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Sample records for cavity frequency doubling

  1. Frequency doubled, cavity dumped feedback laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sipes, Jr., Donald L. (Inventor); Robinson, Deborah L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Higher efficiency in cavity dumping and frequency doubling in a laser used to produce modulated output beam pulses is achieved by deflecting light out of the resonant cavity to a third mirror through a frequency doubler using an electro-optic modulator and a polarizing beamsplitter in the resonant cavity, or using just an acousto-optic modulator to deflect light out of the laser cavity in response to a control signal (electric or acoustic). The frequency doubler in front of the third mirror rotates the frequency doubled light so that it will pass out of the laser cavity through the polarizing beamsplitter, while undoubled frequency light is reflected by the polarizing beamsplitter back into the gain medium of the laser. In the case of using a type-II frequency doubler, a dichroic beamsplitter deflects out the frequency doubled light and passes the undoubled frequency light to the polarizing beamsplitter for return to the laser gain medium. If an acousto-optic modulator is used, it deflects light out of the primary laser cavity, so a polarizing beamsplitter is not needed, and only a dichroic beamsplitter is needed to separate frequency doubled light out of the path from the third mirror.

  2. Efficient frequency doubling at 776 nm in a ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhen-Hai; Liu, Shi-Long; Liu, Shi-Kai; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan

    2017-08-01

    We report efficient frequency doubling (FD) at 776 nm using periodically poled LiNbO3 (PPLN) in a ring cavity pumped by a commercial erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) operating at 1552 nm. Two sets of input couplers are used that have been optimized to operate in the low pump and high pump regimes. The maximum conversion efficiencies measured for these couplers are 65.8% (transmittance T=4.5%) and 65.9% (T=9.1%). The internal conversion efficiencies are 85.0% and 88.2%, respectively, after the mode-matching efficiency and filtering transmittance have been taken into account. The maximum output powers obtained for the two couplers are 333 mW and 602 mW at pump powers of 535 mW and 999 mW, respectively. Coupling efficiency of more than 80% to single mode fibers indicates the high beam quality of the FD laser. This FD laser will be useful for quantum optics experiments in the telecommunications band and atomic physics experiments.

  3. Quantum frequency doubling based on tripartite entanglement with cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan, Guo; Zhi-Feng, Wei; Su-Ying, Zhang

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the entanglement characteristics of three harmonic modes, which are the output fields from three cavities with an input tripartite entangled state at fundamental frequency. The entanglement properties of the input beams can be maintained after their frequencies have been up-converted by the process of second harmonic generation. We have calculated the parametric dependences of the correlation spectrum on the initial squeezing factor, the pump power, the transmission coefficient, and the normalized analysis frequency of cavity. The numerical results provide references to choose proper experimental parameters for designing the experiment. The frequency conversion of the multipartite entangled state can also be applied to a quantum communication network. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91430109), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20111401110004), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014011005-3).

  4. In-phased second harmonic wave array generation with intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling.

    PubMed

    Hirosawa, Kenichi; Shohda, Fumio; Yanagisawa, Takayuki; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2015-03-23

    The Talbot cavity is one promising method to synchronize the phase of a laser array. However, it does not achieve the lowest array mode with the same phase but the highest array mode with the anti-phase between every two adjacent lasers, which is called out-phase locking. Consequently, their far-field images exhibit 2-peak profiles. We propose intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling. By placing a nonlinear crystal in a Talbot cavity, the Talbot cavity generates an out-phased fundamental wave array, which is converted into an in-phase-locked second harmonic wave array at the nonlinear crystal. We demonstrate numerical calculations and experiments on intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling and obtain an in-phase-locked second harmonic wave array for a Nd:YVO₄ array laser.

  5. Intracavity Frequency Doubling of a Diode-Pumped, External Cavity, Surface Emitting Semiconductor Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, W.J.; Allerman, A.A.; Crawford, M.H.; Raymond, T.D.

    1999-04-22

    The authors present a compact, robust, solid-state blue light (490 nm) source capable of greater than 5 mW of output in a TEM{sub 00} mode. This device is an optically pumped, vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) with an intracavity frequency doubling crystal.

  6. Semi-monolithic cavity for external resonant frequency doubling and method of performing the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The fabrication of an optical cavity for use in a laser, in a frequency doubling external cavity, or any other type of nonlinear optical device, can be simplified by providing the nonlinear crystal in combination with a surrounding glass having an index of refraction substantially equal to that of the nonlinear crystal. The closed optical path in this cavity is formed in the surrounding glass and through the nonlinear crystal which lies in one of the optical segments of the light path. The light is transmitted through interfaces between the surrounding glass in the nonlinear crystal through interfaces which are formed at the Brewster-angle to minimize or eliminate reflection.

  7. Red laser based on intra-cavity Nd:YAG/CH4 frequency doubled Raman lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Pengyuan; Liu, Jinbo; Liu, Wanfa; Guo, Jingwei

    2017-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is a powerful tool for the extension of the spectral range of lasers. To obtain efficient Raman conversion in SRS, many researchers have studied different types of Raman laser configurations. Among these configurations, the intra-cavity type is particularly attractive. Intra-cavity SRS has the advantages of high intra-cavity laser intensity, low-SRS threshold, and high Raman conversion efficiency. In this paper, An Q-switched intra-cavity Nd: YAG/CH4 frequency-doubled Raman lasers is reported. A negative branch confocal resonator with M= 1.25 is used for the frequency-doubling of Nd: YAG laser. The consequent 532nm light is confined in intra- cavity SRS with travelling wave resonator, and the focal of one mirror of cavity is overlap with the center of the other mirror of the cavity. We found this design is especially efficient to reduce the threshold of SRS, and increase conversion efficiency. The threshold is measured to be 0.62 MW, and at the pump energy of 16.1 mJ, the conversion efficiency is 34%. With the smaller magnification M, the threshold could further decrease, and the conversion efficiency could be improved further. This is a successful try to extend the spectral range of a laser to the shorter wavelength by SRS, and this design may play an important role in the fulfillment of high power red lasers.

  8. Efficient frequency doubling of femtosecond pulses with BIBO in an external synchronized cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanseri, Bhaskar; Bouillard, Martin; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the second harmonic generation (SHG) of infrared femtosecond pulses using a BIBO crystal placed in an external ring cavity, synchronized with an input mode-locked laser at 78 MHz. A frequency doubling efficiency of 53% is achieved which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest value ever reported for a low energy input beam of 1.4 nJ/pulse. Theoretical analysis of cavity related issues such as design, fundamental mode characteristics and fidelity against misalignments are also presented. The modeling of SHG cavity enables us to estimate the cavity losses and the mode matching visibility. Such synchronized SHG cavities in pulse domain, having higher SHG conversion efficiencies compared to their continuous wave counterparts, may find potential applications in scientific areas such as in photonics, and in quantum optics.

  9. Frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Thomas D.; Alford, William J.; Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2002-01-01

    A frequency-doubled semiconductor vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) is disclosed for generating light at a wavelength in the range of 300-550 nanometers. The VECSEL includes a semiconductor multi-quantum-well active region that is electrically or optically pumped to generate lasing at a fundamental wavelength in the range of 600-1100 nanometers. An intracavity nonlinear frequency-doubling crystal then converts the fundamental lasing into a second-harmonic output beam. With optical pumping with 330 milliWatts from a semiconductor diode pump laser, about 5 milliWatts or more of blue light can be generated at 490 nm. The device has applications for high-density optical data storage and retrieval, laser printing, optical image projection, chemical-sensing, materials processing and optical metrology.

  10. Compact intra-cavity frequency doubled line beam green laser by a laser diode array pumped

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Boxia; Qi, Yan; Wang, Yanwei

    2016-10-01

    Compact, high power, and low-cost green laser light sources are needed in projection-related applications such as digital cinema, rear-projection television, simulators, and command and control stations. We report a LD array directly pumped intracavity SHG Nd:YVO4/PPMgLN laser without lens or waveguide in this letter. A compact 3.12 W green laser was demonstrated by intra-cavity frequency doubled using a PPMgLN bulk crystal by a 19-emitter LD array pumped(single bar), the conversion efficiency from input LD array was 9.2%. A line-beam output suitable for laser projectors was generated, which has the potential to be scalable to small volumes and low costs for laser projection displays.

  11. A novel approach to a PPM-modulated frequency-doubled electro-optic cavity-dumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    A technique which can provide frequency doubling, with high efficiency, while cavity dumping a laser for pulse position M-ary modulation while being used for an optical communication link is discussed. This approach uses a secondary cavity that provides feedback of the undoubled fundamental light, which is normally lost, into the primary cavity to be recirculated and frequency doubled. Specific operations of the electrooptic modulator and frequency-doubling crystal are described along with the overall modulation scheme and experimental setup.

  12. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  13. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  14. Compact double optical feedback external-cavity diode laser system and its frequency stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Kohei; Minabe, Yuta; Sato, Takashi; Maruyama, Takeo; Ohkawa, Masashi; Tsubokawa, Tsuneya

    2007-02-01

    External cavity diode laser (ECDL) systems are presently experiencing a surge in popularity as laser light-sources, in advanced optical communications- and measurement-systems. Because such systems require that their external reflectors be precisely controlled, to eliminate low frequency fluctuations (LFF) in optical output, we conducted experiments with a two-cavity version, which easily eliminated LFFs, as expected. The technique has the added advantage of a narrower oscillation-linewidth than would be achievable, using a single optical feedback. However, the ECDL's oscillation frequency is susceptible to the influences of the drive-current, as well as changes, both in the refractive index, and the overall length of the external reflector that results from fluctuations in atmospheric temperature. We made every effort to maintain the length of the ECDL cavity, while evaluating oscillation-frequency stability. We used a Super-Invar board as the platform for our compact ECDL system to minimize the influence of thermal expansion, because of its low expansion coefficient. We then compared the effect of atmospheric temperature variations between two experimental conditions, with the Super-invar board and without it, and finally took note of the improvement in performance, using the board.

  15. 532-nm laser sources based on intracavity frequency doubling of extended-cavity surface-emitting diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchegrov, Andrei V.; Umbrasas, Arvydas; Watson, Jason P.; Lee, Dicky; Amsden, Charles A.; Ha, Wonill; Carey, Glen P.; Doan, Vincent V.; Moran, Bryan; Lewis, Alan; Mooradian, Aram

    2004-07-01

    We introduce a novel type of cw green laser source, the Protera 532, based on the intracavity frequency doubling of an extended-cavity, surface-emitting diode laser. The distinguishing characteristics of this platform are high compactness and efficiency in a stable, single-longitudinal mode with beam quality M2 < 1.2. The laser design is based on the previously reported NECSEL architecture used for 488nm lasers, and includes several novel features to accommodate different types of nonlinear optical materials. The infrared laser die wavelength is increased from 976nm to 1064nm without compromising performance or reliability. The intracavity frequency doubling to 532nm has been demonstrated with both bulk and periodically poled nonlinear materials, with single-ended cw power outputs of greater than 30 mW.

  16. Study of Gain in C-Band Deflection Cavities for a Frequency-Doubling Magnicon Amplifier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-26

    surface cleanliness , and background vacuum pressure. The threshold for multipactor in the drive cavity, in the presence of the axial magnetic field, was...different degrees of surface cleanliness . In order to make an unambiguous test of the linear interaction theory, the experimental gain measurements were

  17. Experimental study of double-cavity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuerke, F.; Pastur, L. R.; Sciamarella, D.; Lusseyran, F.; Artana, G.

    2017-07-01

    The flow through two facing, identical cavities (double-cavity) is characterized experimentally, as the inflow velocity and the distance between the cavities is varied. Standard 2D2C particle image velocimetry measurements in the spanwise mid-plane provide information on the instantaneous and mean velocity flow fields. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements at several points in the double-cavity domain reveal the global character of the streamwise fluctuating velocity spectra. The flow is characterized based on time series, recorded in the shear layer of one of the cavities, for a wide range of inflow velocities and intercavity distances. In a detailed spectral study, we show how the shear layer spectra get affected when the two cavities are brought closer together. Based on the experimental data, a temporal local linear stability analysis was carried out, which was able to explain why the frequency peaks for close intercavity distances broaden and move to higher Strouhal numbers.

  18. Gain chip design, power scaling and intra-cavity frequency doubling with LBO of optically pumped red-emitting AlGaInP-VECSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahle, Hermann; Mateo, Cherry M. N.; Brauch, Uwe; Bek, Roman; Schwarzbäck, Thomas; Jetter, Michael; Graf, Thomas; Michler, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The wide range of applications in biophotonics, television or projectors, spectroscopy and lithography made the optically-pumped semiconductor (OPS) vertical external cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) an important category of power scalable lasers. The possibility of bandgap engineering, inserting frequency selective and converting elements into the open laser cavity and laser emission in the fundamental Gaussian mode leads to ongoing growth of the area of applications for tuneable laser sources. We present an AlGaInP-VECSEL system with a multi quantum well structure consisting of compressively strained GaInP quantum wells in an AlxGa1-xInP separate confinement heterostructure with an emission wavelength around 665 nm. The VECSEL chip with its n-λ cavity is pumped by a 532nm Nd:YAG laser under an angle to the normal incidence of 50°. In comparison, a gain chip design for high absorption values at pump wavelengths around 640nm with the use of quantum dot layers as active material is also presented. Frequency doubling is now realized with an antireflection coated lithium borate crystal, while a birefringent filter, placed inside the laser cavity under Brewster's angle, is used for frequency tuning. Further, power-scaling methods like in-well pumping as well as embedding the active region of a VECSEL between two transparent ic heaspreaders are under investigation.

  19. Highly-efficient continuous-wave intra-cavity frequency-doubled Yb:LuAG thin-disk laser with 1 kW of output power.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Tom; Piehler, Stefan; Rumpel, Martin; Villeval, Philippe; Lupinski, Dominique; Abdou-Ahmed, Marwan; Graf, Thomas

    2017-03-06

    We report on the generation of continuous-wave, intra-cavity frequency-doubled, multi-mode laser radiation in an Yb:LuAG thin-disk laser. Output powers of up to 1 kW at a wavelength of 515 nm were achieved at an unprecedented optical efficiency of 51.6% with respect to the pumping power of the thin-disk laser. The wavelength stabilization and spectral narrowing as well as the polarization selection, which is necessary for a stable and efficient second-harmonic generation, was achieved by the integration of a diffraction grating into the dielectric end mirror of the cavity, which exhibits a diffraction efficiency of 99.8%. At a frequency-doubled output power of 820 W the peak-to-valley power fluctuations measured during 100 minutes of laser operation amounted to only 8.2 W (1.0%). The beam parameter product of the frequency-doubled output was 3.4 mm·mrad (M2 ≈ 20), which is suitable for standard beam delivery using fibers with a core diameter of 100 µm and a NA of 0.2.

  20. A high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity with a frequency-doubled green laser for precision Compton polarimetry at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGES

    Rakhman, A.; Hafez, Mohamed A.; Nanda, Sirish K.; ...

    2016-03-31

    Here, a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity with a frequency-doubled continuous wave green laser (532 nm) has been built and installed in Hall A of Jefferson Lab for high precision Compton polarimetry. The infrared (1064 nm) beam from a ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier seeded by a Nd:YAG nonplanar ring oscillator laser is frequency doubled in a single-pass periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. The maximum achieved green power at 5 W infrared pump power is 1.74 W with a total conversion efficiency of 34.8%. The green beam is injected into the optical resonant cavity and enhanced up to 3.7 kW with a corresponding enhancement ofmore » 3800. The polarization transfer function has been measured in order to determine the intra-cavity circular laser polarization within a measurement uncertainty of 0.7%. The PREx experiment at Jefferson Lab used this system for the first time and achieved 1.0% precision in polarization measurements of an electron beam with energy and current of 1.0 GeV and 50 μA.« less

  1. A high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity with a frequency-doubled green laser for precision Compton polarimetry at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhman, A.; Hafez, Mohamed A.; Nanda, Sirish K.; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Camsonne, Alexandre; Cates, Gordon D.; Dalton, Mark M.; Franklin, Gregg B.; Friend, Megan L.; Michaels, Robert W.; Nelyubin, Vladimir V.; Parno, Diana S.; Paschke, Kent D.; Quinn, Brian P.; Souder, Paul A.; Tobias, W. Al

    2016-03-31

    Here, a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity with a frequency-doubled continuous wave green laser (532 nm) has been built and installed in Hall A of Jefferson Lab for high precision Compton polarimetry. The infrared (1064 nm) beam from a ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier seeded by a Nd:YAG nonplanar ring oscillator laser is frequency doubled in a single-pass periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. The maximum achieved green power at 5 W infrared pump power is 1.74 W with a total conversion efficiency of 34.8%. The green beam is injected into the optical resonant cavity and enhanced up to 3.7 kW with a corresponding enhancement of 3800. The polarization transfer function has been measured in order to determine the intra-cavity circular laser polarization within a measurement uncertainty of 0.7%. The PREx experiment at Jefferson Lab used this system for the first time and achieved 1.0% precision in polarization measurements of an electron beam with energy and current of 1.0 GeV and 50 μA.

  2. A high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity with a frequency-doubled green laser for precision Compton polarimetry at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhman, A.; Hafez, M.; Nanda, S.; Benmokhtar, F.; Camsonne, A.; Cates, G. D.; Dalton, M. M.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Michaels, R. W.; Nelyubin, V.; Parno, D. S.; Paschke, K. D.; Quinn, B. P.; Souder, P. A.; Tobias, W. A.

    2016-06-01

    A high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity with a frequency-doubled continuous wave green laser (532 nm) has been built and installed in Hall A of Jefferson Lab for high precision Compton polarimetry. The infrared (1064 nm) beam from a ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier seeded by a Nd:YAG nonplanar ring oscillator laser is frequency doubled in a single-pass periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. The maximum achieved green power at 5 W infrared pump power is 1.74 W with a total conversion efficiency of 34.8%. The green beam is injected into the optical resonant cavity and enhanced up to 3.7 kW with a corresponding enhancement of 3800. The polarization transfer function has been measured in order to determine the intra-cavity circular laser polarization within a measurement uncertainty of 0.7%. The PREx experiment at Jefferson Lab used this system for the first time and achieved 1.0% precision in polarization measurements of an electron beam with energy and current of 1.06 GeV and 50 μA.

  3. Intra-cavity frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser with dual-stability-range cavity emitting high power near-diffraction-limited radiation in CW and Q-switched mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woll, Dirk; Gregg, Jeffrey; Lefort, James; Morehead, James J.; Lindahl, Jennifer

    2010-02-01

    A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser has been demonstrated which emits 7.2 W of 532-nm radiation in the CW mode as well as 23 ns, 2.7 mJ pulses at a repetition rate of 10 kHz in the Q-switched mode. The high power in both modes was achieved by intra-cavity second harmonic generation in lithium triborate. The nonlinear output coupling through SHG in this laser causes a factor of 5.7 change of intra-cavity power between the CW and the Q-switched mode. The resulting variation of the thermal lens in the laser rod makes it challenging to maintain a geometrically stable cavity in both operation regimes, which is essential for diffraction limited beam quality. Diffraction limited beam quality with M2 values of less than 1.1 in the CW and less than 1.2 in the Q-switched regime was achieved by a novel dual-stabilityrange cavity-design. This design provides geometrically stable cavity configurations in both operation regimes, which are separated by an unstable region. This cavity makes it possible to switch between the two operation regimes without any moving components.

  4. Blue light generated by intra-cavity frequency doubling of an edge-emitting diode laser with a periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Yao, Aiyun; Copner, N J; Gawith, C B E; Knight, Ian G; Pfeiffer, Hans-Ulrich; Musk, Bob

    2009-11-23

    We demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge intra-cavity frequency doubling (ICFD) of an edge-emitter diode laser using a 10 mm-long 5.0 microm periodically poled LiNbO(3) (PPLN) crystal. An optical output power of 33 mW second harmonic blue light at 490.5 nm is generated at 1.0 A injection current, equivalent to an overall wall-plug efficiency of 1.8%. The measured M(2) values of blue beam are 1.7 and 2.4 along the fast and slow axis.

  5. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1984-02-09

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  6. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, Salvatore

    1985-01-01

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  7. Trace measurement of BrO at the ppt level by a transportable mode-locked frequency-doubled cavity-enhanced spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilli, R.; Méjean, G.; Kassi, S.; Ventrillard, I.; Abd-Alrahman, C.; Fasci, E.; Romanini, D.

    2012-04-01

    Pptv levels of BrO radical have been detected around 338.5-nm wavelength probing a rotationally structured A←X (7,0) electronic transition using mode-locked cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (ML-CEAS). The spectrometer is composed by a widely tunable, broadband frequency-doubled Ti:Sa mode-locked frequency comb laser injected into a high-finesse optical cavity and a high-resolution spectrometer based on a high-order diffraction grating and a high-sensitivity back-thinned CCD camera. A typical minimum detectable absorption coefficient of 1×10-9 cm-1 in 30 s of acquisition has been achieved, leading to a detection limit of 1.7 parts per trillion of BrO at atmospheric pressure. The compact and robust ultrasensitive broadband UV spectrometer is intended to be employed for in situ long-term direct measurements of BrO and other halogenated radicals, thus responding to the lack of analytical techniques to monitor the concentrations of such highly chemically reactive species.

  8. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  9. Hydrogen masers with cavity frequency switching servos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Harry E.; Owings, H. B.; Koppang, Paul A.

    1990-01-01

    The stability of the free-running hydrogen maser is limited by pulling of the unperturbed hydrogen transition frequency due to instability of the cavity resonance frequency. While automatic spin-exchange tuning is in principle the more basic and accurate method, the required beam intensity switching and the long servo time constant result in reduced stability for measuring intervals up to 10(exp 6) seconds. More importantly, the spin-exchange tuning method requires a second stable frequency source as a reference, ideally a second hydrogen maser, to get the best results. The cavity frequency switching servo, on the other hand, has very little effect on the maser short term stability, and is fast enough to correct for cavity drift while maintaining the cavity at the spin-exchange tuned offset required to minimize instability due to beam intensity fluctuations. Not only does the cavity frequency switching servo not require a second stable frequency source, but the frequency reference is the atomic hydrogen radiated beam signal, so that no extra RF connections need be made to the cavity, and externally generated signals that would perturb the hydrogen atom need not be transmitted through the cavity. The operation of the cavity frequency switching stabilization method is discussed and the transient response of the servo and certain other aspects of the technique that have potential for achieving improved basic accuracy are illustrated.

  10. Nb3Sn for Radio Frequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.

    2006-12-18

    In this article, the suitability of Nb3Sn to improve theperformance of superconducting Radio-Frequency (RF)cavities is discussed.The use of Nb3Sn in RF cavitiesis recognized as an enabling technology toretain a veryhigh cavity quality factor (Q0) at 4.2 K and tosignificantly improve the cavity accelerating efficiency per unitlength(Eacc). This potential arises through the fundamental properties ofNb3Sn. The properties that are extensively characterized in theliterature are, however, mainly related to improvements in currentcarrying capacity (Jc) in the vortex state. Much less is available forthe Meissner state, which is of key importance to cavities. Relevantdata, available for the Meissner state is summarized, and it is shown howthis already validates the use of Nb3Sn. In addition, missing knowledgeis highlighted and suggestions are given for further Meissner statespecific research.

  11. Frequency doubling crystals

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Francis; Velsko, Stephan P.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic approach to the production of frequency conversion crystals is described in which a chiral molecule has attached to it a "harmonic generating unit" which contributes to the noncentrosymmetry of the molecule. Certain preferred embodiments of such harmonic generating units include carboxylate, guanadyly and imidazolyl units. Certain preferred crystals include L-arginine fluoride, deuterated L-arginine fluoride, L-arginine chloride monohydrate, L-arginine acetate, dithallium tartrate, ammonium N-acetyl valine, N-acetyl tyrosine and N-acetyl hydroxyproline. Chemical modifications of the chiral molecule, such as deuteration, halogenation and controlled counterion substitution are available to adapt the dispersive properties of a crystal in a particular wavelength region.

  12. 5-W Yellow Laser by Intracavity Frequency Doubling of High-Power Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-15

    pumped semiconductor lasers, tunable vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser ( VECSEL ). I. INTRODUCTION H IGH-POWER laser sources covering the...wavelengths are difficult to fabricate. Optically pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers ( VECSELs ) using multiquantum wells are very...highly strained InGaAs–GaAs VECSEL which can cover a significantly longer wavelength range of 1147–1197 nm. Very robust multi-Watt high-brightness

  13. Plasma processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Janardan

    The development of plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities not only provides a chemical free and less expensive processing method, but also opens up the possibility for controlled modification of the inner surfaces of the cavity for better superconducting properties. The research was focused on the transition of plasma etching from two dimensional flat surfaces to inner surfaces of three dimensional (3D) structures. The results could be applicable to a variety of inner surfaces of 3D structures other than SRF cavities. Understanding the Ar/Cl2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for achieving the desired modification of Nb SRF cavities. In the process of developing plasma etching technology, an apparatus was built and a method was developed to plasma etch a single cell Pill Box cavity. The plasma characterization was done with the help of optical emission spectroscopy. The Nb etch rate at various points of this cavity was measured before processing the SRF cavity. Cylindrical ring-type samples of Nb placed on the inner surface of the outer wall were used to measure the dependence of the process parameters on plasma etching. The measured etch rate dependence on the pressure, rf power, dc bias, temperature, Cl2 concentration and diameter of the inner electrode was determined. The etch rate mechanism was studied by varying the temperature of the outer wall, the dc bias on the inner electrode and gas conditions. In a coaxial plasma reactor, uniform plasma etching along the cylindrical structure is a challenging task due to depletion of the active radicals along the gas flow direction. The dependence of etch rate uniformity along the cylindrical axis was determined as a function of process parameters. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the

  14. Fabrication and Measurements of 500 MHz Double Spoke Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Park, HyeKyoung; Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.

    2014-12-01

    A 500 MHz β0=1 double spoke cavity has been designed and optimized for a high velocity application such as a compact electron accelerator at the Center for Accelerator Science at Old Dominion University [1] and the fabrication was recently completed at Jefferson Lab. The geometry specific to the double spoke cavity required a variety of tooling and fixtures. Also a number of asymmetric weld joints were expected to make it difficult to maintain minimal geometric deviation from the design. This paper will report the fabrication procedure, resulting tolerance from the design, initial test results and the lessons learned from the first β0=1 double spoke cavity fabrication.

  15. Striped-double cavity fabry-perot interferometers using both glass and air cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, S; Steinmetz, L

    1998-07-08

    We have used piezo-driven Fabry-Perot interferometers in the past far many continuous velocity-time measurements of fast moving surfaces. In order to avoid the annoying drift of some of these devices, we have developed and used inexpensive, solid glass, striped etalons with lengths up to 64 mm. Usable apertures are 35 mm by 80 mm with a finess of 25. A roundabout technique was devised for double cavity operation. We built a passive thermal housing for temperature stability, with tilt and height adjustments. We have also developed and used our first fixed etalon air-spaced cavity with a rotatable glass double- cavity insert. The rotation allows the referee cavity fractional order to be adjusted separately from that of the main cavity. It needs very little thermal protection, and eliminates the need for a roundabout scheme for double cavity operation, but is more costly than the solid glass version I

  16. VCSEL's frequency stabilization of an external cavity diode laser: countermeasures against atmospheric temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motojima, Mutsuki; Doi, Kohei; Sato, Takashi; Ohkawa, Masashi; Suzuki, Takamasa

    2010-02-01

    We introduced the vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) as the laser diode in tour external cavity system. Because VCSELs are now commercially available, and the External cavity diode laser (ECDL) systems using them are expected to improve their frequency stability, we have replaced a Fabry-Perot type laser diode with a VCSEL, and examined its oscillation-frequency stability. Therefore we were able to expect that the VCSELs with our double optical feedback system have good oscillation frequency stability. The obtained VCSEL's oscillation-frequency stability, i.e., the square root of Allan variance σ was 4×10-10, at an averaging time of τ=1 sec.

  17. XUV Frequency Combs via Femtosecond Enhancement Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Arthur

    2012-10-01

    We report on recent developments in tabletop extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sources based on high harmonic generation (HHG) in femtosecond enhancement cavities (fsEC). The XUV frequency comb is produced via HHG at the full repetition rate of the mode-locked oscillator (typically >50 MHz), inside a passive enhancement cavity with an enhancement of a few hundred. Several technical challenges have recently been resolved, which have led to an increase in the generated photon flux in the XUV (10^14 photons/sec), and a substantial improvement in the operating time of these sources. XUV sources based on fsECs are now able to perform direct frequency comb spectroscopy with MHz precision in atomic systems at wavelengths down to 60 nm. Ongoing research is aimed at determining the ultimate frequency stability of these new XUV frequency comb sources. XUV fsEC sources are also promising for some applications that are typically performed with XUV light at advanced light sources. These applications include electronic structure of quantum material systems, such as angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), size metrology of nano-aerosol particles, and potentially velocity map imaging for studies of chemical physical problems. In this talk, we present a brief introduction to XUV frequency comb sources and the technical challenges that have been overcome to achieve the current performance levels. We will also discuss our progress on ARPES experiments with a fsEC XUV source and our efforts toward increasing the energy resolution of the produced harmonics. Finally, we describe ongoing efforts to further increase the maximum photon energy and photon flux generated, and subsequently delivered to an experiment by fsEC XUV sources.

  18. New limit on Lorentz violation using a double-pass optical ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Michimura, Yuta; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Ohmae, Noriaki; Kokuyama, Wataru; Aso, Yoichi; Ando, Masaki; Tsubono, Kimio

    2013-05-17

    A search for Lorentz violation in electrodynamics was performed by measuring the resonant frequency difference between two counterpropagating directions of an optical ring cavity. Our cavity contains a dielectric element, which makes our cavity sensitive to the violation. The laser frequency is stabilized to the counterclockwise resonance of the cavity, and the transmitted light is reflected back into the cavity for resonant frequency comparison with the clockwise resonance. This double-pass configuration enables a null experiment and gives high common mode rejection of environmental disturbances. We found no evidence for odd-parity anisotropy at the level of δc/c ≲ 10(-14). Within the framework of the standard model extension, our result put more than 5 times better limits on three odd-parity parameters κ(o+)(JK) and a 12 times better limit on the scalar parameter κ(tr) compared with the previous best limits.

  19. Investigation on 447.3 nm blue-violet laser by extra-cavity frequency doubling of a diode-pumped cesium vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongdong; Chen, Fei; Guo, Jin; Shao, Mingzhen; Xie, Jijiang

    2016-09-01

    447.3 nm blue-violet lasers are investigated by extra-cavity single-pass second harmonic generation (SHG) of diode-pumped cesium vapor lasers (Cs-DPALs) using a LBO crystal. Two types of 894.6 nm Cs-DPAL are constructed, and the beam quality factors are Mx2=1.02, My2=1.13 and Mx2=2.13, Mx2=2.66, respectively. The maximum output powers for the two types of Cs-DPAL operating in pulsed mode are 0.692 W and 2.6 W, and the corresponding maximum second harmonics (SH) powers are 9.5 μW and 11.2 μW at optimal focusing parameter of 1.68, respectively. The relative insensitivity of SH power to the LBO crystal temperature and the influence of Cs laser beam quality on the SHG efficiency are analyzed qualitatively.

  20. Compact microwave cavity for high performance rubidium frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanucci, Camillo; Bandi, Thejesh; Merli, Francesco; Pellaton, Matthieu; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano; Skrivervik, Anja K.

    2012-10-01

    The design, realization, and characterization of a compact magnetron-type microwave cavity operating with a TE011-like mode are presented. The resonator works at the rubidium hyperfine ground-state frequency (i.e., 6.835 GHz) by accommodating a glass cell of 25 mm diameter containing rubidium vapor. Its design analysis demonstrates the limitation of the loop-gap resonator lumped model when targeting such a large cell, thus numerical optimization was done to obtain the required performances. Microwave characterization of the realized prototype confirmed the expected working behavior. Double-resonance and Zeeman spectroscopy performed with this cavity indicated an excellent microwave magnetic field homogeneity: the performance validation of the cavity was done by achieving an excellent short-term clock stability as low as 2.4 × 10-13 τ-1/2. The achieved experimental results and the compact design make this resonator suitable for applications in portable atomic high-performance frequency standards for both terrestrial and space applications.

  1. Compact microwave cavity for high performance rubidium frequency standards.

    PubMed

    Stefanucci, Camillo; Bandi, Thejesh; Merli, Francesco; Pellaton, Matthieu; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano; Skrivervik, Anja K

    2012-10-01

    The design, realization, and characterization of a compact magnetron-type microwave cavity operating with a TE(011)-like mode are presented. The resonator works at the rubidium hyperfine ground-state frequency (i.e., 6.835 GHz) by accommodating a glass cell of 25 mm diameter containing rubidium vapor. Its design analysis demonstrates the limitation of the loop-gap resonator lumped model when targeting such a large cell, thus numerical optimization was done to obtain the required performances. Microwave characterization of the realized prototype confirmed the expected working behavior. Double-resonance and Zeeman spectroscopy performed with this cavity indicated an excellent microwave magnetic field homogeneity: the performance validation of the cavity was done by achieving an excellent short-term clock stability as low as 2.4 × 10(-13) τ(-1/2). The achieved experimental results and the compact design make this resonator suitable for applications in portable atomic high-performance frequency standards for both terrestrial and space applications.

  2. Laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates to a laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity. It is known in the prior art to utilize a PZT (piezoelectric transducer) element in combination with a mirror to change the cavity length of a laser cavity (which changes the laser frequency). Using a PZT element to drive the mirror directly is adequate at frequencies below 10 kHz. However, in high frequency applications (100 kHz and higher) PZT elements alone do not provide a sufficient change in the cavity length. The present invention utilizes an ultrasonic concentrator with a PZT element and mirror to provide modulation of the laser cavity. With an ultrasonic concentrator, the mirror element at the end of a laser cavity can move at larger amplitudes and higher frequencies.

  3. Transfer functions of double- and multiple-cavity Fabry Perot filters driven by Lorentzian sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Javier; Capmany, Jose

    1996-12-01

    We derive expressions for the transfer functions of double- and multiple-cavity Fabry Perot filters driven by laser sources with Lorentzian spectrum. These are of interest because of their applications in sensing and channel filtering in optical frequency-division multiplexing networks.

  4. Frequency combs for cavity cascades: OPO combs and graphene-coupled cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin F.; Kowzan, Grzegorz; Lee, C.-C.; Mohr, C.; Jiang, Jie; Schunemann, Peter G.; Schibli, T. R.; Maslowski, Piotr; Fermann, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    Frequency combs can be used directly, for example as a highly precise spectroscopic light source. They can also be used indirectly, as a bridge between devices whose high precision requirements would normally make them incompatible. Here, we demonstrate two ways that a frequency comb enables new technologies by matching optical cavities. One cavity is the laser oscillator. A second cavity is a low-threshold doubly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Extending optical referencing to the doubly-resonant OPO turns the otherwise unstable device into an extremely precise midinfrared frequency comb. Another cavity is an optical enhancement cavity for amplifying spectral absorption in a gas. With the high speed of a graphene-modulated frequency comb, we can couple a frequency comb directly into a high-finesse cavity for trace gas detection.

  5. Updating the CSNS injector linac to 250 MeV with superconducting double-spoke cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Fu, Shi-Nian

    2015-03-01

    In order to update the beam power from 100 kW to 500 kW in the China Spallation neutron source (CSNS) Phase II, one of the important measures is to replace the 80 m long beam transport line between the present 80 MeV linac injector and the rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) to another kind of acceleration structure. In this paper, we proposed a scheme based on 324 MHz double-spoke superconducting cavities. Unlike the superconducting elliptical cavity and normal conducting coupled cavity linac (CCL) structure, the double-spoke cavity belongs to the TE mode structure and has a smaller transverse dimension compared with that of the TH mode one. It can work at base frequency as the drift tube Linac (DTL) section, so that the cost and complexity of the RF system will be much decreased, and the behaviors of the beam dynamics are also improved significantly because of the low charge density and larger longitudinal acceptance. Furthermore, because of the relatively longer interactive length between the charged particle and the electromagnetic field per cell, it needs relatively less cell numbers and it has larger velocity acceptance compared with the double frequency TH structures. The superconducting section consists of 14 periods, each of which includes 3 superconducting cavities encapsulated in one cryomodule and a doublet in room temperate. The general considerations on cavity and beam dynamics design are discussed and the main results are presented. Supported by National Nature Sciences Foundation of China (11375122, 91126003) and China ADS Project

  6. Dynamic entanglement transfer in a double-cavity optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Tiantian; Zhou, Rigui; Ian, Hou

    2015-08-01

    We give a theoretical study of a double-cavity system in which a mechanical resonator beam is coupled to two cavity modes on both sides through radiation pressures. The indirect coupling between the cavities via the resonator sets up a correlation in the optomechanical entanglements between the two cavities with the common resonator. This correlation initiates an entanglement transfer from the intracavity photon-phonon entanglements to an intercavity photon-photon entanglement. Using numerical solutions, we show two distinct regimes of the optomechanical system, in which the indirect entanglement either builds up and eventually saturates or undergoes a death-and-revival cycle, after a time lapse for initiating the cooperative motion of the left and right cavity modes.

  7. Mounting system for optical frequency reference cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notcutt, Mark (Inventor); Hall, John L. (Inventor); Ma, Long-Sheng (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A technique for reducing the vibration sensitivity of laser-stabilizing optical reference cavities is based upon an improved design and mounting method for the cavity, wherein the cavity is mounted vertically. It is suspended at one plane, around the spacer cylinder, equidistant from the mirror ends of the cavity. The suspension element is a collar of an extremely low thermal expansion coefficient material, which surrounds the spacer cylinder and contacts it uniformly. Once the collar has been properly located, it is cemented in place so that the spacer cylinder is uniformly supported and does not have to be squeezed at all. The collar also includes a number of cavities partially bored into its lower flat surface, around the axial bore. These cavities are support points, into which mounting base pins will be inserted. Hence the collar is supported at a minimum of three points.

  8. Stable two-wavelength lasers by use of a double alpha-type fiber cavity with fiber grating mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho-Young; Oh, Myoung-Suk; Nam, Eun-Soo; Cho, Kyoung-Ik

    2005-12-01

    For high-frequency (20-200 GHz) modulated light sources, we developed and investigated two-wavelength lasers using the double alpha-type fiber cavities with fiber grating mirrors. For variations of polarization states and pump powers, parallel alpha-type coupled cavity lasers were found to be more stable than serial lasers.

  9. Cavities for electron spin resonance: predicting the resonant frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, John; Miller, Kyle; Meehan, Michael; Spencer, Ross

    Microwave cavities are used in electron spin resonance to enhance magnetic fields. Dielectric resonators (DRs), pieces of high dielectric material, can be used to tailor the resonant frequency of a cavity. However, designing cavities with DRs to obtain desired frequencies is challenging and in general can only be done numerically with expensive software packages. We present a new method for calculating the resonant frequencies and corresponding field modes for cylindrically symmetric cavities and apply it to a cavity with vertically stacked DRs. The modes of an arbitrary cavity are expressed as an expansion of empty cavity modes. The wave equation for D gives rise to an eigenvalue equation whose eigenvalues are the resonant frequencies and whose eigenvectors yield the electric and magnetic fields of the mode. A test against theory for an infinitely long dielectric cylinder inside an infinite cavity yields an accuracy better than 0.4% for nearly all modes. Calculated resonant frequencies are also compared against experiment for quasi-TE011 modes in resonant cavities with ten different configurations of DRs; experimental results agree with predicted values with an accuracy better than 1.0%. MATLAB code is provided at http://www.physics.byu.edu/research/coltonlab/cavityresonance.

  10. Accoustic Localization of Breakdown in Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Peter Gwin

    2016-07-01

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  11. Acoustic localization of breakdown in radio frequency accelerating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Peter

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  12. Double diffusion in arbitrary porous cavity: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamad, N. Ameer; Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum

    2017-07-01

    Double diffusion refers to the heat and mass transfer that takes place simultaneously. The current work highlights the double diffusion when a solid block is placed at the bottom of a square porous cavity. The whole cavity is filed with saturated porous medium except the small block placed at the bottom left corner of the domain. The left vertical surface of porous cavity is maintained at concentration Ch and right vertical surface possesses lowest concentration Cc in the porous domain. The results are discussed in terms of isotherms, iso-concentration and streamlines inside the domain for various physical parameters. It is seen that the mass transfer is substantially different in present case as compared to the case of natural convection.

  13. Yellow light generation by frequency doubling of a fiber oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacher, Christoph; Oliveira, Ricardo; Nogueira, Rogério N.; Romano, Valerio; Ryser, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Laser sources with light-emission in the yellow spectral range around 577nm are very favorable for a variety of applications. These include applications in astronomy, in ophthalmology or in quantum optics. The generation and amplification of 1154 nm light is not straight forward when using Yb-doped optical fibers, since lasing occurs preferentially around the gain-maximum of 1030 nm. We generate the radiation within a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based cavity and focused on reducing the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). After the cavity, the output is frequency doubled to 577nm by using a second harmonic crystal.

  14. Frequency budget for the PoP cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ratti, Alessandro

    1995-07-01

    The computer code superfish has been used in conjunction with measurements, to obtain a frequency budget for the PoP cavity. The goal of the exercise is to have a valid prediction of the natural resonant frequency of the final accelerating cavity to be built for RHIC. An estimation of the frequency shift due to the power coupling window is also included and compared with measurements.

  15. Self-Frequency-Doubling Ytterbium Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, Judith M.; Dekker, Peter; Burns, Philip; Piper, James A.

    2005-03-01

    Ytterbium-doped self-frequency-doubling lasers offer high efficiency, tunable, visible and near-infrared, cw and pulsed operation from compact devices. We review the performance of ytterbium-doped yttrium aluminium borate (Yb:YAB) self-frequency-doubling lasers. Because of the detailed dynaMisc of the interaction of the nonlinear pulse shaping process for mode-locking or for Q-switching self-frequency-doubled lasers, we observe pulse lengthening in each process when frequency doubling is optimised, with high average output power. However, for continuous wave operation, the self-frequency doubling process may be optimised to give highly efficient, robust, widely-tunable output in the visible as well as fundamental output in the infrared.

  16. Oscillation frequency stabilization and narrowing of a laser diode by using an external cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahori, Minoru; Doi, Kohei; Arai, Hideaki; Sato, Takashi; Ohkawa, Masashi

    2012-02-01

    External cavity diode laser (ECDL) systems are presently experiencing a surge in popularity as laser light-sources, in advanced optical communications- and measurement-applications. Because such systems require that their external reflectors be precisely controlled, to eliminate low frequency fluctuations in optical output, we conducted experiments with a two-cavity version of the ECDL system for a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). This technique brings the added advantages of a narrower linewidth than would be achievable via a single optical feedback. VCSELs are characterized by wider oscillation linewidths than edge emitting types, so the larger effect of double optical feedback system is expected.

  17. Design, prototyping, and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Binping; Alberty, Luis; Belomestnykh, Sergey; ...

    2015-04-01

    We proposed a novel design for a compact superconducting crab cavity with a double quarter wave (DQWCC) shape. After fabrication and surface treatments, this niobium proof-of-principle cavity was tested cryogenically in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service in the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The cavity’s electromagnetic properties are well suited for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the required 3.34 MV for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC. In this paper, we present themore » design, prototyping, and results from testing the DQWCC.« less

  18. Precise Frequency Measurements Using a Superconducting Cavity Stabilized Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D. M.; Yeh, N.-C.; Jiang, W.; Anderson, V. L.; Asplund, N.

    1999-01-01

    Many physics experiments call on improved resolution to better define the experimental results, thus improving tests of theories. Modern microwave technology combined with high-Q resonators can achieve frequency readout and control with resolutions up to a part in 10(exp 18). When the physical quantity in question in the experiment can be converted to a frequency or a change in frequency, a high-stability microwave oscillator can be applied to obtain state-of-the-art precision. In this work we describe the overall physical concepts and the required experimental procedures for optimizing a high-resolution frequency measurement system that employs a high-Q superconducting microwave cavity and a low-noise frequency synthesizer. The basic approach is to resolve the resonant frequencies of a high-Q (Q > 10(exp 10)) cavity to extremely high precision (one part in 10(exp 17)- 10(exp 18)). Techniques for locking the synthesizer frequency to a resonant frequency of the superconducting cavity to form an ultra-stable oscillator are described. We have recently set up an ultra-high-vacuum high-temperature annealing system to process superconducting niobium cavities, and have been able to consistently achieve Q > 10(exp 9). We have integrated high-Q superconducting cavities with a low-noise microwave synthesizer in a phase-locked-loop to verify the frequency stability of the system. Effects that disturb the cavity resonant frequency (such as the temperature fluctuations and mechanical vibrations) and methods to mitigate those effects are also considered. Applicability of these techniques to experiments will be discussed, and our latest experimental progress in achieving high-resolution frequency measurements using the superconducting-cavity-stabilized-oscillator will be presented.

  19. Cavity design for high-frequency axion dark matter detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Stern, I.; Chisholm, A. A.; Hoskins, J.; ...

    2015-12-30

    In this paper, in an effort to extend the usefulness of microwave cavity detectors to higher axion masses, above ~8 μeV (~2 GHz), a numerical trade study of cavities was conducted to investigate the merit of using variable periodic post arrays and regulating vane designs for higher-frequency searches. The results show that both designs could be used to develop resonant cavities for high-mass axion searches. Finally, multiple configurations of both methods obtained the scanning sensitivity equivalent to approximately 4 coherently coupled cavities with a single tuning rod.

  20. Cavity design for high-frequency axion dark matter detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, I.; Chisholm, A. A.; Hoskins, J.; Sikivie, P.; Sullivan, N. S.; Tanner, D. B.; Carosi, G.; van Bibber, K.

    2015-12-30

    In this paper, in an effort to extend the usefulness of microwave cavity detectors to higher axion masses, above ~8 μeV (~2 GHz), a numerical trade study of cavities was conducted to investigate the merit of using variable periodic post arrays and regulating vane designs for higher-frequency searches. The results show that both designs could be used to develop resonant cavities for high-mass axion searches. Finally, multiple configurations of both methods obtained the scanning sensitivity equivalent to approximately 4 coherently coupled cavities with a single tuning rod.

  1. Test of local position invariance using a double-cavity laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Agachev, A. R.; Belov, I. Yu.; Bochkarev, V. V.; Daishev, R. A.; Mavrin, S. V.; Murzakhanov, Z. G.; Skochilov, A. F. Chugunov, Yu. P.; Shindyaev, O. P.

    2010-01-15

    The results of testing local position invariance, which is a constituent of the Einstein equivalence principle, in a 'null' gravitational redshift experiment are reported. The processing of the experimental data collected during the five-month operation of a double-c avity laser system, where one cavity operates in the free generation mode and the frequency of the second cavity is stabilized with the nonlinear ultranarrow absorption resonance of the methane molecule, has confirmed the universality of the gravitational redshift law at a level of 0.9%. This result almost doubly improves the best existing accuracy (1.7%) of testing local position invariance for clocks of different physical natures.

  2. Dielectric supported radio-frequency cavities

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L.; Lee, Terry G.

    2000-01-01

    A device which improves the electrical and thermomechanical performance of an RF cavity, for example, in a disk-loaded accelerating structure. A washer made of polycrystalline diamond is brazed in the middle to a copper disk washer and at the outer edge to the plane wave transformer tank wall, thus dissipating heat from the copper disk to the outer tank wall while at the same time providing strong mechanical support to the metal disk. The washer structure eliminates the longitudinal connecting rods and cooling channels used in the currently available cavities, and as a result minimizes problems such as shunt impedance degradation and field distortion in the plane wave transformer, and mechanical deflection and uneven cooling of the disk assembly.

  3. Frequency doubling of Raman fiber lasers with random distributed feedback.

    PubMed

    Dontsova, E I; Kablukov, S I; Vatnik, I D; Babin, S A

    2016-04-01

    This Letter presents what we believe is the first experimental study of frequency doubling of a Raman fiber laser (RFL) with random distributed feedback (RDFB) in an MgO:PPLN crystal. We compared two laser configurations, each with a half-open cavity. The cavity contained either a broadband Sagnac mirror or a narrowband fiber Bragg grating (FBG). We found that spectral broadening in the studied configurations of the RDFB RFLs differed from that found in a conventional RFL with a linear cavity, as well as from each other. We also compared the second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency for these three types of lasers. The highest SHG efficiency was obtained for the RDFB RFL with the FBG delivering >100  mW power at 654 nm.

  4. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Rob; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the power frequencies for the doubled fiber laser. It includes information on the 780 nm laser, second harmonic generation in one crystal, cascading crystals, the tenability of laser systems, laser cooling, and directions for future work.

  5. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Rob; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the power frequencies for the doubled fiber laser. It includes information on the 780 nm laser, second harmonic generation in one crystal, cascading crystals, the tenability of laser systems, laser cooling, and directions for future work.

  6. Comparison of various decentralised structural and cavity feedback control strategies for transmitted noise reduction through a double panel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Jen-Hsuan; Berkhoff, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    This paper compares various decentralised control strategies, including structural and acoustic actuator-sensor configuration designs, to reduce noise transmission through a double panel structure. The comparison is based on identical control stability indexes. The double panel structure consists of two panels with air in between and offers the advantages of low sound transmission at high frequencies, low heat transmission, and low weight. The double panel structure is widely used, such as in the aerospace and automotive industries. Nevertheless, the resonance of the cavity and the poor sound transmission loss at low frequencies limit the double panel's noise control performance. Applying active structural acoustic control to the panels or active noise control to the cavity has been discussed in many papers. In this paper, the resonances of the panels and the cavity are considered simultaneously to further reduce the transmitted noise through an existing double panel structure. A structural-acoustic coupled model is developed to investigate and compare various structural control and cavity control methods. Numerical analysis and real-time control results show that structural control should be applied to both panels. Three types of cavity control sources are presented and compared. The results indicate that the largest noise reduction is obtained with cavity control by loudspeakers modified to operate as incident pressure sources.

  7. Frequency Doubling Broadband Light in Multiple Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    ALFORD,WILLIAM J.; SMITH,ARLEE V.

    2000-07-26

    The authors compare frequency doubling of broadband light in a single nonlinear crystal with doubling in five crystals with intercrystal temporal walk off compensation, and with doubling in five crystals adjusted for offset phase matching frequencies. Using a plane-wave, dispersive numerical model of frequency doubling they study the bandwidth of the second harmonic and the conversion efficiency as functions of crystal length and fundamental irradiance. For low irradiance the offset phase matching arrangement has lower efficiency than a single crystal of the same total length but gives a broader second harmonic bandwidth. The walk off compensated arrangement gives both higher conversion efficiency and broader bandwidth than a single crystal. At high irradiance, both multicrystal arrangements improve on the single crystal efficiency while maintaining broad bandwidth.

  8. Mechanical properties of niobium radio-frequency cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Matalevich, Joseph R.; ...

    2015-07-02

    Radio-frequency cavities made of bulk niobium are one of the components used in modern particle accelerators. The mechanical stability is an important aspect of cavity design, which typically relies on finite-element analysis simulations using material properties from tensile tests on sample. This contribution presents the results of strain and resonant frequency measurements as a function of a uniform pressure up to 722 kPa, applied to single-cell niobium cavities with different crystallographic structure, purity and treatments. In addition, burst tests of high-purity multi-cell cavities with different crystallographic structure have been conducted up to the tensile strength of the material. Finite-element analysismore » of the single-cell cavity geometry is in good agreement with the observed behavior in the elastic regime assuming a Young's modulus value of 88.5 GPa and a Poisson's ratio of 0.4, regardless of crystallographic structure, purity or treatment. However, the measured yield strength and tensile strength depend on crystallographic structure, material purity and treatment. In particular, the results from this study show that the mechanical properties of niobium cavities with large crystals are comparable to those of cavities made of fine-grain niobium.« less

  9. Mechanical properties of niobium radio-frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Schmidt, A.; Iversen, J.; Matheisen, A.; Singer, W.

    2015-07-02

    Radio-frequency cavities made of bulk niobium are one of the components used in modern particle accelerators. The mechanical stability is an important aspect of cavity design, which typically relies on finite-element analysis simulations using material properties from tensile tests on sample. This contribution presents the results of strain and resonant frequency measurements as a function of a uniform pressure up to 722 kPa, applied to single-cell niobium cavities with different crystallographic structure, purity and treatments. In addition, burst tests of high-purity multi-cell cavities with different crystallographic structure have been conducted up to the tensile strength of the material. Finite-element analysis of the single-cell cavity geometry is in good agreement with the observed behavior in the elastic regime assuming a Young's modulus value of 88.5 GPa and a Poisson's ratio of 0.4, regardless of crystallographic structure, purity or treatment. However, the measured yield strength and tensile strength depend on crystallographic structure, material purity and treatment. In particular, the results from this study show that the mechanical properties of niobium cavities with large crystals are comparable to those of cavities made of fine-grain niobium.

  10. Stretchable photonic crystal cavity with wide frequency tunability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun L; Kim, Hyunwoo; de Leon, Nathalie; Frank, Ian W; Robinson, Jacob T; McCutcheon, Murray; Liu, Mingzhao; Lukin, Mikhail D; Loncar, Marko; Park, Hongkun

    2013-01-09

    We report a new approach for realizing a flexible photonic crystal (PC) cavity that enables wide-range tuning of its resonance frequency. Our PC cavity consists of a regular array of silicon nanowires embedded in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix and exhibits a cavity resonance in the telecommunication band that can be reversibly tuned over 60 nm via mechanical stretching-a record for two-dimensional (2D) PC structures. These mechanically reconfigurable devices could find potential applications in integrated photonics, sensing in biological systems, and smart materials.

