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Sample records for cavitation bubble growth

  1. Bubbly Cavitation Flows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-31

    and 12. Comparison is also made with analytical predictions based on the Rayleigh - Plesset equations. In addition to the single bubble studies, the...bubble maximum size distributions and those predicted using the measured nuclei number distribution and the Rayleigh - Plesset model for the bubble dyna...tions 7, 9, 11, 12, 13 examined travelling bubble cavitation on two classic axisymmetric headforms (a Schiebe body and the ITTC headform) and, with the

  2. Experimental study of temperature effect on the growth and collapse of cavitation bubbles near a rigid boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiu-mei; Long, Zheng; He, Jie; Li, Bei-bei; Liu, Xin-hua; Zhao, Ji-yun; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao-wu

    2013-07-01

    The effect of temperature on the dynamics of a laser-induced cavitation bubble is studied experimentally. The growth and collapse of the cavitation bubble are measured by two sensitive fiber-optic sensors based on optical beam deflection (OBD). Cavitation bubble tests are performed in water at different temperatures, and the temperature ranges from freezing point (0°C) to near boiling point. The results indicate that both the maximum bubble radius and bubble lifetime are increased with the increase of temperature. During the stage of bubble rapidly collapsing in the vicinity of a solid surface, besides laser ablation effect, both the first and second liquid-jet-induced impulses are also observed. They are both increased with liquid temperature increasing, and then reach a peak, followed by a decrease. The peak appears at the temperature which is approximately the average of freezing and boiling points. The mechanism of liquid temperature influence on cavitation erosion is also discussed.

  3. Temperature measurements in cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation is usually a nearly isothermal process in the liquid phase, but in some specific flow conditions like hot water or cryogenic fluids, significant temperature variations are detected. In addition, a large temperature increase happens inside the cavitation bubbles at the very end of their collapse, due to the fast compression of the gas at the bubble core, which is almost adiabatic. This process is of primary interest in various biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, where the mechanisms of bubble collapse plays a major role. To investigate the amplitude and the spatial distribution of these temperature variations inside and outside the cavitation bubbles, a system based on cold wires has been developed. They have been tested in a configuration of a single bubble obtained by submitting a small air bubble to a large amplitude pressure wave. Some promising results have been obtained after the initial validation tests. This work is funded by the Office of Naval Research Global under Grant N62909-16-1-2116, Dr. Salahuddin Ahmed & Ki-Han Kim program managers.

  4. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Mørch, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years, and experimental investigations of bubbles and cavitation inception have been presented. These results suggest that cavitation nuclei in equilibrium are gaseous voids in the water, stabilized by a skin which allows diffusion balance between gas inside the void and gas in solution in the surrounding liquid. The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure–time history of the water. A recent model and associated experiments throw new light on the effects of transient pressures on the tensile strength of water, which may be notably reduced or increased by such pressure changes. PMID:26442138

  5. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei.

    PubMed

    Mørch, K A

    2015-10-06

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years, and experimental investigations of bubbles and cavitation inception have been presented. These results suggest that cavitation nuclei in equilibrium are gaseous voids in the water, stabilized by a skin which allows diffusion balance between gas inside the void and gas in solution in the surrounding liquid. The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure-time history of the water. A recent model and associated experiments throw new light on the effects of transient pressures on the tensile strength of water, which may be notably reduced or increased by such pressure changes.

  6. A Two-Scale Solution of the Forced Rayleigh-Plesset Equation Governing the Dynamics of Cavitation Bubble Vaporous Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    Unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Awammumf 200 wveas) A two -scale analysis of the forced Rayleigh - Plesset equation of cavitation bubble dynamics is performed. The...Dst I;-,; -I I I’W A-1i ii ABSTRACT A two -scale analysis of the forced Rayleigh - Plesset equation of cavitation bubble dynamics is...found for the Rayleigh - Plesset equation in terms of the two dimensionless time scales involved in the perturbation expansion for the point when Cp

  7. The acoustic emissions of cavitation bubbles in stretched vortices.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha A; Ceccio, Steven L

    2011-11-01

    Pairs of unequal strength, counter-rotating vortices were produced in order to examine the inception, dynamics, and acoustic emission of cavitation bubbles in rapidly stretching vortices. The acoustic signatures of these cavitation bubbles were characterized during their inception, growth, and collapse. Growing and collapsing bubbles often produced a sharp, broadband, pop sound. The spectrum of these bubbles, and the peak resonant frequency can generally be related to quiescent flow bubble dynamics and corresponding resonant frequencies. However, some elongated cavitation bubbles produced a short tonal burst, or chirp, with frequencies on the order of a few kilohertz. Theses frequencies are too low to be related to resonant frequencies of a bubble in a quiescent flow. Instead, the frequency content of the acoustic signal during bubble inception and growth is related to the volumetric oscillations of the bubble while it interacted with vortical flow that surrounds the bubble (i.e., the resonant frequency of the vortex-bubble system). A relationship was determined between the observed peak frequency of the oscillations, the highly stretched vortex properties, and the water nuclei content. It was found that different cavitation spectra could relate to different flow and fluid properties and therefore would not scale in the same manner.

  8. Sonoporation from Jetting Cavitation Bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Arora, Manish; Ikink, Roy; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel; Delius, Michael; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    The fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads to the detachment of cells. Cells at the edge of the circular area of detachment are found to be permanently porated, whereas cells at some distance from the detachment area undergo viable cell membrane poration (sonoporation). The wall flow field leading to cell detachment is modeled with a self-similar solution for a wall jet, together with a kinetic ansatz of adhesive bond rupture. The self-similar solution for the δ-type wall jet compares very well with the full solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for a jet of finite thickness. Apart from annular sites of sonoporation we also find more homogenous patterns of molecule delivery with no cell detachment. PMID:16950843

  9. Noise from Tip Vortex and Bubble Cavitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    composantes spectrales. la directivit6 et la forme d’onde des sons dans le champ lointain en conditions correspondant essentiellement an champ libre, jusqu...disappeared completely, leaving only bubble cavitation. A small amount of huil , vortex cavitation also was present at speeds above 1300 rpm. The final

  10. Sonoluminescence, sonochemistry and bubble dynamics of single bubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Shin-ichi

    2012-09-01

    The amount of hydroxyl radicals produced from a single cavitation bubble was quantified by terephthalate dosimetry at various frequencies and pressure amplitudes, while the dynamics of the single bubble was observed by stroboscopic and light-scattering methods. Also, sonoluminescence (SL), sonochemiluminescence (SCL) of luminol, and sodium atom emission (Na*) in the cavitation field were observed. The amount of hydroxyl radicals per cycle as well as the intensity of SL was proportional to pressure amplitude at every frequency performed, and it decreased with increasing frequency. When the single bubble was dancing with a decrease in pressure amplitude, however, the amount of hydroxyl radicals was greater than that for the stable bubble at the higher pressure amplitude and did not significantly decrease with frequency. Furthermore, SCL and Na* were detected only under unstable bubble conditions. These results imply that the instability of bubbles significantly enhances sonochemical efficiency for non-volatile substances in liquid phase.

  11. Shock Waves in Bubbly Cavitating Flows: Part I. Shock Waves in Cloud Cavitation. Part II. Bubbly Cavitating Flows Through a Converging-Diverging Nozzle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Chun

    Two problems are considered in this thesis: the nonlinear dynamics of a cloud of cavitation bubbles, and bubbly cavitating flows through a converging-diverging nozzle. The focus of the first problem is to explore the characteristics of the growth and collapse of a spherical cloud of bubbles. This is typical of the transient behaviour exhibited by a bubble cloud as it passes a body or the blade of a ship propeller. The simulations employ the fully nonlinear, non-barotropic, homogeneous two-phase flow equations coupled with the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for the dynamics of individual bubbles. It was found that the collapse of the cloud is accompanied by the formation of an inward propagating bubbly shock wave. The focusing of the shock is responsible for the severe noise and damage potential in cloud cavitation. The second problem investigates the nonlinear behavior of bubbly cavitating flows through a converging -diverging nozzle. Two different flow regimes are found from steady state solutions: quasi-steady and quasi-unsteady. Bifurcation occurs as the flow transitions from one regime to the other. Unsteady solutions in a period of consecutive times are also presented. These solutions are characterized by large pressure pulses changing in both magnitude and location with time downstream of the throat. The characteristics of these pulses are similar to the shock pulses of the first problem and are produced by the local violent collapse of the bubbles in the flow.

  12. Intensely oscillating cavitation bubble in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siew-Wan, Ohl; Tandiono; Klaseboer, Evert; Dave, Ow; Choo, Andre; Claus-Dieter, Ohl

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the technical breakthrough in generating intense ultrasonic cavitation in the confinement of a microfluidics channel [1], and applications that has been developed on this platform for the past few years [2,3,4,5]. Our system consists of circular disc transducers (10-20 mm in diameter), the microfluidics channels on PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), and a driving circuitry. The cavitation bubbles are created at the gas- water interface due to strong capillary waves which are generated when the system is driven at its natural frequency (around 100 kHz) [1]. These bubbles oscillate and collapse within the channel. The bubbles are useful for sonochemistry and the generation of sonoluminescence [2]. When we add bacteria (Escherichia coli), and yeast cells (Pichia pastoris) into the microfluidics channels, the oscillating and collapsing bubbles stretch and lyse these cells [3]. Furthermore, the system is effective (DNA of the harvested intracellular content remains largely intact), and efficient (yield reaches saturation in less than 1 second). In another application, human red blood cells are added to a microchamber. Cell stretching and rapture are observed when a laser generated cavitation bubble expands and collapses next to the cell [4]. A numerical model of a liquid pocket surrounded by a membrane with surface tension which was placed next to an oscillating bubble was developed using the Boundary Element Method. The simulation results showed that the stretching of the liquid pocket occurs only when the surface tension is within a certain range.

  13. Bubble Dynamics and Resulting Noise from Traveling Bubble Cavitation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-13

    has resulted in models which aqree well with bubble dynamics recorded by high speed film . Chahine, et. al. (23) incorporated asymmetric bubble...recording on the tape soundtrack . 3.8 Measurement of Gas Nuclei in Water The role of nuclei density and size in cavitation inception has been the subject...interference between the coherent background and the particle-diffracted radiation exooses photographic film in the far-field of the nuclei. This

  14. Acoustic Cavitation and Bubble Dynamics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-15

    study, they irradiated a liquid containing luminol , a light enhancing chemical, and observed light emission indicative of chemiluminescence for acoustic...liquid was water containing luminol and saturated with argon. 1-31. Variation of the cavitation threshold of water containing luminol with duty cycle

  15. Multiscale Modeling of Cavitating Bubbly Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Hsiao, C.-T.; Chahine, G. L.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of cavitating bubbly flows is challenging due to the wide range of characteristic lengths of the physics at play: from micrometers (e.g., bubble nuclei radius) to meters (e.g., propeller diameter or sheet cavity length). To address this, we present here a multiscale approach which integrates a Discrete Bubble Model for dispersed microbubbles and a level set N-S solver for macro cavities, along with a mesoscale transition model to bridge the two. This approach was implemented in 3DYNAFScopyright and used to simulate sheet-to-cloud cavitation over a hydrofoil. The hybrid model captures well the full cavitation process starting from free field nuclei and nucleation from solid surfaces. In low pressure region of the foil small nuclei are seen to grow large and eventually merge to form a large scale sheet cavity. A reentrant jet forms under the cavity, travels upstream, and breaks it, resulting in a bubble cloud of a large amount of microbubbles as the broken pockets shrink and travel downstream. This is in good agreement with experimental observations based of sheet lengths and frequency of lift force oscillation. DOE-SBIR, ONR (monitored by Dr. Ki-Han Kim)

  16. Rectified growth of histotripsy bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D.; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Simon, Julianna C.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy treatments use high-amplitude shock waves to fractionate tissue. Such treatments have been demonstrated using both cavitation bubbles excited with microsecond-long pulses and boiling bubbles excited for milliseconds. A common feature of both approaches is the need for bubble growth, where at 1 MHz cavitation bubbles reach maximum radii on the order of 100 microns and boiling bubbles grow to about 1 mm. To explore how histotripsy bubbles grow, a model of a single, spherical bubble that accounts for heat and mass transport was used to simulate the bubble dynamics. Results suggest that the asymmetry inherent in nonlinearly distorted waveforms can lead to rectified bubble growth, which is enhanced at elevated temperatures. Moreover, the rate of this growth is sensitive to the waveform shape, in particular the transition from the peak negative pressure to the shock front. Current efforts are focused on elucidating this behavior by obtaining an improved calibration of measured histotripsy waveforms with a fiber-optic hydrophone, using a nonlinear propagation model to assess the impact on the focal waveform of higher harmonics present at the source’s surface, and photographically observing bubble growth rates. PMID:26413193

  17. Bubble Dynamics and Cavitation Inception Theory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-30

    appearing in the forcing function, with the result that this problem involves only a soft excitation. Expanding the forced Rayleigh - Plesset equation and...Expanding the forced Rayleigh - Plesset equation and its initial conditions to the second order in 6, we find that the zeroth-order problem is the well...involves only an ordinary pulsed (e) This interaction causes the cavitation Rayleigh - Plesset differential equation. bubble to be removed from the

  18. On thermonuclear processes in cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, R. I.; Lahey, R. T., Jr.; Taleyarkhan, R. P.; West, C. D.; Block, R. C.

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical and experimental foundations of so-called bubble nuclear fusion are reviewed. In the nuclear fusion process, a spherical cavitation cluster ˜ 10-2 m in diameter is produced of spherical bubbles at the center of a cylindrical chamber filled with deuterated acetone using a focused acoustic field having a resonant frequency of about 20 kHz. The acoustically-forced bubbles effectuate volume oscillations with sharp collapses during the compression stage. At the final stages of collapse, the bubble cluster emits 2.5 MeV D-D fusion neutron pulses at a rate of ˜ 2000 per second. The neutron yield is ˜ 10^5 s -1. In parallel, tritium nuclei are produced at the same yield. It is shown numerically that, for bubbles having sufficient molecular mass, spherical shock waves develop in the center of the cluster and that these spherical shock waves (microshocks) produce converging shocks within the interior bubbles, which focus energy on the centers of the bubbles. When these shock waves reflect from the centers of the bubbles, extreme conditions of temperature ( ˜ 10^8 K) and density ( ˜ 10^4 kg m -3) arise in a (nano)spherical region ( ˜ 10-7 m in size) that last for ˜ 10-12 s, during which time about ten D-D fusion neutrons and tritium nuclei are produced in the region. A paradoxical result in our experiments is that it is bubble cluster (not streamer) cavitation and the sufficiently high molecular mass of (and hence the low sound speed in) D-acetone ( C3D6O) vapor (as compared, for example, to deuterated water D2O) which are necessary conditions for the formation of convergent spherical microshock waves in central cluster bubbles. It is these waves that allow the energy to be sufficiently focused in the nanospherical regions near the bubble centers for fusion events to occur. The criticism to which the concept of 'bubble fusion' has been subjected in the literature, in particular, most recently in Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (Physics - Uspekhi) journal, is

  19. Bubble proliferation in the cavitation field of a shock wave lithotripter

    PubMed Central

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; Williams, James C.; McAteer, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Lithotripter shock waves (SWs) generated in non-degassed water at 0.5 and 2 Hz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) were characterized using a fiber-optic hydrophone. High-speed imaging captured the inertial growth-collapse-rebound cycle of cavitation bubbles, and continuous recording with a 60 fps camcorder was used to track bubble proliferation over successive SWs. Microbubbles that seeded the generation of bubble clouds formed by the breakup of cavitation jets and by bubble collapse following rebound. Microbubbles that persisted long enough served as cavitation nuclei for subsequent SWs, as such bubble clouds were enhanced at fast PRF. Visual tracking suggests that bubble clouds can originate from single bubbles. PMID:21877776

  20. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    SciTech Connect

    Takahira, Hiroyuki Ogasawara, Toshiyuki Mori, Naoto Tanaka, Moe

    2015-10-28

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t{sub 0} to a characteristic time of wave propagation t{sub S}, η = t{sub 0}/t{sub s}, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  1. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability.

  2. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability. PMID:26912021

  3. Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-12-01

    In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.

  4. Suppression of cavitation inception by gas bubble injection: a numerical study focusing on bubble-bubble interaction.

    PubMed

    Ida, Masato; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2007-10-01

    The dynamic behavior of cavitation and gas bubbles under negative pressure has been studied numerically to evaluate the effect of gas bubble injection into a liquid on the suppression of cavitation inception. In our previous studies, it was demonstrated by direct observation that cavitation occurs in liquid mercury when mechanical impacts are imposed, and this will cause cavitation damage in spallation neutron sources, in which liquid mercury is bombarded by a high-power proton beam. In the present paper, we describe numerical investigations of the dynamics of cavitation bubbles in liquid mercury using a multibubble model that takes into account the interaction of a cavitation bubble with preexisting gas bubbles through bubble-radiated pressure waves. The numerical results suggest that, if the mercury includes gas bubbles whose equilibrium radius is much larger than that of the cavitation bubble, the explosive expansion of the cavitation bubble (i.e., cavitation inception) is suppressed by the positive-pressure wave radiated by the injected bubbles, which decreases the magnitude of the negative pressure in the mercury.

  5. Phaco-emulsification causes the formation of cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Svensson, B; Mellerio, J

    1994-09-01

    There have been reports of complications arising from damage to non-lenticular ocular tissue during the increasingly popular procedure of cataract extraction with phaco-emulsification. One cause of this damage might be the formation of cavitation bubbles. Such bubbles are known to produce free radicals and shock waves. This paper demonstrates directly the formation of cavitation bubbles at the tip of the phaco-probe. It also shows the importance of a smooth probe profile in reducing bubble formation. Recommendations are made for probe and tip design and for the use of minimum power during the surgical procedure of phaco-emulsification.

  6. Supersonic microjets induced by hemispherical cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Avila, Roberto; Song, Chaolong; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-11-01

    In recent years methods to produce fast microjets have received significant attention due to their potential to be employed in needle-free injection devices that can provide mass inoculation. In this talk we present a novel technique capable of producing jets that can reach up to 400 m/s. The jets are produced by a device that consists only of two electrodes on a plastic substrate and a tapered hole of 13 ~ 20 μm between them. A short pulse of electric current is applied to the electrodes, then a spark bridges between the electrodes creating a cavitation bubble. Liquid is accelerated through the hole during the expansion and collapse of the bubble producing two separate jets. We found that as the exit velocity of the jet increases the jets become unstable. The second jet exiting the hole, usually faster than the first jet exits as a spray. The effect of viscosity was also studied with silicone oils up to 100 cSt. Finally, we also demonstrate that the jets can penetrate into soft material, thus they have the potential to be used in a needle-free drug-delivery application.

  7. Cavitation bubble behavior inside a liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Etienne; Lettry, Jacques; Farhat, Mohamed; Monkewitz, Peter A.; Avellan, François

    2007-06-01

    The growth and collapse of laser-induced vapor cavities inside axisymmetric free-falling liquid water jets have been studied. Bubbles of different size are generated at various distances from the jet axis and the effects on the jet interface are recorded by means of ultrafast cinematography. The configuration is characterized by two dimensionless parameters: the bubble to jet diameter ratio δ and the eccentricity coefficient ɛ defined as the radius of bubble generation divided by the jet radius. For high δ and ɛ, microjets and droplets are ejected from the liquid jet at speeds exceeding 100m/s. The observed jet fragmentation shows similarities with experiments conducted on a liquid mercury jet hit by a pulsed proton beam, a candidate configuration for future accelerator based facilities.

  8. Interaction of two cavitation bubbles in a tube and its effects on heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Cai, Jun; Tao, Yuequn; Huai, Xiulan

    2017-02-01

    When two cavitation bubbles exist in a confined space, the interaction between the bubbles significantly affects the characteristics of bubble dynamic behaviors. In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) model is established to study the growth and collapse of two cavitation bubbles in a heated tube and its effects on heat transfer. The liquid and gas phases throughout the calculation domain are solved by a set of Navier-Stokes equations. It is assumed that the gas inside the bubble is compressible vapor, and the surrounding liquid is incompressible water. The mass transfer between two phases is ignored. The calculated bubble profiles were compared to the available experimental data, and a good agreement has been achieved. Then, the relationship among the bubble motion, flow field and pressure distributions was analyzed. On this basis, the effects of bubble interaction on the heat transfer between the wall surface and sounding liquid were discussed. It is found that heat transfer in the centre wall region is enhanced owing to the vortex flow and micro-jet induced by the bubble contraction and collapse. In contrast, the highest surface temperature appears in the surrounding region, which is mainly attributed to the thermal resistance induced by the bubble. The present study is helpful to understand the heat transfer phenomenon with cavitation in the liquid.

  9. Cavitation Bubble Streaming in Ultrasonic-Standing-Wave Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu; Kuroiwa, Masaya; Okada, Yasuyuki; Murakami, Koichi

    2005-05-01

    The mechanism of cavitation bubble streaming by ultrasonic vibration in a water tank was experimentally investigated. A standard ultrasonic cleaner unit with a resonant frequency of 40 kHz was used as an ultrasonic generator. The behavior of the streaming was visualized by the schlieren method and sonochemical luminescence, and the velocity of the streaming was measured by laser Doppler velocity measurement equipment (LDV). The cavitation bubble streaming has two structures. A cavitation cloud, which consists of many cavitation bubbles, is shaped like a facing pair of bowls with a diameter of approximately 1/3 the wavelength of the standing wave, and moves inside the standing-wave field with a velocity of 30 to 60 mm/s. The cavitation bubbles move intensely in the cloud with a velocity of 5 m/s at an ultrasonic output power of 75 W. The streaming is completely different from conventional acoustic streaming. Also the cavitation bubble is generated neither at the pressure node nor at the antinode.

  10. Surface tension and quasi-emulsion of cavitation bubble cloud.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lixin; Chen, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Gang; Xu, Weilin; Lin, Weijun; Wu, Pengfei; Li, Chao; Xu, Delong; Yan, Jiuchun

    2017-03-01

    A quasi-emulsion phenomenon of cavitation structure in a thin liquid layer (the thin liquid layer is trapped between a radiating surface and a hard reflector) is investigated experimentally with high-speed photography. The transformation from cloud-in-water (c/w) emulsion to water-in-cloud (w/c) emulsion is related to the increase of cavitation bubble cloud. The acoustic field in the thin liquid layer is analyzed. It is found that the liquid region has higher acoustic pressure than the cloud region. The bubbles are pushed from liquid region to cloud region by the primary Bjerknes forces. The rate of change of CSF increased with the increase of CSF. The cavitation bubbles on the surface of cavitation cloud are attracted by the cavitation bubbles inside the cloud due to secondary Bjerknes forces. The existence of surface tension on the interface of liquid region and cloud region is proved. The formation mechanism of disc-shaped liquid region and cloud region are analysed by surface tension and incompressibility of cavitation bubble cloud.

  11. Comparison of numerical simulations and laboratory studies of shock waves and cavitation bubble growth produced by optical breakdown in water

    SciTech Connect

    Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.; Vogel, A.

    1997-04-01

    In numerical calculations of idealized bubble dynamics test problems, Los Alamos computational tools perform well. A realistic equation of state must be used and geometrical features must be carefully modeled to simulate experiments accurately. In this work, we compare numerical simulations taking these features into account with experiments performed at the Medizinisches Laserzentrum Lubeck. We compare the measured and calculated positions of the shock front and of the bubble wall as a function of time in the laser optical breakdown of water produced by 30-ps 1-mJ Nd:YAG laser pulses.

  12. Controlled permeation of cell membrane by single bubble acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Yang, K; Cui, J; Ye, J Y; Deng, C X

    2012-01-10

    Sonoporation is the membrane disruption generated by ultrasound and has been exploited as a non-viral strategy for drug and gene delivery. Acoustic cavitation of microbubbles has been recognized to play an important role in sonoporation. However, due to the lack of adequate techniques for precise control of cavitation activities and real-time assessment of the resulting sub-micron process of sonoporation, limited knowledge has been available regarding the detail processes and correlation of cavitation with membrane disruption at the single cell level. In the current study, we developed a combined approach including optical, acoustical, and electrophysiological techniques to enable synchronized manipulation, imaging, and measurement of cavitation of single bubbles and the resulting cell membrane disruption in real-time. Using a self-focused femtosecond laser and high frequency ultrasound (7.44MHz) pulses, a single microbubble was generated and positioned at a desired distance from the membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Cavitation of the bubble was achieved by applying a low frequency (1.5MHz) ultrasound pulse (duration 13.3 or 40μs) to induce bubble collapse. Disruption of the cell membrane was assessed by the increase in the transmembrane current (TMC) of the cell under voltage clamp. Simultaneous high-speed bright field imaging of cavitation and measurements of the TMC were obtained to correlate the ultrasound-generated bubble activities with the cell membrane poration. The change in membrane permeability was directly associated with the formation of a sub-micrometer pore from a local membrane rupture generated by bubble collapse or bubble compression depending on ultrasound amplitude and duration. The impact of the bubble collapse on membrane permeation decreased rapidly with increasing distance (D) between the bubble (diameter d) and the cell membrane. The effective range of cavitation impact on membrane poration was determined to be D/d=0.75. The maximum mean

  13. Dual pulses for cavitation control in lithotripsy: Shock wave-bubble interactions and bioeffects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Dahlia L.

    2002-08-01

    Cavitation, the growth and collapse of gas/vapor bubbles, appears to play an important role in both stone comminution and tissue injury during shock wave lithotripsy, the clinical treatment in which focused, high amplitude shock pulses are used to comminute kidney stones. The goal of this research was to characterize in vitro cavitation activity and stone and cell damage in a novel system that uses converging dual pulses, produced by two identical, confocal lithotripters, to modify the cavitation field. The cavitation bubble dynamics were numerically calculated, and experiments were performed in a research electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripter to determine bubble size, lifetime, and pit depth created in aluminum foils by cavitation collapse. Furthermore, damage to model stones and to red blood cells was measured for both single and dual-pulses. A single shock pulse creates a ˜15 x 100 mm cloud of bubbles in water. The greatest cavitation activity and stone damage from single-pulses was found to occur 2 cm proximal to the geometric focus, F2, where the stone is normally aligned. Therefore, a 2 cm shift in stone alignment may potentially improve stone comminution and reduce tissue injury in clinical treatment. The dual-pulse lithotripter, on the other hand, generates a localized and intensified cavitation field that increased stone comminution efficiency at F2 by at least three times the maximum values achieved by single-pulses. At F2, acoustic pressure approximately doubled, as did bubble size, collapse time, and pit depth on foils. A significant reduction in comminution of stones suspended in glycerol indicates that cavitation activity, not the doubling of acoustic pressure, explains the increased comminution. On either side of F2, the second delayed pulse mitigated bubble collapse, resulting in little or no pitting on foils and reduced hemolysis, even when compared with single pulses. Numerical calculations of radial dynamics agreed with experimental findings

  14. Cavitation erosion by single laser-produced bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, A.; Lauterborn, W.

    1998-04-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanism of cavitation erosion, the dynamics of a single laser-generated cavitation bubble in water and the resulting surface damage on a flat metal specimen are investigated in detail. The characteristic effects of bubble dynamics, in particular the formation of a high-speed liquid jet and the emission of shock waves at the moment of collapse are recorded with high-speed photography with framing rates of up to one million frames/s. Damage is observed when the bubble is generated at a distance less than twice its maximum radius from a solid boundary ([gamma]=2, where [gamma]=s/Rmax, s is the distance between the boundary and the bubble centre at the moment of formation and Rmax is the maximum bubble radius). The impact of the jet contributes to the damage only at small initial distances ([gamma][less-than-or-eq, slant]0.7). In this region, the impact velocity rises to 83 m s[minus sign]1, corresponding to a water hammer pressure of about 0.1 GPa, whereas at [gamma]>1, the impact velocity is smaller than 25 m s[minus sign]1. The largest erosive force is caused by the collapse of a bubble in direct contact with the boundary, where pressures of up to several GPa act on the material surface. Therefore, it is essential for the damaging effect that bubbles are accelerated towards the boundary during the collapse phases due to Bjerknes forces. The bubble touches the boundary at the moment of second collapse when [gamma]<2 and at the moment of first collapse when [gamma]<1. Indentations on an aluminium specimen are found at the contact locations of the collapsing bubble. In the range [gamma]=1.7 to 2, where the bubble collapses mainly down to a single point, one pit below the bubble centre is observed. At [gamma][less-than-or-eq, slant]1.7, the bubble shape has become toroidal, induced by the jet flow through the bubble centre. Corresponding to the decay of this bubble torus into multiple tiny bubbles each collapsing separately along the

  15. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen sonochemically generated by cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Miyashita, Takuya; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation bubbles can induce not only a thermal bioeffect but also a chemical bioeffect. When cavitation bubbles collapse and oscillate violently, they produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause irreversible changes to the tissue. A sonosensitizer can promote such ROS generation. A treatment method using a sonosensitizer is called sonodynamic treatment. Rose bengal (RB) is one of the sonosensitizers whose in vivo and in vitro studies have been reported. In sonodynamic treatment, it is important to produce ROS at a high efficiency. For the efficient generation of ROS, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence has been proposed. In this study, cavitation bubbles were generated in a chamber where RB solution was sealed, and a high-speed camera captured the behavior of these cavitation bubbles. The amount of ROS was also quantified by a potassium iodide (KI) method and compared with high-speed camera pictures to investigate the effectiveness of the triggered HIFU sequence. As a result, ROS could be obtained efficiently by this sequence.

  16. Cavitation and bubble dynamics: the Kelvin impulse and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Blake, John R.; Leppinen, David M.; Wang, Qianxi

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics have a wide range of practical applications in a range of disciplines, including hydraulic, mechanical and naval engineering, oil exploration, clinical medicine and sonochemistry. However, this paper focuses on how a fundamental concept, the Kelvin impulse, can provide practical insights into engineering and industrial design problems. The pathway is provided through physical insight, idealized experiments and enhancing the accuracy and interpretation of the computation. In 1966, Benjamin and Ellis made a number of important statements relating to the use of the Kelvin impulse in cavitation and bubble dynamics, one of these being ‘One should always reason in terms of the Kelvin impulse, not in terms of the fluid momentum…’. We revisit part of this paper, developing the Kelvin impulse from first principles, using it, not only as a check on advanced computations (for which it was first used!), but also to provide greater physical insights into cavitation bubble dynamics near boundaries (rigid, potential free surface, two-fluid interface, flexible surface and axisymmetric stagnation point flow) and to provide predictions on different types of bubble collapse behaviour, later compared against experiments. The paper concludes with two recent studies involving (i) the direction of the jet formation in a cavitation bubble close to a rigid boundary in the presence of high-intensity ultrasound propagated parallel to the surface and (ii) the study of a ‘paradigm bubble model’ for the collapse of a translating spherical bubble, sometimes leading to a constant velocity high-speed jet, known as the Longuet-Higgins jet. PMID:26442141

  17. Spatial-temporal dynamics of cavitation bubble clouds in 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi

    2006-09-01

    Cavitation bubbles have been recognized as being essential to many applications of ultrasound. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of cavitation bubble clouds induced by a focused ultrasound transducer of 1.2 MHz center frequency are investigated by high-speed photography. It is revealed that at a total acoustic power of 72 W the cavitation bubble cloud first emerges in the focal region where cavitation bubbles are observed to generate, grow, merge and collapse during the initial 600 micros. The bubble cloud then grows upward to the post-focal region, and finally becomes visible in the pre-focal region. The structure of the final bubble cloud is characterized by regional distribution of cavitation bubbles in the ultrasound field. The cavitation bubble cloud structure remains stable when the acoustic power is increased from 25 W to 107 W, but it changes to a more violent form when the acoustic power is further increased to 175 W.

  18. Cavitation in confined water: ultra-fast bubble dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    In the hydraulic vessels of trees, water can be found at negative pressure. This metastable state, corresponding to mechanical tension, is achieved by evaporation through a porous medium. It can be relaxed by cavitation, i.e. the sudden nucleation of vapor bubbles. Harmful for the tree due to the subsequent emboli of sap vessels, cavitation is on the contrary used by ferns to eject spores very swiftly. We will focus here on the dynamics of the cavitation bubble, which is of primary importance to explain the previously cited natural phenomena. We use the recently developed method of artificial tress, using transparent hydrogels as the porous medium. Our experiments, on water confined in micrometric hydrogel cavities, show an extremely fast dynamics: bubbles are nucleated at the microsecond timescale. For cavities larger than 100 microns, the bubble ``rings'' with damped oscillations at MHz frequencies, whereas for smaller cavities the oscillations become overdamped. This rich dynamics can be accounted for by a model we developed, leading to a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Interestingly, this model predicts the impossibility to nucleate bubbles above a critical confinement that depends on liquid negative pressure and corresponds to approximately 100 nm for 20 MPa tensions.

  19. Unsteady translation and repetitive jetting of acoustic cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Till; Mettin, Robert

    2014-09-01

    High-speed recordings reveal peculiar details of the oscillation and translation behavior of cavitation bubbles in the vicinity of an ultrasonic horn tip driven at 20 kHz. In particular, a forward jump during collapse that is due to the rapid reduction of virtual mass is observed. Furthermore, frequently a jetting in the translation direction during the collapse phase is resolved. In spite of strong aspherical deformations and frequent splitting, these bubbles survive the jetting collapse, and they rebound recollecting fragments. Because of incomplete restoration of the spherical shape within the following driving period, higher periodic volume oscillations can occur. This is recognized as a yet unknown source of subharmonic acoustic emission by cavitation bubbles. Numerical modeling can capture the essentials of the unsteady translation.

  20. Dynamics of a single cavitating and reacting bubble.

    PubMed

    Hauke, Guillermo; Fuster, Daniel; Dopazo, Cesar

    2007-06-01

    Some of the studies on the dynamics of cavitating bubbles often consider simplified submodels assuming uniform fluid properties within the gas bubbles, ignoring chemical reactions, or suppressing fluid transport phenomena across the bubble interface. Another group of works, to which the present contribution belongs, includes the radial dependence of the fluid variables. Important fluid processes that occur inside the gas bubble, such as chemical reactions, and across the bubble interface, such as heat and mass transfer phenomena, are here considered also. As a consequence, this model should yield more realistic results. In particular, it is found that water evaporation and condensation are fundamental transport phenomena in estimating the dissociation reactions of water into OH. The thermal and mass boundary layers and the radial variation of the chemical concentrations also seem essential for accurate predictions.

  1. Cavitation bubble dynamics during thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Kennedy, Joshua D.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored for lithotripsy. TFL parameters differ from standard Holmium:YAG laser in several ways, including smaller fiber delivery, more strongly absorbed wavelength, low pulse energy/high pulse rate operation, and more uniform temporal pulse structure. High speed imaging of cavitation bubbles was performed at 105,000 fps and 10 μm spatial resolution to determine influence of these laser parameters on bubble formation. TFL was operated at 1908 nm with pulse energies of 5-75 mJ, and pulse durations of 200-1000 μs, delivered through 100-μm-core fiber. Cavitation bubble dynamics using Holmium laser at 2100 nm with pulse energies of 200-1000 mJ and pulse duration of 350 μs was studied, for comparison. A single, 500 μs TFL pulse produced a bubble stream extending 1090 +/- 110 μm from fiber tip, and maximum bubble diameters averaged 590 +/- 20 μm (n=4). These observations are consistent with previous studies which reported TFL ablation stallout at working distances < 1.0 mm. TFL bubble dimensions were five times smaller than for Holmium laser due to lower pulse energy, higher water absorption coefficient, and smaller fiber diameter used.

  2. A Study of Cavitation-Ignition Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Jacqmin, David A.

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental and computational study of the physics and chemistry of cavitation-ignition bubble combustion (CIBC), a process that occurs when combustible gaseous mixtures are ignited by the high temperatures found inside a rapidly collapsing bubble. The CIBC process was modeled using a time-dependent compressible fluid-dynamics code that includes finite-rate chemistry. The model predicts that gas-phase reactions within the bubble produce CO and other gaseous by-products of combustion. In addition, heat and mechanical energy release through a bubble volume-expansion phase are also predicted by the model. We experimentally demonstrate the CIBC process using an ultrasonically excited cavitation flow reactor with various hydrocarbon-air mixtures in liquid water. Low concentrations (< 160 ppm) of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from the ultrasonic reactor were measured, and found to be proportional to the acoustic excitation power. The results of the model were consistent with the measured experimental results. Based on the experimental findings, the computational model, and previous reports of the "micro-diesel effect" in industrial hydraulic systems, we conclude that CIBC is indeed possible and exists in ultrasonically- and hydrodynamically-induced cavitation. Finally, estimates of the utility of CIBC process as a means of powering an idealized heat engine are also presented.

  3. Bubble nucleation and growth in open-cycle OTEC subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugby, D. C.; Wassel, A. T.; Mills, A. F.

    1983-05-01

    Bubble nucleation and growth in the evaporator, condenser, upcomers, and feedwater distribution systems of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power plants are examined. The phenomenon that will probably have the most impact on system design is cavitation in the warm water feed near the entrance of the evaporator. The critical bubble size for cavitation is about 105 microns. Sources of bubbles in the warm water feed are those entering from the ocean, those nucleating on suspended particles, and those nucleating on the upcomer wall. Analyses of bubble growth induced by changes in hydrostatic pressure, mass transfer, and coalescence are presented. Using available information for bubble size distribution in seawater at California locations, it is shown that cavitation will probably have a significant impact on evaporator performance unless a debubbler is provided upstream of the evaporator entrance.

  4. Shock wave emission during the collapse of cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garen, W.; Hegedűs, F.; Kai, Y.; Koch, S.; Meyerer, B.; Neu, W.; Teubner, U.

    2016-07-01

    Shock wave emission induced by intense laser pulses is investigated experimentally. The present work focuses on the conditions of shock wave emission in glycerine and distilled water during the first bubble collapse. Experimental investigations are carried out in liquids as a function of temperature and viscosity. Comparison is made with the theoretical work of Poritsky (Proc 1st US Natl Congress Appl Mech 813-821, 1952) and Brennen (Cavitation and bubble dynamics, Oxford University Press 1995). To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first experimental verification of those theories.

  5. Interaction dynamics of spatially separated cavitation bubbles in water.

    PubMed

    Tinne, Nadine; Schumacher, Silvia; Nuzzo, Valeria; Arnold, Cord L; Lubatschowski, Holger; Ripken, Tammo

    2010-01-01

    We present a high-speed photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles generated in two spatially separated regions by femtosecond laser-induced optical breakdown in water. Depending on the relative energies of the femtosecond laser pulses and their spatial separation, different kinds of interactions, such as a flattening and deformation of the bubbles, asymmetric water flows, and jet formation were observed. The results presented have a strong impact on understanding and optimizing the cutting effect of modern femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates (>1 MHz).

  6. Interaction dynamics of spatially separated cavitation bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinne, Nadine; Schumacher, Silvia; Nuzzo, Valeria; Arnold, Cord L.; Lubatschowski, Holger; Ripken, Tammo

    2010-11-01

    We present a high-speed photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles generated in two spatially separated regions by femtosecond laser-induced optical breakdown in water. Depending on the relative energies of the femtosecond laser pulses and their spatial separation, different kinds of interactions, such as a flattening and deformation of the bubbles, asymmetric water flows, and jet formation were observed. The results presented have a strong impact on understanding and optimizing the cutting effect of modern femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates (>1 MHz).

  7. Modeling of cavitation-bubble compression in benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dnestrovskii, A. Yu.; Voropaev, S. A.; Zabrodina, E. A.

    2016-08-01

    In this study a two-dimensional model for calculating cavitation-bubble compression in benzene using a wide range of equations of state for ultrahigh pressures and temperatures is constructed. The calculations are carried out on the supercomputer of the Keldysh IAM. With the help of this model, the possibility of hits in the diamond-formation mode depending on the parameters of the external pressure and the initial bubble radius are analyzed. The dependence of the duration of the presence in the diamond-formation mode on these parameters is investigated.

  8. Bubbly flow model for the dynamic characteristics of cavitating pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennen, C.

    1978-01-01

    The recent experimental transfer matrices obtained by Ng and Brennen (1978) for some axial flow pumps revealed some dynamic characteristics which were unaccounted for by any existing theoretical analysis; their visual observations suggested that the bubbly cavitating flow in the blade passages could be responsible for these effects. A theoretical model of the dynamic response of this bubbly blade-passage flow is described in the present paper. Void-fraction fluctuations in this flow result not only from pressure fluctuations but also because the fluctuating angle of attack causes fluctuations in the rate of production of bubbles near the leading edge. The latter causes kinematic waves which interact through the boundary conditions with the dynamic waves caused by pressure fluctuation. The resulting theoretical transfer functions which results are in good qualitative agreement with the experiments; with appropriate choices of two parameters good quantitative agreement is also obtained. The theoretical model also provides one possible explanation of the observation that the pump changes from an essentially passive dynamic element in the absence of cavitation to a progressively more active element as the extent of cavitation increases.

  9. Cavitation clouds created by shock scattering from bubbles during histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Cain, Charles A; Fowlkes, J Brian; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Bailey, Michael R; Xu, Zhen

    2011-10-01

    Histotripsy is a therapy that focuses short-duration, high-amplitude pulses of ultrasound to incite a localized cavitation cloud that mechanically breaks down tissue. To investigate the mechanism of cloud formation, high-speed photography was used to observe clouds generated during single histotripsy pulses. Pulses of 5-20 cycles duration were applied to a transparent tissue phantom by a 1-MHz spherically focused transducer. Clouds initiated from single cavitation bubbles that formed during the initial cycles of the pulse, and grew along the acoustic axis opposite the propagation direction. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that clouds form as a result of large negative pressure generated by the backscattering of shockwaves from a single bubble. The positive-pressure phase of the wave inverts upon scattering and superimposes on the incident negative-pressure phase to create this negative pressure and cavitation. The process repeats with each cycle of the incident wave, and the bubble cloud elongates toward the transducer. Finite-amplitude propagation distorts the incident wave such that the peak-positive pressure is much greater than the peak-negative pressure, which exaggerates the effect. The hypothesis was tested with two modified incident waves that maintained negative pressure but reduced the positive pressure amplitude. These waves suppressed cloud formation which supported the hypothesis.

  10. Uniting the family of jets of single cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Tinguely, Marc; Kobel, Philippe; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Farhat, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Micro-jets are high-speed liquid jets that are produced when a cavitation bubble experiences a non-spherical collapse. Such jets may be driven by any anisotropy in the liquid, such as those induced by near surfaces, gravity, pressure gradients in flows or shock waves. Here we unify this diverse family of micro-jets by describing their dynamics with a single anisotropy parameter ζ >= 0 that represents a dimensionless version of the liquid momentum at the collapse point. We observe, experimentally and numerically, that the dimensionless jet parameters describing the jet speed, jet impact time, bubble displacement, bubble volume at jet impact and vapor-jet volume, all reduce to functions of ζ. Consequently, a measurement of a single parameter, such as the bubble displacement, may be used to estimate any other parameter, such as the jet speed. The jets are phenomenologically categorized into three visually distinct regimes: weak jets that hardly pierce the bubble, intermediate jets that pierce the bubble late during the collapse, and strong jets that pierce the bubble at an early stage of the collapse. In the weak and intermediate jet regimes, that is, when ζ < 0 . 1 , the dimensionless jet parameters scale as simple power laws of ζ independently of the jet driver. Swiss National Science Foundation, University of Western Australia Research Collaboration Award, European Space Agency.

  11. Cloud Cavitation and Collective Bubble Dynamics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-15

    Experiment To experimentally determine a relationship between bubble size, density, and acoustic damping, a number of tests were conducted varying the...CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE 19. ABSTRACT - (Continued) A fundamental experimental program was conducted in parallel with the theoretical effort described here...of both low and high void fractions could be studied. A set of experiments of a more preliminary nature concerned sbund wave propagation through a

  12. Interactions of inertial cavitation bubbles with stratum corneum lipid bilayers during low-frequency sonophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tezel, Ahmet; Mitragotri, Samir

    2003-12-01

    Interactions of acoustic cavitation bubbles with biological tissues play an important role in biomedical applications of ultrasound. Acoustic cavitation plays a particularly important role in enhancing transdermal transport of macromolecules, thereby offering a noninvasive mode of drug delivery (sonophoresis). Ultrasound-enhanced transdermal transport is mediated by inertial cavitation, where collapses of cavitation bubbles microscopically disrupt the lipid bilayers of the stratum corneum. In this study, we describe a theoretical analysis of the interactions of cavitation bubbles with the stratum corneum lipid bilayers. Three modes of bubble-stratum corneum interactions including shock wave emission, microjet penetration into the stratum corneum, and impact of microjet on the stratum corneum are considered. By relating the mechanical effects of these events on the stratum corneum structure, the relationship between the number of cavitation events and collapse pressures with experimentally measured increase in skin permeability was established. Theoretical predictions were compared to experimentally measured parameters of cavitation events.

  13. Size distribution estimation of cavitation bubble cloud via bubbles dissolution using an ultrasound wide-beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Liu, Xiaodong; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposed an acoustic technique to estimate size distribution of a cavitation bubble cloud induced by focused ultrasound (FUS) based on the dissolution of bubble cloud trapped by a wide beam of low acoustic pressure, after the acoustic exposure of FUS is turned off. Dissolution of cavitation bubbles in saline and in phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion diluted with degassed saline or saturated saline has been respectively studied to quantify the effects of pulse duration (PD) and acoustic power (AP) or peak negative pressure (PNP) of FUS on size distribution of cavitation bubbles.

  14. Synchrotron x-ray imaging of acoustic cavitation bubbles induced by acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung Yong; Park, Han Wook; Park, Sung Ho; Lee, Sang Joon

    2017-04-01

    The cavitation induced by acoustic excitation has been widely applied in various biomedical applications because cavitation bubbles can enhance the exchanges of mass and energy. In order to minimize the hazardous effects of the induced cavitation, it is essential to understand the spatial distribution of cavitation bubbles. The spatial distribution of cavitation bubbles visualized by the synchrotron x-ray imaging technique is compared to that obtained with a conventional x-ray tube. Cavitation bubbles with high density in the region close to the tip of the probe are visualized using the synchrotron x-ray imaging technique, however, the spatial distribution of cavitation bubbles in the whole ultrasound field is not detected. In this study, the effects of the ultrasound power of acoustic excitation and working medium on the shape and density of the induced cavitation bubbles are examined. As a result, the synchrotron x-ray imaging technique is useful for visualizing spatial distributions of cavitation bubbles, and it could be used for optimizing the operation conditions of acoustic cavitation.

  15. Investigations on dynamics of interacting cavitation bubbles in strong acoustic fields.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liang; Ge, Han; Liu, Fengbin; Chen, Darong

    2017-01-01

    Given its importance to the dynamics of cavitation bubbles, the mutual interaction between bubbles was carefully investigated in this work. The cavitation noises emitted in different sonication conditions were recorded to study the dynamical behavior of the bubbles. The frequency spectra of the noises suggest that the dispersing state of the bubbles severely influence the oscillations of bubbles, and that the nonlinear feature of the dynamics of cavitation bubbles, imposed by the mutual bubble-bubble interaction, gradually develops with the decrease of the dispersing height. Theoretical analysis shows that the size difference between the interacting bubbles should be responsible for the increase of nonlinearity of the oscillation, and that the decrease of the distance between them could effectively enhance the nonlinear feature of the oscillation of the bubble, both of which agree well with the experimental observation.

  16. Variations of bubble cavitation and temperature elevation during acculysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2017-03-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is effective in both thermal ablations and soft-tissue fragmentation. Mechanical and thermal effects depend on the operating parameters and vary with the progress of therapy. Different types of lesions could be produced with the pulse duration of 5-30 ms, much longer than histotripsy burst but shorter than the time for tissue boiling, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.2-5 Hz. Meanwhile, bubble cavitation and temperature elevation in the focal region were measured by passive cavitation detection (PCD) and thermocouples, respectively. Temperature in the pre-focal region is always higher than those at the focal and post-focal position in all tests. Overall, it is suggested that appropriate synergy and monitoring of mechanical and thermal effects would broaden the HIFU application and enhance its efficiency as well as safety.

  17. Modeling and experimental analysis of acoustic cavitation bubbles for Burst Wave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kazuki; Colonius, Tim; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam; Cunitz, Bryan; Bailey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A combined modeling and experimental study of acoustic cavitation bubbles that are initiated by focused ultrasound waves is reported. Focused ultrasound waves of frequency 335 kHz and peak negative pressure 8 MPa are generated in a water tank by a piezoelectric transducer to initiate cavitation. The resulting pressure field is obtained by direct numerical simulation (DNS) and used to simulate single bubble oscillation. The characteristics of cavitation bubbles observed by high-speed photography qualitatively agree withs the simulation result. Finally, bubble clouds are captured using acoustic B-mode imaging that works in synchronization with high-speed photography. PMID:27087826

  18. Effect of entropy on the nucleation of cavitation bubbles in water under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzl, Georg; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Water can exist in a metastable liquid state under tension for long times before the system relaxes into the vapor via cavitation, i.e., bubble nucleation. Microscopic information on the cavitation process can be extracted from experimental data by the use of the nucleation theorem, which relates measured cavitation rates to the size of the critical bubble. To apply the nucleation theorem to experiments performed along an isochoric path, for instance, in cavitation experiments in mineral inclusions, knowledge of the bubble entropy is required. Using computer simulations, we compute the entropy of bubbles in water as a function of their volume over a wide range of tensions from free energy calculations. We find that the bubble entropy is an important contribution to the free energy that significantly lowers the barrier to bubble nucleation, thereby facilitating cavitation. Furthermore, the bubble entropy per surface area depends on the curvature of the liquid-vapor interface, decreasing approximately linearly with its mean curvature over the studied range of bubble volumes. At room temperature, the entropy of a flat liquid-vapor interface at ambient pressure is very similar to that of critical bubbles over a wide range of tensions, which justifies the use of the former as an approximation when interpreting data from experiments. Based on our simulation results, we obtain an estimate for the volume of the critical bubble from experimentally measured cavitation rates.

  19. Hysteresis of inertial cavitation activity induced by fluctuating bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Muleki Seya, Pauline; Desjouy, Cyril; Béra, Jean-Christophe; Inserra, Claude

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the variety of complex phenomena encountered in nonlinear physics, a hysteretic effect can be expected on ultrasound cavitation due to the intrinsic nonlinearity of bubble dynamics. When applying successive ultrasound shots for increasing and decreasing acoustic intensities, a hysteretic behaviour is experimentally observed on inertial cavitation activity, with a loop area sensitive to the inertial cavitation threshold. To get a better insight of the phenomena underlying this hysteretic effect, the evolution of the bubble size distribution is studied numerically by implementing rectified diffusion, fragmentation process, rising and dissolution of bubbles from an initial bubble size distribution. When applying increasing and decreasing acoustic intensities, the numerical distribution exhibits asymmetry in bubble number and distribution. The resulting inertial cavitation activity is assessed through the numerical broadband noise of the emitted acoustic radiation of the bubble cloud dynamics. This approach allows obtaining qualitatively the observed hysteretic effect and its interest in terms of control is discussed.

  20. Plasma formation and temperature measurement during single-bubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flannigan, David J.; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2005-03-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) results from the extreme temperatures and pressures achieved during bubble compression; calculations have predicted the existence of a hot, optically opaque plasma core with consequent bremsstrahlung radiation. Recent controversial reports claim the observation of neutrons from deuterium-deuterium fusion during acoustic cavitation. However, there has been previously no strong experimental evidence for the existence of a plasma during single- or multi-bubble sonoluminescence. SBSL typically produces featureless emission spectra that reveal little about the intra-cavity physical conditions or chemical processes. Here we report observations of atomic (Ar) emission and extensive molecular (SO) and ionic (O2+) progressions in SBSL spectra from concentrated aqueous H2SO4 solutions. Both the Ar and SO emission permit spectroscopic temperature determinations, as accomplished for multi-bubble sonoluminescence with other emitters. The emissive excited states observed from both Ar and O2+ are inconsistent with any thermal process. The Ar excited states involved are extremely high in energy (>13eV) and cannot be thermally populated at the measured Ar emission temperatures (4,000-15,000K) the ionization energy of O2 is more than twice its bond dissociation energy, so O2+ likewise cannot be thermally produced. We therefore conclude that these emitting species must originate from collisions with high-energy electrons, ions or particles from a hot plasma core.

  1. Plasma formation and temperature measurement during single-bubble cavitation.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, David J; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2005-03-03

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) results from the extreme temperatures and pressures achieved during bubble compression; calculations have predicted the existence of a hot, optically opaque plasma core with consequent bremsstrahlung radiation. Recent controversial reports claim the observation of neutrons from deuterium-deuterium fusion during acoustic cavitation. However, there has been previously no strong experimental evidence for the existence of a plasma during single- or multi-bubble sonoluminescence. SBSL typically produces featureless emission spectra that reveal little about the intra-cavity physical conditions or chemical processes. Here we report observations of atomic (Ar) emission and extensive molecular (SO) and ionic (O2+) progressions in SBSL spectra from concentrated aqueous H2SO4 solutions. Both the Ar and SO emission permit spectroscopic temperature determinations, as accomplished for multi-bubble sonoluminescence with other emitters. The emissive excited states observed from both Ar and O2+ are inconsistent with any thermal process. The Ar excited states involved are extremely high in energy (>13 eV) and cannot be thermally populated at the measured Ar emission temperatures (4,000-15,000 K); the ionization energy of O2 is more than twice its bond dissociation energy, so O2+ likewise cannot be thermally produced. We therefore conclude that these emitting species must originate from collisions with high-energy electrons, ions or particles from a hot plasma core.

  2. High-contrast active cavitation imaging technique based on multiple bubble wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shukuan; Xu, Shanshan; Liu, Runna; Hu, Hong; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a unique method that combines the ultrafast active cavitation imaging technique with multiple bubble wavelet transform (MBWT) for improving cavitation detection contrast was presented. The bubble wavelet was constructed by the modified Keller-Miksis equation that considered the mutual effect among bubbles. A three-dimensional spatial model was applied to simulate the spatial distribution of multiple bubbles. The effects of four parameters on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of cavitation images were evaluated, including the following: initial radii of bubbles, scale factor in the wavelet transform, number of bubbles, and the minimum inter-bubble distance. And the other two spatial models and cavitation bubble size distributions were introduced in the MBWT method. The results suggested that in the free-field experiments, the averaged SNR of images acquired by the MBWT method was improved by 7.16 ± 0.09 dB and 3.14 ± 0.14 dB compared with the values of images acquired by the B-mode and single bubble wavelet transform (SBWT) methods. In addition, in the tissue experiments, the averaged cavitation-to-tissue ratio of cavitation images acquired by the MBWT method was improved by 4.69 ± 0.25 dB and 1.74± 0.29 dB compared with that of images acquired by B-mode and SBWT methods.

  3. Experimental investigation on dynamic characteristics and strengthening mechanism of laser-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ren, X D; He, H; Tong, Y Q; Ren, Y P; Yuan, S Q; Liu, R; Zuo, C Y; Wu, K; Sui, S; Wang, D S

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic features of nanosecond laser-induced cavitation bubbles near the light alloy boundary were investigated with the high-speed photography. The shock-waves and the dynamic characteristics of the cavitation bubbles generated by the laser were detected using the hydrophone. The dynamic features and strengthening mechanism of cavitation bubbles were studied. The strengthening mechanisms of cavitation bubble were discussed when the relative distance parameter γ was within the range of 0.5-2.5. It showed that the strengthening mechanisms caused by liquid jet or shock-waves depended on γ much. The research results provided a new strengthening method based on laser-induced cavitation shotless peening (CSP).

  4. Sonoporation of suspension cells with a single cavitation bubble in a microfluidic confinement.

    PubMed

    Gac, Séverine Le; Zwaan, Ed; van den Berg, Albert; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2007-12-01

    We report here the sonoporation of HL60 (human promyelocytic leukemia) suspension cells in a microfluidic confinement using a single laser-induced cavitation bubble. Cavitation bubbles can induce membrane poration of cells located in their close vicinity. Membrane integrity of suspension cells placed in a microfluidic chamber is probed through either the calcein release out of calcein-loaded cells or the uptake of trypan blue. Cells that are located farther away than four times Rmax (maximum bubble radius) from the cavitation bubble center remain fully unaffected, while cells closer than 0.75 Rmax become porated with a probability of >75%. These results enable us to define a distance of 0.75 Rmax as a critical interaction distance of the cavitation bubble with HL60 suspension cells. These experiments suggest that flow-induced poration of suspension cells is applicable in lab-on-a-chip systems, and this might be an interesting alternative to electroporation.

  5. Reconstruction of laser-induced cavitation bubble dynamics based on a Fresnel propagation approach.

    PubMed

    Devia-Cruz, Luis Felipe; Camacho-López, Santiago; Cortés, Víctor Ruiz; Ramos-Muñiz, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2015-12-10

    A single laser-induced cavitation bubble in transparent liquids has been studied through a variety of experimental techniques. High-speed video with varying frame rate up to 20×10(7)   fps is the most suitable to study nonsymmetric bubbles. However, it is still expensive for most researchers and more affordable (lower) frame rates are not enough to completely reproduce bubble dynamics. This paper focuses on combining the spatial transmittance modulation (STM) technique, a single shot cavitation bubble and a very simple and inexpensive experimental technique, based on Fresnel approximation propagation theory, to reproduce a laser-induced cavitation spatial dynamics. Our results show that the proposed methodology reproduces a laser-induced cavitation event much more accurately than 75,000 fps video recording. In conclusion, we propose a novel methodology to reproduce laser-induced cavitation events that combine the STM technique with Fresnel propagation approximation theory that properly reproduces a laser-induced cavitation event including a very precise identification of the first, second, and third collapses of the cavitation bubble.

  6. Spatial distribution of sonoluminescence and sonochemiluminescence generated by cavitation bubbles in 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hua; Wan, Mingxi; Qiao, Yangzi; Zhang, Shusheng; Li, Ruixue

    2012-03-01

    An intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera was used to observe the spatial distribution of sonoluminescence (SL) and sonochemiluminescence (SCL) generated by cavitation bubbles in a 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound (FU) field in order to investigate the mechanisms of acoustic cavitation under different sonication conditions for FU therapeutic applications. It was found that SL emissions were located in the post-focal region. When the intensity of SL and SCL increased as the power rose, the growth of SCL was much higher than that of SL. In the post-focal region, the SCL emissions moved along specific paths and formed branch-like streamers. At the beginning of the ultrasound irradiation, cavitation bubbles generated SCL in both the pre-focal and the post-focal region. When the electrical power or the sonication time increased, the SCL in the post-focal region increased and became higher than that in the pre-focal region. The intensity of SCL in the focal region is usually the weakest because of "oversaturation". The spatial distribution of SCL near a tissue boundary differed from that obtained in free fields. It organized into special structures under different acoustic amplitudes. When the electrical power was relatively low, the SCL emission was conical shape which suggested a standing wave formation at the tissue-fluid boundary. When the electrical power exceeded a certain threshold, only a bright spot could be captured in the focus. The cavitation bubbles which centralized in the focus concentrated energy and hindered the formation of standing waves. With rising electrical power at high levels, besides a bright spot in the focus, there were some irregular light spots in pre-focal region, which indicated some cavitation bubbles or small bubble clusters achieved the threshold of SCL and induced the reaction with the luminol solution.

  7. Acceleration of lithotripsy using cavitation bubbles induced by second-harmonic superimposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuga, Masamizu; Yasuda, Jun; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy potentially produces residual stone fragments too large to pass through ureters and significant injury to the normal tissue surrounding the stone. Previous works have shown that the collapse of cavitation bubbles induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound can produce small stone fragments via cavitation erosion. However, the erosion rate is hypothesized to be reduced by ultrasound attenuation by excessively generated bubble clouds. If so, it is important to generate the bubbles only on the stone surface. The effects of peak-negative-enhanced (PNE) and peak-positive-enhanced (PPE) waves obtained by second-harmonic superimposition were investigated to control cavitation bubbles. With the PNE waves, the bubbles were generated only on the stone surface and the maximum erosion rate was 232 ± 32 mg/min. All the fragments were smaller than 2 mm, which makes them pass through ureters naturally. The proposed method shows the potential to significantly improve the speed of lithotripsy.

