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Sample records for cayman rise mcr

  1. Diverse styles of submarine venting on the ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise

    PubMed Central

    German, C. R.; Bowen, A.; Coleman, M. L.; Honig, D. L.; Huber, J. A.; Jakuba, M. V.; Kinsey, J. C.; Kurz, M. D.; Leroy, S.; McDermott, J. M.; de Lépinay, B. Mercier; Nakamura, K.; Seewald, J. S.; Smith, J. L.; Sylva, S. P.; Van Dover, C. L.; Whitcomb, L. L.; Yoerger, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    Thirty years after the first discovery of high-temperature submarine venting, the vast majority of the global mid-ocean ridge remains unexplored for hydrothermal activity. Of particular interest are the world’s ultraslow spreading ridges that were the last to be demonstrated to host high-temperature venting but may host systems particularly relevant to prebiotic chemistry and the origins of life. Here we report evidence for previously unknown, diverse, and very deep hydrothermal vents along the ∼110 km long, ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR). Our data indicate that the MCR hosts at least three discrete hydrothermal sites, each representing a different type of water-rock interaction, including both mafic and ultramafic systems and, at ∼5,000 m, the deepest known hydrothermal vent. Although submarine hydrothermal circulation, in which seawater percolates through and reacts with host lithologies, occurs on all mid-ocean ridges, the diversity of vent types identified here and their relative geographic isolation make the MCR unique in the oceans. These new sites offer prospects for an expanded range of vent-fluid compositions, varieties of abiotic organic chemical synthesis and extremophile microorganisms, and unparalleled faunal biodiversity—all in close proximity. PMID:20660317

  2. Subseafloor Microbial Life in Venting Fluids from the Mid Cayman Rise Hydrothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, J. A.; Reveillaud, J.; Reddington, E.; McDermott, J. M.; Sylva, S. P.; Breier, J. A.; German, C. R.; Seewald, J.

    2012-12-01

    In hard rock seafloor environments, fluids emanating from hydrothermal vents are one of the best windows into the subseafloor and its resident microbial community. The functional consequences of an extensive population of microbes living in the subseafloor remains unknown, as does our understanding of how these organisms interact with one another and influence the biogeochemistry of the oceans. Here we report the abundance, activity, and diversity of microbes in venting fluids collected from two newly discovered deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the ultra-slow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR). Fluids for geochemical and microbial analysis were collected from the Von Damm and Piccard vent fields, which are located within 20 km of one another, yet have extremely different thermal, geological, and depth regimes. Geochemical data indicates that both fields are highly enriched in volatiles, in particular hydrogen and methane, important energy sources for and by-products of microbial metabolism. At both sites, total microbial cell counts in the fluids ranged in concentration from 5 x 10 4 to 3 x 10 5 cells ml-1 , with background seawater concentrations of 1-2 x 10 4 cells ml-1 . In addition, distinct cell morphologies and clusters of cells not visible in background seawater were seen, including large filaments and mineral particles colonized by microbial cells. These results indicate local enrichments of microbial communities in the venting fluids, distinct from background populations, and are consistent with previous enumerations of microbial cells in venting fluids. Stable isotope tracing experiments were used to detect utilization of acetate, formate, and dissolve inorganic carbon and generation of methane at 70 °C under anaerobic conditions. At Von Damm, a putatively ultra-mafic hosted site located at ~2200 m with a maximum temperature of 226 °C, stable isotope tracing experiments indicate methanogenesis is occurring in most fluid samples. No activity was detected

  3. Diverse styles of submarine venting on the ultra-slow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Bowen, A.; Coleman, M. L.; Honig, D. L.; Huber, J. A.; Jakuba, M.; Kinsey, J. C.; Kurz, M. D.; Leroy, S.; McDermott, J.; Mercier de Lepinay, B. F.; Nakamura, K.; Seewald, J.; Smith, J.; Sylva, S.; van Dover, C. L.; Whitcomb, L. L.; Yoerger, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Thirty years after the first discovery of high-temperature submarine venting, the vast majority of the global Mid Ocean Ridge remains unexplored for hydrothermal activity. Of particular interest are the world’s ultra-slow spreading ridges which were the last to be demonstrated to host high-temperature venting, but may host systems particularly relevant to pre-biotic chemistry and the origins of life. Here we report first evidence for diverse and very deep hydrothermal vents along the ~110 km long, ultra-slow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise collected using a combination of CTD-rosette operations and dives of the Hybrid Remotely Operated Vehicle (HROV) Nereus in 2009 followed by shore based work-up of samples for geochemical and microbiological analyses. Our data indicate that the Mid-Cayman Rise hosts at least three discrete hydrothermal sites, each representing a different type of water-rock interaction, including both mafic and ultra-mafic systems and, at ~5000 m, the deepest known hydrothermal vent. Although submarine hydrothermal circulation, in which seawater percolates through and reacts with host lithologies, occurs on all mid-ocean ridges, the diversity of vent-types identified here and their relative geographic isolation make the Mid-Cayman Rise unique in the oceans. These new sites offer prospects for: an expanded range of vent-fluid compositions; varieties of abiotic organic chemical synthesis and extremophile microorganisms; and unparalleled faunal biodiversity - all in close proximity.

  4. Extreme Tolerance to Elevated Pressure in a Thermococcus isolate from the Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasingarao, P.; Huber, J. A.; Schrenk, M. O.; Bartlett, D.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrothermal systems are windows into the deep biosphere. Venting fluids with temperatures up to 400°C containing gases such as H2, CO2, H2S and CH4 provide an oasis of life in the deep ocean primarily based on chemosynthesis. The Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR) includes the deepest hydrothermal vent system known thus far, and is characterized by two venting sites Piccard (4950m) and Von Damm (2350m). Here we demonstrate the remarkable high pressure tolerance limits of a Thermococcus sp. designated strain 175, isolated from samples collected from Piccard during an expedition in 2012. Diffuse venting fluids collected at the site resulted in the isolation of several Thermococcus strains capable of growth in basal salts medium supplemented with H2/CO2 and yeast extract, along with sulfur as an electron acceptor. Given the importance of pressure as an environmental parameter influencing evolution and adaptation of deep-sea life, the pressure tolerance of Thermococcus strain 175 was tested. High pressure incubations were originally conducted in serum vials filled completely with growth medium and therefore lacking all headspace gas. To test for growth with H2/CO2 , modified hungate tubes with a piston mechanism were used (Bowles et al. 2011) . The results indicate that strain 175 can grow at 90°C up to 120 megapascal (MPa). Growth rates are comparable when the strain is grown at atmospheric pressure or at 120 MPa pressure. Morphologically, the strain is irregular cocci and does not show any changes in its cellular structure when switched between atmospheric pressure and elevated pressure. This wide range of pressure tolerance has not been previously observed in other microorganisms, including Pyrococcus yayanosii CH1 (Zeng et al., 2009) which is also capable of growth at 120MPa but does not grow below 15 MPa. Thermococcus strain 175 represents an excellent model system to study high pressure adaptation due to its high growth rate and broad range of growth pressures. The

  5. Discovery of hydrothermally active and extinct talc mounds on the Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, M.; Murton, B. J.; Roberts, S.

    2013-12-01

    Since 1977, hydrothermal vents have been the subject of intense scientific interest due to their role in cooling the oceanic crust and global geochemical cycles. Until now, two types of hydrothermal system have been identified: one, driven by magmatic heat extruding ';black smoker' fluids; and another, involving serpentinisation of ultramafic rocks and the precipitation of carbonate/brucite chimneys. Here, we present details of a new, off-axis type of hydrothermal system consisting of mounds of predominately botryoidal talc (a magnesium-silicate) with accessory silica and copper sulphides, and chimneys exhaling fluids of moderate temperature and pH. Discovered on the Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR) in 2010, the Von Damm Vent Field (VDVF) features a NNW-ESE-trending line of four overlapping cones, the largest of which is 75 m high by 150 m in diameter. The VDVF is hosted in the gabbroic footwall of the Mount Dent Oceanic Core Complex (MDOCC), which includes serpentinised peridotite at depth. The largest cone vents clear fluids from two main orifices at its summit, with primary temperatures of 215°C. Elsewhere, both focussed and diffuse flow areas emit fluids with temperatures of up to 150°C. The surrounding ~1 m thick pelagic sediment contains abundant pockmarks that emit methane-rich fluids at temperatures of less than 10°C. During the return to the MCR in early 2013, several other talc mounds were discovered within a kilometre of the active VDVF. These inactive mounds also comprise an assemblage of botryoidal talc, silica, disseminated sulphides (including chalcopyrite) and sulphates. One of these mounds (Mystic Mount) is double the volume of the active VDVF. The unique dominance of talc as the major mineral forming the hydrothermal structures indicates unusual vent fluid compositions that are able to carry both copper (at high-temperatures) and precipitate magnesium silicate. Thermodynamic modelling indicates that talc precipitates on mixing a moderately acidic, silica

  6. Characterizing the metatranscriptomic profile of archaeal metabolic genes at deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galambos, D.; Reveillaud, J. C.; Anderson, R.; Huber, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems host a wide diversity of bacteria, archaea and viruses. Although the geochemical conditions at these vents are well-documented, the relative metabolic activity of microbial lineages, especially among archaea, remains poorly characterized. The deep, slow-spreading Mid-Cayman Rise, which hosts the mafic-influenced Piccard and ultramafic-influenced Von Damm vent fields, allows for the comparison of vent sites with different geochemical characteristics. Previous metagenomic work indicated that despite the distinct geochemistry at Von Damm and Piccard, the functional profile of microbial communities between the two sites was similar. We examined relative metabolic gene activity using a metatranscriptomic analysis and observed functional similarity between Von Damm and Piccard, which is consistent with previous results. Notably, the relative expression of the methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcr) gene was elevated in both vent fields. Additionally, we analyzed the ratio of RNA expression to DNA abundance of fifteen archaeal metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) across the two fields. Previous work showed higher archaeal diversity at Von Damm; our results indicate relatively even expression among archaeal lineages at Von Damm. In contrast, we observed lower archaeal diversity at Piccard, but individual archaeal lineages were very highly expressed; Thermoprotei showed elevated transcriptional activity, which is consistent with higher temperatures and sulfur levels at Piccard. At both Von Damm and Piccard, specific Methanococcus lineages were more highly expressed than others. Future analyses will more closely examine metabolic genes in these Methanococcus MAGs to determine why some lineages are more active at a vent field than others. We will conduct further statistical analyses to determine whether significant differences exist between Von Damm and Piccard and whether there are correlations between geochemical metadata and metabolic gene or

  7. Microbial anaerobic methane cycling in the subseafloor at the Von Damm hydrothermal vent field, Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, J. A.; Reveillaud, J. C.; Stepanauskas, R.; McDermott, J. M.; Sylva, S. P.; Seewald, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR) is Earth's deepest and slowest spreading mid-ocean ridge located in the western Caribbean. With an axial rift valley floor at a depth of ~4200-6500 m, it represents one of the deepest sections of ridge crest worldwide. In 2009, the world's deepest hydrothermal vents (Piccard at 4960 m) and an ultramafic-influenced system only 20 km away on top of an oceanic core complex (Von Damm at 2350 m) were discovered along the MCR. Each site is hosted in a distinct geologic setting with different thermal and chemical regimes. The Von Damm site is a particularly interesting location to examine chemolithoautotrophic subseafloor microbial communities due to the abundant hydrogen, methane, and organic compounds in the venting fluids. Here, we used a combination of stable isotope tracing, next-generation sequencing, and single cell techniques to determine the identity, activity, and genomic repertoire of subseafloor anaerobic archaea involved in methane cycling in hydrothermal fluids venting at the Von Damm site. Molecular sequencing of phylogenetic marker genes revealed the presence of diverse archaea that both generate and consume methane across a geochemical and thermal spectrum of vents. Stable isotope tracing experiments were used to detect biological utilization of formate and dissolved inorganic carbon, and methane generation at 70 °C under anaerobic conditions. Results indicate that methanogenesis with formate as a substrate is occurring at 70 °C at two Von Damm sites, Ginger Castle and the Main Orifice. The results are consistent with thermodynamic predictions for carbon speciation at the temperatures encountered at the ultramafic-hosted Von Damm, where formate is predicted to be thermodynamically stable, and may thus serve as a an important source of carbon. Diverse thermophilic methanogenic archaea belonging to the genera Methanothermococcus were detected at all vent sites with both 16S rRNA tag sequencing and single cell sorting. Other

  8. Petrology of gabbroic rocks from the Mid-Cayman rise spreading center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elthon, Don

    1987-01-01

    Mineral analyses of oxide and silicate phases from a suite (collected with the DSRV Alvin in January 1976 and July 1977) of 48 gabbroic rocks collected from the vicinity of the Mid-Cayman Rise spreading center are reported. Mineral compositions of these anorthosites, leuco-troctolite, leuco-olivine gabbros, olivine gabbros, leuco-gabbros, and gabbros indicate the cumulate rocks have been produced by the crystal fractionation of basaltic liquids. Certain features of these rocks are inconsistent with the occurrence of this fractionation at low pressures (1 atm to 2 kbar). Although the experimental data are not available to conclusively demonstrate that the effects seen were produced at moderate pressures (5-10 kbar), the effects are similar to those predicted thermodynamically and to those observed in limited experimental studies within this pressure range. It is therefore suggested that the most likely scenario for the production of these gabbroic rocks is the moderate-pressure crystallization of basaltic magmas within deep-seated magma chambers underneath this slow-spreading center.

  9. Character of High Temperature Mylonitic Shear Zones Associated with Oceanic Detachment Faults at the Ultra-Slow Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marr, C.; John, B. E.; Cheadle, M. J.; German, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Two well-preserved core complexes at the Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR), Mt Dent and Mt Hudson, provide an opportunity to examine the deformation history and rheology of detachment faults at an ultra-slow spreading ridge. Samples from the CAYTROUGH (1976-77) project and the Nautilus NA034 cruise (2013) were selected for detailed petrographic and microstructural study. Surface samples from Mt. Dent (near the center of the MCR) provide insight into lateral variation in footwall rock type and deformation history across a core complex in both the across and down dip directions. In contrast, sampling of Mt. Hudson (SE corner of the MCR) focuses on a high-angle, crosscutting normal fault scarp, which provides a cross section of the detachment fault system. Sampling across Mt Dent reveals that the footwall is composed of heterogeneously-distributed gabbro (47%) and peridotite (20%) with basaltic cover (33%) dominating the top of the core complex. Sampling of Mt Hudson is restricted to the normal fault scarp cutting the core complex and suggests the interior is dominated by gabbro (85% gabbro, 11% peridotite, 4% basalt). At Mt. Dent, peridotite is exposed within ~4km of the breakaway indicating that the Mt. Dent detachment does not cut Penrose-style oceanic crust. The sample set provides evidence of a full down-temperature sequence of detachment related-fault rocks, from possible granulite and clear amphibolite mylonitizatization to prehnite-pumpellyite brittle deformation. Both detachments show low-temperature brittle deformation overprinting higher temperature plastic fabrics. Fe-Ti oxide gabbro mylonites dominate the sample set, and plastic deformation of plagioclase is recorded in samples collected as near as ~4km from the inferred breakaway along the southern flank of Mt. Dent, suggesting the brittle-plastic transition was initially at ~3km depth. Recovered samples suggest strain associated with both detachment systems is localized into discrete mylonitic shear zones (~1-10cm

  10. Hydrothermal Activity on the Mid-Cayman Rise: ROV Jason sampling and site characterization at the Von Damm and Piccard hydrothermal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    In January 2012 our multi-national and multi-disciplinary team conducted a series of 10 ROV Jason dives to conduct first detailed and systematic sampling of the Mid Cayman Rise hydrothermal systems at the Von Damm and Piccard hydrothermal fields. At Von Damm, hydrothermal venting is focused at and around a large conical structure that is approximately 120 m in diameter and rises at least 80m from the surrounding, largely sedimented seafloor. Clear fluids emitted from multiple sites around the flanks of the mound fall in the temperature range 110-130°C and fall on a common mixing line with hotter (>200°C) clear fluids emitted from an 8m tall spire at the summit which show clear evidence of ultramafic influence. Outcrop close to the vent-site is rare and the cone itself appear to consist of clay minerals derived from highly altered host rock. The dominant fauna at the summit of Von Damm are a new species of chemosynthetic shrimp but elsewhere the site also hosts two distinct species of chemosynthetic tube worm as well as at least one species of gastropod. The adjacent Piccard site, at ~5000m depth comprises 7 distinct sulfide mounds, 3 of which are currently active: Beebe Vents, Beebe Woods and Beebe Sea. Beebe Vents consists of 5 vigorous black smoker chimneys with maximum temperatures in the range 400-403°C while at Beebe Woods a more highly colonized thicket of up to 8m tall chimneys includes predominantly beehive diffusers with rare black smokers emitting fluids up to 353°C. Beebe Sea a diffuse site emitting fluids at 38°C Tmax, is the largest of the currently active mounds and immediately abuts a tall (8m) rift that strikes NE-SW bisecting the host Axial Volcanic Ridge. The fauna at Piccard are less diverse than at Von Damm and, predominantly, comprise the same species of MCR shrimp, a distinct gastropod species and abundant anemones.

  11. Microevolutionary dynamics in Methanothermococcus populations from deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffert, M.; Anderson, R. E.; Stepanauskas, R.; Huber, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents sustain diverse communities of microorganisms. The effects of geochemical and biological interactions on the process of evolution in these ecosystems remains poorly understood because the majority of subsurface microorganisms remain uncultivated. By examining metagenomic samples from hydrothermal fluids and mapping the samples to closely-related genomes found in vent sites, we can better understand how the process of evolution is affected by the geochemical and environmental context in deep-sea vents. The Mid-Cayman Rise is a spreading ridge that hosts both mafic-influenced and ultramafic-influenced vent fields. Previous research on metagenomic samples from sites in the Mid-Cayman Rise has shown that these vents contain metabolically and taxonomically diverse microbial communities. Here, we investigate five single cell amplified Methanothermococcus genomes (SAGs) to investigate patterns in pangenomic variation and molecular evolution in these methanogens. Mappings of metagenomic reads from 15 sample sites to the SAGs reveal substantial variation in Methanothermococcus population abundance, nucleotide variability and selection pressure among the 15 geochemically distinct sample sites. Within each sample site, we observed distinct patterns of single nucleotide variant (SNV) accumulation and selection pressure within the SAG populations. Closely related genomes showed similar patterns of SNV accumulation. Analysis of open reading frames (ORFs) from the SAGs indicated that homologous genes accumulated variation at the same rate. For example, a genomic island for Nif genes was identified in three of the five genomes with significantly elevated SNV counts. dN/dS analyses revealed evidence for frequency-dependent selection, in which genes unique to individual SAGs displayed elevated diversifying selection relative to other genes. These results indicate that different strains of Methanothermococcus outcompete others in specific environmental

  12. Subseafloor microbial communities in hydrogen‐rich vent fluids from hydrothermal systems along the Mid‐Cayman Rise

    PubMed Central

    Reveillaud, Julie; Reddington, Emily; McDermott, Jill; Algar, Christopher; Meyer, Julie L.; Sylva, Sean; Seewald, Jeffrey; German, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Warm fluids emanating from hydrothermal vents can be used as windows into the rocky subseafloor habitat and its resident microbial community. Two new vent systems on the Mid‐Cayman Rise each exhibits novel geologic settings and distinctively hydrogen‐rich vent fluid compositions. We have determined and compared the chemistry, potential energy yielding reactions, abundance, community composition, diversity, and function of microbes in venting fluids from both sites: Piccard, the world's deepest vent site, hosted in mafic rocks; and Von Damm, an adjacent, ultramafic‐influenced system. Von Damm hosted a wider diversity of lineages and metabolisms in comparison to Piccard, consistent with thermodynamic models that predict more numerous energy sources at ultramafic systems. There was little overlap in the phylotypes found at each site, although similar and dominant hydrogen‐utilizing genera were present at both. Despite the differences in community structure, depth, geology, and fluid chemistry, energetic modelling and metagenomic analysis indicate near functional equivalence between Von Damm and Piccard, likely driven by the high hydrogen concentrations and elevated temperatures at both sites. Results are compared with hydrothermal sites worldwide to provide a global perspective on the distinctiveness of these newly discovered sites and the interplay among rocks, fluid composition and life in the subseafloor. PMID:26663423

  13. Subseafloor microbial communities in hydrogen-rich vent fluids from hydrothermal systems along the Mid-Cayman Rise.

    PubMed

    Reveillaud, Julie; Reddington, Emily; McDermott, Jill; Algar, Christopher; Meyer, Julie L; Sylva, Sean; Seewald, Jeffrey; German, Christopher R; Huber, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Warm fluids emanating from hydrothermal vents can be used as windows into the rocky subseafloor habitat and its resident microbial community. Two new vent systems on the Mid-Cayman Rise each exhibits novel geologic settings and distinctively hydrogen-rich vent fluid compositions. We have determined and compared the chemistry, potential energy yielding reactions, abundance, community composition, diversity, and function of microbes in venting fluids from both sites: Piccard, the world's deepest vent site, hosted in mafic rocks; and Von Damm, an adjacent, ultramafic-influenced system. Von Damm hosted a wider diversity of lineages and metabolisms in comparison to Piccard, consistent with thermodynamic models that predict more numerous energy sources at ultramafic systems. There was little overlap in the phylotypes found at each site, although similar and dominant hydrogen-utilizing genera were present at both. Despite the differences in community structure, depth, geology, and fluid chemistry, energetic modelling and metagenomic analysis indicate near functional equivalence between Von Damm and Piccard, likely driven by the high hydrogen concentrations and elevated temperatures at both sites. Results are compared with hydrothermal sites worldwide to provide a global perspective on the distinctiveness of these newly discovered sites and the interplay among rocks, fluid composition and life in the subseafloor. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Genomic variation of subseafloor archaeal and bacterial populations from venting fluids at the Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Eren, A. M.; Stepanauskas, R.; Huber, J. A.; Reveillaud, J.