  11. High frequency estimation of 2-dimensional cavity scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dering, R. S.

    1984-12-01

    This thesis develops a simple ray tracing approximation for the high frequency scattering from a two-dimensional cavity. Whereas many other cavity scattering algorithms are very time consuming, this method is very swift. The analytical development of the ray tracing approach is performed in great detail, and it is shown how the radar cross section (RCS) depends on the cavity's length and width along with the radar wave's angle of incidence. This explains why the cavity's RCS oscillates as a function of incident angle. The RCS of a two dimensional cavity was measured experimentally, and these results were compared to computer calculations based on the high frequency ray tracing theory. The comparison was favorable in the sense that angular RCS minima and maxima were exactly predicted even though accuracy of the RCS magnitude decreased for incident angles far off-axis. Overall, once this method is extended to three dimensions, the technique shows promise as a fast first approximation of high frequency cavity scattering.

  12. Noise-Immune Cavity-Enhanced Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, Lucile; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Johanssson, Alexandra C.; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2015-06-01

    We present noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy (NICE-OFCS), a recently developed technique for sensitive, broadband, and high resolution spectroscopy. In NICE-OFCS an optical frequency comb (OFC) is locked to a high finesse cavity and phase-modulated at a frequency precisely equal to (a multiple of) the cavity free spectral range. Since each comb line and sideband is transmitted through a separate cavity mode in exactly the same way, any residual frequency noise on the OFC relative to the cavity affects each component in an identical manner. The transmitted intensity contains a beat signal at the modulation frequency that is immune to frequency-to-amplitude noise conversion by the cavity, in a way similar to continuous wave noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). The light transmitted through the cavity is detected with a fast-scanning Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) and the NICE-OFCS signal is obtained by fast Fourier transform of the synchronously demodulated interferogram. Our NICE-OFCS system is based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser locked to a cavity with a finesse of ˜9000 and a fast-scanning FTS equipped with a high-bandwidth commercial detector. We measured NICE-OFCS signals from the 3νb{1}+νb{3} overtone band of CO_2 around 1.57 μm and achieved absorption sensitivity 6.4×10-11cm-1 Hz-1/2 per spectral element, corresponding to a minimum detectable CO_2 concentration of 25 ppb after 330 s integration time. We will describe the principles of the technique and its technical implementation, and discuss the spectral lineshapes of the NICE-OFCS signals. A. Khodabakhsh, C. Abd Alrahman, and A. Foltynowicz, Opt. Lett. 39, 5034-5037 (2014). J. Ye, L. S. Ma, and J. L. Hall, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 15, 6-15 (1998). A. Khodabakhsh, A. C. Johansson, and A. Foltynowicz, Appl. Phys. B (2015) doi:10.1007/s00340-015-6010-7.

  13. Enhanced generation of higher-order sidebands in a single-quantum-dot-cavity system coupled to a PT -symmetric double cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wen-Xing; Chen, Ai-Xi; Xie, Xiao-Tao; Ni, Linyu

    2017-07-01

    We propose and analyze an effective scheme to enhance the optical higher-order sideband generation in a three-cavity array with local parity-time (PT ) symmetry. In this three-cavity configuration, a single cavity containing a quantum dot (QD) is coupled to an assisted PT -symmetric combination of two cavities. Beyond the weak-excitation approximation, we derive the analytic formulas used to determine the nonlinear coefficient of the optical second-order sideband (OSS) by employing the perturbation technique. Using experimentally achievable parameters, we identify the conditions under which the assisted PT -symmetric double-cavity system allows us to modify the transmission of the probe field and improve the efficiency of OSS generation beyond what is achievable in a loss-only QD-cavity system. We examine the influence of the PT phase transition from unbroken- to broken-PT regimes on the OSS generation. It is found that the efficiency of optical second-order sideband generation can be significantly enhanced when the assisted double-cavity system is in PT -symmetric phase, extremely in the vicinity of the transition point. The present results illustrate the potential to utilize PT -symmetric physical systems for enhancing optical higher-order sidebands and controlling optical frequency combs, as well as to guide the design of experimental implementation.

  14. Generation of single-frequency tunable green light in a coupled ring tapered diode laser cavity.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2013-03-11

    We report the realization of a tapered diode laser operated in a coupled ring cavity that significantly improves the coherence properties of the tapered laser and efficiently generates tunable light at the second harmonic frequency. The tapered diode laser is tunable with single-frequency output in the broad wavelength range from 1049 nm to 1093 nm and the beam propagation factor is improved from M(2) = 2.8 to below 1.1. The laser frequency is automatically locked to the cavity resonance frequency using optical feedback. Furthermore, we show that this adaptive external cavity approach leads to efficient frequency doubling. More than 500 mW green output power is obtained by placing a periodically poled LiNbO(3) crystal in the external cavity. The single frequency green output from the laser system is tunable in the 530 nm to 533 nm range limited by the LiNbO(3) crystal. The optical to optical conversion efficiency exceeds 30%.

  15. Surface processing for bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, M. P.; Reid, T.

    2017-04-01

    The majority of niobium cavities for superconducting particle accelerators continue to be fabricated from thin-walled (2-4 mm) polycrystalline niobium sheet and, as a final step, require material removal from the radio frequency (RF) surface in order to achieve performance needed for use as practical accelerator devices. More recently bulk niobium in the form of, single- or large-grain slices cut from an ingot has become a viable alternative for some cavity types. In both cases the so-called damaged layer must be chemically etched or electrochemically polished away. The methods for doing this date back at least four decades, however, vigorous empirical studies on real cavities and more fundamental studies on niobium samples at laboratories worldwide have led to seemingly modest improvements that, when taken together, constitute a substantial advance in the reproducibility for surface processing techniques and overall cavity performance. This article reviews the development of niobium cavity surface processing, and summarizes results of recent studies. We place some emphasis on practical details for real cavity processing systems which are difficult to find in the literature but are, nonetheless, crucial for achieving the good and reproducible cavity performance. New approaches for bulk niobium surface treatment which aim to reduce cost or increase performance, including alternate chemical recipes, barrel polishing and ‘nitrogen doping’ of the RF surface, continue to be pursued and are closely linked to the requirements for surface processing.

  16. Surface processing for bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Kelly, M. P.; Reid, T.

    2017-02-21

    The majority of niobium cavities for superconducting particle accelerators continue to be fabricated from thin-walled (2-4mm) polycrystalline niobium sheet and, as a final step, require material removal from the radio frequency (RF) surface in order to achieve performance needed for use as practical accelerator devices. More recently bulk niobium in the form of, single-or large-grain slices cut from an ingot has become a viable alternative for some cavity types. In both cases the so-called damaged layer must be chemically etched or electrochemically polished away. The methods for doing this date back at least four decades, however, vigorous empirical studies onmore » real cavities and more fundamental studies on niobium samples at laboratories worldwide have led to seemingly modest improvements that, when taken together, constitute a substantial advance in the reproducibility for surface processing techniques and overall cavity performance. This article reviews the development of niobium cavity surface processing, and summarizes results of recent studies. We place some emphasis on practical details for real cavity processing systems which are difficult to find in the literature but are, nonetheless, crucial for achieving the good and reproducible cavity performance. New approaches for bulk niobium surface treatment which aim to reduce cost or increase performance, including alternate chemical recipes, barrel polishing and 'nitrogen doping' of the RF surface, continue to be pursued and are closely linked to the requirements for surface processing.« less

  17. Electrochemical system and method for electropolishing superconductive radio frequency cavities

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, E. Jennings; Inman, Maria E.; Hall, Timothy

    2015-04-14

    An electrochemical finishing system for super conducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities including a low viscosity electrolyte solution that is free of hydrofluoric acid, an electrode in contact with the electrolyte solution, the SCRF cavity being spaced apart from the electrode and in contact with the electrolyte solution and a power source including a first electrical lead electrically coupled to the electrode and a second electrical lead electrically coupled to the cavity, the power source being configured to pass an electric current between the electrode and the workpiece, wherein the electric current includes anodic pulses and cathodic pulses, and wherein the cathodic pulses are interposed between at least some of the anodic pulses. The SCRF cavity may be vertically oriented during the finishing process.

  18. Photoemission and Masing in a Cavity-Coupled Semiconductor Double Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petta, Jason

    2015-05-01

    Semiconductor circuit QED devices are exciting platforms for studying the coupled dynamics of single charges, photons, and phonons. I will describe a newly discovered maser, which is driven by single electron tunneling events that result in gigahertz frequency photon emission. Semiconductor double quantum dots, sometimes referred to as electrically tunable ``artificial molecules,'' serve as the gain medium and are placed inside of a high quality factor microwave cavity. Maser action is verified by comparing the statistics of the emitted microwave field above and below the maser threshold. Furthermore, by driving the cavity with a seed tone, it is possible to injection lock the maser, greatly reducing the emission linewidth. The frequency range over which the maser can be injection locked closely follows predictions from Adler's equation. Research was performed in collaboration with Yinyu Liu, Jiri Stehlik, Christopher Eichler, Michael Gullans, and Jacob Taylor. We acknowledge support from the Sloan and Packard Foundations, ARO, DARPA, and the NSF.

  19. Frequency comb generation beyond the Lugiato-Lefever equation: multi-stability and super cavity solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, Tobias; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    The generation of optical frequency combs in microresonators is considered without resorting to the mean-field approximation. New dynamical regimes are found to appear for high intracavity power that cannot be modeled using the Lugiato-Lefever equation. Using the Ikeda map we show the existence of multi-valued stationary states and analyse their stability. Period doubled patterns are considered and a novel type of super cavity soliton associated with the multi-stable states is predicted.

  20. External cavity diode laser with very-low frequency drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Ikegami, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    An external cavity diode laser with significant mechanical robustness was installed in a housing that was sealed from outside for eliminating variations in the refractive index of air. Using the feedback signal for a frequency lock, it was found that the variation in the laser frequency under free running was suppressed to 275 MHz over one month and depended on the room temperature. Moreover, the upper limit of the linear frequency drift rate was evaluated as intrinsically 40 Hz/s. The frequency lock is expected to be sustainable for more than 110 days with temperature-controlled housing.

  1. Resonant-frequency discharge in a multi-cell radio frequency cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Popović, S.; Upadhyay, J.; Nikolić, M.; Vušković, L.; Mammosser, J.

    2014-11-07

    We are reporting experimental results on a microwave discharge operating at resonant frequency in a multi-cell radio frequency (RF) accelerator cavity. Although the discharge operated at room temperature, the setup was constructed so that it could be used for plasma generation and processing in fully assembled active superconducting radio-frequency cryo-module. This discharge offers a mechanism for removal of a variety of contaminants, organic or oxide layers, and residual particulates from the interior surface of RF cavities through the interaction of plasma-generated radicals with the cavity walls. We describe resonant RF breakdown conditions and address the issues related to resonant detuning due to sustained multi-cell cavity plasma. We have determined breakdown conditions in the cavity, which was acting as a plasma vessel with distorted cylindrical geometry. We discuss the spectroscopic data taken during plasma removal of contaminants and use them to evaluate plasma parameters, characterize the process, and estimate the volatile contaminant product removal.

  2. Dual-etalon, cavity-ring-down, frequency comb spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2010-10-01

    The 'dual etalon frequency comb spectrometer' is a novel low cost spectometer with limited moving parts. A broad band light source (pulsed laser, LED, lamp ...) is split into two beam paths. One travels through an etalon and a sample gas, while the second arm is just an etalon cavity, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges (FSR) of the two cavities are not identical, the intensity pattern at the detector with consist of a series of heterodyne frequencies. Each mode out of the sample arm etalon with have a unique frequency in RF (radio-frequency) range, where modern electronics can easily record the signals. By monitoring these RF beat frequencies we can then determine when an optical frequencies is absorbed. The resolution is set by the FSR of the cavity, typically 10 MHz, with a bandwidth up to 100s of cm{sup -1}. In this report, the new spectrometer is described in detail and demonstration experiments on Iodine absorption are carried out. Further we discuss powerful potential next generation steps to developing this into a point sensor for monitoring combustion by-products, environmental pollutants, and warfare agents.

  3. Overlapping double potential wells in a single optical microtube cavity with vernier-scale-like tuning effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, A.; Bolaños Quiñones, V. A.; Ma, L. B.; Miao, S. D.; Jorgensen, M. R.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2016-04-01

    Spatially and temporally overlapping double potential wells are realized in a hybrid optical microtube cavity due to the coexistence of an aggregate of luminescent quantum dots embedded in the tube wall and the cone-shaped tube's geometry. The double potential wells produce two independent sets of optical modes with different sets of mode numbers, indicating phase velocity separation for the modes overlapping at the same frequency. The overlapping mode position can be tuned by modifying the tube cavity, where these mode sets shift with different magnitudes, allowing for a vernier-scale-like tuning effect.

  4. Overlapping double potential wells in a single optical microtube cavity with vernier-scale-like tuning effect

    SciTech Connect

    Madani, A.; Schmidt, O. G.; Bolaños Quiñones, V. A.; Ma, L. B. Jorgensen, M. R.; Miao, S. D.

    2016-04-25

    Spatially and temporally overlapping double potential wells are realized in a hybrid optical microtube cavity due to the coexistence of an aggregate of luminescent quantum dots embedded in the tube wall and the cone-shaped tube's geometry. The double potential wells produce two independent sets of optical modes with different sets of mode numbers, indicating phase velocity separation for the modes overlapping at the same frequency. The overlapping mode position can be tuned by modifying the tube cavity, where these mode sets shift with different magnitudes, allowing for a vernier-scale-like tuning effect.

  5. Frequency-Agile Differential Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Zachary; Hodges, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    The ultimate precision of highly sensitive cavity-enhanced spectroscopic measurements is often limited by interferences (etalons) caused by weak coupled-cavity effects. Differential measurements of ring-down decay constants have previously been demonstrated to largely cancel these effects, but the measurement acquisition rates were relatively low [1,2]. We have previously demonstrated the use of frequency agile rapid scanning cavity ring-down spectroscopy (FARS-CRDS) for acquisition of absorption spectra [3]. Here, the method of rapidly scanned, frequency-agile differential cavity ring-down spectroscopy (FADS-CRDS) is presented for reducing the effect of these interferences and other shot-to-shot statistical variations in measured decay times. To this end, an electro-optic phase modulator (EOM) with a bandwidth of 20 GHz is driven by a microwave source, generating pairs of sidebands on the probe laser. The optical resonator acts as a highly selective optical filter to all laser frequencies except for one tunable sideband. This sideband may be stepped arbitrarily from mode-to-mode of the ring-down cavity, at a rate limited only by the cavity buildup/decay time. The ability to probe any cavity mode across the EOM bandwidth enables a variety of methods for generating differential spectra. The differential mode spacing may be changed, and the effect of this method on suppressing the various coupled-cavity interactions present in the system is discussed. Alternatively, each mode may also be differentially referenced to a single point, providing immunity to temporal variations in the base losses of the cavity while allowing for conventional spectral fitting approaches. Differential measurements of absorption are acquired at 3.3 kHz and a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of 5 x10-12 cm-1 in 1 s averaging time is achieved. 1. J. Courtois, K. Bielska, and J.T Hodges J. Opt. Soc. Am. B, 30, 1486-1495, 2013 2. H.F. Huang and K.K. Lehmann App. Optics 49, 1378

  6. Nonlinear cavity dumping of a high finesse frequency mixing module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Andersen, Martin T.; Johansson, Sandra; Canalias, Carlota; Laurell, Fredrik; Buchhave, Preben; Karamehmedovic, Emir; Pedersen, Christian

    2007-07-01

    We present a novel generic approach for pulsed light generation in the visible spectrum. We demonstrate how the circulating field of a high finesse laser can be efficiently cavity dumped through sum-frequency mixing with externally injected high peak power single pass pulses. Periodically poled KTP is used as the nonlinear medium to minimize the peak power requirement of the injected beam. The experimental setup consists of a high finesse 1342 nm Nd:YVO4 laser cavity and a passively Qswitched Nd:YAG laser. Yellow pulses at 593 nm are generated.

  7. Femtogram scale nanomechanical resonators embedded in a double-slot photonic crystal nanobeam cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He; Zeng, Cheng; Chen, Daigao; Li, Miaofeng; Wang, Yi; Huang, Qingzhong; Xiao, Xi; Xia, Jinsong

    2016-02-01

    An optomechanical device that contains a nanomechanical resonator with an ultralow effective mass of 6.42 fg is designed and demonstrated. The femtogram scale nanomechanical resonator is embedded in a double-slot photonic crystal nanobeam cavity. Optical resonance provides efficient readout of the nanomechanical resonator movements. The fabricated device is optically and mechanically characterized in atmosphere. In the measured radio-frequency power spectral density, a peak at 3.928 GHz is identified to be the mechanical mode with an effective mass of 6.42 fg. The measured room-temperature mechanical Q-factor is 1255, and a displacement sensitivity of 0.13 fm/ √{ Hz } , which is 22 times beyond the standard quantum limit, is obtained. These demonstrated on-chip integrated optomechanical devices combining high Q-factor optical cavities and nanomechanical resonators with ultralow effective masses are promising in ultrasensitive measurements.

  8. Improving the efficiency of microwave devices with a double output cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Lee, T.G.

    1986-05-01

    Double output cavities have been used experimentally to increase the efficiency of high-power klystrons. We have used particle-in-cell simulations with the 2 + 1/2 dimensional code MASK to optimize the design of double output cavities for the lasertron and the 50 MW klystron under development at SLAC. We discuss design considerations for double output cavities (e.g., optimum choice of voltages and phases, efficiency, wall interception, breakdown). We describe how one calculates the cavity impedance matrix from the gap voltages and phases. Simulation results are compared to experience with the 150 MW klystron.

  9. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert J.; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the development of a high power 780 nm laser suitable for space applications of laser cooling. A possible solution is to use frequency doubling of high power 1560 nm telecom lasers. The presentation shows a diagram of the frequency conversion, and a graph of the second harmonic generation in one crystal, and the use of the cascading crystals. Graphs show the second harmonic power as a function of distance between crystals, second harmonic power vs. pump power, tunability of laser systems.

  10. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert J.; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the development of a high power 780 nm laser suitable for space applications of laser cooling. A possible solution is to use frequency doubling of high power 1560 nm telecom lasers. The presentation shows a diagram of the frequency conversion, and a graph of the second harmonic generation in one crystal, and the use of the cascading crystals. Graphs show the second harmonic power as a function of distance between crystals, second harmonic power vs. pump power, tunability of laser systems.

  11. Vibroacoustic behavior of clamp mounted double-panel partition with enclosure air cavity.

    PubMed

    Xin, F X; Lu, T J; Chen, C Q

    2008-12-01

    A theoretical study on the vibroacoustic performance of a rectangular double-panel partition clamp mounted in an infinite acoustic rigid baffle is presented. With the clamped boundary condition taken into account by the method of modal function, a double Fourier series solution to the dynamic response of the structure is obtained by employing the weighted residual method (i.e., the Galerkin method). The double series solution can be considered as the exact solution of the problem, as the structural and acoustic-structural coupling effects are fully accounted for and the solution converges numerically. The accuracy of the theoretical predictions is checked against existing experimental data, with good agreement achieved. The influence of several key parameters on the sound isolation capability of the double-panel configuration is then systematically studied, including panel dimensions, thickness of air cavity, elevation angle, and azimuth angle of incidence sound. The present method is suitable for double-panel systems of finite or infinite extent and is applicable for both low- and high-frequency ranges. With these merits, the proposed method compares favorably with a number of other approaches, e.g., finite element method, boundary element method, and statistical energy analysis method.

  12. Transmission loss of orthogonally rib-stiffened double-panel structures with cavity absorption.

    PubMed

    Xin, F X; Lu, T J

    2011-04-01

    The transmission loss of sound through infinite orthogonally rib-stiffened double-panel structures having cavity-filling fibrous sound absorptive materials is theoretically investigated. The propagation of sound across the fibrous material is characterized using an equivalent fluid model, and the motions of the rib-stiffeners are described by including all possible vibrations, i.e., flexural displacements, bending, and torsional rotations. The effects of fluid-structure coupling are account for by enforcing velocity continuity conditions at fluid-panel interfaces. By taking full advantage of the periodic nature of the double-panel, the space-harmonic approach and virtual work principle are applied to solve the sets of resultant governing equations, which are eventually truncated as a finite system of simultaneous algebraic equations and numerically solved insofar as the solution converges. To validate the proposed model, a comparison between the present model predictions and existing numerical and experimental results for a simplified version of the double-panel structure is carried out, with overall agreement achieved. The model is subsequently employed to explore the influence of the fluid-structure coupling between fluid in the cavity and the two panels on sound transmission across the orthogonally rib-stiffened double-panel structure. Obtained results demonstrate that this fluid-structure coupling affects significantly sound transmission loss (STL) at low frequencies and cannot be ignored when the rib-stiffeners are sparsely distributed. As a highlight of this research, an integrated optimal algorithm toward lightweight, high-stiffness and superior sound insulation capability is proposed, based on which a preliminary optimal design of the double-panel structure is performed.

  13. Theoretical Analysis About Quantum Noise Squeezing of Optical Fields From an Intracavity Frequency-Doubled Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Kuanshou; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    1996-01-01

    The dependence of the quantum fluctuation of the output fundamental and second-harmonic waves upon cavity configuration has been numerically calculated for the intracavity frequency-doubled laser. The results might provide a direct reference for the design of squeezing system through the second-harmonic-generation.

  14. Applications of Cavity-Enhanced Direct Frequency Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossel, Kevin C.; Adler, Florian; Maslowski, Piotr; Ye, Jun

    2010-06-01

    Cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy (CE-DFCS) is a unique technique that provides broad bandwidth, high resolution, and ultra-high detection sensitivities. This is accomplished by combining a femtosecond laser based optical frequency comb with an enhancement cavity and a broadband, multichannel imaging system. These systems are capable of simultaneously recording many terahertz of spectral bandwidth with sub-gigahertz resolution and absorption sensitivities of 1×10-7 cm-1 Hz-1/2. In addition, the ultrashort pulses enable efficient nonlinear processes, which makes it possible to reach spectral regions that are difficult to access with conventional laser sources. We will present an application of CE-DFCS for trace impurity detection in the semiconductor processing gas arsine near 1.8 μm and the development of a high-power, mid-infrared frequency comb for breath analysis in the 2.8-4.8 μm region. M. J. Thorpe, K. D. Moll, R. J. Jones, B. Safdi, and J. Ye. Science 311, 1595-1599 (2006) F. Adler, M. J. Thorpe, K. C. Cossel, and J. Ye. Annu. Rev. Anal. Chem. 3, 175-205 (2010) F. Adler, K. C. Cossel, M. J. Thorpe, I. Hartl, M. E. Fermann, and J. Ye. Opt. Lett. 34, 1330-1332 (2009)

  15. Upgrading Emma to Use Low-Frequency RF Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Chihiro; Berg, J. Scott

    EMMA is an experiment to study beam dynamics in fixed field alternating gradient accelerators (FFAGs). It accelerates the beam in about 10 turns using 1.3 GHz cavities in a mode like that used for muon accelerators. Many applications of FFAGs prefer to have slower acceleration, typically thousands of turns. To do so in EMMA would require the RF system to be replaced with a low-frequency, high-gradient system. This paper describes the motivation for studying slow acceleration in EMMA and the required parameters for an RF system to do that. It then describes the technology needed for the RF system.

  16. Resonant-frequency discharge in a multi-cell radio frequency cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, S; Upadhyay, J; Mammosser, J; Nikolic, M; Vuskovic, L

    2014-11-07

    We are reporting experimental results on microwave discharge operating at resonant frequency in a multi-cell radio frequency (RF) accelerator cavity. Although the discharge operated at room temperature, the setup was constructed so that it could be used for plasma generation and processing in fully assembled active superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cryomodule (in situ operation). This discharge offers an efficient mechanism for removal of a variety of contaminants, organic or oxide layers, and residual particulates from the interior surface of RF cavities through the interaction of plasma-generated radicals with the cavity walls. We describe resonant RF breakdown conditions and address the problems related to generation and sustaining the multi-cell cavity plasma, which are breakdown and resonant detuning. We have determined breakdown conditions in the cavity, which was acting as a plasma vessel with distorted cylindrical geometry. We discuss the spectroscopic data taken during plasma removal of contaminants and use them to evaluate plasma parameters, characterize the process, and estimate the volatile contaminant product removal.

  17. Intracavity frequency-doubled degenerate laser (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hui; Liew, Seng Fatt; Knitter, Sebastian; Weiler, Sascha; Monjardin-Lopez, Jesus F.; Ramme, Mark; Redding, Brandon; Choma, Michael A.

    2017-02-01

    Visible lasers have a wide range of applications in imaging, spectroscopy and displays. Unfortunately, they suffer from coherent artifacts such as speckle. Various compounding techniques have been developed to remove speckle, but these methods usually involve mechanically moving parts and require long acquisition times. A different approach to prevent speckle formation is developing lasers with low spatial coherence. A careful design of the laser cavity can facilitate lasing in many spatial modes with distinct emission pattern. The total emission from those mutually incoherent lasing modes has low spatial coherence. To date, several types of such lasers have been developed, but most of them have emission beyond the visible spectrum, making them unsuitable for imaging or display applications that require visible light. An alternative way of making visible sources, especially of green color, is frequency doubling of infrared (IR) lasers. We develop a green light source with low spatial coherence via intracavity frequency doubling of a solid-state degenerate laser. The second harmonic emission is distributed over a few thousands independent transverse modes, and exhibits low spatial coherence. A strong suppression of speckle formation is demonstrated for both fundamental and second harmonic beams. Using the green emission for fluorescence excitation, we show the coherent artifacts are removed from the full-field fluorescence images. The achievable high power, low spatial coherence, and good directionality make the green degenerate laser an attractive illumination source for parallel imaging and projection display.

  18. Design and prototyping of HL-LHC double quarter wave crab cavities for SPS test

    SciTech Connect

    Verdu-Andres, S.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Alberty, L.; Artoos, K.; Calaga, R.; Capatina, O.; Capelli, T.; Carra, F.; Leuxe, R.; Kuder, N.; Zanoni, C.; Li, Z.; Ratti, A.

    2015-05-03

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  19. Electron density and collision frequency of microwave resonant cavity produced discharges. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McColl, W.; Brooks, C.; Brake, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    This progress report consists of an article, the abstract of which follows, and apparently the references and vita from a proposal. A review of perturbation diagnostics applied to microwave resonant cavity discharges is presented. The classical microwave perturbation technique examines the shift in the resonant frequency and cavity quality factor of the resonant cavity caused by low electron density discharges. However, modifications presented here allow the analysis to be applied to discharges with electron densities beyond the limit predicted by perturbation theory. An {open_quote}exact{close_quote} perturbation analysis is presented which models the discharge as a separate dielectric, thereby removing the restrictions on electron density imposed by the classical technique. The {open_quote}exact{close_quote} method also uses measurements of the shifts in the resonant conditions of the cavity. Thirdly, an electromagnetic analysis is presented which uses a characteristic equation, based upon Maxwell`s laws, and predicts the discharge conductivity based upon measurements of a complex axial wave number. By allowing the axial wave number of the electromagnetic fields to be complex, the fields are experimentally and theoretically shown to be spatially attenuated. The diagnostics are applied to continuous-wave microwave (2.45 GHz) discharges produced in an Asmussen resonant cavity. Double Langmuir probes, placed directly in the discharge at the point where the radial electric field is zero, act as a comparison with the analytic diagnostics. Microwave powers ranging from 30 to 100 watts produce helium and nitrogen discharges with pressures ranging from 0.5 to 6 torr. Analysis of the data predicts electron temperatures from 5 to 20 eV, electron densities from 10{sup 11} to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}, and collision frequencies from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 11} sec{sup {minus}1}.

  20. New generation of one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities as robust high-efficient frequency converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvini, T. S.; Tehranchi, M. M.; Hamidi, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    An effective method is proposed to design finite one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities (PhCCs) as robust high-efficient frequency converter. For this purpose, we consider two groups of PhCCs which are constructed by stacking m nonlinear (LiNbO3) and n linear (air) layers with variable thicknesses. In the first group, the number of linear layers is less than the nonlinear layers by one and in the second group by two. The conversion efficiency is calculated as a function of the arrangement and thicknesses of the linear and nonlinear layers by benefiting from nonlinear transfer matrix method. Our numerical simulations show that for each group of PhCCs, there is a structural formula by which the configurations with the highest efficiency can be constructed for any values of m and n (i.e. any number of layers). The efficient configurations are equivalent to Fabry-Pérot cavities that depend on the relationship between m and n and the mirrors in two sides of these cavities can be periodic or nonperiodic. The conversion efficiencies of these designed PhCCs are more than 5 orders of magnitude higher than the perfect ones which satisfy photonic bandgap edge and quasi-phase matching. Moreover, the results reveal that conversion efficiencies of Fabry-Pérot cavities with non-periodic mirrors are one order of magnitude higher than those with periodic mirrors. The major physical mechanisms of the enhancement are quasi-phase matching effect, cavity effect induced by dispersive mirrors, and double resonance for the pump and the harmonic fields in defect state. We believe that this method is very beneficial to the design of high-efficient compact optical frequency converters.

  1. Double diffusion in arbitrary porous cavity: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamad, N. Ameer; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Salman Ahmed N., J.; Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.; Khan, T. M. Yunus

    2017-07-01

    Heat and mass transfer in porous medium is one of the fundamental topics of interest. The present article is dedicated to study the effect of a small block placed at center of left vertical surface of the cavity. The block is maintained at isothermal temperature That three of its edges attached with porous medium. The left surface of cavity is maintained at highest concentration and right surface at lowest concentration. The right surface of cavity is at cold isothermal temperature Tc. Governing equations are converted into matrix form of equations with the help of finite element method and solved iteratively by using a computer code generated in MATLAB.

  2. High-efficiency frequency doubling of continuous-wave laser light.

    PubMed

    Ast, Stefan; Nia, Ramon Moghadas; Schönbeck, Axel; Lastzka, Nico; Steinlechner, Jessica; Eberle, Tobias; Mehmet, Moritz; Steinlechner, Sebastian; Schnabel, Roman

    2011-09-01

    We report on the observation of high-efficiency frequency doubling of 1550 nm continuous-wave laser light in a nonlinear cavity containing a periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate crystal (PPKTP). The fundamental field had a power of 1.10 W and was converted into 1.05 W at 775 nm, yielding a total external conversion efficiency of 95±1%. The latter value is based on the measured depletion of the fundamental field being consistent with the absolute values derived from numerical simulations. According to our model, the conversion efficiency achieved was limited by the nonperfect mode matching into the nonlinear cavity and by the nonperfect impedance matching for the maximum input power available. Our result shows that cavity-assisted frequency conversion based on PPKTP is well suited for low-decoherence frequency conversion of quantum states of light.

  3. Striped double-cavity Fabry-Perot interferometers using both glass and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goosman, David R.; Steinmetz, Lloyd L.; Perry, Stephen J.

    1999-06-01

    We have used piezo-driven Fabry-Perot interferometers in the past for many continuous velocity-time measurements of fast moving surfaces. In order to avoid the annoying drift of some of these devices, we have developed and used inexpensive, solid glass, striped etalons with lengths up to 64 mm. Useable apertures are 35 mm by 80 mm with a finess of 25. A roundabout technique was devised for double cavity operation. We built a passive thermal housing for temperature stability, with tilt and height adjustments. We have also developed and used our first fixed etalon air-spaced cavity with a rotatable glass double-cavity insert. The rotation allows the referee cavity fractional order to be adjusted separately from that of the main cavity. It needs very little thermal protection, and eliminates the need for a roundabout scheme for double cavity operation, but is more costly than the solid glass version. For a cavity with an air length H, glass length T, index n and wavelength (lambda) , the fringe angles are (root)j(lambda) /(H+T/n) where j is the fractional order plus an integer. This means double cavity fringe patterns plotted vs. velocity will cross if both air and glass are part of the system. This crossing, which is an advantage, will not occur for pure glass or pure air systems. The velocity per fringe is given by c(lambda) /4[H+T(n- (lambda) dn/d(lambda) )] where dn/d(lambda) is the derivative of index with respect to wavelengths. This expression therefore includes the effects of dispersion in the glass. Because the angle depends upon T/n and the velocity upon Tn, there is no equivalent air cavity for a given glass cavity. Very high quality glass is preferable to air, since for a given velocity per fringe, the fringe separation is larger for glass cavities, resulting in less finess degradation due to streak camera spatial resolution.

  4. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic High Frequency Axisymmetric Cavity Scars.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt

    2014-10-01

    This report examines the localization of high frequency electromagnetic fi elds in three-dimensional axisymmetric cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This report treats both the case where the opposing sides, or mirrors, are convex, where there are no interior foci, and the case where they are concave, leading to interior foci. The scalar problem is treated fi rst but the approximations required to treat the vector fi eld components are also examined. Particular att ention is focused on the normalization through the electromagnetic energy theorem. Both projections of the fi eld along the scarred orbit as well as point statistics are examined. Statistical comparisons are m ade with a numerical calculation of the scars run with an axisymmetric simulation. This axisymmetric cas eformstheoppositeextreme(wherethetwomirror radii at each end of the ray orbit are equal) from the two -dimensional solution examined previously (where one mirror radius is vastly di ff erent from the other). The enhancement of the fi eldontheorbitaxiscanbe larger here than in the two-dimensional case. Intentionally Left Blank

  5. The influence of finite and infinite wall cavities on the sound insulation of double-leaf walls.

    PubMed

    Cambridge, Jason E; Davy, John L; Pearse, John

    2017-01-01

    Theories used to predict the sound insulation of double-leaf cavity wall systems are usually based on the assumption that the wall is of an infinite extent. To account for the effect of the finite extent of the wall, limiting the angle of incidence, a finite radiation efficiency model or the spatial windowing method is used in order to obtain realistic predictions. However, the effects of the finite extent of the cavity are often not included. This paper presents an extension of a finite two-dimensional cavity theory to include limp panels on each side of the cavity. It is shown that the oblique incidence mass-air-mass resonance can only occur for certain frequencies and certain angles of incidence. This is the reason why the infinite extent theories under-predict the sound insulation. The results of the predicted sound insulation agree with measurements when the wall cavity is empty. To obtain agreement when the cavity is full of a porous sound absorbing material, a flow resistivity of about one-fifth of the measured value has to be used. Use of the actual flow resistivity gives sound insulation values that are 10 dB too high.

  6. A kind of magnetron cavity used in rubidium atomic frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiyu, Yang; Jingzhong, Cui; Jianhui, Tu; Yaoting, Liang

    2011-12-01

    Research on the magnetron cavity used in the rubidium atomic frequency standards is developed, through which the main characteristic parameters of the magnetron cavity are studied, mainly including the resonant frequency, quality factor and oscillation mode. The resonant frequency and quality factor of the magnetron cavity were calculated, and the test results of the resonant frequency agreed well with the calculation theory. The test results also show that the resonant frequency of the magnetron cavity can be attenuated to 6.835 GHz, which is the resonant frequency of the rubidium atoms, and the Q-factor can be attenuated to 500-1000. The oscillation mode is a typical TE011 mode and is the correct mode needed for the rubidium atomic frequency standard. Therefore these derivative magnetron cavities meet the requirements of the rubidium atomic frequency standards well.

  7. Steady-state mechanical squeezing in a double-cavity optomechanical system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong-Yang; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2016-01-01

    We study the physical properties of double-cavity optomechanical system in which the mechanical resonator interacts with one of the coupled cavities and another cavity is used as an auxiliary cavity. The model can be expected to achieve the strong optomechanical coupling strength and overcome the optomechanical cavity decay, simultaneously. Through the coherent auxiliary cavity interferences, the steady-state squeezing of mechanical resonator can be generated in highly unresolved sideband regime. The validity of the scheme is assessed by numerical simulation and theoretical analysis of the steady-state variance of the mechanical displacement quadrature. The scheme provides a platform for the mechanical squeezing beyond the resolved sideband limit and solves the restricted experimental bounds at present. PMID:27917939

  8. Frequency stability measurement of a transfer-cavity-stabilized diode laser by using an optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetake, S.; Matsubara, K.; Ito, H.; Hayasaka, K.; Hosokawa, M.

    2009-10-01

    We report results of frequency stability measurements of an extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) whose frequency is stabilized by a non-evacuated scanning transfer cavity. The transfer cavity is locked to a commercial frequency stabilized helium-neon laser. Frequency stability is measured by use of an optical frequency comb. The environmental perturbations (variations of temperature, air pressure, and humidity) are also simultaneously measured. The observed frequency drift of the ECDL is well explained by environmental perturbations. An atmospheric pressure variation, which is difficult to control with a non-evacuated cavity, is mainly affected to the frequency stability. Thus we put the cavity into a simple O-ring sealed (non-evacuated) tube. With this simple O-ring sealed tube, the frequency drift is reduced by a factor of 3, and the Allan variance reaches a value of 2.4×10-10, corresponds to the frequency stability of 83 kHz, at the average time of 3000 s. Since the actual frequency drift is well estimated by simultaneous measurement of the ambient temperature, pressure, and humidity, a feed-forward compensation of frequency drifts is also feasible in order to achieve a higher frequency stability with a simple non-evacuated transfer cavity.

  9. Multiphysics Analysis of Frequency Detuning in Superconducting RF Cavities for Proton Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Awida, M. H.; Gonin, I.; Passarelli, D.; Sukanov, A.; Khabiboulline, T.; Yakovlev, V.

    2016-01-22

    Multiphysics analyses for superconducting cavities are essential in the course of cavity design to meet stringent requirements on cavity frequency detuning. Superconducting RF cavities are the core accelerating elements in modern particle accelerators whether it is proton or electron machine, as they offer extremely high quality factors thus reducing the RF losses per cavity. However, the superior quality factor comes with the challenge of controlling the resonance frequency of the cavity within few tens of hertz bandwidth. In this paper, we investigate how the multiphysics analysis plays a major role in proactively minimizing sources of frequency detuning, specifically; microphonics and Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD) in the stage of RF design of the cavity and mechanical design of the niobium shell and the helium vessel.

  10. Double Brillouin frequency spaced multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser with 50 nm tuning range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. F.; Liao, T. Q.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, R. X.; Miao, C. Y.; Tong, Z. R.

    2012-09-01

    A 50 nm tuning range multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser (MWBEFL) with double Brillouin frequency spacing is presented. Two separated gain blocks with symmetrical architecture, consisted by erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) and Brillouin gain media, are used to generate double Brillouin frequency spacing. The wider tuning range is realized by eliminating the self-lasing cavity modes existing in conventional MWBEFLs because of the absence of the physical mirrors at the ends of the linear cavity. The Brillouin pump (BP) is preamplified by the EDFA before entering the single-mode fiber (SMF), which leads to the reduction of threshold power and the generation enhancement of Brillouin Stokes (BS) signals. Four channels with 0.176 nm spacing are achieved at 2 mW BP power and 280 mW 980 nm pump power which can be tuned from 1525 to 1575 nm.

  11. Efficient frequency doubling of a mode-locked diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Maker, G.T.; Ferguson, A.I. )

    1989-09-18

    We report on high-efficiency frequency doubling of a mode-locked diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser to 532 nm in a crystal of MgO:LiNbO{sub 3} in an external enhancement ring cavity. At a pump power of 500 mW the mode-locked Nd:YAG laser produced an average power of 66 mW incident on the enhancement cavity in pulses of 12 ps duration at a repetition rate of 366 MHz. This has been frequency doubled with a conversion efficiency of 53% to produce pulses at 532 nm of 35 mW average power in bandwidth-limited pulses of 9.5 ps duration.

  12. Self-determining high-frequency oscillation from an external-cavity laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Émeric; Uy, Chi-Hak; Weicker, Lionel; Virte, Martin; Wolfersberger, Delphine; Sciamanna, Marc

    2016-12-01

    We report on a bifurcation mechanism following which an external-cavity laser diode emits regular oscillating output power at a high frequency. This frequency does not vary with the external-cavity length and it can be adjusted by varying the feedback strength. We observe this phenomenon numerically by investigating the external-cavity modes generated by a semiconductor laser subject to a phase-conjugate optical feedback. Particularly, we explore the effects of both the feedback rate and the time delay induced by the feedback on the frequency of the external-cavity modes. Counterintuitively, we evidence that having a short cavity does not necessarily yield oscillations at higher frequencies. We show that the key parameter in order to generate high-frequency solutions is the feedback rate. This parameter fixes the frequency of the solutions obtained independently of the time delay. We finally relate our observations to Hopf bifurcation phenomena.

  13. Frequency stabilization of a diode-laser-pumped CW neodymium-doped yttrium vanadate intracavity-doubled solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carty, Timothy; Honda, Tokuyuki; Matsumoto, Hirokazu

    1993-07-01

    A Brewster plate and a KTiOPO4 crystal are placed inside a laser-diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 solid-state laser cavity to cause single-frequency oscillation of the 1.06 micron CW transition. The second-harmonic frequency generated by the KTP crystal is locked to an iodine absorption line at room temperature. Difficulties with intracavity frequency doubling and the observation of intensity and frequency hysteresis during cavity length modulation are discussed.

  14. Double diffusion in arbitrary porous cavity: Part III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamad, N. Ameer; Salman Ahmed N., J.; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Khan, T. M. Yunus; Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.

    2017-07-01

    Investigation of heat and mass transfer in a porous cavity is carried out with respect to a small block placed at top corner of cavity along its left vertical surface. The block is heated isothermally to temperature Th and right vertical surface is maintained at isothermal temperature Tc. The left vertical surface is maintained at constant concentration Ch and right vertical surface at Cc such that Ch>Cc. The governing equations are non-dimensionalised and converted into simpler form of algebraic equations to facilitate its solution. It is found that the heat and mass transfer behaviour is substantially different from the case of block placed at bottom or at the center of left vertical surface.

  15. Near-infrared lasers and self-frequency-doubling in Nd:YCOB cladding waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yingying; Chen, Feng; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R

    2013-05-06

    A design of cladding waveguides in Nd:YCOB nonlinear crystals is demonstrated in this work. Compact Fabry-Perot oscillation cavities are employed for waveguide laser generation at 1062 nm and self-frequency-doubling at 531 nm, under optical pump at 810 nm. The waveguide laser shows slope efficiency as high as 55% at 1062 nm. The SFD green waveguide laser emits at 531 nm with a maximum power of 100 μW.

  16. High-efficiency YSGG:Cr,Nd laser with radiation frequency doubling in a KTP crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Iakonov, G. I.; Maslov, V. A.; Mikhailov, V. A.; Pak, S. K.; Semenenko, V. N.

    1989-08-01

    The lasing characteristics of a pulsed YSSG:Cr,Nd laser with polarizational dumping of the radiation from the cavity and with frequency conversion into the second harmonic in a KTP crystal are investigated. At the second-harmonic frequency, an efficiency of about 1 percent was obtained at a mean output power of about 6 W and a monopulse output energy of about 0.12 J. A frequency doubling efficiency of about 80 percent was achieved in the KTP crystal under pumping by radiation with a homogeneous intensity distribution over the beam cross section.

  17. Cryogenic test of double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC High luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, B.; Alberty, L.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Cullen, C.; Capatina, O.; Hammons, L.; Li, Z.; Marques, C.; Skaritka, J.; Verdu-Andres, S.; Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109. We report the test results of this design.

  18. Realization of a double-barrier resonant tunneling diode for cavity polaritons.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H S; Vishnevsky, D; Sturm, C; Tanese, D; Solnyshkov, D; Galopin, E; Lemaître, A; Sagnes, I; Amo, A; Malpuech, G; Bloch, J

    2013-06-07

    We report on the realization of a double-barrier resonant tunneling diode for cavity polaritons, by lateral patterning of a one-dimensional cavity. Sharp transmission resonances are demonstrated when sending a polariton flow onto the device. We show that a nonresonant beam can be used as an optical gate and can control the device transmission. Finally, we evidence distortion of the transmission profile when going to the high-density regime, signature of polariton-polariton interactions.

  19. Cavity-photon-switched coherent transient transport in a double quantum waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf Gudmundsson, Vidar; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei

    2014-12-21

    We study a cavity-photon-switched coherent electron transport in a symmetric double quantum waveguide. The waveguide system is weakly connected to two electron reservoirs, but strongly coupled to a single quantized photon cavity mode. A coupling window is placed between the waveguides to allow electron interference or inter-waveguide transport. The transient electron transport in the system is investigated using a quantum master equation. We present a cavity-photon tunable semiconductor quantum waveguide implementation of an inverter quantum gate, in which the output of the waveguide system may be selected via the selection of an appropriate photon number or “photon frequency” of the cavity. In addition, the importance of the photon polarization in the cavity, that is, either parallel or perpendicular to the direction of electron propagation in the waveguide system is demonstrated.

  20. Adiabatic transfer of light in a double cavity and the optical Landau-Zener problem

    SciTech Connect

    Miladinovic, N.; Hasan, F.; Linnington, I. E.; O'Dell, D. H. J.; Chisholm, N.; Hinds, E. A.

    2011-10-15

    We analyze the evolution of an electromagnetic field inside a double cavity when the difference in length between the two cavities is changed, e.g., by translating the common mirror. We find that this allows photons to be moved deterministically from one cavity to the other. We are able to obtain the conditions for adiabatic transfer by first mapping the Maxwell wave equation for the electric field onto a Schroedinger-like wave equation and then using the Landau-Zener result for the transition probability at an avoided crossing. Our analysis reveals that this mapping only rigorously holds when the two cavities are weakly coupled (i.e., in the regime of a highly reflective common mirror) and that, generally speaking, care is required when attempting a Hamiltonian description of cavity electrodynamics with time-dependent boundary conditions.

  1. Frequency stability of maser oscillators operated with cavity Q. [hydrogen and rubidium masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tetu, M.; Tremblay, P.; Lesage, P.; Petit, P.; Audoin, C.

    1982-01-01

    The short term frequency stability of masers equipped with an external feedback loop to increase the cavity quality factor was studied. The frequency stability of a hydrogen and a rubidium maser were measured and compared with theoretical evaluation. It is shown that the frequency stability passes through an optimum when the cavity Q is varied. Long term fluctuations are discussed and the optimum mid term frequency stability achievably by small size active and passive H-masers is considered.

  2. A water-filled radio frequency accelerating cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Faehl, R.J.; Keinigs, R.K.; Pogue, E.W.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to study water-filled resonant cavities as a high-energy density source to drive high-current accelerator configurations. Basic considerations lead to the expectation that a dielectric-filled cavity should be able to store up to e/e{sub o} as much energy as a vacuum one with the same dimensions and thus be capable of accelerating a proportionately larger amount of charge before cavity depletion occurs. During this project, we confirmed that water-filled cavities with e/e{sub o} = 60-80 did indeed behave with the expected characteristics, in terms of resonant TM modes and cavity Q. We accomplished this result with numerical cavity eigenvalue codes; fully electromagnetic, two-dimensional, particle-in-cell codes; and, most significantly, with scaled experiments performed in water-filled aluminum cavities. The low-power experiments showed excellent agreement with the numerical results. Simulations of the high-field, high-current mode of operation indicated that charged-particle loss on the dielectric windows, which separate the cavity from the beamline, must be carefully controlled to avoid significant distortion of the axial fields.

  3. Dynamics of a driven two-level atom coupled to a frequency-tunable cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Swain, S.

    1998-08-01

    A cavity-modified master equation is derived for a coherently driven two-level atom coupled to a single-mode cavity in the bad cavity limit, in which the cavity frequency is tuned to either the center or one of the sidebands of the Mollow triplet. The atomic populations in both the bare- and dressed-state representations are analyzed in terms of the cavity-modified transition rates. In the bare-state basis, the role of the cavity may be interpreted as enhancing the stimulated absorption of the atom while suppressing the stimulated emission. The bare-state population may thus be inverted under appropriate conditions. The dressed-state inversion, however, originates from the enhancement of the atom-cavity interaction when the cavity is resonant with the atomic dressed-state transition. We show that two-phase quadratures of the atomic polarization decay at different rates. The decay of the in-phase (or out-of-phase) quadrature may be greatly inhibited as the driving intensity increases, depending on the cavity resonant frequency. The spectrum of the atomic fluorescence emitted out the side of the cavity is also studied. The spectral profiles are sensitive to the cavity frequency. When the cavity frequency is tuned to the center of the Mollow resonances, the fluorescence spectrum is symmetrical with three peaks whose linewidths and heights are intensity dependent. When the cavity frequency is tuned to one of the Mollow sidebands, however, it is asymmetric, and the central peak and the sideband on resonance with the cavity can be significantly suppressed for strong driving fields. All three spectral lines can be narrowed by increasing the Rabi frequency. The physics of these striking spectral features is explored in the dressed-state basis. We also investigate the probe absorption spectrum. When the cavity frequency is tuned to the center of the Mollow fluorescence triplet, the central component exhibits a Lorentzian line shape, while the side bands show the Rayleigh

  4. Compact, low power radio frequency cavity for femtosecond electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lassise, A.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; Luiten, O. J.

    2012-04-15

    Reported here is the design, construction, and characterization of a small, power efficient, tunable dielectric filled cavity for the creation of femtosecond electron bunches in an existing electron microscope without the mandatory use of femtosecond lasers. A 3 GHz pillbox cavity operating in the TM{sub 110} mode was specially designed for chopping the beam of a 30 keV scanning electron microscope. The dielectric material used is ZrTiO{sub 4}, chosen for the high relative permittivity ({epsilon}{sub r}= 37 at 10 GHz) and low loss tangent (tan {delta}= 2 x 10{sup -4}). This allows the cavity radius to be reduced by a factor of six, while the power consumption is reduced by an order of magnitude compared to a vacuum pillbox cavity. These features make this cavity ideal as a module for existing electron microscopes, and an alternative to femtosecond laser systems integrated with electron microscopes.

  5. Compact, low power radio frequency cavity for femtosecond electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lassise, A; Mutsaers, P H A; Luiten, O J

    2012-04-01

    Reported here is the design, construction, and characterization of a small, power efficient, tunable dielectric filled cavity for the creation of femtosecond electron bunches in an existing electron microscope without the mandatory use of femtosecond lasers. A 3 GHz pillbox cavity operating in the TM(110) mode was specially designed for chopping the beam of a 30 keV scanning electron microscope. The dielectric material used is ZrTiO(4), chosen for the high relative permittivity (ε(r) = 37 at 10 GHz) and low loss tangent (tan δ = 2 × 10(-4)). This allows the cavity radius to be reduced by a factor of six, while the power consumption is reduced by an order of magnitude compared to a vacuum pillbox cavity. These features make this cavity ideal as a module for existing electron microscopes, and an alternative to femtosecond laser systems integrated with electron microscopes.

  6. Non-intrusive Diagnosis of Individual Cell Frequencies in a Coupled Cavity Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yi

    1997-05-01

    When tuning an accelerating cavity chain, the cell frequency must be measured cell by cell by inserting probes into the cavity. This process takes a very long time for long multicell or non-uniform chains. Moreover, the frequencies within a sealed cavity or a superconducting cavity in a liquid helium bath can not be diagnosed by inserting a probe. A method has been developed to estimate the frequency of each cell and neighbor couplings without introducing a probe into the cavity chain. This methold is based on the information obtained from an RF network analyzer. The data analysis program combines the Newton and Simplex methods;therefore, the program can accept a wide range of initial data, converges quickly.This program has been tested by experimental results and can be used as substitution for the measurements of accelerating cavity chain.

  7. Nonlinear frequency mixing in a resonant cavity: numerical simulations in a bubbly liquid.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé; Sinha, Dipen N

    2014-12-01

    The study of nonlinear frequency mixing for acoustic standing waves in a resonator cavity is presented. Two high frequencies are mixed in a highly nonlinear bubbly liquid filled cavity that is resonant at the difference frequency. The analysis is carried out through numerical experiments, and both linear and nonlinear regimes are compared. The results show highly efficient generation of the difference frequency at high excitation amplitude. The large acoustic nonlinearity of the bubbly liquid that is responsible for the strong difference-frequency resonance also induces significant enhancement of the parametric frequency mixing effect to generate second harmonic of the difference frequency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Resonant Optomechanics with a Vibrating Carbon Nanotube and a Radio-Frequency Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, N.; Pei, T.; Mavalankar, A.; Mergenthaler, M.; Warner, J. H.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Laird, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    In an optomechanical setup, the coupling between cavity and resonator can be increased by tuning them to the same frequency. We study this interaction between a carbon nanotube resonator and a radio-frequency tank circuit acting as a cavity. In this resonant regime, the vacuum optomechanical coupling is enhanced by the dc voltage coupling the cavity and the mechanical resonator. Using the cavity to detect the nanotube's motion, we observe and simulate interference between mechanical and electrical oscillations. We measure the mechanical ring down and show that further improvements to the system could enable the measurement of mechanical motion at the quantum limit.

  9. Resonant Optomechanics with a Vibrating Carbon Nanotube and a Radio-Frequency Cavity.

    PubMed

    Ares, N; Pei, T; Mavalankar, A; Mergenthaler, M; Warner, J H; Briggs, G A D; Laird, E A

    2016-10-21

    In an optomechanical setup, the coupling between cavity and resonator can be increased by tuning them to the same frequency. We study this interaction between a carbon nanotube resonator and a radio-frequency tank circuit acting as a cavity. In this resonant regime, the vacuum optomechanical coupling is enhanced by the dc voltage coupling the cavity and the mechanical resonator. Using the cavity to detect the nanotube's motion, we observe and simulate interference between mechanical and electrical oscillations. We measure the mechanical ring down and show that further improvements to the system could enable the measurement of mechanical motion at the quantum limit.