  8. Generation of laser-induced cavitation bubbles with a digital hologram

    PubMed Central

    Quinto-Su, P. A.; Venugopalan, V.; Ohl, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a method using a spatial light modulator (SLM) to generate arbitrary 2-D spatial configurations of laser induced cavitation bubbles. The SLM acts as a phase hologram that controls the light distribution in the focal plane of a microscope objective. We generate cavitation bubbles over an area of 380x380 μm2 with a 20x microscope objective through absorption of the pulsed laser light in a liquid ink solution. We demonstrate the ability to accurately position up to 34 micrometer sized bubbles using laser energies of 56 μJ. PMID:19581988

  9. A numerical method for the dynamics of non-spherical cavitation bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucca, G.; Prosperetti, A.

    1982-01-01

    A boundary integral numerical method for the dynamics of nonspherical cavitation bubbles in inviscid incompressible liquids is described. Only surface values of the velocity potential and its first derivatives are involved. The problem of solving the Laplace equation in the entire domain occupied by the liquid is thus avoided. The collapse of a bubble in the vicinity of a solid wall and the collapse of three bubbles with collinear centers are considered.

  10. A New Active Cavitation Mapping Technique for Pulsed HIFU Applications – Bubble Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Hwang, Joo Ha; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a new active cavitation mapping technique for pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) applications termed bubble Doppler is proposed and its feasibility tested in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms. pHIFU therapy uses short pulses, delivered at low pulse repetition frequency, to cause transient bubble activity that has been shown to enhance drug and gene delivery to tissues. The current gold standard for detecting and monitoring cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments is passive cavitation detection (PCD), which provides minimal information on the spatial distribution of the bubbles. B-mode imaging can detect hyperecho formation, but has very limited sensitivity, especially to small, transient microbubbles. The bubble Doppler method proposed here is based on a fusion of the adaptations of three Doppler techniques that had been previously developed for imaging of ultrasound contrast agents – color Doppler, pulse inversion Doppler, and decorrelation Doppler. Doppler ensemble pulses were interleaved with therapeutic pHIFU pulses using three different pulse sequences and standard Doppler processing was applied to the received echoes. The information yielded by each of the techniques on the distribution and characteristics of pHIFU-induced cavitation bubbles was evaluated separately, and found to be complementary. The unified approach - bubble Doppler – was then proposed to both spatially map the presence of transient bubbles and to estimate their sizes and the degree of nonlinearity. PMID:25265178

  11. Visualization of ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles using the synchrotron x-ray Analyzer Based Imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zahra; Belev, George; Izadifar, Mohammad; Izadifar, Zohreh; Chapman, Dean

    2014-12-07

    Observing cavitation bubbles deep within tissue is very difficult. The development of a method for probing cavitation, irrespective of its location in tissues, would improve the efficiency and application of ultrasound in the clinic. A synchrotron x-ray imaging technique, which is capable of detecting cavitation bubbles induced in water by a sonochemistry system, is reported here; this could possibly be extended to the study of therapeutic ultrasound in tissues. The two different x-ray imaging techniques of Analyzer Based Imaging (ABI) and phase contrast imaging (PCI) were examined in order to detect ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles. Cavitation was not observed by PCI, however it was detectable with ABI. Acoustic cavitation was imaged at six different acoustic power levels and six different locations through the acoustic beam in water at a fixed power level. The results indicate the potential utility of this technique for cavitation studies in tissues, but it is time consuming. This may be improved by optimizing the imaging method.

  12. Effects of non-condensable gas on the dynamic oscillations of cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuning

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation is an essential topic of multiphase flow with a broad range of applications. Generally, there exists non-condensable gas in the liquid and a complex vapor/gas mixture bubble will be formed. A rigorous prediction of the dynamic behavior of the aforementioned mixture bubble is essential for the development of a complete cavitation model. In the present paper, effects of non-condensable gas on the dynamic oscillations of the vapor/gas mixture bubble are numerically investigated in great detail. For the completeness, a large parameter zone (e.g. bubble radius, frequency and ratio between gas and vapor) is investigated with many demonstrating examples. The mechanisms of mass diffusion are categorized into different groups with their characteristics and dominated regions given. Influences of non-condensable gas on the wave propagation (e.g. wave speed and attenuation) in the bubbly liquids are also briefly discussed. Specifically, the minimum wave speed is quantitatively predicted in order to close the pressure-density coupling relationship usually employed for the cavitation modelling. Finally, the application of the present finding on the development of cavitation model is demonstrated with a brief discussion of its influence on the cavitation dynamics. This work was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Project No.: 51506051).

  13. Transfection effect of microbubbles on cells in superposed ultrasound waves and behavior of cavitation bubble.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Tetsuya; Tomita, Yukio; Koshiyama, Ken-Ichiro; Blomley, Martin J K

    2006-06-01

    The combination of ultrasound and ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) is able to induce transient membrane permeability leading to direct delivery of exogenous molecules into cells. Cavitation bubbles are believed to be involved in the membrane permeability; however, the detailed mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, the effects of ultrasound and the UCAs, Optison on transfection in vitro for different medium heights and the related dynamic behaviors of cavitation bubbles were investigated. Cultured CHO-E cells mixed with reporter genes (luciferase or beta-gal plasmid DNA) and UCAs were exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound in 24-well plates. Ultrasound was applied from the bottom of the well and reflected at the free surface of the medium, resulting in the superposition of ultrasound waves within the well. Cells cultured on the bottom of 24-well plates were located near the first node (displacement node) of the incident ultrasound downstream. Transfection activity was a function determined with the height of the medium (wave traveling distance), as well as the concentration of UCAs and the exposure time was also determined with the concentration of UCAs and the exposure duration. Survival fraction was determined by MTT assay, also changes with these values in the reverse pattern compared with luciferase activity. With shallow medium height, high transfection efficacy and high survival fraction were obtained at a low concentration of UCAs. In addition, capillary waves and subsequent atomized particles became significant as the medium height decreased. These phenomena suggested cavitation bubbles were being generated in the medium. To determine the effect of UCAs on bubble generation, we repeated the experiments using crushed heat-treated Optison solution instead of the standard microbubble preparation. The transfection ratio and survival fraction showed no additional benefit when ultrasound was used. These results suggested that cavitation bubbles created by the

  14. Study of cavitation bubble dynamics during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy by high-speed camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Xuan, Jason R.; Yu, Honggang; Devincentis, Dennis

    2016-02-01

    Although laser lithotripsy is now the preferred treatment option for urolithiasis, the mechanism of laser pulse induced calculus damage is still not fully understood. This is because the process of laser pulse induced calculus damage involves quite a few physical and chemical processes and their time-scales are very short (down to sub micro second level). For laser lithotripsy, the laser pulse induced impact by energy flow can be summarized as: Photon energy in the laser pulse --> photon absorption generated heat in the water liquid and vapor (super heat water or plasma effect) --> shock wave (Bow shock, acoustic wave) --> cavitation bubble dynamics (oscillation, and center of bubble movement , super heat water at collapse, sonoluminscence) --> calculus damage and motion (calculus heat up, spallation/melt of stone, breaking of mechanical/chemical bond, debris ejection, and retropulsion of remaining calculus body). Cavitation bubble dynamics is the center piece of the physical processes that links the whole energy flow chain from laser pulse to calculus damage. In this study, cavitation bubble dynamics was investigated by a high-speed camera and a needle hydrophone. A commercialized, pulsed Ho:YAG laser at 2.1 mu;m, StoneLightTM 30, with pulse energy from 0.5J up to 3.0 J, and pulse width from 150 mu;s up to 800 μs, was used as laser pulse source. The fiber used in the investigation is SureFlexTM fiber, Model S-LLF365, a 365 um core diameter fiber. A high-speed camera with frame rate up to 1 million fps was used in this study. The results revealed the cavitation bubble dynamics (oscillation and center of bubble movement) by laser pulse at different energy level and pulse width. More detailed investigation on bubble dynamics by different type of laser, the relationship between cavitation bubble dynamics and calculus damage (fragmentation/dusting) will be conducted as a future study.

  15. The dynamic behavior and compliance of a stream of cavitating bubbles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennen, C.

    1973-01-01

    Study of the dynamic response of streams of cavitating bubbles to imposed pressure fluctuations to determine the role played by turbopump cavitation in the POGO instability of liquid rockets. Both quasi-static and more general linearized dynamic analyses are made of the perturbations to a cavitating flow through a region of reduced pressure in which the bubbles first grow and then collapse. The results, when coupled with typical bubble number density distribution functions, yield compliances which compare favorably with the existing measurements. Since the fluids involved are frequently cryogenic, a careful examination was made of the thermal effects both on the mean flow and on the perturbations. As a result, the discrepancy between theory and experiment for particular engines could be qualitatively ascribed to reductions in the compliance caused either by these thermal effects or by relatively high reduced frequencies.

  16. Numerical simulation of cavitation erosion on a NACA0015 hydrofoil based on bubble collapse strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, V.; Luo, X.; Escaler, X.; Huang, R.; Valencia, E.

    2015-12-01

    The prediction of erosion under unsteady cavitation is crucial to prevent damage in hydraulic machinery. The present investigation deals with the numerical simulation of erosive partial cavitation around a NACA0015 hydrofoil. The study presents the calculation of the bubble collapse strength, Sb, based on the bubble potential energy to identify the surface areas with highest risk of damage. The results are obtained with a numerical scheme assuming homogeneous mixture flow, implicit LES and Zwart cavitation model. The 3D unsteady flow simulation has been solved using OpenFOAM. Python language and OpenFOAM calculator (foamCalcEx) have been used to obtain and represent Sb. The obtained results clearly show the instants of erosive bubble collapse and the affected surface areas.

  17. Investigation of cavitation bubble dynamics using particle image velocimetry: implications for photoacoustic drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, HanQun; Casperson, Lee W.; Shearin, Alan; Prahl, Scott A.

    1996-05-01

    Photoacoustic drug delivery is a technique for delivering drugs to localized areas in the body. In cardiovascular applications, it uses a laser pulse to generate a cavitation bubble in a blood vessel due to the absorption of laser energy by targets (e.g., blood clots) or surrounding liquids (e.g., blood or injected saline). The hydrodynamic pressure arising from the expansion and collapse of the cavitation bubble can force the drug into the clots and tissue wall tissue. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry was used to investigate the flow of liquids during the expansion and collapse of cavitation bubbles near a soft boundary. A gelatin-based thrombus model was used to simulate the blood clot present during laser thrombolysis. An argon laser chopped by an acousto-optic modulator was used for illumination and photography was achieved using a CCD camera. The implications of this phenomenon on practical photoacoustic drug delivery implementation are discussed.

  18. Dependence of pulsed focused ultrasound induced thrombolysis on duty cycle and cavitation bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Feng, Yi; Liu, Runna; Liu, Xiaodong; Hu, Yaxin; Han, Shimin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed, focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis, the duty cycle (2.3%, 9%, and 18%) and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles. The efficiency of thrombolysis was evaluated through the degree of mechanical fragmentation, namely the number, mass, and size of clot debris particles. First, we found that the total number and mass of clot debris particles were highest when a duty cycle of 9% was used and that the mean diameter of clot debris particles was smallest. Second, we found that the size distribution of cavitation bubbles was mainly centered around the linear resonance radius (2.5μm) of the emission frequency (1.2MHz) of the FUS transducer when a 9% duty cycle was used, while the majority of cavitation bubbles became smaller or larger than the linear resonance radius when a 2.3% or 18% duty cycle was used. In addition, the inertial cavitation dose from the treatment performed at 9% duty cycle was much higher than the dose obtained with the other two duty cycles. The data presented here suggest that there is an optimal duty cycle at which the thrombolysis efficiency and cavitation activity are strongest. They further indicate that using a pulsed FUS may help control the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range, which we found to be near the linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer.

  19. Bubble Growth in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Although Moon is usually said to be volatile-"free", lunar basalts are often vesicular with mm-size bubbles. The vesicular nature of the lunar basalts suggests that they contained some initial gas concentration. A recent publication estimated volatile concentrations in lunar basalts (Saal et al. 2008). This report investigates bubble growth on Moon and compares with that on Earth. Under conditions relevant to lunar basalts, bubble growth in a finite melt shell (i.e., growth of multiple regularly-spaced bubbles) is calculated following Proussevitch and Sahagian (1998) and Liu and Zhang (2000). Initial H2O content of 700 ppm (Saal et al. 2008) or lower is used and the effect of other volatiles (such as carbon dioxide, halogens, and sulfur) is ignored. H2O solubility at low pressures (Liu et al. 2005), concentration-dependent diffusivity in basalt (Zhang and Stolper 1991), and lunar basalt viscosity (Murase and McBirney 1970) are used. Because lunar atmospheric pressure is essentially zero, the confining pressure on bubbles is completely supplied by the overlying magma. Due to low H2O content in lunar basaltic melt (700 ppm H2O corresponds to a saturation pressure of 75 kPa), H2O bubbles only grow in the upper 16 m of a basalt flow or lake. A depth of 20 mm corresponds to a confining pressure of 100 Pa. Hence, vesicular lunar rocks come from very shallow depth. Some findings from the modeling are as follows. (a) Due to low confining pressure as well as low viscosity, even though volatile concentration is very low, bubble growth rate is extremely high, much higher than typical bubble growth rates in terrestrial melts. Hence, mm-size bubbles in lunar basalts are not strange. (b) Because the pertinent pressures are so low, bubble pressure due to surface tension plays a main role in lunar bubble growth, contrary to terrestrial cases. (c) Time scale to reach equilibrium bubble size increases as the confining pressure increases. References: (1) Liu Y, Zhang YX (2000) Earth

  20. Optical observation of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in high intensity laser-induced shock processes.

    PubMed

    Martí-López, L; Ocaña, R; Porro, J A; Morales, M; Ocaña, J L

    2009-07-01

    We report an experimental study of the temporal and spatial dynamics of shock waves, cavitation bubbles, and sound waves generated in water during laser shock processing by single Nd:YAG laser pulses of nanosecond duration. A fast ICCD camera (2 ns gate time) was employed to record false schlieren photographs, schlieren photographs, and Mach-Zehnder interferograms of the zone surrounding the laser spot site on the target, an aluminum alloy sample. We recorded hemispherical shock fronts, cylindrical shock fronts, plane shock fronts, cavitation bubbles, and phase disturbance tracks.

  1. Optical observation of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in high intensity laser-induced shock processes

    SciTech Connect

    Marti-Lopez, L.; Ocana, R.; Porro, J. A.; Morales, M.; Ocana, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    We report an experimental study of the temporal and spatial dynamics of shock waves, cavitation bubbles, and sound waves generated in water during laser shock processing by single Nd:YAG laser pulses of nanosecond duration. A fast ICCD camera (2 ns gate time) was employed to record false schlieren photographs, schlieren photographs, and Mach-Zehnder interferograms of the zone surrounding the laser spot site on the target, an aluminum alloy sample. We recorded hemispherical shock fronts, cylindrical shock fronts, plane shock fronts, cavitation bubbles, and phase disturbance tracks.

  2. Multifocal laser surgery: cutting enhancement by hydrodynamic interactions between cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Toytman, I; Silbergleit, A; Simanovski, D; Palanker, D

    2010-10-01

    Transparent biological tissues can be precisely dissected with ultrafast lasers using optical breakdown in the tight focal zone. Typically, tissues are cut by sequential application of pulses, each of which produces a single cavitation bubble. We investigate the hydrodynamic interactions between simultaneous cavitation bubbles originating from multiple laser foci. Simultaneous expansion and collapse of cavitation bubbles can enhance the cutting efficiency, by increasing the resulting deformations in tissue, and the associated rupture zone. An analytical model of the flow induced by the bubbles is presented and experimentally verified. The threshold strain of the material rupture is measured in a model tissue. Using the computational model and the experimental value of the threshold strain one can compute the shape of the rupture zone in tissue resulting from application of multiple bubbles. With the threshold strain of 0.7 two simultaneous bubbles produce a continuous cut when applied at the distance 1.35 times greater than that required in sequential approach. Simultaneous focusing of the laser in multiple spots along the line of intended cut can extend this ratio to 1.7. Counterpropagating jets forming during collapse of two bubbles in materials with low viscosity can further extend the cutting zone-up to approximately a factor of 1.5.

  3. Cavitation bubble cluster activity in the breakage of stones by shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuriy A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.; McAteer, James A.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Colonius, Tim; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2002-05-01

    High-speed photography was used to investigate cavitation at the surface of artificial and natural kidney stones during exposure to lithotripter shock pulses in vitro. It was observed that numerous individual bubbles formed over virtually the entire surface of the stone, but these bubbles did not remain independent and combined with one another to form larger bubbles and bubble clusters. The movement of bubble boundaries across the surface left portions of the stone bubble free. The biggest cluster grew to envelop the proximal end of the stone (6.5 mm diameter artificial stone) then collapsed to a small spot that over multiple shots formed a crater in that face of the stone. The bubble clusters that developed at the sides of stones tended to align along fractures and to collapse into these cracks. High-speed camera images demonstrated that cavitation-mediated damage to stones was due not to the action of solitary, individual bubbles, but to the forceful collapse of dynamic clusters of bubbles. [Work supported by NIH DK43881.

  4. Experimental investigation of the collapse of laser-generated cavitation bubbles near a solid boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui; Xu, Rong-qing; Shen, Zhong-hua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao-wu

    2007-07-01

    The oscillation of a laser-generated single cavitation bubble near a solid boundary is investigated by a fiber-optic diagnostic technique based on optical beam deflection (OBD). The maximum bubble radii and collapse time for each oscillation cycle are determined from a sequence of bubble oscillations. Furthermore, by combining the revised Rayleigh theory, the prolongation factor κ at different dimensionless parameter γ ( γ=L/R, where Rmax is the maximum bubble radius and L is the distance of a cavity inception point from a boundary) is obtained. In addition, the prolongation factor of the collapse time versus laser energy is also derived, which are valuable in the fields of hydraulic cavitation, laser lithotripsy and laser ophthalmology.

  5. Physical insights into the sonochemical degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants with cavitation bubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Thirugnanasambandam; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2009-08-01

    This paper tries to discern the mechanistic features of sonochemical degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants using five model compounds, viz. phenol (Ph), chlorobenzene (CB), nitrobenzene (NB), p-nitrophenol (PNP) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP). The sonochemical degradation of the pollutant can occur in three distinct pathways: hydroxylation by ()OH radicals produced from cavitation bubbles (either in the bubble-bulk interfacial region or in the bulk liquid medium), thermal decomposition in cavitation bubble and thermal decomposition at the bubble-liquid interfacial region. With the methodology of coupling experiments under different conditions (which alter the nature of the cavitation phenomena in the bulk liquid medium) with the simulations of radial motion of cavitation bubbles, we have tried to discern the relative contribution of each of the above pathway to overall degradation of the pollutant. Moreover, we have also tried to correlate the predominant degradation mechanism to the physico-chemical properties of the pollutant. The contribution of secondary factors such as probability of radical-pollutant interaction and extent of radical scavenging (or conservation) in the medium has also been identified. Simultaneous analysis of the trends in degradation with different experimental techniques and simulation results reveals interesting mechanistic features of sonochemical degradation of the model pollutants. The physical properties that determine the predominant degradation pathway are vapor pressure, solubility and hydrophobicity. Degradation of Ph occurs mainly by hydroxylation in bulk medium; degradation of CB occurs via thermal decomposition inside the bubble, degradation of PNP occurs via pyrolytic decomposition at bubble interface, while hydroxylation at bubble interface contributes to degradation of NB and 2,4-DCP.

  6. Studies on the tempo of bubble formation in recently cavitated vessels: a model to predict the pressure of air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Pan, Ruihua; Tyree, Melvin T

    2015-06-01

    A cavitation event in a vessel replaces water with a mixture of water vapor and air. A quantitative theory is presented to argue that the tempo of filling of vessels with air has two phases: a fast process that extracts air from stem tissue adjacent to the cavitated vessels (less than 10 s) and a slow phase that extracts air from the atmosphere outside the stem (more than 10 h). A model was designed to estimate how water tension (T) near recently cavitated vessels causes bubbles in embolized vessels to expand or contract as T increases or decreases, respectively. The model also predicts that the hydraulic conductivity of a stem will increase as bubbles collapse. The pressure of air bubbles trapped in vessels of a stem can be predicted from the model based on fitting curves of hydraulic conductivity versus T. The model was validated using data from six stem segments each of Acer mono and the clonal hybrid Populus 84 K (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). The model was fitted to results with root mean square error less than 3%. The model provided new insight into the study of embolism formation in stem tissue and helped quantify the bubble pressure immediately after the fast process referred to above.

  7. Localized Tissue Surrogate Deformation due to Controlled Single Bubble Cavitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-27

    dissolved gasses, and cavitation can be induced within CSF or other fluid compartments within the brain when exposed to relatively low blast...particulate surfaces. However, pre-existing gas nuclei can act as another source 5. Previous hyperbaric decompression and ultrasound studies suggest that...studies using ultrasound shock waves also support cavitation induced damage, e.g. hemorrhage and cellular membrane poration 26-28. In addition

  8. A reduced-order, single-bubble cavitation model with applications to therapeutic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Cavitation often occurs in therapeutic applications of medical ultrasound such as shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Because cavitation bubbles can affect an intended treatment, it is important to understand the dynamics of bubbles in this context. The relevant context includes very high acoustic pressures and frequencies as well as elevated temperatures. Relative to much of the prior research on cavitation and bubble dynamics, such conditions are unique. To address the relevant physics, a reduced-order model of a single, spherical bubble is proposed that incorporates phase change at the liquid-gas interface as well as heat and mass transport in both phases. Based on the energy lost during the inertial collapse and rebound of a millimeter-sized bubble, experimental observations were used to tune and test model predictions. In addition, benchmarks from the published literature were used to assess various aspects of model performance. Benchmark comparisons demonstrate that the model captures the basic physics of phase change and diffusive transport, while it is quantitatively sensitive to specific model assumptions and implementation details. Given its performance and numerical stability, the model can be used to explore bubble behaviors across a broad parameter space relevant to therapeutic ultrasound. PMID:22088026

  9. The effect of cavitation bubbles on the removal of juvenile barnacles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shifeng; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Teo, Serena Lay Ming; Lee, Heow Pueh

    2013-09-01

    The effect of cavitation bubbles on the removal of juvenile barnacles was documented using high speed photography. Using spark generated bubbles, the interaction between barnacle and cavitation bubble was examined in detail. The liquid jet generated by the bubble collapse was observed to be directed towards barnacle at different impact intensities, which is related to the dimensionless distance H' (H'=H/Rm), where H is the distance between bubble formation point and the top of barnacle, and Rm is the maximum bubble radius. At lower values of H', higher speed liquid jet was produced; consequently a larger impact pressure was generated. In general, barnacles are more easily removed at a younger stage. In older barnacles, the liquid jet impact was only able to remove the barnacle shells, leaving the base plate attached to the surface. This study indicates that cavitation can be used to remove attached barnacles, and it would be more efficient if it is applied during early stages of fouling, before the formation of hard calcareous structures.

  10. A reduced-order, single-bubble cavitation model with applications to therapeutic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A

    2011-11-01

    Cavitation often occurs in therapeutic applications of medical ultrasound such as shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Because cavitation bubbles can affect an intended treatment, it is important to understand the dynamics of bubbles in this context. The relevant context includes very high acoustic pressures and frequencies as well as elevated temperatures. Relative to much of the prior research on cavitation and bubble dynamics, such conditions are unique. To address the relevant physics, a reduced-order model of a single, spherical bubble is proposed that incorporates phase change at the liquid-gas interface as well as heat and mass transport in both phases. Based on the energy lost during the inertial collapse and rebound of a millimeter-sized bubble, experimental observations were used to tune and test model predictions. In addition, benchmarks from the published literature were used to assess various aspects of model performance. Benchmark comparisons demonstrate that the model captures the basic physics of phase change and diffusive transport, while it is quantitatively sensitive to specific model assumptions and implementation details. Given its performance and numerical stability, the model can be used to explore bubble behaviors across a broad parameter space relevant to therapeutic ultrasound.

  11. Localized removal of layers of metal, polymer, or biomaterial by ultrasound cavitation bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez Rivas, David; Verhaagen, Bram; Seddon, James R. T.; Zijlstra, Aaldert G.; Jiang, Lei-Meng; van der Sluis, Luc W. M.; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef; Gardeniers, Han J. G. E.

    2012-01-01

    We present an ultrasonic device with the ability to locally remove deposited layers from a glass slide in a controlled and rapid manner. The cleaning takes place as the result of cavitating bubbles near the deposited layers and not due to acoustic streaming. The bubbles are ejected from air-filled cavities micromachined in a silicon surface, which, when vibrated ultrasonically at a frequency of 200 kHz, generate a stream of bubbles that travel to the layer deposited on an opposing glass slide. Depending on the pressure amplitude, the bubble clouds ejected from the micropits attain different shapes as a result of complex bubble interaction forces, leading to distinct shapes of the cleaned areas. We have determined the removal rates for several inorganic and organic materials and obtained an improved efficiency in cleaning when compared to conventional cleaning equipment. We also provide values of the force the bubbles are able to exert on an atomic force microscope tip. PMID:23964308

  12. Interaction of lithotripter shockwaves with single inertial cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Klaseboer, Evert; Fong, Siew Wan; Turangan, Cary K; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Szeri, Andrew J; Calvisi, Michael L; Sankin, Georgy N; Zhong, Pei

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic interaction of a shockwave (modelled as a pressure pulse) with an initially spherically oscillating bubble is investigated. Upon the shockwave impact, the bubble deforms non-spherically and the flow field surrounding the bubble is determined with potential flow theory using the boundary-element method (BEM). The primary advantage of this method is its computational efficiency. The simulation process is repeated until the two opposite sides of the bubble surface collide with each other (i.e. the formation of a jet along the shockwave propagation direction). The collapse time of the bubble, its shape and the velocity of the jet are calculated. Moreover, the impact pressure is estimated based on water-hammer pressure theory. The Kelvin impulse, kinetic energy and bubble displacement (all at the moment of jet impact) are also determined. Overall, the simulated results compare favourably with experimental observations of lithotripter shockwave interaction with single bubbles (using laser-induced bubbles at various oscillation stages). The simulations confirm the experimental observation that the most intense collapse, with the highest jet velocity and impact pressure, occurs for bubbles with intermediate size during the contraction phase when the collapse time of the bubble is approximately equal to the compressive pulse duration of the shock wave. Under this condition, the maximum amount of energy of the incident shockwave is transferred to the collapsing bubble. Further, the effect of the bubble contents (ideal gas with different initial pressures) and the initial conditions of the bubble (initially oscillating vs. non-oscillating) on the dynamics of the shockwave-bubble interaction are discussed.

  13. Interaction of lithotripter shockwaves with single inertial cavitation bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Klaseboer, Evert; Fong, Siew Wan; Turangan, Cary K.; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Szeri, Andrew J.; Calvisi, Michael L.; Sankin, Georgy N.; Zhong, Pei

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic interaction of a shockwave (modelled as a pressure pulse) with an initially spherically oscillating bubble is investigated. Upon the shockwave impact, the bubble deforms non-spherically and the flow field surrounding the bubble is determined with potential flow theory using the boundary-element method (BEM). The primary advantage of this method is its computational efficiency. The simulation process is repeated until the two opposite sides of the bubble surface collide with each other (i.e. the formation of a jet along the shockwave propagation direction). The collapse time of the bubble, its shape and the velocity of the jet are calculated. Moreover, the impact pressure is estimated based on water-hammer pressure theory. The Kelvin impulse, kinetic energy and bubble displacement (all at the moment of jet impact) are also determined. Overall, the simulated results compare favourably with experimental observations of lithotripter shockwave interaction with single bubbles (using laser-induced bubbles at various oscillation stages). The simulations confirm the experimental observation that the most intense collapse, with the highest jet velocity and impact pressure, occurs for bubbles with intermediate size during the contraction phase when the collapse time of the bubble is approximately equal to the compressive pulse duration of the shock wave. Under this condition, the maximum amount of energy of the incident shockwave is transferred to the collapsing bubble. Further, the effect of the bubble contents (ideal gas with different initial pressures) and the initial conditions of the bubble (initially oscillating vs. non-oscillating) on the dynamics of the shockwave–bubble interaction are discussed. PMID:19018296

  14. Shock wave and cavitation bubble measurements of ultrashort-pulse laser-induced breakdown in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Thomas, Robert J.; Frenz, Martin; Jansen, E. Duco; Noojin, Gary D.; Diggs, Sarah J.; Noack, Joachim; Vogel, Alfred; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    1996-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) has long been used in ophthalmic microsurgery as a mechanism for disruption of tissue. The goal of this surgery has been precise tissue cutting by plasma formation and a minimization of collateral damage due to shock wave and cavitation bubble formation. We investigate the strength of the shock wave emission, the size of the cavitation bubble, and the amount of plasma shielding to determine the efficacy of using femtosecond pulses in surgery to reduce collateral photoacoustic damage. A pump-probe technique is used to image the time-resolved evolution of the cavitation bubble produced by focused laser pulses with pulsewidths of 130 fs, 300 fs, 3 ps, and 60 ps. Simultaneously, a hydrophone is used to measure the pressure response generated by the initial plasma shock wave and subsequent shock waves generated by the collapse and rebound of the cavitation bubbles. In addition, transmission measurements are made which indicate the amount of energy shielded beyond the focus by the plasma. These measurements give a good indication of the degree to which collateral damage may be reduced as the pulsewidths is decreased from the picosecond to the femtosecond time regime.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble formation and cavitation in liquid metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Hassanein, A.; Bazhirov, T. T.; Norman, G. E.; Stegailov, V. V.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Inst. for High Energy Densities of Joint Inst. for High Temperatures of RAS

    2007-11-01

    Thermodynamics and kinetics of nano-scale bubble formation in liquid metals such as Li and Pb were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at pressures typical for magnetic and inertial fusion. Two different approaches to bubble formation were developed. In one method, radial densities, pressures, surface tensions, and work functions of the cavities in supercooled liquid lithium were calculated and compared with the surface tension experimental data. The critical radius of a stable cavity in liquid lithium was found for the first time. In the second method, the cavities were created in the highly stretched region of the liquid phase diagram; and then the stability boundary and the cavitation rates were calculated in liquid lead. The pressure dependences of cavitation frequencies were obtained over the temperature range 700-2700 K in liquid Pb. The results of MD calculations for cavitation rate were compared with estimates of classical nucleation theory (CNT).

  16. Micro-bubble emission boiling with the cavitation bubble blow pit

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Shigeaki; Shinagawa, Kazuaki; Illias, Suhaimi Bin; Sumiya, Hiroyuki; Jalaludin, Helmisyah A.

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization boiling (micro-bubble emission boiling [MEB]) phenomenon, with a high heat removal capacity that contributes considerably to the cooling of the divertor of the nuclear fusion reactor, was discovered in the early 1980s. Extensive research on MEB has been performed since its discovery. However, the progress of the application has been delayed because the generation mechanism of MEB remains unclear. Reasons for this lack of clarity include the complexity of the phenomenon itself and the high-speed phase change phenomenon in which boiling and condensation are rapidly generated. In addition, a more advanced thermal technique is required to realize the MEB phenomenon at the laboratory scale. To the authors’ knowledge, few studies have discussed the rush mechanism of subcooled liquid to the heating surface, which is critical to elucidating the mechanism behind MEB. This study used photographic images to verify that the cavitation phenomenon spreads to the inside of the superheated liquid on the heating surface and thus clarify the mechanism of MEB. PMID:27628271

  17. Micro-bubble emission boiling with the cavitation bubble blow pit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Shigeaki; Shinagawa, Kazuaki; Illias, Suhaimi Bin; Sumiya, Hiroyuki; Jalaludin, Helmisyah A.

    2016-09-01

    The miniaturization boiling (micro-bubble emission boiling [MEB]) phenomenon, with a high heat removal capacity that contributes considerably to the cooling of the divertor of the nuclear fusion reactor, was discovered in the early 1980s. Extensive research on MEB has been performed since its discovery. However, the progress of the application has been delayed because the generation mechanism of MEB remains unclear. Reasons for this lack of clarity include the complexity of the phenomenon itself and the high-speed phase change phenomenon in which boiling and condensation are rapidly generated. In addition, a more advanced thermal technique is required to realize the MEB phenomenon at the laboratory scale. To the authors’ knowledge, few studies have discussed the rush mechanism of subcooled liquid to the heating surface, which is critical to elucidating the mechanism behind MEB. This study used photographic images to verify that the cavitation phenomenon spreads to the inside of the superheated liquid on the heating surface and thus clarify the mechanism of MEB.

  18. Micro-bubble emission boiling with the cavitation bubble blow pit.

    PubMed

    Inada, Shigeaki; Shinagawa, Kazuaki; Illias, Suhaimi Bin; Sumiya, Hiroyuki; Jalaludin, Helmisyah A

    2016-09-15

    The miniaturization boiling (micro-bubble emission boiling [MEB]) phenomenon, with a high heat removal capacity that contributes considerably to the cooling of the divertor of the nuclear fusion reactor, was discovered in the early 1980s. Extensive research on MEB has been performed since its discovery. However, the progress of the application has been delayed because the generation mechanism of MEB remains unclear. Reasons for this lack of clarity include the complexity of the phenomenon itself and the high-speed phase change phenomenon in which boiling and condensation are rapidly generated. In addition, a more advanced thermal technique is required to realize the MEB phenomenon at the laboratory scale. To the authors' knowledge, few studies have discussed the rush mechanism of subcooled liquid to the heating surface, which is critical to elucidating the mechanism behind MEB. This study used photographic images to verify that the cavitation phenomenon spreads to the inside of the superheated liquid on the heating surface and thus clarify the mechanism of MEB.

  19. Hydrodynamics, Acoustics and Scaling of Traveling Bubble Cavitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-24

    distribution around the Schiebe headform 4 Figure B. I Rayleigh - Plesset bubble radius as a function of time 7 Figure B.2 Initial streamtube radius versus...the first two processes. These processes tend to produce small transverse vortices with vapor/gas filled cores. It was noted that the collapse phase ...and the important bubble-to-bubble interactions seen (particularly over the larger headforms) it becomes clear that the spherical Rayleigh - Plesset

  20. Effect of a bubble nucleation model on cavitating flow structure in rarefaction wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, N.; Schmidt, A.

    2016-12-01

    This paper explains research examining processes accompanying underwater explosions near the free surface. Particular attention is paid to the effect of heterogeneous nucleation on cavitating flow induced by underwater explosions near the free surface. Variation of the size spectrum of produced bubbles and influence of this process on flow structure are studied. The cavitating liquid is considered as a two-phase bubbly medium described in the framework of the Euler-Lagrange approach treating the carrier phase (liquid) as a continuum and the dispersed phase (bubbles) as a set of test particles. More detailed descriptions of a mathematical model, numerical method, and algorithm validation are observed in the authors' previous paper [see, Petrov and Schmidt (Exp Thermal Fluid Sci 60:367-373, 2015)].

  1. Effect of static pressure on acoustic energy radiated by cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-11-01

    The effect of static pressure on acoustic emissions including shock-wave emissions from cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound has been studied by numerical simulations in order to investigate the effect of static pressure on dispersion of nano-particles in liquids by ultrasound. The results of the numerical simulations for bubbles of 5 μm in equilibrium radius at 20 kHz have indicated that the optimal static pressure which maximizes the energy of acoustic waves radiated by a bubble per acoustic cycle increases as the acoustic pressure amplitude increases or the viscosity of the solution decreases. It qualitatively agrees with the experimental results by Sauter et al. [Ultrason. Sonochem. 15, 517 (2008)]. In liquids with relatively high viscosity (∼200 mPa s), a bubble collapses more violently than in pure water when the acoustic pressure amplitude is relatively large (∼20 bar). In a mixture of bubbles of different equilibrium radius (3 and 5 μm), the acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is much larger than that by a 3 μm bubble due to the interaction with bubbles of different equilibrium radius. The acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is substantially increased by the interaction with 3 μm bubbles.

  2. Numerical investigation of strong compression of vapor inside spherical cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalitova, T. F.; Toporkov, D. Yu

    2016-11-01

    Numerical investigation of possibility of realizing shock waves in cavitation bubbles during their collapse in water, acetone, and tetradecane is performed. The radius of the bubble is 500 pm, the liquid pressure and temperature are in the ranges of 1-100 bar and 293-313 K, respectively. A numerical technique is used in which the movement of the interphase boundary is governed by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. The thermodynamic parameters of the vapor are assumed uniform, the state of the vapor being described by the modified Van der Waals equation. The shock waves inside a bubble in tetradecane are found to arise in all the conditions under consideration. By contrast, inside the bubble in acetone they do not appear at relatively low pressures, while inside the bubble in water they never arise. At equal initial data the shock wave is formed much closer to the interface in the case of tetradecane.

  3. Effects of tissue stiffness, ultrasound frequency, and pressure on histotripsy-induced cavitation bubble behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew T.; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 µm. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness cause a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest.

  4. A model of bubble growth leading to xylem conduit embolism.

    PubMed

    Hölttä, T; Vesala, T; Nikinmaa, E

    2007-11-07

    The dynamics of a gas bubble inside a water conduit after a cavitation event was modeled. A distinction was made between a typical angiosperm conduit with a homogeneous pit membrane and a typical gymnosperm conduit with a torus-margo pit membrane structure. For conduits with torus-margo type pits pit membrane deflection was also modeled and pit aspiration, the displacement of the pit membrane to the low pressure side of the pit chamber, was found to be possible while the emboli was still small. Concurrent with pit aspiration, the high resistance to water flow out of the conduit through the cell walls or aspirated pits will make the embolism process slow. In case of no pit aspiration and always for conduits with homogeneous pit membranes, embolism growth is more rapid but still much slower than bubble growth in bulk water under similar water tension. The time needed for the embolism to fill a whole conduit was found to be dependent on pit and cell wall conductance, conduit radius, xylem water tension, pressure rise in adjacent conduits due to water freed from the embolising conduit, and the rigidity and structure of the pits in the case of margo-torus type pit membrane. The water pressure in the conduit hosting the bubble was found to occur almost immediately after bubble induction inside a conduit, creating a sudden tension release in the conduit, which can be detected by acoustic and ultra-acoustic monitoring of xylem cavitation.

  5. Single bubble perturbation in cavitation proximity of solid glass: hot spot versus distance.

    PubMed

    Radziuk, Darya; Möhwald, Helmuth; Suslick, Kenneth

    2014-02-28

    A systematic study of the energy loss of a cavitation bubble in a close proximity of a glass surface is introduced for the first time in a low acoustic field (1.2-2.4 bar). Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is used as a tool to predict the temperature and pressure decrease of bubble (μm) versus surface distance. A glass as a model system is used to imitate the boundary conditions relevant for nano- or micromaterials. SBSL preequilibrated with 5% argon is perturbed by a glass rod with the tip (Z-perturbation) and with the long axis (X-perturbation) at a defined distance. From 2 mm to 500 μm argon-SBSL lines monotonically narrow and the effective emission temperature decreases from 9000 K to 6800 K comparable to multiple bubbles. The electron density decreases by two orders of magnitude in Z-perturbation and is by a factor of two higher in X-perturbation than the unperturbed cavitating bubble. The perturbed single bubble sonoluminescence pressure decreases from 2700 atm to 1200 atm at 2.4 bar. In water new non-SBSL SiO molecular emission lines are observed and OH emission disappears.

  6. Acoustic saturation in bubbly cavitating flow adjacent to an oscillating wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonius, T.; d'Auria, F.; Brennen, C. E.

    2000-11-01

    Bubbly cavitating flow generated by the normal oscillation of a wall bounding a semi-infinite domain of fluid is computed using a continuum two-phase flow model. Bubble dynamics are computed, on the microscale, using the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. A Lagrangian finite volume scheme and implicit adaptive time marching are employed to accurately resolve bubbly shock waves and other steep gradients in the flow. The one-dimensional, unsteady computations show that when the wall oscillation frequency is much smaller than the bubble natural frequency, the power radiated away from the wall is limited by an acoustic saturation effect (the radiated power becomes independent of the amplitude of vibration), which is similar to that found in a pure gas. That is, for large enough vibration amplitude, nonlinear steepening of the generated waves leads to shocking of the wave train, and the dissipation associated with the jump conditions across each shock limits the radiated power. In the model, damping of the bubble volume oscillations is restricted to a simple "effective" viscosity. For wall oscillation frequency less than the bubble natural frequency, the saturation amplitude of the radiated field is nearly independent of any specific damping mechanism. Finally, implications for noise radiation from cavitating flows are discussed.

  7. Effects of f-number on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold and cavitation bubble cloud behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Gerhardson, Tyler; Hall, Tim; Xu, Zhen

    2017-02-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation of a cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. Although previous work has provided significant insight into the process of intrinsic threshold histotripsy, the majority of these studies have used highly focused (i.e. f-number  <  0.6) transducers. In this study, we investigate the effects of f-number on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold and cavitation bubble cloud behavior using a 500 kHz array transducer, with the effective f-number of the transducer varied from 0.51 to 0.89. The intrinsic threshold did not significantly change with f-number, with the threshold remaining ~27–30 MPa for all conditions. The predictability of intrinsic threshold histotripsy was further demonstrated by experiments comparing the predicted and experimentally measured bubble cloud dimensions, with results showing close agreement for all f-numbers. Finally, the effects of f-number on ‘bubble density’ and tissue fractionation efficiency were investigated, with results supporting the hypothesis that the density of the bubbles within the bubble cloud significantly decreases at higher f-numbers, resulting in decreased fractionation efficiency. Overall, this study provides significant insight into the effects of f-number on intrinsic threshold histotripsy that will help to guide the development of histotripsy for specific clinical applications.

  8. Effects of f-number on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold and cavitation bubble cloud behavior.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Gerhardson, Tyler; Hall, Tim; Xu, Zhen

    2017-02-21

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation of a cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. Although previous work has provided significant insight into the process of intrinsic threshold histotripsy, the majority of these studies have used highly focused (i.e. f-number  <  0.6) transducers. In this study, we investigate the effects of f-number on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold and cavitation bubble cloud behavior using a 500 kHz array transducer, with the effective f-number of the transducer varied from 0.51 to 0.89. The intrinsic threshold did not significantly change with f-number, with the threshold remaining ~27-30 MPa for all conditions. The predictability of intrinsic threshold histotripsy was further demonstrated by experiments comparing the predicted and experimentally measured bubble cloud dimensions, with results showing close agreement for all f-numbers. Finally, the effects of f-number on 'bubble density' and tissue fractionation efficiency were investigated, with results supporting the hypothesis that the density of the bubbles within the bubble cloud significantly decreases at higher f-numbers, resulting in decreased fractionation efficiency. Overall, this study provides significant insight into the effects of f-number on intrinsic threshold histotripsy that will help to guide the development of histotripsy for specific clinical applications.

  9. Ultrasonic emissions reveal individual cavitation bubbles in water-stressed wood

    PubMed Central

    Ponomarenko, A.; Vincent, O.; Pietriga, A.; Cochard, H.; Badel, É.; Marmottant, P.

    2014-01-01

    Under drought conditions, the xylem of trees that conducts ascending sap produces ultrasonic emissions whose exact origin is not clear. We introduce a new method to record simultaneously both acoustic events and optical observation of the xylem conduits within slices of wood that were embedded in a transparent material setting a hydric stress. In this article, we resolved the rapid development of all cavitation bubbles and demonstrated that each ultrasound emission was linked to the nucleation of one single bubble, whose acoustic energy is an increasing function of the size of the conduit where nucleation occurred and also of the hydric stress. We modelled these observations by the fact that water columns in conduits store elastic energy and release it into acoustic waves when they are broken by cavitation bubbles. Water columns are thus elastic, and not rigid, ‘wires of water’ set under tension by hydric stresses. Cavitation bubbles are at the origin of an embolism, whose development was followed in our experiments. Such an embolism of sap circulation can result in a fatal condition for living trees. These findings provide new insights for the non-destructive monitoring of embolisms within trees, and suggest a new approach to study porous media under hydric stress. PMID:25056212

  10. Interaction dynamics of temporal and spatial separated cavitation bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinne, N.; Ripken, T.; Lubatschowski, H.

    2010-02-01

    The LASIK procedure is a well established laser based treatment in ophthalmology. Nowadays it includes a cutting of the corneal tissue bases on ultra short pulses which are focused below the tissue surface to create an optical breakdown and hence a dissection of the tissue. The energy of the laser pulse is absorbed by non-linear processes that result in an expansion of a cavitation bubble and rupturing of the tissue. Due to a reduction of the duration of treatment the current development of ultra short laser systems points to higher repetition rates. This in turn results in a probable interaction between different cavitation bubbles of adjacent optical breakdowns. While the interaction of one single laser pulse with biological tissue is analyzed reasonably well experimentally and theoretically, the interaction of several spatial and temporal following pulses is scarcely determined yet. We present a high-speed photography analysis of cavitation bubble interaction for two spatial separated laser-induced optical breakdowns varying the laser pulse energy as well as the spatial distance. Depending on a change of these parameters different kinds of interactions such as a flattening and deformation of bubble shape, asymmetric water streams and jet formation were observed. The results of this research can be used to comprehend and optimize the cutting effect of ultra short pulse laser systems with high repetition rates (> 1 MHz).

  11. Spatial-temporal ultrasound imaging of residual cavitation bubbles around a fluid-tissue interface in histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong; Xu, Shanshan; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Runna; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation is considered as the primary mechanism of soft tissue fragmentation (histotripsy) by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound. The residual cavitation bubbles have a dual influence on the histotripsy pulses: these serve as nuclei for easy generation of new cavitation, and act as strong scatterers causing energy "shadowing." To monitor the residual cavitation bubbles in histotripsy, an ultrafast active cavitation imaging method with relatively high signal-to-noise ratio and good spatial-temporal resolution was proposed in this paper, which combined plane wave transmission, minimum variance beamforming, and coherence factor weighting. The spatial-temporal evolutions of residual cavitation bubbles around a fluid-tissue interface in histotripsy under pulse duration (PD) of 10-40 μs and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.67-2 kHz were monitored by this method. The integrated bubble area curves inside the tissue interface were acquired from the bubble image sequence, and the formation process of histotripsy damage was estimated. It was observed that the histotripsy efficiency decreased with both longer PDs and higher PRFs. A direct relationship with a coefficient of 1.0365 between histotripsy lesion area and inner residual bubble area was found. These results can assist in monitoring and optimization of the histotripsy treatment further.

  12. Acoustic cavitation bubbles in the kidney induced by focused shock waves in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, M.; Ioritani, N.; Kambe, K.; Taguchi, K.; Saito, T.; Igarashi, M.; Shirai, S.; Orikasa, S.; Takayama, K.

    1990-07-01

    On an ultrasonic imaging system a hyperechoic region was observed in a focal area of fucused shock waves in the dog kidney. This study was performed to learn whether cavitation bubbles are responsible for this hyperechoic region. The ultrasonic images in water of varying temperatures were not markedly different. In the flowing stream of distilled water, the stream was demonstrated as a hyperechoic region only with a mixture of air bubbles. Streams of 5%-50% glucose solutions were also demonstrated as a hyperechoic region. However, such concentration changes in living tissue, as well as thermal changes, are hardly thought to be induced. The holographic interferometry showed that the cavitation bubbles remained for more than 500 msec. in the focal area in water. This finding indicate that the bubble can remain for longer period than previously supposed. These results support the contentions that cavitation bubbles are responsible for the hyperechoic region in the kidney in situ.

  13. A New Unsteady Model for Dense Cloud Cavitation in Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Background on thermal effects in cavitation. Physical properties of hydrogen. Multi-phase cavitation with thermal effect. Solution procedure. Cavitation model overview. Cavitation source terms. New cavitation model. Source term for bubble growth. One equation les model. Unsteady ogive simulations: liquid nitrogen. Unsteady incompressible flow in a pipe. Time averaged cavity length for NACA15 flowfield.

  14. Observations of the Dynamics and Acoustics of Travelling Bubble Cavitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-25

    and Geib (1977), Hamilton (1981), Hamilton, Thompson, and Bil- let (1982), and Marboe, Billet, and Thompson (1986). Although trends are seen in the...boundary, R (t): Rd2R 3( dR ) 2 P(R)-Po 5.1 where P (R) and Po are the liquid pressure at the bubble wall and far from the bubble wall respectively, and p is...present in the cavity such that 2S 4v dR P(R) = P! + PG 25.2 R R dt where PG is the non-condensable gas pressure, Pv is the vapor pressure, S is the

  15. Time-resolved measurement of bubble cavitation by using power Doppler ultrasound image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Ren; Izumi, Yosuke; Nagai, Hayato; Yamakoshi, Yoshiki

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a novel measurement method for a secondary ultrasound wave irradiated by microbubble cavitation is proposed. High-intensity ultrasound (h-US, 1.0–1.5 MPa), which produces bubble cavitation, is irradiated with a fixed time delay after introducing imaging US, whose frequency is different from that of the h-US. The bubble cavitation signal (BCS) is detected by the signal-processing unit of an ultrasound power Doppler imaging instrument. By this method, both a spatially resolved bubble image (S-image) and the temporal transition of the BCS (T-image) are monitored simultaneously. A feature of the method is that the BCS is observed in situ with sub-µs time resolution. The accuracy of the method is evaluated and it is found that the maximum deviation of the amplitude of the simulated BCS is 4.80%. This method is applied to measure the BCS of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles. As a result, the dependence of the inherent temporal transition of the BCS on the sound pressure of the h-US (0.6–1.2 MPa) is observed.

  16. Asymmetric interface temperature during vapor bubble growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, A.; Castillo, M.; Steinberg, T.; Brutin, D.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the nucleation, growth, and detachment of single vapor bubbles at the interface microscale. Shear flow is used to investigate pool and convective boiling situations using visible and infrared visualizations. We determine a threshold Reynolds number for the onset of asymmetric interfacial temperatures. Below this threshold, bubble growth is geometrically and thermally symmetric, while above, bubbles no longer grow thermally symmetrically. This is explained by the dominance of convective heat transfer removal over viscous effects at the bubble interface. We experimentally demonstrate asymmetric interfacial temperature profiles that should be taken into account for future bubble growth modeling.

  17. Variations of bubble cavitation and temperature elevation during lesion formation by high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2013-08-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as an effective therapeutic modality in both thermal ablations for solid tumor/cancer and soft-tissue fragmentation. Mechanical and thermal effects, which play an important role in the HIFU treatment simultaneously, are dependent on the operating parameters and may vary with the progress of therapy. Mechanical erosion in the shape of a "squid," a "dumbbell" lesion with both mechanical and thermal lesions, or a "tadpole" lesion with mechanical erosion at the center and thermal necrosis on the boundary in the transparent gel phantom could be produced correspondingly with the pulse duration of 5-30 ms, which is much longer than histotripsy burst but shorter than the time for tissue boiling, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.2-5 Hz. Meanwhile, variations of bubble cavitation (both inertial and stable cavitation) and temperature elevation in the focal region (i.e., z = -2.5, 0, and 2.5 mm) were measured by passive cavitation detection (PCD) and thermocouples during the therapeutic procedure, respectively. Stable cavitation increased with the pulse duration, PRF, and the number of pulses delivered. However, inertial cavitation was found to increase initially and then decrease with long pulse duration and high PRF. Temperature in the pre-focal region is always higher than those at the focal and post-focal position in all tests. Great variations of PCD signals and temperature elevation are due to the generation and persistence of large bubble, which is resistant to collapse and occurs with the increase of pulse duration and PRF. Similar lesion pattern and variations were also observed in ex vivo porcine kidneys. Hyperechoes in the B-mode ultrasound image were comparable to the shape and size of lesions in the dissected tissue. Thermal lesion volume increased with the increase of pulse duration and PRF, but mechanical erosion reached its maximum volume with the pulse duration of 20 ms and PRF of 1

  18. Incubation pit analysis and calculation of the hydrodynamic impact pressure from the implosion of an acoustic cavitation bubble.

    PubMed

    Tzanakis, I; Eskin, D G; Georgoulas, A; Fytanidis, D K

    2014-03-01

    An experimental study to evaluate cavitation bubble dynamics is conducted. The aim is to predict the magnitude and statistical distribution of hydrodynamic impact pressure generated from the implosion of various individual acoustic cavitation bubbles near to a rigid boundary, considering geometrical features of the pitted area. A steel sample was subjected to cavitation impacts by an ultrasonic transducer with a 5mm diameter probe. The pitted surface was then examined using high-precision 3D optical interferometer techniques. Only the incubation period where surface is plastically deformed without material loss is taken into account. The exposure time was adjusted in the range of 3-60 s to avoid pit overlapping and a special procedure for pit analysis and characterisation was then followed. Moreover, a high-speed camera device was deployed to capture the implosion mechanisms of cavitation bubbles near to the surface. The geometrical characteristics of single incubation pits as well as pit clusters were studied and their deformation patterns were compared. Consequently, a reverse engineering approach was applied in order the hydrodynamic impact pressure from the implosion of an individual cavitation bubble to be determined. The characteristic parameters of the cavitation implosion process such as hydrodynamic impact pressure and liquid micro-jet impact velocity as well as the hydrodynamic severity of the cavitation impacts were quantified. It was found that the length of the hypotenuse of the orthographic projections from the center of the pit, which basically represents the deformed area of the pit, increases with the hydrodynamic impact aggressiveness in a linear rate. Majority of the hydrodynamic impacts were in the range of 0.4-1 GPa while the corresponding micro-jet velocities were found to be in the range of 200-700 m/s. Outcomes of this study, contribute to further understanding the cavitation intensity from the implosion of acoustically generated bubbles and

  19. Wavelet-transform-based active imaging of cavitation bubbles in tissues induced by high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Xu, Shanshan; Hu, Hong; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-08-01

    Cavitation detection and imaging are essential for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapies. In this paper, an active cavitation imaging method based on wavelet transform is proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The Yang-Church model, which is a combination of the Keller-Miksis equation with the Kelvin-Voigt equation for the pulsations of gas bubbles in simple linear viscoelastic solids, is utilized to construct the bubble wavelet. Experiments with porcine muscles demonstrate that image quality is associated with the initial radius of the bubble wavelet and the scale. Moreover, the Yang-Church model achieves a somewhat better performance compared with the Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model. Furthermore, the pulse inversion (PI) technique is combined with bubble wavelet transform to achieve further improvement. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio (CTR) of the best tissue bubble wavelet transform (TBWT) mode image is improved by 5.1 dB compared with that of the B-mode image, while the CTR of the best PI-based TBWT mode image is improved by 7.9 dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image. This work will be useful for better monitoring of cavitation in HIFU-induced therapies.

  20. Bubble-induced sheet cavitation inception on an isolated roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rijsbergen, Martijn; Slot, Jesse

    2015-12-01

    The nucleation process on an isolated roughness element, located at the point of minimum pressure of a NACA 0015 hydrofoil was studied experimentally and computationally. The objective of this study was to investigate the working mechanism of bubble-induced sheet cavitation inception. High-speed micro-scale observations show the generation of a streak of cavitation—attached to the roughness element—in the wake of the bubble. Below its critical diameter, the bubble can detach from the streak cavity and travel on while the streak cavity remains. The solutions of a Rayleigh-Plesset equation along a streamline extracted from a RANS calculation show strong similarities with the experimental observations, but a factor 5 to 10 higher frame rate is needed to validate the calculations.

  1. Helium Bubble Injection Solution To The Cavitation Damage At The Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, M. W.; Ruggles, A. E.

    2009-03-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is one of the largest science projects in the United States, with total cost near 1.4 Billion Dollars. The limiting factor of the facility had always been assumed to be the lifetime of the target window due to radiation damage. After further investigation, the lifetime of the target was determined not to be limited by radiation damage but by cavitation damage. The cavitation damage derives from pressure waves caused by the beam energy deposition. Vapor bubbles form when low to negative pressures occur in the mercury near the stainless steel target window due to wave interaction with the structure. Collapse of these bubbles can focus wave energy in small liquid jets that erode the window surface. Compressibility of the mercury can be enhanced to reduce the amplitude of the pressure wave caused by the beam energy deposition. To enhance compressibility, small (10 to 30 micron diameter) gas bubbles could be injected into the bulk of the mercury. Solubility and diffusivity parameters of inert gas in mercury are required for a complete mechanical simulation and engineering of these strategies. Using current theoretical models, one obtains a theoretical Henry coefficient of helium in mercury on the order of 3.9E15 Pa-molHg/molHe at 300 K. This low solubility was confirmed by a direct, offline experimental method. Mercury was charged with helium and any pressure change was recorded. Any pressure change was attributed to gas going into solution. Therefore, with the sensitivity of the experiment, a lower limit of 9E12 Pa-molHg/molHe was placed on the mercury-helium system. These values guarantee a stable bubble lifetime needed within the SNS mercury target to mitigate cavitation issues.

  2. Nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the bubble cavitation and application to dissociate amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H.

    2016-11-01

    The cavitation of gas bubbles in liquids has been applied to different disciplines in life and natural sciences, and in technologies. To obtain an appropriate theoretical description of effects induced by the bubble cavitation, we develop an all-atom nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation method to simulate bubbles undergoing harmonic oscillation in size. This allows us to understand the mechanism of the bubble cavitation-induced liquid shear stress on surrounding objects. The method is then employed to simulate an Aβ fibril model in the presence of bubbles, and the results show that the bubble expansion and contraction exert water pressure on the fibril. This yields to the deceleration and acceleration of the fibril kinetic energy, facilitating the conformational transition between local free energy minima, and leading to the dissociation of the fibril. Our work, which is a proof-of-concept, may open a new, efficient way to dissociate amyloid fibrils using the bubble cavitation technique, and new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  3. Single-bubble Acoustic Cavitation in Inorganic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flannigan, David

    2005-11-01

    We have discovered that single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from concentrated aqueous solutions of the mineral acids, especially sulfuric acid (H2SO4), can be made to be over 10^3 times brighter than SBSL from pure water. In addition, we have observed intense and well-resolved line emission within the SBSL spectra arising from many different ions (e.g., Xe^+, Ar^+, O2^+), atoms (e.g., Ar, Ne, H, O), and small molecules (e.g., N2, SO, SO2); the observation of monocationic emission lines provides the first definitive experimental evidence of plasma formation during SBSL. By studying the relative intensities of, for example, Ar atom emission lines observed in the SBSL spectra, we are able to measure observable emission temperatures in excess of 15,000 K and pressures approaching 1,000 bar. The temperatures determined from molecular emissions are lower, however, and do not exceed 5,000 K. This observation suggests the presence of a spatial temperature gradient within the bubble or a temporal dependence to the SBSL emissions.

  4. Transient trapping of two microparticles interacting with optical tweezers and cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona-Sosa, Viridiana; Quinto-Su, Pedro A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we show that two absorbing microbeads can briefly share the same optical trap while creating microscopic explosions. Optical forces pull the particles towards the waist of the trapping beam, once a particle reaches the vicinity of the waist, the surrounding liquid is superheated creating an explosion or cavitation bubble that pushes the particle away while lengthening or shortening the trajectories of the surrounding particles. Hence effectively coupling all the trajectories to each cavitation event. We find that when two microbeads reach the waist simultaneously within a distance of 2.9 μ {{m}} from the beam center in the transverse plane, a larger explosion might result in ejection from the trap. The measured maximum radial displacements {{Δ }}{ρ }{{c}} due to cavitation are {{Δ }}{ρ }{{c}}=3.9+/- 2.2 μ {{m}} when the particles reach simultaneously with maximum bubble sizes {R}{{\\max }}=6.2+/- 3.1 μ {{m}}, while for individual cases {{Δ }}{ρ }{{c}} is 2.7+/- 1.2 μ {{m}} and {R}{{\\max }}=4.2+/- 1.6 μ {{m}}. We also measure the characteristic timescale of two particle coalescence which is a measure of the expected time that the particles can stay trapped near the waist. The measurements are fitted by a Poisson decaying exponential probability distribution. A simple one-dimensional model shows that the characteristic timescales for transient trapping of multiple absorbing particles decrease as more objects are added.

  5. Interaction mechanisms of cavitation bubbles induced by spatially and temporally separated fs-laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Tinne, Nadine; Kaune, Brigitte; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers.