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems serve as windows to a dynamic, gradient-dominated deep biosphere that is home to a wide diversity of archaea, bacteria, and viruses. Until recently the majority of these microbial lineages were uncultivated, resulting in a poor understanding of how the physical and geochemical context shapes microbial evolution in the deep subsurface. By comparing metagenomes, metatranscriptomes and single-cell genomes between geologically distinct vent fields, we can better understand the relationship between the environment and the evolution of subsurface microbial communities. An ideal setting in which to use this approach is the Mid-Cayman Rise, located on the world's deepest and slowest-spreading mid-ocean ridge, which hosts both the mafic-influenced Piccard and ultramafic-influenced Von Damm vent fields. Previous work has shown that Von Damm has higher taxonomic and metabolic diversity than Piccard, consistent with geochemical model expectations, and the fluids from all vents are enriched in hydrogen (Reveillaud et al., submitted). Mapping of both metagenomes and metatranscriptomes to a combined assembly showed very little overlap among the Von Damm samples, indicating substantial variability that is consistent with the diversity of potential metabolites in this ultramafic vent field. In contrast, the most consistently abundant and active lineage across the Piccard samples was Sulfurovum, a sulfur-oxidizing chemolithotroph that uses nitrate or oxygen as an electron acceptor. Moreover, analysis of point mutations within individual lineages suggested that Sulfurovumat Piccard is under strong selection, whereas microbial genomes at Von Damm were more variable. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the subsurface environment at Piccard supports the emergence of a dominant lineage that is under strong selection pressure, whereas the more geochemically diverse microbial habitat at Von Damm creates a wider variety of stable

  15. Geochemistry of fluids from Earth's deepest ridge-crest hot-springs: Piccard hydrothermal field, Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Jill M.; Sylva, Sean P.; Ono, Shuhei; German, Christopher R.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.

    2018-05-01

    Hosted in basaltic substrate on the ultra-slow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise, the Piccard hydrothermal field is the deepest currently known seafloor hot-spring (4957-4987 m). Due to its great depth, the Piccard site is an excellent natural system for investigating the influence of extreme pressure on the formation of submarine vent fluids. To investigate the role of rock composition and deep circulation conditions on fluid chemistry, the abundance and isotopic composition of organic, inorganic, and dissolved volatile species in high temperature vent fluids at Piccard were examined in samples collected in 2012 and 2013. Fluids from the Beebe Vents and Beebe Woods black smokers vent at a maximum temperature of 398 °C at the seafloor, however several lines of evidence derived from inorganic chemistry (Cl, SiO2, Ca, Br, Fe, Cu, Mn) support fluid formation at much higher temperatures in the subsurface. These high temperatures, potentially in excess of 500 °C, are attainable due to the great depth of the system. Our data indicate that a single deep-rooted source fluid feeds high temperature vents across the entire Piccard field. High temperature Piccard fluid H2 abundances (19.9 mM) are even higher than those observed in many ultramafic-influenced systems, such as the Rainbow (16 mM) and the Von Damm hydrothermal fields (18.2 mM). In the case of Piccard, however, these extremely high H2 abundances can be generated from fluid-basalt reaction occurring at very high temperatures. Magmatic and thermogenic sources of carbon in the high temperature black smoker vents are described. Dissolved ΣCO2 is likely of magmatic origin, CH4 may originate from a combination of thermogenic sources and leaching of abiotic CH4 from mineral-hosted fluid inclusions, and CO abundances are at equilibrium with the water-gas shift reaction. Longer-chained n-alkanes (C2H6, C3H8, n-C4H10, i-C4H10) may derive from thermal alteration of dissolved and particulate organic carbon sourced from the original

  16. Sources of organic carbon for Rimicaris hybisae: Tracing individual fatty acids at two hydrothermal vent fields in the Mid-Cayman rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Kathrin; Bennett, Sarah A.; Van Dover, Cindy L.; Coleman, Max

    2015-06-01

    Hydrothermal vents harbor ecosystems mostly decoupled from organic carbon synthesized with the energy of sunlight (photosynthetic carbon source) but fueled instead by oxidation of reduced compounds to generate a chemosynthetic carbon source. Our study aimed to disentangle photosynthetic and chemosynthetic organic carbon sources for the shrimp species Rimicaris hybisae, a primary consumer presumed to obtain its organic carbon mainly from ectosymbiotic chemoautotrophic bacteria living on its gill cover membrane. To provide ectosymbionts with ideal conditions for chemosynthesis, these shrimp live in dense clusters around vent chimneys; they are, however, also found sparsely distributed adjacent to diffuse vent flows, where they might depend on alternative food sources. Densely and sparsely distributed shrimp were sampled and dissected into abdominal tissue and gill cover membrane, covered with ectosymbiotic bacteria, at two hydrothermal vent fields in the Mid-Cayman rise that differ in vent chemistry. Fatty acids (FA) were extracted from shrimp tissues and their carbon isotopic compositions assessed. The FA data indicate that adult R. hybisae predominantly rely on bacteria for their organic carbon needs. Their FA composition is dominated by common bacterial FA of the n7 family (~41%). Bacterial FA of the n4 FA family are also abundant and found to constitute good biomarkers for gill ectosymbionts. Sparsely distributed shrimp contain fractions of n4 FA in gill cover membranes ~4% lower than densely packed ones (~18%) and much higher fractions of photosynthetic FA in abdominal tissues, ~4% more (compared with 1.6%), suggesting replacement of ectosymbionts along with exoskeletons (molt), while they take up alternative diets of partly photosynthetic organic carbon. Abdominal tissues also contain photosynthetic FA from a second source taken up presumably during an early dispersal phase and still present to c. 3% in adult shrimp. The contribution of photosynthetic carbon to

  17. Constraints on hydrocarbon and organic acid abundances in hydrothermal fluids at the Von Damm vent field, Mid-Cayman Rise (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, J. M.; Seewald, J.; German, C. R.; Sylva, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of organic compounds in vent fluids has been of interest since the discovery of seafloor hydrothermal systems, due to implications for the sustenance of present-day microbial populations and their potential role in the origin of life on early Earth. Possible sources of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems include microbial production, thermogenic degradation of organic material, and abiotic synthesis. Abiotic organic synthesis reactions may occur during active circulation of seawater-derived fluids through the oceanic crust or within olivine-hosted fluid inclusions containing carbon-rich magmatic volatiles. H2-rich end-member fluids at the Von Damm vent field on the Mid-Cayman Rise, where fluid temperatures reach 226°C, provide an exciting opportunity to examine the extent of abiotic carbon transformations in a highly reducing system. Our results indicate multiple sources of carbon compounds in vent fluids at Von Damm. An ultramafic-influenced hydrothermal system located on the Mount Dent oceanic core complex at 2350 m depth, Von Damm vent fluids contain H2, CH4, and C2+ hydrocarbons in high abundance relative to basalt-hosted vent fields, and in similar abundance to other ultramafic-hosted systems, such as Rainbow and Lost City. The CO2 content and isotopic composition in end-member fluids are virtually identical to bottom seawater, suggesting that seawater DIC is unchanged during hydrothermal circulation of seawater-derived fluids. Accordingly, end-member CH4 that is present in slightly greater abundance than CO2 cannot be generated from reduction of aqueous CO2 during hydrothermal circulation. We postulate that CH4 and C2+ hydrocarbons that are abundantly present in Von Damm vent fluids reflect leaching of fluids from carbon- and H2-rich fluid inclusions hosted in plutonic rocks. Geochemical modeling of carbon speciation in the Von Damm fluids suggests that the relative abundances of CH4, C2+ hydrocarbons, and CO2 are consistent with

  18. Coral bleaching at Little Cayman, Cayman Islands 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hooidonk, Ruben J.; Manzello, Derek P.; Moye, Jessica; Brandt, Marilyn E.; Hendee, James C.; McCoy, Croy; Manfrino, Carrie

    2012-06-01

    The global rise in sea temperature through anthropogenic climate change is affecting coral reef ecosystems through a phenomenon known as coral bleaching; that is, the whitening of corals due to the loss of the symbiotic zooxanthellae which impart corals with their characteristic vivid coloration. We describe aspects of the most prevalent episode of coral bleaching ever recorded at Little Cayman, Cayman Islands, during the fall of 2009. The most susceptible corals were found to be, in order, Siderastrea siderea, Montastraea annularis, and Montastraea faveolata, while Diplora strigosa and Agaricia spp. were less so, yet still showed considerable bleaching prevalence and severity. Those found to be least susceptible were Porites porites, Porites astreoides, and Montastraea cavernosa. These observations and other reported observations of coral bleaching, together with 29 years (1982-2010) of satellite-derived sea surface temperatures, were used to optimize bleaching predictions at this location. To do this a Degree Heating Weeks (DHW) and Peirce Skill Score (PSS) analysis was employed to calculate a local bleaching threshold above which bleaching was expected to occur. A threshold of 4.2 DHW had the highest skill, with a PSS of 0.70. The method outlined here could be applied to other regions to find the optimal bleaching threshold and improve bleaching predictions.

  19. The Delineation of Coral Bleaching Thresholds and Future Reef Health, Little Cayman Cayman Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfrino, C.; Van Hooidonk, R. J.; Manzello, D.; Hendee, J.

    2011-12-01

    The global rise in sea temperature through anthropogenic climate change is affecting coral reef ecosystems through a phenomenon known as coral bleaching; a common reaction to thermally induced physiological stress in reef-building corals that often leads to coral mortality. We describe aspects of the most prevalent episode of coral bleaching ever recorded at Little Cayman, Cayman Islands, during the fall of 2009. Scleractinian coral species exhibiting susceptibility to thermal stress and bleaching in Little Cayman were, in order, Siderastrea siderea, Montastraea annularis, and Montastraea faveolata, while Diplora strigosa and Agaricia spp. were less so, yet still showed considerable bleaching prevalence and severity. In contrast, the least susceptible were Porites porites, Porites astreoides, and Montastraea cavernosa. These observations and other reported observations of coral bleaching, together with 29 years (1982 - 2010) of satellite-derived sea surface temperatures, were used in a Degree Heating Weeks (DHW) and Peirce Skill Score (PSS) analysis to calculate a bleaching threshold above which bleaching was expected to occur. A threshold of 4.2 DHW had the highest skill, with a PSS of 0.70. This threshold and susceptibility ranking are used in combination with SST data from global, coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models (GCM) from the fourth IPCC assessment to forecast future reef health on Little Cayman. While these GCMs possess skill in reproducing many aspects of climate, they vary in their ability to correctly capture such parameters as the tropical ocean seasonal cycle and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability. These model weaknesses likely reduce the skill of coral bleaching predictions. To overcome this, a multi-model ensemble of GCMs are corrected for their mean, annual cycle and ENSO variability prior to calculating future thermal stress. Preliminary results show that from 2045 on Little Cayman is likely to see more than two

  20. Deciphering MCR-2 Colistin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian; Xu, Yongchang; Gao, Rongsui; Lin, Jingxia; Wei, Wenhui; Srinivas, Swaminath; Li, Defeng; Yang, Run-Shi; Li, Xing-Ping; Liao, Xiao-Ping

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibiotic resistance is a prevalent problem in public health worldwide. In general, the carbapenem β-lactam antibiotics are considered a final resort against lethal infections by multidrug-resistant bacteria. Colistin is a cationic polypeptide antibiotic and acts as the last line of defense for treatment of carbapenem-resistant bacteria. Very recently, a new plasmid-borne colistin resistance gene, mcr-2, was revealed soon after the discovery of the paradigm gene mcr-1, which has disseminated globally. However, the molecular mechanisms for MCR-2 colistin resistance are poorly understood. Here we show a unique transposon unit that facilitates the acquisition and transfer of mcr-2. Evolutionary analyses suggested that both MCR-2 and MCR-1 might be traced to their cousin phosphoethanolamine (PEA) lipid A transferase from a known polymyxin producer, Paenibacillus. Transcriptional analyses showed that the level of mcr-2 transcripts is relatively higher than that of mcr-1. Genetic deletions revealed that the transmembrane regions (TM1 and TM2) of both MCR-1 and MCR-2 are critical for their location and function in bacterial periplasm, and domain swapping indicated that the TM2 is more efficient than TM1. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) confirmed that all four MCR proteins (MCR-1, MCR-2, and two chimeric versions [TM1-MCR-2 and TM2-MCR-1]) can catalyze chemical modification of lipid A moiety anchored on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with the addition of phosphoethanolamine to the phosphate group at the 4′ position of the sugar. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis defined an essential 6-residue-requiring zinc-binding/catalytic motif for MCR-2 colistin resistance. The results further our mechanistic understanding of transferable colistin resistance, providing clues to improve clinical therapeutics targeting severe infections by MCR-2-containing pathogens. PMID:28487432

  1. The nature of the crust under Cayman Trough from gravity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Coleman, D.F.; Dillon, William P.

    2002-01-01

    Considerable crustal thickness variations are inferred along Cayman Trough, a slow-spreading ocean basin in the Caribbean Sea, from modeling of the gravity field. The crust to a distance of 50 km from the spreading center is only 2–3 km thick in agreement with dredge and dive results. Crustal thickness increases to ∼5.5 km at distances between 100 and 430 km west of the spreading center and to 3.5–6 km at distances between 60 and 370 km east of the spreading center. The increase in thickness is interpreted to represent serpentinization of the uppermost mantle lithosphere, rather than a true increase in the volume of accreted ocean crust. Serpentinized peridotite rocks have indeed been dredged from the base of escarpments of oceanic crust rocks in Cayman Trough. Laboratory-measured density and P-wave speed of peridotite with 40–50% serpentine are similar to the observed speed in published refraction results and to the inferred density from the model. Crustal thickness gradually increases to 7–8 km at the far ends of the trough partially in areas where sea floor magnetic anomalies were identified. Basement depth becomes gradually shallower starting 250 km west of the rise and 340 km east of the rise, in contrast to the predicted trend of increasing depth to basement from cooling models of the oceanic lithosphere. The gradual increase in apparent crustal thickness and the shallowing trend of basement depth are interpreted to indicate that the deep distal parts of Cayman Trough are underlain by highly attenuated crust, not by a continuously accreted oceanic crust.

  2. MCR Container Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Nicholas Q; Gillen, Robert E; Karnowski, Thomas P

    MathWorks' MATLAB is widely used in academia and industry for prototyping, data analysis, data processing, etc. Many users compile their programs using the MATLAB Compiler to run on workstations/computing clusters via the free MATLAB Compiler Runtime (MCR). The MCR facilitates the execution of code calling Application Programming Interfaces (API) functions from both base MATLAB and MATLAB toolboxes. In a Linux environment, a sizable number of third-party runtime dependencies (i.e. shared libraries) are necessary. Unfortunately, to the MTLAB community's knowledge, these dependencies are not documented, leaving system administrators and/or end-users to find/install the necessary libraries either as runtime errors resulting frommore » them missing or by inspecting the header information of Executable and Linkable Format (ELF) libraries of the MCR to determine which ones are missing from the system. To address various shortcomings, Docker Images based on Community Enterprise Operating System (CentOS) 7, a derivative of Redhat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7, containing recent (2015-2017) MCR releases and their dependencies were created. These images, along with a provided sample Docker Compose YAML Script, can be used to create a simulated computing cluster where MATLAB Compiler created binaries can be executed using a sample Slurm Workload Manager script.« less

  3. Multiplex PCR for detection of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance determinants, mcr-1, mcr-2, mcr-3, mcr-4 and mcr-5 for surveillance purposes

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Ana Rita; Bortolaia, Valeria; Kjeldgaard, Jette S; Pedersen, Susanne K; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hansen, Inge M; Guerra, Beatriz; Malorny, Burkhard; Borowiak, Maria; Hammerl, Jens Andre; Battisti, Antonio; Franco, Alessia; Alba, Patricia; Perrin-Guyomard, Agnes; Granier, Sophie A; De Frutos Escobar, Cristina; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Villa, Laura; Carattoli, Alessandra; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2018-01-01

    Background and aim Plasmid-mediated colistin resistance mechanisms have been identified worldwide in the past years. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol for detection of all currently known transferable colistin resistance genes (mcr-1 to mcr-5, and variants) in Enterobacteriaceae was developed for surveillance or research purposes. Methods: We designed four new primer pairs to amplify mcr-1, mcr-2, mcr-3 and mcr-4 gene products and used the originally described primers for mcr-5 to obtain a stepwise separation of ca 200 bp between amplicons. The primer pairs and amplification conditions allow for single or multiple detection of all currently described mcr genes and their variants present in Enterobacteriaceae. The protocol was validated testing 49 European Escherichia coli and Salmonella isolates of animal origin. Results: Multiplex PCR results in bovine and porcine isolates from Spain, Germany, France and Italy showed full concordance with whole genome sequence data. The method was able to detect mcr-1, mcr-3 and mcr-4 as singletons or in different combinations as they were present in the test isolates. One new mcr-4 variant, mcr-4.3, was also identified. Conclusions: This method allows rapid identification of mcr-positive bacteria and overcomes the challenges of phenotypic detection of colistin resistance. The multiplex PCR should be particularly interesting in settings or laboratories with limited resources for performing genetic analysis as it provides information on the mechanism of colistin resistance without requiring genome sequencing. PMID:29439754

  4. Natural and Man-Made Hazards in the Cayman Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Suarez, G.

    2010-12-01

    Located in the western Caribbean Sea to the northwest of Jamaica, the Cayman Islands are a British overseas territory comprised of three islands: Grand Cayman, Cayman Brac, and Little Cayman. These three islands occupy around 250 km2 of land area. In this work, historical and recent data were collected and classified to identify and rank the natural and man-made hazards that may potentially affect the Cayman Islands and determine the level of exposure of Grand Cayman to these events. With this purpose, we used the vulnerability assessment methodology developed by the North Caroline Department of Environment and Natural Resources. The different degrees of physical vulnerability for each hazard were graphically interpreted with the aid of maps using a relative scoring system. Spatial maps were generated showing the areas of different levels of exposure to multi-hazards. The more important natural hazard to which the Cayman Islands are exposed is clearly hurricanes. To a lesser degree, the islands may be occasionally exposed to earthquakes and tsunamis. Explosions or leaks of the Airport Texaco Fuel Depot and the fuel pipeline at Grand Cayman are the most significant man-made hazards. Our results indicate that there are four areas in Grand Cayman with various levels of exposure to natural and man-made hazards: The North Sound, Little Sound and Eastern West Bay (Area 1) show a very high level of exposure; The Central Mangroves, Central Bodden Town, Central George Town and the West Bay (Area 2) have high level of exposure; The Northwestern West Bay, Western Georgetown-Bodden Town, and East End-North Side (Area 3) are under moderate levels of exposure. The remainder of the island shows low exposure (Area 4). It is important to underline that this study presents a first evaluation of the main natural and man-made hazards that may affect the Cayman Islands. The maps generated will be useful tools for emergency managers and policy developers and will increase the overall

  5. 77 FR 38085 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cayman Chemical Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ...; Notice of Registration; Cayman Chemical Company By Notice dated March 8, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on March 20, 2012, 77 FR 16263, Cayman Chemical Company, 1180 East Ellsworth Road, Ann... registration of Cayman Chemical Company to manufacture the listed basic classes of controlled substances is...

  6. Photoinactivation of mcr-1 positive Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caires, C. S. A.; Leal, C. R. B.; Rodrigues, A. C. S.; Lima, A. R.; Silva, C. M.; Ramos, C. A. N.; Chang, M. R.; Arruda, E. J.; Oliveira, S. L.; Nascimento, V. A.; Caires, A. R. L.

    2018-01-01

    The emergence of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae, mostly in Escherichia coli due to the mcr-1 gene, has revealed the need to develop alternative approaches in treating mcr-1 positive bacterial infections. This is because colistin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic and one of the ‘last-resort’ antibiotics for multidrug resistant bacteria. The present study evaluated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the efficacy of photoinactivation processes to kill a known mcr-1 positive E. coli strain. Eosin methylene-blue (EMB) was investigated as a photoantimicrobial agent for inhibiting the growth of a mcr-1 positive E. coli strain obtained from a patient with a diabetic foot infection. The photoantimicrobial activity of EMB was also tested in a non-multidrug resistant E. coli strain. The photoinactivation process was tested using light doses in the 30-45 J cm-2 range provided by a LED device emitting at 625 nm. Our findings demonstrate that a mcr-1 positive E. coli strain is susceptible to photoinactivation. The results show that the EMB was successfully photoactivated, regardless of the bacterial multidrug resistance; inactivating the bacterial growth by oxidizing the cells in accordance with the generation of the oxygen reactive species. Our results suggest that bacterial photoinactivation is an alternative and effective approach to kill mcr-1 positive bacteria.

  7. Magnetic anomaly map of the central Cayman Trough, northwestern Caribbean Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.; Edgar, N. Terence; Parson, Lindsay M.; Scanlon, Kathryn M.; Driscoll, George R.; Jacobs, Colin L.

    1993-01-01

    This is the first large-scale published map of magnetic anomalies in the central Cayman Trough area. Two previously published very small scale maps based on much less data are a regional map (Gough and Heirtzler, 1969) and a map compiled from several tracklines running parallel to the axis of the Cayman Trough (MacDonald and Holcombe, 1978).