  10. Response of a store with tunable natural frequencies in compressible cavity flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell W.; Henfling, John F.

    2016-05-20

    Fluid–structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage were experimentally explored at Mach 0.58–1.47 using a generic, aerodynamic store installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of seven. The store vibrated in response to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionally dependent response to cavity resonance frequencies. Cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas the spanwise response to cavity tones was much more limited. Increased surface area associated with tail fins raised vibration levels. The store had interchangeable components to vary its natural frequencies by about 10–300 Hz. By tuning natural frequencies, mode-matched cases were explored where a prominent cavity tone frequency matched a structural natural frequency of the store. Mode matching in the streamwise and wall-normal directions produced substantial increases in peak store vibrations, though the response of the store remained linear with dynamic pressure. Near mode-matched frequencies, changes in cavity tone frequencies of only 1% altered store peak vibrations by as much as a factor of two. In conclusion, mode matching in the spanwise direction did little to increase vibrations.

  11. Response of a store with tunable natural frequencies in compressible cavity flow

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; ...

    2016-05-20

    Fluid–structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage were experimentally explored at Mach 0.58–1.47 using a generic, aerodynamic store installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of seven. The store vibrated in response to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionally dependent response to cavity resonance frequencies. Cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas the spanwise response to cavity tones was much more limited. Increased surface area associated with tail fins raised vibration levels. The store had interchangeable components to vary its natural frequencies bymore » about 10–300 Hz. By tuning natural frequencies, mode-matched cases were explored where a prominent cavity tone frequency matched a structural natural frequency of the store. Mode matching in the streamwise and wall-normal directions produced substantial increases in peak store vibrations, though the response of the store remained linear with dynamic pressure. Near mode-matched frequencies, changes in cavity tone frequencies of only 1% altered store peak vibrations by as much as a factor of two. In conclusion, mode matching in the spanwise direction did little to increase vibrations.« less

  12. Response of a store with tunable natural frequencies in compressible cavity flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell W.; Henfling, John F.

    2016-05-20

    Fluid–structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage were experimentally explored at Mach 0.58–1.47 using a generic, aerodynamic store installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of seven. The store vibrated in response to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionally dependent response to cavity resonance frequencies. Cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas the spanwise response to cavity tones was much more limited. Increased surface area associated with tail fins raised vibration levels. The store had interchangeable components to vary its natural frequencies by about 10–300 Hz. By tuning natural frequencies, mode-matched cases were explored where a prominent cavity tone frequency matched a structural natural frequency of the store. Mode matching in the streamwise and wall-normal directions produced substantial increases in peak store vibrations, though the response of the store remained linear with dynamic pressure. Near mode-matched frequencies, changes in cavity tone frequencies of only 1% altered store peak vibrations by as much as a factor of two. In conclusion, mode matching in the spanwise direction did little to increase vibrations.

  13. Frequency selection mechanisms in the flow of a laminar boundary layer over a shallow cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadri, Ubaid Ali; Schmid, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the flow over shallow cavities as a representative configuration for modeling small surface irregularities in wall-bounded shear flows. Due to the globally stable nature of the flow, we perform a frequency response analysis, which shows a significant potential for the amplification of disturbance kinetic energy by harmonic forcing within a certain frequency band. Shorter and more shallow cavities exhibit less amplified responses, while energy from the base flow can be extracted predominantly from forcing that impacts the cavity head on. A structural sensitivity analysis, combined with a componentwise decomposition of the sensitivity tensor, reveals the regions of the flow that act most effectively as amplifiers. We find that the flow inside the cavity plays a negligible role, whereas boundary layer modifications immediately upstream and downstream of the cavity edges contribute significantly to the frequency response. The same regions constitute preferred locations for implementing active or passive control strategies to manipulate the frequency response of the flow.

  14. Higher order mode filter design for double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC high luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, B.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burt, G.; Calaga, R.; Capatina, O.; Hall, B.; Jones, T.; Skaritka, J.; Verdu-Andres, S.; Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    A Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A compact Higher Order Mode (HOM) filter with wide stop band at the deflecting mode is developed for this cavity. Multiphysics finite element simulation results are presented. The integration of this design to the cavity cryomodule is described.

  15. Three-dimensional self-consistent simulations of multipacting in superconducting radio frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Chet Nieter

    2010-12-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are a popular choice among researchers designing new accelerators because of the reduced power losses due to surface resistance. However, SRF cavities still have unresolved problems, including the loss of power to stray electrons. Sources of these electrons are field emission from the walls and ionization of background gas, but the predominant source is secondary emission yield (SEY) from electron impact. When the electron motion is in resonance with the cavity fields the electrons strike the cavity surface repeatedly creating a resonant build up of electrons referred to as multipacting. Cavity shaping has successfully reduced multipacting for cavities used in very high energy accelerators. However, multipacting is still a concern for the cavity power couplers, where shaping is not possible, and for cavities used to accelerate particles at moderate velocities. This Phase II project built upon existing models in the VORPAL simulation framework to allow for simulations of multipacting behavior in SRF cavities and their associated structures. The technical work involved allowed existing models of secondary electron generation to work with the complex boundary conditions needed to model the cavity structures. The types of data produced by VORPAL were also expanded to include data common used by cavity designers to evaluate cavity performance. Post-processing tools were also modified to provide information directly related to the conditions that produce multipacting. These new methods were demonstrated by running simulations of a cavity design being developed by researchers at Jefferson National Laboratory to attempt to identify the multipacting that would be an issue for the cavity design being considered. These simulations demonstrate that VORPAL now has the capabilities to assist researchers working with SRF cavities to understand and identify possible multipacting issues with their cavity designs.

  16. Qualification of niobium materials for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications: View of a condensed matter physicist

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S. B.; Myneni, G. R.

    2015-12-04

    We address the issue of qualifications of the niobium materials to be used for superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavity fabrications, from the point of view of a condensed matter physicist/materials scientist. We focus on the particular materials properties of niobium required for the functioning a SCRF cavity, and how to optimize the same properties for the best SCRF cavity performance in a reproducible manner. In this way the niobium materials will not necessarily be characterized by their purity alone, but in terms of those materials properties, which will define the limit of the SCRF cavity performance and also other related material properties, which will help to sustain this best SCRF cavity performance. Furthermore we point out the need of standardization of the post fabrication processing of the niobium-SCRF cavities, which does not impair the optimized superconducting and thermal properties of the starting niobium-materials required for the reproducible performance of the SCRF cavities according to the design values.

  17. High-power dual-wavelength external-cavity diode laser based on tapered amplifier with tunable terahertz frequency difference.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mingjun; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2011-07-15

    Tunable dual-wavelength operation of a diode laser system based on a tapered diode amplifier with double-Littrow external-cavity feedback is demonstrated around 800 nm. The two wavelengths can be tuned individually, and the frequency difference of the two wavelengths is tunable from 0.5 to 5.0 THz. An output power of 1.54 W is achieved with a frequency difference of 0.86 THz, the output power is higher than 1.3 W in the 5.0 THz range of frequency difference, and the amplified spontaneous emission intensity is more than 20 dB suppressed in the range of frequency difference. To our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a dual-wavelength diode laser system operating with tunable terahertz frequency difference. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. Narrow linewidth single-frequency terahertz source based on difference frequency generation of vertical-external-cavity source-emitting lasers in an external resonance cavity.

    PubMed

    Paul, Justin R; Scheller, Maik; Laurain, Alexandre; Young, Abram; Koch, Stephan W; Moloney, Jerome

    2013-09-15

    We demonstrate a continuous wave, single-frequency terahertz (THz) source emitting 1.9 THz. The linewidth is less than 100 kHz and the generated THz output power exceeds 100 μW. The THz source is based on parametric difference frequency generation within a nonlinear crystal located in an optical enhancement cavity. Two single-frequency vertical-external-cavity source-emitting lasers with emission wavelengths spaced by 6.8 nm are phase locked to the external cavity and provide pump photons for the nonlinear downconversion. It is demonstrated that the THz source can be used as a local oscillator to drive a receiver used in astronomy applications.

  19. Selective engineering of cavity resonance for frequency matching in optical parametric processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiyuan; Rogers, Steven; Jiang, Wei C.; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-13

    We propose to selectively engineer a single cavity resonance to achieve frequency matching for optical parametric processes in high-Q microresonators. For this purpose, we demonstrate an approach, selective mode splitting (SMS), to precisely shift a targeted cavity resonance, while leaving other cavity modes intact. We apply SMS to achieve efficient parametric generation via four-wave mixing in high-Q silicon microresonators. The proposed approach is of great potential for broad applications in integrated nonlinear photonics.

  20. Thermal Noise Limit in Frequency Stabilization of Lasers with Rigid Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with t.he direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency- reference cavity of order 1 Hz/square root Hz(0.01 Hz/square root Hz) at 10 mHz (100 Hz) at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results.

  1. Thermal Noise Limit in Frequency Stabilization of Lasers with Rigid Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity Used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with the direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency-reference cavity of order 1 Hz/rtHz at 10mHz at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results.

  2. Study of influence of radial matcher section end shape on RFQ cavity frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhou-Li; He, Yuan; Zhang, Bin; Li, De-Run; Shi, Ai-Min; Pan, Gang; Du, Xiao-Nan; Sun, Lie-Peng

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using a form cutter to machine the Radial Matcher Section (RMS) of the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) for the Accelerator Driven System (ADS) project at Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP, CAS), the influence of RMS end shape on the RFQ cavity frequency is studied. The results indicate that using a form cutter to machine the RMS of an RFQ will indeed influence the cavity frequency. The RMS end shape will give more influence to a shorter RFQ cavity. For the 4.2 m ADS RFQ, the influence is negligible, which means that a form cutter can be used to machine the RMS.

  3. Thermal Noise Limit in Frequency Stabilization of Lasers with Rigid Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with t.he direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency- reference cavity of order 1 Hz/square root Hz(0.01 Hz/square root Hz) at 10 mHz (100 Hz) at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results.

  4. Thermal Noise Limit in Frequency Stabilization of Lasers with Rigid Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity Used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with the direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency-reference cavity of order 1 Hz/rtHz at 10mHz at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results.

  5. Self-Frequency-Doubling Glass-Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selker, Mark D.; Dallas, Joseph L.

    1993-01-01

    Specially prepared germanium and phosphorous-doped glass optical fiber doped with neodymium shown to act as self-frequency-doubling laser. Self-frequency-doubling fiber laser with further refinements, eliminates need for expensive, easily damaged, nonlinear crystals currently used. Enables one to avoid loss and damage mechanisms associated with interfaces of nonlinear crystals as well as to eliminate angle/temperature phase-matching tuning.

  6. Spatial frequency doubling - Retinal or central. [visual illusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W.; Felton, T. B.

    1973-01-01

    When a wide field is sinusoidally modulated both in space and in time, the spatial frequency of the pattern will appear doubled at high rates of modulation. Kelly (1966) proposed that this illusion is due to temporal integration of the nonlinear brightness response of the visual system. The anatomical locus of this temporal integrator is uncertain, and could be subcortical. Results indicate that spatial frequency doubling follows binocular disparity detection and is thus a cortical phenomenon.

  7. Spatial frequency doubling - Retinal or central. [visual illusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W.; Felton, T. B.

    1973-01-01

    When a wide field is sinusoidally modulated both in space and in time, the spatial frequency of the pattern will appear doubled at high rates of modulation. Kelly (1966) proposed that this illusion is due to temporal integration of the nonlinear brightness response of the visual system. The anatomical locus of this temporal integrator is uncertain, and could be subcortical. Results indicate that spatial frequency doubling follows binocular disparity detection and is thus a cortical phenomenon.

  8. Nonlinear Cavity and Frequency Comb Radiations Induced by Negative Frequency Field Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourés, Cristian Redondo; Faccio, Daniele; Biancalana, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Optical Kerr frequency combs (KFCs) are an increasingly important optical metrology tool with applications ranging from ultraprecise spectroscopy to time keeping. KFCs may be generated in compact resonators with extremely high quality factors. Here, we show that the same features that lead to high quality frequency combs in these resonators also lead to an enhancement of nonlinear emissions that may be identified as originating from the presence of a negative frequency (NF) component in the optical spectrum. While the negative frequency component of the spectrum is naturally always present in the real-valued optical field, it is not included in the principal theoretical model used to model nonlinear cavities, i.e., the Lugiato-Lefever equation. We therefore extend these equations in order to include the contribution of NF components and show that the predicted emissions may be studied analytically, in excellent agreement with full numerical simulations. These results are of importance for a variety of fields, such as Bose-Einstein condensates, mode-locked lasers, nonlinear plasmonics, and polaritonics.

  9. Nonlinear Cavity and Frequency Comb Radiations Induced by Negative Frequency Field Effects.

    PubMed

    Lourés, Cristian Redondo; Faccio, Daniele; Biancalana, Fabio

    2015-11-06

    Optical Kerr frequency combs (KFCs) are an increasingly important optical metrology tool with applications ranging from ultraprecise spectroscopy to time keeping. KFCs may be generated in compact resonators with extremely high quality factors. Here, we show that the same features that lead to high quality frequency combs in these resonators also lead to an enhancement of nonlinear emissions that may be identified as originating from the presence of a negative frequency (NF) component in the optical spectrum. While the negative frequency component of the spectrum is naturally always present in the real-valued optical field, it is not included in the principal theoretical model used to model nonlinear cavities, i.e., the Lugiato-Lefever equation. We therefore extend these equations in order to include the contribution of NF components and show that the predicted emissions may be studied analytically, in excellent agreement with full numerical simulations. These results are of importance for a variety of fields, such as Bose-Einstein condensates, mode-locked lasers, nonlinear plasmonics, and polaritonics.

  10. Compact two wavelength Brillouin fiber laser sensor with double Brillouin frequency spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Mingjiang; Zhang, Jianzhong; Han, Hong; Yi, Xiaogang; Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-12-01

    A compact two wavelength Brillouin fiber laser (BFL) sensor with double Brillouin frequency spacing is proposed and demonstrated. In the experiment, 20 m polarization maintaining fiber is used as the sensing element and Brillouin gain medium. This short cavity configuration not only guarantees single longitudinal mode operation of two Stokes wavelengths, but also can effectively reduce external perturbations, complexity and noise of BFL in the absence of an erbium-doped fiber amplifier in intra-cavity. In experiment, about 2 MHz/°C sensitivity of beat frequency between the pump and the 2nd-order Stokes wavelength keep in good agreement with the theoretical value. Meanwhile, 0.2 °C temperature stability and  ±0.1 dB power fluctuation are better than the traditional structure. The system is simple and stable, making it convenient for more applications.

  11. Design and test of the microwave cavity in an optically-pumped Rubidium beam frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Yan-Hui

    2015-01-01

    We are developing a compact rubidium atomic beam frequency standard with optical pumping and detection. The cavity for microwave interrogation is an important part of the clock. The cavity in our design is a Ramsey-type, E-bend one, which is the same as the conventional method in most cesium beam clocks. Requirements for the design are proposed based on the frequency shift associated with the cavity. The basic structure of the cavity is given by theoretical analysis and detailed dimensions are determined by means of electromagnetic field simulation with the help of commercial software. The cavity is manufactured and fabricated successfully. The preliminary test result of the cavity is given, which is in good agreement with the simulation. The resonant frequency is 6.835 GHz, equal to the clock transition frequency of 87Rb, and the loaded quality factor is 500. These values are adjustable with posts outside the cavity. Estimations on the Ramsey line width and several frequency shifts are made. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174015).

  12. Frequency switched narrow linewidth microwave signal photonic generation based on a double-Brillouin-frequency spaced fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Tianshu; Jia, Qingsong; Sun, Hongwei; Dong, Keyan; Liu, Xin; Kong, Mei; Jiang, Huilin

    2014-04-10

    A simple photonic approach to generate microwave frequency switched microwave signal is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In this scheme, a Brillouin fiber laser with double-Brillouin-frequency spacing is used. The Brillouin ring configuration suppresses incoming Brillouin pump and even-order Stokes signals in the cavity. In addition, it also allows propagation of the odd-order Brillouin Stokes signals from configuration to output coupler. A dual-wavelength optical signal is heterodyned at the high-speed photodetector to produce a microwave signal. Frequency switched microwave signals, at 10.75 and 21.39 GHz, respectively, can be obtained through adjusting the polarization controller (PC) and loss of the variable optical attenuator (VOA).

  13. Response of a store with tunable natural frequencies in compressible cavity flow

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; ...

    2015-01-07

    Fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage were experimentally explored at Mach 0.94 and 1.47 using a generic, aerodynamic store installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 7. Similar to previous studies using a cylindrical store, the aerodynamic store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionally dependent response to cavity resonance. Moreover, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas the spanwise response was much more limited.

  14. Quantum dots lasers dynamics under the influence of double cavity external feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, S. S.; Oloinic, T.; Tronciu, V. Z.

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports results on investigations of the dynamical behavior of a semiconductor laser with quantum dots active medium under the influence of a feedback from double external cavity. This configuration is treated in the framework of Lang-Kobayashi equations. The locus of external cavity modes is found to be elliptic, as in case of conventional optical feedback, but also represents different shapes, even with possible satellite bubbles. A bifurcation analysis is carried out revealing the points of saddle-node and Hopf bifurcations. Finally, the nature of bifurcations and the stability of steady state solutions are analyzed in dependence on different parameters.

  15. Tunable two-photon correlation in a double-cavity optomechanical system

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhi-Bo; Zhang, Jian-Qi

    2015-12-15

    Correlated photons are essential sources for quantum information processing. We propose a practical scheme to generate pairs of correlated photons in a controllable fashion from a double-cavity optomechanical system, where the variable optomechanical coupling strength makes it possible to tune the photon correlation at our will. The key operation is based on the repulsive or attractive interaction between the two photons intermediated by the mechanical resonator. The present protocol could provide a potential approach to coherent control of the photon correlation using the optomechanical cavity.

  16. A single-frequency, diode-pumped Nd:YLF laser at 657 nm: a frequency and intensity noise comparison with an extended cavity diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez Portela, M.; Wetter, N. U.; Zondy, J. J.; Cruz, F. C.

    2013-02-01

    We report on a continuous wave, diode-pumped, intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YLF (yttrium lithium fluoride) single-frequency ring laser designed for high-resolution spectroscopy of the calcium intercombination transition at 657 nm. We measured its frequency modulation (FM) and amplitude modulation (AM) noise and compared it with an extended cavity diode laser (ECDL). The Nd:YLF laser has much lower FM noise, extending to 50 kHz in comparison with 5 MHz for the ECDL, and slightly higher AM noise, transferred from the pump diode laser. This characterization is important for the design of servo-systems for frequency or intensity stabilization, and also for quantum optics experiments. A Nd:YLF laser at 657 nm can become an attractive high-power ‘local oscillator’ for a calcium optical clock, with a fundamental ‘telecom wavelength’ that can be directly used for remote transfer in optical fibers.

  17. QED in a time-dependent double cavity and creation of entanglement between noninteracting atoms via quantum eraser technique

    SciTech Connect

    Cirone, Markus A.; Rzazewski, Kazimierz

    1999-03-11

    We discuss two striking features of quantum mechanics: The concepts of vacuum and of entanglement. We first study the radiation field inside a double cavity (a cavity which contains a reflecting mirror). If the mirror is rapidly removed, peculiar quantum phenomena, such as photon creation from vacuum and squeezing, occur. We discuss then a gedanken experiment which employs the double cavity to create entanglement between two atoms. The atoms cross the double cavity and interact with its two independent radiation fields. After the atoms leave the cavity, the mirror is suddenly removed. Measurement of the radiation field inside the cavity can give rise to entanglement between the atoms. The method can be extended to an arbitrary number of atoms, providing thus an N-particle GHZ state.

  18. Coherent Phonon Rabi Oscillations with a High-Frequency Carbon Nanotube Phonon Cavity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dong; Wang, Xin-He; Kong, Wei-Cheng; Deng, Guang-Wei; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Jiang, Kai-Li; Dai, Xing-Can; Guo, Guang-Can; Nori, Franco; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2017-02-08

    Phonon-cavity electromechanics allows the manipulation of mechanical oscillations similar to photon-cavity systems. Many advances on this subject have been achieved in various materials. In addition, the coherent phonon transfer (phonon Rabi oscillations) between the phonon cavity mode and another oscillation mode has attracted many interest in nanoscience. Here, we demonstrate coherent phonon transfer in a carbon nanotube phonon-cavity system with two mechanical modes exhibiting strong dynamical coupling. The gate-tunable phonon oscillation modes are manipulated and detected by extending the red-detuned pump idea of photonic cavity electromechanics. The first- and second-order coherent phonon transfers are observed with Rabi frequencies 591 and 125 kHz, respectively. The frequency quality factor product fQm ∼ 2 × 10(12) Hz achieved here is larger than kBTbase/h, which may enable the future realization of Rabi oscillations in the quantum regime.

  19. A method to measure the frequencies of individual half cells in a dumbbell cavity.

    PubMed

    An, Sun; Liping, Zhang; Yazhe, Tang; Li, Ying-min; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2008-10-01

    Dumbbell fabrication is a midprocess for manufacturing an elliptical superconducting rf cavity. In order to understand how a welding shrinkage affects a dumbbell's frequencies and length, we need to measure the exact frequencies of each individual half cell of a dumbbell. To improve such a calculation precision and to simplify the calculation formulae, based on a two-coupled oscillator model and a cavity perturbation theory, a new formula to calculate the individual half-cell frequencies of a dumbbell or the individual cavity frequencies of a two-cavity coupling system has been developed, and its performance has been confirmed by using a dumbbell simulation. This formula can be applied to any kind of rf cavities with electric, magnetic, or electromagnetic coupling, if a coupling hole between two coupling cavities is small compared to the wavelength. Compared to other calculation formulae, this formula simplifies the calculation process of the individual resonator frequencies of a coupling system considerably, and it can also improve the calculation precision than that of a normal calculation method. Another advantage of this new method is that we do not need to consider a coupling factor between two resonators during a testing for an individual resonator frequency of an oscillator. The developed formula has been successfully used to tune the PEFP dumbbells.

  20. Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity Field Profile Analysis and Higher Order Mode Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Carlos; Xiao, B. P.; Belomestnykh, S.

    2014-06-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is underway for a major upgrade to increase its luminosity by an order of magnitude beyond its original design specifications. This novel machine configuration known as the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on various innovative technologies including very compact and ultra-precise superconducting crab cavities for beam rotation. A double quarter wave crab cavity (DQWCC) has been designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the HL-LHC. This cavity as well as the structural support components were fabricated and assembled at Niowave. The field profile of the crabbing mode for the DQWCC was investigated using a phase shift bead pulling technique and compared with simulated results to ensure proper operation or discover discrepancies from modeled results and/or variation in fabrication tolerances. Higher-Order Mode (HOM) characterization was also performed and correlated with simulations.

  1. L-band double Brillouin frequency spaced tunable multiwavelength Brillouin fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Tianshu; Jia, Qingsong; Dong, Keyan

    2014-12-01

    A tunable multi-wavelength Brillouin fiber laser with double Brillouin frequency spacing based on a four-port circulator is experimentally demonstrated. The fiber laser configuration formed by four-port circulator isolates the odd-order Brillouin stokes signal to circulate within the cavity only. In addition, it also allows propagation of the incoming Brillouin pump and even-order Stokes signals from four-port circulator to output coupler .A L-band erbiumdoped fiber (EDF) with 1480nm pump is used to amplify Stokes signals and to get more output channels. At the Brillouin pump power of 8dBm and the 1480 nm pump power of 200mw, 5 output channels with double Brillouin frequency spacing and tuning range of 20 nm from 1568nm to 1588nm are achieved.

  2. A high power, continuous-wave, single-frequency fiber amplifier at 1091 nm and frequency doubling to 545.5 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stappel, M.; Steinborn, R.; Kolbe, D.; Walz, J.

    2013-07-01

    We present a high power single-frequency ytterbium fiber amplifier system with an output power of 30 W at 1091 nm. The amplifier system consists of two stages, a preamplifier stage in which amplified spontaneous emission is efficiently suppressed (>40 dB) and a high power amplifier with an efficiency of 52%. Two different approaches to frequency doubling are compared. We achieve 8.6 W at 545.5 nm by single-pass frequency doubling in a MgO-doped periodically poled stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystal and up to 19.3 W at 545.5 nm by frequency doubling with a lithium-triborate crystal in an external enhancement cavity.

  3. Hyperparallel optical quantum computation assisted by atomic ensembles embedded in double-sided optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-08-01

    We propose an effective, scalable, hyperparallel photonic quantum computation scheme in which photonic qubits are hyperencoded both in the spatial degrees of freedom (DOF) and the polarization DOF of each photon. The deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-cnot) gate on a two-photon system is attainable with our interesting interface between the polarized photon and the collective spin wave (magnon) of an atomic ensemble embedded in a double-sided optical cavity, and it doubles the operations in the conventional quantum cnot gate. Moreover, we present a compact hyper-cnotN gate on N +1 hyperencoded photons with only two auxiliary cavity-magnon systems, not more, and it can be faithfully constituted with current experimental techniques. Our proposal enables various applications with the hyperencoded photons in quantum computing and quantum networks.

  4. Double-diffusive natural convection in a fluid saturated porous cavity with a freely convecting wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nithiarasu, P.; Sundararajan, T.; Seetharamu, K.N.

    1997-12-01

    Double-diffusive natural convection in fluid saturated porous medium has been investigated using a generalized porous medium model. One of the vertical walls of the porous cavity considered is subjected to convective heat and mass transfer conditions. The results show that the flow, heat and mass transfer become sensitive to applied mass transfer coefficient in both the Darcy and non-Darcy flow regimes. It is also observed that the Sherwood number approaches a constant value as the solutal Biot number increases. Double-diffusive natural convection in fluid saturated porous medium is encountered in applications such as food processing, contaminant transport in ground water, and others.

  5. Frequency doubling of copper lasers using temperature-tuned ADP

    SciTech Connect

    Molander, W.A.

    1994-03-01

    The ability to generate high average power uv at 255 nm by frequency doubling the green line (510.6 nm) of copper lasers would greatly extend the utility of copper lasers. Material processing and microlithography are two areas of interest. The frequency-doubled copper laser could replace the KrF excimer laser, which has a similar wavelength (248 nm), in some applications. The frequency-doubled copper laser has a narrow linewidth and excellent beam quality at a competitive cost. Other attractive features are high reliability, low operating costs, and the absence of toxic gases. This paper will report recent progress in high-efficiency, high-average-power harmonic generation of the copper laser green line using noncritical phase matching in ADP. Frequency doubling of the yellow line (578.2 nm) and sum-frequency mixing of the two lines are also of interest. These processes, however, cannot be phase-matched in ADP and, therefore, will not be discussed here. The results reported and the issues identified here would be important in these other processes and also in many other frequency conversion schemes in the uv such as 4{omega} conversion of Nd{sup 3+}:YAG lasers.

  6. Two-frequency injection on a multimode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Pierce, David W; Basnet, Amod J; Quirce, Ana; Zhang, Yu; Valle, Angel

    2011-11-07

    We have studied experimentally effects of two-frequency optical injection on a multimode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The injected signal comes from another VCSEL. Polarization switching (PS) with and without frequency locking occurs for relatively small frequency detuning. Outside the regime of polarization switching, the VCSEL demonstrates two types of instabilities. The instability regions and boundaries of PS of each transverse mode are mapped in the parameter plane of frequency detuning versus injected power.

  7. Experimental investigation of combustion mechanisms of kerosene-fueled scramjet engines with double-cavity flameholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu; Tan, Jian-Guo; Liang, Jian-Han; Liu, Wei-Dong; Wang, Zhen-Guo

    2011-12-01

    A scramjet combustor with double cavitybased flameholders was experimentally studied in a directconnected test bed with the inflow conditions of M = 2.64, P t = 1.84MPa, T t = 1 300 K. Successful ignition and self-sustained combustion with room temperature kerosene was achieved using pilot hydrogen, and kerosene was vertically injected into the combustor through 4×ϕ0.5mm holes mounted on the wall. For different equivalence ratios and different injection schemes with both tandem cavities and parallel cavities, flow fields were obtained and compared using a high speed camera and a Schlieren system. Results revealed that the combustor inside the flow field was greatly influenced by the cavity installation scheme, cavities in tandem easily to form a single side flame distribution, and cavities in parallel are more likely to form a joint flame, forming a choked combustion mode. The supersonic combustion flame was a kind of diffusion flame and there were two kinds of combustion modes. In the unchoked combustion mode, both subsonic and supersonic combustion regions existed. While in the choked mode, the combustion region was fully subsonic with strong shock propagating upstream. Results also showed that there was a balance point between the boundary separation and shock enhanced combustion, depending on the intensity of heat release.

  8. Steady flows in rotating spherical cavity excited by multi-frequency oscillations of free inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Victor G.; Kozlov, Nikolai V.; Subbotin, Stanislav V.

    2017-01-01

    Fluid motion in a rotating spherical cavity in the conditions of resonant oscillations of free inner core is experimentally investigated. The centrifugal force retains a solid core with density less than the fluid density near the center of the cavity. In the absence of external force field the system "solid core - liquid" performs solid body rotation. The oscillations of the core are excited by an external oscillating force field and this results in differential rotation of the core with respect to the cavity. The direction of rotation is determined by the ratio of the oscillation frequency to the cavity angular velocity. The core oscillations with the radian frequency, which exceeds the cavity angular velocity, are investigated. It is found that a steady flow in the form of a system of nested fluid columns of circular cross section, which rotate at different angular velocities, is generated in the cavity as a result of oscillations of the core and the fluid. It is shown that at simultaneous influence of several oscillating fields the resulting steady flow is determined by a linear superposition of the flows, which are excited by the oscillations of the inner core with different frequencies. At a certain ratio of the vibration frequency to the rotation one the transformation of the circular shape of the column into the elliptical one is observed.

  9. Laser cooling of beryllium ions using a frequency-doubled 626 nm diode laser.

    PubMed

    Cozijn, F M J; Biesheuvel, J; Flores, A S; Ubachs, W; Blume, G; Wicht, A; Paschke, K; Erbert, G; Koelemeij, J C J

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate laser cooling of trapped beryllium ions at 313 nm using a frequency-doubled extended cavity diode laser operated at 626 nm, obtained by cooling a ridge waveguide diode laser chip to -31°C. Up to 32 mW of narrowband 626 nm laser radiation is obtained. After passage through an optical isolator and beam shaping optics, 14 mW of 626 nm power remains of which 70% is coupled into an external enhancement cavity containing a nonlinear crystal for second-harmonic generation. We produce up to 35 μW of 313 nm radiation, which is subsequently used to laser cool and detect 6×10(2) beryllium ions, stored in a linear Paul trap, to a temperature of about 10 mK, as evidenced by the formation of Coulomb crystals. Our setup offers a simple and affordable alternative for Doppler cooling, optical pumping, and detection to presently used laser systems.

  10. Experimental observation of coherent cavity soliton frequency combs in silica microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Karen E.; Erkintalo, Miro; Coen, Stéphane; Murdoch, Stuart G.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the experimental observation of coherent cavity soliton frequency combs in silica microspheres. Specifically, we demonstrate that careful alignment of the microsphere relative to the coupling fiber taper allows for the suppression of higher-order spatial modes, reducing mode interactions and enabling soliton formation. Our measurements show that the temporal cavity solitons have sub-100-fs durations, exhibit considerable Raman self-frequency shift, and generally come in groups of three or four, occasionally with equidistant spacing in the time domain. RF amplitude noise measurements and spectral interferometry confirm the high coherence of the observed soliton frequency combs, and numerical simulations show good agreement with experiments.

  11. High-frequency limit of the longitudinal impedance of an array of cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heifets, S. A.; Kheifets, S. A.

    1989-02-01

    The longitudinal impedance of an array of cylindrically symmetric cavities connected by side pipes is estimated in the high-frequency limit. The expression for the impedance is obtained for an arbitrary number of cavities. The transition from the case of a single cavity to a periodic structure is studied. The impedance per cell decreases with frequency ω as ω-1/2 for a small number of cells. For a large number of cells the impedance decreases as ω-1/2 or as ω-3/2 depending on a certain relation between the frequency and the number of cells. The parameter which governs the transition from one regime to the other is found. In particular, for the infinite periodic structure there is only the second regime and the impedance decreases as ω-3/2 for all frequencies.

  12. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; He, Min; Wang, Zhibiao E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Song, Dan; Lei, Guangrong; Lin, Zhou; Zhang, Dong E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Wu, Junru

    2015-12-15

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  13. Laser nitriding for niobium superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Senthilraja Singaravelu, John Klopf, Gwyn Williams, Michael Kelley

    2010-10-01

    Particle accelerators are a key tool for scientific research ranging from fundamental studies of matter to analytical studies at light sources. Cost-forperformance is critical, both in terms of initial capital outlay and ongoing operating expense, especially for electricity. It depends on the niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities at the heart of most of these machines. Presently Nb SRF cavities operate near 1.9 K, well (and expensively) below the 4.2 K atmospheric boiling point of liquid He. Transforming the 40 nm thick active interior surface layer from Nb to delta NbN (Tc = 17 K instead of 9.2 K) appears to be a promising approach. Traditional furnace nitriding appears to have not been successful for this. Further, exposing a complete SRF cavity to the time-temperature history required for nitriding risks mechanical distortion. Gas laser nitriding instead has been applied successfully to other metals [P.Schaaf, Prog. Mat. Sci. 47 (2002) 1]. The beam dimensions and thermal diffusion length permit modeling in one dimension to predict the time course of the surface temperature for a range of per-pulse energy densities. As with the earlier work, we chose conditions just sufficient for boiling as a reference point. We used a Spectra Physics HIPPO nanosecond laser (l = 1064 nm, Emax= 0.392 mJ, beam spot@ 34 microns, PRF =15 – 30 kHz) to obtain an incident fluence of 1.73 - 2.15 J/cm2 for each laser pulse at the target. The target was a 50 mm diameter SRF-grade Nb disk maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 550 – 625 torr and rotated at a constant speed of 9 rpm. The materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM images show a sharp transition with fluence from a smooth, undulating topography to significant roughening, interpreted here as the onset of ablation. EPMA measurements of N/Nb atom ratio as a function of depth found a constant

  14. Broadband electron spin resonance at low frequency without resonant cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Z.; Suh, B.; Corti, M.; Cattaneo, L.; Hajny, D.; Borsa, F.; Luban, M.

    2008-04-09

    We have developed a nonconventional broadband electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer operating continuously in the frequency range from 0.5 to 9 GHz. Dual antenna structure and the microwave absorbing environment differentiate the setup from the conventional one and enable broadband operation with any combination of frequency or magnetic field modulation and frequency or magnetic field sweeping. Its performance has been tested with the measurements on a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) sample and with the measurements on the single molecular magnet, V6, in solid state at low temperature.

  15. Two-tone frequency-modulation spectroscopy in off-axis cavity.

    PubMed

    Malara, P; Witinski, M F; Gagliardi, G; De Natale, P

    2013-11-15

    As opposed to a conventional optical resonator, an off-axis-aligned cavity is able to transmit without distortion radiation modulated at a frequency even far above the cavity bandpass. This allows us to implement a simple spectroscopic technique that combines the cavity path-length enhancement of integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) and the noise reduction associated with radio-frequency modulation (FM). An FM-ICOS spectrometer is demonstrated for the first time using a two-tone modulation technique. The performance is compared to the traditional ICOS by examining the acetylene absorption at 1543.77 nm. A signal-to-noise ratio improvement by a factor 3.5 is found with our proof-of-concept setup. Larger improvements are expected in a more optimized setup.

  16. Adaptive frequency comb illumination for interferometry in the case of nested two-beam cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, Irina; Leuchs, Gerd; Mantel, Klaus; Schwider, Johannes

    2011-09-01

    The homogeneity test of glass plates in a Fizeau interferometer is hampered by the superposition of multiple interference signals coming from the surfaces of the glass plate as well as the empty Fizeau cavity. To evaluate interferograms resulting from such nested cavities, various approaches such as the use of broadband light sources have been applied. In this paper, we propose an adaptive frequency comb interferometer to accomplish the cavity selection. An adjustable Fabry-Perot resonator is used to generate a variable frequency comb that can be matched to the length of the desired cavity. Owing to its flexibility, the number of measurements needed for the homogeneity test can be reduced to four. Furthermore, compared to approaches using a two-beam interferometer as a filter for the broadband light source, the visibility of the fringe system is considerably higher if a Fabry-Perot filter is applied.

  17. Frequency response enhancement in integrated coupled-cavity DBR lasers.

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Alford, Charles Fred; Skogen, Erik J.; Chow, Weng Wah; Cajas, Florante G.; Overberg, Mark E.; Torres, David L.; Yang, Zhenshan; Peake, Gregory Merwin

    2010-11-01

    We present a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) composed of two strongly coupled lasers. This PIC utilizes the dynamics of mutual injection locking to increase the relaxation resonance frequency from 3 GHz to beyond 30 GHz.

  18. Radio frequency regenerative oscillations in monolithic high-Q/V heterostructured photonic crystal cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jinghui E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu; Gu, Tingyi E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu; Zheng, Jiangjun; Wei Wong, Chee; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guo-Qiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee

    2014-02-10

    We report temporal and spectral domain observation of regenerative oscillation in monolithic silicon heterostructured photonic crystals cavities with high quality factor to mode volume ratios (Q/V). The results are interpreted by nonlinear coupled mode theory (CMT) tracking the dynamics of photon, free carrier population, and temperature variations. We experimentally demonstrate effective tuning of the radio frequency tones by laser-cavity detuning and laser power levels, confirmed by the CMT simulations with sensitive input parameters.

  19. Frequency-selection mechanism in incompressible open-cavity flows via reflected instability waves.

    PubMed

    Tuerke, F; Sciamarella, D; Pastur, L R; Lusseyran, F; Artana, G

    2015-01-01

    We present an alternative perspective on nonharmonic mode coexistence, commonly found in the shear layer spectrum of open-cavity flows. Modes obtained by a local linear stability analysis of perturbations to a two-dimensional, incompressible, and inviscid sheared flow over a cavity of finite length and depth were conditioned by a so-called coincidence condition first proposed by Kulikowskii [J. Appl. Math. Mech. 30, 180 (1966)] which takes into account instability wave reflection within the cavity. The analysis yields a set of discrete, nonharmonic frequencies, which compare well with experimental results [Phys. Fluids 20, 114101 (2008); Exp. Fluids 50, 905 (2010)].

  20. Thermal analysis and test of SUNLITE reference cavity for laser frequency stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    SUNLITE is a space-based experiment which uses a reference cavity to provide a stable frequency reference for a terahertz laser oscillator. Thermal stability of the cavity is a key factor in attaining a stable narrow-linewidth laser beam. This paper describes the thermal stability requirements on the cavity design and detailed thermal analysis performed, as well as thermal testing that was performed on a prototype. Analytical thermal models were correlated to the test data and additional modeling of the current design is presented. Suggestions for improving similar high-precision thermal tests are given.

  1. Role of thermal resistance on the performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2017-03-01

    Thermal stability is an important parameter for the operation of the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in particle accelerators. The rf power dissipated on the inner surface of the cavities is conducted to the helium bath cooling the outer cavity surface and the equilibrium temperature of the inner surface depends on the thermal resistance. In this manuscript, we present the results of direct measurements of thermal resistance on 1.3 GHz single cell SRF cavities made from high purity large-grain and fine-grain niobium as well as their rf performance for different treatments applied to outer cavity surface in order to investigate the role of the Kapitza resistance to the overall thermal resistance and to the SRF cavity performance. The results show no significant impact of the thermal resistance to the SRF cavity performance after chemical polishing, mechanical polishing or anodization of the outer cavity surface. Temperature maps taken during the rf test show nonuniform heating of the surface at medium rf fields. Calculations of Q0(Bp) curves using the thermal feedback model show good agreement with experimental data at 2 and 1.8 K when a pair-braking term is included in the calculation of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer surface resistance. These results indicate local intrinsic nonlinearities of the surface resistance, rather than purely thermal effects, to be the main cause for the observed field dependence of Q0(Bp) .

  2. Role of thermal resistance on the performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2017-03-07

    Thermal stability is an important parameter for the operation of the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in particle accelerators. The rf power dissipated on the inner surface of the cavities is conducted to the helium bath cooling the outer cavity surface and the equilibrium temperature of the inner surface depends on the thermal resistance. In this manuscript, we present the results of direct measurements of thermal resistance on 1.3 GHz single cell SRF cavities made from high purity large-grain and fine-grain niobium as well as their rf performance for different treatments applied to outer cavity surface in order tomore » investigate the role of the Kapitza resistance to the overall thermal resistance and to the SRF cavity performance. The results show no significant impact of the thermal resistance to the SRF cavity performance after chemical polishing, mechanical polishing or anodization of the outer cavity surface. Temperature maps taken during the rf test show nonuniform heating of the surface at medium rf fields. Calculations of Q0(Bp) curves using the thermal feedback model show good agreement with experimental data at 2 and 1.8 K when a pair-braking term is included in the calculation of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer surface resistance. In conclusion, these results indicate local intrinsic nonlinearities of the surface resistance, rather than purely thermal effects, to be the main cause for the observed field dependence of Q0(Bp).« less

  3. Development of Ultra High Gradient and High Q{sub 0} Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Rongli; Clemens, William A.; Follkie, James E.; Harris, Teena M.; Kushnick, Peter W.; Machie, Danny; Martin, Robert E.; Palczewski, Ari D.; Perry, Era A.; Slack, Gary L.; Williams, R. S.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Hao, J. K.; Li, Y. M.; Liu, K. X.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the recent progress at Jefferson Lab in developing ultra high gradient and high Q{sub 0} superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for future SRF based machines. A new 1300 MHz 9-cell prototype cavity is being fabricated. This cavity has an optimized shape in terms of the ratio of the peak surface field (both magnetic and electric) to the acceleration gradient, hence the name low surface field (LSF) shape. The goal of the effort is to demonstrate an acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m with Q{sub 0} of 10{sup 10} at 2 K in a 9-cell SRF cavity. Fine-grain niobium material is used. Conventional forming, machining and electron beam welding method are used for cavity fabrication. New techniques are adopted to ensure repeatable, accurate and inexpensive fabrication of components and the full assembly. The completed cavity is to be first mechanically polished to a mirror-finish, a newly acquired in-house capability at JLab, followed by the proven ILC-style processing recipe established already at JLab. In parallel, new single-cell cavities made from large-grain niobium material are made to further advance the cavity treatment and processing procedures, aiming for the demonstration of an acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m with Q{sub 0} of 2-10{sup 10} at 2K.

  4. Frequency characterization of a swept- and fixed-wavelength external-cavity quantum cascade laser by use of a frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Knabe, Kevin; Williams, Paul A; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R; Armacost, Chris M; Crivello, Sam; Radunsky, Michael B; Newbury, Nathan R

    2012-05-21

    The instantaneous optical frequency of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser (QCL) is characterized by comparison to a near-infrared frequency comb. Fluctuations in the instantaneous optical frequency are analyzed to determine the frequency-noise power spectral density for the external-cavity QCL both during fixed-wavelength and swept-wavelength operation. The noise performance of a near-infrared external-cavity diode laser is measured for comparison. In addition to providing basic frequency metrology of external-cavity QCLs, this comb-calibrated swept QCL system can be applied to rapid, precise broadband spectroscopy in the mid-infrared spectral region.

  5. Observation of frequency doubling in tantalum doped silica fibres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, T. J.; Lawandy, N. M.; Killian, A.; Rienhart, L.; Morse, T. F.

    1991-01-01

    Second harmonic conversion efficients of 3 x 0,0001 in tantalum-doped silica fibers prepared by the seeding technique are reported. A series of experiments were conducted to characterize the frequency doubling in this fiber and to compare the results to the behavior observed in germanosilicate and rare earth-doped aluminosilicate fibers.

  6. Observation of frequency doubling in tantalum doped silica fibres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, T. J.; Lawandy, N. M.; Killian, A.; Rienhart, L.; Morse, T. F.

    1991-01-01

    Second harmonic conversion efficients of 3 x 0,0001 in tantalum-doped silica fibers prepared by the seeding technique are reported. A series of experiments were conducted to characterize the frequency doubling in this fiber and to compare the results to the behavior observed in germanosilicate and rare earth-doped aluminosilicate fibers.

  7. Radio-frequency identification of surgical sponges in the abdominal cavity of pigs.

    PubMed

    Wiederkehr, Julio Cesar; Gama, Ricardo R; Wiederkehr, Henrique A; Stelmasuk, Kleber; Carvalho, Caroline A; Wiederkehr, Barbara A

    2014-06-01

    Counting the sponges is an important step in surgical procedures. A miscount may impact the patient's health, and it also has legal implications for the surgeon. This is an experimental study evaluating radio-frequency technology used in the perioperative period to identify surgical sponges left in the peritoneal cavity of swine. Radio-frequency labeled-disc identification tags were sewn into 40 surgical towels. Twenty labels had the ability to emit radio-frequency waves, and 20 labels were inert to radio-frequency identification. Twenty adult pigs that underwent laparotomy and randomly received two surgical sponges were scanned by a radio-frequency identification antenna. This method presented a positive predictive value of 100% and 100% specificity and sensitivity, as all of the tagged surgical sponges were detected. Radio-frequency identification has been proved to be a useful method for the identification of surgical sponges within the abdominal cavities of swine.

  8. Frequency-stabilised external-cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Permyakova, O I; Yakovlev, A V; Chapovskii, Pavel L

    2005-05-31

    The design and characteristics of a semiconductor laser with the modified external Littrow resonator are described. The additional output mirror of the V-shaped resonator made the system more efficient and convenient. The laser radiation frequency is stabilised with the help of magnetooptical Faraday and circular dichroism effects in rubidium vapour. (diode lasers)

  9. Out-of-plane nanomechanical tuning of double-coupled one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Zhou, Guangya; Du, Yu; Chau, Fook Siong; Deng, Jie; Akkipeddi, Ramam

    2013-06-15

    We demonstrate tuning of double-coupled one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities by their out-of-plane nanomechanical deformations. The coupled cavities are pulled by the vertical electrostatic force generated by the potential difference between the device layer and the handle layer in a silicon-on-insulator chip, and the induced deformations are analyzed by the finite element method. Applied with a voltage of 12 V, the cavities obtain a redshift of 0.0405 nm (twice the linewidth) for their second-order odd resonance mode and a blueshift of 0.0635 nm (three times the linewidth) for their second-order even resonance mode, which are mainly attributed to out-of-plane relative displacement. Out-of-plane tuning of coupled cavities does not need actuators and corresponding circuits; thus the device is succinct and compact. This working principle can be potentially applied in chip-level optoelectronic devices, such as sensors, switches, routers, and tunable filters.

  10. a New Broadband Cavity Enhanced Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique Using GHz Vernier Filtering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morville, Jérôme; Rutkowski, Lucile; Dobrev, Georgi; Crozet, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    We present a new approach to Cavity Enhanced - Direct Frequency Comb Spectroscopy where the full emission bandwidth of a Titanium:Sapphire laser is exploited at GHz resolution. The technique is based on a low-resolution Vernier filtering obtained with an appreciable -actively stabilized- mismatch between the cavity Free Spectral Range and the laser repetition rate, using a diffraction grating and a split-photodiode. This particular approach provides an immunity to frequency-amplitude noise conversion, reaching an absorption baseline noise in the 10-9 cm-1 range with a cavity finesse of only 3000. Spectra covering 1800 cm-1 (˜ 55 THz) are acquired in recording times of about 1 second, providing an absorption figure of merit of a few 10-11 cm-1/√{Hz}. Initially tested with ambient air, we report progress in using the Vernier frequency comb method with a discharge source of small radicals. Rutkowski et al, Opt. Lett., 39(23)2014

  11. Cryogenic monocrystalline silicon Fabry-Perot cavity for the stabilization of laser frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, J.-P.; Hamilton, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    A 1.6 kg silicon monocrystal was used to make a Fabry-Perot optical cavity operated at cryogenic temperatures. High-resolution thermal expansion measurements were made as the silicon cooled to 4.2 K, in order to characterize the cavity as a length reference standard. A helium-neon laser was then locked to a transmission resonance at liquid-helium temperatures, and the laser frequency tracked the cavity resonance with error fluctuations at the level of 10 Hz/sq rt Hz in the bandwidth dc to 1 Hz. Implications of the combined set of data, thermal expansion plus frequency-tracking fluctuations, for using such a system as a frequency standard are discussed.

  12. Radio frequency accelerating cavity having slotted irises for damping certain electromagnetic modes

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1991-05-21

    An accelerating cavity is disclosed having one or more iris structures mounted therein for strongly damping unwanted frequencies that are generated in the cavity by bunches of particles in a particle beam that is accelerated through the cavity during its operation. Each of the iris structures is characterized by containing a plurality of radial slots therein that extend from the central aperture through the iris member to the perimeter thereof. The outer end of each of the radial slots includes an enlarged portion that is effective to prevent undesired frequencies from being reflected back into the center aperture of the iris member. Waveguide means connect the outer ends of the radial slots to frequency damping means or to a dump or dumps. 17 figures.

  13. Radio frequency accelerating cavity having slotted irises for damping certain electromagnetic modes

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    An accelerating cavity having one or more iris structures mounted therein for strongly damping unwanted frequencies that are generated in the cavity by bunches of particles in a particle beam that is accelerated through the cavity during its operation. Each of the iris structures is characterized by containing a plurality of radial slots therein that extend from the central aperture through the iris member to the perimeter thereof. The outer end of each of the radial slots includes an enlarged portion that is effective to prevent undesired frequencies from being reflected back into the center aperture of the iris member. Waveguide means connect the outer ends of the radial slots to frequency damping means or to a dump or dumps.

  14. Frequency control in the process of a multicell superconducting cavity production.

    PubMed

    Shemelin, Valery; Carriere, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Modifications in the geometry of a superconducting RF cavity due to various processing procedures are presented in a convenient matrix formulation. Specifically, the effect of chemical etching, cooling down, and preloading are characterized, while the corresponding frequency shifts are calculated with a reliable software. This matrix method was used in the fabrication of the first cornell energy recovery linac (ERL) 7-cell cavity. Cavity fabrication can be broken down into three main stages: deep-drawing cups, welding the cups in pairs to obtain "dumbbells" and end groups, and, finally, welding the obtained components into a completed cavity. Frequency measurements and precise machining were implemented after the second stage. A custom RF fixture and data acquisition system were designed and validated for this purpose. The system comprised of a mechanical press with RF contacts, a network analyzer, a load cell and custom LABVIEW and MATLAB scripts. To extract the individual frequencies of the cups from these measurements, the established algorithm of calculations was analysed and corrected. Corrections for the ambient environment were also incorporated into the measurement protocol. Using the procedure presented, the frequency deviation of the completed 1.3 GHz 7-cell cavity was 360 kHz, corresponding to an average error about 75 μm in length for every cell.

  15. Frequency control in the process of a multicell superconducting cavity production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelin, Valery; Carriere, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Modifications in the geometry of a superconducting RF cavity due to various processing procedures are presented in a convenient matrix formulation. Specifically, the effect of chemical etching, cooling down, and preloading are characterized, while the corresponding frequency shifts are calculated with a reliable software. This matrix method was used in the fabrication of the first cornell energy recovery linac (ERL) 7-cell cavity. Cavity fabrication can be broken down into three main stages: deep-drawing cups, welding the cups in pairs to obtain "dumbbells" and end groups, and, finally, welding the obtained components into a completed cavity. Frequency measurements and precise machining were implemented after the second stage. A custom RF fixture and data acquisition system were designed and validated for this purpose. The system comprised of a mechanical press with RF contacts, a network analyzer, a load cell and custom LABVIEW and MATLAB scripts. To extract the individual frequencies of the cups from these measurements, the established algorithm of calculations was analysed and corrected. Corrections for the ambient environment were also incorporated into the measurement protocol. Using the procedure presented, the frequency deviation of the completed 1.3 GHz 7-cell cavity was 360 kHz, corresponding to an average error about 75 μm in length for every cell.

  16. Transportable cavity-stabilized laser system for optical carrier frequency transmission experiments.

    PubMed

    Parker, B; Marra, G; Johnson, L A M; Margolis, H S; Webster, S A; Wright, L; Lea, S N; Gill, P; Bayvel, P

    2014-12-10

    We report the design and performance of a transportable laser system at 1543 nm, together with its application as the source for a demonstration of optical carrier frequency transmission over 118 km of an installed dark fiber network. The laser system is based around an optical reference cavity featuring an elastic mounting that bonds the cavity to its support, enabling the cavity to be transported without additional clamping. The cavity exhibits passive fractional frequency insensitivity to vibration along the optical axis of 2.0×10(-11)  m(-1) s(2). With active fiber noise cancellation, the optical carrier frequency transmission achieves a fractional frequency instability, measured at the user end, of 2.6×10(-16) at 1 s, averaging down to below 3×10(-18) after 20,000 s. The fractional frequency accuracy of the transfer is better than 3×10(-18). This level of performance is sufficient for comparison of state-of-the-art optical frequency standards and is achieved in an urban fiber environment.

  17. Diode-Pumped, Q-Switched, Frequency-Doubling Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental Q-switched, diode-pumped, intracavity-frequency-doubling laser generates pulses of radiation at wavelength of 532 nm from excitation at 810 nm. Principal innovative feature distinguishing laser from others of its type: pulsed operation of laser at pulse-repetition frequencies higher than reported previously. Folded resonator keeps most of second-harmonic radiation away from Q-switcher, laser crystal, and laser diodes. Folding mirror highly reflective at fundamental laser wavelength and highly transmissive at second-harmonic laser wavelength. By virtue of difference of about 0.6 percent between reflectivities in two polarizations at fundamental wavelength, folding mirror favors polarized oscillation at fundamental wavelength. This characteristic desirable for doubling of frequency in some intracavity crystals.

