars defined recently [1-3] became possible with the maps of elemental mass fractions generated with Mars Odyssey Gamma and Neutron Spectrometer (GS) data [4,5]. These provide a unique perspective by representing compositional signatures distinctive of the regolith vertically at decimeter depths and laterally at hundreds of kilometer scale. Some provinces overlap compellingly with regions highlighted by other remote sensing observations, such as the Mars Radar Stealth area [3]. The spatial convergence of mutually independent data with the consequent highlight of a region provides a unique opportunity of insight not possible with a single type of remote sensing observation. Among such provinces, previous work [3] highlighted Elysium lava flows as a promising candidate on the basis of convergence with mapped geologic units identifying Elysium's lava fields generally, and Amazonian-aged lava flows specifically. The South Eastern lava flows of Elysium Mons, dating to the recent Amazonian epoch, overlap compellingly with a chemical province of K and Th depletion relative to the Martian midlatitudes. We characterize the composition, geology, and geomorphology of the SE Elysium province to constrain the confluence of geologic and alteration processes that may have contributed to its evolution. We compare this with the North Western lava fields, extending the discussion on chemical products from the thermal evolution of Martian volcanism as discussed by Baratoux et al. [6]. The chemical province, by regional proximity to Cerberus Fossae, may also reflect the influence of recently identified buried flood channels [7] in the vicinity of Orcus Patera. Despite the compelling chemical signature from γ spectra, fine grained unconsolidated sediment hampers regional VNTIR (Visible, Near, and Thermal Infrared) spectral analysis. But some observations near scarps and fresh craters allow a view of small scale mineral content. The judicious synthesis of

  2. An Enigmatic Feature in Athabasca Lava Flows

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-03

    The Athabasca region contains some of the youngest lava flows on Mars. This looks like a circular island surrounded by a ea of smooth-looking lava flows. This image was observed by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  3. Newberry Volcano's youngest lava flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Joel E.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The central caldera is visible in the lower right corner of the center map, outlined by the black dashed line. The caldera collapsed about 75,000 years ago when massive explosions sent volcanic ash as far as the San Francisco Bay area and created a 3,000-ft-deep hole in the center of the volcano. The caldera is now partly refilled by Paulina and East Lakes, and the byproducts from younger eruptions, including Newberry Volcano’s youngest rhyolitic lavas, shown in red and orange. The majority of Newberry Volcano’s many lava flows and cinder cones are blanketed by as much as 5 feet of volcanic ash from the catastrophic eruption of Mount Mazama that created Crater Lake caldera approximately 7,700 years ago. This ash supports abundant tree growth and obscures the youthful appearance of Newberry Volcano. Only the youngest volcanic vents and lava flows are well exposed and unmantled by volcanic ash. More than one hundred of these young volcanic vents and lava flows erupted 7,000 years ago during Newberry Volcano’s northwest rift zone eruption.

  4. Exploring old caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luana Belli, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Quarries, caves and mines often contain fossils. During the '30s in Rome, the urban expansion needs for building materials such as gravel, sand and clay were extracted from quarries that surrounded the city. One of these quarries in particular, in the area of Saccopastore (Nomentana area 3 km from the University Sapienza Roma) returned an ancient human fossil skull belonging to a Neanderthal (most likely a female) who lived in Latium about 120,000 years ago. Detailed studies of this fossil were carried out by Sergio Sergi, the son of the founder of the Museum of Anthropology in Rome, Giuseppe Sergi. The museum was founded in 1884 and was later transferred to the University City (1934) where it is still located. Professor Maria Luana Belli, a science teacher in the Liceo Scientifico "G. Keplero" is a volunteer and collaborator with the Museum "G. Sergi", and she and her students retrace the places of the discovery on the trail of the Neanderthals, for understanding the evolution of the territory in a perspective of interdisciplinary teaching.

  5. Lava Flow at Kilauea, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On July 21, 2007, the world's most active volcano, Kilauea on Hawaii's Big Island, produced a new fissure eruption from the Pu'u O'o vent, which fed an open lava channel and lava flows toward the east. Access to the Kahauale'a Natural Area Reserve was closed due to fire and gas hazards. The two Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) nighttime thermal infrared images were acquired on August 21 and August 30, 2007. The brightest areas are the hottest lava flows from the recent fissure eruption. The large lava field extending down to the ocean is part of the Kupaianaha field. The most recent activity there ceased on June 20, but the lava is still hot and appears bright on the images. Magenta areas are cold lava flows from eruptions that occurred between 1969 and 2006. Clouds are cold (black) and the ocean is a uniform warm temperature, and light gray in color. These images are being used by volcanologists at the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaii Volcano Observatory to help monitor the progress of the lava flows.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud

  6. Mapping Overburden and Cave Networks with Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, T. H.; Titus, T. N.; Boston, P. J.; Koontz, S. L.; Miller, R. S.

    2015-10-01

    We describe the use of highly-penetrating muons produced by cosmic ray showers to measure overburden and image the rock formation around terrestrial/extraterrestrial caves, and implications for cave science, exploration, and habitation.

  7. Unique Biosignatures in Caves of All Lithologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, P. J.; Schubert, K. E.; Gomez, E.; Conrad, P. G.

    2015-10-01

    Unique maze-like microbial communities on cave surfaces on all lithologies all over the world are an excellent candidate biosignatures for life detection missions into caves and other extraterrestrial environments.

  8. Introduction to special section: Long lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Katharine; Pinkerton, Harry; Stephenson, Jon

    1998-11-01

    Long lava flows are traditionally considered to form when low-viscosity lava is erupted at high effusion rates. However, this view has recently been challenged. Detailed field measurements on active lava flows on Kilauea have shown that inflation of lava flows after emplacement can result in reactivation and continued lengthening of flows. Inflated sheets can thus act a insulated conduits (lava tubes) that permit the transport of lava over great distances at near isothermal conditions. Detailed observations of long lava flows in the Columbia River Basalt Group and in the Cenozoic Volcanic Provinces in northern Queensland confirm that this mechanism is not restricted to recent flows on Hawaii. These findings have led to a search for evidence of inflation in flows in other parts of the world and have stimulated theoretical and laboratory research on the emplacement and cooling of lava in flows and in tubes. Understanding the formation of long submarine and planetary lava flows presents an additional challenge. Current evidence supports high effusion rates for some, possibly all, long planetary lava flows, and improved resolution from the Mars Global Surveyor will undoubtedly lead to either a confirmation or a rejection of this view. In this review, we discuss the geological importance and distribution of long lava flows, we investigate diametrically opposed views on the formation of long lava flows, and we stress the need for an interdisciplinary approach to improve our understanding of these enigmatic geological features.

  9. The future of the CAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defanti, Thomas A.; Acevedo, Daniel; Ainsworth, Richard A.; Brown, Maxine D.; Cutchin, Steven; Dawe, Gregory; Doerr, Kai-Uwe; Johnson, Andrew; Knox, Chris; Kooima, Robert; Kuester, Falko; Leigh, Jason; Long, Lance; Otto, Peter; Petrovic, Vid; Ponto, Kevin; Prudhomme, Andrew; Rao, Ramesh; Renambot, Luc; Sandin, Daniel J.; Schulze, Jurgen P.; Smarr, Larry; Srinivasan, Madhu; Weber, Philip; Wickham, Gregory

    2011-03-01

    The CAVE, a walk-in virtual reality environment typically consisting of 4-6 3 m-by-3 m sides of a room made of rear-projected screens, was first conceived and built in 1991. In the nearly two decades since its conception, the supporting technology has improved so that current CAVEs are much brighter, at much higher resolution, and have dramatically improved graphics performance. However, rear-projection-based CAVEs typically must be housed in a 10 m-by-10 m-by-10 m room (allowing space behind the screen walls for the projectors), which limits their deployment to large spaces. The CAVE of the future will be made of tessellated panel displays, eliminating the projection distance, but the implementation of such displays is challenging. Early multi-tile, panel-based, virtual-reality displays have been designed, prototyped, and built for the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, and the University of Illinois at Chicago. New means of image generation and control are considered key contributions to the future viability of the CAVE as a virtual-reality device.

  10. Cave Art: Reflections of Early Human Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Brother Nicholas

    1981-01-01

    Discusses Paleolithic and Neolithic cave art and artifacts, stressing the degree of intellectual ability exhibited by the creators of this art. Topics discussed include some misunderstandings about cave art intellect shown by cave artists and the use of light and color. (DS)

  11. Summit firn caves, mount rainier, washington.

    PubMed

    Kiver, E P; Mumma, M D

    1971-07-23

    Heat and steam from the crater fumaroles have melted over 5700 feet (1737 meters) of cave passage in the ice-filled east crater of Mount Rainier. The caves are in approximate balance with the present geothermal heat release. Future changes in the thermal activity of the summit cone will cause corresponding changes in cave passage dimensions, location, and ceiling and wall ablation features.

  12. Cave Art: Reflections of Early Human Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Brother Nicholas

    1981-01-01

    Discusses Paleolithic and Neolithic cave art and artifacts, stressing the degree of intellectual ability exhibited by the creators of this art. Topics discussed include some misunderstandings about cave art intellect shown by cave artists and the use of light and color. (DS)

  13. Groundmass Crystallinities of Proximal and Distal Lavas from Cinder Cone, Lassen Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanski, M. E.; Teasdale, R.

    2015-12-01

    Cinder Cone is located in the northeast corner of Lassen Volcanic Center, approximately 35 km southeast of Old Station, California. The area consists of a cinder cone constructed of loose scoria, lava flows and a 13-16 km diameter ash deposit. According to radiocarbon ages from trees affected by the lava flows and paleomagnetic data, Cinder Cone erupted in about 1650 AD (1). The youngest products of the Cinder Cone eruption are two Fantastic Lava Beds flows which are basaltic andesite and andesite with olivine (1). Samples were collected along the longest flow from Cinder Cone, the Fantastic Lava Beds Flow 2 (4.5 km) at approximately 0.5 km interval. The samples contain olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene phenocrysts in fine grained groundmass with varying vesicularity. Quartz xenocrysts also occur. SEM-Back Scatter Electron images are used to map and quantify groundmass crystallinities along the length of the Fantastic Lava Beds flow 2 and of tephra units. The average area of groundmass plagioclase crystals increases along the length of the lava flow from 94.7 to 292.6 μm2. The number of groundmass plagioclase crystals per area (μm2) decreases from 0.0045 to 0.0018 from proximal to distal samples. Crystals also become blockier in distal samples along the lava flow. The larger number of crystals per area in near vent samples establishes a baseline from which we interpret crystal growth and nucleation to have occurred in the flow channel. Increasing crystal size and a decrease in the number of crystals per area indicates growth dominated nucleation during cooling and crystallization in the flow channel. Relative cooling rates along the length of the flow from proximal to distal samples can be inferred based on groundmass crystallinities, distance travelled and estimates of flow and crystallization rates. (1) Muffler and Clynne, 2015.

  14. The lava dome tomography in Unzen : the discussion about the observation and data treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, S.; Bozza, C.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Kose, U.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, M.; Rescigno, R.; Russo, A.; Shimizu, H.; Sirignano, C.; Stellacci, S.; Strolin, P.; Tanaka, H.; Tioukov, V.

    2012-04-01

    The observation of the lava dome density 2D map was performed by using cosmic-ray muon and muon detector in Unzen. The muon detector, nuclear emulsion films which has high position resolution and 0.85m2 effective area, was installed in a natural cave from early December 2010 to the end of March. The developed nuclear emulsion films has been scanned by automated muon readout system. In this session, the flow of data acquisition, basic treatment of the data, and density calculation will be shown. A lot of discussions about this observation and data treatment are welcome.

  15. Chronology of guitarrero cave, peru.

    PubMed

    Lynch, T F; Gillespie, R; Gowlett, J A; Hedges, R E

    1985-08-30

    Dating by accelerator mass spectrometry of wooden artifacts, cord, and charcoal samples from Guitarrero Cave, Peru, supports the antiquity of South America's earliest textiles and other perishable remains. The new dates are consistent with those obtained from disintegration counters and leave little doubt about the integrity of the lower Preceramic layers and their early cultivars. Re-evaluation of the mode of deposition suggests that most of the remains resulted from short-term use of the cave in the eighth millennium B.C., with a possible brief human visit as early as 12,560 years ago.

  16. Fish Assemblages of Mediterranean Marine Caves

    PubMed Central

    Bussotti, Simona; Di Franco, Antonio; Francour, Patrice; Guidetti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Fish assemblages associated with 14 marine caves and adjacent external rocky reefs were investigated at four Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) along the coasts of Italy. Within the caves sampling was carried out in different sub-habitats: walls, ceilings, bottoms and ends of caves. On the whole, 38 species were recorded inside the 14 caves investigated. Eighteen species were exclusively found inside the caves: they were mainly represented by speleophilic (i.e. species preferentially or exclusively inhabiting caves) gobids (e.g. Didogobius splechtnai) and nocturnal species (e.g. Conger conger). Forty-one species were censused outside, 20 of which were shared with cave habitats. Apogon imberbis was the most common fish found in all 14 caves investigated, followed by Thorogobius ephippiatus (recorded in 13 caves), and Diplodus vulgaris and Scorpaena notata (both censused in 12 caves). Distinct fish assemblages were found between external rocky reefs and the different cave sub-habitats. New data on the distribution of some speleophilic gobids were collected, showing the existence of a pool of species shared by marine caves on a large scale (i.e. hundreds of km). Considering the uniqueness of cave fishes (18 exclusive species and different assemblage structures), the inclusion of marine caves among the habitats routinely investigated for fish biodiversity monitoring could facilitate the achievement of more comprehensive inventories. Due to their contribution to local species diversity and the shelter they provide to species valuable for conservation, marine caves should be prioritized for their inclusion not only within future MPAs through the Mediterranean Sea, but also into larger management spatial planning. PMID:25875504

  17. Fish assemblages of Mediterranean marine caves.

    PubMed

    Bussotti, Simona; Di Franco, Antonio; Francour, Patrice; Guidetti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Fish assemblages associated with 14 marine caves and adjacent external rocky reefs were investigated at four Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) along the coasts of Italy. Within the caves sampling was carried out in different sub-habitats: walls, ceilings, bottoms and ends of caves. On the whole, 38 species were recorded inside the 14 caves investigated. Eighteen species were exclusively found inside the caves: they were mainly represented by speleophilic (i.e. species preferentially or exclusively inhabiting caves) gobids (e.g. Didogobius splechtnai) and nocturnal species (e.g. Conger conger). Forty-one species were censused outside, 20 of which were shared with cave habitats. Apogon imberbis was the most common fish found in all 14 caves investigated, followed by Thorogobius ephippiatus (recorded in 13 caves), and Diplodus vulgaris and Scorpaena notata (both censused in 12 caves). Distinct fish assemblages were found between external rocky reefs and the different cave sub-habitats. New data on the distribution of some speleophilic gobids were collected, showing the existence of a pool of species shared by marine caves on a large scale (i.e. hundreds of km). Considering the uniqueness of cave fishes (18 exclusive species and different assemblage structures), the inclusion of marine caves among the habitats routinely investigated for fish biodiversity monitoring could facilitate the achievement of more comprehensive inventories. Due to their contribution to local species diversity and the shelter they provide to species valuable for conservation, marine caves should be prioritized for their inclusion not only within future MPAs through the Mediterranean Sea, but also into larger management spatial planning.

  18. Numerical modelling of impact crater formation associated with isolated lunar skylight candidates on lava tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martellato, E.; Foing, B. H.; Benkhoff, J.

    2013-09-01

    Skylights are openings on subsurface voids as lava tubes and caves. Recently deep hole structures, possibly skylights, were discovered on lunar photo images by the JAXA SELenological and ENgineering Explorer (SELENE)-Kaguya mission, and successively confirmed by the NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission. Vertical hole structures and possibly underlying subsurface voids have high potential as resources for scientific study, and future unmanned and manned activities on the Moon. One mechanism proposed for their formation is impact cratering. The collapse of craters is due to the back spallation phenomena on the rear surface of the lava tube roofs. Previous analysis in this topic was based on small-scales laboratory experiments. These have pointed out that (i) the target thickness-to-crater diameter ratio is 0.7, and (ii) the projectile diameter-to-target thickness ratio is 0.16, at the ballistic limit once extrapolated to planetary conditions.

  19. LavaSIM: the effect of heat transfer in 3D on lava flow characteristics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, E.

    2013-12-01

    Characteristics of lava flow are governed by many parameters like lava viscosity, effusion rate, ground topography, etc. The accuracy and applicability of lava flow simulation code is evaluated whether the numerical simulation can reproduce these features quantitatively, which is important from both strategic and scientific points of views. Many lava flow simulation codes are so far proposed, and they are classified into two categories, i.e., the deterministic and the probabilistic models. LavaSIM is one of the former category models, and has a disadvantage of time consuming. But LavaSIM can solves the equations of continuity, motion, energy by step and has an advantage in the calculation of three-dimensional analysis with solid-liquid two phase flow, including the heat transfer between lava, solidified crust, air, water and ground, and three-dimensional convection in liquid lava. In other word, we can check the detailed structure of lava flow by LavaSIM. Therefore, this code can produce both channeled and fan-dispersive flows. The margin of the flow is solidified by cooling and these solidified crusts control the behavior of successive lava flow. In case of a channel flow, the solidified margin supports the stable central main flow and elongates the lava flow distance. The cross section of lava flow shows that the liquid lava flows between solidified crusts. As for the lava extrusion flow rate, LavaSIM can include the time function as well as the location of the vents. In some cases, some parts of the solidified wall may be broken by the pressure of successive flow and/or re-melting. These mechanisms could characterize complex features of the observed lava flows at many volcanoes in the world. To apply LavaSIM to the benchmark tests organized by V-hub is important to improve the lava flow evaluation technique.

  20. The first radiography result of the latest lava dome in Unzen by cosmic muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, S.; Bozza, C.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Kose, U.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, M.; Rescigno, R.; Russo, A.; Shimizu, H.; Sirignano, C.; Stellacci, S.; Strolin, P.; Tanaka, H.; Tioukov, V.

    2012-04-01

    The latest lava dome in Mt. Unzen was formed in the eruption from January 1991 to early 1995 and the activity was calmed down in 1995. The researchers kept to observe the eruption in this period precisely. Some of them proposed the growth model, another person proposed different model from their data. It is significant for the growth model of lava dome which has viscous magma to investigate the density structure in it. The observation of the lava dome density 2D map was performed by using cosmic-ray muon and muon detector in Unzen. The muon detector, nuclear emulsion films which has high position resolution and 0.85m2 effective area, was installed in a natural cave from early December 2010 to the end of March. The developed nuclear emulsion films has been scanned by automated muon readout system. The systematic analysis of efficiency and random noise ratio are performed by taking a pattern match and making a connection of muon tracks between three films. After estimation and removing unwanted low energy electron tracks, the density map of Unzen lava dome appeared. The performance of the detector and the first result of radiography will be shown in this topic.

  1. The cave fauna of California

    Treesearch

    William R. Elliott; James R. Reddell; D. Craig Rudolph; G.O. Graening; Thomas S. Briggs; Darrell Ubick; Rolf L. Aalbu; Jean Krejca; Steven J. Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Hidden biodiversity is revealed in this study of California's subterranean fauna, which contains distinctive elements that differentiate it from other North American regions. Since 1975, the rate of discovery of new species has accelerated with funded projects in most of the important cave areas of the state, including our own studies. Here we compile all...

  2. A Cave of Our Own.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colegate, Carol; Smith, Janice

    1995-01-01

    Describes an activity that involves exploring a model cave made out of a two-person tent as a way to add science process to a thematic unit on bats and spiders. This multifunctional learning center provides students with a variety of hands-on experiences, helps students focus on observable things from nature, and emphasizes process skills. Lists…

  3. Lava Flows in Eastern Tharsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 31 May 2002) This image may at first appear somewhat bland -- there is little contrast in the surface materials due to dust cover, and there are few impact craters -- but there are some very interesting geologic features here. The great Tharsis volcanoes have produced vast fields of lava flows, such as those shown in this image, to the east of Tharsis Tholus. The flows in this image have moved from west to east, down the regional topographic slope. The lobate edges of the flows are distinctive, and permit the discrimination of many overlapping individual flows that may represent tens, hundreds, thousands, or even millions of years worth of volcanic activity (overlapping relationships are especially evident at the bottom of the image). Viewed at full resolution, the image reveals interesting patterns and textures on the top surfaces of these flows. In particular, at the top of the image, there are numerous parallel curved ridges visible on the upper surfaces of the lava flows. These ridges make the flow surface look somewhat ropy, and at smaller scales this flow might be referred to as pahoehoe, indicative of a relatively fluid type of lava flow. At the scales observed here, however, these features are probably better referred to as pressure ridges. Pressure ridges form on the surface of a lava flow when the upper part of the flow is exposed to air, freezing it, but the insulated unfrozen interior of the flow continues to move down slope (and more material is pushed forward from behind), causing the surface to compress and pile up like a rug. Rough-looking flows with less distinct (more random) patterns on their surfaces may be flows that are more like terrestrial a'a flows, which are distinguished from pahoehoe flows by their higher viscosities and effusion rates. Near the center of the image there is an east-west trending, smooth-floored depression. The somewhat continuous width of this depression suggests that it is not simply formed by the edges of two

  4. Bed Bugs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Prevent, identify, and treat bed bug infestations using EPA’s step-by-step guides, based on IPM principles. Find pesticides approved for bed bug control, check out the information clearinghouse, and dispel bed bug myths.

  5. Accelerator 14C dates for early upper paleolithic (basal Aurignacian) at El Castillo Cave (Spain)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valdes, V.C.; Bischoff, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Three fragments of charcoal taken from different parts of the lowermost bed containing Aurignacian artifacts at El Castillo Cave yielded AMS dates of 37??7 (?? 1??8) ka bp, 38??5 (?? 1??8) ka bp, and 40??0 (?? 2??1) ka bp (average 38??7 ?? 1??9 ka bp). These dates are almost identical to new AMS dates from l'Arbreda cave in Catalunya on the same cultural horizon (average 38??5 ?? 1??0 ka bp) and are significantly older than the earliest dates for Aurignacian industries in the Aquitaine and in other parts of Central and Western Europe. ?? 1989.

  6. Constraints on alpine speleogenesis from cave morphology — A case study from the eastern Totes Gebirge (Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plan, Lukas; Filipponi, Marco; Behm, Michael; Seebacher, Robert; Jeutter, Peter

    2009-05-01

    The Totes Gebirge is the largest karst massif in the Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA). This paper focuses on the eastern part, where two major multiphase alpine cave systems (Burgunderschacht Cave System and DÖF-Sonnenleiter Cave System) are described with respect to morphology, hydrology, and sediments. The caves consist of Upper Miocene galleries of (epi)phreatic genesis and younger vadose canyon-shaft systems. Morphometrical analyses were used to determine the relevance of (1) cave levels (horizontal accumulations of galleries), (2) slightly inclined palaeo water tables of speleogenetic phases, (3) initial fissures, and (4) inception horizons on the development of the cave systems. (Epi)phreatic cave conduits developed preferentially along vertical faults and along only a restricted number of bedding planes, which conforms to the inception horizon hypothesis. For at least one of the systems, a development under epiphreatic conditions is certain and a hydrological behaviour in the "filling overflow manner" is likely. Observations in further major cave systems in the Totes Gebirge identify palaeo water tables of speleogenetic phases that show inclinations of 1.5° ± 1°. Analyses of cave levels reveal distinct peaks for each cave but it is hardly possible to correlate these elevation levels between caves of different parts of the karst massif. Therefore, we conclude that cave levels (strictly horizontal) indicate speleogenetic phases or palaeo water tables respectively, but they cannot be correlated with palaeo base levels or on regional scale. An exact correlation between cave development and palaeo base levels at the surface is only possible with inclined palaeo water tables of speleogenetic phases. For the Totes Gebirge, the inclination directions of the speleogenetic phases imply that palaeo drainage was radial and recharge was autogenic, which is in contrast to observations from other plateaus in the NCA. Differences in fracture properties seem to be the

  7. 36 CFR 290.4 - Confidentiality of cave location information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Confidentiality of cave... AGRICULTURE CAVE RESOURCES MANAGEMENT § 290.4 Confidentiality of cave location information. (a) Information... location of a significant cave or a cave nominated for designation, unless the authorized officer...

  8. 36 CFR 290.4 - Confidentiality of cave location information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Confidentiality of cave... AGRICULTURE CAVE RESOURCES MANAGEMENT § 290.4 Confidentiality of cave location information. (a) Information... location of a significant cave or a cave nominated for designation, unless the authorized officer...

  9. 36 CFR 290.4 - Confidentiality of cave location information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Confidentiality of cave... AGRICULTURE CAVE RESOURCES MANAGEMENT § 290.4 Confidentiality of cave location information. (a) Information... location of a significant cave or a cave nominated for designation, unless the authorized officer...

  10. 36 CFR 290.4 - Confidentiality of cave location information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Confidentiality of cave... AGRICULTURE CAVE RESOURCES MANAGEMENT § 290.4 Confidentiality of cave location information. (a) Information... location of a significant cave or a cave nominated for designation, unless the authorized officer...

  11. Fragmentation Mechanisms Associated with Lacustrine Lava-Water Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, E. P.; Fagents, S. A.; Thordarson, T.; Hamilton, C.

    2015-12-01

    Rootless cones form when degassed lava interacts explosively with water contained in the near-surface substrate, and represents an end-member system that can elucidate mechanisms of magma-water interactions due to the absence of primary degassing-induced fragmentation. The proportion of finely fragmented ejecta (i.e. ash), generated in rootless explosions, even if the volume is small relative to coarser ejecta, may contribute significantly to the explosion energy release. Explosive melt-water experiments indicate that the degree of melt-water mixing and energy release are proportional to the abundance of blocky grains, fragmented by brittle disintegration, which effectively contribute thermal energy to the explosive lava-water interaction. In order to determine the state of the lava at the point of ash-grade fragmentation in rootless explosions we examined grain morphology over the following size ranges: 0.5-0 ϕ (1.41-1 mm, very coarse ash), 1.5-2 ϕ (0.354-0.250 mm, medium ash), and 3.5-4 ϕ (0.088-0.062 mm, very fine ash). We found that rootless ash is composed of blocky, mossy, and fluidal grains with a minor component of aggregates (≤ 2%) and glassy shards (< 35%). Typically, (1) very coarse ash contains blocky (9-58%), mossy (8-36%) and fluidal (28-67%) grains only, (2) medium ash contains blocky (32-76%), mossy (9-39%) and fluidal (15-43%) grains with a minor abundance of glassy shards (≤ 8%), and (3) very fine ash is dominated by blocky clasts (53-80%), with lower shard (12-34%) and fluidal (4-24%) components. We observe that the abundance of fluidal grains decreases while the abundance of blocky grains increases with decreasing grain size. Also, the abundance of blocky grains decreases with increasing stratigraphic height, indicating that as rootless explosions progressed, brittle fragmentation of lava is less pronounced, suggesting that the efficiency of lava-water mixing dropped, most likely due to reduced availability of external water. However, we

  12. The probability of lava inundation at the proposed and existing Kulani prison sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, J.P.; Trusdell, F.A.; Heliker, C.C.

    1998-01-01

    The State of Hawai`i has proposed building a 2,300-bed medium-security prison about 10 km downslope from the existing Kulani medium-security correctional facility. The proposed and existing facilities lie on the northeast rift zone of Mauna Loa, which last erupted in 1984 in this same general area. We use the best available geologic mapping and dating with GIS software to estimate the average recurrence interval between lava flows that inundate these sites. Three different methods are used to adjust the number of flows exposed at the surface for those flows that are buried to allow a better representation of the recurrence interval. Probabilities are then computed, based on these recurrence intervals, assuming that the data match a Poisson distribution. The probability of lava inundation for the existing prison site is estimated to be 11- 12% in the next 50 years. The probability of lava inundation for the proposed sites B and C are 2- 3% and 1-2%, respectively, in the same period. The probabilities are based on estimated recurrence intervals for lava flows, which are approximately proportional to the area considered. The probability of having to evacuate the prison is certainly higher than the probability of lava entering the site. Maximum warning times between eruption and lava inundation of a site are estimated to be 24 hours for the existing prison site and 72 hours for proposed sites B and C. Evacuation plans should take these times into consideration.

  13. A Mechanism for Stratifying Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A.

    2005-12-01

    Relict lava flows (e.g., komatiites) are often reported to be zoned in the vertical, each zone separated by a sharp contact. Such stratifications in igneous flows, both intrusive and extrusive, can be treated as analogues of suspended loads of sediments in rivers and streams, and hence amenable to quantitative treatment derived for the hydraulic environment as long as dynamic similitude is assured. Situations typically encountered in the hydraulic environment are streams carrying a bed load at the bottom of the stream, the bed load separated by a sharp horizon from a sediment load carried above it. This sediment load may be topped by others of decreasing density as one moves to the surface of the flow, with perhaps the uppermost layer clear of any suspended matter. Rules exist for estimating the thickness D of these loads: one of them is given by D ~ 4.4V3/rgcvs where V is the shear velocity or average velocity of the flow, r = (ρs - ρl)/ρl where ρs is the density of the suspended solid matter, ρl the density of the fluid, g the acceleration of gravity, c the concentration of the particulate content and vs the settling velocity. The settling velocity is secured through Stoke's Law and the velocity of the flow is given by V = R2/3S1/2/n where R is the hydraulic radius, S the gradient along which the fluid flows and n is the Manning Coefficient. In the igneous case, the bed load would be composed of primocrysts, i.e., of the first crystals to come out of solution as the flow cools along its run. This would leave the upper portions of the flow more evolved except perhaps for a quenched crust riding atop the flow. As the viscosity of the flow is dependent not only on temperature but on composition and crystal content, the mean velocity of each layer will be different from the layer above and below it. This requires shear at the interface of adjoining stratifications, which brings into play another mechanism: dispersive pressure (the Bagnold effect). Dispersive

  14. Emplacement of Long Lava Flows: Detailed Topography of the Carrizozo Basalt Lava Flow, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R; Johnston, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    The Carrizozo flow in south-central New Mexico was examined to obtain detailed topography for a long basaltic lava flow. This information will be helpful in evaluating emplacement models for long lava flows.

  15. Emplacement of Long Lava Flows: Detailed Topography of the Carrizozo Basalt Lava Flow, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R; Johnston, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    The Carrizozo flow in south-central New Mexico was examined to obtain detailed topography for a long basaltic lava flow. This information will be helpful in evaluating emplacement models for long lava flows.

  16. Silica activity in lunar lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, W. P.; Haselton, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Calculated values of log alpha SiO2 in lunar magmas range from approximately -0.8 to unity in the temperature range of 1100-1300 C. High-titanium mare basalts begin crystallizing at silica activities insufficient for orthopyroxene saturation; in contrast to terrestrial lavas, silica activities rise substantially with crystallization and cause silica saturation in the residuum. Igneous rocks of the highland regions have relatively higher initial silica activities than mare basalts. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that high-titanium mare basalts could be derived from a 90 to 240-km deep source region containing olivine and orthopyroxene in addition to other phases.

  17. What factors control superficial lava dome explosivity?

    PubMed Central

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoît; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style and a major hazard on numerous volcanoes worldwide. Lava domes are built by slow extrusion of degassed, viscous magma and may be destroyed by gravitational collapse or explosion. The triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood: here we propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite precipitation. Both processes generate an impermeable and rigid carapace allowing overpressurisation of the inner parts of the lava dome by the rapid input of vesiculated magma batches. The relative thickness of the cristobalite-rich carapace is an inverse function of the external lava dome surface area. Explosive activity is thus more likely to occur at the onset of lava dome extrusion, in agreement with observations, as the likelihood of superficial lava dome explosions depends inversely on lava dome volume. This new result is of interest for the whole volcanological community and for risk management. PMID:26420069

  18. Characterizing Lava Flows With LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligne, N. I.; Cashman, K. V.; Deardorff, N.; Dietterich, H. R.; House, P. K.; Soule, S.

    2009-12-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) have been used in volcanology in predictive modeling of lava flow paths, both for assessment of potential hazards and specific predictions of lava flow paths. Topographic analysis of a lava flow is potentially useful for mapping and quantifying flow surface morphologies, which in turn can be used to determine flow emplacement conditions, such as effusion rate, steadiness of flow, and interactions with pre-existing topography and surface water. However, this has been limited in application because of the coarse resolution of most DEMs. In recent years, use of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) airborne laser altimetry, capable of producing high resolution (≤ 1 meter) DEMs, has become increasingly common in the geomorphic and mapping community. However, volcanologists have made little use of airborne LiDAR. Here we compare information obtained using field observations and standard (10 meter) DEMs against LiDAR high resolution DEMs to assess the usefulness, capabilities, and limitations of LiDAR as applicable to lava flows. We compare morphologic characteristics of five lava flows of different compositions, tectonic settings, flow extents, slopes, and eruption duration: (1) 1984 Mauna Loa lava flow, Hawaii; (2) December 1974 Kilauea lava flow, Hawaii; (3) c. 1600 ybp Collier Cone lava flow, central Oregon Cascades; (4) Holocene lava flows from the Sand Mountain volcanic chain, central Oregon Cascades; and (5) Pleistocene lava flows along the Owyhee River, eastern Oregon basin and range. These lava flows range in composition from basalt to andesite, and have eruption durations ranging from 6 hours (observed) to years (inferred). We measure channel width, levee and flow front heights, compression ridge amplitude, wavelength and tumuli dimensions, and surface roughness. For all but the smallest scale features, LiDAR is easily used to quantify these features, which often is impossible or technically challenging to do in the field, while

  19. Utility of Lava Tubes on Other Worlds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walden, Bryce E.; Billings, T. L.; York, Cheryl Lynn; Gillett, S. L.; Herbert, M. V.

    1998-01-01

    On Mars, as on Earth, lava tubes are found in the extensive lava fields associated with shield volcanism. Lunar lava-tube traces are located near mare-highland boundaries, giving access to a variety of minerals and other resources, including steep slopes, prominent heights for local area communications and observation, large-surface areas in shade, and abundant basalt plains suitable for landing sites, mass-drivers, surface transportation, regolith harvesting, and other uses. Methods for detecting lava tubes include visual observations of collapse trenches and skylights, ground-penetrating radar, gravimetry, magnetometry, seismography, atmospheric effects, laser, lidar, infrared, and human or robotic exploration.

  20. What factors control superficial lava dome explosivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoît; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-09-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style and a major hazard on numerous volcanoes worldwide. Lava domes are built by slow extrusion of degassed, viscous magma and may be destroyed by gravitational collapse or explosion. The triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood: here we propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite precipitation. Both processes generate an impermeable and rigid carapace allowing overpressurisation of the inner parts of the lava dome by the rapid input of vesiculated magma batches. The relative thickness of the cristobalite-rich carapace is an inverse function of the external lava dome surface area. Explosive activity is thus more likely to occur at the onset of lava dome extrusion, in agreement with observations, as the likelihood of superficial lava dome explosions depends inversely on lava dome volume. This new result is of interest for the whole volcanological community and for risk management.

  1. Bed bugs.

    PubMed

    Foulke, Galen T; Anderson, Bryan E

    2014-09-01

    The term bed bug is applied to 2 species of genus Cimex: lectularius describes the common or temperate bed bug, and hemipterus its tropical cousin. Cimex lectularius is aptly named; its genus and species derive from the Latin words for bug and bed, respectively. Though the tiny pest is receiving increased public attention and scrutiny, the bed bug is hardly a new problem.

  2. 36 CFR 290.4 - Confidentiality of cave location information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE CAVE RESOURCES MANAGEMENT § 290.4 Confidentiality of cave location information. (a) Information... harm, theft, or destruction to cave resources. (b) Requesting confidential information. Notwithstanding... Federal or State governmental agencies, bona fide educational or research institutes, or individuals...

  3. CAVES - Computer-Aided Vehicle Embarkation System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    14. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES It. KEY WORDS (Continue on rewer@* olde it necessary and identify by block number) Pallet loading Vehicle loading Cutting...loading problem. A computer-aided vehicle embarkation system (CAVES) is developed to assist embarkation personnel to load vehicles on board a ship. Caves...load vehicles on board a ship. CAVES provides the Embarkation Officer the flexibility and portability needed to make real time decisions about vehicle

  4. From Cave Walls to Clay Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Julie

    2004-01-01

    About 15,000 BC, the bison and other animals roamed the land and cave people, in their spare time, found colorful, chalky rocks with which to play. Over the course of time, they found that the chalky rocks would rub off on the cave walls, thus cave paintings and the pursuit of art was born. This article describes one fourth-grade classroom's…

  5. From Cave Walls to Clay Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Julie

    2004-01-01

    About 15,000 BC, the bison and other animals roamed the land and cave people, in their spare time, found colorful, chalky rocks with which to play. Over the course of time, they found that the chalky rocks would rub off on the cave walls, thus cave paintings and the pursuit of art was born. This article describes one fourth-grade classroom's…

  6. Computer Assisted Virtual Environment - CAVE

    ScienceCinema

    Erickson, Phillip; Podgorney, Robert; Weingartner, Shawn; Whiting, Eric

    2016-07-12

    Research at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies is taking on another dimension with a 3-D device known as a Computer Assisted Virtual Environment. The CAVE uses projection to display high-end computer graphics on three walls and the floor. By wearing 3-D glasses to create depth perception and holding a wand to move and rotate images, users can delve into data.

  7. Computer Assisted Virtual Environment - CAVE

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Phillip; Podgorney, Robert; Weingartner, Shawn; Whiting, Eric

    2014-01-14

    Research at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies is taking on another dimension with a 3-D device known as a Computer Assisted Virtual Environment. The CAVE uses projection to display high-end computer graphics on three walls and the floor. By wearing 3-D glasses to create depth perception and holding a wand to move and rotate images, users can delve into data.

  8. Snow-ice-tephra-lava interactions during the 2010 Fimmvorduhals eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haklar, J.; Edwards, B. R.; Gudmundsson, M. T.

    2010-12-01

    On March 20th a small basaltic fissure opened at the northern edge of Fimmvorduhals, a popular hiking pass between Eyjafjallajökull, to the west, and Myrdalsjökull, to the east. Immediately prior to the eruption, the vent area was covered with typically 1-3 meters of snow and locally snow-covered, isolated remnants of glacial ice. Fieldwork conducted during June and July documented evidence for a variety of different types of interactions between volcanism (tephra and lava) and snow/ice, including direct contact (e.g. ash-covered snow, lava blocks on snow/ice, lava flows on ash-covered snow), indirect melting (e.g. arcuate snow/ice melting patterns at lava flow fronts, partly collapsed sheet lava flows), and the formation of small bomb-cored mounds via post-depositional snow melting. Many of these features are likely ephemeral, and may leave no trace in the geological record; however under certain circumstances they may leave subtle clues that could aide in identifying the presence of snow during eruptions. The field relationships documented are consistent with varied mechanisms of heat transfer during the eruption to the surrounding environment. The arcuate-shaped snow and ice-banks at the edges of flows appear to closely mimic the shape of the adjacent lava lobes. The geometric relationships are consistent with snow/ice melting several meters in front of the advancing flows by radiant heat from the front of the lava lobes. Also, in at least two areas we observed features that are consistent with snow melting beneath lava, possibly by slower heat conduction. One example is a small cave beneath the lava at the lava-snow contact. The other is a ~1 m thick sheet flow that has partly collapsed, forming a fracture that appears to have been controlled by incipient polygonal jointing; melting of underlying snow may have undermined part of the sheet flow based and facilitated its collapse. However, under at least two separate types of conditions lava seems to have

  9. A Preliminary Geophysical Study Involving Remote Sensing at the Archaeological Site Trinchera Cave, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, L.; Bank, C.

    2003-12-01

    Resistivity, magnetic, seismic, and geodetic surveys were performed at Trinchera cave, an archaeological site ˜50 km east of Trinidad, Colorado, in order to locate the foundation walls of an ancient jacal structure. This structure, a shelter built during the Apishapa phase (earlier than 750 years before present), was reported - and backfilled - during a 1974 excavation; recent excavations have failed to again find it. The cave is a ˜8 m high overhang, the bottom of which marks the contact between the Dakota formation (yellowish-brown, fine-grained sandstone) and the underlying Purgatoire formation (bedded, organic-rich shale). The foundation was reported to be made of blocks of sandstone surrounded by cave fill/soil that is estimated to be 1.5 m thick in the cave. A total station survey mapped the topography beneath the overhang (the cave, ˜30 by 8 m) and within the adjacent creek. This part of the study should be useful to tie together future archaeological and geophysical work. Our magnetic map of the area is inconclusive due to the presence of metallic pipes left at the site by previous excavations and because of the overhang. Seismic refraction tests yielded varying thicknesses of the cave fill (0.7-2.3 m); however we experienced problems with the equipment in the field and realized that a 1-D model is insufficient to explain the data. A future reflection experiment might produce more useful seismic data. Our most reliable results were obtained by resistivity profiling. They show a more resistive structure in the SW part of the cave, about 1 m from the overhang and at a model depth of 2 m. We interpret this as the `lost' foundation.

  10. Martian cave air-movement via Helmholtz resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Kaj; Titus, Timothy N.; Okubo, Chris; Cushing, Glen

    2017-01-01

    Infrasonic resonance has previously been measured in terrestrial caves by other researchers, where Helmholtz resonance has been suggested as the plausible mechanism resulting in periodic wind reversals within cave entrances. We extend this reasoning to possible Martian caves, where we examine the characteristics of four atypical pit craters (APCs) on Tharsis, suggested as candidate cave entrance locations. The results show that, for several possible cave air movement periods, we are able to infer the approximate cave volumes. The utility of inferring cave volumes for planetary cave exploration is discussed.

  11. Propagation style controls lava-snow interactions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, B R; Belousov, A; Belousova, M

    2014-12-16

    Understanding interactions between volcanic eruptions and the cryosphere (a.k.a. glaciovolcanism) is important for climate reconstructions as well as for hazard mitigation at ice-clad volcanoes. Here we present unique field observations of interactions between snowpack and advancing basaltic lava flows during the 2012-13 eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Our observations show that lava-snow heat transfer is slow, and that styles of lava propagation control snowpack responses. 'A'a and sheet lava flows advance in a rolling caterpillar-track motion on top of the rigid, snowpack substrate with minor lava-snow interaction. In contrast, pahoehoe lava propagates by inflation of lobes beneath/inside the snowpack, producing rigorous lava-snow interaction via meltwater percolation down into the incandescent lava causing production of voluminous steam, rapid surface cooling and thermal shock fragmentation. The textures produced by pahoehoe-snowpack interactions are distinctive and, where observed at other sites, can be used to infer syn-eruption seasonality and climatic conditions.

  12. Tephra on Lava Flows Promotes Vegetation Development: Case Studies From Recent Holocene Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligne, N. I.; Cashman, K. V.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions re-surface landscapes rapidly with lava flows, pyroclastic deposits, or a combination of both. Whereas explosive deposits are generally fine grained and share many characteristics with fertile soil, lava does not - it is massive, fractured, and sterile rock. As such, barren lava presents a formidable challenge for plant colonization. However, most lava-forming eruptions have an explosive component, albeit often in the early stages of activity prior to lava emplacement when the magma still has a considerable gas fraction. Tephra from the explosive stage of an eruption blankets local and downwind areas, and tephra thickness decreases exponentially with distance from the vent. We examine several sites of Holocene volcanism in the United States, Mexico, and Italy and find that in the absence of tephra or external sources of soil, vegetation establishment and growth on lava flows is exceptionally slow. Conversely, lava flows with late stage syn-eruptive explosive activity or lava flows in areas with subsequent repeat volcanism have considerable vegetation development. Although thick tephra blankets hinder plant establishment, it appears that tephra deposits on lava flows provide a growth medium and enhances water retention, promoting plant colonization and vegetation development. Our results caution against the common practice of mapping lava flows based on vegetation, and provide new insights on key factors in plant establishment and growth on lava flows.

  13. Emplacement of Xenolith Nodules in the Kaupulehu Lava Flow, Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guest, J. E.; Spudis, P. D.; Greeley, R.; Taylor, G. J.; Baloga, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    The basaltic Kaupulehu 1800-1801 lava flow of Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii contains abundant ultramafic xenoliths. Many of these xenoliths occur as bedded layers of semi-rounded nodules, each thinly coated with a veneer (typically 1 mm thick) of lava. The nodule beds are analogous to cobble deposits of fluvial sedimentary systems. Although several mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of the nodule beds, it was found that, at more than one locality, the nodule beds are overbank levee deposits. The geological occurrence of the nodules, certain diagnostic aspects of the flow morphology and consideration of the inferred emplacement process indicate that the Kaupulehu flow had an exceptionally low viscosity on eruption and that the flow of the lava stream was extremely rapid, with flow velocities of at least 10 m/s (more than 40 km/h. This flow is the youngest on Hualalai Volcano and future eruptions of a similar type would pose considerable hazard to life as well as property.

  14. Modeling and analysis of caves using voxelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeifert, Gábor; Szabó, Tivadar; Székely, Balázs

    2014-05-01

    Although there are many ways to create three dimensional representations of caves using modern information technology methods, modeling of caves has been challenging for researchers for a long time. One of these promising new alternative modeling methods is using voxels. We are using geodetic measurements as an input for our voxelization project. These geodetic underground surveys recorded the azimuth, altitude and distance of corner points of cave systems relative to each other. The diameter of each cave section is estimated from separate databases originating from different surveys. We have developed a simple but efficient method (it covers more than 99.9 % of the volume of the input model on the average) to convert these vector-type datasets to voxels. We have also developed software components to make visualization of the voxel and vector models easier. Since each cornerpoint position is measured relative to another cornerpoints positions, propagation of uncertainties is an important issue in case of long caves with many separate sections. We are using Monte Carlo simulations to analyze the effect of the error of each geodetic instrument possibly involved in a survey. Cross-sections of the simulated three dimensional distributions show, that even tiny uncertainties of individual measurements can result in high variation of positions that could be reduced by distributing the closing errors if such data are available. Using the results of our simulations, we can estimate cave volume and the error of the calculated cave volume depending on the complexity of the cave. Acknowledgements: the authors are grateful to Ariadne Karst and Cave Exploring Association and State Department of Environmental and Nature Protection of the Hungarian Ministry of Rural Development, Department of National Parks and Landscape Protection, Section Landscape and Cave Protection and Ecotourism for providing the cave measurement data. BS contributed as an Alexander von Humboldt Research

  15. Gravity for Detecting Caves: Airborne and Terrestrial Simulations Based on a Comprehensive Karstic Cave Benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braitenberg, Carla; Sampietro, Daniele; Pivetta, Tommaso; Zuliani, David; Barbagallo, Alfio; Fabris, Paolo; Rossi, Lorenzo; Fabbri, Julius; Mansi, Ahmed Hamdi

    2016-04-01

    Underground caves bear a natural hazard due to their possible evolution into a sink hole. Mapping of all existing caves could be useful for general civil usages as natural deposits or tourism and sports. Natural caves exist globally and are typical in karst areas. We investigate the resolution power of modern gravity campaigns to systematically detect all void caves of a minimum size in a given area. Both aerogravity and terrestrial acquisitions are considered. Positioning of the gravity station is fastest with GNSS methods the performance of which is investigated. The estimates are based on a benchmark cave of which the geometry is known precisely through a laser-scan survey. The cave is the Grotta Gigante cave in NE Italy in the classic karst. The gravity acquisition is discussed, where heights have been acquired with dual-frequency geodetic GNSS receivers and Total Station. Height acquisitions with non-geodetic low-cost receivers are shown to be useful, although the error on the gravity field is larger. The cave produces a signal of -1.5 × 10-5 m/s2, with a clear elliptic geometry. We analyze feasibility of airborne gravity acquisitions for the purpose of systematically mapping void caves. It is found that observations from fixed wing aircraft cannot resolve the caves, but observations from slower and low-flying helicopters or drones do. In order to detect the presence of caves the size of the benchmark cave, systematic terrestrial acquisitions require a density of three stations on square 500 by 500 m2 tiles. The question has a large impact on civil and environmental purposes, since it will allow planning of urban development at a safe distance from subsurface caves. The survey shows that a systematic coverage of the karst would have the benefit to recover the position of all of the greater existing void caves.