  8. 77 FR 47115 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cayman Chemical Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cayman Chemical Company Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on June 1, 2012, Cayman Chemical Company, 1180 East...

  9. Remarkable Diversity of Escherichia coli Carrying mcr-1 from Hospital Sewage with the Identification of Two New mcr-1 Variants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feifei; Feng, Yu; Lü, Xiaoju; McNally, Alan; Zong, Zhiyong

    2017-01-01

    The plasmid-borne colistin-resistant gene mcr-1 has rapidly become a worldwide public health concern. This study aims to determine the host bacterial strains, plasmids, and genetic contexts of mcr-1 in hospital sewage. A 1-ml hospital sewage sample was cultured. Colistin-resistant bacterial colonies were selected on agar plates and were subjected to whole genome sequencing and subsequent analysis. The transfer of mcr-1 between bacterial strains was tested using conjugation. New variants of mcr-1 were cloned to test the impact of variations on the function of mcr-1 . Plasmids carrying mcr-1 were retrieved from GenBank for comparison based on concatenated backbone genes. In the sewage sample, we observed that mcr-1 was located in various genetic contexts on the chromosome, or plasmids of four different replicon types (IncHI2, IncI2, IncP, and IncX4), in Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera spp. and seven Escherichia coli strains of six different sequence types (ST10, ST34, ST48, ST1196, ST7086, and ST7087). We also identified two new variants of mcr-1, mcr-1.4 and mcr-1.7 , both of which encode an amino acid variation from mcr-1 . mcr-1 -carrying IncX4 plasmids, which have a global distribution across the Enterobacteriaceae , are the result of global dissemination of a single common plasmid, while IncI2 mcr-1 plasmids appear to acquire mcr-1 in multiple events. In conclusion, the unprecedented remarkable diversity of species, strains, plasmids, and genetic contexts carrying mcr-1 present in a single sewage sample from a single healthcare site highlights the continued evolution and dynamic transmission of mcr-1 in healthcare-associated environments.

  10. Dissemination and Mechanism for the MCR-1 Colistin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingjing; Lin, Jingxia; Ye, Huiyan; Liu, Fei; Srinivas, Swaminath; Li, Defeng; Zhu, Baoli; Liu, Ya-Hong; Tian, Guo-Bao; Feng, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    Polymyxins are the last line of defense against lethal infections caused by multidrug resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Very recently, the use of polymyxins has been greatly challenged by the emergence of the plasmid-borne mobile colistin resistance gene (mcr-1). However, the mechanistic aspects of the MCR-1 colistin resistance are still poorly understood. Here we report the comparative genomics of two new mcr-1-harbouring plasmids isolated from the human gut microbiota, highlighting the diversity in plasmid transfer of the mcr-1 gene. Further genetic dissection delineated that both the trans-membrane region and a substrate-binding motif are required for the MCR-1-mediated colistin resistance. The soluble form of the membrane protein MCR-1 was successfully prepared and verified. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that MCR-1 is highly homologous to its counterpart PEA lipid A transferase in Paenibacili, a known producer of polymyxins. The fact that the plasmid-borne MCR-1 is placed in a subclade neighboring the chromosome-encoded colistin-resistant Neisseria LptA (EptA) potentially implies parallel evolutionary paths for the two genes. In conclusion, our finding provids a first glimpse of mechanism for the MCR-1-mediated colistin resistance. PMID:27893854

  11. Gaseous modification of MCrAlY coatings

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes methods for modifying MCrAlY coatings by using gaseous carburization, gaseous nitriding or gaseous carbonitriding. The modified MCrAlY coatings are useful in thermal barrier coating systems, which may be used in gas turbine engines.

  12. MCrAlY bond coat with enhanced Yttrium layer

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D; Hawk, Jeffrey A

    2015-04-21

    One or more embodiments relates to an MCrAlY bond coat comprising an MCrAlY layer in contact with a Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer. The MCrAlY layer is comprised of a .gamma.-M solid solution, a .beta.-MAl intermetallic phase, and Y-type intermetallics. The Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer is comprised of Yttrium atoms coordinated with oxygen atoms comprising the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 lattice. Both the MCrAlY layer and the Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer have a substantial absence of Y--Al oxides, providing advantage in the maintainability of the Yttrium reservoir within the MCrAlY bulk. The MCrAlY bond coat may be fabricated through application of a Y.sub.2O.sub.3 paste to an MCrAlY material, followed by heating in a non-oxidizing environment.

  13. SeaMARC II mapping of transform faults in the Cayman Trough, Caribbean Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosencrantz, Eric; Mann, Paul

    1992-01-01

    SeaMARC II maps of the southern wall of the Cayman Trough between Honduras and Jamaica show zones of continuous, well-defined fault lineaments adjacent and parallel to the wall, both to the east and west of the Cayman spreading axis. These lineaments mark the present, active traces of transform faults which intersect the southern end of the spreading axis at a triple junction. The Swan Islands transform fault to the west is dominated by two major lineaments that overlap with right-stepping sense across a large push-up ridge beneath the Swan Islands. The fault zone to the east of the axis, named the Walton fault, is more complex, containing multiple fault strands and a large pull-apart structure. The Walton fault links the spreading axis to Jamaican and Hispaniolan strike-slip faults, and it defines the southern boundary of a microplate composed of the eastern Cayman Trough and western Hispaniola. The presence of this microplate raises questions about the veracity of Caribbean plate velocities based primarily on Cayman Trough opening rates.

  14. Human Capital Development in the Cayman Islands: the Perception of Local Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Caula Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The remarkable economic success of the Cayman Islands is primarily driven by its large expatriate population. Expatriates make up over one-third of the total population of the Islands and half of the labor force. This has led some Caymanians to demand more opportunities for local individuals. However in April 2014, one of the two local newspapers…

  15. Caves, Carbonates and Climate: Karst Landscape Development through Environmental Forcing, Little Cayman Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, S.; Ouellette, G., Jr.; Manfrino, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Cayman Islands are situated in the west-central Caribbean Sea, between Cuba and the Yucatan Peninsula. Little Cayman Island (LCI) is relatively underdeveloped and understudied in comparison to its sister islands, Grand Cayman and Cayman Brac, and hosts less than 200 permanent residents over a 30 square kilometer area. However, like its sister islands, LCI is a small carbonate platform derived from reef building during the Oligocene, Miocene, and Quaternary. The shared geologic history of the Cayman Islands along with minimal human disturbance makes LCI an ideal site to study an island karst landscape. Conduction of field surveys, stratigraphic and petrologic comparisons between primary lithologic formations, and compilation of a geospatial inventory of karst features and lithology of LCI using GIS revealed novel insights into landscape evolution on LCI. In addition to surface karst surveys, several caves on the island were mapped. Cave morphologies suggest that evolution of LCI karst features have been driven by both hydroclimate, as well as salt and freshwater mixing, modulated by sea level fluctuations. These findings are mirrored in the lithology of partially dolomitized Miocene carbonates, which contain paleo-karst fill features and reveal hydroclimate influence, as well as enhanced resistance to dissolution in the present day, ostensibly from submersion in Mg-rich sea waters prior to the Quaternary. These findings shed light on the complex relationship of climate, geology, and karst landscape development on this particular carbonate island. This information is critical in anticipating structural and hydrogeological integrity on LCI under future climate change scenarios and serves as an example of the interplay linking climate and geologic processes to karst landscape development on small carbonate islands.

  16. MCrAlY bond coat with enhanced yttrium

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2016-08-30

    One or more embodiments relates to a method of producing an MCrAlY bond coat comprising an MCrAlY layer in contact with a Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer. The MCrAlY layer is comprised of a .gamma.-M solid solution, a .beta.-MAl intermetallic phase, and Y-type intermetallics. The Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer is comprised of Yttrium atoms coordinated with oxygen atoms comprising the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 lattice. The method comprises depositing an MCrAlY material on a substrate, applying an Y.sub.2O.sub.3 paste, and heating the substrate in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a temperature between 400-1300.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer. Both the MCrAlY layer and the Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer have a substantial absence of Y.sub.2O.sub.3, YAG, and YAP phases.

  17. mcr-1 and mcr-2 variant genes identified in Moraxella species isolated from pigs in Great Britain from 2014 to 2015.

    PubMed

    AbuOun, Manal; Stubberfield, Emma J; Duggett, Nick A; Kirchner, Miranda; Dormer, Luisa; Nunez-Garcia, Javier; Randall, Luke P; Lemma, Fabrizio; Crook, Derrick W; Teale, Christopher; Smith, Richard P; Anjum, Muna F

    2017-10-01

    To determine the occurrence of mcr-1 and mcr-2 genes in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from healthy pigs in Great Britain. Gram-negative bacteria (n = 657) isolated from pigs between 2014 and 2015 were examined by WGS. Variants of mcr-1 and mcr-2 were identified in Moraxella spp. isolated from pooled caecal contents of healthy pigs at slaughter collected from six farms in Great Britain. Other bacteria, including Escherichia coli from the same farms, were not detected harbouring mcr-1 or mcr-2. A Moraxella porci-like isolate, MSG13-C03, harboured MCR-1.10 with 98.7% identity to MCR-1, and a Moraxella pluranimalium-like isolate, MSG47-C17, harboured an MCR-2.2 variant with 87.9% identity to MCR-2, from E. coli; the isolates had colistin MICs of 1-2 mg/L. No intact insertion elements were identified in either MSG13-C03 or MSG47-C17, although MSG13-C03 harboured the conserved nucleotides abutting the ISApl1 composite transposon found in E. coli plasmids and the intervening ∼2.6 kb fragment showed 97% identity. Six Moraxella osloensis isolates were positive for phosphoethanolamine transferase (EptA). They shared 62%-64.5% identity to MCR-1 and MCR-2, with colistin MICs from 2 to 4 mg/L. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MCR and EptA have evolved from a common ancestor. In addition to mcr, the β-lactamase gene, blaBRO-1, was found in both isolates, whilst the tetracycline resistance gene, tetL, was found in MSG47-C17. Our results add further evidence for the mobilization of the mcr-pap2 unit from Moraxella via composite transposons leading to its global dissemination. The presence of mcr-pap2 from recent Moraxella isolates indicates they may comprise a reservoir for mcr. © Crown Copyright 2017.

  18. Impact of warming events on reef-scale temperature variability as captured in two Little Cayman coral Sr/Ca records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Reumont, J.; Hetzinger, S.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Manfrino, C.; Dullo, W.-Chr.

    2016-03-01

    The rising temperature of the world's oceans is affecting coral reef ecosystems by increasing the frequency and severity of bleaching and mortality events. The susceptibility of corals to temperature stress varies on local and regional scales. Insights into potential controlling parameters are hampered by a lack of long term in situ data in most coral reef environments and sea surface temperature (SST) products often do not resolve reef-scale variations. Here we use 42 years (1970-2012) of coral Sr/Ca data to reconstruct seasonal- to decadal-scale SST variations in two adjacent but distinct reef environments at Little Cayman, Cayman Islands. Our results indicate that two massive Diploria strigosa corals growing in the lagoon and in the fore reef responded differently to past warming events. Coral Sr/Ca data from the shallow lagoon successfully record high summer temperatures confirmed by in situ observations (>33°C). Surprisingly, coral Sr/Ca from the deeper fore reef is strongly affected by thermal stress events, although seasonal temperature extremes and mean SSTs at this site are reduced compared to the lagoon. The shallow lagoon coral showed decadal variations in Sr/Ca, supposedly related to the modulation of lagoonal temperature through varying tidal water exchange, influenced by the 18.6 year lunar nodal cycle. Our results show that reef-scale SST variability can be much larger than suggested by satellite SST measurements. Thus, using coral SST proxy records from different reef zones combined with in situ observations will improve conservation programs that are developed to monitor and predict potential thermal stress on coral reefs.

  19. Transferability of MCR-1/2 Polymyxin Resistance: Complex Dissemination and Genetic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Feng, Youjun

    2018-03-09

    Polymyxins, a group of cationic antimicrobial polypeptides, act as a last-resort defense against lethal infections by carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Recent emergence and fast spread of mobilized colistin resistance determinant mcr-1 argue the renewed interest of colistin in clinical therapies, threatening global public health and agriculture production. This mini-review aims to present an updated overview of mcr-1, covering its global dissemination, the diversity of its hosts/plasmid reservoirs, the complexity in the genetic environment adjacent to mcr-1, the appearance of new mcr-like genes, and the molecular mechanisms for mobilized colistin resistance determinant 1/2 (MCR-1/2).

  20. Biogenicity of terrestrial oncoids formed in soil pockets, Cayman Brac, British West Indies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian

    2011-05-01

    Terrestrial oncoids, up to 85 mm long, are common in some of the soil-filled pockets found in the finely crystalline dolostones of the Cayman Formation on Cayman Brac. Each of these coated grains has a nucleus formed of a white, finely crystalline dolostone lithoclast (derived from the Cayman Formation) that is encased by a light brown to tan cortex that is formed largely of micrite and minimicrite, is vaguely laminated, and lacks obvious biogenic structures. The cortex, typically < 10 mm thick, is variable in thickness around individual grains and from grain to grain. On the surfaces of the oncoids there is a diverse microbiota that includes various reticulate filaments that are typically < 1 μm in diameter, cocci, some large-diameter collapsed and calcified filaments, sporangia-like structures, and locally, exopolysaccharides (EPS). In the subsurface parts of the cortices, however, filaments are very rare and there are only scattered cocci. Evidence derived from the surface microbes indicates that they played an active role in the growth of the cortical laminae by binding material to their surfaces, calcification of the microbes, providing substrates on which calcite was precipitated, and forming cavities in which calcite cement was later precipitated. In stark contrast, it is difficult to ascribe a biotic influence to the formation of the subsurface laminae because of the paucity of preserved microbes. The lack of microbes, however, probably reflects the fact that the formative microbes were destroyed during diagenesis. This example clearly demonstrates that the lack of preserved microbes cannot be taken as an indication that the grains formed as a result of abiogenic processes.

  1. Status and conservation of parrots and parakeets in the Greater Antilles, Bahama Islands, and Cayman Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    In the 1490s a minimum of 28 species of psittacines occurred in the West Indies. Today, only 43% (12) of the species survive. All macaws and most parakeet species have been lost. Although the surviving parrot fauna of the Greater Antilles, Cayman Islands, and Bahama Islands has fared somewhat better than that of the Lesser Antilles, every species has undergone extensive reductions of populations and all but two have undergone extensive reductions in range, mostly as a result of habitat loss, but also from persecution as agricultural pests, conflicts with exotic species, harvesting for pets, and natural disasters. The Cayman Brac Parrot Amazona leucocephala hesterna with its tiny population (less than 150 individuals in the wild) and range, and the Puerto Rican Parrot A. vittata, with about 22-23 birds in the wild and 56 individuals in captivity, must be considered on the verge of extinction and in need of (in the latter's case, continuing) aggressive programmes of research and management. Other populations declining in numbers and range include the Yellow-billed Amazona collaria, and Black-billed A. agilis Parrots of Jamaica, Hispaniolan Parakeet Aratinga chloroptera, Hispaniolan Parrot Amazona ventralis, Cuban Parrot A. leucocephala leucocephala and, most seriously, Cuban Parakeet Aratinga euops. The population of the Grand Cayman Parrot (Amazona leucocephala caymanensis), although numbering only about 1,000 birds, appears stable and the current conservation programme gives hope for the survival of the race. An active conservation and public education programme has begun for the Bahama Parrot A. l. bahamensis, which still occurs in good numbers on Great Inagua Island, but is threatened on Abaco Island. Recommendations for conservation of parrots and parakeets in the region include (1) instituting long-term programmes of research to determine distribution, status, and ecology of each species; (2) developing conservation programmes through education and management

  2. Screening for the presence of mcr-1/mcr-2 genes in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli recovered from a major produce-production region in California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The rapid spreading of polymyxin E (colistin) resistance among bacterial strains through the horizontally transmissible mcr-1 and mcr-2 plasmids has become a serious concern. The emergence of these genes in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), a group of human pathogenic bacteria was even ...

  3. [Results of a multicenter study investigating plasmid mediated colistin resistance genes (mcr-1 and mcr-2) in clinical Enterobacteriaceae ısolates from Turkey].

    PubMed

    Sarı, Ayşe Nur; Süzük, Serap; Karatuna, Onur; Öğünç, Dilara; Karakoç, Ayşe Esra; Çizmeci, Zeynep; Alışkan, Hikmet Eda; Cömert, Füsun; Bakıcı, Mustafa Zahir; Akpolat, Nezahat; Çilli, Fatma Feriha; Zer, Yasemin; Karataş, Aysel; Akgün Karapınar, Bahar; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Özdamar, Melda; Kalem, Fatma; Delialioğlu, Nuran; Aktaş, Elif; Yılmaz, Nisel; Gürcan, Şaban; Gülay, Zeynep

    2017-07-01

    Colistin is a polymyxin antibiotic which is considered as one of the last line agents against infections due to multidrug resistant or carbapenem resistant gram-negative pathogens. Colistin resistance is associated with chromosomal alterations which can usually cause mutations in genes coding specific two component regulator systems. The first plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1 was described in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in December 2015 and followed by another plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene mcr-2 in 2016. The rapid and interspecies dissemination of plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms through horizontal gene transfer, have made these genes considerably threatening. After the first reports, although mcr-1/mcr-2 producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates have been reported from many countries, there have been no reports from Turkey. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the presence of mcr-1/mcr-2 in clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates from different parts of our country. A total of 329 Enterobacteriaceae isolates from 22 laboratories were collected which were isolated between March, 2015 and February, 2016. mcr-1/mcr-2 were investigated by polymerase chain reaction during February-March, 2016. Two hundred and seventeen of Klebsiella pneumoniae (66%), 75 of Salmonella spp. (22.8%), 31 of Esherichia coli (9.4%), 3 of Enterobacter cloacae (0.9%), 2 of Klebsiella oxytoca (0.6%) and 1 of Enterobacter aerogenes (0.3%) isolates were included to the study. Agarose gel electrophoresis results of PCR studies have shown expected band sizes for positive control isolates as 309 bp for mcr-1 and 567 bp for mcr-2. However, the presence of mcr-1/mcr-2 genes was not detected among the tested study isolates of Enterobacteriaceae. Although mcr-1/mcr-2 were not detected in our study isolates, it is highly important to understand the mechanism of resistance dissemination and determine the resistant isolates by considering that

  4. Prospective study on human fecal carriage of Enterobacteriaceae possessing mcr-1 and mcr-2 genes in a regional hospital in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wai-Sing; Au, Chun-Hang; Ho, Dona N; Chan, Tsun-Leung; Ma, Edmond Shiu-Kwan; Tang, Bone Siu-Fai

    2018-02-13

    Human fecal carriage of Enterobacteriaceae possessing mobilized colistin resistance genes (mcr-1 and mcr-2) remains obscure in Hong Kong. As part of routine surveillance on emerging antibiotic resistance, we conducted a prospective study on this topic in a regional hospital in Hong Kong. From October 31 to November 25, 2016, all fecal specimens submitted for routine analysis were included in this surveillance study. These comprised 672 consecutive routine fecal specimens collected from 616 individuals. Fecal specimens were screened for colistin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae by culture-based method, and the presence of mcr-1 and mcr-2 genes in resistant isolates was identified by polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) of mcr-1-possessing Escherichia coli strains was facilitated using Illumina® MiSeq® followed by sequence analysis with appropriate bioinformatics tools. Fourteen mcr-1-positive E. coli strains were isolated from 14 separate individuals (2.08% of total fecal specimens), with 9 of them being asymptomatic, healthy clients coming for health assessment. No mcr-2-possessing Enterobacteriaceae was identified. Colistin minimum inhibitory concentrations of these mcr-1-positive isolates ranged from 2 to 4 μg/mL. All these isolates were susceptible to carbapenems with 2 being extended spectrum β-lactamase producers. WGS data revealed that these isolates belonged to at least 12 different sequence types (STs) and possessed diversified plasmid replicons, virulence and acquired antibiotic resistance genes. Further study on an E. coli ST201 strain (Pasteur scheme) revealed coexistence of 47,818-bp IncP-1 and 33,309-bp IncX4 types of mcr-1 plasmids, which was a combination of stability and high transmissibility. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on human fecal carriage of Enterobacteriaceae possessing mcr-1 and mcr-2 genes in Hong Kong. Our data further revealed asymptomatic carriage of mcr-1-possessing

  5. Moraxella Species as Potential Sources of MCR-Like Polymyxin Resistance Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, Nicolas; Nordmann, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plasmid-mediated resistance to polymyxins mediated by the MCR-1/2 determinants has been reported in Enterobacteriaceae worldwide. Using PCR-based and cloning strategies, a series of Moraxella spp. were screened for mcr-like genes. Moraxella spp. that are mainly animal pathogens but may also be human pathogens were identified as potential reservoirs of mcr-like genes. PMID:28320720

  6. Emergence of colistin-resistant Escherichia coli clinical isolates harboring mcr-1 in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tada, Tatsuya; Nhung, Pham Hong; Shimada, Kayo; Tsuchiya, Mitsuhiro; Phuong, Doan Mai; Anh, Nguyen Quoc; Ohmagari, Norio; Kirikae, Teruo

    2017-10-01

    The mcr-1 was first detected on a plasmid in colistin-resistant Escherichia coli from livestock and patients in China. We described here the emergence of colistin-resistant E. coli clinical isolates harboring mcr-1 on the chromosomes in Vietnam. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hospital-acquired E. coli isolates harboring mcr-1 in a medical setting in Vietnam. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. High Incidence of Escherichia coli Strains Coharboring mcr-1 and blaNDM from Chickens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bao-Tao; Song, Feng-Jing; Zou, Ming; Zhang, Qi-Di; Shan, Hu

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of Escherichia coli isolates carrying mcr-1-bla NDM from a chicken farm in China. Of the 78 E. coli isolates, 21 clonally unrelated isolates carried mcr-1-bla NDM Diverse IncI2 plasmids disseminated mcr-1 , while the dissemination of bla NDM was mediated by diverse IncB/O plasmids. More striking was the colocalization of resistance genes mcr-1 and bla NDM-4 in an IncHI2/ST3 plasmid, which might pose a great challenge for public health. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Co-occurrence of colistin-resistance genes mcr-1 and mcr-3 among multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from cattle, Spain, September 2015

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Marta; Iglesias, M Rocío; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David; Gallardo, Alejandro; Quijada, Narciso M; Miguela-Villoldo, Pedro; Campos, Maria Jorge; Píriz, Segundo; López-Orozco, Gema; de Frutos, Cristina; Sáez, José Luis; Ugarte-Ruiz, María; Domínguez, Lucas; Quesada, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Colistin resistance genes mcr-3 and mcr-1 have been detected in an Escherichia coli isolate from cattle faeces in a Spanish slaughterhouse in 2015. The sequences of both genes hybridised to same plasmid band of ca 250 kb, although colistin resistance was non-mobilisable. The isolate was producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases and belonged to serotype O9:H10 and sequence type ST533. Here we report an mcr-3 gene detected in Europe following earlier reports from Asia and the United States. PMID:28797328

  9. Co-occurrence of colistin-resistance genes mcr-1 and mcr-3 among multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from cattle, Spain, September 2015.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Marta; Iglesias, M Rocío; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David; Gallardo, Alejandro; Quijada, Narciso; Miguela-Villoldo, Pedro; Campos, Maria Jorge; Píriz, Segundo; López-Orozco, Gema; de Frutos, Cristina; Sáez, José Luis; Ugarte-Ruiz, María; Domínguez, Lucas; Quesada, Alberto

    2017-08-03

    Colistin resistance genes mcr-3 and mcr-1 have been detected in an Escherichia coli isolate from cattle faeces in a Spanish slaughterhouse in 2015. The sequences of both genes hybridised to same plasmid band of ca 250 kb, although colistin resistance was non-mobilisable. The isolate was producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases and belonged to serotype O9:H10 and sequence type ST533. Here we report an mcr-3 gene detected in Europe following earlier reports from Asia and the United States. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  10. Prevalence of mcr-1 in E. coli from Livestock and Food in Germany, 2010-2015.