  18. High Quality Plasmonic Sensors Based on Fano Resonances Created through Cascading Double Asymmetric Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangao; Shao, Mingzhen; Zeng, Xiaoqi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a type of compact nanosensor based on a metal-insulator-metal structure is proposed and investigated through cascading double asymmetric cavities, in which their metal cores shift along different axis directions. The cascaded asymmetric structure exhibits high transmission and sharp Fano resonance peaks via strengthening the mutual coupling of the cavities. The research results show that with the increase of the symmetry breaking in the structure, the number of Fano resonances increase accordingly. Furthermore, by modulating the geometrical parameters appropriately, Fano resonances with high sensitivities to the changes in refractive index can be realized. A maximum figure of merit (FoM) value of 74.3 is obtained. Considerable applications for this work can be found in bio/chemical sensors with excellent performance and other nanophotonic integrated circuit devices such as optical filters, switches and modulators. PMID:27763539

  19. Double wavelet transform of frequency-modulated nonstationary signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhokin, S. V.; Suslova, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    A mathematical model is proposed for a frequency-modulated signal in the form of a system of Gaussian peaks randomly distributed in time. An analytic expression is obtained for continuous wavelet transform (CWT) of the model signal. For signals with time-varying sequence of peaks, the main ridge of the skeleton characterized by frequency ν{max/MFB} ( t) is analyzed. The value of ν{max/MFB} ( t) is determined for any instant t from the condition of the CWT maximum in the spectral range of the main frequency band (MFB). Double CWT of function ν{max/MFB} ( t) is calculated for a frequency-modulated signal with a transition regions of smooth frequency variation (trend) as well as with varying frequency oscillations relative to the trend. The duration of transition periods of the signal is determined using spectral integrals E ν( t). The instants of emergence and decay of low-frequency spectral components of the signal are determined. The double CWT method can be used for analyzing cardiac rhythms and neural activity, as well as nonstationary processes in quantum radio physics and astronomy.

  20. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Conditions for two-frequency lasing in coupled-cavity vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logginov, Aleksandr S.; Rzhanov, A. G.; Skorov, D. V.

    2007-06-01

    A self-consistent model of a semiconductor coup-led-cavity vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser is presented. The electromagnetic field distribution in the laser is found by the effective-frequency method. The dynamic model is constructed on coupled rate equations for two active cavities. Dynamic, threshold and spectral parameters of the laser are studied. The applicability of the model is confirmed by the good agreement with the experimental data available in the literature.

  1. Computational imaging using a mode-mixing cavity at microwave frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Fromenteze, Thomas; Decroze, Cyril; Carsenat, David; Yurduseven, Okan; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Gollub, Jonah; Smith, David R.

    2015-05-11

    We present a 3D computational imaging system based on a mode-mixing cavity at microwave frequencies. The core component of this system is an electrically large rectangular cavity with one corner re-shaped to catalyze mode mixing, often called a Sinai Billiard. The front side of the cavity is perforated with a grid of periodic apertures that sample the cavity modes and project them into the imaging scene. The radiated fields are scattered by the scene and are measured by low gain probe antennas. The complex radiation patterns generated by the cavity thus encode the scene information onto a set of frequency modes. Assuming the first Born approximation for scattering dynamics, the received signal is processed using computational methods to reconstruct a 3D image of the scene with resolution determined by the diffraction limit. The proposed mode-mixing cavity is simple to fabricate, exhibits low losses, and can generate highly diverse measurement modes. The imaging system demonstrated in this letter can find application in security screening and medical diagnostic imaging.

  2. Multiple harmonic frequencies resonant cavity design and half-scale prototype measurements for a fast kicker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yulu; Wang, Haipeng; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Shaoheng; Guo, Jiquan

    2016-12-01

    Quarter wavelength resonator (QWR) based deflecting cavities with the capability of supporting multiple odd-harmonic modes have been developed for an ultrafast periodic kicker system in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC, formerly MEIC). Previous work on the kicking pulse synthesis and the transverse beam dynamics tracking simulations show that a flat-top kicking pulse can be generated with minimal emittance growth during injection and circulation of the cooling electron bunches. This flat-top kicking pulse can be obtained when a DC component and 10 harmonic modes with appropriate amplitude and phase are combined together. To support 10 such harmonic modes, four QWR cavities are used with 5, 3, 1, and 1 modes, respectively. In the multiple-mode cavities, several slightly tapered segments of the inner conductor are introduced to tune the higher order deflecting modes to be harmonic, and stub tuners are used to fine tune each frequency to compensate for potential errors. In this paper, we summarize the electromagnetic design of the five-mode cavity, including the geometry optimization to get high transverse shunt impedance, the frequency tuning and sensitivity analysis, and the single loop coupler design for coupling to all of the harmonic modes. In particular we report on the design and fabrication of a half-scale copper prototype of this proof-of-principle five-odd-mode cavity, as well as the rf bench measurements. Finally, we demonstrate mode superposition in this cavity experimentally, which illustrates the kicking pulse generation concept.

  3. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical ingot niobium used in superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Dhavale Ashavai, Pashupati Dhakal, Anatolii A Polyanskii, Gianluigi Ciovati

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data were fitted using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples which implies a lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities.

  4. Ignition and monitoring technique for plasma processing of multicell superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Doleans, Marc

    2016-12-27

    In this study, an in-situ plasma processing technique has been developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to improve the performance of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities in operation. The technique uses a low-density reactive neon-oxygen plasma at room-temperature to improve the surface work function, to help remove adsorbed gases on the RF surface and to reduce its secondary emission yield. SNS SRF cavities are six-cell elliptical cavities and the plasma typically ignites in the cell where the electric field is the highest. This article will detail a technique that was developed to ignite and monitor the plasma in eachmore » cell of the SNS cavities.« less

  5. High-frequency RCS of open cavities with rectangular and circular cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Hao; Lee, Shung-Wu; Chou, Ri-Chee

    1989-01-01

    The radar cross-section (RCS) analysis of open-ended cavities with rectangular and circular cross sections is carried out using the waveguide modal approach and the shooting-and-bouncing ray (SBR) approach. For a cavity opening on the order of ten wavelengths or larger, the comparison between the two approaches is excellent. It is also observed that at lower frequencies the SBR results deviate from the more accurate modal results. On the other hand, the SBR approach allows for greater flexibility in geometrical modeling, and can be applied to problems where waveguide modes cannot be easily found. SBR results for an offset rectangular cavity and a circular cavity with rounded endplate are presented.

  6. High-frequency RCS of open cavities with rectangular and circular cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hao; Lee, Shung-Wu; Chou, Ri-Chee

    1989-05-01

    The radar cross-section (RCS) analysis of open-ended cavities with rectangular and circular cross sections is carried out using the waveguide modal approach and the shooting-and-bouncing ray (SBR) approach. For a cavity opening on the order of ten wavelengths or larger, the comparison between the two approaches is excellent. It is also observed that at lower frequencies the SBR results deviate from the more accurate modal results. On the other hand, the SBR approach allows for greater flexibility in geometrical modeling, and can be applied to problems where waveguide modes cannot be easily found. SBR results for an offset rectangular cavity and a circular cavity with rounded endplate are presented.

  7. Superconducting magnesium diboride coatings for radio frequency cavities fabricated by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolak, M. A.; Tan, T.; Krick, A.; Johnson, E.; Hambe, M.; Chen, Ke; Xi, X. X.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the coating of an inner surface of superconducting radio frequency cavities with a magnesium diboride thin film by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD). To simulate a 6 GHz rf cavity, a straight stainless steel tube of 1.5-inch inner diameter and a dummy stainless steel cavity were employed, on which small sapphire and metal substrates were mounted at different locations. The MgB2 films on these substrates showed uniformly good superconducting properties including Tc of 37-40 K, residual resistivity ratio of up to 14, and root-mean-square roughness Rq of 20-30 nm. This work demonstrates the feasibility of coating the interior of cylindrical and curved objects with MgB2 by the HPCVD technique, an important step towards superconducting rf cavities with MgB2 coating.

  8. Ignition and monitoring technique for plasma processing of multicell superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Doleans, Marc

    2016-12-27

    In this study, an in-situ plasma processing technique has been developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to improve the performance of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities in operation. The technique uses a low-density reactive neon-oxygen plasma at room-temperature to improve the surface work function, to help remove adsorbed gases on the RF surface and to reduce its secondary emission yield. SNS SRF cavities are six-cell elliptical cavities and the plasma typically ignites in the cell where the electric field is the highest. This article will detail a technique that was developed to ignite and monitor the plasma in each cell of the SNS cavities.

  9. InSb nanowire double quantum dots coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Deacon, R. S.; Car, D.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.; Ishibashi, K.

    2016-05-01

    By employing a micrometer precision mechanical transfer technique, we embed individual InSb nanowires into a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator. We investigate the characteristics of a double quantum dot formed in an InSb nanowire interacting with a single mode microwave field. The charge stability diagram can be obtained from the amplitude and phase response of the resonator independently from the dc transport measurement. As the charge transits between dot-dot, or dot-lead, the change of resonator transmission is compared and the charge-cavity coupling strength is extracted to be in the magnitude of several MHz.

  10. InSb nanowire double quantum dots coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R.; Deacon, R. S. Ishibashi, K.; Car, D.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.

    2016-05-16

    By employing a micrometer precision mechanical transfer technique, we embed individual InSb nanowires into a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator. We investigate the characteristics of a double quantum dot formed in an InSb nanowire interacting with a single mode microwave field. The charge stability diagram can be obtained from the amplitude and phase response of the resonator independently from the dc transport measurement. As the charge transits between dot-dot, or dot-lead, the change of resonator transmission is compared and the charge-cavity coupling strength is extracted to be in the magnitude of several MHz.

  11. Label-Free, Single Molecule Resonant Cavity Detection: A Double-Blind Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakova, Maria V.; Shi, Ce; Armani, Andrea M.

    2015-01-01

    Optical resonant cavity sensors are gaining increasing interest as a potential diagnostic method for a range of applications, including medical prognostics and environmental monitoring. However, the majority of detection demonstrations to date have involved identifying a “known” analyte, and the more rigorous double-blind experiment, in which the experimenter must identify unknown solutions, has yet to be performed. This scenario is more representative of a real-world situation. Therefore, before these devices can truly transition, it is necessary to demonstrate this level of robustness. By combining a recently developed surface chemistry with integrated silica optical sensors, we have performed a double-blind experiment to identify four unknown solutions. The four unknown solutions represented a subset or complete set of four known solutions; as such, there were 256 possible combinations. Based on the single molecule detection signal, we correctly identified all solutions. In addition, as part of this work, we developed noise reduction algorithms. PMID:25785307

  12. T-shaped cavity dual-frequency Nd:YAG laser with electro-optical modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Junhong; Jiao, Mingxing; Liu, Yun

    2016-05-01

    A T-shaped cavity dual-frequency Nd:YAG laser with electro-optical modulation is proposed, which consists of both p- and s-cavities sharing the same gain medium of Nd:YAG. Each cavity was not only able to select longitudinal mode but also tune frequency using an electro-optic birefringent filter polarization beam splitter + lithium niobate. The frequency difference of dual frequency was tuned through the whole gain bandwidth of Nd:YAG, which is far above the usually accepted free spectral range value in the case of a single-axis laser. As a result, the simultaneous operation of orthogonally and linearly polarized dual-frequency laser was obtained, which coincides with the theoretical analysis based on Jones matrices. The obtained frequency difference ranges from 0 to 132 GHz. This offers a simple and widely tunable source with potential for portable frequency reference applications in terahertz-wave generation and absolute-distance interferometry measurement areas.

  13. Summary of performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from CBMM niobium ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi Dhakal, Pashupati Kneisel, Peter Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-12-04

    Several Nb ingots have been provided by CBMM to Jefferson Lab since 2004 as part of an R&D collaboration aimed at evaluating the performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from ingots with different purity, as a results of different ingot production processes. Approximately 32 multi- and single-cell cavities with resonant frequency between ∼1.3-2.3 GHz were built, treated and tested at 2 K at Jefferson Lab between 2004 and 2014. The average peak surface field achieved in cavities made of RRR∼260 and RRR∼100-150 ingots was (119 ± 4) mT and (100 ± 8) mT, respectively. Higher quality factor values at 2.0 K have been measured in medium-purity, compared to higher purity material.

  14. External cavity diode laser with frequency drift following natural variation in air pressure.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Ikegami, Takeshi; Kawabata, Ryuzo

    2015-06-20

    A compact and mechanically very robust external cavity diode laser was made by removing any position adjusters such as precision screws and piezo actuators, taking advantage of a cat's eye retroreflector insensitive to misalignment. Under free-running operation during 150 h, the frequency drift followed natural variation in air pressure with a ratio of -66.6±0.1  MHz/hPa in a range between 1001.5 and 1013.6 hPa. The ratio was in good agreement with that estimated from variation in the effective cavity length derived from the relation between the pressure and the refractive index of air. These results indicate that an external cavity diode laser with predictable frequency drift was successfully created.

  15. Summary of performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from CBMM niobium ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-12-01

    Several Nb ingots have been provided by CBMM to Jefferson Lab since 2004 as part of an R&D collaboration aimed at evaluating the performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from ingots with different purity, as a results of different ingot production processes. Approximately 32 multi- and single-cell cavities with resonant frequency between ˜1.3-2.3 GHz were built, treated and tested at 2 K at Jefferson Lab between 2004 and 2014. The average peak surface field achieved in cavities made of RRR˜260 and RRR˜100-150 ingots was (119 ± 4) mT and (100 ± 8) mT, respectively. Higher quality factor values at 2.0 K have been measured in medium-purity, compared to higher purity material.

  16. Strong Coupling Cavity QED with Gate-Defined Double Quantum Dots Enabled by a High Impedance Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockklauser, A.; Scarlino, P.; Koski, J. V.; Gasparinetti, S.; Andersen, C. K.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.; Wallraff, A.

    2017-01-01

    The strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) implies the capability of a matterlike quantum system to coherently transform an individual excitation into a single photon within a resonant structure. This not only enables essential processes required for quantum information processing but also allows for fundamental studies of matter-light interaction. In this work, we demonstrate strong coupling between the charge degree of freedom in a gate-defined GaAs double quantum dot (DQD) and a frequency-tunable high impedance resonator realized using an array of superconducting quantum interference devices. In the resonant regime, we resolve the vacuum Rabi mode splitting of size 2 g /2 π =238 MHz at a resonator linewidth κ /2 π =12 MHz and a DQD charge qubit decoherence rate of γ2/2 π =40 MHz extracted independently from microwave spectroscopy in the dispersive regime. Our measurements indicate a viable path towards using circuit-based cavity QED for quantum information processing in semiconductor nanostructures.

  17. Cavity-backed metasurface antennas and their application to frequency diversity imaging.

    PubMed

    Marks, Daniel L; Yurduseven, Okan; Smith, David R

    2017-04-01

    Frequency diversity antennas with spatially structured radiation patterns reduce the reliance on actively switched elements for beamforming which become increasingly expensive and impractical as frequency increases. As the quality factor Q of a frequency diverse antenna increases, the antenna samples more spatial structure as the number of unique radiated coded spatial patterns correspondingly increases. Antennas that combine hollow cavities and metamaterial apertures achieve both large fractional bandwidth, in excess of 40%, and a high Q of 1600, so that each antenna radiates over 640 unique coded patterns. As compared to switched active antennas, such a passive antenna replaces the 50 antennas and switches that would produce at most (50/2)2=625 unique patterns. Furthermore, the engineered metamaterial apertures enable a radiation efficiency exceeding 60% to be achieved in a single desired polarization. The theory of cavity-backed metasurface antennas is explained, and frequency diverse imaging is demonstrated with a pair of these antennas.

  18. Frequency stabilization of an external cavity diode laser to molecular iodine at 657.483 nm.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hui-Mei; Wang, Shing-Chung; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2006-05-01

    The saturation spectrum of the P(84) 5-5 transition of 127I2 at 657.483 nm is obtained with the third-harmonic demodulation method using an external cavity diode laser. The laser frequency is modulated by modulating the diode current instead of modulating the cavity length with a piezoelectric transducer (PZT). Current modulation allows a modulation frequency that is higher than PZT modulation. The signal-to-noise ratio of 1000 is better than previous results presented in the literature. The laser is frequency stabilized to the hyperfine component o of the P(84) 5-5 transition with a frequency stability of better than 10 kHz (2.2 x 10(-11) relative stability).

  19. Tunable ultraviolet laser source from a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuhang; Liu, Jingjiao; Wang, Lijun

    2007-11-01

    A tunable ultraviolet laser source in the spectrum range of 0.36-0.388 μm was obtained as second harmonics from a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser whose output covers the wave range over 0.72-0.78 μm. A LBO crystal was used as frequency doubling crystal. The phase mateching angle in the wide spectrum range of the crystal was calculated, and the crystal was cut in the way that the normal incidence at the center wavelength of the fundamental wave at the crystal. The output spectrum line was measured and the highest second harmonics conversion efficiency reached 1.2% from long pulse fundamental wave at the center wavelength.

  20. Generation of broadband ultraviolet frequency-entangled photons using cavity quantum plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Oka, Hisaki

    2017-08-14

    Application of quantum entangled photons is now extending to various fields in physics, chemistry and biology. In particular, in terms of application to molecular science, broadband ultraviolet frequency-entangled photons are desired because molecules inducing photochemical reactions of interest often have electronic transition energies in the ultraviolet region. Recent standard method for generating such entangled photons is a chirped quasi-phase-matching method, however this method is not suitable for the generation of ultraviolet frequency-entangled photons because it requires down-conversion of a photon with a wavelength shorter than ultraviolet into an entangled photon pair. Here we propose a simple method for generating broadband ultraviolet frequency-entangled photons using cavity quantum plasmonics, in which conventional cavity quantum electrodynamics theory is applied to quantum plasmonics. We introduce a cavity-plasmon system in which localised surface plasmon (LSP) is coupled to the cavity fields of a state-of-the-art microcavity. Using this system, we theoretically show that broadband ultraviolet frequency-entangled photons can be generated simply by utilising the absorption saturation effect of LSP.

  1. Flight-Like Optical Reference Cavity for GRACE Follow-On Laser Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; deVine, G.; Klipstein, W. M.; McKenzie, K.; Spero, R.; Thompson, R.; Yu, N.; Stephens, M.; Leitch, J.; Pierce, R.; Shaddock, D.; Lam, T.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a prototype optical cavity and associated optics that has been developed to provide a stable frequency reference for a future space-based laser ranging system. This instrument is being considered for inclusion as a technology demonstration on the recently announced GRACE follow-on mission, which will monitor variations in the Earth's gravity field.

  2. Gas-lens effect and cavity design of some frequency-stabilized He-Ne lasers.

    PubMed

    Cérez, P; Felder, R

    1983-04-15

    It is shown that there exists an optimal cavity length which should minimize the frequency shifts induced by lenslike effects in intracavity saturated absorption lasers. Ideas are developed which provide a satisfactory explanation for the dispersion in modulation shifts observed in some recent laser intercomparisons.

  3. Dual-etalon cavity ring-down frequency-comb spectroscopy with broad band light source

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, David W; Strecker, Kevin E

    2014-04-01

    In an embodiment, a dual-etalon cavity-ring-down frequency-comb spectrometer system is described. A broad band light source is split into two beams. One beam travels through a first etalon and a sample under test, while the other beam travels through a second etalon, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges ("FSR") of the two etalons are not identical, the interference pattern at the detector will consist of a series of beat frequencies. By monitoring these beat frequencies, optical frequencies where light is absorbed may be determined.

  4. A microwave exciter for Cs frequency standards based on a sapphire-loaded cavity oscillator.

    PubMed

    Koga, Y; McNeilage, C; Searls, J H; Ohshima, S

    2001-01-01

    A low noise and highly stable microwave exciter system has been built for Cs atomic frequency standards using a tunable sapphire-loaded cavity oscillator (SLCO), which works at room temperature. This paper discusses the successful implementation of a control system for locking the SLCO to a long-term reference signal and reports an upper limit of the achieved frequency tracking error 6 x 10(-15) at tau = 1 s.

  5. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Shahid; Mammosser, John D.

    2015-07-15

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar–O{sub 2} (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM{sub 010}-mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper.

  6. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q 0-values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3-1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb of medium (RRR = 100-150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q 0-value of 2 × 1010 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. The performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching.

  7. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2016-04-07

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q0-values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3–1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb of medium (RRR = 100–150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q0-value of 2 × 1010 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. As a result, the performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching.

  8. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    DOE PAGES

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2016-04-07

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q0-values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3–1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb ofmore » medium (RRR = 100–150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q0-value of 2 × 1010 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. As a result, the performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching.« less

  9. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shahid; Mammosser, John D

    2015-07-01

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar-O2 (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM010-mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper.

  10. Measurement of Frequency, Temperature, RF Field Dependence of Surface Resistance of Superconductors Using a Half Wave Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyekyoung; Delayen, Jean

    2017-01-01

    A theory of surface resistance of superconductor was rigorously formulated by Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer more than 50 years ago. Since then the accelerator community has been used the theory as a guideline to improve the surface resistance of the superconducting cavity. It has been observed that the surface resistance is dependent on frequency, temperature and rf field strength, and surface preparation. To verify these dependences, a well-controlled study is required. Although many different types of cavities have been tested, the typical superconducting cavities are built for specific frequencies of their application. They do not provide data other than at its own frequency. A superconducting half wave cavity is a cavity that enables us to collect the surface resistance data across frequencies of interest for particle accelerators and evaluate preparation techniques. This paper will present the design of the half wave cavity, its electromagnetic mode characteristics and experimental results. Research supported by NSF Award PHY-1416051.

  11. Efficient blue light generation using periodically poled stoichiometric lithium tantalate via resonant frequency doubling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademian, Ali; Jadhav, Shilpa; Shiner, David

    2014-05-01

    Convenient high power blue diode lasers with single frequency operation are still under developments and are not as well developed and cost effective as IR laser sources. Harmonic generation of IR lasers provide a viable alternative source of blue and UV light. Magnesium oxide doped periodically poled Stoichiometric Lithium Tantalate (PPMgO:SLT) has been reported to have the lowest blue, IR and blue induced IR absorption (BLIIRA) among ferroelectric crystals such as Lithium Niobate (PPLN) and Potassium Titanyl Phosphate (PPKTP). All these properties, along with higher thermal conductivity, make this crystal an excellent candidate for efficient blue light generation using second harmonic generation (SHG) in a resonant buildup cavity. Efficient resonant doubling is very sensitive to various cavity and crystal loss mechanisms. Recently we obtained 400 mW of blue light at 486 nm with net conversion efficiency of 77% using a 515 mW fiber grating stabilized IR source. Sources of conversion loss have been identified and evaluated with various methods in our investigation. These include reflection, scattering, absorption, and polarization rotation of IR light in the crystal, as well as mode mismatching and spherical aberration due to focusing lenses. The locking and electronic control functions of the cavity are automated using an internally mounted single chip microcontroller with embedded DSP (digital signal processor). Work is supported by NSF grant.

  12. High-frequency electromagnetic scarring in three-dimensional axisymmetric convex cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Warne, Larry K.; Jorgenson, Roy E.

    2016-04-13

    Here, this article examines the localization of high-frequency electromagnetic fields in three-dimensional axisymmetric cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. When these orbits lead to unstable localized modes, they are known as scars. This article treats the case where the opposing sides, or mirrors, are convex. Particular attention is focused on the normalization through the electromagnetic energy theorem. Both projections of the field along the scarred orbit as well as field point statistics are examined. Statistical comparisons are made with a numerical calculation of the scars run with an axisymmetric simulation.

  13. High-frequency electromagnetic scarring in three-dimensional axisymmetric convex cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry K.; Jorgenson, Roy E.

    2016-04-13

    Here, this article examines the localization of high-frequency electromagnetic fields in three-dimensional axisymmetric cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. When these orbits lead to unstable localized modes, they are known as scars. This article treats the case where the opposing sides, or mirrors, are convex. Particular attention is focused on the normalization through the electromagnetic energy theorem. Both projections of the field along the scarred orbit as well as field point statistics are examined. Statistical comparisons are made with a numerical calculation of the scars run with an axisymmetric simulation.

  14. Telecom-band degenerate-frequency photon pair generation in silicon microring cavities.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuan; Zhang, Wei; Dong, Shuai; Huang, Yidong; Peng, Jiangde

    2014-04-15

    In this Letter, telecom-band degenerate-frequency photon pairs are generated in a specific mode of a silicon microring cavity by the nondegenerate spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) process, under two continuous-wave pumps at resonance wavelength of two different cavity modes. The ratio of coincidence to accidental coincidence is up to 100 under a time bin width of 5 ns, showing their characteristics of quantum correlation. Their quantum interference in balanced and unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometers is investigated theoretically and experimentally, and the results show potential in quantum metrology and quantum information.

  15. Self-organization in Kerr-cavity-soliton formation in parametric frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Y. Henry; Lamont, Michael R. E.; Strogatz, Steven H.; Gaeta, Alexander L.

    2016-12-01

    We show that self-organization and synchronization underlie Kerr-cavity-soliton formation in parametric frequency combs. By reducing the Lugiato-Lefever equation to a set of phase equations, we find that self-organization arises from a two-stage process via pump-degenerate and pump-nondegenerate four-wave mixing. The reduced phase equations are akin to the Kuramoto model of coupled oscillators and intuitively explain the origin of the pump phase offset, predict antisymmetrization of the intracavity field before phase synchronization, and clarify the role of chaos in Kerr-cavity-soliton formation in parametric combs.

  16. High power single-frequency continuously-tunable compact extended-cavity semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Laurain, A; Myara, M; Beaudoin, G; Sagnes, I; Garnache, A

    2009-06-08

    We demonstrate high power high efficiency (0:3 W) low noise single frequency operation of a compact extended-cavity surface-emitting-semiconductor-laser exhibiting a continuous tunability over 0:84 THz with high beam quality. We took advantage of thermal lens-based stability to develop a short (< 3 mm) plano-plano external cavity without any intracavity filter. The structure is optically pumped by a 1 W commercial 830 nm multimode diode laser. No heat management was required. We measured a low divergence circular TEM(00) beam at the diffraction limit (M(2) < 1:05) with a linear light polarization (> 37 dB). The side mode suppression ratio is 60 dB. The free running laser linewidth is 850 kHz limited by pump induced thermal fluctuations. Thanks to this high-Q external cavity approach, the frequency noise is low and the dynamics is in the relaxation-oscillation-free regime, exhibiting a low intensity noise, with a cutoff frequency approximately 250 MHz above which the shot noise level is reached. We show that pump properties define the cavity design and laser coherence.

  17. Frequency-agile terahertz-wave parametric oscillator in a ring-cavity configuration.

    PubMed

    Minamide, Hiroaki; Ikari, Tomofumi; Ito, Hiromasa

    2009-12-01

    We demonstrate a frequency-agile terahertz wave parametric oscillator (TPO) in a ring-cavity configuration (ring-TPO). The TPO consists of three mirrors and a MgO:LiNbO(3) crystal under noncollinear phase-matching conditions. A novel, fast frequency-tuning method was realized by controlling a mirror of the three-mirror ring cavity. The wide tuning range between 0.93 and 2.7 THz was accomplished. For first demonstration using the ring-TPO, terahertz spectroscopy was performed as the verification of the frequency-agile performance, measuring the transmission spectrum of the monosaccharide glucose. The spectrum was obtained within about 8 s in good comparison to those of Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

  18. Dual-pump Kerr Micro-cavity Optical Frequency Comb with varying FSR spacing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiqiang; Chu, Sai T.; Little, Brent E.; Pasquazi, Alessia; Wang, Yishan; Wang, Leiran; Zhang, Wenfu; Wang, Lei; Hu, Xiaohong; Wang, Guoxi; Hu, Hui; Su, Yulong; Li, Feitao; Liu, Yuanshan; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel dual-pump approach to generate robust optical frequency comb with varying free spectral range (FSR) spacing in a CMOS-compatible high-Q micro-ring resonator (MRR). The frequency spacing of the comb can be tuned by an integer number FSR of the MRR freely in our dual-pump scheme. The dual pumps are self-oscillated in the laser cavity loop and their wavelengths can be tuned flexibly by programming the tunable filter embedded in the cavity. By tuning the pump wavelength, broadband OFC with the bandwidth of >180 nm and the frequency-spacing varying from 6 to 46-fold FSRs is realized at a low pump power. This approach could find potential and practical applications in many areas, such as optical metrology, optical communication, and signal processing systems, for its excellent flexibility and robustness. PMID:27338250

  19. Dual-pump Kerr Micro-cavity Optical Frequency Comb with varying FSR spacing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiqiang; Chu, Sai T; Little, Brent E; Pasquazi, Alessia; Wang, Yishan; Wang, Leiran; Zhang, Wenfu; Wang, Lei; Hu, Xiaohong; Wang, Guoxi; Hu, Hui; Su, Yulong; Li, Feitao; Liu, Yuanshan; Zhao, Wei

    2016-06-24

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel dual-pump approach to generate robust optical frequency comb with varying free spectral range (FSR) spacing in a CMOS-compatible high-Q micro-ring resonator (MRR). The frequency spacing of the comb can be tuned by an integer number FSR of the MRR freely in our dual-pump scheme. The dual pumps are self-oscillated in the laser cavity loop and their wavelengths can be tuned flexibly by programming the tunable filter embedded in the cavity. By tuning the pump wavelength, broadband OFC with the bandwidth of >180 nm and the frequency-spacing varying from 6 to 46-fold FSRs is realized at a low pump power. This approach could find potential and practical applications in many areas, such as optical metrology, optical communication, and signal processing systems, for its excellent flexibility and robustness.

  20. Dual-pump Kerr Micro-cavity Optical Frequency Comb with varying FSR spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiqiang; Chu, Sai T.; Little, Brent E.; Pasquazi, Alessia; Wang, Yishan; Wang, Leiran; Zhang, Wenfu; Wang, Lei; Hu, Xiaohong; Wang, Guoxi; Hu, Hui; Su, Yulong; Li, Feitao; Liu, Yuanshan; Zhao, Wei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel dual-pump approach to generate robust optical frequency comb with varying free spectral range (FSR) spacing in a CMOS-compatible high-Q micro-ring resonator (MRR). The frequency spacing of the comb can be tuned by an integer number FSR of the MRR freely in our dual-pump scheme. The dual pumps are self-oscillated in the laser cavity loop and their wavelengths can be tuned flexibly by programming the tunable filter embedded in the cavity. By tuning the pump wavelength, broadband OFC with the bandwidth of >180 nm and the frequency-spacing varying from 6 to 46-fold FSRs is realized at a low pump power. This approach could find potential and practical applications in many areas, such as optical metrology, optical communication, and signal processing systems, for its excellent flexibility and robustness.

  1. Frequency stabilization of an external cavity diode laser: countermeasures against atmospheric temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minabe, Yuta; Doi, Kohei; Sato, Takashi; Maruyama, Takeo; Ohkawa, Masashi; Tsubokawa, Tsuneya

    2008-02-01

    External cavity diode lasers (ECDL) are presently experiencing a surge in popularity, as laser light-sources for advanced optical measurement systems. While these devices normally require external optical-output controls, we simplified the setup, a bit, by adding a second external cavity. This technique boasts the added advantage of having a narrower oscillation-linewidth than would be achievable, using a single optical feedback. Because drive-current and atmospheric temperature directly impact the ECDL systems' oscillation frequency, during frequency stability checks, it was necessary, in this instance, to construct a slightly smaller ECDL system, which we mounted on a Super-Invar board, to minimize the influence of thermal expansion. Taking these and other aggressive and timely measures to prevent atmospheric temperature-related changes allowed us to achieve an improvement in oscillation-frequency stability, i.e., to obtain the square root of Allan variance σ =2×10 -10, at averaging time τ =10 -1. We introduced a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) to the setup, for the simple reason that its frequency is far less susceptible to changes in temperature, than other lasers of its type. And, because VCSELs are widely available, and the ECDL systems that use them improve frequency stability, we replaced the Fabry-Perot semiconductor laser with a VCSEL.

  2. Trimming algorithm of frequency modulation for CIAE-230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron model cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengzhan; Zhang, Tianjue; Ji, Bin; Hou, Shigang; Guo, Juanjuan; Yin, Meng; Xing, Jiansheng; Lv, Yinlong; Guan, Fengping; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    A new project, the 230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron for cancer therapy, was proposed at CIAE in 2013. A model cavity is designed to verify the frequency modulation trimming algorithm featuring a half-wave structure and eight sets of rotating blades for 1 kHz frequency modulation. Based on the electromagnetic (EM) field distribution analysis of the model cavity, the variable capacitor works as a function of time and the frequency can be written in Maclaurin series. Curve fitting is applied for theoretical frequency and original simulation frequency. The second-order fitting excels at the approximation given its minimum variance. Constant equivalent inductance is considered as an important condition in the calculation. The equivalent parameters of theoretical frequency can be achieved through this conversion. Then the trimming formula for rotor blade outer radius is found by discretization in time domain. Simulation verification has been performed and the results show that the calculation radius with minus 0.012 m yields an acceptable result. The trimming amendment in the time range of 0.328-0.4 ms helps to reduce the frequency error to 0.69% in Simulation C with an increment of 0.075 mm/0.001 ms, which is half of the error in Simulation A (constant radius in 0.328-0.4 ms). The verification confirms the feasibility of the trimming algorithm for synchrocyclotron frequency modulation.

  3. Self-consistent modeling of terahertz waveguide and cavity with frequency-dependent conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. J.; Chu, K. R.; Thumm, M.

    2015-01-01

    The surface resistance of metals, and hence the Ohmic dissipation per unit area, scales with the square root of the frequency of an incident electromagnetic wave. As is well recognized, this can lead to excessive wall losses at terahertz (THz) frequencies. On the other hand, high-frequency oscillatory motion of conduction electrons tends to mitigate the collisional damping. As a result, the classical theory predicts that metals behave more like a transparent medium at frequencies above the ultraviolet. Such a behavior difference is inherent in the AC conductivity, a frequency-dependent complex quantity commonly used to treat electromagnetics of metals at optical frequencies. The THz region falls in the gap between microwave and optical frequencies. However, metals are still commonly modeled by the DC conductivity in currently active vacuum electronics research aimed at the development of high-power THz sources (notably the gyrotron), although a small reduction of the DC conductivity due to surface roughness is sometimes included. In this study, we present a self-consistent modeling of the gyrotron interaction structures (a metallic waveguide or cavity) with the AC conductivity. The resulting waveguide attenuation constants and cavity quality factors are compared with those of the DC-conductivity model. The reduction in Ohmic losses under the AC-conductivity model is shown to be increasingly significant as the frequency reaches deeper into the THz region. Such effects are of considerable importance to THz gyrotrons for which the minimization of Ohmic losses constitutes a major design consideration.

  4. A digital frequency stabilization system of external cavity diode laser based on LabVIEW FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuohuan; Hu, Zhaohui; Qi, Lu; Wang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Frequency stabilization for external cavity diode laser has played an important role in physics research. Many laser frequency locking solutions have been proposed by researchers. Traditionally, the locking process was accomplished by analog system, which has fast feedback control response speed. However, analog system is susceptible to the effects of environment. In order to improve the automation level and reliability of the frequency stabilization system, we take a grating-feedback external cavity diode laser as the laser source and set up a digital frequency stabilization system based on National Instrument's FPGA (NI FPGA). The system consists of a saturated absorption frequency stabilization of beam path, a differential photoelectric detector, a NI FPGA board and a host computer. Many functions, such as piezoelectric transducer (PZT) sweeping, atomic saturation absorption signal acquisition, signal peak identification, error signal obtaining and laser PZT voltage feedback controlling, are totally completed by LabVIEW FPGA program. Compared with the analog system, the system built by the logic gate circuits, performs stable and reliable. User interface programmed by LabVIEW is friendly. Besides, benefited from the characteristics of reconfiguration, the LabVIEW program is good at transplanting in other NI FPGA boards. Most of all, the system periodically checks the error signal. Once the abnormal error signal is detected, FPGA will restart frequency stabilization process without manual control. Through detecting the fluctuation of error signal of the atomic saturation absorption spectrum line in the frequency locking state, we can infer that the laser frequency stability can reach 1MHz.

  5. Investigation of the resonance frequency and performance of a partially plasma filled reconfigurable cylindrical TE111 mode cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadaegh, Mostafa; Mohajeri, Farzad

    2017-05-01

    A partially plasma filled reconfigurable cylindrical cavity is proposed. Plasma offers an encouraging alternative to metal for a wide variety of microwave engineering applications. Implementation of a low-cost plasma element permits the resonant frequency to be changed electrically. The level of the resonant frequency shifts toward the empty-cavity resonant frequency and depends on certain parameters, such as the plasma diameter, relative permittivity and thickness of the plasma tube. In this article, we first introduce the partially plasma filled reconfigurable cylindrical cavity; then, the resonant frequency equation of the cavity is obtained by variational methods. Finally, we plot the resonant frequency versus different parameters of the cavity, which we compare with the results of the CST software. We show that the two results are compatible with each other.

  6. Frequency stabilization at the sub-kilohertz level of an external cavity diode laser.

    PubMed

    Bayrakli, Ismail

    2016-03-20

    A simple external cavity diode laser (ECDL) in a Littrow configuration was established and actively frequency-stabilized by using a side-of-fringe stabilization technique. A wavelength tuning range of 60 nm for the spectral range between 1000 and 1060 nm was demonstrated by rotating the diffraction grating. A sub-kilohertz frequency stabilization of the ECDL was achieved. The linewidth of the laser was narrowed from 160 kHz to 400 Hz by laser frequency locking to a flank of a Fabry-Perot interferometer peak.

  7. Frequency-selection mechanism in incompressible open-cavity flows via reflected instability waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuerke, F.; Sciamarella, D.; Pastur, L. R.; Lusseyran, F.; Artana, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present an alternative perspective on nonharmonic mode coexistence, commonly found in the shear layer spectrum of open-cavity flows. Modes obtained by a local linear stability analysis of perturbations to a two-dimensional, incompressible, and inviscid sheared flow over a cavity of finite length and depth were conditioned by a so-called coincidence condition first proposed by Kulikowskii [J. Appl. Math. Mech. 30, 180 (1966), 10.1016/0021-8928(66)90066-9] which takes into account instability wave reflection within the cavity. The analysis yields a set of discrete, nonharmonic frequencies, which compare well with experimental results [Phys. Fluids 20, 114101 (2008), 10.1063/1.3005435; Exp. Fluids 50, 905 (2010), 10.1007/s00348-010-0942-9].

  8. Broadband cavity-enhanced molecular spectra from Vernier filtering of a complete frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Lucile; Morville, Jérôme

    2014-12-01

    We present a new approach to cavity enhanced-direct frequency comb spectroscopy where the full emission bandwidth of a titanium:sapphire laser is exploited, currently at gigahertz resolution. The technique is based on low-resolution Vernier filtering obtained with an appreciable actively stabilized mismatch between the cavity-free spectral range and the laser repetition rate, using a diffraction grating and a split-photodiode. Spectra covering 1300  cm⁻¹ (40 THz) are acquired in less than 100 ms, and a baseline noise of 1.7×10⁻⁸ cm⁻¹ is reached with a cavity finesse of only 300, providing an absorption figure of merit M=6×10⁻¹¹ cm⁻¹·Hz(-1/2).

  9. Strong Meissner screening change in superconducting radio frequency cavities due to mild baking

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A. Grassellino, A.; Barkov, F.; Suter, A.; Salman, Z.; Prokscha, T.

    2014-02-17

    We investigate “hot” regions with anomalous high field dissipation in bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities for particle accelerators by using low energy muon spin rotation (LE-μSR) on corresponding cavity cutouts. We demonstrate that superconducting properties at the hot region are well described by the non-local Pippard/BCS model for niobium in the clean limit with a London penetration depth λ{sub L}=23±2 nm. In contrast, a cutout sample from the 120 ∘C baked cavity shows a much larger λ>100 nm and a depth dependent mean free path, likely due to gradient in vacancy concentration. We suggest that these vacancies can efficiently trap hydrogen and hence prevent the formation of hydrides responsible for rf losses in hot regions.

  10. Alignment sensing for optical cavities using radio-frequency jitter modulation.

    PubMed

    Fulda, P; Voss, D; Mueller, C; Ortega, L F; Ciani, G; Mueller, G; Tanner, D B

    2017-05-01

    Alignment sensing is often required in precision interferometry applications such as Advanced LIGO in order to achieve the optimum performance. Currently favored sensing schemes rely on the use of two separate radio-frequency (RF) quadrant photodetectors and Gouy phase telescopes to determine the alignment of a beam relative to an optical cavity axis. In this paper, we demonstrate an alternative sensing scheme that has potential advantages over the current standard schemes. We show that by using electro-optic beam deflectors to impose RF jitter sidebands on a beam, it is possible to extract full alignment signals for two in-line optical cavities from just one single-element photodetector in reflection of each cavity.

  11. Global stability and frequency response of boundary layers developing over shallow cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadri, Ubaid; Schmid, Peter

    2014-11-01

    In the presence of surface imperfections, the boundary layer developing over an aircraft wing can separate and reattach, leading to a small separation bubble. We study the flow over a shallow rectangular cavity at Reynolds numbers at which the boundary layer is unstable to Tollmien-Schlichting waves. We obtain steady two-dimensional solutions to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and study the growth of three-dimensional perturbations on top of these steady base flows. We use the linearized Navier-Stokes operator to identify how the dominant modes of instability vary with the thickness of the upstream boundary layer and with the cavity aspect ratio. We calculate the global frequency response and optimal forcing to map out the influence of the cavity on the growth of TS-waves. Finally, we compare the results with those for boundary layers developing over backward-facing and forward-facing steps.

  12. Multiple harmonic frequencies resonant cavity design and half-scale prototype measurements for a fast kicker

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Yulu; Wang, Haipeng; Wang, Shaoheng; ...

    2016-12-09

    Quarter wavelength resonator (QWR) based deflecting cavities with the capability of supporting multiple odd-harmonic modes have been developed for an ultrafast periodic kicker system in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC, formerly MEIC). Previous work on the kicking pulse synthesis and the transverse beam dynamics tracking simulations show that a flat-top kicking pulse can be generated with minimal emittance growth during injection and circulation of the cooling electron bunches. This flat-top kicking pulse can be obtained when a DC component and 10 harmonic modes with appropriate amplitude and phase are combined together. To support 10 such harmonic modes,more » four QWR cavities are used with 5, 3, 1, and 1 modes, respectively. In the multiple-mode cavities, several slightly tapered segments of the inner conductor are introduced to tune the higher order deflecting modes to be harmonic, and stub tuners are used to fine tune each frequency to compensate for potential errors. In this paper, we summarize the electromagnetic design of the five-mode cavity, including the geometry optimization to get high transverse shunt impedance, the frequency tuning and sensitivity analysis, and the single loop coupler design for coupling to all of the harmonic modes. In particular we report on the design and fabrication of a half-scale copper prototype of this proof-of-principle five-odd-mode cavity, as well as the rf bench measurements. Lastly, we demonstrate mode superposition in this cavity experimentally, which illustrates the kicking pulse generation concept.« less

  13. High-frequency asymptotic methods for analyzing the EM scattering by open-ended waveguide cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, R. J.; Pathak, P. H.

    1989-01-01

    Four high-frequency methods are described for analyzing the electromagnetic (EM) scattering by electrically large open-ended cavities. They are: (1) a hybrid combination of waveguide modal analysis and high-frequency asymptotics, (2) geometrical optics (GO) ray shooting, (3) Gaussian beam (GB) shooting, and (4) the generalized ray expansion (GRE) method. The hybrid modal method gives very accurate results but is limited to cavities which are made up of sections of uniform waveguides for which the modal fields are known. The GO ray shooting method can be applied to much more arbitrary cavity geometries and can handle absorber treated interior walls, but it generally only predicts the major trends of the RCS pattern and not the details. Also, a very large number of rays need to be tracked for each new incidence angle. Like the GO ray shooting method, the GB shooting method can handle more arbitrary cavities, but it is much more efficient and generally more accurate than the GO method because it includes the fields diffracted by the rim at the open end which enter the cavity. However, due to beam divergence effects the GB method is limited to cavities which are not very long compared to their width. The GRE method overcomes the length-to-width limitation of the GB method by replacing the GB's with GO ray tubes which are launched in the same manner as the GB's to include the interior rim diffracted field. This method gives good accuracy and is generally more efficient than the GO method, but a large number of ray tubes needs to be tracked.

  14. Compact 4.7 W, 18.3% wall-plug efficiency green laser based on an electrically pumped VECSEL using intracavity frequency doubling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pu; Xu, Bing; van Leeuwen, Robert; Chen, Tong; Watkins, Laurence; Zhou, Delai; Gao, Peng; Xu, Guoyang; Wang, Qing; Ghosh, Chuni

    2014-08-15

    We have demonstrated a compact, 4.7 W green laser based on an electrically pumped vertical external-cavity surface emitting laser through intracavity frequency doubling. The overall wall-plug efficiency (electrical to green) was 18.3%. The power fluctuations were measured to be ±1.4% over a 2 h time period.

  15. Investigation of niobium surface structure and composition for improvement of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenikhina, Yulia

    Nano-scale investigation of intrinsic properties of niobium near-surface is a key to control performance of niobium superconducting radio-frequency cavities. Mechanisms responsible for the performance limitations and their empirical remedies needs to be justified in order to reproducibly control fabrication of SRF cavities with desired characteristics. The high field Q-slope and mechanism behind its cure (120°C mild bake) were investigated by comparison of the samples cut out of the cavities with high and low dissipation regions. Material evolution during mild field Q-slope nitrogen treatment was characterized using the coupon samples as well as samples cut out of nitrogen treated cavity. Evaluation of niobium near-surface state after some typical and novel cavity treatments was accomplished. Various TEM techniques, SEM, XPS, AES, XRD were used for the structural and chemical characterization of niobium near-surface. Combination of thermometry and structural temperature-dependent comparison of the cavity cutouts with different dissipation characteristics revealed precipitation of niobium hydrides to be the reason for medium and high field Q-slopes. Step-by-step effect of the nitrogen treatment processing on niobium surface was studied by analytical and structural characterization of the cavity cutout and niobium samples, which were subject to the treatment. Low concentration nitrogen doping is proposed to explain the benefit of nitrogen treatment. Chemical characterization of niobium samples before and after various surface processing (Electropolishing (EP), 800°C bake, hydrofluoric acid (HF) rinsing) showed the differences that can help to reveal the microscopic effects behind these treatments as well as possible sources of surface contamination.

  16. Studies of radiation fields of LCLS-II super conducting radio frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana Leitner, M.; Ge, L.; Li, Z.; Xu, C.; Adolphsen, C.; Ross, M.; Carrasco, M.

    2016-09-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) will be a hard X-ray Free Electron Laser whose linac can deliver a 1.2 MW CW electron beam with bunch rates up to 1 MHz. To efficiently generate such a high power beam, Super-Conducting Radio-Frequency (SCRF) cavities will be installed in the upstream portion of the existing 3 km Linac at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The 9-cell niobium cavities will be cooled at 2K inside 35 cryomodules, each containing a string of eight of those cavities followed by a quadrupole. The strong electromagnetic fields in the SCRF cavities will extract electrons from the cavity walls that may be accelerated. Most such dark current will be deposited locally, although some electrons may reach several neighboring cryomodules, gaining substantial energy before they hit a collimator or other aperture. The power deposited by the field emitted electrons and the associated showers may pose radiation and machine protection issues at the cryomodules and also in other areas of the accelerator. Simulation of these effects is therefore crucial for the design of the machine. The in-house code Track3P was used to simulate field emitted electrons from the LCLS-II cavities, and a sophisticated 3D model of the cryomodules including all cavities was written to transport radiation with the Fluka Monte Carlo code, which was linked to Track3P through custom-made routines. This setup was used to compute power deposition in components, prompt and residual radiation fields, and radioisotope inventories.

  17. Double layers and plasma-wave resistivity in extragalactic jets - Cavity formation and radio-wave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    Current driven electrostatic-wave- and electromagnetic-wave-produced resistivities do not occur in extragalactic jets for estimated values of the carried currents. Strong plasma double layers, however, may exist within self-maintained density cavities. The relativistic double-layer-emitted electron and ion beams drive plasma-wave resistivities in the low- and high-potential plasma adjacent to the double layers. The double-layer-emitted electron beams may also emit polarized radio waves via a collective bremsstrahlung process mediated by electrostatic two-stream instabilities.

  18. Double layers and plasma-wave resistivity in extragalactic jets: Cavity formation and radio-wave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    For estimated values of the currents carried by extragalactic jets, current-driven electrostatic-wave- and electromagnetic-wave-produced resistivities do not occur. Strong plasma double layers, however, may exist within self-maintained density cavities, the relativistic double-layer-emitted electron, and ion beams driving plasma-wave resistivities in the low- and high-potential plasma adjacent to the double layers. The double-layer-emitted electron beams may also emit polarized radio waves via a collective bremsstrahlung process mediated by electrostatic two-stream instabilities.

  19. Double layers and plasma-wave resistivity in extragalactic jets - Cavity formation and radio-wave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    Current driven electrostatic-wave- and electromagnetic-wave-produced resistivities do not occur in extragalactic jets for estimated values of the carried currents. Strong plasma double layers, however, may exist within self-maintained density cavities. The relativistic double-layer-emitted electron and ion beams drive plasma-wave resistivities in the low- and high-potential plasma adjacent to the double layers. The double-layer-emitted electron beams may also emit polarized radio waves via a collective bremsstrahlung process mediated by electrostatic two-stream instabilities.

  20. Plasma Etching of superconducting radio frequency cavity by Ar/Cl2 capacitively coupled Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Popovic, Svetozar; Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie; Phillips, Larry; Vuskovic, Lepsha

    2016-09-01

    We are developing plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the asymmetry was studied by changing the contour of the inner electrode. The optimized contour of the electrode based on these measurements was chosen for SRF cavity processing. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity is used, which previously mechanically polished, buffer chemically etched afterwards and rf tested at cryogenic temperatures for a baseline test. Plasma processing was accomplished by moving axially the inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish segmented plasma processing. The cavity is rf tested afterwards at cryogenic temperatures. The rf test and surface condition results are presented.

  1. High power narrowband 589 nm frequency doubled fibre laser source.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Luke; Feng, Yan; Calia, Domenico Bonaccini

    2009-08-17

    We demonstrate high-power high-efficiency cavity-enhanced second harmonic generation of an in-house built ultra-high spectral density (SBS-suppressed) 1178 nm narrowband Raman fibre amplifier. Up to 14.5 W 589 nm CW emission is achieved with linewidth Delta nu(589) < 7 MHz in a diffraction-limited beam, with peak external conversion efficiency of 86%. The inherently high spectral and spatial qualities of the 589 nm source are particularly suited to both spectroscopic and Laser Guide Star applications, given the seed laser can be easily frequency-locked to the Na D(2a) emission line. Further, we expect the technology to be extendable, at similar or higher powers, to wavelengths limited only by the seed-pump-pair availability. (c) 2009 Optical Society of America

  2. Green pulsed lidar-radar emitter based on a multipass frequency-shifting external cavity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Brunel, Marc; Romanelli, Marco; Vallet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the radio frequency (RF) up-conversion properties of a frequency-shifting external cavity on a laser beam. We consider an infrared passively Q-switched pulsed laser whose intensity modulation results from the multiple round-trips in the external cavity, which contains a frequency shifter. The output beam undergoes optical second-harmonic generation necessary to reach the green wavelength. We model the pulse train using a rate-equation model to simulate the laser pulses, together with a time-delayed interference calculation taking both the diffraction efficiency and the Gaussian beam propagation into account. The predictions are verified experimentally using a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser passively Q-switched by Cr4+:YAG whose pulse train makes multiple round-trips in a mode-matched external cavity containing an acousto-optic frequency shifter driven at 85 MHz. Second-harmonic generation is realized in a KTP crystal, yielding RF-modulated pulses at 532 nm with a modulation contrast of almost 100%. RF harmonics up to the 6th order (1.020 GHz) are observed in the green output pulses. Such a RF-modulated green laser may find applications in underwater detection and ranging.

  3. An ac method for the precise measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of a microwave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebendahl, B.; Peligrad, D.-N.; Požek, M.; Dulčić, A.; Mehring, M.

    2001-03-01

    We have developed a new and fast method for the determination of the complex frequency shift of a microwave resonant cavity. The method is based on frequency modulation of the microwave source around the cavity resonance and detection of the 2nd and 4th harmonic of the modulation frequency. With this procedure the static measurement of the response amplitude is not necessary and all the data are obtained through a single ac channel. The optimal frequency deviation is shown to be comparable to the cavity resonance width.

  4. The importance of the electron mean free path for superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniscalco, J. T.; Gonnella, D.; Liepe, M.