  6. Interaction Mechanisms of Cavitation Bubbles Induced by Spatially and Temporally Separated fs-Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Tinne, Nadine; Kaune, Brigitte; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers. PMID:25502697

  7. Modification of Rayleigh-Plesset Theory for Reproducing Dynamics of Cavitation Bubbles in Liquid-Phase Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Wafaa; Nakano, Tetsutaro; Takada, Noriharu; Sasaki, Koichi

    2010-11-01

    The solution of the conventional Rayleigh-Plesset equation did not agree with the experimental results on the temporal variations of the sizes of cavitation bubbles produced by laser ablation in water. In this work, we modified the conventional Rayleigh-Plesset theory in the following two points to reproduce the experimental observation theoretically. One was to introduce the effect of the contact angle among the water, the cavitation bubble, and the ablation target. The other was to treat the surface tension and the kinematic viscosity coefficient of water as additional adjusting parameters to fit the theoretical result with the experimental observation. The latter modification was effective especially for laser ablation in the pressurized water. Better agreement between the theoretical and the experimental results was realized with the help of these modifications, but anomalous thermodynamic parameters were necessary to obtain the best fitting. We evaluated the pressures and the temperatures inside the cavitation bubbles.

  8. Stress wave emission and cavitation bubble dynamics by nanosecond optical breakdown in a tissue phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, Emil-Alexandru; Vogel, Alfred

    2006-07-01

    Stress wave emission and cavitation bubble dynamics after optical breakdown in water and a tissue phantom with Nd: YAG laser pulses of 6 ns duration were investigated both experimentally and numerically to obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in plasma-mediated laser surgery. Experimental tools were high-speed photography with 50000 frames s(-1) , and acoustic measurements. The tissue phantom consisted of a transparent polyacrylamide (PAA) gel, the elastic properties of which can be controlled by modifying the water content. Breakdown in water produced a purely compressive stress wave. By contrast, in stiff PAA samples and for sufficiently large pulse energies, the compression wave was followed by an intense tensile wave, similar to the behaviour previously observed in cornea. The elastic/plastic response of the medium led to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and to a shortening of its oscillation period which was found to be related to the generation of the tensile stress wave upon breakdown. For increasing elastic modulus of the PAA, both the amplitudes of the bubble oscillation and of the stress wave emitted during bubble collapse decreased until the bubble oscillation was so strongly damped that no collapse stress wave was emitted. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which includes the compressibility and elastic/plastic behaviour of the medium, viscosity, density and surface tension. The calculations revealed that consideration of the elastic/plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble is essential to describe the experimentally observed bipolar shape of the stress wave emitted upon optical breakdown. Water is a poor tissue model because the shape of the emitted stress waves and the bubble dynamics differ strongly for both materials. The mechanical properties of PAA were also found to be quite different from those of tissues. Experimental and

  9. Shock wave emission from laser-induced cavitation bubbles in polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Brujan, Emil-Alexandru

    2008-09-01

    The role of extensional viscosity on the acoustic emission from laser-induced cavitation bubbles in polymer solutions and near a rigid boundary is investigated by acoustic measurements. The polymer solutions consist of a 0.5% polyacrylamide (PAM) aqueous solution with a strong elastic component and a 0.5% carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) aqueous solution with a weak elastic component. A reduction of the maximum amplitude of the shock wave pressure and a prolongation of the oscillation period of the bubble were found in the elastic PAM solution. It might be caused by an increased resistance to extensional flow which is conferred upon the liquid by the polymer additive. In both polymer solutions, however, the shock pressure decays proportionally to r(-1) with increasing distance r from the emission centre.

  10. Gas Bubble Growth in Muddy Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    it is fairly easy to show that R ~ eat (a = S/ρg), i.e. exponential growth , which is a far faster than has been suggested previously. We expect this...Gas Bubble Growth in Muddy Sediments Bernard P. Boudreau Department of Oceanography Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4J1, Canada phone...objective is a working model for the growth of a single, isolated bubble in a marine sediment, validated with bubble growth data obtained in laboratory

  11. Bubble Proliferation or Dissolution of Cavitation Nuclei in the Beam Path of a Shock-Wave Lithotripter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Spencer; Lautz, Jaclyn; Sankin, Georgy N.; Szeri, Andrew J.; Zhong, Pei

    2015-03-01

    It is hypothesized that the decreased treatment efficiency in contemporary shock-wave lithotripters is related to tensile wave attenuation due to cavitation in the prefocal beam path. Utilizing high-speed imaging of the beam path and focal pressure waveform measurements, tensile attenuation is associated with bubble proliferation. By systematically testing different combinations of pulse-repetition frequency and gas concentration, we modulate the bubble-dissolution time to identify which conditions lead to bubble proliferation and show that reducing bubble proliferation in the beam path significantly improves acoustic transmission and stone comminution efficiency in vitro. In addition to experiments, a bubble-proliferation model is developed that takes gas diffusion across the bubble wall and bubble fragmentation into account. By aligning the model with experimental observations, the number of daughter bubbles produced after a single lithotripter bubble collapse is estimated to be in the range of 253 ˜510 . This finding is on the same order of magnitude with previous measurements of an isolated bubble collapse in a lithotripter field by Pishchalnikov, McAteer, and Williams [BJU Int. 102, 1681 (2008), 10.1111/j.1464-410X.2008.07896.x], and this estimate improves the general understanding of lithotripsy bubble dynamics in the beam path.

  12. Transcranial ultrasonic therapy based on time reversal of acoustically induced cavitation bubble signature

    PubMed Central

    Gâteau, Jérôme; Marsac, Laurent; Pernot, Mathieu; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Tanter, Mickaël; Fink, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    Brain treatment through the skull with High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) can be achieved with multichannel arrays and adaptive focusing techniques such as time-reversal. This method requires a reference signal to be either emitted by a real source embedded in brain tissues or computed from a virtual source, using the acoustic properties of the skull derived from CT images. This non-invasive computational method focuses with precision, but suffers from modeling and repositioning errors that reduce the accessible acoustic pressure at the focus in comparison with fully experimental time-reversal using an implanted hydrophone. In this paper, this simulation-based targeting has been used experimentally as a first step for focusing through an ex vivo human skull at a single location. It has enabled the creation of a cavitation bubble at focus that spontaneously emitted an ultrasonic wave received by the array. This active source signal has allowed 97%±1.1% of the reference pressure (hydrophone-based) to be restored at the geometrical focus. To target points around the focus with an optimal pressure level, conventional electronic steering from the initial focus has been combined with bubble generation. Thanks to step by step bubble generation, the electronic steering capabilities of the array through the skull were improved. PMID:19770084

  13. The calculation of weakly non-spherical cavitation bubble impact on a solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganin, A. A.; Guseva, T. S.; Kosolapova, L. A.; Khismatullina, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of small spheroidal non-sphericity of a cavitation bubble touching a solid at the beginning of its collapse on its impact on the solid of a copper-nickel alloy is investigated. The impact on the solid is realized by means of a high-speed liquid jet arising at collapse on the bubble surface. The shape of the jet, its velocity and pressure are calculated by the boundary element method. The spatial and temporal characteristics of the pressure pulses on the solid surface are determined by the CIP-CUP method on dynamically adaptive grids without explicitly separating the gas-liquid interface. The solid surface layer dynamics is evaluated by the Godunov method. The results are analyzed in dimensionless variables obtained with using the water hammer pressure, the time moment and the jet-solid contact area radius at which the jet begins to spread on the solid surface. It is shown that in those dimensionless variables, the dependence of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the solid surface pressure pulses on the initial bubble shape non-sphericity is relatively small. The nonsphericity also slightly influences the main qualitative features of the dynamic processes inside the solid, whereas its effect on their quantitative characteristics can be significant.

  14. Studies on the Tempo of Bubble Formation in Recently Cavitated Vessels: A Model to Predict the Pressure of Air Bubbles1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yujie; Pan, Ruihua; Tyree, Melvin T.

    2015-01-01

    A cavitation event in a vessel replaces water with a mixture of water vapor and air. A quantitative theory is presented to argue that the tempo of filling of vessels with air has two phases: a fast process that extracts air from stem tissue adjacent to the cavitated vessels (less than 10 s) and a slow phase that extracts air from the atmosphere outside the stem (more than 10 h). A model was designed to estimate how water tension (T) near recently cavitated vessels causes bubbles in embolized vessels to expand or contract as T increases or decreases, respectively. The model also predicts that the hydraulic conductivity of a stem will increase as bubbles collapse. The pressure of air bubbles trapped in vessels of a stem can be predicted from the model based on fitting curves of hydraulic conductivity versus T. The model was validated using data from six stem segments each of Acer mono and the clonal hybrid Populus 84K (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). The model was fitted to results with root mean square error less than 3%. The model provided new insight into the study of embolism formation in stem tissue and helped quantify the bubble pressure immediately after the fast process referred to above. PMID:25907963

  15. Spectrum of laser light scattered by nanoparticles in an ablation-induced cavitation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Masato; Sasaki, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    The spectrum of the laser light scattered by nanoparticles in a cavitation bubble, which was induced by laser ablation of a titanium target in water, was measured using a triple-grating spectrograph. The scattered laser light observed at 100 \\upmu s after laser ablation had no wavelength-shifted component, suggesting that nanoparticles at this delay time were metallic. The wavelength-shifted component was observed in the spectrum at a delay time of 200 \\upmu s, suggesting the formation of oxidized nanoparticles. However, we observed no peaks in the spectrum of the scattered laser light in the present in situ laser-light scattering experiment. On the other hand, we observed clear peaks in the Raman spectrum of synthesized nanoparticles. The experimental results suggest slow crystallization of nanoparticles in liquid in liquid-phase laser ablation.

  16. Cavitation and contrast: the use of bubbles in ultrasound imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Stride, E P; Coussios, C C

    2010-01-01

    Microbubbles and cavitation are playing an increasingly significant role in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications of ultrasound. Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents have been in clinical use now for more than two decades, stimulating the development of a range of new contrast-specific imaging techniques which offer substantial benefits in echocardiography, microcirculatory imaging, and more recently, quantitative and molecular imaging. In drug delivery and gene therapy, microbubbles are being investigated/developed as vehicles which can be loaded with the required therapeutic agent, traced to the target site using diagnostic ultrasound, and then destroyed with ultrasound of higher intensity energy burst to release the material locally, thus avoiding side effects associated with systemic administration, e.g. of toxic chemotherapy. It has moreover been shown that the motion of the microbubbles increases the permeability of both individual cell membranes and the endothelium, thus enhancing therapeutic uptake, and can locally increase the activity of drugs by enhancing their transport across biologically inaccessible interfaces such as blood clots or solid tumours. In high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) surgery and lithotripsy, controlled cavitation is being investigated as a means of increasing the speed and efficacy of the treatment. The aim of this paper is both to describe the key features of the physical behaviour of acoustically driven bubbles which underlie their effectiveness in biomedical applications and to review the current state of the art.

  17. Bubble Growth and Detachment from a Needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusser, Michael; Rambod, Edmond; Gharib, Morteza

    1999-11-01

    The release of bubbles from an underwater nozzle or orifice occurs in large number of applications, such as perforated plate columns, blood oxygenators and various methods of water treatment. It is also a widely used method in laboratory research on multiphase flow and acoustics for generating small bubbles in a controlled fashion. We studied experimentally the growth and pinch-off of air bubbles released from a submerged needle into a quiescent liquid or a liquid flowing parallel to the needle. Micron-sized bubbles were generated by an air-liquid dispenser. High-speed imaging was performed to study the formation and detachment of bubbles from the tip of the needle. The impact of the needle diameter was investigated and the size and number of produced bubbles were assessed for different flow rates of air and for different velocities of the imposed upward liquid flow. The results were compared with available theoretical models and numerical computations. The existence of a critical gas flow rate and two regimes of bubble growth were verified.

  18. CO2 bubbling-based 'Nanobomb' System for Targetedly Suppressing Panc-1 Pancreatic Tumor via Low Intensity Ultrasound-activated Inertial Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Xu, Huixiong; Chen, Hangrong; Jia, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Shuguang; Cai, Xiaojun; Wang, Ronghui; Mou, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Shi, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive and targeted physical treatment is still desirable especially for those cancerous patients. Herein, we develop a new physical treatment protocol by employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system consisting of low-intensity ultrasound (1.0 W/cm(2)) and a well-constructed pH/temperature dual-responsive CO2 release system. Depending on the temperature elevation caused by exogenous low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound irradiation and the low pH caused by the endogenous acidic-environment around/within tumor, dual-responsive CO2 release system can quickly release CO2 bubbles, and afterwards, the generated CO2 bubbles waves will timely explode before dissolution due to triggering by therapeutic ultrasound waves. Related bio-effects (e.g., cavitation, mechanical, shock waves, etc) caused by CO2 bubbles' explosion effectively induce instant necrosis of panc-1 cells and blood vessel destruction within panc-1 tumor, and consequently inhibit the growth of panc-1 solid tumor, simultaneously minimizing the side effects to normal organs. This new physiotherapy employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system promises significant potentials in targetedly suppressing tumors, especially for those highly deadly cancers.

  19. CO2 bubbling-based 'Nanobomb' System for Targetedly Suppressing Panc-1 Pancreatic Tumor via Low Intensity Ultrasound-activated Inertial Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Xu, Huixiong; Chen, Hangrong; Jia, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Shuguang; Cai, Xiaojun; Wang, Ronghui; Mou, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Shi, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive and targeted physical treatment is still desirable especially for those cancerous patients. Herein, we develop a new physical treatment protocol by employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system consisting of low-intensity ultrasound (1.0 W/cm2) and a well-constructed pH/temperature dual-responsive CO2 release system. Depending on the temperature elevation caused by exogenous low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound irradiation and the low pH caused by the endogenous acidic-environment around/within tumor, dual-responsive CO2 release system can quickly release CO2 bubbles, and afterwards, the generated CO2 bubbles waves will timely explode before dissolution due to triggering by therapeutic ultrasound waves. Related bio-effects (e.g., cavitation, mechanical, shock waves, etc) caused by CO2 bubbles' explosion effectively induce instant necrosis of panc-1 cells and blood vessel destruction within panc-1 tumor, and consequently inhibit the growth of panc-1 solid tumor, simultaneously minimizing the side effects to normal organs. This new physiotherapy employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system promises significant potentials in targetedly suppressing tumors, especially for those highly deadly cancers. PMID:26379793

  20. Gas Bubble Growth in Muddy Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-30

    the ebullitive flux of methane, an important “greenhouse gas”, to the atmosphere. OBJECTIVES The immediate objective is a working model for the growth...OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE SEP 2000 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2000 to 00-00-2000 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gas Bubble Growth in...N is the porosity, D is the tortuosity-corrected diffusivity, cg is the concentration of gas in the bubble, S is the local rate of methanogenesis, R1

  1. Contribution of stress wave and cavitation bubble in evaluation of cell-cell adhesion by femtosecond laser-induced impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Takanori; Li, Po-Lin; Wang, Wen-Zhe; Deng, Jia-Huei; Lu, Yun-Chang; Kao, Fu-Jen; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh

    2014-10-01

    When an intense femtosecond laser is focused in a cell culture medium, shock wave, stress wave, and cavitation bubble are generated at the laser focal point. Cell-cell adhesion can be broken at the cellular level by the impacts of these factors. We have applied this breaking of the adhesion to an estimation of the cell-cell adhesion strength. In this application, it is important to identify which of these factors is the dominant factor that breaks the adhesion. Here we investigated this issue using streptavidin-coated microbeads adhering to a biotin-coated substrate as a mimic of the cell-cell adhesion. The results indicated that the break was induced mainly by the stress wave, not by the impact of the cavitation bubble.

  2. Some problems of the theory of bubble growth and condensation in bubble chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkachev, L. G.

    1988-01-01

    This work is an attempt to explain the reasons for the discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental values of bubble growth rate in an overheated liquid, and to provide a brief formulation of the main premises of the theory on bubble growth in liquid before making a critical analysis. To simplify the problem, the floating upward of bubbles is not discussed; moreover, the study is based on the results of the theory of the behavior of fixed bubbles.

  3. Gas Bubble Growth In Muddy Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    1 Gas Bubble Growth In Muddy Sediments Bruce D . Johnson Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1 phone...that this information can be used to improve and test acoustic backscatter models for sediments and to better understand the ebullitive flux of...currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30 SEP 2002 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2002 to 00-00-2002 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE

  4. Gas Bubble Growth in Muddy Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    1 Gas Bubble Growth In Muddy Sediments Bruce D . Johnson Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1 phone...that this information can be used to improve and test acoustic backscatter models for sediments and to better understand the ebullitive flux of...currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30 SEP 2001 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2001 to 00-00-2001 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE

  5. Target geometry and rigidity determines laser-induced cavitation bubble transport and nanoparticle productivity - a high-speed videography study.

    PubMed

    Kohsakowski, Sebastian; Gökce, Bilal; Tanabe, Rie; Wagener, Philipp; Plech, Anton; Ito, Yoshiro; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-06-28

    Laser-induced cavitation has mostly been studied in bulk liquid or at a two-dimensional wall, although target shapes for the particle synthesis may strongly affect bubble dynamics and interfere with particle productivity. We investigated the dynamics of the cavitation bubble induced by pulsed-laser ablation in liquid for different target geometries with high-speed laser microsecond videography and focus on the collapse behaviour. This method enables us observations in a high time resolution (intervals of 1 μs) and single-pulse experiments. Further, we analyzed the nanoparticle productivity, the sizes of the synthesized nanoparticles and the evolution of the bubble volume for each different target shape and geometry. For the ablation of metal (Ag, Cu, Ni) wire tips a springboard-like behaviour after the first collapse is observed which can be correlated with vertical projectile motion. Its turbulent friction in the liquid causes a very efficient transport and movement of the bubble and ablated material into the bulk liquid and prevents particle redeposition. This effect is influenced by the degree of freedom of the wire as well as the material properties and dimensions, especially the Young's modulus. The most efficient and largest bubble movement away from the wire was observed for a thin (500 μm) silver wire with velocities up to 19.8 m s(-1) and for materials with a small Young's modulus and flexural rigidity. We suggest that these observations may contribute to upscaling strategies and increase of particle yield towards large synthesis of colloids based on targets that may continuously be fed.

  6. Cavitation passive control on immersed bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, Khodayar; Dorostkar, Mohammad Mortezazadeh; Katal, Ali

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces a new idea of controlling cavitation around a hydrofoil through a passive cavitation controller called artificial cavitation bubble generator (ACG). Cyclic processes, namely, growth and implosion of bubbles around an immersed body, are the main reasons for the destruction and erosion of the said body. This paper aims to create a condition in which the cavitation bubbles reach a steady-state situation and prevent the occurrence of the cyclic processes. For this purpose, the ACG is placed on the surface of an immersed body, in particular, the suction surface of a 2D hydrofoil. A simulation was performed with an implicit finite volume scheme based on a SIMPLE algorithm associated with the multiphase and cavitation model. The modified k-ɛ RNG turbulence model equipped with a modification of the turbulent viscosity was applied to overcome the turbulence closure problem. Numerical simulation of water flow over the hydrofoil equipped with the ACG shows that a low-pressure recirculation area is produced behind the ACG and artificially generates stationary cavitation bubbles. The location, shape, and size of this ACG are the crucial parameters in creating a proper control. Results show that the cavitation bubble is controlled well with a well-designed ACG.

  7. Cavitation passive control on immersed bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, Khodayar; Dorostkar, Mohammad Mortezazadeh; Katal, Ali

    2017-03-01

    This paper introduces a new idea of controlling cavitation around a hydrofoil through a passive cavitation controller called artificial cavitation bubble generator (ACG). Cyclic processes, namely, growth and implosion of bubbles around an immersed body, are the main reasons for the destruction and erosion of the said body. This paper aims to create a condition in which the cavitation bubbles reach a steady-state situation and prevent the occurrence of the cyclic processes. For this purpose, the ACG is placed on the surface of an immersed body, in particular, the suction surface of a 2D hydrofoil. A simulation was performed with an implicit finite volume scheme based on a SIMPLE algorithm associated with the multiphase and cavitation model. The modified k-ɛ RNG turbulence model equipped with a modification of the turbulent viscosity was applied to overcome the turbulence closure problem. Numerical simulation of water flow over the hydrofoil equipped with the ACG shows that a low-pressure recirculation area is produced behind the ACG and artificially generates stationary cavitation bubbles. The location, shape, and size of this ACG are the crucial parameters in creating a proper control. Results show that the cavitation bubble is controlled well with a well-designed ACG.

  8. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Abdou, Ashraf A; West, David L; Shea, Thomas J; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Farny, Dr. Caleb H.; Kaminsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  9. Theoretical model of ice nucleation induced by inertial acoustic cavitation. Part 2: Number of ice nuclei generated by a single bubble.

    PubMed

    Cogné, C; Labouret, S; Peczalski, R; Louisnard, O; Baillon, F; Espitalier, F

    2016-01-01

    In the preceding paper (part 1), the pressure and temperature fields close to a bubble undergoing inertial acoustic cavitation were presented. It was shown that extremely high liquid water pressures but quite moderate temperatures were attained near the bubble wall just after the collapse providing the necessary conditions for ice nucleation. In this paper (part 2), the nucleation rate and the nuclei number generated by a single collapsing bubble were determined. The calculations were performed for different driving acoustic pressures, liquid ambient temperatures and bubble initial radius. An optimal acoustic pressure range and a nucleation temperature threshold as function of bubble radius were determined. The capability of moderate power ultrasound to trigger ice nucleation at low undercooling level and for a wide distribution of bubble sizes has thus been assessed on the theoretical ground.

  10. Current Status in Cavitation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Ashok K.; Avva, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation is a common problem for many engineering devices in which the main working fluid is in liquid state. In turbomachinery applications, cavitation generally occurs on the inlet side of pumps. The deleterious effects of cavitation include: lowered performance, load asymmetry, erosion and pitting of blade surfaces, vibration and noise, and reduction of the overall machine life. Cavitation models in use today range from rather crude approximations to sophisticated bubble dynamics models. Details about bubble inception, growth and collapse are relevant to the prediction of blade erosion, but are not necessary to predict the performance of pumps. An engineering model of cavitation is proposed to predict the extent of cavitation and performance. The vapor volume fraction is used as an indicator variable to quantify cavitation. A two-phase flow approach is employed with the assumption of the thermal equilibrium between liquid and vapor. At present velocity slip between the two phases is selected. Preliminary analyses of 2D flows shows qualitatively correct results.

  11. Characterization of the shock pulse-induced cavitation bubble activities recorded by an optical fiber hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gwansuk; Cho, Sung Chan; Coleman, Andrew John; Choi, Min Joo

    2014-03-01

    A shock pressure pulse used in an extracorporeal shock wave treatment has a large negative pressure (<-5 MPa) which can produce cavitation. Cavitation cannot be measured easily, but may have known therapeutic effects. This study considers the signal recorded for several hundred microseconds using an optical hydrophone submerged in water at the focus of shock pressure field. The signal is characterized by shock pulse followed by a long tail after several microseconds; this signal is regarded as a cavitation-related signal (CRS). An experimental investigation of the CRS was conducted in the shock pressure field produced in water using an optical hydrophone (FOPH2000, RP Acoustics, Germany). The CRS was found to contain characteristic information about the shock pulse-induced cavitation. The first and second collapse times (t1 and t2) were identified in the CRS. The collapse time delay (tc = t2 - t1) increased with the driving shock pressures. The signal amplitude integrated for time from t1 to t2 was highly correlated with tc (adjusted R(2) = 0.990). This finding suggests that a single optical hydrophone can be used to measure shock pulse and to characterize shock pulse-induced cavitation.

  12. Numerical simulation of the nonlinear ultrasonic pressure wave propagation in a cavitating bubbly liquid inside a sonochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Hakan; Popov, Viktor

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the acoustic wave propagation in bubbly liquid inside a pilot sonochemical reactor which aims to produce antibacterial medical textile fabrics by coating the textile with ZnO or CuO nanoparticles. Computational models on acoustic propagation are developed in order to aid the design procedures. The acoustic pressure wave propagation in the sonoreactor is simulated by solving the Helmholtz equation using a meshless numerical method. The paper implements both the state-of-the-art linear model and a nonlinear wave propagation model recently introduced by Louisnard (2012), and presents a novel iterative solution procedure for the nonlinear propagation model which can be implemented using any numerical method and/or programming tool. Comparative results regarding both the linear and the nonlinear wave propagation are shown. Effects of bubble size distribution and bubble volume fraction on the acoustic wave propagation are discussed in detail. The simulations demonstrate that the nonlinear model successfully captures the realistic spatial distribution of the cavitation zones and the associated acoustic pressure amplitudes.

  13. Dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in bilinear elastic-plastic media, and the implications to short-pulsed laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, E.-A.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by short laser pulses in water and elastic-plastic media were investigated theoretically in order to get a better understanding of their role in short-pulsed laser surgery. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which include the elastic-plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble, compressibility, viscosity, density and surface tension. Breakdown in water produces a monopolar acoustic signal characterized by a compressive wave. Breakdown in an elastic-plastic medium produces a bipolar acoustic signal, with a leading positive compression wave and a trailing negative tensile wave. The calculations revealed that consideration of the tissue elasticity is essential to describe the bipolar shape of the shock wave emitted during optical breakdown. The elastic-plastic response of the medium surrounding the bubble leads to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and pressure amplitude of the shock wave emitted during bubble collapse, and shortening of the oscillation period of the bubble. The results are discussed with respect to collateral damage in short-pulsed laser surgery.

  14. Efficient generation of cavitation bubbles and reactive oxygen species using triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound sequence for sonodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Sonodynamic treatment is a method of treating cancer using reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by cavitation bubbles in collaboration with a sonosensitizer at a target tissue. In this treatment method, both localized ROS generation and ROS generation with high efficiency are important. In this study, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence, which consists of a short, extremely high intensity pulse immediately followed by a long, moderate-intensity burst, was employed for the efficient generation of ROS. In experiments, a solution sealed in a chamber was exposed to a triggered HIFU sequence. Then, the distribution of generated ROS was observed by the luminol reaction, and the amount of generated ROS was quantified using KI method. As a result, the localized ROS generation was demonstrated by light emission from the luminol reaction. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the triggered HIFU sequence has higher efficiency of ROS generation by both the KI method and the luminol reaction emission.

  15. Dynamic Nucleation of Ice Induced by a Single Stable Cavitation Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, Kenichi; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamic nucleation of ice induced by caviation bubble in undercooled water is observed using an acoustic levitation technique. The observation indicates that a high pressure pulse associated with a collapsing bubble is indeed responsible for the nucleation of a high pressure phase of ice.

  16. Electrolytic Bubble Growth on Pillared Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kenneth; Savas, Omer

    2013-11-01

    In current energy research, artificial photosynthetic (AP) devices are being designed to split water and harvest hydrogen gas using sunlight. In one such design, hydrogen gas bubbles evolve on catalytic surfaces of arrayed micropillars. If these bubbles are not promptly removed from the surface, they can adversely affect gas evolution rates, water flow rates, sunlight capture, and heat management of the system - all of which deteriorate device performance. Therefore, understanding how to remove evolved gas bubbles from the pillar surfaces is crucial. Flow visualization of electrolytic bubble nucleation and detachment from the catalytic pillar surfaces has been conducted. The bubble departure diameter and lift-off frequency are extracted and compared with known correlations from boiling heat transfer. Bubble tracking indicates that bubble detachment is enhanced by local interactions with neighboring bubbles. These observations suggest how hydrogen gas bubbles can be effectively removed from pillared surfaces to prolong AP device longevity. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovations Hub.

  17. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70 °C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling.

  18. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70 °C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling.

  19. Optical investigation of cavitation erosion by laser-induced bubble collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Xu, R. Q.; Shen, Z. H.; Lu, J.; Ni, X. W.

    2004-04-01

    By means of a new force sensor based on optical beam deflection (OBD), the mechanical effects of laser-matter interaction underwater at different incident laser energy are investigated in detail. The experimental results show that a target underwater is impacted in turn by laser-plasma ablation force and high-speed liquid-jet impulse induced by bubbles collapse in the vicinity of a solid boundary. Furthermore, the amplitudes of the two forces increase monotonously with laser energy. According to the ablation force detected by the experiment and the theoretical relationship between laser intensity and ablation pressure, the value of liquid-jet impact against a solid boundary can be easily obtained. In addition, based on the model of a collapsing bubble, some characteristic parameters, such as the liquid-jet impact velocity, the maximum bubble radius, the bubble energy can also be obtained at different laser energy, which are valuable in the corresponding research fields.

  20. Control of acoustic cavitation with application to lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael Rollins

    Control of acoustic cavitation, which is sound-induced growth and collapse of bubbles, is the subject of this dissertation. Application is to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), used to treat kidney stones. Cavitation is thought to help comminute stones yet may damage tissue. Can cavitation be controlled? The acoustic source in a widely used clinical lithotripter is an electrical spark at the near focus of an underwater ellipsoidal reflector. To control cavitation, we used rigid reflectors, pressure release reflectors, and pairs of reflectors aligned to have a common focus and a controlled delay between sparks. Cavitation was measured with aluminum foil, which was placed along the axis at the far focus of the reflector(s). Collapsing bubbles pitted the foil. Pit depth measured with a profilometer provided a relative measure of cavitation intensity. Cavitation was also measured with a focused hydrophone, which detected the pressure pulse radiated in bubble collapse. Acoustic pressure signals produced by the reflectors were measured with a PVdF membrane hydrophone, digitally recorded, and input into a numerical version of the Gilmore equation (F. R. Gilmore, 'The growth or collapse of a spherical bubble in a viscous compressible liquid,' Rep#26-4, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (1952), pp.1-40.). Maximum pressure produced in a spherical bubble was calculated and employed as a relative measure of collapse intensity. Experimental and numerical results demonstrate cavitation can be controlled by an appropriately delayed auxiliary pressure pulse. When two rigid-reflector pulses are used, a long interpulse delay (150-200 μs) of the second pulse 'kicks' the collapsing bubble and intensifies cavitation. Foil pit depth and computed pressure three times single pulse values were obtained. Conversely, a short delay (<90 μs) 'stifles' bubble growth and weakens cavitation. A single pressure release reflector time- reverses the rigid-reflector waveform

  1. Hot spot conditions during cavitation in water

    SciTech Connect

    Didenko, Y.T.; McNamara, W.B. III; Suslick, K.S.

    1999-06-23

    Liquids irradiated with high-intensity ultrasound undergo acoustic cavitation--the formation, growth, and implosive collapse of bubbles. The energy stored during the growth of the bubble in the rarefaction phase of the acoustic field is released when the bubble violently collapses in the compression phase of the acoustic field, as acoustic noise, shock waves, chemical reactions, and the emission of light (sonoluminescence, SL). This violent collapse is predicted to generate a hot spot of thousands of Kelvin within the bubble, but, to date, there have been only a limited number of experimental measurements of the temperature of this hot spot. Although the SL of water has been studied for more than 50 years, the effective hot spot temperature during aqueous cavitation remains unresolved. Given the importance of aqueous cavitation (sonography and bioeffects of ultrasound, sonochemical remediation of aqueous pollutants, synthetic applications of sonochemistry, etc.), the authors decided to apply previous spectroscopic analysis of SL of nonaqueous liquids to aqueous solutions doped with small amounts of hydrocarbons. The authors have collected and analyzed excited-state C{sub 2} NBSL (multi-bubble sonoluminescence, light emission from the clouds of cavitating bubbles) spectra from mixtures of organic liquids in water at 20 kHz and find an effective emission temperature of 4,300 {+-} 200 K.

  2. Bubble and bubble cloud dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2000-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles are formed from small air bubbles, so-called nuclei, with the surrounding pressure reduction caused by the flow, and then, the bubbles shrink and collapse with the surrounding pressure rise. Such volumetric changes of bubbles are calculated in detail and it is found that they are significantly influenced by the internal phenomena, such as thermal diffusion, mist formation due to a homogeneous condensation, mass diffusion between vapor and noncondensable gas, heat and mass transfer through the bubble wall. The structure in cavitating flow interacts with the cavitation bubbles, and those bubbles form a cloud cavitation. It is well known that cloud cavitation is one of the most destructive forms. The behavior of bubble clouds is simulated numerically. An inward propagating shock wave is formed during the collapse of the bubble cloud, and the shock wave and its precursor are focused at the cloud center area. These phenomena associate high frequency pressure oscillations and violent bubble collapses. Those bubble collapses emit high pressure peaks, which are several hundreds times larger than that of a single bubble collapse.

  3. Cavitation inception on microparticles: a self-propelled particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2004-04-30

    Corrugated, hydrophilic particles with diameters between 30 and 150 microm are found to cause cavitation inception at their surfaces when they are exposed to a short, intensive tensile stress wave. The growing cavity accelerates the particle into translatory motion until the tensile stress decreases, and subsequently the particle separates from the cavity. The cavity growth and particle detachment are modeled by considering the momentum of the particle and the displaced liquid. The analysis suggests that all particles which cause cavitation are accelerated into translatory motion, and separate from the cavities they themselves nucleate. Thus, in the research of cavitation nuclei the link is established between developed cavitation bubbles and their origin.

  4. Gas depletion through single gas bubble diffusive growth and its effect on subsequent bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Soto, Alvaro; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj; Physics of Fluid Group Collaboration; MCEC Netherlands CenterMultiscale Catalytic Energy Conversion Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    In weakly supersaturated mixtures, bubbles are known to grow quasi-statically as diffusion-driven mass transfer governs the process. In the final stage of the evolution, before detachment, there is an enhancement of mass transfer, which changes from diffusion to natural convection. Once the bubble detaches, it leaves behind a gas-depleted area. The diffusive mass transfer towards that region cannot compensate for the amount of gas which is taken away by the bubble. Consequently, the consecutive bubble will grow in an environment which contains less gas than for the previous one. This reduces the local supersaturation of the mixture around the nucleation site, leading to a reduced bubble growth rate. We present quantitative experimental data on this effect and the theoretical model for depletion during the bubble growth rate. This work was supported by the Netherlands Center for Multiscale Catalytic Energy Conversion (MCEC), an NWO Gravitation programme funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the government of the Netherlands.

  5. Numerical simulaion of dynamics of a gas bubble in liquid near a rigid wall during its growth and collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgamov, M. A.; Kosolapova, L. A.; Malakhov, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    A numerical technique of calculating the dynamics of a cavitation bubble near a plane rigid wall is presented. The bubble at its collapse can become toroidal. The liquid is assumed inviscid and incompressible, its flow being potential. The bubble surface movement is determined by the Euler method, the normal component of the liquid velocity on the bubble surface is found by the boundary element method. The technique also includes an algorithm for calculating the velocity and pressure fields in the liquid. The convergence of the numerical solution with refining the temporal and spatial steps is demonstrated. The results of the present technique are compared with some known numerical and experimental data by other authors, their satisfactory agreement is found. To illustrate the capabilities of the present technique the process of growth and collapse of a bubble in water near a wall is considered. The liquid pressure contours in the stage of the bubble collapse are given and the radial liquid pressure profiles on the wall and at a small distance from the wall where the liquid pressure is maximum are shown.

  6. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, A.; Noack, J.; Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.

    1999-06-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored by time-resolved photography and numerical simulations. The growth-collapse period of cylindrical bubbles of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) differs only slightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble size and energy even for aspherical bubbles. The change of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid walls and elastic (tissue-like) boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also investigated.

  7. EXPERIMENTS AND SIMULATIONS WITH LARGE GAS BUBBLES IN MERCURY TOWARDS ESTABLISHING A GAS LAYER TO MITIGATE CAVITATION DAMAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie; Felde, David K; Ruggles, Arthur; Karnowski, Thomas Paul

    2006-01-01

    One of several options that shows promise for protecting solid surfaces from cavitation damage in liquid metal spallation targets, involves introducing an interstitial gas layer between the liquid metal and the containment vessel wall. Several approaches toward establishing such a protective gas layer are being investigated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory including large bubble injection, and methods that involve stabilization of the layer by surface modifications to enhance gas hold-up on the wall or by inserting a porous media. It has previously been reported that using a gas layer configuration in a test target showed an order-of-magnitude decrease in damage for an in-beam experiment. Video images that were taken of the successful gas/mercury flow configuration have been analyzed and correlated. The results show that the success was obtained under conditions where only 60% of the solid wall was covered with gas. Such a result implies that this mitigation scheme may have much more potential. Additional experiments with gas injection into water are underway. Multi-component flow simulations are also being used to provide direction for these new experiments. These simulations have been used to size the gas layer and position multiple inlet nozzles.

  8. Microlayer Topology And Bubble Growth In Nucleate Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawurek, H. H.; Macgregor, H. G.; Bodenheimer, J. S.

    1987-09-01

    During nucleate boiling thin liquid films (nicrolayers) form beneath the base of bubbles and evaporate into the bubble interiors. A technique is presented which permits the simultaneous determination of microlayer topology and the contribution of microlayer evaporation to bubble growth. Isolated-bubble boiling takes place on an electrically heated, transparent tin-oxide coating deposited on a glass plate, the latter forming the floor of a vessel. With coherent Claser) illumination from beneath, the microlayers reflect fringe patterns similar to Newton's rings. Owing to the rapid evaporation of the layers (the process is completed within milliseconds) the fringes are in rapid motion and are recorded by eine photography at some 4 000 frames per second and exposure times of 50 μs. The resulting interferograms provide details of microlayer shape and thickness versus time, and thus evaporation rate. Simultaneously, and on the same film, bubble profiles (and thus volumes) are obtained under white light illumination. The two bubble images are manipulated by mirrors and lenses so as to appear side by side on the same frame of film, the fringes magnified and the profiles reduced. Sample results for methanol boiling at a pressure of 58.5 kPa and with the liquid bulk at saturation temperature, are presented. Under such conditions microlayer evaporation accounts for 37 per cent of the total bubble volume at detachment.

  9. Simulation of bubble growth and coalescence in reacting polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchisio, Daniele; Karimi, Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns with the simulation of reacting polymer foams with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In these systems upon mixing of different ingredients polymerization starts and some gaseous compounds are produced, resulting in the formation of bubbles that growth and coalesce. As the foam expands, the polymerization proceeds resulting in an increase of the apparent viscosity. The evolution of the collective behavior of the bubbles within the polymer foam is tracked by solving a master kinetic equation, formulated in terms of the bubble size distribution. The rate with which individual bubbles grow is instead calculated by resolving the momentum and concentration boundary layers around the bubbles. Moreover, since it is useful to track the evolution of the interface between the foam and the surrounding air, a volume-of-fluid (VOF) model is adopted. The final computational model is implemented in the open-source CFD code openFOAM by making use of the compressibleInterFoam solver. The master kinetic equation is solved with a quadrature-based moment method (QBMM) directly implemented in openFOAM, whereas the bubble growth model is solved independently and ''called'' from the CFD code by using an unstructured database. Model predictions are validated against experimental data. This work was funded by the European Commission under the grant agreement number 604271 (Project acronym: MoDeNa; call identifier: FP7-NMP-2013-SMALL-7).

  10. The growth of vapor bubble and relaxation between two-phase bubble flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadein, S. A.; Subba Reddy Gorla, Rama

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents the behavior of the bubble growth and relaxation between vapor and superheated liquid. The growth and thermal relaxation time between the two-phases are obtained for different levels of superheating. The heat transfer problem is solved numerically by using the extended Scriven model. Results are compared with those of Scriven theory and MOBY DICK experiment with reasonably good agreement for lower values of superheating.

  11. Cavitation luminescence of argon-saturated alkali-metal solutions from a conical bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ha; Jie He, Shou; Fang, Wang; Min, Song Jian

    2008-10-01

    In 1,2-propanediol solutions containing sodium chloride, spectra of luminescence from a collapsed conical bubble have been detected. Results show that the spectra consist of a broad continuum background, on which a resonance line arising from de-excitation of sodium atom at 589 nm and two satellite diffuse bands at ~554 nm and 620 nm respectively are superimposed. These are confirmed to be the emission from alkali-metal-argon exciplexes and are suggested to occur when the mixtures of alkali metal vapour and argon are rapidly compressed. The intracavity density of argon deduced from the line shift of Na resonance line data is estimated to be about 2 × 1026 m-3.

  12. Numerical estimation of cavitation intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumenacker, L.; Fortes-Patella, R.; Archer, A.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation may appear in turbomachinery and in hydraulic orifices, venturis or valves, leading to performance losses, vibrations and material erosion. This study propose a new method to predict the cavitation intensity of the flow, based on a post-processing of unsteady CFD calculations. The paper presents the analyses of cavitating structures' evolution at two different scales: • A macroscopic one in which the growth of cavitating structures is calculated using an URANS software based on a homogeneous model. Simulations of cavitating flows are computed using a barotropic law considering presence of air and interfacial tension, and Reboud's correction on the turbulence model. • Then a small one where a Rayleigh-Plesset software calculates the acoustic energy generated by the implosion of the vapor/gas bubbles with input parameters from macroscopic scale. The volume damage rate of the material during incubation time is supposed to be a part of the cumulated acoustic energy received by the solid wall. The proposed analysis method is applied to calculations on hydrofoil and orifice geometries. Comparisons between model results and experimental works concerning flow characteristic (size of cavity, pressure,velocity) as well as pitting (erosion area, relative cavitation intensity) are presented.

  13. Theoretical and experimental comparison of vapor cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.; Jacobson, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Vapor cavitation for a submerged journal bearing under dynamically loaded conditions was investigated. The observation of vapor cavitation in the laboratory was done by high-speed photography. It was found that vapor cavitation occurs when the tensile stress applied to the oil exceeded the tensile strength of the oil or the binding of the oil to the surface. The theoretical solution to the Reynolds equation is determined numerically using a moving boundary algorithm. This algorithm conserves mass throughout the computational domain including the region of cavitation and its boundaries. An alternating direction implicit (MDI) method is used to effect the time march. A rotor undergoing circular whirl was studied. Predicted cavitation behavior was analyzed by three-dimensional computer graphic movies. The formation, growth, and collapse of the bubble in response to the dynamic conditions is shown. For the same conditions of dynamic loading, the cavitation bubble was studied in the laboratory using high-speed photography.

  14. He bubble growth and interaction in W nano-tendrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2015-11-01

    Tungsten plasma-facing components (PFCs) in fusion devices are exposed to variety of extreme plasma conditions, which can lead to alteration of tungsten micro-structure and degradation of the PFCs. In particular, it is known that filamentary nano-structures called fuzz can grow on helium plasma exposed tungsten surfaces. However, mechanism of the fuzz growth is still not fully understood. Existing experimental observations indicate that formation of helium nano-bubbles in tungsten plays essential role in fuzz formation and growth. In this work we investigate mechanisms of growth and interaction of helium bubbles in fuzz-like nano-tendrils using molecular dynamics simulations with LAMMPS code. We show that growth of the bubbles has anisotropic character producing complex stress field in the nano-tendrils with distinct compression and tension regions. We found that formation of large inter-bubble tension regions can cause lateral stretching and bending of the tendrils that consequently lead to their elongation and thinning at the stretching sites. The rate of nano-tendril growth due to the described mechanism is also evaluated from the simulations.

  15. Visualization and simulation of bubble growth in pore networks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuehai; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1994-03-01

    Bubble nucleation and bubble growth in porous media is an important problem encountered in processes, such as pressure depletion and boiling. To understand its basic aspects, experiments and numerical simulations in micromodel geometries were undertaken. Experiments of bubble growth by pressure depletion were carried out in 2-D etched-glass micromodels and in Hele-Shaw cells. Nucleation of bubbles and the subsequent growth of gas clusters were visualized. Contrary to the bulk or to Hele-Shaw cells, gas clusters in the micromodel have irregular and ramified shapes and share many of the features of an external invasion process (e.g. of percolation during drainage). A pore network numerical model was developed to simulate the growth of multiple gas clusters under various conditions. The model is based on the solution of the convection-diffusions equation and also accounts for capillary and viscous forces, which play an important role in determining the growth patterns. Numerical simulation resulted in good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. The dynamics of histotripsy bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2011-09-01

    Histotripsy describes treatments in which high-amplitude acoustic pulses are used to excite bubbles and erode tissue. Though tissue erosion can be directly attributed to bubble activity, the genesis and dynamics of bubbles remain unclear. Histotripsy lesions that show no signs of thermal coagulative damage have been generated with two different acoustic protocols: relatively long acoustic pulses that produce local boiling within milliseconds and relatively short pulses that are higher in amplitude but likely do not produce boiling. While these two approaches are often distinguished as `boiling' versus `cavitation', such labels can obscure similarities. In both cases, a bubble undergoes large changes in radius and vapor is transported into and out of the bubble as it oscillates. Moreover, observations from both approaches suggest that bubbles grow to a size at which they cease to collapse violently. In order to better understand the dynamics of histotripsy bubbles, a single-bubble model has been developed that couples acoustically excited bubble motions to the thermodynamic state of the surrounding liquid. Using this model for bubbles exposed to histotripsy sound fields, simulations suggest that two mechanisms can act separately or in concert to lead to the typically observed bubble growth. First, nonlinear acoustic propagation leads to the evolution of shocks and an asymmetry in the positive and negative pressures that drive bubble motion. This asymmetry can have a rectifying effect on bubble oscillations whereby the bubble grows on average during each acoustic cycle. Second, vapor transport to/from the bubble tends to produce larger bubbles, especially at elevated temperatures. Vapor transport by itself can lead to rectified bubble growth when the ambient temperature exceeds 100 °C (`boiling') or local heating in the vicinity of the bubble leads to a superheated boundary layer.

  17. Analogy between fluid cavitation and fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.; Braun, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    When the stresses imposed on a fluid are sufficiently large, rupture or cavitation can occur. Such conditions can exist in many two-phase flow applications, such as the choked flows, which can occur in seals and bearings. Nonspherical bubbles with large aspect ratios have been observed in fluids under rapid acceleration and high shear fields. These bubbles are geometrically similar to fracture surface patterns (Griffith crack model) existing in solids. Analogies between crack growth in solid and fluid cavitation are proposed and supported by analysis and observation (photographs). Healing phenomena (void condensation), well accepted in fluid mechanics, have been observed in some polymers and hypothesized in solid mechanics. By drawing on the strengths of the theories of solid mechanics and cavitation, a more complete unified theory can be developed.

  18. CLASSICAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY: Growth and collapse of laser-induced bubbles in glycerol water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiu-Mei; He, Jie; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2008-07-01

    Comprehensive numerical and experimental analyses of the effect of viscosity on cavitation oscillations are performed. This numerical approach is based on the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. The model predictions are compared with experimental results obtained by using a fibre-optic diagnostic technique based on optical beam deflection (OBD). The maximum and minimum bubble radii as well as the oscillation times for each oscillation cycle are determined according to the characteristic signals. It is observed that the increasing of viscosity decreases the maximum bubble radii but increases the minimum bubble radii and the oscillation time. These experimental results are consistent with numerical results.

  19. Cavitation bioeffects.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Eitan

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation takes place when tiny gas bubbles oscillate, grow, and collapse in liquid under the influence of ultrasonic field. This study reviews cavitation bioeffects that are found both in vivo and in vitro when exposed to either low- or high-power acoustics. Proposed mechanisms are discussed here as well based on theoretical studies, simulations and test bench experiments. Bioeffects are induced in living tissue once the gas bubble is, for instance, within a blood vessel in close vicinity to the endothelium or to the red blood cells. Conditions for inducing various bioeffects are discussed - from severe damage, such as cell necrosis, to delicate alterations, such as increased permeability of cell membrane. Present and potential applications for therapeutic purpose from stone pulverization and tissue ablation to gene transfection and transdermal delivery are reviewed including the growing use of artificial microbubbles.

  20. Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Vanitas vanitatum et omnia vanitas: bubbles are emptiness, non-liquid, a tiny cloud shielding a mathematical singularity. Born from chance, a violent and brief life ending in the union with the (nearly) infinite. But a wealth of phenomena spring forth from this nothingness: underwater noise, sonoluminescence, boiling, and many others. Some recent results on a "blinking bubble" micropump and vapor bubbles in sound fields are outlined. The last section describes Leonardo da Vinci's observation of the non-rectlinear ascent of buoyant bubbles and justifies the name Leonardo's paradox recently attributed to this phenomenon.

  1. Vortex cavitation: A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt, R.E.A.; Maines, B.H.

    1994-12-31

    Cavitation in vortical flows is a significant problem. An important aspect is the need for a better understanding of the physics of cavitation in the vortices tailing from lifting surfaces such as propellers and hydrofoils. This is a review of experimental and numerical research that has been recently carried out with a series of hydrofoils. This is a review of experimental and numerical research that has been recently carried out with a series of hydrofoils. This research was aimed at investigating the interrelated effects of vortex structure, including the details of the vortex roll-up process close to the tip, dissolved gas content, and water quality as it related to the amount of tension that can be sustained in the vortex before cavitation occurs. The experimental phase includes lift and drag measurements, oil flow visualization of the boundary layer flow on the lifting surfaces, and observation of both cavitation inception and desinence in strong and weak water. An improved photographic technique has been developed to study the complex bubble dynamics inherent in the inception process. Preliminary results indicate that the bubble growth process is strongly dependent on the size and number of nuclei in the free stream. Numerical simulations indicate that the minimum pressure in the vortex is very close to the tip of the lifting surface, in agreement with the observation that the inception process also occurs very close to the tip under most conditions.

  2. Optimization of centrifugal pump cavitation performance based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S. F.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. C.; Zhu, Z. T.; Ning, C.; Zhao, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to further improve the cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump, slots on impeller blade near inlet were studied and six groups of hydraulic model were designed. Base on cavitating flow feature inside a centrifugal pump, bubble growth and implosion are calculated from the Rayleigh-Plesset equation which describes the dynamic behavior of spherical bubble and RNG κ-epsilon model was employed to simulate and analyze the internal two-phase flow of the model pump under the same conditions. The simulation results show that slots on blade near inlet could improve the cavitation performance and cavitation performance improvement of the second group was more obvious. Under the same conditions, the pressure on the back of blade near inlet was higher than the pressure on the back of unmodified blade near inlet, and energy distribution in the flow channel between the two blades was more uniform with a small change of head.

  3. Cavitation in medicine

    PubMed Central

    Brennen, Christopher Earls

    2015-01-01

    We generally think of bubbles as benign and harmless and yet they can manifest the most remarkable range of physical effects. Some of those effects are the stuff of our everyday experience as in the tinkling of a brook or the sounds of breaking waves at the beach. But even these mundane effects are examples of the ability of bubbles to gather, focus and radiate energy (acoustic energy in the above examples). In other contexts that focusing of energy can lead to serious technological problems as when cavitation bubbles eat great holes through ships' propeller blades or cause a threat to the integrity of the spillways at the Hoover Dam. In liquid-propelled rocket engines, bubbles pose a danger to the stability of the propulsion system, and in artificial heart valves they can cause serious damage to the red blood cells. In perhaps the most extraordinary example of energy focusing, collapsing cavitation bubbles can emit not only sound, but also light with black body radiation temperatures equal to that of the sun (Brennen 1995 Cavitation and bubble dynamics). But, harnessed carefully, this almost unique ability to focus energy can also be put to remarkably constructive use. Cavitation bubbles are now used in a remarkable range of surgical and medical procedures, for example to emulsify tissue (most commonly in cataract surgery or in lithotripsy procedures for the reduction of kidney and gall stones) or to manipulate the DNA in individual cells. By creating cavitation bubbles non-invasively thereby depositing and focusing energy non-intrusively, one can generate minute incisions or target cancer cells. This paper will begin by briefly reviewing the history of cavitation phenomena and will end with a vision of the new horizons for the amazing cavitation bubble. PMID:26442145

  4. Cavitation in medicine.

    PubMed

    Brennen, Christopher Earls

    2015-10-06

    We generally think of bubbles as benign and harmless and yet they can manifest the most remarkable range of physical effects. Some of those effects are the stuff of our everyday experience as in the tinkling of a brook or the sounds of breaking waves at the beach. But even these mundane effects are examples of the ability of bubbles to gather, focus and radiate energy (acoustic energy in the above examples). In other contexts that focusing of energy can lead to serious technological problems as when cavitation bubbles eat great holes through ships' propeller blades or cause a threat to the integrity of the spillways at the Hoover Dam. In liquid-propelled rocket engines, bubbles pose a danger to the stability of the propulsion system, and in artificial heart valves they can cause serious damage to the red blood cells. In perhaps the most extraordinary example of energy focusing, collapsing cavitation bubbles can emit not only sound, but also light with black body radiation temperatures equal to that of the sun (Brennen 1995 Cavitation and bubble dynamics). But, harnessed carefully, this almost unique ability to focus energy can also be put to remarkably constructive use. Cavitation bubbles are now used in a remarkable range of surgical and medical procedures, for example to emulsify tissue (most commonly in cataract surgery or in lithotripsy procedures for the reduction of kidney and gall stones) or to manipulate the DNA in individual cells. By creating cavitation bubbles non-invasively thereby depositing and focusing energy non-intrusively, one can generate minute incisions or target cancer cells. This paper will begin by briefly reviewing the history of cavitation phenomena and will end with a vision of the new horizons for the amazing cavitation bubble.

  5. Physical facets of ultrasonic cavitational synthesis of zinc ferrite particles.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Bhaskar Rao; Sivasankar, Thirugnanasambandam; Sivakumar, Manickam; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2010-02-01

    This paper addresses the physical features of the ultrasonic cavitational synthesis of zinc ferrite particles and tries to establish the relationship between cavitation physics and sonochemistry of the zinc ferrite synthesis. A dual approach of coupling experimental results with simulations of radial motion of cavitation bubbles has been adopted. The precursors for the zinc ferrite, viz. ZnO and Fe(3)O(4) are produced in situ by the hydrolysis of Zn and Fe(II) acetates stimulated by (*)OH radicals produced from the transient collapse of the cavitation bubbles. Experiments performed under different conditions create significant variation in the production of (*)OH radicals, and hence, the rate of acetate hydrolysis. Correlation of the results of experiments and simulations sheds light on the important facets of the physical mechanism of ultrasonic cavitational zinc ferrite synthesis. It is revealed that too much or too little rate of acetate hydrolysis results in smaller particle size of zinc ferrite. The first effect of a higher rate of hydrolysis leads to excessively large growth of particles, due to which they become susceptible to the disruptive action of cavitation bubbles. Whereas, the second effect of too small rate of hydrolysis of Zn and Fe(II) acetates restricts the growth of particles. It has been observed that the initial reactant concentration does not influence the mean particle size or the size distribution of zinc ferrite particles. The present investigation clearly confirms that the rate-controlling step of zinc ferrite synthesis through ultrasonic cavitational route is the rate of formation of (*)OH radicals from cavitation bubbles.

  6. Kr bubble formation and growth in sputtered Au

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, J.W.; Bayne, M.A.; Hays, D.D.; Moss, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Sputtering parameters were adjusted to produce Kr content up to several atomic percent in sputtered Au. As-sputtered density was approximately 17.5 g/cm/sup 3/ or 91% of theoretical density for a Kr content of approximately 5 at.%. Kr bubble formation and growth behavior was characterized as a function of heat treatment time and temperature (below the melting point) by transmission electron microscopy, optical metallography, and density measurement. Kr bubbles as small as 50 A diameter and densities down to 72% of theoretical (14.0 g/cm/sup 3/) were observed. Larger bubbles in excess of 1 ..mu..m diameter were observed in the lowest density samples. Surface finishes better than 20 ..mu..m were produced on the substrate sides of these sputtered deposits by replication of machined substrate surfaces. However, surface finish was degraded with increasing deposit thickness for deposits containing up to 5 at.% Kr. Surfaces were also degraded by heat treatments sufficiently severe to produce large (1 ..mu..m diameter) Kr bubbles intersecting the deposit surfaces.

  7. Controlled multibubble surface cavitation.

    PubMed

    Bremond, Nicolas; Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-06-09

    Heterogeneous bubble nucleation at surfaces has been notorious because of its irreproducibility. Here controlled multibubble surface cavitation is achieved by using a hydrophobic surface patterned with microcavities. The expansion of the nuclei in the microcavities is triggered by a fast lowering of the liquid pressure. The procedure allows us to control and fix the bubble distance within the bubble cluster. We observe a perfect quantitative reproducibility of the cavitation events where the inner bubbles in the two-dimensional cluster are shielded by the outer ones, reflected by their later expansion and their delayed collapse. Apart from the final bubble collapse phase (when jetting flows directed towards the cluster's center develop), the bubble dynamics can be quantitatively described by an extended Rayleigh-Plesset equation, taking pressure modification through the surrounding bubbles into account.

  8. Controlled Multibubble Surface Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremond, Nicolas; Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-06-01

    Heterogeneous bubble nucleation at surfaces has been notorious because of its irreproducibility. Here controlled multibubble surface cavitation is achieved by using a hydrophobic surface patterned with microcavities. The expansion of the nuclei in the microcavities is triggered by a fast lowering of the liquid pressure. The procedure allows us to control and fix the bubble distance within the bubble cluster. We observe a perfect quantitative reproducibility of the cavitation events where the inner bubbles in the two-dimensional cluster are shielded by the outer ones, reflected by their later expansion and their delayed collapse. Apart from the final bubble collapse phase (when jetting flows directed towards the cluster’s center develop), the bubble dynamics can be quantitatively described by an extended Rayleigh-Plesset equation, taking pressure modification through the surrounding bubbles into account.

  9. Nonlinear bubble nucleation and growth following filament and white-light continuum generation induced by a single-shot femtosecond laser pulse into dielectrics based on consideration of the time scale

    SciTech Connect

    Mizushima, Yuki; Saito, Takayuki

    2015-09-14

    Bubble nucleation and growth following plasma channeling (filament) and white-light continuum in liquid irradiated by a single-shot fs-pulse were experimentally investigated with close observation of the time scale. Making full use of a new confocal system and time-resolved visualization techniques, we obtained evidence suggestive of a major/minor role of the non-linear/thermal effects during the fs-pulse-induced bubble's fountainhead (10{sup −13} s) and growth (10{sup −7} s), which was never observed with the use of the ns-pulse (i.e., optic cavitation). In this context, the fs-pulse-induced bubble is not an ordinary optic cavitation but rather is nonlinear-optic cavitation. We present the intrinsic differences in the dominant-time domain of the fs-pulse and ns-pulse excitation, and intriguingly, a mere hundred femtoseconds' excitation predetermines the size of the bubble appearing several microseconds after irradiation. That is, the nucleation happens temporally beyond a six-order-of-magnitude difference.

  10. Exploding and Imaging of Electron Bubbles in Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Neha; Vadakkumbatt, Vaisakh; Maris, Humphrey J.; Ghosh, Ambarish

    2016-11-01

    An electron bubble in liquid helium-4 under the saturated vapor pressure becomes unstable and explodes if the pressure becomes more negative than -1.9 bars. In this paper, we use focused ultrasound to explode electron bubbles. We then image at 30,000 frames per second the growth and subsequent collapse of the bubbles. We find that bubbles can grow to as large as 1 mm in diameter within 2 ms after the cavitation event. We examine the relation between the maximum size of the bubble and the lifetime and find good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. The onset condition of equatorial plasma bubbles - the role of seeding mechanism and growth condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kil, H.; Choi, J. M.; Kwak, Y. S.; Lee, W. K.; Park, J.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the role of seeding mechanism and growth condition of perturbations in the creation of equatorial plasma bubbles by analyzing the C/NOFS and ROCSAT-1 satellite observations. The initial development times of bubbles were identified by manual processing of the data, and the periodic characteristics in the occurrence of bubbles were investigated using periodograms obtained from segments of bubble chains. Our preliminary results show that bubbles initiate at the time that the pre-reversal enhancement (PRE) ends. This time corresponds to the time that the F region reaches the highest altitude where the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability is large. The initial onset time of bubbles varies with season and longitude in accordance with the variation of the PRE ending time. Our investigation of the periodicity in the occurrence of bubbles (spacing between bubbles) shows that a dominant periodicity does not exist; the spacing between bubbles ranges from 100 km to over 1000 km. A pronounced periodicity occurs in some series of bubbles, but, in general, multiple periodicity co-exists. The initiation of bubbles at a specific local time but the absence of a preferential wave property in the occurrence of bubbles lead to the conclusion that the onset of bubbles is controlled by the growth condition of the R-T instability.

  12. Bubble evolution and properties in homogeneous nucleation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg; Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the properties of naturally formed nanobubbles in Lennard-Jones molecular dynamics simulations of liquid-to-vapor nucleation in the boiling and the cavitation regimes. The large computational volumes provide a realistic environment at unchanging average temperature and liquid pressure, which allows us to accurately measure properties of bubbles from their inception as stable, critically sized bubbles, to their continued growth into the constant speed regime. Bubble gas densities are up to 50 % lower than the equilibrium vapor densities at the liquid temperature, yet quite close to the gas equilibrium density at the lower gas temperatures measured in the simulations: The latent heat of transformation results in bubble gas temperatures up to 25 % below those of the surrounding bulk liquid. In the case of rapid bubble growth—typical for the cavitation regime—compression of the liquid outside the bubble leads to local temperature increases of up to 5 %, likely significant enough to alter the surface tension as well as the local viscosity. The liquid-vapor bubble interface is thinner than expected from planar coexistence simulations by up to 50 % . Bubbles near the critical size are extremely nonspherical, yet they quickly become spherical as they grow. The Rayleigh-Plesset description of bubble-growth gives good agreement in the cavitation regime.