    PubMed

    Irrgang, Alexandra; Roschanski, Nicole; Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois; Grobbel, Mirjam; Skladnikiewicz-Ziemer, Tanja; Thomas, Katharina; Roesler, Uwe; Käsbohrer, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    Since the first description of a plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene (mcr-1) in November 2015 multiple reports of mcr-1 positive isolates indicate a worldwide spread of this newly discovered resistance gene in Enterobacteriaceae. Although the occurrence of mcr-1 positive isolates of livestock, food, environment and human origin is well documented only few systematic studies on the prevalence of mcr-1 are available yet. Here, comprehensive data on the prevalence of mcr-1 in German livestock and food isolates are presented. Over 10.600 E. coli isolates from the national monitoring on zoonotic agents from the years 2010-2015 were screened for phenotypic colistin resistance (MIC value >2 mg/l). Of those, 505 resistant isolates were screened with a newly developed TaqMan-based real-time PCR for the presence of the mcr-1 gene. In total 402 isolates (79.8% of colistin resistant isolates) harboured the mcr-1 gene. The prevalence was depending on the food production chain. The highest prevalence was detected in the turkey food chain (10.7%), followed by broilers (5.6%). A low prevalence was determined in pigs, veal calves and laying hens. The mcr-1 was not detected in beef cattle, beef and dairy products in all years investigated. In conclusion, TaqMan based real-time PCR provides a fast and accurate tool for detection of mcr-1 gene. The overall detection rate of 3.8% for mcr-1 among all E. coli isolates tested is due to high prevalence of mcr-1 in poultry production chains. More epidemiological studies of other European countries are urgently needed to assess German prevalence data.

  11. A simple phenotypic method for screening of MCR-1-mediated colistin resistance.

    PubMed

    Coppi, M; Cannatelli, A; Antonelli, A; Baccani, I; Di Pilato, V; Sennati, S; Giani, T; Rossolini, G M

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate a novel method, the colistin-MAC test, for phenotypic screening of acquired colistin resistance mediated by transferable mcr-1 resistance determinants, based on colistin MIC reduction in the presence of dipicolinic acid (DPA). The colistin-MAC test consists in a broth microdilution method, in which colistin MIC is tested in the absence or presence of DPA (900 μg/mL). Overall, 74 colistin-resistant strains of Enterobacteriaceae (65 Escherichia coli and nine other species), including 61 strains carrying mcr-1-like genes and 13 strains negative for mcr genes, were evaluated with the colistin-MAC test. The presence of mcr-1-like and mcr-2-like genes was assessed by real-time PCR and end-point PCR. For 20 strains, whole-genome sequencing data were also available. A ≥8-fold reduction of colistin MIC in the presence of DPA was observed with 59 mcr-1-positive strains, including 53 E. coli of clinical origin, three E. coli transconjugants carrying MCR-1-encoding plasmids, one Enterobacter cloacae complex and two Citrobacter spp. Colistin MICs were unchanged, increased or at most reduced by twofold with the 13 mcr-negative colistin-resistant strains (nine E. coli and four Klebsiella pneumoniae), but also with two mcr-1-like-positive K. pneumoniae strains. The colistin-MAC test could be a simple phenotypic test for presumptive identification of mcr-1-positive strains among isolates of colistin-resistant E. coli, based on a ≥8-fold reduction of colistin MIC in the presence of DPA. Evaluation of the test with a larger number of strains, species and mcr-type resistance determinants would be of interest. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular characteristic of mcr-1 producing Escherichia coli in a Chinese university hospital.

    PubMed

    He, Qing-Wen; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Lan, Fang-Jun; Zhao, Zhi-Chang; Wu, Zhi-Yun; Cao, Ying-Ping; Li, Bin

    2017-04-19

    Colistin has been considered as a last-line treatment option in severe infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative pathogens. However, the emergence of the mobile colistin resistance gene (mcr-1) has challenged this viewpoint. The aim of this study is to explore the prevalence of mcr-1 in Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a Chinese teaching hospital, and investigate their molecular characteristics. A total of 700 E. coli isolates were used to screen mcr-1 by PCR and sequencing in a Chinese university hospital from August 2014 to August 2015. Susceptibility test of mcr-1-producing isolates was determined by Vitek -2 Compact system. 26 virulence factors (VFs), phylogenetic groups, Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), and DNA Fingerprinting (ERIC-PCR) of strains were investigated by PCR. Four (0.6%) mcr-1 producing E. coli isolates were found in this study. The results of antibiotic susceptibility test showed that all four isolates were resistant to colistin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, cefazolin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and were susceptible to amikacin, ertapenem and imipenem. In addition, all 4 isolates exhibited high-level resistance to aztreonam, cefotaxime and gentamicin. The numbers of VFs contained in mcr-1 positive isolates were no more than 4 in our study. MLST result demonstrated that these isolates were assigned to two sequence types: ST156 and ST167. The result of phylogenetic analysis showed that four mcr-1-positive isolates belong to two phylogenetic groups: A and B1 group. ERIC-PCR showed that four mcr-1 positive strains were categorized into three different genotypes. Our study demonstrated a low prevalence of mcr-1 in E. coli clinical isolates in a Chinese teaching hospital, and we have gained insights into the molecular characteristics of these mcr-1-positive strains. Increasing the surveillance of these infections, as well as taking effective infection control measures are urgently needed to take to control the transmission

  13. Spatio-temporal segregation of calling behavior at a multispecies fish spawning site in Little Cayman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, K. C.; Sirovic, A.; Jaffe, J. S.; Semmens, B.; Pattengill-Semmens, C.; Gibb, J.

    2016-02-01

    Fish spawning aggregation (FSA) sites are extremely vulnerable to over-exploitation. Accurate understanding of the spatial and temporal use of such sites is necessary for effective species management. The size of FSAs can be on the order of kilometers and peak spawning often occurs at night, posing challenges to visual observation. Passive acoustics are an alternative method for dealing with these challenges. An array of passive acoustic recorders and GoPro cameras were deployed during Nassau grouper (Epinephelus striatus) spawning from February 7th to 12th, 2015 at a multispecies spawning aggregation site in Little Cayman, Cayman Islands. In addition to Nassau grouper, at least 10 other species are known to spawn at this location including tiger grouper (Mycteroperca tigris), red hind (Epinephelus guttatus), black grouper (Mycteroperca bonaci), and yellowfin grouper (Mycteroperca venenosa). During 5 days of continuous recordings, over 21,000 fish calls were detected. These calls were classified into 15 common types. Species identification and behavioral context of unknown common call types were determined by coupling video recordings collected during this time with call localizations. There are distinct temporal patterns in call production of different species. For example, red hind and yellowfin grouper call predominately at night with yellowfin call rates increasing after midnight, and black grouper call primarily during dusk and dawn. In addition, localization methods were used to reveal how the FSA area was divided among species. These findings facilitate a better understanding of the behavior of these important reef fish species allowing policymakers to more effectively manage and protect them.

  14. Considering Species Tolerance to Climate Change in Conservation Management at Little Cayman's Coral Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, E.; Manfrino, C.; Smith, D.; Suggett, D.

    2013-05-01

    There is growing evidence demonstrating that climate change, notably increased frequency and intensity of thermal anomalies combined with ocean acidification, will negatively impact the future growth and viability of many reef systems, including those in the Caribbean. One key question that remains unanswered is whether or not there are management options aimed at protecting coral species from these threats. Little Cayman (Cayman Islands) provides a rare opportunity to investigate global climate stressors without the confounding impact of local anthropogenic stressors. Our research has focused on two climate change issues: Firstly, we have identified species-specific coral bleaching susceptibility (and the influence of regulation upon this susceptibility) to thermal anomalies. Species level of vulnerability to thermal anomalies can decrease when grown under variable temperature. Environmental variability may be key in influencing the susceptibility of corals to stress. The second part of our research has therefore addressed the variability in inorganic carbon chemistry that naturally occurs where certain reef building corals exist. We have identified how the inorganic carbon chemistry varies naturally among habitats and thus how corals within these habitats are potentially adapted to future acidification. Spatial, diurnal, lunar and seasonal variability have been identified as important factors with pCO2 values of up to 700-800 μatm and pH values as low as 7.801 for lagoon habitats, showing that some species are already being exposed to typical pCO2 and pH levels expected for the oceans in ~50 years' time. Using an eco-physiological approach, we are exploring how some reef-building corals are able to acclimate to more variable chemistry compared to others and whether this natural capacity installs increased tolerance to future acidification. These eco-physiological studies provide important information that can be utilized in a management framework. The aim of

  15. The first human report of mobile colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, in Finland.

    PubMed

    Gröndahl-Yli-Hannuksela, Kirsi; Lönnqvist, Emilia; Kallonen, Teemu; Lindholm, Laura; Jalava, Jari; Rantakokko-Jalava, Kaisu; Vuopio, Jaana

    2018-05-01

    Colistin resistance mediated by mobile mcr-1 gene has raised concern during the last years. After steep increase in mcr-1 reports, other mcr-gene variants (mcr-2 to mcr-5) have been revealed as well. In 2016, a clinical study was conducted on asymptomatic stool carriage of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae among Finnish adults. All suspected ESBL producing bacterial isolates were first tested by phenotypic ESBL-confirmation methods, and then further analyzed with whole genome sequencing to identify the resistance genes. We found one study subject carrying a colistin resistant E. coli with a transferrable mcr-1 gene. This multi-drug resistant isolate, although initially suspected to be an ESBL producer, did not carry any ESBL genes, but was proven to carry several other resistance genes by using whole genome sequencing. Sequence type was ST93. The mcr-1 gene was connected to IncX4 plasmid which suggests that the colistin resistance gene locates in the respective plasmid. Here, we report the finding of a mcr-1 harboring human E. coli isolate from Finland. Clinical antimicrobial resistance (AMR) rates are low in Finland, and mobile colistin resistance has not been reported previously. This highlights the importance of AMR surveillance also in populations with low levels of resistance. © 2018 The Authors. APMIS published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Scandinavian Societies for Medical Microbiology and Pathology.

  16. Locally Acquired mcr-1 in Escherichia coli, Australia, 2011 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Ellem, Justin A; Ginn, Andrew N; Chen, Sharon C-A; Ferguson, John; Partridge, Sally R; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2017-07-01

    We identified discrete importation events of the mcr-1 gene on incompatibility group IncI2 plasmids in Escherichia coli isolated from patients in New South Wales, Australia, in 2011 and 2013. mcr-1 is present in a small minority of colistin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and appears not to be established locally.

  17. Colistin resistance mcr-1 gene bearing Escherichia coli from the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transmissible colistin resistance in the form of an mcr-1 gene bearing plasmid has been recently reported in Enterobacteriaceae in several parts of the world. We report the completed genome sequence of an Escherichia coli isolated from swine in the US that carried the mcr-1 gene on an IncI2 type pl...

  18. Oxidation resistant nanocrystalline MCrAl(Y) coatings and methods of forming such coatings

    DOEpatents

    Cheruvu, Narayana S.; Wei, Ronghua

    2014-07-29

    The present disclosure relates to an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating and a method of forming an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating. An oxidation resistant coating comprising an MCrAl(Y) alloy may be deposited on a substrate, wherein M, includes iron, nickel, cobalt, or combinations thereof present greater than 50 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, chromium is present in the range of 15 wt % to 30 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, aluminum is present in the range of 6 wt % to 12 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy and yttrium, is optionally present in the range of 0.1 wt % to 0.5 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy. In addition, the coating may exhibit a grain size of 200 nm or less as deposited.

  19. Identification and characterization of mcr mediated colistin resistance in extraintestinal Escherichia coli from poultry and livestock in China.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Afrah Kamal; Zhang, Jilei; Wang, Jiawei; Chen, Li; Kelly, Patrick; Butaye, Patrick; Lu, Guangwu; Gong, Jiansen; Li, Min; Wei, Lanjing; Wang, Yaoyao; Qi, Kezong; Han, Xiangan; Price, Stuart; Hathcock, Terri; Wang, Chengming

    2017-12-29

    Antimicrobial resistance to colistin has emerged worldwide threatening the efficacy of one of the last-resort antimicrobials used for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infection in humans. In this study, we investigated the presence of colistin resistance genes (mcr-1, mcr-2, mcr-3) in Escherichia coli strains isolated from poultry and livestock collected between 2004 and 2012 in China. Furthermore, we studied the maintenance and transfer of the mcr-1 gene in E. coli after serial passages. Overall, 2.7% (17/624) of the E. coli isolates were positive for the mcr-1 gene while none were positive for the mcr-2 and mcr-3 genes. The prevalences of mcr-1 were similar in E. coli isolates from chickens (3.2%; 13/404), pigs (0.9%; 1/113) and ducks (6.8%; 3/44) but were absent in isolates from cattle (0/63). The mcr-1 gene was maintained in the E. coli after six passages (equivalent to 60 generations). In vitro transfer of mcr-1 was evident even without colistin selection. Our data indicate the presence of mcr-1 in extraintestinal E. coli from food-producing animals in China, and suggest that high numbers of the mcr-1-positive bacteria in poultry and livestock do not appear to be readily lost after withdrawal of colistin as a food additive. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Occurrence and characterization of mcr-1-harbouring Escherichia coli isolated from pigs in Great Britain from 2013 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Duggett, Nicholas A; Sayers, Ellie; AbuOun, Manal; Ellis, Richard J; Nunez-Garcia, Javier; Randall, Luke; Horton, Robert; Rogers, Jon; Martelli, Francesca; Smith, Richard P; Brena, Camilla; Williamson, Susanna; Kirchner, Miranda; Davies, Robert; Crook, Derrick; Evans, Sarah; Teale, Chris; Anjum, Muna F

    2017-03-01

    To determine the occurrence of mcr-1 -harbouring Escherichia coli in archived pig material originating in Great Britain (GB) from 2013 to 2015 and characterize mcr-1 plasmids. Enrichment and selective culture of 387 archived porcine caecal contents and recovery from archive of 1109 E. coli isolates to identify colistin-resistant bacteria by testing for the presence of mcr-1 by PCR and RT-PCR. mcr-1 -harbouring E. coli were characterized by WGS and compared with other available mcr-1 WGS. Using selective isolation following enrichment, the occurrence of mcr-1 E. coli in caeca from healthy pigs at slaughter from unique farms in GB was 0.6% (95% CI 0%-1.5%) in 2015. mcr-1 E. coli were also detected in isolates from two porcine veterinary diagnostic submissions in 2015. All isolates prior to 2015 were negative. WGS analysis of the four mcr-1 -positive E. coli indicated no other antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes were linked to mcr-1 -plasmid-bearing contigs, despite all harbouring multiple AMR genes. The sequence similarity between mcr-1 -plasmid-bearing contigs identified and those found in GB, Chinese and South African human isolates and Danish, French and Estonian livestock-associated isolates was 90%-99%. mcr-1- harbouring plasmids were diverse, implying transposable elements are involved in mcr-1 transmission in GB. The low number of mcr-1 -positive E. coli isolates identified suggested mcr-1 is currently uncommon in E. coli from pigs within GB. The high sequence similarity between mcr-1 plasmid draft genomes identified in pig E. coli and plasmids found in human and livestock-associated isolates globally requires further investigation to understand the full implications. © Crown copyright 2016.

  1. Parasitism in Pterois volitans (Scorpaenidae) from coastal waters of Puerto Rico, the Cayman Islands, and the Bahamas.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Ascherl, Zullaylee; Williams, Ernest H; Bunkley-Williams, Lucy; Tuttle, Lillian J; Sikkel, Paul C; Hixon, Mark A

    2015-02-01

    Recently, Pterois volitans, a Pacific species of lionfish, invaded the Atlantic Ocean, likely via the aquarium trade. We examined for internal and external parasites 188 individuals from 8 municipalities of Puerto Rico collected during 2009-2012, 91 individuals from Little Cayman, Cayman Islands, collected during the summers of 2010 and 2011, and 47 individuals from Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas, collected during the summer of 2009. In total, 27 parasite taxa were found, including 3 previously reported species from lionfish, the digenean Lecithochirium floridense, the leech Trachelobdella lubrica, and an Excorallana sp. isopod. We also report another 24 previously unreported parasite taxa from lionfish, including digeneans, monogeneans, cestodes, nematodes, isopods, a copepod, and an acanthocephalan. Among these parasites, several were previously unreported at their respective geographic origins: We report 5 new locality records from Puerto Rico, 9 from Cayman Islands, 5 from the Bahamas, 5 from the Caribbean, and 3 from the subtropical western Atlantic region. Three parasites are reported to associate with a fish host for the first time. The parasite faunas of P. volitans among our 3 study sites were quite different; most of the species infecting lionfish were generalists and/or species that infect carnivorous fishes. Although our study did not assess the impact of parasites on the fitness of invasive lionfish, it provides an important early step. Our results provide valuable comparative data for future studies at these and other sites throughout the lionfish's invaded range.

  2. Platynosomum fastosum-induced chronic intrahepatic cholangitis and Spirometra spp. infections in feral cats from Grand Cayman.

    PubMed

    Headley, S A; Gillen, M A; Sanches, A W D; Satti, M Z

    2012-06-01

    The occurrence of platynosomiasis and intestinal sparganosis is described in feral cats from Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands. Spirometra spp. was observed within the intestine of 18.18% (10/55) of cats; 1.18% (1/55) of cats demonstrated gross and histological manifestation of parasitism by Platynosomum fastosum, but 14.5% (8/55) of cats had the characteristic pathological manifestations of P. fastosum-induced intrahepatic cholangitis without the concomitant presence of the intraductal trematode. Combined parasitism (Spirometra spp. and P. fastosum) was observed in 9.09% (5/55) of feral cats. Significant pathological findings were only associated with the hepatic fluke, P. fastosum, and were grossly characterized by moderate hepatomegaly with enlarged and dilated bile ducts. Examples of cestodes with morphological features characteristic of Spirometra spp. were observed within the small intestine without any associated pathological lesion. The histopathological evaluation of liver fragments revealed chronic intrahepatic cholangitis with and without the associated intraductal trematode, and was characterized by marked periductal fibrosis, adenomatous proliferation of bile duct epithelium, dilation of intrahepatic bile ducts and portal accumulations of inflammatory cells. The occurrence of the cestode in feral cats coupled with factors that are unique to Grand Cayman makes this island the ideal location for sporadic cases of human sparganosis.