    2017-01-01

    Impurity-doping of niobium is an exciting new technology in the field of superconducting radio-frequency accelerators, producing cavities with record-high quality factor Q0 and Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer surface resistance that decreases with increasing radio-frequency field. Recent theoretical work has offered a promising explanation for this so-called "anti-Q-slope," but the link between the decreasing surface resistance and the shortened electron mean free path of doped cavities has remained elusive. In this work, we investigate this link, finding that the magnitude of this decrease varies directly with the mean free path: shorter mean free paths correspond to stronger anti-Q-slopes. We draw a theoretical connection between the mean free path and the overheating of the quasiparticles, which leads to the reduction of the anti-Q-slope towards the normal Q-slope of long-mean-free-path cavities. We also investigate the sensitivity of the residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux, a property that is greatly enhanced for doped cavities, and calculate an optimal doping regime for a given amount of trapped flux.

  5. High-mechanical-frequency characteristics of optomechanical crystal cavity with coupling waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhilei; Cui, Kaiyu; Bai, Guoren; Feng, Xue; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Optomechanical crystals have attracted great attention recently for their ability to realize strong photon-phonon interaction in cavity optomechanical systems. By far, the operation of cavity optomechanical systems with high mechanical frequency has to employ tapered fibres or one-sided waveguides with circulators to couple the light into and out of the cavities, which hinders their on-chip applications. Here, we demonstrate larger-centre-hole nanobeam structures with on-chip transmission-coupling waveguide. The measured mechanical frequency is up to 4.47 GHz, with a high mechanical Q-factor of 1.4 × 103 in the ambient environment. The corresponding optomechanical coupling rate is calculated and measured to be 836 kHz and 1.2 MHz, respectively, while the effective mass is estimated to be 136 fg. With the transmission waveguide coupled structure and a small footprint of 3.4 μm2, this simple cavity can be directly used as functional components or integrated with other on-chip devices in future practical applications. PMID:27686419

  6. High-sensitivity double-cavity silicon photonic-crystal resonator for label-free biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Amrita Kumar; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Yokoyama, Shin

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrated a two-dimensional double-cavity silicon photonic-crystal resonator based neighboring hole radius modulation. By theoretical and experimental analyses, we confirmed that the quality factor (Q-factor) increases at a certain neighboring hole radius. Experimentally, we showed Q-factors of (1.93-2.02) × 105. Moreover, by using sucrose solution, we measured a sensitivity of 1571 nm/RIU (refractive index unit), which is the highest sensitivity ever reported for such a two-dimensional photonic-crystal-based resonator type device. We reported the detection limit (DL) of the refractive index change of (4.15-4.34) × 10-6 RIU, which is one of the best in previous reports.

  7. Coherent perfect absorption, transmission, and synthesis in a double-cavity optomechanical system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao-Bo; Cui, Cui-Li; Gu, Kai-Hui; Tian, Xue-Dong; Fu, Chang-Bao; Wu, Jin-Hui

    2014-03-10

    We study a double-cavity optomechanical system in which a movable mirror with perfect reflection is inserted between two fixed mirrors with partial transmission. This optomechanical system is driven from both fixed end mirrors in a symmetric scheme by two strong coupling fields and two weak probe fields. We find that three interesting phenomena: coherent perfect absorption (CPA), coherent perfect transmission (CPT), and coherent perfect synthesis (CPS) can be attained within different parameter regimes. That is, we can make two input probe fields totally absorbed by the movable mirror without yielding any energy output from either end mirror (CPA); make an input probe field transmitted from one end mirror to the other end mirror without suffering any energy loss in the two cavities (CPT); make two input probe fields synthesized into one output probe field after undergoing either a perfect transmission or a perfect reflection (CPS). These interesting phenomena originate from the efficient hybrid coupling of optical and mechanical modes and may be all-optically controlled to realize novel photonic devices in quantum information networks.

  8. Laser Frequency Stabilization and Control through Offset Sideband Locking to Optical Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James I.; Livas, J.; Numata, K.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a class of techniques whereby a laser frequency can be stabilized to a fixed optical cavity resonance with an adjustable offset, providing a wide tuning range for the central frequency. These techniques require only minor modifications to the standard Pound-Drever-Hall locking techniques and have the advantage of not altering the intrinsic stability of the frequency reference. In a laboratory investigation the sideband techniques were found to perform equally well as the standard, non-tunable Pound-Drever-Hall technique, each providing more than four decades of frequency noise suppression over the free-running noise. An application of a tunable system as a pre-stabilization stage in a phase-lock loop is also presented with the combined system achieving a frequency noise suppression of nearly twelve orders of magnitude.

  9. Detecting topological superconductivity using low-frequency doubled Shapiro steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Jay D.; Setiawan, F.

    2017-02-01

    The fractional Josephson effect has been observed in many instances as a signature of a topological superconducting state containing zero-energy Majorana modes. We present a nontopological scenario which can produce a fractional Josephson effect generically in semiconductor-based Josephson junctions, namely, a resonant impurity bound state weakly coupled to a highly transparent channel. We show that the fractional ac Josephson effect can be generated by the Landau-Zener processes which flip the electron occupancy of the impurity bound state. The Josephson effect signature for Majorana modes become distinct from this nontopological scenario only at low frequency. We prove that a variant of the fractional ac Josephson effect, namely, the low-frequency doubled Shapiro steps, can provide a more reliable signature of the topological superconducting state.

  10. Parametric generation of radiation in a dynamic cavity with frequency dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Rosanov, N N; Fedorov, E G; Matskovsky, A A

    2016-01-31

    A numerical simulation of the parametric generation of electromagnetic radiation in a cavity with periodically oscillating mirrors and Lorentz-type frequency dispersion has been performed. It is shown that initially weak seed radiation can be transformed into intense short pulses, the shape of which under steady-state conditions changes periodically when reflecting from mirrors and, depending on the dispersion characteristics, corresponds to uni- or bipolar pulses. (letters)

  11. Lasic -Cavity-enhanced molecular iodine laser frequency stabilization for space projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turazza, Oscar; Acef, O.; Auger, G.; Halloin, H.; Duburck, F.; Plagnol, E.; Holleville, D.; Dimarcq, N.; Binetruy, P.; Brillet, A.; Lemonde, P.; Devismes, E.; Prat, P.; Lours, M.; Tuckey, P.; Argence, B.

    We present work in progress at SYRTE, APC and ARTEMIS aiming at stabilizing the frequency of a Nd:YAG laser using saturated absorption spectroscopy of molecular iodine 127I2. The novel design of the LASIC project allows for robustness and compacity while achieving high-performance phase noise suppression. The project is a follow-up of the laser stabilization work started at Artemis and continued at APC. The use of a low-finesse bow-tie optical cavity around the iodine absorber, combined with an adapted high-frequency modulation of the laser phase -NICE-OHMS technique-yields shot-noise limited saturated absorption signals with cavity-enhanced signal-to-noise ratios. Residual fractional frequency instability in terms of Allan Std. Deviation is expected below 10-14 @1s integration time and down to 10-15 over several hours. The compact iodine / cavity design, and performance well above LISA requirements make this project an interesting candidate for the space-based Gravitational Waves detector. We discuss the scientific background and outline of this project within the LISA framework, as well as its potential impact on other stringent technical requirements of the LISA project (e.g. U.S.O. clock-stability, arm-length measurements. . . ). We also present other possible applications for space projects involving interferometry, laser ranging or onboard ultrastable oscillators.

  12. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Ciovati, G.; Anlage, Steven M.; Baldwin, C.; ...

    2012-03-16

    An apparatus was created to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in details in this contribution.

  13. Multi-cavity locally resonant structure with the low frequency and broad band-gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jiulong; Yao, Hong; Du, Jun; Zhao, Jinbo

    2016-11-01

    A multi-cavity periodic structure with the characteristic of local resonance was proposed in the paper. The low frequency band-gap structure was comparatively analyzed by the finite element method (FEM) and electric circuit analogy (ECA). Low frequency band-gap can be opened through the dual influence of the coupling's resonance in the cavity and the interaction among the couplings between structures. Finally, the influence of the structural factors on the band-gap was analyzed. The results show that the structure, which is divided into three parts equally, has a broader effective band-gap below the frequency of 200 Hz. It is also proved that reducing the interval between unit structures can increase the intensity of the couplings among the structures. And in this way, the width of band-gap would be expanded significantly. Through the parameters adjustment, the structure enjoys a satisfied sound insulation effect below the frequency of 500Hz. In the area of low frequency noise reduction, the structure has a lot of potential applications.

  14. Double-loop frequency selective surfaces for multi frequency division multiplexing in a dual reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A multireflector antenna utilizes a frequency-selective surface (FSS) in a subreflector to allow signals in two different RF bands to be selectively reflected back into a main reflector and to allow signals in other RF bands to be transmitted through it to the main reflector for primary focus transmission. A first approach requires only one FSS at the subreflector which may be an array of double-square-loop conductive elements. A second approach uses two FSS's at the subreflector which may be an array of either double-square-loop (DSL) or double-ring (DR). In the case of DR elements, they may be advantageously arranged in a triangular array instead of the rectangular array for the DSL elements.

  15. High frequency computation in wave equations and optimal design for a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jun

    Two types of problems are studied in this thesis. One part of the thesis is devoted to high frequency computation. Motivated by fast multiscale Gaussian wavepacket transforms and multiscale Gaussian beam methods which were originally designed for initial value problems of wave equations in the high frequency regime, we develop fast multiscale Gaussian beam methods for wave equations in bounded convex domains in the high frequency regime. To compute the wave propagation in bounded convex domains, we have to take into account reflecting multiscale Gaussian beams, which are accomplished by enforcing reflecting boundary conditions during beam propagation and carrying out suitable reflecting beam summation. To propagate multiscale beams efficiently, we prove that the ratio of the squared magnitude of beam amplitude and the beam width is roughly conserved, and accordingly we propose an effective indicator to identify significant beams. We also prove that the resulting multiscale Gaussian beam methods converge asymptotically. Numerical examples demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method. The second part of the thesis studies the reduction of backscatter radar cross section (RCS) for a cavity embedded in the ground plane. One approach for RCS reduction is through the coating material. Assume the bottom of the cavity is coated by a thin, multilayered radar absorbing material (RAM) with possibly different permittivities. The objective is to minimize the backscatter RCS by the incidence of a plane wave over a single or a set of incident angles and frequencies. By formulating the scattering problem as a Helmholtz equation with artificial boundary condition, the gradient with respect to the material permittivities is determined efficiently by the adjoint state method, which is integrated into a nonlinear optimization scheme. Numerical example shows the RCS may be significantly reduced. Another approach is through shape optimization. By introducing a transparent

  16. Advances in development of Nb3Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posen, Sam; Liepe, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    A 1.3 GHz Nb3Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavity prepared with a modified annealing step reached Bp k>50 mT , well above Bc 1=25 ±7 mT , without the strong Q -slope observed in previous Nb3Sn cavities. At 4.2 K, it has a Q0 of approximately 1 ×1 010 at >10 MV /m , far outperforming Nb at useable gradients. At 2 K, quench occurred at ˜55 mT , apparently due to a defect, so additional treatment may increase the maximum gradient. Material parameters of the coating were extracted from Q vs T data, including a Tc of 18.0 ±0.1 K , close to the maximum literature value. High power pulses were used to reach fields far higher than in CW measurements, and near Tc, quench fields close to the superheating field were observed. Based on a review of previous experience with Nb3Sn cavities, a speculative mechanism involving weak link grain boundaries is presented to explain how the modified annealing step could be the cause of the absence of strong Q -slope. Finally, an analysis of the progress to date provides hints that the path forward for Nb3Sn cavities should focus on minimizing defects.

  17. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  18. Frequency and Intensity Stabilization of Planar Waveguide-External Cavity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez, Gregorio; Shoen, Steven; Quetschke, Volker

    2012-02-01

    Planar Waveguide External Cavity Lasers (PW-ECL) show an immense potential for use in precision measurement tasks and space missions because of its compactness and simple design. We show the techniques used to frequency and intensity stabilize a PW-ECL 1550nm laser system with the goal of achieving a frequency stability of 30 Hz/sqrt(Hz) and a RIN of less than 10-6. These PW-ECL systems are a potential replacement for Non-Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO) laser systems, which have become a standard for low-noise interferometric applications, if the PW-ECL can meet the required stability. We present the initial experimental results of the intensity and frequency stabilization setup and we show a comparison between PW-ECL lasers and NPRO lasers with respect to measurements and applications requiring a high frequency and intensity stability.

  19. High frequency optical pulse generation by frequency doubling using polarization rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we propose and experimentally characterize a stable 40 GHz optical pulse generation by frequency doubling using polarization rotation in a phase modulator (PM). Only half the electrical driving frequency is required (i.e. 20 GHz); hence the deployment cost can be reduced. Besides, precise control of the bias of the PM is not required. The generated optical pulses have a high center-mode-suppression-ratio (CMSR) of  >  28 dB. The single sideband (SSB) noise spectrum is also measured, and the time-domain waveforms under different CMSRs are also analyzed and discussed.

  20. Application of superconducting magnesium diboride (MGB2) in superconducting radio frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Teng

    The superconductivity in magnesium diboride (MgB2) was discovered in 2001. As a BCS superconductor, MgB2 has a record-high Tc of 39 K, high Jc of > 107 A/cm2 and no weak link behavior across the grain boundary. All these superior properties endorsed that MgB2 would have great potential in both power applications and electronic devices. In the past 15 years, MgB2 based power cables, microwave devices, and commercial MRI machines emerged and the next frontier are superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. SRF cavities are one of the leading accelerator technologies. In SRF cavities, applied microwave power generates electrical fields that accelerate particle beams. Compared with other accelerator techniques, SRF cavity accelerators feature low loss, high acceleration gradients and the ability to accelerate continuous particle beams. However, current SRF cavities are made from high-purity bulk niobium and work at 2 K in superfluid helium. The construction and operational cost of SRF cavity accelerators are very expensive. The demand for SRF cavity accelerators has been growing rapidly in the past decade. Therefore, a lot of effort has been devoted to the enhancement of the performance and the reduction of cost of SRF cavities. In 2010, an acceleration gradient of over 50 MV/m has been reported for a Nb-based SRF cavity. The magnetic field at the inner surface of such a cavity is ~ 1700 Oe, which is close to the thermodynamic critical field of Nb. Therefore, new materials and technologies are required to raise the acceleration gradient of future SRF cavity accelerators. Among all the proposed approaches, using MgB2 thin films to coat the inner surface of SRF cavities is one of the promising tactics with the potential to raise both the acceleration gradient and the operation temperature of SRF cavity accelerators. In this work, I present my study on MgB2 thin films for their application in SRF cavities. C-epitaxial MgB2 thin films grown on SiC(0001) substrates

  1. LOFAR MSSS: The scaling relation between AGN cavity power and radio luminosity at low radio frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokotanekov, G.; Wise, M.; Heald, G. H.; McKean, J. P.; Bîrzan, L.; Rafferty, D. A.; Godfrey, L. E. H.; de Vries, M.; Intema, H. T.; Broderick, J. W.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Bonafede, A.; Clarke, A. O.; van Weeren, R. J.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Pizzo, R.; Iacobelli, M.; Orrú, E.; Shulevski, A.; Riseley, C. J.; Breton, R. P.; Nikiel-Wroczyński, B.; Sridhar, S. S.; Stewart, A. J.; Rowlinson, A.; van der Horst, A. J.; Harwood, J. J.; Gürkan, G.; Carbone, D.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Tasse, C.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Pratley, L.; Ferrari, C.; Croston, J. H.; Pandey, V. N.; Jurusik, W.; Mulcahy, D. D.

    2017-09-01

    We present a new analysis of the widely used relation between cavity power and radio luminosity in clusters of galaxies with evidence for strong AGN feedback. We studied the correlation at low radio frequencies using two new surveys - the first alternative data release of the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS ADR1) at 148 MHz and LOFAR's firstall-sky survey, the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS) at 140 MHz. We find a scaling relation Pcav ∝ Lβ148, with a logarithmic slope of β = 0.51 ± 0.14, which is in good agreement with previous results based on data at 327 MHz. The large scatter present in this correlation confirms the conclusion reached at higher frequencies that the total radio luminosity at a single frequency is a poor predictor of the total jet power. Previous studies have shown that the magnitude of this scatter can be reduced when bolometric radio luminosity corrected for spectral aging is used. We show that including additional measurements at 148 MHz alone is insufficient to improve this correction and further reduce the scatter in the correlation. For a subset of four well-resolved sources, we examined the detected extended structures at low frequencies and compare with the morphology known from higher frequency images and Chandra X-ray maps. In the case of Perseus we discuss details in the structures of the radio mini-halo, while in the 2A 0335+096 cluster we observe new diffuse emission associated with multiple X-ray cavities and likely originating from past activity. For A2199 and MS 0735.6+7421, we confirm that the observed low-frequency radio lobes are confined to the extents known from higher frequencies. This new low-frequency analysis highlights the fact that existing cavity power to radio luminosity relations are based on a relatively narrow range of AGN outburst ages. We discuss how the correlation could be extended using low frequency data from the LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey (LoTSS) in combination with future, complementary deeper X

  2. Numerical evaluation of aperture coupling in resonant cavities and frequency perturbation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, R.; Nayak, B.; Sharma, A.; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a general formulation for numerical evaluation of the coupling between two identical resonant cavities by a small elliptical aperture in a plane common wall of arbitrary thickness. It is organized into two parts. In the first one we discuss the aperture coupling that is expressed in terms of electric and magnetic dipole moments and polarizabilities using Carlson symmetric elliptical integrals. Carlson integrals have been numerically evaluated and under zero thickness approximation, the results match with the complete elliptical integrals of first and second kind. It is found that with zero wall thickness, the results obtained are the same as those of Bethe and Collin for an elliptical and circular aperture of zero thickness. In the second part, Slater's perturbation method is applied to find the frequency changes due to apertures of finite thickness on the cavity wall.

  3. Experimental Demonstration of Frequency Autolocking an Optical Cavity Using a Time-Varying Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, Dirk; Hassen, S. Z. Sayed; Karvinen, Kai S.; Boyson, Toby K.; Kallapur, Abhijit G.; Song, Hongbin; Petersen, Ian R.; Huntington, Elanor H.; Heurs, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a new autolocking scheme using a three-mirror ring cavity consisting of a linear quadratic regulator and a time-varying Kalman filter. Our technique does not require a frequency scan to acquire resonance. We utilize the singular perturbation method to simplify our system dynamics and to permit the application of linear control techniques. The error signal combined with the transmitted power is used to estimate the cavity detuning. This estimate is used by a linear time-varying Kalman filter which enables the implementation of an optimal controller. The experimental results validate the controller design, and we demonstrate improved robustness to disturbances and a faster locking time than a traditional proportional-integral controller. More important, the time-varying Kalman filtering approach automatically reacquires lock for large detunings, where the error signal leaves its linear capture range, a feat which linear time-invariant controllers cannot achieve.

  4. Surface Science Laboratory for Studying the Surfaces of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Andy Wu

    2003-09-01

    A Surface Science Laboratory (SSL) has been established at JLab to study surfaces relevant to superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Current operational facilities include a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive x-ray analysis, a secondary ion mass spectrometry, a metallographic optical microscope, a transmission electron microscope, a high precision and large scan area 3-D profilometer, a scanning field emission microscope, and a fully equipped sample preparation room. A scanning Auger microscope is being commissioned, and will be available for routine usage soon. Results from typical examples of the R&D projects on SRF cavities that were supported in the past through the use of the facilities in the SSL will be briefly reported.

  5. Effective index model predicts modal frequencies of vertical-cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    SERKLAND,DARWIN K.; HADLEY,G. RONALD; CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; GEIB,KENT M.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-04-18

    Previously, an effective index optical model was introduced for the analysis of lateral waveguiding effects in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. The authors show that the resultant transverse equation is almost identical to the one typically obtained in the analysis of dielectric waveguide problems, such as a step-index optical fiber. The solution to the transverse equation yields the lateral dependence of the optical field and, as is recognized in this paper, the discrete frequencies of the microcavity modes. As an example, they apply this technique to the analysis of vertical-cavity lasers that contain thin-oxide apertures. The model intuitively explains the experimental data and makes quantitative predictions in good agreement with a highly accurate numerical model.

  6. Multi-cavity coupling acoustic metamaterials with low-frequency broad band gaps based on negative mass density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chuanhui; Wu, Jiu Hui; Cao, Songhua; Jing, Li

    2016-08-01

    This paper studies a novel kind of low-frequency broadband acoustic metamaterials with small size based on the mechanisms of negative mass density and multi-cavity coupling. The structure consists of a closed resonant cavity and an open resonant cavity, which can be equivalent to a homogeneous medium with effective negative mass density in a certain frequency range by using the parameter inversion method. The negative mass density makes the anti-resonance area increased, which results in broadened band gaps greatly. Owing to the multi-cavity coupling mechanism, the local resonances of the lower frequency mainly occur in the closed cavity, while the local resonances of the higher frequency mainly in the open cavity. Upon the interaction between the negative mass density and the multi-cavity coupling, there exists two broad band gaps in the range of 0-1800 Hz, i.e. the first-order band gap from 195 Hz to 660 Hz with the bandwidth of 465 Hz and the second-order band gap from 1157 Hz to 1663 Hz with the bandwidth of 506 Hz. The acoustic metamaterials with small size presented in this paper could provide a new approach to reduce the low-frequency broadband noises.

  7. Low Frequency NQR using Double Contact Cross-relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, David; Smith, John A. S.

    2000-02-01

    A cross-relaxation technique is described which involves two spin contacts per double reso-nance cycle. The result is an improvement in signal to noise ratio particularly at low frequencies. Experimental spectra and analyses are presented: 14N in ammonium sulphate showing that the tech-nique gives essentially the same information as previous studies; 14N in ammonium dichromate determining e2Qq/h as (76±3) kHz and η = 0.84±.04; 7Li in lithium acetylacetonate for which the spectrum (corrected for Zeeman distortion) yields e2Qq/h = (152 ±5) kHz and η=.5 ±.2. Calculated spectra are presented to demonstrate the η dependence of the line shapes for 7Li.

  8. Ringing and double frequency response of a tri-pod

    SciTech Connect

    Nedergaard, H.; Lyngesen, S.; Tychsen, J.

    1996-12-31

    The dynamic behavior of a tri-pod steel jacket installed in 65 m water depth in the North Sea has been investigated. The analysis method is a time-domain simulation of the platform exposed to irregular sea. Similar to monotower platforms the so-called ringing phenomenon caused by higher order harmonics in the wave loading is detected. Further, the analysis discovered another dynamic feature, double frequency response, caused by the interaction between the spatial distribution of the waveload and the shape of first vibrational mode. The dynamic response showed that the top of the platform vibrates notably more in first mode than found by a quasi static analysis with incorporation of standard dynamic amplification factors, however, the resulting extreme stress level and accumulated fatigue damage is found quite similar and the consequences to human comfort small. The basis for this finding is the fact that first mode only contributes very little to the stress level in critical points.

  9. Mode-locked frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brookman, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    The design, fabrication, test, and delivery of two mode-locked, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser systems are described. Each system was comprised of two units, the laser head and optics on an Invar plate and the electronics control unit in a relay rack chassis panel. Laser number one operated at a repetition rate of 400 MHz and was designed for use in an optical communication system. Laser number two operated at 200 MHz repetition rate and was designed for optical ranging and target signature experiments. Both lasers had a pulse width of 200 ps at the 10% amplitude points at 1.064 micrometer wavelength (150 ps at 0.532 micrometers) with an amplitude stability of + or - 4%. Output power exceeded the design goals.

  10. Efficient Generation of Visible Femtosecond Pulses by Frequency Doubling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guo (Gary) Yao

    In principle, second harmonic generation (SHG) can convert near-infrared femtosecond mode-locked pulses into visible and UV regions. However, the finite phase matching bandwidth makes it difficult to simultaneously phase match the entire pulse spectrum. Effects such as peak power saturation and pulse broadening arise as the length of a frequency-doubling crystal increases. To avoid these problems, very thin crystals have to be used, which results in low conversion efficiency unless the laser intensity is very high. Two new approaches based on quasi-phase match and traditional Cerenkov SHG are proposed in this thesis. In the former scheme, proper design provides the requisite delay of the fundamental pulses, resulting in simultaneous phase and group velocity matches. The latter scheme makes use of the auto-phase matching property of Cerenkov SHG to phase match the whole pulse spectrum. The stretched output pulses are compressed by a dispersion element, such as a prism or a grating. Pulse width preservation and high efficiency are thus expected from low pump power. Experiments to conform the latter proposal were conducted. Proton-exchanged MgO doped LiNbO_3 Cerenkov waveguides were used to double the frequency of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. 25 mW blue harmonic pulses were generated from only 50 mW input. A diffraction grating compressed the stretched 2 psec pulses back to 300 fsec. The device is easy to make and to use. The concept presented can be extended to femtosecond pulses in any three-photon process in any waveguide material and any modelocked source.

  11. Investigation of the superconducting properties of niobium radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    Radio-frequency (rf) superconducting cavities are widely used to increase the energy of a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The maximum gradients of cavities made of bulk niobium have constantly improved over the last ten years and they are approaching the theoretical limit of the material. Nevertheless, rf tests of niobium cavities are still showing some "anomalous" losses (so-called "Q-drop"), characterized by a marked increase of the surface resistance at high rf fields, in absence of field emission. A low temperature "in-situ" baking under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied by several laboratories to reduce those losses and improve the cavity's quality factor. Several models have been proposed to explain the cause of the Q-drop and the baking effect. We investigated the effect of baking on niobium material parameters by measuring the temperature dependence of a cavity's surface impedance and comparing it with the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer's theory of superconductivity. It was found that baking allows interstitial oxygen to diffuse from the surface deeper into the bulk. This produces a significant reduction of the normal electrons' mean free path, which causes an increase of the quality factor. The optimum baking parameters are 120°C for 24-48 h. We were also able to identify the origin of the Q-drop as due to a high magnetic field, rather then electric field, by measuring the quality factor of a cavity as function of the rf field in a resonant mode with only magnetic field present on the surface. With the aid of a thermometry system, we were able to localize the losses in the high magnetic field region. We measured the Q-drop in cavities which had undergone different treatments, such as anodization, electropolishing and post-purification, and with different metallurgical properties and we study the effectiveness of baking in each case. As a result, none of the models proposed so far can explain all the experimental observations. We

  12. Sisyphus Thermalization of Photons in a Cavity-Coupled Double Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullans, M. J.; Stehlik, J.; Liu, Y.-Y.; Eichler, C.; Petta, J. R.; Taylor, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the nonclassical states of light that emerge in a microwave resonator coupled to a periodically driven electron in a nanowire double quantum dot (DQD). Under certain drive configurations, we find that the resonator approaches a thermal state at the temperature of the surrounding substrate with a chemical potential given by a harmonic of the drive frequency. Away from these thermal regions we find regions of gain and loss, where the system can lase, or regions where the DQD acts as a single-photon source. These effects are observable in current devices and have broad utility for quantum optics with microwave photons.

  13. Sisyphus Thermalization of Photons in a Cavity-Coupled Double Quantum Dot

    PubMed Central

    Gullans, M. J.; Stehlik, J.; Liu, Y.-Y.; Eichler, C.; Petta, J. R.; Taylor, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the non-classical states of light that emerge in a microwave resonator coupled to a periodically-driven electron in a nanowire double quantum dot (DQD). Under certain drive configurations, we find that the resonator approaches a thermal state at the temperature of the surrounding substrate with a chemical potential given by a harmonic of the drive frequency. Away from these thermal regions we find regions of gain and loss, where the system can lase, or regions where the DQD acts as a single-photon source. These effects are observable in current devices and have broad utility for quantum optics with microwave photons. PMID:27517784

  14. Single-frequency tunable 447.3 nm laser by frequency doubling of tapered amplified diode laser at cesium D1 line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jinhong; Wu, Jinze; Ma, Rong; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Junxiang

    2016-08-22

    A continuous single-frequency tunable blue laser at 447.3 nm is developed by external-cavity frequency doubling of a tapered amplifier-boosted continuous-wave diode laser at cesium (Cs) D1 line. A maximum blue power of 178 mW with 50.8% conversion efficiency is obtained. It can be continuously tuned over a range around 1.6 GHz as the diode laser frequency is scanned across the F=4→F'=3 transition of 133Cs D1 line. The generated tunable and stable blue laser source has potential applications in constructing quantum light-atom interfaces in quantum networks.

  15. Operation of the CAPRICE electron cyclotron resonance ion source applying frequency tuning and double frequency heating.

    PubMed

    Maimone, F; Tinschert, K; Celona, L; Lang, R; Mäder, J; Rossbach, J; Spädtke, P

    2012-02-01

    The properties of the electromagnetic waves heating the electrons of the ECR ion sources (ECRIS) plasma affect the features of the extracted ion beams such as the emittance, the shape, and the current, in particular for higher charge states. The electron heating methods such as the frequency tuning effect and the double frequency heating are widely used for enhancing the performances of ECRIS or even for the routine operation during the beam production. In order to better investigate these effects the CAPRICE ECRIS has been operated using these techniques. The ion beam properties for highly charged ions have been measured with beam diagnostic tools. The reason of the observed variations of this performance can be related to the different electromagnetic field patterns, which are changing inside the plasma chamber when the frequency is varying.

  16. Tunable resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector with double high-index-contrast grating mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Yvind, Kresten; Chung, Il-Sug

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a broadband-tunable resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCE-PD) structure with double high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirrors and numerically investigate its characteristics. The detector is designed to operate at 1550-nm wavelength. The detector structure consists of a top InP HCG mirror, a p-i-n photodiode embedding multiple quantum wells, and a Si HCG mirror formed in the Si layer of a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The detection wavelength can be changed by moving the top InP HCG mirror suspended in the air. High reflectivity and small penetration length of HCGs lead to a narrow absorption linewidth of 0.38 nm and a broad tuning range of 111 nm. The peak absorption efficiency is 76-84% within the tuning range. This broadband-tunable and narrow-absorption-linewidth RCE-PD is desirable for applications where selective wavelength demultiplexing is required. Furthermore, the fact that it can be fabricated on a silicon platform offers us a possibility of integration with electronics.

  17. Development of double spiral MEMS hotplate using front-side etching cavity for gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Magandeep; Prasad, Mahanth

    2016-04-01

    A microhotplate has increased attention in the field of metal oxide based gas sensors in order to provide an adequate temperature required for gas sensing phenomena. In this work a double spiral platinum based heater has been design and fabricated. The design and simulation of the microhotplate was carried out using MEMS-CAD TOOL COVENTORWARE. The electro-thermal simulation of heater was used in the simulation. The hotplate structure was consists of a 1.0 µm-thick SiO2 membrane of size 500 ×500 µm2 over which a platinum resistor of 0.2 µm thickness was laid out. The fabrication of microhotplate was done using bulk micromachining process. In this process, the SiO2 membrane was suspended by making a 180 µm deep cavity using tetra methyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution. For an applied voltage (5V), the temperature of 927°C was obtained across center area of the membrane. The test results indicate that the microhotplate consumes only 5 V when heated up to 600°C. However, at 11V, a maximum temperature of around 1230°C in center area of the membrane was achieved.

  18. Widely tunable terahertz source based on intra-cavity frequency mixing in quantum cascade laser arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Aiting; Jung, Seungyong; Jiang, Yifan; Kim, Jae Hyun; Belkin, Mikhail A.; Vijayraghavan, Karun

    2015-06-29

    We demonstrate a compact monolithic terahertz source continuously tunable from 1.9 THz to 3.9 THz with the maximum peak power output of 106 μW at 3.46 THz at room temperature. The source consists of an array of 10 electrically tunable quantum cascade lasers with intra-cavity terahertz difference-frequency generation. To increase fabrication yield and achieve high THz peak power output in our devices, a dual-section current pumping scheme is implemented using two electrically isolated grating sections to independently control gain for the two mid-IR pumps.

  19. Phase and frequency dynamics of a short cavity swept-source OCT laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, T.; Goulding, D.; Slepneva, S.; O'Shaughnessy, B.; Kelleher, B.; Lyu, H.-C.; Hegarty, S. P.; Vladimirov, A. G.; Karnowski, K.; Wojtkowski, M.; Huyet, G.

    2015-03-01

    We analyse the dynamical behaviour of a short cavity OCT swept-source laser experimentally and theoretically. Mode-hopping, sliding frequency mode-locking and chaos are all observed during the laser sweep period. Hetero- dyne measurements of laser dynamics allows some insight into the behaviour of the laser, while interferometric techniques allow the full phase reconstruction of the laser electric field. A delay differential equation enables modelling of the laser output, and laser parameters can be altered to provide optimisation conditions for future laser designs.

  20. Continuous Vernier filtering of an optical frequency comb for broadband cavity-enhanced molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, Lucile; Morville, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    We have recently introduced the Vernier-based Direct Frequency Comb Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy technique which allows us to record broadband spectra at high sensitivity and GHz resolution (Rutkowski and Morville, 2014) [1]. We discuss here the effect of Vernier filtering on the observed lineshapes in the 3 ν + δ band of water vapor and the entire A-band of oxygen around 800 nm in ambient air. We derive expressions for the absorption profiles resulting from the continuous Vernier filtering method, testing them on spectra covering more than 2000 cm-1 around 12,500 cm-1. With 31,300 independent spectral elements acquired at the second time scale, an absorption baseline noise of 2 ×10-8cm-1 is obtained, providing a figure of merit of 1.1×10-10 cm-1/√{ Hz } per spectral element with a cavity finesse of 3000 and a cavity round-trip length around 3.3 m.

  1. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Tian, Guilhem Ribeill, Chen Xu, Charles E. Reece, Michael J. Kelley

    2011-03-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  2. Surface Characterization of Impurities in Superconducting Niobium for Radio Frequency (RF) Cavities used in Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Prateek

    Niobium (Nb) is the material of choice for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Cavities used in particle accelerators owing to its high critical temperature (Tc = 9.2 K) and critical magnetic field (≈ 200mT). However, niobium tends to harbor interstitial impurities such as H, C, O and N, which are detrimental to cavity performance. Since the magnetic field penetration depth (lambda) of niobium is 40nm, it is important to characterize these impurities using surface characterization techniques. Also, it is known that certain heat treatments improve cavity efficiency via interstitial impurity removal from the surface of niobium. Thus, a systematic study on the effect of these heat treatments on the surface impurity levels is needed. In this work, surface analysis of both heat treated and non heat treated (120°C-1400°C) large grain (single crystal) bulk niobium samples was performed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Impurity levels were compared on the surface using SIMS after various types of heat treatments expected to improve cavity performance, and the effect of these heat treatments on the surface impurities were examined. SIMS characterization of ion implanted standards of C, N, O, D showed that quantification of C, N and O impurities in Nb is achievable and indicated that H is very mobile in Nb. It was hence determined that quantification of H in Nb is not possible using SIMS due to its high diffusivity in Nb. However, a comparative study of the high temperature heat treated (600°C-1400°C) and non heat treated (control) samples revealed that hydrogen levels decreased by upto a factor of 100. This is attributed to the dissociation of the niobium surface oxide layer, which acts as a passivating film on the surface, and subsequent desorption of hydrogen. Reformation of this oxide layer on cool down disallows any re-absorption of hydrogen, indicating that the oxide acts as a surface barrier for

  3. Q-switched mode-locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser using cavity modulation frequency detuning.

    PubMed

    Chang, You Min; Lee, Junsu; Jhon, Young Min; Lee, Ju Han

    2012-07-20

    We present the results of an investigation regarding a Q-switched mode-locked fiber laser scheme based on a cavity modulation frequency detuning technique. The approach is based on undamped laser relaxation oscillations occurring due to frequency detuning in the fundamental cavity resonance frequency. Through a range of experiments with an erbium-doped, fiber-based, ring-cavity laser, this approach has been shown to be capable of generating high-quality Q-switched mode-locked pulses from an optical fiber-based laser. The maximum frequency detuning range for a stable Q-switched mode-locking operation has been observed to vary depending on the pump power used. We found that the highest pulse peak power was obtained at the frequency detuning threshold at which the operation changed from the mode-locking to the Q-switched mode-locking regime.

  4. Highly efficient Er-Yb codoped double-clad fiber amplifier with an Yb-band resonant cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qun; Yao, Yunzhi; Tang, Xiaoyun; Chen, Yaofei; Yan, Wenchuan; Liu, Tiegen; Song, Huiling

    2017-02-01

    A high-power Er-Yb codoped fiber amplifier (EYDFA) with an Yb-band resonant cavity is investigated. By introducing a linear resonant cavity formed by a pair of high-reflection double-clad fiber Bragg gratings, the Yb-ASE problem of high-power pumped EYDFAs can be resolved and the efficiency of the amplifier can be notably improved. At a pump power of ~17 W, an output power of 7.25 W was experimentally achieved. The pump conversion efficiency and slope efficiency relative to the applied pump power are ~42.6% and ~45.6%, respectively. Moreover, due to the gain-clamping effect of the Yb cavity, the gain flatness of the amplifier is also evidently improved.

  5. Disk patch resonators for cavity quantum electrodynamics at the terahertz frequency.

    PubMed

    Derntl, Christian G; Bachmann, Dominic; Unterrainer, Karl; Darmo, Juraj

    2017-05-29

    We designed disk patch resonators to meet the requirements for enhanced coupling of optical cavities to intersubband transitions in heterostructures in the terahertz frequency regime. We applied modifications to the standard patch resonator in the form of a chain of holes and slits to control the resonator eigenmodes featuring quality factors ωFWHM/ω0 as high as 40. Due to the broken rotational symmetry of the resonators the individual eigenmodes can be accessed selectively depending on the incidence and the polarization of the THz wave. The demonstrated post-process blue-shifting of the resonance frequency up to 50% is a key tuning knob for an optimization of light-matter interaction in a quantum system.

  6. Characterizing the dynamics of cavity solitons and frequency combs in the Lugiato-Lefever equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rivas, P.; Gomila, D.; Gelens, L.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present a detailed analysis of bifurcation structures of cavity solitons (CSs) and determine the different dynamical regimes in the Lugiato-Lefever (LL) equation in the presence of anomalous and normal chromatic dispersion regimes. Such an analysis has been shown to also increase our understanding of frequency combs (FCs). A FC consists in a set of equidistant spectral lines that can be used to measure light frequencies and time intervals more easily and precisely than ever before. Due to the duality between CSs in microcavities and FCs, we can gain information about the behavior of FCs by analyzing the dynamics of CSs. In the anomalous dispersion case bright CSs are organized in what is known as a homoclinic snaking bifurcation structure. In contrast, in the normal dispersion regime dark CSs are organized differently, in a structure known as collapsing snaking. Despite the differences in bifurcation scenarios, both types of CSs present similar temporal instabilities.

  7. Long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser based on mode boundary detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhouxiang; Huang, Kaikai; Jiang, Yunfeng; Lu, Xuanhui

    2011-12-01

    We have realized a long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser (ECDL) based on mode boundary detection method. In this system, the saturated absorption spectroscopy was used. The current and the grating of the ECDL were controlled by a computer-based feedback control system. By checking if there are mode boundaries in the spectrum, the control system determined how to adjust current to avoid mode hopping. This procedure was executed periodically to ensure the long-term stabilization of ECDL in the absence of mode hops. This diode laser system with non-antireflection coating had operated in the condition of long-term mode-hop-free stabilization for almost 400 h, which is a significant improvement of ECDL frequency stabilization system.

  8. Long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser based on mode boundary detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhouxiang; Huang, Kaikai; Jiang, Yunfeng; Lu, Xuanhui

    2011-12-01

    We have realized a long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser (ECDL) based on mode boundary detection method. In this system, the saturated absorption spectroscopy was used. The current and the grating of the ECDL were controlled by a computer-based feedback control system. By checking if there are mode boundaries in the spectrum, the control system determined how to adjust current to avoid mode hopping. This procedure was executed periodically to ensure the long-term stabilization of ECDL in the absence of mode hops. This diode laser system with non-antireflection coating had operated in the condition of long-term mode-hop-free stabilization for almost 400 h, which is a significant improvement of ECDL frequency stabilization system.

  9. Frequency stabilization of an external-cavity diode laser to metastable argon atoms in a discharge.

    PubMed

    Douglas, P; Maher-McWilliams, C; Barker, P F

    2012-06-01

    A laser stabilization scheme using magnetic dichroism in a RF plasma discharge is presented. This method has been used to provide a frequency stable external-cavity diode laser that is locked to the 4s[3/2](2) → 4p[5/2](3) argon laser cooling transition at 811.53 nm. Using saturated absorption spectroscopy, we lock the laser to a Doppler free peak which gave a locking range of 20 MHz when the slope of the error signal was maximized. The stability of the laser was characterized by determining the square root Allan variance of laser frequency fluctuations when the laser was locked. A stability of 129 kHz was measured at 1 s averaging time for data acquired over 6000 s.

  10. Characterization of Nb Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities Based On In-Situ STEM And EELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Runzhe

    Niobium, a 4d transition metal, has the highest superconducting transition temperature (Tc=9.2K) of any elemental superconductor as type II superconductor with coherent length, sigma approximately that of the penetration length, lambda. Pure niobium is grey in color and very soft, which makes this metal easily fabricable into different shapes for superconducting radio- frequency (SRF) cavities. Such cavities are used in some modern accelerators (SNS, CEBAF, XFEL), and are intended for usage in the next generation of particle accelerators, such as ILC. Since the crucial part of the cavities is top 100 nm of Nb near the inner cavity surface, considering the penetration depth is around 40 nm, it has attracted more and more attention in improving the surface process for optimizing the performance of the cavities. Nowadays, the main treatment of the Nb surface includes electro polishing (EP), buffered chemical polishing (BCP), high temperature baking (800 °C, 1000 °C and 1200 °C) and mild baking (120 °C). Firstly, the two half cells are welded together and the weld line is quite rough; there exists a lot of visible pits and defects on the inner shell of cavities. In this Ph.D. thesis, novel techniques in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that can be used to analyze the atomic scale structure-property relationship, both at room tem- perature and high/LN 2 temperature, are explored. Specifically, by using correlated Z-contrast imaging and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS), the structure, composition and bonding can be characterized directly on the atomic scale, also, light atoms, like H, O and C, are visible in ABF images. For the examining the defect behavior on the cavity surface, heating and cold stages are involved to simulate the baking treatment and low-temperature environments. These studies will serve as an important reference for qualifying different surface treatments to further improve SRF cavities' performance. The experimental results

  11. Highly Accurate Frequency Calculations of Crab Cavities Using the VORPAL Computational Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, T.M.; Cary, J.R.; Bellantoni, L.; /Argonne

    2009-05-01

    We have applied the Werner-Cary method [J. Comp. Phys. 227, 5200-5214 (2008)] for extracting modes and mode frequencies from time-domain simulations of crab cavities, as are needed for the ILC and the beam delivery system of the LHC. This method for frequency extraction relies on a small number of simulations, and post-processing using the SVD algorithm with Tikhonov regularization. The time-domain simulations were carried out using the VORPAL computational framework, which is based on the eminently scalable finite-difference time-domain algorithm. A validation study was performed on an aluminum model of the 3.9 GHz RF separators built originally at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the US. Comparisons with measurements of the A15 cavity show that this method can provide accuracy to within 0.01% of experimental results after accounting for manufacturing imperfections. To capture the near degeneracies two simulations, requiring in total a few hours on 600 processors were employed. This method has applications across many areas including obtaining MHD spectra from time-domain simulations.

  12. Tunable photonic cavity coupled to a voltage-biased double quantum dot system: Diagrammatic nonequilibrium Green's function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Kulkarni, Manas; Mukamel, Shaul; Segal, Dvira

    2016-07-01

    We investigate gain in microwave photonic cavities coupled to voltage-biased double quantum dot systems with an arbitrarily strong dot-lead coupling and with a Holstein-like light-matter interaction, by employing the diagrammatic Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function approach. We compute out-of-equilibrium properties of the cavity: its transmission, phase response, mean photon number, power spectrum, and spectral function. We show that by the careful engineering of these hybrid light-matter systems, one can achieve a significant amplification of the optical signal with the voltage-biased electronic system serving as a gain medium. We also study the steady-state current across the device, identifying elastic and inelastic tunneling processes which involve the cavity mode. Our results show how recent advances in quantum electronics can be exploited to build hybrid light-matter systems that behave as microwave amplifiers and photon source devices. The diagrammatic Keldysh approach is primarily discussed for a cavity-coupled double quantum dot architecture, but it is generalizable to other hybrid light-matter systems.

  13. An innovative MRE absorber with double natural frequencies for wide frequency bandwidth vibration absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuaishuai; Yang, Jian; Li, Weihua; Deng, Huaxia; Du, Haiping; Alici, Gursel; Yan, Tianhong

    2016-05-01

    A new design of adaptive tuned vibration absorber was proposed in this study for vibration reduction. The innovation of the new absorber is the adoption of the eccentric mass on the top of the multilayered magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) structure so that this proposed absorber has two vibration modes: one in the torsional direction and the other in translational direction. This property enables the absorber to expand its effective bandwidth and to be more capable of reducing the vibrations especially dealing with those vibrations with multi-frequencies. The innovative MRE absorber was designed and tested on a horizontal vibration table. The test results illustrate that the MRE absorber realized double natural frequencies, both of which are controllable. Inertia’s influence on the dynamic behavior of the absorber is also investigated in order to guide the design of the innovative MRE absorber. Additionally, the experimentally obtained natural frequencies coincide with the theoretical data, which sufficiently verifies the feasibility of this new design. The last part in terms of the vibration absorption ability also proves that both of these two natural frequencies play a great role in absorbing vibration energy.

  14. Towards strongly correlated photons in arrays of dissipative nonlinear cavities under a frequency-dependent incoherent pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreuilly, José; Wouters, Michiel; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-10-01

    We report a theoretical study of a quantum optical model consisting of an array of strongly nonlinear cavities incoherently pumped by an ensemble of population-inverted two-level atoms. Projective methods are used to eliminate the atomic dynamics and write a generalized master equation for the photonic degrees of freedom only, where the frequency-dependence of gain introduces non-Markovian features. In the simplest single cavity configuration, this pumping scheme gives novel optical bistability effects and allows for the selective generation of Fock states with a well-defined photon number. For many cavities in a weakly non-Markovian limit, the non-equilibrium steady state recovers a Grand-Canonical statistical ensemble at a temperature determined by the effective atomic linewidth. For a two-cavity system in the strongly nonlinear regime, signatures of a Mott state with one photon per cavity are found. xml:lang="fr"

  15. Sub-kilohertz linewidth narrowing of a mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator idler frequency by direct cavity stabilization.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, I; Mosca, S; Parisi, M; Maddaloni, P; Santamaria, L; De Natale, P; De Rosa, M

    2015-10-15

    We stabilize the idler frequency of a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator directly to the resonance of a mid-infrared Fabry-Perot reference cavity. This is accomplished by the Pound-Drever-Hall locking scheme, controlling either the pump laser or the resonant signal frequency. A residual relative frequency noise power spectral density below 10(3)  Hz(2)/Hz is reached on average, with a Gaussian linewidth of 920 Hz over 100 ms, which reveals the potential for reaching spectral purity down to the hertz level by locking the optical parametric oscillator against a mid-infrared cavity with state-of-the-art superior performance.

  16. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karhu, J.; Nauta, J.; Vainio, M.; Metsälä, M.; Hoekstra, S.; Halonen, L.

    2016-06-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, ν 1 + ν 2 + ν 3 + ν4 1 + ν5 - 1 in the normal mode notation. Single-photon transitions to this state from the vibrational ground state are forbidden. Ten lines of the newly measured state are observed and fitted with the linear least-squares method to extract the band parameters. The vibrational term value was measured to be at 9775.0018(45) cm-1, the rotational parameter B was 1.162 222(37) cm-1, and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameter D was 3.998(62) × 10-6 cm-1, where the numbers in the parenthesis are one-standard errors in the least significant digits.

  17. Compact, single-frequency, doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator pumped in an achromatic phase-adapted double-pass geometry.

    PubMed

    Hardy, B; Berrou, A; Guilbaud, S; Raybaut, M; Godard, A; Lefebvre, M

    2011-03-01

    We report on a nested-cavity, doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (NesCOPO) architecture for widely tunable, mid-IR, single-frequency generation. By use of an achromatic phase-adapted double-pass pumping scheme, this new, low-threshold, semimonolithic architecture only requires two free-standing cavity mirrors and a nonlinear crystal with a mirror coating deposited on its input facet while the other facet is antireflection coated. It is thus as simple and compact as any basic linear optical parametric oscillator cavity, is easily tunable, and displays low sensitivity to mechanical vibrations. Using a high-repetition-rate (4.8 kHz) microlaser as the pump source of the NesCOPO, we demonstrate a compact source that provides pulsed, stable single-frequency output over a wide spectral range (3.8-4.3 μm) with a high peak power (up to 50 W), which are properties well suited for practical gas sensing applications.

  18. Periodontal treatment with the frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser in dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Hennig, Thomas; Reichart, Peter

    2000-03-01

    While earlier periodontal investigations have proved the frequency doubled Alexandrite laser to eliminate efficiently and selectively dental calculus as well as bacteria the aim of this study was to demonstrate the safety of this laser for removal of dental calculus with respect to the dental pulp. Four adult Labrador dogs were treated with a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser (laboratory prototype, q-switched, fiber guided, wavelength 377 nm, pulse duration 1 microsecond, pulse repetition rate 70 Hz, water cooling) to remove dental calculus. After performing a modified Widman flap procedure the buccal surface of nine teeth in the lower and upper right jaw were irradiated for four minutes per tooth. Three different laser fluences up to four times higher than the fluence required for calculus removal were used (1.5, 3 and 6 J/cm2). At three other sites of the right jaw deep cavities were prepared with a dental drill and filled with compomere material (DyractR, Dentsply, Germany) to serve as a positive control with regard to possible pulpal reactions. The corresponding teeth of the lower and upper left jaw served as controls. Animals were sacrificed one day, one week, four weeks and six weeks after treatment. Teeth were separated, fixed in formalin and decalcified. After embedding and sectioning the histological sections were stained and investigated by a totally blinded investigator (P.A.R). Histological investigations revealed that irradiation with the frequency doubled Alexandrite laser for periodontal treatment with fluences of 1.5 J/cm2 -- those fluences necessary for the selective removal of dental calculus and microbial plaque -- had no adverse side effects to the pulpal tissues. Moreover this pulpal safety study demonstrated that even applying fluences two or four times higher than those suggested for calculus removal do not lead to observable changes or alterations in the odontoblast cell layer or the pulpal tissues. No inflammatory reactions and no

  19. Temporal characterization of FEL micropulses as function of cavity length detuning using frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, B.A.; DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R.

    1995-12-31

    Results of frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) measurements on the Stanford mid-IR FEL system show the effect of FEL cavity length detuning on the micropulse temporal structure. The FROG technique enables the acquisition of complete and uniquely invertible amplitude and phase temporal dependence of optical pulses. Unambiguous phase and amplitude profiles are recovered from the data. The optical pulses are nearly transform limited, and the pulse length increases with cavity length detuning.

  20. A Wide Spaced Femtosecond Ti:Sapphire Frequency Comb at 15 GHz by a Fabry—Pérot Filter Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lei; Han, Hai-Nian; Zhang, Jin-Wei; Li, De-Hua; Wei, Zhi-Yi

    2013-10-01

    We realize a wide spaced frequency comb by using an external low-fineness Fabry—Pérot (F-P) cavity to filter few-cycle laser pulses from a Kerr-lens mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser at the fundamental repetition rate of 350MHz. Mode spacing as wide as 15 GHz with spectrum covered from 690 nm to 710 nm is demonstrated, corresponding to a filter multiple of about 43. The scanning transmission peaks after the F-P cavity with cavity lengths are also simulated numerically, and the results are in agreement with the experiment.

  1. Cavity-assisted atomic frequency comb memory in an isotopically pure 143Nd3+ :YLiF4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedzhanov, R. A.; Gushchin, L. A.; Kalachev, A. A.; Nizov, N. A.; Nizov, V. A.; Sobgayda, D. A.; Zelensky, I. V.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we present an implementation of cavity-assisted atomic frequency comb (AFC) memory protocol in an isotopically pure 143Nd3+ :YLiF4 crystal. We use a tunable confocal Fabry-Perot cavity that is placed inside the cryostat. For a 1 mm thick sample with optical depth of 0.2 we obtain total storage efficiency of 3%, which is a 15-fold enhancement compared to the no cavity case. The memory bandwidth is limited by the inhomogeneous broadening of the optical transition and allows us to store short 30 ns pulses.

  2. Spectrum of the cavity-QED microlaser: strong coupling effects in the frequency pulling at off resonance.

    PubMed

    Hong, H-G; Seo, W; Song, Y; Lee, M; Jeong, H; Shin, Y; Choi, W; Dasari, R R; An, K

    2012-12-14

    We report the first experimental observation of the cavity-QED microlaser spectrum, specifically the unconventional frequency pulling brought by a strong atom-cavity coupling at off resonance. The pulling is enhanced quadratically by the atom-cavity coupling to result in a sensitive response to the number of pumping atoms (2.1 kHz per atom maximally). Periodic variation of the pulling due to the coherent Rabi oscillation is also observed as the number of pumping atoms is increased across multiple thresholds.

  3. [THE FREQUENCY OF FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO THE FORMATION OF ADHESIONS IN THE ABDOMINAL CAVITY IN WOMEN].