  16. Management issues in a Tasmanian tourist cave: potential microclimatic impacts of cave modifications.

    PubMed

    Russell, Mick J; MacLean, Victoria L

    2008-05-01

    Caves can be difficult to navigate and often require physical modification to allow easy access for visitors. Single entrance caves double the access impact of each visitor. Visitors in tourist caves have direct physical effects such as the introduction of concrete and steel structures; transport of mud, dust, and nutrients; installation of lights and the exhalation of water vapour and carbon dioxide into the air. Indirect physical effects include alteration of the microclimate, both through physical modifications that change the ventilation regime and through the presence of visitors leading to changes in temperature, humidity and CO2 within the cave environment. Anthropomorphic changes to cave physical environments to aid access or to reduce backtracking can have adverse effects on the internal microclimate of cave systems with subsequent changes to the cave environment affecting the quality of decorations and cave art and the diversity of cave fauna. Although often stated that caves operate at or near a constant temperature, closer examination indicates that cave temperatures are neither static nor constant. The degree of variation depends largely on the structure and physical characteristics of the cave. Air temperature and humidity gradients between the inside and outside cave environment can result in air density differences, which create airflow, which will in turn affect the cave microclimate. As part of the development of a management framework for King Solomons Cave, Tasmania, a study of the microclimate was carried out on behalf of Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service. Analysis of the variables showed significant differences in air temperature within each site and between sites. These differences range from 4 degrees C variation at one site to 0 degrees C at another site. The data were used to model potential airflow between the cave and the external environment. Results indicate that part of the cave is dominated by airflow between the chimney and the

  17. Thirty years of American cave diving fatalities.

    PubMed

    Potts, Leah; Buzzacott, Peter; Denoble, Petar

    2016-09-01

    Cave divers enter an inherently dangerous environment that often includes little visibility, maze-like passageways and a ceiling of rock that prevents a direct ascent to the surface in the event of a problem. Reports of cave diving fatality cases occurring between 01 July 1985 and 30 June 2015 collected by Divers Alert Network were reviewed. Training status, safety rules violated, relevancy of the violations, and root causes leading to death were determined. A total of 161 divers who died were identified, 67 trained cave divers and 87 untrained. While the annual number of cave diving fatalities has steadily fallen over the last three decades, from eight to less than three, the proportion of trained divers among those fatalities has doubled. Data regarding trained cave divers were divided into two equal 15-year time periods. Trained cave divers who died in the most recent time period were older but little else differed. The most common cause of death was asphyxia due to drowning, preceded by running out of breathing gas, usually after getting lost owing to a loss of visibility caused by suspended silt. An overwhelming majority of the fatalities occurred in the state of Florida where many flooded caves are located. Even with improvements in technology, the greatest hazards faced by cave divers remain unchanged. Efforts to develop preventative interventions to address these hazards should continue.

  18. The conservation of Britain's limestone cave resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwick, P.; Gunn, J.

    1996-10-01

    Limestone caves are an important scientific and recreational resource in Britain. During the mid- to late 1970s, cavers and statutory conservation bodies cooperated in a review of cave resources which resulted in the designation of 48 caves or cave areas as Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). During the same period, the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 was introduced to provide more effective planning controls on activities such as agriculture carried out within SSSI boundaries. In one case, at Priddy in the Mendip Hills of Somerset, landowners prevented access to a number of caves in protest over the new, tougher restrictions on agriculture. Faced with the closure, and perceiving that their recreational use of caves might also be controlled, local cavers joined the landowners in opposing the proposals for SSSI designation. As a result the proposals were reviewed, three caves were excluded from the site and controls on the remaining area were relaxed. The case emphasized a need for an effective system to take account of all factors affecting cave conservation, a need which has led to a more constructive dialogue between nature conservation bodies, caver organizations and other interested parties.

  19. Magnetostratigraphy of sediments in mammoth cave, kentucky.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, V A

    1982-08-27

    Clastic sediment deposits found within the caves of Mammoth Cave National Park have yielded a magnetostratigraphic pattern of magnetic polarity reversals which indicates-that they were deposited over a range of at least 1 million and most likely 2 million years.

  20. Magnetostratigraphy of Sediments in Mammoth Cave, Kentucky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Victor A.

    1982-08-01

    Clastic sediment deposits found within the caves of Mammoth Cave National Park have yielded a magnetostratigraphic pattern of magnetic polarity reversals which indicates that they were deposited over a range of at least 1 million and most likely 2 million years.

  1. [Anatomic variants of Meckel's cave on MRI].

    PubMed

    Benoudiba, F; Hadj-Rabia, M; Iffenecker, C; Fuerxer, F; Bekkali, F; Francke, J P; Doyon, D

    1998-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gives an accurate analysis of Meckel's cave variability. Images were acquired in 50 patients with several sections for anatomical comparison. Using several sections, MRI is a suitable method for better analysis of the trigeminal cistern. The most frequent findings are symmetrical trigeminal cisterns. Expansion of Meckel's cave or its disappearance has pathological significance.

  2. Cavernous hemangioma of Meckel's cave. Case report.

    PubMed

    Fehlings, M G; Tucker, W S

    1988-04-01

    A case of a cavernous hemangioma located within Meckel's cave and involving the gasserian ganglion is described in a patient presenting with facial pain and a trigeminal nerve deficit. Although these lesions have been reported to occur in the middle fossa, this is believed to be the first case of such a vascular malformation arising solely from within Meckel's cave.

  3. Microbiological and environmental issues in show caves.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2012-07-01

    Cultural tourism expanded in the last half of the twentieth century, and the interest of visitors has come to include caves containing archaeological remains. Some show caves attracted mass tourism, and economical interests prevailed over conservation, which led to a deterioration of the subterranean environment and the rock art. The presence and the role of microorganisms in caves is a topic that is often ignored in cave management. Knowledge of the colonisation patterns, the dispersion mechanisms, and the effect on human health and, when present, over rock art paintings of these microorganisms is of the utmost importance. In this review the most recent advances in the study of microorganisms in caves are presented, together with the environmental implications of the findings.

  4. Dynamics of the Mount Nyiragongo lava lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgi, P.-Y.; Darrah, T. H.; Tedesco, D.; Eymold, W. K.

    2014-05-01

    The permanent and presently rising lava lake at Mount Nyiragongo constitutes a major potential geological hazard to the inhabitants of the Virunga volcanic region in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Rwanda. Based on two field campaigns in June 2010 and 2011, we estimate the lava lake level from the southeastern crater rim (~400 m diameter) and lava lake area (~46,550 m2), which constrains, respectively, the lava lake volume (~9 × 106 m3) and volume flow rate needed to keep the magma in a molten state (0.6 to 3.5 m3 s-1). A bidirectional magma flow model, which includes the characterization of the conduit diameter and funnel-shaped lava lake geometry, is developed to constrain the amount of magma intruded/emplaced within the magmatic chamber and rift-related structures that extend between Mount Nyiragongo's volcanic center and the city of Goma, DRC, since Mount Nyiragongo's last eruption (17 January 2002). Besides matching field data of the lava lake level covering the period 1977 to 2002, numerical solutions of the model indicate that by 2022, 20 years after the January 2002 eruption, between 300 and 1700 × 106 m3 (0.3 to 1.7 km3) of magma could have intruded/emplaced underneath the edifice, and the lava lake volume could exceed 15 × 106 m3.

  5. Ultrathin lava layers exposed near San Luis Obispo Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James G.; Charlton, Douglas W.

    1984-09-01

    Sequences of extraordinarily thin (1 5 cm thick) lava layers, resembling individual lava flows, are interbedded with Jurassic and Cretaceous pillowed lava flows near San Luis Obispo Bay on the California coast. Such layers are formed inside submarine pillowed lava pipes or flow lobes. As the lava surface in a pillow pipe falls to a lower level owing to diminished supply entering the pipe, water enters the upper compartment through cracks in the outer crust and chills a new crust on top of the lava stream. Repeated lowerings of the lava level in the pipe create a series of discrete lava shelves, each of which represents the upper crust of the lava stream flowing within the pipe. These crusts are supported at different levels on their edges at the side of the pipe. The weight of subsequent overlying lava flows collapses the partly hollow tube, creating a stacked sequence of ultrathin lava layers progressively younger downward.

  6. The Mechanisms and Dynamics of High-Energy Lava-Water Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, E. P.; Fagents, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The study of explosive interactions between surface lava flows and water can provide context for understanding explosive magma-water interactions, without the competing effects of juvenile degassing-induced fragmentation. Explosive melt-water experiments and analysis of tephra produced during natural lava-water explosions (i.e. rootless tephra) indicate that the energy release during an explosion is proportional to the abundance of ash having undergone brittle fragmentation. This "blocky" ash contributes significant energy, even if the total mass of blocky ash is small relative to coarser ejecta, making it the thermodynamic driver of the explosion. Previous work has focused on relatively low-energy lava-water explosions, with a dispersal diameter of 150 m, but cones of rootless tephra (i.e. rootless cones) range in diameter from approximately 5 to 450 m, and an increase in explosion energy generally produces a more widely dispersed cone. Therefore, in order to identify processes occurring on the higher-energy end of the spectrum, we investigated the characteristics of tephra from a cone with a diameter of 400 m. In general, we find that coarser-grained beds contain a larger total abundance of fluidal grains (i.e. molten spatter) than finer-grained beds, consistent with previous work. However, some beds display an elevated abundance of fluidal ash, independent of the mean grain size of the deposit, which may be evidence of changing mixing conditions resulting in a different explosion type. Additionally, beds of the 400 m cone contain three to six times as much blocky ash as beds of the 150 m cone having similar grain-size distributions. We interpret this result to be a product of higher-energy explosions, in which ash-scale fragmentation is the most important, energetically. However, the potential effect of lava rheology will be constrained through additional analyses of tephra morphology, vesicle sizes and shapes, in addition to more detailed analysis of tephra

  7. Early life recorded in archean pillow lavas.

    PubMed

    Furnes, Harald; Banerjee, Neil R; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Staudigel, Hubert; de Wit, Maarten

    2004-04-23

    Pillow lava rims from the Mesoarchean Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa contain micrometer-scale mineralized tubes that provide evidence of submarine microbial activity during the early history of Earth. The tubes formed during microbial etching of glass along fractures, as seen in pillow lavas from recent oceanic crust. The margins of the tubes contain organic carbon, and many of the pillow rims exhibit isotopically light bulk-rock carbonate delta13C values, supporting their biogenic origin. Overlapping metamorphic and magmatic dates from the pillow lavas suggest that microbial life colonized these subaqueous volcanic rocks soon after their eruption almost 3.5 billion years ago.

  8. 43 CFR 37.12 - Confidentiality of cave location information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Confidentiality of cave location information. 37.12 Section 37.12 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CAVE MANAGEMENT Cave Designation § 37.12 Confidentiality of cave location information. (a) Information disclosure...

  9. 43 CFR 37.12 - Confidentiality of cave location information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Confidentiality of cave location information. 37.12 Section 37.12 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CAVE MANAGEMENT Cave Designation § 37.12 Confidentiality of cave location information. (a) Information disclosure...

  10. 43 CFR 37.12 - Confidentiality of cave location information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Confidentiality of cave location information. 37.12 Section 37.12 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CAVE MANAGEMENT Cave Designation § 37.12 Confidentiality of cave location information. (a) Information disclosure...

  11. 43 CFR 37.12 - Confidentiality of cave location information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Confidentiality of cave location information. 37.12 Section 37.12 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CAVE MANAGEMENT Cave Designation § 37.12 Confidentiality of cave location information. (a) Information disclosure...

  12. 43 CFR 37.12 - Confidentiality of cave location information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Confidentiality of cave location information. 37.12 Section 37.12 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CAVE MANAGEMENT Cave Designation § 37.12 Confidentiality of cave location information. (a) Information disclosure...

  13. Mysterious Lava Mineral on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph or spectrum captured by the Moessbauer spectrometer onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the presence of three different iron-bearing minerals in the soil at the rover's landing site. One of these minerals has been identified as olivine, a shiny green rock commonly found in lava on Earth. The other two have yet to be pinned down. Scientists were puzzled by the discovery of olivine because it implies the soil consists at least partially of ground up rocks that have not been weathered or chemically altered. The black line in this graph represents the original data; the three colored regions denote individual minerals and add up to equal the black line.

    The Moessbauer spectrometer uses two pieces of radioactive cobalt-57, each about the size of pencil erasers, to determine with a high degree of accuracy the composition and abundance of iron-bearing minerals in martian rocks and soil. It is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm.'

  14. Mysterious Lava Mineral on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph or spectrum captured by the Moessbauer spectrometer onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the presence of three different iron-bearing minerals in the soil at the rover's landing site. One of these minerals has been identified as olivine, a shiny green rock commonly found in lava on Earth. The other two have yet to be pinned down. Scientists were puzzled by the discovery of olivine because it implies the soil consists at least partially of ground up rocks that have not been weathered or chemically altered. The black line in this graph represents the original data; the three colored regions denote individual minerals and add up to equal the black line.

    The Moessbauer spectrometer uses two pieces of radioactive cobalt-57, each about the size of pencil erasers, to determine with a high degree of accuracy the composition and abundance of iron-bearing minerals in martian rocks and soil. It is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm.'

  15. Taylor instability in rhyolite lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, B. A.; Krantz, W. B.; Fink, J. H.; Dickinson, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    A refined Taylor instability model is developed to describe the surface morphology of rhyolite lava flows. The effect of the downslope flow of the lava on the structures resulting from the Taylor instability mechanism is considered. Squire's (1933) transformation is developed for this flow in order to extend the results to three-dimensional modes. This permits assessing why ridges thought to arise from the Taylor instability mechanism are preferentially oriented transverse to the direction of lava flow. Measured diapir and ridge spacings for the Little and Big Glass Mountain rhyolite flows in northern California are used in conjunction with the model in order to explore the implications of the Taylor instability for flow emplacement. The model suggests additional lava flow features that can be measured in order to test whether the Taylor instability mechanism has influenced the flows surface morphology.

  16. Lunar lava tube radiation safety analysis.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Giovanni; Wilson, J W; Clowdsley, M S; Nealy, J E; Humes, D H; Clem, J M

    2002-12-01

    For many years it has been suggested that lava tubes on the Moon could provide an ideal location for a manned lunar base, by providing shelter from various natural hazards, such as cosmic radiation, meteorites, micrometeoroids, and impact crater ejecta, and also providing a natural environmental control, with a nearly constant temperature, unlike that of the lunar surface showing extreme variation in its diurnal cycle. An analysis of radiation safety issues on lunar lava tubes has been performed by considering radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE) interacting with the lunar surface, modeled as a regolith layer and rock. The chemical composition has been chosen as typical of the lunar regions where the largest number of lava tube candidates are found. Particles have been transported all through the regolith and the rock, and received particles flux and doses have been calculated. The radiation safety of lunar lava tubes environments has been demonstrated.

  17. Turbulent Lava Flow in Mars Athabasca Valles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-11

    This combination of images, taken by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, helped researchers analyze the youngest flood lava on Mars, which is in Athabasca Valles, in the Elysium Planitia region of equatorial Mars.

  18. Lunar lava tube radiation safety analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Angelis, Giovanni; Wilson, J. W.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Nealy, J. E.; Humes, D. H.; Clem, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    For many years it has been suggested that lava tubes on the Moon could provide an ideal location for a manned lunar base, by providing shelter from various natural hazards, such as cosmic radiation, meteorites, micrometeoroids, and impact crater ejecta, and also providing a natural environmental control, with a nearly constant temperature, unlike that of the lunar surface showing extreme variation in its diurnal cycle. An analysis of radiation safety issues on lunar lava tubes has been performed by considering radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE) interacting with the lunar surface, modeled as a regolith layer and rock. The chemical composition has been chosen as typical of the lunar regions where the largest number of lava tube candidates are found. Particles have been transported all through the regolith and the rock, and received particles flux and doses have been calculated. The radiation safety of lunar lava tubes environments has been demonstrated.

  19. Taylor instability in rhyolite lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, B. A.; Krantz, W. B.; Fink, J. H.; Dickinson, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    A refined Taylor instability model is developed to describe the surface morphology of rhyolite lava flows. The effect of the downslope flow of the lava on the structures resulting from the Taylor instability mechanism is considered. Squire's (1933) transformation is developed for this flow in order to extend the results to three-dimensional modes. This permits assessing why ridges thought to arise from the Taylor instability mechanism are preferentially oriented transverse to the direction of lava flow. Measured diapir and ridge spacings for the Little and Big Glass Mountain rhyolite flows in northern California are used in conjunction with the model in order to explore the implications of the Taylor instability for flow emplacement. The model suggests additional lava flow features that can be measured in order to test whether the Taylor instability mechanism has influenced the flows surface morphology.

  20. Overlapping Lobate Lava Flows in Daedalia Planum

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-10

    Lava flows south of Arsia Mons in Daedalia Planum transition from younger flows with elongated, sinuous morphologies to the northeast, to older, broader lobes and sheet flows to the southwest. This image is from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  1. Lunar Lava Tubes as Prepared Emergency Shelters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardon, Austin; Nichol, Kenneth; Mardon, Austin

    If Lunar lava tubes were mapped from orbit and robotically explored their could be supplies for potentially used emergency depots. This occurs in the Antarctic. Lava tubes are hollowed out tubes where ancient lava flowed through and left a tunnel. A major problem of their use is the entering and egress. These might have to be excavated robotically. Lava tubes have been proposed to be used as shelters on the Moon before but supplies could be cached in areas potentially traversed in case of an emergency during a surface traverse. These supplies would be protected from some radiation would be fully protected from micrometeorites and theoretically could be left indefinitely. It has been proposed that they be used as shelters but to the authors knowledge it has not been proposed that they be used as cache and emergency depots.

  2. Lunar lava tube radiation safety analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Angelis, Giovanni; Wilson, J. W.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Nealy, J. E.; Humes, D. H.; Clem, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    For many years it has been suggested that lava tubes on the Moon could provide an ideal location for a manned lunar base, by providing shelter from various natural hazards, such as cosmic radiation, meteorites, micrometeoroids, and impact crater ejecta, and also providing a natural environmental control, with a nearly constant temperature, unlike that of the lunar surface showing extreme variation in its diurnal cycle. An analysis of radiation safety issues on lunar lava tubes has been performed by considering radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE) interacting with the lunar surface, modeled as a regolith layer and rock. The chemical composition has been chosen as typical of the lunar regions where the largest number of lava tube candidates are found. Particles have been transported all through the regolith and the rock, and received particles flux and doses have been calculated. The radiation safety of lunar lava tubes environments has been demonstrated.

  3. Radon as a natural tracer for underwater cave exploration and hypogenic cave formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csondor, Katalin; Erőss, Anita; Horváth, Ákos; Szieberth, Dénes

    2017-04-01

    Using 222Rn as a natural tracer is a novel approach in underwater cave exploration and in the research of active hypogenic caves. The research area, the Molnár János cave is one of the largest caves of an unique hypogenic karst system, the Buda Thermal Karst (Budapest, Hungary). The cave system is mainly characterized by water-filled passages. The cave is located at one of the main discharge areas of the Buda Thermal Karst and the major outflow point of the waters of the cave system is the Boltív spring, which feeds the artificial Malom Lake. Previous complex hydrogeological studies and radon measurements in the cave system and in the spring established the highest radon concentration (71 Bq/L, where the average is 44 Bq/L) in the springwater. The origin of radon was identified in the form of iron-hydroxide containing biofilms, which form by mixing of waters and efficiently adsorb radium from the thermal water component and cause local radon anomalies. Since mixing of waters is responsible for the formation of the cave as well, these iron-hydroxide containing biofilms and consequently high radon concentrations mark the active cave forming zones. The aim of the study was to use the radon as a natural tracer to locate active mixing and cave forming zones. Based on previous radon measurements it is supposed that the active mixing and cave forming zone has to be close to the spring, since the highest radon concentration was measured there. Therefore, the radon activity concentration mapping was carried out with the help of divers and involving that part of the cave which closest to the spring. Based on our measurements the highest radon concentration (84 Bq/L) ever was achieved in the springwater. Based on the radon concentration distribution direct connection and active karst conduit was established between the spring and the deepest room of the researched part of the cave, which was verified by artificial tracer as well. However, the distribution of radon in the

  4. Determination of eruption temperature of Io's lavas using lava tube skylights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2016-11-01

    Determining the eruption temperature of Io's dominant silicate lavas would constrain Io's present interior state and composition. We have examined how eruption temperature can be estimated at lava tube skylights through synthesis of thermal emission from the incandescent lava flowing within the lava tube. Lava tube skylights should be present along Io's long-lived lava flow fields, and are attractive targets because of their temporal stability and the narrow range of near-eruption temperatures revealed through them. We conclude that these skylights are suitable and desirable targets (perhaps the very best targets) for the purposes of constraining eruption temperature, with a 0.9:0.7-μm radiant flux ratio ≤6.3 being diagnostic of ultramafic lava temperatures. Because the target skylights may be small - perhaps only a few m or 10 s of m across - such observations will require a future Io-dedicated mission that will obtain high spatial resolution (< 100 m/pixel), unsaturated observations of Io's surface at multiple wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared, ideally at night. In contrast to observations of lava fountains or roiling lava lakes, where accurate determination of surface temperature distribution requires simultaneous or near-simultaneous (< 0.1 s) observations at different wavelengths, skylight thermal emission data are superior for the purposes of temperature derivation, as emission is stable on much longer time scales (minutes, or longer), so long as viewing geometry does not greatly change during that time.

  5. The structural stability of lunar lava tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, David M.; Chappaz, Loic; Sood, Rohan; Milbury, Colleen; Bobet, Antonio; Melosh, H. Jay; Howell, Kathleen C.; Freed, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Mounting evidence from the SELENE, LRO, and GRAIL spacecraft suggests the presence of vacant lava tubes under the surface of the Moon. GRAIL evidence, in particular, suggests that some may be more than a kilometer in width. Such large sublunarean structures would be of great benefit to future human exploration of the Moon, providing shelter from the harsh environment at the surface-but could empty lava tubes of this size be stable under lunar conditions? And what is the largest size at which they could remain structurally sound? We address these questions by creating elasto-plastic finite element models of lava tubes using the Abaqus modeling software and examining where there is local material failure in the tube's roof. We assess the strength of the rock body using the Geological Strength Index method with values appropriate to the Moon, assign it a basaltic density derived from a modern re-analysis of lunar samples, and assume a 3:1 width-to-height ratio for the lava tube. Our results show that the stability of a lava tube depends on its width, its roof thickness, and whether the rock comprising the structure begins in a lithostatic or Poisson stress state. With a roof 2 m thick, lava tubes a kilometer or more in width can remain stable, supporting inferences from GRAIL observations. The theoretical maximum size of a lunar lava tube depends on a variety of factors, but given sufficient burial depth (500 m) and an initial lithostatic stress state, our results show that lava tubes up to 5 km wide may be able to remain structurally stable.

  6. Geochemical aspects of some Japanese lavas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpotts, J. A.; Martin, W.; Schnetzler, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    K, Rb, Sr, Ba and rare-earth concentrations in some Japanese lavas have been determined by mass-spectrometric stable-isotope dilution. The samples fall into three rare-earth groups corresponding to tholeiitic, high alumina and alkali basalts. Japanese tholeiites have trace element characteristics similar to those of oceanic ridge tholeiites except for distinctly higher relative concentrations of Ba. Japanese lavas may result from various degrees of partial fusion of amphibole eclogite.

  7. Does the Cave Environment Reduce Functional Diversity?

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Camile Sorbo; Batalha, Marco Antonio; Bichuette, Maria Elina

    2016-01-01

    Caves are not colonised by all taxa present in the surface species pool, due to absence of light and the tendency to food limitation when compared to surface communities. Under strong species sorting during colonisation and later by the restrictive environmental filter, traits that are not adaptive in subterranean habitats may be filtered out. We tested whether cave communities were assembled by the restrictive regime propitiated by permanent darkness or by competitive exclusion due to resource scarcity. When compared to surface communities, the restrictive subterranean regime would lead to lower functional diversity and phenotypic clustering inside the caves, and the opposite should be expected in the case of competitive exclusion. Using isopods (Oniscidea) as model taxa, we measured several niche descriptors of taxa from surface and cave habitats, used a multivariate measure of functional diversity, and compared their widths. We found phenotypic overdispersion and higher functional diversity in cave taxa when compared to surface taxa. On the one hand, the dry climate outside of caves hampered the survival of several taxa and their ecological strategies, not viable under severe desiccation risk, culminating in the clustering of functional traits. In contrast, this restriction does not occur inside of caves, where isopods find favourable conditions under lower predation pressures and more amenable environmental parameters that allow occupation and subsequent diversification. Our results showed that, at least for some taxa, caves may not be such a harsh environment as previously thought. The high functional diversity we found inside caves adds an additional reason for the conservation of these sensitive environments. PMID:27003837

  8. Does the Cave Environment Reduce Functional Diversity?

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Camile Sorbo; Batalha, Marco Antonio; Bichuette, Maria Elina

    2016-01-01

    Caves are not colonised by all taxa present in the surface species pool, due to absence of light and the tendency to food limitation when compared to surface communities. Under strong species sorting during colonisation and later by the restrictive environmental filter, traits that are not adaptive in subterranean habitats may be filtered out. We tested whether cave communities were assembled by the restrictive regime propitiated by permanent darkness or by competitive exclusion due to resource scarcity. When compared to surface communities, the restrictive subterranean regime would lead to lower functional diversity and phenotypic clustering inside the caves, and the opposite should be expected in the case of competitive exclusion. Using isopods (Oniscidea) as model taxa, we measured several niche descriptors of taxa from surface and cave habitats, used a multivariate measure of functional diversity, and compared their widths. We found phenotypic overdispersion and higher functional diversity in cave taxa when compared to surface taxa. On the one hand, the dry climate outside of caves hampered the survival of several taxa and their ecological strategies, not viable under severe desiccation risk, culminating in the clustering of functional traits. In contrast, this restriction does not occur inside of caves, where isopods find favourable conditions under lower predation pressures and more amenable environmental parameters that allow occupation and subsequent diversification. Our results showed that, at least for some taxa, caves may not be such a harsh environment as previously thought. The high functional diversity we found inside caves adds an additional reason for the conservation of these sensitive environments.

  9. ACCESS Mars: A Mission Architecture for an initial settlement on Mars; using caves as habitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Poch, Antoni; Gallardo, Beatriz; Laufer, Ren; Zavaleta, Jhony; Davila, Alfonso; de Carufel, Guy; Antonakopoulos, Konstantinos; Husseini, A. Al; Alvarez Sánchez, L.; Antonakopoulos, K.; Apeldoorn, J.; Ashford, K., Jr.; Atabay, D.; Barrios, I.; Baydaroglu, Y.; Bennell, K. M.; Chen, J.; Chen, X.; Cormier, D.; Crowley, P.; de Carufel, G.; Deper, B.; Drube, L.; Duffy, P.; Edwards, P.; Gutiérrez Fernandez, E.; Haider, O.; Kumar, G.; Henselowsky, C.; Hirano, D.; Hirmer, T.; Hogan, B.; Albalat, A. Jaime; Jens, E.; Jivenescu, I.; Jojaghaian, A.; Kerrigan, M.; Kodachi, Y.; Langston, S.; Macintosh, R.; Miguélez, X.; Panek, N.; Pegg, C.; Peldszus, R.; Peng, X.; Perez-Poch, A.; Perron, A.; Qiu, J.; Renten, P.; Ricardo, J.; Saraceno, T.; Sauceda, F.; Shaghaghi Varzeghani, A.; Shimmin, R.; Solaz, R.; Solé, A.; Suresh, E. R.; Mar Vaquero Escribano, T.; Vargas Muñoz, M.; Vaujour, P. D.; Zeile, D. Veilette, Y. Winetraub, O.

    This paper summarizes a team project report produced during the Summer Space Program of the International Space University, held at Nasa-Ames Research Center (CA, USA) by 56 students from 15 countries. Chair of the team project was Rene Laufer. Facilitators were Alfonso Davila and Jhonny Zavaleta, and teacher associate supporting the team was Beatriz Gallardo. The human race has evolved, grown and expanded through the exploration of Earth. After initial steps on the Moon, our next challenge is to explore the solar system. Mars shows potential for both scientific discovery and future human settlement, and therefore represents a prime candidate for the next leap of human exploration. Such a bold endeavor will be a driver for an unprecedented worldwide cooperative effort and the catalyst for a new era of international, intercultural and interdisciplinary human relations. Scientific and technological progress will also accelerate as mankind is ushered into a new era of space exploration. Currently proposed Mars missions have identified a number of challenges such as high levels of radiation, harsh climate and limited launch windows. Recently discovered lava tubes on Mars present potential solutions to some of these issues, but raise a variety of intriguing new challenges. This paper reviews existing reference missions and identifies areas of further research essential for adapting mission architectures to utilize caves. Different mission scenarios are proposed and analyzed, with a number of different recommendations given. An analysis of the feasibility of using Martian lava tubes as habitation is given in another paper by the same authors at COSPAR 2010 F34 Technical Session. Literature suggests a low radiation environment within Martian caves, allowing for extended duration missions. The ACCESS Mars Team concludes that the use of lava tubes as human habitats will be more beneficial for human Mars exploration than currently proposed surface solutions.

  10. Organic Sulfur Gas Production in Sulfidic Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, L. A.; Engel, A. S.; Bennett, P. C.

    2001-12-01

    Lower Kane Cave, Big Horn Basin, WY, permits access to an environment where anaerobic sulfide-rich groundwater meets the aerobic vadose zone. At this interface microorganisms thrive on diverse metabolic pathways including autotrophic sulfur oxidation, sulfate reduction, and aerobic heterotrophy. Springs introduce groundwater rich in H2S to the cave where it both degasses into the cave atmosphere and is used by chemautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria in the cave spring and stream habitat. The cave atmosphere in the immediate vicinity of the springs has elevated levels of CO2, H2S and methane, mirroring the higher concentration of H2S and methane in the spring water. The high CO2 concentrations are attenuated toward the two main sources of fresh air, the cave entrance and breathing holes at the rear of the cave. Conventional toxic gas monitors permit estimations of H2S concentrations, but they have severe cross sensitivity with other reduced sulfur gases, and thus are inadequate for characterization of sulfur cave gases. However employment of a field-based GC revealed elevated concentrations of carbonyl sulfide in cave atmosphere. Cultures of microorganisms collected from the cave optimized for enriching fermenters and autotrophic and heterophic sulfate reducing bacteria each produced carbonyl sulfide suggesting a biogenic in origin of the COS in addition to H2S. Enrichment cultures also produced methanethiol (methyl mercaptan) and an additional as yet undetermined volatile organic sulfur compound. In culture, the organo-sulfur compounds were less abundant than H2S, whereas in the cave atmosphere the organo-sulfur compounds were the dominant sulfur gases. Thus, these organo-sulfur gases may prove to be important sources of both reduced sulfur and organic carbon to microorganisms living on the cave wall in a subaerial habitat. Moreover groundwater has not yet been recognized as a source of sulfur gases to the atmosphere, but with the abundance of sulfidic

  11. Bilateral Meckel's cave amyloidoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gültaşli, N; van den Hauwe, L; Bruneau, M; D'Haene, N; Delpierre, I; Balériaux, D

    2012-05-01

    Primary solitary amyloidoma of Meckel's cave is rare, and a bilateral location is even more rare. To the best of our knowledge, only 12 cases in the literature have described such a primary lesion, including one case of bilateral involvement of Meckel's cave. We report here on the case of a 57-year-old woman presenting with pseudotumor masses involving both Meckel's caves and responsible for trigeminal neuropathy. The final diagnosis of amyloidoma was made on the basis of histological examination of surgical biopsy specimens.

  12. Paleoenvironmental Investigations at Seed Cave (Windust Cave H-45FR46), Franklin County, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    near Seed Cave falls into the Agropyron-Festuca vegetation zone (Daubenmire 1970) and more xeric Artemisia-dominated communities occur approximately...Mountains. The mean annual precipitation in the Windust Cave region is in the range of 250-300 mm (10-12 in) and falls primarily in the cooler months...endocarps (Table 2). As can be seen in Table 2 and Figure 9, most of the radio- carbon dates from Seed Cave fall in their correct place in the

  13. Glacioclimatological study of perennial ice in the Fuji Ice Cave, Japan. Part 2. Interannual variation and relation to climate

    SciTech Connect

    Ohata, Tetsuo; Furukawa, Teruo; Osada, Kazuo )

    1994-08-01

    A glacioclimatological study of the interannual variation of mass of perennial ice in the Fuji Ice Cave at the foot of Mt. Fuji, in central Japan is presented. The cave is a 150-m-long lava tube located in a dense forest area at an altitude of 1120 m. It has a perennial floor ice of areas approximately 3000 m[sup 3] and mean thickness 2.8 m. Mean annual air temperature at the ground surface level is 8.4[degrees]C. Ice surface levels and air temperatures were measured 39 times from July 1984 to December 1992. Mean ice level showed a 15 cm increase from 1984 to 1989 and suddenly started to decrease from 1989 to 1992. In the increase stage, annual net balance (December to November) was similar at various points, but in the decreasing stage, the lowering of the level near the entrance was very large due to intense melting. Air temperature inside the cave at the end of the annual cycle showed a correlation to net balance of the corresponding year. Comparison of yearly net balance with meterological indices at ground level (winter and summer, annual mean air temperature and total precipitation; and number of days with strong precipitation) showed that net balance of a give year has a high correlation with the average winter air temperature anomaly of the preceding 4 yr. This is probably due to the high heat capacity of the cave system. 6 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Non-explosive lava-water interaction in Skaelingar, Iceland and the formation of subaerial lava pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Tracy K. P.; Christle, Kenneth W.

    2013-08-01

    Hollow cylinders of basalt < 2.5 m tall and generally < 1 m in diameter were generated by non-explosive lava-water interactions during the emplacement of the Laki lava flow in Iceland during 1783-1784. We know of only one location within the Laki lava flow where these basalt formations occur: a valley called Skaelingar, located at ~ 64.0°N, 18.5°W, which contains a tributary stream to the Skafta River. Skaelingar was temporarily filled with Laki lava when the main body of the lava flow advancing down the Skafta River valley became blocked, forcing lava to flow upstream into tributary valleys along the north side of the river. After the blockage within the Skafta River valley was removed, the Laki lava mostly drained out of these tributary valleys. We refer to the remaining vertical hollow basalt pipes as lava pillars because they morphologically resemble subaerial lava trees and submarine lava pillars that have been observed at mid-ocean ridges. We propose that the subaerial pillars formed as an inflating lava flow advanced slowly over water-saturated ground, or perhaps into temporarily ponded water, causing heated columns of water to rise between adjacent advancing lava lobes. The subaerial pillars continued to grow in height and diameter as the lava flow inflated. When the lava drained back out of the valley, the lava pillars were left standing. Thus, the Icelandic subaerial pillars represent a non-explosive interaction between lava and water.

  15. Physical volcanology of a voluminous rhyolite lava flow: The Badlands lava, Owyhee Plateau, southwestern Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, Curtis R.

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes an extraordinarily well preserved example of a large, high-SiO 2 rhyolite unit that by its exposed physical features can be demonstrated to be an effusive lava flow, not a rheomorphic ignimbrite. The Badlands lava flow of southwestern Idaho shows a multi-lobate form, with flow lobes that advanced along several azimuths from a long fissure vent. The lava flowed around one of its tephra ridges and a bedrock topographic high, creating a kipuka in the middle of the flow; the other tephra ridge was shoved aside by the lava. The lava itself is everywhere flow foliated, with foliation horizontal at the base, steepening toward the top, and convex in the direction of flow advance. The foliation parallels the margins of the flow lobes and reveals the position and orientation of the vent. Many samples of the lava flow's dense upper vitrophyre show one or more fragmental textures that formed by the settling of pumiceous and glassy debris into open fractures and the debris' subsequent welding into a rock that in many respects resembles welded tuff. By this process, the lava flow mimics an ignimbrite at the scale of an outcrop or thin section. Identical textures in other units have been cited as indicative of ash-flow emplacement mechanisms. The Badlands eruption tapped a stratified magma chamber, in which a large volume of phenocryst-rich (30 vol.%) magma underlay a small volume of magma more evolved and nearly aphyric. The lava flow shows mingling relations between the two magmas, with minor volumes of the aphyric magma occurring as early, small lava lobes and as individual layers in the dominant phenocryst-rich lava. Effusion of the 15 km 3 of rhyolite lava may have continued for as short as 6 or as long as 16 years, with effusion rates comparable to those observed at the Mount St. Helens dome. The Badlands lava had a pre-eruptive volatile content of about 2.75 wt.% H 2O or less, and erupted at approximately 830 °C, much lower than the temperatures of

  16. Keck Geology Consortium Lava Project: Undergraduate Research Linking Natural and Experimental Basaltic Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J. A.; Hazlett, R. W.; Wysocki, R.; Bromfield, M. E.; Browne, N. C.; Davis, N. C.; Pelland, C. G.; Rowan, W. L.; Warner, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Undergraduate students in the Keck Geology Consortium Lava Project participated in a month-long investigation of features of basaltic lava flows from two very different perspectives. The first half of the project focused on field relations in basaltic lava flows from the 1984 Krafla Fires eruption in northern Iceland. Students gained valuable experience in the collection of observations and samples in the field leading to hypotheses for the formation of selected features related to lava flow dynamics. Studies focused on a wide range of features including: morphology and heat loss in lava tubes (pyroducts), growth and collapse of lava ponds and overflow deposits, textural changes of lava falls (flow over steep steps), spaced spatter cones from flows over wet ground, and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility related to flow kinematics. In the second half of the program students designed, helped execute, documented, and analyzed features similar to those they studied in the field with large-scale (50-250 kg) basaltic lava flows created in the Syracuse University Lava Project (http://lavaproject.syr.edu). Data collected included video from multiple perspectives, infrared thermal (FLIR) images, still images, detailed measurements of flow dimensions and rates, and samples for textural and magnetic analyses. Experimental lava flow features provided critical tests of hypotheses generated in the field and a refined understanding of the behavior and final morphology of basaltic lava flows. The linked field and experimental studies formed the basis for year-long independent research projects under the supervision of their faculty mentors, leading to senior theses at the students' respective institutions.

  17. Characteristics of a young lava-hyaloclastite sheet, Snaebylisheidi, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. D.; Gorny, C. F.; Gudmundsson, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    Extensive sheets of hyaloclastite volcaniclastic debris, coupled with and intruded by largely underlying layers of coherent basalt, are common in the Sida area of southeastern Iceland. They were initially interpreted as submarine deposits, but have recently been re-interpreted as nonmarine deposits formed in the presence of glaciers. Detailed interpretation of the units has been challenging, because their source areas are not preserved. A younger deposit of the same type forms an elongate flat-topped ridge in the Snaebylisheidi area. Its volume of ca. 35 cubic km is similar to that of the larger Sida units, its source area is preserved, and parts of the deposit remain unlithified. Our initial investigation reveals that the source area is dominated by clastic deposits. There is no evidence for a source edifice of pillow or sheet lavas, but there are extensive low-level intrusions near the base, and a plexus of smaller high-level intrusions showing evidence of high viscosities during emplacement. Isolated pillows and other fluidal juvenile clasts near the source lie within matrices of highly vesicular ash and lapilli, or of mixed vesicular and dense glassy fragments. Downstream in the unit, deposits are dominated by dense clasts, and these can in places be demonstrated to have been derived locally from the underlying to intruding basalt sheet. Larger dense clasts are commonly highly irregular, vuggy, and composite; in places many are rolled into subspherical forms enclosing matrix material comprising dense angular glass fragments. The clastic part of the unit has an upper subunit dominated by well-developed bedding in complex geometries with multiple internal truncation surfaces. Lower subunits include thick structureless to alignment-bedded layers, along with intrusion-dominated zones. Soft-sediment deformation is ubiquitous along the edges of the deposit, with many layers broken and tilted to subvertical inclinations. Taken together, these features indicate that

  18. Flood lavas on Earth, Io and Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyi, L.; Self, S.; Thordarson, T.

    2006-01-01

    Flood lavas are major geological features on all the major rocky planetary bodies. They provide important insight into the dynamics and chemistry of the interior of these bodies. On the Earth, they appear to be associated with major and mass extinction events. It is therefore not surprising that there has been significant research on flood lavas in recent years. Initial models suggested eruption durations of days and volumetric fluxes of order 107 m3 s-1 with flows moving as turbulent floods. However, our understanding of how lava flows can be emplaced under an insulating crust was revolutionized by the observations of actively inflating pahoehoe flows in Hawaii. These new ideas led to the hypothesis that flood lavas were emplaced over many years with eruption rates of the order of 104 m3 s-1. The field evidence indicates that flood lava flows in the Columbia River Basalts, Deccan Traps, Etendeka lavas, and the Kerguelen Plateau were emplaced as inflated pahoehoe sheet flows. This was reinforced by the observation of active lava flows of ??? 100 km length on Io being formed as tube-fed flow fed by moderate eruption rates (102-103 m3 s-1). More recently it has been found that some flood lavas are also emplaced in a more rapid manner. New high-resolution images from Mars revealed 'platy-ridged' flood lava flows, named after the large rafted plates and ridges formed by compression of the flow top. A search for appropriate terrestrial analogues found an excellent example in Iceland: the 1783-1784 Laki Flow Field. The brecciated Laki flow top consists of pieces of pahoehoe, not aa clinker, leading us to call this 'rubbly pahoehoe'. Similar flows have been found in the Columbia River Basalts and the Kerguelen Plateau. We hypothesize that these flows form with a thick, insulating, but mobile crust, which is disrupted when surges in the erupted flux are too large to maintain the normal pahoehoe mode of emplacement Flood lavas emplaced in this manner could have

  19. Investigating lava-substrate interactions through flow experiments with syrup, wax, and molten basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, M. E.; Lev, E.

    2015-12-01

    Among the many factors influencing the complex process of lava flow emplacement, the interaction with the substrate onto which flow is emplaced plays a central role. Lava flows are rarely emplaced onto smooth or regular surfaces. For example, at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, lava flows regularly flow over solid rock, vegetation, basaltic or silica sand, and man-made materials, including asphalt and concrete. In situ studies of lava-substrate interactions are inherently difficult, and often dangerous, to carry-out, requiring the design of controllable laboratory experiments. We investigate the effects of substrate grain size, cohesion, and roughness on flow mobility and morphology through a series of flow experiments using analog materials and molten basalt. We have developed a series of experiments that allow for adjustable substrate parameters and analyze their effects on lava flow emplacement. The first set of experiments are performed at the Fluids Mechanics Laboratory at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and focus on two analog materials: polyethylene glycol (PEG), a commercially available wax, and corn syrup. The fluids were each extruded onto a series of scaled substrate beds to replicate the emplacement of lava in a natural environment. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that irregular topography, particularly topography with a height amplitude similar to that of the flow itself, can affect flow morphology, width, and velocity by acting as local barriers or culverts to the fluid. This is expected from observations of fluid flow in natural environments. A follow-up set of experiments will be conducted in Fall 2015 at the Syracuse University (SU) Lava Project Lab. In this set, we will pour molten basalt directly onto a series of substrates representing natural environments found on the Earth and other rocky bodies in the Solar System. These experiments will allow for analysis of the effects of basaltic composition and high temperatures on lava-substrate heat

  20. Southwest Caves Reveal New Forms of Life

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynne, J. Judson; Drost, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Caves in northern Arizona and western New Mexico are being researched and inventoried by scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating agencies. Southwestern caves have been little studied, and scientists are now finding that these lightless and nutrient-poor natural systems are home to life forms found nowhere else on Earth. This research has identified unique communities of arthropods (insects, arachnids, and crustaceans) that include 3 new genera, or groups of species, and at least 15 new species - some only known to exist in a single cave. This exciting research is yielding information that will be used by resource managers to better understand and protect fragile and important Southwestern cave ecosystems.

  1. Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears.

    PubMed

    Noonan, James P; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, James R; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J Chris; Pääbo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M

    2005-07-22

    Despite the greater information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies have largely been limited to the amplification of mitochondrial sequences. Here we describe metagenomic libraries constructed with unamplified DNA extracted from skeletal remains of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of approximately 1 megabase of sequence from each library showed that despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 and 1.1% of clones contained cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 base pairs of cave bear genome sequence. Comparison of cave bear and modern bear sequences revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. The metagenomic approach used here establishes the feasibility of ancient DNA genome sequencing programs.

  2. Adult peripheral neuroepithelioma in Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Midroni, G; Dhanani, A N; Gray, T; Tucker, W S; Bilbao, J M

    1991-02-01

    A case of peripheral neuroepithelioma arising from the trigeminal nerve in Meckel's cave is presented. The discussion emphasizes the pathological criteria for the diagnosis of a peripheral neuroepithelioma and the current controversy about the classification of this and related tumors.

  3. High resolution CT of Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Chui, M; Tucker, W; Hudson, A; Bayer, N

    1985-01-01

    High resolution CT of the parasellar region was carried out in 50 patients studied for suspected pituitary microadenoma, but who showed normal pituitary gland or microadenoma on CT. This control group of patients all showed an ellipsoid low-density area in the posterior parasellar region. Knowledge of the gross anatomy and correlation with metrizamide cisternography suggest that the low density region represents Meckel's cave, rather than just the trigeminal ganglion alone. Though there is considerable variation in the size of Meckel's cave in different patients as well as the two sides of the same patient, the rather constant ellipsoid configuration of the cave in normal subjects will aid in diagnosing small pathological lesions, thereby obviating more invasive cisternography via the transovale or lumbar route. Patients with "idiopathic" tic douloureux do not show a Meckel's cave significantly different from the control group.

  4. Mapping of Daedalia Planum Lava Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Carli, Cristian; Massironi, Matteo; Pasquarè, Giorgio; Sgavetti, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Daedalia Planum is one of the Tharsis volcanic plains and is located southwest of the Arsia Mons. MOLA, THEMIS, MOC and OMEGA data have been analysed, providing a multi-scale characterisation of this Martian lava field. According to Mars Global Surveyor's MOLA data, the flanks of Arsia have an average slope <5°, while the surrounding regions, including Daedalia Planum, have slopes <0,5° and commonly <0,1°. Mars Odyssey/THEMIS VIS and IR images show a plain covered by a huge number of lava flows. Older and larger lava flows on the field have a length greater than ~1500 km. Moreover most of the Daedalia flows are associated to wrinkly and ropy surfaces, typical of pahoehoe lavas. On the base of the morphology differences among the flows and through stratigraphic relationships we performed a geological map of the area. MEX/OMEGA spectra were collected in different areas of the lava field. Besides the similar absorption bands OMEGA spectra showed also some differences in reflectance and spectral slope. The spectral map created using the SAM classification reveals that these spectral variations are generally in agreement with the lava flows mapped previously on the base of the flows morphology and stratigraphy. This suggested that such variability is related with different surface textures of the lava flow. Moreover in some cases spectral map highlighted the presence of spectral subunits inside the same stratigraphic unit, due likely to a different mineralogy or rock textures. Therefore spectral analysis revealed useful to improve the geological mapping of the Daedalia Planum region.