  3. Spread of mcr-1-carrying Enterobacteriaceae in sewage water from Spain.

    PubMed

    Ovejero, C M; Delgado-Blas, J F; Calero-Caceres, W; Muniesa, M; Gonzalez-Zorn, B

    2017-04-01

    The mobile colistin resistance gene mcr-1 has been identified worldwide in human and animal sources, while its occurrence in the environment is still largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of mcr-1 -harbouring Enterobacteriaceae in water samples obtained from rivers and waste water treatment plants in the area of Barcelona, Spain. The presence of mcr-1 was detected by PCR. Bacterial identification was performed via MALDI-TOF MS. Resistance to colistin was determined by a broth dilution method. The epidemiological relationship between the positive isolates was assessed with PFGE and ST was determined by MLST. Plasmid characterization was performed by transformation experiments, antimicrobial susceptibility testing and incompatibility group PCR. Thirty MDR isolates bearing mcr-1 , 29 Escherichia coli (ST632 and ST479) and 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae (ST526), were identified in sewage from two different waste water treatment plants, whereas the gene was not found in river water. All isolates, including the K. pneumoniae , harboured bla CTX-M-55 and bla TEM-1 . mcr-1 was in all cases associated with an IncI2 plasmid, which only conferred resistance to colistin. mcr-1 was harboured by two predominant E. coli clones that were found in both waste water treatment plants. This study showed a high occurrence of mcr-1 in the sewage of Barcelona, mainly due to the dissemination of two E. coli pulsotypes that are circulating in the population. The presence of mcr-1 in the environment is a cause for concern, and suggests high prevalence of mcr-1 in the community. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Coexistence of mcr-1 and blaNDM-1 in Escherichia coli from Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Blas, Jose F; Ovejero, Cristina M; Abadia-Patiño, Lorena; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    We studied the presence of the mobile colistin resistance gene mcr-1 in human, animal, and environmental Enterobacteriaceae samples from Cumana, Venezuela, that were collected in 2015. The mcr-1 gene was detected in 2/93 Escherichia coli isolates from swine (novel ST452) and human (ST19) samples that were resistant to colistin. Whole-genome sequencing and transformation experiments identified mcr-1 on an IncI2 plasmid. One of the isolates also bore the widely spread carbapenemase NDM-1. A One Health approach is necessary to further elucidate the flux of these high-risk genes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Pathways and Distribution of Marine Debris Around a Remote Caribbean Island, Little Cayman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, L.; Marsh, L.; O'Keefe, A.; Duran, J.; Wilcox, S. M.; James, R.; Cowan, E.

    2011-12-01

    Marine Debris is a major environmental concern that affects all levels of marine life. On remote beaches in the Caribbean, where human populations are minimal, marine debris is largely deposited by ocean currents. The ocean is estimated to be littered with over 6 million metric tons of trash per year with 90% coming from land sources, but little is known about the exact sources and pathways for the debris. In 2006, on Little Cayman Island, coastal debris was collected at two coastal areas where removal of debris had not occurred in at least 9 years and along 2000 meters squared. One site was located on the north side, while the other site was located on the south side of the island. Both sites were located in reef-protected coastal zones. These two sites were revisited in 2007, 2010, and 2011 to determine the volume, weight, and type of debris arriving annually and to assess the importance of different coastal processes in deposition. In 2011, eight turtle nesting beaches were added to the study and a total of 11,186 liters of debris was collected from 1600 meters of coastline. The island lies in a northeast southwest orientation. The south-side of the island is influenced largely by prevailing trade winds, currents and tropical storms, traveling across the Caribbean from the east. Currents, eddies, and Norwesters would presumably deposit debris on the north side of the island. Approximately five times the amount of debris is deposited on the south side of the island than on the north side of the island. From the total debris collected, 72.45% was plastic, 8.23% shoes, 6.37% ropes & nets , 5.13% glass, 4.37% styrofoam, and 3.44% contained other debris. The marine debris originated in 8 different countries, and it is estimated that there is collectively 223,721 liters (11,635 kg) covering the shores of the entire island. Remarkably, debris found on Little Cayman in 2011 was traced to the 2010 Haitian earthquake relief effort.

  6. Electrodeposited MCrAlY Coatings for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Electrolytic codeposition is a promising alternative process for fabricating MCrAlY coatings. The coating process involves two steps, i.e., codeposition of CrAlY-based particles and a metal matrix of Ni, Co, or (Ni,Co), followed by a diffusion heat treatment to convert the composite coating to the desired MCrAlY microstructure. Despite the advantages such as low cost and non-line-of-sight, this coating process is less known than electron beam-physical vapor deposition and thermal spray processes for manufacturing high-temperature coatings. This article provides an overview of the electro-codeposited MCrAlY coatings for gas turbine engine applications, highlighting the unique features of this coating process and some important findings in the past 30 years. Challenges and research opportunities for further optimization of this type of MCrAlY coatings are also discussed.

  7. Colistin-resistant Escherichia coli clinical isolate harbouring the mcr-1 gene in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Paredes, D; Barba, P; Zurita, J

    2016-10-01

    Colistin resistance mediated by the mcr-1 gene has been reported worldwide, but to date not from the Andean region, South America. We report the first clinical isolate of Escherichia coli harbouring the mcr-1 gene in Ecuador. The strain was isolated from peritoneal fluid from a 14-year-old male with acute appendicitis, and subjected to molecular analysis. The minimum inhibitory concentration of colistin for the strain was 8 mg/ml and it was susceptible to carbapenems but resistant to tigecycline. The strain harboured mcr-1 and bla CTX-M-55 genes and was of sequence type 609. The recognition of an apparently commensal strain of E. coli harbouring mcr-1 serves as an alert to the presence in the region of this recently described resistance mechanism to one of the last line of drugs available for the treatment of multi-resistant Gram-negative infections.

  8. Phosphatic precipitates associated with actinomycetes in speleothems from Grand Cayman, British West Indies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian

    2009-07-01

    Calcitic speleothems from a cave located on the north central coast of Grand Cayman commonly include corrosion surfaces that developed when calcite precipitation ceased and corrosion mediated by condensates became the operative process. Dissolution features associated with these surfaces, including etched crystal surfaces, microcavities, and solution-widened boundaries between crystals, are commonly occupied by microbes and microbial mats that have been replaced by calcium phosphate and/or coated with calcium phosphate. No mineralized microbes were found in the calcite crystals that form the speleothems. The morphology of the mineralized hyphae (eight morphotypes) and spores (nine morphotypes) are indicative of actinomycetes, a group of microbes that are ideally adapted to life in oligotrophic cave environs. Superb preservation of the delicate hyphae, aerial hyphae, and delicate ornamentation on the hyphae and spores indicate that the microbes underwent rapid mineralized while close to their original life positions. Although these actinomycetes were extremely susceptible to replacement by calcium phosphate, there is no evidence that they directly or indirectly controlled precipitation. Nevertheless, the association between the P-rich precipitates and microbes shows that the use of phosphorus as a proxy for seasonal climate changes in paleoclimate analyses must be treated with caution.

  9. Chromosomally Encoded mcr-5 in Colistin non-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Snesrud, Erik; Maybank, Rosslyn; Kwak, Yoon I; Jones, Anthony R; Hinkle, Mary K; Mc Gann, Patrick

    2018-05-29

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) of historical Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates identified a chromosomal copy of mcr-5 within a Tn 3 -like transposon in P. aeruginosa MRSN 12280. The isolate was non-susceptible to colistin by broth microdilution and genome analysis revealed no mutations known to confer colistin resistance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of mcr in colistin non-susceptible P. aeruginosa .

  10. Structural Modification of Lipopolysaccharide Conferred by mcr-1 in Gram-Negative ESKAPE Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Yun; Chandler, Courtney E; Leung, Lisa M; McElheny, Christi L; Mettus, Roberta T; Shanks, Robert M Q; Liu, Jian-Hua; Goodlett, David R; Ernst, Robert K; Doi, Yohei

    2017-06-01

    mcr-1 was initially reported as the first plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in China and has subsequently been identified worldwide in various species of the family Enterobacteriaceae mcr-1 encodes a phosphoethanolamine transferase, and its expression has been shown to generate phosphoethanolamine-modified bis-phosphorylated hexa-acylated lipid A in E. coli Here, we investigated the effects of mcr-1 on colistin susceptibility and on lipopolysaccharide structures in laboratory and clinical strains of the Gram-negative ESKAPE ( Enterococcus faecium , Staphylococcus aureus , K. pneumoniae , Acinetobacter baumannii , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , and Enterobacter species) pathogens, which are often treated clinically by colistin. The effects of mcr-1 on colistin resistance were determined using MIC assays of laboratory and clinical strains of E. coli , K. pneumoniae , A. baumannii , and P. aeruginosa Lipid A structural changes resulting from MCR-1 were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The introduction of mcr-1 led to colistin resistance in E. coli , K. pneumoniae , and A. baumannii but only moderately reduced susceptibility in P. aeruginosa Phosphoethanolamine modification of lipid A was observed consistently for all four species. These findings highlight the risk of colistin resistance as a consequence of mcr-1 expression among ESKAPE pathogens, especially in K. pneumoniae and A. baumannii Furthermore, the observation that lipid A structures were modified despite only modest increases in colistin MICs in some instances suggests more sophisticated surveillance methods may need to be developed to track the dissemination of mcr-1 or plasmid-mediated phosphoethanolamine transferases in general. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Structural Modification of Lipopolysaccharide Conferred by mcr-1 in Gram-Negative ESKAPE Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Yun; Chandler, Courtney E.; Leung, Lisa M.; McElheny, Christi L.; Mettus, Roberta T.; Liu, Jian-Hua; Goodlett, David R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT mcr-1 was initially reported as the first plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in China and has subsequently been identified worldwide in various species of the family Enterobacteriaceae. mcr-1 encodes a phosphoethanolamine transferase, and its expression has been shown to generate phosphoethanolamine-modified bis-phosphorylated hexa-acylated lipid A in E. coli. Here, we investigated the effects of mcr-1 on colistin susceptibility and on lipopolysaccharide structures in laboratory and clinical strains of the Gram-negative ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, K. pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogens, which are often treated clinically by colistin. The effects of mcr-1 on colistin resistance were determined using MIC assays of laboratory and clinical strains of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, A. baumannii, and P. aeruginosa. Lipid A structural changes resulting from MCR-1 were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The introduction of mcr-1 led to colistin resistance in E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and A. baumannii but only moderately reduced susceptibility in P. aeruginosa. Phosphoethanolamine modification of lipid A was observed consistently for all four species. These findings highlight the risk of colistin resistance as a consequence of mcr-1 expression among ESKAPE pathogens, especially in K. pneumoniae and A. baumannii. Furthermore, the observation that lipid A structures were modified despite only modest increases in colistin MICs in some instances suggests more sophisticated surveillance methods may need to be developed to track the dissemination of mcr-1 or plasmid-mediated phosphoethanolamine transferases in general. PMID:28373195

  12. Complex dissemination of the diversified mcr-1-harbouring plasmids in Escherichia coli of different sequence types

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jingxia; Wang, Xiuna; Deng, Xianbo; Feng, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of the mobilized colistin resistance gene, representing a novel mechanism for bacterial drug resistance, challenges the last resort against the severe infections by Gram-negative bacteria with multi-drug resistances. Very recently, we showed the diversity in the mcr-1-carrying plasmid reservoirs from the gut microbiota. Here, we reported that a similar but more complex scenario is present in the healthy swine populations, Southern China, 2016. Amongst the 1026 pieces of Escherichia coli isolates from 3 different pig farms, 302 E. coli isolates were determined to be positive for the mcr-1 gene (30%, 302/1026). Multi-locus sequence typing assigned no less than 11 kinds of sequence types including one novel Sequence Type to these mcr-1-positive strains. PCR analyses combined with the direct DNA sequencing revealed unexpected complexity of the mcr-1-harbouring plasmids whose backbones are at least grouped into 6 types four of which are new. Transcriptional analyses showed that the mcr-1 promoter of different origins exhibits similar activity. It seems likely that complex dissemination of the diversified mcr-1-bearing plasmids occurs amongst the various ST E. coli inhabiting the healthy swine populations, in Southern China. PMID:27741523

  13. Development of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened MCrAlY Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Schläfer, T.; Richardt, K.; Brühl, M.

    2008-12-01

    MCrAlY materials are widely used as bond coats for thermal barrier coatings on turbine blades. The aim of this work is to improve mechanical properties and wear resistance of thermal sprayed NiCoCrAlY-coatings by strengthening the coating with hard phase particles. In order to retain the effect of the dispersion reinforcement at high temperatures, the use of temperature-stable oxide hard phases such as ZrO2-Y2O3 is necessary. To realize this new material structure, the high-energy ball-milling process is applied and analyzed. The mixture ratio between NiCoCrAlY and ZrO2-Y2O3 was varied between 5 and 10 wt.% ZrO2-Y2O3. The influences of the milling time of the high-energy ball-milling process on the distribution of the hard phases in the metal matrix were analyzed. After spraying with a HVOF system the mechanical properties of the coatings are measured and compared with conventional NiCoCrAlY coatings.

  14. Generation of Newly Discovered Resistance Gene mcr-1 Knockout in Escherichia coli Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lichang; He, Tao; Zhang, Lili; Pang, Maoda; Zhang, Qiaoyan; Zhou, Yan; Bao, Hongduo; Wang, Ran

    2017-07-28

    The mcr-1 gene is a new "superbug" gene discoverd in China in 2016 that makes bacteria highly resistant to the last-resort class of antibiotics. The mcr-1 gene raised serious concern about its possible global dissemination and spread. Here, we report a potential anti-resistant strategy using the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated approach that can efficiently induce mcr-1 gene knockout in Escherichia coli . Our findings suggested that using the CRISPR/Cas9 system to knock out the resistance gene mcr-1 might be a potential anti-resistant strategy. Bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide-27 could help deliver plasmid pCas::mcr targeting specific DNA sequences of the mcr-1 gene into microbial populations.

  15. The Death Throes of Ocean Core Complexes: Examples from the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheadle, M. J.; John, B. E.; German, C. R.; Kusznir, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre (MCSC) is an ultraslow (full rate 15-17 mm/yr) mid-ocean ridge that is located within the Cayman Trough, at the boundary between the North American and Caribbean plates. It is 110km long, and at ~6km below sea level, is the deepest spreading centre in the world. In the Summer of 2011, during NOAA EX 1104, the RV Okeanos Explorer collected high resolution (50m) Simrad EM302 multibeam bathymetry, and high-resolution video using the ROV Little Hercules ,which together provide insight into the evolution (from birth to death) of oceanic core complexes (OCCs). The MCSC exhibits bathymetry typical of slow spreading, magmatically deficient, ridges with thick lithosphere. It has both well-developed OCCs with ~15km of detachment fault offset and smaller offset (6-7km) normal faults forming >40km long linear ridges. Mass wasting is conspicuous. The MCSC is flanked on both sides by three oceanic core complexes: i) the now inactive, Mount Emms to the northeast, ii) the near-recently active Mount Dent in the west centre of the axial valley, and iii) the decapitated Mount Hudson on the south east flank. Together these massifs show different stages of OCC termination. Mount Emms lies approximately 2Ma off axis, is the oldest of the OCCs, and is heavily dissected by faulting and mass wasting. Mount Hudson is terminated by a west dipping high angle normal fault, with 1.6km throw and was initially rifted apart ~0.5Ma. A recently active axial volcanic ridge (AVR) with ROV observed pahoehoe lava forms, and a line of conical volcanic edifices lie within the rifted remains at the toe of the OCC. In contrast, Mount Dent was the most recently active, but is now in the very initial stages of being rifted apart by the presently active AVR that currently intersects the OCC. Incipient high angle normal faults that lie along strike of the AVR cut the dome of Mount Dent, and host the active von Damm hydrothermal system. Mount Dent also shows excess (>1km) uplift

  16. Seismic structure and segmentation of the axial valley of the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Avendonk, Harm J. A.; Hayman, Nicholas W.; Harding, Jennifer L.; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Peirce, Christine; Dannowski, Anke

    2017-06-01

    We report the results of a two-dimensional tomographic inversion of marine seismic refraction data from an array of ocean-bottom seismographs (OBSs), which produced an image of the crustal structure along the axial valley of the ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC). The seismic velocity model shows variations in the thickness and properties of the young oceanic crust that are consistent with the existence of two magmatic-tectonic segments along the 110 km long spreading center. Seismic wave speeds are consistent with exhumed mantle at the boundary between these two segments, but changes in the vertical gradient of seismic velocity suggest that volcanic crust occupies most of the axial valley seafloor along the seismic transect. The two spreading segments both have a low-velocity zone (LVZ) several kilometers beneath the seafloor, which may indicate the presence of shallow melt. However, the northern segment also has low seismic velocities (3 km/s) in a thick upper crustal layer (1.5-2.0 km), which we interpret as an extrusive volcanic section with high porosity and permeability. This segment hosts the Beebe vent field, the deepest known high-temperature black smoker hydrothermal vent system. In contrast, the southern spreading segment has seismic velocities as high as 4.0 km/s near the seafloor. We suggest that the porosity and permeability of the volcanic crust in the southern segment are much lower, thus limiting deep seawater penetration and hydrothermal recharge. This may explain why no hydrothermal vent system has been found in the southern half of the MCSC.

  17. MCR-1 and OXA-48 In Vivo Acquisition in KPC-Producing Escherichia coli after Colistin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Beyrouthy, Racha; Robin, Frederic; Lessene, Aude; Lacombat, Igor; Dortet, Laurent; Naas, Thierry; Ponties, Valérie; Bonnet, Richard

    2017-08-01

    The spread of mcr-1 -encoding plasmids into carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae raises concerns about the emergence of untreatable bacteria. We report the acquisition of mcr-1 in a carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli strain after a 3-week course of colistin in a patient repatriated to France from Portugal. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing E. coli strain acquired two plasmids, an IncL OXA-48-encoding plasmid and an IncX4 mcr-1 -encoding plasmid. This is the first report of mcr-1 in carbapenemase-encoding bacteria in France. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Structure of the catalytic domain of the colistin resistance enzyme MCR-1

    DOE PAGES

    Stojanoski, Vlatko; Sankaran, Banumathi; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; ...

    2016-09-21

    Due to the paucity of novel antibiotics, colistin has become a last resort antibiotic for treating multidrug resistant bacteria. Colistin acts by binding the lipid A component of lipopolysaccharides and subsequently disrupting the bacterial membrane. The recently identified plasmid-encoded MCR-1 enzyme is the first transmissible colistin resistance determinant and is a cause for concern for the spread of this resistance trait. MCR-1 is a phosphoethanolamine transferase that catalyzes the addition of phosphoethanolamine to lipid A to decrease colistin affinity. The structure of the catalytic domain of MCR-1 at 1.32 Å reveals the active site is similar to that of relatedmore » phosphoethanolamine transferases. The putative nucleophile for catalysis, threonine 285, is phosphorylated in cMCR-1 and a zinc is present at a conserved site in addition to three zincs more peripherally located in the active site. As noted for catalytic domains of other phosphoethanolamine transferases, binding sites for the lipid A and phosphatidylethanolamine substrates are not apparent in the cMCR-1 structure, suggesting that they are present in the membrane domain.« less

  19. Epiphyte communities on Thalassia testudinum from Grand Cayman, British West Indies: Their composition, structure, and contribution to lagoonal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corlett, Hilary; Jones, Brian

    2007-02-01

    Thalassia testudinum, the most common seagrass found in lagoons around Grand Cayman, influences sedimentation by baffling currents, binding sediment on the seafloor, and providing substrates for a diverse epiphytic biota. About 85% of the epiphytic biota is formed of at least 3 species of coralline algae, 72 species of foraminifera, and 61 species of diatoms. The rest of the biota is formed of sponges, gastropods, ostracods, coccoliths, dinoflagellates, brown algae, and worms. The epiphytes are organized in three communities that are part of an organized tripartite community succession. The basal diatom community is overlain by the coralline algae community, which is then overlain by a community composed of a variety of taxa. The coralline algae community, which is the most extensive, typically covers ˜ 75% of the leaf's surface. Potentially, the skeletons of these epiphytes can make a significant contribution to the fine-grained sediment budget of these lagoons. Surprisingly, only a few of the epiphytes were found in the lagoonal sediment. It appears, therefore, that the epiphytes are lost through skeletal dissolution or transported out of the lagoon following storms. Irrespective of the cause, the epiphytes do not form a significant part of the lagoon sediment in Grand Cayman.

  20. Prostate cancer screening by prostate-specific antigen (PSA); a relevant approach for the small population of the Cayman Islands.

    PubMed

    Jyoti, Shravana Kumar; Blacke, Camille; Patil, Pallavi; Amblihalli, Vibha P; Nicholson, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    The common tool for diagnosing prostate cancer is prostate-specific antigen (PSA), but the high sensitivity and low specificity of PSA testing are the problems in clinical practice. There are no proper guidelines to investigate the suspected prostate cancer in the Cayman Islands. We correlated PSA levels with the incidence of prostate cancers by tissue diagnosis and proposed logical protocol for prostate screening by using PSA test in this small population. A total of 165 Afro Caribbean individuals who had prostate biopsy done after the investigations for PSA levels from year 2005 to 2015 were studied retrospectively. The patients were divided into subgroups by baseline PSA levels as follows: <4, 4.1-10, 10.1-20, 20.1-50, 50.1-100, and >100 ng/mL and were correlated to the age and presence of cancer. Benign lesions had lower PSA levels compared to cancer which generally had higher values. Only three cases that had less than 4 ng/mg were turned out to be malignant. When PSA value was more than 100 ng/mL, all the cases were malignant. Between PSA values of 4-100 ng/mL, the probability of cancer diagnosis was 56.71% (76 cancers out of 134 in this range). Limitation of PSA testing has the risk of over diagnosis and the resultant negative biopsies owing to poor specificity. Whereas the cutoff limit for cancer diagnosis still remains 4 ng/mL from our study, most of the patients can be assured of benign lesion below this level and thus morbidity associated with the biopsy can be prevented. When the PSA value is greater than 100 ng, biopsy procedure was mandatory as there were 100% cancers above this level. On the background of vast literature linking PSA to prostate cancer and its difficulty in implementing in clinical practice, we studied literature of this conflicting and complex topic and tried to bring relevant protocols to the small population of Cayman Islands for the screening of prostate cancer. In this study, a total of 165 Afro Caribbean individuals who

  1. Geochemical and Rheological Constraints on the Dynamics of the Oceanic Upper Mantle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    405-412. 201 Dick, H. J. B., Natland, J., Party, L. . S., 1994. Melt transport and evolution in the shallow mantle beneath the East Pacific Rise ...in the shallow mantle beneath the East Pacific Rise . In: M6vel, C., Gillis, K. M., Allan, J. F., Meyer, P. S. (Eds.), Proceedings of the Ocean...according to ridge location: East Pacific Rise (EPR), Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR), Central Indian Ridge/Carlsberg Ridge (CIR/Carl), Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR

  2. Complete sequence of a colistin resistance gene (mcr-1) bearing isolate of Escherichia coli from the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transmissible colistin resistance conferred by mcr-1 gene bearing IncI2 plasmid has been recently reported in Esherichia coli in the US. We report the completed genome sequence of a second E. coli isolated from swine in the US that carried the mcr-1 gene on an IncI2 type plasmid....