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, F

    2017-01-01

    To determine the major factor that contributed to the formation of adhesions in the abdominal cavity in women with a history of surgical interventions, examined 86 women with adhesive disease (main group) in the past have suffered various surgeries. The average age of patients was 35,7±5,6 years. Clinical examination of patients included a collection of complaints, anamnesis of disease and life, physical examination. The degree of adhesion process in the abdominal cavity was evaluated according to the classification of the American Fertility Society (R-AFS, 1985) and the macroscopic scale proposed by N.I. Ayushinova and co-authors. I severity of adhesions was detected in 32 (37.2%) II stage - in 13 (15.1%), grade III - 14 (16.3%) and IV degree in 27 (31.4%) patients. The duration of the adhesive process averaged 6.3±0.6 years. Adhesions lasting 1-3 years met in 43.0% of cases, 4-5 years - in 31.4% of cases and more than 5 years - in 25.6% of cases. The reason for the formation of adhesions served as inflammatory diseases - at 39.5%, gynecological surgeries - in 32.7% of patients, appendectomy - 20.9%, surgery for acute intestinal obstruction - in 5.8% of patients. After laparotomy adhesions of grade III-IV were formed in 62.5% after laparoscopy - in 33.0% of cases, ie, in 1,9 times less (p <0,05). Adhesions in the abdominal cavity occurs in 39.5% of patients after salpingoophoritis and sexually transmitted infections, as well as in 32.7% women undergoing gynecological surgery. In 32.0% of patients with salpingoophoritis and 44.4% of STIs, there is a III-IV degree of adhesion. The frequency of high adhesion after laparotomy is 62.5%, after laparoscopy - 33.3%.

  4. Superconducting NbTiN thin films for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavity applications

    DOE PAGES

    Burton, Matthew C.; Beebe, Melissa R.; Yang, Kaida; ...

    2016-02-12

    Current superconducting radio frequency technology, used in various particle accelerator facilities across the world, is reliant upon bulk niobium superconducting cavities. Due to technological advancements in the processing of bulk Nb cavities, the facilities have reached accelerating fields very close to a material-dependent limit, which is close to 50 MV/m for bulk Nb. One possible solution to improve upon this fundamental limitation was proposed a few years ago by Gurevich [Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 012511 (2006)], consisting of the deposition of alternating thin layers of superconducting and insulating materials on the interior surface of the cavities. The use of type-IImore » superconductors with Tc > TcNb and Hc > HcNb, (e.g., Nb3Sn, NbN, or NbTiN) could potentially greatly reduce the surface resistance (Rs) and enhance the accelerating field, if the onset of vortex penetration is increased above HcNb, thus enabling higher field gradients. Although Nb3Sn may prove superior, it is not clear that it can be grown as a suitable thin film for the proposed multilayer approach, since very high temperature is typically required for its growth, hindering achieving smooth interfaces and/or surfaces. On the other hand, since NbTiN has a smaller lower critical field (Hc1) and higher critical temperature (Tc) than Nb and increased conductivity compared to NbN, it is a promising candidate material for this new scheme. Here, the authors present experimental results correlating filmmicrostructure with superconducting properties on NbTiN thin film coupon samples while also comparing filmsgrown with targets of different stoichiometry. In conclusion, it is worth mentioning that the authors have achieved thin films with bulk-like lattice parameter and transition temperature while also achieving Hc1 values larger than bulk for films thinner than their London penetration depths.« less

  5. Occurrence, frequency, and significance of cavities in fractured-rock aquifers near Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    Virtually all wells drilled into bedrock intercept a water-bearing fracture, but cavities occur only in areas underlaid by limy rocks. Multiple cavities are common in wells in the Conasauga and Knox Groups but are rare in the Rome Formation and the Chickamauga Group. The geometric mean height (vertical dimension) of the cavities is 0.59 m, the geometric mean depth is 14 m, the average lateral spatial frequency is 0.16, and the average vertical spatial frequency is 0.019. Differences in cavity parameter values are caused partly by geologic factors such as lithology, bed thickness, and spatial fracture frequency. However, hydrologic factors such as percolation rate, recharge amount, aquifer storage capacity, and differences between lateral and vertical permeability may also be important. Tracer tests show that groundwater velocity in some cavities is in the range 20-300 m/d, and relatively rapid flow rates occur near springs. In contrast, wells that intercept cavities have about the same range in hydraulic conductivity as wells in regolith and fractured rock. The hydraulic conductivity data indicate a flow rate of less than 1.0 m/d. This difference cannot be adequately explained, but rapid groundwater movement may be much more common above the water table than below. Rapid groundwater flows below the water table might be rare except near springs in the Knox Group. 10 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Cavity partition and functionalization of a [2+3] organic molecular cage by inserting polar P[double bond, length as m-dash]O bonds.

    PubMed

    Feng, Genfeng; Liu, Wei; Peng, Yuxin; Zhao, Bo; Huang, Wei; Dai, Yafei

    2016-07-28

    The cavity of a [2+3] organic molecular cage was partitioned and functionalized by inserting inner-directed P[double bond, length as m-dash]O bonds, which shows CO2 capture and CH4 exclusion due to the size-matching and polarity effects. Computational results demonstrate that the successful segmentation via polar P[double bond, length as m-dash]O bonds facilitates the CO2 molecules to reside selectively inside the cavity.

  7. Relative frequency stabilization of extended-cavity diode lasers for the re-pumping of Ca ion

    SciTech Connect

    Minamino, K.; Hasegawa, S.

    2009-03-17

    Traditional stabilization methods of multiple lasers using Fabry-Perot interferometers need several optical devices for combining and separating the laser beams. Therefore, laser beams with similar frequencies are difficult to stabilize because they cannot be easily optically separated. For this reason, we built a new laser frequency stabilization system which does not require the optical separation of the laser beams. We achieved the frequency stabilization of two extended-cavity diode lasers using an FPI within {+-}5 MHz per hour.

  8. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Denise Christine

    2013-03-01

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 <-> HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities – hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon – in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I

  9. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Denise Christine

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 <-> HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities---hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon---in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I present the beginning of a model to describe magnetic

  10. Surface polishing of niobium for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Liang

    2014-08-01

    Niobium cavities are important components in modern particle accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology. The interior of SRF cavities are cleaned and polished in order to produce high accelerating field and low power dissipation on the cavity wall. Current polishing methods, buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electro-polishing (EP), have their advantages and limitations. We seek to improve current methods and explore laser polishing (LP) as a greener alternative of chemical methods. The topography and removal rate of BCP at different conditions (duration, temperature, sample orientation, flow rate) was studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Differential etching on different crystal orientations is the main contributor to fine grain niobium BCP topography, with gas evolution playing a secondary role. The surface of single crystal and bi-crystal niobium is smooth even after heavy BCP. The topography of fine grain niobium depends on total removal. The removal rate increases with temperature and surface acid flow rate within the rage of 0~20 °C, with chemical reaction being the possible dominate rate control mechanism. Surface flow helps to regulate temperature and avoid gas accumulation on the surface. The effect of surface flow rate on niobium EP was studied with optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and power spectral density (PSD) analysis. Within the range of 0~3.7 cm/s, no significant difference was found on the removal rate and the macro roughness. Possible improvement on the micro roughness with increased surface flow rate was observed. The effect of fluence and pulse accumulation on niobium topography during LP was studied with optical microscopy, SEM, AFM, and PSD analysis. Polishing on micro scale was achieved within fluence range of 0.57~0.90 J/cm2, with pulse accumulation adjusted accordingly. Larger area treatment was proved possible by

  11. Reclamation of niobium compounds from ionic liquid electrochemical polishing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wixtrom, Alex I.; Buhler, Jessica E.; Reece, Charles E.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that choline chloride (vitamin B4)-based solutions can be used as a greener alternative to acid-based electrochemical polishing solutions. This study demonstrated a successful method for electrochemical deposition of niobium compounds onto the surface of copper substrates using a novel choline chloride-based ionic liquid. Niobium ions present in the ionic liquid solution were dissolved into the solution prior to deposition via electrochemical polishing of solid niobium. A black coating was clearly visible on the surface of the Cu following deposition. This coating was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). This ionic liquid-based electrochemical deposition method effectively recycles previously dissolved niobium from electrochemical polishing of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities.

  12. Approach to high-frequency, cavity-enhanced Faraday rotation in fluids.

    PubMed

    Pagliero, D; Li, Y; Fisher, S; Meriles, C A

    2011-02-10

    Recent work demonstrating detection of nuclear spin magnetization via Faraday rotation in transparent fluids promises novel opportunities for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Unfortunately, low sensitivity is a serious concern. With this motivation in mind, we explore the use of an optical cavity to augment the Faraday rotation experienced by a linearly polarized beam traversing a sample fluid. Relying on a setup that affords reduced sample size and high-frequency modulation, we demonstrate amplification of regular (i.e., nonnuclear) Faraday rotation of order 20. Extensions of the present methodology that take into account the geometric constraints imposed by a high-field magnet may open the way to high-sensitivity, optically-detected magnetic resonance in the liquid state.

  13. Characterization of spatiotemporal chaos in a Kerr optical frequency comb and in all fiber cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Ouali, M.; Coulibaly, S.; Clerc, M. G.; Taki, M.; Tlidi, M.

    2017-03-01

    Complex spatiotemporal dynamics have been a subject of recent experimental investigations in optical frequency comb microresonators and in driven fiber cavities with a Kerr-type media. We show that this complex behavior has a spatiotemporal chaotic nature. We determine numerically the Lyapunov spectra, allowing to characterize different dynamical behavior occurring in these simple devices. The Yorke-Kaplan dimension is used as an order parameter to characterize the bifurcation diagram. We identify a wide regime of parameters where the system exhibits a coexistence between the spatiotemporal chaos, the oscillatory localized structure, and the homogeneous steady state. The destabilization of an oscillatory localized state through radiation of counter propagative fronts between the homogeneous and the spatiotemporal chaotic states is analyzed. To characterize better the spatiotemporal chaos, we estimate the front speed as a function of the pump intensity.

  14. Cavity-enhanced optical Hall effect in two-dimensional free charge carrier gases detected at terahertz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Knight, S; Schöche, S; Darakchieva, V; Kühne, P; Carlin, J-F; Grandjean, N; Herzinger, C M; Schubert, M; Hofmann, T

    2015-06-15

    The effect of a tunable, externally coupled Fabry-Perot cavity to resonantly enhance the optical Hall effect signatures at terahertz frequencies produced by a traditional Drude-like two-dimensional electron gas is shown and discussed in this Letter. As a result, the detection of optical Hall effect signatures at conveniently obtainable magnetic fields, for example, by neodymium permanent magnets, is demonstrated. An AlInN/GaN-based high-electron mobility transistor structure grown on a sapphire substrate is used for the experiment. The optical Hall effect signatures and their dispersions, which are governed by the frequency and the reflectance minima and maxima of the externally coupled Fabry-Perot cavity, are presented and discussed. Tuning the externally coupled Fabry-Perot cavity strongly modifies the optical Hall effect signatures, which provides a new degree of freedom for optical Hall effect experiments in addition to frequency, angle of incidence, and magnetic field direction and strength.

  15. Evaluation of thermal expansion coefficient of Fabry-Perot cavity using an optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulehla, Jindřich; Šmíd, Radek; Buchta, Zdeněk; Čížek, Martin; Mikel, Břetislav; Jedlička, Petr; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2011-05-01

    In construction of highly mechanically stable measuring devices like AFM microscopes or nano-comparators the use of low expansion materials is very necessary. We can find Zerodur ceramics or ULE glasses used as a frame or basement of these devices. The expansion coefficient of such low-expansion materials is lower than 0.01 x 10-6 m•K-1. For example in case of a frame or basement 20 cm long it leads to a dilatation approximately 4 nm per 1 K. For calculation of the total uncertainty of the mentioned measuring devices the knowledge of the thermal expansion coefficient of the frame or basement is necessary. In this work we present a method, where small distance changes are transformed into rf-frequency signal. The frequency of this signal is detected by a counter which measures the value of the frequency with respect to an ultra-stable time-base. This method uses a Fabry-Perot cavity as a distance measuring tool. The spacer of the optical resonator is made from the investigated low-expansion material. It is placed into a vacuum chamber where the inside temperature is controlled. A selected mode of the femtosecond frequency of the femtosecond comb which represent the distance changes of the optical resonator. The frequency is measured by the rf-counter which is synchronized by a time-base signal from an atomic clock. The first results show the resolution of the method in the 0.1 nm order. Therefore the method has a potential in characterisation of materials in the nanoworld.

  16. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Hydroformed Tubular Materials for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Sung

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities represent a well established technology benefiting from some 40 years of research and development. An increasing demand for electron and positron accelerators leads to a continuing interest in improved cavity performance and fabrication techniques. Therefore, several seamless cavity fabrication techniques have been proposed for eliminating the multitude of electron-beam welded seams that contribute to the introduction of performance-reducing defects. Among them, hydroforming using hydraulic pressure is a promising fabrication technique for producing the desired seamless cavities while at the same time reducing manufacturing cost. This study focused on experimental and numerical analysis of hydroformed niobium (Nb) tubes for the successful application of hydroforming technique to the seamless fabrication of multi-cell SRF cavities for particle acceleration. The heat treatment, tensile testing, and bulge testing of Cu and Nb tubes has been carried out to both provide starting data for models of hydroforming of Nb tube into seamless SRF cavities. Based on the results of these experiments, numerical analyses using finite element modeling were conducted for a bulge deformation of Cu and Nb. In the experimental part of the study samples removed from representative tubes were prepared for heat treatment, tensile testing, residual resistance ratio (RRR) measurement, and orientation imaging electron microscopy (OIM). After being optimally heat treated Cu and Nb tubes were subjected to hydraulic bulge testing and the results analyzed. For numerical analysis of hydroforming process, two different simulation approaches were used. The first model was the macro-scale continuum model using the constitutive equations (stress-strain relationship) as an input of the simulation. The constitutive equations were obtained from the experimental procedure including tensile and tube bulge tests in order to investigate the influence of loading

  17. Efficient solar-pumped Nd:YAG laser by a double-stage light-guide/V-groove cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Joana; Liang, Dawei

    2011-05-01

    Since the first reported Nd:YAG solar laser, researchers have been exploiting parabolic mirrors and heliostats for enhancing laser output performance. We are now investigating the production of an efficient solar-pumped laser for the reduction of magnesium from magnesium oxide, which could be an alternative solution to fossil fuel. Therefore both high conversion efficiency and excellent beam quality are imperative. By using a single fused silica light guide of rectangular cross section, highly concentrated solar radiation at the focal spot of a stationary parabolic mirror is efficiently transferred to a water-flooded V-groove pump cavity. It allows for the double-pass absorption of pump light along a 4mm diameter, 30mm length, 1.1at% Nd:YAG rod. Optimum pumping parameters and solar laser output power are found through ZEMAXTM non-sequential ray-tracing and LASCADTM laser cavity analysis. 11.0 W of multimode laser output power with excellent beam profile is numerically calculated, corresponding to 6.1W/m2 collection efficiency. To validate the proposed pumping scheme, an experimental setup of the double-stage light-guide/V-groove cavity was built. 78% of highly concentrated solar radiation was efficiently transmitted by the fused silica light guide. The proposed pumping scheme can be an effective solution for enhancing solar laser performances when compared to other side-pump configurations.

  18. Arm-length stabilisation for interferometric gravitational-wave detectors using frequency-doubled auxiliary lasers.

    PubMed

    Mullavey, Adam J; Slagmolen, Bram J J; Miller, John; Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Sigg, Daniel; Waldman, Sam J; Shaddock, Daniel A; McClelland, David E

    2012-01-02

    Residual motion of the arm cavity mirrors is expected to prove one of the principal impediments to systematic lock acquisition in advanced gravitational-wave interferometers. We present a technique which overcomes this problem by employing auxiliary lasers at twice the fundamental measurement frequency to pre-stabilise the arm cavities' lengths. Applying this approach, we reduce the apparent length noise of a 1.3 m long, independently suspended Fabry-Perot cavity to 30 pm rms and successfully transfer longitudinal control of the system from the auxiliary laser to the measurement laser.

  19. Reliable and integrated technique for determining resonant frequency in radio frequency resonators. Application to a high-precision resonant cavity-based displacement sensor.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Rigoberto; Asua, Estibaliz; Portilla, Joaquin; Etxebarria, Victor

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a reliable and integrated technique for determining the resonant frequency of radio frequency resonators, which can be of interest for different purposes. The approach uses a heterodyne scheme as phase detector coupled to a voltage-controlled oscillator. The system seeks the oscillator frequency that produces a phase null in the resonator, which corresponds to the resonant frequency. A complete explanation of the technique to determine the resonant frequency is presented and experimentally tested. The method has been applied to a high-precision displacement sensor based on resonant cavity, obtaining a theoretical nanometric precision.

  20. Planar-waveguide external cavity laser stabilization for an optical link with 10(-19) frequency stability.

    PubMed

    Clivati, Cecilia; Mura, Alberto; Calonico, Davide; Levi, Filippo; Costanzo, Giovanni A; Calosso, Claudio E; Godone, Aldo

    2011-12-01

    We stabilized the frequency of a compact planar-waveguide external cavity laser (ECL) on a Fabry-Perot cavity (FPC) through a Pound-Drever-Hall scheme. The residual frequency stability of the ECL is 10(-14), comparable to the stability achievable with a fiber laser (FL) locked to an FPC through the same scheme. We set up an optical link of 100 km, based on fiber spools, that reaches 10(-19) relative stability, and we show that its performances using the ECL or FL are comparable. Thus ECLs could serve as an excellent replacement for FLs in optical links where cost-effectiveness and robustness are important considerations.

  1. Effective sealing of a disk cavity using a double-toothed rim seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavnani, S. H.; Khilnani, V. I.; Tsai, L.-C.; Khodadadi, J. M.; Goodling, J. S.; Waggott, J.

    1992-06-01

    The sealing characteristics of an advanced air-cooled turbo-expander disk cavity are examined employing laser sheet flow visualization and static pressure measurements. Tests are conducted on a simplified half-scale model of an actual low pressure turbo-expander first-stage disk cavity. The superior performance of the seal studied is confirmed by comparison with a single-toothed rim seal and a simple axial rim seal.

  2. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Conical Double Frequency Emission by Femtosecond Laser Pulses from DKDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi-Peng; Jiang, Hong-Bing; Tang, Shan-Chun; Gong, Qi-Huang

    2009-07-01

    Conical double frequency emission is investigated by femtosecond laser pulses at a wavelength of 800 nm in a DKDP crystal. It is demonstrated that the sum frequency of incident wave and its scattering wave accounts for the conical double frequency emission. The gaps on the conical rings are observed and they are very sensitive to the propagation direction, and thus could be used to detect the small angle deviation of surface direction.

  3. Period-doubling and total mode-locking, and chaotic pulsations in a GaAs ridge wave-guide external-cavity diode laser.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Tai Hyun; Jang, Gwang Hoon

    2007-10-29

    We report on the experimental observations of a period-doubling route to chaos and a total mode-locking between two lowest-order lateral modes of a GaAs ridge wave-guide diode laser at 795 nm. A self-starting passively mode-locking was achieved in an extended-cavity diode laser (ECDL) operating in a gain saturation regime. In the period-doubling mode-locked state, the RF spectra associated with the coherently coupled lateral TE(0) and TE(1) modes, consisted of harmonics (nf(rep)/2, n is an integer) of the half of pulse repetition rate f(rep)/2 and the period (2T) of the pulse train was two-times longer than the pulse round-trip time T. On the other hand, in the total mode-locked state, the RF spectra and the pulse train corresponding to the TE(0) and TE(1) modes had exactly the same features compared to those of the period-doubling mode-locked state, except the RF spectra and the pulse train of the TE(1) mode were shifted by f(ref)/4 in frequency and by T in time, respectively, indicating the pulses actually traveled alternatively through two lateral modes. The total mode-locking and also chaotic pulsations were observed at slightly different operation parameters, e.g. at different feedback angle of the grating, which was used as an output coupler of the ECDL.

  4. Dual-frequency comb generation with differing GHz repetition rates by parallel Fabry-Perot cavity filtering of a single broadband frequency comb source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildner, Jutta; Meiners-Hagen, Karl; Pollinger, Florian

    2016-07-01

    We present a dual-comb-generator based on a coupled Fabry-Perot filtering cavity doublet and a single seed laser source. By filtering a commercial erbium-doped fiber-based optical frequency comb with CEO-stabilisation and 250 MHz repetition rate, two broadband coherent combs of different repetition rates in the GHz range are generated. The filtering doublet consists of two Fabry-Perot cavities with a tunable spacing and Pound-Drever-Hall stabilisation scheme. As a prerequisite for the development of such a filtering unit, we present a method to determine the actual free spectral range and transmission bandwidth of a Fabry-Perot cavity in situ. The transmitted beat signal of two diode lasers is measured as a function of their tunable frequency difference. Finally, the filtering performance and resulting beat signals of the heterodyned combs are discussed as well as the optimisation measures of the whole system.

  5. Superconducting NbTiN thin films for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavity applications

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Matthew C.; Beebe, Melissa R.; Yang, Kaida; Lukaszew, Rosa A.; Valente-Feliciano, Anne -Marie; Reece, Charles

    2016-02-12

    Current superconducting radio frequency technology, used in various particle accelerator facilities across the world, is reliant upon bulk niobium superconducting cavities. Due to technological advancements in the processing of bulk Nb cavities, the facilities have reached accelerating fields very close to a material-dependent limit, which is close to 50 MV/m for bulk Nb. One possible solution to improve upon this fundamental limitation was proposed a few years ago by Gurevich [Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 012511 (2006)], consisting of the deposition of alternating thin layers of superconducting and insulating materials on the interior surface of the cavities. The use of type-II superconductors with Tc > TcNb and Hc > HcNb, (e.g., Nb3Sn, NbN, or NbTiN) could potentially greatly reduce the surface resistance (Rs) and enhance the accelerating field, if the onset of vortex penetration is increased above HcNb, thus enabling higher field gradients. Although Nb3Sn may prove superior, it is not clear that it can be grown as a suitable thin film for the proposed multilayer approach, since very high temperature is typically required for its growth, hindering achieving smooth interfaces and/or surfaces. On the other hand, since NbTiN has a smaller lower critical field (Hc1) and higher critical temperature (Tc) than Nb and increased conductivity compared to NbN, it is a promising candidate material for this new scheme. Here, the authors present experimental results correlating filmmicrostructure with superconducting properties on NbTiN thin film coupon samples while also comparing filmsgrown with targets of different stoichiometry. In conclusion, it is worth mentioning that the authors have achieved thin films with bulk-like lattice parameter and transition temperature while also achieving Hc1 values larger than bulk for films thinner than their London penetration depths.

  6. Fast electron beam measurements from relativistically intense, frequency-doubled laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R. H. H.; Pérez, F.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Clark, E. L.; Davies, J. R.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Santos, J. J.; Hulin, S.; Lancaster, K. L.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Vauzour, B.; Soloviev, A. A.; Baton, S. D.; Rose, S. J.; Norreys, P. A.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental measurements of the fast electron beam created by the interaction of relativistically intense, frequency-doubled laser light with planar solid targets and its subsequent transport within the target are presented and compared with those of a similar experiment using the laser fundamental frequency. Using frequency-doubled laser light, the fast electron source size is significantly reduced, while evidence suggests the divergence angle may be reduced. Pyrometric measurements of the target rear surface temperature and the Cu Kα imager data indicate the laser to fast electron absorption fraction is reduced using frequency doubled laser light. Bremsstrahlung measurements indicate the fast electron temperature is 125 keV, while the laser energy absorbed into forward-going fast electrons was found to be 16 ± 4% for frequency doubled light at a mean laser intensity of 5 ± 3 × 1018 W cm-2.

  7. Etching of Niobium Sample Placed on Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavity Surface in Ar/CL2 Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Janardan Upadhyay, Larry Phillips, Anne-Marie Valente

    2011-09-01

    Plasma based surface modification is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. It has been proven with flat samples that the bulk Niobium (Nb) removal rate and the surface roughness after the plasma etchings are equal to or better than wet etching processes. To optimize the plasma parameters, we are using a single cell cavity with 20 sample holders symmetrically distributed over the cell. These holders serve the purpose of diagnostic ports for the measurement of the plasma parameters and for the holding of the Nb sample to be etched. The plasma properties at RF (100 MHz) and MW (2.45 GHz) frequencies are being measured with the help of electrical and optical probes at different pressures and RF power levels inside of this cavity. The niobium coupons placed on several holders around the cell are being etched simultaneously. The etching results will be presented at this conference.

  8. Investigation of double-mode operation and fast fine tuning properties of a grating-coupled external cavity diode laser configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakli, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    Double-mode operation and fast piezo fine tuning properties of a gain chip on a thermoelectric cooler in an external cavity are investigated. A widely course double-mode tuning range of 120 nm for the spectral range between 1470 and 1590 nm is achieved by rotating the diffraction gratings forming a double Littrow-type configuration. A fast piezo fine tuning range over 7cm-1 (1.5 nm, 210 GHz) in a single-mode operation is obtained by scanning the external cavity length with scan rates up to 0.5 kHz.

  9. Simultaneous fundamental and subharmonic/ harmonic frequency signals generation from a dual-cavity fiber laser based on regenerative mode-locking and active mode-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zi, Yuejiao; Jiang, Yang; Tian, Jing; Bai, Guangfu; Xia, Yi; He, Yutong; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a dual-cavity mode-locked laser, which is able to simultaneously output two optical pulses with different wavelengths and frequency. In this dual-cavity configuration, one cavity works as a regenerative mode-locked laser and outputs signal with a fundamental repetition frequency, the other one acts as an active mode-locked laser and generates signal with subharmonic or harmonic frequency by fine tuning the cavity length. In experimental demonstration, 5 GHz signal from regenerative mode-locked cavity and 2.5/ 5/ 10/ 15/ 20 GHz signal from active mode-locked cavity are simultaneously obtained. Additionally, signals in active mode-locked cavity get further super-mode suppression.

  10. Influence of radiation on double conjugate diffusion in a porous cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Azeem,; Idris, Mohd Yamani Idna; Khan, T. M. Yunus; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum Nik-Ghazali, N.

    2016-05-06

    The current work highlights the effect of radiation on the conjugate heat and mass transfer in a square porous cavity having a solid wall. The solid wall is placed at the center of cavity. The left surface of cavity is maintained at higher temperature T{sub w} and concentration C{sub w} whereas the right surface is maintained at T{sub c} and C{sub c} such that T{sub w}>T{sub c} and Cw>Cc. The top and bottom surfaces are adiabatic. The governing equations are solved with the help of finite element method by making use of triangular elements. The results are discussed with respect to two different heights of solid wall inside the porous medium along with the radiation parameter.

  11. Double-cavity radiometer for high-flux density solar radiation measurements.

    PubMed

    Parretta, A; Antonini, A; Armani, M; Nenna, G; Flaminio, G; Pellegrino, M

    2007-04-20

    A radiometric method has been developed, suitable for both total power and flux density profile measurement of concentrated solar radiation. The high-flux density radiation is collected by a first optical cavity, integrated, and driven to a second optical cavity, where, attenuated, it is measured by a conventional radiometer operating under a stationary irradiation regime. The attenuation factor is regulated by properly selecting the aperture areas in the two cavities. The radiometer has been calibrated by a pulsed solar simulator at concentration levels of hundreds of suns. An optical model and a ray-tracing study have also been developed and validated, by which the potentialities of the radiometer have been largely explored.

  12. Influence of radiation on double conjugate diffusion in a porous cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeem, Khan, T. M. Yunus; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Nik-Ghazali, N.; Idris, Mohd Yamani Idna

    2016-05-01

    The current work highlights the effect of radiation on the conjugate heat and mass transfer in a square porous cavity having a solid wall. The solid wall is placed at the center of cavity. The left surface of cavity is maintained at higher temperature Tw and concentration Cw whereas the right surface is maintained at Tc and Cc such that Tw>Tc and Cw>Cc. The top and bottom surfaces are adiabatic. The governing equations are solved with the help of finite element method by making use of triangular elements. The results are discussed with respect to two different heights of solid wall inside the porous medium along with the radiation parameter.

  13. Peritumoral interstitial double-nuclide double-compound lymphoscintigraphy (PIDDL) in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Munz, D.L.; Jung, H.

    1985-05-01

    PIDDL is a new two-phase lymphoscintigraphic approach developed by MUNZ et al. for identification of lymph node drainage groups of primary tumors followed by direct visualization of metastases in the nodes. The present study was done to test the diagnostic usefulness of PIDDL in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. 58 patients of either sex, aged 31-86 years, were examined prior to surgery. In the first phase of PIDDL, lymph node groups draining the primary lesions were identified after peritumoral interstitial injection of 1.52.0 mCi Tc-99m antimony trisulfide colloid or Tc-99m human serum albumin microcolloid. In the second phase, metastases located in the draining lymph nodes were visualized following peritumoral interstitial injection of 200-300 ..mu..Ci Ga-67 citrate. Ga-67 accumulated in 71% of lymph node drainage groups identified. No GA-67 uptake was observed in lymph nodes other than those identified by the radiocolloid. Based on the radiocolloid lymphoscintigraphic data, selective lymph node dissection was performed in 41 of the patients examined. The study concludes that PIDDL offers a promising approach for the noninvasive assessment of lymph node metastases in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

  14. A Microbolometer System for Radiation Detection in the THz Frequency Range with a Resonating Cavity Fabricated in the CMOS Technology.

    PubMed

    Sesek, Aleksander; Zemva, Andrej; Trontelj, Janez

    2017-07-04

    The THz sensors using microbolometers as a sensing element are reported as one of the most sensitive room-temperature THz detectors suitable for THz imaging and spectroscopic applications. Microbolometer detectors are usually fabricated using different types of the MEMS technology. The patent for the detection system presented in this paper describes a method for microbolometer fabrication using a standard CMOS technology with advanced micromachining techniques. The measured sensitivity of the sensors fabricated by the patented method is 1000 V/W at an optimal frequency and is determined by the performance of a double-dipole antenna and quarter-wavelength resonant cavity. The paper presents a patented method for fabrication of a microbolometer system for radiation detection in the THz frequency range (16). The method is divided in several stages regarding the current silicon micromachining process. Main stages are fabrication of supporting structures for micro bridge, creation of micro cavities and fabrication of Aluminum antenna and Titanium microbolometer. Additional method for encapsulation in the vacuum is described which additionally improves the performance of bolometer. The CMOS technology is utilized for fabrication as it is cost effective and providing the possibility of larger sensor systems integration with included amplification. At other wavelengths (e.g. IR region) thermistors are usually also the receivers with the sensor resistance change provoked by self-heating. In the THz region the energy is received by an antenna coupled to a thermistor. Depending on the specific application requirement, two types of the antenna were designed and used; a narrow-band dipole antenna and a wideband log-periodic antenna. With method described in the paper the microbolometer detector reach sensitivities up to 500 V/W and noise equivalent power (NEP) down to 10 pW/√Hz. Additional encapsulation in the vacuum improves its performance at least by a factor of 2

  15. A Novel Micro- and Nano-Scale Positioning Sensor Based on Radio Frequency Resonant Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Asua, Estibaliz; Etxebarria, Victor; García-Arribas, Alfredo; Feutchwanger, Jorge; Portilla, Joaquín; Lucas, Julio

    2014-01-01

    In many micro- and nano-scale technological applications high sensitivity displacement sensors are needed, especially in ultraprecision metrology and manufacturing. In this work a new way of sensing displacement based on radio frequency resonant cavities is presented and experimentally demonstrated using a first laboratory prototype. The principle of operation of the new transducer is summarized and tested. Furthermore, an electronic interface that can be used together with the displacement transducer is designed and proved. It has been experimentally demonstrated that very high and linear sensitivity characteristic curves, in the range of some kHz/nm; are easily obtainable using this kind of transducer when it is combined with a laboratory network analyzer. In order to replace a network analyzer and provide a more affordable, self-contained, compact solution, an electronic interface has been designed, preserving as much as possible the excellent performance of the transducer, and turning it into a true standalone positioning sensor. The results obtained using the transducer together with a first prototype of the electronic interface built with cheap discrete elements show that positioning accuracies in the micrometer range are obtainable using this cost-effective solution. Better accuracies would also be attainable but using more involved and costly electronics interfaces. PMID:24887041

  16. A novel micro- and nano-scale positioning sensor based on radio frequency resonant cavities.

    PubMed

    Asua, Estibaliz; Etxebarria, Victor; García-Arribas, Alfredo; Feutchwanger, Jorge; Portilla, Joaquín; Lucas, Julio

    2014-05-30

    In many micro- and nano-scale technological applications high sensitivity displacement sensors are needed, especially in ultraprecision metrology and manufacturing. In this work a new way of sensing displacement based on radio frequency resonant cavities is presented and experimentally demonstrated using a first laboratory prototype. The principle of operation of the new transducer is summarized and tested. Furthermore, an electronic interface that can be used together with the displacement transducer is designed and proved. It has been experimentally demonstrated that very high and linear sensitivity characteristic curves, in the range of some kHz/nm; are easily obtainable using this kind of transducer when it is combined with a laboratory network analyzer. In order to replace a network analyzer and provide a more affordable, self-contained, compact solution, an electronic interface has been designed, preserving as much as possible the excellent performance of the transducer, and turning it into a true standalone positioning sensor. The results obtained using the transducer together with a first prototype of the electronic interface built with cheap discrete elements show that positioning accuracies in the micrometer range are obtainable using this cost-effective solution. Better accuracies would also be attainable but using more involved and costly electronics interfaces.

  17. Evaluation of Continuous Irrigation and Drainage with a Double-Cavity Sleeve Tube to Treat Brain Abscess.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenxing; Du, Li; Liu, Renzhong; Jian, Zhihong; Wan, Yu

    2017-10-01

    Brain abscesses carries a high morbidity and mortality, and despite medical advances, it continues to pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges worldwide. The traditional surgical approaches to treating brain abscess (burr hole aspiration and craniotomy) have both advantages and disadvantages and remain controversial. Here we report a single institution's experience with a new surgical approach for brain abscess. We retrospectively analyzed 46 patients with intracranial abscess who underwent continuous irrigation and drainage through a double-cavity sleeve tube placed surgically in conjunction with a 4-week course of intravenous cefotaxime and metronidazole at Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University between January 2008 and December 2016. The patients' medical records were analyzed for demographic data, clinical presentation, predisposing factors, imaging findings, microbiological test results, treatments, surgical techniques, and outcomes. The 46 patients included 29 males and 17 females, ranging in age from 22 to 74 years. A single abscess was detected in 34 patients, whereas 12 patients had multiple abscesses. The average duration of hospitalization was 12.6 days. After treatment, 38 of the 46 patients resumed a normal life despite minor deficits (Glasgow Outcome Score [GOS] 5), 6 patients exhibited slight neurologic deficits (GOS 4), and 2 patients died of severe systemic infection and multiorgan failure. In particular, a patient with a brain abscess broken into the ventricle recovered well (GOS 5). No patient required repeat aspiration or surgical excision. Continuous brain abscess cavity irrigation and drainage with a double-cavity sleeve tube is an effective treatment for brain abscess and produces excellent results, especially for an abscess broken into the ventricle. It combines the advantages of burr hole aspiration and open craniotomy excision. It is easy to perform and reduces costs and damage to the patient, and also shortens hospitalization time and

  18. Perturbation theory for electric-field amplitude and phase ripple transfer in frequency doubling and tripling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, Jerome M.; L, L.; Eimerl, David; Milam, David; Milonni, Peter W.

    1997-01-01

    A theory is presented for the transfer of a perturbation of the electric field from the input to the output of a frequency converter. The transfer relationship for the field ripple is shown to depend on the plane-wave operating parameters of the converter. Predictions of the theory are shown to be in excellent agreement with full numerical simulations of doubling and tripling and experiments measuring ripple transfer in frequency doubling.

  19. Double sideband suppressed carrier modulation for stable fiber delivery of radio frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikas, Thomas; Bogris, Adonis; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the properties of a double sideband suppressed carrier modulation transmission scheme for long distance microwave frequency standard dissemination. The proposed method effectively doubles the transmitted frequency obtaining enhanced phase noise and stability performance. Suppressing the optical carrier also eliminates the dispersion induced signal fading. Important transmission parameters like optical modulation depth and linearity are also improved. Allan deviation and phase noise measurements prove the superior performance of the proposed modulation format.

  20. Intracavity frequency doubling of {mu}s alexandrite laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkmann, R.; Schoof, K.

    1994-12-31

    Intracavity second harmonic generation (SHG) with a three mirror folded cavity configuration was investigated with a flashlamp pumped, Q-switched Alexandrite laser. The authors therefore used different nonlinear optical crystals to convert the fundamental 750 nm radiation into the near UV spectral ,range (3 75 nm). The laser pulses were stretched into the {mu}s time domain by an electronic feedback system regulating the losses of the resonator. They investigated the conversion efficiency for different pulse lengths as well as the effect of pulse-lengthening due to the nonlinearity of the intracavity losses introduced by the optical crystal used. Working with BBO-crystals, they were able to achieve a second harmonic output of 25 mJ per pulse at 375 mn with a temporal rectangular pulse of 1 {mu}s in length and a stable nearly gaussian shaped beam profile.

  1. Multiwatt-power highly-coherent compact single-frequency tunable vertical-external-cavity-surface-emitting-semiconductor-laser.

    PubMed

    Laurain, A; Myara, M; Beaudoin, G; Sagnes, I; Garnache, A

    2010-07-05

    We demonstrate high power (2.1W) low noise single frequency operation of a tunable compact verical-external-cavity surface-emitting- laser exhibiting a high beam quality. We took advantage of thermal lens-based stability to develop a short (3-10 mm) plano-plano external cavity without any intracavity filter. The semiconductor structure emitting at 1microm is optically pumped by a 8W commercial 808 nm multimode diode laser at large incidence angle. For heat management purpose the GaAs-based VECSEL membrane was bonded on a SiC substrate. We measured a low divergence quasi-circular TEM00 beam (M2 = 1.2) close to diffraction limit, with a linear light polarization (>30 dB).We simulated the steady state laser beam of this unstable cavity using Fresnel diffraction. The side mode suppression ratio is > 45 dB. The free running laser linewidth is 37 kHz limited by pump induced thermal fluctuations. Thanks to this high-Q external cavity approach, the frequency noise is low and the dynamics is in the relaxation-oscillation-free regime, exhibiting low intensity noise (< 0.1%), with a cutoff frequency approximately 41MHz above which the shot noise level is reached. The key parameters limiting the laser power and coherence are studied. This design/properties can be extended to other wavelengths.

  2. A numerical study of the effect of frequency of pulsed flow control applied to a rectangular cavity in supersonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanek, Michael J.

    Stabilization of turbulent free shear flows is a poorly understood, and recently discovered flow phenomenon, not described in modern textbooks on fluid dynamics. This dissertation describes the design and large-scale experimental test of one type of flow control actuator, a rod in crossflow, which is shown to pulse at high frequency (relative to the dominant instabilities of a turbulent free shear layer), and in the process, locally stabilizes that shear layer. The shear layer in question spans a cavity (representative of a 1/10th scale modern aircraft weapons bay) in supersonic (Mach 1.2) crossflow. Without the high frequency flow control, the cavity experiences acoustic resonance (and the creation of large coherent vortical structures), which creates sound pressure levels high enough to fatigue aircraft components. With the high frequency control (and the local shear layer stabilization), the sound pressure levels are rendered benign. Evidence of suppression due to other types of high frequency pulsing devices (primarily resonance tube type designs) is also presented. A numerical study is undertaken to investigate the nature of the stabilization and acoustic suppression. An implicit, 2nd-order in space and time flow solver, coupled with a recently-developed hybrid RANS-LES turbulence model by Nichols, is utilized in a Chimera-based parallel format, to numerically simulate both the unsuppressed cavity in resonance, as well as the effect of pulsing flow control. Due to the limited ability to vary frequency using a rod in crossflow type device, a pulsed jet device is simulated instead. Frequency (and in a limited number of cases, amplitude) of pulse is varied, from 0 Hz (steady) up to 5000 Hz. The change in the character of the flow control effect as pulsing frequency is changed is described, and linked to changes in acoustic levels. The observed local stabilization of the cavity turbulent shear layer is shown in simulation to be the result of a violent instability

  3. Systematic cavity design approach for a multi-frequency gyrotron for DEMO and study of its RF behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Kalaria, P. C. Avramidis, K. A.; Franck, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Illy, S.; Pagonakis, I. Gr.; Thumm, M.; Jelonnek, J.

    2016-09-15

    High frequency (>230 GHz) megawatt-class gyrotrons are planned as RF sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive in DEMOnstration fusion power plants (DEMOs). In this paper, for the first time, a feasibility study of a 236 GHz DEMO gyrotron is presented by considering all relevant design goals and the possible technical limitations. A mode-selection procedure is proposed in order to satisfy the multi-frequency and frequency-step tunability requirements. An effective systematic design approach for the optimal design of a gradually tapered cavity is presented. The RF-behavior of the proposed cavity is verified rigorously, supporting 920 kW of stable output power with an interaction efficiency of 36% including the considerations of realistic beam parameters.

  4. Narrow linewidth 578 nm light generation using frequency-doubling with a waveguide PPLN pumped by an optical injection-locked diode laser.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eok Bong; Lee, Won-Kyu; Park, Chang Yong; Yu, Dai-Hyuk; Park, Sang Eon

    2010-05-10

    This study demonstrates 578 nm yellow light generation with a narrow linewidth using a waveguide periodically poled lithium niboate (PPLN) and an optical injection-locked diode laser. The frequency of an external cavity diode laser used as a master laser operating at 1156 nm in optical injection-locking mode was locked into a high-finesse cavity with the Pound-Drever-Hall technique, which results in a linewidth reduction of the master laser. The linewidth of the master laser was estimated to be approximately 1.6 kHz. In an effort to amplify the optical power, a distributed feed-back laser was phase-locked to the master laser by an optical injection-locking technique. A waveguide PPLN was used for second harmonic generation. Frequency-doubled yellow light of approximately 2.4 mW was obtained with a conversion efficiency of 6.5%. (c) 2010 Optical Society of America.

  5. Autonomous frequency stabilization of two extended-cavity diode lasers at the potassium wavelength on a sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinkelaker, Aline N.; Schiemangk, Max; Schkolnik, Vladimir; Kenyon, Andrew; Lampmann, Kai; Wenzlawski, André; Windpassinger, Patrick; Hellmig, Ortwin; Wendrich, Thijs; Rasel, Ernst M.; Giunta, Michele; Deutsch, Christian; Kürbis, Christian; Smol, Robert; Wicht, Andreas; Krutzik, Markus; Peters, Achim

    2017-02-01

    We have developed, assembled, and flight-proven a stable, compact, and autonomous extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) system designed for atomic physics experiments in space. To that end, two micro-integrated ECDLs at 766.7 nm were frequency stabilized during a sounding rocket flight by means of frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) of 39^K and offset locking techniques based on the beat note of the two ECDLs. The frequency stabilization as well as additional hard- and software to test hot redundancy mechanisms were implemented as part of a state-machine, which controlled the experiment completely autonomously throughout the entire flight mission.

  6. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy of Doppler-broadened absorption line with sub-MHz absolute frequency accuracy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C-F; Sun, Y R; Pan, H; Lu, Y; Li, X-F; Wang, J; Liu, A-W; Hu, S-M

    2012-04-23

    A continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectrometer has been built for precise determination of absolute frequencies of Doppler-broadened absorption lines. Using a thermo-stabilized Fabry-Pérot interferometer and Rb frequency references at the 780 nm and 795 nm, 0.1 - 0.6 MHz absolute frequency accuracy has been achieved in the 775-800 nm region. A water absorption line at 12579 cm(-1) is studied to test the performance of the spectrometer. The line position at zero-pressure limit is determined with an uncertainty of 0.3 MHz (relative accuracy of 0.8 × 10(-9)).

  7. 0.5W CW single frequency blue at 486 nm via SHG with net conversion of 81.5% from the NIR using a 30mm PPMgO:SLT crystal in a resonant cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademian, Ali; Jadhav, Shilpa; Shiner, David

    2015-02-01

    A single frequency fiber Bragg grating (FBG) stabilized laser at 972 nm is coupled into a doubling ring cavity with an optical length of 138 mm, a 91% input coupler, a 30 mm long Brewster cut magnesium doped periodically poled lithium tantalate (PPMgO:SLT) crystal and a high reflector. The cavity buildup is 37 and loss is 0.63%. The cavity is monitored, controlled and locked with a single chip processor. With IR power of 572 mW in the input fiber, 466 mW blue output is obtained, giving 81.5% net efficiency. The blue and IR beams are separated by refraction at the crystal's Brewster surface with negligible loss and without the need for dichroic optics.

  8. Operation of a high-gradient superconducting radio-frequency cavity with a non-evaporable getter pump

    DOE PAGES

    Ciovati, G.; Geng, R.; Lushtak, Y.; ...

    2016-10-28

    The use of non-evaporable getter (NEG) pumps in particle accelerators has increased significantly over the past few years because of their large pumping speed, particularly for hydrogen, compared to the size of the pump. A concern about using such pumps in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators is the possibility of shedding particulates which could then migrate into the SRF cavities and produce field emission, therefore degrading the cavity performance. One option to mitigate such issue is to use sintered getter materials which intrinsically offer superior mechanical and particle retention properties. In this article we present the results from cryogenic RF testsmore » of a high-gradient SRF cavity after being evacuated several times with an NEG pump equipped with sintered getter disks and placed in close proximity to the cavity. Here, the results showed that the cavity performance was not affected by the pump up to the quench gradient of 34 MV/m. As a result of this study, two such NEG pumps have been installed next to a cryomodule in the CEBAF accelerator to maintain ultra-high vacuum in the SRF cryomodule and two adjacent warm girder sections.« less

  9. Operation of a high-gradient superconducting radio-frequency cavity with a non-evaporable getter pump

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, G.; Geng, R.; Lushtak, Y.; Manini, P.; Maccallini, E.; Stutzman, M.

    2016-10-28

    The use of non-evaporable getter (NEG) pumps in particle accelerators has increased significantly over the past few years because of their large pumping speed, particularly for hydrogen, compared to the size of the pump. A concern about using such pumps in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators is the possibility of shedding particulates which could then migrate into the SRF cavities and produce field emission, therefore degrading the cavity performance. One option to mitigate such issue is to use sintered getter materials which intrinsically offer superior mechanical and particle retention properties. In this article we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of a high-gradient SRF cavity after being evacuated several times with an NEG pump equipped with sintered getter disks and placed in close proximity to the cavity. Here, the results showed that the cavity performance was not affected by the pump up to the quench gradient of 34 MV/m. As a result of this study, two such NEG pumps have been installed next to a cryomodule in the CEBAF accelerator to maintain ultra-high vacuum in the SRF cryomodule and two adjacent warm girder sections.

  10. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE041-like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code "CST Particle Studio" has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ˜108 kW with ˜15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE041-like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  11. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE{sub 041}–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE{sub 041}–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  12. Quad-Chip Double-Balanced Frequency Tripler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Robert H.; Ward, John S.; Bruneau, Peter J.; Mehdi, Imran; Thomas, Bertrand C.; Maestrini, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Solid-state frequency multipliers are used to produce tunable broadband sources at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. The maximum power produced by a single chip is limited by the electrical breakdown of the semiconductor and by the thermal management properties of the chip. The solution is to split the drive power to a frequency tripler using waveguides to divide the power among four chips, then recombine the output power from the four chips back into a single waveguide. To achieve this, a waveguide branchline quadrature hybrid coupler splits a 100-GHz input signal into two paths with a 90 relative phase shift. These two paths are split again by a pair of waveguide Y-junctions. The signals from the four outputs of the Y-junctions are tripled in frequency using balanced Schottky diode frequency triplers before being recombined with another pair of Y-junctions. A final waveguide branchline quadrature hybrid coupler completes the combination. Using four chips instead of one enables using four-times higher power input, and produces a nearly four-fold power output as compared to using a single chip. The phase shifts introduced by the quadrature hybrid couplers provide isolation for the input and output waveguides, effectively eliminating standing waves between it and surrounding components. This is accomplished without introducing the high losses and expense of ferrite isolators. A practical use of this technology is to drive local oscillators as was demonstrated around 300 GHz for a heterodyne spectrometer operating in the 2-3-THz band. Heterodyne spectroscopy in this frequency band is especially valuable for astrophysics due to the presence of a very large number of molecular spectral lines. Besides high-resolution radar and spectrographic screening applications, this technology could also be useful for laboratory spectroscopy.

  13. Cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy in the mid-infrared application to trace detection of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltynowicz, A.; Masłowski, P.; Fleisher, A. J.; Bjork, B. J.; Ye, J.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate the first cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy in the mid-infrared wavelength region and report the sensitive real-time trace detection of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a large amount of water. The experimental apparatus is based on a mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator synchronously pumped by a high-power Yb:fiber laser, a high-finesse broadband cavity, and a fast-scanning Fourier transform spectrometer with autobalancing detection. The comb spectrum with a bandwidth of 200 nm centered around 3.76 μm is simultaneously coupled to the cavity and both degrees of freedom of the comb, i.e. the repetition rate and carrier envelope offset frequency, are locked to the cavity to ensure stable transmission. The autobalancing detection scheme reduces the intensity noise by a factor of 300, and a sensitivity of 5.4×10-9 cm-1 Hz-1/2 with a resolution of 800 MHz is achieved (corresponding to 6.9×10-11 cm-1 Hz-1/2 per spectral element for 6000 resolved elements). This yields a noise equivalent detection limit for hydrogen peroxide of 8 parts-per-billion (ppb); in the presence of 2.8 % of water the detection limit is 130 ppb. Spectra of acetylene, methane, and nitrous oxide at atmospheric pressure are also presented, and a line-shape model is developed to simulate the experimental data.

  14. Microwave photonic filter using multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser with double-Brillouin-frequency shift

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, K. K.; Yeo, K. S.; Shee, Y. G.

    2015-04-24

    A microwave photonic filter based on double-Brillouin-frequency spaced multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser (BEFL) is experimentally demonstrated. The filter selectivity can be easily adjusted by tuning and apodizing the optical taps generated from the multiwavelength BEFL. Reconfiguration of different frequency responses are demonstrated.

  15. Long-range alignments of single fullerenes by site-selective inclusion into a double-cavity 2D open network.

    PubMed

    Piot, Luc; Silly, Fabien; Tortech, Ludovic; Nicolas, Yohann; Blanchard, Philippe; Roncali, Jean; Fichou, Denis

    2009-09-16

    We show by means of STM that C(60) molecules can be trapped into specific sites of a 2D double-cavity open network, thus forming long-range alignments of single molecules. Since only one of the two cavities has the right size to host C(60), the smallest cavity remains empty and is thus available to trap additional species of smaller size. This novel 2D supramolecular network opens new perspectives in the design of multicomponent guest-host architectures with electronic functionalities.

  16. Analysis of frequency noise properties of 729nm extended cavity diode laser with unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tuan M.; Čížek, Martin; Hucl, Václav; Lazar, Josef; Hrabina, Jan; Řeřucha, Šimon; Lešundák, Adam; Obšil, Petr; Filip, Radim; Slodička, Lukáš; Číp, Ondřej

    2016-12-01

    We report on the frequency noise investigation of a linewidth-suppressed Extended Cavity Diode Laser (ECDL), working at 729 nm. Since the ECDL is intended as an excitation laser for the forbidden transition in a trapped and laser cooled 40Ca+ ion, an Hz-level linewidth is required. We present the experimental design that comprises a two-stage linewidth narrowing and a facility for frequency and noise analysis. The linewidth is first narrowed with a phase lock loop of the ECDL onto a selected component of an optical frequency comb where the frequency noise was suppressed with a fast electronic servo-loop controller that drives the laser injection current with a high bandwidth. The second stage comprises locking the laser onto a selected mode of a high-finesse passive optical cavity. The frequency analysis used an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fiber spool inserted in the reference arm in order to give a general insight into the signal properties by mixing two separated beams, one of them delayed by the spool, and processing it with a spectral analyzer. Such a frequency noise analysis reveals what are the most significant noises contributions to the laser linewidth, which is a crucial information in field of ion trapping and cooling. The presented experimental results show the effect of the linewidth narrowing with the first stage, where the linewidth of ECDL was narrowed down to a kHz level.

  17. Suppressing gate errors in frequency-domain quantum computation through extra physical systems coupled to a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Goto, Hayato; Kujiraoka, Mamiko; Ichimura, Kouichi

    2016-12-01

    We propose a scheme for frequency-domain quantum computation (FDQC) in which the errors due to crosstalk are suppressed using extra physical systems coupled to a cavity. FDQC is a promising method to realize large-scale quantum computation, but crosstalk is a major problem. When physical systems employed as qubits satisfy specific resonance conditions, gate errors due to crosstalk increase. In our scheme, the errors are suppressed by controlling the resonance conditions using extra physical systems.

  18. Analysis of entropy generation for double diffusive MHD convection in a square cavity with isothermal hollow cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojumder, Satyajit; Saha, Sourav; Saha, Sumon

    2016-07-01

    Entropy optimization is a major concern for designing modern thermal management system. In the present work, entropy analysis in a square cavity with an isothermal hollow cylinder at the center is carried out for magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) double diffusive convection. Galerkin weighted residuals method of finite element formulation is adopted for the numerical solution. Entropies due to fluid flow, heat, and mass transfer are computed for wide range of Hartmann (0 ≤ Ha ≤ 50) and Lewis numbers (1 ≤ Le ≤ 15), and buoyancy ratios (-5 ≤ N ≤ 5) at constant Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers. It is found that the influence of buoyancy ratio is prominent on entropy generation, which also depends on both Lewis and Hartmann numbers. The ratio N = -1 shows minimum entropy generation for any combination of Lewis and Hartman numbers. Visualization of isentropic contours and the variation of total entropy with the governing parameters provide remarkable evidences of entropy optimization.