  5. Nodal network generator for CAVE3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, J. V.; Rathjen, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    A new extension of CAVE3 code was developed that automates the creation of a finite difference math model in digital form ready for input to the CAVE3 code. The new software, Nodal Network Generator, is broken into two segments. One segment generates the model geometry using a Tektronix Tablet Digitizer and the other generates the actual finite difference model and allows for graphic verification using Tektronix 4014 Graphic Scope. Use of the Nodal Network Generator is described.

  6. Hypogene caves of the central Appalachian Shenandoah Valley in Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doctor, Daniel H.; Orndorff, Wil

    2017-01-01

    Several caves in the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia show evidence for early hypogenic conduit development with later-enhanced solution under partly confined phreatic conditions guided by geologic structures. Many (but not all) of these caves have been subsequently invaded by surface waters as a result of erosion and exhumation. Those not so affected are relict phreatic caves, bearing no relation to modern drainage patterns. Field and petrographic evidence shows that carbonate rocks hosting certain relict phreatic caves were dolomitized and/or silicified by early hydrothermal fluid migration in zones that served to locally enhance rock porosity, thus providing preferential pathways for later solution by groundwater flow, and making the surrounding bedrock more resistant to surficial weathering to result in caves that reside within isolated hills on the land surface. Features suggesting that deep phreatic processes dominated the development of these relict caves include (1) cave passage morphologies indicative of ascending fluids, (2) cave plans of irregular pattern, reflecting early maze or anastomosing development, (3) a general lack of cave breakdown and cave streams or cave stream deposits, and (4) calcite wall and pool coatings within isolated caves intersecting the local water table, and within unroofed caves at topographic locations elevated well above the local base level. Episodes of deep karstification were likely separated by long periods of geologic time, encompassing multiple phases of sedimentary fill and excavation within caves, and reflect a complex history of deep fluid migration that set the stage for later shallow speleogenesis that continues today.

  7. Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, James P.; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, JamesR.; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J. Chris; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M.

    2005-04-01

    Despite the information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies to date have largely been limited to amplification of mitochondrial DNA due to technical hurdles such as contamination and degradation of ancient DNAs. In this study, we describe two metagenomic libraries constructed using unamplified DNA extracted from the bones of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of {approx}1 Mb of sequence from each library showed that, despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 percent and 1.1 percent of clones in the libraries contain cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 bp of cave bear genome sequence. Alignment of this sequence to the dog genome, the closest sequenced genome to cave bear in terms of evolutionary distance, revealed roughly the expected ratio of cave bear exons, repeats and conserved noncoding sequences. Only 0.04 percent of all clones sequenced were derived from contamination with modern human DNA. Comparison of cave bear with orthologous sequences from several modern bear species revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. Using the metagenomic approach described here, we have recovered substantial quantities of mammalian genomic sequence more than twice as old as any previously reported, establishing the feasibility of ancient DNA genomic sequencing programs.

  8. Nornahraun lava morphology and mode of emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Gro B. M.; Höskuldsson, Armann; Riishuus, Morten S.; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Óskarsson, Birgir V.; Drouin, Vincent; Gallagher, Catherine; Askew, Rob; Moreland, William M.; Dürig, Tobias; Dumont, Stephanie; Þórdarson, Þór

    2015-04-01

    The ongoing Nornahraun eruption is the largest effusive eruption in Iceland since the Laki eruption in 1783-84, with an estimated lava volume of ~1.15 km3 covering an area of ~83.4 km2 (as of 5 JAN 2015). The eruption provides an unprecedented opportunity to study i) lava morphologies and their emplacement styles, ii) the transition from from open to closed lava pathways and iii) lava pond formation. Tracking of the lava advancement and morphology has been performed by GPS and GoPro cameras installed in 4×4 vehicles as well as video footage. Complimentary observations have been provided from aircraft platforms and by satellite data. Of particular importance for lava morphology observations are 1-12 m/pixel airborne SAR images (x-band). The Nornahraun flow field comprises a continuum of morphologies from pāhoehoe to 'a'ā, which have varied tem-porally and spatially. At the onset of the eruption 31 AUG, lava flows advanced rapidly (400-800 m/hr) from the 1.5 km long fissure as large slabby pāhoehoe [1-3] sheet lobes, 100-500 m wide and 0.3-1 m thick at the flow fronts. By 1 SEPT, the flows began channeling towards the NE constrained by the older Holuhraun I lava field and the to-pography of flood plain itself. A central open channel developed, feeding a 1-2 km wide active 'a'ā frontal lobe that advanced 1-2 km/day. In addition to its own caterpillar motion, the frontal lobe advanced in a series of 30-50 m long breakouts, predominantly slabby and rubbly pāhoehoe [4,5]. These breakouts had initial velocities of 10-30 m/hr and reached their full length within tens of minutes and subsequently inflated over hours. With the continuous advancement of the 'a'ā flow front, the breakouts were incorporated into the 'a'ā flow fronts and seldom preserved. At the margins of the frontal lava lobe, the breakouts were more sporadic, but predominantly rubbly pāhoehoe and slabby pāhoehoe, as at the flow front. The lava flow advanced ENE into Jökulsá á Fjöllum on 7 SEPT

  9. Mafic-crystal distributions, viscosities, and lava structures of some Hawaiian lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, Scott K.; Walker, George P. L.

    1988-09-01

    The distribution patterns of mafic phenocrysts in some Hawaiian basalt flows are consistent with simple in situ gravitational settling. We use the patterns to estimate the crystal settling velocity and hence viscosity of the lava, which in turn can be correlated with surface structures. Numerical modeling generates theoretical crystal concentration profiles through lava flow units of different thicknesses for differing settling velocities. By fitting these curves to field data, crystal-settling rates through the lavas can be estimated, from which the viscosities of the flows can be determined using Stokes' Law. Lavas in which the crystal settling velocity was relatively high (on the order of 5 × 10 -4 cm/sec) show great variations in phenocryst content, both from top to bottom of the same flow unit, and from one flow unit to another. Such lava is invariably pahoehoe, flow units of which are usually less than 1 m thick. Lavas in which the crystal-settling velocity was low show a small but measurable variation in phenocryst content. These lavas are part of a progression from a rough pahoehoe to toothpaste lava to a'a. Toothpaste lava is characterized by spiny texture as well as the ability to retain surface grooves during solidification, and flow units are usually thicker than 1 m. In the thickest of Hawaiian a'a flows, those of the distal type, no systematic crystal variations are observed, and high viscosity coupled with a finite yield strength prevented crystal settling. The amount of crystal settling in pahoehoe indicates that the viscosity ranged from 600 to 6000 Pa s. The limited amount of settling in toothpaste lava indicates a viscosity greater than this value, approaching 12,000 Pa s. We infer that distal-type a'a had a higher viscosity still and also possessed a yield strength.

  10. Study on Roof Safe Thickness of Rock Foundation with Karst Cave and Karst Cave-surrounding Rock Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongqin; Yi, Cao

    2017-07-01

    The deformation of karst cave-surrounding rock and its roof thickness are the key indicators to evaluate the stability of karst cave foundation. According to engineering characteristics of pile foundation in karst area, Using mechanical analytical method, cave-surrounding rock elasticity theory and Griffith criterion to calculate the safe thickness of Karst cave roof. According to karst cave-surrounding rock unstable and failure conditions, such as groundwater, different pile diameter, different thickness of Karst cave roof.Through comparing and analyzing engineering cases, the results show that the mechanical analytical method to determine the safety thickness of Karst cave roof can not meet the engineering requirements, determine the safe thickness of Karst cave roof Should be based on stability of cave-surrounding rock.

  11. Basics of lava-lamp convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyüre, Balázs; Jánosi, Imre M.

    2009-10-01

    Laboratory experiments are reported in an immiscible two-fluid system, where thermal convection is initiated by heating at the bottom and cooling at the top. The lava-lamp regime is characterized by a robust periodic exchange process where warm blobs rise from the bottom, attach to the top surface for a while, then cold blobs sink down again. Immiscibility allows to reach real steady (dynamical equilibrium) states which can be sustained for several days. Two modes of lava-lamp convection could be identified by recording and evaluating temperature time series at the bottom and at the top of the container: a “slow” mode is determined by an effective heat transport speed at a given temperature gradient, while a second mode of constant periodicity is viscosity limited. Contrasting of laboratory and geophysical observations yields the conclusion that the frequently suggested lava-lamp analogy fails for the accepted models of mantle convection.

  12. Basics of lava-lamp convection.

    PubMed

    Gyüre, Balázs; Jánosi, Imre M

    2009-10-01

    Laboratory experiments are reported in an immiscible two-fluid system, where thermal convection is initiated by heating at the bottom and cooling at the top. The lava-lamp regime is characterized by a robust periodic exchange process where warm blobs rise from the bottom, attach to the top surface for a while, then cold blobs sink down again. Immiscibility allows to reach real steady (dynamical equilibrium) states which can be sustained for several days. Two modes of lava-lamp convection could be identified by recording and evaluating temperature time series at the bottom and at the top of the container: a "slow" mode is determined by an effective heat transport speed at a given temperature gradient, while a second mode of constant periodicity is viscosity limited. Contrasting of laboratory and geophysical observations yields the conclusion that the frequently suggested lava-lamp analogy fails for the accepted models of mantle convection.

  13. Studies of fluid instabilities in flows of lava and debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan H.

    1987-01-01

    At least two instabilities have been identified and utilized in lava flow studies: surface folding and gravity instability. Both lead to the development of regularly spaced structures on the surfaces of lava flows. The geometry of surface folds have been used to estimate the rheology of lava flows on other planets. One investigation's analysis assumed that lava flows have a temperature-dependent Newtonian rheology, and that the lava's viscosity decreased exponentially inward from the upper surface. The author reviews studies by other investigators on the analysis of surface folding, the analysis of Taylor instability in lava flows, and the effect of surface folding on debris flows.

  14. Reconstruction of the dynamics of the 1800-1801 Hualalai eruption: Implications for planetary lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, Stephen; Spudis, Paul

    1993-01-01

    The 1800-1801 eruption of alkalic basalt from the Hualalai volcano, Hawaii provides a unique opportunity for investigating the dynamics of lava flow emplacement with eruption rates and compositions comparable to those that have been suggested for planetary eruptions. Field observations suggest new considerations must be used to reconstruct the emplacement of these lava flows. These observations are: (1) the flow traversed the 15 km from the vent to the sea so rapidly that no significant crust formed and an observation of the eruption reported that the flow reach the sea from the vent in approximately 1 hour; (2) the drainage of beds of xenolith nodules indicates a highly fluid, low viscosity lava; (3) overspills and other morphologic evidence for a very low viscosity host fluid; (4) no significant longitudinal increase in flow thickness that might be associated with an increase in the rheological properties of the lava; and (5) the relatively large size of channels associated with the flow, up to 80 meters across and several km long. Models for many geologic mass movements and fast moving fluids with various loadings and suspensions are discussed.

  15. Fire, Lava Flows, and Human Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medler, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Richard Wrangham and others argue that cooked food has been obligate for our ancestors since the time of Homo erectus. This hypothesis provides a particularly compelling explanation for the smaller mouths and teeth, shorter intestines, and larger brains that separate us from other hominins. However, natural ignitions are infrequent and it is unclear how earlier hominins may have adapted to cooked food and fire before they developed the necessary intelligence to make or control fire. To address this conundrum, we present cartographical evidence that the massive and long lasting lava flows in the African Rift could have provided our ancestors with episodic access to heat and fire as the front edges of these flows formed ephemeral pockets of heat and ignition and other geothermal features. For the last several million years major lava flows have been infilling the African Rift. After major eruptions there were likely more slowly advancing lava fronts creating small areas with very specific adaptive pressures and opportunities for small isolated groups of hominins. Some of these episodes of isolation may have extended for millennia allowing these groups of early hominins to develop the adaptations Wrangham links to fire and cooked food. To examine the potential veracity of this proposal, we developed a series of maps that overlay the locations of prominent hominin dig sites with contemporaneous lava flows. These maps indicate that many important developments in hominin evolution were occurring in rough spatial and temporal proximity to active lava flows. These maps indicate it is worth considering that over the last several million years small isolated populations of hominins may have experienced unique adaptive conditions while living near the front edges of these slowly advancing lava flows.

  16. The Payun-Matru lava field: a source of analogues for Martian long lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, L.; Pasquarè, G.; Massironi, M.; Frigeri, A.; Bistacchi, A.; Frederico, C.

    2007-08-01

    The Payun Matru Volcanic complex is a Quaternary fissural structure belonging to the back-arc extensional area of the Andes in the Mendoza Province (Argentina). The eastern portion of the volcanic structure is covered by a basaltic field of pahoehoe lava flows advanced over more than 180 km from the fissural feeding vents that are aligned with a E-W fault system (Carbonilla fault). Thanks to their widespread extension, these flows represent some of the largest lava flows in the world and the Pampas Onduladas flow can be considered the longest sub-aerial individual lava flow on the Earth surface [1,2]. These gigantic flows propagated over the nearly flat surface of the Pampean foreland, moving on a 0.3 degree slope. The very low viscosity of the olivine basalt lavas, coupled with the inflation process and an extensive system of lava tubes are the most probable explanation for their considerable length. The inflation process likely develop under a steady flow rate sustained for a long time [3]. A thin viscoelastic crust, built up at an early stage, is later inflated by the underlying fluid core, which remains hot and fluid thanks to the thermal-shield effect of the crust. The crust is progressively thickened by accretion from below and spreading is due to the continuous creation of new inflated lobes, which develop at the front of the flow. Certain morphological features are considered to be "fingerprints" of inflation [4, 5, 6]; these include tumuli, lava rises, lava lobes and ridges. All these morphologies are present in the more widespread Payun Matru lava flows that, where they form extensive sheetflows, can reach a maximum thickness of more than 20 meters. After the emplacement of the major flows, a second eruptive cycle involved the Payun Matru volcanic structure. During this stage thick and channelized flows of andesitic and dacitic lavas, accompanied the formation of two trachitic and trachiandesitic strato-volcanoes (Payun Matru and Payun Liso) culminated

  17. Experimental Studies of Lava Dome Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Sammonds, P. R.; Kilburn, C. R.

    2005-12-01

    Renewed extrusion at andesitic to dacitic lava domes and collapses of these domes are usually preceded by fracturing and frictional sliding of material in and around the lava dome and magma conduit. This is observed through the occurrence of shallow high frequency earthquakes. Samples of andesite from Mount Shasta in the Cascades, a typical material for both lava domes and shallow underlying country rock, have been deformed in compression and tension, at temperatures of up to 900°C, and under confining pressures of up to 70MPa. During these tests the axial load, sample deformation and acoustic emissions were recorded, in order to compare the results with field observations of deformation and short period seismicity at lava domes. Typical strengths at room temperature and pressure were 6MPa in tension, and 100MPa in compression. Increased temperatures increased the tensile strength, but reduced the compressive strength, whereas both strengths increased with increasing confining pressure. There were ~10 times more acoustic emissions at room temperature than at maximum test temperatures, indicating that increased temperatures favour ductile, rather than brittle, failure. These results suggest that young, hot lava domes may collapse or erupt with little precursory short period seismicity, whilst older, cooler domes are likely to exhibit stronger short period seismic precursors. However, hotter material is likely to exhibit more recognisable deformation precursors. This is consistent with the seismicity observed after the 18 May 1980 climactic eruption at Mount St Helens, where there was ~100 times more seismicity prior to eruptions in 1985 and 1986 than there was prior to eruptions in 1980 and 1981. During these later eruptions, the interior of the dome would still have been ductile due to its temperature and the overburden weight acting as a confining pressure, but the large amount of pre-failure deformation in this zone could drive fracturing of the cooler outer

  18. Geology of selected lava tubes in the Bend Area, Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greely, R.

    1971-01-01

    Longitudinal profiles representing 5872.5 m of mapped lava tubes and a photogeologic map relating lava tubes to surface geology, regional structure and topography are presented. Three sets of lava tubes were examined: (1) Arnold Lava Tube System (7km long) composed of collapsed and uncollapsed tube segments and lava ponds, (2) Horse Lava Tube System (11 km long) composed of parallel and anastomosing lava tube segments, and (3) miscellaneous lava tubes. Results of this study tend to confirm the layered lava hypothesis of Ollier and Brown (1965) for lava tube formation; however, there are probably several modes of formation for lava tubes in general. Arnold System is a single series of tubes apparently formed in a single basalt flow on a relatively steep gradient. The advancing flow in which the tubes formed was apparently temporarily halted, resulting in the formation of lava ponds which were inflated and later drained by the lava tube system. Horse System probably formed in multiple, interconnected flows. Pre-flow gradient appears to have been less than for Arnold System, and resulted in meandrous, multiple tube networks.

  19. Developmental constraints in cave beetles.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, Alexandra; Fresneda, Javier; Ribera, Ignacio

    2014-10-01

    In insects, whilst variations in life cycles are common, the basic patterns typical for particular groups remain generally conserved. One of the more extreme modifications is found in some subterranean beetles of the tribe Leptodirini, in which the number of larval instars is reduced from the ancestral three to two and ultimately one, which is not active and does not feed. We analysed all available data on the duration and size of the different developmental stages and compared them in a phylogenetic context. The total duration of development was found to be strongly conserved, irrespective of geographical location, habitat type, number of instars and feeding behaviour of the larvae, with a single alteration of the developmental pattern in a clade of cave species in southeast France. We also found a strong correlation of the size of the first instar larva with adult size, again regardless of geographical location, ecology and type of life cycle. Both results suggest the presence of deeply conserved constraints in the timing and energy requirements of larval development. Past focus on more apparent changes, such as the number of larval instars, may mask more deeply conserved ontogenetic patterns in developmental timing. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Developmental constraints in cave beetles

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, Alexandra; Fresneda, Javier; Ribera, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    In insects, whilst variations in life cycles are common, the basic patterns typical for particular groups remain generally conserved. One of the more extreme modifications is found in some subterranean beetles of the tribe Leptodirini, in which the number of larval instars is reduced from the ancestral three to two and ultimately one, which is not active and does not feed. We analysed all available data on the duration and size of the different developmental stages and compared them in a phylogenetic context. The total duration of development was found to be strongly conserved, irrespective of geographical location, habitat type, number of instars and feeding behaviour of the larvae, with a single alteration of the developmental pattern in a clade of cave species in southeast France. We also found a strong correlation of the size of the first instar larva with adult size, again regardless of geographical location, ecology and type of life cycle. Both results suggest the presence of deeply conserved constraints in the timing and energy requirements of larval development. Past focus on more apparent changes, such as the number of larval instars, may mask more deeply conserved ontogenetic patterns in developmental timing. PMID:25354919

  1. The Tony Grove Karst Region in Northern Utah: From Cave Sediments to Fluvial Geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Tony Grove lake area is a dolomitic karst region in the Bear River Range of the Middle Rocky Mountain Province (Hintze, 1973; Wilson, 1976). Figure 1. The 5 km study area is strewn with boulders and consists of a combination of subsurface dissolution caves underlying the highly-eroded karst surface remnancent of past glaciation. Traces of the dynamic mountain structure can be seen in faults, fractures, and folds with the largest being the Logan Syncline (Wilson, 1976) formed during the Sevier Orogeny. The Tony Grove area stratigraphy is dominated by the Ordovician (505 MYR) Fish Haven dolomite and Silurian (438 MYR) Laketown dolomite units topped with some Devonian (406 MYR) aged inter-bedded quartzite, shale, and dolostone from the Water Canyon Formation (Morgan 1992, Spangler 2001). The 5 km study area contains over 90 karst features formed through vadose water flow due to the alpine proximity. The development and exhumation of these features have been greatly influenced over time by plate tectonics and water. We investigate cave formation and sediments as an indicator of past water flow and watershed dynamics (Figure 2). Figure 1. Site location of the Tony Grove Lake Area including an image of the karst terrain and geologic map showing the Logan Peak Syncline. The area is home to about 90 karst features inculding both dolines and caves. Figure 2. The cave sediments in this image of Thundershower Cave in the Tony Grove Lake Area show the flow pattern and a step and pool channel morphology with a side channel formed to the right during times of higher flow.

  2. The Tony Grove Karst Region in Northern Utah: From Cave Sediments to Fluvial Geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Tony Grove lake area is a dolomitic karst region in the Bear River Range of the Middle Rocky Mountain Province (Hintze 1973, Wilson 1976). The 5 km study area (Figure 1) is strewn with boulders and consists of a combination of subsurface dissolution caves underlying the highly-eroded karst surface reminiscent of past glaciation. Traces of the dynamic mountain structure can be seen in faults, fractures, and folds with the largest being the Logan Syncline (Wilson, 1976) formed during the Sevier Orogeny. The Tony Grove area stratigraphy is dominated by the Ordovician (505 MYR) Fish Haven dolomite and Silurian (438 MYR) Laketown dolomite units topped with some Devonian (406 MYR) aged inter-bedded quartzite, shale, and dolostone from the Water Canyon Formation (Morgan 1992, Spangler 2001). The 5 km study area contains over 90 karst features formed through vadose water flow due to the alpine proximity. The development and exhumation of these features have been greatly influenced over time by plate tectonics and water. We investigate cave formation and sediments as an indicator of past water flow and watershed dynamics. Figure 1. Site location of the Tony Grove lake area including an image of the karst terrain and geologic map showing the Logan Peak Syncline. The area is home to about 90 karst features including both do lines and caves. Figure 2. The cave sediments in this image of Thundershower Cave in the Tony Grove lake area show the flow pattern and a step and pool channel morphology with a side channel formed to the right during times of higher flow.

  3. PATTERNS OF ENDEMISM OF THE EASTERN NORTH AMERICAN CAVE FAUNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over 250 species of obligate terrestrial cave-dwelling animals (troglobionts) are known from single caves in the eastern United States. We investigate their geographic distribution, especially in relation to other troglobionts. We relate these patterns to taxonomic group, oppor...

  4. Preservation of Microbial-Mineral Biosignatures in Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, P. J.; Alexander, C.

    2016-05-01

    Earth caves are wonderful preservation environments for distinctive in situ biopatterns and biominerals. Several thousand volcanic caves have been detected on Mars and may contain biosignatures or extant life and are valuable future mission targets.

  5. PATTERNS OF ENDEMISM OF THE EASTERN NORTH AMERICAN CAVE FAUNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over 250 species of obligate terrestrial cave-dwelling animals (troglobionts) are known from single caves in the eastern United States. We investigate their geographic distribution, especially in relation to other troglobionts. We relate these patterns to taxonomic group, oppor...

  6. NASA Aircraft Aids Earth-Mars Cave Detection Study

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The most likely location for discovering potential primitive life forms on Mars to be in caves. A recent NASA-funded airborne and ground study designed to aid in detection of caves on the Earth, th...

  7. Some New Caves under Airport in Dubrovnik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garasic, Mladen; Garasic, Davor

    2013-04-01

    Till today six speleological sites are known to exist at the premises of the Dubrovnik Airport in Croatia. This is a highly weathered area that has been in the focus of attention of speleologists ever since the airport was built in 1961/62. Two vertical caves measuring 31 m and 10.5 m in depth were discovered at that time. These two caves are now situated right underneath the new control tower of the Dubrovnik Airport. A tunnel entrance to the cave that has been known to local population for a long time is situated in the immediate vicinity of the control tower. In late 1950's the entrance to the cave was closed with concrete because of a military airport construction, but a tunnel was built so as to enable access to the cave. The cave is about 200 meters long and it fully occupies the space underneath the concrete runways of the Dubrovnik Airport. Thanks to efforts made by speleologists in 2006-2010 the cave was adapted to enable tourist visits, and it is now the world's only tourist cave underneath an operating airport. During apron extension activities in May 2012, three additional speleological sites were discovered and examined, together with other previously discovered caves, from the standpoint of geophysics, geology and speleology. Results of exploration shows that there are several faults zones in karstified limestones. The water flow in the caverns varies depending on climatic conditions on the ground surface. Water reaches the caverns via joints directly from the ground surface (to a lesser extent) or in deeper parts via joints and paraclases from other parts of Cretaceous carbonate formations (in most cases). The weathering zone depth in the area of these speleological features, are estimated at 300 to 500 meters (included under sea levels) , and the zone of vertical circulation varies from 50 to 150 m. It is followed by the zone of horizontal circulation in which the ground water is carried via Cretaceous limestones toward submarine springs in the

  8. The influence of cave stream sediments on the transport behavior of karst springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Winkler, G.; Woessner, W.; Birk, S.

    2012-04-01

    Spring response to recharge in karst systems is influenced by the complex distribution of the rock mass hydraulic properties, fracture systems, and the presence of conduits. In addition the exchange of karst water with unconsolidated sediments in conduits may also further influence spring responses. To evaluate the effects of cave streams and sediments on solute transport in karst systems a small scale tracer experiment using fluorescein as an artificial tracer and water temperature as a natural tracer was conducted within the hyporheic zone of the active cave stream Schmelzbach. This interior stream drains parts of the Lurbach Karst System (Semriach-Peggau, Styria, Austria). The main goal of the experiment was to investigate if measurable cave stream hyporheic exchange (with the stream bottom sediments) occurs and the degree to which this process alters the transport of conservative tracers. One hundred meters downstream of the tracer injection point three cross sections of monitoring wells (9 in total along a distance of approximately 25 m) were constructed and fitted with two vertically isolated activated charcoal bags, 10 cm and 30 cm below the streambed surface. PVC monitoring wells were installed along the three cross sections using hand driven steel pipes as a temporary casing. In two of these wells temperature sensors were placed at different depths within the saturated bed sediment to investigate how post tracer test stream flood events impacted the timing and rate of stream water penetration into the bed sediments. The tracer breakthrough curve was measured with a fluorimeter located 100 m from the injection point. The results show a sharp peak and a modest tailing of the breakthrough. A one-dimensional advection dispersion model that accounts for mass transfer and storage of tracer in immobile fluid zones such as pools or sediments provides a good fit to the measured breakthrough curve. The model results suggest that immobile fluid zones amount to 40% of

  9. Solar activity influence on air temperature regimes in caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeva, Penka; Mikhalev, Alexander; Stoev, Alexey

    Cave atmospheres are generally included in the processes that happen in the external atmosphere as circulation of the cave air is connected with the most general circulation of the air in the earth’s atmosphere. Such isolated volumes as the air of caves are also influenced by the variations of solar activity. We discuss cave air temperature response to climate and solar and geomagnetic activity for four show caves in Bulgaria studied for a period of 46 years (1968 - 2013). Everyday noon measurements in Ledenika, Saeva dupka, Snezhanka and Uhlovitsa cave have been used. Temperatures of the air in the zone of constant temperatures (ZCT) are compared with surface temperatures recorded at meteorological stations situated near about the caves - in the towns of Vratsa, Lovech, Peshtera and Smolyan, respectively. For comparison, The Hansen cave, Middle cave and Timpanogos cave from the Timpanogos Cave National Monument, Utah, USA situated nearly at the same latitude have also been examined. Our study shows that the correlation between cave air temperature time series and sunspot number is better than that between the cave air temperature and Apmax indices; that t°ZCT is rather connected with the first peak in geomagnetic activity, which is associated with transient solar activity (CMEs) than with the second one, which is higher and connected with the recurrent high speed streams from coronal holes. Air temperatures of all examined show caves, except the Ledenika cave, which is ice cave show decreasing trends. On the contrary, measurements at the meteorological stations show increasing trends in the surface air temperatures. The trend is decreasing for the Timpanogos cave system, USA. The conclusion is that surface temperature trends depend on the climatic zone, in which the cave is situated, and there is no apparent relation between temperatures inside and outside the caves. We consider possible mechanism of solar cosmic rays influence on the air temperatures in caves

  10. 9. CRATER RIM DRIVE NEAR THURSTON LAVA TUBE. VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CRATER RIM DRIVE NEAR THURSTON LAVA TUBE. VIEW OF CRENELATED LAVA STONE GUARD WALL AND ROCK CUT OPPOSITE. NOTE CATTLE GUARD ACROSS ROAD PARTIALLY PAVED OVER. - Crater Rim Drive, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  11. Finding and utilizing lunar lava tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuck, David L.

    Horz describes the evidence for lava tubes associated with rills in lunar photo-imaging. These tubes have terrestrial counterparts as described by Billings, et al., and Gillet. The widths of these tubes range from 10s to 100s of meters. Their roof thickness are at least 0.125 to 0.25 times their widths and stand unsupported on the Moon. To confine one atmosphere of internal pressure, static roof thickness must be at least 16 m. Favorable locations of lava tubes may be surveyed using roving gravity meters on Doodle Bugs, which consist of platforms containing equipment for communication with Earth-based control stations. The stable -20 C temperature of the lava tubes should provide a workable habitat environment. The greater than 16 m of basalt in the roof should give adequate radiation and impact protection. Typically, after clearing entries and grading ramps, habitats might be placed in tubes and inflated. Later, larger habitats might be built by enclosing tube sections with compacted-regolith dams. The interior can then be sealed to hold an atmosphere. The huge lava tubes inferred from the photographs are capable of providing habitats hundreds of meters wide, in lengths of kilometers.

  12. Diverting lava flows in the lab

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dietterich, Hannah; Cashman, Katharine V.; Rust, Alison C.; Lev, Einat

    2015-01-01

    Recent volcanic eruptions in Hawai'i, Iceland and Cape Verde highlight the challenges of mitigating hazards when lava flows threaten infrastructure. Diversion barriers are the most common form of intervention, but historical attempts to divert lava flows have met with mixed success and there has been little systematic analysis of optimal barrier design. We examine the interaction of viscous flows of syrup and molten basalt with barriers in the laboratory. We find that flows thicken immediately upslope of an obstacle, forming a localized bow wave that can overtop barriers. Larger bow waves are generated by faster flows and by obstacles oriented at a high angle to the flow direction. The geometry of barriers also influences flow behaviour. Barriers designed to split or dam flows will slow flow advance, but cause the flow to widen, whereas oblique barriers can effectively divert flows, but may also accelerate flow advance. We argue that to be successful, mitigation of lava-flow hazards must incorporate the dynamics of lava flow–obstacle interactions into barrier design. The same generalizations apply to the effect of natural topographic features on flow geometry and advance rates.

  13. Seismogenic lavas and explosive eruption forecasting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Y; Meredith, P G; Dingwell, D B; Hess, K-U; Wassermann, J; Cordonnier, B; Gerik, A; Kruhl, J H

    2008-05-22

    Volcanic dome-building episodes commonly exhibit acceleration in both effusive discharge rate and seismicity before explosive eruptions. This should enable the application of material failure forecasting methods to eruption forecasting. To date, such methods have been based exclusively on the seismicity of the country rock. It is clear, however, that the rheology and deformation rate of the lava ultimately dictate eruption style. The highly crystalline lavas involved in these eruptions are pseudoplastic fluids that exhibit a strong component of shear thinning as their deformation accelerates across the ductile to brittle transition. Thus, understanding the nature of the ductile-brittle transition in dome lavas may well hold the key to an accurate description of dome growth and stability. Here we present the results of rheological experiments with continuous microseismic monitoring, which reveal that dome lavas are seismogenic and that the character of the seismicity changes markedly across the ductile-brittle transition until complete brittle failure occurs at high strain rates. We conclude that magma seismicity, combined with failure forecasting methods, could potentially be applied successfully to dome-building eruptions for volcanic forecasting.

  14. Early Earth: Lava Floods and Life Opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafieva, M. M.

    2017-05-01

    At the earliest stages of the Earth development, in Archean, a large part of the Earth was molten due to active volcanism and intense meteorite bombardment that ended about 4.0 GA. Stopping or weakening of the cosmic bombardment has allowed the planet to cool and form a solid crust. It is from this time geologically documented history of the Earth begins. Accordingly, the earliest Earth rocks are igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks were formed later (the oldest metasedimentary rocks - 3.7-3.85 GA). Therefore, the question of microorganism colonization of lava at the earliest stages of life evolution on the Earth is of paramount importance. A few model objects were chosen for investigation of microbial colonization of getting cold lava floods. Among them Early Protherozoic pillow-lavas of Karelia (2.41 and 2.2 GA) and South Africa (2.22 GA). Modern volcanic glasses of pillow lavas of Mid-Atlantic ridge were used as comparative material.

  15. Bellholes: Ceiling Cavities Eroded By Bats in Caves of the Neotropical Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, T.

    2014-12-01

    Hundreds of thousands of symmetrical, vertical, bullet-shaped cavities known as bellholes are present in the ceilings of caves restricted to the tropical Americas. Most have circular diameters (rarely influenced by joints or bedding) of at least 30 cm, and may be several meters in height. They are often paired with bellbasins (shallow depressions located vertically beneath them that contain guano produced by bats). Members of the species Artibeus jamaicensis (Jamaican Fruit Bat) are almost exclusive users of these roosts. Brown streaks flowing down the sides of the bellholes and centimeters-thick rinds of the basins below are largely apatite minerals produced by the reaction of the host limestone with phosphoric acids in the guano.Many bellholes have developed in speleothem in the cave ceilings, disproving early theories that they are the result of solution by phreatic currents in flooded caves. A. jamaicensis roosts singly or in harem groups of 2-14 that commonly cluster in the bellholes and it is likely that these social habits of this species focus corrosion resulting from the transfer of feces to rock (producing altered rock then removed by claws) to create discretely-spaced upward-growing cavities. Fossil evidence from Jamaica supports an arrival there from the mainland in the past 12,000 years, suggesting bellholes and bellbasins are geologically recent features in the Caribbean islands. Their locations (not all cave passages have bellholes) can provide information on the hydrological history or microclimate of a cave, due to the absence of both bellholes and bats in some specific situations, e.g. where physical barriers exist such as sumps, small airspaces above streams or through rock collapses, or with increasing distance from an entrance.Smaller circular, increasingly-indented ceiling cavities demonstrate a sequence of bellhole development. Small (23 cm diameter, 9 cm high), circular, streaked cavities in a limestone drainage tunnel constructed in 1927 in

  16. Circulation patterns in active lava lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, T. C.; Lev, E.

    2014-12-01

    Active lava lakes provide a unique window into magmatic conduit processes. We investigated circulation patterns of 4 active lava lakes: Kilauea's Halemaumau crater, Mount Erebus, Erta Ale and Nyiragongo, and in an artificial "lava lake" constructed at the Syracuse University Lava Lab. We employed visual and thermal video recordings collected at these volcanoes and use computer vision techniques to extract time-dependent, two-dimensional surface velocity maps. The large amount of data available from Halemaumau enabled us to identify several characteristic circulation patterns. One such pattern is a rapid acceleration followed by rapid deceleration, often to a level lower than the pre-acceleration level, and then a slow recovery. Another pattern is periodic asymmetric peaks of gradual acceleration and rapid deceleration, or vice versa, previously explained by gas pistoning. Using spectral analysis, we find that the dominant period of circulation cycles at approximately 30 minutes, 3 times longer than the dominant period identified previously for Mount Erebus. Measuring a complete surface velocity field allowed us to map and follow locations of divergence and convergence, therefore upwelling and downwelling, thus connecting the surface flow with that at depth. At Nyiragongo, the location of main upwelling shifts gradually, yet is usually at the interior of the lake, for Erebus it is usually along the perimeter yet often there is catastrophic downwelling at the interior; For Halemaumau upwelling/downwelling position is almost always on the perimeter. In addition to velocity fields, we developed an automated tool for counting crustal plates at the surface of the lava lakes, and found a correlation, and a lag time, between changes if circulation vigor and the average size of crustal plates. Circulation in the artificial basaltic lava "lake" was limited by its size and degree of foaming, yet we measured surface velocities and identify patterns. Maximum surface velocity

  17. Lava Flows in the Grand Canyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Over vast expanses of time, natural processes like floods and volcanoes deposit layers of rock on the Earth's surface. To delve down through layers of rock is to explore our planet's history. Sometimes rock layers are exposed through human activity, such as drilling or excavation. Other times, rivers carve through the rock. One of the best, and most well-known, examples of a river exposing ancient rocks is Colorado River in Arizona's Grand Canyon. What fewer people know is that the Grand Canyon also has a history of relatively recent (on geologic time scales) volcanism. The evidence--hardened lava--spills down the canyon walls all the way to the river. On June 22, 2003, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of the Grand Canyon, near 36.2 degrees north latitude and 113.2 degrees west longitude. ASTER detects light visible to human eyes as well as 'invisible' infrared light. Because different minerals reflect different portions of the light spectrum, ASTER can see varying mineral compositions of the rocks it observes, as well as detecting vegetation. In this three-dimensional visualization, lava fields appear brownish gray, darker than the layers of limestone, sandstone and other rock in the canyon. Vegetation appears green, and sparsely vegetated areas appear mustard. Water in the Colorado River is blue-purple. Geologists estimate that between 1.8 million and 400,000 years ago, lava flows actually dammed the Colorado River more than a dozen times. Some of the lava dams were as high as 600 meters (about 1,969 feet), forming immense reservoirs. Over time, enough water and sediment built up to push the river flow over the tops of these dams and eventually erode them away. Today, remnants of these lava dams remain throughout the area, along with the much older rock layers they cover. Among the most well known examples of these 'frozen' lava cascades is Lava Falls, which spills down to the

  18. Introduction to Bed Bugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... preventing infestations, increased resistance of bed bugs to pesticides, and ineffective pest control practices. The good news ... Bed Bugs — Do-it-yourself Bed Bug Control — Pesticides to Control Bed Bugs Bed Bug Information Clearinghouse ...

  19. Toothpaste lava: Characteristics and origin of a lava structural type transitional between pahoehoe and aa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, Scott K.; Walker, George P. L.

    1987-08-01

    Toothpaste lava, an important basalt structural type which illustrates the transition from pahoehoe to aa, is particularly well displayed on the 1960 Kapoho lava of Kilauea Volcano. Its transitional features stem from a viscosity higher than that of pahoehoe and a rate of flow slower than that of aa. Viscosity can be quantified by the limited settling of olivine phenocrysts and rate of flow by field observations related to the low-angle slope on which the lava flowed. Much can be learned about the viscosity, rheologic condition, and flow velocity of lavas long after solidification by analyses of their structural characteristics, and it is possible to make at least a semiquantitative assessment of the numerical values of these parameters.

  20. 36 CFR 7.68 - Russell Cave National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Russell Cave National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.68 Russell Cave National Monument. (a) Caves—(1) Closed Areas. Entering, exploring, or remaining within any cave area other than the public...

  1. Parallel speciation in Astyanax cave fish (Teleostei) in Northern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Strecker, Ulrike; Hausdorf, Bernhard; Wilkens, Horst

    2012-01-01

    We investigated differentiation processes in the Neotropical fish Astyanax that represents a model system for examining adaptation to caves, including regressive evolution. In particular, we analyzed microsatellite and mitochondrial data of seven cave and seven surface populations from Mexico to test whether the evolution of the cave fish represents a case of parallel evolution. Our data revealed that Astyanax invaded northern Mexico across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt at least three times and that populations of all three invasions adapted to subterranean habitats. Significant differentiation was found between the cave and surface populations. We did not observe gene flow between the strongly eye and pigment reduced old cave populations (Sabinos, Tinaja, Pachon) and the surface fish, even when syntopically occurring like in Yerbaniz cave. Little gene flow, if any, was found between cave populations, which are variable in eye and pigmentation (Micos, Chica, Caballo Moro caves), and surface fish. This suggests that the variability is due to their more recent origin rather than to hybridization. Finally, admixture of the young Chica cave fish population with nuclear markers from older cave fish demonstrates that gene flow between populations that independently colonized caves occurs. Thus, all criteria of parallel speciation are fulfilled. Moreover, the microsatellite data provide evidence that two co-occurring groups with small sunken eyes and externally visible eyes, respectively, differentiated within the partly lightened Caballo Moro karst window cave and might represent an example for incipient sympatric speciation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 36 CFR 7.68 - Russell Cave National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Russell Cave National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.68 Russell Cave National Monument. (a) Caves—(1) Closed Areas. Entering, exploring, or remaining within any cave area other than the public...

  3. 36 CFR 7.68 - Russell Cave National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Russell Cave National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.68 Russell Cave National Monument. (a) Caves—(1) Closed Areas. Entering, exploring, or remaining within any cave area other than the public...

  4. 36 CFR 7.68 - Russell Cave National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Russell Cave National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.68 Russell Cave National Monument. (a) Caves—(1) Closed Areas. Entering, exploring, or remaining within any cave area other than the public...

  5. 75 FR 4417 - Wind Cave National Park, Custer County, SD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... Wind Cave National Park, Custer County, SD AGENCY: National Park Service. ACTION: Notice of... Statement, Wind Cave National Park, Custer County, South Dakota. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 102(2)(C) of... Environmental Impact Statement (Plan), Wind Cave National Park, Custer County, South Dakota. On December 3,...

  6. Imaging of a lava dome in Unzen, Japan and a shallow conduit in Stromboli, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Bozza, C.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Kose, U.; Lauria, A.; Montesi, C.; Naganawa, N.; Pupilli, F.; Rescigno, R.; Russo, A.; Sirignano, C.; Stellacci, S. M.; Strolin, P.; Tanaka, H.; Tioukov, V.

    2012-12-01

    The latest lava dome in Mt. Unzen was formed in the eruption from January 1991 to early 1995 and the activity was calmed down in 1995. The researchers kept to observe the eruption in this period precisely. Some of them proposed the growth model, another person proposed different model from their data[1,2]. It is significant for the growth model and the landslide prediction to investigate the density structure in the lava dome. The observation of the lava dome density 2D map was performed by using cosmic-ray muon and muon detector in Unzen. The muon detector, nuclear emulsion films which has high position resolution and 0.85m2 effective areas, was installed in a natural cave from early December 2010 to the end of March. The developed nuclear emulsion films have been scanned by automated muon readout system. The systematic analysis of efficiency and random noise ratio estimation are performed by taking a pattern match and making a connection of muon tracks between several films. Stromboli is one of the Aeolian Islands, which is located at a volcanic arc north of Sicily Island Italy. 1.0m2 nuclear emulsion films were installed at the site which is 500m far from active volcanic conduit. The shape of volcanic conduit is critical information to the study of the dynamics of eruption. After three month exposure, the films were developed and we started to analyze them in the beginning of May 2012. We will report the results of Unzen and Stromboli.

  7. Identifying hazards associated with lava deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.

    2014-12-01

    Lava deltas, formed where lava enters the ocean and builds a shelf of new land extending from the coastline, represent a significant local hazard, especially on populated ocean island volcanoes. Such structures are unstable and prone to collapse—events that are often accompanied by small explosions that can deposit boulders and cobbles hundreds of meters inland. Explosions that coincide with collapses of the East Lae `Apuki lava delta at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i, during 2005-2007 followed an evolutionary progression mirroring that of the delta itself. A collapse that occurred when the lava-ocean entry was active was associated with a blast of lithic blocks and dispersal of spatter and fine, glassy tephra. Shortly after delta growth ceased, a collapse exposed hot rock to cold ocean water, resulting in an explosion composed entirely of lithic blocks and lapilli. Further collapse of the delta after several months of inactivity, by which time it had cooled significantly, resulted in no recognizable explosion deposit. Seaward displacement and subsidence of the coastline immediately inland of the delta was measured by both satellite and ground-based sensors and occurred at rates of several centimeters per month even after the lava-ocean entry had ceased. The anomalous deformation ended only after complete collapse of the delta. Monitoring of ground deformation may therefore provide an indication of the potential for delta collapse, while the hazard associated with collapse can be inferred from the level of activity, or the time since the last activity, on the delta.

  8. Emplacing a cooling-limited rhyolite lava flow: similarities with basaltic lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnall, Nathan; James, Mike R.; Tuffen, Hugh; Vye-Brown, Charlotte

    2017-06-01

    Accurate forecasts of lava flow length rely on estimates of eruption and magma properties and, potentially more challengingly, an understanding of the relative influence of characteristics such as the apparent viscosity, the yield strength of the flow core, or the strength of the surface crust. Consequently, even the most straightforward models of lava advance involve sufficient parameters that constraints can be relatively easily fitted within the uncertainties involved, at the expense of gaining insight. Here, for the first time, we incorporate morphological observations from during and after flow field evolution to improve model constraints and reduce uncertainties. After demonstrating the approach on a basaltic lava flow (Mt. Etna, 2001), we apply it to the 2011-12 Cordón Caulle rhyolite flow, where unprecedented observations and syn-emplacement satellite imagery of an advancing silica-rich lava flow have indicated an important crustal influence on flow emplacement. Our results show that an initial phase of viscosity-controlled advance at Cordón Caulle was followed by later crustal control, accompanied by formation of flow surface folds and large-scale crustal fractures. Where the lava was unconstrained by topography, the cooled crust ultimately halted advance of the main flow and led to the formation of breakouts from the flow front and margins, influencing the footprint of the lava, its advance rate, and the duration of flow advance. Highly similar behaviour occurred in the 2001 Etna basaltic lava flow. The processes controlling the advance of crystal-poor rhyolite and basaltic lava flow therefore appear similar, indicating common controlling mechanisms that transcend profound rheological and compositional differences.

  9. Ridge-like lava tube systems in southeast Tharsis, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiannan; Huang, Jun; Kraft, Michael D.; Xiao, Long; Jiang, Yun

    2017-10-01

    Lava tubes are widely distributed in volcanic fields on a planetary surface and they are important means of lava transportation. We have identified 38 sinuous ridges with a lava-tube origin in southeast Tharsis. The lengths vary between 14 and 740 km, and most of them occur in areas with slopes < 0.3°. We analyzed their geomorphology in detail with CTX (Context Camera) and HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) images and DTM (digital terrain model) derived from them. We identified three cross-sectional shapes of these sinuous ridges: round-crested, double-ridged, and flat-crested and described features associated with the lava tubes, including branches, axial cracks, collapsed pits, breakout lobes, and tube-fed lava deltas. Age determination results showed that most of the lava tubes formed in Late Hesperian and were active until the Hesperian-Amazonian boundary. We proposed that these lava tubes formed at relatively low local flow rate, low lava viscosity, and sustained magma supply during a long period. Besides, lava flow inflation is also important in the formation of the ridge-like lava tubes and some associated features. These lava tubes provide efficient lateral pathways for magma transportation over the relatively low topographic slopes in southeast Tharsis, and they are important for the formation of long lava flows in this region. The findings of this study provide an alternative formation mechanism for sinuous ridges on the martian surface.

  10. Metabolically active Crenarchaeota in Altamira Cave.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Juan M; Portillo, M Carmen; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2006-01-01

    Altamira Cave contains valuable paleolithic paintings dating back to 15,000 years. The conservation of these unique paintings is attracting increasing interest, and so, understanding microbial proliferation in Altamira Cave represents a prioritary objective. Here, we show for the first time that members of the Crenarchaeota were metabolically active components of developing microbial communities. RNA was extracted directly from the studied environment, and a number of 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the low-temperature Crenarchaeota were detected. Although low-temperature Crenarchaeota detected in a variety of ecosystems by using molecular techniques remain uncultured, this RNA-based study confirms an active participation of the Crenarchaeota in cave biogeochemical cycles.

  11. Meckel's cave meningiomas with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, G A; Herz, D A; Leeds, N; Strully, K

    1975-06-01

    Two patients with Meckel's Cave meningiomas were initially hospitalized as a result of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Four-vessel angiography was necessary to exclude other causes of bleeding while demonstrating these lesions. Apoplectic presentation in both cases led to early diagnosis and successful surgical therapy. A review of the literature reveals subarachnoid hemorrhage to be a rarity in association with meningiomas. The two patients currently reported are believed to be the only examples on record of hemorrhagic meningiomas arising from the region of Meckel's Cave.