  13. Behavior of bubbles in glassmelts. III - Dissolution and growth of a rising bubble containing a single gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onorato, P. I. K.; Weinberg, M. C.; Uhlmann, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    Finite difference solutions of the mass transport equations governing the dissolution (growth) of a rising gas bubble, containing a single gas, in a glassmelt were obtained. These solutions were compared with those obtained from an approximate procedure for a range of the controlling parameters. Applications were made to describe various aspects of O2 and CO2 gas-bubble behavior in a soda-lime-silicate melt.

  14. The life of bubbles under negative pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Woo; Park, Keunhwan; Nagashima, So; Moon, Myoung-Woon; Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation of sap in plant vessels, or embolism, may occur when the liquid pressure becomes negative either in a high elevation or a dry environment. Effective suppression of nucleation and growth of cavitation bubbles is important for continuous transport of water and thus survival of the plant. Here we investigate the life of cavitation bubbles under negative pressure from their nucleation through growth and maturation. As a model system for the plant vessel, we fabricate hydrogel microchannels whose inner pressure is reduced to a negative value. The roughness of the channel surface is modified by plasma treatment to form wrinkles emulating observed xylem wall surfaces. We find a finite effect of surface wrinkles on the critical nucleation pressure. Also, dense wrinkles tend to slow down bubble growth. In all the channel roughness conditions, the bubbles grow diffusively with time until their maturation. Then in the matured stage, the growth speed is substantially lowered and follows the value determined by Darcy's law. Our results suggest that surface wrinkles or roughness can be used to control the nucleation pressure and bubble growth behavior. Also, the observations can give deeper insight into embolism control mechanisms of tall trees.

  15. Molecular mechanism for cavitation in water under tension.

    PubMed

    Menzl, Georg; Gonzalez, Miguel A; Geiger, Philipp; Caupin, Frédéric; Abascal, José L F; Valeriani, Chantal; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-11-29

    Despite its relevance in biology and engineering, the molecular mechanism driving cavitation in water remains unknown. Using computer simulations, we investigate the structure and dynamics of vapor bubbles emerging from metastable water at negative pressures. We find that in the early stages of cavitation, bubbles are irregularly shaped and become more spherical as they grow. Nevertheless, the free energy of bubble formation can be perfectly reproduced in the framework of classical nucleation theory (CNT) if the curvature dependence of the surface tension is taken into account. Comparison of the observed bubble dynamics to the predictions of the macroscopic Rayleigh-Plesset (RP) equation, augmented with thermal fluctuations, demonstrates that the growth of nanoscale bubbles is governed by viscous forces. Combining the dynamical prefactor determined from the RP equation with CNT based on the Kramers formalism yields an analytical expression for the cavitation rate that reproduces the simulation results very well over a wide range of pressures. Furthermore, our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with cavitation rates obtained from inclusion experiments. This suggests that homogeneous nucleation is observed in inclusions, whereas only heterogeneous nucleation on impurities or defects occurs in other experiments.

  16. Generation and control of acoustic cavitation structure.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lixin; Xu, Weilin; Deng, Jingjun; Li, Chao; Xu, Delong; Gao, Yandong

    2014-09-01

    The generation and control of acoustic cavitation structure are a prerequisite for application of cavitation in the field of ultrasonic sonochemistry and ultrasonic cleaning. The generation and control of several typical acoustic cavitation structures (conical bubble structure, smoker, acoustic Lichtenberg figure, tailing bubble structure, jet-induced bubble structures) in a 20-50 kHz ultrasonic field are investigated. Cavitation bubbles tend to move along the direction of pressure drop in the region in front of radiating surface, which are the premise and the foundation of some strong acoustic cavitation structure formation. The nuclei source of above-mentioned acoustic cavitation structures is analyzed. The relationship and mutual transformation of these acoustic cavitation structures are discussed.

  17. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, R.P.; Chapyak, E.J.; Noack, J.; Vogel, A.

    1999-03-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored. Time-resolved experimental photographs and simulations of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) cylindrical bubble dynamics are presented. The experiments and calculations exhibit similar dynamics. A small high-pressure cylindrical bubble initially expands radially with hardly any axial motion. Then, after reaching its maximum volume, a cylindrical bubble collapses along its long axis with relatively little radial motion. The growth-collapse period of these very aspherical bubbles differs only sightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble energy even for aspherical bubbles. The prolongation of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also discussed.

  18. Cavitation in a metallic liquid: Homogeneous nucleation and growth of nanovoids

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Wu, H. A.; Luo, S. N.

    2014-06-07

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate homogeneous nucleation and growth of nanovoids during cavitation in liquid Cu. We characterize in detail the atomistic cavitation processes by following the temporal evolution of cavities or voids, analyze the nucleation behavior with the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP) methods, and discuss the results against classical nucleation theory (CNT), the Tolman equation for surface energy, independent calculation of surface tension via integrating the stress profiles, the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) growth law, and the power law for nucleus size distributions. Cavitation in this representative metallic liquid is a high energy barrier Poisson processes, and the steady-state nucleation rates obtained from statistical runs with the MFPT and SP methods are in agreement. The MFPT method also yields the critical nucleus size and the Zeldovich factor. Fitting with the Tolman's equation to the MD simulations yields the surface energy of a planar interface (∼0.9 J m{sup −2}) and the Tolman length (0.4–0.5 Å), and those values are in accord with those from integrating the stress profiles of a planar interface. Independent CNT predictions of the nucleation rate (10{sup 33−34} s{sup −1} m{sup −3}) and critical size (3–4 Å in radius) are in agreement with the MFPT and SP results. The JMA law can reasonably describe the nucleation and growth process. The size distribution of subcritical nuclei appears to follow a power law with an exponent decreasing with increasing tension owing to coupled nucleation and growth, and that of the supercritical nuclei becomes flattened during further stress relaxation due to void coalescence.

  19. Vulnerability to cavitation, hydraulic efficiency, growth and survival in an insular pine (Pinus canariensis)

    PubMed Central

    López, Rosana; López de Heredia, Unai; Collada, Carmen; Cano, Francisco Javier; Emerson, Brent C.; Cochard, Hervé; Gil, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims It is widely accepted that hydraulic failure due to xylem embolism is a key factor contributing to drought-induced mortality in trees. In the present study, an attempt is made to disentangle phenotypic plasticity from genetic variation in hydraulic traits across the entire distribution area of a tree species to detect adaptation to local environments. Methods A series of traits related to hydraulics (vulnerability to cavitation and hydraulic conductivity in branches), growth performance and leaf mass per area were assessed in eight Pinus canariensis populations growing in two common gardens under contrasting environments. In addition, the neutral genetic variability (FST) and the genetic differentiation of phenotypic variation (QST) were compared in order to identify the evolutionary forces acting on these traits. Key Results The variability for hydraulic traits was largely due to phenotypic plasticity. Nevertheless, the vulnerability to cavitation displayed a significant genetic variability (approx. 5 % of the explained variation), and a significant genetic × environment interaction (between 5 and 19 % of the explained variation). The strong correlation between vulnerability to cavitation and survival in the xeric common garden (r = –0·81; P < 0·05) suggests a role for the former in the adaptation to xeric environments. Populations from drier sites and higher temperature seasonality were less vulnerable to cavitation than those growing at mesic sites. No trade-off between xylem safety and efficiency was detected. QST of parameters of the vulnerability curve (0·365 for P50 and the slope of the vulnerability curve and 0·452 for P88) differed substantially from FST (0·091), indicating divergent selection. In contrast, genetic drift alone was found to be sufficient to explain patterns of differentiation for xylem efficiency and growth. Conclusions The ability of P. canariensis to inhabit a wide range of ecosystems seemed to be associated

  20. Diffusion-driven growth of a spherical gas bubble in gelatin gels supersaturated with air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Eriko; Ando, Keita

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally and theoretically study diffusion-driven growth of laser-induced gas bubbles in gelatin gels supersaturated with air. The supersaturation in the gels is realized by using a large separation between heat and mass diffusion rates. An optical system is developed to induce bubble nucleation by laser focusing and visualize the subsequent bubble growth. To evaluate the effect of the gel elasticity on the bubble growth rate, we propose the extended Epstein-Plesset theory that considers bubble pressure modifications due to linear/nonlinear elasticity (in addition to Laplace pressure). From comparisons between the experiments and the proposed theory, the bubble growth rate is found to be hindered by the elasticity. This study is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25709008.

  1. Reconstructing the Growth History of Bubbles in Magma from Preserved Volatile Concentrations in Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Llewellin, E. W.; Humphreys, M.; Larsen, J. F.; Blower, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are driven by the nucleation and growth of bubbles that are formed when volatile species (particularly water) exsolve from magma. Once nucleated, bubbles may continue to grow through a combination of diffusion of volatiles from the melt and decompressive expansion. The kinetics of bubble formation and growth exert a critical influence on eruption dynamics, particularly on the explosivity of the eruption; consequently, numerical models of volcanic eruptions are sensitive to the choice of bubble growth model. We present preliminary results of analyses of experimentally-decompressed phonolite and rhyolite samples, which provide data against which bubble growth models can be validated. Data interpretation is supported by numerical modelling of the growth of isolated and paired bubbles in three-dimensions. Previous numerical modelling of bubble growth has demonstrated the importance of the dynamic feedback between the concentration of water in the melt, its diffusivity, and the viscosity of the melt shell in which the bubble grows (e.g. Blower et al., 2001). Diffusion of water, therefore, not only alters the water concentration profile surrounding the bubble, but is itself modified by the resulting concentration profile. This concentration profile may be preserved when the magma is quenched to glass. We adapt the technique of Humphreys et al (2008) to extract sub-micron resolution water concentration data from backscatter SEM images of volcanic glasses by using greyscale variation as a proxy for water content. The profiles are calibrated using SEM-Raman and FTIR. We present preliminary two-dimensional maps of water concentration around isolated bubbles and bubble-pairs in synthetically hydrated and decompressed samples of volcanic glass. To support the interpretation of the data, we have developed a finite element model of bubble growth, which couples volatile diffusion with concentration dependent viscosity and melt hydrodynamics around the growing

  2. Dynamics of diffusive bubble growth and pressure recovery in a bubbly rhyolitic melt embedded in an elastic solid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Nakano, Masaru

    2006-01-01

    We present a model of gas exsolution and bubble expansion in a melt supersaturated in response to a sudden pressure drop. In our model, the melt contains a suspension of gas bubbles of identical sizes and is encased in a penny-shaped crack embedded in an elastic solid. The suspension is modeled as a three-dimensional lattice of spherical cells with slight overlap, where each elementary cell consists of a gas bubble surrounded by a shell of volatile-rich melt. The melt is then subjected to a step drop in pressure, which induces gas exsolution and bubble expansion, resulting in the compression of the melt and volumetric expansion of the crack. The dynamics of diffusion-driven bubble growth and volumetric crack expansion span 9 decades in time. The model demonstrates that the speed of the crack response depends strongly on volatile diffusivity in the melt and bubble number density and is markedly sensitive to the ratio of crack thickness to crack radius and initial bubble radius but is relatively insensitive to melt viscosity. The net drop in gas concentration in the melt after pressure recovery represents only a small fraction of the initial concentration prior to the drop, suggesting the melt may undergo numerous pressure transients before becoming significantly depleted of gases. The magnitude of pressure and volume recovery in the crack depends sensitively on the size of the input-pressure transient, becoming relatively larger for smaller-size transients in a melt containing bubbles with initial radii less than 10-5 m. Amplification of the input transient may be large enough to disrupt the crack wall and induce brittle failure in the rock matrix surrounding the crack. Our results provide additional basis for the interpretation of volume changes in the magma conduit under Popocatépetl Volcano during Vulcanian degassing bursts in its eruptive activity in April–May 2000.

  3. Arresting bubble coarsening: A two-bubble experiment to investigate grain growth in the presence of surface elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salonen, A.; Gay, C.; Maestro, A.; Drenckhan, W.; Rio, E.

    2016-11-01

    Many two-phase materials suffer from grain growth due to the energy cost which is associated with the interface that separates both phases. While our understanding of the driving forces and the dynamics of grain growth in different materials is well advanced by now, current research efforts address the question of how this process may be slowed down, or, ideally, arrested. We use a model system of two bubbles to explore how the presence of a finite surface elasticity may interfere with the coarsening process and the final grain size distribution. Combining experiments and modelling in the analysis of the evolution of two bubbles, we show that clear relationships can be predicted between the surface tension, the surface elasticity and the initial/final size ratio of the bubbles. We rationalise these relationships by the introduction of a modified Gibbs criterion. Besides their general interest, the present results have direct implications for our understanding of foam stability.

  4. A cavitation model for computations of unsteady cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Guoyu; Huang, Biao

    2016-04-01

    A local vortical cavitation (LVC) model for the computation of unsteady cavitation is proposed. The model is derived from the Rayleigh-Plesset equations, and takes into account the relations between the cavitation bubble radius and local vortical effects. Calculations of unsteady cloud cavitating flows around a Clark-Y hydrofoil are performed to assess the predictive capability of the LVC model using well-documented experimental data. Compared with the conventional Zwart's model, better agreement is observed between the predictions of the LVC model and experimental data, including measurements of time-averaged flow structures, instantaneous cavity shapes and the frequency of the cloud cavity shedding process. Based on the predictions of the LVC model, it is demonstrated that the evaporation process largely concentrates in the core region of the leading edge vorticity in accordance with the growth in the attached cavity, and the condensation process concentrates in the core region of the trailing edge vorticity, which corresponds to the spread of the rear component of the attached cavity. When the attached cavity breaks up and moves downstream, the condensation area fully transports to the wake region, which is in accordance with the dissipation of the detached cavity. Furthermore, using vorticity transport equations, we also find that the periodic formation, breakup, and shedding of the sheet/cloud cavities, along with the associated baroclinic torque, are important mechanisms for vorticity production and modification. When the attached cavity grows, the liquid-vapour interface that moves towards the trailing edge enhances the vorticity in the attached cavity closure region. As the re-entrant jet moves upstream, the wavy/bubbly cavity interface enhances the vorticity near the trailing edge. At the end of the cycle, the break-up of the stable attached cavity is the main reason for the vorticity enhancement near the suction surface.

  5. Modelling of single bubble growth in carbon nanofibre filled mesophase pitch during carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calebrese, Christopher; Schadler, Linda S.; Lewis, Daniel J.

    2010-06-01

    A single bubble growth model is presented for bubble growth in mesophase pitch during carbonization. This model is distinguished from typical polymer foaming models in its design to be used over a wider temperature range, its accounting for mass transfer from the liquid to the bubble, and the incorporation of reaction sites in the melt which produce volatile gases. The effect of nanofibre loading on growth is investigated in terms of viscosity, density and volatile concentration. It is found that the viscosity change is the controlling factor in altering the bubble growth rate in this system. Comparison with experimental data shows that a single bubble growth model is a reasonable assumption for carbon nanofibre loading of 1 wt% or below.

  6. Growth rate effects on the formation of dislocation loops around deep helium bubbles in Tungsten

    DOE PAGES

    Sandoval, Luis; Perez, Danny; Uberuaga, Blas P.; ...

    2016-11-15

    Here, the growth process of spherical helium bubbles located 6 nm below a (100) surface is studied using molecular dynamics and parallel replica dynamics simulations, over growth rates from 106 to 1012 helium atoms per second. Slower growth rates lead to a release of pressure and lower helium content as compared with fast growth cases. In addition, at slower growth rates, helium bubbles are not decorated by multiple dislocation loops, as these tend to merge or emit given sufficient time. At faster rates, dislocation loops nucleate faster than they can emit, leading to a more complicated dislocation structure around themore » bubble.« less

  7. Growth rate effects on the formation of dislocation loops around deep helium bubbles in Tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Luis; Perez, Danny; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Voter, Arthur Ford

    2016-11-15

    Here, the growth process of spherical helium bubbles located 6 nm below a (100) surface is studied using molecular dynamics and parallel replica dynamics simulations, over growth rates from 106 to 1012 helium atoms per second. Slower growth rates lead to a release of pressure and lower helium content as compared with fast growth cases. In addition, at slower growth rates, helium bubbles are not decorated by multiple dislocation loops, as these tend to merge or emit given sufficient time. At faster rates, dislocation loops nucleate faster than they can emit, leading to a more complicated dislocation structure around the bubble.

  8. Atomistic modeling of growth and coalescence of helium nano-bubbles in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Guterl, J.

    2015-08-01

    The mechanisms of growth and coalescence of helium nano-bubbles in tungsten are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that crystal symmetries and governed by them properties of dislocations, generated by the growing nano-bubbles, are responsible for main nano-bubble features revealed, including non-spherical shape and anisotropy of surrounding stress field. The transport of helium atoms in non-uniform stress field is simulated at different temperatures and the transport coefficients are determined. The implications of the considered dislocation and helium dynamics on nucleation and growth of bubbles in tungsten with implanted helium are discussed.

  9. Dynamics of gas bubble growth in a supersaturated solution with Sievert's solubility law.

    PubMed

    Gor, G Yu; Kuchma, A E

    2009-07-21

    This paper presents a theoretical description of diffusion growth of a gas bubble after its nucleation in supersaturated liquid solution. We study systems where gas molecules completely dissociate in the solvent into two parts, thus making Sievert's solubility law valid. We show that the difference between Henry's and Sievert's laws for chemical equilibrium conditions causes the difference in bubble growth dynamics. Assuming that diffusion flux is steady we obtain a differential equation on bubble radius. Bubble dynamics equation is solved analytically for the case of homogeneous nucleation of a bubble, which takes place at a significant pressure drop. We also obtain conditions of diffusion flux steadiness. The fulfillment of these conditions is studied for the case of nucleation of water vapor bubbles in magmatic melts.

  10. Particle image velocimetry studies of bubble growth and detachment by high-speed photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickland, Mathew; Dempster, William; Lothian, Lee; Oldroyd, Andrew

    1997-05-01

    An understanding of bubble flows is important in the design of process equipment, particularly in the chemical and power industries. In vapor-liquid processes the mass and heat transfer between the phases is dominated by the liquid-vapor interface and is determined by the number, size, and shape of the bubbles. For bubble flows these characteristics are often controlled by the generation mechanisms and, since bubble flows are often generated at an orifice, it is important to determine the controlling parameters which dictate how bubbles grow and detach. For bubbles growing at orifices the liquid displacement is an important feature and affects the pressure distribution acting on the bubble and the heat and mass transfer that may occur at the bubble interface. Therefore, in this study, the characteristics of the liquid velocity field are studied experimentally using Particle image Velocimetry (PIV) during growth, detachment and translation of a bubble being generated at an orifice supplied with a constant mass flow rate of air. The process is transient and occurs over a period of approximately 50 msecs. In order to map the transient flow field a combination of high speed cine and cross correlation PIV image processing has been used to determine the liquid velocity vector field during the bubble growth process. The paper contains details of the PIV technique and presents several of the velocity vector maps calculated.

  11. Pseudo-Steady Diffusional Growth or Collapse of Bubbles Rising in Time Dependent Pressure Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-13

    et al. [12], Ishikawa, et al. [13] and Payvar [14] to name a few. Brankovic, et al. collected data for air and carbon dioxide bubbles with a triple...hydrostatic pressure field. Payvar [141 examined the effects, both experimentally and analytically, of a rapid de- compression on bubble growth for C0 2...Furthermore, bubble experimental rise data have only been obtained for a static hydrostatic head, with the exception of Payvar [14], but that was for a

  12. Electron irradiation effect on bubble formation and growth in a sodium borosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2000-02-08

    In this study, the authors studied simultaneous and intermittent electron irradiation effects on bubble growth in a simple sodium borosilicate glass during Xe ion implantation at 200 C. Simultaneous electron irradiation increases the average bubble size in the glass. This enhanced diffusion is also shown by the migration of Xe from bubbles into the matrix when the sample is irradiated by an electron beam after the Xe implantation.

  13. Advanced Mathematical Modeling of Sonar-Induced Bubble Growth and Coalescence in Humans and Marine Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    and their temperature dependencies. Our definition of HD corresponds to (jfkH) -1 in Ref. [15], where M is the Avogadro constant and kH is the...is due to the underlying assumption that the gas concentration in the liquid is given by its value for a bubble of constant equilibrium radius. This... constant equilibrium bubble radius. The effect of gas supersaturation level, excitation frequency, duty cycle and sound pressure level on bubble growth were

  14. Cavitation Susceptibility Measurements of Ocean Lake and Laboratory Waters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    32 *13 - A Typical Acoustic Signal from Single Bubble Bursting............................. 33 14 -Cavitation Event...waters. rhe environmental effect on cavitation was measured by a cavitation susceptibility meter consisting of a venturi, a hydrophone , a pressure...rate is regulated by a motor-speed controller in the shipboard subsystem. The cavitation signals are detected by a wideband high frequency hydrophone

  15. Interface dynamics and coupled growth in directional solidification in presence of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamgotchian, H.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.

    1993-12-01

    The formation and dynamics of gas bubbles in Bridgman growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys is examined. The experimental results show for the first time the rich dynamics that are associated with the formation and propagation of bubbles during directional solidification of alloys. The strong coupling of bubbles with the solid-liquid interface is found to result in the growth of elongated bubbles, either attached to a flat solidification front or forming localized cellular as well as dendritic duplexes (bubbles wrapped by a solid envelope). The coupling of the bubble with the solidification front is shown to cause oscillations in the bubble, which are characterized by fast Fourier transforms. When several duplexes are formed, coupled growth and screening may occur. The basic factors that give rise to oscillations, namely competition between source and sink of acetone assisted by capillary convection at the bubble cap, are discussed qualitatively through the development of an internal oscillator model. Coherent sidebranching observed on dendritic duplexes is shown to be due to resonant modes between the bubble cap and the solid envelope.

  16. Empirical relationships of homogeneous bubble nucleation, growth and coalescence in rhyolitic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giachetti, T.; Gonnermann, H. M.; Gardner, J. E.; Truong, N.; Toledo, P.; Hajimirza, S.

    2015-12-01

    Decompression experiments of homogeneous nucleation, growth and coalescence of bubbles in rhyolitic melt provide new data for an empirical formulation to predict bubble number density and size from controlled experimental conditions. Samples were hydrated at 200-250 MPa and 850 °C to water contents of 5.4-6.0 wt%, followed by decompression at rates of 60-150 MPa.s-1. Samples were held at final pressures for 6-90 s, allowing for bubble growth and coalescence after decompression and nucleation. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images and computed tomography (CT) scans of the decompressed glasses were analyzed for size distributions of both isolated and coalesced bubbles separately. Sample porosities vary from 4% to 63%, and connected porosity is positively correlated with total porosity for samples where it is greater than approximately 35%. A steep increase in the proportion of connected bubbles is observed once the average bubble wall thickness becomes lower than approximately 2 μm. In combination with SEM, CT and bubble size distributions these results indicate that bubble coalescence is independent of bubble size. Bubble number density varies from 8.9×1011 m-3 to 4.4×1016 m-3 (melt-referenced), and is positively correlated with the degree of supersaturation (130-210 MPa), as well as initial water content. For most experiments, we do not observe any increase in bubble number density after 10-20 s, suggesting that bubble nucleation has stopped. The bubble number density does not show a systematic correlation with decompression rate.

  17. Computer simulation of boundary effects on bubble growth in metals due to He.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.

    2003-03-01

    Atomistic simulation methods were used to investigate and identify the relevant physical mechanisms necessary to describe the growth of helium gas bubbles within a metal lattice. Specifically, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to examine the material defects that originate from growing spherical He bubbles in a palladium crystal. These simulations consist of a model system containing bubbles within a metal and near a free surface. The simulation code employed was ParaDyn using the Embedded Atom Method to model the constitutive properties of Pd atoms in a FCC lattice. The results of these simulations are compared with previously run calculations of He bubbles in a bulk lattice [l]. These simulations show the influence of the free surface on defect creation and evolution. Features compared include the formation of inter-bubble dislocations, bubble pressure and swelling as functions of He to metal (He/M) concentration.

  18. Plasma and Cavitation Dynamics during Pulsed Laser Microsurgery in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, M. Shane; Ma Xiaoyan

    2007-10-12

    We compare the plasma and cavitation dynamics underlying pulsed laser microsurgery in water and in fruit fly embryos (in vivo)--specifically for nanosecond pulses at 355 and 532 nm. We find two key differences. First, the plasma-formation thresholds are lower in vivo --especially at 355 nm--due to the presence of endogenous chromophores that serve as additional sources for plasma seed electrons. Second, the biological matrix constrains the growth of laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Both effects reduce the disrupted region in vivo when compared to extrapolations from measurements in water.

  19. Gas-bubble growth mechanisms in the analysis of metal fuel swelling

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    During steady-state irradiation, swelling rates associated with growth of fission-gas bubbles in metallic fast reactor fuels may be expected to remain small. As a consequence, bubble-growth mechanisms are not a major consideration in modeling the steady-state fuel behavior, and it is usually adequate to consider the gas pressure to be in equilibrium with the external pressure and surface tension restraint. On transient time scales, however, various bubble-growth mechanisms become important components of the swelling rate. These mechanisms include growth by diffusion, for bubbles within grains and on grain boundaries; dislocation nucleation at the bubble surface, or ''punchout''; and bubble growth by creep. Analyses of these mechanisms are presented and applied to provide information on the conditions and the relative time scales for which the various processes should dominate fuel swelling. The results are compared to a series of experiments in which the swelling of irradiated metal fuel was determined after annealing at various temperatures and pressures. The diffusive growth of bubbles on grain boundaries is concluded to be dominant in these experiments.

  20. Cloud cavitation effects in shockwave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonius, Tim; Tanguay, Michel

    2003-10-01

    Cavitation has already been identified as an important damage mechanism in the comminution of kidney stones in shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). However, the precise conditions that maximize the damage caused by the collapsing bubbles are still unknown. Numerical simulations are used to investigate shock propagation and the consequent growth and collapse of a bubble cloud in the focal region of a lithotripter. In the simulations, a continuum two-phase flow model for the ensemble-averaged macroscale is coupled to a Gilmore model for individual spherical bubble dynamics at the microscale. The simulations show agreement with experimental pressure measurements and high-speed photography of the bubble cloud. At void fractions commensurate with experiments, it is found that the collective collapse of the bubble cloud provides a significant increase to the energy available for comminution (beyond what a single bubble would produce). Relatively small increases in the pressure at the center of the cloud in advance of collapse (two orders of magnitude smaller than the initial shock) can more than double the energy of the collapsing bubble.

  1. A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Zapanta, C M; Liszka, E G; Lamson, T C; Stinebring, D R; Deutsch, S; Geselowitz, D B; Tarbell, J M

    1994-11-01

    A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on a prosthetic heart valve has been developed. Cavitation of four blood analog fluids (distilled water, aqueous glycerin, aqueous polyacrylamide, and aqueous xanthan gum) has been documented for a Medtronic/Hall prosthetic heart valve. This method employed a Penn State Electrical Ventricular Assist Device in a mock circulatory loop that was operated in a partial filling mode associated with reduced atrial filling pressure. The observations were made on a valve that was located in the mitral position, with the cavitation occurring on the inlet side after valve closure on every cycle. Stroboscopic videography was used to document the cavity life cycle. Bubble cavitation was observed on the valve occluder face. Vortex cavitation was observed at two locations in the vicinity of the valve occluder and housing. For each fluid, cavity growth and collapse occurred in less than one millisecond, which provides strong evidence that the cavitation is vaporous rather than gaseous. The cavity duration time was found to decrease with increasing atrial pressure at constant aortic pressure and beat rate. The area of cavitation was found to decrease with increasing delay time at a constant aortic pressure, atrial pressure, and beat rate. Cavitation was found to occur in each of the fluids, with the most cavitation seen in the Newtonian fluids (distilled water and aqueous glycerin).

  2. Why Are Short Pulses More Efficient in Tissue Erosion Using Pulsed Cavitational Ultrasound Therapy (Histotripsy)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2010-03-01

    Histotripsy produces mechanical tissue fractionation through controlled cavitation. The histotripsy induced tissue erosion is more efficient with shorter (i.e., 3-6 cycles) rather than longer (i.e. 24 cycles) pulses. In this study, we investigated the reasons behind this observation by studying dynamics of the cavitating bubble clouds and individual bubbles during and after a therapy pulse. Bubble clouds were generated at a gel-water interface using 5 to 30-cycle 1 MHz pulses at P-/P+>19/125-MPa pressure and 1-kHz pulse repetition frequency. The evolution of the overall bubble cloud and individual bubbles were studied using high speed photography. Results show that: 1) within the first 10-15 cycles, the overall cloud grew to its maximum size; the individual bubbles underwent violent expansion and collapse, and grew in size with each cycle of ultrasound; 2) between the 15th cycle and the end of the pulse, the overall cloud size did not change even if further cycles of ultrasound were delivered; the individual bubbles no longer underwent violent collapse; 3) after the pulse, the overall cloud gradually dissolved; the individual bubbles may coalesce into larger bubbles for 0-40 μs, and then gradually dissolved. These observations suggest that violent growth and collapse of individual bubbles occur within the first few cycles of ultrasound pulse most often. This may explain why extremely short pulses are more energy efficient in histotripsy-induced tissue erosion.

  3. Cavitating vortex generation by a submerged jet

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, G. V.; Filippov, A. N.

    2006-05-15

    The surface geometry of a cavitating vortex is determined in the limit of inviscid incompressible flow. The limit surface is an ovaloid of revolution with an axis ratio of 5: 3. It is shown that a cavitating vortex ring cannot develop if the cavitation number is lower than a certain critical value. Experiments conducted at various liquid pressures and several jet exit velocities confirm the existence of a critical cavitation number close to 3. At cavitation numbers higher than the critical one, the cavitating vortex ring does not develop. At substantially lower cavitation numbers (k {<=} 0.1), an elongated asymmetric cavitation bubble is generated, with an axial reentrant jet whose length can exceed the initial jet length by several times. This flow structure is called an asymmetric cavitating vortex, even though steady motion of this structure has not been observed.

  4. Model for interaction of bubbles in a cloud near a rigid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Meegan, G. Douglas; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2001-05-01

    Bubble clouds produced during lithotripsy undergo complicated motions including bubble interactions that may inhibit kidney stone comminution. Our study of bubble interactions is motivated by high-speed photographs reported by Pishchalnikov et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 2386 (2003)]. In the work reported here, we simulated the observed bubble motion with a model based on the equations derived by Zabolotskaya [Sov. Phys. Acoust. 30, 365 (1984)]. The equations for interaction of two bubbles were generalized and solved numerically for a cluster of n bubbles near a rigid boundary, which represents the stone. The initial spatial distribution of bubbles in three dimensions was assumed to be random. When a short negative pressure pulse was applied, the simulated bubbles grew in size. When two bubbles touched each other, they were merged into a single bubble that conserved mass of the gas. Results are presented in selected planes intersecting the bubble cloud for different instants of time. Bubble interaction was found to reduce the maximum sizes to which the bubbles grow. The bubbles near the rigid boundary are constrained by neighboring bubbles and grow less rapidly, and to smaller sizes, than other bubbles. Interactions within the cloud thus suppress bubble growth and cavitation. [Work supported by ARL:UT IR&D.

  5. The role of gas in ultrasonically driven vapor bubble growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Stricker, Laura; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we study both experimentally and theoretically the dynamics of an ultrasound-driven vapor bubble of perfluoropentane (PFP) inside a droplet of the same liquid, immersed in a water medium superheated with respect to the PFP boiling point. We determine the temporal evolution of the bubble radius with ultra-high speed imaging at 20 million frames per second. In addition, we model the vapor-gas bubble dynamics, based on a Rayleigh-Plesset-type equation, including thermal and gas diffusion inside the liquid. We compare the numerical results with the experimental data and find good agreement. We underline the fundamental role of gas diffusion in order to prevent total recondensation of the bubble at collapse.

  6. The dissolution or growth of a gas bubble inside a drop in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondos, Pericles A.; Subramanian, R. Shankar; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The radius-time history of a gas bubble located concentrically within a spherical liquid drop in a space laboratory is analyzed within the framework of the quasi-stationary approximation. Illustrative results are calculated from the theory which demonstrate interesting qualitative features. For instance, when a pure gas bubble dissolves within a liquid drop in an environment containing the same gas and some inert species, the dissolution can be more or less rapid than that in an unbounded liquid depending on the initial relative size of the drop. Further, given a similar growth situation, indefinite growth is not possible, and the bubble will initially grow, but always dissolve in the end.

  7. Vapor and Gas-Bubble Growth Dynamics around Laser-Irradiated, Water-Immersed Plasmonic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuliang; Zaytsev, Mikhail E; The, Hai Le; Eijkel, Jan C T; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-02-28

    Microbubbles produced by exposing water-immersed metallic nanoparticles to resonant light play an important role in emerging and efficient plasmonic-enhanced processes for catalytic conversion, solar energy harvesting, biomedical imaging, and cancer therapy. How do these bubbles form, and what is their gas composition? In this paper, the growth dynamics of nucleating bubbles around laser-irradiated, water-immersed Au plasmonic nanoparticles are studied to determine the exact origin of the occurrence and growth of these bubbles. The microbubbles' contact angle, footprint diameter, and radius of curvature were measured in air-equilibrated water (AEW) and degassed water (DGW) with fast imaging. Our experimental data reveals that the growth dynamics can be divided into two regimes: an initial bubble nucleation phase (regime I, < 10 ms) and, subsequently a bubble growth phase (regime II). The explosive growth in regime I is identical for AEW and DGW due to the vaporization of water. However, the slower growth in regime II is distinctly different for AEW and DGW, which is attributed to the uptake of dissolved gas expelled from the water around the hot nanoparticle. Our scaling analysis reveals that the bubble radius scales with time as R(t) ∝ t(1/6) for both AEW and DGW in the initial regime I, whereas in the later regime II it scales as R(t) ∝ t(1/3) for AEW and is constant for perfectly degassed water. These scaling relations are consistent with the experiments.

  8. Effects of microgravity on Marangoni convection and growth characteristic of a single bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Pan, Liang-ming; Xu, Jian-jun

    2014-07-01

    Based on previous experiments and the volume of fluid (VOF) multiphase model, the growth characteristics of a single bubble have been numerically investigated in a rectangular pool (10×10×25 mm3) under microgravity. The transport of mass and energy during phase change was realized by source terms of the mass and energy equations through user-defined functions (UDF). Under microgravity, the results show that the temperature and the streamline field distribution around the bubble are significantly changed as compared to the ones of terrestrial conditions. The temperature profile at the two-phase interface is no longer a uniform distribution, and the Marangoni flows are more obvious at the two-phase interface. The effects of gravity on the detachment of the bubble are significant: the bubble does not immediately detach from the heating wall under microgravity conditions. The surface tension gradient caused by the Marangoni effect is more significant at lower microgravity. Bubble growth is more complex under microgravity conditions than normal gravity conditions, and it is related to the magnitude of the microgravity: the lower the microgravity, the higher the bubble growth rate. Furthermore, under microgravity, the bubble diameter changes differently, and the fluctuation amplitude of the heat transfer coefficient increases with increasing microgravity.

  9. Taxing the rich: recombinations and bubble growth during reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlanetto, Steven R.; Oh, S. Peng

    2005-11-01

    Reionization is inhomogeneous for two reasons: the clumpiness of the intergalactic medium (IGM), and clustering of the discrete ionizing sources. While numerical simulations can in principle take both into account, they are at present limited by small box sizes. On the other hand, analytic models have only examined the limiting cases of a clumpy IGM (with uniform ionizing emissivity) and clustered sources (embedded in a uniform IGM). Here, we present the first analytic model that includes both factors. At first, recombinations can be ignored and ionized bubbles grow primarily through major mergers, because at any given moment the bubbles have a well-defined characteristic size. As a result, reionization resembles `punctuated equilibrium,' with a series of well-separated sharp jumps in the ionizing background. These features are local effects and do not reflect similar jumps in the global ionized fraction. We then combine our bubble model with a simple description of recombinations in the IGM. We show that the bubbles grow until recombinations balance ionizations, when their expansion abruptly halts. If the IGM density structure is similar to that at moderate redshifts, this limits the bubble radii to ~20 comoving Mpc; however, if the IGM is significantly clumpier at higher redshifts (because of minihalo formation, for example), the limit could be much smaller. Once a bubble reaches saturation, that region of the Universe has for all intents and purposes entered the `post-overlap' stage. Because different HII regions saturate over a finite time interval, the overlap epoch actually has a finite width. Our model also predicts a mean recombination rate several times larger than expected for a uniformly illuminated IGM. This picture naturally explains the substantial large-scale variation in Lyman-series opacity along the lines of sight to the known z > 6 quasars. More quasar spectra will shed light on the transition between the `bubble-dominated' topology

  10. Growth and collapse of laser-induced bubbles in gas-supersaturated gelatin gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Keita; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2016-11-01

    We study, with experiments and theory, the growth and collapse of laser-induced bubbles in a gelatin gel. The gel sample is prepared so as to obtain gas supersaturation, according to a difference between heat and gas diffusion rates. Spherical gas bubbles are created by focusing a nano-second laser pulse at 532 nm into the gas-supersaturated gel. The bubble dynamics are recorded by a high-speed camera. To explore effects of the gel elasticity on the bubble collapse, the experimental observations are compared to an extended Rayleigh-Plesset model that accounts for linear/nonlinear elasticity of the gel surrounding bubbles. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 25709008.

  11. A New Unsteady Model for Dense Cloud Cavitation in Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, A.; Ahuja, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new unsteady, cavitation model is presented wherein the phase change process (bubble growth/collapse) is coupled to the acoustic field in a cryogenic fluid. It predicts the number density and radius of bubbles in vapor clouds by tracking both the aggregate surface area and volume fraction of the cloud. Hence, formulations for the dynamics of individual bubbles (e.g. Rayleigh-Plesset equation) may be integrated within the macroscopic context of a dense vapor cloud i.e. a cloud that occupies a significant fraction of available volume and contains numerous bubbles. This formulation has been implemented within the CRUNCH CFD, which has a compressible real fluid formulation, a multi-element, unstructured grid framework, and has been validated extensively for liquid rocket turbopump inducers. Detailed unsteady simulations of a cavitating ogive in liquid nitrogen are presented where time-averaged mean cavity pressure and temperature depressions due to cavitation are compared with experimental data. The model also provides the spatial and temporal history of the bubble size distribution in the vapor clouds that are shed, an important physical parameter that is difficult to measure experimentally and is a significant advancement in the modeling of dense cloud cavitation.

  12. Cavitation studies in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobel, Philippe; Obreschkow, Danail; Farhat, Mohamed; Dorsaz, Nicolas; de Bosset, Aurele

    The hydrodynamic cavitation phenomenon is a major source of erosion for many industrial systems such as cryogenic pumps for rocket propulsion, fast ship propellers, hydraulic pipelines and turbines. Erosive processes are associated with liquid jets and shockwaves emission fol-lowing the cavity collapse. Yet, fundamental understanding of these processes requires further cavitation studies inside various geometries of liquid volumes, as the bubble dynamics strongly depends the surrounding pressure field. To this end, microgravity represents a unique platform to produce spherical fluid geometries and remove the hydrostatic pressure gradient induced by gravity. The goal of our first experiment (flown on ESA's parabolic flight campaigns 2005 and 2006) was to study single bubble dynamics inside large spherical water drops (having a radius between 8 and 13 mm) produced in microgravity. The water drops were created by a micro-pump that smoothly expelled the liquid through a custom-designed injector tube. Then, the cavitation bubble was generated through a fast electrical discharge between two electrodes immersed in the liquid from above. High-speed imaging allowed to analyze the implications of isolated finite volumes and spherical free surfaces on bubble evolution, liquid jets formation and shock wave dynamics. Of particular interest are the following results: (A) Bubble lifetimes are shorter than in extended liquid volumes, which could be explain by deriving novel corrective terms to the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. (B) Transient crowds of micro-bubbles (smaller than 1mm) appeared at the instants of shockwaves emission. A comparison between high-speed visualizations and 3D N-particle simulations of a shock front inside a liquid sphere reveals that focus zones within the drop lead to a significantly increased density of induced cavitation. Considering shock wave crossing and focusing may hence prove crucially useful to understand the important process of cavitation erosion

  13. Cavitation in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Evan, Andrew P.; McAteer, James A.; Colonius, Tim; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2003-10-01

    A case is presented for the important role of cavitation in stone comminution and tissue injury in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). Confocal hydrophones and a coincidence algorithm were used to detect cavitation in kidney parenchyma. Elevated hydrostatic pressure dissolved cavitation nuclei and suppressed cell injury and stone comminution in vitro. A low-insertion-loss, thin, mylar film nearly eliminated stone erosion and crack formation only when in direct contact with the stone. This result indicates not only that cavitation is important in both cracking and erosion but also that bubbles act at the surface. Time inversion of the shock wave by use of a pressure-release reflector reduced the calculated pressure at bubble collapse and the measured depth of bubble-induced pits in aluminum. Correspondingly tissue injury in vivo was nearly eliminated. Cavitation was localized and intensified by the use of synchronously triggered, facing lithotripters. This dual pulse lithotripter enhanced comminution at its focus and reduced lysis in surrounding blood samples. The enhancement of comminution was lost when stones were placed in glycerol, which retarded bubble implosion. Thus, cavitation is important in comminution and injury and can be controlled to optimize efficacy and safety. [Work supported by NIH DK43381, DK55674, and FIRCA.

  14. Formation and Growth of Micro and Macro Bubbles on Copper-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Motil, Brian J.; Zhang, Nengli

    2007-01-01

    Micro scale boiling behavior in the vicinity of graphite micro-fiber tips on the coppergraphite composite boiling surfaces is investigated. It is discovered that a large number of micro bubbles are formed first at the micro scratches and cavities on the copper matrix in pool boiling. In virtue of the non-wetting property of graphite, once the growing micro bubbles touch the graphite tips, the micro bubbles are sucked by the tips and merged into larger micro bubbles sitting on the tips. The micro bubbles grow rapidly and coalesce to form macro bubbles, each of which sitting on several tips. The growth processes of the micro and macro bubbles are analyzed and formulated followed by an analysis of bubble departure on the composite surfaces. Based on these analyses, the enhancement mechanism of the pool boiling heat transfer on the composite surfaces is clearly revealed. Experimental results of pool boiling heat transfer both for water and Freon-113 on the composite surfaces convincingly demonstrate the enhancement effects of the unique structure of Cu-Gr composite surfaces on boiling heat transfer.

  15. Real-time in vitro observation of cavitation in a prosthetic heart valve.

    PubMed

    Lamson, T C; Stinebring, D R; Deutsch, S; Rosenberg, G; Tarbell, J M

    1991-01-01

    A technique for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on a prosthetic heart valve operating in a ventricular assist device under normal physiologic conditions has been developed. Considering the documented observation of cavitation erosion in heart valve components from human explants, and the potential risk of blood damage that cavitation presents, the technique developed in this study may prove useful in the design of prosthetic heart valves and ventricular assist devices. Cavitation of a glycerol blood analog fluid has been documented for a Medtronic/Hall prosthetic heart valve operating in a Penn State Electric Ventricular Assist Device. The ventricular assist device was operated in a mock circulatory system under normal physiologic conditions. The valve was located in the mitral position, with the cavitation occurring on the inlet side after valve closure. Bubble cavitation was seen on the valve occluder face, and vortex cavitation was observed at two locations in the vicinity of the valve occluder and housing. The cavity growth and collapse cycle for these forms of vaporous cavitation was less than 1 msec. Stroboscopic photography and stroboscopic videography with frame grabbing were used to document the cavity life cycle. With beat rate held constant, the cavity duration time was found to decrease with increasing mean venous return pressure.

  16. Effects of FLIRT on bubble growth in man.

    PubMed

    Winkler, B E; Koch, A; Schoeppenthau, H; Ludwig, T; Tetzlaff, K; Hartig, F; Kaehler, W; Koehler, A; Kanstinger, A; Ciscato, W; Muth, C-M

    2012-11-01

    Recompression during decompression has been suggested to possibly reduce the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The main objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of FLIRT (First Line Intermittent Recompression Technique) on bubble detection in man. 29 divers underwent 2 simulated dives in a dry recompression chamber to a depth of 40 msw (500 kPa ambient pressure) in random order. A Buehlmann-based decompression profile served as control and was compared to an experimental profile with intermittent recompression during decompression (FLIRT). Circulating bubbles in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) were monitored by Doppler ultrasound and quantified using the Spencer scoring algorithm. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), thrombocytes, D-Dimers and serum osmolarity were analyzed before and 120 min after the dive. Both dive profiles elicited bubbles in most subjects (range Spencer 0-4). However, no statistically significant difference was found in bubble scores between the control and the experimental dive procedure. There was no significant change in either HSP70, thrombocytes, and D-Dimers. None of the divers had clinical signs or symptoms suggestive of DCS. We conclude that FLIRT did not significantly alter the number of microbubbles and thus may not be considered superior to classical decompression in regards of preventing DCS.

  17. Measurements of the Growth of Air Bubbles by Rectified Diffusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    enough each cycle to cause a significant increase in the amount of gas containea within the bubble. The observations 32 by Liebermann that diffusion rates...32. L. Liebermann , J. Appl. Phys. 28, 205-211 (1957). 33. Lord Rayleiyh, Proc. Roy. Soc. 47, 231-287 (1890). -25- Ii. DISTRIBUTION LIST Director 3

  18. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM

  19. Cavitation Generation and Usage Without Ultrasound: Hydrodynamic Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogate, Parag R.; Pandit, Aniruddha B.

    Hydrodynamic Cavitation, which was and is still looked upon as an unavoidable nuisance in the flow systems, can be a serious contender as an alternative to acoustic cavitation for harnessing the spectacular effects of cavitation in physical and chemical processing. The present chapter covers the basics of hydrodynamic cavitation including the considerations for the bubble dynamics analysis, reactor designs and recommendations for optimum operating parameters. An overview of applications in different areas of physical, chemical and biological processing on scales ranging from few grams to several hundred kilograms has also been presented. Since hydrodynamic cavitation was initially proposed as an alternative to acoustic cavitation, it is necessary to compare the efficacy of both these modes of cavitations for a variety of applications and hence comparisons have been discussed either on the basis of energy efficiency or based on the scale of operation. Overall it appears that hydrodynamic cavitation results in conditions similar to those generated using acoustic cavitation but at comparatively much larger scale of operation and with better energy efficiencies.

  20. Growth of a gas bubble in a supersaturated and slightly compressible liquid at low Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadein, S. A.; Mohamed, K. G.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the growth of a gas bubble in a supersaturated and slightly compressible liquid is discussed. The mathematical model is solved analytically by using the modified Plesset and Zwick method. The growth process is affected by: sonic speed in the liquid, polytropic exponent, diffusion coefficient, initial concentration difference, surface tension, viscosity, adjustment factor and void fraction. The famous formula of Plesset and Zwick is produced as a special case of the result at some values of the adjustment factor. Moreover, the resultant formula is implemented to the case of the growth of underwater gas bubble.

  1. Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the fundamental physics of vapor bubbles in liquids. Work on bubble growth and condensation for stationary and translating bubbles is summarized and the differences with bubbles containing a permanent gas stressed. In particular, it is shown that the natural frequency of a vapor bubble is proportional not to the inverse radius, as for a gas bubble, but to the inverse radius raised to the power 2/3. Permanent gas dissolved in the liquid diffuses into the bubble with strong effects on its dynamics. The effects of the diffusion of heat and mass on the propagation of pressure waves in a vaporous bubbly liquid are discussed. Other topics briefly touched on include thermocapillary flow, plasmonic nanobubbles, and vapor bubbles in an immiscible liquid.

  2. Using Improved Equation of State to Model Simultaneous Nucleation and Bubble Growth in Thermoplastic Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Irfan; Costeux, Stephane; Adrian, David; Cristancho, Diego

    2013-11-01

    Due to environmental regulations carbon-dioxide (CO2) is increasingly being used to replace traditional blowing agents in thermoplastic foams. CO2 is dissolved in the polymer matrix under supercritical conditions. In order to predict the effect of process parameters on foam properties using numerical modeling, the P-V-T relationship of the blowing agents should accurately be represented at the supercritical state. Previous studies in the area of foam modeling have all used ideal gas equation of state to predict the behavior of the blowing agent. In this work the Peng-Robinson equation of state is being used to model the blowing agent during its diffusion into the growing bubble. The model is based on the popular ``Influence Volume Approach,'' which assumes a growing boundary layer with depleted blowing agent surrounds each bubble. Classical nucleation theory is used to predict the rate of nucleation of bubbles. By solving the mass balance, momentum balance and species conservation equations for each bubble, the model is capable of predicting average bubble size, bubble size distribution and bulk porosity. The effect of the improved model on the bubble growth and foam properties are discussed.

  3. Modeling methane bubble growth in fine-grained muddy aquatic sediments: correlation with sediment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsman, Regina

    2015-04-01

    Gassy sediments contribute to destabilization of aquatic infrastructure, air pollution, and global warming. In the current study a precise shape and size of the buoyant mature methane bubble in fine-grained muddy aquatic sediment is defined by numerical and analytical modeling, their results are in a good agreement. A closed-form analytical solution defining the bubble parameters is developed. It is found that the buoyant mature bubble is elliptical in its front view and resembles an inverted tear drop in its cross-section. The size and shape of the mature bubble strongly correlate with sediment fracture toughness. Bubbles formed in the weaker sediments are smaller and characterized by a larger surface-to volume ratio that induces their faster growth and may lead to their faster dissolution below the sediment-water interface. This may prevent their release to the water column and to the atmosphere. Shapes of the bubbles in the weaker sediments deviate further from the spherical configuration, than those in the stronger sediments. Modeled bubble characteristics, important for the acoustic applications, are in a good agreement with field observations and lab experiments.

  4. RANTES and fibroblast growth factor 2 in jawbone cavitations: triggers for systemic disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Johann; von Baehr, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Background Jawbone cavitations (JC) are hollow dead spaces in jawbones with dying or dead bone marrow. These areas are defined as fatty degenerative osteonecrosis of the jawbone or neuralgia-inducing cavitational osteonecrosis and may produce facial pain. These afflictions have been linked to the immune system and chronic illnesses. Surgical debridement of JC is reported to lead to an improvement in immunological complaints, such as rheumatic, allergic, and other inflammatory diseases (ID). Little is known about the underlying cause/effect relationship. Objectives JC bone samples were analyzed to assess the expression and quantification of immune modulators that can play a role in the pathogenesis of IDs. The study supports a potential mechanism where JC is a mediating link in IDs. Materials and methods Samples of fatty softened bone taken from JCs were extracted from 31 patients. The specimens were analyzed by bead-based multiplex technology and tested for seven immune messengers. Results Regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed, and secreted (RANTES) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 were found at high levels in the JCs tested. Other cytokines could not be detected at excessive levels. Discussion The study confirms that JC is able to produce inflammatory messengers, primarily RANTES, and, secondarily, FGF-2. Both are implicated in many serious illnesses. The excessive levels of RANTES/FGF-2 in JC patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and breast cancer are compared to levels published in medical journals. Levels detected in JCs are higher than in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis patients and four-fold higher than in breast cancer tissue. Conclusion This study suggests that JC might serve as a fundamental cause of IDs, through RANTES/FGF-2 production. Thus, JC and implicated immune messengers represent an integrative aspect of IDs and serve as a

  5. Bubble Proliferation in Shock Wave Lithotripsy Occurs during Inertial Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-06-01

    In shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), firing shock pulses at slow pulse repetition frequency (0.5 Hz) is more effective at breaking kidney stones than firing shock waves (SWs) at fast rate (2 Hz). Since at fast rate the number of cavitation bubbles increases, it appears that bubble proliferation reduces the efficiency of SWL. The goal of this work was to determine the basis for bubble proliferation when SWs are delivered at fast rate. Bubbles were studied using a high-speed camera (Imacon 200). Experiments were conducted in a test tank filled with nondegassed tap water at room temperature. Acoustic pulses were generated with an electromagnetic lithotripter (DoLi-50). In the focus of the lithotripter the pulses consisted of a ˜60 MPa positive-pressure spike followed by up to -8 MPa negative-pressure tail, all with a total duration of about 7 μs. Nonlinear propagation steepened the shock front of the pulses to become sufficiently thin (˜0.03 μm) to impose differential pressure across even microscopic bubbles. High-speed camera movies showed that the SWs forced preexisting microbubbles to collapse, jet, and break up into daughter bubbles, which then grew rapidly under the negative-pressure phase of the pulse, but later coalesced to re-form a single bubble. Subsequent bubble growth was followed by inertial collapse and, usually, rebound. Most, if not all, cavitation bubbles emitted micro-jets during their first inertial collapse and re-growth. After jetting, these rebounding bubbles could regain a spherical shape before undergoing a second inertial collapse. However, either upon this second inertial collapse, or sometimes upon the first inertial collapse, the rebounding bubble emerged from the collapse as a cloud of smaller bubbles rather than a single bubble. These daughter bubbles could continue to rebound and collapse for a few cycles, but did not coalesce. These observations show that the positive-pressure phase of SWs fragments preexisting bubbles but this initial

  6. Fighting fish (Betta splendens) bubble nests do not inhibit microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alexandria C; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2012-12-01

    Some organisms produce antimicrobial substances in nesting foam to favorably manipulate the environment to which their developing offspring are exposed. We tested if fighting fish Betta splendens foamy nest material, which is comprised of bubbles produced in the oral cavity of nesting males, has antimicrobial properties against a pathogenic bacteria (Edwardsiella tarda), a nonpathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli), or a pathogenic oomycete (Saprolegnia parasitica). We also tested if exposure to nest material increases larval survival by performing in vitro fertilizations and individually incubating eggs in bubble nest extract or tank water (control). Our results show no evidence of antimicrobial properties of bubble nests. On the contrary, bubble nests provided favorable microenvironments for the growth of Saprolegnia parasitica. Our results confirm earlier work citing the importance of male nest attendance, and suggest that the mechanism responsible for decreased survival in the absence of attending males is pathogenic microbes.

  7. Improving microalgal growth with small bubbles in a raceway pond with swing gas aerators.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zongbo; Cheng, Jun; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-09-01

    A novel swing gas aerator was developed to generate small bubbles for improving the mass transfer coefficient and microalgal growth rate in a raceway pond. A high-speed photography system (HSP) was used to measure the bubble diameter and generation time, and online precise dissolved oxygen probes and pH probes were used to measure the mass transfer coefficient and mixing time. Bubble generation time and diameter decreased by 21% and 9%, respectively, when rubber gas aerators were swung in the microalgae solution. When water pump power and gas aeration rate increased in a raceway pond with swing gas aerators and oscillating baffles (SGAOB), bubble generation time and diameter decreased but solution velocity and mass transfer coefficient increased. The mass transfer coefficient increased by 25% and the solution velocity increased by 11% when SGAOB was used, and the microalgal biomass yield increased by 18%.

  8. Cavitation propagation in water under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noblin, Xavier; Yip Cheung Sang, Yann; Pellegrin, Mathieu; Materials and Complex Fluids Team

    2012-11-01

    Cavitation appears when pressure decreases below vapor pressure, generating vapor bubbles. It can be obtain in dynamical ways (acoustic, hydraulic) but also in quasi-static conditions. This later case is often observed in nature, in trees, or during the ejection of ferns spores. We study the cavitation bubbles nucleation dynamics and its propagation in a confined microfabricated media. This later is an ordered array of microcavities made in hydrogel filled with water. When the system is put into dry air, it dehydrates, water leaves the cavities and tension (negative pressure) builds in the cavities. This can be sustained up to a critical pressure (of order -20 MPa), then cavitation bubbles appear. We follow the dynamics using ultra high speed imaging. Events with several bubbles cavitating in a few microseconds could be observed along neighboring cells, showing a propagation phenomenon that we discuss. ANR CAVISOFT 2010-JCJC-0407 01.

  9. Experimental modeling of cavitation occurring at vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaynutdinova, D. F.; Modorskii, V. Ya.; Shevelev, N. A.

    2016-10-01

    The article investigates the problem of effects in two-stage centrifugal pumps due to hydro-gas-dynamic processes resulting from vibrations of design elements which are difficult to forecast. Numerical and experimental simulation of this problem was conducted. The experiment discovered cavitation effects brought about by the vibrations. The area of cavitations was plotted. Dependence of cavitation bubble concentration on amplitude and frequency of the vibrations was found.

  10. Cavitation during wire brushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Zou, Jun; Ji, Chen

    2016-11-01

    In our daily life, brush is often used to scrub the surface of objects, for example, teeth, pots, shoes, pool, etc. And cleaning rust and stripping paint are accomplished using wire brush. Wire brushes also can be used to clean the teeth for large animals, such as horses, crocodiles. By observing brushing process in water, we capture the cavitation phenomenon on the track of moving brush wire. It shows that the cavitation also can affect the surface. In order to take clear and entire pictures of cavity, a simplified model of one stainless steel wire brushing a boss is adopted in our experiment. A transparent organic tank filled with deionized water is used as a view box. And a high speed video camera is used to record the sequences. In experiment, ambient pressure is atmospheric pressure and deionized water temperature is kept at home temperature. An obvious beautiful flabellate cavity zone appears behind the moving steel wire. The fluctuation of pressure near cavity is recorded by a hydrophone. More movies and pictures are used to show the behaviors of cavitation bubble following a restoring wire. Beautiful tracking cavitation bubble cluster is captured and recorded to show.

  11. Formation of methane nano-bubbles during hydrate decomposition and their effect on hydrate growth.

    PubMed

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John; Englezos, Peter

    2015-06-07

    Molecular dynamic simulations are performed to study the conditions for methane nano-bubble formation during methane hydrate dissociation in the presence of water and a methane gas reservoir. Hydrate dissociation leads to the quick release of methane into the liquid phase which can cause methane supersaturation. If the diffusion of methane molecules out of the liquid phase is not fast enough, the methane molecules agglomerate and form bubbles. Under the conditions of our simulations, the methane-rich quasi-spherical bubbles grow to become cylindrical with a radius of ∼11 Å. The nano-bubbles remain stable for about 35 ns until they are gradually and homogeneously dispersed in the liquid phase and finally enter the gas phase reservoirs initially set up in the simulation box. We determined that the minimum mole fraction for the dissolved methane in water to form nano-bubbles is 0.044, corresponding to about 30% of hydrate phase composition (0.148). The importance of nano-bubble formation to the mechanism of methane hydrate formation, growth, and dissociation is discussed.

  12. Formation of methane nano-bubbles during hydrate decomposition and their effect on hydrate growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagherzadeh, S. Alireza; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John; Englezos, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations are performed to study the conditions for methane nano-bubble formation during methane hydrate dissociation in the presence of water and a methane gas reservoir. Hydrate dissociation leads to the quick release of methane into the liquid phase which can cause methane supersaturation. If the diffusion of methane molecules out of the liquid phase is not fast enough, the methane molecules agglomerate and form bubbles. Under the conditions of our simulations, the methane-rich quasi-spherical bubbles grow to become cylindrical with a radius of ˜11 Å. The nano-bubbles remain stable for about 35 ns until they are gradually and homogeneously dispersed in the liquid phase and finally enter the gas phase reservoirs initially set up in the simulation box. We determined that the minimum mole fraction for the dissolved methane in water to form nano-bubbles is 0.044, corresponding to about 30% of hydrate phase composition (0.148). The importance of nano-bubble formation to the mechanism of methane hydrate formation, growth, and dissociation is discussed.

  13. Growth of oxygen bubbles during recharge process in zinc-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Ma, Ze; Chen, Huicui; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang; Xing, Haoqiang

    2015-11-01

    Rechargeable zinc-air battery used for energy storage has a serious problem of charging capacity limited by oxygen bubble coalescence. Fast removal of oxygen bubbles adhered to the charging electrode surface is of great importance for improving the charging performance of the battery. Here we show that the law of oxygen bubble growth can be achieved by means of phase-field simulation, revealing two phenomena of bubble detachment and bubble coalescence located in the charging electrode on both sides. Hydrodynamic electrolyte and partial insulation structure of the charging electrode are investigated to solve the problem of oxygen bubble coalescence during charging. Two types of rechargeable zinc-air battery are developed on the basis of different tri-electrode configurations, demonstrating that the charging performance of the battery with electrolyte flow (Ⅰ) is better than that of the battery with the partially insulated electrode (Ⅱ), while the battery Ⅱ is superior to the battery Ⅰ in the discharging performance, cost and portability. The proposed solutions and results would be available for promoting commercial application of rechargeable zinc-air batteries or other metal-air batteries.