  19. Fano Resonance Based on Metal-Insulator-Metal Waveguide-Coupled Double Rectangular Cavities for Plasmonic Nanosensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhidong; Luo, Liang; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong; Yan, Shubin

    2016-01-01

    A refractive index sensor based on metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguides coupled double rectangular cavities is proposed and investigated numerically using the finite element method (FEM). The transmission properties and refractive index sensitivity of various configurations of the sensor are systematically investigated. An asymmetric Fano resonance lineshape is observed in the transmission spectra of the sensor, which is induced by the interference between a broad resonance mode in one rectangular and a narrow one in the other. The effect of various structural parameters on the Fano resonance and the refractive index sensitivity of the system based on Fano resonance is investigated. The proposed plasmonic refractive index sensor shows a maximum sensitivity of 596 nm/RIU. PMID:27164101

  20. Effectiveness of T-shaped acoustic resonators in low-frequency sound transmission control of a finite double-panel partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deyu; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Cheng, Li; Yu, Ganghua

    2010-10-01

    Double-panel partitions are widely used for sound insulation purposes. Their insulation efficiency is, however, deteriorated at low frequencies due to the structural and acoustic resonances. To tackle this problem, this paper proposes the use of long T-shaped acoustic resonators in a double-panel partition embedded along the edges. In order to facilitate the design and assess the performance of the structure, a general vibro-acoustic model, characterizing the interaction between the panels, air cavity, and integrated acoustic resonators, is developed. The effectiveness of the technique as well as the optimal locations of the acoustic resonators is examined at various frequencies where the system exhibits different coupling characteristics. The measured optimal locations are also compared with the predicted ones to verify the developed theory. Finally, the performance of the acoustic resonators in broadband sound transmission control is demonstrated.

  1. Micro Ion Frequency Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    will be a frequency-doubled vertical external cavity surface-emitting laser ( VECSEL ). A low-phase- noise local oscillator at 12.6 GHz will also be...the output power somewhat, we plan to pursue a vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser ( VECSEL ) as a means to both increase the output power...laser cavity. The challenge with the VECSEL is to retain the low threshold power consumption and relatively high conversion efficiency of a regular

  2. A double expansion method for the frequency response of finite-length beams with periodic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Z. G.; Ni, Y. Q.

    2017-03-01

    A double expansion method for the frequency response of finite-length beams with periodic distribution parameters is proposed. The vibration response of the beam with spatial periodic parameters under harmonic excitations is studied. The frequency response of the periodic beam is the function of parametric period and then can be expressed by the series with the product of periodic and non-periodic functions. The procedure of the double expansion method includes the following two main steps: first, the frequency response function and periodic parameters are expanded by using identical periodic functions based on the extension of the Floquet-Bloch theorem, and the period-parametric differential equation for the frequency response is converted into a series of linear differential equations with constant coefficients; second, the solutions to the linear differential equations are expanded by using modal functions which satisfy the boundary conditions, and the linear differential equations are converted into algebraic equations according to the Galerkin method. The expansion coefficients are obtained by solving the algebraic equations and then the frequency response function is finally determined. The proposed double expansion method can uncouple the effects of the periodic expansion and modal expansion so that the expansion terms are determined respectively. The modal number considered in the second expansion can be reduced remarkably in comparison with the direct expansion method. The proposed double expansion method can be extended and applied to the other structures with periodic distribution parameters for dynamics analysis. Numerical results on the frequency response of the finite-length periodic beam with various parametric wave numbers and wave amplitude ratios are given to illustrate the effective application of the proposed method and the new frequency response characteristics, including the parameter-excited modal resonance, doubling-peak frequency response

  3. LASERS: Low-frequency power and pointing noises of a spectrally-selective external-cavity diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruevich, V. V.; Elizarov, S. G.; Parashchuk, D. Yu

    2006-05-01

    The spectral density of low-frequency power noise and pointing noises of an external cavity AlGaAs/GaAs laser in Littman—Metcalf configuration is studied in the frequency region up to 1 kHz. The relative level of the power and pointing noises in the laser operating on a single longitudinal mode of the external resonator was ~10-6 Hz-1/2 and did not change substantially when the feedback was switched off. Long-term intensity fluctuations caused by intermode switchings did not exceed 2%.

  4. Low-frequency power and pointing noises of a spectrally-selective external-cavity diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bruevich, V V; Elizarov, S G; Parashchuk, D Yu

    2006-05-31

    The spectral density of low-frequency power noise and pointing noises of an external cavity AlGaAs/GaAs laser in Littman-Metcalf configuration is studied in the frequency region up to 1 kHz. The relative level of the power and pointing noises in the laser operating on a single longitudinal mode of the external resonator was {approx}10{sup -6} Hz{sup -1/2} and did not change substantially when the feedback was switched off. Long-term intensity fluctuations caused by intermode switchings did not exceed 2%. (lasers)

  5. Frequency scanning interferometry with nanometer precision using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode under scanning speed control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuma, Seiichi

    2015-12-01

    Frequency scanning interferometry technique with a nanometer precision using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode (VCSEL) is presented. Since the frequency scanning of the VCSEL is linearized by the phase-locked-loop technique, the gradient of the interference fringe order can be precisely determined using linear least squares fitting. This enables a length measurement with a precision better than a quarter wavelength, and the absolute fringe number including the integer part at the atomic transition spectrum (rubidium-D2 line) is accurately determined. The validity of the method is demonstrated by excellent results of block gauge measurement with a root mean square error better than 5 nm.

  6. Optimal feedback in efficient ring double-cavity optical parametric oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Petnikova, V M; Shuvalov, Vladimir V

    2010-09-10

    It is shown that the use of two feedback circuits with matched transfer constants and optimal phase incursions in a nondegenerate optical parametric oscillator (OPO) makes it possible to localise the extremes of intensity distributions of interacting waves on the output face of a nonlinear crystal, which provides maximum possible conversion efficiency of pump energy. The optimisation procedure in this case is rather flexible because it is reduced to ambiguous matching of the period and shift of the extremes of exact analytic solutions of the corresponding problem in the form of cnoidal waves with respect to the nonlinear crystal position. Unlike the single-cavity OPO scheme, both these parameters can substantially exceed the nonlinear crystal length and even tend to infinity, which corresponds to solitary soliton-like solutions. (optical parametric oscillators)

  7. Heating properties of the re-entrant type cavity applicator for brain tumor with several resonant frequencies.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Kato, K; Hirashima, T; Shindo, Y; Uzuka, T; Takahashi, H; Fujii, Y

    2009-01-01

    We have proposed the re-entrant resonant cavity applicator system for non-invasive brain tumor hyperthermia treatment. In this method, a human head is placed in the gap of the inner electrodes. A brain tumor is heated with the electromagnetic field stimulated in the cavity without contact between the human head and the applicator. We have already presented the effectiveness of the heating properties of this system with cylinder-type agar phantoms and by computer simulations. This paper discusses the heating properties of the developed system with the human head-type agar phantom for brain tumor hyperthermia treatment. First, in order to heat deep brain tumors, we tried to heat the human head-type agar phantom by using several electromagnetic field patterns of the resonant frequency. We found that the temperature distributions can be controlled inside the agar phantom by changing the resonant frequencies. Second, to heat local and deep areas of the agar phantom, we tried to achieve heating using the two different resonant frequencies. We found distinct heating properties by changing the electromagnetic field patterns of resonant frequencies. From these results, it was found that our developed heating system can be applied to hyperthermia treatments of deep-seated brain tumors. Further, by changing resonant frequency, treatment can very correspond to the size and the position of a tumor.

  8. Laser frequency stabilization by light shift of optical-magnetic double resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yuanzhi; Peng, Xiang; Lin, Zaisheng; Gong, Wei; Guo, Hong

    2015-05-01

    This work adopts the light shift of optical-magnetic double resonance frequency in metastable-state 4He atoms to lock the laser center frequency to the magic point. At this magic frequency, both the left-circularly and right-circularly optical pumping processes will give the same value of optical-magnetic double resonance. With this method and after locking, experimental results show that the laser frequency fluctuation is dramatically reduced to 2.79 MHz in 3600 seconds, comparing with 34.1 MHz drift in the free running mode. In application, with the locked magic laser frequency, the heading error for laser pumped 4He magnetometer can be eliminated much. The National Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars of China (Grant No. 61225003), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61101081), and the National Hi-Tech Research and Development (863) Program.

  9. Acousto-optical modulation of light at a doubled sound frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, V M; Averin, S V; Shkerdin, G N

    2016-02-28

    A method of acousto-optical (AO) Bragg diffraction is proposed that provides the amplitude modulation of optical radiation at a doubled acoustic frequency. The method is based on the double transmission of the light through the AO modulator made of a gyrotropic crystal and is experimentally tested by the example of the modulation of light with a wavelength of 0.63 μm, controlled by the paratellurite AO cell. (acoustooptics)

  10. Coherent-state storage and retrieval between superconducting cavities using parametric frequency conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Sirois, A. J.; Castellanos-Beltran, M. A.; DeFeo, M. P.; Ranzani, L.; Lecocq, F.; Simmonds, R. W.; Teufel, J. D.; Aumentado, J.

    2015-04-27

    In superconducting quantum information, machined aluminum superconducting cavities have proven to be a well-controlled, low-dissipation electromagnetic environment for quantum circuits such as qubits. They can possess large internal quality factors, Q{sub int} > 10{sup 8}, and present the possibility of storing quantum information for times far exceeding those of microfabricated circuits. However, in order to be useful as a storage element, these cavities require a fast “read/write” mechanism—in other words, they require tunable coupling between other systems of interest such as other cavity modes and qubits, as well as any associated readout hardware. In this work, we demonstrate these qualities in a simple dual cavity architecture in which a low-Q “readout” mode is parametrically coupled to a high-Q “storage” mode, allowing us to store and retrieve classical information. Specifically, we employ a flux-driven Josephson junction-based coupling scheme to controllably swap coherent states between two cavities, demonstrating full, sequenced control over the coupling rates between modes.

  11. Automated optical inspection and image analysis of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenskat, M.

    2017-05-01

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. For an investigation of this inner surface of more than 100 cavities within the cavity fabrication for the European XFEL and the ILC HiGrade Research Project, an optical inspection robot OBACHT was constructed. To analyze up to 2325 images per cavity, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. The accuracy of this code is up to 97 % and the positive predictive value (PPV) 99 % within the resolution of 15.63 μm. The optical obtained surface roughness is in agreement with standard profilometric methods. The image analysis algorithm identified and quantified vendor specific fabrication properties as the electron beam welding speed and the different surface roughness due to the different chemical treatments. In addition, a correlation of ρ = -0.93 with a significance of 6 σ between an obtained surface variable and the maximal accelerating field was found.

  12. Hybrid Brillouin/thulium multiwavelength fiber laser with switchable single- and double-Brillouin-frequency spacing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kai; Kabakova, Irina V; Lefrancois, Simon; Hudson, Darren D; He, Sailing; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2014-12-29

    We demonstrate a multiwavelength laser at 2 µm based on a hybrid gain scheme consisting of a Brillouin gain medium and a thulium-doped fiber. The laser has switchable frequency spacing, corresponding to the single and double Brillouin frequency shifts. In the 20 dB bandwidth, seven lasing channels with a frequency spacing of 0.1 nm (7.62 GHz) and eleven channels with a double-spacing of 0.2 nm (15.24 GHz) are obtained. A wavelength tunability of 1.3 nm is realized for both laser configurations by shifting the pump wavelength. Strong four wave mixing is observed in the double-spacing laser resulting in an improved performance: larger number of channels and better temporal stability.

  13. High frequency electron nuclear double resonance at 239 GHz using a far-infrared laser source

    SciTech Connect

    Paschedag, L.; van Tol, J.; Wyder, P.

    1995-10-01

    We report on the application of {sup 14}N electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) at 8.5 T and 239 GHz ({lambda}=1.2 mm) in a {gamma}-irradiated betaine arsenate single crystal. A laser was used as a far-infrared radiation source in a transmission-type electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup without a cavity. The four expected nitrogen ENDOR lines were observed, but due to insufficient saturation of the EPR transitions the signal/noise ratio was not larger than 10 and the signals vanished at temperatures above 20 K. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  14. Microresonator-stabilized extended-cavity diode laser for supercavity frequency stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jinkang; Savchenkov, Anatoliy A.; Matsko, Andrey B.; Huang, Shu-Wei; Maleki, Lute; Wong, Chee Wei

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate a simple, compact, and cost-effective laser noise reduction method for stabilizing an extended cavity diode laser to a 3x105 finesse mirror Fabry-P\\'erot (F-P) cavity corresponding to resonance linewidth of 10 kHz using a crystalline MgF2 whispering gallery mode microresonator (WGMR). The laser linewidth is reduced to sub-kHz such that a stable Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) error signal is built up. The wavelength of the pre-stabilized laser is tunable within a large bandwidth covering the high reflection mirror coating of a F-P supercavity.

  15. Effect of frequency-doubling pulse Nd:YAG laser on microbial mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yansheng; Wang, Luyan; Zheng, Heng; Yin, Hongping; Chen, Xiangdong; Tan, Zheng; Wu, Wutong

    1999-09-01

    We are going to report the mutagenic effect of frequency-doubling pulse Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) on microbe. After irradiation with pulse laser, mutants of abscisic acid producing strains and erythromycin producing strains were obtained, one of which could produce 62.1% and 57% more products than control, respectively. In the study of mutagenization of Spirulina platensis caused by pulse laser, we selected a high photosynthetic strains, with improved productivity of protein and exocellular ploysaccharides of 12% and 246%, respectively. The experimental results indicate that frequency-doubling pulse laser (532 nm) is a potential new type of physical mutagenic factor.

  16. Efficient continuous-wave nonlinear frequency conversion in high-Q gallium nitride photonic crystal cavities on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Mohamed Sabry; Simbula, Angelica; Carlin, Jean-François; Minkov, Momchil; Gerace, Dario; Savona, Vincenzo; Grandjean, Nicolas; Galli, Matteo; Houdré, Romuald

    2017-03-01

    We report on nonlinear frequency conversion from the telecom range via second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) in suspended gallium nitride slab photonic crystal (PhC) cavities on silicon, under continuous-wave resonant excitation. Optimized two-dimensional PhC cavities with augmented far-field coupling have been characterized with quality factors as high as 4.4 × 104, approaching the computed theoretical values. The strong enhancement in light confinement has enabled efficient SHG, achieving a normalized conversion efficiency of 2.4 × 10-3 W-1, as well as simultaneous THG. SHG emission power of up to 0.74 nW has been detected without saturation. The results herein validate the suitability of gallium nitride for integrated nonlinear optical processing.

  17. Field-programmable gate array based locking circuit for external cavity diode laser frequency stabilization.

    PubMed

    Schwettmann, Arne; Sedlacek, Jonathon; Shaffer, James P

    2011-10-01

    We present a locking circuit for external cavity diode lasers implemented on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The main advantages over traditional non-FPGA-based locking circuits are rapid reconfigurability without any soldering and a friendly user interface. We characterize the lock quality by measuring the linewidth of a locked laser using electromagnetically induced transparency in a Rb vapor cell.

  18. Changing and predicting the frequency of double wall carbon nanotubes oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xing; Xiao, Shao-Rong; Liu, Hong-De; Wang, Tong; Yue, Ju-Qing

    2017-06-01

    Double wall carbon nanotubes have been considered as potential candidate for ultra-high frequency oscillator. However, the exact frequency change versus the nanotubes' shape has not been detailed discussed. In this article, a series of double wall carbon nanotubes oscillators are investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. We find that, by changing the tube length and radius, the oscillation frequency can be easily modified. To better understand the simulation result above, a theoretical model with maximum main force approximation is introduced. Then the tendency for the frequency change can be well interpreted. Moreover, we find the effective force increases linearly with the tube radius. After a careful derivation, a universal formula is given, which can predict the oscillation period with a good accuracy.

  19. Diagrammatic analysis of the unitary group for double-barrier ballistic cavities: Equivalence with circuit theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, A. L. R.; Macêdo, A. M. S.

    2005-06-01

    We derive a set of coupled nonlinear algebraic equations for the asymptotics of the Poisson kernel distribution describing the statistical properties of a two-terminal double-barrier chaotic billiard (or ballistic quantum dot). The equations are calculated from a diagrammatic technique for performing averages over the unitary group, proposed by Brouwer and Beenakker [J. Math. Phys. 37, 4904 (1996)]. We give strong analytical evidences that these equations are equivalent to a much simpler polynomial equation calculated from a recent extension of Nazarov’s circuit theory [A. M. S. Macêdo, Phys. Rev. B 66, 033306 (2002)]. These results offer interesting perspectives for further developments in the field via the direct conversion of one approach into the other.

  20. Interferometric determination of the silicon sphere diameter using a laser frequency tuning system calibrated by a Fabry-Perot cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuejian; Zhang, Jitao; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2012-11-01

    In order to obtain an accurate Avogadro constant with a relative uncertainty of 1×10-8 to redefine the kilogram, the diameter of a perfect single crystal silicon sphere is required with the measurement uncertainty of 0.3 nm using the X-ray crystal density method. To achieve this, phase-shifting interferometers have been developed. A laser frequency tuning system calibrated by a Fabry-Perot cavity is proposed to improve the laser wavelength and the phase-shift accuracy. The laser frequency standard deviation of the beat frequency is 85 kHz with a gate time of 0.1 s. The gap distances in the diameter determination interferometer are measured based on the laser tuning system, which are 275.3 nm and 110.5 nm, respectively.

  1. Phase-Coherent Frequency Combs in the Vacuum Ultraviolet via High-Harmonic Generation inside a Femtosecond Enhancement Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. Jason; Moll, Kevin D.; Thorpe, Michael J.; Ye, Jun

    2005-05-01

    We demonstrate the generation of phase-coherent frequency combs in the vacuum utraviolet spectral region. The output from a mode-locked laser is stabilized to a femtosecond enhancement cavity with a gas jet at the intracavity focus. The resulting high-peak power of the intracavity pulse enables efficient high-harmonic generation by utilizing the full repetition rate of the laser. Optical-heterodyne-based measurements reveal that the coherent frequency comb structure of the original laser is fully preserved in the high-harmonic generation process. These results open the door for precision frequency metrology at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths and permit the efficient generation of phase-coherent high-order harmonics using only a standard laser oscillator without active amplification of single pulses.

  2. Modulation-free frequency stabilization of external-cavity diode laser based on a phase-difference biased Sagnac interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Chen, Dijun; Fang, Zujie; Cai, Haiwen; Qu, Ronghui

    2010-11-15

    We propose a modulation-free technique for frequency stabilization of an external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) by using a phase-difference biased Sagnac interferometer to produce dispersion spectroscopic error signals. A half-wave plate and a total internal reflection prism are inserted into the loop to provide a phase-difference bias between the clockwise and counterclockwise beams with perpendicular polarizations, instead of the previous method with misaligned optical paths. In the experiments, the frequency of the Littman-Metcalf configuration ECDL is locked at the transition of the Rb atomic vapor, and the frequency fluctuation is suppressed from 8 to less than 0.5 MHz peak to peak. It is shown that this scheme is simple, robust, low cost, and it shows promise for use in a variety of related applications.

  3. Coherent continuous-wave dual-frequency high-Q external-cavity semiconductor laser for GHz-THz applications.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Romain; Blin, Stéphane; Myara, Mikhaël; Gratiet, Luc Le; Sellahi, Mohamed; Chomet, Baptiste; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Sagnes, Isabelle; Garnache, Arnaud

    2016-08-15

    We report a continuous-wave highly-coherent and tunable dual-frequency laser emitting at two frequencies separated by 30 GHz to 3 THz, based on compact III-V diode-pumped quantum-well surface-emitting semiconductor laser technology. The concept is based on the stable simultaneous operation of two Laguerre-Gauss transverse modes in a single-axis short cavity, using an integrated sub-wavelength-thick metallic mask. Simultaneous operation is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally by recording intensity noises and beat frequency, and time-resolved optical spectra. We demonstrated a >80  mW output power, diffraction-limited beam, narrow linewidth of <300  kHz, linear polarization state (>45  dB), and low intensity noise class-A dynamics of <0.3% rms, thus opening the path to a compact low-cost coherent GHz to THz source development.

  4. Diode-pumped self-frequency-doubled neodymium yttrium aluminum borate (NYAB) laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid

    1992-01-01

    Over 50 mW of the fundamental-mode 531-nm laser output was obtained with approximately 4 percent optical-to-optical conversion efficiency from a self-frequency-doubling NYAB crystal when pumped with two 1-W diode lasers. The prospect of higher conversion efficiency is discussed.

  5. Adults with Dyslexia Show Deficits on Spatial Frequency Doubling and Visual Attention Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchholz, Judy; McKone, Elinor

    2004-01-01

    We examine the visual processing of high-functioning adults with developmental dyslexia (mean Performance IQ=126.5) and current phonological problems. In comparison to an age- and IQ-matched control group, the group with dyslexia showed deficits in two tasks associated with magnocellular/dorsal pathway function. For the "frequency doubling"…

  6. A UV laser by frequency doubling within the resonator of a helium-neon laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Cantao; Li Xinzhang; Zhao Suitang; Wang Yichong

    1996-12-31

    An ultraviolet laser has been developed from the 632.8nm line of a helium-neon laser using internal frequency doubling method with a lithium iodate crystal. It generates continuous ultraviolet radiation at 316.4nm. By optimizing the optical components, a folded three-mirror resonator gave out UV radiation up to 1.5mW.

  7. Multifunctional quantum node based on double quantum dot in laser and cavity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukanov, Alexander V.

    2016-12-01

    The concept of multifunctional device (a quantum node) composed of a semiconductor single-electron four-level doublequantum dot coupled to an optical microcavity resonator is developed. The terahertz laser field and voltage biases provide an external control. The structure enables flexible driving via appropriate variations of field amplitudes and switching between resonant and off-resonant modes. As shown this hybrid electron-photon system can be used as the charge qubit with flying-to-stationary qubit conversion or the single-photon transistor and several others. Each of listed devices works in the specific regime of system evolution. For example, the qubit is robust when the optical resonator and laser Rabi frequencies dominate the dissipation rates - the so-called strong coupling or coherent regime. From another hand, in order to attain the steady-state one has to work in the so-called weak coupling or incoherent regime when the dissipation rates are comparable to or greater than the Rabi frequencies. Further, the single-photon driving is required for spectroscopic applications of this system. We numerically investigate the population dynamics to reveal the parameter choice corresponding to each device. The model is based on Lindblad formalism where all incoherent processes are considered as the markovian ones. The time dependencies of populations and spectrograms for different pairs of parameters are obtained. The specific features concerned with working characteristics of the quantum node in different modes are discussed.

  8. Efficient frequency generation in phoXonic cavities based on hollow whispering gallery mode resonators

    PubMed Central

    Farnesi, Daniele; Righini, Giancarlo; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Soria, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    We report on nonlinear optical effects on phoxonic cavities based on hollow whispering gallery mode resonators pumped with a continuous wave laser. We observed stimulated scattering effects such as Brillouin and Raman, Kerr effects such as degenerated and non-degenerated four wave mixing, and dispersive wave generation. These effects happened concomitantly. Hollow resonators give rise to a very rich nonlinear scenario due to the coexistence of several family modes. PMID:28266641

  9. Characteristics of polarization switching from the low to the high frequency mode in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ackemann, T.; Sondermann, M.

    2001-06-04

    Polarization selection in small-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers is studied experimentally in dependence of injection current and substrate temperature in the vicinity of the minimum threshold condition. Polarization switching from the low to the high frequency fundamental spatial mode is demonstrated. The effective birefringence displays a minimum in the transition region. The observation of dynamical transition states hints to the relevance of nonlinear effects. A comparison to the predictions of the San Miguel{endash}Feng{endash}Moloney model based on phase-amplitude coupling is given. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Conceptual design of a sapphire loaded coupler for superconducting radio-frequency 1.3 GHz cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Chen; Tantawi, Sami

    2016-02-25

    This paper explores a hybrid mode rf structure that served as a superconducting radio-frequency coupler. This application achieves a reflection S(1,1) varying from 0 to -30 db and delivers cw power at 7 KW. The coupler has good thermal isolation between the 2 and 300 K sections due to vacuum separation. Only one single hybrid mode can propagate through each section, and no higher order mode is coupled. The analytical and numerical analysis for this coupler is given and the design is optimized. As a result, the coupling mechanism to the cavity is also discussed.

  11. Analysis of Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layers for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Chaoyue; Posen, Sam; Hall, Daniel Leslie; Groll, Nickolas; Proslier, Thomas; Cook, Russell; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Liepe, Matthias; Pellin, Michael; Zasadzinski, John

    2015-02-23

    We present an analysis of Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layers grown on a bulk Niobium (Nb) coupon prepared at the same time and by the same vapor diffusion process used to make Nb{sub 3}Sn coatings on 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. Tunneling spectroscopy reveals a well-developed, homogeneous superconducting density of states at the surface with a gap value distribution centered around 2.7 ± 0.4 meV and superconducting critical temperatures (T{sub c}) up to 16.3 K. Scanning transmission electron microscopy performed on cross sections of the sample's surface region shows an ∼2 μm thick Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layer. The elemental composition map exhibits a Nb:Sn ratio of 3:1 and reveals the presence of buried sub-stoichiometric regions that have a ratio of 5:1. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments indicate a polycrystalline Nb{sub 3}Sn film and confirm the presence of Nb rich regions that occupy about a third of the coating volume. These low T{sub c} regions could play an important role in the dissipation mechanisms occurring during RF tests of Nb{sub 3}Sn-coated Nb cavities and open the way for further improving a very promising alternative to pure Nb cavities for particle accelerators.

  12. Analysis of Nb3Sn surface layers for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    DOE PAGES

    Becker, Chaoyue; Posen, Sam; Groll, Nickolas; ...

    2015-02-23

    Here, we present an analysis of Nb3Sn surface layers grown on a bulk Nb coupon prepared at the same time and by the same vapor diffusion process used to make Nb3Sn coatings on 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. Tunneling spectroscopy reveal a well developed, homogeneous superconducting density of states at the surface with a gap value distribution centered around 2.7 ± 0.4 meV and superconducting critical temperature's (Tc) up to 16.3K. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) performed on cross sections of the sample's surface shows a ~ 2 microns thick Nb3Sn surface layer. The elemental composition map exhibits a Nb:Sn ratio ofmore » 3:1 with buried substoichiometric regions with a ratio of 5:1. Synchrotron diffraction experiments indicate a polycrystalline Nb3Sn film and confirm the presence of Nb rich regions that occupies about a third of the coating volume. These low Tc regions could play an important role in the dissipation mechanisms occurring during RF tests of Nb3Sn -coated Nb cavities and open the way for further improving a very promising alternative to pure Nb cavities for particle accelerators.« less

  13. Measuring the dispersive frequency shift of a rectangular microwave cavity induced by an ensemble of Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stammeier, M.; Garcia, S.; Thiele, T.; Deiglmayr, J.; Agner, J. A.; Schmutz, H.; Merkt, F.; Wallraff, A.

    2017-05-01

    In recent years the interest in studying interactions of Rydberg atoms or ensembles thereof with optical and microwave frequency fields has steadily increased, both in the context of basic research and for potential applications in quantum information processing. We present measurements of the dispersive interaction between an ensemble of helium atoms in the 37 s Rydberg state and a single resonator mode by extracting the amplitude and phase change of a weak microwave probe tone transmitted through the cavity. The results are in quantitative agreement with predictions made on the basis of the dispersive Tavis-Cummings Hamiltonian. We study this system with the goal of realizing a hybrid between superconducting circuits and Rydberg atoms. We measure maximal collective coupling strengths of 1 MHz, corresponding to 3 ×103 Rydberg atoms coupled to the cavity. As expected, the dispersive shift is found to be inversely proportional to the atom-cavity detuning and proportional to the number of Rydberg atoms. This possibility of measuring the number of Rydberg atoms in a nondestructive manner is relevant for quantitatively evaluating scattering cross sections in experiments with Rydberg atoms.

  14. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Xin; Ciovati, G.; Bieler, T. R.

    2010-12-15

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots”) were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD), and optical microscopy. Pits with clearly discernible crystal facets were observed in both “hotspot” and “coldspot” specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bicrystal boundaries, and on tricrystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced bymore » crystal defects (e.g. dislocations). All coldspots examined had a qualitatively lower density of etch pits or relatively smooth tricrystal boundary junctions. EBSD mapping revealed the crystal orientation surrounding the pits. Locations with high pit density are correlated with higher mean values of the local average misorientation angle distributions, indicating a higher geometrically necessary dislocation content. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive x-ray analysis did not show any significant contamination of the samples’ surface. In conclusion, the local magnetic field enhancement produced by the sharp-edge features observed on the samples is not sufficient to explain the observed degradation of the cavity quality factor, which starts at peak surface magnetic field as low as 20 mT.« less

  15. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Ciovati, G.; Bieler, T. R.

    2010-12-15

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots”) were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD), and optical microscopy. Pits with clearly discernible crystal facets were observed in both “hotspot” and “coldspot” specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bicrystal boundaries, and on tricrystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced by crystal defects (e.g. dislocations). All coldspots examined had a qualitatively lower density of etch pits or relatively smooth tricrystal boundary junctions. EBSD mapping revealed the crystal orientation surrounding the pits. Locations with high pit density are correlated with higher mean values of the local average misorientation angle distributions, indicating a higher geometrically necessary dislocation content. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive x-ray analysis did not show any significant contamination of the samples’ surface. In conclusion, the local magnetic field enhancement produced by the sharp-edge features observed on the samples is not sufficient to explain the observed degradation of the cavity quality factor, which starts at peak surface magnetic field as low as 20 mT.

  16. Translocation frequency of double-stranded DNA through a solid-state nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Nicholas A. W.; Muthukumar, Murugappan; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state nanopores are single-molecule sensors that measure changes in ionic current as charged polymers such as DNA pass through. Here, we present comprehensive experiments on the length, voltage, and salt dependence of the frequency of double-stranded DNA translocations through conical quartz nanopores with mean opening diameter 15 nm. We observe an entropic barrier-limited, length-dependent translocation frequency at 4M LiCl salt concentration and a drift-dominated, length-independent translocation frequency at 1M KCl salt concentration. These observations are described by a unifying convection-diffusion equation, which includes the contribution of an entropic barrier for polymer entry.

  17. Model for initiation of quality factor degradation at high accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyuba, A.; Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L. D.

    2010-12-01

    A model for the onset of the reduction in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity quality factor, the so-called Q-drop, at high accelerating electric fields is presented. Since magnetic fields at the cavity equator are tied to accelerating electric fields by a simple geometric factor, the onset of magnetic flux penetration determines the onset of Q-drop. We consider breakdown of the surface barrier at triangular grooves to predict the magnetic field of first flux penetration Hpen. Such defects were argued to be the worst case by Buzdin and Daumens (1998 Physica C 294 257), whose approach, moreover, incorporates both the geometry of the groove and local contamination via the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. Since previous Q-drop models focused on either topography or contamination alone, the proposed model allows new comparisons of one effect in relation to the other. The model predicts equivalent reduction of Hpen when either roughness or contamination were varied alone, so smooth but dirty surfaces limit cavity performance about as much as rough but clean surfaces do. Still lower Hpen was predicted when both effects were combined, i.e. contamination should exacerbate the negative effects of roughness and vice versa. To test the model with actual data, coupons were prepared by buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing, and stylus profilometry was used to obtain distributions of angles. From these data, curves for surface resistance generated by simple flux flow as a function of magnetic field were generated by integrating over the distribution of angles for reasonable values of κ. This showed that combined effects of roughness and contamination indeed reduce the Q-drop onset field by ~ 20%, and that contamination contributes to Q-drop as much as roughness. The latter point may be overlooked by SRF cavity research, since access to the cavity interior by spectroscopy tools is very difficult, whereas optical images have become commonplace. The model was

  18. Cryogenic Testing of High-Velocity Spoke Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.; Park, HyeKyoung

    2014-12-01

    Spoke-loaded cavities are being investigated for the high-velocity regime. The relative compactness at low-frequency makes them attractive for applications requiring, or benefiting from, 4 K operation. Additionally, the large velocity acceptance makes them good candidates for the acceleration of high-velocity protons and ions. Here we present the results of cryogenic testing of a 325 MHz, β0= 0.82 single-spoke cavity and a 500 MHz, β0 = 1 double-spoke cavity.

  19. Frequency Response Calculations of Input Characteristics of Cavity-Backed Aperture Antennas Using AWE with Hybrid FEM/MoM Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Application of Asymptotic Waveform Evaluation (AWE) is presented in conjunction with a hybrid Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM) technique to calculate the input characteristics of cavity-backed aperture antennas over a frequency range. The hybrid FEM/MoM technique is used to form an integro-partial-differential equation to compute the electric field distribution of the cavity-backed aperture antenna. The electric field, thus obtained, is expanded in a Taylor series around the frequency of interest. The coefficients of 'Taylor series (called 'moments') are obtained using the frequency derivatives of the integro-partial-differential Equation formed by the hybrid FEM/MoM technique. Using the moments, the electric field in the cavity is obtained over a frequency range. Using the electric field at different frequencies, the input characteristics of the antenna are obtained over a wide frequency band. Numerical results for an open coaxial line, probe fed cavity, and cavity-backed microstrip patch antennas are presented. Good agreement between AWE and the exact solution over the frequency range is observed.

  20. Analysis of double-probe characteristics in low-frequency gas discharges and its improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, DongLin Li, XiaoPing; Xie, Kai; Liu, ZhiWei; Shao, MingXu

    2015-01-15

    The double-probe has been used successfully in radio-frequency discharges. However, in low-frequency discharges, the double-probe I-V curve is so much seriously distorted by the strong plasma potential fluctuations that the I-V curve may lead to a large estimate error of plasma parameters. To suppress the distortion, we investigate the double-probe characteristics in low-frequency gas discharge based on an equivalent circuit model, taking both the plasma sheath and probe circuit into account. We discovered that there are two primary interferences to the I-V curve distortion: the voltage fluctuation between two probe tips caused by the filter difference voltage and the current peak at the negative edge of the plasma potential. Consequently, we propose a modified passive filter to reduce the two types of interference simultaneously. Experiments are conducted in a glow-discharge plasma (f = 30 kHz) to test the performance of the improved double probe. The results show that the electron density error is reduced from more than 100% to less than 10%. The proposed improved method is also suitable in cases where intensive potential fluctuations exist.

  1. Generation of 3.5W high efficiency blue-violet laser by intracavity frequency-doubling of an all-solid-state tunable Ti:sapphire laser.

    PubMed

    Ding, X; Wang, R; Zhang, H; Wen, W Q; Huang, L; Wang, P; Yao, J Q; Yu, X Y; Li, Z

    2008-03-31

    In this paper, we report a high power, high efficiency blue-violet laser obtained by intracavity frequency-doubling of an all-solid-state Q-switched tunable Ti:sapphire laser, which was pumped by a 532 nm intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. A beta-BaB2O4 (BBO) crystal was used for frequency-doubling of the Ti:sapphire laser and a V-shape folded three-mirror cavity was optimized to obtain high power high efficiency second harmonic generation (SHG). At an incident pump power of 22 W, the tunable output from 355 nm to 475 nm was achieved, involving the maximum average output of 3.5 W at 400 nm with an optical conversion efficiency of 16% from the 532 nm pump laser to the blue-violet output. The beam quality factor M(2) was measured to be Mx(2)=2.15, My(2)=2.38 for characterizing the tunable blue laser.

  2. Vortex Ring Formation Characteristics in Synthetic Jet due to Changes of Excitation Frequency in the ½-Ball Cavity Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosasih, Engkos A.; Harinaldi; Trisno, Ramon

    2017-04-01

    A jet flow that contains vortex ring has a large energy compared to a regular jet. As one of the causes of the aerodynamic drag to the vehicle, the flow separation that occurs behind the bluff body must be controlled, so that aerodynamic drag can be significantly reduced. This study is a basic work on the development of turbulent flow separation control for aerodynamic purpose, especially in the design of the vehicle body. The main objective of this study is to analyze the performance of the synthetic jet (SJA) as one of flow control tool to reduce separation area. To get the maximum performance of the synthetic jet actuator, the research starts by characterizing the actuator. Characterization of ½ ball-shaped cavity is done with excitation frequency changes and orifice diameter of 3, 5 and 8 mm. The study was conducted using computational and experimental methods. The experimental data was obtained by testing synthetic jet actuator with providing sinusoidal signal to drive the membrane and at the orifice end a hotwire probe that is set and plugged into a CTA (Constant Temperature Anemometry) to obtain the speed velocity of the exhaust jet. Computational methods used a commercial CFD software (FLUENT 6.3) with a Reynolds Stress Model as a model of turbulence. Each of these calculations or measurements was conducted under the same conditions. The research result is displayed in frequency testing curve to get the maximum velocity of the jet stream. The results are further indicative of the synthetic jet actuator capability to generate vortex rings. In the experimental results, the determination of ring vortex formation taken from the calculation of the flow velocity, while the CFD simulations, the formation of vortex rings can be seen from the visualization of the flow contour. Vortex ring formed from this ½ -ball cavity, occurred at 3 mm and 5 mm orifice diameter, while the 8 mm orifice diameter cavity cannot form a ring vortex.

  3. Frequency-doubling of an optical vortex output from a stressed Yb-doped fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Mio; Shimomura, Akito; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Omatsu, Takashige

    2014-08-01

    The frequency-doubling of a picosecond vortex fiber laser, formed of a 1-μm picosecond master laser and a large-mode-area fiber amplifier by using a nonlinear LiB3O5, crystal, was performed. A maximum second-harmonic power of 7.7 W was achieved, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 31 %. The second harmonic had an annular spatial form owing to a phase singularity with a doubled topological charge, and its wavefront helicity was selectively controlled by tuning the stress applied to the fiber amplifier.

  4. Absolute distance measurement by multi-heterodyne interferometry using a frequency comb and a cavity-stabilized tunable laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Fumin; Liu, Tingyang; Balling, Petr; Qu, Xinghua

    2016-05-20

    In this paper, we develop a multi-heterodyne system capable of absolute distance measurement using a frequency comb and a tunable diode laser locked to a Fabry-Perot cavity. In a series of subsequent measurements, numerous beat components can be obtained by downconverting the optical frequency into the RF region with multi-heterodyne interferometry. The distances can be measured via the mode phases with a series of synthetic wavelengths. The comparison with the reference interferometer shows an agreement within 1.5 μm for the averages of five measurements and 2.5 μm for the single measurement, which is at the 10-8 relative precision level.

  5. Development of multi-frequency ESR/EDMR system using a rectangular cavity equipped with waveguide window.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Kunito; Asakawa, Naoki

    2016-11-01

    A straightforward method for a variable frequency electron spin resonance/electrically detected magnetic resonance (ESR/EDMR) spectroscopy using a C-band microwave cavity equipped with waveguide windows is presented. The method enables us to perform quasi-continuous multiple resonance frequency (MF-ESR/EDMR) experiments for electronic devices. The C-band microwave circuitry was selected because of larger available sample volume than that for conventional X-band one. All the measurements were performed using a combined sample of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl/ pn-junction Si diode. The present simple MF-ESR/EDMR method will be useful for the characterization of electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  6. Development of multi-frequency ESR/EDMR system using a rectangular cavity equipped with waveguide window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Kunito; Asakawa, Naoki

    2016-11-01

    A straightforward method for a variable frequency electron spin resonance/electrically detected magnetic resonance (ESR/EDMR) spectroscopy using a C-band microwave cavity equipped with waveguide windows is presented. The method enables us to perform quasi-continuous multiple resonance frequency (MF-ESR/EDMR) experiments for electronic devices. The C-band microwave circuitry was selected because of larger available sample volume than that for conventional X-band one. All the measurements were performed using a combined sample of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl/ pn-junction Si diode. The present simple MF-ESR/EDMR method will be useful for the characterization of electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  7. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.20, respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  8. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata.

    PubMed

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.2(0), respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  9. An ultra-wide-band optical frequency comb generator based on semiconductor quantum dot F-P cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenhui; Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Wenting; Guo, Jinjin; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Ninghua

    2014-11-01

    An ultra wideband optical frequency comb (OFC) generator based on semiconductor Quantum dot F-P cavity is packaged by our group. The free spectral rage (FSR) of the OFC can be tunable from 97GHz to 100GHz and the pulse width of the 100GHz OFC is 1.2ps.The full span of the OFC spectra is 80nm with a Gaussian shaped, and in span of 10nm, the flatness of the OFC can be limited to 1.7dB. The OFC has the advantages of small volume, simple and compact structure, low power dissipation, and has an ultra-wide bandwidth and flat spectrum, which can be used in the field of arbitrary waveform generation, channel information processing, and optical frequency division multiplexing.

  10. Topographic power spectral density study of the effect of surface treatment processes on niobium for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece, Hui Tian, Michael Kelley, Chen Xu

    2012-04-01

    Microroughness is viewed as a critical issue for attaining optimum performance of superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. The principal surface smoothing methods are buffered chemical polish (BCP) and electropolish (EP). The resulting topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The power spectral density (PSD) of AFM data provides a more thorough description of the topography than a single-value roughness measurement. In this work, one dimensional average PSD functions derived from topography of BCP and EP with different controlled starting conditions and durations have been fitted with a combination of power law, K correlation, and shifted Gaussian models to extract characteristic parameters at different spatial harmonic scales. While the simplest characterizations of these data are not new, the systematic tracking of scale-specific roughness as a function of processing is new and offers feedback for tighter process prescriptions more knowledgably targeted at beneficial niobium topography for superconducting radio frequency applications.

  11. Low-cost, smartphone based frequency doubling technology visual field testing using virtual reality (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawa, Karam A.; Sayed, Mohamed; Arboleda, Alejandro; Durkee, Heather A.; Aguilar, Mariela C.; Lee, Richard K.

    2017-02-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Due to its wide prevalence, effective screening tools are necessary. The purpose of this project is to design and evaluate a system that enables portable, cost effective, smartphone based visual field screening based on frequency doubling technology. The system is comprised of an Android smartphone to display frequency doubling stimuli and handle processing, a Bluetooth remote for user input, and a virtual reality headset to simulate the exam. The LG Nexus 5 smartphone and BoboVR Z3 virtual reality headset were used for their screen size and lens configuration, respectively. The system is capable of running the C-20, N-30, 24-2, and 30-2 testing patterns. Unlike the existing system, the smartphone FDT tests both eyes concurrently by showing the same background to both eyes but only displaying the stimulus to one eye at a time. Both the Humphrey Zeiss FDT and the smartphone FDT were tested on five subjects without a history of ocular disease with the C-20 testing pattern. The smartphone FDT successfully produced frequency doubling stimuli at the correct spatial and temporal frequency. Subjects could not tell which eye was being tested. All five subjects preferred the smartphone FDT to the Humphrey Zeiss FDT due to comfort and ease of use. The smartphone FDT is a low-cost, portable visual field screening device that can be used as a screening tool for glaucoma.

  12. Theoretical estimates of maximum fields in superconducting resonant radio frequency cavities: stability theory, disorder, and laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liarte, Danilo B.; Posen, Sam; Transtrum, Mark K.; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias; Sethna, James P.

    2017-03-01

    Theoretical limits to the performance of superconductors in high magnetic fields parallel to their surfaces are of key relevance to current and future accelerating cavities, especially those made of new higher-T c materials such as Nb3Sn, NbN, and MgB2. Indeed, beyond the so-called superheating field {H}{sh}, flux will spontaneously penetrate even a perfect superconducting surface and ruin the performance. We present intuitive arguments and simple estimates for {H}{sh}, and combine them with our previous rigorous calculations, which we summarize. We briefly discuss experimental measurements of the superheating field, comparing to our estimates. We explore the effects of materials anisotropy and the danger of disorder in nucleating vortex entry. Will we need to control surface orientation in the layered compound MgB2? Can we estimate theoretically whether dirt and defects make these new materials fundamentally more challenging to optimize than niobium? Finally, we discuss and analyze recent proposals to use thin superconducting layers or laminates to enhance the performance of superconducting cavities. Flux entering a laminate can lead to so-called pancake vortices; we consider the physics of the dislocation motion and potential re-annihilation or stabilization of these vortices after their entry.

  13. Development of a cryogenic radiation detector for mapping radio frequency superconducting cavity field emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Danny Dotson; John Mammosser

    2005-05-01

    Field emissions in a super conducting helium cooled RF cavity and the production of radiation (mostly X-Rays) have been measured externally on cryomodules at Jefferson Lab since 1991. External measurements are limited to radiation energies above 100 keV due to shielding of the stainless steel cryogenic body. To measure the onset of and to map field emissions from a superconducting cavity requires the detecting instrument be inside the shield and within the liquid Helium. Two possible measurement systems are undergoing testing at JLab. A CsI detector array set on photodiodes and an X-Ray film camera with a fixed aperture. Several devices were tested in the cell with liquid Helium without success. The lone survivor, a CsI array, worked but saturated at high power levels due to backscatter. The array was encased in a lead shield with a slit opening set to measure the radiation emitted directly from the cell eliminating a large portion of the backscatter. This is a work in progress and te sting should be complete before the PAC 05. The second system being tested is passive. It is a shielded box with an aperture to expose radiation diagnostic film located inside to direct radiation from the cell. Developing a technique for mapping field emissions in cryogenic cells will assist scientists and engineers in pinpointing any surface imperfections for examination.

  14. Dual-Frequency Operation in a Short-Cavity Ytterbium-Doped Fiber Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, W.; Maricante, J.R.

    2007-02-15

    A dual-frequency 2-cm silica fiber laser with a wavelength spacing of 0.3 nm has been demonstrated using a polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber-Bragg-grating (FBG) reflector. The birefringence of the PM FBG was used to generate the two single-mode (SM) lasing frequencies of orthogonal polarizations. The SM operation in each wavelength has been verified.

  15. High-efficiency intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Darrell Jewell; Smith, Arlee Virgil

    2005-02-01

    We have built and tested a highly efficient source of pulsed 320 nm light based on intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-injection-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator. The four-mirror nonplanar ring optical cavity uses the RISTRA geometry, denoting rotated-image singly-resonant twisted rectangle. The cavity contains a type-II xz-cut KTP crystal pumped by the 532 nm second harmonic of Nd:YAG to generate an 803{approx}nm signal and 1576 nm idler, and a type-II BBO crystal to sum-frequency mix the 532 nm pump and cavity-resonant 803 nm signal to generate 320 nm light. The cavity is configured so pump light passes first through the BBO crystal and then through the KTP crystal with the 320 nm light exiting through the output coupler following the BBO sum-frequency crystal. The cavity output coupler is designed to be a high reflector at 532 nm, have high transmission at 320 nm, and reflect approximately 85% at 803 nm. With this configuration we've obtained 1064 nm to 320 nm optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 24% and generated single-frequency {lambda} = 320 nm pulses with energies up to 140 mJ.

  16. High efficiency intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Darrell J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2005-03-01

    We have built and tested a highly efficient source of pulsed 320 nm light based on intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-injection-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator. The four-mirror nonplanar ring optical cavity uses the RISTRA geometry, denoting rotated-image singly-resonant twisted rectangle. The cavity contains a type-II xz-cut KTP crystal pumped by the 532 nm second harmonic of Nd:YAG to generate an 803~nm signal and 1576 nm idler, and a type-II BBO crystal to sum-frequency mix the 532 nm pump and cavity-resonant 803 nm signal to generate 320 nm light. The cavity is configured so pump light passes first through the BBO crystal and then through the KTP crystal with the 320 nm light exiting through the output coupler following the BBO sum-frequency crystal. The cavity output coupler is designed to be a high reflector at 532 nm, have high transmission at 320 nm, and reflect approximately 85% at 803 nm. With this configuration we've obtained 1064 nm to 320 nm optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 24% and generated single-frequency λ = 320 nm pulses with energies up to 140 mJ.

  17. Production of Seamless Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities from Ultra-fine Grained Niobium, Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Crooks, Ph.D., P.E.

    2009-10-31

    The positron and electron linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) will require over 14,000, nine-cell, one meter length, superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities [ILC Reference Design Report, 2007]. Manufacturing on this scale will benefit from more efficient fabrication methods. The current methods of fabricating SRF cavities involve deep drawing of the halves of each of the elliptical cells and joining them by high-vacuum, electron beam welding, with at least 19 circumferential welds per cavity. The welding is costly and has undesirable effects on the cavity surfaces, including grain-scale surface roughening at the weld seams. Hydroforming of seamless tubes avoids welding, but hydroforming of coarse-grained seamless tubes results in strain-induced surface roughening. Surface roughness limits accelerating fields, because asperities prematurely exceed the critical magnetic field and become normal conducting. This project explored the technical and economic feasibility of an improved processing method for seamless tubes for hydroforming. Severe deformation of bulk material was first used to produce a fine structure, followed by extrusion and flow-forming methods of tube making. Extrusion of the randomly oriented, fine-grained bulk material proceeded under largely steady-state conditions, and resulted in a uniform structure, which was found to be finer and more crystallographically random than standard (high purity) RRR niobium sheet metal. A 165 mm diameter billet of RRR grade niobium was processed into five, 150 mm I.D. tubes, each over 1.8 m in length, to meet the dimensions used by the DESY ILC hydroforming machine. Mechanical properties met specifications. Costs of prototype tube production were approximately twice the price of RRR niobium sheet, and are expected to be comparable with economies of scale. Hydroforming and superconducting testing will be pursued in subsequent collaborations with DESY and Fermilab. SRF Cavities are used to construct

  18. Nanostructural features degrading the performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Trenikhina, Y.; Romanenko, A.; Kwon, J.; ...

    2015-04-21

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ~100 nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride formation in the electropolished cavity after 120°C baking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adding 800°C hydrogen degassing followed by light buffered chemical polishing restores the hydride formation to the pre-120°C bake level.more » We also show absence of niobium oxides along the grain boundaries and the modifications of the surface oxide upon 120°C bake.« less

  19. Nanostructural features degrading the performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trenikhina, Y.; Romanenko, A.; Kwon, J.; Zuo, J.-M.; Zasadzinski, J. F.

    2015-04-21

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ∼100 nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride formation in the electropolished cavity after 120 °C baking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adding 800 °C hydrogen degassing followed by light buffered chemical polishing restores the hydride formation to the pre-120 °C bake level. We also show absence of niobium oxides along the grain boundaries and the modifications of the surface oxide upon 120 °C bake.

  20. Nanostructural features degrading the performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenikhina, Y.; Romanenko, A.; Kwon, J.; Zuo, J.-M.; Zasadzinski, J. F.

    2015-04-01

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ˜100 nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride formation in the electropolished cavity after 120 °C baking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adding 800 °C hydrogen degassing followed by light buffered chemical polishing restores the hydride formation to the pre-120 °C bake level. We also show absence of niobium oxides along the grain boundaries and the modifications of the surface oxide upon 120 °C bake.

  1. Effect of variation of length-to-depth ratio and Mach number on the performance of a typical double cavity scramjet combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahto, Navin Kumar; Choubey, Gautam; Suneetha, Lakka; Pandey, K. M.

    2016-11-01

    The two equation standard k-ɛ turbulence model and the two-dimensional compressible Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations have been used to computationally simulate the double cavity scramjet combustor. Here all the simulations are performed by using ANSYS 14-FLUENT code. At the same time, the validation of the present numerical simulation for double cavity has been performed by comparing its result with the available experimental data which is in accordance with the literature. The results are in good agreement with the schlieren image and the pressure distribution curve obtained experimentally. However, the pressure distribution curve obtained numerically is under-predicted in 5 locations by numerical calculation. Further, investigations on the variations of the effects of the length-to-depth ratio of cavity and Mach number on the combustion characteristics has been carried out. The present results show that there is an optimal length-to-depth ratio for the cavity for which the performance of combustor significantly improves and also efficient combustion takes place within the combustor region. Also, the shifting of the location of incident oblique shock took place in the downstream of the H2 inlet when the Mach number value increases. But after achieving a critical Mach number range of 2-2.5, the further increase in Mach number results in lower combustion efficiency which may deteriorate the performance of combustor.

  2. High-efficiency frequency upconversion of 1.5 μm laser based on a doubly resonant external ring cavity with a low finesse for signal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wei; Qiu, Xiaodong; Zhao, Gang; Jia, Mengyuan; Ma, Weiguang; Yan, Xiaojuan; Dong, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Zhaomin; Yin, Wangbao; Feng, Xiaoxia; Xiao, Liantuan; Axner, Ove; Jia, Suotang

    2017-02-01

    A doubly resonant external ring cavity with a low finesse for the signal field is used to improve the frequency upconversion efficiency of a weak 1583 nm signal laser to 636 nm by mixing with a resonance power enhanced 1064 nm pump laser in a 25 mm periodically poled lithium niobate crystal. The process of frequency upconversion is described and optimized by the doubly resonant cavity-enhanced sum frequency generation theory under the condition of undepleted pump approximation. By selecting the suitable reflectivity of the signal input mirror and the incident pump power, a cavity-enhanced frequency conversion efficiency of 94.6% was obtained for signal powers up to 25 mW with an input pump power of 780 mW.