  12. Field and Lava Flow Experiment Analysis of Vesicle Deformation as a Means of Determining Ancient Flow Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McColl, B.; Teasdale, R.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this work is to test whether flow direction of ancient lavas can be determined from orientations of preserved vesicles. We have attempted to correlate field observations with lab experiments as a means of understanding the development of deformed vesicles. This work focuses on vesicles deformed parallel to the lava flow direction. On a fieldtrip, we observed deformed vesicles in basaltic lava flows at cinder cones in the Coso Volcanic Field. Other basalt flows with similarly deformed vesicles are also documented in the Lovejoy Basalt (Chico, CA) and in flows at Lava Beds National Monument, Medicine Lake Volcanic Field. We believe that the vesicles were deformed during lava flow emplacement and cooling. Analog flow experiments used materials with Newtonian behavior (honey, syrup) but Bingham fluid behavior is more similar to natural lavas so gelatin was also attempted. Experiments started with the analog fluids on a horizontal surface. Air was then injected into the fluids with a hypodermic needle and then the surface was inclined to approximately 4-5 degrees. The deformation of the bubbles in the analog fluids was recorded with digital photos taken from above the flows. In some cases, bubbles rose to the surface of the flow and were not deformed parallel to the flow direction. In other cases, bubbles were deformed and we recorded a bulbous end and elongate tail parallel to the flow direction. In all cases the bulbous end of deformed vesicles are directed down stream and a tail stretches behind. Honey best preserved vesicle deformation. Bubbles in syrup rose to the surface too quickly to document (even when syrup was chilled). Air injected into gelatin caused shear, releasing the air without forming bubbles. Future work will address analog material issues by using wax or polyethylene glycol (PEG). These materials are likely to better represent rheologies of basalt lavas during flow emplacement.

  13. Emplacement of a silicic lava dome through a crater glacier: Mount St Helens, 2004-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walder, J.S.; LaHusen, R.G.; Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    The process of lava-dome emplacement through a glacier was observed for the first time after Mount St Helens reawakened in September 2004. The glacier that had grown in the crater since the cataclysmic 1980 eruption was split in two by the new lava dome. The two parts of the glacier were successively squeezed against the crater wall. Photography, photogrammetry and geodetic measurements document glacier deformation of an extreme variety, with strain rates of extraordinary magnitude as compared to normal alpine glaciers. Unlike normal temperate glaciers, the crater glacier shows no evidence of either speed-up at the beginning of the ablation season or diurnal speed fluctuations during the ablation season. Thus there is evidently no slip of the glacier over its bed. The most reasonable explanation for this anomaly is that meltwater penetrating the glacier is captured by a thick layer of coarse rubble at the bed and then enters the volcano's groundwater system rather than flowing through a drainage network along the bed.

  14. Ice-Confined Basaltic Lava Flows: Review and Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilling, I.; Edwards, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    Basaltic lavas that are interpreted as having been emplaced in subglacial or ice-confined subaerial settings are known from several localities in Iceland, British Columbia and Antarctica. At least four different types of observations have been used to date to identify emplacement of basaltic lavas in an ice-rich environment: i) gross flow morphology, ii) surface structures, iii) evidence for ice-confined water during emplacement, and iv) lava fracture patterns. Five types of ice-confined lava are identified: sheets, lobes, mounds, linear ridges and sinuous ridges. While the appearance of lavas is controlled by the same factors as in the submarine environment, such as the geometry and configuration of vents and lava tubes, flow rheology and rates, and underlying topography, the presence of ice can lead to distinct features that are specific to the ice-confined setting. Other types have very similar or identical equivalents in submarine environment, albeit with some oversteepening/ice contact surfaces. Ice-confined lavas can form as (1) subaerial or subaqueous lavas emplaced against ice open to the air, (2) subaqueous lavas emplaced into pre-existing sub-ice drainage networks, and (3) subaqueous lavas emplaced into ponded water beneath ice. Their surface structures reflect the relationship between rates of lava flow emplacement at the site of ice-water-lava contact, ice melting and water drainage. Variations in local lava flow rates could be due to lava cooling, constriction, inflation, tube development, ice melting, ice collapse, lava collapse, changes in eruption rate etc. Episodes of higher lava flow rate would favour direct ice contact and plastic compression against the ice, generating oversteepened and/or overthickened chilled margins, cavities in the lava formed by melting of enveloped ice blocks (cryolith cavities) and structures such as flattened pillows and lava clasts embedded into the glassy margins. Melting back of the confining ice generates space to

  15. Underwater observations of active lava flows from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tribble, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    Underwater observation of active submarine lava flows from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, in March-June 1989 revealed both pillow lava and highly channelized lava streams flowing down a steep and unconsolidated lava delta. The channelized streams were 0.7-1.5 m across and moved at rates of 1-3 m/s. The estimated flux of a stream was 0.7 m3/s. Jets of hydrothermal water and gas bubbles were associated with the volcanic activity. The rapidly moving channelized lava streams represent a previously undescribed aspect of submarine volcanism. -Author

  16. Modelling the emplacement of compound lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, S.; Bruno, B. C.

    2000-12-01

    The physical variables controlling crust-dominated lava flow have been investigated using laboratory experiments in which molten polyglycol wax was extruded from a point source on to a horizontal plane under cold water. The wax initially spread axisymmetrically and a crust of solid wax grew. Eventually wax broke out from the flow's periphery, sending out a flow lobe which in turn cooled and produced another breakout. The process repeated itself many times, building a 'compound lava'. The time for the first breakout to form correlates well with the theoretically predicted time ( tc) required for cooling to form a crust thick enough for its strength to limit the flow's spreading rate. This time is proportional to the product of effusion rate ( Q) and initial magma viscosity ( μ) and inversely proportional to the square of the crust strength at the flow front. The number of flow units and the apparent fractal dimension of the flow perimeter increase with time normalised by tc. Our model illuminates the physical basis for the observation by Walker [G.P.L. Walker, Bull. Volcanol. 35 (1972) 579-590] that compound lava flows form by slow effusion of low viscosity magma, whereas faster effusion and higher viscosity favour lavas with fewer flow units. Because compound flows require t≫ tc, and given that tc∝ Qμ and the relationship between volume and effusion rate is V= Qt, simple and compound lava flows are predicted to fall in separate fields on a graph of μ against V/ Q2, all else being equal. Compound flows plot at small values of μ and large values of V/ Q2, with the position of the simple/compound boundary defined by field data implying a crust strength of order 10 4 Pa for basaltic to intermediate lavas. Whether a flow remains as a simple flow or matures into a compound flow field depends on the combined effect of viscosity, eruption rate and eruption duration (and hence volume) and these parameters need to be taken in to account when using morphology to infer

  17. ACCESS MARS: Study of the viability of Mars Caves as an alternative to surface-based habitation solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Poch, Antoni; Laufer, Ren; Zavaleta, Jhony; Davila, Alfonso; Gallardo, Beatriz; Antonakopoulos, Konstantinos; de Carufel, Guy

    This paper summarizes a team project report that was produced during the Summer Space Program of the International Space University, held at NASA-Ames Research Center (CA, USA), by 56 students from 15 countries. Chair of the team project was René Laufer. Facilitators were Alfonso Dévila and Jhonny Zavaleta, and teacher associate supporting the team was a Beatriz Gallardo. Currently proposed Mars missions have identified a number of challenges such as high levels of radiation, harsh climate and limited launch windows. Recently discovered lava tubes on Mars present potential solutions to some of these issues, but raise a variety of intriguing new challenges. These encompass not only technological and engineering considerations, but also legal, ethical and societal issues such as planetary protection and crew safety. This paper assesses the feasibility of overcoming such challenges through the exploitation of Mars caves. Cave suitability is considered with respect to size, type, location and their potential to mitigate hazards. They are also assessed with respect to their potential for scientific work adhering to astrobiology guidelines and the search for extra-terrestrial life. This report compares surface and subsurface habitat options. Engineering challenges arising from the use of caves are addressed along with proposals for alternate architecture solutions. Different types of habitat are described and evaluated. The implications of sub-surface operations on thermal control, communications and power systems are investigated, and recommendations given. Crew selection, training methods and life support system solutions are also addressed. A Mission architecture analysis from the same Team Project is given in another paper from the same authors, at COSPAR 2010 B02 Technical Session. The ACCESS Mars Team concludes that using lava tubes as human habitats is not merely a viable habitat solution for a Mars expedition, but also potentially more beneficial than proposed

  18. Is radon emission in caves causing deletions in satellite DNA sequences of cave-dwelling crickets?

    PubMed

    Allegrucci, Giuliana; Sbordoni, Valerio; Cesaroni, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    The most stable isotope of radon, 222Rn, represents the major source of natural radioactivity in confined environments such as mines, caves and houses. In this study, we explored the possible radon-related effects on the genome of Dolichopoda cave crickets (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae) sampled in caves with different concentrations of radon. We analyzed specimens from ten populations belonging to two genetically closely related species, D. geniculata and D. laetitiae, and explored the possible association between the radioactivity dose and the level of genetic polymorphism in a specific family of satellite DNA (pDo500 satDNA). Radon concentration in the analyzed caves ranged from 221 to 26,000 Bq/m3. Specimens coming from caves with the highest radon concentration showed also the highest variability estimates in both species, and the increased sequence heterogeneity at pDo500 satDNA level can be explained as an effect of the mutation pressure induced by radon in cave. We discovered a specific category of nuclear DNA, the highly repetitive satellite DNA, where the effects of the exposure at high levels of radon-related ionizing radiation are detectable, suggesting that the satDNA sequences might be a valuable tool to disclose harmful effects also in other organisms exposed to high levels of radon concentration.

  19. Is Radon Emission in Caves Causing Deletions in Satellite DNA Sequences of Cave-Dwelling Crickets?

    PubMed Central

    Allegrucci, Giuliana; Sbordoni, Valerio; Cesaroni, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    The most stable isotope of radon, 222Rn, represents the major source of natural radioactivity in confined environments such as mines, caves and houses. In this study, we explored the possible radon-related effects on the genome of Dolichopoda cave crickets (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae) sampled in caves with different concentrations of radon. We analyzed specimens from ten populations belonging to two genetically closely related species, D. geniculata and D. laetitiae, and explored the possible association between the radioactivity dose and the level of genetic polymorphism in a specific family of satellite DNA (pDo500 satDNA). Radon concentration in the analyzed caves ranged from 221 to 26000 Bq/m3. Specimens coming from caves with the highest radon concentration showed also the highest variability estimates in both species, and the increased sequence heterogeneity at pDo500 satDNA level can be explained as an effect of the mutation pressure induced by radon in cave. We discovered a specific category of nuclear DNA, the highly repetitive satellite DNA, where the effects of the exposure at high levels of radon-related ionizing radiation are detectable, suggesting that the satDNA sequences might be a valuable tool to disclose harmful effects also in other organisms exposed to high levels of radon concentration. PMID:25822625

  20. Instrumenting caves to collect hydrologic and geochemical data: case study from James Cave, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreiber, Madeline E.; Schwartz, Benjamin F.; Orndorff, William; Doctor, Daniel H.; Eagle, Sarah D.; Gerst, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Karst aquifers are productive groundwater systems, supplying approximately 25 % of the world’s drinking water. Sustainable use of this critical water supply requires information about rates of recharge to karst aquifers. The overall goal of this project is to collect long-term, high-resolution hydrologic and geochemical datasets at James Cave, Virginia, to evaluate the quantity and quality of recharge to the karst system. To achieve this goal, the cave has been instrumented for continuous (10-min interval) measurement of the (1) temperature and rate of precipitation; (2) temperature, specific conductance, and rate of epikarst dripwater; (3) temperature of the cave air; and (4) temperature, conductivity, and discharge of the cave stream. Instrumentation has also been installed to collect both composite and grab samples of precipitation, soil water, the cave stream, and dripwater for geochemical analysis. This chapter provides detailed information about the instrumentation, data processing, and data management; shows examples of collected datasets; and discusses recommendations for other researchers interested in hydrologic and geochemical monitoring of cave systems. Results from the research, briefly described here and discussed in more detail in other publications, document a strong seasonality of the start of the recharge season, the extent of the recharge season, and the geochemistry of recharge.

  1. Helium Isotopes and Noble Gas Abundances of Cave Dripping Water in Three Caves in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. T.; Shen, C. C.; Tan, M.; Li, T.; Uemura, R.; Asami, R.

    2015-12-01

    Paleo-temperature recorded in nature archives is a critical parameter to understand climate change in the past. With advantages of unique inert chemical characteristics and sensitive solubilities with temperature, dissolved noble gases in speleothem inclusion water were recently proposed to retrieve terrestrial temperature history. In order to accurately apply this newly-developed speleothem noble gas temperature (NGT) as a reliable proxy, a fundamental issue about behaviors of noble gases in the karst should be first clarified. In this study, we measured noble gas contents in air and dripping water to evaluate any ratio deviation between noble gases. Cave dripping water samples was collected from three selected caves, Shihua Cave in northern China, Furong Cave in southwestern, and Gyukusen Cave in an island located in the western Pacific. For these caves are characterized by a thorough mixing and long-term storage of waters in a karst aquifer by the absence of seasonal oxygen isotope shifts. Ratios of dripping water noble gases are statistically insignificant from air data. Helium isotopic ratios in the dripping water samples match air value. The results indicate that elemental and isotopic signatures of noble gases from air can be frankly preserved in the epikarst and support the fidelity of NGT techniques.

  2. Lava and Snow on Klyuchevskaya Volcano [detail

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    This false-color (shortwave infrared, near infrared, green) satellite image reveals an active lava flow on the western slopes of Klyuchevskaya Volcano. Klyuchevskaya is one of several active volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula in far eastern Russia. The lava flow itself is bright red. Snow on Klyuchevskaya and nearby mountains is cyan, while bare ground and volcanic debris is gray or brown. Vegetation is green. The image was collected by Landsat 8 on September 9, 2013. NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using Instrument: Landsat 8 - OLI More info: 1.usa.gov/1evspH7 NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  3. Cooling of Kilauea Iki lava lake

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, R.G.

    1982-02-01

    In 1959 Kilauea Iki erupted leaving a 110 to 120 m lake of molten lava in its crater. The resulting lava lake has provided a unique opportunity to study the cooling dynamics of a molten body and its associated hydrothermal system. Field measurements taken at Kilauea Iki indicate that the hydrothermal system above the cooling magma body goes through several stages, some of which are well modeled analytically. Field measurements also indicate that during most of the solidification period of the lake, cooling from above is controlled by 2-phase convection while conduction dominates the cooling of the lake from below. A summary of the field work related to the study of the cooling dynamics of Kilauea Iki is presented. Quantitative and qualitative cooling models for the lake are discussed.

  4. Support of LAVA Integration and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Marcus Algernon

    2014-01-01

    The Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is a part of the Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Analysis (RESOLVE) Payload that will fly to the lunar pole on the Resource Prospector Mission (RPM) in 2019. The purpose of the mission is to characterize the water on the surface and subsurface of the moon in various locations in order to map the distribution. This characterization of water will help to understand how feasible water is as a resource that can be used for drinking water, breathable air, and propellants in future missions. This paper describes the key support activities performed during a 10 week internship; specifically, troubleshooting the Near Infrared Spectrometer for the Surge Tank (NIRST) instrument count loss, contributing to a clamp to be used in the installation of Resistive Temperature Detectors (RTDs) to tubing, performing a failure analysis of the LAVA Fluid Subsystem (FSS), and finalizing trade studies for release.

  5. Voluminous submarine lava flows from Hawaiian volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, R.T.; Moore, J.G.; Lipman, P.W.; Belderson, R.H.

    1988-05-01

    The GLORIA long-range sonar imaging system has revealed fields of large lava flows in the Hawaiian Trough east and south of Hawaii in water as deep as 5.5 km. Flows in the most extensive field (110 km long) have erupted from the deep submarine segment of Kilauea's east rift zone. Other flows have been erupted from Loihi and Mauna Loa. This discovery confirms a suspicion, long held from subaerial studies, that voluminous submarine flows are erupted from Hawaiian volcanoes, and it supports an inference that summit calderas repeatedly collapse and fill at intervals of centuries to millenia owing to voluminous eruptions. These extensive flows differ greatly in form from pillow lavas found previously along shallower segments of the rift zones; therefore, revision of concepts of volcano stratigraphy and structure may be required.

  6. Community Action Volunteers in Education (CAVE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerville, Janet R.

    The Community Action Volunteers in Education (CAVE), which is described in this report, is a co-curricular learning, non-profit agency offering over 16 programs to children, the elderly, special populations, and low-income residents in the Chico, California, area and in three state institutions in the Napa and Sonoma Valleys. Based at California…

  7. Meckel's cave tuberculoma with unusual infratemporal extension.

    PubMed

    Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Somasundaram, S; Rao, Ravi M; Radhakrishnan, V V

    2007-07-01

    The authors describe a rare case of intracranial tuberculoma of the Meckel's cave and cavernous sinus with extension into the infratemporal fossa causing widening of the foramen ovale and adjacent bone destruction. The rarity of the lesion and the unusual extension of the lesion are presented with a brief review of literature.

  8. Xanthoma in Meckel's cave. A case report.

    PubMed

    Kimura, H; Oka, K; Nakayama, Y; Tomonaga, M

    1991-04-01

    A case of xanthoma located within Meckel's cave and the semilunar ganglion is described in a patient with a trigeminal nerve deficit. This is the first case of xanthoma in such a location. The distinctive morphological appearance is illustrated and the possible histogenesis is discussed.

  9. Magnetostratigraphy of cave sediments, Wyandotte Ridge, Crawford County, southern Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, P.P.; Gomez, B. . Dept. of Geography and Geology); Schmidt, V.A. . Dept. of Geology and Planetary Science)

    1992-01-01

    The field polarities of 42 sediment samples obtained from 21 sites in Wyandotte Cave, and five smaller satellite caves in Wyandotte Ridge, southern Indiana, have been determined and correlated with magnetostratigraphic data from Mammoth Cave, Kentucky. In Wyandotte Cave sediment samples obtained between 137 m and 162 m in elevation possessed a normal field polarity, while samples obtained between 168 m and 171 m exhibited a field reversal. The reversal was interpreted to represent the most recent polarity change, dating the sediment fill and the end of the active period of the upper level of Wyandotte Cave at ca 0.788 Ma. There is a temporal correlation between the active period of the upper level in Wyandotte Cave and the C-level in Mammoth Cave, which lies at a similar elevation. Such a correlation is most likely a consequence of the contemporaneous abandonment of passages in the two cave systems during the early Pleistocene reconstruction of the Ohio River system, which acts as the base level control in both caves. Samples from two caves near the top of Wyandotte Ridge, located between elevations of 236 m and 241 m, exhibited a normal polarity. These caves are located at a higher elevation than any of the sample sites in Mammoth Cave and their location suggests that the fill predates sediments from that system. It appears most likely that the fill in these caves is a minimum of ca 2.48 Ma. old and correlates with the residuum of the upper Mitchell Plain surface, not with the fill in the upper (A- or B-levels) in Mammoth Cave.

  10. Geothermometry of Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helz, R.T.; Thornber, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Data on the variation of temperature with time and in space are essential to a complete understanding of the crystallization history of basaltic magma in Kilauea Iki lava lake. Methods used to determine temperatures in the lake have included direct, downhole thermocouple measurements and Fe-Ti oxide geothermometry. In addition, the temperature variations of MgO and CaO contents of glasses, as determined in melting experiments on appropriate Kilauean samples, have been calibrated for use as purely empirical geothermometers and are directly applicable to interstitial glasses in olivine-bearing core from Kilauea Iki. The uncertainty in inferred quenching temperatures is ??8-10?? C. Comparison of the three methods shows that (1) oxide and glass geothermometry give results that are consistent with each other and consistent with the petrography and relative position of samples, (2) downhole thermo-couple measurements are low in all but the earliest, shallowest holes because the deeper holes never completely recover to predrilling temperatures, (3) glass geothermometry provides the greatest detail on temperature profiles in the partially molten zone, much of which is otherwise inaccessible, and (4) all three methods are necessary to construct a complete temperature profile for any given drill hole. Application of glass-based geothermometry to partially molten drill core recovered in 1975-1981 reveals in great detail the variation of temperature, in both time and space, within the partially molten zone of Kilauea Iki lava lake. The geothermometers developed here are also potentially applicable to glassy samples from other Kilauea lava lakes and to rapidly quenched lava samples from eruptions of Kilauea and Mauna Loa. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Kilauea Iki lava lake experiment plans

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.; Hills, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    Twelve experimental studies are proposed to complete field laboratory work at Kilauea Iki lava lake. Of these twelve experiments, eleven do not require the presence of melt. Some studies are designed to use proven techniques in order to expand our existing knowledge, while others are designed to test new concepts. Experiments are grouped into three main categories: geophysics, energy extraction, and drilling technology. Each experiment is described in terms of its location, purpose, background, configuration, operation, and feasibility.

  12. Flow and convective cooling in lava tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Zuber, M. T.

    1998-11-01

    Tube-fed basaltic lava flows with lengths ranging from 10 to 200 km are inferred to exhibit similar amounts of cooling. To explain the wide range of implied cooling rates, we consider forced convection as a dominant cooling process in lava tubes and present solutions that express mean temperature versus distance down the tube as a function of flow rate and flow cross section. Our models treat forced convective thermal losses in steady laminar flow through a lava tube with constant temperature walls and constant material properties. We explore the effects of different wall temperature and heat flux rate boundary conditions for circular tube and parallel plate flows over a range of tube sizes, plate spacings, eruption temperatures, and volume flow rates. Results show that nonlinear cooling rates over distance are characteristic of constant wall temperature for a piecewise parallel plate/circular tube model. This provides the best fit to temperature observations for Hawaiian tubes. Such a model may also provide an explanation for the very low (˜10°C) cooling observed in ˜10 km long Hawaii tube flows and inferred in longer ˜50 to 150 km tube-fed flows in Queensland. The forced convective cooling model may also explain similar flow morphologies for long tube-fed basaltic lava flows in a wide variety of locations, since small variations in eruption temperature or flow rate can accommodate the entire range of flow lengths and cooling rates considered. Our results are consistent with previous suggestions that long basaltic flows may be a reflection of low slopes, a particularly steady moderate eruption rate, and well-insulated flow, rather than of high discharge rates.

  13. The Crystals Cave in a test tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, C.; Romero, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    It's quite easy to understand formation of crystals in Nature by evaporation of the solutions that contain minerals, but many times we have realised that our pupils hardly understand that precipitation is a process mostly caused by changing parameters in a solution, like pH, temperature, etc. and not necessarily depending on evaporation. We propose a hands-on activity using the context of the Cave of the Crystals in Naica's mine, Mexico. The Crystals Cave is a wonderful place where giant crystals of selenite (gypsum) have grown feeding from a supersaturated anhydrite solution1. Miners discovered the cave filled with hot water, and drained it to explore the gallery. The cave is now a giant laboratory where scientists are looking for the keys to understand geological processes. Teaching sequence (for students 15 years old) is as follows: DISCOVERING A MARVELLOUS PLACE: We showed our pupils several images and a short video of the Cave of the Crystals and ask them about the process that may have caused the phenomenon. Whole-class discussion. PRESENTING A CHALLENGE TO OUR STUDENTS: "COULD WE CREATE A CRYSTALS CAVE IN A TEST TUBE?" EXPERIMENTING TO IMITATE NATURE: Students tried to grow crystals simulating the same conditions as those in Naica's mine. We have chosen KNO3, a salt more soluble than gypsum. We added 85 g of salt to 200 ml of water (solubility of KNO3 at 25°C is 36 g per 100 gr of water) and heated it until it is dissolved. Afterwards, we poured the solution into some test tubes and other recipients and let them cool at room temperature. And they got a beautiful crystals cave!! THINKING A LITTLE MORE: we asked pupils some questions to make them think about the process and to predict what would happen in different situations. For example: a) What would happen with crystals if we heated the tubes again? or b) What would happen if we took the remaining solution from the tubes and keep it in the fridge? PROVING A NEW HYPOTHESIS: Pupils collected the remaining

  14. Modeling steam pressure under martian lava flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dundas, Colin M.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2013-01-01

    Rootless cones on Mars are a valuable indicator of past interactions between lava and water. However, the details of the lava–water interactions are not fully understood, limiting the ability to use these features to infer new information about past water on Mars. We have developed a model for the pressurization of a dry layer of porous regolith by melting and boiling ground ice in the shallow subsurface. This model builds on previous models of lava cooling and melting of subsurface ice. We find that for reasonable regolith properties and ice depths of decimeters, explosive pressures can be reached. However, the energy stored within such lags is insufficient to excavate thick flows unless they draw steam from a broader region than the local eruption site. These results indicate that lag pressurization can drive rootless cone formation under favorable circumstances, but in other instances molten fuel–coolant interactions are probably required. We use the model results to consider a range of scenarios for rootless cone formation in Athabasca Valles. Pressure buildup by melting and boiling ice under a desiccated lag is possible in some locations, consistent with the expected distribution of ice implanted from atmospheric water vapor. However, it is uncertain whether such ice has existed in the vicinity of Athabasca Valles in recent history. Plausible alternative sources include surface snow or an aqueous flood shortly before the emplacement of the lava flow.

  15. Magnetic Mineralogy in Oxidized Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontny, A.; Kletetschka, G.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2004-12-01

    Oxidized basaltic lava flows are common in terrestrial environment and magnetic mineralogy ranges from rhombohedral to spinel phases contributing to a complex overall magnetic behavior. Similar rock types are responsable for very intense magnetic anomalies on Earth and may be an equivalent to those on Mars. Therefore this research may identify the magnetic techniques that should be employed as part of instrumentation on board of remote control rover on surface of Mars. We obtained a large number of magnetic and mineralogic tests on a basaltic profile across a tree mold from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, where the oxygen fugacity was presumably modified by the presence of combustible organic material within the lava flow. The lava flow cools down rapidly as it approaches much cooler organic material. This process results in contrasting contents of titanium in magnetic phases and different Fe-Ti oxide textures, which is important for the overall rock magnetic properties. We attempted to identify the contribution of all the magnetic phases within these rocks using different remanence and susceptibility measurement at very low-, low- and high-temperature as well as optical and electron microscope investigations. The phases within these rocks are titanohematite (self reversing composition), ferrian ilmenite and titanomagnetite, which contribute to the induced as well as to the remanent component of the magnetization.

  16. Impacts of cave air ventilation and in-cave prior calcite precipitation on Golgotha Cave dripwater chemistry, southwest Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treble, Pauline C.; Fairchild, Ian J.; Griffiths, Alan; Baker, Andy; Meredith, Karina T.; Wood, Anne; McGuire, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    Speleothem trace element chemistry is an important component of multi-proxy records of environmental change but a thorough understanding of hydrochemical processes is essential for its interpretation. We present a dripwater chemistry dataset (PCO2, alkalinity, Ca, SIcc, Mg and Sr) from an eight-year monitoring study from Golgotha Cave, building on a previous study of hydrology and dripwater oxygen isotopes (Treble et al., 2013). Golgotha Cave is developed in Quaternary aeolianite and located in a forested catchment in the Mediterranean-type climate of southwest Western Australia. All dripwaters from each of the five monitored sites become supersaturated with respect to calcite during most of the year when cave ventilation lowers PCO2 in cave air. In this winter ventilation mode, prior calcite precipitation (PCP) signals of increased Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca in dripwater are attributed to stalactite deposition. A fast-dripping site displays less-evolved carbonate chemistry, implying minimal stalactite growth, phenomena which are attributed to minimal degassing because of the short drip interval (30 s). We employ hydrochemical mass-balance modelling techniques to quantitatively investigate the impact of PCP and CO2 degassing on our dripwater. Initially, we reverse-modelled dripwater solutions to demonstrate that PCP is dominating the dripwater chemistry at our low-flow site and predict that PCP becomes enhanced in underlying stalagmites. Secondly, we forward-modelled the ranges of solution Mg/Ca variation that potentially can be caused by degassing and calcite precipitation to serve as a guide to interpreting the resulting stalagmite chemistry. We predict that stalagmite trace element data from our high-flow sites will reflect trends in original dripwater solutes, preserving information on biogeochemical fluxes within our system. By contrast, stalagmites from our low-flow sites will be dominated by PCP effects driven by cave ventilation. Our poorly karstified system allows us

  17. 43 CFR 37.11 - Nomination, evaluation, and designation of significant caves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... significant caves. 37.11 Section 37.11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CAVE MANAGEMENT Cave Designation § 37.11 Nomination, evaluation, and designation of significant caves. (a... the public, including those who utilize caves for scientific, educational, and recreational purposes...

  18. 43 CFR 37.11 - Nomination, evaluation, and designation of significant caves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... significant caves. 37.11 Section 37.11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CAVE MANAGEMENT Cave Designation § 37.11 Nomination, evaluation, and designation of significant caves. (a... the public, including those who utilize caves for scientific, educational, and recreational purposes...

  19. 43 CFR 37.11 - Nomination, evaluation, and designation of significant caves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... significant caves. 37.11 Section 37.11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CAVE MANAGEMENT Cave Designation § 37.11 Nomination, evaluation, and designation of significant caves. (a... the public, including those who utilize caves for scientific, educational, and recreational purposes...

  20. 76 FR 42654 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Petition To List Grand Canyon Cave Pseudoscorpion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ...) describes examining the walls, ceilings, and floors for animals and invertebrates. He identified 12 invertebrates from the 8 caves. The Grand Canyon cave pseudoscorpion was found only in the Cave of the Domes... literature on cave-dwelling invertebrates within Grand Canyon National Park, as well as cave trip reports on...

  1. Reply to the Comment on "Sandstone caves on Venezuelan tepuis: Return to pseudokarst?"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, R.; Lánczos, T.; Gregor, M.; Schlögl, J.; Šmída, B.; Liščák, P.; Brewer-Carías, Ch.; Vlček, L.

    2013-09-01

    In Aubrecht et al. (2011) we brought new data showing that the arenitic caves in the Venezuelan tepuis did not necessarily originate through quartz cement dissolution ('arenization') but the main portion of the caves originated because of poor lithification prior to erosion. An additional important process is lateritization which is responsible for at least 30% of the caves' volume. Sauro et al. (2012) in their comment support the 'arenization' theory (quartz cement dissolution) and provide several arguments against some points of our research. Their main objections and arguments relate to the following topics: 1) the validity of the arenization theory, 2) the origin and importance of the 'finger-flow' pillars, 3) the importance of the Schmidt hammer measurements and, 4) metamorphism of the Matauí Formation. In our reply we present further documentation that: The quartz cement dissolution theory of cave evolution was far less documented petrographically than the new theory presented by us. Although the presence of quartz dissolution is evident, there is no current evidence that it is widespread or that it plays a trigger role. Many of the presented examples of corrosion on quartz grains could have been caused by local alkalization. In addition, the hydrogeochemical data presented in the comment to support the 'arenization' theory do not in fact contradict our speleogenetic interpretations. 'Finger-flow' pillars are speleogenetic indicators and not speleogenetic factors. Their absence in some caves provides no evidence against our theory. Schmidt hammer measurements only objectivize the data on contrasting hardness in the Matauí Formation beds. They do not say anything about the origin of this difference. The arguments of Sauro et al. (2012) involve the metamorphic overprint of the Matauí Formation shown by the presence of pyrophyllite and quartz mobilizations. Because quartz mobilization also occurs in hypergenic conditions, it may be neglected as a metamorphic

  2. Electromagnetic Monitoring of Lava Tubes: Numerical Modeling and Instrument Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sly, Michael K.

    Currently the only method to measure the flow rates of lava in lava tubes is through the use of a skylight. This means that only a fraction of lava tubes can be measured. It is important to know the flow rate throughout a lava tube to know how much lava is being produced by a volcano at a given time. In order to measure the flow rate without using a skylight we can utilize the electromagnetic properties of flowing lava and the Lorentz force. Theoretical as well as numerical methods have been used to model an expected response using this technique. The experimental results will be compared to these models to discern accuracy. The main difficulty involved in this experiment is the high resistivity of the basalt that surrounds the lava tube. In order to obtain measurements in this environment high impedance electrodes are needed. After months of development and testing, multiple high impedance electrodes are available to be used on any surface including basalt. These electrodes are able to measure electric signals through any highly resistive surface including concrete, asphalt, basalt, and ice. Currently no tests have been done or are planned to measure flowing lava. Instead we will measure flowing sea water in pipes on the SIO campus. These pipes provide a good analog to the lava tubes. These tests have provided useful information about the noise floor for this system, telling us that a response from a full size lava tube could most likely be seen.

  3. Geochemistry of the Hawi lavas, Kohala Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spengler, Steven R.; Garcia, Michael O.

    1988-05-01

    Hawi lavas form the late stage alkalic cap on Kohala Volcano and range in composition from hawaiite to trachyte. New, detailed field mapping of Kohala and reinterpretation of previously published age data suggest that there was no significant eruption hiatus between the Hawi and underlying Pololu shield lavas as was previously suggested. Mineral and whole-rock chemical data are consistent with a crystal fractionation origin for the hawaiite to trachyte compositional variation observed within the Hawi lavas. Plagioclase, clinopyroxene, Ti-magnetite, olivine and apatite fractionation are needed to explain this variation. The clinopyroxene fractionation may have occurred at moderate pressure because it is virtually absent in these lavas and is not a near liquidus phase at pressures of less than 8 Kb. Plagioclase would be buoyant in the Hawi hawaiite magmas so a mechanism like dynamic flow crystallization is needed for its fractionation and to account for the virtual absence of phenocrysts in the lavas. Hawi lavas are distinct in Sr and Nd isotopic ratios and/or incompatible element ratios from the Pololu lavas. Thus they were derived from compositionally distinct sources. Compared to other suites of Hawaiian alkalic cap lavas, Hawi lavas have anomalously high concentrations of phosphorus and rare earth elements. These differences could be due to greater apatite content in the source for the Hawi lavas.

  4. Next generation phylogeography of cave and surface Astyanax mexicanus.

    PubMed

    Coghill, Lyndon M; Darrin Hulsey, C; Chaves-Campos, Johel; García de Leon, Francisco J; Johnson, Steven G

    2014-10-01

    The loss of traits is a commonly observed evolutionary pattern in cave organisms, but due to extensive morphological convergence, inferring relationships between cave and surface populations can be difficult. For instance, Astyanax mexicanus (the blind Mexican cavefish) is thought to have repeatedly lost its eyes following colonization of cave environments, but the number of evolutionarily independent invasions of this species into caves remains unclear. Because of these repeated losses, it has become a model organism for studying the genetic basis of phenotypic trait loss. Here we reconstruct a high-resolution phylogeography for A. mexicanus inferred from both mitochondrial DNA and several thousand single nucleotide polymorphisms. We provide novel insight into the origin of cave populations from the Sabinos and Río Subterráneo caves and present evidence that the Sabinos cave population is part of a unique cave lineage unrelated to other A. mexicanus cave populations. Our results indicate A. mexicanus cave populations have at least four independent origins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploring caves: teaching packet for grades K-3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1998-01-01

    "Exploring Caves" is an interdisciplinary set of materials on caves for grades K-3. Caves entail at least five scientific disciplines: earth science, hydrology, mapping, biology, and anthropology. Each of these disciplines involves a unique content area as well as the development of particular intellectual skills. This unit aims at helping teachers to sort and organize the most important ideas in this rich scientific area. Detailed lesson plans serve as ways to pass these ideas on to very young students. Most American caves are big holes that form in limestone rock. The holes begin as cracks in limestone. The cracks get bigger and bigger. They grow into underground streams, rivers, and even lakes. When water drains away, the waterways turn into open cave tunnels, passages, and caverns. It takes 10,000 to 100,000 years to form a cave big enough for people to move around inside. Water drips constantly in caves. The drips dissolve limestone minerals in one part of the cave. As water dries out, the minerals build up in other places. In this way, beautiful cave rock formations and crystals grow over thousands of years. These rock formations change dark limestone caves into hidden fantasy lands.

  6. Book Review: Caves and Karst of the Yorkshire Dales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westaway, Rob

    2015-10-01

    The British Cave Research Association (BCRA) is the research division of the British Caving Association (BCA), itself the principal society in Britain for those interested in caving, with activities including provision of training and safety certification for cavers and managing access to caves. Although some UK cave-related research is carried out by academics, this tends to be restricted to archaeological investigations of caves that have served as human habitations, and to be focused more on the occupants than the caves themselves. In contrast, most cave exploration is undertaken as a leisure activity, under the auspices of clubs affiliated to the BCA/BCRA, this being indeed virtually the only field of Earth science where amateur investigators can continue to make significant discoveries. Many cave explorers are also affiliated with academic researchers, such as managers of dating laboratories; the synergy between these two groups is highly productive, having resulted for instance in the discovery and exploration in recent years of the vast Ogof Draenen cave system in South Wales, which probably dates back to the Early Pleistocene (e.g., Farrant et al., 2014).

  7. A >400 kyrs archive of sedimentation in Scladina cave (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonhof, Hubert; Bonjean, Dominique; Pirson, Stéphane; van der Lubbe, Jeroen; Hellstrom, John; Scholz, Denis; Verheyden, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    Scladina Cave, near the Meuse River in Belgium, is well-known for its well preserved Neanderthal fossils and stone tools. Cave research started in the 1970's, when archeological findings near the entrance of the cave initiated a long-running excavation programme in the -at that time- almost completely sediment-infilled cave. Over the past decades, a wealth of mammal fossils, stone tools, and a mandible of a Neanderthal child were found, and the complex sedimentary context of the cave strata was reconstructed in high detail. Crucial to understanding the cave stratigraphy is the construction of an absolutely dated age model. Until recently, this age model was based on a number of OSL ages, pollen stratigraphy and a few U-series ages on flowstone and stalagmite calcite. These U-series ages, however, had much lower precision than can be obtained by modern MC-ICP-MS techniques. In this study, we present new and more precise U-series ages for the major flow stone levels in Scladina Cave (upper stratigraphical sequence), and two flowstone levels from Sous-Saint-Paul Cave (lower stratigraphical sequence). The oldest flow stone layer dates back to > 400 ka, and the youngest represents the Holocene. The age model shows that flow stone formation typically occurred during warm climate conditions. These findings help to improve the existing age model for Scladina Cave significantly, and place better constraints on the age of individual fossils, and fossil assemblages in the cave.

  8. Actinobacterial Diversity in Volcanic Caves and Associated Geomicrobiological Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Cristina; Marshall Hathaway, Jennifer J.; Enes Dapkevicius, Maria de L. N.; Miller, Ana Z.; Kooser, Ara; Northup, Diana E.; Jurado, Valme; Fernandez, Octavio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Cheeptham, Naowarat

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic caves are filled with colorful microbial mats on the walls and ceilings. These volcanic caves are found worldwide, and studies are finding vast bacteria diversity within these caves. One group of bacteria that can be abundant in volcanic caves, as well as other caves, is Actinobacteria. As Actinobacteria are valued for their ability to produce a variety of secondary metabolites, rare and novel Actinobacteria are being sought in underexplored environments. The abundance of novel Actinobacteria in volcanic caves makes this environment an excellent location to study these bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) from several volcanic caves worldwide revealed diversity in the morphologies present. Spores, coccoid, and filamentous cells, many with hair-like or knobby extensions, were some of the microbial structures observed within the microbial mat samples. In addition, the SEM study pointed out that these features figure prominently in both constructive and destructive mineral processes. To further investigate this diversity, we conducted both Sanger sequencing and 454 pyrosequencing of the Actinobacteria in volcanic caves from four locations, two islands in the Azores, Portugal, and Hawai'i and New Mexico, USA. This comparison represents one of the largest sequencing efforts of Actinobacteria in volcanic caves to date. The diversity was shown to be dominated by Actinomycetales, but also included several newly described orders, such as Euzebyales, and Gaiellales. Sixty-two percent of the clones from the four locations shared less than 97% similarity to known sequences, and nearly 71% of the clones were singletons, supporting the commonly held belief that volcanic caves are an untapped resource for novel and rare Actinobacteria. The amplicon libraries depicted a wider view of the microbial diversity in Azorean volcanic caves revealing three additional orders, Rubrobacterales, Solirubrobacterales, and Coriobacteriales. Studies of microbial ecology in

  9. Actinobacterial Diversity in Volcanic Caves and Associated Geomicrobiological Interactions.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Cristina; Marshall Hathaway, Jennifer J; Enes Dapkevicius, Maria de L N; Miller, Ana Z; Kooser, Ara; Northup, Diana E; Jurado, Valme; Fernandez, Octavio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Cheeptham, Naowarat

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic caves are filled with colorful microbial mats on the walls and ceilings. These volcanic caves are found worldwide, and studies are finding vast bacteria diversity within these caves. One group of bacteria that can be abundant in volcanic caves, as well as other caves, is Actinobacteria. As Actinobacteria are valued for their ability to produce a variety of secondary metabolites, rare and novel Actinobacteria are being sought in underexplored environments. The abundance of novel Actinobacteria in volcanic caves makes this environment an excellent location to study these bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) from several volcanic caves worldwide revealed diversity in the morphologies present. Spores, coccoid, and filamentous cells, many with hair-like or knobby extensions, were some of the microbial structures observed within the microbial mat samples. In addition, the SEM study pointed out that these features figure prominently in both constructive and destructive mineral processes. To further investigate this diversity, we conducted both Sanger sequencing and 454 pyrosequencing of the Actinobacteria in volcanic caves from four locations, two islands in the Azores, Portugal, and Hawai'i and New Mexico, USA. This comparison represents one of the largest sequencing efforts of Actinobacteria in volcanic caves to date. The diversity was shown to be dominated by Actinomycetales, but also included several newly described orders, such as Euzebyales, and Gaiellales. Sixty-two percent of the clones from the four locations shared less than 97% similarity to known sequences, and nearly 71% of the clones were singletons, supporting the commonly held belief that volcanic caves are an untapped resource for novel and rare Actinobacteria. The amplicon libraries depicted a wider view of the microbial diversity in Azorean volcanic caves revealing three additional orders, Rubrobacterales, Solirubrobacterales, and Coriobacteriales. Studies of microbial ecology in

  10. Using Lava Tube Skylights To Derive Lava Eruption Temperatures on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-11-01

    The eruption temperature of Io’s silicate lavas constrains Io’s interior state and composition [1]. We have examined the theoretical thermal emission from lava tube skylights above basaltic and ultramafic lava channels. Assuming that tube-fed lava flows are common on Io, skylights could also be common. Skylights present steady thermal emission on a scale of days to months. We find that the thermal emission from such a target, measured at multiple visible and NIR wavelengths, can provide a highly accurate diagnostic of eruption temperature. However, the small size of skylights means that close flybys of Io are necessary, requiring a dedicated Io mission [2]. Observations would ideally be at night or in eclipse. We have modelled the thermal emission spectrum for different skylight sizes, lava flow stream velocities, end-member lava compositions, and skylight radiation shape factors, determining the resulting flow surface cooling rates. We calculate the resulting thermal emission spectrum as a function of viewing geometry. From the resulting 0.7:0.9 μm ratios, we see a clear distinction between basaltic and ultramafic compositions for skylights smaller than 20 m across, even if sub-pixel. Our analysis will be further refined as accurate high-temperature short-wavelength emissivity values become available [3]. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. We thank the NASA OPR Program for support. References: [1] Keszthelyi et al. (2007) Icarus 192, 491-502 [2] McEwen et al. (2015) The Io Volcano Observer (IVO) LPSC-46 abstract 1627 [3] Ramsey and Harris (2015) IAVCEI-2015, Prague, Cz. Rep., abstract IUGG-3519.

  11. Stratigraphy and geochronology of pitfall accumulations in caves and fissures, Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearty, Paul J.; Olson, Storrs L.; Kaufman, Darrell S.; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cheng, Hai

    2004-05-01

    Deep fractures ("fissures") and avens ("skylights") in limestone cave roofs create natural traps for sediments and biota. Fissures fill quickly with surface sediment and organisms soon after opening. Debris cones are formed as materials fall, wash, or drift on air through openings in cave skylights. Such deposits in Admiral's and Grand Canyon Cave, Bermuda contain distinct beds and are composed of mixtures of sediment and charcoal, together with fossils of land snails, crabs, birds, reptiles, and bats. The "pitfall" accumulations were periodically sealed over by calcite flowstone. A stratigraphic record of surface activity and fauna through both glacial and interglacial periods has been preserved. The succession also provides an ideal setting in which to compare several geochronological methods. Calibrated 14C ages on charcoal and shells provide dated horizons at 1600, 12,800, and about 35,000 14C yr BP. Thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) ages on several flowstone layers constrain the entire sequence in the Admiral's Cave sequence between 126,300±900 yr (Termination II) and historical times. A continuous relative-age record generated by amino acid epimerization (AAE) geochronology ( D-alloisoleucine/ L-isoleucine or aIle/Ile) on the pulmonate land gastropod Poecilozonites verifies the biostratigraphy, reveals a minimal degree of mixing between stratigraphic units, and establishes an independent temporal link between the subterranean and subaerial deposits of Bermuda. This convergence between stratigraphy and geochronology yields a precisely dated succession from the oceanic island of Bermuda, and thus presents a unique opportunity to assess the rates and processes of evolutionary and climate change during that interval.

  12. Predecessors of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in a coastal cave, Aceh Province, Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilarczyk, J.; Rubin, C. M.; Sieh, K.; Horton, B.; Daly, P.; Majewski, J.; Ismail, N.

    2013-12-01

    Geological studies of coral reefs and coastal plains have uncovered short and incomplete records of predecessors for the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Here we present a longer and more-complete mid- to late Holocene tsunami history from an extraordinary sedimentary deposit in northwestern Aceh Province, Sumatra. We exposed clastic sediment in six trenches up to 2 m deep within a sheltered limestone cave 200 m from the present coastline. The trim line of the 2004 tsunami is about 25 m above sea level and 15 m above the top of the 10-m high entrance to the cave. Within the cave, the deposits of 2004 comprise a 15 - 20 cm thick, laterally continuous sand sheet. Beneath this youngest tsunami sand is a <3-cm thick bed rich in guano dropped by insect feeding bats (Microchiroptera). Many similar couplets of sand and bat guano occur lower in the stratigraphic sequence. The sands have many diagnostic features of the 2004 deposit, namely a distinctly marine geochemical signature, high-diversity foraminiferal assemblages that include offshore species, normal grading, basal rip-up clasts, lenticular laminations, and articulated bivalves. Minor, local, non-tectonic normal and decollement faults that break the layers at several locations are likely due to strong ground shaking. Radiocarbon dating of charcoal and molluscs establish a mid- to late Holocene age range for the tsunami sands. Other than the 2004 deposit, layers younger than about 2,000 years are absent, because by about 2,000 years ago, accommodation space beneath the level of the rocky entrance to the cave had been filled. Pending analyses will reveal whether three clay layers within the sequence are of marine or of freshwater origin.

  13. Additional Observations of Actively Forming Lava Tubes and Associated Structures, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    1972-01-01

    Extensive changes occurred after the initial observations (Greeley, 1971) of lava tube and channel formation associated with the eruption of Mauna Ulu. Individual vents, which apparently acted somewhat independently, merged by collapse of intervening sections to form an elongate trench. Lava erupted from the summit vent flowed down the trench to the lower end and drained through lava tubes into Alae lava lake. Alae lava lake is in turn drained occasionally by other lava tubes and lava tube networks.