  14. A simple cavitation model for unsteady simulation and its application to cavitating flow in two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Tsuda, S. I.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a simple cavitation model is developed under the framework of homogeneousone-fluid model, in which the perfect mixture of liquid and vapor phases is assumed. In most of conventional models, the vapor phase is considered as a dispersed phase against the liquid phase as a continuous phase, while in the present model, two extreme conditions are considered: for low void fraction, dispersed vapor bubbles in continuous liquid phase, while for high void fraction, dispersed droplets in continuous vapor phase. The growth of bubbles and droplets are taken into account in the mass transfer between vapor and liquid phases, and are switched according to the local void fraction. The model is applied for the simulation of cavitating flow in a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle, and the result is compared with that using a conventional model. To enhance the unsteadiness of cavitation due to the instability at the cavity interphase, the turbulent shear stress is modified depending upon the continuous phases in combination with the proposed cavitation model, which drastically reduces the turbulent viscosity for high void fraction region. As a result, the unsteadiness of cavitation observed in experiments is well reproduced.

  15. Monitoring Cavitation in HIFU as an Aid to Assisting Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chang-yu; Smith, Penny Probert; Kennedy, James; Leslie, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Rapid hypothermia resulting in tissue necrosis is often associated with bubble activity (normally from cavitation) in HIFU treatment. Indeed in some HIFU protocols, the evidence of cavitation is taken as an indicator of tissue lesions. In this paper we discuss two methods to delineate reliably the region in which cavitation occurs, so that a history of the cavitation events can be provided automatically during treatment. Results are shown on simulated images and from a clinical treatment session.

  16. Bubble Dynamics in Polymer Solutions Undergoing Shear.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    20D 23 REYNOLDS NUMBER *10’ FIGURE 1-1. The effect of dilute polymer solutes on hydraulic cavitation inception (Ellis &Ting, 1974). (a) ( b ) FIGURE 1-2...Comparison of cavitation appearance in (a) water and ( b ) dilute aqueous Polyox solution (Ting, 1978). 3 cavitation is significantly altered (Figure...research fall into two distinct (but related) areas. These are (a) Newtonian (or viscous) flow-induced cavitation bubble deformation and ( b ) non

  17. The importance of control over bubble size distribution in pulsed megasonic cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Marc; Struyf, Herbert; Mertens, Paul; Heyns, Marc; De Gendt, Stefan; Glorieux, Christ; Brems, Steven

    2012-05-01

    The presence of acoustic cavitation in the cleaning liquid is a crucial precondition for cleaning action. One can achieve enhanced cleaning by periodically switching the ultrasonic agitation on and off rather than sonicating the liquid in a continuous fashion. The physical effects leading to that improvement are investigated experimentally with a dedicated setup and correlated to cleaning results obtained in an experimental cleaning tank. With the first setup, sonoluminescence and cavitation noise are measured simultaneously while imaging the nucleation and the interaction of the bubbles with the sound field using Hi-Speed Stroboscopic Schlieren Imaging. In this way it is possible to identify the role of streamer bubbles and transient cavitation. Furthermore, the attenuation of the sound field due to the highly efficient bubble induced acoustic scattering and the growth of bubbles due to coalescence is investigated. The results give an idea of the stability of the bubble size distribution during and after the nucleation process. The measurements obtained for pulsed megasonic agitation are compared to that obtained while sonicating the liquid continuously. They are further correlated to experimental data on particle removal efficiency for varying pulse duration, and corresponding cavitation noise measurements. Here, the latter proves to be a suitable and easy-to-do method to identify cleaning regimes beforehand.

  18. Using a dynamic point-source percolation model to simulate bubble growth.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Zeigler, David A.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2004-05-01

    Accurate modeling of nucleation, growth and clustering of helium bubbles within metal tritide alloys is of high scientific and technological importance. Of interest is the ability to predict both the distribution of these bubbles and the manner in which these bubbles interact at a critical concentration of helium-to-metal atoms to produce an accelerated release of helium gas. One technique that has been used in the past to model these materials, and again revisited in this research, is percolation theory. Previous efforts have used classical percolation theory to qualitatively and quantitatively model the behavior of interstitial helium atoms in a metal tritide lattice; however, higher fidelity models are needed to predict the distribution of helium bubbles and include features that capture the underlying physical mechanisms present in these materials. In this work, we enhance classical percolation theory by developing the dynamic point-source percolation model. This model alters the traditionally binary character of site occupation probabilities by enabling them to vary depending on proximity to existing occupied sites, i.e. nucleated bubbles. This revised model produces characteristics for one and two dimensional systems that are extremely comparable with measurements from three dimensional physical samples. Future directions for continued development of the dynamic model are also outlined.

  19. Vapor Cavitation in Dynamically Loaded Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    High speed motion camera experiments were performed on dynamically loaded journal bearings. The length to diameter ratio of the bearing, the speed of the roller and the tube, the surface material of the roller, and the static and dynamic eccentricity of the bearing were varied. One hundred and thirty-four cases were filmed. The occurrence of vapor cavitation was clearly evident in the films and figures presented. Vapor cavitation was found to occur when the tensile stress applied to the oil exceeded the tensile strength of the oil or the binding of the oil to the surface. The physical situation in which vapor cavitation occurs is during the squeezing and sliding motion within a bearing. Besides being able to accurately capture the vapor cavitation on film, an analysis of the formation and collapse of the cavitation bubbles and characteristics of the bubble content are presented.

  20. Three-Dimensional Bubble Size Distributions From Growth at High Water Supersaturation: X-ray Microtomographic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, G.; Allard, E.; Jeff, L.; Rivers, M.; Baker, D. R.

    2004-05-01

    The growth of bubbles and exsolution of water from molten rocks is responsible for most volcanic eruptions on Earth. Rapid bubble growth without formation of an interconnected, percolating, cluster of bubbles can create a volcanic eruption, whereas slower bubble growth and a high enough (but still quantitatively unknown) bubble density results in more passive volcanic degassing. Understanding the rates and mechanisms of water exsolution provides better insight into volcanic eruptions and can lead to mitigation of their potentially devastating effects. In order to better understand the mechanisms of volcanic eruptions we are investigating the formation of water bubbles by heating previously hydrated silicate melts at 1 atm pressure and using x-ray microtomography to study the bubble size distribution. Hydrous silicate melts spanning a wide range of composition and physical properties were prepared by dissolving water into silicate melts at high temperatures and high pressure by melting glasses with water in sealed capsules at 500 MPa and 1100 oC in a piston-cylinder apparatus followed by rapid quenching to room temperature and pressure. Chips of these glasses were heated at 1 atm and temperatures up to 1000 oC. Most chips of samples were heated under an optical microscope at 1 atm in the laboratory at McGill University to make bubble-bearing samples, whereas a few chips were degassed a custom-designed, boron-nitride furnace on a bending magnet beamline at the Advanced Photon Source and observed with x-rays during bubble growth. In some cases the chips were heated to sufficiently high temperatures and for durations long enough to grow many large bubbles and convert the sample into a foam; in other cases the samples were only partially degassed so that we could observe the development of bubble formation and possible coalescence prior to foam formation. The bubble-bearing glasses formed during the heating experiment were imaged by x-ray microtomography performed on

  1. Enhanced Generic Phase-field Model of Irradiation Materials: Fission Gas Bubble Growth Kinetics in Polycrystalline UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2012-05-30

    Experiments show that inter-granular and intra-granular gas bubbles have different growth kinetics which results in heterogeneous gas bubble microstructures in irradiated nuclear fuels. A science-based model predicting the heterogeneous microstructure evolution kinetics is desired, which enables one to study the effect of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system on gas bubble microstructure evolution kinetics and morphology, improve the understanding of the formation mechanisms of heterogeneous gas bubble microstructure, and provide the microstructure to macroscale approaches to study their impact on thermo-mechanical properties such as thermo-conductivity, gas release, volume swelling, and cracking. In our previous report 'Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration, Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing', we developed a phase-field model to simulate the intra-granular gas bubble evolution in a single crystal during post-irradiation thermal annealing. In this work, we enhanced the model by incorporating thermodynamic and kinetic properties at grain boundaries, which can be obtained from atomistic simulations, to simulate fission gas bubble growth kinetics in polycrystalline UO2 fuels. The model takes into account of gas atom and vacancy diffusion, vacancy trapping and emission at defects, gas atom absorption and resolution at gas bubbles, internal pressure in gas bubbles, elastic interaction between defects and gas bubbles, and the difference of thermodynamic and kinetic properties in matrix and grain boundaries. We applied the model to simulate gas atom segregation at grain boundaries and the effect of interfacial energy and gas mobility on gas bubble morphology and growth kinetics in a bi-crystal UO2 during post-irradiation thermal annealing. The preliminary results demonstrate that the model can produce the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and the morphology of gas bubbles at

  2. CAVITATION DAMAGE STUDY VIA A NOVEL REPETITIVE PRESSURE PULSE APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation damage can significantly affect system performance. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing cavitation damage and improving materials resistance to cavitation damage. In this paper, we present a novel methodology to simulate cavitation environment. A pulsed laser is utilized to induce optical breakdown in the cavitation media, with the emission of shock wave and the generation of bubbles. The pressure waves induced by the optical breakdown fluctuate/propagate within the media, which enables the cavitation to occur and to further develop cavitation damage at the solid boundary. Using the repetitive pulsed-pressure apparatus developed in the current study, cavitation damage in water media was verified on stainless steel and aluminum samples. Characteristic cavitation damages such as pitting and indentation are observed on sample surfaces using scanning electron microscopy.

  3. Use of Dual-Pulse Lithotripter to Generate a Localized Intensified Cavitation Field

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Dihlia L.; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2001-09-01

    Localizing cavitation to the kidney stone in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy may be desirable since cavitation appears to play a major role in both stone comminution and renal tissue damage. A method has been developed to localize and intensify cavitation damage in vitro. Cavitation fields in water were filmed with a high-speed digital video camera. In a conventional lithotripter (CL), the shock wave produced by a single source creates a 2 x 10 cm cylindrical cloud of bubbles in water. Bubbles in the CL field collapse simultaneously along the focal axis to produce a nearly uniform 1-mm x 8-cm line of pits in 25- mm-thick aluminum foil. Our dual-pulse lithotripter (DPL) uses two shock wave sources, facing each other, confocal, and triggered simultaneously to create a 4 x 5 cm cylindrical cloud of bubbles that collapse over a range of times and strengths such that the greatest pit damage on foils is contained within a few square millimeters of the focus. The time for bubbles to grow and collapse was measured with a focused hydrophone and compared with calculations based on the Gilmore equation. Pressure doubling due to synchronous arrival of the two pulses at the focus created increased bubble growth and increased foil pit depth. Asynchronous timing between the two pulses elsewhere in the DPL field resulted in disruption of radial dynamics and negligible pitting to foils. Translation of bubbles was also investigated, both numerically and experimentally. While net translation was calculated to be ,0.3 mm in all cases, the rapid

  4. Dissolved water distribution in vesicular magmatic glass records both decompressive bubble growth and quench resorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Llewellin, E.; Humphreys, M.; Nichols, A. R.; Burgisser, A.; Schipper, C.

    2013-12-01

    Water distribution in magma varies over the lifetime of an eruption due to a variety of processes, including decompressive degassing of the melt, cooling during the quench from melt to glass, and post-emplacement hydration under ambient conditions. Correct interpretation of water distributions in erupted pyroclasts can therefore offer crucial insights into the dynamics of eruption mechanisms and emplacement histories. Volcanic eruptions are driven by the nucleation and growth of bubbles in magma. Bubbles grow as volatile species in the melt, of which water is volumetrically the most important, diffuse down a concentration gradient towards and across the bubble wall. On cooling, the melt quenches to glass, preserving the spatial distribution of water concentration around the bubbles (now vesicles). We use Backscatter Scanning Electron Microscopy (BSEM), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR) to measure the spatial distribution of water around vesicles in experimentally-vesiculated samples. We find that, contrary to expectation, the total water concentration increases (by up to 2 wt.%) in the ~30 microns closest to the vesicle wall. Our samples record significant resorption of water back into the melt around bubbles during the quench process, a process which represents ';regassing' of the magma. We propose that the observed total water resorption profiles result from the increase in the equilibrium solubility of water as temperature decreases during the quench to glass, and that this resorption locally overprints the pre-existing concentration total water profile resulting from bubble growth during decompression. This resorption occurs over the very short timescales of rapid experimental quench (3-10 seconds) resulting in strongly disequilibrium water speciation. Water re-enters the melt as molecular water leading to enrichment in molecular water around vesicles, while the distribution of hydroxyl groups remains

  5. Nuclei and propeller cavitation inception

    SciTech Connect

    Gindroz, B.; Billet, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Propeller cavitation inception tests were conducted in the Grand Tunnel Hydrodynamique (GTH) of the Bassin d`Essaid des Carenes. Both acoustic and visual cavitation inception were determined for leading-edge sheet, travelling bubble, and tip vortex. These data were obtained for specific water quality conditions. The water quality was determined from cavitation susceptibility meter measurements for degassed water (maximum liquid tension, few nuclei), low injection rate of microbubbles (medium liquid tension, low nuclei concentration), medium injection rate of microbubbles (medium liquid tension, high nuclei concentration) and high injection rate of microbubbles (minimum liquid tension, high nuclei concentration). Results clearly demonstrate a different influence of water quality for each type of cavitation. Little variation in cavitation inception index for a significant increase in liquid tension and microbubble size distribution was found for leading-edge sheet; however, tip vortex cavitation inception index decreased significantly for an increase in liquid tension. In addition, a dependency on event rate was determined for tip vortex cavitation inception.

  6. Application of signal analysis to cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. S.; Veerabhadra Rao, P.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnostic facilities of the cross power spectrum and the coherence function have been employed to enhance the identification of not only the inception of cavitation, but also its level. Two piezoelectric pressure transducers placed in the downstream chamber of a model spool valve undergoing various levels of cavitation allowed for the use of both functions - the phase angle of the complex cross spectrum and the dimensionless coherence function - to sense clearly the difference between noise levels associated with a noncavitating jet from those once cavitation inception is attained. The cavitation noise within the chamber exhibited quite a regular character in terms of the phase difference between instruments for limited cavitation. Varying cavitation levels clearly illustrated the effect of bubble size on the attendant frequency range for which there was an extremely high coherence or nearly perfect causality.

  7. Grain Growth and Bubble Evolution in U-Mo Alloy by Multiscale Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Zhi-Gang; Liang, Linyun; Kim, Yeon Soo; Wiencek, Tom; Hofman, Gerard; Anitescu, Mihai; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2015-01-01

    Increased grain size in U-Mo dispersion fuel is believed to affect the fuel swelling at high fission density. In this work, a multiscale simulation approach combining first-principles calculation and phase-field modeling is used to investigate the grain growth behavior in U-Mo alloys. The material properties of U-Mo alloys predicted by first-principles calculations are incorporated into the mesoscale phase-field models to study the effect of annealing temperature, annealing time and the initial grain structures of fuel particles on the grain growth. The grain growth rate is evaluated and compared with experiment. Meanwhile, the gas bubble evolution kinetics in irradiated U-Mo alloy fuels is investigated to understand its effect on fuel swelling. We systematically examine the effect of Xe, vacancy, and SIA concentration, fission defect generation, and elastic interaction on the growth kinetics of gas bubble. The bubble size distribution and swelling of U-Mo are simulated and compared to experimental measurements.

  8. Large-scale atomistic simulations of helium-3 bubble growth in complex palladium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Lucas M.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Wong, Bryan M.

    2016-05-01

    Palladium is an attractive material for hydrogen and hydrogen-isotope storage applications due to its properties of large storage density and high diffusion of lattice hydrogen. When considering tritium storage, the material's structural and mechanical integrity is threatened by both the embrittlement effect of hydrogen and the creation and evolution of additional crystal defects (e.g., dislocations, stacking faults) caused by the formation and growth of helium-3 bubbles. Using recently developed inter-atomic potentials for the palladium-silver-hydrogen system, we perform large-scale atomistic simulations to examine the defect-mediated mechanisms that govern helium bubble growth. Our simulations show the evolution of a distribution of material defects, and we compare the material behavior displayed with expectations from experiment and theory. We also present density functional theory calculations to characterize ideal tensile and shear strengths for these materials, which enable the understanding of how and why our developed potentials either meet or confound these expectations.

  9. Sensitivity of a bubble growth to the cheese material properties during ripening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokoua, G.; Grenier, D.; Lucas, T.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a model of transport phenomena describes a single bubble growth in semi-hard cheese. Carbon dioxide production, its transport to the bubble interface, equilibrium laws and mechanics were coupled. Semi-hard cheese mainly behaves as elastic when loads are quickly applied to a piece of cheese like during chewing (few seconds). However, when slowly loaded with increasing gas pressure during ripening in warm room, the mechanical cheese behavior can be simply modelled as a viscous material (Grenier et al. [9]). It is true, as long as viscosity remains low compared to the rate of gas production. This paper investigates a wider range of viscosity (from core η = 6.32 × 107 Pa.s to rind η = 2.88 × 108 Pa.s) than that used in previous studies. FEM simulations have shown that higher viscosities encountered close to the rind of a cheese block can partly explain the increase in gas pressure within bubbles from the core to the rind (up to 3.4 kPa). These results confirm that mechanics does not really control the evolution of bubble volume in cheese. However, mechanics can explain greater pressure observed close to the rind even if gas production is lower than at core.

  10. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive experimental program was initiated for the purpose of understanding the mechanisms leading to bubble generation during fluid handling procedures in a microgravity environment. Several key fluid handling procedures typical for PCG experiments were identified for analysis in that program. Experiments were designed to specifically understand how such procedures can lead to bubble formation. The experiments were then conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which is capable of simulating a low gravity environment by executing a parabolic flight attitude. However, such a flight attitude can only provide a low gravity environment of approximately 10-2go for a maximum period of 30 seconds. Thus all of the tests conducted for these experiments were designed to last no longer than 20 seconds. Several experiments were designed to simulate some of the more relevant fluid handling procedures during protein crystal growth experiments. These include submerged liquid jet cavitation, filling of a cubical vessel, submerged surface scratch, attached drop growth, liquid jet impingement, and geysering experiments. To date, four separate KC-135 flight campaigns were undertaken specifically for performing these experiments. However, different experiments were performed on different flights.

  11. What controls Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rate and the formation of bubbles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M.; Zesta, E.; Damtie, B.; Rabiu, B.; Valladares, C. E.; Stoneback, R.

    2014-12-01

    According to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) growth rate mathematical expression, the vertical drift is supposed to be the primary component that controls the RTI growth rate. However, in the African sector that does not seem to be the case. In this paper we present independent ground- and space-based observations that consistently show weaker vertical drift (both dayside and evening sector) in the African sector compared with the American sector. On the other hand, observations from both satellite and recently deployed ground-based instruments have shown that the African sector is home to stronger and year-round ionospheric bubbles/irregularities and scintillations compared to the American and Asian sectors. The question is if the drift is weaker in the African sector, what causes these strong bubbles that have been observed in the African sector almost throughout the night and during all seasons? Are there other mechanisms that initiate RTI growth other than vertical drift? Would it be the neutral winds that cause the long lasting bubbles in Africa? If it is the neutral wind, why are the winds unique in terms of orientation and magnitude in the African sector compared to other longitudinal sectors?

  12. Study of Cavitation Shedding Dynamics on a NACA0015 Hydrofoil Using X-Ray Densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Harish; Wu, Juliana; Ceccio, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation dynamics on the NACA0015 hydrofoil at several attack angles are found to be spectrally rich, being multi-modal with abrupt changes in Strouhal number with change in cavitation number. Present study focusses on identifying the physical mechanisms responsible for the change in cavitation dynamics on a NACA0015 hydrofoil in a re-circulating water tunnel using time resolved X-ray densitometry. Time-resolved void fraction flow fields obtained using X-ray densitometry, synchronized with acoustic noise measurements using a hydrophone, are used to identify different flow features and mechanisms that are responsible for the change in the observed spectral behavior. It is shown that under higher cavitation numbers, the shedding mechanism is predominantly re-entrant liquid flow based, but as the cavitation number drops many different processes are at play. At lower cavitation numbers, the shed cavity cloud collapse arrests cavity growth and this results in altered cycle dynamics and hence the Strouhal number. In addition, propagation bubbly shock waves are also found to be a dominant mechanism of shedding for certain conditions. The multi-modal nature of the acoustic pressure signature is explained by presence of different flow features, which could be concurrent or alternating. Office of Naval Research.

  13. Nonlinear dynamics of laser-induced bubble near elastic boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiu Mei; He, Jie; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao Wu

    2008-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of a laser-generated single cavitation bubble near an elastic boundary is investigated by a fiber-optic diagnostic technique based on optical beam deflection (OBD). The maximum bubble radii and the bubble life-time for each oscillation cycle are determined according to the characteristic signals. It is shown that with the increase of the number of oscillating cycles, the maximum radii and the life-time of the bubble are decreased sharply. Furthermore, the effect of material elasticity on nonlinear dynamics of cavitation bubble has also been investigated in some detail. The maximum bubble size and thus the bubble life time decreases with an increase in elastic modulus. In addition, increasing elastic modulus leads to a significant decrease of the collapse amplitude and the bubble energy. These results are valuable in the fields of cavitation erosion, collateral damage in laser surgery, and cavitation-mediated enhancement of pulsed laser ablation of tissue.

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Cavitation in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J.

    1945-01-01

    The cavitation in nozzles on airfoils of various shape and on a sphere are experimentally investigated. The limits of cavitation and the extension of the zone of the bubbles in different stages of cavitation are photographically established. The pressure in the bubble area is constant and very low, jumping to high values at the end of the area. The analogy with the gas compression shock is adduced and discussed. The collapse of the bubbles under compression shock produces very high pressures internally, which must be contributory factors to corrosion. The pressure required for purely mechanical corrosion is also discussed.

  15. Bubble growth from clustered hydrogen and helium atoms in tungsten under a fusion environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yu-Wei; Kong, Xiang-Shan; Wu, Xuebang; Liu, C. S.; Chen, J. L.; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-01-01

    Bubbles seriously degrade the mechanical properties of tungsten and thus threaten the safety of nuclear fusion devices, however, the underlying atomic mechanism of bubble growth from clustered hydrogen and helium atoms is still mysterious. In this work, first-principles calculations are therefore carried out to assess the stability of tungsten atoms around both hydrogen and helium clusters. We find that the closest vacancy-formation energies of interstitial hydrogen and helium clusters are substantially decreased. The first-nearest and second-nearest vacancy-formation energies close to vacancy-hydrogen clusters decrease in a step-like way to  ˜0, while those close to vacancy-helium clusters are reduced almost linearly to  ˜-5.46 eV when atom number reaches 10. The vacancy-formation energies closest to helium clusters are more significantly reduced than those nearest to hydrogen clusters, whatever the clusters are embedded at interstitial sites or vacancies. The reduction of vacancy-formation energies results in instability and thus emission of tungsten atoms close to interstitial helium and vacancy-helium clusters, which illustrates the experimental results, that the tungsten atoms can be emitted from the vicinity of vacancy-helium clusters. In addition, the emission of unstable tungsten atoms close to hydrogen clusters may become possible once they are disturbed by the environment. The emission of tungsten atoms facilitates the growth and evolution of hydrogen and helium clusters and ultimately the bubble formation. The results also explain the bubble formation even if no displacement damage is produced in tungsten exposed to low-energy hydrogen and helium plasma.

  16. Mechanisms of thrombolysis acceleration by cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Hope; Selvaraj, Prashanth; Ahadi, Golnaz; Voie, Arne; Hoelscher, Thilo; Okita, Kohei; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Szeri, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies, in vitro and in vivo, have shown that High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) accelerates thrombolysis, the dissolution of blood clots, for ischemic stroke. Although the mechanisms are not fully understood, cavitation is thought to play an important role in sonothrombolysis. The damage to a blood clot's fibrin fiber network from cavitation in a HIFU field is studied using two independent approaches for an embedded bubble. One method is extended to the more important scenario of a bubble outside a blood clot that collapses asymmetrically creating a jet towards the clot. There is significantly more damage potential from a bubble undergoing cavitation collapse outside the clot compared to a rapidly expanding bubble embedded within the clot structure. Also, the effects of the physical properties of skull bone when a HIFU wave propagates through it are examined by use of computer simulation. The dynamics of a test bubble placed at the focus is used in understanding of the pressure field. All other things being equal, the analysis suggests that skull thickness can alter the wave at the focus, which in turn can change the nature of cavitation bubble dynamics and the amount of energy available for clot damage. Now at MSOE.

  17. Removal of nutrient limitations in forest gaps enhances growth rate and resistance to cavitation in subtropical canopy tree species differing in shade tolerance.

    PubMed

    Villagra, Mariana; Campanello, Paula I; Montti, Lia; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2013-03-01

    A 4-year fertilization experiment with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) was carried out in natural gaps of a subtropical forest in northeastern Argentina. Saplings of six dominant canopy species differing in shade tolerance were grown in five control and five N + P fertilized gaps. Hydraulic architectural traits such as wood density, the leaf area to sapwood area ratio (LA : SA), vulnerability to cavitation (P50) and specific and leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity were measured, as well as the relative growth rate, specific leaf area (SLA) and percentage of leaf damage by insect herbivores. Plant growth rates and resistance to drought-induced embolisms increased when nutrient limitations were removed. On average, the P50 of control plants was -1.1 MPa, while the P50 of fertilized plants was -1.6 MPa. Wood density and LA : SA decreased with N + P additions. A trade-off between vulnerability to cavitation and efficiency of water transport was not observed. The relative growth rate was positively related to the total leaf surface area per plant and negatively related to LA : SA, while P50 was positively related to SLA across species and treatments. Plants with higher growth rates and higher total leaf area in fertilized plots were able to avoid hydraulic dysfunction by becoming less vulnerable to cavitation (more negative P50). Two high-light-requiring species exhibited relatively low growth rates due to heavy herbivore damage. Contrary to expectations, shade-tolerant plants with relatively high resistance to hydraulic dysfunction and reduced herbivory damage were able to grow faster. These results suggest that during the initial phase of sapling establishment in gaps, species that were less vulnerable to cavitation and exhibited reduced herbivory damage had faster realized growth rates than less shade-tolerant species with higher potential growth rates. Finally, functional relationships between hydraulic traits and growth rate across species and treatments

  18. Pore-network study of bubble growth in porous media driven by heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Satik, C.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1996-05-01

    We present experimental and theoretical investigations of vapor phase growth in pore-network models of porous media. Visualization experiments of boiling of ethyl alcohol in horizontal etched-glass micromodels were conducted. The vapor phase was observed to grow into a disordered pattern following a sequence of pressurization and pore-filling steps. At sufficiently small cluster sizes, growth occurred `one pore at a time,` leading to invasion percolation patterns. Single-bubble (cluster) growth was next simulated with a pore-network simulator that includes heat transfer (convection and conduction), and capillary and viscous forces, although not gravity. A boundary in the parameter space was delineated that separates patterns of growth dictated solely by capillarity (invasion percolation) from other patterns. The region of validity of invasion percolation was found to decrease as the supersaturation (heat flux), the capillary number, the thermal diffusivity, and the vapor cluster size increase. Implications to continuum models are discussed. 33 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Improvement of growth rate of plants by bubble discharge in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahata, Junichiro; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Fujio, Takuya; Sasaki, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The effect of bubble discharge in water on the growth rate of plants was investigated experimentally for application to plant cultivation systems. Spinach (Spinacia oleracea), radish (Raphanus sativus var. sativus), and strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) were used as specimens to clarify the effect of the discharge treatment on edible parts of the plants. The specimens were cultivated in pots filled with artificial soil, which included chicken manure charcoal. Distilled water was sprayed on the artificial soil and drained through a hole in the pots to a water storage tank. The water was circulated from the water storage tank to the cultivation pots after 15 or 30 min discharge treatment on alternate days. A magnetic compression-type pulsed power generator was used to produce the bubble discharge with a repetition rate of 250 pps. The plant height in the growth phase and the dry weight of the harvested plants were improved markedly by the discharge treatment in water. The soil and plant analyzer development (SPAD) value of the plants also improved in the growth phase of the plants. The concentration of nitrate nitrogen, which mainly contributed to the improvement of the growth rate, in the water increased with the discharge treatment. The Brix value of edible parts of Fragaria × ananassa increased with the discharge treatment. The inactivation of bacteria in the water was also confirmed with the discharge treatment.

  20. Cardiovascular bubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bull, Joseph L

    2005-01-01

    Gas bubbles can form in the cardiovascular system as a result of patho-physiological conditions or can be intentionally introduced for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons. The dynamic behavior of these bubbles is caused by a variety of mechanisms, such as inertia, pressure, interfacial tension, viscosity, and gravity. We review recent advances in the fundamental mechanics and applications of cardiovascular bubbles, including air embolism, ultrasound contrast agents, targeted microbubbles for drug delivery and molecular imaging, cavitation-induced tissue erosion for ultrasonic surgery, microbubble-induced angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, and gas embolotherapy.

  1. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation.

    PubMed

    Warnez, M T; Johnsen, E

    2015-06-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller-Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin-Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time.

  2. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller–Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin–Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time. PMID:26130967

  3. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-06-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller-Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin-Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time.

  4. Ultrafast active cavitation imaging with enhanced cavitation to tissue ratio based on wavelet transform and pulse inversion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Hu, Hong; Xu, Shanshan; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-06-01

    The quality of ultrafast active cavitation imaging (UACI) using plane wave transmission is hindered by low transmission pressure, which is necessary to prevent bubble destruction. In this study, a UACI method that combined wavelet transform with pulse inversion (PI) was proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The main challenge in using wavelet transform is the selection of the optimum mother wavelet. A mother wavelet named "cavitation bubble wavelet" and constructed according to Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model was expected to obtain a high correlation between the bubbles and beamformed echoes. The method was validated by in vitro experiments. Results showed that the image quality was associated with the initial radius of bubble and the scale. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the best optimum cavitation bubble wavelet transform (CBWT) mode image was improved by 3.2 dB compared with that of the B-mode image in free-field experiments. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio of the best optimum PI-based CBWT mode image was improved by 2.3 dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image in tissue experiments. Furthermore, the SNR versus initial radius curve had the potential to estimate the size distribution of cavitation bubbles.

  5. Inertial confinement fusion based on the ion-bubble trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari, S. Nilkar, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Mehdian, H.

    2014-10-15

    Triggering the ion-bubble in an inertial confinement fusion, we have developed a novel scheme for the fast ignition. This scheme relies on the plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense laser pulse to generate an ion-bubble. The bubble acts both as an intense electron accelerator and as an electron wiggler. Consequently, the accelerated electrons trapped in the bubble can emit an intense tunable laser light. This light can be absorbed by an ablation layer on the outside surface of the ignition capsule, which subsequently drills it and thereby produces a guide channel in the pellet. Finally, the relativistic electron beam created in the bubble is guided through the channel to the high density core igniting the fusion fuel. The normalized beam intensity and beam energy required for triggering the ignition have been calculated when core is heated by the e-beam. In addition, through solving the momentum transfer, continuity and wave equations, a dispersion relation for the electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been analytically derived. The variations of growth rate with the ion-bubble density and electron beam energy have been illustrated. It is found that the growth rates of instability are significantly controlled by the ions concentration and the e-beam energy in the bubble.

  6. Transient pressure signals in mechanical heart valve cavitation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z J; Slonin, J H; Hwang, N H

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to establish a correlation between mechanical heart valve (MHV) cavitation and transient pressure (TP) signals at MHV closure. This correlation may suggest a possible method to detect in vivo MHV cavitation. In a pulsatile mock flow loop, a study was performed to measure TP and observe cavitation bubble inception at MHV closure under simulated physiologic ventricular and aortic pressures at heart rates of 70, 90, 120, and 140 beats/min with corresponding cardiac outputs of 5.0, 6.0, 7.5, and 8.5 L/min, respectively. The experimental study included two bileaflet MHV prostheses: 1) St. Jude Medical 31 mm and 2) Carbomedics 31 mm. High fidelity piezo-electric pressure transducers were used to measure TP immediately before and after the valve leaflet/housing impact. A stroboscopic lighting imaging technique was developed to capture cavitation bubbles on the MHV inflow surfaces at selected time delays ranging from 25 microseconds to 1 ms after the leaflet/housing impact. The TP traces measured 10 mm away from the valve leaflet tip showed a large pressure reduction peak at the leaflet/housing impact, and subsequent high frequency pressure oscillations (HPOs) while the cavitation bubbles were observed. The occurrence of cavitation bubbles and HPO bursts were found to be random on a beat by beat basis. However, the amplitude of the TP reduction, the intensity of the cavitation bubble (size and number), and the intensity of HPO were found to increase with the test heart rate. A correlation between the MHV cavitation bubbles and the HPO burst was positively established. Power spectrum analysis of the TP signals further showed that the frequency of the HPO (cavitation bubble collapse pressures) ranged from 100 to 450 kHz.

  7. Synchronised electrical monitoring and high speed video of bubble growth associated with individual discharges during plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troughton, S. C.; Nominé, A.; Nominé, A. V.; Henrion, G.; Clyne, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Synchronised electrical current and high speed video information are presented from individual discharges on Al substrates during PEO processing. Exposure time was 8 μs and linear spatial resolution 9 μm. Image sequences were captured for periods of 2 s, during which the sample surface was illuminated with short duration flashes (revealing bubbles formed where the discharge reached the surface of the coating). Correlations were thus established between discharge current, light emission from the discharge channel and (externally-illuminated) dimensions of the bubble as it expanded and contracted. Bubbles reached radii of 500 μm, within periods of 100 μs, with peak growth velocity about 10 m/s. It is deduced that bubble growth occurs as a consequence of the progressive volatilisation of water (electrolyte), without substantial increases in either pressure or temperature within the bubble. Current continues to flow through the discharge as the bubble expands, and this growth (and the related increase in electrical resistance) is thought to be responsible for the current being cut off (soon after the point of maximum radius). A semi-quantitative audit is presented of the transformations between different forms of energy that take place during the lifetime of a discharge.

  8. Stem Hydraulic Conductivity depends on the Pressure at Which It Is Measured and How This Dependence Can Be Used to Assess the Tempo of Bubble Pressurization in Recently Cavitated Vessels1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyu; Tyree, Melvin T.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation of water in xylem vessels followed by embolism formation has been authenticated for more than 40 years. Embolism formation involves the gradual buildup of bubble pressure (air) to atmospheric pressure as demanded by Henry’s law of equilibrium between gaseous and liquid phases. However, the tempo of pressure increase has not been quantified. In this report, we show that the rate of pressurization of embolized vessels is controlled by both fast and slow kinetics, where both tempos are controlled by diffusion but over different spatial scales. The fast tempo involves a localized diffusion from endogenous sources: over a distance of about 0.05 mm from water-filled wood to the nearest embolized vessels; this process, in theory, should take <2 min. The slow tempo involves diffusion of air from exogenous sources (outside the stem). The latter diffusion process is slower because of the increased distance of diffusion of up to 4 mm. Radial diffusion models and experimental measurements both confirm that the average time constant is >17 h, with complete equilibrium requiring 1 to 2 d. The implications of these timescales for the standard methods of measuring percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity are discussed in theory and deserve more research in future. PMID:26468516

  9. Simultaneous pressure measurement and high-speed photography study of cavitation in a dynamically loaded journal bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, David E.; Abel, Philip B.

    1994-02-01

    Cavitation of the oil film in a dynamically loaded journal bearing was studied using high-speed photography and pressure measurement simultaneously. Comparison of the visual and pressure data provided considerable insight into the occurrence and nonoccurrence of cavitation. It was found that (1) for the submerged journal bearing, cavitation typically occurred in the form of one bubble with the pressure in the cavitation bubble close to the absolute zero; and (2) for cavitation-producing operating conditions, cavitation did not always occur; with the oil film then supporting a tensile stress.

  10. Simultaneous pressure measurement and high-speed photography study of cavitation in a dynamically loaded journal bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, David E.; Abel, Philip B.

    1994-01-01

    Cavitation of the oil film in a dynamically loaded journal bearing was studied using high-speed photography and pressure measurement simultaneously. Comparison of the visual and pressure data provided considerable insight into the occurrence and nonoccurrence of cavitation. It was found that (1) for the submerged journal bearing, cavitation typically occurred in the form of one bubble with the pressure in the cavitation bubble close to the absolute zero; and (2) for cavitation-producing operating conditions, cavitation did not always occur; with the oil film then supporting a tensile stress.

  11. Simultaneous pressure measurement and high-speed photography study of cavitation in a dynamically loaded journal bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, D. E.; Abel, P. B.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation of the oil film in a dynamically loaded journal bearing was studied using high-speed photography and pressure measurement simultaneously. Comparison of the visual and pressure data provided considerable insight into the occurence and non-occurrence of cavitation. It was found that (1), cavitation typically occurred in the form of one bubble with the pressure in the cavitation bubble close to the absolute zero; and (2), for cavitation-producing operating conditions, cavitation did not always occur; with the oil film then supporting a tensile stress.

  12. Control of Acoustic Cavitation with Application to Lithotripsy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    cavitation contributes to kidney stone comminution and tissue damage. An electrical spark at the near focus of an underwater ellipsoidal reflector was the...Control of acoustic cavitation (sound-induced bubble activity) is the subject of this dissertation. Application is to clinical lithotripsy where

  13. Radiation induced cavitation: A possible phenomenon in liquid targets?

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-07-01

    The proposed design of a new, short-pulse spallation neutron source includes a liquid mercury target irradiated with a 1 GeV proton beam. This paper explores the possibility that cavitation bubbles may be formed in the mercury and briefly discusses some design features that could avoid harmful effects should cavitation take place.

  14. Cavitation dynamics on the nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Kotaidis, Vassilios; Plech, Anton

    2005-11-21

    The ultrafast excitation of gold nanoparticle sols causes a strong nonequilibrium heating of the particle lattice and subsequently of the water shell close to the particle surface. Above a threshold in laser fluence, which is defined by the onset of homogeneous nucleation, nanoscale vapor bubbles develop around the particles, expand and collapse again within the first nanosecond after excitation. We show the existence of cavitation on the nanometer and subnanosecond time scale, described within the framework of continuum thermodynamics.

  15. Breaking beer bottles with cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunny; Fontana, Jake; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter; Shelley, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Hitting the top of a beer bottle, nearly full of water, with an open hand can cause the bottle to break, with the bottom separating from upper section. We have studied this phenomenon using a high-speed camera, and observed the formation, coalescence and collapse of bubbles. The breaking of glass is due to cavitation, typically occurring near the bottom edge. We make numerical estimates of the relevant physical parameters, and compare these with experimental observations.

  16. Cavitation dynamics on the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotaidis, Vassilios; Plech, Anton

    2005-11-01

    The ultrafast excitation of gold nanoparticle sols causes a strong nonequilibrium heating of the particle lattice and subsequently of the water shell close to the particle surface. Above a threshold in laser fluence, which is defined by the onset of homogeneous nucleation, nanoscale vapor bubbles develop around the particles, expand and collapse again within the first nanosecond after excitation. We show the existence of cavitation on the nanometer and subnanosecond time scale, described within the framework of continuum thermodynamics.

  17. Numerical investigation of cavitation performance on bulb tubular turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L. G.; Guo, P. C.; Zheng, X. B.; Luo, X. Q.

    2016-05-01

    The cavitation flow phenomena may occur in the bulb tubular turbine at some certain operation conditions, which even decrease the performance of units and causes insatiably noise and vibration when it goes worse. A steady cavitating flow numerical simulations study is carried out on the bulb tubular unit with the same blade pitch angle and different guide vane openings by using the commercial code ANSYS CFX in this paper. The phenomena of cavitation induction areas and development process are obtained and draws cavitation performance curves. The numerical results show that the travelling bubble cavity is the main types of cavitation development over a wide operating range of discharge and this type of cavitation begins to sensitive to the value of cavitation number when the discharge exceeding a certain valve, in this condition, it can lead to a severe free bubble formation with the gradually decrement of cavitation number. The reported cavitation performance curves results indicate that the flow blockage incident would happen because of a mount of free bubble formation in the flow passage when the cavity developed to certain extend, which caused head drop behavior and power broken dramatically and influenced the output power.

  18. Acoustic methods for cavitation mapping in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, M.; Xu, S.; Ding, T.; Hu, H.; Liu, R.; Bai, C.; Lu, S.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, cavitation is increasingly utilized in a wide range of applications in biomedical field. Monitoring the spatial-temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles is of great significance for efficiency and safety in biomedical applications. In this paper, several acoustic methods for cavitation mapping proposed or modified on the basis of existing work will be presented. The proposed novel ultrasound line-by-line/plane-by-plane method can depict cavitation bubbles distribution with high spatial and temporal resolution and may be developed as a potential standard 2D/3D cavitation field mapping method. The modified ultrafast active cavitation mapping based upon plane wave transmission and reception as well as bubble wavelet and pulse inversion technique can apparently enhance the cavitation to tissue ratio in tissue and further assist in monitoring the cavitation mediated therapy with good spatial and temporal resolution. The methods presented in this paper will be a foundation to promote the research and development of cavitation imaging in non-transparent medium.

  19. Experimental investigation on noise of cavitation nozzle and its chaotic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Liu, Haifeng; Xu, Junchao; Tang, Chuanlin

    2013-07-01

    The researches of cavitation noise mainly focus on the incipiency and developing of cavitation to prevent the cavititation erosion in the hydraulic machinery, while there is few report about the collapse strength of cavitation bubbles produced by water jet through the cavitation nozzle to utilize efficiently the collapse energy of cavitation bubbles. The cavitation noise signals are collected with hydrophones for the cavitation nozzle and general nozzle at the target position and the nozzle exit separately in the conditions of different standoff distance. The features of signal's frequency spectrum and power spectrum are analyzed for various nozzles by way of classical methods. Meanwhile, based on chaotic theory, phase space reconstruction is processed and the maximum Lyapunov index is calculated separately for each cavitation signal's time series. The results of chaotic analysis are compared with the one of conventional analysis. The analyzed data show that there are the marked differences at the spectrum between the cavitation nozzle and general nozzle at the target position while the standoff distance is 35 mm, which mainly displays at the high frequency segment (60-120 kHz). The maximum Lyapunov index calculated appear at standoff distance 35 mm, which is an optimum standoff distance for the most bubbles to collapse at the target. At the nozzle exit, the noise signal of cavitation nozzle is different from the general nozzle, which also displays at the high frequency segment. The results demonstrate that the water jet modulated by the cavitation nozzle can produce effectually cavitation, and at the target position the amplitude and energy of noise spectrum in high frequency segment for cavitation nozzle are higher than conventional nozzle and the Lyapunov index of cavitation nozzle is larger than conventional nozzle as the standoff distance is less than 55 mm. The proposed research reveals that the cavitation noise produced by collapse of cavitation bubbles

  20. Activating Molecules, Ions, and Solid Particles with Acoustic Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Pflieger, Rachel; Chave, Tony; Virot, Matthieu; Nikitenko, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical and physical effects of ultrasound arise not from a direct interaction of molecules with sound waves, but rather from the acoustic cavitation: the nucleation, growth, and implosive collapse of microbubbles in liquids submitted to power ultrasound. The violent implosion of bubbles leads to the formation of chemically reactive species and to the emission of light, named sonoluminescence. In this manuscript, we describe the techniques allowing study of extreme intrabubble conditions and chemical reactivity of acoustic cavitation in solutions. The analysis of sonoluminescence spectra of water sparged with noble gases provides evidence for nonequilibrium plasma formation. The photons and the "hot" particles generated by cavitation bubbles enable to excite the non-volatile species in solutions increasing their chemical reactivity. For example the mechanism of ultrabright sonoluminescence of uranyl ions in acidic solutions varies with uranium concentration: sonophotoluminescence dominates in diluted solutions, and collisional excitation contributes at higher uranium concentration. Secondary sonochemical products may arise from chemically active species that are formed inside the bubble, but then diffuse into the liquid phase and react with solution precursors to form a variety of products. For instance, the sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV) in pure water provides an innovative synthetic route for monodispersed nanoparticles of metallic platinum without any templates or capping agents. Many studies reveal the advantages of ultrasound to activate the divided solids. In general, the mechanical effects of ultrasound strongly contribute in heterogeneous systems in addition to chemical effects. In particular, the sonolysis of PuO2 powder in pure water yields stable colloids of plutonium due to both effects. PMID:24747272

  1. Activating molecules, ions, and solid particles with acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Pflieger, Rachel; Chave, Tony; Virot, Matthieu; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2014-04-11

    The chemical and physical effects of ultrasound arise not from a direct interaction of molecules with sound waves, but rather from the acoustic cavitation: the nucleation, growth, and implosive collapse of microbubbles in liquids submitted to power ultrasound. The violent implosion of bubbles leads to the formation of chemically reactive species and to the emission of light, named sonoluminescence. In this manuscript, we describe the techniques allowing study of extreme intrabubble conditions and chemical reactivity of acoustic cavitation in solutions. The analysis of sonoluminescence spectra of water sparged with noble gases provides evidence for nonequilibrium plasma formation. The photons and the "hot" particles generated by cavitation bubbles enable to excite the non-volatile species in solutions increasing their chemical reactivity. For example the mechanism of ultrabright sonoluminescence of uranyl ions in acidic solutions varies with uranium concentration: sonophotoluminescence dominates in diluted solutions, and collisional excitation contributes at higher uranium concentration. Secondary sonochemical products may arise from chemically active species that are formed inside the bubble, but then diffuse into the liquid phase and react with solution precursors to form a variety of products. For instance, the sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV) in pure water provides an innovative synthetic route for monodispersed nanoparticles of metallic platinum without any templates or capping agents. Many studies reveal the advantages of ultrasound to activate the divided solids. In general, the mechanical effects of ultrasound strongly contribute in heterogeneous systems in addition to chemical effects. In particular, the sonolysis of PuO2 powder in pure water yields stable colloids of plutonium due to both effects.

  2. Large-scale atomistic simulations of helium-3 bubble growth in complex palladium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Lucas M.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Wong, Bryan M.

    2016-05-18

    Palladium is an attractive material for hydrogen and hydrogen-isotope storage applications due to its properties of large storage density and high diffusion of lattice hydrogen. When considering tritium storage, the material’s structural and mechanical integrity is threatened by both the embrittlement effect of hydrogen and the creation and evolution of additional crystal defects (e.g., dislocations, stacking faults) caused by the formation and growth of helium-3 bubbles. Using recently developed inter-atomic potentials for the palladium-silver-hydrogen system, we perform large-scale atomistic simulations to examine the defect-mediated mechanisms that govern helium bubble growth. Our simulations show the evolution of a distribution of material defects, and we compare the material behavior displayed with expectations from experiment and theory. In conclusion, we also present density functional theory calculations to characterize ideal tensile and shear strengths for these materials, which enable the understanding of how and why our developed potentials either meet or confound these expectations.

  3. Large-scale atomistic simulations of helium-3 bubble growth in complex palladium alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Hale, Lucas M.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Wong, Bryan M.

    2016-05-18

    Palladium is an attractive material for hydrogen and hydrogen-isotope storage applications due to its properties of large storage density and high diffusion of lattice hydrogen. When considering tritium storage, the material’s structural and mechanical integrity is threatened by both the embrittlement effect of hydrogen and the creation and evolution of additional crystal defects (e.g., dislocations, stacking faults) caused by the formation and growth of helium-3 bubbles. Using recently developed inter-atomic potentials for the palladium-silver-hydrogen system, we perform large-scale atomistic simulations to examine the defect-mediated mechanisms that govern helium bubble growth. Our simulations show the evolution of a distribution of materialmore » defects, and we compare the material behavior displayed with expectations from experiment and theory. In conclusion, we also present density functional theory calculations to characterize ideal tensile and shear strengths for these materials, which enable the understanding of how and why our developed potentials either meet or confound these expectations.« less

  4. Comparison of Multibubble and Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matula, Thomas J.; Roy, Ronald A.; Mourad, Pierre D.; McNamara, William B., III; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    1995-09-01

    Comparisons of the spectral characteristics of sonoluminescence from cavitation in bubble fields (MBSL) versus cavitation of single bubbles (SBSL) have been made for aqueous solutions under similar experimental conditions. In particular, alkali metal chloride solutions exhibit sonoluminescence emission from excited state Na or K atoms in MBSL, while SBSL exhibits no such emission. Since the metal ions are not volatile, participation of the initially liquid phase must occur in MBSL. Surface wave and microjet formation in cavitating bubble fields versus the high spherical symmetry of collapse of an isolated bubble may account for the observed differences.

  5. Improving microalgal growth with reduced diameters of aeration bubbles and enhanced mass transfer of solution in an oscillating flow field.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zongbo; Cheng, Jun; Lin, Richen; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-07-01

    A novel oscillating gas aerator combined with an oscillating baffle was proposed to generate smaller aeration bubbles and enhance solution mass transfer, which can improve microalgal growth in a raceway pond. A high-speed photography system (HSP) was used to measure bubble diameter and generation time, and online precise dissolved oxygen probes and pH probes were used to measure mass-transfer coefficient and mixing time. Bubble diameter and generation time decreased with decreased aeration gas rate, decreased orifice diameter, and increased water velocity in the oscillating gas aerator. The optimized oscillating gas aerator decreased bubble diameter and generation time by 25% and 58%, respectively, compared with a horizontal tubular gas aerator. Using an oscillating gas aerator and an oscillating baffle in a raceway pond increased the solution mass-transfer coefficient by 15% and decreased mixing time by 32%; consequently, microalgal biomass yield increased by 19%.

  6. The effects of geometric, flow, and boiling parameters on bubble growth and behavior in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaroo, Randy

    Air bubble injection and subcooled flow boiling experiments have been performed to investigate the liquid flow field and bubble nucleation, growth, and departure, in part to contribute to the DOE Nuclear HUB project, Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The main objective was to obtain quantitative data and compartmentalize the many different interconnected aspects of the boiling process -- from the channel geometry, to liquid and gas interactions, to underlying heat transfer mechanisms. The air bubble injection experiments were performed in annular and rectangular geometries and yielded data on bubble formation and departure from a small hole on the inner tube surface, subsequent motion and deformation of the detached bubbles, and interactions with laminar or turbulent water flow. Instantaneous and ensemble- average liquid velocity profiles have been obtained using a Particle Image Velocimetry technique and a high speed video camera. Reynolds numbers for these works ranged from 1,300 to 7,700. Boiling experiments have been performed with subcooled water at atmospheric pres- sure in the same annular channel geometry as the air injection experiments. A second flow loop with a slightly larger annular channel was constructed to perform further boiling experiments at elevated pressures up to 10 bar. High speed video and PIV measurements of turbulent velocity profiles in the presence of small vapor bubbles on the heated rod are presented. The liquid Reynolds number for this set of experiments ranged from 5,460 to 86,000. It was observed that as the vapor bubbles are very small compared to the injected air bubbles, further experiments were performed using a microscopic objective to obtain higher spatial resolution for velocity fields near the heated wall. Multiple correlations for the bubble liftoff diameter, liftoff time and bub- ble history number were evaluated against a number of experimental datasets from previous works, resulting in a

  7. Dynamics of a Spherical Vapor/Gas Bubble in Varying Pressure Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Hisanobu; Kameda, Masaharu

    A mathematical model is developed to simulate the radial motion of cavitation bubbles. The heat and mass transports including phase change are formulated precisely. In order to reduce the computational cost without loss of the important thermo-fluid phenomena, two simplifications are employed: time-dependent bubble radius is described using the Rayleigh-Plesset equation; the pressure in the bubble is assumed to be uniform in space. For validation of the model, the transient radial motion of an air bubble in water is observed experimentally. A shock tube is used to make the sudden pressure reduction from atmospheric to below the saturated vapor pressure. The bubble radius is measured by high-speed photography, in which an interferomtric laser imaging technique is used for accurate determination of the initial bubble radius. The radial motion is successfully predicted by using this model. The temperature reduction at the bubble wall is a predominant factor on the bubble growth rate under superheated conditions, even if the liquid temperature is close to room temperature. The numerical result indicates that the growth rate is very sensitive to initial bubble radius, ambient pressure, and liquid temperature.

  8. The Role of Cavitation in Liposome Formation

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Eric S.; Pitt, William G.; Woodbury, Dixon J.

    2007-01-01

    Liposome size is a vital parameter of many quantitative biophysical studies. Sonication, or exposure to ultrasound, is used widely to manufacture artificial liposomes, yet little is known about the mechanism by which liposomes are affected by ultrasound. Cavitation, or the oscillation of small gas bubbles in a pressure-varying field, has been shown to be responsible for many biophysical effects of ultrasound on cells. In this study, we correlate the presence and type of cavitation with a decrease in liposome size. Aqueous lipid suspensions surrounding a hydrophone were exposed to various intensities of ultrasound and hydrostatic pressures before measuring their size distribution with dynamic light scattering. As expected, increasing ultrasound intensity at atmospheric pressure decreased the average liposome diameter. The presence of collapse cavitation was manifested in the acoustic spectrum at high ultrasonic intensities. Increasing hydrostatic pressure was shown to inhibit the presence of collapse cavitation. Collapse cavitation, however, did not correlate with decreases in liposome size, as changes in size still occurred when collapse cavitation was inhibited either by lowering ultrasound intensity or by increasing static pressure. We propose a mechanism whereby stable cavitation, another type of cavitation present in sound fields, causes fluid shearing of liposomes and reduction of liposome size. A mathematical model was developed based on the Rayleigh-Plesset equation of bubble dynamics and principles of acoustic microstreaming to estimate the shear field magnitude around an oscillating bubble. This model predicts the ultrasound intensities and pressures needed to create shear fields sufficient to cause liposome size change, and correlates well with our experimental data. PMID:17766335

  9. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, R Glynn; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark

    2010-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 muC will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 muC by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 mus after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 muC and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber ( approximately 300 mus), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  10. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, Ray G; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 C will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 C by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 s after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 C and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber (~300 s), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  11. Growth characteristics of Chlorella sorokiniana in airlift and bubble column photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kanhaiya; Das, Debabrata

    2012-07-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of bioCO(2) sequestration using Chlorella sorokiniana. It was found that 5% CO(2) (v/v) in air was the most suitable concentration for the growth of this organism. At this concentration, the maximum rate of CO(2) sequestered and the biomass obtained were found to be 1.21 g L(-1)d(-1) and 4.4 g L(-1) respectively. Modeling and simulation of the growth profile was obtained using the logistic equation. Further, at higher CO(2) concentrations, pH drop in the growth media, TAP [-acetate], was prevented by replacing NH(4)Cl by NaNO(3.) Additionally, the study evaluated the performance of two reactors namely: bubble column and airlift reactor based on their growth profile and transport properties like K(L)a and mixing time. The growth profile was better in airlift reactor and it provides cyclic axial mixing of media. K(L)a of downcomer was significantly lower than the riser in airlift reactor.

  12. Metallic bubbles nucleation and growth in VO2 nanofilms: insights from TDDFT+DMFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkowski, Volodymyr; Galicia-Hernandez, Jose Mario; Hernandez-Cocoletzi, Gregorio; Rahman, Talat S.

    We apply a time-dependent density-functional theory + dynamical mean-field theory (TDDFT+DMFT) approach to model the response of insulating nanofilms of VO2 to perturbations by ultrafast laser pulses. We focus on the spatially-resolved metallization of the systems, and especially on the process of nucleation and time-dependence of the size of the ''surface'' and ''bulk'' metallic domains (bubbles) as a function of film width. In particular, we find that the initial universal (parameter-independent) growth of the domains (radius R ~t 1 / 2), changes by the bubbles shrinking (R ~t-a , a ~ 1) as a result of Coulomb scattering effects, and eventually by post-femto-second phonon-involved relaxation of the systems to the equilibrium accompanied by infrared photoemission. The time-dependent conductivity obtained from the above results is in a good agreement with available experimental data. Work supported in part by DOE Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-07ER46354 and by CONACYT Scholarship # 23210 (J.M.G.H.).

  13. Numerical study of nucleation and growth of bubbles in viscous magmas

    SciTech Connect

    Toramaru, A.

    1995-02-01

    The nucleation and growth processes of bubbles in viscous magmas with a constant decompression rate have been numerically investigated based on a formation which accounts for effects of viscosity, as well as diffusivity, interfacial tension, and decompression rate. The numerical solutions show two regimes in the nucleation and growth process, a diffusion-controlled regime and a viscosity-controlled regime, mainly depending on the decompression rate, initial saturation pressure and viscosity. The basic mechanism common to both regimes is that growth governs nucleation through depletion of degassing components. In basaltic eruptions the vesiculation is essentially controlled by diffusion, and the viscosity-controlled regime is limited to very high decompression rate and very small water content. When andesitic magma saturated by water at 10 MPa is decompressed through the propagation of rarefraction wave induced by a landslide, as took place in the Mount St. Helens 1980 eruption, the vesiculation is controlled by the viscosity up to 100 m depth. On the other hand, in a rhyolitic magma for the same situation, vesiculation is controlled by the viscosity over the whole depth of the magma column. In the viscosity-controlled regime, the vesicularity may be 90% or less as seen in silicic pumice, whereas in the diffusion-controlled regime the vesicularity equals or exceeds 98% such as in reticulite in Hawaiian basalt. An observed variation of the number density of bubbles by several orders of magnitude in plinian eruptions and the correlation with the SiO2 content can be attributed approximately to the dependence of diffusivity of viscosity on SiO2 content and temperature, assuming the apparent correlation between SiO2 content and temperature of magma.

  14. Single-Bubble and Multibubble Sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    1999-11-01

    Computer simulations of radiation processes in an air bubble and an argon bubble are performed under a condition of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) based on a quasiadiabatic compression model of a bubble collapse. It is clarified that emissions from excited molecules are strongly quenched by high pressure and temperature inside a SBSL bubble and SBSL originates in the emissions from plasma. It is pointed out that sonoluminescence from cavitation fields (MBSL) originates in emissions from excited molecules, which is not quenched due to the much lower pressure and temperature inside the MBSL bubbles.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Bubble Dynamics in Deformable Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2011-11-01

    The growth and collapse of cavitation bubbles has been implicated as a potential damage mechanism leading to the rupture of blood vessels in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). While this phenomenon has been investigated numerically, the resulting simulations have often assumed some degree of symmetry and have often failed to include a large number of influential physics, such as viscosity, compressibility, surface tension, phase change and fluid-structure interactions. We present here our efforts to explore the role that cavitation bubbles play in the rupture of blood vessels in SWL and to improve upon the current state of the numerical approach. We have developed a three-dimensional, high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, multicomponent flow algorithm that accounts for the effects of viscosity and surface tension. At this time, we omit any effects due to elasticity and instead, as a first step, model tissue as a viscous and stiffened gas. We discuss preliminary results for the Rayleigh and shock-induced collapse of a gas bubble within a blood vessel and characterize the increase in vessel deformation with increasing bubble confinement and proximity to the vessel wall. This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health grant No. 2PO1DK43881.

  16. Dynamics of concerted bubble cluster collapse in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Colonius, Tim; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-10-01

    Cavitation bubble cluster collapse at the surface of artificial kidney stones during shock wave lithotripsy was investigated in vitro by means of multiframe high-speed photography, passive cavitation detection (PCD), and pressure waveform measurements using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone (FOPH). It was observed that after the passage of the lithotripter shock pulse the stone was covered by numerous individual bubbles. During their growth phase the bubbles coalesced into bubble clusters, with the biggest cluster at the proximal face of the stone. High-speed camera images suggested that cluster collapse started at the periphery and ended with a violent collapse in a small region in the center of the surface of the stone. Shadowgraphy resolved numerous secondary shock waves emitted during this focused collapse. Shock wave emission during cluster collapse was confirmed by PCD. Measurement with the FOPH showed that these shock waves were typically of short duration (0.2 μs). The majority of the shock waves emanating from cluster collapse were low amplitude but some shock waves registered amplitudes on the order of the incident shock pulse (tens of MPa). [Work supported by NIH DK43881, DK55674.

  17. Experimental characterization of aviation-fuel cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Patrick F.; Thomas, Flint O.; Davis, Michael P.; Dorofeeva, Irina E.