  3. 58W LD side-pump Nd:YAG picosecond laser system at 1KHz with double length of regenerative cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Ming Liang; Li, G.; Chen, Meng

    2016-11-01

    An average power of 58 W, pulse width of 40 ps at 1 KHz repetition rate of Nd:YAG picosecond laser is reported. It used an etalon to directly get pulse width of 135 ps from Nd:YVO4 mode locked laser in 1064 nm, which repetition rate was 88 MHz. When the seed pulses were injected into the double length of regenerative LD side-pump Nd:YAG cavity at 1 KHz repetition rate, the single pulse energy was amplified to 3 mJ, the pulse width was compressed to 99 ps, beam quality of M^2 factor was 1.3. The single pulse energy was amplified up to 58 mJ, the pulse width was self compressed to 40 ps, beam quality of M^2 factor was approximately 3.5 after single passing three stages of double high gain LD side-pump Nd:YAG module. Beam pointing was about 40 urad. The stability for pulse to pulse RMS was less than 3%. A thin-film polarizer and a quarter-wave plate was inserted into the regenerative amplification cavity to let pulses double travel the same geometric path basis on pulse polarization. Serrated aperture were used in the amplification. That's beneficial to decrease the nonlinear effect for the high power in the crystal. High gain LD side-pump Nd:YAG module could lead the pulse energy amplify more and self compress the pulse width. Double length of regenerative cavity was used to enhance the optical cavity length, it greatly decreased the laser's volume and improved stability of picosecond laser. It's a nice way for high power picosecond laser and the laser system would be more simple and smaller.

  4. Efficient generation of 1.9  W yellow light by cascaded frequency doubling of a distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode.

    PubMed

    Hansen, A K; Christensen, M; Noordegraaf, D; Heist, P; Papastathopoulos, E; Loyo-Maldonado, V; Jensen, O B; Skovgaard, P M W

    2016-11-10

    Watt-level yellow emitting lasers are interesting for medical applications, due to their high hemoglobin absorption, and for efficient detection of certain fluorophores. In this paper, we demonstrate a compact and robust diode-based laser system in the yellow spectral range. The system generates 1.9 W of single-frequency light at 562.4 nm by cascaded single-pass frequency doubling of the 1124.8 nm emission from a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) tapered laser diode. The absence of a free-space cavity makes the system stable over a base-plate temperature range of 30 K. At the same time, the use of a laser diode enables the modulation of the pump wavelength by controlling the drive current. This is utilized to achieve a power modulation depth above 90% for the second harmonic light, with a rise time below 40  μs.

  5. Generation of Weak Double Layers and Low-Frequency Electrostatic Waves in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhina, G. S.; Singh, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    We propose that the mechanism for the generation of weak double layers (WDLs) and low-frequency coherent electrostatic waves, observed by Wind in the solar wind at 1 AU, might be slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons and double layers. The solar wind plasma is modelled as a fluid of hot protons and hot α particles streaming with respect to protons, and suprathermal electrons having a κ-distribution. The fast ion-acoustic mode is similar to the ion-acoustic mode of a proton-electron plasma and can support only positive-potential solitons. The slow ion-acoustic mode is a new mode that occurs due to the presence of α particles. This mode can support both positive and negative solitons and double layers. The slow ion-acoustic mode can exist even when the relative streaming, U0, between α particles and protons is zero, provided that the α temperature, Ti, is not exactly equal to four times the proton temperature, Tp. An increase of the κ-index leads to an increase in the critical Mach number, maximum Mach number, and the maximum amplitude of both slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons. The slow ion-acoustic double layer can explain the amplitudes and widths, but not the shapes, of the observed WDLs in the solar wind at 1 AU by Wind spacecraft. The Fourier transform of the slow ion-acoustic solitons/double layers would produce broadband low-frequency electrostatic waves having main peaks between 0.35 kHz to 1.6 kHz, with an electric field in the range of E = (0.01 - 0.7) mV m^{-1}, in excellent agreement with the observed low-frequency electrostatic wave activity in the solar wind at 1 AU.

  6. The study of stability on a laser-diode-pumped high-power high-repetition-rate intracavity frequency-doubled 532-nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shi-yong; Yao, Jian-Quan; Xu, De-gang; Zhou, Rui; Zhang, Bai-gang; Zhou, Jia-ning; Wang, Peng

    2005-01-01

    High power laser-diode-pumped 532nm laser sources (including continuous wave and high repetition rate operation) are directly used for precise processing of metals and plastics. Furthermore, high power green laser will be used in some fields such as ocean exploration, laser probe and underwater communication. Recently, we reported a 110W diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG intracavity frequency doubled high stability 532nm laser. In the experiment, we found that the average output power of second harmonic fluctuated acutely with the variety of pumping current. Moreover, the length of arms between the mirrors were very sensitive to this cavity. We consider that one of the reason is the focus length of thermal lens of Nd:YAG rod alter with the variational pumping current, which makes the cavity be unstable. We consider the KTP crystal as a thin lens for its short length. As thermal lensing effect of the Nd:YAG rod is quite severe, so we consider it as thermal lensing medium. By ray matrix methods, we have obtained the stable regions and beam waist radii distribution in the flat-concave cavity. In our experiment, we used a pump head consisting of 80 diode bars with pentagon pump model and employed flat-concave cavity structure in order to achieve high stability output and increase output power. The total cavity length is 505mm. By using an acousto-optic Q-switching with high diffraction loss and the KTP crystal which is type II phase matching, 110 W high stability 532nm laser is achieved. The experimental result is in good agreement with the calculation.

  7. Generation of 180 W average green power from a frequency-doubled picosecond rod fiber amplifier

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Zhi; Sheehy, Brian; Minty, Michiko

    2017-03-29

    Here, we report on the generation of 180 W average green power from a frequency-doubled picosecond rod fiber amplifier. In an Yb-doped fiber master-oscillator-power-amplifier system, 2.3-ps 704 MHz pulses are first amplified in small-core fibers and then in large-mode-area rod fibers to produce 270 W average infrared power with a high polarization extinction ratio and diffraction-limited beam quality. By carrying out frequency doubling in a lithium triborate (LBO) crystal, 180 W average green power is generated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest average green power achieved in fiber-based laser systems.

  8. Study of fuzzy adaptive PID controller on thermal frequency stabilizing laser with double longitudinal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Qingkai; Zhang, Tao; Yan, Yining

    2016-10-01

    There are contradictions among speediness, anti-disturbance performance, and steady-state accuracy caused by traditional PID controller in the existing light source systems of thermal frequency stabilizing laser with double longitudinal modes. In this paper, a new kind of fuzzy adaptive PID controller was designed by combining fuzzy PID control technology and expert system to make frequency stabilizing system obtain the optimal performance. The experiments show that the frequency stability of the designed PID controller is similar to the existing PID controller (the magnitude of frequency stability is less than 10-9 in constant temperature and 10-7 in open air). But the preheating time is shortened obviously (from 10 minutes to 5 minutes) and the anti-disturbance capability is improved significantly (the recovery time needed after strong interference is reduced from 1 minute to 10 seconds).

  9. Frequency doubled high-power disk lasers in pulsed and continuous-wave operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Sascha; Hangst, Alexander; Stolzenburg, Christian; Zawischa, Ivo; Sutter, Dirk; Killi, Alexander; Kalfhues, Steffen; Kriegshaeuser, Uwe; Holzer, Marco; Havrilla, David

    2012-03-01

    The disk laser with multi-kW output power in infrared cw operation is widely used in today's manufacturing, primarily in the automotive industry. The disk technology combines high power (average and/or peak power), excellent beam quality, high efficiency and high reliability with low investment and operating costs. Additionally, the disk laser is ideally suited for frequency conversion due to its polarized output with negligible depolarization losses. Laser light in the green spectral range (~515 nm) can be created with a nonlinear crystal. Pulsed disk lasers with green output of well above 50 W (extracavity doubling) in the ps regime and several hundreds of Watts in the ns regime with intracavity doubling are already commercially available whereas intracavity doubled disk lasers in continuous wave operation with greater than 250 W output are in test phase. In both operating modes (pulsed and cw) the frequency doubled disk laser offers advantages in existing and new applications. Copper welding for example is said to show much higher process reliability with green laser light due to its higher absorption in comparison to the infrared. This improvement has the potential to be very beneficial for the automotive industry's move to electrical vehicles which requires reliable high-volume welding of copper as a major task for electro motors, batteries, etc.

  10. NONLINEAR OPTICAL PHENOMENA: Efficient frequency doubling in a transversely diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donin, Valerii I.; Nikonov, Andrei V.; Yakovin, Dmitrii V.

    2004-10-01

    A simple scheme is proposed for efficient frequency doubling in a Nd:YAG laser transversely pumped by diode lasers. The average output TEM00-mode power of the 1064-nm Q-switched laser at the Q-switching rate exceeding 20 kHz is 15 W. The radiation power at the second harmonic frequency (λ=532 nm) is found to be 12 and 8.3 W for KTP and LBO crystals for Q-switching rates f>=20 kHz and 10 kHz, respectively. The maximum second-harmonic conversion efficiency is ~80%.

  11. Double Langmuir frequency radiation due to transformation processes in turbulent plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, V. N.; Panchenko, V. G.; Beloshenko, N. A.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the transformation process of longitudinal Langmuir wave into the transverse electromagnetic wave in turbulent plasma subjected to an upper hybrid pump. The case, when upper hybrid pump wave decays into daughter and ion - sound waves is considered. The transformation of the Langmuir wave into electromagnetic one is considered as the possible mechanism of energy radiation from the plasma. It is shown that the frequency of such radiation is chosen to be near double electron Langmuir frequency 2ωpe . These results give us the possibility to explain the nature of radiation from the laboratory and cosmic plasmas (particularly, from the solar crown).

  12. Topological charge transfer in frequency doubling of fractional orbital angular momentum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, R.; Niu, Y. F.; Du, L.; Hu, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, S. N.

    2016-10-01

    Nonlinear frequency conversion is promising for manipulating photons with orbital angular momentum (OAM). In this letter, we investigate the second harmonic generation (SHG) of light beams carrying fractional OAM. By measuring the OAM components of the generated second harmonic (SH) waves, we find that the integer components of the fundamental beam will interact with each other during the nonlinear optical process; thus, we figure out the law for topological charge transfer in frequency doubling of the fractional OAM state. Theoretical predictions by solving the nonlinear coupled wave equations are consistent with the experimental results.

  13. Compact and efficient CW 473nm blue laser with LBO intracavity frequency doubling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yan; Wang, Yu; Wang, Yanwei; Zhang, Jing; Yan, Boxia

    2016-10-01

    With diode end pumped Nd:YAG directly and LBO intracavity frequency doubling, a compact, high efficient continuous wave blue laser at 473nm is realized. When the incident pump power reach 6.2W, 630mW maximum output power of blue laser at 473nm is achieved with 15mm long LBO, the optical-to-optical conversion efficiency is as high as 10.2%.

  14. Frequency-doubled CO2 lidar measurement and diode laser spectroscopy of atmospheric CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.; Itabe, T.; Strow, L. L.; Korb, C. L.; Gentry, B. M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A lidar instrument based on pulsed frequency-doubled carbon-dioxide lasers has been used at 4.88 microns for remote sensing of atmospheric carbon dioxide. A tunable-diode laser spectrometer provided the high-resolution spectroscopic data on carbon-dioxide line strength and line broadening needed for an accurate differential absorption measurement. Initial field measurements are presented, and instrument improvements necessary for accurate carbon dioxide measurement are discussed.

  15. 1 W at 785 nm from a frequency-doubled wafer-fused semiconductor disk laser.

    PubMed

    Rantamäki, Antti; Rautiainen, Jussi; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Sirbu, Alexei; Mereuta, Alexandru; Kapon, Eli; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2012-04-09

    We demonstrate an optically pumped semiconductor disk laser operating at 1580 nm with 4.6 W of output power, which represents the highest output power reported from this type of laser. 1 W of output power at 785 nm with nearly diffraction-limited beam has been achieved from this laser through intracavity frequency doubling, which offers an attractive alternative to Ti:sapphire lasers and laser diodes in a number of applications, e.g., in spectroscopy, atomic cooling and biophotonics.

  16. Ultrahigh contrast from a frequency-doubled chirped-pulse-amplification beamline.

    PubMed

    Hillier, David; Danson, Colin; Duffield, Stuart; Egan, David; Elsmere, Stephen; Girling, Mark; Harvey, Ewan; Hopps, Nicholas; Norman, Michael; Parker, Stefan; Treadwell, Paul; Winter, David; Bett, Thomas

    2013-06-20

    This paper describes frequency-doubled operation of a high-energy chirped-pulse-amplification beamline. Efficient type-I second-harmonic generation was achieved using a 3 mm thick 320 mm aperture KDP crystal. Shots were fired at a range of energies achieving more than 100 J in a subpicosecond, 527 nm laser pulse with a power contrast of 10(14).

  17. Multi-band reflector antenna with double-ring element frequency selective subreflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Lee, S. W.

    1993-01-01

    Frequency selective subreflectors (FSS) are often employed in the reflector antenna system of a communication satellite or a deep space exploration vehicle for multi-frequency operations. In the past, FSS's have been designed for diplexing two frequency bands. For example, the Voyager FSS was designed to diplex S and X bands and the TDRSS FSS was designed to diplex S and Ku bands. Recently, NASA's CASSINI project requires an FSS to multiplex four frequency (S/X/Ku/Ka) bands. Theoretical analysis and experimental verifications are presented for a multi-band flat pannel FSS with double-ring elements. Both the exact formulation and the thin-ring approximation are described for analyzing and designing this multi-ring patch element FSS. It is found that the thin-ring approximation fails to predict the electrically wide ring element FSS's performance. A single screen double-ring element FSS is demonstrated for the tri-band system that reflects the X-band signal while transmitting through the S- and Ku-band signals. In addition, a double screen FSS with non-similar double-ring elements is presented for the Cassini's four-band system which reflects the X- and Ka-band signals while passing the S- and Ku-band signals. To accurately predict the FSS effects on a dual reflector antenna's radiation pattern, the FSS subreflector's transmitted/reflected field variation as functions of the polarization and incident angles with respect to the local coordinates was taken into account. An FSS transmission/reflection coefficient table is computed for TE and TM polarizations at various incident angles based on the planar FSS model. Next, the hybrid Geometric Optics (GO) and Physical Optics (PO) technique is implemented with linearly interpolating the FSS table to efficiently determine the FSS effects in a dual reflector antenna.

  18. Efficient frequency doubler of 1560 nm laser based on a semi-monolithic resonant cavity with a PPKTP crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junmin; Zhang, Kong; Ge, Yulong; Guo, Shanlong

    2016-06-01

    We have demonstrated 1.61 W of 780 nm single-frequency continuous-wave laser output with a semi-monolithic periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PPKTP) crystal doubler pumped by a 2-W erbium-doped fiber amplifier boosted 1560 nm diode laser. The measured maximum doubling efficiency is 77%, and the practical value should be 80% when taking into account the fundamental-wave mode matching efficiency. The measured beam quality factor of 780 nm output, M2, is better than 1.04. Typical root-mean-square fluctuation of 780 nm output is less than 0.5% in 30 minutes. This compact frequency doubler has good mechanical stability, and can be employed for many applications, such as laser cooling and trapping, atomic coherent control, atomic interferometer, and quantum frequency standard with rubidium atoms.

  19. Light storage and cavity supermodes in two coupled optomechanical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yong

    2016-12-01

    We theoretically investigate a hybrid optomechanical system including two coupled optomechanical cavities in the presence of two strong pump fields and a weak probe field. The photon-hopping coupling of the cavities gives rise to two cavity supermodes whose resonant frequencies can be obtained in the probe transmission spectrum. In a strong photon-hopping coupling regime, there is a large coupling rate between the probe field and one of the two cavity supermodes that is called a bright mode. The optomechanical couplings between the bright mode and two mechanical resonators can cause double optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT), which can be employed to both separately and simultaneously store two weak probe pulses with different central frequencies. We obtain the group delay (light storage time) of the probe field in the hybrid optomechanical system. The results suggest that compared with that of a single cavity optomechanical system, the maximum value of the storage time roughly quadrupled in a particular case. The physical origin of the results is discussed. The hybrid optomechanical system opens an avenue of light storage in cavity optomechanics.

  20. Increased frequency of double and triple heterozygous gene variants in children with intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Monique L.; Mourya, Reena; Connor, Jessica; Dexheimer, Phillip; Karns, Rebekah; Miethke, Alexander; Sheridan, Rachel; Zhang, Kejian; Bezerra, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Single-gene mutations cause syndromes of intrahepatic cholestasis, but previous multi-gene mutation screening in children with idiopathic cholestasis failed to fulfill diagnostic criteria in about two-thirds of children. In adults with fibrosing cholestatic disease, heterozygous ABCB4 mutations were present in 34% of patients. Here, we hypothesized that children with idiopathic cholestasis have a higher frequency of heterozygous non-synonymous gene sequence variants. Methods We analyzed the frequency and types of variants in 717 children in whom high-throughput sequencing of the genes SERPINA1, JAG1, ATP8B1, ABCB11, and ABCB4 was performed as part of an evaluation for intrahepatic idiopathic cholestasis. The frequency of non-synonymous variants (NSVs) was compared to those of 1092 control subjects enrolled in the 1000-Genome-Project. Results The frequency of NSVs in single genes was similar between disease (25%) and controls (26%, P=0.518). In contrast, double or triple NSVs in 2 or more genes were more frequent in disease (N= 7%) than controls (N=4.7%, P=0.028). Detailed review of clinical and laboratory information in a subgroup of double or triple heterozygous patients revealed variable GGT levels and severity of pruritus, with liver biopsies showing stage 2–3 fibrosis. Conclusion Children with intrahepatic idiopathic cholestasis have a higher frequency of double or triple NSVs in SERPINA1, JAG1, ATPB1, ABCB11, or ABCB4. These findings raise the potential role for gene-gene relationships in determining the phenotype of cholestatic liver disease in children. PMID:26126923

  1. Roughness analysis applied to niobium thin films grown on MgO(001) surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    SciTech Connect

    Beringer, D. B.; Roach, W. M.; Clavero, C.; Reece, C. E.; Lukaszew, R. A.

    2013-02-05

    This paper describes surface studies to address roughness issues inherent to thin film coatings deposited onto superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. This is particularly relevant for multilayered thin film coatings that are being considered as a possible scheme to overcome technical issues and to surpass the fundamental limit of ~500 MV/m accelerating gradient achievable with bulk niobium. In 2006, a model by Gurevich [ Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 012511 (2006)] was proposed to overcome this limit that involves coating superconducting layers separated by insulating ones onto the inner walls of the cavities. Thus, we have undertaken a systematic effort to understand the dynamic evolution of the Nb surface under specific deposition thin film conditions onto an insulating surface in order to explore the feasibility of the proposed model. We examine and compare the morphology from two distinct Nb/MgO series, each with its own epitaxial registry, at very low growth rates and closely examine the dynamical scaling of the surface features during growth. Further, we apply analysis techniques such as power spectral density to the specific problem of thin film growth and roughness evolution to qualify the set of deposition conditions that lead to successful SRF coatings.

  2. THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

  3. Low-frequency fluctuations in an external-cavity laser leading to extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Daeyoung; Wishon, Michael J.; Barnoud, J.; Chang, C. Y.; Bouazizi, Y.; Locquet, A.; Citrin, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally investigate the dynamical regimes of a laser diode subject to external optical feedback in light of extreme-event (EE) analysis. We observe EEs in the low-frequency fluctuations (LFFs) regime. This number decreases to negligible values when the laser transitions towards fully developed coherence collapse as the injection current is increased. Moreover, we show that EEs observed in the LFF regime are linked to high-frequency pulsing events observed after a power dropout. Finally, we prove experimentally that the observation of EEs in the LFF regimes is robust to changes in operational parameters.

  4. Low-frequency fluctuations in an external-cavity laser leading to extreme events.

    PubMed

    Choi, Daeyoung; Wishon, Michael J; Barnoud, J; Chang, C Y; Bouazizi, Y; Locquet, A; Citrin, D S

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally investigate the dynamical regimes of a laser diode subject to external optical feedback in light of extreme-event (EE) analysis. We observe EEs in the low-frequency fluctuations (LFFs) regime. This number decreases to negligible values when the laser transitions towards fully developed coherence collapse as the injection current is increased. Moreover, we show that EEs observed in the LFF regime are linked to high-frequency pulsing events observed after a power dropout. Finally, we prove experimentally that the observation of EEs in the LFF regimes is robust to changes in operational parameters.

  5. Efficient generation of 3.5 W laser light at 515 nm by frequency doubling a single-frequency high power DBR tapered diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Müller, André; Sumpf, Bernd; Petersen, Paul Michael; Andersen, Peter E.

    2017-06-01

    More than 3.5 W of green light at 515 nm is generated by frequency doubling a single-frequency high power DBR tapered diode laser. The frequency doubling is performed in a cascade of PPMgLN and PPMgSLT crystals in order to reach high power and avoid thermal effects present in PPMgLN at high power. The green light is diffraction limited (M2 <1.1) and single-frequency operation is demonstrated with a linewidth less than 2 pm.

  6. Comparison and characterization of efficient frequency doubling at 397.5 nm with PPKTP, LBO and BiBO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xin; Han, Yashuai; Wang, Junmin

    2016-04-01

    A continuous-wave Ti:sapphire laser at 795 nm is frequency doubled in a bow-tie type enhancement four-mirror ring cavity with LiB3O5 (LBO), BiB3O6 (BiBO), and periodically polled KTiOPO4 (PPKTP) crystals, respectively. The properties of 397.5 nm ultra-violet (UV) output power, beam quality, stability for these different nonlinear crystals are investigated and compared. For PPKTP crystal, the highest doubling efficiency of 58.1% is achieved from 191 mW of 795 nm mode-matched fundamental power to 111 mW of 397.5 nm UV output. For LBO crystal, with 1.34 W of mode-matched 795 nm power, 770 mW of 397.5 nm UV output is achieved, implying a doubling efficiency of 57.4%. For BiBO crystal, with 323 mW of mode-matched 795 nm power, 116 mW of 397.5 nm UV output is achieved, leading to a doubling efficiency of 35.9%. The generated UV radiation has potential applications in the fields of quantum physics.

  7. The external Q factor of a dual-feed coupling for superconducting radio frequency cavities: theoretical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Dai, J; Belomestnykh, S; Ben-Zvi, I; Xu, Wencan

    2013-11-01

    We propose a theoretical model based on network analysis to study the external quality factor (Q factor) of dual-feed coupling for superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. Specifically, we apply our model to the dual-feed 704 MHz half-cell SRF gun for Brookhaven National Laboratory's prototype Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). The calculations show that the external Q factor of this dual-feed system is adjustable from 10(4) to 10(9) provided that the adjustment range of a phase shifter covers 0°-360°. With a period of 360°, the external Q factor of the coupling system changes periodically with the phase difference between the two coupling arms. When the RF phase of both coupling arms is adjusted simultaneously in the same direction, the external Q factor of the system also changes periodically, but with a period of 180°.

  8. Ultrafast direct modulation of transverse-mode coupled-cavity VCSELs far beyond the relaxation oscillation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalir, Hamed; Koyama, Fumio

    2014-02-01

    A novel approach for bandwidth augmentation for direct modulation of VCSELs using transverse-coupled-cavity (TCC) scheme is raised, which enables us to tailor the modulation-transfer function. The base structure is similar to that of 3QW VCSELs with 980 nm wavelength operation. While the bandwidth of conventional VCSELs was limited by 9-10 GHz, the 3-dB bandwidth of TCC VCSEL with aperture diameters of 8.5×8.5μm2 and 3×3μm2 are increased by a factor of 3 far beyond the relaxation-oscillation frequency. Our current bandwidth achievement on the larger aperture size is 29 GHz which is limited by the used photo-detector. To the best of our knowledge this is the fastest 980 nm VCSEL.

  9. All-Optical Quasi-Phase Matching of Frequency Doubling Using Counterpropagating Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camuccio, Richard; Myer, Rachel; Penfield, Allison; Gagnon, Etienne; Lytle, Amy

    Nonlinear optical frequency conversion is a useful method for creating coherent light sources with unique capabilities. The main challenge for conversion efficiency of processes like frequency doubling is the chromatic dispersion of the nonlinear medium. Successful techniques for correcting the phase mismatch between the different frequencies are often limited by the type of nonlinear medium that may be used. An all-optical method of quasi-phase matching using counterpropagating light has recently been demonstrated for high-order harmonic generation, an extreme nonlinear process. Sequences of counterpropagating pulses are used to interfere with the harmonic generation process periodically, correcting the phase mismatch and boosting efficiency. We report progress on an experimental investigation of the effect of counterpropagating light on the more commonly used low-order nonlinear optical processes. We present data showing the effects of a single counterpropagating pulse on the efficiency of frequency doubling of a Ti:sapphire ultrafast laser oscillator in beta-Barium Borate. Research Corporation for Science Advancement (RCSA), Cottrell College Science Award #21084; Franklin & Marshall Hackman Summer Scholars Program.

  10. All-optical quasi-phase matching of frequency doubling using counterpropagating light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myer, Rachel; Penfield, Allison; Gagnon, Etienne; Lytle, Amy

    2013-03-01

    Nonlinear optical frequency conversion is a useful method for creating coherent light sources with unique capabilities. The main challenge for conversion efficiency of processes like frequency doubling is the chromatic dispersion of the nonlinear medium. Successful techniques for correcting the phase mismatch between the different frequencies are often limited by the type of nonlinear medium that may be used. An all-optical method of quasi-phase matching using counterpropagating light has recently been demonstrated for high-order harmonic generation, an extreme nonlinear process. Sequences of counterpropagating pulses are used to interfere with the harmonic generation process periodically, correcting the phase mismatch and boosting efficiency. We report progress on an experimental investigation of the effect of counterpropagating light on the more commonly used low-order nonlinear optical processes. We present data showing the effects of a single counterpropagating pulse on the efficiency of frequency doubling of a Ti:sapphire ultrafast laser oscillator in beta-Barium Borate. This work is supported by the Hackman Summer Scholars program at Franklin & Marshall College, and a CCSA grant (#21084) from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  11. A study on the effect of tantalum-impurity content on the superconducting properties of niobium materials used for making superconducting radio frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    S B Roy, L S Sharath Chandra, M K Chattopadhyay, M K Tiwari, G S Lodha, G R Myneni

    2012-10-01

    Niobium materials in highly pure form are used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavities. We present here a study of the superconducting properties of such niobium materials that have been used in the fabrication of high accelerating gradient superconducting radio frequency cavities after determining their tantalum-impurity contents using a synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy technique. Our results show that there is a small change in superconducting parameters such as T{sub C},H{sub C1} and H{sub C2} when the tantalum-impurity content varies from ≈150 to ≈1300 ppm. In contrast, a buffered chemical polishing of the same niobium samples changes all these superconducting parameters more significantly. The implications of these results on the performance of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities are discussed.

  12. A new three-dimensional shape measurement method based on double-frequency fringes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Biao; Yang, Jie; Wu, Haitao; Fu, Yanjun

    2015-10-01

    Fringe projection profilometry (FPP) is a rapidly developing technique which is widely used for industrial manufacture, heritage conservation, and medicine etc. because of its high speed, high precision, non-contact operation, full-field acquisition, and easy information processing. Among the various FFP methods, the squared binary defocused projection method (SBM) has been promptly expanding with several advantages: (1) high projection speed because of 1-bit grayscale fringe; (2) eliminating nonlinear gamma of the projector for the defocusing effect. Nevertheless, the method is not trouble-free. When the fringe stripe is wide, it brings down the fringe contrast and is difficult to control the defocused degree, resulting in a low measurement accuracy. In order to further improve high-speed and high-precision three-dimensional shape measurement, this paper presents a new three-dimensional shape measurement method based on double-frequency fringes projection. This new method needs to project two sets of 1-bit grayscale fringe patterns (low-frequency fringe and high-frequency fringe) onto the object surface under slightly defocused projection mode. The method has the following advantages: (1) high projection speed because of 1-bit grayscale fringe; (2) high measurement precision for selectively removing undesired harmonics. Low-frequency fringe is produced by error-diffusion dithering (Dithering) technique and high-frequency fringe is generated by optimal pulse-width modulation (OPWM) technique. The two kinds of fringe patterns have each superiorities and flaws. The low-frequency fringe has a low measurement accuracy, but the continue phase can be easily retrieved. However, the property of high-frequency fringe and low-frequency fringe is the opposite. The general idea of this method proposed is as follows: Because the both fringes test the same object, the height is the same. The low-frequency fringe can be used to assist the high frequency fringe to retrieve

  13. A single-frequency double-pulse Ho:YLF laser for CO2-lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucirek, P.; Meissner, A.; Eiselt, P.; Höfer, M.; Hoffmann, D.

    2016-03-01

    A single-frequency q-switched Ho:YLF laser oscillator with a bow-tie ring resonator, specifically designed for highspectral stability, is reported. It is pumped with a dedicated Tm:YLF laser at 1.9 μm. The ramp-and-fire method with a DFB-diode laser as a reference is employed for generating single-frequency emission at 2051 nm. The laser is tested with different operating modes, including cw-pumping at different pulse repetition frequencies and gain-switched pumping. The standard deviation of the emission wavelength of the laser pulses is measured with the heterodyne technique at the different operating modes. Its dependence on the single-pass gain in the crystal and on the cavity finesse is investigated. At specific operating points the spectral stability of the laser pulses is 1.5 MHz (rms over 10 s). Under gain-switched pumping with 20% duty cycle and 2 W of average pump power, stable single-frequency pulse pairs with a temporal separation of 580 μs are produced at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. The measured pulse energy is 2 mJ (<2 % rms error on the pulse energy over 10 s) and the measured pulse duration is approx. 20 ns for each of the two pulses in the burst.

  14. Application of Model Based Parameter Estimation for Fast Frequency Response Calculations of Input Characteristics of Cavity-Backed Aperture Antennas Using Hybrid FEM/MoM Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy C. J.

    1998-01-01

    Model Based Parameter Estimation (MBPE) is presented in conjunction with the hybrid Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM) technique for fast computation of the input characteristics of cavity-backed aperture antennas over a frequency range. The hybrid FENI/MoM technique is used to form an integro-partial- differential equation to compute the electric field distribution of a cavity-backed aperture antenna. In MBPE, the electric field is expanded in a rational function of two polynomials. The coefficients of the rational function are obtained using the frequency derivatives of the integro-partial-differential equation formed by the hybrid FEM/ MoM technique. Using the rational function approximation, the electric field is obtained over a frequency range. Using the electric field at different frequencies, the input characteristics of the antenna are obtained over a wide frequency range. Numerical results for an open coaxial line, probe-fed coaxial cavity and cavity-backed microstrip patch antennas are presented. Good agreement between MBPE and the solutions over individual frequencies is observed.

  15. LD-pumped double-clad fiber single-frequency power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Feng; Yang, Su-Hui; Zhao, Chang-Ming

    2005-12-01

    Single frequency, single mode laser output from a monolithic resonator was amplified by a double-clad D-shape fiber of 4.4 meters long. When the signal laser is 200mw, up to 6.65 W single frequency laser output was obtained, slope efficiency is 30.6%. The amplifier is Yb 3+ doped glass fiber pumped by a laser diode array at 976nm with signal at 1064nm. Single frequency amplification has been proved by a Fabri-Parrot interferometer. It is shown from the experiments that the signal input has not been saturated. By increasing the input signal, amplification can be increased further under the same pumping power. Experimental results meet well with theoretical calculation.

  16. Continuous-wave frequency comb Fourier transform source based on a high-dispersion cavity.

    PubMed

    Kraetschmer, Thilo; Walewski, Joachim W; Sanders, Scott T

    2006-11-01

    A dispersive grating compressor was included in a fiber ring laser to generate an unequally spaced frequency comb spanning approximately 1549-1552 nm. Beating of nearby modes in the comb naturally assigns unique amplitude modulation frequencies to each spectral component emitted. The source contains no moving parts. The single-mode fiber-coupled output is directed through hydrogen cyanide gas and detected by a photodiode. A Fourier transform of a 1 ms record yields a spectrum that agrees with results from a grating spectrometer at 0.06 nm resolution. By engineering stable, broadband combs, the technique could result in a universal and simple approach for spectroscopy at almost arbitrary measurement speeds and spectral resolutions limited only by Fourier principles.

  17. Compact deep UV laser system at 222.5 nm by single-pass frequency doubling of high-power GaN diode laser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhnke, Norman; Müller, André; Eppich, Bernd; Güther, Reiner; Maiwald, Martin; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2016-03-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) lasers emitting below 300 nm are of great interest for many applications, for instance in medical diagnostics or for detecting biological agents. Established DUV lasers, e.g. gas lasers or frequency quadrupled solid-state lasers, are relatively bulky and have high power consumptions. A compact and reliable laser diode based system emitting in the DUV could help to address applications in environments where a portable and robust light source with low power consumption is needed. In this work, a compact DUV laser system based on single-pass frequency doubling of highpower GaN diode laser emission is presented. A commercially available high-power GaN laser diode from OSRAM Opto Semiconductors serves as a pump source. The laser diode is spectrally stabilized in an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) setup in Littrow configuration. The ECDL system reaches a maximum optical output power of 700 mW, maintaining narrowband emission below 60 pm (FWHM) at 445 nm over the entire operating range. By direct single pass frequency doubling in a BBO crystal with a length of 7.5 mm a maximum DUV output power of 16 μW at a wavelength of 222.5 nm is generated. The presented concept enables compact and efficient diode laser based light sources emitting in the DUV spectral range that are potentially suitable for in situ applications where a small footprint and low power consumption is essential.

  18. A double stranded metal-organic assembly accommodating a pair of water trimers in the host cavity and catalysing Glaser coupling.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Subhashis; Moon, Dohyun; John, Rohith P

    2016-02-01

    A supramolecular compound, catena-poly{[Cu2(1,3-μ2-(1a))2(μ2-ter)2(H2O)2]n·(6H2O)n} (1) has been synthesized using (1a) [(1a = N(1),N(3),N(5)-trimethyl-N(1),N(3),N(5)-tris((pyridin-4-yl)methyl)-1,3,5-benzene tricarboxamide] and terephthalate (ter) as the pillaring unit by self-assembly. The terephthalate units are connected by copper(II) ions forming a single strand, while a pair of such strands are then linked by (1a) via two pyridyl terminal arms bound to copper(II) nodes on either side forming a one-dimensional double stranded assembly propagating along the c axis. The compound crystallizes in the Fdd2 space group. The cavity created in the interior of this double strand assembly trap six water molecules and are stabilized by hydrogen bonding with the host. The arrangement of the pair of acyclic water trimers in isolated cavities of (1) is such that it resembles a closed-bracket-like formation. The Hirshfeld surface analysis of (1) reveals the presence of strong intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions between one-dimensional ladder-like units and with the water trimer in the host cavity. The copper(II)-containing coordination polymer also acts as an efficient catalyst for the Glaser-Hay homo-coupling reaction.

  19. Operation of a frequency-narrowed high-beam quality broad-area laser by a passively stabilized external cavity technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayram, S. B.; Coons, R. W.

    2007-11-01

    The average spectral bandwidth of a 2W broad-area diode laser was narrowed to 5GHz with wavelength tunability of up to 12nm at a center wavelength of 790nm with the use of a Littman-Metcalf external cavity in a displaced configuration. The use of lens and combined lens-laser transformation systems allowed precise alignment of the beam shaping optics, which led to significant improvements of the beam quality and an enhanced suppression of the free-running laser modes. We characterize the spatial beam quality of our external cavity diode laser by measuring the M2 quality factor and relate this to our measured bandwidths. Our external cavity can be configured over a range of cavity lengths and is modular in design, enabling access to a broad frequency spectrum for a wide range of applications that require high-power, narrow bandwidth operation.

  20. Proposed Cavity for Reduced Slip-Stacking Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, J.; Zwaska, R.

    2015-06-01

    This paper employs a novel dynamical mechanism to improve the performance of slip-stacking. Slip-stacking in an accumulation technique used at Fermilab since 2004 which nearly double the proton intensity. During slip-stacking, the Recycler or the Main Injector stores two particles beams that spatially overlap but have different momenta. The two particle beams are longitudinally focused by two 53 MHz 100 kV RF cavities with a small frequency difference between them. We propose an additional 106 MHz 20 kV RF cavity, with a frequency at the double the average of the upper and lower main RF frequencies. In simulation, we find the proposed RF cavity significantly enhances the stable bucket area and reduces slip-stacking losses under reasonable injection scenarios. We quantify and map the stability of the parameter space for any accelerator implementing slip-stacking with the addition of a harmonic RF cavity.

  1. Design of a standing-wave multicell radio frequency cavity beam monitor for simultaneous position and emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Miller, Roger; Nantista, Christopher

    2005-07-15

    High precision, nondisruptive emittance measurement through second moment monitoring requires precise beam position at the measurement location. We present the design and analysis of a multicavity standing wave structure for a pulse-to-pulse beam position-emittance measurement system in which the quadrupole and the dipole standing wave modes resonate at harmonics of a presumed beam bunch train frequency. As an application for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) beams, an optimized nine-cavity standing-wave structure is designed for simultaneous high precision beam position and emittance measurement. It operates with the {pi}-phase advance quadrupole mode resonating at the 16th harmonic (11.424 GHz) of the NLC bunch frequency and the 3{pi}/4-phase advance dipole mode at the 12th harmonic (8.568 GHz). The output powers from these modes are estimated for the NLC beams. Measurement resolution is estimated to be on the micron scale for rms beam size and on the nanometer scale for beam position.

  2. Frequency-induced polarization bistability in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with orthogonal optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gatare, I.; Panajotov, K.; Sciamanna, M.

    2007-02-15

    We report theoretically on a pure frequency-induced polarization bistability in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) subject to orthogonal optical injection, i.e., the master laser light polarization is orthogonal to that of the slave VCSEL. As the frequency detuning is scanned from negative to positive values and for a fixed injected power, the VCSEL exhibits two successive and possibly bistable polarization switchings. The first switching (from the slave laser polarization to the injected light polarization) exhibits a bistable region whose width is maximum for a given value of the injected power. Such a dependency of hysteresis width on the injected power is similar to that recently found experimentally by Hong et al.[Electron. Lett. 36, 2019 (2000)]. The bistability accompanying the second switching (from the injected light polarization back to the slave laser free-running polarization) exhibits, however, significantly different features related to the occurrence of optical chaos. Interestingly, the width of the bistable region can be tuned over a large range not only by modifying the injection parameters but also by modifying the device parameters, in particular the VCSEL linewidth enhancement factor.

  3. Characteristic analysis of the optical delay in frequency response of resonant cavity enhanced (RCE) photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jian-Chuan; Zuo, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Yun; Ding, Wu-Chang; Cheng, Bu-Wen; Yu, Jin-Zhong; Wang, Qi-Ming

    2009-06-01

    With consideration of the modulation frequency of the input lightwave itself, we present a new model to calculate the quantum efficiency of RCE p-i-n photodetectors (PD) by superimposition of multiple reflected lightwaves. For the first time, the optical delay, another important factor limiting the electrical bandwidth of RCE p-i-n PD excluding the transit time of the carriers and RCd response of the photodetector, is analyzed and discussed in detail. The optical delay dominates the bandwidth of RCE p-i-n PD when its active layer is thinner than several 10 nm. These three limiting factors must be considered exactly for design of ultra-high-speed RCE p-i-n PD.

  4. Multi-wavelength generation based on cascaded Raman scattering and self-frequency-doubling in KTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, K.; Li, J. S.; Xu, D. G.; Ding, X.; Zhou, R.; Wen, W. Q.; Li, Z. Y.; Xu, X. Y.; Wang, P.; Yao, J. Q.

    2010-04-01

    A multi-wavelength laser is developed based on cascaded stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and self-frequency-doubling in an x-cut KTA crystal pumped by an A-O Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The generation of 1178 nm from cascaded SRS of 234 and 671 cm-1 Raman modes is observed. The six wavelengths, including the fundamental 1064 nm, four Stokes waves at 1091, 1120, 1146, 1178 nm, and the second harmonic generation (SHG) of 1146 nm, are tens to hundreds of millwatts for each at 10 kHz, corresponding to a total conversion efficiency of 8.72%.

  5. The impact of manufacturing errors of domain structure on frequency doubling efficiency in PPLN waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengying; Ren, Aihong; Zhang, Rongzhu; Liu, Jinglun; Sun, Nianchun; Chen, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    While the length of polarization period in the periodically poled (PP) waveguides has manufacturing errors (MEs), the impact of this errors on Quasi-Phase-Macthed (QPM) frequency doubling efficiency (FDE), and that of polarization period Λ0 and length of the waveguides at the direction of transmission beams on ME tolerance, which are all theoretically analyzed. The results show that with the ME increasing, FDE decreases rapidly. And the ME tolerance of PP waveguides is inversely proportional to the length of waveguides and is directly proportional to the polarization period Λ0. These results provide a theoretical basis for choosing material of periodically poled crystal (PPC) and controlling MEs.

  6. Treatment of overhanging blebs with frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Sony, Parul; Kumar, Harsh; Pushker, Neelam

    2004-01-01

    Large overhanging blebs can be associated with various complications (eg, overfiltration, endophthalmitis, and dellen formation). Argon laser treatment of such blebs has already been described. The authors used frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser in 3 eyes of 3 patients with large filtering blebs. Gentian violet was used to stain the bleb surface and enhance the laser absorption. Laser spots were applied over the bleb surface. Bleb shrinkage and remodeling was observed in all 3 eyes. Intraocular pressure remained normal, suggesting that the filtering capability of the blebs was maintained.

  7. Green frequency-doubled laser-beam propagation in high-temperature hohlraum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Niemann, C; Berger, R L; Divol, L; Froula, D H; Jones, O; Kirkwood, R K; Meezan, N; Moody, J D; Ross, J; Sorce, C; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate propagation and small backscatter losses of a frequency-doubled (2omega) laser beam interacting with inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmas. The electron temperature of 3.3 keV, approximately a factor of 2 higher than achieved in previous experiments with open geometry targets, approaches plasma conditions of high-fusion yield hohlraums. In this new temperature regime, we measure 2omega laser-beam transmission approaching 80% with simultaneous backscattering losses of less than 10%. These findings suggest that good laser coupling into fusion hohlraums using 2omega light is possible.

  8. Frequency-doubled telecom fiber laser for a cold atom interferometer using optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theron, Fabien; Bidel, Yannick; Dieu, Emily; Zahzam, Nassim; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2017-06-01

    A compact and robust frequency-doubled telecom laser system at 780 nm is presented for a rubidium cold atom interferometer using optical lattices. Adopting an optical switch at 1.5 μm and a dual-wavelength second harmonic generation system, only one laser amplifier is required for the laser system. Our system delivers a 900 mW laser beam with a detuning of 110 GHz for the optical lattice and a 650 mW laser beam with an adjustable detuning between 0 and -1 GHz for the laser cooling, the detection and the Raman transitions.

  9. A double quantum (129)Xe NMR experiment for probing xenon in multiply-occupied cavities of solid-state inclusion compounds.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Darren H; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2007-03-07

    A method is presented for detecting multiple xenon atoms in cavities of solid-state inclusion compounds using (129)Xe double quantum NMR spectroscopy. Double quantum filtered (129)Xe NMR spectra, performed on the xenon clathrate of Dianin's compound were obtained under high-resolution Magic-Angle Spinning (MAS) conditions, by recoupling the weak (129)Xe-(129)Xe dipole-dipole couplings that exist between xenon atoms in close spatial proximity. Because the (129)Xe-(129)Xe dipole-dipole couplings are generally weak due to dynamics of the atoms and to large internuclear separations, and since the (129)Xe Chemical Shift Anisotropy (CSA) tends to be relatively large, a very robust dipolar recoupling sequence was necessary, with the symmetry-based SR26 dipolar recoupling sequence proving appropriate. We have also attempted to measure the (129)Xe-(129)Xe dipole-dipole coupling constant between xenon atoms in the cavities of the xenon-Dianin's compound clathrate and have found that the dynamics of the xenon atoms (as investigated with molecular dynamics simulations) as well as (129)Xe multiple spin effects complicate the analysis. The double quantum NMR method is useful for peak assignment in (129)Xe NMR spectra because peaks arising from different types of absorption/inclusion sites or from different levels of occupancy of single sites can be distinguished. The method can also help resolve ambiguities in diffraction experiments concerning the order/disorder in a material.

  10. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  11. A double tuned rail damper—increased damping at the two first pinned-pinned frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, J.; Sol, H.

    2003-10-01

    Railway-induced vibrations are a growing matter of environmental concern. The rapid development of transportation, the increase of vehicle speeds and vehicle weights have resulted in higher vibration levels. In the meantime vibrations that were tolerated in the past are now considered to be a nuisance. Numerous solutions have been proposed to remedy these problems. The majority only acts on a specific part of the dynamic behaviour of the track. This paper presents a possible solution to reduce the noise generated by the 'pinned-pinned' frequencies. Pinned-pinned frequencies correspond with standing waves whose nodes are positioned exactly at the sleeper supports. The two first pinned-pinned frequencies are situated approximately at 950 and 2200 Hz (UIC60-rail and sleeper spacing of 0.60 m). To attenuate these vibrations, the Department of MEMC at the VUB has developed a dynamic vibration absorber called the Double Tuned Rail Damper (DTRD). The DTRD is mounted between two sleepers on the rail and is powered by the motion of the rail. The DTRD consists of two major parts: a steel plate which is connected to the rail with an interface of an elastic layer, and a rubber mass. The two first resonance frequencies of the steel plate coincide with the targeted pinned-pinned frequencies of the rail. The rubber mass acts as a motion controller and energy absorber. Measurements at a test track of the French railway company (SNCF) have shown considerable attenuation of the envisaged pinned-pinned frequencies. The attenuation rate surpasses 5 dB/m at certain frequency bands.

  12. Monolithic MgO:LiNbO sub 3 doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator pumped by a frequency-doubled diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Byer, R.L.; Nabors, C.D.; Kozlovsky, W.J.; Eckardt, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    The authors demonstrated a monolithic MgO:LiNbO3 doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) using an all solid-state pump. The pump laser was a single-axial-mode monolithic Nd:YAG nonplanar ring oscillator whose diode-laser pump was modulated at 325 kHz to produce relaxation oscillation spikes to higher peak powers at 1.06 micrometers that were frequency doubled in a resonant cavity to 532 nm. Pump depletions for the OPO output was temperature tuned from 1.01 to 1.13 micrometers, producing single-axial-mode output over much of the range. By changing the voltage applied across the OPO, the output wavelength was scanned as much as 11 nm in 310 V.

  13. 1W frequency-doubled VCSEL-pumped blue laser with high pulse energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Leeuwen, Robert; Chen, Tong; Watkins, Laurence; Xu, Guoyang; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Wang, Qing; Zhou, Delai; Ghosh, Chuni

    2015-02-01

    We report on a Q-switched VCSEL side-pumped 946 nm Nd:YAG laser that produces high average power blue light with high pulse energy after frequency doubling in BBO. The gain medium was water cooled and symmetrically pumped by three 1 kW 808 nm VCSEL pump modules. More than 1 W blue output was achieved at 210 Hz with 4.9 mJ pulse energy and at 340 Hz with 3.2 mJ pulse energy, with 42% and 36% second harmonic conversion efficiency respectively. Higher pulse energy was obtained at lower repetition frequencies, up to 9.3 mJ at 70 Hz with 52% conversion efficiency.

  14. Photonic generation of versatile frequency-doubled microwave waveforms via a dual-polarization modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zihang; Zhao, Shanghong; Li, Xuan; Qu, Kun; Lin, Tao

    2017-02-01

    We report a photonic approach to generate frequency-doubled microwave waveforms using an integrated electro-optic dual-polarization modulator driven by a sinusoidal radio frequency (RF) signal. With active bias control, two MZMs of the dual-polarization modulator operate at minimum transmission points, a triangular waveform can be generated by a parameter setting of modulation index. After introducing a broadband 90° microwave phase shifter, a square waveform can be obtained by readjusting the power relationship of harmonics. The proposal is first theoretically analyzed and then validated by simulation. Simulation results show that a 10 GHz triangular and square waveform sequences are successfully generated from a 5 GHz sinusoidal RF drive signal, and the performance of the microwave waveforms are not influenced by the finite extinction ratio of modulator.

  15. Double-wavelet approach to study frequency and amplitude modulation in renal autoregulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnovtseva, O. V.; Pavlov, A. N.; Mosekilde, E.; Holstein-Rathlou, N.-H.; Marsh, D. J.

    2004-09-01

    Biological time series often display complex oscillations with several interacting rhythmic components. Renal autoregulation, for instance, involves at least two separate mechanisms both of which can produce oscillatory variations in the pressures and flows of the individual nephrons. Using double-wavelet analysis we propose a method to examine how the instantaneous frequency and amplitude of a fast mode is modulated by the presence of a slower mode. Our method is applied both to experimental data from normotensive and hypertensive rats showing different oscillatory patterns and to simulation results obtained from a physiologically based model of the nephron pressure and flow control. We reveal a nonlinear interaction between the two mechanisms that regulate the renal blood flow in the form of frequency and amplitude modulation of the myogenic oscillations.

  16. Intensity correlations and entanglement by frequency doubling in a two-port resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, O.-K.; Saffman, M.

    2006-08-15

    We show that nonclassical intensity correlations and quadrature entanglement can be generated by frequency doubling in a resonator with two output ports. We predict twin-beam intensity correlations 6 dB below the coherent-state limit, and that the product of the inference variances of the quadrature fluctuations gives an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlation coefficient of V{sub EPR}=0.64<1, using the criterion of Reid [Phys. Rev. A 40, 913 (1989)]. Comparison with an entanglement source based on combining two frequency doublers with a beam splitter shows that the dual-ported resonator provides stronger entanglement at lower levels of individual beam squeezing. Calculations are performed using a self-consistent propagation method that does not invoke a mean-field approximation. Results are given for physically realistic parameters that account for the Gaussian shape of the intracavity beams, as well as intracavity losses.

  17. A parametric study of double-shell tank response to internal high-frequency pressure loading

    SciTech Connect

    Baliga, R.; Choi, K.; Shulman, J.S.; Strehlow, J.P.; Abatt, G.

    1995-02-01

    The double-shell waste tank 241SY101 (SY101) is a 3,785,400-liter tank used to store radioactive waste at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The tank waste has formed two layers of sludge in the tank; a convective and a nonconvective layer. Ongoing reactions in the waste cause a buildup of hydrogen molecules that become trapped within the nonconvective layer of the waste. Various means of preventing the buildup of hydrogen molecules in the nonconvective layer have been investigated, including the use of a sonic probe that would transmit high-frequency acoustic pressure waves into the nonconvective layer of the waste. During the operation of the sonic probe, the pressure waves transmitted from the probe induce pressure time history loading on the inside surface of the primary tank. For low-frequency fluid-structure interaction loads, such as those associated with seismic events, the convective and impulsive effects of the waste-filled tank are well documented. However, for high-frequency loading, such as that associated with acoustic pressure waves, interactions between the waste and the primary tank are not understood. The pressure time history is represented by a harmonic function with a frequency range between 30 and 100 Hz. Structural analyses of the double-shell tank have been performed that address the tank`s response to the sonic probe acoustic pressure loads. This paper addresses the variations in the tank response as a function of percent waste mass considered to be effective in the dynamic excitation of the tank. It also compares results predicted by analyses that discretely model the liquid waste and presents recommendations for the simplified effective mass approach. Also considered in the parametric study is the effect of damping on the tank response for the same pressure loading.

  18. Continuous-wave sum-frequency generation near 194 nm in beta-BaB(2)O(4) crystals with an enhancement cavity.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Hayasaka, K; Imajo, H; Urabe, S

    1992-01-01

    Continuous-wave coherent radiation tunable near 194 nm has been generated by sum-frequency generation in beta-BaB(2)O(4) placed inside an external enhancement cavity. An output power of 16 microW has been obtained with a walk-off-compensated configuration of beta-BaB(2)O(4) crystals.

  19. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Stabilization and Shift of Frequency in an External Cavity Diode Laser with Solenoid-Assisted Saturated Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shun-Li; Cheng, Bing; Zhang, Jing-Fang; Xu, Yun-Fei; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Lin, Qiang

    2009-06-01

    A simple method to realize both stabilization and shift of the frequency in an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) is reported. Due to the Zeeman effect, the saturated absorption spectrum of Rb atoms in a magnetic field is shifted. This shift can be used to detune the frequency of the ECDL, which is locked to the saturated absorption spectrum. The frequency shift amount can be controlled by changing the magnetic field for a specific polarization state of the laser beam. The advantages of this tunable frequency lock include low laser power requirement, without additional power loss, cheapness, and so on.

  20. The double-ridge structure of the high-frequency time-distance crosscorrelation function in local helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambara, Nagaaki; Sekii, Takashi

    2017-08-01

    We model helioseismic high-frequency cross-correlation function and carry out comparison with observational data.We also discuss the source depth of the acoustic waves, one of the model parameters.It has been reported that when time-distance analysis is applied to the high-frequency acoustic waves, with frequencies above the critical cutoff frequency, time-distance cross-correlation function exhibits double-ridge structure. It has been pointed out, however, that in such analyses subcritical components (frequency < 5.3 MHz) may not be completely filtered out, and a hypothesis is that the double ridges are generated as artificial interference patterns of the subcritical waves and the supercritical waves. We test this hypothesis using SDO/HMI data.The data are put through a frequency filter before the cross-correlation function is computed. We vary the width and central frequency of the filter and examine when double ridges appear. When both the supercritical and the subcritical components are present in the filtered power spectrum, double ridges appear. When there is only one of the components, however, double ridges do not appear, confirming that interference between the two components is necessary for the double ridges.Next, we construct a simple model of cross-correlation function by ray-tracing the waves generated at a certain depth. The model reproduces the double-ridge structure well, indeed by interference between the supercritical part and the subcritical part, each of which by itself exhibits only a single ridge. We find that the successful reproduction of the observations depends sharply on the source depth of the acoustic wave, one of the input parameters to the model.This indicates a possibility that we can measure the source depth of the acoustic waves precisely, using the double ridges.