  14. Age and speleogenesis of epigenic gypsum caves in the northern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Columbu, Andrea; Chiarini, Veronica; De Waele, Jo; Drysdale, Russell; Forti, Paolo; Hellstrom, John; Woodhead, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Triassic and Messinian gypsum beds host the majority of the caves in the eastern flank of the northern Apennines. To date, more than six hundreds voids have been mapped, including the longest known epigenic gypsum cave system in the world (Spipola-Acquafredda, ~11 km of tunnels) (De Waele et al., 2013). Superimposed caves are typically sub-horizontal (Klimchouk, 2000) and connected through vertical shafts, reflecting the palaeo base-level variations. When preserved, river terraces at the surface lie at the same palaeo altitude of the base level and horizontal cave passages. Notwithstanding the well-known geology of the area known (Vai and Martini, 2001), the age of these caves has been greatly underestimated in the past. Considering the rapid dissolution of the gypsum and uplifting of the area, the start of speleogenesis activity was considered to have occurred during the last glacial age. The age of karst voids can be only indirectly estimated by the dating of the infilling sediments. U-Th dating on carbonate speleothems provides high-precision and accurate ages (Hellstrom, 2003; Scholz and Hoffmann, 2008). We thus applied this methodology to 20 speleothems coming from 14 different caves belonging to the Monte Tondo, Spipola Acquafredda, Castelnuovo, Stella-Rio Basino and Brisighella systems. The results show that: i) caves were forming since at least ~300 ka; ii) the peak of speleogenesis was reached during relatively cold climate stages, when rivers formed terraces at the surface and aggradation caused paragenesis in the stable cave levels (Columbu et al., 2015). Besides the significant contribution to the understanding of the Apennines evaporite karst evolution, this study (and its further advancement) may also refine knowledge of the local vs regional uplifting rates and base-level variations since the late Pleistocene (Wegmann and Pazzaglia, 2009). References Columbu, A., De Waele, J., Forti, P., Montagna, P., Picotti, V., Pons-Branchu, E., Hellstrom, J

  15. Temperature as tracer of the hydraulic dynamic of an anchialine cave (coastal submerged cave) of Krka Estuary (Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Villar, David; Cukrov, Neven; Krklec, Kristina

    2016-04-01

    A series of temperature, conductivity and water level loggers were used to characterize the hydraulic dynamic of a submerged cave (anchialine cave) in Krka Estuary. Litno Cave is a sub-horizontal gallery, less than 5 m in diameter and one meter below sea level. Apart from some sections that contain occasional air pockets under the ceiling, the cave is completely flooded. Outflow discharge through the cave is continuous during the year (>30 l/s). During several months vertical temperature profiles were measured in three locations inside the cave at 20, 60 and 100 m from the cave entrance, whereas another vertical profile was set in the estuary in front of the cave. Thermometers from the estuary measured thermal gradients to characterize position and evolution of the thermocline up to a depth of 3.5 m. Tides measured in the estuary are synchronous to those recorded in the cave and their amplitudes (20 to 40 cm in the estuary) are the same or smaller depending on cave outflow discharge. Records of cave water temperature show a non-linear response to tides due to the vertical displacement of the thermocline. During neap tides the thermocline was located in the aquifer below the cave, whereas during spring tides only thermometers in the top meter of the cave were not affected by the thermocline vertical displacement. After the first significant rains of the hydrological year, the freshwater contribution increased the cave outflow discharge by one order of magnitude. Thus, conductivity decreased in response to rains from 16000 ±1000 μS/cm to <700 μS/cm at the bottom of the cave. Under these conditions variability of cave water temperature was less than 0.1 °C, although a 0.4 °C long-term variability was recorded. These data shows that the discharge of freshwater to the estuary determines the dynamic of this submerged cave, limiting the influence of estuarine water intrusion in the coastal aquifer and the impact of tides. This research shows that temperature is a

  16. A biosignature suite from cave pool precipitates, Cottonwood Cave, New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Melim, L A; Liescheidt, R; Northup, D E; Spilde, M N; Boston, P J; Queen, J M

    2009-11-01

    Calcite cave pool precipitates often display a variety of potential biosignatures from the macroscopic to the submicroscopic. A fossil cave pool in Cottonwood Cave, New Mexico, exhibits older stalactites and stalagmites that are completely coated in brown, laminated calcitic crust that extends down as pool fingers and u-loops. The pool fingers and u-loops are mainly micrite to clotted micrite, some recrystallized to microspar, with some isopachous spar layers. Micrite, particularly clotted micrite, is usually interpreted by carbonate workers as microbial in origin. Scanning electron microscopy examination of etched pool fingers, u-loops, and the brown crust revealed abundant calcified microbial filaments and biofilm. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis showed that these features have excess carbon, above that found in pure calcite. Independent carbon analysis indicated that these same samples contain up to 0.2% organic carbon. Since pool fingers hang down but form underwater, we hypothesize they are biogenic with hanging microbial filaments or biofilm acting as nuclei for calcite precipitation. Because of the abundance of micrite and fossil filaments, we further hypothesize that these pendant features formed during a period of plentiful nutrients and active hydrological activity when the pool was literally dripping with microbial slime. Although each of these lines of evidence could be interpreted in other ways, their combined weight strongly suggests the cave pool precipitates in Cottonwood Cave are biogenic. These investigations can be used to help inform extraterrestrial life-detection studies.

  17. Gusev Rocks Solidified from Lava (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In recent weeks, as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven through the basin south of 'Husband Hill,' it has been traversing mainly sand and dune deposits. This week, though, Spirit has been maneuvering along the edge of an arc-shaped feature called 'Lorre Ridge' and has encountered some spectacular examples of basaltic rocks with striking textures. This panoramic camera (Pancam) image shows a group of boulders informally named 'FuYi.' These basaltic rocks were formed by volcanic processes and may be a primary constituent of Lorre Ridge and other interesting landforms in the basin.

    Spirit first encountered basalts at its landing site two years ago, on a vast plain covered with solidified lava that appeared to have flowed across Gusev Crater. Later, basaltic rocks became rare as Spirit climbed Husband Hill. The basaltic rocks that Spirit is now seeing are interesting because they exhibit many small holes or vesicles, similar to some kinds of volcanic rocks on Earth. Vesicular rocks form when gas bubbles are trapped in lava flows and the rock solidifies around the bubbles. When the gas escapes, it leaves holes in the rock. The quantity of gas bubbles in rocks on Husband Hill varies considerably; some rocks have none and some, such as several here at FuYi, are downright frothy.

    The change in textures and the location of the basalts may be signs that Spirit is driving along the edge of a lava flow. This lava may be the same as the basalt blanketing the plains of Spirit's landing site, or it may be different. The large size and frothy nature of the boulders around Lorre Ridge might indicate that eruptions once took place at the edge of the lava flow, where the lava interacted with the rocks of the basin floor. Scientists hope to learn more as Spirit continues to investigate these rocks.

    As Earth approaches the Chinese New Year (The Year of the Dog), the Athena science team decided to use nicknames representing Chinese culture and geography

  18. Gusev Rocks Solidified from Lava (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In recent weeks, as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven through the basin south of 'Husband Hill,' it has been traversing mainly sand and dune deposits. This week, though, Spirit has been maneuvering along the edge of an arc-shaped feature called 'Lorre Ridge' and has encountered some spectacular examples of basaltic rocks with striking textures. This panoramic camera (Pancam) image shows a group of boulders informally named 'FuYi.' These basaltic rocks were formed by volcanic processes and may be a primary constituent of Lorre Ridge and other interesting landforms in the basin.

    Spirit first encountered basalts at its landing site two years ago, on a vast plain covered with solidified lava that appeared to have flowed across Gusev Crater. Later, basaltic rocks became rare as Spirit climbed Husband Hill. The basaltic rocks that Spirit is now seeing are interesting because they exhibit many small holes or vesicles, similar to some kinds of volcanic rocks on Earth. Vesicular rocks form when gas bubbles are trapped in lava flows and the rock solidifies around the bubbles. When the gas escapes, it leaves holes in the rock. The quantity of gas bubbles in rocks on Husband Hill varies considerably; some rocks have none and some, such as several here at FuYi, are downright frothy.

    The change in textures and the location of the basalts may be signs that Spirit is driving along the edge of a lava flow. This lava may be the same as the basalt blanketing the plains of Spirit's landing site, or it may be different. The large size and frothy nature of the boulders around Lorre Ridge might indicate that eruptions once took place at the edge of the lava flow, where the lava interacted with the rocks of the basin floor. Scientists hope to learn more as Spirit continues to investigate these rocks.

    As Earth approaches the Chinese New Year (The Year of the Dog), the Athena science team decided to use nicknames representing Chinese culture and geography

  19. Comparison of Natural Dams from Lava Flows and Landslides on the Owyhee River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, L. L.; Brossy, C. C.; Othus, S. M.; Orem, C.; Fenton, C.; House, P. K.; O'Connor, J. E.; Safran, E. B.

    2008-12-01

    Numerous large lava flows and mass movements have temporarily dammed the Owyhee River in southeastern Oregon at various temporal and spatial scales. These channel-encroaching events potentially play a significant role in creating and maintaining the geomorphic features of river canyons in uplifted volcanic terranes that compose a significant part of the western U.S. Abundant landslides and lava flows have the capacity to inhibit incision by altering channel slope, width, and bed character, and burying valley- bottom bedrock under exogenous material; or promote incision by generating cataclysmic floods through natural dam failures. The natural dams vary in their source, morphology, longevity and process of removal, which in turn affects the extent and duration of their impact on the river. The 3 most recent lava flows filled the channel 10-75 m deep and flowed up to 26 kilometers downvalley, creating long, low dams that were subject to gradual, rather than catastrophic, removal. In the last 125 ka, the Saddle Butte and West Crater lava dams created reservoirs into which 10-30 meters of silt and sand were deposited. The river overtopped the dams and in most reaches eventually cut a new channel through the adjacent, less resistant bedrock buttresses. Terraces at several elevations downstream and upstream of the West Crater dam indicate periods of episodic incision ranging from 0.28 to 1.7 mm/yr., based on 3He exposure ages on strath surfaces and boulder-rich fluvial deposits. In contrast to the lava dams, outburst flood deposits associated with landslide dams are common along the river. The mechanisms of failure are related to the geologic setting, and include rotational slump complexes, cantilevered blocks and block slides, and massive earthflows. Most large-scale mass movements occur in reaches where the Owyhee canyon incises through stacks of interbedded fluviolacustrine sediments capped with lava flows. The frequently observed association of landslides and flood

  20. Molecular phylogeny of the extinct cave lion Panthera leo spelaea.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joachim; Rosendahl, Wilfried; Loreille, Odile; Hemmer, Helmut; Eriksson, Torsten; Götherström, Anders; Hiller, Jennifer; Collins, Matthew J; Wess, Timothy; Alt, Kurt W

    2004-03-01

    To reconstruct the phylogenetic position of the extinct cave lion (Panthera leo spelaea), we sequenced 1 kb of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene from two Pleistocene cave lion DNA samples (47 and 32 ky B.P.). Phylogenetic analysis shows that the ancient sequences form a clade that is most closely related to the extant lions from Africa and Asia; at the same time, cave lions appear to be highly distinct from their living relatives. Our data show that these cave lion sequences represent lineages that were isolated from lions in Africa and Asia since their dispersal over Europe about 600 ky B.P., as they are not found among our sample of extant populations. The cave lion lineages presented here went extinct without mitochondrial descendants on other continents. The high sequence divergence in the cytochrome b gene between cave and modern lions is notable.

  1. Sampling Elysium lavas (13 deg N, 203 deg W)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.

    1994-01-01

    The proposed Pathfinder landing site presents the opportunity to determine chemical and mineralogical compositions of an Elysium lava flow. The flow is part of a geologic unit of planetary significance. The proposed site appears suitable for landing, and lava surfaces should be accessible to the Pathfinder instruments. By analogy to terrestrial flood basalts, any lava analyzed by Pathfinder is likely to be representative of the entire Elysium province.

  2. Identifying hazards associated with lava deltas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.

    2014-01-01

    Lava deltas, formed where lava enters the ocean and builds a shelf of new land extending from the coastline, represent a significant local hazard, especially on populated ocean island volcanoes. Such structures are unstable and prone to collapse—events that are often accompanied by small explosions that can deposit boulders and cobbles hundreds of meters inland. Explosions that coincide with collapses of the East Lae ‘Apuki lava delta at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, during 2005–2007 followed an evolutionary progression mirroring that of the delta itself. A collapse that occurred when the lava–ocean entry was active was associated with a blast of lithic blocks and dispersal of spatter and fine, glassy tephra. Shortly after delta growth ceased, a collapse exposed hot rock to cold ocean water, resulting in an explosion composed entirely of lithic blocks and lapilli. Further collapse of the delta after several months of inactivity, by which time it had cooled significantly, resulted in no recognizable explosion deposit. Seaward displacement and subsidence of the coastline immediately inland of the delta was measured by both satellite and ground-based sensors and occurred at rates of several centimeters per month even after the lava–ocean entry had ceased. The anomalous deformation ended only after complete collapse of the delta. Monitoring of ground deformation may therefore provide an indication of the potential for delta collapse, while the hazard associated with collapse can be inferred from the level of activity, or the time since the last activity, on the delta.

  3. Chips Off an Old Lava Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    Photogeologic and remote sensing studies of the Moon show that many light-colored, smooth areas in the highlands contain craters surrounded by dark piles of excavated debris. The dark deposits resemble the dark basalts that make up the lunar maria. They contain the same diagnostic minerals (especially high-calcium pyroxene) and chemical compositions (high iron oxide) as do mare basalts. The deposits formed when vast amounts of material ejected during the formation of giant impact basins covered pre-existing lava plains. Since the smooth plains are older than the youngest impact basin (about 3.8 billion years old), the lavas must have erupted before formation of the visible maria. In fact, they were visible maria for a while eons ago, but were buried by ejecta when the basins formed. We have samples of these ancient mare basalts. They reside in breccias collected from the lunar highlands. Age dating indicates that the chips have ages of 3.9 billion years and older. The oldest dated mare basalt in the Apollo collection is 4.23 billion years. Now Kentaro Terada (Hiroshima University, Japan), Mahesh Anand (Open University, UK), Anna Sokol and Addi Bischoff (Institute for Planetology, Muenster, Germany), and Yuji Sano (The University of Tokyo, Japan) have determined the age of pieces of an ancient lava flow in a lunar meteorite, Kalahari 009, found in Botswana in 1999. The team dated this very low-titanium mare basalt by using an ion microprobe to measure the isotopic composition of lead and uranium in phosphate minerals. They found that the basalt fragments in the rock have an age of about 4.35 (plus or minus 0.15) billion years. This overlaps with the ages of chemically-distinct igneous rocks from the highlands, indicating that diverse magmas were being produced early in the history of the Moon.

  4. Geochemical Stratigraphy of Southern Parana' Lava Piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzoli, A.; De Min, A.; Marques, L. S.; Nardy, A.; Chiaradia, M.

    2015-12-01

    Basaltic lava flows of the Paranà Large Igneous Province exhibit significant regional and stratigraphic geochemical variations. While the most notable difference concerns the dominance of low-Ti (TiO2 < 2.0 wt.%) and high-Ti types in the southern and northern part of the province, respectively, detailed analyses of lava flow sequences sampled mostly in drill cores allowed definition of six main groups of chemically distinct flow units. The chemical and possible age differences among these units were then used to define the global time-related evolution of Paranà basaltic magmatism and involvement of distinct mantle-source components. Newly sampled outcropping lava flow sequences from the southern Paranà do however only partially support this picture. Our new major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data show that high- and low-Ti basaltic flows are interlayered. In particular, Pitanga type high-Ti basalts are interlayered with Gramado and Esmeralda low-Ti basalts (these latter being present both towards the base and the top of the sequence) in Paranà State, while in Santa Caterina State Gramado flows are interlayered with Urubici-type high-Ti basalts. The interlayering of distinct basaltic magma type requires near-synchronous eruption of chemically strongly different magma types generated from clearly heterogeneous mantle sources and erupted through separated magma plumbing systems, without apparent interaction (mixing) among the distinct basalts. In conclusion, the relative timing of low- and high-Ti magma types seems to be much more complicated than previously thought, as for example Esmeralda or Pitanga basalts, previously considered as quite late and postdating Gramado basalts, are indeed synchronous with them.

  5. 36 CFR 290.3 - Nomination, evaluation, and designation of significant caves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... recreational purposes, the opportunity to nominate caves. The authorized officer shall give public notice... events. (iii) Paleontologic resources with potential to contribute useful educational or scientific... humans, biota, or development of cave resources. (5) Recreational. The cave provides or could...

  6. 222Rn variations in Mystery Cave, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Krafthefer, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    222Rn concentrations and meteorological parameters were measured at 4- h intervals over a 2-y period in Mystery Cave, southeastern Minnesota. Continuous radon monitors and meteorological sensors connected to data loggers were installed at several locations along commercial tour routes. 222Rn concentrations ranged as high as 25 kBq m-3 in summer and 20 kBq m-3 in winter. Average winter concentrations were lower than summer by at least a factor of two. Seasonal radon variations were correlative with outside air temperatures. During the winter, radon concentrations were observed to fluctuate periodically by factors of 20 or more in under 24 h. Both the long- and short-term variations are correlative with temperature- induced mixing of cave air with surface air.

  7. 222Rn variations in Mystery Cave, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Lively, R S; Krafthefer, B C

    1995-04-01

    222Rn concentrations and meteorological parameters were measured at 4-h intervals over a 2-y period in Mystery Cave, southeastern Minnesota. Continuous radon monitors and meteorological sensors connected to data loggers were installed at several locations along commercial tour routes. 222Rn concentrations ranged as high as 25 kBq m-3 in summer and 20 kBq m-3 in winter. Average winter concentrations were lower than summer by at least a factor of two. Seasonal radon variations were correlative with outside air temperatures. During the winter, radon concentrations were observed to fluctuate periodically by factors of 20 or more in under 24 h. Both the long- and short-term variations are correlative with temperature-induced mixing of cave air with surface air.

  8. Sensing Structures Inspired by Blind Cave Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConney, Michael E.; Chen, Nannan; Lu, David; Anderson, Kyle D.; Hu, Huan; Liu, Chang; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2009-03-01

    Blind cave fish, with degenerated non-functioning eyes, have evolved to ``see'' their hydrodynamic environment by using the flow receptors of the lateral line system. The hair-cell receptors are encapsulated in a hydrogel-like material, called a cupula, which increases the sensitivity of the hair-cell receptors by coupling their motion to the surrounding flowing media. We characterized the viscoelastic properties and of blind cave fish cupulae by using colloidal-probe spectroscopy in fluid. A photo-patternable hydrogel with similar properties was developed to mimic the fish receptor coupling structure. Flow-based measurements indicated that the hydrogels enhance drag through increased surface area, but also inherent material properties. These bio-inspired structures endowed micro-fabricated flow sensors with sensitivities rivaling that of fish.

  9. Palaeolithic paintings. Evolution of prehistoric cave art.

    PubMed

    Valladas, H; Clottes, J; Geneste, J M; Garcia, M A; Arnold, M; Cachier, H; Tisnérat-Laborde, N

    2001-10-04

    Sophisticated examples of European palaeolithic parietal art can be seen in the caves of Altamira, Lascaux and Niaux near the Pyrenees, which date to the Magdalenian period (12,000-17,000 years ago), but paintings of comparable skill and complexity were created much earlier, some possibly more than 30,000 years ago. We have derived new radiocarbon dates for the drawings that decorate the Chauvet cave in Vallon-Pont-d'Arc, Ardèche, France, which confirm that even 30,000 years ago Aurignacian artists, already known as accomplished carvers, could create masterpieces comparable to the best Magdalenian art. Prehistorians, who have traditionally interpreted the evolution of prehistoric art as a steady progression from simple to more complex representations, may have to reconsider existing theories of the origins of art.

  10. Intraformational deformation in the tuffs and lavas of Calico Hills exposed near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Buesch, D.C. ); Dickerson, R.P. )

    1993-04-01

    The 12.9 Ma tuffs and lavas of Calico Hills (CH) records development of part of the Southwest Nevada Volcanic Field that formed during intermittent periods of extensional tectonism. Exposures of the CH in upper Paintbrush Canyon, 6 km northeast of Yucca Mountain, consists of five lava flows interstratified with pyroclastic flow and fallout deposits, and fluvially redeposited sediment. The lower part of the exposures (shown in cross section below) consists of a lava flow (L1), interbedded primary and redeposited tuffaceous deposits (R1a and R1b), massive breccia deposit (M1), lava flow (L2), massive breccia deposit (M2), and redeposited tuffaceous deposits (R2). Moderately developed stratification at the base of massive breccia deposit M1 and localized concentrations of lithic fragments throughout the deposit indicates probably deposition from a pyroclastic flow. Bedding in R1, R2, and the base of M1 (dashed line) parallels stratigraphic unit contacts. An intraformational unconformity between R1 subunits (solid line) is interpreted as a fluctuation in local base level, or minor folding prior to deposition of R1b. Northward thinning of post-R1 rocks indicate L1 and R1 were folded into a southeast plunging anticline that formed a topographic high; across which M1 was deposited and against which L2, M2, and R2 abutted. Because post-R2 CH deposits shown no significant intraformational deformation at this location, most deformation described here occurred early in the depositional history of the CH and resulted from localized compression synchronous with regional extension or localized tumescence associated with volcanism.

  11. Determining the Compositions of Extraterrestrial Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan H.

    2002-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research project has been to develop techniques that allow the emplacement conditions of volcanic landforms on other planets to be related to attributes that can be remotely detected with available instrumentation. The underlying assumption of our work is that the appearance of a volcano, lava flow, debris avalanche, or exhumed magmatic intrusion can provide clues about the conditions operating when that feature was first emplaced. Magma composition, amount of crustal heat flow, state of tectonic stress, and climatic conditions are among the important variables that can be inferred from the morphology and texture of an igneous body.

  12. Laboratory Investigations of Lava Flow Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagents, S. A.; Rumpf, M. E.; Hamilton, C. W.

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the effectiveness with which lava can heat substrates of different types, we conducted a suite of experiments in which molten basalt was poured onto solid or particulate materials, and the downward propagation of the heat pulse was measured. The motivation for this work lies in seeking to understand how lava flows on the Moon would have heated the underlying regolith, and thus to determine the depths at which solar wind particles implanted in the regolith would have been protected from the heat of the overlying flow. Extraction and analysis of ancient solar wind samples would provide a wealth of information on the evolution and fate of the Sun. Our experimental device consists of a box constructed from 1"-thick calcium silicate sheeting with interior dimensions of 20 x 20 x 25 cm. The substrate material (a particulate lunar regolith simulant or solid basalt) occupies the lower 15 cm of the box, which is embedded with an array of 8 thermocouples. Up to 6 kg of crushed basalt collected from the 2010 Kilauea lava flows is heated to supraliquidus temperatures and poured directly onto the substrate. The evolution of the temperature profile within the lava flow and substrate is recorded as the basalt cools, and the surface temperature distribution is recorded using a Forward Looking Infrared Radiometer (FLIR) video camera. We have been using the experimental data sets to validate a numerical model of substrate heating. If the physics is appropriately formulated, the model will accurately predict both surface and internal temperature distribution as a function of time. A key issue has been incorporation of valid temperature-dependent thermophysical properties, because particulate materials are not well characterized at elevated temperatures. Regolith thermal conductivity in particular exerts a strong control over the depth of penetration of the thermal wave, so its accurate description is essential for a robust model. Comparison of experimental vs. modeled

  13. Lava tubes - Potential shelters for habitats. [on moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horz, F.

    1985-01-01

    Natural caverns occur on the moon in the form of 'lava tubes', which are the drained conduits of underground lava rivers. The inside dimensions of these tubes measure tens to hundreds of meters, and their roofs are expected to be thicker than 10 meters. Consequently, lava tube interiors offer an environment that is naturally protected from the hazards of radiation and meteorite impact. Further, constant, relatively benign temperatures of -20 C prevail. These are extremely favorable environmental conditions for human activities and industrial operations. Significant operational, technological, and economical benefits might result if a lunar base were constructed inside a lava tube.

  14. Lava tubes - Potential shelters for habitats. [on moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horz, F.

    1985-01-01

    Natural caverns occur on the moon in the form of 'lava tubes', which are the drained conduits of underground lava rivers. The inside dimensions of these tubes measure tens to hundreds of meters, and their roofs are expected to be thicker than 10 meters. Consequently, lava tube interiors offer an environment that is naturally protected from the hazards of radiation and meteorite impact. Further, constant, relatively benign temperatures of -20 C prevail. These are extremely favorable environmental conditions for human activities and industrial operations. Significant operational, technological, and economical benefits might result if a lunar base were constructed inside a lava tube.

  15. Radon levels in Romanian caves: an occupational exposure survey.

    PubMed

    Cucoş Dinu, Alexandra; Călugăr, Monica I; Burghele, Bety D; Dumitru, Oana A; Cosma, Constantin; Onac, Bogdan P

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive radon survey has been carried out in seven caves located in the western half of Romania's most significant karst regions. Touristic and non-touristic caves were investigated with the aim to provide a reliable distribution of their radon levels and evaluate the occupational exposure and associated effective doses. Radon gas concentrations were measured with long-term diffusion-type detectors during two consecutive seasons (warm and cold). All investigated caves exceed the European Union reference level of radon gas at workplaces (300 Bq/m(3)). The radon concentration in these caves ranges between 53 and 2866 Bq/m(3), reflecting particular cave topography, season-related cave ventilation, and complex tectonic and geological settings surrounding each location. Relatively homogeneous high radon levels occur in all investigated touristic caves and in Tăuşoare and Vântului along their main galleries. Except for Muierii, in all the other caves radon levels are higher during the warm season, compared to the cold one. This suggests that natural cave ventilation largely controls the underground accumulation of radon. The results reported here reveal that the occupational exposure in Urşilor, Vadu Crişului, Tăuşoare, Vântului, and Muierii caves needs to be carefully monitored. The effective doses to workers vary between an average of 0.25 and 4.39 mSv/year depending on the measuring season. The highest values were recorded in show caves, ranging from 1.15 to 6.15 mSv/year, well above the European recommended limit, thus posing a potential health hazard upon cave guides, cavers, and scientists.

  16. Diversity and Function of Methanotrophic Bacteria in Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, K.; Schimmelmann, A.; Lennon, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    Despite representing the second largest sink for the atmospheric greenhouse gas methane (CH4), the methanotrophic organisms responsible for atmospheric CH4 consumption have eluded cultivation. High-throughput studies of methanotrophic communities present an opportunity to learn novel details about the organisms responsible, yet such studies have rarely been conducted. Recent observations of subatmospheric CH4 concentrations in cave-air have led to the hypothesis that methanotrophs are active over large spatial scales in the subsurface. Karst terrains cover between 10 - 20 % of the terrestrial surface area and offer abundant cave-related methanotrophic habitat due to the exchange of air with the atmosphere. We collected 42 cave soil samples from 20 caves to test the hypothesis that subterranean methanotrophy removes CH4 from cave-air. Methanotrophs were found in 90 % of samples, notably in locations with subatmospheric CH4­ concentrations. Methylocystaceae were present in caves and accounted for 92 % of the methanotrophic community on average (median), however almost all of the observations were of unidentified Methylocystaceae. Abundances of uncultured and unidentified members of the Methylococcales were correlated with cave-air CH4 concentrations suggesting that some Methylococcales may contribute to atmospheric CH4 oxidation. Individual caves had a strong influence on the observed methanotrophic community composition accounting for 77 % of the variance in the assemblage. Nevertheless, cave-air CH4 concentrations were predictive of the methanotrophic community composition accounting for 5 % of the variation. Our findings also are suggestive of CH4-fueled microbial food webs. For example, abundances of known methylotrophic organisms were correlated with cave-air CH4 concentrations. This may suggest that some methylotrophs contribute to atmospheric CH4 oxidation or that molecules produced in the CH4 oxidation pathway, like methanol, are leaked from methanotrophic

  17. Monitoring tropical cave environmental parameters: Implications for palaeoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, H.; Baldini, J. U. L.; Prufer, K. M.

    2012-04-01

    This study presents findings from on-going surface and cave environmental monitoring at Yok Balum Cave in southern Belize. Drip hydrochemistry and cave atmosphere dynamics play key roles in calcite deposition, stalagmite growth, and climate proxy signal emplacement. An understanding of daily, seasonal, and inter-annual variability in cave hydrology and atmosphere is therefore critical information for accurately interpreting stalagmite geochemistry in terms of palaeoclimate. Ten month time series datasets of drip rates, cave air PCO2, soil air PCO2, cave air temperature and humidity, drip and surface water δ18O values, and meteorological data are presented here and initial relationships discussed. Initial cave air PCO2 datasets suggest short term (daily) cave ventilation patterns exist which may be superimposed on seasonal-scale variability driven by seasonal rainfall patterns. Rainfall apparently controls soil air PCO2 by controlling soil bioproductivity, so during the rainy season cave air PCO2 may increase in response to an increased CO2 flux into the cave via degassing and flow through micro-fissures. Eight actively growing stalagmites were monitored, indicating that drip hydrology varies spatially within the cave. Temperature and humidity are constant at 23oC and 100% respectively throughout the cave, year round, limiting potential kinetic fractionation of carbon and oxygen isotopes during carbonate precipitation and simplifying interpretations of climate records from stalagmites from the site. Continued environmental monitoring will yield long term datasets which may relate to multi-annual climate phenomena such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation and provide critical data for interpreting and calibrating the records obtained from Yok Balum stalagmite samples.

  18. Toxicity and Geochemistry of Missouri Cave Stream Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, C. A.; Besser, J.; Wicks, C. M.

    2005-05-01

    Water and sediment quality are among the most important variables affecting the survival of stygobites. In Tumbling Creek Cave, Taney County Missouri the population of the endangered cave snail, Antrobia culveri, has declined significantly over the past decade. The cause of the population decline is unknown but could be related to the quality of streambed sediment in which the cave snail lives. The objective of this study was to determine the toxicity and concentrations of heavy metals in the sediment of Tumbling Creek Cave and five other caves in Missouri. These sediments were analyzed to assess possible point sources from within the recharge areas of the caves and to provide baseline geochemical data to which Tumbling Creek Cave sediments could be compared. Standard sediment toxicity tests and ICP-MS analysis for heavy metals were conducted. Survival and reproduction of the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, did not differ significantly between cave sediments and a control sediment. However the growth of amphipods differed significantly among sites and was significantly reduced in sediments from Tumbling Creek Cave relative to controls. Concentrations of several metals in sediments differed substantially among locations, with elevated levels of zinc and copper occurring in Tumbling Creek Cave. However, none of the measured metal concentrations exceeded sediment quality guidelines derived to predict probable effects on benthic organisms and correlations between sediment metal concentrations and toxicity endpoints were generally weak. While elevated metal levels may play a part in the cave snail's decline, other factors may be of equal or greater importance. Ongoing analyses of persistent organic contaminants and total organic carbon in cave sediments, along with continued water quality monitoring, may provide data that will allow us to better understand this complicated problem.

  19. Primary melanoma of Meckel's cave: case report.

    PubMed

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Borba, Luis A B; Ferraz, Fernando Antonio Patriani; Almeida, Giovana Camargo de; Krindges Júnior, José Valentim

    2004-06-01

    We present a case of trigeminal neuralgia with cranial normal magnetic resonance image (MRI) and computed tomography. The pain was not relieved by carbamazepine and microvascular decompression surgery was done. After two months the pain was similar to the condition before surgery. At this time, MRI showed an expansive lesion in Meckel's cave that was treated with radical resection by extra-dural approach. The pathologic examination revealed a primary melanoma. The follow-up after six months did not show abnormalities.

  20. Physical characteristics of a lava flow determined from thermal measurements at the lava's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A. T.; Kovtunov, D. A.; Korotkii, A. I.; Melnik, O. E.; Tsepelev, I. A.

    2016-04-01

    We consider the problem about determination of characteristics of a lava flow from the physical parameters measured on its surface. The problem is formulated as an inverse boundary problem for the model simulating the dynamics of a viscous heat-conducting incompressible inhomogeneous fluid, where, on the basis of additional data at one part of the model boundary, the missing conditions at another part of the boundary have to be determined, and then the characteristics of fluid in the entire model domain have to be reconstructed. The considered problem is ill-posed. We develop a numerical approach to the solution of the problem in the case of a steady-state flow. Assuming that the temperature and the heat flow are known at the upper surface of the lava, we determine the flow characteristics inside the lava. We compute model examples and show that the lava temperature and flow velocity can be determined with a high precision when the initial data are smooth or slightly noisy.

  1. Topographic Attributes of Three Hawaiian Lava Flows: Implications for Evaluation of Lava Flow Emplacement on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Differential Global Positioning System surveys were carried out recently across portions of three lava flows on the Big Island of Hawaii. Transects crossed an entire flow in several cases, and in other cases provided detailed information about selected flow margins. The 1907 basalt (a'a) flow from the southwestern rift zone of Mauna Loa has easy access at several points via the Ocean View Estates road system; flow thickness ranges from about 1 m near the middle of the eastern flow lobe to more than 10 m toward the distal end of this flow. Several components of a benmoreite (alkali-rich basaltic andesite) flow complex from Mauna Kea were examined near the small community of Mana (with permission of the Parker Ranch management), on the western flank of the volcano. The flows are more than 14,000 years old and completely covered with soil more than a meter thick, but flow morphology at the decameter scale remains very evident in aerial photographs; some benmoreite flows have up to 30 m of relief along their middle reaches. A trachyte flow more than 100,000 years old extends down slope from Puu Waawaa, on the northern flank of Hualalai; Puu Anahulu represents a very advanced stage of magmatic differentiation that resulted in a flow complex with more than 120 m of relief at its southern margin. Width/thickness represents a good discriminator between these three Hawaiian lava flows. Unfortunately, width is often the most difficult parameter to measure remotely for flows on other planets. Recent imaging data from the Thermal Emission Imaging System on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft reveal important new details of lava flows in the Tharsis region of Mars, some of which can be combined with elevation information from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter. The precise topographic characteristics of diverse Hawaiian lava flows provide a new tool for evaluating the potential emplacement conditions for some Martian lava flows, which appear to be more consistent with the basalt to

  2. Cave biosignature suites: microbes, minerals, and Mars.

    PubMed

    Boston, P J; Spilde, M N; Northup, D E; Melim, L A; Soroka, D S; Kleina, L G; Lavoie, K H; Hose, L D; Mallory, L M; Dahm, C N; Crossey, L J; Schelble, R T

    2001-01-01

    Earth's subsurface offers one of the best possible sites to search for microbial life and the characteristic lithologies that life leaves behind. The subterrain may be equally valuable for astrobiology. Where surface conditions are particularly hostile, like on Mars, the subsurface may offer the only habitat for extant lifeforms and access to recognizable biosignatures. We have identified numerous unequivocally biogenic macroscopic, microscopic, and chemical/geochemical cave biosignatures. However, to be especially useful for astrobiology, we are looking for suites of characteristics. Ideally, "biosignature suites" should be both macroscopically and microscopically detectable, independently verifiable by nonmorphological means, and as independent as possible of specific details of life chemistries--demanding (and sometimes conflicting) criteria. Working in fragile, legally protected environments, we developed noninvasive and minimal impact techniques for life and biosignature detection/characterization analogous to Planetary Protection Protocols. Our difficult field conditions have shared limitations common to extraterrestrial robotic and human missions. Thus, the cave/subsurface astrobiology model addresses the most important goals from both scientific and operational points of view. We present details of cave biosignature suites involving manganese and iron oxides, calcite, and sulfur minerals. Suites include morphological fossils, mineral-coated filaments, living microbial mats and preserved biofabrics, 13C and 34S values consistent with microbial metabolism, genetic data, unusual elemental abundances and ratios, and crystallographic mineral forms.

  3. Cave Biosignature Suites: Microbes, Minerals, and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, P. J.; Spilde, M. N.; Northup, D. E.; Melim, L. A.; Soroka, D. S.; Kleina, L. G.; Lavoie, K. H.; Hose, L. D.; Mallory, L. M.; Dahm, C. N.; Crossey, L. J.; Schelble, R. T.

    2001-03-01

    Earth's subsurface offers one of the best possible sites to search for microbial life and the characteristic lithologies that life leaves behind. The subterrain may be equally valuable for astrobiology. Where surface conditions are particularly hostile, like on Mars, the subsurface may offer the only habitat for extant lifeforms and access to recognizable biosignatures. We have identified numerous unequivocally biogenic macroscopic, microscopic, and chemical/geochemical cave biosignatures. However, to be especially useful for astrobiology, we are looking for suites of characteristics. Ideally, "biosignature suites" should be both macroscopically and microscopically detectable, independently verifiable by nonmorphological means, and as independent as possible of specific details of life chemistries - demanding (and sometimes conflicting) criteria. Working in fragile, legally protected environments, we developed noninvasive and minimal impact techniques for life and biosignature detection/characterization analogous to Planetary Protection Protocols. Our difficult field conditions have shared limitations common to extraterrestrial robotic and human missions. Thus, the cave/subsurface astrobiology model addresses the most important goals from both scientific and operational points of view. We present details of cave biosignature suites involving manganese and iron oxides, calcite, and sulfur minerals. Suites include morphological fossils, mineral-coated filaments, living microbial mats and preserved biofabrics, 13C and 34S values consistent with microbial metabolism, genetic data, unusual elemental abundances and ratios, and crystallographic mineral forms.

  4. 6. Photographic copy of historic photograph (from Wind Cave National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photographic copy of historic photograph (from Wind Cave National Park), photographer unknown, date unknown. Route 87, Pigtail Bridge, elevation. - Pigtail Bridge, Hot Springs, Fall River County, SD

  5. Analysis of Vadose Hydrology at Jinapsan Cave, Guam, Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, K. K.; Jenson, J. W.; Lander, M.; Noronha, A. L.; Righetti, T.

    2016-12-01

    Six years of monthly data were analyzed from an active tropical limestone cave in Guam, the southernmost of the Mariana Islands, in the western Pacific Ocean. The purpose of this study was to characterize vadose processes of aquifer recharge in the Plio-Pleistocene Mariana Limestone, which occupies about 75% of the surface of the Northern Guam Lens Aquifer, which produces 90% of the island's drinking water. This hydrogeologic study was conducted concurrent with paleoclimate research, in which correlative data on CO2 and other cave meteorological parameters are also collected. For this study, a ground survey grid was established on the surface above the cave, a vegetated talus slope at the foot of the >150-m cliff in the Mariana Limestone behind the cave. Cave and vadose zone 3-D models were constructed from the surface survey and an interior cave survey. Cross sections display talus slope features (33°), notational talus grain size distribution, inferred epikarst and vadose layer dimensions, cave slope (-34°) and structural and geomorphic features of the cave, including a brackish sea-level pool at the cave bottom. GIS products include georeferenced cave boundary and cave room shapefiles. A plan-view map displays significant boulder talus and limestone forest trees, cave entrance location and the underlying cave boundary and fractures mapped on the cave ceiling. Thicknesses of the talus and vadose bedrock sections range from 1.3 to 17.0 meters and 1.7 to 46.4 meters, respectively. Drip rate and discharge rate data from 7 cave stations are presented in graphs showing varying responses between percolation and changes in rainfall during wet (Jul-Dec) and dry (Jan-Jun) seasons. Three stations exhibited fast responses to wet season rainfall, which gradually dropped during the dry season. Two of these stations are at separate cave ceiling fractures. The third is indiscernible from its distance (>4m) above the floor. Three stations exhibited slow responses in both wet

  6. Legal protection for caves in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, G. N.

    1995-09-01

    This study reviews significant state and federal laws that can be used to protect karst, caves, and associated unique minerals and biota. The first state cave protection act was passed in Colorado in 1883; unfortunately it was repealed in 1971. From that modest beginning there are now a total of 22 states, Puerto Rico, and the Cherokee Nation that have specific cave protection acts. Most of these have been legislated during the last 20 years. There are a number of laws on the federal level that can be used for cave protection. The most important of these is the Federal Cave Resources Protection Act of 1988, which mandates cave conservation for many federal land management agencies. The Endangered Species Act of 1973 and the Federal Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1976 can also be of significant use in the conservation of caves on federal land. The effects of these acts are variable. One factor is how important agency officials and law enforcement officers regard caves. It has not been unusual that little was done in the way of protection or prosecution even when the perpetrators have been apprehended. This attitude is changing rapidly primarily because those involved in enforcing the laws have been educated to the uniqueness and values of caves and their contents.

  7. Bacteria and free-living amoeba in the Lascaux Cave.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Fabiola; Alabouvette, Claude; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2009-01-01

    The Lascaux Cave was discovered in 1940, and by 1960 it had received up to 1800 daily visitors. In 1963, the cave was closed and in 2001 it was invaded by a Fusarium solani species complex which was treated for four years with benzalkonium chloride. However, Lascaux Cave bacteria have only been poorly investigated. Here we show that the cave is now a reservoir of potential pathogenic bacteria and protozoa which can be found in outbreaks linked to air-conditioning systems and cooling towers in community hospitals and public buildings.

  8. Measuring radon concentrations and estimating dose in tourist caves.

    PubMed

    Martín Sánchez, A; de la Torre Pérez, J; Ruano Sánchez, A B; Naranjo Correa, F L

    2015-11-01

    Caves and mines are considered to be places of especial risk of exposure to (222)Rn. This is particularly important for guides and workers, but also for visitors. In the Extremadura region (Spain), there are two cave systems in which there are workers carrying out their normal everyday tasks. In one, visits have been reduced to maintain the conditions of temperature and humidity. The other comprises several caves frequently visited by school groups. The caves were radiologically characterised in order to estimate the dose received by workers or possible hazards for visitors.

  9. Pre-excavation studies of prehistoric cave sites by magnetic prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkis., Sonia; Matskevich, Zinovii; Meshveliani, Tengiz

    2014-05-01

    Detailed magnetic survey was performed for caves study in Israel (1995-1996) within the framework of the Beit Shemesh Regional Project (Judean Shephelah). The experience accumulated in Israel we applied later (2010) in two Georgian prehistoric cave sites: Cherula and Kotias-Klde. The magnetic method is based on the contrast in magnetic properties between a target object (e.g., buried archaeological feature) and the host medium (i.e, the surrounding bedrock and soil). The feasibility of the magnetic method for cave revealing was evaluated by magnetic susceptibility (κ) measurements of surrounding soil and rocks, and archaeological features: stones making up the walls, ceramic fragments and cave fill. According to data obtained, the κ of soil within caves (cave fill) is higher than that of surrounding soil. The enhancement of cave fill κ occurs because processes associated with human habitation: repeated heating and accumulation of organic debris. Both these processes provide good conditions for the conversion of the iron oxide found within the soil to a strongly ferromagnetic form (Mullins, 1977; Maher, 1986; Dalan and Banerjee, 1998, Itkis and Eppelbaum, 1999; Itkis, 2003) The presence of highly magnetic ceramics in caves also enhances magnetic contrast between practically non-magnetic bed rock (chalk in Ramat Beit Shemesh Site (Israel) and limestone (Georgian sites) and the cave fill, increasing the potential of the magnetic method to reveal caves (Itkis, 2011). Based on magnetic survey results, an excavation revealed a cave with a large amount of well preserved pottery and finds typical of the Early Bronze Age. Both studied cave sites in Georgia were located in Chiatura region of Imeretia province. Cherula site is a karstic rockshelter with a single chamber, ca 100 sq. m. The site was briefly tested in 1970s'. The area excavated in 2010 went to the depth of 60 cm below the present day surface; the limestone bedrock was not reached. The excavation revealed

  10. Eruptive behavior of the Marum/Mbwelesu lava lake, Vanuatu and comparisons with lava lakes on Earth and Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, Jani; Lopes, Rosaly M.; Howell, Robert R.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2016-08-01

    Observations from field remote sensing of the morphology, kinematics and temperature of the Marum/Mbwelesu lava lake in the Vanuatu archipelago in 2014 reveal a highly active, vigorously erupting lava lake. Active degassing and fountaining observed at the 50 m lava lake led to large areas of fully exposed lavas and rapid ( 5 m/s) movement of lava from the centers of upwelling outwards to the lake margins. These rapid lava speeds precluded the formation of thick crust; there was never more than 30% non-translucent crust. The lava lake was observed with several portable, handheld, low-cost, near-infrared imagers, all of which measured temperatures near 1000 °C and one as high as 1022 °C, consistent with basaltic temperatures. Fine-scale structure in the lava fountains and cooled crust was visible in the near infrared at 5 cm/pixel from 300 m above the lake surface. The temperature distribution across the lake surface is much broader than at more quiescent lava lakes, peaking 850 °C, and is attributed to the highly exposed nature of the rapidly circulating lake. This lava lake has many characteristics in common with other active lava lakes, such as Erta Ale in Ethiopia, being confined, persistent and high-temperature; however it was much more active than is typical for Erta Ale, which often has > 90% crust. Furthermore, it is a good analogue for the persistent, high-temperature lava lakes contained within volcanic depressions on Jupiter's moon Io, such as Pele, also believed from spacecraft and ground-based observations to exhibit similar behavior of gas emission, rapid overturn and fountaining.

  11. Some deep caves in Biokovo Mountain (Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garasic, Mladen; Garasic, Davor

    2014-05-01

    The investigation of 3 caves explored more than 1000 meters in depth in the Dinaric karst area in Croatia, has been in progress for a considerable period of time. These are complex speleological features situated in the longest mountain range of the Dinaric karst, i.e. at the Northern Velebit mountain range. In fact, these caves have been studied for over two decades now. The first one is a cave system of Lukina jama (Luke's Cave) - Trojama cave, which has been investigated until the depth of 1421 meters (Jalžić, 2007; Šmida, 1993). Its total length is 3731 meters and a new expedition will soon continue to investigate this pit through speleodiving in siphons. The second greatest cave by depth is Slovačka jama (Slovak Cave), 1320 meters in depth, with cave chanals measuring 5677 meters in total length. The third greatest cave by depth is the Cave system of Velebita, reaching down to 1026 m in depth, with the chanal length of 3176 meters (Bakšić, 2006a; 2006b). However, another 3 speleological sites, which can rightly be added to those deeper than 1000 m, have recently been discovered. These are three caverns that were discovered during construction of the Sveti Ilija Tunnel that passes through Mt. Biokovo, in the Dinaric karst area. These caverns undoubtedly point to the link with the ground surface, while the rock overburden above the tunnel in the zone where the caverns were discovered ranges from 1250 and 1350 meters. Bats from the ground surface were found in the caverns and, according to measurements, they are situated in the depth from 200 and 300 meters below the tunnel level. This would mean that the depth of these newly found caves ranges from 1450 and 1650 m, when observed from the ground surface. There are several hundreds of known caves in Biokovo, and the deepest ones discovered so far are Jama Mokre noge (Wet Feet Cave) 831 m in depth, and Jama Amfora (Amphora Cave) 788 m in depth (Bockovac, 1999; Bakšić & all, 2002; Lacković & all, 2001

  12. Microbiology and Geochemistry of Acidic Cave Biofilms in the Frasassi Caves, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, K. M.; Cleaveland, L. C.; Galdenzi, S.; Macalady, J. L.