    2010-11-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of the gaseous cavitation of JP-8 aviation fuel in a converging-diverging nozzle are presented. Fuel cavitation is experimentally characterized by high-speed digital imaging, static pressure distributions, and nonintrusive void fraction and bubble velocity measurements. For comparative purposes, experiments were performed using distilled water and dodecane for the same nozzle and nozzle pressure ratios. Dodecane, the largest component of JP-8 by weight, served as its single-component surrogate. For each working fluid, the experiments examined two different flow regimes: an initially single-phase liquid flow in which no cavitation occurred and another that evolved into two-phase cavitating flow. Additional experiments were performed to study the effect of air bubbles injected into either water or JP-8 at the nozzle inlet. For a sufficiently low range of imposed back pressures, gaseous cavitation led to choked flow for each working fluid. The character of the cavitation in the three fluids was different. These differences are highlighted and plausible mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior are discussed.

  18. Visualization of acoustic cavitation effects on suspended calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Wagterveld, R M; Boels, L; Mayer, M J; Witkamp, G J

    2011-01-01

    The acoustic cavitation (42,080 Hz, 7.1 W cm(-2) or 17 W) effects on suspended calcite crystals, sized between 5 and 50 μm, have been visualized for the first time using high speed photography. High speed recordings with a duration of 1 s containing up to 300,000 frames per second, revealed the effect of cluster and streamer cavitation on several calcite crystals. Cavitation clusters, evolved from cavitation inception and collapse, caused attrition, disruption of aggregates and deagglomeration, whereas streamer cavitation was observed to cause deagglomeration only. Cavitation on the surface gave the crystals momentum. However, it is shown that breakage of accelerated crystals by interparticle collisions is unrealistic because of their small sizes and low velocities. Crystals that were accelerated by bubble expansion, subsequently experienced a deceleration much stronger than expected from drag forces, upon bubble collapse. Experiments with pre-dried crystals seemed to support the current theory on bubble nucleation through the presence of pre-existing gas pockets. However, experiments with fully wetted crystals also showed the nucleation of bubbles on the crystal surface. Although microjet impingement on the crystal surface could not be directly visualized with high speed photography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of irradiated calcite seeds showed deep circular indentations. It was suggested that these indentations might be caused by shockwave induced jet impingement. Furthermore, the appearance of voluminous fragments with large planes of fracture indicated that acoustic cavitation can also cause the breakage of single crystal structures.

  19. Photoacoustic cavitation for theranostics: mechanism, current progress and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Qin, D.; Wan, M.

    2015-12-01

    As an emerging cavitation technology, photoacoustic cavitation (PAC) means the formation of bubbles in liquids using focused laser and pre-established ultrasound synchronously. Its significant advantages include the decreased threshold of each modality and the precise location of cavitation determined by the focused laser. In this paper, a brief review of PAC is presented, including the physical mechanism description, the classic experimental technology, the representative results in variety of media, and its applications in biomedical imaging and therapy. Moreover, some preliminary results of PAC in perfluoropentane (PFP) liquid and PFP droplets investigated by passive cavitation detection (PCD) in our group are also presented.

  20. Localization in an Acoustic Cavitation Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Bo-Ya; An, Yu

    2017-03-01

    Using a nonlinear sound wave equation for a bubbly liquid in conjunction with an equation for bubble pulsation, we predict and experimentally demonstrate the appearance of a gap in the frequency spectrum of a sound wave propagating in a cavitation cloud comprising bubbles. For bubbles with an ambient radius of 100 {\\mu}m, the calculations revealed that this gap corresponds to the phenomenon of sound wave localization. For bubbles with an ambient radius of 120 {\\mu}m, this spectral gap relates to a forbidden band of the sound wave. In the experiment, we observed the predicted gap in the frequency spectrum in soda water; however, in tap water, no spectral gap was present because the bubbles were much smaller than 100 {\\mu}m.

  1. Study on cavitation behavior during high-intensity focused ultrasound exposure by using optical and ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Kei; Takagi, Ryo; Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles are known to enhance the heating effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). In our previous study, the use of a “triggered HIFU” sequence consisting of a high-intensity pulse and a relatively low-intensity burst was proposed as an effective method to utilize the effect of cavitation bubbles. However, the duration of each component in the sequence has not been optimized. In this study, optical imaging was carried out to observe the behavior of cavitation bubbles in a gel phantom during the triggered HIFU exposure. Ultrasound imaging using the pulse inversion method was also conducted to detect the behavior of the bubbles. The results suggest that the oscillation of cavitation bubbles become inactive as the duration of HIFU burst exposure increases to the order of 10 ms. It was also suggested that ultrasonic imaging has potential use for detecting a change in the oscillation of cavitation bubbles for optimizing a triggered HIFU sequence.

  2. Effect of vibration amplitude on vapor cavitation in journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Jacobson, B. O.

    1986-01-01

    Computational movies were used to analyze the formation and collapse of vapor cavitation bubbles in a submerged journal bearing. The effect of vibration amplitude on vapor cavitation was studied for a journal undergoing circular whirl. The boundary conditions were implemented using Elrod's algorithm, which conserves mass flow through the cavitation bubble as well as through the oil-film region of the bearing. The vibration amplitudes for the different cases studied resulted in maximum eccentricity ratios ranging from 0.4 to 0.9. The minimum eccentricity ratio reached in each case was 0.1. For the least vibration amplitude studied in which the eccentricity ratio varied between 0.1 and 0.4, no vapor cavitation occurred. The largest vibration amplitude (i.e., eccentricity ratios of 0.1 to 0.9) resulted in vapor cavitation present 76 percent of one complete orbit.

  3. The making of a cavitation children's book

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Patterson, Brandon; Lazar, Erika

    2016-11-01

    Engaging young children in science is particularly important to future scientific endeavors. From thunderstorms to the waterpark, children are constantly exposed to the wonders of fluid dynamics. Among fluid phenomena, bubbles have always fascinated children. Yet some of the most exciting aspects of bubbles, such as cavitation, are scarcely known to non-experts. To introduce cavitation to a five year old audience, we wrote "Brooke Bubble Breaks Things", a children's book about the adventures of a cavitation bubble learning about all the things she could break. In this talk, we discuss how a children's book is made by walking through the steps involved in creating the book from concept to publication. We focus on strategies for successfully communicating a technical message while balancing entertainment and fidelity to nature. To provide parents, teachers, and young inquiring minds with a detailed explanation of the physics and applications of cavitation, we also created a website with detailed explanations, animations, and links to further information. We aim to convince the fluids community that writing picture books is an intellectually stimulating and fun way of communicating fluids principles and applications to children. ArtsEngine Microgrant at the University of Michigan.

  4. Removal of residual nuclei following a cavitation event using low-amplitude ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Cain, Charles A; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A; Roberts, William W; Hall, Timothy L

    2014-10-01

    Microscopic residual bubble nuclei can persist on the order of 1 s following a cavitation event. These bubbles can limit the efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, because they attenuate pulses that arrive subsequent to their formation and seed repetitive cavitation activity at a discrete set of sites (cavitation memory). Here, we explore a strategy for the removal of these residual bubbles following a cavitation event, using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate bubble coalescence. All experiments were conducted in degassed water and monitored using high-speed photography. In each case, a 2-MHz histotripsy transducer was used to initiate cavitation activity (a cavitational bubble cloud), the collapse of which generated a population of residual bubble nuclei. This residual nuclei population was then sonicated using a 1 ms pulse from a separate 500-kHz transducer, which we term the bubble removal pulse. Bubble removal pulse amplitudes ranging from 0 to 1.7 MPa were tested, and the backlit area of shadow from bubbles remaining in the field following bubble removal was calculated to quantify efficacy. It was found that an ideal amplitude range exists (roughly 180 to 570 kPa) in which bubble removal pulses stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubble nuclei, effectively removing them from the field. Further optimization of bubble removal pulse sequences stands to provide an adjunct to cavitation-based ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, mitigating the effects of residual bubble nuclei that currently limit their efficacy.

  5. Removal of Residual Nuclei Following a Cavitation Event using Low-Amplitude Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Cain, Charles A.; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Microscopic residual bubble nuclei can persist on the order of 1 second following a cavitation event. These bubbles can limit the efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, as they attenuate pulses that arrive subsequent to their formation and seed repetitive cavitation activity at a discrete set of sites (cavitation memory). Here, we explore a strategy for the removal of these residual bubbles following a cavitation event, using low amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate bubble coalescence. All experiments were conducted in degassed water and monitored using high speed photography. In each case, a 2 MHz histotripsy transducer was used to initiate cavitation activity (a cavitational bubble cloud), the collapse of which generated a population of residual bubble nuclei. This residual nuclei population was then sonicated using a 1 ms pulse from a separate 500 kHz transducer, which we term the ‘bubble removal pulse.’ Bubble removal pulse amplitudes ranging from 0 to 1.7 MPa were tested, and the backlit area of shadow from bubbles remaining in the field following bubble removal was calculated to quantify efficacy. It was found that an ideal amplitude range exists (roughly 180 – 570 kPa) in which bubble removal pulses stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubble nuclei, effectively removing them from the field. Further optimization of bubble removal pulse sequences stands to provide an adjunct to cavitation-based ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, mitigating the effects of residual bubble nuclei that currently limit their efficacy. PMID:25265172

  6. Review on Lithotripsy and Cavitation in Urinary Stone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Morteza; Oral, Ozlem; Ekici, Sinan; Gozuacik, Devrim; Kosar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation is the sudden formation of vapor bubbles or voids in liquid media and occurs after rapid changes in pressure as a consequence of mechanical forces. It is mostly an undesirable phenomenon. Although the elimination of cavitation is a major topic in the study of fluid dynamics, its destructive nature could be exploited for therapeutic applications. Ultrasonic and hydrodynamic sources are two main origins for generating cavitation. The purpose of this review is to give the reader a general idea about the formation of cavitation phenomenon and existing biomedical applications of ultrasonic and hydrodynamic cavitation. Because of the high number of the studies on ultrasound cavitation in the literature, the main focus of this review is placed on the lithotripsy techniques, which have been widely used for the treatment of urinary stones. Accordingly, cavitation phenomenon and its basic concepts are presented in Section II. The significance of the ultrasound cavitation in the urinary stone treatment is discussed in Section III in detail and hydrodynamic cavitation as an important alternative for the ultrasound cavitation is included in Section IV. Finally, side effects of using both ultrasound and hydrodynamic cavitation in biomedical applications are presented in Section V.

  7. Impeded growth of magnetic flux bubbles in the intermediate state pattern of type I superconductors.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, V; Gourdon, C; Okada, T

    2004-04-09

    Normal state bubble patterns in type I superconducting indium and lead slabs are studied by the high resolution magneto-optical imaging technique. The size of bubbles is found to be independent of the long-range interaction between the normal state domains. Under bubble diameter and slab thickness proper scaling, the results gather onto a single master curve. We calculate the equilibrium diameter of an isolated bubble resulting from the competition between the Biot-and-Savart interaction of the Meissner current encircling the bubble and the superconductor-normal interface energy. A good quantitative agreement with the master curve is found over two decades of the magnetic Bond number. The isolation of each bubble in the superconductor and the interface energy are shown to preclude any continuous size variation of the bubbles after their formation, contrary to the prediction of mean-field models.

  8. Acoustical emission from bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longuet-Higgins, Michael S.

    1991-12-01

    The scientific objectives of this report are to investigate the dynamics of bubbles formed from a free surface (particularly the upper surface of the ocean) by breaking waves, and the resulting emission of underwater sound. The chief natural source of underwater sound in the ocean at frequencies from 0.5 to 50 kHz is known to be the acoustical emission from newly-formed bubbles and bubble clouds, particularly those created by breaking waves and rain. Attention has been drawn to the occurrence of high-speed jets directed into the bubble just after bubble closure. They have been observed both in rain-drop impacts and in the release of bubbles from an underwater nozzle. Qualitatively they are similar to the inward jets seen in the collapse of a cavitation bubble. There is also a similarity to the highly-accelerated upward jets in standing water waves (accelerations greater than 20g) or in bubbles bursting at a free surface. We have adopted a theoretical approach based on the dynamics of incompressible fluids with a free surface.

  9. Bursting Bubbles and Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Wrenn, Steven P.; Dicker, Stephen M.; Small, Eleanor F.; Dan, Nily R.; Mleczko, Michał; Schmitz, Georg; Lewin, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses various interactions between ultrasound, phospholipid monolayer-coated gas bubbles, phospholipid bilayer vesicles, and cells. The paper begins with a review of microbubble physics models, developed to describe microbubble dynamic behavior in the presence of ultrasound, and follows this with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict inertial cavitation profiles. Predicted sensitivities of inertial cavitation to changes in the values of membrane properties, including surface tension, surface dilatational viscosity, and area expansion modulus, indicate that area expansion modulus exerts the greatest relative influence on inertial cavitation. Accordingly, the theoretical dependence of area expansion modulus on chemical composition - in particular, poly (ethylene glyclol) (PEG) - is reviewed, and predictions of inertial cavitation for different PEG molecular weights and compositions are compared with experiment. Noteworthy is the predicted dependence, or lack thereof, of inertial cavitation on PEG molecular weight and mole fraction. Specifically, inertial cavitation is predicted to be independent of PEG molecular weight and mole fraction in the so-called mushroom regime. In the “brush” regime, however, inertial cavitation is predicted to increase with PEG mole fraction but to decrease (to the inverse 3/5 power) with PEG molecular weight. While excellent agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved, it is shown that the calculated inertial cavitation profiles depend strongly on the criterion used to predict inertial cavitation. This is followed by a discussion of nesting microbubbles inside the aqueous core of microcapsules and how this significantly increases the inertial cavitation threshold. Nesting thus offers a means for avoiding unwanted inertial cavitation and cell death during imaging and other applications such as sonoporation. A review of putative sonoporation mechanisms is then presented, including those

  10. Numerical study of cavitation inception in the near field of an axisymmetric jet at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Stefano; Knio, Omar M.; Katz, Joseph

    2000-10-01

    Cavitation inception in the near field of high Reynolds number axisymmetric jets is analyzed using a simplified computational model. The model combines a vorticity-stream-function finite-difference scheme for the simulation of the unsteady flow field with a simplified representation for microscopic bubbles that are injected at the jet inlet. The motion of the bubbles is tracked in a Lagrangian reference frame by integrating a semiempirical dynamical equation which accounts for pressure, drag, and lift forces. The likelihood of cavitation inception is estimated based on the distributions of pressure and microscopic bubbles. The computations are used to examine the role of jet slenderness ratio, Reynolds number, bubble size, and bubble injection location on the cavitation inception indices. The results indicate that, for all bubble sizes considered, the cavitation inception index increases as the jet slenderness ratio decreases. Larger bubbles entrain more rapidly into the cores of concentrated vortices than smaller bubbles, and the corresponding inception indices are generally higher than those of smaller bubbles. The inception indices for larger bubbles are insensitive to the injection location, while the inception indices of smaller bubbles tend to increase when they are injected inside the shear layer near the nozzle lip. Although it affects the bubble distributions, variation of the Reynolds number leads to insignificant changes in pressure minima and in the inception indices of larger bubbles, having noticeable effect only on the inception indices of smaller bubbles. Computed results are consistent with, and provide plausible explanations for, several trends observed in recent jet cavitation experiments.

  11. Optic cavitation with CW lasers: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Martinez, J. P.; Berrospe-Rodriguez, C.; Aguilar, G.; Ramirez-San-Juan, J. C.; Ramos-Garcia, R.

    2014-12-01

    The most common method to generate optic cavitation involves the focusing of short-pulsed lasers in a transparent liquid media. In this work, we review a novel method of optic cavitation that uses low power CW lasers incident in highly absorbing liquids. This novel method of cavitation is called thermocavitation. Light absorbed heats up the liquid beyond its boiling temperature (spinodal limit) in a time span of microseconds to milliseconds (depending on the optical intensity). Once the liquid is heated up to its spinodal limit (˜300 °C for pure water), the superheated water becomes unstable to random density fluctuations and an explosive phase transition to vapor takes place producing a fast-expanding vapor bubble. Eventually, the bubble collapses emitting a strong shock-wave. The bubble is always attached to the surface taking a semi-spherical shape, in contrast to that produced by pulsed lasers in transparent liquids, where the bubble is produced at the focal point. Using high speed video (105 frames/s), we study the bubble's dynamic behavior. Finally, we show that heat diffusion determines the water superheated volume and, therefore, the amplitude of the shock wave. A full experimental characterization of thermocavitation is described.

  12. PIV Analysis of Cavitation Flow Characteristics of He II

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, K.; Murakami, M.

    2006-04-27

    In the present experimental study cavitation phenomena in both He I and He II flows were investigated through the application of the PIV technique and visual observation under the saturated vapor pressure condition. The cavitation flow was generated in the downstream regions of a Venturi channel and a converging jet nozzle driven by a contracting metal bellows. It is seen that cavitation inception is a kind of stochastic process and has definite temperature dependence. The spatial distribution of the cavitation bubble velocity is measured by using the PIV technique. Some differences in the cavitating flow pattern and the void fraction are found between He II and He I cavitating flows. The PIV result indicates that the void fraction for He II flow is larger than that for He I flow.

  13. Use of ultrasonics in shear layer cavitation control.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Dhiman

    2003-08-01

    In this paper we report results from some investigations on the use of ultrasonics in controlling hydrodynamic cavitation in the shear layer downstream of a sudden expansion. Control of this type of cavitation has been achieved by modulating the local pressure that was experienced by a nucleus present in the shear layer. This modulation was made possible by using a piezoelectric device, termed as Ultrasonic Pressure Modulator (UPM). The performance of UPM has been studied at different dissolved gas concentrations with electrolysis bubbles as nuclei. Control of cavitation due to natural nuclei has also been attempted. Efficiency of UPM, in reducing cavitation, was seen to be dependent on the driving frequency employed. Experimental and numerical studies have been conducted to bring out the physics behind this approach of cavitation control. Different measures of cavitation control have been identified and some possible applications of this method have also been outlined.

  14. Stem xylem resistance to cavitation is related to xylem structure but not to growth and water-use efficiency at the within-population level in Populus nigra L.

    PubMed

    Guet, Justine; Fichot, Régis; Lédée, Camille; Laurans, Françoise; Cochard, Hervé; Delzon, Sylvain; Bastien, Catherine; Brignolas, Franck

    2015-08-01

    Xylem resistance to drought-induced cavitation is a key trait of plant water relations. This study assesses the genetic variation expressed for stem cavitation resistance within a population of a riparian species, the European black poplar (Populus nigra L.), and explores its relationships with xylem anatomy, water-use efficiency (WUE), and growth. Sixteen structural and physiological traits related to cavitation resistance, xylem anatomy, growth, bud phenology, and WUE were measured on 33 P. nigra genotypes grown under optimal irrigation in a 2-year-old clonal experiment in a nursery. Significant genetic variation was expressed for the xylem tension inducing 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity (Ψ50) within the studied population, as attested by the high value of broad-sense heritability estimated for this trait (H (2) ind = 0.72). Stem cavitation resistance was associated with xylem structure: the more cavitation-resistant genotypes exhibited lower hydraulic efficiency and higher mechanical reinforcement as assessed from stem xylem cross sections. By contrast, Ψ50 was not significantly related to shoot height increment, total above-ground dry mass, or bulk leaf carbon isotope discrimination, a proxy for intrinsic WUE. These findings indicate that the trade-offs between xylem resistance to cavitation, hydraulic efficiency, and mechanical reinforcement can occur at the within-population level. Given that the studied genotypes were exposed to the same environmental conditions and evolutionary drivers in situ, the trade-offs detected at this scale are expected to reflect true functional relationships.

  15. Numerical simulation on the cavitation of waterjet propulsion pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, C. Z.; Cheng, L.; Shang, Y. N.; Zhou, J. R.; Yang, F.; Jin, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Waterjet propulsion system is widely used in high speed vessels with advantages of simple transmission mechanism, low noise underwater and good manoeuvrability. Compared with the propeller, waterjet propulsion can be used flow stamping to increasing cavitation resistance at high speed. But under certain conditions, such as low ship speed or high ship speed, cavitation problem still exists. If water-jet propulsion pump is run in cavitation condition for a long time, then the cavitation will cause a great deal of noise CFD is applied to analysis and predict the process of production and development of cavitation in waterjet propulsion pump. Based on the cavitation model of Zwart-Gerber-Belamri and a mixture of homogeneous flow model, commercial CFD software CFX was taken for characteristics of cavitation under the three operating conditions. Commercial software ANSYS 14.0 is used to build entity model, mesh and numerical simulation. The grid independence analysis determine the grid number of mixed flow pump model is about 1.6 million and the grid number of water-jet pump system unit is about 2.7 million. The cavitation characteristics of waterjet pump under three operating conditions are studied. The results show that the cavitation development trend is similar design and small rate of flow condition .Under the design conditions Cavitation bubbles are mainly gathered in suction surface of blade near the inlet side of the hub under the primary stage, and gradually extended to the water side in the direction of the rim with the loss of the inlet total pressure. Cavitation appears in hub before the blade rim, but the maximum value of gas content in blade rim is bigger than that in hub. Under large flow conditions, bubble along the direction of wheel hub extends to the rim gradually. Cavitation is found in the pressure surface of blade near the hub region under the critical point of cavitation nearby. When NPSHa is lower than critical point, the area covering by bubbles

  16. Sonoluminescence and sonochemiluminescence study of cavitation field in a 1.2MHz focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hui; Qiao, Yangzi; Cao, Hua; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-03-01

    An intensified CCD (ICCD) and an electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) were employed to observe the spatial distribution of sonoluminescence (SL) and sonochemiluminescence (SCL) generated by cavitation bubbles in a 1.2MHz HIFU field. Various sonication conditions, which are free field and focal region near a water-parenchyma interface, were studied. In addition, the differences of two shells coated UCAs were also investigated. In this study, an acoustic radiation force (ARF) counterbalance appliance was added to reduce bubble displacement. Cavitation mapping in this situation was also operated through SCL recording. SCL was also employed to measure cavitation does and map the spatial distribution of cavitation near a boundary of parenchyma.

  17. Application of the "Full Cavitation Model" to the fundamental study of cavitation in liquid metal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebon, G. S. B.; Pericleous, K.; Tzanakis, I.; Eskin, D.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic cavitation treatment of melt significantly improves the downstream properties and quality of conventional and advanced metallic materials. However, the transfer of this technology has been hindered by difficulties in treating large volumes of liquid metal. To improve the understanding of cavitation processing efficiency, the Full Cavitation Model, which is derived from a reduced form of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, is modified and applied to the two-phase problem of bubble propagation in liquid melt. Numerical simulations of the sound propagation are performed in the microsecond time scale to predict the maximum and minimum acoustic pressure amplitude fields in the domain. This field is applied to the source term of the bubble transport equation to predict the generation and destruction of cavitation bubbles in a time scale relevant to the fluid flow. The use of baffles to limit flow speed in a launder conduit is studied numerically, to determine the optimum configuration that maximizes the residence time of the liquid in high cavitation activity regions. With this configuration, it is then possible to convert the batch processing of liquid metal into a continuous process. The numerical simulations will be validated against water and aluminium alloy experiments, carried out at Brunel University.

  18. Detailed Jet Dynamics in a Collapsing Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    We present detailed visualizations of the micro-jet forming inside an aspherically collapsing cavitation bubble near a free surface. The high-quality visualizations of large and strongly deformed bubbles disclose so far unseen features of the dynamics inside the bubble, such as a mushroom-like flattened jet-tip, crown formation and micro-droplets. We also find that jetting near a free surface reduces the collapse time relative to the Rayleigh time.

  19. Cavitation dynamics of mechanical heart valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Lee, C S; Chandran, K B; Chen, L D

    1994-10-01

    Nine different mechanical mitral heart valves were chosen in order to study cavitation dynamics in detail in an in vitro flow system simulating a single event of mitral valve closure. The transvalvular pressure (ventricular minus atrial pressure) rise rate averaged during the valve closing period was used as an index of the loading rate. A series of photographs in the vicinity of the inflow surface of the valve were attempted during the bubble appearance period using a stroboscopic visualization technique. The in vitro study revealed three sources of cavitation initiation in the design of the mechanical heart valves tested: stop (seat stop or seating lip), inflow strut, and clearance (gap formed between the occluder and the housing or between the two occluders in the closed position). Among these, the occluder stop design was the most critical to cavitation since all valves having the stop at the edge of the major orifice area showed a higher intensity of cavitation and threshold loading rates below the estimated normal physiological value. The analysis of bubble locations and dynamics led us to propose that the fluid squeezing effect between the occluder and the stop in the housing and the streamline contraction effect along the clearance are factors responsible for cavitation incipience.

  20. Vapor-Gas Bubble Evolution and Growth in Extremely Viscous Fluids Under Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John; Balasubramaniam, R.; Nahra, Henry; Agui, Juan; Truong, Duc

    2008-01-01

    Formation of vapor and gas bubbles and voids is normal and expected in flow processes involving extremely viscous fluids in normal gravity. Practical examples of extremely viscous fluids are epoxy-like filler materials before the epoxy fluids cure to their permanent form to create a mechanical bond between two substrates. When these fluids flow with a free liquid interface exposed to vacuum, rapid bubble expansion process may ensue. Bubble expansion might compromise the mechanical bond strength. The potential sources for the origin of the gases might be incomplete out-gassing process prior to filler application; regasification due to seal leakage in the filler applicator; and/or volatiles evolved from cure reaction products formed in the hardening process. We embarked on a study that involved conducting laboratory experiments with imaging diagnostics in order to deduce the seriousness of bubbling caused by entrained air and volatile fluids under space vacuum and low gravity environment. We used clear fluids with the similar physical properties as the epoxy-like filler material to mimic the dynamics of bubbles. Another aspect of the present study was to determine the likelihood of bubbling resulting from dissolved gases nucleating from solution. These experimental studies of the bubble expansion are compared with predictions using a modified Rayleigh- Plesset equation, which models the bubble expansion.

  1. Towards numerical prediction of cavitation erosion

    PubMed Central

    Fivel, Marc; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Chandra Roy, Samir

    2015-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide a potential basis for a numerical prediction of cavitation erosion damage. The proposed method can be divided into two steps. The first step consists in determining the loading conditions due to cavitation bubble collapses. It is shown that individual pits observed on highly polished metallic samples exposed to cavitation for a relatively small time can be considered as the signature of bubble collapse. By combining pitting tests with an inverse finite-element modelling (FEM) of the material response to a representative impact load, loading conditions can be derived for each individual bubble collapse in terms of stress amplitude (in gigapascals) and radial extent (in micrometres). This step requires characterizing as accurately as possible the properties of the material exposed to cavitation. This characterization should include the effect of strain rate, which is known to be high in cavitation erosion (typically of the order of several thousands s−1). Nanoindentation techniques as well as compressive tests at high strain rate using, for example, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test system may be used. The second step consists in developing an FEM approach to simulate the material response to the repetitive impact loads determined in step 1. This includes a detailed analysis of the hardening process (isotropic versus kinematic) in order to properly account for fatigue as well as the development of a suitable model of material damage and failure to account for mass loss. Although the whole method is not yet fully operational, promising results are presented that show that such a numerical method might be, in the long term, an alternative to correlative techniques used so far for cavitation erosion prediction. PMID:26442139

  2. Towards numerical prediction of cavitation erosion.

    PubMed

    Fivel, Marc; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Chandra Roy, Samir

    2015-10-06

    This paper is intended to provide a potential basis for a numerical prediction of cavitation erosion damage. The proposed method can be divided into two steps. The first step consists in determining the loading conditions due to cavitation bubble collapses. It is shown that individual pits observed on highly polished metallic samples exposed to cavitation for a relatively small time can be considered as the signature of bubble collapse. By combining pitting tests with an inverse finite-element modelling (FEM) of the material response to a representative impact load, loading conditions can be derived for each individual bubble collapse in terms of stress amplitude (in gigapascals) and radial extent (in micrometres). This step requires characterizing as accurately as possible the properties of the material exposed to cavitation. This characterization should include the effect of strain rate, which is known to be high in cavitation erosion (typically of the order of several thousands s(-1)). Nanoindentation techniques as well as compressive tests at high strain rate using, for example, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test system may be used. The second step consists in developing an FEM approach to simulate the material response to the repetitive impact loads determined in step 1. This includes a detailed analysis of the hardening process (isotropic versus kinematic) in order to properly account for fatigue as well as the development of a suitable model of material damage and failure to account for mass loss. Although the whole method is not yet fully operational, promising results are presented that show that such a numerical method might be, in the long term, an alternative to correlative techniques used so far for cavitation erosion prediction.

  3. Modeling of Vapor Bubble Growth Under Nucleate Boiling Conditions in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Yu A.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamic model is developed to describe the evolution of a vapor bubble growing at a nucleation site on a superheated surface under arbitrary gravity. The bubble is separated from the surface by a thin microlayer and grows due to the evaporation from the microlayer interface. The average thickness of the microlayer increases as the bubble expands along the surface if the evaporation rate is lower than some critical value. The corresponding threshold value of the surface temperature has to be associated with the burn-out crisis. Two main reasons make for bubble separation, which are the buoyancy force and a force caused by the vapor momentum that comes to the bubble with vapor molecules. The latter force is somewhat diminished if condensation takes place at the upper bubble surface in subcooled liquids. The action of the said forces is opposed by inertia of the additional mass of liquid as the bubble center rises above the surface and by inertia of liquid being expelled by the growing bubble in radial directions. An extra pressure force arises due to the liquid inflow into the microlayer with a finite velocity. The last force helps in holding the bubble close to the surface during an initial stage of bubble evolution. Two limiting regimes with distinctly different properties can be singled out, depending on which of the forces that favor bubble detachment dominates. Under conditions of moderately reduced gravity, the situation is much the same as in normal gravity, although the bubble detachment volume increases as gravity diminishes. In microgravity, the buoyancy force is negligible. Then the bubble is capable of staying near the surface for a long time, with intensive evaporation from the microlayer. It suggests a drastic change in the physical mechanism of heat removal as gravity falls below a certain sufficiently low level. Inferences of the model and conclusions pertaining to effects caused on heat transfer processes by changes in bubble hydrodynamics induced

  4. Cavitation dynamics and directional microbubble ejection induced by intense femtosecond laser pulses in liquids.

    PubMed

    Faccio, D; Tamošauskas, G; Rubino, E; Darginavičius, J; Papazoglou, D G; Tzortzakis, S; Couairon, A; Dubietis, A

    2012-09-01

    We study cavitation dynamics when focusing ring-shaped femtosecond laser beams in water. This focusing geometry reduces detrimental nonlinear beam distortions and enhances energy deposition within the medium, localized at the focal spot. We observe remarkable postcollapse dynamics of elongated cavitation bubbles with high-speed ejection of microbubbles out of the laser focal region. Bubbles are ejected along the laser axis in both directions (away and towards the laser). The initial shape of the cavitation bubble is also seen to either enhance or completely suppress jet formation during collapse. In the absence of jetting, microbubble ejection occurs orthogonal to the laser propagation axis.

  5. High-speed motion picture camera experiments of cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A high-speed camera was used to investigate cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings. The length-diameter ratio of the bearing, the speeds of the shaft and bearing, the surface material of the shaft, and the static and dynamic eccentricity of the bearing were varied. The results reveal not only the appearance of gas cavitation, but also the development of previously unsuspected vapor cavitation. It was found that gas cavitation increases with time until, after many hundreds of pressure cycles, there is a constant amount of gas kept in the cavitation zone of the bearing. The gas can have pressures of many times the atmospheric pressure. Vapor cavitation bubbles, on the other hand, collapse at pressures lower than the atmospheric pressure and cannot be transported through a high-pressure zone, nor does the amount of vapor cavitation in a bearing increase with time. Analysis is given to support the experimental findings for both gas and vapor cavitation.

  6. Influence of the empirical coefficients of cavitation model on predicting cavitating flow in the centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hou-lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Haoqin

    2014-03-01

    The phenomenon of cavitation is an unsteady flow, which is nearly inevitable in pump. It would degrade the pump performance, produce vibration and noise and even damage the pump. Hence, to improve accuracy of the nu¬merical prediction of the pump cavitation performance is much desirable. In the present work, a homogenous model, the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model, is considered to investigate the influence of the empirical coefficients on predicting the pump cavitation performance, concerning a centrifugal pump. Three coefficients are analyzed, namely the nucleation site radius, evaporation and condensation coefficients. Also, the experiments are carried out to validate the numerical simulations. The results indicate that, to get a precise prediction, the approaches of declining the initial bubble radius, the condensation coefficient or increasing the evaporation coefficient are all feasible, especially for de¬clining the condensation coefficient, which is the most effective way.

  7. Reactor internal pump behavior during cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Komita, Hideo; Usuki, Shouji; Fukuda, Shinichi )

    1989-11-01

    The characteristics of reactor internal pumps (RIPs) under cavitation conditions were experimentally evaluated in full scale with different water temperature parameters. The hydraulic performance and vibration behavior under cavitation conditions were clarified. An advanced boiling water reactor is equipped with RIPs for coolant recirculation. The RIP is a vertical, single-stage, mixed-flow pump that is mounted in the annular downcomer of the reactor pressure vessel. In general, when a pump operates under cavitation conditions, the pump total head decreases, and the appearance and collapse of vapor bubbles induce vibration and noise, causing damage to components. Various reports have been made on centrifugal pump behavior in cold water, but very few have discussed the characteristics of a mixed-flow pump like the RIP in hot water. Very few have measured impeller vibration in hot water, which is significantly influenced by cavitation. Therefore, it is difficult to precisely determine RIP behavior under cavitation conditions. Hydraulic performance and vibration behavior under cavitation conditions are experimentally clarified in this paper.

  8. Experimental study and modeling of swelling and bubble growth in carbon nanofiber filled mesophase pitch during carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calebrese, Christopher

    Graphite and all carbon bipolar plates show corrosion resistance in fuel cells and provide good electrical conductivity. These materials typically need to be individually machined, a time consuming and costly process. Mesophase pitch is used to manufacture carbon fibers and carbon-carbon composites. This material provides a good starting point for the production of a moldable, all carbon bipolar plate. However, processing of mesophase pitch to produce all carbon materials requires a time intensive oxidation step to prevent swelling during carbonization. In this work, carbon nanofibers were used to reduce swelling in mesophase pitch. It was found that the increase in viscosity with the addition of carbon nanofibers was responsible for the reduction in swelling. The influence of the filler became apparent above the percolation threshold. At loadings below the percolation threshold, the swelling of the mesophase pitch was not reduced after carbonization. The swelling of the mesophase pitch at a given carbon nanofiber loading was also dependent on the length of the carbon nanofibers. Longer carbon nanofibers led to greater increases in the viscosity of the melt and thus led to greater reduction in swelling. The final carbon product was evaluated for use as a low temperature fuel cell bipolar plate material. Constraining the mesophase pitch during carbonization led to a final product with strength and electrical conductivity comparable to current composite bipolar plate materials. The addition of micron size chopped glass fibers with a softening point near 850°C and carbon nanofibers led to a final product with air permeability less than that of graphite. A spherically symmetric, single bubble growth model was also developed. The model included temperature dependence, liquid to bubble mass transfer and reactions in the system. Results from simulations showed that that the increase in viscosity due to the addition of carbon nanofibers slows the growth of bubbles, but

  9. First-order Description of the Mechanical Fracture Behavior of Fine-Grained Surficial Marine Sediments During Gas Bubble Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    10 F04O29 BARRY ET AL.: BUBBLE GROWTH BY FRACTURE P04029 Figure 3. Map of field site. Canard, Nova Scotia, Canada. appears to approximate the...Bottinger. and T. Dahm (2005), Buoyancy-driven fracture ascent: Experiments in layered gelatine. J. Volcano!. Geotherm . Res., 144. 273-285. doi...Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE First-order description of the mechanical fracture behavior of fine-grained

  10. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in austenitic stainless steels using an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Backer, A.; Adjanor, G.; Domain, C.; Lescoat, M. L.; Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Fortuna, F.; Gentils, A.; Ortiz, C. J.; Souidi, A.; Becquart, C. S.

    2015-06-01

    Implantation of 10 keV helium in 316L steel thin foils was performed in JANNuS-Orsay facility and modeled using a multiscale approach. Density Functional Theory (DFT) atomistic calculations [1] were used to obtain the properties of He and He-vacancy clusters, and the Binary Collision Approximation based code MARLOWE was applied to determine the damage and He-ion depth profiles as in [2,3]. The processes involved in the homogeneous He bubble nucleation and growth were defined and implemented in the Object Kinetic Monte Carlo code LAKIMOCA [4]. In particular as the He to dpa ratio was high, self-trapping of He clusters and the trap mutation of He-vacancy clusters had to be taken into account. With this multiscale approach, the formation of bubbles was modeled up to nanometer-scale size, where bubbles can be observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Their densities and sizes were studied as functions of fluence (up to 5 × 1019 He/m2) at two temperatures (473 and 723 K) and for different sample thicknesses (25-250 nm). It appears that the damage is not only due to the collision cascades but is also strongly controlled by the He accumulation in pressurized bubbles. Comparison with experimental data is discussed and sensible agreement is achieved.

  11. The effect of static pressure on the inertial cavitation threshold.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Raymond, Jason L; Mobley, Joel; Church, Charles C; Felipe Gaitan, D

    2012-08-01

    The amplitude of the acoustic pressure required to nucleate a gas or vapor bubble in a fluid, and to have that bubble undergo an inertial collapse, is termed the inertial cavitation threshold. The magnitude of the inertial cavitation threshold is typically limited by mechanisms other than homogeneous nucleation such that the theoretical maximum is never achieved. However, the onset of inertial cavitation can be suppressed by increasing the static pressure of the fluid. The inertial cavitation threshold was measured in ultrapure water at static pressures up to 30 MPa (300 bars) by exciting a radially symmetric standing wave field in a spherical resonator driven at a resonant frequency of 25.5 kHz. The threshold was found to increase linearly with the static pressure; an exponentially decaying temperature dependence was also found. The nature and properties of the nucleating mechanisms were investigated by comparing the measured thresholds to an independent analysis of the particulate content and available models for nucleation.

  12. FOREWORD: International Symposium of Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    multiphase flow detection Fluid-structure interaction induced by cavitation and multiphase flow Multi-scale modelling of cavitating flows and Multiphase Flow Cavitation nuclei: theory and experiments Supercavitation and its applications Synergetic effects of cavitation and silt-laden erosion Shock waves and microjets generated by cavitation Nonlinear oscillations of gas and vapour bubbles Fundamentals of physics of acoustic cavitation Sonochemistry and sonoluminescence Biomedical applications of cavitation effects Ultrasonic cavitation for molten metal treatment Cavitation for enhanced heat transfer The ISCM 2014 brought together 95 scientists, researchers and graduate students from 11 countries, affiliated with universities, technology centers and industrial firms to debate topics related to advanced technologies for cavitation and Multiphase Flow, which would enhance the sustainable development of cavitation and Multiphase Flow in interdisciplinary sciences and technology. The technical committee selected 54 technical papers on the following topics: (i) Hydrodynamic Cavitation, (ii) Super Cavitation, (iii) Pump Cavitation, (iv) Acoustic Cavitation, (v) Interdisciplinary Research of Cavitation and Multi-Phase Flows, and 13 invited plenary and invited forum lectures, which were presented at the symposium, to be included in the proceedings. All the papers of ISCM 2014, which are published in this Volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, had been peer reviewed through processes administered by the editors of the ISCM 2014, those are Yulin WU, Shouqi YUAN, Zhengwei WANG, Shuhong LIU, Xingqi LUO, Fujun WANG and Guoyu WANG. The papers published in this Volume include 54 technical papers and 3 full length texts of the invited lectures. We sincerely hope that the International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow is a significant step forward in the world wide efforts to address the present challenges in the modern science and technology. Professor

  13. Comments on the possibility of cavitation in liquid metal targets for pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter J.M.

    1996-06-01

    When short pulses of protons strike the volume of a liquid target, the rapid heating produces a pressurized region which relaxes as the pressure wave propagates outward. Skala and Bauer have modeled the effects of the pressure wave impinging on the container walls of a liquid mercury target under ESS conditions. They find that high pressures and high wall stresses result if the medium is uniform, nearly incompressible liquid. The pressure and the stresses are much reduced if the liquid contains bubbles of helium, due to their high compressibility. However, according to the calculation, the pressure still reaches an atmosphere or so at the surface, which reflects the compressive wave as a rarefaction wave of the same magnitude. Even such modest underpressures can lead to the growth of bubbles (cavitation) at or near the surface, which can collapse violently and erode the container surface. It is necessary to avoid this. Leighton provides a wide ranging discussion of pressure waves in bubbly media, which may provide insights into the nature and control of cavitation phenomena. The paper surveys some of the relevant information from that source.

  14. Modelling of single bubble-dynamics and thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoulias, D.; Gavaises, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper evaluates the solution effects of different Rayleigh-Plesset models (R-P) for simulating the growth/collapse dynamics and thermal behaviour of homogeneous gas bubbles. The flow inputs used for the discrete cavitation bubble calculations are obtained from Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (RANS), performed in high-pressure nozzle holes. Parametric 1-D results are presented for the classical thermal R-P equation [1] as well as for refined models which incorporated compressibility corrections and thermal effects [2, 3]. The thermal bubble model is coupled with the energy equation, which provides the temperature of the bubble as a function of conduction/convection and radiation heat-transfer mechanisms. For approximating gas pressure variations a high-order virial equation of state (EOS) was used, based on Helmholtz free energy principle [4]. The coded thermal R-P model was validated against experimental measurements [5] and model predictions [6] reported in single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL).

  15. Cavitation milling of natural cellulose to nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Pinjari, Dipak Vitthal; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2010-06-01

    Cavitation holds the promise of a new and exciting approach to fabricate both top down and bottom up nanostructures. Cavitation bubbles are created when a liquid boils under less than atmospheric pressure. The collapse process occurs supersonically and generates a host of physical and chemical effects. We have made an attempt to fabricate natural cellulose material using hydrodynamic as well as acoustic cavitation. The cellulose material having initial size of 63 micron was used for the experiments. 1% (w/v) slurry of cellulose sample was circulated through the hydrodynamic cavitation device or devices (orifice) for 6h. The average velocity of the fluid through the device was 10.81m/s while average pressure applied was 7.8 kg/cm(2). Cavitation number was found to be 2.61. The average particle size obtained after treatment was 1.36 micron. This hydrodynamically processed sample was sonicated for 1h 50 min. The average size of ultrasonically processed particles was found to be 301 nm. Further, the cellulose particles were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to see the effect of cavitation on crystallinity (X(c)) as well as on melting temperature (T(m)). Cellulose structures consist of amorphous as well as crystalline regions. The initial raw sample was 86.56% crystalline but due to the effect of cavitation, the crystallinity reduced to 37.76%. Also the melting temperature (T(m)) was found to be reduced from 101.78 degrees C of the original to 60.13 degrees C of the processed sample. SEM images for the cellulose (processed and unprocessed) shows the status and fiber-fiber alignment and its orientation with each other. Finally cavitation has proved to be very efficient tool for reduction in size from millimeter to nano scale for highly crystalline materials.

  16. Synchronized passive imaging of single cavitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Chauvet, Daurian; Boch, Anne-Laure; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-09-01

    Passive cavitation detection techniques are usually of relatively low sensitivity to single cavitation events. Moreover, a single-element transducer is generally used, so that the spatial localization of these cavitation events is not possible, or is limited to the probing volume. To both detect and localize single cavitation events over an extended volume, the following experimental set-up has been used and validated: cavitation is induced with a focused single-element transducer (mean frequency 660 kHz, f♯ = 1) driven by a high power (up to 5 kW) electric burst of a few cycles, and the acoustic emission of the bubbles is recorded on a standard linear array (4-7 MHz), mounted on the side of the single element to probe its focal spot. Both the frequencies and the geometry used are appropriate to in vivo implementation. The recording of ultrasonic radio-frequency (RF) data was performed simultaneously on 64 channels of the array and was synchronized with the pulsed excitation. A single cavitation event results in a high frequency and coherent wave front on the RF data. Thanks to synchronization, these RF data are beam-formed to localize the event with a axial resolution of 0.3 mm. A small number of discrete events could also be separated with this method. Besides, B-mode images obtained with the linear array prior to passive detection allowed the positioning of the events within the tissue structure. This technique has been used first ex vivo on freshly harve pig and sheep thigh muscle: with a two cycle excitation, a 9 MPa cavitation threshold was found. Cavitation detection was also achieved in vivo with a five cycle burst excitation in sheep thigh muscle for a peak acoustic pressure of 11MPa. This technique could provide useful information in order to better understand, control and monitor the initiation phase of the histotripsy process.

  17. Micro-bubbles seeding for flow characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumelas, V.; Lecoffre, Y.; Maj, G.; Franc, J.-P.

    2016-11-01

    Micro-bubbles injection has long been used in hydrodynamic facilities for the control of dissolved and free air. In some cavitation tunnels [9], very large quantities of microbubbles (billions per second) are injected for rapid degassing and, in smaller quantities (millions per second), for cavitation nuclei seeding. Micro-bubbles can also be used as tracers for optical measurements including visualization, LDV or PIV. For these applications, bubbles must be sufficiently small to faithfully follow the flow. Depending on the quality and spatial characteristics of the micro-bubbles seeding, several optical methods can be applied: simple visualization gives access to semi-quantitative information on the behaviour of flows; LASER velocimetry provides information on the mean velocity and other temporal local characteristics of the flow. This paper presents some new micro-bubbles seeding devices recently developed by YLEC Consultants. These devices have been designed to fulfill specific requirements related to integration into cavitation tunnels and permit optical velocimetry measurement techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The LEGI cavitation tunnel is the first tunnel which has been equipped with these microbubbles seeding systems dedicated to optical velocimetry. This paper presents the final integration schemes selected for micro-bubbles seeding into LEGI tunnel and discuss about practical concerns related to the use of the injection system for optical velocimetry.

  18. Prediction of cavitating flow noise by direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung H.; Moon, Young J.; Shin, Byeong Rog

    2008-06-01

    In this study, a direct numerical simulation procedure for the cavitating flow noise is presented. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are written for the two-phase fluid, employing a density-based homogeneous equilibrium model with a linearly-combined equation of state. To resolve the linear and non-linear waves in the cavitating flow, a sixth-order compact central scheme is utilized with the selective spatial filtering technique. The present cavitation model and numerical methods are validated for two benchmark problems: linear wave convection and acoustic saturation in a bubbly flow. The cavitating flow noise is then computed for a 2D circular cylinder flow at Reynolds number based on a cylinder diameter, 200 and cavitation numbers, σ=0.7-2. It is observed that, at cavitation numbers σ=1 and 0.7, the cavitating flow and noise characteristics are significantly changed by the shock waves due to the coherent collapse of the cloud cavitation in the wake. To verify the present direct simulation and further analyze the sources of cavitation noise, an acoustic analogy based on a classical theory of Fitzpatrik and Strasberg is derived. The far-field noise predicted by direct simulation is well compared with that of acoustic analogy, and it also confirms the f-2 decaying rate in the spectrum, as predicted by the model of Fitzpatrik and Strasberg with the Rayleigh-Plesset equation.

  19. High Speed Imaging of Cavitation around Dental Ultrasonic Scaler Tips.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nina; Pecheva, Emilia; Dehghani, Hamid; Sammons, Rachel L; Wang, Qianxi X; Leppinen, David M; Walmsley, A Damien

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation occurs around dental ultrasonic scalers, which are used clinically for removing dental biofilm and calculus. However it is not known if this contributes to the cleaning process. Characterisation of the cavitation around ultrasonic scalers will assist in assessing its contribution and in developing new clinical devices for removing biofilm with cavitation. The aim is to use high speed camera imaging to quantify cavitation patterns around an ultrasonic scaler. A Satelec ultrasonic scaler operating at 29 kHz with three different shaped tips has been studied at medium and high operating power using high speed imaging at 15,000, 90,000 and 250,000 frames per second. The tip displacement has been recorded using scanning laser vibrometry. Cavitation occurs at the free end of the tip and increases with power while the area and width of the cavitation cloud varies for different shaped tips. The cavitation starts at the antinodes, with little or no cavitation at the node. High speed image sequences combined with scanning laser vibrometry show individual microbubbles imploding and bubble clouds lifting and moving away from the ultrasonic scaler tip, with larger tip displacement causing more cavitation.

  20. High Speed Imaging of Cavitation around Dental Ultrasonic Scaler Tips

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Nina; Pecheva, Emilia; Dehghani, Hamid; Sammons, Rachel L.; Wang, Qianxi X.; Leppinen, David M.; Walmsley, A. Damien

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation occurs around dental ultrasonic scalers, which are used clinically for removing dental biofilm and calculus. However it is not known if this contributes to the cleaning process. Characterisation of the cavitation around ultrasonic scalers will assist in assessing its contribution and in developing new clinical devices for removing biofilm with cavitation. The aim is to use high speed camera imaging to quantify cavitation patterns around an ultrasonic scaler. A Satelec ultrasonic scaler operating at 29 kHz with three different shaped tips has been studied at medium and high operating power using high speed imaging at 15,000, 90,000 and 250,000 frames per second. The tip displacement has been recorded using scanning laser vibrometry. Cavitation occurs at the free end of the tip and increases with power while the area and width of the cavitation cloud varies for different shaped tips. The cavitation starts at the antinodes, with little or no cavitation at the node. High speed image sequences combined with scanning laser vibrometry show individual microbubbles imploding and bubble clouds lifting and moving away from the ultrasonic scaler tip, with larger tip displacement causing more cavitation. PMID:26934340

  1. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Cain, Charles A; Hall, Timothy L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, two-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (P(cav)) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p(-)) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching one when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as P(cav) = 0.5) was between p(-) = 26 and 30 MPa in all samples with high water content but varied between p(-) = 13.7 and >36 MPa in other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p(-) = 28.2 megapascals was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at various pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue.

  2. Hydrodynamic cavitation kills prostate cells and ablates benign prostatic hyperplasia tissue.

    PubMed

    Itah, Zeynep; Oral, Ozlem; Perk, Osman Yavuz; Sesen, Muhsincan; Demir, Ebru; Erbil, Secil; Dogan-Ekici, A Isin; Ekici, Sinan; Kosar, Ali; Gozuacik, Devrim

    2013-11-01

    Hydrodynamic cavitation is a physical phenomenon characterized by vaporization and bubble formation in liquids under low local pressures, and their implosion following their release to a higher pressure environment. Collapse of the bubbles releases high energy and may cause damage to exposed surfaces. We recently designed a set-up to exploit the destructive nature of hydrodynamic cavitation for biomedical purposes. We have previously shown that hydrodynamic cavitation could kill leukemia cells and erode kidney stones. In this study, we analyzed the effects of cavitation on prostate cells and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue. We showed that hydrodynamic cavitation could kill prostate cells in a pressure- and time-dependent manner. Cavitation did not lead to programmed cell death, i.e. classical apoptosis or autophagy activation. Following the application of cavitation, we observed no prominent DNA damage and cells did not arrest in the cell cycle. Hence, we concluded that cavitation forces directly damaged the cells, leading to their pulverization. Upon application to BPH tissues from patients, cavitation could lead to a significant level of tissue destruction. Therefore similar to ultrasonic cavitation, we propose that hydrodynamic cavitation has the potential to be exploited and developed as an approach for the ablation of aberrant pathological tissues, including BPH.

  3. Observation of a cavitation cloud in tissue using correlation between ultrafast ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Fabrice; Zorgani, Ali; Catheline, Stefan; Souchon, Rémi; Mestas, Jean-Louis; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril

    2015-07-01

    The local application of ultrasound is known to improve drug intake by tumors. Cavitating bubbles are one of the contributing effects. A setup in which two ultrasound transducers are placed confocally is used to generate cavitation in ex vivo tissue. As the transducers emit a series of short excitation bursts, the evolution of the cavitation activity is monitored using an ultrafast ultrasound imaging system. The frame rate of the system is several thousands of images per second, which provides several tens of images between consecutive excitation bursts. Using the correlation between consecutive images for speckle tracking, a decorrelation of the imaging signal appears due to the creation, fast movement, and dissolution of the bubbles in the cavitation cloud. By analyzing this area of decorrelation, the cavitation cloud can be localized and the spatial extent of the cavitation activity characterized.

  4. Numerical simulation of viscous cavitating flow around a ship propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhi-Feng; Fang, Shi-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Meng, Zhao-Wen; Liu, Ping-Xiang; Du, Xuan-Min

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, cavitation and a ship propeller wake are reported by computed fluid dynamics based on viscous multiphase flow theory. Some recent validation results with a hybrid grid based on unsteady Navier-Stokes (N-S) and bubble dynamics equations are presented to predict velocity, pressure and vapor volume fraction in propeller wake in a uniform inflow. Numerical predictions of sheet cavitation, tip vortex cavitation and hub vortex cavitation are in agreement with the experimental data, same as numerical predictions of longitudinal and transversal evolution of the axial velocity. Blade and shaft rate frequency of propeller is well predicted by the computed results of pressure, and tip vortex is the most important to generate the pressure field within the near wake. The overall results indicate that the present approach is reliable for prediction of cavitation and propeller wake on the condition of uniform inflow.

  5. Gauging the likelihood of stable cavitation from ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2013-01-07

    The mechanical index (MI) was formulated to gauge the likelihood of adverse bioeffects from inertial cavitation. However, the MI formulation did not consider bubble activity from stable cavitation. This type of bubble activity can be readily nucleated from ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and has the potential to promote beneficial bioeffects. Here, the presence of stable cavitation is determined numerically by tracking the onset of subharmonic oscillations within a population of bubbles for frequencies up to 7 MHz and peak rarefactional pressures up to 3 MPa. In addition, the acoustic pressure rupture threshold of an UCA population was determined using the Marmottant model. The threshold for subharmonic emissions of optimally sized bubbles was found to be lower than the inertial cavitation threshold for all frequencies studied. The rupture thresholds of optimally sized UCAs were found to be lower than the threshold for subharmonic emissions for either single cycle or steady state acoustic excitations. Because the thresholds of both subharmonic emissions and UCA rupture are linearly dependent on frequency, an index of the form I(CAV) = P(r)/f (where P(r) is the peak rarefactional pressure in MPa and f is the frequency in MHz) was derived to gauge the likelihood of subharmonic emissions due to stable cavitation activity nucleated from UCAs.

  6. Quantitative observations of cavitation activity in a viscoelastic medium.

    PubMed

    Collin, Jamie R T; Coussios, Constantin C

    2011-11-01

    Quantitative experimental observations of single-bubble cavitation in viscoelastic media that would enable validation of existing models are presently lacking. In the present work, single bubble cavitation is induced in an agar gel using a 1.15 MHz high intensity focused ultrasound transducer, and observed using a focused single-element passive cavitation detection (PCD) transducer. To enable quantitative observations, a full receive calibration is carried out of a spherically focused PCD system by a bistatic scattering substitution technique that uses an embedded spherical scatterer and a hydrophone. Adjusting the simulated pressure received by the PCD by the transfer function on receive and the frequency-dependent attenuation of agar gel enables direct comparison of the measured acoustic emissions with those predicted by numerical modeling of single-bubble cavitation using a modified Keller-Miksis approach that accounts for viscoelasticity of the surrounding medium. At an incident peak rarefactional pressure near the cavitation threshold, period multiplying is observed in both experiment and numerical model. By comparing the two sets of results, an estimate of the equilibrium bubble radius in the experimental observations can be made, with potential for extension to material parameter estimation. Use of these estimates yields good agreement between model and experiment.

  7. Dynamics of Cavitation Clouds within a High-Intensity Focused Ultrasonic Beam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    the cloud size. I. INTRODUCTION High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), along with the associated cavitation , is used in a variety of fields. The...Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) March 2012- May 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dynamics of Cavitation Clouds within a High-Intensity Focused...in initially quiescent water. The resulting pressure field and behavior of the cavitation bubbles are measured using high-speed digital in-line

  8. Microbubble cavitation imaging.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Francois; Shi, William T; Powers, Jeffry E; Everbach, E Carr; Liu, Jinjin; Gao, Shunji; Xie, Feng; Porter, Thomas R

    2013-04-01

    Ultrasound cavitation of microbubble contrast agents has a potential for therapeutic applications such as sonothrombolysis (STL) in acute ischemic stroke. For safety, efficacy, and reproducibility of treatment, it is critical to evaluate the cavitation state (moderate oscillations, stable cavitation, and inertial cavitation) and activity level in and around a treatment area. Acoustic passive cavitation detectors (PCDs) have been used to this end but do not provide spatial information. This paper presents a prototype of a 2-D cavitation imager capable of producing images of the dominant cavitation state and activity level in a region of interest. Similar to PCDs, the cavitation imaging described here is based on the spectral analysis of the acoustic signal radiated by the cavitating microbubbles: ultraharmonics of the excitation frequency indicate stable cavitation, whereas elevated noise bands indicate inertial cavitation; the absence of both indicates moderate oscillations. The prototype system is a modified commercially available ultrasound scanner with a sector imaging probe. The lateral resolution of the system is 1.5 mm at a focal depth of 3 cm, and the axial resolution is 3 cm for a therapy pulse length of 20 μs. The maximum frame rate of the prototype is 2 Hz. The system has been used for assessing and mapping the relative importance of the different cavitation states of a microbubble contrast agent. In vitro (tissue-mimicking flow phantom) and in vivo (heart, liver, and brain of two swine) results for cavitation states and their changes as a function of acoustic amplitude are presented.

  9. A novel instrumentation of study cavitation maximum radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui; Xu, Rong-qing; Chen, Xiao; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2005-02-01

    Based on the optical beam deflection (OBD) technique, a fiber-optic diagnostic technique is applied to investigate the pulsation of a laser-induced cavitation bubble on the vicinity of an aluminum target in water. The sequence waveforms induced by the bubble pulsation is presented and analyzed in detail. The maximum radii corresponding to each pulsation are determined. Furthermore, by varying the acting laser energy, the variation of the maximum bubble radius and bubble energy with respect to acting laser energy is obtained. The theoretical and experimental results are in good agreement within a relative error.

  10. AN EFFICIENT TREATMENT STRATEGY FOR HISTOTRIPSY BY REMOVING CAVITATION MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation memory effects occur when remnants of cavitation bubbles (nuclei) persist in the host medium and act as seeds for subsequent events. In pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy, or histotripsy, this effect may cause cavitation to repeatedly occur at these seeded locations within a target volume, producing inhomogeneous tissue fractionation or requiring an excess number of pulses to completely homogenize the target volume. We hypothesized that by removing the cavitation memory, i.e., the persistent nuclei, the cavitation bubbles could be induced at random locations in response to each pulse; therefore, complete disruption of a tissue volume may be achieved with fewer pulses. To test the hypothesis, the cavitation memory was passively removed by increasing the intervals between successive pulses, Δt, from 2, 10, 20, 50 and 100, to 200 ms. Histotripsy treatments were performed in red blood cell tissue phantoms and ex vivo livers using 1-MHz ultrasound pulses of 10 cycles at P−/P+ pressure of 21/59 MPa. The phantom study allowed for direct visualization of the cavitation patterns and the lesion development process in real time using high-speed photography; the ex vivo tissue study provided validation of the memory effect in real tissues. Results of the phantom study showed an exponential decrease in the correlation coefficient between cavitation patterns in successive pulses from 0.5 ± 0.1 to 0.1 ± 0.1 as Δt increased from 2–200 ms; correspondingly, the lesion was completely fractionated with significantly fewer pulses for longer Δts. In the tissue study, given the same number of therapy pulses, complete and homogeneous tissue fractionation with well-defined lesion boundaries was achieved only for Δt ≥ 100 ms. These results indicated that the removal of the cavitation memory resulted in more efficient treatments and homogeneous lesions. PMID:22402025

  11. Formation, growth and dissociation of He bubbles in Al 2O 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Huis, M. A.; van Veen, A.; Labohm, F.; Fedorov, A. V.; Schut, H.; Kooi, B. J.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2004-02-01

    The formation and dissociation of helium bubbles and helium desorption are investigated in sapphire Al 2O 3(0 0 0 1) implanted with 30 keV He ions to four different doses of 0.1, 0.3, 1.0 and 2.0 × 10 16 ions cm -2. The samples were annealed isochronally up to 1850 K in steps of 100 K. The techniques of Doppler broadening positron beam analysis (PBA) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) were used to investigate defect evolution and helium retention, respectively, during the annealing procedure. It was observed that the maximum bubble volume is found after 1250 K annealing, after which a process of bubble shrinkage sets in. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) was performed on the sample that was implanted with the highest-dose (2.0 × 10 16 He ions cm -2) after annealing at 1250 K. It was found that the bubbles are shaped as discs lying parallel with the surface and that the average bubble size is 5.5 nm. In all samples, helium is released mainly at a temperature of 1750 K. The desorption curves were analyzed by means of a permeation model. The activation energy for permeation was found as 4.0 eV.