  3. First Detection of an Escherichia coli Strain Harboring the mcr-1 Gene in Retail Domestic Chicken Meat in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohsaki, Yusuke; Hayashi, Wataru; Saito, Satomi; Osaka, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Yui; Koide, Shota; Kawamura, Kumiko; Nagano, Yukiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Nagano, Noriyuki

    2017-09-25

    Global spread of the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1 poses a challenge to public health because colistin is the last-line-of-defense against severe infections of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. In Japan, a few studies have reported the prevalence of mcr-1 among food animal-derived Escherichia coli isolates, but the prevalence of mcr-1 in retail meats is not well known. We report here the first detection of mcr-1 in retail chicken meat. A total of 70 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing E. coli isolates, recovered from retail chicken meats between August 2015 and June 2016, were screened for mcr-1. We found 1 CTX-M-1 beta-lactamase-producing E. coli isolate belonging to ST1684, phylogroup A. The mcr-1 gene was not located on an IncI1 plasmid encoding the bla CTX-M-1 gene. However, whole plasmid sequencing revealed that mcr-1 was located on an IncI2 plasmid. The sequences of the nikB-mcr-1-pap2-ydfA-topB region of the IncI2 plasmid in this study was almost identical to that of the previously described IncI2 plasmid, pECJS-61-63 present in E. coli isolated from pig feces in China, except for containing a synonymous mutation in the mcr-1 gene. Plasmid carrying the mcr-1 gene have not yet been identified in human isolates in Japan. Thus, strict monitoring or surveillance of colistin resistance among Gram-negative bacteria recovered from retail meat of food animals under colistin pressure, and humans, is crucial.

  4. Complete genetic analysis of plasmids carrying mcr-1 and other resistance genes in an Escherichia coli isolate of animal origin.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruichao; Xie, Miaomiao; Lv, Jingzhang; Wai-Chi Chan, Edward; Chen, Sheng

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the genetic features of three plasmids recovered from an MCR-1 and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli strain, HYEC7, and characterize the transmission mechanism of mcr-1 . The genetic profiles of three plasmids were determined by PCR, S1-PFGE, Southern hybridization and WGS analysis. The ability of the mcr-1 -bearing plasmid to undergo conjugation was also assessed. The mcr-1 -bearing transposon Tn 6330 was characterized by PCR and DNA sequencing. Complete sequences of three plasmids were obtained. A non-conjugative phage P7-like plasmid, pHYEC7- mcr1 , was found to harbour the mcr-1 -bearing transposon Tn 6330 , which could be excised from the plasmid by generating a circular intermediate harbouring mcr-1 and the IS Apl1 element. The insertion of the circular intermediate into another plasmid, pHYEC7-IncHI2, could form pHNSHP45-2, the original IncHI2-type mcr-1 -carrying plasmid that was reported. The third plasmid, pHYEC7-110, harboured two replicons, IncX1 and IncFIB, and comprised multiple antimicrobial resistance mobile elements, some of which were shared by pHYEC7-IncHI2. The Tn 6330 element located in the phage-like plasmid pHYEC7- mcr1 could be excised from the plasmid and formed a circular intermediate that could be integrated into plasmids containing the IS Apl1 element. This phenomenon indicated that Tn 6330 is a key element responsible for widespread dissemination of mcr-1 among various types of plasmids and bacterial chromosomes. The dissemination rate of such an element may be further enhanced upon translocation into phage-like vectors, which may also be transmitted via transduction events. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. mcr-1 Colistin Resistance in ESBL-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, France

    PubMed Central

    Maillet, Mylène; Pavese, Patricia; Francony, Gilles; Brion, Jean-Paul; Mallaret, Marie-Reine; Bonnet, Richard; Robin, Frédéric; Beyrouthy, Racha; Maurin, Max

    2017-01-01

    We report intestinal carriage of an extended-spectrum β-lactamase−producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strain with high-level resistance to colistin (MIC 24 mg/L) in a patient in France who had been hospitalized for fungal meningitis. The strain had the mcr-1 plasmid gene and an inactivated mgrB gene, which are associated with colistin resistance. PMID:28418313

  6. Prevalence of mcr-1 in U.S. food-animal cecal contents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A survey of 2003 cecal content samples from chickens, turkeys, cattle and swine at slaughter facilities in the United States was conducted to estimate the prevalence of mcr-1 gene conferring resistance to colistin in Enterobacteriaceae. Two samples from swine had Escherichia coli with IncI2 plasmids...

  7. Comprehensive resistome analysis reveals the prevalence of NDM and MCR-1 in Chinese poultry production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Rongmin; Li, Jiyun; Wu, Zuowei; Yin, Wenjuan; Schwarz, Stefan; Tyrrell, Jonathan M; Zheng, Yongjun; Wang, Shaolin; Shen, Zhangqi; Liu, Zhihai; Liu, Jianye; Lei, Lei; Li, Mei; Zhang, Qidi; Wu, Congming; Zhang, Qijing; Wu, Yongning; Walsh, Timothy R; Shen, Jianzhong

    2017-02-06

    By 2030, the global population will be 8.5 billion, placing pressure on international poultry production, of which China is a key producer 1 . From April 2017, China will implement the withdrawal of colistin as a growth promoter, removing over 8,000 tonnes per year from the Chinese farming sector 2 . To understand the impact of banning colistin and the epidemiology of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli (using bla NDM and mcr-1 as marker genes), we sampled poultry, dogs, sewage, wild birds and flies. Here, we show that mcr-1, but not bla NDM , is prevalent in hatcheries, but bla NDM quickly contaminates flocks through dogs, flies and wild birds. We also screened samples directly for resistance genes to understand the true breadth and depth of the environmental and animal resistome. Direct sample testing for bla NDM and mcr-1 in hatcheries, commercial farms, a slaughterhouse and supermarkets revealed considerably higher levels of positive samples than the bla NDM - and mcr-1-positive E. coli, indicating a substantial segment of unseen resistome-a phenomenon we have termed the 'phantom resistome'. Whole-genome sequencing identified common bla NDM -positive E. coli shared among farms, flies, dogs and farmers, providing direct evidence of carbapenem-resistant E. coli transmission and environmental contamination.

  8. Genomic Characterization of Nonclonal mcr-1-Positive Multidrug-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae from Clinical Samples in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Srijan, Apichai; Ruekit, Sirigade; Snesrud, Erik; Maybank, Rosslyn; Serichantalergs, Oralak; Kormanee, Rosarin; Sukhchat, Prawet; Sriyabhaya, Jossin; Hinkle, Mary; Crawford, John M.; McGann, Patrick; Swierczewski, Brett E.

    2018-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains are one of the most prevalent causes of nosocomial infections and pose an increasingly dangerous public health threat. The lack of remaining treatment options has resulted in the utilization of older drug classes, including colistin. As a drug of last resort, the discovery of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance by mcr-1 denotes the potential development of pandrug-resistant bacterial pathogens. To address the emergence of the mcr-1 gene, 118 gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae isolated from clinical samples collected at Queen Sirikit Naval Hospital in Chonburi, Thailand were screened for colistin resistance using automated antimicrobial susceptibility testing and conventional PCR screening. Two K. pneumoniae strains, QS17-0029 and QS17-0161, were positive for mcr-1, and both isolates were sequenced to closure using short- and long-read whole-genome sequencing. QS17-0029 carried 16 antibiotic resistance genes in addition to mcr-1, including 2 carbapenemases, blaNDM-1 and blaOXA-232. QS17-0161 carried 13 antibiotic resistance genes in addition to mcr-1, including the extended-spectrum β-lactamase blaCTX-M-55. Both isolates carried multiple plasmids, but mcr-1 was located alone on highly similar 33.9 Kb IncX4 plasmids in both isolates. The IncX4 plasmid shared considerable homology to other mcr-1-containing IncX4 plasmids. This is the first report of a clinical K. pneumoniae strain from Thailand carrying mcr-1 as well as the first strain to simultaneously carry mcr-1 and multiple carbapenemase genes (QS17-0029). The identification and characterization of these isolates serves to highlight the urgent need for continued surveillance and intervention in Southeast Asia, where extensively drug-resistant pathogens are being increasingly identified in hospital-associated infections. PMID:29688801

  9. Genomic Characterization of Nonclonal mcr-1-Positive Multidrug-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae from Clinical Samples in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srijan, Apichai; Margulieux, Katie R; Ruekit, Sirigade; Snesrud, Erik; Maybank, Rosslyn; Serichantalergs, Oralak; Kormanee, Rosarin; Sukhchat, Prawet; Sriyabhaya, Jossin; Hinkle, Mary; Crawford, John M; McGann, Patrick; Swierczewski, Brett E

    2018-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains are one of the most prevalent causes of nosocomial infections and pose an increasingly dangerous public health threat. The lack of remaining treatment options has resulted in the utilization of older drug classes, including colistin. As a drug of last resort, the discovery of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance by mcr-1 denotes the potential development of pandrug-resistant bacterial pathogens. To address the emergence of the mcr-1 gene, 118 gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae isolated from clinical samples collected at Queen Sirikit Naval Hospital in Chonburi, Thailand were screened for colistin resistance using automated antimicrobial susceptibility testing and conventional PCR screening. Two K. pneumoniae strains, QS17-0029 and QS17-0161, were positive for mcr-1, and both isolates were sequenced to closure using short- and long-read whole-genome sequencing. QS17-0029 carried 16 antibiotic resistance genes in addition to mcr-1, including 2 carbapenemases, bla NDM-1 and bla OXA-232 . QS17-0161 carried 13 antibiotic resistance genes in addition to mcr-1, including the extended-spectrum β-lactamase bla CTX-M-55 . Both isolates carried multiple plasmids, but mcr-1 was located alone on highly similar 33.9 Kb IncX4 plasmids in both isolates. The IncX4 plasmid shared considerable homology to other mcr-1-containing IncX4 plasmids. This is the first report of a clinical K. pneumoniae strain from Thailand carrying mcr-1 as well as the first strain to simultaneously carry mcr-1 and multiple carbapenemase genes (QS17-0029). The identification and characterization of these isolates serves to highlight the urgent need for continued surveillance and intervention in Southeast Asia, where extensively drug-resistant pathogens are being increasingly identified in hospital-associated infections.

  10. A perspective on two chemometrics tools: PCA and MCR, and introduction of a new one: Pattern recognition entropy (PRE), as applied to XPS and ToF-SIMS depth profiles of organic and inorganic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Shiladitya; Singh, Bhupinder; Diwan, Anubhav; Lee, Zheng Rong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Terry, Jeff; Tolley, H. Dennis; Gallagher, Neal B.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2018-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) are much used analytical techniques that provide information about the outermost atomic and molecular layers of materials. In this work, we discuss the application of multivariate spectral techniques, including principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate curve resolution (MCR), to the analysis of XPS and ToF-SIMS depth profiles. Multivariate analyses often provide insight into data sets that is not easily obtained in a univariate fashion. Pattern recognition entropy (PRE), which has its roots in Shannon's information theory, is also introduced. This approach is not the same as the mutual information/entropy approaches sometimes used in data processing. A discussion of the theory of each technique is presented. PCA, MCR, and PRE are applied to four different data sets obtained from: a ToF-SIMS depth profile through ca. 100 nm of plasma polymerized C3F6 on Si, a ToF-SIMS depth profile through ca. 100 nm of plasma polymerized PNIPAM (poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)) on Si, an XPS depth profile through a film of SiO2 on Si, and an XPS depth profile through a film of Ta2O5 on Ta. PCA, MCR, and PRE reveal the presence of interfaces in the films, and often indicate that the first few scans in the depth profiles are different from those that follow. PRE and backward difference PRE provide this information in a straightforward fashion. Rises in the PRE signals at interfaces suggest greater complexity to the corresponding spectra. Results from PCA, especially for the higher principal components, were sometimes difficult to understand. MCR analyses were generally more interpretable.

  11. Identification of a novel transposon-associated phosphoethanolamine transferase gene, mcr-5, conferring colistin resistance in d-tartrate fermenting Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi B.

    PubMed

    Borowiak, Maria; Fischer, Jennie; Hammerl, Jens A; Hendriksen, Rene S; Szabo, Istvan; Malorny, Burkhard

    2017-12-01

    Plasmid-mediated mobilized colistin resistance is currently known to be caused by phosphoethanolamine transferases termed MCR-1, MCR-2, MCR-3 and MCR-4. However, this study focuses on the dissection of a novel resistance mechanism in mcr-1-, mcr-2- and mcr-3-negative d-tartrate fermenting Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi B (Salmonella Paratyphi B dTa+) isolates with colistin MIC values >2 mg/L. A selected isolate from the strain collection of the German National Reference Laboratory for Salmonella was investigated by WGS and bioinformatical analysis to identify novel phosphoethanolamine transferase genes involved in colistin resistance. Subsequently PCR screening, S1-PFGE and DNA-DNA hybridization were performed to analyse the prevalence and location of the identified mcr-5 gene. Cloning and transformation experiments in Escherichia coli DH5α and Salmonella Paratyphi B dTa+ control strains were carried out and the activity of MCR-5 was determined in vitro by MIC testing. In this study, we identified a novel phosphoethanolamine transferase in 14 mcr-1-, mcr-2- and mcr-3-negative Salmonella Paratyphi B dTa+ isolates with colistin MIC values >2 mg/L that were received during 2011-13. The respective gene, further termed as mcr-5 (1644 bp), is part of a 7337 bp transposon of the Tn3 family and usually located on related multi-copy ColE-type plasmids. Interestingly, in one isolate an additional subclone with a chromosomal location of the mcr-5 transposon was observed. Our findings suggest that the transfer of colistin-resistance-mediating phosphoethanolamine transferase genes from bacterial chromosomes to mobile genetic elements has occurred in multiple independent events raising concern regarding their variety, prevalence and impact on public health. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. A study to assess the usage of MCR footwear in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Lal, Vivek; Sarkar, Debajit; Das, Sukumar; Mahato, Mukunda; Srinivas, Govindrajulu

    2015-09-01

    The routine use of appropriate footwear is an important intervention to prevent disability in leprosy. We conducted a study to assess utilisation of MCR footwear and observe the condition of footwear. Fifty-six persons affected by leprosy who had been provided MCR footwear in the preceding 3 years were paid home visit and administered a semi-structured interview schedule. Although a total of 30 participants reported using special footwear currently, only 10 reported usage during participation in social events. On observation, 16 pairs were found to be in an unusable condition owing to foot deformity and another 14 pairs in poor condition. In order to ensure greater utilisation of special footwear, the National Programme may seek local solutions through engagement of cobblers and shoemakers with appropriate training in customisation. Persons affected by leprosy should be empowered to appreciate the benefits of special footwear and to take care of themselves, including taking responsibility for using their footwear.

  13. Genomic and Molecular Characterization of Clinical Isolates of Enterobacteriaceae Harboring mcr-1 in Colombia, 2002 to 2016.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Sandra Yamile; Diaz, Lorena; Wiesner, Magdalena; Correa, Adriana; Arévalo, Stefany Alejandra; Reyes, Jinnethe; Hidalgo, Andrea Melissa; de la Cadena, Elsa; Perenguez, Marcela; Montaño, Lucy Angeline; Ardila, Javier; Ríos, Rafael; Ovalle, María Victoria; Díaz, Paula; Porras, Paola; Villegas, Maria V; Arias, Cesar A; Beltrán, Mauricio; Duarte, Carolina

    2017-12-01

    Polymyxins are last-resort antimicrobial agents used to treat infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae Due to the worldwide dissemination of polymyxin resistance in animal and human isolates, we aimed to characterize polymyxin resistance associated with the presence of mcr-1 in Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermenter Gram-negative bacilli, using isolates collected retrospectively in Colombia from 2002 to 2016. A total of 5,887 Gram-negative clinical isolates were studied, and 513 were found to be resistant to the polymyxins. Susceptibility to colistin was confirmed by broth microdilution for all mcr-1 -positive isolates, and these were further subjected to whole-genome sequencing (WGS). The localization of mcr-1 was confirmed by S1 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (S1-PFGE) and CeuI-PFGE hybridization. Transferability was evaluated by mating assays. A total of 12 colistin-resistant isolates recovered after 2013 harbored mcr-1 , including 8 Escherichia coli , 3 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate . E. coli isolates were unrelated by PFGE and belonged to 7 different sequence types (STs) and phylogroups. S Typhimurium and K. pneumoniae isolates belonged to ST34 and ST307, respectively. The mcr-1 gene was plasmid borne in all isolates but two E. coli isolates which harbored it on the chromosome. Conjugation of mcr-1 was successful in 8 of 10 isolates (8.2 × 10 -5 to 2.07 × 10 -1 cell per recipient). Plasmid sequences showed that the mcr-1 plasmids belonged to four different Inc groups (a new IncP-1 variant and the IncFII, IncHI1, and IncH families). Our results indicate that mcr-1 is circulating in clinical isolates of colistin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Colombia and is mainly harbored in transferable plasmids. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Genomic and Molecular Characterization of Clinical Isolates of Enterobacteriaceae Harboring mcr-1 in Colombia, 2002 to 2016

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Lorena; Wiesner, Magdalena; Correa, Adriana; Arévalo, Stefany Alejandra; Reyes, Jinnethe; Hidalgo, Andrea Melissa; de la Cadena, Elsa; Perenguez, Marcela; Montaño, Lucy Angeline; Ardila, Javier; Ríos, Rafael; Ovalle, María Victoria; Díaz, Paula; Porras, Paola; Villegas, Maria V.; Arias, Cesar A.; Beltrán, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polymyxins are last-resort antimicrobial agents used to treat infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Due to the worldwide dissemination of polymyxin resistance in animal and human isolates, we aimed to characterize polymyxin resistance associated with the presence of mcr-1 in Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermenter Gram-negative bacilli, using isolates collected retrospectively in Colombia from 2002 to 2016. A total of 5,887 Gram-negative clinical isolates were studied, and 513 were found to be resistant to the polymyxins. Susceptibility to colistin was confirmed by broth microdilution for all mcr-1-positive isolates, and these were further subjected to whole-genome sequencing (WGS). The localization of mcr-1 was confirmed by S1 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (S1-PFGE) and CeuI-PFGE hybridization. Transferability was evaluated by mating assays. A total of 12 colistin-resistant isolates recovered after 2013 harbored mcr-1, including 8 Escherichia coli, 3 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate. E. coli isolates were unrelated by PFGE and belonged to 7 different sequence types (STs) and phylogroups. S. Typhimurium and K. pneumoniae isolates belonged to ST34 and ST307, respectively. The mcr-1 gene was plasmid borne in all isolates but two E. coli isolates which harbored it on the chromosome. Conjugation of mcr-1 was successful in 8 of 10 isolates (8.2 × 10−5 to 2.07 × 10−1 cell per recipient). Plasmid sequences showed that the mcr-1 plasmids belonged to four different Inc groups (a new IncP-1 variant and the IncFII, IncHI1, and IncH families). Our results indicate that mcr-1 is circulating in clinical isolates of colistin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Colombia and is mainly harbored in transferable plasmids. PMID:28893788

  15. Barrier layer for a MCrAlY basecoat superalloy combination

    DOEpatents

    Sabol, Stephen M.; Goedjen, John G.; Vance, Steven J.

    2001-01-01

    A turbine component contains a substrate (22) such as a superalloy, a basecoat (24) of the type MCrAlY, and a continuous barrier layer (28) between the substrate and basecoat, where the barrier layer (28) is made of an alloy of (Re, Ta, Ru, Os)X, where X can be Ni, Co or their mixture, where the barrier layer is at least 2 micrometers thick and substantially prevents materials from both the basecoat and substrate from migrating through it.

  16. mcr-1−Harboring Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Sequence Type 34 in Pigs, China

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Linxian; Wang, Jing; Gao, Yanling; Liu, Yiyun; Doi, Yohei; Wu, Renjie; Zeng, Zhenling; Liang, Zisen

    2017-01-01

    We detected the mcr-1 gene in 21 (14.8%) Salmonella isolates from pigs at slaughter; 19 were serovar Typhimurium sequence type 34. The gene was located on IncHI2-like plasmids that also harbored IncF replicons and lacked a conjugative transfer region. These findings highlight the need to prevent further spread of colistin resistance in animals and humans. PMID:28098547

  17. McrEngine: A Scalable Checkpointing System Using Data-Aware Aggregation and Compression

    DOE PAGES

    Islam, Tanzima Zerin; Mohror, Kathryn; Bagchi, Saurabh; ...