    2003-12-01

    Acidic (pH 2-4) and extremely acidic (pH 0-1) biofilms in sulfidic regions of the Frasassi cave system are relatively simple, chemoautotrophic microbial communities. As such, they serve as model systems to test relationships between microbial diversity and physical and geochemical factors. Both biofilm types are isolated from surface sources of C and N and are ultimately powered by oxidation of H2S present in the cave atmosphere. pH 2-4 biofilms consist of cells in close association with sub-um to sub-mm mineral grains (primarily CaSO4) coating cave walls. Direct counts of cells stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, hydrochloride (DAPI) yield a biomass estimate of 7.5 x 106 to 1.3 x 107 cells per cm3. The great majority of these cells are either dormant (contain few ribosomes) or cells which do not hybridize with either bacteria- or archaea-specific oligonucleotide probes. Sparse clusters of short rod and coccus-shaped cells hybridized with a bacteria-specific Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) probe. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rDNA was successful with bacteria-specific primers as well as with several sets of archaeal-specific primers, suggesting that some of the "dormant" cells are archaea. Extremely acidic biofilms (snottites) drip from macroscopic (1-2 cm length), reddish CaSO4 crystals on the cave walls. DAPI-staining and FISH revealed abundant bacterial rods, bacterial filaments, and fungi in the snottites. Future work will characterize the acidic cave wall biofilms, as well as neutral-pH cave stream biofilms, using 16S rDNA clone libraries in order to determine whether pH is an important factor controlling microbial diversity.

  13. Pressure Analysis for LAVA-OVEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cendana, Donna Q.

    2014-01-01

    The Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) and the Oxygen Volatiles Extraction Node (OVEN) are subsystems included in the Regolith Environment Science, and Oxygen Lunar Volatiles Extraction (RESOLVE) payload bound for the Moon in 2019. This Resource Prospector Mission (RPM) has the objective of landing on a shadowed region of the Moons South Pole to collect data and determine whether the resources could be effectively used for space exploration systems. The quantification of the resources will help understand if it can adequately minimize materials carried from Earth by: providing life support, propellants, construction materials or energy supply to the payload or crew. This paper outlines the procedures done for the pressure analysis of the LAVA-OVEN (LOVEN) Integration Testing. The pressure analysis quantifies how much gases and water are present in the sample tested during the Engineering Testing Unit (ETU) phase of instrument development. Ultimately the purpose of these tests is to improve the estimate of the amount of water in each Lunar sample and reduce the time necessary for this estimate. The governing principle that was used for the analysis is the Ideal Gas Law, PV=nRT where P stands for pressure, V for volume, n for number of moles, R being the gas constant and T for temperature. We also estimate the errors involved in these measured and derived quantities since a key objective of the mission is to estimate the quantity of volatiles present in the lunar samples introduced into OVEN.

  14. Conservation of prehistoric caves and stability of their inner climate: lessons from Chauvet and other French caves.

    PubMed

    Bourges, F; Genthon, P; Genty, D; Lorblanchet, M; Mauduit, E; D'Hulst, D

    2014-09-15

    In the last 150 years, some prehistoric painted caves suffered irreversible degradations due to misperception of conservation issues and subsequent mismanagement. These sites presented naturally an exceptional stability of their internal climate allowing conservation in situ of outstanding fragile remains, some for nearly 40,000 years. This is for a large part due to exchanges of air, CO2, heat and water with the karstic system in which these caves are included. We introduce the concept of underground confinement, based on the stability of the inner cave climate parameters, especially its temperature. Confined caves present the best conservative properties. It is emphasized that this confined state implies slow exchanges with the surrounding karst and that a stable cave cannot be viewed as a closed system. This is illustrated on four case studies of French caves of various confinement states evidenced by long term continuous monitoring and on strategies to improve their conservation properties. The Chauvet cave presents optimal conservation properties. It is wholly confined as shown by the stability of its internal parameters since its discovery in 1994. In Marsoulas cave, archeological works removed the entrance scree and let a strong opening situation of the decorated zone. Remediation is expected by adding a buffer structure at the entrance. In Pech Merle tourist cave, recurrent painting fading was related to natural seasonal drying of walls. Improvement of the cave closure system restored a confined state insuring optimal visibility of the paintings. In Gargas tourist cave, optimization of closures, lighting system and number of visitors, allowed it to gradually reach a semi-confined state that improved the conservation properties. Conclusions are drawn on the characterization of confinement state of caves and on the ways to improve their conservation properties by restoring their initial regulation mechanisms and to avoid threats to their stability. Copyright

  15. Flash flood events recorded by air temperature changes in caves: A case study in Covadura Cave (SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gázquez, Fernando; Calaforra, José María; Fernández-Cortés, Ángel

    2016-10-01

    On 28th September 2012, more than 150 mm rain fell in just two hours in some points of southeastern Spain, triggering intense flash floods that resulted in the death of ten people and widespread material damage. In the gypsum karst of Sorbas, rainfall intensity reached 33 mm/h. Air temperature monitoring in different levels of Covadura Cave, down to 85 m depth, enabled the effect of this extreme episode on the cave microclimate to be evaluated in real time. The cave air temperature increased by between 0.9 and 4.1 °C as a result of water flow into the cavity and intense mixing of air masses, in addition to the displacement of deeper air masses toward shallower levels produced by fast recharge of the surrounding karst aquifer. The lag between peak rainfall intensity and the highest cave air temperature was 5-6 h, indicating the response time of the karst to this rainfall event. No trends with depth were observed, suggesting that water not only flowed in through the main cave entrance but also through secondary accesses and fractures. Furthermore, the size of the cave passages and the intensity of air turbulence generated by waterfalls in the cave played an important role in producing these temperature differences. Even though the rainfall event lasted 10 h, cave air temperature did not return to pre-flash flood values until more than 20 days later. This indicates that, while waterflow through the cave might stop a few hours after the rainfall event, cave air temperature can be affected over a longer period. This can be explained by slow groundwater level decreasing of the surrounding karst aquifer and latent heat liberation produced by moisture condensation on the cave walls. Our results show how continuous monitoring of air temperature in caves can be a useful tool for evaluating the short-term effects of flash floods in subterranean karst systems.

  16. Lava tube shatter rings and their correlation with lava flux increases at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    Shatter rings are circular to elliptical volcanic features, typically tens of meters in diameter, which form over active lava tubes. They are typified by an upraised rim of blocky rubble and a central depression. Prior to this study, shatter rings had not been observed forming, and, thus, were interpreted in many ways. This paper describes the process of formation for shatter rings observed at Kīlauea Volcano during November 2005–July 2006. During this period, tilt data, time-lapse images, and field observations showed that episodic tilt changes at the nearby Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone, the shallow magmatic source reservoir, were directly related to fluctuations in the level of lava in the active lava tube, with periods of deflation at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō correlating with increases in the level of the lava stream surface. Increases in lava level are interpreted as increases in lava flux, and were coincident with lava breakouts from shatter rings constructed over the lava tube. The repetitive behavior of the lava flux changes, inferred from the nearly continuous tilt oscillations, suggests that shatter rings form from the repeated rise and fall of a portion of a lava tube roof. The locations of shatter rings along the active lava tube suggest that they form where there is an abrupt decrease in flow velocity through the tube, e.g., large increase in tube width, abrupt decrease in tube slope, and (or) sudden change in tube direction. To conserve volume, this necessitates an abrupt increase in lava stream depth and causes over-pressurization of the tube. More than a hundred shatter rings have been identified on volcanoes on Hawai‘i and Maui, and dozens have been reported from basaltic lava fields in Iceland, Australia, Italy, Samoa, and the mainland United States. A quick study of other basaltic lava fields worldwide, using freely available satellite imagery, suggests that they might be even more common than previously thought. If so, this confirms that episodic

  17. Lava tube shatter rings and their correlation with lava flux increases at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Tim R.

    2011-04-01

    Shatter rings are circular to elliptical volcanic features, typically tens of meters in diameter, which form over active lava tubes. They are typified by an upraised rim of blocky rubble and a central depression. Prior to this study, shatter rings had not been observed forming, and, thus, were interpreted in many ways. This paper describes the process of formation for shatter rings observed at Kīlauea Volcano during November 2005-July 2006. During this period, tilt data, time-lapse images, and field observations showed that episodic tilt changes at the nearby Pu`u `Ō`ō cone, the shallow magmatic source reservoir, were directly related to fluctuations in the level of lava in the active lava tube, with periods of deflation at Pu`u `Ō`ō correlating with increases in the level of the lava stream surface. Increases in lava level are interpreted as increases in lava flux, and were coincident with lava breakouts from shatter rings constructed over the lava tube. The repetitive behavior of the lava flux changes, inferred from the nearly continuous tilt oscillations, suggests that shatter rings form from the repeated rise and fall of a portion of a lava tube roof. The locations of shatter rings along the active lava tube suggest that they form where there is an abrupt decrease in flow velocity through the tube, e.g., large increase in tube width, abrupt decrease in tube slope, and (or) sudden change in tube direction. To conserve volume, this necessitates an abrupt increase in lava stream depth and causes over-pressurization of the tube. More than a hundred shatter rings have been identified on volcanoes on Hawai`i and Maui, and dozens have been reported from basaltic lava fields in Iceland, Australia, Italy, Samoa, and the mainland United States. A quick study of other basaltic lava fields worldwide, using freely available satellite imagery, suggests that they might be even more common than previously thought. If so, this confirms that episodic fluctuation in lava

  18. Construction dynamics of a lava channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Andrew J. L.; Favalli, Massimiliano; Mazzarini, Francesco; Hamilton, Christopher W.

    2009-05-01

    We use a kinematic GPS and laser range finder survey of a 200 m-long section of the Muliwai a Pele lava channel (Mauna Ulu, Kilauea) to examine the construction processes and flow dynamics responsible for the channel-levee structure. The levees comprise three packages. The basal package comprises an 80-150 m wide 'a'a flow in which a ˜2 m deep and ˜11 m wide channel became centred. This is capped by a second package of thin (<45 cm thick) sheets of pahoehoe extending no more than 50 m from the channel. The upper-most package comprises localised 'a'a overflows. The channel itself contains two blockages located 130 m apart and composed of levee chunks veneered with overflow lava. The channel was emplaced over 50 h, spanning 30 May-2 June, 1974, with the flow front arriving at our section (4.4 km from the vent) 8 h after the eruption began. The basal 'a'a flow thickness yields effusion rates of 35 m3 s-1 for the opening phase, with the initial flow advancing across the mapped section at ˜10 m/min. Short-lived overflows of fluid pahoehoe then built the levee cap, increasing the apparent channel depth to 4.8 m. There were at least six pulses at 90-420 m3 s-1, causing overflow of limited extent lasting no more than 5 min. Brim-full flow conditions were thus extremely short-lived. During a dominant period of below-bank flow, flow depth was ˜2 m with an effusion rate of ˜35 m3 s-1, consistent with the mean output rate (obtained from the total flow bulk volume) of 23-54 m3 s-1. During pulses, levee chunks were plucked and floated down channel to form blockages. In a final low effusion rate phase, lava ponded behind the lower blockage to form a syn-channel pond that fed 'a'a overflow. After the end of the eruption the roofed-over pond continued to drain through the lower blockage, causing the roof to founder. Drainage emplaced inflated flows on the channel floor below the lower blockage for a further ˜10 h. The complex processes involved in levee-channel construction

  19. The explosive origin of obsidian lava (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, J. M.; Bindeman, I. N.; Tuffen, H.; Schipper, C.

    2013-12-01

    A long-standing challenge in volcanology has been to explain why explosive eruptions of rhyolite magma transition into outpourings of lava. Many studies suggest that lava is the product of non-explosive processes that allow magmatic vapour to escape in an open-system manner without wholesale fragmentation. Recent eruptions at Chaitén and Cordón Caulle volcanoes have shown that effusive rhyolites are anything but 'non-explosive' and may erupt simultaneously with vigourous pyroclastic fountains for months from a common vent. This behaviour implies that pyroclastic processes play a critical if not dominant role in degassing magma sufficiently such that it erupts effusively. Here we use H-isotope and bulk H2O measurements paired with textural evidence from the 2008 Chaitén and 2011 Cordón Caulle eruptions to demonstrate that effusion requires explosion(s)--lavas are the direct product of brittle deformation that fosters batched degassing into transient pyroclastic channels that repetitively and explosively vent from effusing lava. Evidence for cyclical brecciation and collapse of porous and permeable magmatic foams is abundant in the textures and structures of tuffisites--ash and lapilli-filled pyroclastic channels--found in volcanic bombs at both Chaitén and Cordón Caulle. We have used FTIR and a TCEA-MAT 253 system to precisely measure total water and D/H in erupted glass. Bulk H2O measurements on tuffisite and adjacent bomb obsidian indicate significantly lower H2O (~0.2-1.0 wt.%) in the tuffisite veins. These depletions imply effective local degassing and rapid advective transport of exsolved vapour through the veins. The H-isotopic signatures of tuffisites are also different from the hosting material insofar as being enriched in deuterium (up to -20‰). Such deuterium enrichments are inconsistent with isotope fractionation during both closed- and open-system degassing, but can be explained if an abundant and more primitive volatile phase from less degassed

  20. Sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and paleoenvironmental study of Paleocene Fort Union Formation in South Cave Hills of Harding County, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Best, W.A.; Rich, F.J.

    1986-08-01

    The Paleocene Fort Union Formation consists of the Ludlow, Cannonball, and Tongue River Members and forms prominent buttes in the Cave Hills, north-central Harding County, South Dakota. Investigations in the North Cave Hills show that cliff-forming Tongue River sandstones are actually the marine Cannonball Member. Field/laboratory studies indicate a similar reinterpretation for the cliff-forming sandstones in the South Cave Hills. These strata include fine to very fine-grained silty/clayey quartz sandstone. Textural analyses indicate the sand grains are subangular to rounded, polished, and of low to moderate sphericity. Sedimentary/biogenic structures indicate a high-energy, mainland beach/nearshore marine depositional environment. The transgressive sequence includes foreshore or littoral, shoreface, and subshoreface or estuarine environments. Foreshore/littoral sediments consist of fine to very fine-grained, moderately well to well-sorted, low-angle wedge planar and wedge trough cross-bedded sandstone. Trace fossils are dominated by Skolithos-like burrows. Marine vertebrate remains include Elasmobrachii sp., Myliobatis sp., and Myledaphus sp. Shoreface deposits are similar to those of the foreshore. Sedimentary structures are dominantly low- and high-angle wedge trough cross-beds. Ophiomorpha burrows occur near the upper contact. Shoreface deposits are separated from the subshoreface deposits by extensively burrowed silty sandstone or an erosional surface. The subshoreface environment produced very fine-grained sandstone interbedded with clay-claystone and clay shale that is very thin to thin bedded with minor amounts of ripple lamination and low-angle cross-stratification. Pseudo-symmetrical and composite ripples; flaser, wavy, and lenticular bedding; and sand-filled trails and burrows are present.

  1. What factors control the superficial lava dome explosivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoit; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-04-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style; lava domes result from intermittent, slow extrusion of viscous lava. Most dome-forming eruptions produce highly microcrystallized and highly- to almost totally-degassed magmas which have a low explosive potential. During lava dome growth, recurrent collapses of unstable parts are the main destructive process of the lava dome, generating concentrated pyroclastic density currents (C-PDC) channelized in valleys. These C-PDC have a high, but localized, damage potential that largely depends on the collapsed volume. Sometimes, a dilute ash cloud surge develops at the top of the concentrated flow with an increased destructive effect because it may overflow ridges and affect larger areas. In some cases, large lava dome collapses can induce a depressurization of the magma within the conduit, leading to vulcanian explosions. By contrast, violent, laterally directed, explosions may occur at the base of a growing lava dome: this activity generates dilute and turbulent, highly-destructive, pyroclastic density currents (D-PDC), with a high velocity and propagation poorly dependent on the topography. Numerous studies on lava dome behaviors exist, but the triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood. Here, seven dome-forming eruptions are investigated: in the Lesser Antilles arc: Montagne Pelée, Martinique (1902-1905, 1929-1932 and 650 y. BP eruptions), Soufrière Hills, Montserrat; in Guatemala, Santiaguito (1929 eruption); in La Chaîne des Puys, France (Puy de Dome and Puy Chopine eruptions). We propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by these key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite

  2. A flexible open-source toolkit for lava flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossoux, Sophie; Feltz, Adelin; Poppe, Sam; Canters, Frank; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2014-05-01

    Lava flow hazard modeling is a useful tool for scientists and stakeholders confronted with imminent or long term hazard from basaltic volcanoes. It can improve their understanding of the spatial distribution of volcanic hazard, influence their land use decisions and improve the city evacuation during a volcanic crisis. Although a range of empirical, stochastic and physically-based lava flow models exists, these models are rarely available or require a large amount of physical constraints. We present a GIS toolkit which models lava flow propagation from one or multiple eruptive vents, defined interactively on a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). It combines existing probabilistic (VORIS) and deterministic (FLOWGO) models in order to improve the simulation of lava flow spatial spread and terminal length. Not only is this toolkit open-source, running in Python, which allows users to adapt the code to their needs, but it also allows users to combine the models included in different ways. The lava flow paths are determined based on the probabilistic steepest slope (VORIS model - Felpeto et al., 2001) which can be constrained in order to favour concentrated or dispersed flow fields. Moreover, the toolkit allows including a corrective factor in order for the lava to overcome small topographical obstacles or pits. The lava flow terminal length can be constrained using a fixed length value, a Gaussian probability density function or can be calculated based on the thermo-rheological properties of the open-channel lava flow (FLOWGO model - Harris and Rowland, 2001). These slope-constrained properties allow estimating the velocity of the flow and its heat losses. The lava flow stops when its velocity is zero or the lava temperature reaches the solidus. Recent lava flows of Karthala volcano (Comoros islands) are here used to demonstrate the quality of lava flow simulations with the toolkit, using a quantitative assessment of the match of the simulation with the real lava flows. The

  3. Biomineralization and biosignatures of coralloid-type speleothems from lava tubes of Galapagos Islands: evidences on the fossil record of prokaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ana Z.; Garcia-Sanchez, Angela M.; Pereira, Manuel F. C.; Gazquez, Fernando; Calaforra, José M.; Forti, Paolo; Toulkeridis, Theofilos; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2016-04-01

    Lava tubes have traditionally been considered of little interest from a mineralogical point of view. Recently, this type of volcanic caves has received particular attention because lava tubes have been described on Mars. Speleothems, or secondary mineral deposits in lava tubes are mainly composed of siliceous minerals. Coralloid-type speleothems are found either on basaltic cave walls or on the surface of other speleothems. Several authors attribute a microbially mediated origin to their formation. This type of speleothems was recorded within Royal Palm Cave of Santa Cruz Island in Galapagos Archipelago (Ecuador), a lava tube 600 m long, 5 to 15 m height and 2 to 10 m width. The Galapagos Islands are an archipelago of 19 volcanic islands located some 1500 km west of Ecuador, in the Pacific Ocean. These islands host one of the most biodiverse settings on Earth, studied by Charles Darwin. Beige and greyish small coralloids were collected in Royal Palm Cave and analysed by field emission scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FESEM-EDS), X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and mineralogical analyses for morphological, 3D microstructural and compositional characterization, as well as for assessing microbe-mineral interactions and biogenicity. In addition, 16S rRNA gene analyses were performed to identify microbial communities associated with the coralloid-type speleothems. The coralloids showed internal compositional zonation along the growth direction of the speleothems, according to micro-CT data. Internal layering was clearly discernable by the differences in opacity of the distinct mineralogical phases to X-rays, being dominated by alteration products of siliceous composition, whereas more opaque phases, usually Ca-rich minerals, were dominant in the outermost part of the speleothems. X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy reinforced that the first stage of deposition is mainly composed of opal A and clay minerals

  4. Initial excavation and dating of Ngalue Cave: a Middle Stone Age site along the Niassa Rift, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Mercader, Julio; Asmerom, Yemane; Bennett, Tim; Raja, Mussa; Skinner, Anne

    2009-07-01

    Direct evidence for a systematic occupation of the African tropics during the early late Pleistocene is lacking. Here, we report a record of human occupation between 105-42ka, based on results from a radiometrically-dated cave section from the Mozambican segment of the Niassa (Malawi/Nyasa) Rift called Ngalue. The sedimentary sequence from bottom to top has five units. We concentrate on the so-called "Middle Beds," which contain a Middle Stone Age industry characterized by the use of the discoidal reduction technique. A significant typological feature is the presence of formal types such as points, scrapers, awls, and microliths. Special objects consist of grinders/core-axes covered by ochre. Ngalue is one of the few directly-dated Pleistocene sites located along the biogeographical corridor for modern human dispersals that links east, central, and southern Africa, and, with further study, may shed new light on hominin cave habitats during the late Pleistocene.

  5. Monitoring of Radon in Tourist Part of Skocjan Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debevec Gerjevic, Vanja; Jovanovic, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Due to their exceptional significance for cultural and natural heritage, the Škocjan Caves were entered on UNESCO's list of natural and cultural world heritage sites in 1986. Park Škocjan Caves is located in South Eastern part of Slovenia. It was established with aim of conserving and protecting exceptional geomorphological, geological and hydrological outstanding features, rare and endangered plant and animal species, paleontological and archaeological sites, ethnological and architectural characteristics and cultural landscape and for the purpose of ensuring opportunities for suitable development, by the National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia in 1996. Park Škocjan Caves established monitoring that includes caves microclimate parameters: humidity, CO2, wind flow and radon concentration and daughter products. The approach in managing the working place with natural background radiation is complex. Monitoring of Radon has been functioning for more than ten years now. Presentation will show the yearly dynamic observed in the different parts of the caves, related to radon daughter products and other microclimatic data, beside the most convenient measuring technique. Implementing the Slovene legislation in the field of radiation protection, we are obligated to perform special measurements in the caves and also having our guides and workers in the caves regularly examined according to established procedure. The medical exams are performed at Institution of Occupational Safety, Ljubljana in order to monitor the influence of Radon to the workers in the cave. The equivalent dose for each employed person is also established on regular basis and it is part of medical survey of workers in the caves. The survey will be described along with education of the staff working in the caves in the field of radiation protection. An overview of Slovene legislation with practical example on implementation will be demonstrated in the case of Škocjan Caves where the managing

  6. Lava Flows on Io: Modelling Cooling After Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Veeder, G. J.; Johnson, T. V.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    We have modeled the cooling of lava bodies on Io after solidification of the lava, a process that has been little explored since Carr (1986). With recent estimates of lava flow thicknesses on Io ranging from 1 m to 10 m, the modeling of thermal emission from active volcanism must take into account the cooling behaviour after the solidification of the lava, which we model using a finite-element model. Once a lava body is fully solidified, the surface temperature decreases faster, as heat loss is no longer buffered by release of latent heat. This is significant as observed surface temperature is often the only clue available to determine lava surface age. We also find that cooling from the base of the lava is an important process that accelerates the solidification of a flow and therefore subsequent cooling. It is necessary to constrain the cooling process in order to better understand temperature-area relationships on Io's surface and to carry out stochastic modelling of lava flow emplacement.

  7. Lava Flows on Io: Modelling Cooling After Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Veeder, G. J.; Johnson, T. V.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    We have modeled the cooling of lava bodies on Io after solidification of the lava, a process that has been little explored since Carr (1986). With recent estimates of lava flow thicknesses on Io ranging from 1 m to 10 m, the modeling of thermal emission from active volcanism must take into account the cooling behaviour after the solidification of the lava, which we model using a finite-element model. Once a lava body is fully solidified, the surface temperature decreases faster, as heat loss is no longer buffered by release of latent heat. This is significant as observed surface temperature is often the only clue available to determine lava surface age. We also find that cooling from the base of the lava is an important process that accelerates the solidification of a flow and therefore subsequent cooling. It is necessary to constrain the cooling process in order to better understand temperature-area relationships on Io's surface and to carry out stochastic modelling of lava flow emplacement.

  8. Field Detection of Chemical Assimilation in A Basaltic Lava Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, K. E.; Bleacher, J. E.; Needham, D. H.; Evans, C. A.; Whelley, P. L.; Scheidt, S. P.; Williams, D. A.; Rogers, A. D.; Glotch, T.

    2017-01-01

    Lava channels are features seen throughout the inner Solar System, including on Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Flow emplacement is therefore a crucial process in the shaping of planetary surfaces. Many studies, including some completed by members of this team at the December 1974 lava flow, have investigated the dynamics of lava flow emplacement, both on Earth and on the Moon and how pre-flow terrain can impact final channel morphology, but far fewer have focused on how the compositional characteristics of the substrate over which a flow was em-placed influenced its final flow morphology. Within the length of one flow, it is common for flows to change in morphology, a quality linked to rheology (a function of multiple factors including viscosi-ty, temperature, composition, etc.). The relationship between rheology and temperature has been well-studied but less is known about the relationship between an older flow's chemistry and how the interaction between this flow and the new flow might affect lava rheology and therefore emplacement dynamics. Lava erosion. Through visual observations of active terrestrial flows, mechanical erosion by flowing lava has been well-documented. Lava erosion by which flow composition is altered as the active lava melts and assimilates the pre-flow terrain over which it moves is also hypothesized to affect channel formation. However, there is only one previous field study that geochemically documents the process in recent basaltic flow systems.

  9. Documenting Chemical Assimilation in a Basaltic Lava Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, K. E.; Bleacher, J. E.; Needham, D. H.; Evans, C.; Whelley, P. L.; Scheidt, S.; Williams, D.; Rogers, A. D.; Glotch, T.

    2017-01-01

    Lava channels are features seen throughout the inner Solar System, including on Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Flow emplacement is therefore a crucial process in the shaping of planetary surfaces. Many studies have investigated the dynamics of lava flow emplacement, both on Earth and on the Moon [1,2,3] but none have focused on how the compositional and structural characteristics of the substrate over which a flow was emplaced influenced its final flow morphology. Within the length of one flow, it is common for flows to change in morphology, a quality linked to lava rheology (a function of multiple factors including viscosity, temperature, composition, etc.). The relationship between rheology and temperature has been well-studied [4,5,6] but less is understood about the relationship between a pre-flow terrain's chemistry and how the interaction between this flow and the new flow might affect lava rheology and therefore emplacement dynamics. Lava erosion. Through visual observations of active terrestrial flows, lava erosion has been well-documented [i.e. 7,8,9,10]. Lava erosion is the process by which flow composition is altered as the active lava melts and assimilates the pre-flow terrain over which it moves. Though this process has been observed, there is only one instance of where it was been geochemically documented.

  10. Olympus Mons, Mars: Constraints on Lava Flow Silica Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirshner, M.; Jurdy, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    Olympus Mons, Mars, the largest known volcano in our solar system, contains numerous enigmatic lava flow features. Lava tubes have received attention as their final morphologies may offer habitable zones for both native life and human exploration. Such tubes were formed through mechanisms involving several volatile species with significant silica content. Olympus Mons, a shield volcano, might be expected to have flows with silica content similar to that of terrestrial basaltic flows. However, past investigations have estimated a slightly more andesitic composition. Data pertaining to lava tubes such as flow width and slope are collected from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Context Camera, Mars Odyssey's THEMIS instrument, and Mars Express' HRSC instrument. Compiling this data in GIS software allows for extensive mapping and analysis of Olympus Mons' seemingly inactive flow features. A rheological analysis performed on 62 mapped lava tubes utilizes geometric parameters inferred from mapping. Lava was modeled as a Bingham fluid on an inclined plane, allowing for the derivation of lava yield stress. Percent silica content was calculated for each of the 62 mapped flows using a relationship derived from observations of terrestrial lava yield strengths and corresponding silica composition. Results indicate that lava tube flows across Olympus Mons were on average basaltic in nature, occasionally reaching into the andesitic classification: percent silica content is 51% on average and ranges between roughly 40% and 57%.

  11. Small domes on Venus: probable analogs of Icelandic lava shields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garvin, James B.; Williams, Richard S.

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of observed shapes and volumetric estimates, we interpret small, dome-like features on radar images of Venus to be analogs of Icelandic lava-shield volcanoes. Using morphometric data for venusian domes in Aubele and Slyuta (in press), as well as our own measurements of representative dome volumes and areas from Tethus Regio, we demonstrate that the characteristic aspect ratios and flank slopes of these features are consistent with a subclass of low Icelandic lava-shield volcanoes (LILS ). LILS are slightly convex in cross-section with typical flank slopes of ∼3°. Plausible lava-shield-production rates for the venusian plains suggest formation of ∼53 million shields over the past 0.25 Ga. The cumulative global volume of lava that would be associated with this predicted number of lava shields is only a factor of 3–4 times that of a single oceanic composite shield volcano such as Mauna Loa. The global volume of all venusian lava shields in the 0.5–20-km size range would only contribute a meter of resurfacing over geologically significant time scales. Thus, venusian analogs to LILS may represent the most abundant landform on the globally dominant plains of Venus, but would be insignificant with regard to the global volume of lava extruded. As in Iceland, associated lavas from fissure eruptions probably dominate plains volcanism and should be evident on the higher resolution Magellan radar images.

  12. Joint analysis of deformation, gravity, and lava lake elevation reveals temporal variations in lava lake density at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Daniele; Poland, Michael; Patrick, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    We find a tight correlation between (i) changes in lava level within the summit eruptive vent at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, observed for at least 2 years since early 2011, and (ii) ground deformation in the vicinity of the vent. The observed correlation indicates that changing pressure within the shallow magma reservoir feeding the lava lake influences both deformation and lava level. However, those two parameters are related to chamber pressure through different properties, namely, the density of the lava filling the vent (for the lava level) and the size/position of the reservoir plus the elastic parameters of the host rock (for the deformation). Joint analyses in the time and frequency domains of lava level (determined from thermal camera imagery of the lava lake) and tilt measured on a borehole instrument (~2 km from the summit vent) reveal a good correlation throughout the studied period. The highest correlation occurs over periods ranging between 1 and 20 days. The ratio between lava level and tilt is not constant over time, however. Using data from a continuously recording gravimeter located near the rim of the summit eruptive vent, we demonstrate that the tilt-lava level ratio is controlled by the fluctuations in the density of the lava inside the vent (i.e., its degree of vesicularity). A second continuous gravimeter was installed near the summit eruptive vent in 2014, providing a new observation point for gravity change associated with summit lava lave activity to test models developed from the previously existing instrument. In addition, a continuous gravimeter was installed on the rim of the Puu Oo eruptive vent on Kilauea's East Rift Zone in 2013. Puu Oo is connected via the subvolcanic magma plumbing system to the summit eruptive vent and often deforms in concert with the summit. This growing network of continuously recording gravimeters at Kilauea can be used to examine correlations in gravity change associated with variations in eruptive activity

  13. Monitoring of cave air temperature and humidity in the Niedźwiedzia Cave system (Sudetes, Poland) - a key to understanding tourists activity impact to cave environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasiorowski, M.; Hercman, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Niedźwiedzia Cave is located in Śnieżnik Massif (the Easter Sudetes, SW Poland) at 800 m a.s.l. The length of known passages is ~3000 m and denivelation is 69 m. The system is composed of 3 levels of passages and chambers. It is a show cave with ~80,000 visitors every year. In 2010 we started monitoring program of cave air temperature and humidity, drip rate, stable isotopes and Uranium and Polonium content in water in selected sites inside the cave and in its vicinity. Changes in dropping rate in upper level are well correlated with precipitation. However, a response of dripping to rainfall depends on former precipitation frequency and intensity - during the humid period the dripping reacts immediately and after long dry period dripping responses with two-weeks delay. There is not so direct correlation between precipitation and dripping in lower level of the system. Air temperature inside the cave is almost stable in lower level (mean annual ~5.3 °C, and annual variation up to 0.7 °C) and more dynamic in the middle level (mean annual ~6.4 °C, and mean annual amplitude up to 4 °C). Daily and weekly measured changes of cave air temperature demonstrate extremely well correlation with number of visitors. In show cave passages (the middle level of the system) temperature increase 0.1-0.2 °C during every day when the cave is open for tourists and such changes is not observed during days without visitors and in lower level of the system closed for tourists. But even short visits of 3-4 cavers are recorded by temperature sensors exposed in the lower level (~0.02 °C increase). It proves very high sensitivity of cave environment to human activity. This study is funded by the National Science Centre and Higher Education grant no. N N306 131038.

  14. Lava inundation zone maps for Mauna Loa, Island of Hawaiʻi, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, Frank A.; Zoeller, Michael H.

    2017-10-12

    Lava flows from Mauna Loa volcano, on the Island of Hawaiʻi, constitute a significant hazard to people and property. This report addresses those lava flow hazards, mapping 18 potential lava inundation zones on the island.

  15. Carbon dioxide budgets in cave air and carbon in speleothems; insights from a shallow cave in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Frank; Phillips, Dominika

    2017-04-01

    The conventional view that hydrological inputs (e.g. drip-water degassing) comprise the dominant source of cave air CO2 has been challenged by recent studies that emphasise the importance of direct advection of gaseous CO2from above and beneath cave voids (e.g. 'soil air' and 'ground air'). A better understanding of CO2 gas budgets in caves is important, not only for the correct interpretation of δ13C values and 14C activity data in speleothems, but also for an understanding of the wider role of karst in the global carbon cycle as a source or sink of atmospheric CO2. This study presents new results from a combined air-temperature and CO2 monitoring programme at a small multi-chamber cave in SE Ireland (Ballynamintra cave, Co. Waterford), building on an earlier study at this cave (Baldini et al., 2006). Episodic, low-amplitude but temporally coherent diurnal-scale cave air temperature fluctuations detected almost simultaneously by a series of temperature loggers within the cave were used to detect air mass advection. The sequence and pattern of temperature fluctuations at different locations within the cave enabled the identification of discrete air-inflow and air-outflow events. These diurnal-scale events occur episodically throughout the year in the winter/ spring and summer/autumn temperature ventilation regimes of the cave. Importantly, changes in cave air pCO2 values recorded by an infra-red logger located in the inner chamber a few metres from the back of the cave occur contemporaneously with the air-mass displacement events, and are consistent with direct advection of CO2-rich soil air via fractures in the subjacent cave roof and walls. In the winter regime, episodic diurnal-scale air outflow events draw CO2-rich air over the logger, resulting in short-lived pulses of air, typically containing c. 0.7% CO2 (by volume), several times the ambient cave air CO2 values at this site. Similar events occur during the summer/autumn thermal regime, but these reach

  16. Identifying and Describing a Seismogenic Zone in a Sublevel Caving Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolfazlzadeh, Yousef; Hudyma, Marty

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of caving-induced seismicity can aid in the understanding of rock mass behaviour in the different stages of the caving process. A detailed analysis of caving-induced seismicity at the Telfer sublevel caving mine was undertaken. Interpretation of seismic data in the Telfer mine showed the influence of the major geological features on cave behaviour and helped to identify the phases of cave evolution. Two geological zones with unique seismic characteristics (the M50 and M30 stiff reefs) and four key caving phases (initial undercut blasting, cave initiation, cave propagation and breakthrough) were defined through seismic data analysis. Movement of the seismogenic zone was significantly affected by the stiff reefs within the cave column. Seismic source parameter analysis was used to investigate caving mechanisms at Telfer.

  17. Analysis of inflated submarine and sub-lacustrine Pahoehoe lava flows using high-resolution bathymetric and lidar data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, A.; Van Vliet-Lanoe, B.; Soule, S. A.; Allemand, P.; Le Saout, M.; Delacourt, C.

    2013-12-01

    . For example, the Hells Half Acres Holocene lava flows, Idaho, display similar morphology as EPR flows, with sheet lavas, flow lobes 5-8 m high and approximately 100 m wide, and pressure ridges. Similar flows are observed in the ESRP: Craters of the Moon, Wapi, and Cerro Grande lava flows for example. In Oregon, Potholes, Devils Garden, Diamond Craters, Deschute River, Owyhee River, Jordan Crater flows are also strictly comparable. In Iceland, Lake Mytvan lava flows, for example, were emplaced in sublacustrine environments, and Budahraun flows in Snaefellness were emplaced at the coast below the sea level. The common point of these presently "aerial" lava flow is their emplacement in lakes, paleo-lakes and river beds, thus in "wet" environment, often controlled by rivers and their tributaries. A more efficient cooling of the lava lobes in wet environment probably triggers the development of strong and plastic margins due to cooling, which resists continued movement of the flow, whereas a thinner margin developing in aerial environment may favor lobe break out when internal pressure rises above the tensile strength of the crust. We propose a theoretical model for these lava flow emplacement on sub-horizontal basement.

  18. Analysis of inflated submarine and sub-lacustrine Pahoehoe lava flows using high-resolution bathymetric and lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, A.; Soule, S. A.; Le Saout, M.; Allemand, P.

    2012-12-01

    , the Hells Half Acres Holocene lava flows, Idaho, display similar morphology as EPR flows, with sheet lavas, flow lobes 5-8 m high and approximately 100 m wide, and pressure ridges. Similar flows are observed in the ESRP: Craters of the Moon, Wapi, and Cerro Grande lava flows for example. In Oregon, Potholes, Devils Garden, Diamond Craters, Deschute River, Owyhee River, Jordan Crater flows are also strictly comparable. In Iceland, Lake Mytvan lava flows, for example, were emplaced in sublacustrine environments, and Budahraun flows in Snaefellness were emplaced at the coast below the sea level. The common point of these presently "aerial" lava flow is their emplacement in lakes, paleo-lakes and river beds, thus in "wet" environment, often controlled by rivers and their tributaries. A more efficient cooling of the lava lobes in wet environment probably triggers the development of strong and plastic margins due to cooling, which resists continued movement of the flow, whereas a thinner margin developing in aerial environment may favor lobe break out when internal pressure rises above the tensile strength of the crust. We propose a theoretical model for these lava flow emplacement on sub-horizontal basement.

  19. A geochronological approach for cave evolution in the Cantabrian Coast (Pindal Cave, NW Spain)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jimenez-Sanchez, M.; Bischoff, J.L.; Stoll, H.; Aranburu, A.

    2006-01-01

    Some of the oldest speleothems in the North Cantabrian Coast (Spain) are reported for the first time in this work. Pindal Cave is developed at 24 m above sea level, in a karstic massif reaching its highest surface in a marine terrace (rasa) located at 50-64 m above the present sea level. Several phases of evolution were previously recognized into the cave, including block collapse of the roof, episodic flooding and detrital sedimentation, and chemical precipitation of at least four speleothem generations over both alluvial and collapse deposits. Three of these speleothem generations have been dated by U/Th. The first generation yielded ages from 124,2 ?? 1, 5 ka BP to 73,1 ?? 0,9 ka BP, giving a minimum age for the main detritic sediments in the cave. The second one is not dated. The third generation gives an age of 3,71 ?? 0,4 ka BP (mathematically corrected to 2.7 ?? 0.5 ka BP), while for the youngest generation, with actively growing stalagmites in the cave, basal ages of 200 years BP are estimated by counting annual laminae. The data suggest a tentative maximum elevation rate close to 0, 2 mm/yr for the Cantabrian Margin in this area, although further chronological studies will be needed to check this hypothesis. ?? 2006 Gebru??der Borntraeger.

  20. A burial cave in the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

    PubMed

    West, Dixie; Lefèvre, Christine; Corbett, Debra; Crockford, Susan

    2003-01-01

    During the 1998 field season, the Western Aleutians Archaeological and Paleobiological Project (WAAPP) team located a cave in the Near Islands, Alaska. Near the entrance of the cave, the team identified work areas and sleeping/sitting areas surrounded by cultural debris and animal bones. Human burials were found in the cave interior. In 2000, with permission from The Aleut Corporation, archaeologists revisited the site. Current research suggests three distinct occupations or uses for this cave. Aleuts buried their dead in shallow graves at the rear of the cave circa 1,200 to 800 years ago. Aleuts used the front of the cave as a temporary hunting camp as early as 390 years ago. Finally, Japanese and American military debris and graffiti reveal that the cave was visited during and after World War II. Russian trappers may have also taken shelter there 150 to 200 years ago. This is the first report of Aleut cave burials west of the Delarof Islands in the central Aleutians.

  1. Radon survey in caves from Mallorca Island, Spain.

    PubMed

    Dumitru, Oana A; Onac, Bogdan P; Fornós, Joan J; Cosma, Constantin; Ginés, Angel; Ginés, Joaquín; Merino, Antoni

    2015-09-01

    This study reports radon concentration in the most representative caves of Mallorca, identifying those in which the recommended action level is exceeded, thus posing health risks. Two show caves (Campanet and Artà) and three non-touristic caves (Font, Drac, Vallgornera) were investigated. Data were collected at several locations within each cave for three different periods, from March 2013 to March 2014. Except for Vallgornera, where only one monitoring period was possible, and Artà in which low values were recorded throughout the year, a clear seasonal variability, with higher values during the warm seasons and lower during winter time is prominent. Radon concentrations differed markedly from one cave to another, as well as within the same cave, ranging from below detection limit up to 3060 Bq·m(-3). The results of this study have significant practical implications, making it possible to provide some recommendation to cave administrators and other agencies involved in granting access to the investigated caves. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Oldest Cave Art: An Essay on Giftedness and Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Maureen; White, David A.

    1996-01-01

    This essay examines issues of giftedness and excellence, beginning with classical references to human striving toward the "good," the attraction of gifted children to quality, and the recent discovery of the oldest known cave art with its manifest excellence. Classroom activities related to cave art and language arts, social studies,…

  3. 36 CFR 7.36 - Mammoth Cave National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mammoth Cave National Park. 7.36 Section 7.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.36 Mammoth Cave National Park. (a) Fishing—(1...

  4. 36 CFR 7.36 - Mammoth Cave National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mammoth Cave National Park. 7.36 Section 7.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.36 Mammoth Cave National Park. (a) Fishing—(1...

  5. 36 CFR 7.36 - Mammoth Cave National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mammoth Cave National Park. 7.36 Section 7.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.36 Mammoth Cave National Park. (a) Fishing—(1...

  6. 36 CFR 7.36 - Mammoth Cave National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mammoth Cave National Park. 7.36 Section 7.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.36 Mammoth Cave National Park. (a) Fishing—(1...

  7. Evolution and development in cave animals: from fish to crustaceans

    PubMed Central

    Protas, Meredith; Jeffery, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Cave animals are excellent models to study the general principles of evolution as well as the mechanisms of adaptation to a novel environment: the perpetual darkness of caves. In this article, two of the major model systems used to study the evolution and development (evo–devo) of cave animals are described: the teleost fish Astyanax mexicanus and the isopod crustacean Asellus aquaticus. The ways in which these animals match the major attributes expected of an evo–devo cave animal model system are described. For both species, we enumerate the regressive and constructive troglomorphic traits that have evolved during their adaptation to cave life, the developmental and genetic basis of these traits, the possible evolutionary forces responsible for them, and potential new areas in which these model systems could be used for further exploration of the evolution of cave animals. Furthermore, we compare the two model cave animals to investigate the mechanisms of troglomorphic evolution. Finally, we propose a few other cave animal systems that would be suitable for development as additional models to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the developmental and genetic mechanisms involved in troglomorphic evolution. PMID:23580903

  8. 36 CFR 7.68 - Russell Cave National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Russell Cave National Monument. 7.68 Section 7.68 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.68 Russell Cave National Monument....

  9. THE MID-LATITUDE BIODIVERSITY RIDGE IN TERRESTRIAL CAVE FAUNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The world's obligate cave-dwelling fauna holds considerable promise for biogeographic analysis because it represents a large number of independent evolutionary experiments in isolation in caves and adaptation to subterranean life. We focus on seven north temperate regions of at l...

  10. The Oldest Cave Art: An Essay on Giftedness and Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Maureen; White, David A.

    1996-01-01

    This essay examines issues of giftedness and excellence, beginning with classical references to human striving toward the "good," the attraction of gifted children to quality, and the recent discovery of the oldest known cave art with its manifest excellence. Classroom activities related to cave art and language arts, social studies,…

  11. THE MID-LATITUDE BIODIVERSITY RIDGE IN TERRESTRIAL CAVE FAUNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The world's obligate cave-dwelling fauna holds considerable promise for biogeographic analysis because it represents a large number of independent evolutionary experiments in isolation in caves and adaptation to subterranean life. We focus on seven north temperate regions of at l...

  12. Guanophilic fungi in three caves of southwestern Puerto Rico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fifty species of guanophilic (bat guano-loving) fungi were isolated from field-collected samples within three caves in south-western Puerto Rico; most were mitosporic fungi (23 species). The caves studied were Cueva La Tuna (Cabo Rojo), Cueva de Malano (Sistema de Los Chorros, San Germán), and Cuev...

  13. Aspergillosis of the Petrous Apex and Meckel's Cave.

    PubMed

    Ederies, Ash; Chen, Joseph; Aviv, Richard I; Pirouzmand, Farhad; Bilbao, Juan M; Thompson, Andrew L; Symons, Sean P

    2010-05-01

    Cranial cerebral aspergillosis is a rare entity in immunocompetent patients. Invasive disease involving the petrous apex and Meckel's cave has rarely been described. We present a case of localized invasive petrous apical and Meckel's cave disease in an immunocompetent patient who presented with hemicranial neuralgic pain.

  14. Intratentorial lipomas with Meckel's cave and cerebellopontine angle extension.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, M J; Robles, H A; Rao, K C; Armonda, R A; Ondra, S L

    1995-08-01

    An unusual case of bilateral intratentorial lipomas with extension into Meckel's caves and the cerebellopontine angle is described. Surgical and histopathologic correlation demonstrate that the lipoma encased the trigeminal nerve in Meckel's caves. The origin of the lipoma from the anteromedial margins of the tentorium is discussed and correlated with a recently proposed theory for the development of intracranial lipomas.

  15. Meckel's cave epidermoid with trigeminal neuralgia: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Kapila, A; Steinbaum, S; Chakeres, D W

    1984-12-01

    An epidermoid tumor of Meckel's cave was found in a middle-aged woman with trigeminal neuralgia. On CT the lesion had negative attenuation numbers of fat and extended from an expanded Meckel's cave through the porous trigeminus into the ambient and cerebellopontine angle cisterns. Surgical excision provided relief of the patient's trigeminal neuralgia.

  16. Evolution and development in cave animals: from fish to crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Protas, Meredith; Jeffery, William R

    2012-01-01

    Cave animals are excellent models to study the general principles of evolution as well as the mechanisms of adaptation to a novel environment: the perpetual darkness of caves. In this article, two of the major model systems used to study the evolution and development (evo-devo) of cave animals are described: the teleost fish Astyanax mexicanus and the isopod crustacean Asellus aquaticus. The ways in which these animals match the major attributes expected of an evo-devo cave animal model system are described. For both species, we enumerate the regressive and constructive troglomorphic traits that have evolved during their adaptation to cave life, the developmental and genetic basis of these traits, the possible evolutionary forces responsible for them, and potential new areas in which these model systems could be used for further exploration of the evolution of cave animals. Furthermore, we compare the two model cave animals to investigate the mechanisms of troglomorphic evolution. Finally, we propose a few other cave animal systems that would be suitable for development as additional models to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the developmental and genetic mechanisms involved in troglomorphic evolution.

  17. Morphology and dynamics of inflated subaqueous basaltic lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Anne; Grigné, Cécile; Le Saout, Morgane; Soule, Samuel Adam; Allemand, Pascal; Van Vliet-Lanoe, Brigitte; Floc'h, France

    2014-06-01

    eruptions onto low slopes, basaltic Pahoehoe lava can form thin lobes that progressively coalesce and inflate to many times their original thickness, due to a steady injection of magma beneath brittle and viscoelastic layers of cooled lava that develop sufficient strength to retain the flow. Inflated lava flows forming tumuli and pressure ridges have been reported in different kinds of environments, such as at contemporary subaerial Hawaiian-type volcanoes in Hawaii, La Réunion and Iceland, in continental environments (states of Oregon, Idaho, Washington), and in the deep sea at Juan de Fuca Ridge, the Galapagos spreading center, and at the East Pacific Rise (this study). These lava have all undergone inflation processes, yet they display highly contrasting morphologies that correlate with their depositional environment, the most striking difference being the presence of water. Lava that have inflated in subaerial environments display inflation structures with morphologies that significantly differ from subaqueous lava emplaced in the deep sea, lakes, and rivers. Their height is 2-3 times smaller and their length being 10-15 times shorter. Based on heat diffusion equation, we demonstrate that more efficient cooling of a lava flow in water leads to the rapid development of thicker (by 25%) cooled layer at the flow surface, which has greater yield strength to counteract its internal hydrostatic pressure than in subaerial environments, thus limiting lava breakouts to form new lobes, hence promoting inflation. Buoyancy also increases the ability of a lava to inflate by 60%. Together, these differences can account for the observed variations in the thickness and extent of subaerial and subaqueous inflated lava flows.