  12. Elasticity Effects on Cavitation in a Squeeze Film Damper Undergoing Noncentered Circular Whirl

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    numerically determined for a squeeze film damper subjected to dynamic loading. The loading was manifested as a prescribed motion of the rotot undergoing...cavitation bubble as well as the oil film region of the damper. Computational L movies were used to analyze the rapidly changing pressures and vapor bubble...and B.J. Hamrock, "High-Speed Motion Picture Camera Experiments of Cavitation in Dynamically Loaded Journal Bearings," J. Lubr. Technol., 105 (1983

  13. Air emission into a water shear layer through porous media. Part 2: Cavitation induced pressure attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Myer, E.C.; Marboe, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    Cavitation near the casing of a hydroturbine can lead to damage through both cavitation erosion and mechanical vibration of the casing and the associated piping. Cavitation erosion results from the collapse of cavitation bubbles on or near a surface such as the casing wall. Mechanical vibrations transmitted to the casing directly through the collapse of bubbles on the casing wall indirectly through a coupling of the acoustic pressure pulse due to a nearby collapse on the turbine blade. Air emission along the casing can reduce the intensity of the tip vortex and the gap cavitation through ventilation of the cavity. Reduction in the machinery vibration is obtained by reduction of the intensity of cavitation bubble collapse and attenuation and scattering of the radiated acoustic pressure. This requires a bubble layer which may be introduced in the vicinity of the turbine blade tips. This layer remains for some distance downstream of the blades and is effective for attenuation of tip vortex induced noise and blade surface cavitation noise. For the purpose of characterizing this bubble layer within a water pipe, the authors spanned a pipe with a two dimensional hydrofoil and emitted air through porous media (20 and 100 micron porosity sintered stainless steel) into the shear flow over the hydrofoil. This paper is limited to an investigation of the attenuation of acoustic pressure propagating to the casing rather than the reduction in acoustic source level due to collapse cushioning effects.

  14. Experimental investigation of the flow-induced vibration of hydrofoils in cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoyu; Wu, Qin; Huang, Biao; Gao, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the correlation between fluid induced vibration and unsteady cavitation behaviours. Experimental results are presented for a modified NACA66 hydrofoil, which is fixed at α=8°. The high-speed camera is synchronized with a single point Laser Doppler Vibrometer to analyze the transient cavitating flow structures and the corresponding structural vibration characteristics. The results showed that, with the decreasing of the cavitation number, the cavitating flows in a water tunnel display several types of cavitation patterns, such as incipient cavitation, sheet cavitation and cloud cavitation. The cavity shedding frequency reduces with the decrease of the cavitation number. As for the cloud cavitation regime, the trend of the vibration velocity goes up with the growth of the attached cavity, accompanied with small amplitude fluctuations. Then the collapse and shedding of the large-scale cloud cavities leads to substantial increase of the vibration velocity fluctuations.

  15. Effect of acoustic parameters on the cavitation behavior of SonoVue microbubbles induced by pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yutong; Lin, Lizhou; Cheng, Mouwen; Jin, Lifang; Du, Lianfang; Han, Tao; Xu, Lin; Yu, Alfred C H; Qin, Peng

    2017-03-01

    SonoVue microbubbles could serve as artificial nuclei for ultrasound-triggered stable and inertial cavitation, resulting in beneficial biological effects for future therapeutic applications. To optimize and control the use of the cavitation of SonoVue bubbles in therapy while ensuring safety, it is important to comprehensively understand the relationship between the acoustic parameters and the cavitation behavior of the SonoVue bubbles. An agarose-gel tissue phantom was fabricated to hold the SonoVue bubble suspension. 1-MHz transmitting transducer calibrated by a hydrophone was used to trigger the cavitation of SonoVue bubbles under different ultrasonic parameters (i.e., peak rarefactional pressure (PRP), pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and pulse duration (PD)). Another 7.5-MHz focused transducer was employed to passively receive acoustic signals from the exposed bubbles. The ultraharmonics and broadband intensities in the acoustic emission spectra were measured to quantify the extent of stable and inertial cavitation of SonoVue bubbles, respectively. We found that the onset of both stable and inertial cavitation exhibited a strong dependence on the PRP and PD and a relatively weak dependence on the PRF. Approximate 0.25MPa PRP with more than 20μs PD was considered to be necessary for ultraharmonics emission of SonoVue bubbles, and obvious broadband signals started to appear when the PRP exceeded 0.40MPa. Moreover, the doses of stable and inertial cavitation varied with the PRP. The stable cavitation dose initially increased with increasing PRP, and then decreased rapidly after 0.5MPa. By contrast, the inertial cavitation dose continuously increased with increasing PRP. Finally, the doses of both stable and inertial cavitation were positively correlated with PRF and PD. These results could provide instructive information for optimizing future therapeutic applications of SonoVue bubbles.

  16. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from noble gases.

    PubMed

    Yasui, K

    2001-03-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from noble gases in water is studied theoretically in order to clarify the reason of the distinguished feature that the luminescence is strong for all noble gases, while the other systems of cavitation luminescence are greatly enhanced by the presence of the heavy noble gas(xenon). It is clarified that in spite of the larger thermal conductivity of lighter noble gases the maximum temperature in a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases is higher due both to the segregation of water vapor and noble gas inside a SBSL bubble and the stronger acoustic drive of a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases.

  17. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    2001-03-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from noble gases in water is studied theoretically in order to clarify the reason of the distinguished feature that the luminescence is strong for all noble gases, while the other systems of cavitation luminescence are greatly enhanced by the presence of the heavy noble gas(xenon). It is clarified that in spite of the larger thermal conductivity of lighter noble gases the maximum temperature in a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases is higher due both to the segregation of water vapor and noble gas inside a SBSL bubble and the stronger acoustic drive of a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases.

  18. On the origin and acoustical behaviour of cloud cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buist, Jakob

    Cavitation noise, produced by ship propellers, is addressed. Here, cavitation is defined as the occurrence and physical behavior of vapor filled voids in a fluid flow. These cavities, which arise in low pressure areas, are carried with the flow and implode in high pressure regions. The subsequent oscillations produce high noise levels both on-board the ship concerned and in the far field. In particular, an investigation into the problem of how to provide rules for the prediction of cavitation noise, based upon measurements on model scale, is made. On model scale, all similarity conditions cannot be satisfied simultaneously, and hence, scaling rules are needed. Up to now the scaling rules, which are given in the literature, are obtained by considering the behavior of individual bubbles. In practical situations, however, bubble clouds are observed, in which interactions between bubbles are of utmost importance. The issues addressed cover: the prediction of cloud cavitation noise; the relative importance of cluster formation in bubble mixtures; and the origin of bubble clouds.

  19. Modelling cavitation erosion using fluid-material interaction simulations.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Georges L; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2015-10-06

    Material deformation and pitting from cavitation bubble collapse is investigated using fluid and material dynamics and their interaction. In the fluid, a novel hybrid approach, which links a boundary element method and a compressible finite difference method, is used to capture non-spherical bubble dynamics and resulting liquid pressures efficiently and accurately. The bubble dynamics is intimately coupled with a finite-element structure model to enable fluid/structure interaction simulations. Bubble collapse loads the material with high impulsive pressures, which result from shock waves and bubble re-entrant jet direct impact on the material surface. The shock wave loading can be from the re-entrant jet impact on the opposite side of the bubble, the fast primary collapse of the bubble, and/or the collapse of the remaining bubble ring. This produces high stress waves, which propagate inside the material, cause deformation, and eventually failure. A permanent deformation or pit is formed when the local equivalent stresses exceed the material yield stress. The pressure loading depends on bubble dynamics parameters such as the size of the bubble at its maximum volume, the bubble standoff distance from the material wall and the pressure driving the bubble collapse. The effects of standoff and material type on the pressure loading and resulting pit formation are highlighted and the effects of bubble interaction on pressure loading and material deformation are preliminarily discussed.

  20. Modelling cavitation erosion using fluid–material interaction simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chahine, Georges L.; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2015-01-01

    Material deformation and pitting from cavitation bubble collapse is investigated using fluid and material dynamics and their interaction. In the fluid, a novel hybrid approach, which links a boundary element method and a compressible finite difference method, is used to capture non-spherical bubble dynamics and resulting liquid pressures efficiently and accurately. The bubble dynamics is intimately coupled with a finite-element structure model to enable fluid/structure interaction simulations. Bubble collapse loads the material with high impulsive pressures, which result from shock waves and bubble re-entrant jet direct impact on the material surface. The shock wave loading can be from the re-entrant jet impact on the opposite side of the bubble, the fast primary collapse of the bubble, and/or the collapse of the remaining bubble ring. This produces high stress waves, which propagate inside the material, cause deformation, and eventually failure. A permanent deformation or pit is formed when the local equivalent stresses exceed the material yield stress. The pressure loading depends on bubble dynamics parameters such as the size of the bubble at its maximum volume, the bubble standoff distance from the material wall and the pressure driving the bubble collapse. The effects of standoff and material type on the pressure loading and resulting pit formation are highlighted and the effects of bubble interaction on pressure loading and material deformation are preliminarily discussed. PMID:26442140

  1. The Role of Acoustic Cavitation in Ultrasound-triggered Drug Release from Echogenic Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and globally. CVD-related mortality, including coronary heart disease, heart failure, or stroke, generally occurs due to atherosclerosis, a condition in which plaques build up within arterial walls, potentially causing blockage or rupture. Targeted therapies are needed to achieve more effective treatments. Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), which consist of a lipid membrane surrounding an aqueous core, have been developed to encapsulate a therapeutic agent and/or gas bubbles for targeted delivery and ultrasound image enhancement. Under certain conditions ultrasound can cause nonlinear bubble growth and collapse, known as "cavitation." Cavitation activity has been associated with enhanced drug delivery across cellular membranes. However, the mechanisms of ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP have not been previously investigated. Thus, the objective of this dissertation is to elucidate the role of acoustic cavitation in ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP. To determine the acoustic and physical properties of ELIP, the frequency-dependent attenuation and backscatter coefficients were measured between 3 and 30 MHz. The results were compared to a theoretical model by measuring the ELIP size distribution in order to determine properties of the lipid membrane. It was found that ELIP have a broad size distribution and can provide enhanced ultrasound image contrast across a broad range of clinically-relevant frequencies. Calcein, a hydrophilic fluorescent dye, and papaverine, a lipophilic vasodilator, were separately encapsulated in ELIP and exposed to color Doppler ultrasound pulses from a clinical diagnostic ultrasound scanner in a flow system. Spectrophotometric techniques (fluorescence and absorbance measurements) were used to detect calcein or papaverine release. As a positive control, Triton X-100 (a non-ionic detergent) was added to ELIP samples not exposed to ultrasound in order

  2. Bubbles of Metamorphosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu

    2011-11-01

    Metamorphosis presents a puzzling challenge where, triggered by a signal, an organism abruptly transforms its entire shape and form. Here I describe the role of physical fluid dynamic processes during pupal metamorphosis in flies. During early stages of pupation of third instar larvae into adult flies, a physical gas bubble nucleates at a precise temporal and spatial location, as part of the normal developmental program in Diptera. Although its existence has been known for the last 100 years, the origin and control of this ``cavitation'' event has remained completely mysterious. Where does the driving negative pressure for bubble nucleation come from? How is the location of the bubble nucleation site encoded in the pupae? How do molecular processes control such a physical event? What is the role of this bubble during development? Via developing in-vivo imaging techniques, direct bio-physical measurements in live insect pupal structures and physical modeling, here I elucidate the physical mechanism for appearance and disappearance of this bubble and predict the site of nucleation and its exact timing. This new physical insight into the process of metamorphosis also allows us to understand the inherent design of pupal shell architectures in various species of insects. Milton Award, Harvard Society of Fellows; Terman Fellowship, Stanford

  3. Removal of residual nuclei following a cavitation event: a parametric study.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A; Cain, Charles A; Roberts, William W; Hall, Timothy L

    2015-09-01

    The efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as hock-wave lithotripsy and histotripsy can be compromised by residual cavitation bubble nuclei that persist following the collapse of primary cavitation. In our previous work, we have developed a unique strategy for mitigating the effects of these residual bubbles using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate their aggregation and subsequent coalescence—effectively removing them from the field. Here, we further develop this bubble removal strategy through an investigation of the effect of frequency on the consolidation process. Bubble removal pulses ranging from 0.5 to 2 MHz were used to sonicate the population of residual nuclei produced upon collapse of a histotripsy bubble cloud. For each frequency, mechanical index(MI) values ranging from 0 to approximately 1.5 were tested.Results indicated that, when evaluated as a function of bubble removal pulse MI, the efficacy of bubble removal shows markedly similar trends for all frequencies tested. This behavior divides into three distinct regimes (with provided cutoffs being approximate): 1) MI < 0.2: Minimal effect on the population of remanent cavitation nuclei; 2) 0.2 < MI < 1: Aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubbles, the extent of which trends toward a maximum; and 3) MI > 1: Bubble coalescence is compromised as bubble removal pulses induce high-magnitude inertial cavitation of residual bubbles. The major distinction in these trends came for bubble removal pulses applied at 2 MHz, which were observed to generate the most effective bubble coalescence of all frequencies tested. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the secondary Bjerknes force being the major facilitator of the consolidation process, the magnitude of which increases when the bubble size distribution is far from resonance such that the phase difference of oscillation of individual bubbles is minimal.

  4. Bubble growth within the skin by rectified diffusion might play a significant role in sonophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lavon, Ilana; Grossman, Nili; Kost, Joseph; Kimmel, Eitan; Enden, Giora

    2007-02-12

    Low frequency ultrasound has successfully been used for enhancing transdermal transport of a variety of different molecules. This phenomenon is referred to as sonophoresis. Several attempts have been made to investigate the enhancing mechanism in order to modulate the overall process. In this study we assess whether rectified diffusion is a process that occurs within the skin, which could eventually lead to channeling and thereby to transdermal sonophoresis. The model presented in this paper is based on the following postulate: gas bubbles are randomly distributed within the lipid bilayers of the stratum corneum (SC). As the skin is subjected to ultrasound, gas bubbles grow by rectified diffusion. During this period, bubbles may merge with the outer or inner boundaries of the SC, or merge with neighboring bubbles. Eventually, channels are created, allowing drugs to easily penetrate through the most significant barrier to transdermal delivery, the SC. As a result, transdermal transport rate is enhanced. In this work, a mathematical model has been formulated, in which permeability enhancement of the SC is linked to channels, possibly created by means of rectified diffusion. Sonophoresis may result from various mechanisms that act in synergy. The present model predicts that rectified diffusion might be one of the factors that lead to sonophoresis during ultrasound treatment.

  5. Analytical and experimental study of the acoustics and the flow field characteristics of cavitating self-resonating water jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chahine, G.L.; Genoux, P.F.; Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Frederick, G.S.

    1984-09-01

    Waterjet nozzles (STRATOJETS) have been developed which achieve passive structuring of cavitating submerged jets into discrete ring vortices, and which possess cavitation incipient numbers six times higher than obtained with conventional cavitating jet nozzles. In this study we developed analytical and numerical techniques and conducted experimental work to gain an understanding of the basic phenomena involved. The achievements are: (1) a thorough analysis of the acoustic dynamics of the feed pipe to the nozzle; (2) a theory for bubble ring growth and collapse; (3) a numerical model for jet simulation; (4) an experimental observation and analysis of candidate second-generation low-sigma STRATOJETS. From this study we can conclude that intensification of bubble ring collapse and design of highly resonant feed tubes can lead to improved drilling rates. The models here described are excellent tools to analyze the various parameters needed for STRATOJET optimizations. Further analysis is needed to introduce such important factors as viscosity, nozzle-jet interaction, and ring-target interaction, and to develop the jet simulation model to describe the important fine details of the flow field at the nozzle exit.

  6. Characterizing the cavitation development and acoustic spectrum in various liquids.

    PubMed

    Tzanakis, I; Lebon, G S B; Eskin, D G; Pericleous, K A

    2017-01-01

    A bespoke cavitometer that measures acoustic spectrum and is capable of operating in a range of temperatures (up to 750°C) was used to study the cavitation behaviour in three transparent liquids and in molten aluminium. To relate these acoustic measurements to cavitation development, the dynamics of the cavitation bubble structures was observed in three Newtonian, optically transparent liquids with significantly different physical properties: water, ethanol, and glycerine. Each liquid was treated at 20kHz with a piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer coupled to a titanium sonotrode with a tip diameter of 40mm. Two different transducer power levels were deployed: 50% and 100%, with the maximum power corresponding to a peak-to-peak amplitude of 17μm. The cavitation structures and the flow patterns were filmed with a digital camera. To investigate the effect of distance from the ultrasound source on the cavitation intensity, acoustic emissions were measured with the cavitometer at two points: below the sonotrode and near the edge of the experimental vessel. The behaviour of the three tested liquids was very different, implying that their physical parameters played a decisive role in the establishment of the cavitation regime. Non dimensional analysis revealed that water shares the closest cavitation behaviour with liquid aluminium and can therefore be used as its physical analogue in cavitation studies; this similarity was also confirmed when comparing the measured acoustic spectra of water and liquid aluminium.

  7. Comparison between phase field simulations and experimental data from intragranular bubble growth in UO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, M. R.; Biner, S. B.; Mille, P. C.; Andersson, D. A.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, we used the phase field method to simulate the post-irradiation annealing of UO{sub 2} described in the experimental work by Kashibe et al., 1993 [1]. The simulations were carried out in 2D and 3D using the MARMOT FEM-based phase-field modeling framework. The 2-D results compared fairly well with the experiments, in spite of the assumptions made in the model. The 3-D results compare even more favorably to experiments, indicating that diffusion in all three directions must be considered to accurate represent the bubble growth. (authors)

  8. Repeated growth and bubbling transfer of graphene with millimetre-size single-crystal grains using platinum

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Libo; Ren, Wencai; Xu, Huilong; Jin, Li; Wang, Zhenxing; Ma, Teng; Ma, Lai-Peng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Lian-Mao; Bao, Xinhe; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Large single-crystal graphene is highly desired and important for the applications of graphene in electronics, as grain boundaries between graphene grains markedly degrade its quality and properties. Here we report the growth of millimetre-sized hexagonal single-crystal graphene and graphene films joined from such grains on Pt by ambient-pressure chemical vapour deposition. We report a bubbling method to transfer these single graphene grains and graphene films to arbitrary substrate, which is nondestructive not only to graphene, but also to the Pt substrates. The Pt substrates can be repeatedly used for graphene growth. The graphene shows high crystal quality with the reported lowest wrinkle height of 0.8 nm and a carrier mobility of greater than 7,100 cm2 V−1 s−1 under ambient conditions. The repeatable growth of graphene with large single-crystal grains on Pt and its nondestructive transfer may enable various applications. PMID:22426220

  9. Elasticity effects on cavitation in a squeeze film damper undergoing noncentered circular whirl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Elasticity of the liner and its effects on cavitation were numerically determined for a squeeze film damper subjected to dynamic loading. The loading was manifested as a prescribed motion of the rotor undergoing noncentered circular whirl. The boundary conditions were implemented using Elrod's algorithm which conserves lineal mass flux through the moving cavitation bubble as well as the oil film region of the damper. Computational movies were used to analyze the rapidly changing pressures and vapor bubble dynamics throughout the dynamic cycle for various flexibilities in the damper liner. The effects of liner elasticity on cavitation were only noticeable for the intermediate and high values of viscosity used in this study.

  10. Removal of Residual Cavitation Nuclei to Enhance Histotripsy Erosion of Model Urinary Stones

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy has been shown to be an effective treatment for model kidney stones, eroding their surface to tiny particulate debris via a cavitational bubble cloud. However, similar to shock wave lithotripsy, histotripsy stone treatments display a rate-dependent efficacy with pulses applied at low rate generating more efficient stone erosion in comparison to those applied at high rate. This is hypothesized to be the result of residual cavitation bubble nuclei generated by bubble cloud collapse. While the histotripsy bubble cloud only lasts on the order of 100 µs, these microscopic remnant bubbles can persist on the order of 1 second—inducing direct attenuation of subsequent histotripsy pulses and influencing bubble cloud dynamics. In an effort to mitigate these effects, we have developed a novel strategy to actively remove residual cavitation nuclei from the field using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses. Previous work has demonstrated that with selection of the appropriate acoustic parameters these bubble removal pulses can stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of microscopic bubble nuclei—effectively deleting them from the target volume. Here, we incorporate bubble removal pulses in histotripsy treatment of model kidney stones. It was found that when histotripsy is applied at low rate (1 Hz), bubble removal does not produce a statistically significant change in erosion. At higher pulse rates of 10, 100, and 500 Hz, incorporating bubble removal results in 3.7-, 7.5-, and 2.7-fold increases in stone erosion, respectively. High speed imaging indicates that the introduction of bubble removal pulses allows bubble cloud dynamics resulting from high pulse rates to more closely approximate those generated at the low rate of 1 Hz. These results corroborate previous work in the field of shock wave lithotripsy regarding the ill-effects of residual bubble nuclei, and suggest that high treatment efficiency can be recovered at high pulse rates through

  11. Removal of residual cavitation nuclei to enhance histotripsy erosion of model urinary stones.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Roberts, William W; Cain, Charles A; Hall, Timothy L

    2015-05-01

    Histotripsy has been shown to be an effective treatment for model kidney stones, eroding their surface to tiny particulate debris via a cavitational bubble cloud. However, similar to shock wave lithotripsy, histotripsy stone treatments display a rate-dependent efficacy, with pulses applied at a low rate generating more efficient stone erosion in comparison with those applied at a high rate. This is hypothesized to be the result of residual cavitation bubble nuclei generated by bubble cloud collapse. Although the histotripsy bubble cloud only lasts on the order of 100 μs, these microscopic remnant bubbles can persist on the order of 1 s, inducing direct attenuation of subsequent histotripsy pulses and influencing bubble cloud dynamics. In an effort to mitigate these effects, we have developed a novel strategy to actively remove residual cavitation nuclei from the field using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses. Previous work has demonstrated that with selection of the appropriate acoustic parameters these bubble removal pulses can stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of microscopic bubble nuclei, effectively deleting them from the target volume. Here, we incorporate bubble removal pulses in histotripsy treatment of model kidney stones. It was found that when histotripsy is applied at low rate (1 Hz), bubble removal does not produce a statistically significant change in erosion. At higher pulse rates of 10, 100, and 500 Hz, incorporating bubble removal results in 3.7-, 7.5-, and 2.7-fold increases in stone erosion, respectively. High-speed imaging indicates that the introduction of bubble removal pulses allows bubble cloud dynamics resulting from high pulse rates to more closely approximate those generated at the low rate of 1 Hz. These results corroborate previous work in the field of shock wave lithotripsy regarding the ill effects of residual bubble nuclei, and suggest that high treatment efficiency can be recovered at high pulse rates through

  12. Bulk cavitation extent modeling: An energy-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esplin, J. James

    Bulk cavitation is a phenomenon that occurs when a negative-pressure or tension wave causes a liquid to rupture, or cavitate, over space. It is a process which causes resident microbubbles to grow to many times their original size, forming a bubble cloud. Such bubble clouds are observed in shallow underwater explosions, where negative-pressure waves are formed after shock waves reflect off the water surface; they are also observed in shock wave lithotripsy, shock wave histotripsy, ultrasonic cleaning, and other applications. Models had been developed for predicting the size and shape of such bulk cavitation regions. This work introduces a model that accounts for energy "lost" to bulk cavitation which in turn influences the extent that is dependent on the rate at which the passing negative-pressure wave dissipates. In-laboratory underwater experiments utilizing a spark source for high-amplitude pressure pulse generation, hydrophones and high-speed videography validate the energy transfer from tension wave to bubble cloud formation. These experiments are supplemented by computational fluid dynamics simulations. A cavitation absorption coefficient is introduced and parameterized for accurate prediction of cloud extent.

  13. Optical Deflection Technique for Investigation of Laser-Induced Oscillating Bubble on Metal Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong-Qing; Chen, Xiao; Shen, Zhong-Hua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2004-08-01

    The oscillation of a laser-generated single cavitation bubble on a metal surface is investigated by a fiber-optic diagnostic technique based on an optical beam deflection (OBD). The sequence of waveforms induced by the bubble pulsation is obtained with respect to detection distance. The maximum and minimum bubble radii for each oscillation cycle are determined from the experimental results. Furthermore, by tracking the arrival time of a bubble wall during its expanding and collapsing stages, the temporal development of a cavitation bubble on the metal surface is obtained.

  14. Application of computational fluid dynamics on cavitation in journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Marco; Schmidt, Marcus; Reinke, Peter; Nobis, Matthias; Redlich, Marcel

    2014-03-01

    Journal bearings are applied in internal combustion engines due to their favourable wearing quality and operating characteristics. Under certain operating conditions damage of the journal bearing can occur caused by cavitation. The cavitation reduces the load capacity and leads to material erosion. Experimental investigations of cavitating flows in dimension of real journal bearing are difficult to realize or almost impossible caused by the small gap and transient flow conditions. Therefore numerical simulation is a very helpful engineering tool to research the cavitation behaviour. The CFD-Code OpenFOAM is used to analyse the flow field inside the bearing. The numerical cavitation model based on a bubble dynamic approach and requires necessary initial parameter for the calculation, such as nuclei bubble diameter, the number of nuclei and two empirical constants. The first part of this paper shows the influence of these parameters on the solution. For the adjustment of the parameters an experiment of Jakobsson et.al. [1] was used to validate the numerical flow model. The parameters have been varied according to the method Design of Experiments (DoE). With a defined model equation the parameters determined, to identify the parameter for CFD-calculations in comparison to the experimental values. The second part of the paper presents investigations on different geometrical changes in the bearing geometry. The effect of these geometrical changes on cavitation was compared with experimental results from Wollfarth [2] and Garner et.al. [3].

  15. Time-frequency analysis of transient pressure signals for a mechanical heart valve cavitation study.

    PubMed

    Yu, A A; White, J A; Hwang, N H

    1998-01-01

    A series of transient pressure signals (TPSs) can be measured using a miniature pressure transducer mounted near the tip of the inflow side of a mechanical heart valve (MHV) occluder during closure. A relationship appears to exist between the intensity and pattern of the TPS and the cavitation potential of a MHV. To study the relationship between MHV cavitation and the TPSs, we installed an MHV in a valve testing chamber of a digitally controlled burst test loop. A charge coupled device (CCD) camera and a personal computer based image grabbing program was used to visualize cavitation bubbles appearing on or near the occluder surface. One bileaflet MHV was used as the model for this study. Cavitation bubbles were observed within 300 microsec of the leaflet/housing impact. The valve was tested at various driving pressures between 100 and 1,300 mmHg. MHV cavitation bubble intensities were qualitatively classified into three categories: 1) strong, 2) weak, and 3) none. Digital images of the MHV occluder inflow surface were recorded simultaneously with the TPSs. TPSs were studied by the time-frequency analysis method (spectrogram) and correlated to MHV cavitation potential. The intensity of the cavitation bubbles was found to be associated with burst test loop driving pressures during leaflet closure.

  16. Quantitative evaluation of erosive cavitation pressure field from pits in material: fact or myth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.-K.; Chahine, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    Material pitting in a cavitating flow has been used for a long time as an indicator of the vague ‘cavitation intensity’ concept. Periodically, some researchers suggest pitting tests as a “simple” means to provide quantitative measurements of the amplitude of the impulsive pressures in the cavitation field, especially when combined with Tabor's formula or with simple finite element computations with static loads. This paper examines the viability of such a method using fully coupled bubble dynamics and material response, and strongly concludes that the commonly accepted idea is a myth, as different loading scenarios with the same amplitude of the cavitation impulsive pressure result in different pit aspect ratios.

  17. Observation of the inception and evolution of a cavitation cloud in tissue with ultrafast ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieur, Fabrice; Zorgani, Ali; Catheline, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    The local application of ultrasound is known to improve drug intake by tumors. Cavitating bubbles are one of the contributing effects. A setup where two ultrasound transducers are placed confocally is used to generate cavitation in ex vivo tissue. As the transducers emit a series of short bursts, the creation and evolution of the cavitation activity is monitored using an ultrafast ultrasound imaging system. This system capable of frame rates up to 10000 frames per second provides several tens of images between consecutive bursts. A cross-correlation between consecutive images used for speckle tracking shows a decorrelation of the imaging signal due to changes induced by the cavitation cloud. This post-processed sequence of images reveals that once bubbles have been created in the tissue, they remain for a short time even when no ultrasound is applied. The evolution of the size and place of the cavitation cloud between bursts show a repeatable pattern through a burst sequence.

  18. Time-resolved imaging of cavitation effects during laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siano, Salvatore; Pini, Roberto; Salimbeni, Renzo; Vannini, Matteo

    1995-01-01

    We devised a diagnostic technique based on a pump-and-probe scheme that provided time- resolved imaging of photofragmentation effects during laser lithotripsy. The evolution of the cavitation bubble induced on kidney stone samples by underwater irradiation with a XeCl excimer laser is presented and analyzed.

  19. Sound field measurement in a double layer cavitation cluster by rugged miniature needle hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christian

    2016-03-01

    During multi-bubble cavitation the bubbles tend to organize themselves into clusters and thus the understanding of properties and dynamics of clustering is essential for controlling technical applications of cavitation. Sound field measurements are a potential technique to provide valuable experimental information about the status of cavitation clouds. Using purpose-made, rugged, wide band, and small-sized needle hydrophones, sound field measurements in bubble clusters were performed and time-dependent sound pressure waveforms were acquired and analyzed in the frequency domain up to 20 MHz. The cavitation clusters were synchronously observed by an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera and the relation between the sound field measurements and cluster behaviour was investigated. Depending on the driving power, three ranges could be identified and characteristic properties were assigned. At low power settings no transient and no or very low stable cavitation activity can be observed. The medium range is characterized by strong pressure peaks and various bubble cluster forms. At high power a stable double layer was observed which grew with further increasing power and became quite dynamic. The sound field was irregular and the fundamental at driving frequency decreased. Between the bubble clouds completely different sound field properties were found in comparison to those in the cloud where the cavitation activity is high. In between the sound field pressure amplitude was quite small and no collapses were detected.

  20. Study on effect of microparticle's size on cavitation erosion in solid-liquid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haosheng; Liu, Shihan; Wang, Jiadao; Chen, Darong

    2007-05-01

    Five different solutions containing microparticles in different sizes were tested in a vibration cavitation erosion experiment. After the experiment, the number of erosion pits on sample surfaces, free radicals HO• in solutions, and mass loss all show that the cavitation erosion strength is strongly related to the particle size, and 500nm particles cause more severe cavitation erosion than other smaller or larger particles do. A model is presented to explain such result considering both nucleation and bubble-particle collision effects. Particle of a proper size will increase the number of heterogeneous nucleation and at the same time reduce the number of bubble-particle combinations, which results in more free bubbles in the solution to generate stronger cavitation erosion.

  1. Effect of micro/nano-particles in cavitation erosion.

    PubMed

    Li, Y J; Chen, H S; Chen, D R; Wang, J D

    2009-02-01

    The tests in de-ionized water with micro/nano CeO2 particles are carried out to study the effect of the micro/nano particles in inception of cavitation erosion. The existence of micro/nano particles is found to be the requisite factor and the degree of cavitation erosion is related to the sizes of the particles. Particles in the micro/nano scale may act as the transporters of micro bubbles to keep or get close to the solid surface together and the pressure fluctuation induced by the surface roughness causes the collapse of bubbles and erosion of the surface. Discrete phase models are employed to simulation the moving tracks of the particles. The sizes of the particles affect their capabilities of keeping and getting close to the surface. The effect of the particles of a certain size in cavitation erosion is determined by the combinational action of the two.

  2. Cavitation damage in blood clots under HIFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Hope; Ahadi, Golnaz; Hoelscher, Thilo; Szeri, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to accelerate thrombolysis, the dissolution of blood clots, in vitro and in vivo, for treatment of ischemic stroke. Cavitation in sonothrombolysis is thought to play an important role, although the mechanisms are not fully understood. The damage to a blood clot associated with bubble collapses in a HIFU field is studied. The region of damage caused by a bubble collapse on the fibrin network of the blood clot exposed to HIFU is estimated, and compared with experimental assessment of the damage. The mechanical damage to the network caused by a bubble is probed using two independent approaches, a strain based method and an energy based method. Immunoflourescent fibrin staining is used to assess the region of damage experimentally.

  3. Growth of a Gas Bubble in a Supersaturated Liquid Under the Effect of Variant Cases of Surface Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadein, S. A.; Mohamed, K. G.

    In this paper, the growth of a gas bubble in a supersaturated liquid is discussed for a constant and variable cases of surface tension effect. The mathematical model is solved analytically by using the method of Plesset and Zwick18 after modified it. The growth process is affected by: diffusion coefficient D, Jacob number Ja, surface tension σ, adjustment factor b and void fraction ϕ0. The famous formula of Plesset and Zwick is produced as a special case of the results at some values of the adjustment factors. Moreover, for some values of the adjustment factors, good approximation is obtained when a comparison between our results and the result that produced by Hashemi et al., 9 who solved the problem with the method of combining variables.

  4. Promoting inertial cavitation by nonlinear frequency mixing in a bifrequency focused ultrasound beam.

    PubMed

    Saletes, Izella; Gilles, Bruno; Bera, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Enhancing cavitation activity with minimal acoustic intensities could be interesting in a variety of therapeutic applications where mechanical effects of cavitation are needed with minimal heating of surrounding tissues. The present work focuses on the relative efficiency of a signal combining two neighbouring frequencies and a one-frequency signal for initiating ultrasound inertial cavitation. Experiments were carried out in a water tank, using a 550kHz piezoelectric composite spherical transducer focused on targets with 46μm roughness. The acoustic signal scattered, either by the target or by the cavitation bubbles, is filtered using a spectral and cepstral-like method to obtain an inertial cavitation activity measurement. The ultrasound excitations consist of 1.8ms single bursts of single frequency f(0)=550kHz excitation, in the monofrequency case, and of dual frequency f(1)=535kHz and f(2)=565kHz excitation, in the bifrequency case. It is shown that depending on the value of the monofrequency cavitation threshold intensity the bifrequency excitation can increase or reduce the cavitation threshold. The analysis of the thresholds indicates that the mechanisms involved are nonlinear. The progress of the cavitation activity beyond the cavitation threshold is also studied. The slope of the cavitation activity considered as a function of the acoustic intensity is always steeper in the case of the bifrequency excitation. This means that the delimitation of the region where cavitation occurs should be cleaner than with a classical monofrequency excitation.

  5. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1998-06-01

    'The primary goal is to develop a quantitative understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and the development of applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. This report summarizes work after one year of a three year project. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  6. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. Annual progress report, September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1997-11-21

    'During the past year, the authors have continued to make substantial scientific progress on the understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. The efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  7. Removal of Residual Cavitation Nuclei to Enhance Histotripsy Fractionation of Soft Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Remnant bubble nuclei generated by primary cavitation collapse can limit the efficiency of histotripsy soft tissue fractionation. When these residual bubbles persist from one histotripsy pulse to the next, they can seed the repetitive nucleation of cavitation bubbles at a discrete set of sites within the focal volume. This effect—referred to as cavitation memory—manifests in inefficient lesion formation, as certain sites within the focal volume are overtreated while others remain undertreated. While the cavitation memory effect can be passively mitigated by using a low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) that affords remnant nuclei sufficient time for dissolution between successive pulses, this low PRF also results in slow lesion production. As such, it would be highly desirable to maintain the high per-pulse efficiency associated with low pulse rates when much higher PRFs are utilized. In this vein we have developed a strategy for the active removal of the remnant bubble nuclei following primary cavitation collapse, using low amplitude ultrasound sequences (termed bubble removal sequences) to stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of these bubbles. In this study, bubble removal sequences were incorporated in high-PRF histotripsy treatment (100 Hz) of a red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantom that allows for the visualization of lesion development in real-time. A series of reference treatments were also conducted at the low PRF of 1 Hz in order to provide a point of comparison when cavitation memory effects are minimal. It was found that bubble removal sequences as short as 1 ms are capable of maintaining the efficacious lesion development characteristics associated with the low PRF of 1 Hz when the much higher pulse rate of 100 Hz is used. These results were then extended to the treatment of a large volume within the tissue phantom, and optimal bubble removal sequences identified for the single-focal-spot case were utilized to homogenize a 10 × 10

  8. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  9. Modelling of flow with cavitation in centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homa, D.; Wróblewski, W.

    2014-08-01

    The paper concerns flow modelling in centrifugal pump with special consideration of cavitation phenomena. Cavitation occurs when local pressure drops below the saturation pressure according to the temperature of the flow. Vapour bubbles are created and then they flow through the areas with higher pressure. The bubbles collapse rapidly generating pressure wave, noise and vibration. Working under cavitation condition is very dangerous to a pump and can significantly shorten its lifetime. The investigated centrifugal pump consists of three two-flow rotors and stators working on a single shaft. The modelling process started with grid independence study. When the grid was chosen, the pump performance curve was obtained using the single phase fluid model. Next, using the results from pump performance curve calculations, the cavitation characteristic was obtained. The constant capacity was held when the pressure at the inlet was reduced. The two - phase model was used with Zwart cavitation model. The results indicate that the pump work in safe range of parameters. The analysis also provides wide range of information about the areas of vapour appearance. The most endangered regions are leading edges of rotor. When pressure at the inlet drops to about one third of pressure that calculations started from the cavitation cloud appears in whole rotor. The intense of vapour bubbles creation is greater near the shroud of the pump, rather than near the hub. As cavitation is strongly unsteady phenomena, the transient calculations were performed to check if the results are close to those obtained using the steady state type. The differences are not significant.

  10. Effect of hydrodynamic cavitation in the tissue erosion by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2016-09-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as an effective therapeutic modality in clinics. Besides the thermal ablation, tissue disintegration is also possible because of the interaction between the distorted HIFU bursts and either bubble cloud or boiling bubble. Hydrodynamic cavitation is another type of cavitation and has been employed widely in industry, but its role in mechanical erosion to tissue is not clearly known. In this study, the bubble dynamics immediately after the termination of HIFU exposure in the transparent gel phantom was captured by high-speed photography, from which the bubble displacement towards the transducer and the changes of bubble size was quantitatively determined. The characteristics of hydrodynamic cavitation due to the release of the acoustic radiation force and relaxation of compressed surrounding medium were found to associate with the number of pulses delivered and HIFU parameters (i.e. pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency). Because of the initial big bubble (~1 mm), large bubble expansion (up to 1.76 folds), and quick bubble motion (up to ~1 m s-1) hydrodynamic cavitation is significant after HIFU exposure and may lead to mechanical erosion. The shielding effect of residual tiny bubbles would reduce the acoustic energy delivered to the pre-existing bubble at the focus and, subsequently, the hydrodynamic cavitation effect. Tadpole shape of mechanical erosion in ex vivo porcine kidney samples was similar to the contour of bubble dynamics in the gel. Liquefied tissue was observed to emit towards the transducer through the punctured tissue after HIFU exposure in the sonography. In summary, the release of HIFU exposure-induced hydrodynamic cavitation produces significant bubble expansion and motion, which may be another important mechanism of tissue erosion. Understanding its mechanism and optimizing the outcome would broaden and enhance HIFU applications.

  11. Effect of hydrodynamic cavitation in the tissue erosion by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2016-09-21

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as an effective therapeutic modality in clinics. Besides the thermal ablation, tissue disintegration is also possible because of the interaction between the distorted HIFU bursts and either bubble cloud or boiling bubble. Hydrodynamic cavitation is another type of cavitation and has been employed widely in industry, but its role in mechanical erosion to tissue is not clearly known. In this study, the bubble dynamics immediately after the termination of HIFU exposure in the transparent gel phantom was captured by high-speed photography, from which the bubble displacement towards the transducer and the changes of bubble size was quantitatively determined. The characteristics of hydrodynamic cavitation due to the release of the acoustic radiation force and relaxation of compressed surrounding medium were found to associate with the number of pulses delivered and HIFU parameters (i.e. pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency). Because of the initial big bubble (~1 mm), large bubble expansion (up to 1.76 folds), and quick bubble motion (up to ~1 m s(-1)) hydrodynamic cavitation is significant after HIFU exposure and may lead to mechanical erosion. The shielding effect of residual tiny bubbles would reduce the acoustic energy delivered to the pre-existing bubble at the focus and, subsequently, the hydrodynamic cavitation effect. Tadpole shape of mechanical erosion in ex vivo porcine kidney samples was similar to the contour of bubble dynamics in the gel. Liquefied tissue was observed to emit towards the transducer through the punctured tissue after HIFU exposure in the sonography. In summary, the release of HIFU exposure-induced hydrodynamic cavitation produces significant bubble expansion and motion, which may be another important mechanism of tissue erosion. Understanding its mechanism and optimizing the outcome would broaden and enhance HIFU applications.

  12. Cell mechanics in biomedical cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qianxi; Manmi, Kawa; Liu, Kuo-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the deformation behaviours of cellular entities, such as coated microbubbles and liposomes subject to a cavitation flow, become increasingly important for the advancement of ultrasonic imaging and drug delivery. Numerical simulations for bubble dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents based on the boundary integral method are presented in this work. The effects of the encapsulating shell are estimated by adapting Hoff's model used for thin-shell contrast agents. The viscosity effects are estimated by including the normal viscous stress in the boundary condition. In parallel, mechanical models of cell membranes and liposomes as well as state-of-the-art techniques for quantitative measurement of viscoelasticity for a single cell or coated microbubbles are reviewed. The future developments regarding modelling and measurement of the material properties of the cellular entities for cutting-edge biomedical applications are also discussed. PMID:26442142

  13. The effects of bubble-bubble interactions on pressures and temperatures produced by bubbles collapsing near a rigid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alahyari Beig, Shahaboddin; Johnsen, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation occurs in a wide range of hydraulic applications, and one of its most important consequences is structural damage to neighboring surfaces following repeated bubble collapse. A number of studies have been conducted to predict the pressures produced by the collapse of a single bubble. However, the collapse of multiple bubbles is known to lead to enhanced collapse pressures. In this study, we quantify the effects of bubble-bubble interactions on the bubble dynamics and pressures/temperatures produced by the collapse of a pair of bubbles near a rigid surface. For this purpose, we use an in-house, high-order accurate shock- and interface-capturing method to solve the 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations for gas/liquid flows. The non-spherical bubble dynamics are investigated and the subsequent pressure and temperature fields are characterized based on the relevant parameters entering the problem: stand-off distance, geometrical configuation, collapse strength. We demonstrate that bubble-bubble interactions amplify/reduce pressures and temperatures produced at the collapse, and increase the non-sphericity of the bubbles and the collapse time, depending on the flow parameters.

  14. Controlled Cavitation for Scale-Free Heating, Gum Hydration and Emulsification in Food and Consumer Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancosky, Douglas G.; Milly, Paul

    Cavitation is defined as the sudden formation and collapse of bubbles in liquid by means of a mechanical force. As bubbles rapidly form and collapse, pressurized shock waves, localized heating events and tremendous shearing forces occur. As microscopic cavitation bubbles are produced and collapse, shockwaves are given off into the liquid, which can result in heating and/or mixing, similar to ultrasound. These shockwaves can provide breakthrough benefits for the heating of liquids without scale buildup and/or the mixing of liquids with other liquids, gases or solids at the microscopic level to increase the efficiency of the reaction.

  15. Effect of Noble Gases on Sonoluminescence Temperatures during Multibubble Cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Didenko, Yuri T.; McNamara, William B. III; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-24

    Sonoluminescence spectra were collected from Cr(CO){sub 6} solutions in octanol and dodecane saturated with various noble gases. The emission from excited-state metal atoms serves as an internal thermometer of cavitation. The intensity and temperature of sonoluminescence increases from He to Xe. The intensity of the underlying continuum, however, grows faster with increasing temperature than the line emission. Dissociation of solvent molecules within the bubble consumes a significant fraction of the energy generated by the collapsing bubble, which can limit the final temperature inside the bubble. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  16. Stable tridimensional bubble clusters in multi-bubble sonoluminescence (MBSL).

    PubMed

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, stable clusters made of multiple sonoluminescent bubbles are experimentally and theoretically studied. Argon bubbles were acoustically generated and trapped using bi-frequency driving within a cylindrical chamber filled with a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA85w/w). The intensity of the acoustic pressure field was strong enough to sustain, during several minutes, a large number of positionally and spatially fixed (without pseudo-orbits) sonoluminescent bubbles over an ellipsoidally-shaped tridimensional array. The dimensions of the ellipsoids were studied as a function of the amplitude of the applied low-frequency acoustic pressure (PAc(LF)) and the static pressure in the fluid (P0). In order to explain the size and shape of the bubble clusters, we performed a series of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic forces acting over the bubbles. In both cases the observed experimental behavior was in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The simulations revealed that the positionally stable region, mainly determined by the null primary Bjerknes force (F→Bj), is defined as the outer perimeter of an axisymmetric ellipsoidal cluster centered in the acoustic field antinode. The role of the high-frequency component of the pressure field and the influence of the secondary Bjerknes force are discussed. We also investigate the effect of a change in the concentration of dissolved gas on the positional and spatial instabilities through the cluster dimensions. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper are potentially useful for further understanding and modeling numerous current research topics regarding multi-bubble phenomena, e.g. forces acting on the bubbles in multi-frequency acoustic fields, transient acoustic cavitation, bubble interactions, structure formation processes, atomic and molecular emissions of equal bubbles and nonlinear or unsteady acoustic pressure fields in bubbly media.

  17. Detecting cavitation in vivo from shock-wave therapy devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matula, Thomas J.; Yu, Jinfei; Bailey, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (ESWT) has been used as a treatment for plantar faciitis, lateral epicondylitis, shoulder tendonitis, non-unions, and other indications where conservative treatments have been unsuccessful. However, in many areas, the efficacy of SW treatment has not been well established, and the mechanism of action, particularly the role of cavitation, is not well understood. Research indicates cavitation plays an important role in other ultrasound therapies, such as lithotripsy and focused ultrasound surgery, and in some instances, cavitation has been used as a means to monitor or detect a biological effect. Although ESWT can generate cavitation easily in vitro, it is unknown whether or not cavitation is a significant factor in vivo. The purpose of this investigation is to use diagnostic ultrasound to detect and monitor cavitation generated by ESWT devices in vivo. Diagnostic images are collected at various times during and after treatment. The images are then post-processed with image-processing algorithms to enhance the contrast between bubbles and surrounding tissue. The ultimate goal of this research is to utilize cavitation as a means for optimizing shock wave parameters such as amplitude and pulse repetition frequency. [Work supported by APL internal funds and NIH DK43881 and DK55674.

  18. Nano bubbles in liquid of a noble-gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takenori; Ohnishi, Shuhei

    2010-02-07

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with over one million atoms are used to investigate nano bubbles in Ar-Ne liquid. The simulations demonstrate cavitations in the stretched liquid, and bubble creation and collapse. We find that a small cavity created in the stretched liquid spontaneously transforms into a nano bubble with the homogeneous vapor region. The equilibrium spherical bubble of 11.4 nm in radius is obtained after the long-time MD run. The surface tension of the nano bubble is found to be larger than that of the flat surface.

  19. Elimination of cavitation-related attenuation in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankin, G. N.; Lautz, J. M.; Simmons, W. N.; Zhong, P.; Frank, S. T.; Szeri, A. J.

    2017-03-01

    In shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), acoustic pulses with a leading compression wave followed by a tensile wave are delivered into the patient's body using a water-filled coupling cushion. Cavitation-related acoustic energy loss in the coupling unit depends critically on water conditions, e.g. dissolved gas concentration and exchange flow rate. We have systematically investigated the attenuation mechanism in the coupling water via pressure measurements and cavitation characterization. In non-degassed water the bubble cluster became progressively dense (i.e., proliferated because of gas diffusion into bubbles and splitting of bubbles into many daughter bubbles) in shock waves delivered at 1 Hz leading to reduction in the tensile wave duration from a nominal value of 4.6 to 1.8 µs. To reduce cavitation in the coupling water along the beam path, we have used a continuous jet flow to remove residual daughter bubbles between consecutive shocks. As a result, stone fragmentation efficiency was increased from 16±4% to 30±5% (p = 0.002) after 250 shocks. Such a hydrodynamic approach for tensile wave attenuation in the coupling water may be used to provide a flexible means for a novel treatment strategy with tissue protection.

  20. Porous resins as a cavitation enhancer for low-frequency sonophoresis.

    PubMed

    Terahara, Takaaki; Mitragotri, Samir; Langer, Robert

    2002-03-01

    The application of low-frequency ultrasound enhances drug transport through the skin, a phenomenon referred to as low-frequency sonophoresis. This enhancement is mediated through cavitation, the formation and collapse of gaseous bubbles. We hypothesized that the efficacy of low-frequency sonophoresis can be significantly enhanced by provision of nuclei for cavitation. In this study, we used two porous resins, Diaion HP20 and Diaion HP2MG (2MG), as cavitation nuclei. We measured the effect of these resins on cavitation using pitting of aluminum foil. 2MG showed a higher efficacy in enhancing cavitation compared with Diaion HP20. 2MG was also effective in enhancing transdermal mannitol transport. These results confirm that the addition of cavitation nuclei such as porous resins further increases the effect of low-frequency ultrasound on skin permeability.

  1. The influence of air content in water on ultrasonic cavitation field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liyan; Yang, Yang; Liu, Penghong; Tan, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation is a complex physical phenomenon affected by many factors, one of which is the gas dissolved in the medium. Researchers have given some efforts to the influence of gas content on sonoluminescence or some specific chemical reactions in and around the bubble, but limited work has been reported about the influence on the ultrasonic cavitation field distribution. In this work, the intensity distribution of the ultrasound field in a cleaning tank has been measured with the hydrophone. After analysed and visualised by MATLAB software, it was found that the cavitation intensity distribution in degassed water was much better than that in tap water. And further study proved that degassing process can improve the cavitation effect dramatically both in intensity and scope. Finally, the cavitation fields in mediums with different gas content were measured and the specific influence of air content on cavitation field was discussed.

  2. Measurements of the stagnation pressure in the center of a cavitating jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobel, A. J.; Talmon, A. M.

    2012-02-01

    The stagnation pressure at a certain distance from the nozzle is important for the erosion/ cutting capacity of a submerged jet in dredging. The decay of the stagnation pressure with jet distance is well known in the case of non-cavitating jets. It is also known that cavitation causes the rate of decay to decrease. Under conditions of cavitation, a cone of bubbles forms around the jet, which decreases the momentum exchange between the jet and the ambient water and the associated entrainment. Despite the amount of research on cavitating jets, the literature does not provide a description for the entrainment in the case of a cavitating jet. Also, a useful description of the stagnation pressure decay of a cavitating jet is missing. To fill this lacuna, we carried out jet tests at various ambient pressures in both fresh and saline water. We present and analyse the results in this paper.

  3. Detecting vapour bubbles in simulations of metastable water

    SciTech Connect

    González, Miguel A.; Abascal, Jose L. F.; Valeriani, Chantal E-mail: cvaleriani@quim.ucm.es; Menzl, Georg; Geiger, Philipp; Dellago, Christoph E-mail: cvaleriani@quim.ucm.es; Aragones, Juan L.; Caupin, Frederic

    2014-11-14

    The investigation of cavitation in metastable liquids with molecular simulations requires an appropriate definition of the volume of the vapour bubble forming within the metastable liquid phase. Commonly used approaches for bubble detection exhibit two significant flaws: first, when applied to water they often identify the voids within the hydrogen bond network as bubbles thus masking the signature of emerging bubbles and, second, they lack thermodynamic consistency. Here, we present two grid-based methods, the M-method and the V-method, to detect bubbles in metastable water specifically designed to address these shortcomings. The M-method incorporates information about neighbouring grid cells to distinguish between liquid- and vapour-like cells, which allows for a very sensitive detection of small bubbles and high spatial resolution of the detected bubbles. The V-method is calibrated such that its estimates for the bubble volume correspond to the average change in system volume and are thus thermodynamically consistent. Both methods are computationally inexpensive such that they can be used in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations of cavitation. We illustrate them by computing the free energy barrier and the size of the critical bubble for cavitation in water at negative pressure.

  4. Detecting vapour bubbles in simulations of metastable water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Miguel A.; Menzl, Georg; Aragones, Juan L.; Geiger, Philipp; Caupin, Frederic; Abascal, Jose L. F.; Dellago, Christoph; Valeriani, Chantal

    2014-11-01

    The investigation of cavitation in metastable liquids with molecular simulations requires an appropriate definition of the volume of the vapour bubble forming within the metastable liquid phase. Commonly used approaches for bubble detection exhibit two significant flaws: first, when applied to water they often identify the voids within the hydrogen bond network as bubbles thus masking the signature of emerging bubbles and, second, they lack thermodynamic consistency. Here, we present two grid-based methods, the M-method and the V-method, to detect bubbles in metastable water specifically designed to address these shortcomings. The M-method incorporates information about neighbouring grid cells to distinguish between liquid- and vapour-like cells, which allows for a very sensitive detection of small bubbles and high spatial resolution of the detected bubbles. The V-method is calibrated such that its estimates for the bubble volume correspond to the average change in system volume and are thus thermodynamically consistent. Both methods are computationally inexpensive such that they can be used in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations of cavitation. We illustrate them by computing the free energy barrier and the size of the critical bubble for cavitation in water at negative pressure.

  5. Strategy of high efficiency and refined high-intensity focused ultrasound and ultrasound monitoring imaging of thermal lesion and cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Mingxi; Zhang, Siyuan; Lu, Mingzhu; Hu, Hong; Jing, Bowen; Liu, Runna; Zhong, Hui

    2017-03-01

    We proposed that high efficiency high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) could be achieved by using a splitting transducer with various frequencies and focusing patterns, and explored the feasibility of using ultrafast active cavitation imaging (UACI), pulse inversion (PI) sub-harmonic cavitation imaging and bubble wavelet transform imaging for monitoring of cavitation during HIFU, as well as the ultrasonic B-mode images, differential integrated backscatter (IBS) images, Nakagami images and elastography for monitoring HIFU-induced lesion. The use of HIFU splitting transducer had the potential to increase the size of the thermal lesion in a shorter duration and may improve the ablation efficiency of HIFU and would shorten the exposure duration significantly. The spatial-temporal evolution of residual cavitation bubbles at the tissue-water interface was obtained by UACI and the results showed that the UACI had a frame rate high enough to capture the transient behavior of the cavitation bubbles. The experiments demonstrated that comparing with normal sub-harmonic and PI harmonic images, PI sub-harmonic images had higher sensitivity and CTR, which was conducive to showing cavitation bubbles. The CTR would be further improved by combining PI ultrafast plane wave transmitting with cavitation bubble wavelet transform.

  6. Predicting the growth of nanoscale nuclei by histotripsy pulses

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2016-01-01

    Histotripsy is a focused ultrasound therapy that ablates tissue through the mechanical action of cavitation. Histotripsy-initiated cavitation activity is generated from shocked ultrasound pulses that scatter from incidental nuclei (shock scattering histotripsy), or purely tensile ultrasound pulses (microtripsy). The Yang/Church model was numerically integrated to predict the behavior of the cavitation nuclei exposed to measured shock scattering histotripsy pulses. The bubble motion exhibited expansion only behavior, suggesting that the ablative action of a histotripsy pulse is related to the maximum size of the bubble. The analytic model of Holland and Apfel was extended to predict the maximum size of cavitation nuclei for both shock scattering histotripsy and microtripsy excitations. The predictions of the analytic model and the numerical model agree within 2% for fully developed shock scattering histotripsy pulses (>72 MPa peak positive pressure). For shock scattering histotripsy pulses that are not fully developed (<72 MPa), the analytic model underestimated the maximum size by less than 5%. The analytic model was also used to predict bubble growth nucleated from microtripsy insonations, and was found to be consistent with experimental observations. Based on the extended analytic model, metrics were developed to predict the extent of the treatment zone from histotripsy pulses. PMID:26988374

  7. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  8. Large Bubble Growth Quantified By Video and Infrasound at Mount Erebus, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. J. C.; Johnson, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Mount Erebus lava lake eruptions exhibit many characteristic strombolian attributes including the ascent of a large gas slug(s) through the magma column followed by its expansion and bursting at the surface. Strombolian explosions correspond to pressurized large (>10 m radius) bubbles, which distend the lava lake surface before bursting within a few tenths of a second thus generating infrasonic impulses followed by decaying oscillations. We quantify the dynamics of bubble evolution using infrasound and time synchronized video data recording at ~30 FPS. Video footage is used to synthesize pressure time series during eruptions assuming a simple acoustic source. These synthetic pressure records are directly compared to infrasound pressure records collected at two sites located ~300 m from the lava lake source. A scaled relationship exists between infrasound and video derived pressures where video generally overestimates the volumetrically expanding source. This scaling is due to the image processing routine, which tracks and models the ejection of ballistics during eruption as an expanding hemisphere and not necessarily the expansion of a translucent gas source that is not directly visible with optical imagery. Using both data sets, we describe Erebus lava lake eruptions in three phases with smooth distension of spherical cap (P1), followed by membrane fragmentation and violent gas expulsion (P2) and finally a contraction of the volumetric gas source due to an initial over-expansion followed by re-equilibration. (P3). Specifically, P3 is identified by decaying oscillations of the pressure record which has been well modeled in laboratory experiments but never described at Erebus.

  9. Laser-induced cavitation based micropump.

    PubMed

    Dijkink, Rory; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2008-10-01

    Lab-on-a-chip devices are in strong demand as versatile and robust pumping techniques. Here, we present a cavitation based technique, which is able to pump a volume of 4000 microm3 within 75 micros against an estimated pressure head of 3 bar. The single cavitation event is created by focusing a laser pulse in a conventional PDMS microfluidic chip close to the channel opening. High-speed photography at 1 million frames s(-1) resolves the flow in the supply channel, pump channel, and close to the cavity. The elasticity of the material affects the overall fluid flow. Continuous pumping at repetition rates of up to 5 Hz through 6 mm long square channels of 20 microm width is shown. A parameter study reveals the key-parameters for operation: the distance between the laser focus and the channel, the maximum bubble size, and the chamber geometry.

  10. Preliminary wall heat transfer measurements and visualization of bubble growth and departure: Saturated nucleate boiling of FC-72

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, S.W.; Kim, J.; Mullen, J.D.; Kim, M.H.

    1999-07-01

    A visualization study of single bubbles growing on a microscale heater array kept at nominally constant temperature was performed. The heater array consisted of 96 heaters each 0.27 mm x 0.27 mm in size. The heater temperatures were kept constant using electronic feedback loops similar to those used in hot-wire anemometry and the power required to do this was measured throughout the bubble departure cycle for each heater in the array. Preliminary data taken at a wall superheat of 29 C resulted in boiling in the isolated bubble regime on the surface. A snapshot of boiling on the surface is seen in Figure A-1. Three types of bubble behavior were observed. The bubbles nucleating in the upper left and lower left corners of the array did not appear to be influenced by bubbles that had departed previously, nor by other bubbles on the heater (Type I behavior). The bubbles nucleating from the single site towards the center of the array were influenced by the wake of the bubble that had departed previously (Type II behavior). The bubbles nucleating in the upper and lower right corners nucleated and grew on separate sites, then merged to form a single large bubble that departed the surface (Type III behavior). Large amounts of heat transfer were associated with three processes during the bubble departure cycle-bubble nucleation, shrinking of the dry spot before departure, and merging of bubbles. The heat transfer mechanisms seen are often not accounted for in many of the current models.