    2013-01-01

    High performance computing (HPC) systems use checkpoint-restart to tolerate failures. Typically, applications store their states in checkpoints on a parallel file system (PFS). As applications scale up, checkpoint-restart incurs high overheads due to contention for PFS resources. The high overheads force large-scale applications to reduce checkpoint frequency, which means more compute time is lost in the event of failure. We alleviate this problem through a scalable checkpoint-restart system, mcrEngine. McrEngine aggregates checkpoints from multiple application processes with knowledge of the data semantics available through widely-used I/O libraries, e.g., HDF5 and netCDF, and compresses them. Our novel scheme improves compressibility ofmore » checkpoints up to 115% over simple concatenation and compression. Our evaluation with large-scale application checkpoints show that mcrEngine reduces checkpointing overhead by up to 87% and restart overhead by up to 62% over a baseline with no aggregation or compression.« less

  18. Presence of mcr-1-positive Enterobacteriaceae in retail chicken meat but not in humans in the Netherlands since 2009.

    PubMed

    Kluytmans-van den Bergh, Marjolein F; Huizinga, Pepijn; Bonten, Marc J; Bos, Martine; De Bruyne, Katrien; Friedrich, Alexander W; Rossen, John W; Savelkoul, Paul H; Kluytmans, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene mcr-1 was found in Enterobacteriaceae from humans, pigs and retail meat in China. Several reports have documented global presence of the gene in Enterobacteriaceae from humans, food animals and food since. We screened several well-characterised strain collections of Enterobacteriaceae, obtained from retail chicken meat and hospitalised patients in the Netherlands between 2009 and 2015, for presence of colistin resistance and the mcr-1 gene. A total of 2,471 Enterobacteriaceae isolates, from surveys in retail chicken meat (196 isolates), prevalence surveys in hospitalised patients (1,247 isolates), clinical cultures (813 isolates) and outbreaks in healthcare settings (215 isolates), were analysed. The mcr-1 gene was identified in three (1.5%) of 196 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolates from retail chicken meat samples in 2009 and 2014. Two isolates were obtained from the same batch of meat samples, most likely representing contamination from a common source. No mcr-1-positive isolates were identified among 2,275 human isolates tested. All mcr-1-positive isolates were colistin-resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) > 2 mg/L). Our findings indicate that mcr-1-based colistin-resistance currently poses no threat to healthcare in the Netherlands. They indicate however that continued monitoring of colistin resistance and its underlying mechanisms in humans, livestock and food is needed.

  19. A New Look at the Bathymetric and Potential-Field Structure of the Cayman Trough via CaySEIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, N. W.; Harding, J.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Peirce, C.; Grevemeyer, I.; Dannowski, A.; Papenberg, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Cayman Trough (CT) has one of the world's deepest axial valleys, thinnest crust, end-member basalt composition, and slowest spreading rate. Accommodating motion between the North American and Caribbean plates, and the Gonave microplate, marine magnetic anomalies show that the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC) has been spreading at ~15 mm/yr (F.R.) since 20 Ma, if not 49 Ma. At a little over 100 km in length, the MCSC is now recognized to host oceanic core complexes (OCCs), hydrothermal vents, and a seafloor of variably distributed lower crustal gabbros, upper mantle peridotite/serpentinite, and basaltic lavas. Though spreading rate appears to be relatively symmetric over geologic time, the structure of the CT is quite asymmetric, with a broad region of low gravity and somewhat lineated magnetic anomalies to the east, and gravity highs and irregular magnetic anomalies to the west. Until now it has been difficult to further assess the nature of the CT because of the sparse and generally old data from the region; the CT's claim on thinnest crust, for example, stems primarily from pre-1960's seismic data and inferences from satellite gravity. The CaySEIS active-source OBS-experiment on the R/V Meteor thus set out in April of 2015 to provide a more complete, deeper view of the CT. A serendipitous discovery during the expedition is that the off-axis seafloor is characterized by curvilinear ridges preserving what appear to be dismembered OCCs. Thus, a previously proposed model based on the oblique volcanic ridge to the south of the axial OCC, Mt. Dent, could also apply to the geologic history of the CT. This model, which we call "the magmatic cleaver", envisions how intrusions cut the OCC surfaces and raft the hanging-wall-dominated portion of the OCC to the east, and the footwall-dominated portion to the west. The "cleaver" appears to have been operating over at least the last 20 Ma, illustrating how melt flow in ultraslow-spread crust can create distinctive

  20. Longitudinal study on the occurrence in pigs of colistin-resistant Escherichia coli carrying mcr-1 following the cessation of use of colistin.

    PubMed

    Randall, L P; Horton, R A; Lemma, F; Martelli, F; Duggett, N A D; Smith, R P; Kirchner, M J; Ellis, R J; Rogers, J P; Williamson, S M; Simons, R R L; Brena, C M; Evans, S J; Anjum, M F; Teale, C J

    2018-05-09

    In 2015, colistin-resistant Escherichia coli and Salmonella with the mcr-1 gene were isolated from a pig farm in Great Britain. Pigs were subsequently monitored over a ~20-month period for the occurrence of mcr-1-mediated colistin resistance and the risk of mcr-1 E. coli entering the food chain was assessed. Pig faeces and slurry were cultured for colistin-resistant E. coli and Salmonella, tested for the mcr-1 gene by PCR and selected isolates were further analysed. Seventy-eight per cent of faecal samples (n = 275) from pigs yielded mcr-1 E. coli after selective culture, but in positive samples only 0·2-1·3% of the total E. coli carried mcr-1. Twenty months after the initial sampling, faecal samples (n = 59) were negative for E. coli carrying mcr-1. The risk to public health from porcine E. coli carrying mcr-1 was assessed as very low. Twenty months after cessation of colistin use, E. coli carrying mcr-1 was not detected in pig faeces on a farm where it was previously present. The results suggest that cessation of colistin use may help over time to reduce or possibly eliminate mcr-1 E. coli on pig farms where it occurs. © 2018 Crown copyright. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Copernicus Rising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Michael A.

    2007-08-01

    Copernicus Rising began as a historical biography when it was first conceived, but as the writing progressed it quickly became a rather absurd play that took historical research and twisted it through the lens of my own wit, philosophy and personal affection for the characters. When working with historical figures--characters who existed in a very tangible way in our own history--the playwriting process opens a dialogue between different points in time and space. The difficulty lies in finding a unique and clear voice amongst the discordant personalities involved in this time and space overlap, both in the writing and production processes, in order to get to the heart of what the play is really all about. This thesis follows the journey of the play from its historical roots through the creation of an absurd journey both insides and outside time, space and the human mind. The first part of the thesis explains the beginnings of the concept and outlines much of the research and development that went into the play. The next part outlines the process of production and integrating the world on paper with that of moving bodies on stage. In the final part, post-production discussions and audience feedback sessions shape the play into the draft included in this thesis.

  2. Europa Rising

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    New Horizons took this image of the icy moon Europa rising above Jupiter's cloud tops with its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at 11:48 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, six hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter.

    The picture was one of a handful of the Jupiter system that New Horizons took primarily for artistic, rather than scientific, value. This particular scene was suggested by space enthusiast Richard Hendricks of Austin, Texas, in response to an Internet request by New Horizons scientists for evocative, artistic imaging opportunities at Jupiter.

    The spacecraft was 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from Jupiter and 3 million kilometers (1.8 million miles) from Europa when the picture was taken. Europa's diameter is 3,120 kilometers (1,939 miles). The image is centered on Europa coordinates 5 degrees south, 6 degrees west. In keeping with its artistic intent - and to provide a more dramatic perspective - the image has been rotated so south is at the top.

  3. Environmental emission of multiresistant Escherichia coli carrying the colistin resistance gene mcr-1 from German swine farms.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Sebastian; Falgenhauer, Linda; Semmler, Torsten; Imirzalioglu, Can; Chakraborty, Trinad; Roesler, Uwe; Roschanski, Nicole

    2017-05-01

    Pigs have been the focus of the worldwide spread of colistin resistance. However, there is little information on the transmission of mcr-1 -containing bacteria into the environment of pig farms. We therefore rescreened environmental Escherichia coli isolates from the surrounding farm areas of three previously mcr-1 -positive swine herds in Germany. Thirty-five mixed bacterial cultures obtained from boot swabs, flies, dog faeces and manure from three pig farms in Germany in 2011-12 were non-selectively recultivated and the presence of the mcr-1 gene was checked by real-time PCR. After separation, single E. coli colonies were subsequently isolated and the presence of mcr-1 was confirmed by PCR and sequencing. In addition, phenotypic antimicrobial resistance screening and WGS followed by phylogenetic analysis and resistance genotyping as well as plasmid typing were performed. Seven mcr-1 -positive E. coli strains originating from environmental boot swabs, dog faeces, stable flies and manure were found. The isolates belonged to five different STs (ST10, ST1011, ST1140, ST5281 and ST342) and harboured extensive additional resistance genes. Comparative plasmid analysis predominantly located mcr-1 on IncX4 plasmids, which are strongly related to a recently described plasmid of human clinical origin (pICBEC72Hmcr). WGS-based analysis of the environmental E. coli isolates of farm surroundings showed clear links to mcr-1 -harbouring E. coli recovered from pig production in Europe as well as from human clinical isolates worldwide, presenting another piece of the puzzle, which further complicates the rapidly evolving epidemiology of plasmid-mediated colistin-resistant E. coli strains. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Detection of the plasmid-mediated colistin-resistance gene mcr-1 in faecal metagenomes of Dutch travellers.

    PubMed

    von Wintersdorff, Christian J H; Wolffs, Petra F G; van Niekerk, Julius M; Beuken, Erik; van Alphen, Lieke B; Stobberingh, Ellen E; Oude Lashof, Astrid M L; Hoebe, Christian J P A; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Penders, John

    2016-12-01

    Recently, the first plasmid-mediated colistin-resistance gene, mcr-1, was reported. Colistin is increasingly used as an antibiotic of last resort for the treatment of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant bacteria, which have been rapidly disseminating worldwide in recent years. The reported carriage rate of mcr-1 in humans remains sporadic thus far, except for those reported in Chinese populations. We aimed to determine its presence in the faecal metagenomes of healthy Dutch travellers between 2010 and 2012. Faecal metagenomic DNA of pre- and post-travel samples from 122 healthy Dutch long-distance travellers was screened for the presence of mcr-1 using a TaqMan quantitative PCR assay, which was designed in this study. All positive samples were confirmed by sequencing of the amplicons. The mcr-1 gene was detected in 6 (4.9%, 95% CI = 2.1%-10.5%) of 122 healthy Dutch long-distance travellers after they had visited destinations in South(-east) Asia or southern Africa between 2011 and 2012. One of these participants was already found to be positive before travel. Our study highlights the potential of PCR-based targeted metagenomics as an unbiased and sensitive method to screen for the carriage of the mcr-1 gene and suggests that mcr-1 is widespread in various parts of the world. The observation that one participant was found to be positive before travel suggests that mcr-1 may already have disseminated to the microbiomes of Dutch residents at a low prevalence, warranting a more extensive investigation of its prevalence in the general population and possible sources. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Partial gene sequences for the A subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrI) as a phylogenetic tool for the family Methanosarcinaceae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, E.; Sachs, M. S.; Woese, C. R.; Boone, D. R.

    1995-01-01

    Representatives of the family Methanosarcinaceae were analyzed phylogenetically by comparing partial sequences of their methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrI) genes. A 490-bp fragment from the A subunit of the gene was selected, amplified by the PCR, cloned, and sequenced for each of 25 strains belonging to the Methanosarcinaceae. The sequences obtained were aligned with the corresponding portions of five previously published sequences, and all of the sequences were compared to determine phylogenetic distances by Fitch distance matrix methods. We prepared analogous trees based on 16S rRNA sequences; these trees corresponded closely to the mcrI trees, although the mcrI sequences of pairs of organisms had 3.01 +/- 0.541 times more changes than the respective pairs of 16S rRNA sequences, suggesting that the mcrI fragment evolved about three times more rapidly than the 16S rRNA gene. The qualitative similarity of the mcrI and 16S rRNA trees suggests that transfer of genetic information between dissimilar organisms has not significantly affected these sequences, although we found inconsistencies between some mcrI distances that we measured and and previously published DNA reassociation data. It is unlikely that multiple mcrI isogenes were present in the organisms that we examined, because we found no major discrepancies in multiple determinations of mcrI sequences from the same organism. Our primers for the PCR also match analogous sites in the previously published mcrII sequences, but all of the sequences that we obtained from members of the Methanosarcinaceae were more closely related to mcrI sequences than to mcrII sequences, suggesting that members of the Methanosarcinaceae do not have distinct mcrII genes.

  6. Polymyxin Combinations Combat Escherichia coli Harboring mcr-1 and blaNDM-5: Preparation for a Postantibiotic Era.

    PubMed

    Bulman, Zackery P; Chen, Liang; Walsh, Thomas J; Satlin, Michael J; Qian, Yuli; Bulitta, Jürgen B; Peloquin, Charles A; Holden, Patricia N; Nation, Roger L; Li, Jian; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Tsuji, Brian T

    2017-07-25

    The rapid increase of carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative bacteria has resurrected the importance of the polymyxin antibiotics. The recent discovery of plasmid-mediated polymyxin resistance ( mcr - 1 ) in carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae serves as an important indicator that the golden era of antibiotics is under serious threat. We assessed the bacterial killing of 15 different FDA-approved antibiotics alone and in combination with polymyxin B in time-killing experiments against Escherichia coli MCR1_NJ, the first reported isolate in the United States to coharbor mcr-1 and a New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase gene ( bla NDM-5 ). The most promising regimens were advanced to the hollow-fiber infection model (HFIM), where human pharmacokinetics for polymyxin B, aztreonam, and amikacin were simulated over 240 h. Exposure to polymyxin B monotherapy was accompanied by MCR1_NJ regrowth but not resistance amplification (polymyxin B MIC from 0 to 240 h [MIC 0h to MIC 240h ] of 4 mg/liter), whereas amikacin monotherapy caused regrowth and simultaneous resistance amplification (amikacin MIC 0h of 4 mg/liter versus MIC 240h of >64 mg/liter). No MCR1_NJ colonies were observed for any of the aztreonam-containing regimens after 72 h. However, HFIM cartridges for both aztreonam monotherapy and the polymyxin B-plus-aztreonam regimen were remarkably turbid, and the presence of long, filamentous MCR1_NJ cells was evident in scanning electron microscopy, suggestive of a nonreplicating persister (NRP) phenotype. In contrast, the 3-drug combination of polymyxin B, aztreonam, and amikacin provided complete eradication (>8-log 10 CFU/ml reduction) with suppression of resistance and prevention of NRP formation. This is the first comprehensive pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study to evaluate triple-drug combinations for polymyxin- and carbapenem-resistant E. coli coproducing MCR-1 and NDM-5 and will aid in the preparation for a so-called "postantibiotic" era. IMPORTANCE A global

  7. Subsurface Pressure-Temperature Conditions and H2(aq) Generation at the Piccard Hydro-Thermal Field, Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, P. P.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2018-05-01

    The subsurface pressure-temperature conditions at the Piccard hydrothermal field are constrained using the Si-Cl geothermobarometer. Ol-Mgt and Opx-Mgt are proposed as assemblages that buffer H2(aq) at Piccard.

  8. mcrA-Targeted Real-Time Quantitative PCR Method To Examine Methanogen Communities▿

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Lisa M.; Regan, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Methanogens are of great importance in carbon cycling and alternative energy production, but quantitation with culture-based methods is time-consuming and biased against methanogen groups that are difficult to cultivate in a laboratory. For these reasons, methanogens are typically studied through culture-independent molecular techniques. We developed a SYBR green I quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to quantify total numbers of methyl coenzyme M reductase α-subunit (mcrA) genes. TaqMan probes were also designed to target nine different phylogenetic groups of methanogens in qPCR assays. Total mcrA and mcrA levels of different methanogen phylogenetic groups were determined from six samples: four samples from anaerobic digesters used to treat either primarily cow or pig manure and two aliquots from an acidic peat sample stored at 4°C or 20°C. Only members of the Methanosaetaceae, Methanosarcina, Methanobacteriaceae, and Methanocorpusculaceae and Fen cluster were detected in the environmental samples. The three samples obtained from cow manure digesters were dominated by members of the genus Methanosarcina, whereas the sample from the pig manure digester contained detectable levels of only members of the Methanobacteriaceae. The acidic peat samples were dominated by both Methanosarcina spp. and members of the Fen cluster. In two of the manure digester samples only one methanogen group was detected, but in both of the acidic peat samples and two of the manure digester samples, multiple methanogen groups were detected. The TaqMan qPCR assays were successfully able to determine the environmental abundance of different phylogenetic groups of methanogens, including several groups with few or no cultivated members. PMID:19447957

  9. An enzyme-free homogenous electrochemical assay for sensitive detection of the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene mcr-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Chai, Zhixin; Yan, Xiaohui; Liu, Chunchen; Situ, Bo; Zhang, Ye; Pan, Weilun; Luo, Shihua; Liu, Jianhua; Zheng, Lei

    2018-05-22

    Antibiotic resistance associated with the mcr-1 gene of Gram-negative bacteria, which confers resistance to drugs of last resort and has the potential to spread via plasmids, is one of the most pressing issues facing global health today. Point-of-care testing for the mcr-1 gene is needed to aid in the identification of colistin resistance in the field and to control its horizontal transmission. Here, we report the successful development of an enzyme-free homogenous electrochemical strategy for sensitive detection of the antibiotic resistance gene mcr-1 using the hybridization chain reaction and mcr-1-specific toehold probe. The long double-stranded DNA polymer produced using this strategy could be detected by assessing the diffusion of methylene blue towards the surface of a screen-printed gold electrode. Under optimized conditions, a linear relationship was observed between the variation of peak current and the natural logarithm of the mcr-1 gene concentration in the range of 1 nM to 1 μM with a detection limit of 0.78 nM (S/N = 3). This enzyme-free, isothermal platform is a rapid, portable, disposable, and sensitive method for detection of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance.

  10. Global phylogenetic analysis of Escherichia coli and plasmids carrying the mcr-1 gene indicates bacterial diversity but plasmid restriction.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, Sébastien; van Hattem, Jarne M; Arcilla, Maris S; Willemse, Niels; Melles, Damian C; Penders, John; Vinh, Trung Nguyen; Thi Hoa, Ngo; de Jong, Menno D; Schultsz, Constance

    2017-11-10

    To understand the dynamics behind the worldwide spread of the mcr-1 gene, we determined the population structure of Escherichia coli and of mobile genetic elements (MGEs) carrying the mcr-1 gene. After a systematic review of the literature we included 65 E. coli whole genome sequences (WGS), adding 6 recently sequenced travel related isolates, and 312 MLST profiles. We included 219 MGEs described in 7 Enterobacteriaceae species isolated from human, animal and environmental samples. Despite a high overall diversity, 2 lineages were observed in the E. coli population that may function as reservoirs of the mcr-1 gene, the largest of which was linked to ST10, a sequence type known for its ubiquity in human faecal samples and in food samples. No genotypic clustering by geographical origin or isolation source was observed. Amongst a total of 13 plasmid incompatibility types, the IncI2, IncX4 and IncHI2 plasmids accounted for more than 90% of MGEs carrying the mcr-1 gene. We observed significant geographical clustering with regional spread of IncHI2 plasmids in Europe and IncI2 in Asia. These findings point towards promiscuous spread of the mcr-1 gene by efficient horizontal gene transfer dominated by a limited number of plasmid incompatibility types.