  18. Shallow outgassing changes disrupt steady lava lake activity, Kilauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Swanson, D. A.; Lev, E.

    2015-12-01

    Persistent lava lakes are a testament to sustained magma supply and outgassing in basaltic systems, and the surface activity of lava lakes has been used to infer processes in the underlying magmatic system. At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, the lava lake in Halema`uma`u Crater has been closely studied for several years with webcam imagery, geophysical, petrological and gas emission techniques. The lava lake in Halema`uma`u is now the second largest on Earth, and provides an unprecedented opportunity for detailed observations of lava lake outgassing processes. We observe that steady activity is characterized by continuous southward motion of the lake's surface and slow changes in lava level, seismic tremor and gas emissions. This normal, steady activity can be abruptly interrupted by the appearance of spattering - sometimes triggered by rockfalls - on the lake surface, which abruptly shifts the lake surface motion, lava level and gas emissions to a more variable, unstable regime. The lake commonly alternates between this a) normal, steady activity and b) unstable behavior several times per day. The spattering represents outgassing of shallowly accumulated gas in the lake. Therefore, although steady lava lake behavior at Halema`uma`u may be deeply driven by upwelling of magma, we argue that the sporadic interruptions to this behavior are the result of shallow processes occurring near the lake surface. These observations provide a cautionary note that some lava lake behavior is not representative of deep-seated processes. This behavior also highlights the complex and dynamic nature of lava lake activity.

  19. Rheological analyses of lava flows on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.; Davis, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers obtained 183 profiles of lava flows on Mars using photoclinometry. These photoclinometric profiles were leveled by adjusting them until the levee crests or bases had the same elevations (depending on the situation). Here, researchers report some of the results of their analysis of 27 flows on the flanks of Alba Patera (3 flows), near the summit of Ascraeus Mons (6 flows), the flanks of Arsia Mons (3 flows), and the flanks of Olympus Mons (15 flows). Results suggest that the flows examined to date are not felsic or ultramafic; rather, they probably range from basalts to basaltic andesites. Thus, the suggestion that flows on Olympus Mons and elsewhere may be more silicic than Hawaiian basalts is supported by the researchers' results. These suggestions are testable with suitable measurements of silica contents of the flows.

  20. Pluto Heart: Like a Cosmic Lava Lamp

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-01

    Like a cosmic lava lamp, a large section of Pluto's icy surface is being constantly renewed by a process called convection that replaces older surface ices with fresher material. Scientists from NASA's New Horizons mission used state-of-the-art computer simulations to show that the surface of Pluto's informally named Sputnik Planum is covered with churning ice "cells" that are geologically young and turning over due to a process called convection. The scene above, which is about 250 miles (400 kilometers) across, uses data from the New Horizons Ralph/Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), gathered July 14, 2015. Their findings are published in the June 2, 2016, issue of the journal Nature. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20726

  1. Packed Bed Reactor Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The purpose of the Packed Bed Reactor Experiment in low gravity is to determine how a mixture of gas and liquid flows through a packed bed in reduced gravity. A packed bed consists of a metal pipe ...

  2. The longevity of lava dome eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, Robert L.; Ogburn, Sarah E.; Calder, Eliza S.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the duration of past, ongoing, and future volcanic eruptions is an important scientific goal and a key societal need. We present a new methodology for forecasting the duration of ongoing and future lava dome eruptions based on a database (DomeHaz) recently compiled by the authors. The database includes duration and composition for 177 such eruptions, with "eruption" defined as the period encompassing individual episodes of dome growth along with associated quiescent periods during which extrusion pauses but unrest continues. In a key finding, we show that probability distributions for dome eruption durations are both heavy tailed and composition dependent. We construct objective Bayesian statistical models featuring heavy-tailed Generalized Pareto distributions with composition-specific parameters to make forecasts about the durations of new and ongoing eruptions that depend on both eruption duration to date and composition. Our Bayesian predictive distributions reflect both uncertainty about model parameter values (epistemic uncertainty) and the natural variability of the geologic processes (aleatoric uncertainty). The results are illustrated by presenting likely trajectories for 14 dome-building eruptions ongoing in 2015. Full representation of the uncertainty is presented for two key eruptions, Soufriére Hills Volcano in Montserrat (10-139 years, median 35 years) and Sinabung, Indonesia (1-17 years, median 4 years). Uncertainties are high but, importantly, quantifiable. This work provides for the first time a quantitative and transferable method and rationale on which to base long-term planning decisions for lava dome-forming volcanoes, with wide potential use and transferability to forecasts of other types of eruptions and other adverse events across the geohazard spectrum.

  3. Moonshot Laboratories' Lava Relief Google Mapping Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, B.; Tomita, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Moonshot Laboratories were conceived at the University Laboratory School (ULS) on Oahu, Hawaii as way to develop creative problem solvers able to resourcefully apply 21st century technologies to respond to the problems and needs of their communities. One example of this was involved students from ULS using modern mapping and imaging technologies to assist peers who had been displaced from their own school in Pahoe on the Big Island of Hawaii. During 2015, lava flows from the eruption of Kilauea Volcano were slowly encroaching into the district of Puna in 2015. The lava flow was cutting the main town of Pahoa in half, leaving no safe routes of passage into or out of the town. One elementary school in the path of the flow was closed entirely and a new one was erected north of the flow for students living on that side. Pahoa High School students and teachers living to the north were been forced to leave their school and transfer to Kea'au High School. These students were separated from friends, family and the community they grew up in and were being thrust into a foreign environment that until then had been their local rival. Using Google Mapping technologies, Moonshot Laboratories students created a dynamic map to introduce the incoming Pahoa students to their new school in Kea'au. Elements included a stylized My Maps basemap, YouTube video descriptions of the building, videos recorded by Google Glass showing first person experiences, and immersive images of classrooms were created using 360 cameras. During the first day of orientation at Kea'au for the 200 Pahoa students, each of them were given a tablet to view the map as they toured and got to know their new campus. The methods and technologies, and more importantly innovative thinking, used to create this map have enormous potential for how to educate all students about the world around us, and the issues facing it. http://www.moonshotincubator.com/

  4. Correlation of the Deccan and Rajahmundry Trap lavas: Are these the longest and largest lava flows on Earth?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Self, S.; Jay, A.E.; Widdowson, M.; Keszthelyi, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    We propose that the Rajahmundry Trap lavas, found near the east coast of peninsular India, are remnants of the longest lava flows yet recognized on Earth (??? 1000??km long). These outlying Deccan-like lavas are shown to belong to the main Deccan Traps. Several previous studies have already suggested this correlation, but have not demonstrated it categorically. The exposed Rajahmundry lavas are interpreted to be the distal parts of two very-large-volume pa??hoehoe flow fields, one each from the Ambenali and Mahabaleshwar Formations of the Wai Sub-group in the Deccan Basalt Group. Eruptive conditions required to emplace such long flows are met by plausible values for cooling and eruption rates, and this is shown by applying a model for the formation of inflated pa??hoehoe sheet flow lobes. The model predicts flow lobe thicknesses similar to those observed in the Rajahmundry lavas. For the last 400??km of flow, the lava flows were confined to the pre-existing Krishna valley drainage system that existed in the basement beyond the edge of the gradually expanding Deccan lava field, allowing the flows to extend across the subcontinent to the eastern margin where they were emplaced into a littoral and/or shallow marine environment. These lavas and other individual flow fields in the Wai Sub-group may exceed eruptive volumes of 5000??km3, which would place them amongst the largest magnitude effusive eruptive units yet known. We suggest that the length of flood basalt lava flows on Earth is restricted mainly by the size of land masses and topography. In the case of the Rajahmundry lavas, the flows reached estuaries and the sea, where their advance was perhaps effectively terminated by cooling and/or disruption. However, it is only during large igneous province basaltic volcanism that such huge volumes of lava are erupted in single events, and when the magma supply rate is sufficiently high and maintained to allow the formation of very long lava flows. The Rajahmundry lava

  5. THEMIS observes possible cave skylights on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cushing, G.E.; Titus, T.N.; Wynne, J.J.; Christensen, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    Seven possible skylight entrances into Martian caves were observed on and around the flanks of Arsia Mons by the Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). Distinct from impact craters, collapse pits or any other surface feature on Mars, these candidates appear to be deep dark holes at visible wavelengths while infrared observations show their thermal behaviors to be consistent with subsurface materials. Diameters range from 100 m to 225 m, and derived minimum depths range between 68 m and 130 m. Most candidates seem directly related to pitcraters, and may have formed in a similar manner with overhanging ceilings that remain intact. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Adenocarcinoma of Meckel's cave: case report.

    PubMed

    Tacconi, L; Arulampalam, T; Johnston, F; Symon, L

    1995-12-01

    A rare localization of adenocarcinoma in Meckel's cave is reported in a 58-year-old woman, who had a 5-month history of pain and altered sensation in the second division of the left trigeminal nerve. Removal of the lesion was achieved by a subtemporal route. Histology showed this to be an adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent investigations for a primary tumor; the investigations were all negative, and the patient was subsequently treated with a course of radiotherapy. At 4-month follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence, and she remains symptomatically well. The various mechanisms of secondary localization are discussed.

  7. Similarities in basalt and rhyolite lava flow emplacement processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnall, Nathan; James, Mike; Tuffen, Hugh; Vye-Brown, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    Here we use field observations of rhyolite and basalt lava flows to show similarities in flow processes that span compositionally diverse lava flows. The eruption, and subsequent emplacement, of rhyolite lava flows is currently poorly understood due to the infrequency with which rhyolite eruptions occur. In contrast, the emplacement of basaltic lava flows are much better understood due to very frequent eruptions at locations such as Mt Etna and Hawaii. The 2011-2012 eruption of Cordón Caulle in Chile enabled the first scientific observations of the emplacement of an extensive rhyolite lava flow. The 30 to 100 m thick flow infilled a topographic depression with a negligible slope angle (0 - 7°). The flow split into two main channels; the southern flow advanced 4 km while the northern flow advanced 3 km before stalling. Once the flow stalled the channels inflated and secondary flows or breakouts formed from the flow front and margins. This cooling rather than volume-limited flow behaviour is common in basaltic lava flows but had never been observed in rhyolite lava flows. We draw on fieldwork conducted at Cordón Caulle and at Mt Etna to compare the emplacement of rhyolite and basaltic flows. The fieldwork identified emplacement features that are present in both lavas, such as inflation, breakouts from the flow font and margins, and squeeze-ups on the flow surfaces. In the case of Cordón Caulle, upon extrusion of a breakout it inflates due to a combination of continued lava supply and vesicle growth. This growth leads to fracturing and breakup of the breakout surface, and in some cases a large central fracture tens of metres deep forms. In contrast, breakouts from basaltic lava flows have a greater range of morphologies depending on the properties of the material in the flows core. In the case of Mt Etna, a range of breakout morphologies are observed including: toothpaste breakouts, flows topped with bladed lava as well as breakouts of pahoehoe or a'a lava. This

  8. Lost Jim Lava Flow, Seward Peninsula, Alaska as an analog for lava-ice interactions on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcucci, E.; Hamilton, C.; Herrick, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    On Mars, volcanism within Elysium Planitia may have occurred as recently as ~10 million years ago, which associated lava flows being emplaced with ice-bearing permafrost. On Earth, there are few active volcanic regions that are cold enough to support permafrost, but the Seward Peninsula in Alaska is a prime location to study recent volcano-ice interactions. In the early 2000s, J.E. Beget and J.S. Kargel explored two areas in Alaska that exhibit features characteristic of explosive volcanism that may be the result of lava-ice interaction. These locations include the Lost Jim Lava Flow (65°29'N, 163°17'W) and several large maars (66°23'N, 164°29'W). The work presented here focuses on the Lost Jim Lava Flow, emanating from Lost Jim Cone and flowing West and North. The flow was erupted 1000-2000 years ago, covers ~225 km2, and ranges 3-30 m in thickness. Previous fieldwork identified pits along the margins of the flow that were interpreted to be collapse features (i.e., thermokarst) that formed as ground-ice beneath the lava melted due to heat transfer from the overlaying lava flow. This investigation utilizes stereo photogrammetry to generate high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) of these flow features to assess if these pits are indeed the products of thermokarstification, or if they are lava-rise pits formed by lava flow inflation. The DTMs were generated from ALOS PRISM data and DigitalGlobe Worldview 1 and 2 panchromatic satellite images taken as stereo-pairs or -triplets. With these new models the extent and morphology of the flow and pits will be categorized across the entire flow. These results are also compared to young lava flows on Mars, which may have experienced lava-ice interactions. Understanding the expression of such interactions on Earth may aid in the identification and interpretation of analogous eruptions on Mars.

  9. Fossil invertebrates records in cave sediments and paleoenvironmental assessments: a study of four cave sites from Romanian Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, O. T.; Constantin, S.; Panaiotu, C.; Roban, R. D.; Frenzel, P.; Miko, L.

    2015-06-01

    Fossil invertebrates from cave sediments have been recently described as a potential new proxy for paleoenvironment and used in cross-correlations with alternate proxy records from cave deposits. Here we present the results of a fossil invertebrates study in four caves from two climatically different regions of the Romanian Carpathians, to complement paleoenvironmental data previously reported. Oribatid mites and ostracods are the most common invertebrates in the studied cave sediments. Some of the identified taxa are new for science, and most of them are indicative for either warm/cold stages or dry/wetter oscillations. In two caves the fossil invertebrates records indicate rapid climate oscillations during times known for a relatively stable climate. By corroborating the fossil invertebrates' record with the information given by magnetic properties and sediment structures, complementary data on past vegetation, temperatures, and hydraulic regimes could be gathered. This paper analyses the potential of fossil invertebrate records as a paleoenvironmental proxy, potential problems and pitfalls.

  10. Geomorphological maps and 3d models in cave research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Daniel; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; José Domínguez-Cuesta, María

    2013-04-01

    Cave geomorphological processes and features can be studied by geomorphological maps although topographic maps, aerial photos and GPS are not available. Methods in cave geomorphological mapping are conditioned by cave environment configuration, the need of using speleological techniques, and limitations arising from the projection of the 3D data from the cave to a 2D plan. Some of our previous works in the Cantabrian Mountains and Cantabrian Coast (NW Spain) established the approach of the design of cave geomorphological maps and its legend. Today we are improving the display of cave process combining geomorphological maps and 3d models based on the experience obtained from the research of one cave from the Cantabrian Coast and four caves in the Picos de Europa National Park (funded by GEOCAVE project, Spanish National Parks Agency). The five caves are developed in Carboniferous limestone affected by faults and thrusts. The method of work includes: 1) the elaboration of the cave survey at 1:50 to 1:500 scale; 2) the check of the cave survey of three caves by closed loops; 3) the mapping of cave features based on the performed survey; 4) the 3d modeling of the caves approximating each survey shoot by an octagonal prism; and 5) the implementation and management of the survey and geomorphological map in a Geographic Information System. Based on the survey, the cavities are small caves to deep alpine shafts with 281 to 4,438 m length and up to 738 m deep. The precision of the cave maps only could be estimated in two caves at a cavity scale, displaying both of them a 2.49 % error. The prisms of the 3d model was classified into four groups according to the morphology of the cave passage: 1) canyons, 2) phreatic and epiphreatic tubes, 3) soutirage conduits, 4) mixed forms composed by phreatic and epiphreatic tubes modified by fluvial incision, 5) pitches and 6) irregular passages enlarged strongly by gravity process. According to our previous works geomorphological

  11. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, and COMSOL. Using the new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (Geol Soc SP, 2015) as a guide, we model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal and sloping surfaces, topographic obstacles, and digital elevation models of natural topography. We compare model results to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We can apply these models to reconstruct past lava flows in Hawai'i and Saudi Arabia using parameters assembled from morphology, textural analysis, and eruption observations as natural test cases. Our study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection.

  12. A comparative Study of Circulation Patterns at Active Lava Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Einat; Oppenheimer, Clive; Spampinato, Letizia; Hernandez, Pedro; Unglert, Kathi

    2016-04-01

    Lava lakes present a rare opportunity to study magma dynamics in a large scaled-up "crucible" and provide a unique natural laboratory to ground-truth dynamic models of magma circulation. The persistence of lava lakes allows for long-term observations of flow dynamics and of lava properties, especially compared to surface lava flows. There are currently five persistent lava lakes in the world: Halemaumau in Kilauea (Hawaii, USA), Erta Ale (Ethiopia), Nyiragongo (Congo), Erebus (Antarctica), and Villarica (Chile). Marum and Benbow craters of Ambrym volcano (Vanuatu) and Masaya (Nicaragua) have often hosted lava lakes as well. We use visible-light and thermal infrared time-lapse and video footage collected at all above lakes (except Villarica, where the lake is difficult to observe), and compare the circulation patterns recorded. We calculate lake surface motion from the footage using the optical flow method (Lev et al., 2012) to produce 2D velocity fields. We mined both the surface temperature field and the surface velocity field for patterns using machine learning techniques such as "self-organizing maps (SOMs)" and "principle component analysis (PCA)". We use automatic detection technique to study the configuration of crustal plates at the lakes' surface. We find striking differences among the lakes, in flow direction, flow speed, frequency of changes in flow direction and speed, location and consistency of upwelling and downwelling, and crustal plate configuration. We relate the differences to lake size, shallow conduit geometry, lava viscosity, crystal and gas content, and crust integrity.

  13. Red Hot: Determining the Physical Properties of Lava Lake Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, C.; Lev, E.

    2015-12-01

    Lava lakes are the surface expression of conduits that bring magma to the mouth of a volcano from deep within the earth. Time-lapse footage from a thermal imaging camera at Halema'uma'u lake at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii was used to investigate the cooling rate of the lava lake's surface. The data was then combined with an analytical model of lava flow cooling to constrain the porosity of the lava lake skin. The data was processed to account for the influence that the camera's position relative to the lake had on the image geometry and the recorded temperature values. We examined lake cooling in two separate scenarios: First, we calculated the cooling rate of the skin immediately after large gas bubbles burst at the lake's surface. Second, the temperature of the skin was measured as a function of distance from molten spreading centers (cracks) on the surface, and then converted to cooling as a function of the skin's age using the local lake surface velocity. The resulting cooling time-series were compared against cooling curves produced by a model that simulates lava flow cooling based on a myriad of physical factors. We performed quantitative data analysis to determine the approximate porosity of the lava lake skin. Preliminary comparisons reveal that the calculated cooling rates most closely correspond to the cooling curves that were produced with a lava porosity value of at least 80%.

  14. Radon as a natural tracer for underwater cave exploration.

    PubMed

    Csondor, Katalin; Erőss, Anita; Horváth, Ákos; Szieberth, Dénes

    2017-07-01

    The Molnár János cave is one of the largest hypogenic caves of the Buda Thermal Karst (Budapest, Hungary) and mainly characterized by water-filled passages. The major outflow point of the waters of the cave system is the Boltív spring, which feeds the artificial Malom Lake. Previous radon measurements in the cave system and in the spring established the highest radon concentration (71 BqL(-1)) in the springwater. According to previous studies, the origin of radon was identified as iron-hydroxide containing biofilms, which form where there is mixing of cold and thermal waters, and these biofilms efficiently adsorb radium from the thermal water component. Since mixing of waters is responsible for the formation of the cave as well, these iron-hydroxide containing biofilms and the consequent high radon concentrations mark the active cave forming zones. Based on previous radon measurements, it is supposed that the active mixing and cave forming zone has to be close to the spring, since the highest radon concentration was measured there. Therefore radon mapping was carried out with the help of divers in order to get a spatial distribution of radon in the cave passages closest to the spring. Based on our measurements, the highest radon activity concentration (84 BqL(-1)) was found in the springwater. Based on the distribution of radon activity concentrations, direct connection was established between the spring and the István-room of the cave, which was verified by an artificial tracer. However, the distribution of radon in the cave passages shows lower concentrations (18-46 BqL(-1)) compared to the spring, therefore an additional deep inflow from hitherto unknown cave passages is assumed, from which waters with high radon content arrive to the spring. These passages are assumed to be in the active cave formation zone. This study proved that radon activity concentration distribution is a useful tool in underwater cave exploration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  15. Soft-bottom crustacean assemblages in Mediterranean marine caves: the cave of Cerro Gordo (Granada, Spain) as case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Barranco, C.; Guerra-García, J. M.; Sánchez-Tocino, L.; García-Gómez, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Although marine caves are priority conservation areas according to the Directive 92/43/CEE of the European Community, there is a lack of studies dealing with their soft-bottom communities. For a case study, we selected the Cerro Gordo cave at 15 m depth. Three different zones were defined: a semi-dark 25-m long entrance area, a dark intermediate area of 35 m, and the final zone at 90 m from the entrance. Sediment samples were taken from these zones as well as from outside the cave (control) by SCUBA diving. Six rectangular cores of 10 × 250 cm2 were collected in each site for macrofaunal study, and three more replicates were taken to analyze physico-chemical parameters. The granulometry showed a clear gradient from medium sands outside the cave to silt and clay in the inner zone. Measurements of the crustacean assemblages showed that the number of species and abundance were significantly higher outside the cave (30-40 species, >4,000 ind m-2) than inside (5-10 species, <1,000 ind m-2). Multivariate analyses showed a clear difference in species composition between outside and inside the cave. Caprellids, tanaids, cumaceans, and decapods were only found outside the cave, while gammarids and isopods were present both outside and inside the cave. The gammarid Siphonoecetes sabatieri and the tanaid Apseudes latreilli were the dominant species outside the cave, while the gammarids Harpinia pectinata, Harpinia crenulata, and Harpinia ala were dominant inside. The present study represents an increase in depth range and geographic distribution for Kupellonura mediterranea and Monoculodes packardi. This is the first description of soft-bottom crustacean communities from submarine caves of southern Spain.

  16. Lava flow dynamics driven by temperature-dependent viscosity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniega, S.; Smrekar, S. E.; Anderson, S. W.; Stofan, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    As lava viscosity can change 1-2 orders of magnitude due to small changes in temperature, several studies have predicted the formation of low-viscosity/high-temperature "fingers" (similar to a Saffman-Taylor type instability) within an initially near-uniform flow. We examine the onset and evolution of such fingers within a uniform lava sheet flow due to an influx of lava with slightly-variable temperature. We assume Hele-shaw-type geometry (depth << other dimensions), Newtonian and laminar fluid flow, a simple Nahme's exponential law relating temperature and viscosity, and radiative heat-loss through the flow's upper surface. Through the use of numerical simulation and steady-state analysis of model equations, we identify solutions that provide pahoehoe lava flows with a natural mechanism for the formation of lava channels/tubes within a sheet flow. Preliminary results indicate that flow-focusing occurs rapidly due to the thermo-viscosity relation, but zones of hotter flow commonly settle into a new steady-state and it is difficult to create perpetually-lengthening hot-fingers of lava (which seem more physically similar to developing lava tubes). This suggests that additional and/or discontinuous physical processes (such as decreasing radiative rates due to thickening of the surface crust or crystallization abruptly retarding flow within lower-temperature regions) may play important roles in the continued growth of preferred flow zones. We also derive qualitative and quantitative estimates of environmental controls on finger size, spacing, and location. This work has application to Earth and planetary volcanology studies as pahoehoe flows dominate terrestrial basaltic lavas and the eruption/emplacement mechanics that yield long lava flows on the Earth and Mars are not yet well understood.

  17. Improvement of a 2D numerical model of lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimine, Y.

    2013-12-01

    I propose an improved procedure that reduces an improper dependence of lava flow directions on the orientation of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) in two-dimensional simulations based on Ishihara et al. (in Lava Flows and Domes, Fink, JH eds., 1990). The numerical model for lava flow simulations proposed by Ishihara et al. (1990) is based on two-dimensional shallow water model combined with a constitutive equation for a Bingham fluid. It is simple but useful because it properly reproduces distributions of actual lava flows. Thus, it has been regarded as one of pioneer work of numerical simulations of lava flows and it is still now widely used in practical hazard prediction map for civil defense officials in Japan. However, the model include an improper dependence of lava flow directions on the orientation of DEM because the model separately assigns the condition for the lava flow to stop due to yield stress for each of two orthogonal axes of rectangular calculating grid based on DEM. This procedure brings a diamond-shaped distribution as shown in Fig. 1 when calculating a lava flow supplied from a point source on a virtual flat plane although the distribution should be circle-shaped. To improve the drawback, I proposed a modified procedure that uses the absolute value of yield stress derived from both components of two orthogonal directions of the slope steepness to assign the condition for lava flows to stop. This brings a better result as shown in Fig. 2. Fig. 1. (a) Contour plots calculated with the original model of Ishihara et al. (1990). (b) Contour plots calculated with a proposed model.

  18. Seven Possible Cave Skylights on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Seven very dark holes on the north slope of a Martian volcano have been proposed as possible cave skylights, based on day-night temperature patterns suggesting they are openings to subsurface spaces. These six excerpts of images taken in visible-wavelength light by the Thermal Emission Imaging System camera on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter show the seven openings. Solar illumination comes from the left in each frame. The volcano is Arsia Mons, at 9 degrees south latitude, 239 degrees east longitude.

    The features have been given informal names to aid comparative discussion (see figure 1). They range in diameter from about 100 meters (328 feet) to about 225 meters (738 feet). The candidate cave skylights are (A) 'Dena,' (B) 'Chloe,' (C) 'Wendy,' (D) 'Annie,' (E) 'Abby' (left) and 'Nikki,' and (F) 'Jeanne.' Arrows signify north and the direction of illumination.

    Mars Odyssey is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. The orbiter's Thermal Emission Imaging System was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing, Santa Barbara, Calif., and is operated by Arizona State University.

  19. Studies of Cave Sediments: Physical and Chemical Records of Paleoclimate (Revised Edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Andy

    2007-10-01

    Caves have long fascinated humankind, from prehistory to present-day tourism. Caves are also a subject for a range of scientific investigations, including cave biology, archaeology, paleoclimatology, geology, hydrology, and geomorphology. One of the benefits caves provide is their role as a repository of material that might not otherwise survive on the Earth's surface, due to caves' interiors being protected from physical erosion by nature of their underground locations. Studies of Cave Sediments focuses on this role as a repository, in particular on Quaternary (historic to 1.8 million years old) paleoclimate information preserved in cave sediments.

  20. Numerical simulation of lava flows: Applications to the terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, James R.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Kousoum, Juliana; Lampkin, Derrick J.

    1993-01-01

    Lava flows are the visible expression of the extrusion of volcanic materials on a variety of planetary surfaces. A computer program described by Ishihara et al. appears to be well suited for application to different environments, and we have undertaken tests to evaluate their approach. Our results are somewhat mixed; the program does reproduce reasonable lava flow behavior in many situations, but we have encountered some conditions common to planetary environments for which the current program is inadequate. Here we present our initial efforts to identify the 'parameter space' for reasonable numerical simulations of lava flows.

  1. Map Showing Lava Inundation Zones for Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, F.A.; Graves, P.; Tincher, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The Island of Hawaii is composed of five coalesced basaltic volcanoes. Lava flows constitute the greatest volcanic hazard from these volcanoes. This report is concerned with lava flow hazards on Mauna Loa, the largest of the island shield volcanoes. Hilo lies 58 km from the summit of Mauna Loa, the Kona coast 33 km, and the southernmost point of the island 61 km. Hawaiian volcanoes erupt two morphologically distinct types of lava, aa and pahoehoe. The surfaces of pahoehoe flows are rather smooth and undulating. Pahoehoe flows are commonly fed by lava tubes, which are well insulated, lava-filled conduits contained within the flows. The surfaces of aa flows are extremely rough and composed of lava fragments. Aa flows usually form lava channels rather than lava tubes. In Hawaii, lava flows are known to reach distances of 50 km or more. The flows usually advance slowly enough that people can escape from their paths. Anything overwhelmed by a flow will be damaged or destroyed by burial, crushing, or ignition. Mauna Loa makes up 51 percent of the surface area of the Island of Hawaii. Geologic mapping shows that lava flows have covered more than 40 percent of the surface every 1,000 years. Since written descriptions of its activity began in A.D. 1832, Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times. Some eruptions begin with only brief seismic unrest, whereas others start several months to a year following increased seismic activity. Once underway, the eruptions can produce lava flows that reach the sea in less than 24 hours, severing roads and utilities. For example, the 1950 flows from the southwest rift zone reached the ocean in approximately three hours. The two longest flows of Mauna Loa are pahoehoe flows from the 50-kilometer-long 1859 and the 48-kilometer-long 1880-81 eruptions. Mauna Loa will undoubtedly erupt again. When it does, the first critical question that must be answered is: Which areas are threatened with inundation? Once the threatened areas are

  2. Modelling the thermal effects of spherulite growth in rhyolitic lava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuffen, H.; Cordonnier, B.; Castro, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Rhyolitic lava flows, sills and dykes commonly comprise a spherulitic interior enveloped by a glassy carapace. Spherulite crystallisation has long been assumed to be a "passive" process that occurs during cooling of the lava around and below its glass transition temperature (~600-700 °C). It has also been suggested to be self-limiting due to diffusion controlled growth, creating only a small proportion of spherulites embedded in glass (snowflake obsidian). However, textures in rhyolitic lava bodies at Hrafntinnuhryggur, Krafla, Iceland indicate that near-complete spherulite crystallisation can occur, and suggest that parts of the lava spatially associated with zones of spherulite and lithophysae growth may be significantly heated. Evidence for heating includes melting of parts of the glassy lava carapace by lower-viscosity, invading melt of identical composition. Additionally, spherulitic crystal morphologies have been grown experimentally at undercoolings of only 100 °C. As the liquidus temperature of dry rhyolite may approach 1200 °C, this means that spherulites could continue to grow in degassed magma at temperatures of >900 °C, well above the initial magma temperature. We use new constraints on spherulite growth rates to model the thermal effects of spherulite growth within rhyolitic lava bodies, using three growth laws (size- and temperature-dependent, diffusion controlled and linear) and a variety of initial temperatures, nucleation densities and seed nuclei sizes. Models consider both latent heat release due to crystallisation and conductive cooling. Model results indicate that, when lava bodies are sufficiently large, spherulite growth can cause considerable heating (possibly >150 °C), enabling parts of lava bodies to heat to above the initial eruption temperature. This heating can lead to a viscosity reduction of orders of magnitude and trigger vesiculation. Model results indicate that cooling rates of between 10-3 to 10-5 °C/s ought to mark the

  3. Comparative analysis between Payen and Daedalia Planum lava fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Massironi, Matteo; Pasquarè, Giorgio; Carli, Cristian; Martellato, Elena; Frigeri, Alessandro; Cremonese, Gabriele; Bistacchi, Andrea; Federico, Costanzo

    The Payen volcanic complex is a large Quaternary fissural structure belonging to the back-arc extensional area of the Andes in the Mendoza Province (Argentina). From the eastern portion of this volcanic structure huge pahoehoe lava flows were emitted, extending more than 180 km from the feeding vents. These huge flows propagated over the nearly flat surface of the Pampean foreland (ca 0.3° slope). The very low viscosity of the olivine basalt lavas, coupled with the inflation process are the most probable explanation for their considerable length. In an inflation process a thin viscoelastic crust, produced at an early stage, is later inflated by the underlying fluid core, which remains hot and fluid thanks to the thermal-shield effect of the crust. The inflation shows some typical morphological fingerprints like tumuli, lava lobes, lava rises and lava ridges. In order to compare the morphology of the Argentinean Payen flows with lava flows on Mars, MOLA, THEMIS, MOC, MRO/HIRISE, and MEX/OMEGA data have been analysed, providing a multi-scale characterisation of Martian flows. Mars Global Surveyor/MOLA data were used to investigate the topographic environment over which flows propagated on Mars in order to detect very low angle slopes where possibly inflation processes could have developed. Then Mars Odyssey/THEMIS and Mars Global Surveyor's MOC data were used to detect Martian lava flows with inflation "fingerprints", whereas OMEGA data were used to obtain some inferences about their composition. Finally the MRO/HIRISE images recently acquired, can provide further details and constraints on surface morphologies and lava fronts. All these data were used to analyze Daedalia Planum lava field, at about 300 km southwest of Arsia Mons, and clear morphological similarities with the longest flows of the Payen lava fields were found. These striking morphological analogies suggest that inflation process is quite common also for the Daedalia field. This is also supported by

  4. Heat transfer measurements of the 1983 kilauea lava flow.

    PubMed

    Hardee, H C

    1983-10-07

    Convective heat flow measurements of a basaltic lava flow were made during the 1983 eruption of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii. Eight field measurements of induced natural convection were made, giving heat flux values that ranged from 1.78 to 8.09 kilowatts per square meter at lava temperatures of 1088 and 1128 degrees Celsius, respectively. These field measurements of convective heat flux at subliquidus temperatures agree with previous laboratory measurements in furnace-melted samples of molten lava, and are useful for predicting heat transfer in magma bodies and for estimating heat extraction rates for magma energy.

  5. Heat-transfer measurements of the 1983 Kilauea lava flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1983-10-07

    Convective heat flow measurements of a basaltic lava flow were made during the 1983 eruption of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii. Eight field measurements of induced natural convection were made, giving heat flux values that ranged from 1.78 to 8.09 kilowatts per square meter at lava temperatures of 1088 and 1128 degrees Celsius, respectively. These field measurements of convective heat flux at subliquidus temperatures agree with previous laboratory measurements in furnace-melted samples of molten lava, and are useful for predicting heat transfer in magma bodies and for estimating heat extraction rates for magma energy.

  6. Under the volcano: phylogeography and evolution of the cave-dwelling Palmorchestia hypogaea (Amphipoda, Crustacea) at La Palma (Canary Islands).

    PubMed

    Villacorta, Carlos; Jaume, Damià; Oromí, Pedro; Juan, Carlos

    2008-01-31

    The amphipod crustacean Palmorchestia hypogaea occurs only in La Palma (Canary Islands) and is one of the few terrestrial amphipods in the world that have adapted to a strictly troglobitic life in volcanic cave habitats. A surface-dwelling closely related species (Palmorchestia epigaea) lives in the humid laurel forest on the same island. Previous studies have suggested that an ancestral littoral Orchestia species colonized the humid forests of La Palma and that subsequent drought episodes in the Canaries reduced the distribution of P. epigaea favouring the colonization of lava tubes through an adaptive shift. This was followed by dispersal via the hypogean crevicular system. P. hypogaea and P. epigaea did not form reciprocally monophyletic mitochondrial DNA clades. They showed geographically highly structured and genetically divergent populations with current gene flow limited to geographically close surface locations. Coalescence times using Bayesian estimations assuming a non-correlated relaxed clock with a normal prior distribution of the age of La Palma, together with the lack of association of habitat type with ancestral and recent haplotypes, suggest that their adaptation to cave life is relatively ancient. The data gathered here provide evidence for multiple invasions of the volcanic cave systems that have acted as refuges. A re-evaluation of the taxonomic status of the extant species of Palmorchestia is needed, as the division of the two species by habitat and ecology is unnatural. The information obtained here, and that from previous studies on hypogean fauna, shows the importance of factors such as the uncoupling of morphological and genetic evolution, the role of climatic change and regressive evolution as key processes in leading to subterranean biodiversity.

  7. Under the volcano: phylogeography and evolution of the cave-dwelling Palmorchestia hypogaea (Amphipoda, Crustacea) at La Palma (Canary Islands)

    PubMed Central

    Villacorta, Carlos; Jaume, Damià; Oromí, Pedro; Juan, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Background The amphipod crustacean Palmorchestia hypogaea occurs only in La Palma (Canary Islands) and is one of the few terrestrial amphipods in the world that have adapted to a strictly troglobitic life in volcanic cave habitats. A surface-dwelling closely related species (Palmorchestia epigaea) lives in the humid laurel forest on the same island. Previous studies have suggested that an ancestral littoral Orchestia species colonized the humid forests of La Palma and that subsequent drought episodes in the Canaries reduced the distribution of P. epigaea favouring the colonization of lava tubes through an adaptive shift. This was followed by dispersal via the hypogean crevicular system. Results P. hypogaea and P. epigaea did not form reciprocally monophyletic mitochondrial DNA clades. They showed geographically highly structured and genetically divergent populations with current gene flow limited to geographically close surface locations. Coalescence times using Bayesian estimations assuming a non-correlated relaxed clock with a normal prior distribution of the age of La Palma, together with the lack of association of habitat type with ancestral and recent haplotypes, suggest that their adaptation to cave life is relatively ancient. Conclusion The data gathered here provide evidence for multiple invasions of the volcanic cave systems that have acted as refuges. A re-evaluation of the taxonomic status of the extant species of Palmorchestia is needed, as the division of the two species by habitat and ecology is unnatural. The information obtained here, and that from previous studies on hypogean fauna, shows the importance of factors such as the uncoupling of morphological and genetic evolution, the role of climatic change and regressive evolution as key processes in leading to subterranean biodiversity. PMID:18234125

  8. Stability Assessment of Natural Caves Using Empirical Approaches and Rock Mass Classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordá-Bordehore, L.

    2017-08-01

    The stability of underground voids such as caves can be assessed, in an initial approximation, by geomechanical classifications such as the Barton Q index. From a geomechanical viewpoint, the stability of 137 large span natural caves was analyzed herein. The caves were graphically represented based on existing tunnel and underground graphs, according to width and rock quality index Q. Many natural caves analyzed by a tunnel-type engineering approach could result as apparently unstable when represented in empirical existing graphics and would require reinforcements incompatible with speleothems and large chamber heights. A new graph and equation are proposed herein for the maximum span, for the exclusive case of caves, resulting in a reliable representation of large stable natural caves. The main contribution is a new stability chart for natural caves, consisting of two zones: a zone where stable caves are represented and a zone where unstable caves and collapsed caves are located.

  9. Numerical and Experimental Approaches Toward Understanding Lava Flow Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C.; Crawford, I. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have performed numerical modeling and experimental studies to quantify the heat transfer from a lava flow into an underlying particulate substrate. This project was initially motivated by a desire to understand the transfer of heat from a lava flow into the lunar regolith. Ancient regolith deposits that have been protected by a lava flow may contain ancient solar wind, solar flare, and galactic cosmic ray products that can give insight into the history of our solar system, provided the records were not heated and destroyed by the overlying lava flow. In addition, lava-substrate interaction is an important aspect of lava fluid dynamics that requires consideration in lava emplacement models Our numerical model determines the depth to which the heat pulse will penetrate beneath a lava flow into the underlying substrate. Rigorous treatment of the temperature dependence of lava and substrate thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity, density, and latent heat release are imperative to an accurate model. Experiments were conducted to verify the numerical model. Experimental containers with interior dimensions of 20 x 20 x 25 cm were constructed from 1 inch thick calcium silicate sheeting. For initial experiments, boxes were packed with lunar regolith simulant (GSC-1) to a depth of 15 cm with thermocouples embedded at regular intervals. Basalt collected at Kilauea Volcano, HI, was melted in a gas forge and poured directly onto the simulant. Initial lava temperatures ranged from ~1200 to 1300 °C. The system was allowed to cool while internal temperatures were monitored by a thermocouple array and external temperatures were monitored by a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) video camera. Numerical simulations of the experiments elucidate the details of lava latent heat release and constrain the temperature-dependence of the thermal conductivity of the particulate substrate. The temperature-dependence of thermal conductivity of particulate material is not well known

  10. Hardened Lava Meets Wind on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its microscopic imager to capture this spectacular, jagged mini-landscape on a rock called 'GongGong.' Measuring only 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across, this surface records two of the most important and violent forces in the history of Mars -- volcanoes and wind.

    GongGong formed billions of years ago in a seething, stirring mass of molten rock. It captured bubbles of gases that were trapped at great depth but had separated from the main body of lava as it rose to the surface. Like taffy being stretched and tumbled, the molten rock was deformed as it moved across an ancient Martian landscape. The tiny bubbles of gas were deformed as well, becoming elongated. When the molten lava solidified, the rock looked like a frozen sponge.

    Far from finished with its life, the rock then withstood billions of years of pelting by small sand grains carried by Martian dust storms that sometimes blanketed the planet. The sand wore away the surface until, little by little, the delicate strands that enclosed the bubbles of gas were breached and the spiny texture we see today emerged.

    Even now, wind continues to deposit sand and dust in the holes and crevices of the rock.

    Similar rocks can be found on Earth where the same complex interplay of volcanoes and weathering occur, whether it be the pelting of rocks by sand grains in the Mojave desert or by ice crystals in the frigid Antarctic.

    GongGong is one of a group of rocks studied by Spirit and informally named by the Athena Science Team to honor the Chinese New Year (the Year of the Dog). In Chinese mythology, GongGong was the god-king of water in the North Land. When he sacrificed his life to knock down Mount BuZhou, he defeated the bad Emperor in Heaven, freed the sun, moon and stars to go from east to west, and caused all the rivers in China to flow from west to east.

    Spirit's microscopic imager took this image during on the rover's 736th day, or sol, of

  11. Hardened Lava Meets Wind on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its microscopic imager to capture this spectacular, jagged mini-landscape on a rock called 'GongGong.' Measuring only 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across, this surface records two of the most important and violent forces in the history of Mars -- volcanoes and wind.

    GongGong formed billions of years ago in a seething, stirring mass of molten rock. It captured bubbles of gases that were trapped at great depth but had separated from the main body of lava as it rose to the surface. Like taffy being stretched and tumbled, the molten rock was deformed as it moved across an ancient Martian landscape. The tiny bubbles of gas were deformed as well, becoming elongated. When the molten lava solidified, the rock looked like a frozen sponge.

    Far from finished with its life, the rock then withstood billions of years of pelting by small sand grains carried by Martian dust storms that sometimes blanketed the planet. The sand wore away the surface until, little by little, the delicate strands that enclosed the bubbles of gas were breached and the spiny texture we see today emerged.

    Even now, wind continues to deposit sand and dust in the holes and crevices of the rock.

    Similar rocks can be found on Earth where the same complex interplay of volcanoes and weathering occur, whether it be the pelting of rocks by sand grains in the Mojave desert or by ice crystals in the frigid Antarctic.

    GongGong is one of a group of rocks studied by Spirit and informally named by the Athena Science Team to honor the Chinese New Year (the Year of the Dog). In Chinese mythology, GongGong was the god-king of water in the North Land. When he sacrificed his life to knock down Mount BuZhou, he defeated the bad Emperor in Heaven, freed the sun, moon and stars to go from east to west, and caused all the rivers in China to flow from west to east.

    Spirit's microscopic imager took this image during on the rover's 736th day, or sol, of

  12. Vision-mediated interaction with the Nottingham caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghali, Ahmed; Bayomi, Sahar; Green, Jonathan; Pridmore, Tony; Benford, Steve

    2003-05-01

    The English city of Nottingham is widely known for its rich history and compelling folklore. A key attraction is the extensive system of caves to be found beneath Nottingham Castle. Regular guided tours are made of the Nottingham caves, during which castle staff tell stories and explain historical events to small groups of visitors while pointing out relevant cave locations and features. The work reported here is part of a project aimed at enhancing the experience of cave visitors, and providing flexible storytelling tools to their guides, by developing machine vision systems capable of identifying specific actions of guides and/or visitors and triggering audio and/or video presentations as a result. Attention is currently focused on triggering audio material by directing the beam of a standard domestic flashlight towards features of interest on the cave wall. Cameras attached to the walls or roof provide image sequences within which torch light and cave features are detected and their relative positions estimated. When a target feature is illuminated the corresponding audio response is generated. We describe the architecture of the system, its implementation within the caves and the results of initial evaluations carried out with castle guides and members of the public.

  13. Strategies for Creating Prescribed Hydraulic Fractures in Cave Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Q.; Suorineni, F. T.; Oh, J.

    2017-04-01

    The cave mining method was traditionally applied to massive low-grade, weak orebodies at shallow depths (less than 500 m) that favour cave propagation under gravity. Currently, this method is being applied to stronger orebodies and is taking place at depths of up to 2000 m below the surface. To ensure continuous cave propagation, preconditioning of the orebody is essential in this latter caving environment to improve rock mass caveability and to decrease fragmentation sizes. Hydraulic fracturing was initiated in the oil industry and is now being used in the cave mining industry as a preconditioning method and for stalled caves reactivation. A limitation of conventional hydraulic fracturing in the cave mining industry is that the hydraulic fracture orientation is uncontrollable and is dictated by the minimum in situ stress orientation. The preconditioning effectiveness of orientation-uncontrollable hydraulic fractures is limited in some geotechnical conditions, and the concept of creating orientation-controllable hydraulic fractures, here termed prescribed hydraulic fractures, is proposed to fill this gap. In this paper, the feasibility of the proposed approaches to creating prescribed hydraulic fractures is presented based on previous studies and numerical modelling. The numerical modelling code reliability in simulating the hydraulic fracture propagation and reorientation process was validated by comparing with laboratory results in the reported literature. In addition, the sensitivity of the prescribed hydraulic fracturing to the in situ stress condition and rock mass properties is examined.

  14. Radon in the creswell crags Permian limestone caves.

    PubMed

    Gillmore, G K; Phillips, P S; Denman, A R; Gilbertson, D D

    2002-01-01

    An investigation of radon levels in the caves of Creswell Crags, Derbyshire, an important Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) shows that the Lower Magnesian Limestone (Permian) caves have moderate to raised radon gas levels (27-7800 Bq m(-3)) which generally increase with increasing distance into the caves from the entrance regions. This feature is partly explained in terms of cave ventilation and topography. While these levels are generally below the Action Level in the workplace (400 Bq m(-3) in the UK), they are above the Action Level for domestic properties (200 Bq m(-3)). Creswell Crags has approximately 40,000 visitors per year and therefore a quantification of effective dose is important for both visitors and guides to the Robin Hood show cave. Due to short exposure times the dose received by visitors is low (0.0016 mSv/visit) and regulations concerning exposure are not contravened. Similarly, the dose received by guides is fairly low (0.4 mSv/annum) due in part to current working practice. However, the risk to researchers entering the more inaccessible areas of the cave system is higher (0.06 mSv/visit). This survey also investigated the effect of seasonal variations on recorded radon concentration. From this work summer to winter ratios of between 1.1 and 9.51 were determined for different locations within the largest cave system.

  15. Modeling Calcite-Water Oxygen Isotope Fractionation in Cave Calcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noronha, A. L.; Banner, J.; Jenson, J. W.; Partin, J. W.; Hardt, B. F.; Moore, M. W.