  11. Cavitation in ultrasound and shockwave therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonius, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Acoustic waves, especially high-intensity ultrasound and shock waves, are used for medical imaging and intra- and extra-corporeal manipulation of cells, tissue, and urinary calculi. Waves are currently used to treat kidney stone disease, plantar fasciitis, and bone nonunion, and they are being investigated as a technique to ablate cancer tumors and mediate drug delivery. In many applications, acoustic waves induce the expansion and collapse of preexisting or newly cavitating bubbles whose presence can either mediate the generation of localized stresses or lead to collateral damage, depending on how effectively they can be controlled. We describe efforts aimed at simulating the collapse of bubbles, both individually and in clusters, with the aim to characterize the induced mechanical stresses and strains. To simulate collapse of one or a few bubbles, compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes simulations of multi-component materials are performed with WENO-based shock and interface capturing schemes. Repetitive insonification generates numerous bubbles that are difficult to resolve numerically. Such clouds are also important in traditional engineering applications such as caveating hydrofoils. Models that incorporate the dynamics of an unresolved dispersed phase consisting of the bubble cloud are also developed. The results of several model problems including bubble collapse near rigid surfaces, bubble collapse near compliant surfaces and in small capillaries are analyzed. The results are processed to determine the potential for micron-sized preexisting gas bubbles to damage capillaries. The translation of the fundamental fluid dynamics into improvements in the design and clinical application of shockwave lithotripters will be discussed. NIH Grant PO1-DK043881.

  12. Comparative CFD Investigation on the Performance of a New Family of Super-Cavitating Hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizzolara, S.; Bonfiglio, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a CFD characterization of a new type of super-cavitating hydrofoil section designed to have optimal performance both in super-cavitating conditions and in sub-cavitating conditions (including transitional regime). The basic concepts of the new profile family are first introduced. Lift, drag and cavity shapes at different cavitation numbers are calculated for a new foil and compared with those of conventional sub-cavitating and super-cavitating profiles. Numerical calculations confirm the superior characteristics of the new hydrofoil family, which is able to attain high lift and efficiency both in sub-cavitating and super-cavitating conditions. Numerical calculations are based on a multi-phase fully turbulent URANSE solver with a bubble dynamic cavitation model to follow the generation and evaporation of the vapor phase. The new profile family, initially devised for ultra-high speed hydrofoil crafts, may result useful for diverse applications such as super-cavitating or surface-piercing propellers or high-speed sailing boats.

  13. Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Gulec, K.; West, C.D.; Haines, J.

    1998-09-01

    It is well-known that fluids (like solids) will break apart or form voids when put under sufficient tension. The present study has been motivated by the need to evaluate the impact of fluid cavitation in spallation neutron source target systems, more specifically for the proposed 1-MW Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, which is being designed in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. Indeed, results of SNS-specific simulations have indicated that the onset of cavitation could play a very significant role in reducing imposed stresses in structural components of the SNS. In general, the cavitation of fluids is target systems is important to consider for a variety of reasons. Its occurrence can have significant impact on heat transfer, pressure pulse generation, fluid jetting on to structures, surface erosion, stresses induced in enclosures, etc. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the threshold pressure under which the fluid in tension will undergo cavitation. Another major aspect concerns the possible onset of cavitation in an oscillating pressure field; i.e., one would need to know if fluids such as mercury and water will cavitate if the imposed tensile pressure in the fluid is of short duration. If indeed it takes sufficiently long for cavitation bubbles to nucleate, then it would be possible to disregard the complexities involved with addressing cavitation-related issues. This paper provides an overview of preliminary work done to date to derive information on cavitation onset in a relatively static and in a high-frequency environment.

  14. Can Cavitation Be Anticipated?

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-25

    The major problem with cavitation in pumps and hydraulic systems is that there is no effective (conventional) method for detecting or predicting its inception. The traditional method of recognizing cavitation in a pump is to declare the event occurring when the total head drops by some arbitrary value (typically 3%) in response to a pressure reduction at the pump inlet. However, the device is already seriously cavitating when this happens. What is actually needed is a practical method to detect impending rather than incipient cavitation. Whereas the detection of incipient cavitation requires the detection of features just after cavitation starts, the anticipation of cavitation requires the detection and identification of precursor features just before it begins. Two recent advances that make this detection possible. The first is acoustic sensors with a bandwidth of 1 MHz and a dynamic range of 80 dB that preserve the fine details of the features when subjected to coarse vibrations. The second is the application of Bayesian parameter estimation which makes it possible to separate weak signals, such as those present in cavitation precursors, from strong signals, such as pump vibration. Bayesian parameter estimation derives a model based on cavitation hydrodynamics and produces a figure of merit of how well it fits the acquired data. Applying this model to an anticipatory engine should lead to a reliable method of anticipating cavitation before it occurs. This paper reports the findings of precursor features using high-performance sensors and Bayesian analysis of weak acoustic emissions in the 100-1000kHz band from an experimental flow loop.

  15. Experiments in thermosensitive cavitation of a cryogenic rocket propellant surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Sean Benjamin

    Cavitation is a phase-change phenomenon that may appear in practical devices, often leading to loss of performance and possible physical damage. Of particular interest is the presence of cavitation in rocket engine pumps as the cryogenic fluids cavitate in impellers and inducers. Unlike water, which has been studied exhaustively, cryogenic fluids undergo cavitation with significant thermal effect. Past attempts at analyzing this behavior in water have led to poor predictive capability due to the lack of data in the regime defined as thermosensitive cavitation. Fluids flowing near their thermodynamic critical point have a liquid-vapor density ratio that is orders of magnitude less than typical experimental fluids, so that the traditional equation-of-state and cavitation models do not apply. Thermal effects in cavitation have not been fully investigated due to experimental difficulties handling cryogenics. This work investigates the physical effects of thermosensitive cavitation in a model representative of a turbopump inducer in a modern rocket engine. This is achieved by utilizing a room-temperature testing fluid that exhibits a thermal effect equivalent to that experienced by cryogenic propellants. Unsteady surface pressures and high speed imaging collected over the span of thermophysical regimes ranging from thermosensitive to isothermal cavitation offer both quantitative and qualitative insight into the physical process of thermal cavitation. Physical and thermodynamic effects are isolated to identify the source of cavity conditions, oscillations and growth/collapse behavior. Planar laser imaging offers an instantaneous look inside the vapor cavity and at the behavior of the boundary between the two-phase region and freestream liquid. Nondimensional parameters are explored, with cavitation numbers, Reynolds Numbers, coefficient of pressure and nondimensional temperature in a broad range. Results in the form of cavitation regime maps, Strouhal Number of cavity

  16. Numerical simulations of the aspherical collapse of laser and acoustically generated bubbles.

    PubMed

    Tsiglifis, Kostas; Pelekasis, Nikos A

    2007-04-01

    The details of nonlinear axisymmetric oscillations and collapse of bubbles subject to large internal or external pressure disturbances, are studied via a boundary integral method. Weak viscous effects on the liquid side are accounted for by integrating the equations of motion across the boundary layer that is formed adjacent to the interface. Simulations of single-cavitation bubble luminescence (SCBL) and single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) are performed under conditions similar to reported experimental observations, aiming at capturing the details of bubble collapse. It is shown that any small initial deviation from sphericity, modeled through a small initial elongation along the axis of symmetry, may result in the formation and impact of two counter-propagating jets during collapse of the bubble, provided the amplitude of the initial disturbance is large enough and the viscosity of the surrounding fluid is small enough. Comparison between simulations and experimental observations show that this is the case for bubbles induced via a nano-second laser pulse (SCBL) during a luminescence event. In a similar fashion, simulations show that loss of sphericity accompanied with jet formation and impact during collapse is also possible with acoustically trapped bubbles in a standing pressure wave (SBSL), due to the many afterbounces of the bubble during its collapse phase. In both cases jet impact occurs as a result of P(2) growth in the form of an afterbounce instability. When the sound amplitude is decreased or liquid viscosity is increased the intensity of the afterbounce is decreased and jet impact is suppressed. When the sound amplitude is increased jet formation is superceded by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In the same context stable luminescence is quenched in experimental observations. In both SCBL and SBSL simulations the severity of jet impact during collapse is quite large, and its local nature quite distinct. This attests to the fact that it is an energy

  17. Shock-induced collapse of a bubble inside a deformable vessel

    PubMed Central

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy repeatedly focuses shockwaves on kidney stones to induce their fracture, partially through cavitation erosion. A typical side effect of the procedure is hemorrhage, which is potentially the result of the growth and collapse of bubbles inside blood vessels. To identify the mechanisms by which shock-induced collapse could lead to the onset of injury, we study an idealized problem involving a preexisting bubble in a deformable vessel. We utilize a high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, finite-volume scheme and simulate the three-dimensional shock-induced collapse of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column which is embedded in a gelatin/water mixture. The mixture is a soft tissue simulant, 10% gelatin by weight, and is modeled by the stiffened gas equation of state. The bubble dynamics of this model configuration are characterized by the collapse of the bubble and its subsequent jetting in the direction of the propagation of the shockwave. The vessel wall, which is defined by the material interface between the water and gelatin/water mixture, is invaginated by the collapse and distended by the impact of the jet. The present results show that the highest measured pressures and deformations occur when the volumetric confinement of the bubble is strongest, the bubble is nearest the vessel wall and/or the angle of incidence of the shockwave reduces the distance between the jet tip and the nearest vessel surface. For a particular case considered, the 40 MPa shockwave utilized in this study to collapse the bubble generated a vessel wall pressure of almost 450 MPa and produced both an invagination and distention of nearly 50% of the initial vessel radius on a 𝒪(10) ns timescale. These results are indicative of the significant potential of shock-induced collapse to contribute to the injury of blood vessels in shockwave lithotripsy. PMID:24015027

  18. Theory of supercompression of vapor bubbles and nanoscale thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, Robert I.; Akhatov, Iskander Sh.; Topolnikov, Andrey S.; Bolotnova, Raisa Kh.; Vakhitova, Nailya K.; Lahey, Richard T.; Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2005-10-01

    This paper provides the theoretical basis for energetic vapor bubble implosions induced by a standing acoustic wave. Its primary goal is to describe, explain, and demonstrate the plausibility of the experimental observations by Taleyarkhan et al. [Science 295, 1868 (2002); Phys. Rev. E 69, 036109 (2004)] of thermonuclear fusion for imploding cavitation bubbles in chilled deuterated acetone. A detailed description and analysis of these data, including a resolution of the criticisms that have been raised, together with some preliminary HYDRO code simulations, has been given by Nigmatulin et al. [Vestnik ANRB (Ufa, Russia) 4, 3 (2002); J. Power Energy 218-A, 345 (2004)] and Lahey et al. [Adv. Heat Transfer (to be published)]. In this paper a hydrodynamic shock (i.e., HYDRO) code model of the spherically symmetric motion for a vapor bubble in an acoustically forced liquid is presented. This model describes cavitation bubble cluster growth during the expansion period, followed by a violent implosion during the compression period of the acoustic cycle. There are two stages of the bubble dynamics process. The first, low Mach number stage, comprises almost all the time of the acoustic cycle. During this stage, the radial velocities are much less than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid, the vapor pressure is very close to uniform, and the liquid is practically incompressible. This process is characterized by the inertia of the liquid, heat conduction, and the evaporation or condensation of the vapor. The second, very short, high Mach number stage is when the radial velocities are the same order, or higher, than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid. In this stage high temperatures, pressures, and densities of the vapor and liquid take place. The model presented herein has realistic equations of state for the compressible liquid and vapor phases, and accounts for nonequilibrium evaporation/condensation kinetics at the liquid/vapor interface. There are interacting

  19. Theory of supercompression of vapor bubbles and nanoscale thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, Robert I.; Akhatov, Iskander Sh.; Topolnikov, Andrey S.; Bolotnova, Raisa Kh.; Vakhitova, Nailya K.; Lahey, Richard T. Jr.; Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2005-10-01

    This paper provides the theoretical basis for energetic vapor bubble implosions induced by a standing acoustic wave. Its primary goal is to describe, explain, and demonstrate the plausibility of the experimental observations by Taleyarkhan et al. [Science 295, 1868 (2002); Phys. Rev. E 69, 036109 (2004)] of thermonuclear fusion for imploding cavitation bubbles in chilled deuterated acetone. A detailed description and analysis of these data, including a resolution of the criticisms that have been raised, together with some preliminary HYDRO code simulations, has been given by Nigmatulin et al. [Vestnik ANRB (Ufa, Russia) 4, 3 (2002); J. Power Energy 218-A, 345 (2004)] and Lahey et al. [Adv. Heat Transfer (to be published)]. In this paper a hydrodynamic shock (i.e., HYDRO) code model of the spherically symmetric motion for a vapor bubble in an acoustically forced liquid is presented. This model describes cavitation bubble cluster growth during the expansion period, followed by a violent implosion during the compression period of the acoustic cycle. There are two stages of the bubble dynamics process. The first, low Mach number stage, comprises almost all the time of the acoustic cycle. During this stage, the radial velocities are much less than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid, the vapor pressure is very close to uniform, and the liquid is practically incompressible. This process is characterized by the inertia of the liquid, heat conduction, and the evaporation or condensation of the vapor. The second, very short, high Mach number stage is when the radial velocities are the same order, or higher, than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid. In this stage high temperatures, pressures, and densities of the vapor and liquid take place. The model presented herein has realistic equations of state for the compressible liquid and vapor phases, and accounts for nonequilibrium evaporation/condensation kinetics at the liquid/vapor interface. There are interacting

  20. Interaction of Two Differently Sized Bubbles in a Free Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Lup Wai; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Klaseboer, Evert; Ohl, Siew-Wan

    The interaction between two different sized (spark created, non-equilibrium) bubbles is studied by using high speed photography. The bubble size ranges from 2 to 7 mm. The experimental results are compared to that of the similar sized bubbles reported in the literature. Interestingly, all the four major behaviors of bubble-bubble interactions (i.e. 'bubble-collapsed' induced liquid jets directed away from each other, liquid jets directed towards each other, bubble coalescence and the 'catapult' effect) are observed which bear much similarity to that found for similar sized bubbles' interaction. The main parameters studied/varied are the size of the bubbles, the dimensionless separation distance and the phase difference between the two bubbles. The results obtained are consistent with the cases of similar sized bubbles reported in the literature, with each type of behavior occupying a distinct region in the graphical plot. This indicates that the results for the (special) similar sized bubbles can be generalized to cases with different sized bubbles. Many of the real life applications such as cavitations corrosions often involve bubbles with significant size difference, thus the present findings are useful in predicting the behavior of multiple bubbles in many situations.

  1. Cavitation erosion: Using the target material as a pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Samir Chandra; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Fivel, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Numerical prediction of mass loss due to cavitation erosion requires the knowledge of the hydrodynamic impact loads generated by cavitation bubble collapses. Experimental measurements of such impact loads using conventional pressure sensors are not reliable (if not impossible) due to the micron size and the very small duration of the loading. In this paper, a new method to estimate these loading conditions is proposed based on cavitation pitting tests and an iterative inverse finite element modeling. The principle of the method is as follows. First, numerous pits corresponding to localized plastically deformed regions are identified from a cavitation test performed in a dedicated tunnel. Then each pit is numerically reproduced by finite element simulations of the material response to a representative Gaussian pressure field supposed to mimic a single bubble collapse. This gives the size and pressure distribution of the bubble impacts. The prime objective of this study is to find out if the target material itself could be used as a pressure sensor or not, i.e., if the cavitation pits left on the surface of the tested specimen could provide the characteristics of the cavitating flow in terms of pressure fields independently of the target material. Pitting tests were done on three materials, namely, 7075 Aluminum alloy (Al-7075), 2205 duplex stainless steel (A-2205), and Nickel-Aluminum Bronze (NAB) at three different flow conditions and the impact loads have been estimated for each identified pit. Very interestingly, a statistical analysis shows that the estimated impact loads are material independent at all flow conditions, provided the material properties are characterized properly. It is also shown that for some materials, the constitutive parameters obtained from compression tests are not satisfactory.

  2. Cavitation: Hydrofoils. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habercom, G. E., Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Studies are presented on the cavitation characteristics of various classes of hydrofoils such as fully submerged, ventilated, high speed, supercavitating, and jet flapped. Surface piercing struts are studies. Test facilities, models, and test methods are described. Lift, drag, oscillation, flutter, heaving, hydroelasticity, and loading are discussed. Other topics include entrainment, bubbles, unsteady forces, flow fields, sea states, cavitation noise, mathematical models, and boundary layers, along with investigations of hydrofoil craft performance. This updated bibliography contains 194 abstracts, 9 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  3. Detection of cystic structures using pulsed ultrasonically induced resonant cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Kovach, John S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus and method for early detection of cystic structures indicative of ovarian and breast cancers uses ultrasonic wave energy at a unique resonance frequency for inducing cavitation in cystic fluid characteristic of cystic structures in the ovaries associated with ovarian cancer, and in cystic structures in the breast associated with breast cancer. Induced cavitation bubbles in the cystic fluid implode, creating implosion waves which are detected by ultrasonic receiving transducers attached to the abdomen of the patient. Triangulation of the ultrasonic receiving transducers enables the received signals to be processed and analyzed to identify the location and structure of the cyst.

  4. Cavitation in flowing superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daney, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Flowing superfluid helium cavitates much more readily than normal liquid helium, and there is a marked difference in the cavitation behavior of the two fluids as the lambda point is traversed. Examples of cavitation in a turbine meter and centrifugal pump are given, together with measurements of the cavitation strength of flowing superfluid helium. The unusual cavitation behavior of superfluid helium is attributed to its immense thermal conductivity .

  5. The effects of total dissolved gas on chum salmon fry survival, growth, gas bubble disease, and seawater tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.; Linley, Timothy J.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2013-02-01

    Chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta alevin developing in gravel habitats downstream of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River are exposed to elevated levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) when water is spilled at the dam to move migrating salmon smolts downstream to the Pacific Ocean. Current water quality criteria for the management of dissolved gas in dam tailwaters were developed primarily to protect salmonid smolts and are assumed to be protective of alevin if adequate depth compensation is provided. We studied whether chum salmon alevin exposed to six levels of dissolved gas ranging from 100% to 130% TDG at three development periods between hatch and emergence (hereafter early, middle, and late stage) suffered differential mortality, growth, gas bubble disease, or seawater tolerance. Each life stage was exposed for 50 d (early stage), 29 d (middle stage), or 16 d (late stage) beginning at 13, 34, and 37 d post-hatch, respectively, through 50% emergence. The mortality for all stages from exposure to emergence was estimated to be 8% (95% confidence interval (CI) of 4% to 12%) when dissolved gas levels were between 100% and 117% TDG. Mortality significantly increased as dissolved gas levels rose above 117% TDG,; with the lethal concentration that produced 50% mortality (LC50 ) was estimated to be 128.7% TDG (95% CI of 127.2% to 130.2% TDG) in the early and middle stages. By contrast, there was no evidence that dissolved gas level significantly affected growth in any life stage except that the mean wet weight at emergence of early stage fish exposed to 130% TDG was significantly less than the modeled growth of unexposed fish. The proportion of fish afflicted with gas bubble disease increased with increasing gas concentrations and occurred most commonly in the nares and gastrointestinal tract. Early stage fish exhibited higher ratios of filament to lamellar gill chloride cells than late stage fish, and these ratios increased and decreased for early and late stage fish

  6. Mercury Cavitation Phenomenon in Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Naoe, Takashi; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-06-24

    Innovative researches will be performed at Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility in J-PARC, in which a mercury target system will be installed as MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. Proton beams will be injected into mercury target to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by micro-jets and/or shock waves which are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. The pitting damage which degrades the structural integrity of target vessels is a crucial issue for high power mercury targets. Micro-gas-bubbles injection into mercury may be useful to mitigate the pressure wave and the pitting damage. The visualization of cavitation-bubble and gas-bubble collapse behaviors was carried out by using a high-speed video camera. The differences between them are recognized.

  7. Effect of geometrical parameters on submerged cavitation jet discharged from profiled central-body nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minguan; Xiao, Shengnan; Kang, Can; Wang, Yuli

    2013-05-01

    The flow characteristics of cavitation jets are essential issues among relevant studies. The physical properties of the jet are largely determined by the geometrical parameters of the nozzle. The structure and cavitation jets characteristics of the angular-nozzle and the self-resonating cavitation nozzle have been extensively studied, but little research is conducted in the central-body cavitation nozzle mainly because of its hard processing and the cavitation jet effect not satisfactory. In this paper, a novel central-body nozzle (a non-plunger central-body nozzle with square outlet) is studied to solve above problems. Submerged jets discharged from the novel central-body nozzle are simulated, employing the full cavitation model. The impact of nozzle configuration on jet properties is analyzed. The analysis results indicate that when central-body relative diameter keeps constant, there is an optimal contraction degree of nozzle's outlet, which can induce intense cavitation in the jet. The central-body relative diameter also affects jet profiles. In the case of large central-body relative diameter, most of the bubbles settle in the jet core. On the contrary, a smaller relative diameter makes bubbles concentrate in the interface between the jet and its surrounding fluid. Moreover, the shorter outlet part allows the cavitation zone further extend in both the axial and racial directions. The research results further consummate the study on the central-body nozzles and the correlation between cavitation jet and the structure, and elementarily reveal the mechanism of cavitation jet produced in a non-plunger novel central-body nozzle and the effect of the structure parameters on the cavitation jet, moreover, provide the theoretical basis for the optimal design of the nozzle.

  8. Bubble-cell interactions with laser-activated polymeric microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, Michel; Lajoinie, Guillaume; van Rooij, Tom; Skachkov, Ilya; Kooiman, Klazina; de Jong, Nico; Physics of Fluids Group, University of Twente Team; Biomedical Engineering, Erasmus MC Team

    2015-11-01

    Polymeric microcapsules that are made light-absorbing by the addition of a dye in their shell can generate cavitation microbubbles with spatiotemporal control when irradiated by a pulsed laser. These particles less than 3 μm in size can circulate through the body, bind to tissues and are expected to be readily detected, even if a single cavitation bubble is produced. In this paper, we study the impact of such cavitation bubbles on a cell monolayer and quantify it in terms of cell poration and cell viability. Two capsules formulations were used; the first one encapsulates a low boiling point oil and induced less cell damage than the second that was loaded with a high boiling point oil. We also report the generation of stable bubbles by the first capsule formulation that completely absorb the cells in their close vicinity. Physics of Fluid group MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology.

  9. Numerical Study on the Inhibition of Cavitation in Piping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Sun Seok; Lee, Sang Jun; Kim, Youn-Jea

    Abrupt closing valve in piping systems is sometimes resulted in cavitation due to the occurrence of high pressure difference. The bubbles generating by cavitation influence operating pressure and then those generate shock wave and vibration. These phenomena can consequentially cause to corrosion and erosion. So, the cavitation is the important factor to consider reliability of piping systems and mechanical lifetime. This paper investigated the various inhibition methods of cavitation in piping systems in which butterfly valves are installed. To prevent cavitation occurrence, it is desirable to analyze its characteristics between the upstream and downstream of process valve. Results show that the fluid velocity is fast when a working fluid passed through butterfly valve. The pressure of these areas was not only under saturation vapor pressure of water, but also cavitation was continuously occurred. We confirmed that the effect of existence of inserted orifice and influence to break condition under saturation vapor pressure of water. Results were graphically depicted by pressure distribution, velocity distribution, and vapor volume fraction.

  10. Processing of Microalgae: Acoustic Cavitation and Hydrothermal Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenly, Justin Michael

    The production of energy dense fuels from renewable algal biomass feedstocks -- if sustainably developed at a sufficiently large scale -- may reduce the consumption of petroleum from fossil fuels and provide many environmental benefits. Achieving economic feasibility has several technical engineering challenges that arise from dilute concentration of growing algae in aqueous media, small cell sizes, and durable cell walls. For microalgae to be a sustainable source of biofuels and co-products, efficient fractionation and conversion of the cellular contents is necessary. Research was carried out to address two processing options for efficient microalgae biofuel production: 1. Ultrasonic cavitation for cell disruption and 2. Hydrothermal conversion of a model algal triglyceride. 1. Ultrasonic cell disruption, which relies on cavitating bubbles in the suspension to produce damaging shock waves, was investigated experimentally over a range of concentrations and species types. A few seconds of high intensity sonication at fixed frequency yielded significant cell disruption, even for the more durable cells. At longer exposure times, effectiveness was seen to decline and was attributed, using acoustic measurements, to ultrasonic power attenuation in the ensuing cloud of cavitating bubbles. Processing at higher cell concentrations slowed cell disintegration marginally, but increased the effectiveness of dissipating ultrasonic energy. A theoretical study effectively predicted optimal conditions for a variety of parameters that were inaccessible in this experimental investigation. In that study, single bubble collapse was modeled to identify operating conditions that would increase cavitation, and thus cell disruption. Simulations were conducted by varying frequency and pressure amplitude of the ultrasound wave, and initial bubble size. The simulation results indicated that low frequency, high sound wave amplitudes, and small initial bubble size generate the highest shock

  11. The onset of cavitation during the collision of a sphere with a wetted surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansoor, M. M.; Uddin, J.; Marston, J. O.; Vakarelski, I. U.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the onset of cavitation during the collision of a sphere with a solid surface covered with a layer of Newtonian liquid. The conventional theory dictates cavitation to initiate during depressurization, i.e. when the sphere rebounds from the solid surface. Using synchronized dual-view high-speed imaging, we provide conclusive experimental evidence that confirms this scenario—namely—that cavitation occurs only after the sphere makes initial contact with the solid surface. Similar to previous experimental observations for spheres released above the liquid surface, bubbles are formed on the sphere surface during entry into the liquid layer. These were found to squeeze radially outwards with the liquid flow as the sphere approached the solid surface, producing an annular bubble structure unrelated to cavitation. In contrast, spheres released below the liquid surface did not exhibit these patterns.

  12. Cavitation microstreaming and material transport around microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manasseh, Richard; Tho, Paul; Ooi, Andrew; Petkovic-Duran, Karolina; Zhu, Yonggang

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that cavitation microstreaming plays a role in the therapeutic action of microbubbles driven by ultrasound, such as the sonothrombolytic and sonoporative phenomena. Microscopic particle-image velocimetry experiments are presented, showing that many different microstreaming patterns are possible around a microbubble when it is on a surface. Each pattern is associated with a particular oscillation mode of the bubble and generates a different shear stress distribution. It was found that it is possible to change the flow pattern by changing the sound frequency. Microstreaming flows around bubbles could be responsible for mixing therapeutic agents into the surrounding blood, as well as assisting sonoporative delivery of molecules across cell membranes. Appropriate tuning of the driving frequency may benefit therapies.

  13. Investigation of a Method to Reduce Cavitation in Diesel Engine Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Honaker, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Sonoluminescence is the effect of producing light from sound and occurs when a gas bubble is trapped in a fluid filled cavity and is forced to collapse under a barrage of sound waves. Frenzel and Schultes discovered this phenomenon in 1934 while exposing acoustic waves to photographic plates. This effect was not well understood until 1988 when Crum and Gaitan discovered the necessary conditions for producing single bubble sonoluminescence in the laboratory. The luminescence is a result of the bubble violently collapsing from sound waves and this shares a close association with vibratory cavitation. Cavitation erosion is known to cause damage to rotational machinery when the collapse is near to surfaces due to the high pressures associated with bubble collapse. With these high pressures and temperatures there is a considerable amount of damage to the outside layer of a bearing, thereby, reducing its useful life. An experiment was constructed to generate sonoluminescence in the laboratory in order to obtain a greater understanding of this phenomenon and its association with bubble cavitation. Most of the research was done to investigate how to obtain single bubble sonoluminescence under different conditions and to determine how to detect it. Success in this has inspired several theories on how to use the methods for generating sonoluminescence to control cavitation in fluids under industrial conditions.

  14. Quantitative measurements of acoustic emissions from cavitation at the surface of a stone in response to a lithotripter shock wave.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Parag V; Cleveland, Robin O

    2006-04-01

    Measurements are presented of acoustic emissions from cavitation collapses on the surface of a synthetic kidney stone in response to shock waves (SWs) from an electrohydraulic lithotripter. A fiber optic probe hydrophone was used for pressure measurements, and passive cavitation detection was used to identify acoustic emissions from bubble collapse. At a lithotripter charging voltage of 20 kV, the focused SW incident on the stone surface resulted in a peak pressure of 43 +/- 6 MPa compared to 23 +/- 4 MPa in the free field. The focused SW incident upon the stone appeared to be enhanced due to the acoustic emissions from the forced cavitation collapse of the preexisting bubbles. The peak pressure of the acoustic emission from a bubble collapse was 34 +/- 15 MPa, that is, the same magnitude as the SWs incident on the stone. These data indicate that stresses induced by focused SWs and cavitation collapses are similar in magnitude thus likely play a similar role in stone fragmentation.

  15. High-speed observation of bubble cloud generation near a rigid wall by second-harmonic superimposed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Shin; Yasuda, Jun; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2013-08-01

    Cavitation bubbles are known to accelerate therapeutic effects of ultrasound. Although negative acoustic pressure is the principle factor of cavitation, positive acoustic pressure has a role for bubble cloud formation at a high intensity of focused ultrasound when cavitation bubbles provide pressure release surfaces converting the pressure from highly positive to negative. In this study, the second-harmonic was superimposed onto the fundamental acoustic pressure to emphasize either peak positive or negative pressure. The peak negative and positive pressure emphasized waves were focused on a surface of an aluminum block. Cavitation bubbles induced near the block were observed with a high-speed camera by backlight and the size of the cavitation generation region was measured from the high-speed images. The negative pressure emphasized waves showed an advantage in cavitation inception over the positive pressure emphasized waves. In the sequence of the negative pressure emphasized waves immediately followed by the positive pressure emphasized waves, cavitation bubbles were generated on the block by the former waves and the cavitation region were expanded toward the transducer in the latter waves with high reproducibility. The sequence demonstrated its potential usefulness in enhancing the effects of therapeutic ultrasound at a high acoustic intensity.

  16. Ultrafast cavitation induced by an X-ray laser in water drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Claudiu; Willmott, Philip; Stone, Howard; Koglin, Jason; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Robinson, Joseph; Gumerlock, Karl; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond; Boutet, Sebastien; Guillet, Serge; Curtis, Robin; Vetter, Sharon; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation in pure water is determined by an intrinsic heterogeneous cavitation mechanism, which prevents in general the experimental generation of large tensions (negative pressures) in bulk liquid water. We developed an ultrafast decompression technique, based on the reflection of shock waves generated by an X-ray laser inside liquid drops, to stretch liquids to large negative pressures in a few nanoseconds. Using this method, we observed cavitation in liquid water at pressures below -100 MPa. These large tensions exceed significantly those achieved previously, mainly due to the ultrafast decompression. The decompression induced by shock waves generated by an X-ray laser is rapid enough to continue to stretch the liquid phase after the heterogeneous cavitation occurs in water, despite the rapid growth of cavitation nanobubbles. We developed a nucleation-and-growth hydrodynamic cavitation model that explains our results and estimates the concentration of heterogeneous cavitation nuclei in water.

  17. Low frequency cavitation erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardue, Sally J.; Chandekar, Gautam

    2002-11-01

    Damage of diesel engine piston sleeve liners due to cavitation of the coolant fluid can be severe. Coolant fluid additives are used to inhibit cavitation damage, and are evaluated by industry suppliers using ASTM G32-98 Standard Test Method for Cavitation Erosion Using Vibratory Apparatus. The ASTM G32-98 test procedure uses an ultrasonic horn at 20 kHz to vibrate a test button in the coolant. The test button mass loss and surface appearance are studied to sort the performance of new coolant additives. Mismatch between good lab performers and actual engine test runs has raised concerns over the current lab test. The frequency range of the current test has been targeted for investigation. A low frequency, less than 2000 Hz, test rig was built to explore the cavitation damage. The test system did produce cavitation on the surface of the test button for a period of 36 h, with minimal mass loss. The test rig experienced cyclic fatigue when test times were extended. The work is now focusing on designing a better test rig for long duration tests and on developing numerical models in order to explore the effects of cavitation excitation frequency on surface erosion.

  18. A detector for monitoring the onset of cavitation during therapy-level measurements of ultrasonic power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodnett, M.; Zeqiri, B.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation occurring in the water path between a transducer and the target of a radiation force balance can provide a significant source of error during measurements of ultrasonic power. These problems can be particularly acute at physiotherapy levels (>1 W), and low frequencies (leq 1 MHz). The cavitating bubbles can absorb and scatter incident ultrasound, leading to an underestimate in the measured power. For these reasons, International Specification standards demand the use of degassed water. This imposes requirements that may actually be difficult to meet, for example, in the case of hospitals. Also, initially degassed water will rapidly re-gas, increasing the likelihood of cavitation occurring. For these reasons, NPL has developed a device that monitors acoustic emissions generated by bubble activity, for detecting the onset of cavitation during power measurements. A commercially available needle hydrophone is used to detect these emissions. The acoustic signals are then monitored using a Cavitation Detector (CD) unit, comprising an analogue electrical filter that may be tuned to detect frequency components generated by cavitating bubbles, and which provides an indication of when the measured level exceeds a pre-defined threshold. This paper describes studies to establish a suitable detection scheme, the principles of operation of the CD unit, and the performance tests carried out with a range of propagation media.

  19. Cavitation erosion of silver plated coating at different temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Shuji; Motoi, Yoshihiro; Kikuta, Kengo; Tomaru, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Cavitation often occurs in inducer pumps used for space rockets. Silver plated coating on the inducer liner faces the damage of cavitation. Therefore, it is important to study about the cavitation erosion resistance for silver plated coating at several operating conditions in the inducer pumps. In this study, the cavitation erosion tests were carried for silver plated coating in deionized water and ethanol at several liquid temperatures (273K-400K) and pressures (0.10MPa-0.48MPa). The mass loss rate is evaluated in terms of thermodynamic parameter Σ proposed by Brennen [9], suppression pressure p-pv (pv: saturated vapor pressure) and acoustic impedance ρc (ρ: density and c: sound speed). Cavitation bubble behaviors depending on the thermodynamic effect and the liquid type were observed by high speed video camera. The mass loss rate is formulated by thermodynamic parameter Σ, suppression pressure p-pv and acoustic impedance ρc.

  20. Phase-shift nano-emulsions induced cavitation and ablation during high intensity focused ultrasound exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yangzi; Yin, Hui; Chang, Nan; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-03-01

    Phase-shift Nano-emulsions (PSNEs) with a small initial diameter in nanoscale have the potential to leak out of the blood vessels and to accumulate at target point of tissue. At desired location, PSNEs can undergo acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) process, change into gas bubbles and enhance focused ultrasound efficiency. The aim of this work was to provide spatial and temporal information on PSNE induced cavitation and ablation effects during pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposure. The PSNEs were composed of perfluorohaxane (PFH) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), and then uniformly distributed in a transparent polyacrylamide phantom. The Sonoluminescence (SL) method was employed to visualize the cavitation distribution and formation process of PSNEs induced cavitation. For the phantom which was used for ablation observation, heat sensitive BSA was added. When the temperature generated by ultrasound exposure was high enough to denature BSA, the transparent phantom would turn out white lesions. The shape of the lesion and the formation process were compared with those of cavitation. Each of the pulse contained 12 cycles for a duration of 10 µs. And the duty cycle changed from 1:10 to 1:40. The total "on" time of HIFU was 2s. PSNE can evidently accelerate cavitation emitting bright SL in pre-focal region. The cavitation was generated layer by layer towards the transducer. The formed bubble wall can block acoustic waves transmitting to the distal end. And the lesion appeared to be separated into two parts. One in pre-focal region stemmed from one point and grew quickly toward the transducer. The other in focal region was formed by merging some small white dots, and grew much slower. The influence of duty cycle has also been examined. The lower duty cycle with longer pulse-off time would generate more intense cavitation, however, smaller lesion. Bubble cloud gradually developed within phantom would greatly influence the cavitation and ablation

  1. Histotripsy-Induced Cavitation Cloud Initiation Thresholds in Tissues of Different Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Maxwell, Adam; Warnez, Matthew; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles A.; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation and maintenance of a cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. This paper studies how tissue properties impact the pressure threshold to initiate the cavitation bubble cloud. Our previous study showed that shock scattering off one or more initial bubbles, expanded to sufficient size in the focus, plays an important role in initiating a dense cavitation cloud. In this process, the shock scattering causes the positive pressure phase to be inverted, resulting in a scattered wave that has the opposite polarity of the incident shock. The inverted shock is superimposed on the incident negative pressure phase to form extremely high negative pressures, resulting in a dense cavitation cloud growing toward the transducer. We hypothesize that increased tissue stiffness impedes the expansion of initial bubbles, reducing the scattered tensile pressure, and thus requiring higher initial intensities for cloud initiation. To test this hypothesis, 5-cycle histotripsy pulses at pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) of 10, 100, or 1000 Hz were applied by a 1-MHz transducer focused inside mechanically tunable tissue-mimicking agarose phantoms and various ex vivo porcine tissues covering a range of Young’s moduli. The threshold to initiate a cavitation cloud and resulting bubble expansion were recorded using acoustic backscatter detection and optical imaging. In both phantoms and ex vivo tissue, results demonstrated a higher cavitation cloud initiation threshold for tissues of higher Young’s modulus. Results also demonstrated a decrease in bubble expansion in phantoms of higher Young’s modulus. These results support our hypothesis, improve our understanding of the effect of histotripsy in tissues with different mechanical properties, and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for fractionation of specific tissues. PMID:24474139

  2. Possibility of quantitative prediction of cavitation erosion without model test

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Hiroharu; Konno, Akihisa; Maeda, Masatsugu; Yamaguchi, Hajime

    1996-09-01

    A scenario for quantitative prediction of cavitation erosion was proposed. The key value is the impact force/pressure spectrum on a solid surface caused by cavitation bubble collapse. As the first step of prediction, the authors constructed the scenario from an estimation of the cavity generation rate to the prediction of impact force spectrum, including the estimations of collapsing cavity number and impact pressure. The prediction was compared with measurements of impact force spectra on a partially cavitating hydrofoil. A good quantitative agreement was obtained between the prediction and the experiment. However, the present method predicted a larger effect of main flow velocity than that observed. The present scenario is promising as a method of predicting erosion without using a model test.

  3. Can diving-induced tissue nitrogen supersaturation increase the chance of acoustically driven bubble growth in marine mammals?

    PubMed

    Houser, D S; Howard, R; Ridgway, S

    2001-11-21

    The potential for acoustically mediated causes of stranding in cetaceans (whales and dolphins) is of increasing concern given recent stranding events associated with anthropogenic acoustic activity. We examine a potentially debilitating non-auditory mechanism called rectified diffusion. Rectified diffusion causes gas bubble growth, which in an insonified animal may produce emboli, tissue separation and high, localized pressure in nervous tissue. Using the results of a dolphin dive study and a model of rectified diffusion for low-frequency exposure, we demonstrate that the diving behavior of cetaceans prior to an intense acoustic exposure may increase the chance of rectified diffusion. Specifically, deep diving and slow ascent/descent speed contributes to increased gas-tissue saturation, a condition that amplifies the likelihood of rectified diffusion. The depth of lung collapse limits nitrogen uptake per dive and the surface interval duration influences the amount of nitrogen washout from tissues between dives. Model results suggest that low-frequency rectified diffusion models need to be advanced, that the diving behavior of marine mammals of concern needs to be investigated to identify at-risk animals, and that more intensive studies of gas dynamics within diving marine mammals should be undertaken.

  4. Nonlinear ultrasonic waves in bubbly liquids with nonhomogeneous bubble distribution: Numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé

    2009-06-01

    This paper deals with the nonlinear propagation of ultrasonic waves in mixtures of air bubbles in water, but for which the bubble distribution is nonhomogeneous. The problem is modelled by means of a set of differential equations which describes the coupling of the acoustic field and bubbles vibration, and solved in the time domain via the use and adaptation of the SNOW-BL code. The attenuation and nonlinear effects are assumed to be due to the bubbles exclusively. The nonhomogeneity of the bubble distribution is introduced by the presence of bubble layers (or clouds) which can act as acoustic screens, and alters the behaviour of the ultrasonic waves. The effect of the spatial distribution of bubbles on the nonlinearity of the acoustic field is analyzed. Depending on the bubble density, dimension, shape, and position of the layers, its effects on the acoustic field change. Effects such as shielding and resonance of the bubbly layers are especially studied. The numerical experiments are carried out in two configurations: linear and nonlinear, i.e. for low and high excitation pressure amplitude, respectively, and the features of the phenomenon are compared. The parameters of the medium are chosen such as to reproduce air bubbly water involved in the stable cavitation process.

  5. Characterization of factors influencing the growth of Anabaena variabilis in a bubble column reactor.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Hyun; Shin, Jong-Hwan; Park, Tai Hyun

    2008-03-01

    The combined effect of superficial gas velocity, pH, initial phosphate concentration, and light intensity on cell growth was investigated for the mass production of cyanobacterial cells. The light intensity was manipulated to maintain a specific irradiation rate (q(i)) at a constant level for high cell density culture. The optimum condition for the batch culture was achieved at a superficial gas velocity of 2.0 cm/s, pH 7.0, and an initial phosphate concentration of 55 mg/l when the specific irradiation rate was controlled above 11.5 micromol/s/g dry cell. In this condition, the specific growth rate and cell productivity were 1.47 day(-1) and 0.98 g dry cell/l/day, respectively.

  6. Adaptation of the Advanced Spray Combustion Code to Cavitating Flow Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Pak-Yan

    1993-01-01

    A very important consideration in turbopump design is the prediction and prevention of cavitation. Thus far conventional CFD codes have not been generally applicable to the treatment of cavitating flows. Taking advantage of its two-phase capability, the Advanced Spray Combustion Code is being modified to handle flows with transient as well as steady-state cavitation bubbles. The volume-of-fluid approach incorporated into the code is extended and augmented with a liquid phase energy equation and a simple evaporation model. The strategy adopted also successfully deals with the cavity closure issue. Simple test cases will be presented and remaining technical challenges will be discussed.

  7. Cavitation guide for control valves

    SciTech Connect

    Tullis, J.P.

    1993-04-01

    This guide teaches the basic fundamentals of cavitation to provide the reader with an understanding of what causes cavitation, when it occurs, and the potential problems cavitation can cause to a valve and piping system. The document provides guidelines for understanding how to reduce the cavitation and/or select control valves for a cavitating system. The guide provides a method for predicting the cavitation intensity of control valves, and how the effect of cavitation on a system will vary with valve type, valve function, valve size, operating pressure, duration of operation and details of the piping installation. The guide defines six cavitation limits identifying cavitation intensities ranging from inception to the maximum intensity possible. The intensity of the cavitation at each limit Is described, including a brief discussion of how each level of cavitation influences the valve and system. Examples are included to demonstrate how to apply the method, including making both size and pressure scale effects corrections. Methods of controlling cavitation are discussed providing information on various techniques which can be used to design a new system or modify an existing one so it can operate at a desired level of cavitation.

  8. Transient cavitation in high-quality-factor resonators at high static pressures.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, D Felipe; Tessien, Ross A; Hiller, Robert A; Gutierrez, Joel; Scott, Corey; Tardif, Henry; Callahan, Brant; Matula, Thomas J; Crum, Lawrence A; Holt, R Glynn; Church, Charles C; Raymond, Jason L

    2010-06-01

    It is well known that cavitation collapse can generate intense concentrations of mechanical energy, sufficient to erode even the hardest metals and to generate light emissions visible to the naked eye [sonoluminescence (SL)]. Considerable attention has been devoted to the phenomenon of "single bubble sonoluminescence" (SBSL) in which a single stable cavitation bubble radiates light flashes each and every acoustic cycle. Most of these studies involve acoustic resonators in which the ambient pressure is near 0.1 MPa (1 bar), and with acoustic driving pressures on the order of 0.1 MPa. This study describes a high-quality factor, spherical resonator capable of achieving acoustic cavitation at ambient pressures in excess of 30 MPa (300 bars). This system generates bursts of violent inertial cavitation events lasting only a few milliseconds (hundreds of acoustic cycles), in contrast with the repetitive cavitation events (lasting several minutes) observed in SBSL; accordingly, these events are described as "inertial transient cavitation." Cavitation observed in this high pressure resonator is characterized by flashes of light with intensities up to 1000 times brighter than SBSL flashes, as well as spherical shock waves with amplitudes exceeding 30 MPa at the resonator wall. Both SL and shock amplitudes increase with static pressure.

  9. Damage mechanisms for ultrasound-induced cavitation in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnez, M.; Vlaisavljevich, E.; Xu, Z.; Johnsen, E.

    2017-03-01

    In a variety of biomedical applications, cavitation occurs in soft tissue. Although significant amounts of research have been performed on cavitation in water, bubble dynamics, and related bioeffects remain poorly understood. We use numerical simulations of spherical bubble dynamics in soft tissue to assess the extent to which viscoelasticity affects "known" and introduces "new" damage mechanisms. We find that deviatoric stresses - although not an important damage mechanism in water - are significantly enhanced and could be an important bioeffect mechanism in tissue. Both the viscoelastic properties and the nonlinear, large-collapse radius contribute to stress amplification in the surroundings. In addition, temperatures in the surrounding medium increase more in the Zener tissue than in water, due to viscous heating.

  10. Controlled effect of ultrasonic cavitation on hydrophobic/hydrophilic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Belova, Valentina; Gorin, Dmitry A; Shchukin, Dmitry G; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2011-02-01

    Controlling cavitation at the solid surface is of increasing interest, as it plays a major role in many physical and chemical processes related to the modification of solid surfaces and formation of multicomponent nanoparticles. Here, we show a selective control of ultrasonic cavitation on metal surfaces with different hydrophobicity. By applying a microcontact printing technique we successfully formed hydrophobic/hydrophilic alternating well-defined microstructures on aluminium surfaces. Fabrication of patterned surfaces provides the unique opportunity to verify a model of heterogeneous nucleation of cavitation bubbles near the solid/water interface by varying the wettability of the surface, temperature and ultrasonic power. At the initial stage of sonication (up to 30 min), microjets and shock waves resulting from the collapsing bubbles preferably impact the hydrophobic surface, whereas the hydrophilic areas of the patterned Al remain unchanged. Longer sonication periods affect both surfaces. These findings confirm the expectation that higher contact angle causes a lower energy barrier, thus cavitation dominates at the hydrophobic surfaces. Experimental results are in good agreement with expectations from nucleation theory. This paper illustrates a new approach to ultrasound induced modification of solid surfaces resulting in the formation of foam-structured metal surfaces.

  11. Cavitation luminescence in a water hammer: Upscaling sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C.-K.; Camara, C.; Kappus, B.; Putterman, S. J.

    2003-06-01

    Oscillatory acceleration and deceleration of a column of water leads to a pipe hammer as well as cavitation. With a small amount of xenon gas dissolved in the water, we can detect a stream of predominantly ultraviolet subnanosecond flashes of light which are attributed to collapsing bubbles. The observed emission can exceed 108 photons for a single collapse and has a peak power over 0.4 W.

  12. Stretching cells and delivering drugs with bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Li, Fenfang; Chon U, Chan; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we'll review our work on impulsive cell stretching using cavitation bubbles and magnetic microbubbles for drug delivery. For sufficient short times cells can sustain a much larger areal strain than the yield strain obtained from quasi-static stretching. Experiments with red blood cells show that even then the rupture of the cell is slow process; it is caused by diffusive swelling rather than mechanical violation of the plasma membrane. In the second part we'll discuss bubbles coated with magnetic and drug loaded particles. These bubbles offer an interesting vector for on demand delivery of drugs using mild ultrasound and magnetic fields. We report on basic experiments in microfluidic channels revealing the release of the agent during bubble oscillations and first in vivo validation with a mouse tumor model. Singapore National Research Foundations Competitive Research Program funding (NRF-CRP9-2011-04).

  13. Sinking Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Jeremy; Ewoldt, Randy

    2016-11-01

    Intuition tells us that bubbles will rise and steel objects will sink in liquids, though here we describe the opposite. With experimental demonstration and theoretical rationale, we describe how the motion of containers of liquid with immersed solid objects and air bubbles can cause curious behaviors: sinking bubbles and rising high-density particles. Bubbles and solid spheres of diameter on the order of a few millimeters are introduced into fluids with different rheological constitutive behaviors. Imposed motion of the rigid container allows for control of the trajectories of the immersed particles - without the container imparting direct shearing motion on the fluid. Results demonstrate the necessary conditions to prevent or produce net motion of the bubbles and heavy particles, both with and against gravitational expectations.

  14. Biological Effects of Acoustic Cavitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    rectified diffusion. 56 III. STABLE CAVITATION A. Introduction There are manv areas associated with the biological effects of ultrasound in which the...used said as cavitation indicators. Further, if clinical ultrasound systems are found to be inducing cavitation , either stable or transient, it will...O BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF ACOUSTIC CAVITATION by Lawrence A. Crum -- Physical Acoustics Research Laboratory Department of Physics and Astronomy ’ CTE

  15. Prediction of pump cavitation performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    A method for predicting pump cavitation performance with various liquids, liquid temperatures, and rotative speeds is presented. Use of the method requires that two sets of test data be available for the pump of interest. Good agreement between predicted and experimental results of cavitation performance was obtained for several pumps operated in liquids which exhibit a wide range of properties. Two cavitation parameters which qualitatively evaluate pump cavitation performance are also presented.

  16. Detecting Cavitation Pitting Without Disassembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, S.

    1986-01-01

    Technique for detecting cavitation pitting in pumps, turbines, and other machinery uses low-level nuclear irradiation. Isotopes concentrated below surface emit gamma radiation, a portion of which is attenuated by overlying material. Where there are cavitation pits, output of gamma-ray detector fluctuates as detector is scanned near pits. Important to detect cavitation pits because nozzle, turbine blade, or other pump component weakened by cavitation could fail catastrophically and cause machine to explode.

  17. Etiology of gas bubble disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bouck, G.R.

    1980-11-01

    Gas bubble disease is a noninfectious, physically induced process caused by uncompensated hyperbaric pressure of total dissolved gases. When pressure compensation is inadequate, dissolved gases may form emboli (in blood) and emphysema (in tissues). The resulting abnormal physical presence of gases can block blood vessels (hemostasis) or tear tissues, and may result in death. Population mortality is generally skewed, in that the median time to death occurs well before the average time to death. Judged from mortality curves, three stages occur in gas bubble disease: (1) a period of gas pressure equilibrium, nonlethal cavitation, and increasing morbidity; (2) a period of rapid and heavy mortality; and (3) a period of protracted survival, despite lesions, and dysfunction that eventually terminates in total mortality. Safe limits for gas supersaturation depend on species tolerance and on factors that differ among hatcheries and rivers, between continuous and intermittent exposures, and across ranges of temperature and salinity.

  18. Assessment of shock wave lithotripters via cavitation potential

    PubMed Central

    Iloreta, Jonathan I.; Zhou, Yufeng; Sankin, Georgy N.; Zhong, Pei; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    A method to characterize shock wave lithotripters by examining the potential for cavitation associated with the lithotripter shock wave (LSW) has been developed. The method uses the maximum radius achieved by a bubble subjected to a LSW as a representation of the cavitation potential for that region in the lithotripter. It is found that the maximum radius is determined by the work done on a bubble by the LSW. The method is used to characterize two reflectors: an ellipsoidal reflector and an ellipsoidal reflector with an insert. The results show that the use of an insert reduced the −6 dB volume (with respect to peak positive pressure) from 1.6 to 0.4 cm3, the −6 dB volume (with respect to peak negative pressure) from 14.5 to 8.3 cm3, and reduced the volume characterized by high cavitation potential (i.e., regions characterized by bubbles with radii larger than 429 µm) from 103 to 26 cm3. Thus, the insert is an effective way to localize the potentially damaging effects of shock wave lithotripsy, and suggests an approach to optimize the shape of the reflector. PMID:19865493

  19. Transient cavitation and acoustic emission produced by different laser lithotripters.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Tong, H L; Cocks, F H; Pearle, M S; Preminger, G M

    1998-08-01

    Transient cavitation and shockwave generation produced by pulsed-dye and holmium:YAG laser lithotripters were studied using high-speed photography and acoustic emission measurements. In addition, stone phantoms were used to compare the fragmentation efficiency of various laser and electrohydraulic lithotripters. The pulsed-dye laser, with a wavelength (504 nm) strongly absorbed by most stone materials but not by water, and a short pulse duration of approximately 1 microsec, induces plasma formation on the surface of the target calculi. Subsequently, the rapid expansion of the plasma forms a cavitation bubble, which expands spherically to a maximum size and then collapses violently, leading to strong shockwave generation and microjet impingement, which comprises the primary mechanism for stone fragmentation with short-pulse lasers. In contrast, the holmium laser, with a wavelength (2100 nm) most strongly absorbed by water as well as by all stone materials and a long pulse duration of 250 to 350 microsec, produces an elongated, pear-shaped cavitation bubble at the tip of the optical fiber that forms a vapor channel to conduct the ensuing laser energy to the target stone (Moss effect). The expansion and subsequent collapse of the elongated bubble is asymmetric, resulting in weak shockwave generation and microjet impingement. Thus, stone fragmentation in holmium laser lithotripsy is caused primarily by thermal ablation (drilling effect).

  20. Tandem shock wave cavitation enhancement for extracorporeal lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loske, Achim M.; Prieto, Fernando E.; Fernández, Francisco; van Cauwelaert, Javier

    2002-11-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been successful for more than twenty years in treating patients with kidney stones. Hundreds of underwater shock waves are generated outside the patient's body and focused on the kidney stone. Stones fracture mainly due to spalling, cavitation and layer separation. Cavitation bubbles are produced in the vicinity of the stone by the tensile phase of each shock wave. Bubbles expand, stabilize and finally collapse violently, creating stone-damaging secondary shock waves and microjets. Bubble collapse can be intensified by sending a second shock wave a few hundred microseconds after the first. A novel method of generating two piezoelectrically generated shock waves with an adjustable time delay between 50 and 950 µs is described and tested. The objective is to enhance cavitation-induced damage to kidney stones during ESWL in order to reduce treatment time. In vitro kidney stone model fragmentation efficiency and pressure measurements were compared with those for a standard ESWL system. Results indicate that fragmentation efficiency was significantly enhanced at a shock wave delay of about 400 and 250 µs using rectangular and spherical stone phantoms, respectively. The system presented here could be installed in clinical devices at relatively low cost, without the need for a second shock wave generator.

  1. Multi million-to-Billion Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Cavitation-Induced Damage on a Silica Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Adarsh; Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2012-02-01

    Cavitation bubble collapse causes severe damage to materials. For example, cavitation erosion is a major threat to the safety of nuclear power plants. The cavitation bubbles may also be utilized for preventing stress corrosion cracking with water jet peening technology. We have performed multi million-to-billion atoms molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the shock-induced cavitation damage mechanism on an amorphous silica slab in water. The system consists of a 60nm thick silica slab immersed in water in an MD box of dimension 285 x 200 x 200 nm3. A nanobubble is created by removing water molecules within a sphere of radius 100 nm. To apply a planar shock, we assign a uniform particle velocity vp on the entire system towards a planar momentum mirror. We have performed the simulation with two kinds of bubbles, an empty bubble and a bubble filled with inert gas. The simulation results reveal nanojet formation during bubble collapse causing damage on the silica surface; however, the damage was significantly reduced in the case of the filled bubble. We will discuss the effect of the presence of inter gas inside the nanobubble on the pressure distribution, the extent of damage, and collapse behavior corresponding the shock front.

  2. Experimental Observation of the Nonlinear Response of Single Bubbles to an Applied Acoustic Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-31

    93 INTRODUCTION Cavitation bubbles in liquids have been of interest to scientists since 175.4. ’. hen Leonhard Euler [l1 first...or can be observed in single bubble oscillations. S REFERENCES 1. L. Euler , Histoire de ’Academic Royale des Sciences et Belles Lettres, Mem. R. 10

  3. The Influence of Shock-Induced Air Bubble Collapse Resulting from Underwater Explosive Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    buffering effect. To better simulate homogeneous air bubbles, additional studies were conducted using circular shapes of varying diameters. For...regions which reduced the pressure from the initial shockwave, providing a buffering effect. To better simulate homogeneous air bubbles, additional...on the shockwave propagation. B. SCOPE OF RESEARCH Previous research indicated that cavitation zones may provide a buffering effect to marine

  4. Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Bubbles are a fun way to introduce the concepts of surface tension, intermolecular forces, and the use of surfactants. Presents two activities in which students add chemicals to liquid dishwashing detergent with water in order to create longer lasting bubbles. (ASK)

  5. Single-transducer dual-frequency ultrasound generation to enhance acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hsieh, Chao-Ming

    2009-03-01

    Dual- or multiple-frequency ultrasound stimulation is capable of effectively enhancing the acoustic cavitation effect over single-frequency ultrasound. Potential application of this sonoreactor design has been widely proposed such as on sonoluminescence, sonochemistry enhancement, and transdermal drug release enhancement. All currently available sonoreactor designs employed multiple piezoelectric transducers for generating single-frequency ultrasonic waves separately and then these waves were mixed and interfered in solutions. The purpose of this research is to propose a novel design of generating dual-frequency ultrasonic waves with single piezoelectric elements, thereby enhancing acoustic cavitation. Macroscopic bubbles were detected optically, and they were quantified at either a single-frequency or for different frequency combinations for determining their efficiency for enhancing acoustic cavitation. Visible bubbles were optically detected and hydrogen peroxide was measured to quantify acoustic cavitation. Test water samples with different gas concentrations and different power levels were used to determine the efficacy of enhancing acoustic cavitation of this design. The spectrum obtained from the backscattered signals was also recorded and examined to confirm the occurrence of stable cavitation. The results confirmed that single-element dual-frequency ultrasound stimulation can enhance acoustic cavitation. Under certain testing conditions, the generation of bubbles can be enhanced up to a level of five times higher than the generation of bubbles in single-frequency stimulation, and can increase the hydrogen peroxide production up to an increase of one fold. This design may serve as a useful alternative for future sonoreactor design owing to its simplicity to produce dual- or multiple-frequency ultrasound.

  6. Megasonic cleaning, cavitation, and substrate damage: an atomistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapila, Vivek; Deymier, Pierre A.; Shende, Hrishikesh; Pandit, Viraj; Raghavan, Srini; Eschbach, Florence O.

    2006-05-01

    Megasonic cleaning has been a traditional approach for the cleaning of photomasks. Its feasibility as a damage free approach to sub 50 nm particulate removal is under investigation for the cleaning of optical and EUV photomasks. Two major mechanisms are active in a megasonic system, namely, acoustic streaming and acoustic cavitation. Acoustic streaming is instrumental in contaminant removal via application of drag force and rolling of particles, while cavitation may dislodge particles by the release of large energy during cavity implosion or by acting as a secondary source of microstreaming. Often times, the structures (substrates with or without patterns) subjected to megasonic cleaning show evidence of damage. This is one of the impediments in the implementation of megasonic technology for 45 nm and future technology nodes. Prior work suggests that acoustic streaming does not lead to sufficiently strong forces to cause damage to the substrates or patterns. However, current knowledge of the effects of cavitation on cleaning and damage can be described, at best, as speculative. Recent experiments suggest existence of a cavity size and energy distributions in megasonic systems that may be responsible for cleaning and damage. In the current work, we develop a two-dimensional atomistic model to study such multibubble cavitation phenomena. The model consists of a Lennard-Jones liquid which is subjected to sinusoidal pressure changes leading to the formation of cavitation bubbles. The current work reports on the effects of pressure amplitude (megasonic power) and frequency on cavity size distributions in vaporous and gaseous cavitation. The findings of the work highlight the role of multibubble cavitation as cleaning and damage mechanism in megasonic cleaning.

  7. A study of laser-induced bubbles in cryogenic fluid - Behavior of bubbles in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, Kazuo; Yokoyama, Shingo; Hanaoka, Yutaka

    The dynamics of cavitation vapor bubble in cryogenic liquid nitrogen is investigated experimentally and analytically. The bubbles are produced by focusing a giant pulse of Q-switched ruby laser into the liquid nitrogen in a cryostat, and the dynamics of the laser-induced bubble are studied by means of high-speed photography by using an image converter camera with the framing rates of 100,000 frames/s. A numerical analysis is also performed on the behavior of a bubble in cryogenic liquid. The mathematical formulation takes into account the effect of liquid inertia (incompressible liquid), nonequilibrium condensation of the vapor in the bubble, and the heat transfer at the bubble wall. The experimental data on the bubble motion in liquid nitrogen under the near-equilibrium initial conditions with an atmospheric pressure are compared to the numerical solutions. The bubble motion observed indicates more violent and decaying behavior than the estimated tendency. The heat and mass transfer effects including the evaporation and condensation phenomena have strong influence on the vapor bubble motion in cryogenic liquid. Qualitatively, the numerical analysis can simulate the experimental results.

  8. Characterization of the HIFU-induced cloud cavitation for the optimization of high pressure concentration for lithotripsy

    NASA A