    2016-12-01

    Modeling Calcite-Water Oxygen Isotope Fractionation in Cave CalcitesMost speleothem proxy system models are concerned with modeling the effect of karst processes on cave drip water oxygen isotope ratios, generally opting for simple mixing models, and assume fractionation between calcite and water can be modeled as equilibrium. However, measured cave calcite oxygen isotope ratios are rarely in agreement with theoretically and experimentally derived predictions of equilibrium isotopic fractionation, frequently deviating from equilibrium values by up to 1 per mil. Here we use the result of 8 yrs of monthly collection of drip water and cave calcite at Jinapsan Cave, Guam to test existing models of isotope fractionation during cave calcite precipitation. We find that modeling calcite-water oxygen isotope fractionation as a Rayleigh process, and using the experimentally determined fractionation factor of Affek and Zaarur, [2014] yields good agreement with observed cave calcite oxygen isotope ratios. This confirms that drip rate is a key control on both speleothem oxygen isotope ratios and calcite deposition rate, and therefore we argue that while simple models of karst hydrology are adequate for accurate modeling of water oxygen isotope ratio, they are inadequate for accurate models of calcite oxygen isotope ratios. We provide recommendations on the minimum required site specific data for effective characterization of karst processes, and consider multi-proxy and multi-archive approaches to producing robust climate interpretations in the PRYSM [Dee et al., 2015] framework.

  16. The fungal colonisation of rock-art caves: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Valme; Fernandez-Cortes, Angel; Cuezva, Soledad; Laiz, Leonila; Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2009-09-01

    The conservation of rock-art paintings in European caves is a matter of increasing interest. This derives from the bacterial colonisation of Altamira Cave, Spain and the recent fungal outbreak of Lascaux Cave, France-both included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Here, we show direct evidence of a fungal colonisation of rock tablets in a testing system exposed in Altamira Cave. After 2 months, the tablets, previously sterilised, were heavily colonised by fungi and bacteria. Most fungi isolated were labelled as entomopathogens, while the bacteria were those regularly identified in the cave. Rock colonisation was probably promoted by the dissolved organic carbon supplied with the dripping and condensation waters and favoured by the displacement of aerosols towards the interior of the cave, which contributed to the dissemination of microorganisms. The role of arthropods in the dispersal of spores may also help in understanding fungal colonisation. This study evidences the fragility of rock-art caves and demonstrates that microorganisms can easily colonise bare rocks and materials introduced into the cavity.

  17. The fungal colonisation of rock-art caves: experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Valme; Fernandez-Cortes, Angel; Cuezva, Soledad; Laiz, Leonila; Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2009-09-01

    The conservation of rock-art paintings in European caves is a matter of increasing interest. This derives from the bacterial colonisation of Altamira Cave, Spain and the recent fungal outbreak of Lascaux Cave, France—both included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Here, we show direct evidence of a fungal colonisation of rock tablets in a testing system exposed in Altamira Cave. After 2 months, the tablets, previously sterilised, were heavily colonised by fungi and bacteria. Most fungi isolated were labelled as entomopathogens, while the bacteria were those regularly identified in the cave. Rock colonisation was probably promoted by the dissolved organic carbon supplied with the dripping and condensation waters and favoured by the displacement of aerosols towards the interior of the cave, which contributed to the dissemination of microorganisms. The role of arthropods in the dispersal of spores may also help in understanding fungal colonisation. This study evidences the fragility of rock-art caves and demonstrates that microorganisms can easily colonise bare rocks and materials introduced into the cavity.

  18. Rhyolite lava fracturing and degassing induced spherulitic growth of Sawajiriwan and Sanukayama lavas in Kozushima Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, K.; Uno, K.; Kanamaru, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sawajiriwan and Sanukayama rhyolite lavas are distributed along west and east coasts of Kozushima Island, Japan, respectively (Taniguchi, 1977). They were erupted in about 40,000-50,000 years ago (Yokoyama et al., 2004). The both lavas are characterized by alignment of spherulites as well as previous works (Seaman et al., 2009; Clay et al., 2013). Seaman et al. (2009) attributed the spherulite alignment to the contrasting water concentration and concluded that the heterogeneity of water contents has already achieved within the magma chamber. In this study, we propose that development of the spherulite alignment is significantly related to the fracturing within the lavas. In Sawajiriwan lava, the distal part is well exposed and shows ramp structure and reverse faults with ductile-deformed fault planes. The both structures were formed within consistent compressional stress deduced from their geometry. Discrepancy of the structure would be attributed to the strain rate variation within the advancing lava. The spherulite alignment is characteristically developed along the planes. This indicates that the fractures acted as degassing pathway, and the part achieved large undercooling. The fault planes would be healed and deformed after decreasing strain rate, and spherulites were eventually grown along the planes. In Sanukayama lava, the ductile-deformed cataclastic faults are often developed as well as Sawajiriwan lava. The cataclasite is composed of porphyroclasts and nano- and micro-scale fine particles such as microlite and crystalline fragments. Microscopic observation clearly showed that the fine particles are released from the fault margin into the surrounding melt and are aligned along the flow line. Spherulites typically nucleated on the aligned fine particles, and consequently spherulite alignment was developed. We concluded from the lavas that development of the spherulite alignment is significantly related to the fracturing within the lavas.

  19. The evolution of cave systems from the surface to subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G. ); Handford, C.R. )

    1996-01-01

    Many carbonate reservoirs are the result of cave-forming processes. The origin and recognition of fractures, breccias, and sediment fills associated with paleocaves were determined through the study of modern and paleocaves systems. Cave formation and destruction are the products of near-surface processes. Near-surface processes include solutional excavation, clastic and chemical sedimentation, and collapse of cave walls and ceilings. Cave sediment is derived from inside and/or outside the system. Depositional mechanisms include suspension, tractional, mass-flow and rock-fall. Collapse of ceilings and walls from chaotic breakdown breccias. These piles can be tens of meters thick and contain large voids and variable amounts of matrix. Cave-roof crackle breccia forms from stress-and tension-related fractures in cave-roof strata. As the cave-bearing strata subside into the subsurface, mechanical compaction increases and restructures the existing breccias and remaining cavities. Fracture porosity increases and breccia and vug porosity decreases. Large cavities collapse forming burial chaotic breakdown breccias. Differentially compacted strata over the collapsed chamber fracture and form burial cave-roof crackle breccias. Continued burial leads to more extensive mechanical compaction causing previously formed clasts to fracture and pack closer together. The resulting product is a rebrecciated chaotic breakdown breccia composed predominantly of small clasts. Rebrecciated blocks are often overprinted by crackling. Subsurface paleocave systems commonly have a complex history with several episodes of fracturing and brecciation. The resulting collapsed-paleocave reservoir targets are not single collapsed passages of tens of feet across, but are homogenized collapsed-cave systems hundreds to several thousand feet across.

  20. The evolution of cave systems from the surface to subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G.; Handford, C.R.

    1996-12-31

    Many carbonate reservoirs are the result of cave-forming processes. The origin and recognition of fractures, breccias, and sediment fills associated with paleocaves were determined through the study of modern and paleocaves systems. Cave formation and destruction are the products of near-surface processes. Near-surface processes include solutional excavation, clastic and chemical sedimentation, and collapse of cave walls and ceilings. Cave sediment is derived from inside and/or outside the system. Depositional mechanisms include suspension, tractional, mass-flow and rock-fall. Collapse of ceilings and walls from chaotic breakdown breccias. These piles can be tens of meters thick and contain large voids and variable amounts of matrix. Cave-roof crackle breccia forms from stress-and tension-related fractures in cave-roof strata. As the cave-bearing strata subside into the subsurface, mechanical compaction increases and restructures the existing breccias and remaining cavities. Fracture porosity increases and breccia and vug porosity decreases. Large cavities collapse forming burial chaotic breakdown breccias. Differentially compacted strata over the collapsed chamber fracture and form burial cave-roof crackle breccias. Continued burial leads to more extensive mechanical compaction causing previously formed clasts to fracture and pack closer together. The resulting product is a rebrecciated chaotic breakdown breccia composed predominantly of small clasts. Rebrecciated blocks are often overprinted by crackling. Subsurface paleocave systems commonly have a complex history with several episodes of fracturing and brecciation. The resulting collapsed-paleocave reservoir targets are not single collapsed passages of tens of feet across, but are homogenized collapsed-cave systems hundreds to several thousand feet across.

  1. Monitoring of Bunker Cave (NW Germany): Assessing the complexity of cave environmental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechelmann, Dana Fc; Schröder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Scholz, Denis; Spötl, Christoph; Richter, Detlev K.; Mangini, Augusto

    2010-05-01

    Bunker Cave (N 51° 22'03', E 7° 39'53') is located in the Rhenish Slate Mountains in the western part of Germany and is part of a giant cave system in the area of Iserlohn (Hammerschmidt et al., 1995).As part of the DAPHNE (Dated Speleothems - archives of the paleoenvironment) project Bunker Cave is being monitored since the end of 2006. The ongoing monitoring program is performed on a monthly base. Surface climate parameters are measured and samples of rain water, cave air, drip water at eight different drip sites and modern calcite precipitates from watch glasses placed beneath drip sites are collected. Data sets include temperature, precipitation, calculated infiltration, drip rates, electric conductivity, pH, alkalinity, cations, anions and stable isotopes. Bunker Cave shows a constant temperature throughout the year. Active calcite precipitation is higher in winter than in summer, which is due to lower cave pCO2 in winter. The generally low pCO2 values, however, support almost continuous calcite precipitation throughout the whole year. Drip water δ18O values reflect the mean annual isotopic composition of the rainfall in this area with no or less contribution of the summer rain. The slope of the MWL for local precipitation is close to the slope of both the global MWL and the local MWL at the nearby station Bad Salzuflen. The karst aquifer is well mixed as shown by the uniform drip water δ18O values. Hence, the site is well suited to detect multi-annual climate trends using stalagmite stable isotope records. In order to test the potential influence of kinetic isotope fractionation on the stable isotope signals at Bunker Cave, stable isotope data of modern calcite precipitated on watch glasses were compared to predicted values. Comparison of the δ18O values of in situ modern calcite precipitates with the δ18O values expected from equilibrium isotope fractionation suggests a small kinetic influence, which is probably related to the variability in drip rate

  2. A local heat transfer analysis of lava cooling in the atmosphere: application to thermal diffusion-dominated lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Augusto

    1998-05-01

    The local cooling process of thermal diffusion-dominated lava flows in the atmosphere was studied by a transient, one-dimensional heat transfer model taking into account the most relevant processes governing its behavior. Thermal diffusion-dominated lava flows include any type of flow in which the conductive-diffusive contribution in the energy equation largely overcomes the convective terms. This type of condition is supposed to be satisfied, during more or less extended periods of time, for a wide range of lava flows characterized by very low flow-rates, such as slabby and toothpaste pahoehoe, spongy pahoehoe, flow at the transition pahoehoe-aa, and flows from ephemeral vents. The analysis can be useful for the understanding of the effect of crust formation on the thermal insulation of the lava interior and, if integrated with adequate flow models, for the explanation of local features and morphologies of lava flows. The study is particularly aimed at a better knowledge of the complex non-linear heat transfer mechanisms that control lava cooling in the atmosphere and at the estimation of the most important parameters affecting the global heat transfer coefficient during the solidification process. The three fundamental heat transfer mechanisms with the atmosphere, that is radiation, natural convection, and forced convection by the wind, were modeled, whereas conduction and heat generation due to crystallization were considered within the lava. The magma was represented as a vesiculated binary melt with a given liquidus and solidus temperature and with the possible presence of a eutectic. The effects of different morphological features of the surface were investigated through a simplified description of their geometry. Model results allow both study of the formation in time of the crust and the thermal mushy layer underlying it, and a description of the behavior of the temperature distribution inside the lava as well as radiative and convective fluxes to the

  3. Characteristics of Basaltic Lava Flows on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.; Garvin, J. B.; Head, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Some ideas relating to the formation of lava flows on Venus are reviewed. The surface morphological features seen in the panoramic images made by the Venera 13 and 14 landers are examined in detail. The major element compositions measured by the Soviet probes indicate that the surface rocks at the Venera 13 site resemble a terrestrial tholeite composite whereas the Venera 14 rocks are similar to terrestrial alkali basalts. Few data exist on the rheological properties of such magma types on Earth; these properties are a strong function of magma volatile content, and there are important gaps in our knowledge of the typical volatiles to be associated with the magmas on Venus. However, the suggestion that Venusian magmas may be water poor together with consideration of the fact that the high Venusian surface temperatures may cause magmas to experience up to 50 K less cooling during their rise to the surface than corresponding terrestrial counterparts, leads to the finding that Venusian magmas may typically have plastic viscosities, E, up to a factor of three greater than terrestrial counterparts on eruption. A similar analysis of yield strength variations with temperature, magma composition and volatile content suggests that temperature will exert the main control and that Venusian magma yield strengths, Y, may be a factor of several times smaller than those of terrestrial equivalents.

  4. Do cave features affect underground habitat exploitation by non-troglobite species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunghi, Enrico; Manenti, Raoul; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco

    2014-02-01

    Many biospeleological studies focus on organisms that are exclusive inhabitants of the subterranean realm, but organisms that are not obligate cave-dwellers are frequent in caves, and may account for a substantial portion of biomass. Moreover, several taxa that are usually epigeous are regularly found inside caves, but for most of them it is unknown whether they accidentally enter them, or whether they actively select caves for specific environmental features. In this study we analysed the community of non-strict cave-dwelling organisms (amphibians, gastropods, spiders and orthopterans) in 33 caves from Central Italy, to assess how environmental factors determine community structure. Cave features strongly affected the distribution of the taxa considered. The combined effect of cave morphology and microclimate explained nearly 50% of the variation of community structure. Most of community variation occurred along a gradient from deep, dark and humid caves, to dry caves with wider entrances and extended photic areas. Most of species were associated with humid, deep and dark caves. Most of the non-troglobiont amphibians and invertebrates did not occur randomly in caves, but were associated to caves with specific environmental features. Analysing relationships between cave-dwelling species and environmental variables can allow a more ecological and objective classification of cave-dwelling organisms.

  5. Calcite Farming at Hollow Ridge Cave: Calibrating Net Rainfall and Cave Microclimate to Dripwater and Calcite Chemical Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremaine, D. M.; Kilgore, B. P.; Froelich, P. N.

    2012-04-01

    Stable isotope (δ18O and δ13C) and trace element records in cave speleothems are often interpreted as climate changes in rainfall amount or source, cave air temperature, overlying vegetation and atmospheric pCO2. However, these records are difficult to verify without in situ calibration of changes in cave microclimate (e.g., net rainfall, interior ventilation changes) to contemporaneous variations in dripwater and speleothem chemistry. In this study at Hollow Ridge Cave (HRC) in Marianna, Florida (USA), cave dripwater, bedrock, and modern calcite (farmed in situ) were collected in conjunction with continuous cave air pCO2, temperature, barometric pressure, relative humidity, radon-222 activity, airflow velocity and direction, rainfall amount, and drip rate data [1]. We analyzed rain and dripwater δD and δ18O, dripwater Ca2+, pH, δ13C and TCO2, cave air pCO2 and δ13C, and farmed calcite δ18O and δ13C to examine the relationships among rainwater isotopic composition, cave air ventilation, cave air temperature, calcite growth rate and seasonal timing, and calcite isotopic composition. Farmed calcite δ13C decreases linearly with distance from the front entrance to the interior of the cave during all seasons, with a maximum entrance-to-interior gradient of Δδ13C = -7‰ . A whole-cave "Hendy test" at distributed contemporaneous farming sites reveals that ventilation induces a +1.9 ± 0.96‰ δ13C offset between calcite precipitated in a ventilation flow path and out of flow paths. Farmed calcite δ18O exhibits a +0.82 ± 0.24‰ offset from values predicted by both theoretical calcite-water calculations and by laboratory-grown calcite [2]. Unlike calcite δ13C, oxygen isotopes show no ventilation effects and are a function only of temperature. Combining our data with other speleothem studies, we find a new empirical relationship for cave-specific water-calcite oxygen isotope fractionation across a range of temperatures and cave environments: 1000 ln α = 16

  6. DETAIL OF LAVA BEDROCK WHICH WILL ACT AS BASE SUPPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF LAVA BEDROCK WHICH WILL ACT AS BASE SUPPORT FOR REACTOR. INL NEGATIVE NO. 472. Unknown Photographer, 8/23/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. Athabasca Valles, Mars: A lava-draped channel system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaeger, W.L.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; McEwen, A.S.; Dundas, C.M.; Russell, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    Athabasca Valles is a young outflow channel system on Mars that may have been carved by catastrophic water floods. However, images acquired by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft reveal that Athabasca Valles is now entirely draped by a thin layer of solidified lava - the remnant of a once-swollen river of molten rock. The lava erupted from a fissure, inundated the channels, and drained downstream in geologically recent times. Purported ice features in Athabasca Valles and its distal basin, Cerberus Palus, are actually composed of this lava. Similar volcanic processes may have operated in other ostensibly fluvial channels, which could explain in part why the landers sent to investigate sites of ancient flooding on Mars have predominantly found lava at the surface instead.

  8. OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE NORTHWEST SIDE. NOTE THE LAVA ROCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE NORTHWEST SIDE. NOTE THE LAVA ROCK FOUNDATION PIERS AND DETAILING AT THE WINDOWS. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Officers' Housing Type Z, 19 Worchester Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  9. STREET FRONT AND LAVA ROCK RETAINING WALL WITH ENTRY AWNING. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STREET FRONT AND LAVA ROCK RETAINING WALL WITH ENTRY AWNING. VIEW FACING NORTH-NORTHEAST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Makalapa, Senior Officers' Quarters Type A, 37 Makalapa Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Detail of redwood tank on lava rock platform. Trestle and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of redwood tank on lava rock platform. Trestle and steel tanks can be see in right background. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  11. Progress of Hawaii Lava Flow Tracked by NASA Spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    On June 27, 2014, a new vent opened on Hawaii Puu Oo vent, on the eastern flank of Kilauea volcano. NASA Terra spacecraft shows the hot lava flow in white, extending about 11 miles 17 kilometers from the vent.

  12. Lava lakes on Io: New perspectives from modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Tracy K. P.; Lopes, Rosaly M.

    2008-03-01

    Loki Patera (310° W, 12° N) is Io's largest patera at ˜180 km in diameter. Its morphology and distinct thermal behavior have led researchers to hypothesize that Loki Patera may either be an active lava lake that experiences periodic overturn, or a shallow depression whose floor is episodically resurfaced with thin flows. Using results from mathematical models, we suggest that a better model for Loki's behavior is the terrestrial superfast spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR), near 17°30 south. We propose that, like at the southern EPR, Loki Patera is underlain by a thin, persistent magma "lens" that feeds thin, temporary lava lakes within the patera. Also like the southern EPR, overspilling of the volcanic depression is rare, with most of the lava volume being emplaced via a subsurface network of lava tubes.

  13. Athabasca Valles, Mars: a lava-draped channel system.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, W L; Keszthelyi, L P; McEwen, A S; Dundas, C M; Russell, P S

    2007-09-21

    Athabasca Valles is a young outflow channel system on Mars that may have been carved by catastrophic water floods. However, images acquired by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft reveal that Athabasca Valles is now entirely draped by a thin layer of solidified lava-the remnant of a once-swollen river of molten rock. The lava erupted from a fissure, inundated the channels, and drained downstream in geologically recent times. Purported ice features in Athabasca Valles and its distal basin, Cerberus Palus, are actually composed of this lava. Similar volcanic processes may have operated in other ostensibly fluvial channels, which could explain in part why the landers sent to investigate sites of ancient flooding on Mars have predominantly found lava at the surface instead.

  14. Spatial organization and connectivity of caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouves, Johan; Viseur, Sophie; Guglielmi, Yves; Camus, Hubert

    2015-04-01

    The main particularity of karst systems is their hierarchical organization as three-dimensional network of conduits behaving as drain. They are recognized as having a major influence on fluid flow at reservoir scale. However, a karstic network is generally hardly continuously observable and their great intrinsic heterogeneity makes their characterization very complex. This media can be only observed by speleological investigation, conditioned to human possibilities. As a result, only few parts can be observed and therefore it is required to model the non-observable parts for reservoir characterizations. To provide realistic 3D models, non-observable karstic features will be generated using parameters extracted from observed ones. Morphometric analysis of the three-dimensional karstic network provides quantitative measures that can (i) give information on speleogenesis processes, (ii) be used to compare different karst systems, (iii) be correlated with hydrogeological behavior and (iii) control the simulation of realistic karst networks. Recent work done on the subject characterize the karstic network as a whole, without genetic a-priori. However, most of observable caves appears to have a polygenic history due to modifications in boundary conditions and some different karst features can be observed in a same cavity. To study the geometrical organization of caves, we propose to analyze 3D speleological topographies for which speleogenetic context is known. This way, it is possible to characterize karst features according to speleogenetic processes. Several morphometric descriptors have been calculated on three-dimensional topographies provided by speleological works. Some parameters describe the existence of preferential direction of karstification and preferential flow paths, other parameters describe the complexity, geometry and connectivity of the three-dimensional karstic networks. Through the study of fifteen different caves, 150km of 3D data have been analyzed

  15. Automated Search for Lunar Lava Tubes in the Clementine Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Allen G.; Gibbs, A.

    1998-01-01

    A significant problem in computer science, which has become increasingly acute recently, is the automatic extraction and cataloging of desired features from large sets of complex images. Solution of this problem could potentially have broad applicability. As a prototype of this kind of problem, our group has chosen to attempt the automatic retrieval of lava tubes from the Clementine dataset. Lunar lava tubes have long been recognized as desirable locations for the placement of manned lunar bases. Advantages include that (1) little construction is needed; (2) building materials need not be lifted out of Earth's gravity well; (3) the tubes provide natural environmental control; and (4) the tubes provide natural protection from cosmic rays, meteorites, micrometeorites, and impact crater ejecta. Coombs and Hawke identified about 100 probable lava tubes associated with sinuous rilles in the Lunar Orbiter and Apollo photos, primarily in the nearside maria. The lava tubes that are visible to Earth-based telescopes might be too large to provide good candidates for lunar bases. Such lava tubes of large diameter need a great depth of overlying rock to keep from collapsing. Any intact large tubes would lie inconveniently far underground. Most useful would be lava tubes that are too small to be discerned from Earth. The Clementine spacecraft, which mapped the entire surface of the Moon to an unprecedented level of detail in 1994, gives us a view of these smaller lava tubes. Over 1.9 million images in the visible, near infrared, and mid-infrared portions of the spectrum were captured. Our task is to find and catalog the small lava tubes in the Clementine dataset. Of particular interest are small sinuous rifles that contain interruptions, which represent uncollapsed portions of a tube that has partially collapsed. Once cataloged, the candidate base locations can be examined more closely for suitability. Considerations would be proximity to resources, sites of scientific interest

  16. A review: Quantitative models for lava flows on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to review and assess the application of quantitative models (Gratz numerical correlation model, radiative loss model, yield stress model, surface structure model, and kinematic wave model) of lava flows on Mars. These theoretical models were applied to Martian flow data to aid in establishing the composition of the lava or to determine other eruption conditions such as eruption rate or duration.

  17. What Is the Emissivity of Active Basaltic Lava Flows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    The emissivity of molten lava surfaces has been a topic of study for some time because it directly affects the cooling efficiency of the flow, thermo-rheological models of flow evolution, as well as the accurate interpretation of the bulk composition. Despite past studies, it remains unclear whether the emissivity of molten lava truly is different than that of the cooled surface. Measuring emissivity on flows is complicated with errors arising due to changes in the surface glass content and vesicularity, as well as mixing of multiple temperatures, as the lava cools. We therefore see determination of correct surface emissivity and its change with time to be of great importance to anyone working with thermal infrared (TIR) data or modeling of lava flows. A series of high-resolution melting experiments on basalts has been conducted using a novel micro-furnace and TIR spectrometer, producing high-resolution accurate emissivity measurements at known temperatures transitioning from molten to solid state. These results are compared to data from active analog and natural lava surfaces acquired from a newly-developed field-based multispectral camera system, which is capable of generating lower-resolution emissivity spectra. We present the results of these comparative studies conducted at the Syracuse University Lava Project facility in order to test and calibrate the camera system under controlled conditions. The facility conducts large-scale pours of degassed Palisades Sill basalt, an acceptable analog for natural basalt. In addition, several samples of the analog lava were re-melted in the micro-furnace/spectrometer setup to provide a direct comparison of higher and lower resolution IR spectral data. These results, together with data from the Kilauea lava lake, have allowed us to calibrate and fully test the efficacy of this camera system in a field environment for future deployments as well as provide a means of constraining TIR data from satellite observations.

  18. Small domes on Venus - Probable analogs of Icelandic lava shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, James B.; Williams, Richard S., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of observed shapes and volumetric estimates, small, dome-like features on radar images of Venus are interpreted to be analogs of Icelandic lava-shield volcanoes. Morphometric data for Venusian domes in Aubele and Slyuta as well as measurements of representative dome volumes and areas from Tethus Regio are used to demonstrate that the characteristic aspect ratios and flank slopes of these features are consistent with a subclass of low Icelandic lava-shield volcanoes (LILS).

  19. Lava Flow Fields on Earth and Mars: Scales of Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, T. K.; Bulmer, M. H.; Warner, N. H.

    2001-12-01

    Because an active lava flow has yet to be observed on Mars, and available data on surface composition is of limited scope (e.g., the SNC meteorites, or data collected by Sojourner) or resolution (e.g., the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emissions Spectrometer [MGS TES]), Martian eruption and emplacement parameters must be inferred from the resulting volcanic morphologies. A unique set of lava flow lobes to the southwest of Arsia Mons (and possibly genetically associated with that volcano) were initially identified using high-resolution ( ~50 m/pixel) Viking Orbiter (VO) images. These flows are characterized by a ridged surface texture, similar to that observed on folded evolved lava flows (e.g., andesites, dacites and rhyolites) on Earth, and relatively thick ( ~40 to 80 m) flow margins. Additional data collected by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) and the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) reveal that these ridged flows are much more widespread than indicated by the VO images. MGS and VO datasets allow us to identify the location of these ridged flows, measure flow thickness and the wavelengths and amplitudes of the surface undulations. A large lava flow field ( ~67.5 km2) surrounding Sabancaya volcano, Peru, displays similar surface textures and flow thicknesses, and we have been investigating these andesitic to trachyandesitic lavas as potential analogs to the Martian flows. Using high-resolution GPS surveys-collected both along-flow and across-flow, we can quantify the surface topography of these flows with +/-1 cm horizontal and +/-2 cm vertical resolution. This resolution is approximately one order of magnitude better than will be obtained using global MOLA coverage of Mars. Quantitative comparison of the Sabancaya lava flows with those adjacent to Arsia Mons, combined with results from analytical and numerical modeling, suggest that the Sabancaya lavas are fundamentally different from the Martian flows. We therefore suggest that the Martian flows are either not

  20. Validating Cellular Automata Lava Flow Emplacement Algorithms with Standard Benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Connor, L.; Charbonnier, S. J.; Connor, C.; Gallant, E.

    2015-12-01

    A major existing need in assessing lava flow simulators is a common set of validation benchmark tests. We propose three levels of benchmarks which test model output against increasingly complex standards. First, imulated lava flows should be morphologically identical, given changes in parameter space that should be inconsequential, such as slope direction. Second, lava flows simulated in simple parameter spaces can be tested against analytical solutions or empirical relationships seen in Bingham fluids. For instance, a lava flow simulated on a flat surface should produce a circular outline. Third, lava flows simulated over real world topography can be compared to recent real world lava flows, such as those at Tolbachik, Russia, and Fogo, Cape Verde. Success or failure of emplacement algorithms in these validation benchmarks can be determined using a Bayesian approach, which directly tests the ability of an emplacement algorithm to correctly forecast lava inundation. Here we focus on two posterior metrics, P(A|B) and P(¬A|¬B), which describe the positive and negative predictive value of flow algorithms. This is an improvement on less direct statistics such as model sensitivity and the Jaccard fitness coefficient. We have performed these validation benchmarks on a new, modular lava flow emplacement simulator that we have developed. This simulator, which we call MOLASSES, follows a Cellular Automata (CA) method. The code is developed in several interchangeable modules, which enables quick modification of the distribution algorithm from cell locations to their neighbors. By assessing several different distribution schemes with the benchmark tests, we have improved the performance of MOLASSES to correctly match early stages of the 2012-3 Tolbachik Flow, Kamchakta Russia, to 80%. We also can evaluate model performance given uncertain input parameters using a Monte Carlo setup. This illuminates sensitivity to model uncertainty.

  1. Comparison of 3D point clouds produced by LIDAR and UAV photoscan in the Rochefort cave (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watlet, Arnaud; Triantafyllou, Antoine; Kaufmann, Olivier; Le Mouelic, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Amongst today's techniques that are able to produce 3D point clouds, LIDAR and UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) photogrammetry are probably the most commonly used. Both methods have their own advantages and limitations. LIDAR scans create high resolution and high precision 3D point clouds, but such methods are generally costly, especially for sporadic surveys. Compared to LIDAR, UAV (e.g. drones) are cheap and flexible to use in different kind of environments. Moreover, the photogrammetric processing workflow of digital images taken with UAV becomes easier with the rise of many affordable software packages (e.g. Agisoft, PhotoModeler3D, VisualSFM). We present here a challenging study made at the Rochefort Cave Laboratory (South Belgium) comprising surface and underground surveys. The site is located in the Belgian Variscan fold-and-thrust belt, a region that shows many karstic networks within Devonian limestone units. A LIDAR scan has been acquired in the main chamber of the cave (~ 15000 m³) to spatialize 3D point cloud of its inner walls and infer geological beds and structures. Even if the use of LIDAR instrument was not really comfortable in such caving environment, the collected data showed a remarkable precision according to few control points geometry. We also decided to perform another challenging survey of the same cave chamber by modelling a 3D point cloud using photogrammetry of a set of DSLR camera pictures taken from the ground and UAV pictures. The aim was to compare both techniques in terms of (i) implementation of data acquisition and processing, (ii) quality of resulting 3D points clouds (points density, field vs cloud recovery and points precision), (iii) their application for geological purposes. Through Rochefort case study, main conclusions are that LIDAR technique provides higher density point clouds with slightly higher precision than photogrammetry method. However, 3D data modeled by photogrammetry provide visible light spectral information

  2. Field constraints for modeling the emplacement of the 2010 Gigjökull lava flow, southern Iceland: interplay between subaqueous, ice contact and subaerial lava emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, B.; Oddsson, B.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Rossi, R.

    2012-04-01

    One of the least accessible products of the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption is the trachyandesite lava that flowed north from the summit eruption site down through Gigjökull glacier. Based on numerous overflights during 2010, syn-eruption satellite imagery and two on-site investigations in 2011, we have developed a preliminary model to illustrate the progressive movement of the complex lava flow down through Gigjökull. Previous workers have documented the events surrounding the explosive summit eruptions, including the flow path for the majority of the water derived from melting ~0.1 cubic km of summit ice, which moved over, through and beneath Gigjökull producing a series of jokulhlaups during April and May 2010. Overflights in 2010 and 2011 show that most of the upper parts of the lava flow are surfaced by oxidized, blocky lava that appears very similar to what would be expected from an entirely subaerial lava flow. However, exposures at the lowest end of the flow preserve a record documenting lava emplacement in water and through ice tunnels. We describe 8 different components visible in this northernmost, lowest part of the lava flow, including: (1) upper subaerial levee-bounded lava flow, (2) subaerial blocky lava bench, (3) subaqueous/ice contact lava mounds, (4) subaqueous/ice contact sheet lava complex, (5) ponded, glaciolacustrine sediments, (6) subaerial slabby lava flow, (7) subaqueous pillow lava lobes, and (8) ice-tunnel confined lava flows. In combination these 8 components are consistent a model for lava emplacement through a valley glacier. We propose that the lava flow, which appears to have started moving down the glacier from a tephra cone immediately north of the main summit craters after the largest of the jokulhlaups, exploited newly formed and/or pre-existing sub-ice drainage systems along the base of Gigjökull. Initial meltwater from the eruption site created/enhanced basal ice drainage systems. Lava flows exploited these drainage systems

  3. Stochastic modeling of a lava-flow aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronkite-Ratcliff, Collin; Phelps, Geoffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes preliminary three-dimensional geostatistical modeling of a lava-flow aquifer system using a multiple-point geostatistical model. The purpose of this study is to provide a proof-of-concept for this modeling approach. An example of the method is demonstrated using a subset of borehole geologic data and aquifer test data from a portion of the Calico Hills Formation, a lava-flow aquifer system that partially underlies Pahute Mesa, Nevada. Groundwater movement in this aquifer system is assumed to be controlled by the spatial distribution of two geologic units—rhyolite lava flows and zeolitized tuffs. The configuration of subsurface lava flows and tuffs is largely unknown because of limited data. The spatial configuration of the lava flows and tuffs is modeled by using a multiple-point geostatistical simulation algorithm that generates a large number of alternative realizations, each honoring the available geologic data and drawn from a geologic conceptual model of the lava-flow aquifer system as represented by a training image. In order to demonstrate how results from the geostatistical model could be analyzed in terms of available hydrologic data, a numerical simulation of part of an aquifer test was applied to the realizations of the geostatistical model.

  4. Studies of vesicle distribution patterns in Hawaiian lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, George P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Basaltic lava flows are generally vesicular, and the broader facts relating to vesicle distribution have long been established; few studies have yet been made with a view to determining how and when vesicles form in the cooling history of the lava, explaining vesicle shape and size distribution, and gaining enough understanding to employ vesicles as a geological tool. Various avenues of approach exist by which one may seek to gain a better understanding of these ubiquitous structures and make a start towards developing a general theory, and three such avenues have recently been explored. One avenue involves the study of pipe vesicles; these are a well known feature of lava flows and are narrow pipes which occur near the base of many pahoehoe flow units. Another avenue of approach is that presented by the distinctive spongy pahoehoe facies of lava that is common in distal locations on Hawaiian volcanoes. A third avenue of approach is that of the study of gas blisters in lava. Gas blisters are voids, which can be as much as tens of meters wide, where the lava split along a vesicle-rich layer and the roof up-arched by gas pressure. These three avenues are briefly discussed.

  5. ComputerApplications and Virtual Environments (CAVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) can provide cost effective methods to design and evaluate components and systems for maintenance and refurbishment operations. The Marshall Space Flight Centerr (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama began to utilize VR for design analysis in the X-34 experimental reusable space vehicle. Analysts at MSFC's Computer Applications and Virtual Environments (CAVE) used Head Mounted Displays (HMD) (pictured), spatial trackers and gesture inputs as a means to animate or inhabit a properly sized virtual human model. These models were used in a VR scenario as a way to determine functionality of space and maintenance requirements for the virtual X-34. The primary functions of the virtual X-34 mockup was to support operations development and design analysis for engine removal, the engine compartment and the aft fuselage. This capability provided general visualization support to engineers and designers at MSFC and to the System Design Freeze Review at Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC). The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  6. ComputerApplications and Virtual Environments (CAVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) can provide cost effective methods to design and evaluate components and systems for maintenance and refurbishment operations. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama began to utilize VR for design analysis in the X-34 experimental reusable space vehicle. Analysts at MSFC's Computer Applications and Virtual Environments (CAVE) used Head Mounted Displays (HMD) (pictured), spatial trackers and gesture inputs as a means to animate or inhabit a properly sized virtual human model. These models were used in a VR scenario as a way to determine functionality of space and maintenance requirements for the virtual X-34. The primary functions of the virtual X-34 mockup was to support operations development and design analysis for engine removal, the engine compartment and the aft fuselage. This capability providedgeneral visualization support to engineers and designers at MSFC and to the System Design Freeze Review at Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC). The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  7. Computer Applications and Virtual Environments (CAVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) can provide cost effective methods to design and evaluate components and systems for maintenance and refurbishment operations. Marshall SPace Flight Center (MSFC) is begirning to utilize VR for design analysis in the X-34 experimental reusable space vehicle. Analysts at MSFC's Computer Applications and Virtual Environments (CAVE) used Head Mounted Displays (HMD) (pictured), spatial trackers and gesture inputs as a means to animate or inhabit a properly sized virtual human model. These models are used in a VR scenario as a way to determine functionality of space and maintenance requirements for the virtual X-34. The primary functions of the virtual X-34 mockup is to support operations development and design analysis for engine removal, the engine compartment and the aft fuselage. This capability provides general visualization support to engineers and designers at MSFC and to the System Design Freeze Review at Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC).

  8. Computer Applications and Virtual Environments (CAVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) can provide cost effective methods to design and evaluate components and systems for maintenance and refurbishment operations. Marshall SPace Flight Center (MSFC) is begirning to utilize VR for design analysis in the X-34 experimental reusable space vehicle. Analysts at MSFC's Computer Applications and Virtual Environments (CAVE) used Head Mounted Displays (HMD) (pictured), spatial trackers and gesture inputs as a means to animate or inhabit a properly sized virtual human model. These models are used in a VR scenario as a way to determine functionality of space and maintenance requirements for the virtual X-34. The primary functions of the virtual X-34 mockup is to support operations development and design analysis for engine removal, the engine compartment and the aft fuselage. This capability provides general visualization support to engineers and designers at MSFC and to the System Design Freeze Review at Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC).

  9. Discrimination, correlation, and provenance of Bed I tephrostratigraphic markers, Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, based on multivariate analyses of phenocryst compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, Jörg M.; McHenry, Lindsay J.; Stollhofen, Harald; Tolosana-Delgado, Raimon; Stanistreet, Ian G.; Deino, Alan L.

    2016-06-01

    The chronology of Pleistocene flora and fauna, including hominin remains and associated Oldowan industries in Bed I, Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, is primarily based on 40Ar/39Ar dating of intercalated tuffs and lavas, combined with detailed tephrostratigraphic correlations within the basin. Although a high-resolution chronostratigraphic framework has been established for the eastern part of the Olduvai Basin, the western subbasin is less well known due in part to major lateral facies changes within Bed I combined with discontinuous exposure. We address these correlation difficulties using the discriminative power of the chemical composition of the major juvenile mineral phases (augite, anorthoclase, plagioclase) from tuffs, volcaniclastic sandstones, siliciclastic units, and lavas. We statistically evaluate these compositions, obtained from electron probe micro-analysis, applying principal component analysis and discriminant analysis to develop discriminant models that successfully classify most Bed I volcanic units. The correlations, resulting from integrated analyses of all target minerals, provide a basin-wide Bed I chemostratigraphic framework at high lateral and vertical resolution, consistent with the known geological context, that expands and refines the geochemical databases currently available. Correlation of proximal ignimbrites at the First Fault with medial and distal Lower Bed I successions of the western basin enables assessment of lateral facies and thickness trends that confirm Ngorongoro Volcano as the primary source for Lower Bed I, whereas Upper Bed I sediment supply is mainly from Olmoti Volcano. Compositional similarity between Tuff IA, Bed I lava, and Mafic Tuffs II and III single-grain fingerprints, together with north- and northwestward thinning of Bed I lava, suggests a common Ngorongoro source for these units. The techniques applied herein improve upon previous work by evaluating compositional affinities with statistical rigor rather than

  10. Lava-substrate heat transfer: Laboratory experiments and thermodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C. W.; Wright, R.; Crawford, I.

    2012-12-01

    We have performed laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to investigate the heat transfer from a lava flow into various substrate materials, focusing on the effects of the differing thermophysical properties of substrate materials. Initial motivation for this project developed from the desire to understand the loss of solar wind volatiles embedded in lunar regolith deposits that were subsequently covered by a lava flow. The Moon lacks a significant atmosphere and magnetosphere, leaving the surface regolith exposed to bombardment by solar flare and solar wind particles, and by the cosmogenic products of galactic cosmic rays. Preservation of particle-rich regolith deposits may have occurred by the emplacement of an active lava flow on top of the regolith layer, provided the embedded particles survive heating by the lava. During future expeditions to the lunar surface, ancient regolith deposits could be sampled through surface drilling to extract the extra-lunar particles, revealing a history of the solar activity and galactic events not available on the Earth. This project also has important implications for terrestrial lava flows, particularly in the prediction of lava flow hazards. Lava erupted on Earth may be emplaced on various substrates, including solid lava rock, volcanic tephra, sands, soils, etc. The composition, grain size, consolidation, moisture content, etc. of these materials will vary greatly and have different effects on the cooling of the flow. Accounting for specific properties of the substrate could be an important improvement in lava flow models We have performed laboratory experiments in collaboration with the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in which ~5-6 kg of basalt, collected at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is melted to ~1200 °C. The lava is poured into a device constructed of calcium silicate sheeting that has been filled with a solid or particulate substrate material and embedded with thermocouples

  11. 7 CFR 2902.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bedding, bed linens, and towels. 2902.15 Section 2902... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 2902.15 Bedding, bed linens, and towels. (a) Definition. (1) Bedding is that..., bedspreads, comforters, and quilts. (2) Bed linens are woven cloth sheets and pillowcases used in bedding....

  12. 7 CFR 3201.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bedding, bed linens, and towels. 3201.15 Section 3201... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.15 Bedding, bed linens, and towels. (a) Definition. (1) Bedding is that..., bedspreads, comforters, and quilts. (2) Bed linens are woven cloth sheets and pillowcases used in bedding....

  13. 7 CFR 3201.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bedding, bed linens, and towels. 3201.15 Section 3201... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.15 Bedding, bed linens, and towels. (a) Definition. (1) Bedding is that..., bedspreads, comforters, and quilts. (2) Bed linens are woven cloth sheets and pillowcases used in bedding....

  14. 7 CFR 2902.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bedding, bed linens, and towels. 2902.15 Section 2902... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 2902.15 Bedding, bed linens, and towels. (a) Definition. (1) Bedding is that..., bedspreads, comforters, and quilts. (2) Bed linens are woven cloth sheets and pillowcases used in bedding....

  15. 7 CFR 3201.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bedding, bed linens, and towels. 3201.15 Section 3201... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.15 Bedding, bed linens, and towels. (a) Definition. (1) Bedding is that..., bedspreads, comforters, and quilts. (2) Bed linens are woven cloth sheets and pillowcases used in bedding....

  16. Bedrock Channel and Cave Evolution Models Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perne, M.; Covington, M. D.; Cooper, M.

    2014-12-01

    Models of bedrock channel cross-section evolution typically rely on simple approximations of boundary shear stress to calculate erosion rates across the channel. While such models provide a useful tool for gaining general insight into channel dynamics, they also exhibit a narrower range of behaviors than seen in nature and scale experiments. Recent computational advances enable use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to relax many of the assumptions used in these simple models by simulating the full 3D flow field and resulting erosion. We have developed a model of bedrock channel evolution at the reach scale, using CFD, that alternates flow simulation steps with channel evolution steps and evolves the channel in time according to shear stresses calculated from the CFD runs. Caves provide an ideal field setting for studying bedrock channel dynamics, because long records of incision are often preserved in the form of channel widths, meander patterns, and sculpted forms, such as scallops, that indicate flow velocity and direction. However, most existing numerical models of cave formation investigate processes on larger scales, treat conduits as simple shapes, such as cylinders, and deal with the early stages of speleogenesis when sediment transport and erosion mechanisms other than dissolution do not have to be taken into account. Therefore, initial applications of the CFD model focus on the dynamics of cave channels, and particularly on the controls of channel width. While discharge, base level, sediment supply, and the ratio of dissolution to mechanical erosion, are likely to play important roles in determining channel width, we lack a quantitative understanding for the importance of these various factors. Notches in passage walls are thought to result from lateral erosion during periods of increased sediment load when the bed is armored. Modeling is used to check the plausibility of this explanation, and examine whether other mechanisms may also produce notches

  17. Contemporary flowstone development links early hominin bearing cave deposits in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, Robyn; Kramers, Jan D.; Hancox, Philip John; de Ruiter, Darryl J.; Woodhead, Jon D.

    2011-06-01

    The Cradle of Humankind cave sites in South Africa preserve fossil evidence of four early hominin taxa: Australopithecus africanus, Australopithecus sediba, Paranthropus robustus and early Homo. In order to integrate this record into a pan-African scenario of human evolutionary history it is critical to have reliable dates and temporal ranges for the southern African hominins. In the past a lack of precise and accurate chronological data has prevented the evaluation of the temporal relationships between the various sites. Here we report new uranium-lead (U-Pb) radiometric ages obtained from sheets of calcium carbonate flowstone inter-bedded between clastic cave sediments at the site of Swartkrans, providing bracketing ages for the fossiliferous deposits. The fossil bearing units of Swartkrans, specifically the Hanging Remnant and Lower Bank of Member 1, are underlain by flowstone layers dated to 2.25 ± 0.05 Ma and 2.25 ± 0.08 Ma and capped by layers of 1.8 ± 0.01 Ma and 1.7 ± 0.07 Ma. The age bracket of the Member 1 deposits is therefore between 2.31 and 1.64 Ma. However, by combining the U-Pb with biostratigraphic data we suggest that this can be narrowed down to between 1.9 and 1.8 Ma. These data can be compared with other recently dated sites and a radiometrically dated U-Pb age sequence formed: Sterkfontein Member 4, Swartkrans Member 1, Malapa, and Cooper's D. From this new U-Pb dataset, a pattern of contemporary flowstone development emerges, with different caves recording the same flowstone-forming event. Specifically overlapping flowstone formation takes place at Swartkrans and Sterkfontein at ~ 2.29 Ma and ~ 1.77 Ma, and at Sterkfontein and Malapa at ˜ 2.02 Ma. This suggests a regional control over the nature and timing of speleothem development in cave deposits and these flowstone layers could assist in future correlation, both internal to specific deposits and regionally between sites.

  18. Clumped isotope thermometry of cryogenic cave carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Tobias; Affek, Hagit P.; Zhang, Yi Ge; Dublyansky, Yuri; Spötl, Christoph; Immenhauser, Adrian; Richter, Detlev K.

    2014-02-01

    Freezing of cave pool water that is increasingly oversaturated with dissolved carbonate leads to precipitation of a very specific type of speleothems known as cryogenic cave carbonates (CCC). At present, two different environments for their formation have been proposed, based on their characteristic carbon and oxygen isotope ratios. Rapidly freezing thin water films result in the fast precipitation of fine-grained carbonate powder (CCCfine). This leads to rapid physicochemical changes including CO2 degassing and CaCO3 precipitation, resulting in significantly 13C-enriched carbonates. Alternatively, slow carbonate precipitation in ice-covered cave pools results in coarse crystalline CCC (CCCcoarse) yielding strongly 18O-depleted carbonate. This is due to the formation of relatively 18O-enriched ice causing the gradual depletion of 18O in the water from which the CCC precipitates. Cryogenic carbonates from Central European caves were found to have been formed primarily during the last glacial period, specifically during times of permafrost thawing, based on the oxygen isotope ratios and U-Th dating. Information about the precise conditions of CCCcoarse formation, i.e. whether these crystals formed under equilibrium or disequilibrium conditions with the parent fluid, however, is lacking. An improved understanding of CCCcoarse formation will increase the predictive value of this paleo-permafrost archive. Here we apply clumped isotopes to investigate the formation conditions of cryogenic carbonates using well-studied CCCcoarse from five different cave systems in western Germany. Carbonate clumped isotope measurements yielded apparent temperatures between 3 and 18 °C and thus exhibit clear evidence of isotopic disequilibrium. Although the very negative carbonate δ18O values can only be explained by gradual freezing of pool water accompanied by preferential incorporation of 18O into the ice, clumped isotope-derived temperatures significantly above expected freezing

  19. Partnerships in Sustainable Transportation: Mammoth Cave National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, Vickie

    2016-07-13

    This video takes a look at how the U.S. Department of Energy is helping to support a fleet of alternative fuel vehicles at Mammoth Cave National Park, reducing carbon emissions and preserving the park's natural beauty.

  20. LaJolla Spring Cave Complex - Meramec Caverns

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA Region 7 is directing the potentially responsible party at a groundwater contamination Superfund site in Franklin County, Mo., to perform additional work to protect workers and visitors from potentially harmful exposures at LaJolla Springs Cave Complex