  11. Comparative Riftology: Insights into the Evolution of Passive Continental Margins and Continental Rifts from the Failed Midcontinent Rift (MCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elling, R. P.; Stein, C. A.; Stein, S.; Kley, J.; Keller, G. R.; Wysession, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Continental rifts evolve to seafloor spreading and are preserved in passive margins, or fail and remain as fossil features in continents. Rifts at different stages give insight into these evolutionary paths. Of particular interest is the evolution of volcanic passive margins, which are characterized by seaward dipping reflectors, volcanic rocks yielding magnetic anomalies landward of the oldest spreading anomalies, and are underlain by high-velocity lower crustal bodies. How and when these features form remains unclear. Insights are given by the Midcontinent Rift (MCR), which began to form during the 1.1 Ga rifting of Amazonia from Laurentia, but failed when seafloor spreading was established elsewhere. MCR volcanics are much thicker than other continental flood basalts, due to deposition in a narrow rift rather than a broad region, giving a rift's geometry but a LIP's magma volume. The MCR provides a snapshot of the deposition of a thick and highly magnetized volcanic section during rifting. Surface exposures and reflection seismic data near Lake Superior show a rift basin filled by inward-dipping flood basalt layers. Had the rift evolved to seafloor spreading, the basin would have split into two sets of volcanics with opposite-facing SDRs, each with a magnetic anomaly. Because the rift formed as a series of alternating half-grabens, structural asymmetries between conjugate margins would have naturally occurred had it gone to completion. Hence the MCR implies that many passive margin features form prior to seafloor spreading. Massive inversion of the MCR long after it failed has provided a much clearer picture of its structure compared to failed rifts with lesser degrees of inversion. Seismic imaging as well as gravity and magnetic modeling provide important insight into the effects of inversion on failed rifts. The MCR provides an end member for the evolution of actively extending rifts, characterized by upwelling mantle and negative gravity anomalies, to failed

  12. Microbial trophic interactions and mcrA gene expression in monitoring of anaerobic digesters

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alejandra; Montañez-Hernández, Lilia E.; Palacio-Molina, Sandra L.; Oropeza-Navarro, Ricardo; Luévanos-Escareño, Miriam P.; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a biological process where different trophic groups of microorganisms break down biodegradable organic materials in the absence of oxygen. A wide range of AD technologies is being used to convert livestock manure, municipal and industrial wastewaters, and solid organic wastes into biogas. AD gains importance not only because of its relevance in waste treatment but also because of the recovery of carbon in the form of methane, which is a renewable energy and is used to generate electricity and heat. Despite the advances on the engineering and design of new bioreactors for AD, the microbiology component always poses challenges. Microbiology of AD processes is complicated as the efficiency of the process depends on the interactions of various trophic groups involved. Due to the complex interdependence of microbial activities for the functionality of the anaerobic bioreactors, the genetic expression of mcrA, which encodes a key enzyme in methane formation, is proposed as a parameter to monitor the process performance in real time. This review evaluates the current knowledge on microbial groups, their interactions, and their relationship to the performance of anaerobic biodigesters with a focus on using mcrA gene expression as a tool to monitor the process. PMID:25429286

  13. Microbial trophic interactions and mcrA gene expression in monitoring of anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Alejandra; Montañez-Hernández, Lilia E; Palacio-Molina, Sandra L; Oropeza-Navarro, Ricardo; Luévanos-Escareño, Miriam P; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a biological process where different trophic groups of microorganisms break down biodegradable organic materials in the absence of oxygen. A wide range of AD technologies is being used to convert livestock manure, municipal and industrial wastewaters, and solid organic wastes into biogas. AD gains importance not only because of its relevance in waste treatment but also because of the recovery of carbon in the form of methane, which is a renewable energy and is used to generate electricity and heat. Despite the advances on the engineering and design of new bioreactors for AD, the microbiology component always poses challenges. Microbiology of AD processes is complicated as the efficiency of the process depends on the interactions of various trophic groups involved. Due to the complex interdependence of microbial activities for the functionality of the anaerobic bioreactors, the genetic expression of mcrA, which encodes a key enzyme in methane formation, is proposed as a parameter to monitor the process performance in real time. This review evaluates the current knowledge on microbial groups, their interactions, and their relationship to the performance of anaerobic biodigesters with a focus on using mcrA gene expression as a tool to monitor the process.

  14. Impact of food animal trade on the spread of mcr-1-mediated colistin resistance, Tunisia, July 2015.

    PubMed

    Grami, Raoudha; Mansour, Wejdene; Mehri, Wahib; Bouallègue, Olfa; Boujaâfar, Noureddine; Madec, Jean-Yves; Haenni, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    We report a high prevalence of MCR-1 and CTX-M-1-producing Escherichia coli in three Tunisian chicken farms. Chickens were imported from France or derived from French imported chicks. The same IncHI2-type plasmid reported to carry those genes in cattle in France and in a food sample in Portugal was found in Tunisian chickens of French origin. This suggests a significant impact of food animal trade on the spread of mcr-1-mediated colistin resistance in Europe.

  15. Wide-Angle Refraction Tomographic Inversion of Mid Cayman Spreading Center and its Oceanic Core Complex, CaySEIS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, J.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Hayman, N. W.; Grevemeyer, I.; Peirce, C.; Dannowski, A.; Papenberg, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The CaySEIS experiment, conducted in April 2015, is a multi-national collaborative seismic study of the Mid Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC), an ultra-slow spreading center [15 mm/yr fr] in the Caribbean Sea. Ultra-slow spreading centers are thought to have very thin crust and a paucity of magmatism due to cooler mantle conditions. However, the suggestion that gabbro-cored oceanic core complexes (OCCs), volcanic deposits, and multiple layers of hydrothermal vents are widespread in the MCSC and other ultra-slow spreading centers has led to questions about the relationship between seafloor spreading rates and magmatism. To investigate this further, we conducted the CaySEIS experiment, with five wide-angle seismic refraction lines parallel and perpendicular to the neovolcanic zone. This analysis is based on two east-west oriented 100-km-long seismic refraction lines, which were each occupied by 18 ocean bottom seismometers. Line 2 lies across the central MCSC and an OCC called Mt. Dent. Line 3 crosses the northern end of the MCSC near the Oriente Transform Zone. With the wide-angle OBS data we can image the seismic velocity structure of Mt. Dent and distinguish between two models of OCCs - either Mt. Dent is composed of mostly gabbro with peridotite lenses identified by a low velocity gradient, or it is composed of mostly peridotite with gabbroic bodies identified by a constant velocity gradient. The crustal structure of both lines gives more insight into the asymmetry of the MCSC and the style of seafloor spreading to the east vs. the west. The 2-D velocity models reveal Mt. Dent has thick crust of 8 km with a low velocity gradient, supporting the magmatic gabbroic origin of OCCs. The surrounding crust to the west of the MCSC is highly variable, with areas of very thin crust. The crust to the east of the MCSC has an approximately constant thickness of 4 km. The development of OCCs may contribute to the crustal heterogeneity of ultra-slow spreading centers.

  16. mcrA Gene abundance correlates with hydrogenotrophic methane production rates in full-scale anaerobic waste treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Morris, R L; Tale, V P; Mathai, P P; Zitomer, D H; Maki, J S

    2016-02-01

    Anaerobic treatment is a sustainable and economical technology for waste stabilization and production of methane as a renewable energy. However, the process is under-utilized due to operational challenges. Organic overload or toxicants can stress the microbial community that performs waste degradation, resulting in system failure. In addition, not all methanogenic microbial communities are equally capable of consistent, maximum biogas production. Opinion varies as to which parameters should be used to monitor the fitness of digester biomass. No standard molecular tools are currently in use to monitor and compare full-scale operations. It was hypothesized that determining the number of gene copies of mcrA, a methanogen-specific gene, would positively correlate with specific methanogenic activity (SMA) rates from biomass samples from six full-scale anaerobic digester systems. Positive correlations were observed between mcrA gene copy numbers and methane production rates against H2  : CO2 and propionate (R(2)  = 0·67-0·70, P < 0·05) but not acetate (R(2)  = 0·49, P > 0·05). Results from this study indicate that mcrA gene targeted qPCR can be used as an alternate tool to monitor and compare certain methanogen communities in anaerobic digesters. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), we demonstrate that the abundance of mcrA, a gene specific to methane producing archaea, correlated with specific methanogenic activity (SMA) measurements when H2 and CO2 , or propionate were provided as substrates. However, mcrA abundance did not correlate with SMA with acetate. SMA values are often used as a fitness indicator of anaerobic biomass. Results from qPCR can be obtained within a day while SMA analysis requires days to weeks to complete. Therefore, qPCR for mcrA abundance is a sensitive and fast method to compare and monitor the fitness of certain anaerobic biomass. As a monitoring tool, qPCR of mcrA will help anaerobic digester operators optimize treatment and encourage

  17. Membrane chemical reactor (MCR) combining photocatalysis and microfiltration for grey water treatment.

    PubMed

    Rivero, M J; Parsons, S A; Jeffrey, P; Pidou, M; Jefferson, B

    2006-01-01

    Urban water recycling is now becoming an important issue where water resources are becoming scarce. This paper looks at reusing grey water; the preference is treatment processes based on biological systems to remove the dissolved organic content. Here, an alternative process, photocatalysis is discussed as it is an attractive technology that could be well-suited for treating the recalcitrant organic compounds found in grey water. The photocatalytic process oxidises organic reactants at a catalyst surface in the presence of ultraviolet light. Given enough exposure time, organic compounds will be oxidized into CO2 and water. The best contact is achieved in a slurry reactor but a second step to separate and recover the catalyst is need. This paper discusses a new membrane chemical reactor (MCR) combining photocatalysis and microfiltration for grey water treatment.

  18. Development of a swine-specific fecal pollution marker based on host differences in methanogen mcrA genes.

    PubMed

    Ufnar, Jennifer A; Ufnar, David F; Wang, Shiao Y; Ellender, R D

    2007-08-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate methanogen diversity in animal hosts to develop a swine-specific archaeal molecular marker for fecal source tracking in surface waters. Phylogenetic analysis of swine mcrA sequences compared to mcrA sequences from the feces of five animals (cow, deer, sheep, horse, and chicken) and sewage showed four distinct swine clusters, with three swine-specific clades. From this analysis, six sequences were chosen for molecular marker development and initial testing. Only one mcrA sequence (P23-2) showed specificity for swine and therefore was used for environmental testing. PCR primers for the P23-2 clone mcrA sequence were developed and evaluated for swine specificity. The P23-2 primers amplified products in P23-2 plasmid DNA (100%), pig feces (84%), and swine waste lagoon surface water samples (100%) but did not amplify a product in 47 bacterial and archaeal stock cultures and 477 environmental bacterial isolates and sewage and water samples from a bovine waste lagoon and a polluted creek. Amplification was observed in only one sheep sample out of 260 human and nonswine animal fecal samples. Sequencing of PCR products from pig feces demonstrated 100% similarity to pig mcrA sequence from clone P23-2. The minimal amount of DNA required for the detection was 1 pg for P23-2 plasmid, 1 ng for pig feces, 50 ng for swine waste lagoon surface water, 1 ng for sow waste influent, and 10 ng for lagoon sludge samples. Lower detection limits of 10(-6) g of wet pig feces in 500 ml of phosphate-buffered saline and 10(-4) g of lagoon waste in estuarine water were established for the P23-2 marker. This study was the first to utilize methanogens for the development of a swine-specific fecal contamination marker.

  19. Application of the maximum cumulative ratio (MCR) as a screening tool for the evaluation of mixtures in residential indoor air.

    PubMed

    De Brouwere, Katleen; Cornelis, Christa; Arvanitis, Athanasios; Brown, Terry; Crump, Derrick; Harrison, Paul; Jantunen, Matti; Price, Paul; Torfs, Rudi

    2014-05-01

    The maximum cumulative ratio (MCR) method allows the categorisation of mixtures according to whether the mixture is of concern for toxicity and if so whether this is driven by one substance or multiple substances. The aim of the present study was to explore, by application of the MCR approach, whether health risks due to indoor air pollution are dominated by one substance or are due to concurrent exposure to various substances. Analysis was undertaken on monitoring data of four European indoor studies (giving five datasets), involving 1800 records of indoor air or personal exposure. Application of the MCR methodology requires knowledge of the concentrations of chemicals in a mixture together with health-based reference values for those chemicals. For this evaluation, single substance health-based reference values (RVs) were selected through a structured review process. The MCR analysis found high variability in the proportion of samples of concern for mixture toxicity. The fraction of samples in these groups of concern varied from 2% (Flemish schools) to 77% (EXPOLIS, Basel, indoor), the variation being due not only to the variation in indoor air contaminant levels across the studies but also to other factors such as differences in number and type of substances monitored, analytical performance, and choice of RVs. However, in 4 out of the 5 datasets, a considerable proportion of cases were found where a chemical-by-chemical approach failed to identify the need for the investigation of combined risk assessment. Although the MCR methodology applied in the current study provides no consideration of commonality of endpoints, it provides a tool for discrimination between those mixtures requiring further combined risk assessment and those for which a single-substance assessment is sufficient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a Swine-Specific Fecal Pollution Marker Based on Host Differences in Methanogen mcrA Genes▿

    PubMed Central

    Ufnar, Jennifer A.; Ufnar, David F.; Wang, Shiao Y.; Ellender, R. D.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate methanogen diversity in animal hosts to develop a swine-specific archaeal molecular marker for fecal source tracking in surface waters. Phylogenetic analysis of swine mcrA sequences compared to mcrA sequences from the feces of five animals (cow, deer, sheep, horse, and chicken) and sewage showed four distinct swine clusters, with three swine-specific clades. From this analysis, six sequences were chosen for molecular marker development and initial testing. Only one mcrA sequence (P23-2) showed specificity for swine and therefore was used for environmental testing. PCR primers for the P23-2 clone mcrA sequence were developed and evaluated for swine specificity. The P23-2 primers amplified products in P23-2 plasmid DNA (100%), pig feces (84%), and swine waste lagoon surface water samples (100%) but did not amplify a product in 47 bacterial and archaeal stock cultures and 477 environmental bacterial isolates and sewage and water samples from a bovine waste lagoon and a polluted creek. Amplification was observed in only one sheep sample out of 260 human and nonswine animal fecal samples. Sequencing of PCR products from pig feces demonstrated 100% similarity to pig mcrA sequence from clone P23-2. The minimal amount of DNA required for the detection was 1 pg for P23-2 plasmid, 1 ng for pig feces, 50 ng for swine waste lagoon surface water, 1 ng for sow waste influent, and 10 ng for lagoon sludge samples. Lower detection limits of 10−6 g of wet pig feces in 500 ml of phosphate-buffered saline and 10−4 g of lagoon waste in estuarine water were established for the P23-2 marker. This study was the first to utilize methanogens for the development of a swine-specific fecal contamination marker. PMID:17586669

  1. Emergence of Colistin Resistance Gene mcr-1 in Cronobacter sakazakii Producing NDM-9 and in Escherichia coli from the Same Animal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bao-Tao; Song, Feng-Jing; Zou, Ming; Hao, Zhi-Hui; Shan, Hu

    2017-02-01

    We report the presence of mcr-1 in Escherichia coli and carbapenem-resistant Cronobacter sakazakii from the same diseased chicken. The mcr-1 gene linked with ISApl1 was located on two different IncI2 plasmids, including one multidrug plasmid in E. coli, whereas fosA3-bla NDM-9 was on an IncB/O plasmid in C. sakazakii The development of the fosA3-bla NDM-9 resistance region was mediated by IS26 The colocation of mcr-1 or bla NDM-9 with other resistance genes will accelerate the dissemination of the two genes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Large genetic differentiation and low variation in vector competence for dengue and yellow fever viruses of Aedes albopictus from Brazil, the United States, and the Cayman Islands.

    PubMed

    Lourenço de Oliveira, Ricardo; Vazeille, Marie; de Filippis, Ana Maria Bispo; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2003-07-01

    We conducted a population genetic analysis of Aedes albopictus collected from 20 sites in Brazil, the United States (Florida, Georgia, and Illinois), and the Cayman Islands. Using isoenzyme analysis, we examined genetic diversity and patterns of gene flow. High genetic differentiation was found among Brazilian samples, and between them and North American samples. Regression analysis of genetic differentiation according to geographic distances indicated that Ae. albopictus samples from Florida were genetically isolated by distance. Infection rates with dengue and yellow fever viruses showed greater differences between two Brazilian samples than between the two North American samples or between a Brazilian sample and a North American sample. Introductions and establishments of new Ae. albopictus populations in the Americas are still in progress, shaping population genetic composition and potentially modifying both dengue and yellow fever transmission patterns.

  3. Investigation of First Identified mcr-1 Gene in an Isolate from a U.S. Patient - Pennsylvania, 2016.

    PubMed

    Kline, Kelly E; Shover, Jordan; Kallen, Alexander J; Lonsway, David R; Watkins, Sharon; Miller, Jeffrey R

    2016-09-16

    In 2015, scientists reported the emergence of the plasmid-encoded mcr-1 gene conferring bacterial resistance to the antibiotic colistin (1), signaling potential emergence of a pandrug-resistant bacterium. In May 2016, mcr-1-positive Escherichia coli was first isolated from a specimen from a U.S. patient (2) when a Pennsylvania woman was evaluated for a urinary tract infection. The urine culture and subsequent testing identified the gene in an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli with reduced susceptibility to colistin. The patient had no international travel for approximately 1 year, no livestock exposure, and a limited role in meal preparation with store-bought groceries; however, she had multiple and repeated admissions to four medical facilities during 2016.

  4. Oxidation Control with Chromate Pretreatment of MCrAlY Unmelted Particle and Bond Coat in Thermal Barrier Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamano, Hideaki; Tani, Kazumi; Harada, Yoshio; Teratani, Takema

    2008-06-01

    MCrAlY alloy bond coat is widely used in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems to protect substrates from high-temperature oxidizing environments. However, failure of the ceramic topcoat can occur due to a thermally grown oxide (TGO) that grows at the interface between the bond coat and the topcoat. In this study, the effect of chromate treatment was investigated. Prior to topcoat deposition, a thin film of Cr2O3 was formed on the bond coat surface. High-temperature oxidation tests were carried out, and the oxidation rates were determined by inspection of cross sections. Similar oxidation tests were carried out using MCrAlY powder material assumed to be unmelted particles. As a result, the chromate-treated bond coat showed outstanding oxidation resistance. Calculations that take into account the oxidation of particles in the topcoat indicated the generation of internal stress to cause local fracture of the topcoat.

  5. Edge-Preserving Image Smoothing Constraint in Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) of Hyperspectral Data.

    PubMed

    Hugelier, Siewert; Vitale, Raffaele; Ruckebusch, Cyril

    2018-03-01

    This article explores smoothing with edge-preserving properties as a spatial constraint for the resolution of hyperspectral images with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). For each constrained component image (distribution map), irrelevant spatial details and noise are smoothed applying an L 1 - or L 0 -norm penalized least squares regression, highlighting in this way big changes in intensity of adjacent pixels. The feasibility of the constraint is demonstrated on three different case studies, in which the objects under investigation are spatially clearly defined, but have significant spectral overlap. This spectral overlap is detrimental for obtaining a good resolution and additional spatial information should be provided. The final results show that the spatial constraint enables better image (map) abstraction, artifact removal, and better interpretation of the results obtained, compared to a classical MCR-ALS analysis of hyperspectral images.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of a Multidrug- and Colistin-Resistant mcr-1-Producing Escherichia coli Isolate from a Swine Farm in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Tamayo-Legorreta, Elsa; Arellano-Quintanilla, Doris María; Rodriguez-Medina, Nadia; Silva-Sanchez, Jesús; Catalan-Najera, Juan; Rocha-Martínez, Marisol Karina; Bravo-Díaz, María Asunción

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT A colistin-resistant mcr-1-carrying Escherichia coli strain, RC2-007, was isolated from a swine farm in Mexico. This extraintestinal and uropathogenic strain of E. coli belongs to serotype O89:H9 and sequence type 744. Assembly and annotation resulted in a 4.9-Mb draft genome that revealed the presence of plasmid-mediated mcr-1-ISApI1 genes as part of a prophage. PMID:29519827

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of a Multidrug- and Colistin-Resistant mcr-1-Producing Escherichia coli Isolate from a Swine Farm in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Tamayo-Legorreta, Elsa; Arellano-Quintanilla, Doris María; Rodriguez-Medina, Nadia; Silva-Sanchez, Jesús; Catalan-Najera, Juan; Rocha-Martínez, Marisol Karina; Bravo-Díaz, María Asunción; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia

    2018-03-08

    A colistin-resistant mcr-1 -carrying Escherichia coli strain, RC2-007, was isolated from a swine farm in Mexico. This extraintestinal and uropathogenic strain of E. coli belongs to serotype O89:H9 and sequence type 744. Assembly and annotation resulted in a 4.9-Mb draft genome that revealed the presence of plasmid-mediated mcr-1 -IS ApI1 genes as part of a prophage. Copyright © 2018 Garza-Ramos et al.

  8. mcr-1 and blaKPC-3 in Escherichia coli Sequence Type 744 after Meropenem and Colistin Therapy, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Tacão, Marta; Tavares, Rafael Dos Santos; Teixeira, Pedro; Roxo, Inês; Ramalheira, Elmano; Ferreira, Sónia; Henriques, Isabel

    2017-08-01

    Escherichia coli Ec36 was recovered from a patient in Portugal after treatment with meropenem and colistin. Besides an IncF plasmid with Tn1441d-bla KPC-3 , already reported in clinical strains in this country, E. coli Ec36 co-harbored an IncX4::mcr-1 gene. Results highlight emerging co-resistance to carbapenems and polymyxins after therapy with drugs from both classes.

  9. Diversity and three-dimensional structures of the alpha Mcr of the methanogenic Archaea from the anoxic region of Tucuruí Lake, in Eastern Brazilian Amazonia

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Priscila Bessa; Junior, Rubens Ghilardi; Alves, Claudio Nahum; Silva, Jeronimo Lameira; McCulloch, John Anthony; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; da Costa da Silva, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Methanogenic archaeans are organisms of considerable ecological and biotechnological interest that produce methane through a restricted metabolic pathway, which culminates in the reaction catalyzed by the Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (Mcr) enzyme, and results in the release of methane. Using a metagenomic approach, the gene of the α subunit of mcr (mcrα) was isolated from sediment sample from an anoxic zone, rich in decomposing organic material, obtained from the Tucuruí hydroelectric dam reservoir in eastern Brazilian Amazonia. The partial nucleotide sequences obtained were 83 to 95% similar to those available in databases, indicating a low diversity of archaeans in the reservoir. Two orders were identified - the Methanomicrobiales, and a unique Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) forming a clade with the Methanosarcinales according to low bootstrap values. Homology modeling was used to determine the three-dimensional (3D) structures, for this the partial nucleotide sequence of the mcrα were isolated and translated on their partial amino acid sequences. The 3D structures of the archaean Mcrα observed in the present study varied little, and presented approximately 70% identity in comparison with the Mcrα of Methanopyrus klanderi. The results demonstrated that the community of methanogenic archaeans of the anoxic C1 region of the Tucurui reservoir is relatively homogeneous. PMID:22481885

  10. Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) with Raman Imaging Applied to Lunar Meteorites.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joseph P; Smith, Frank C; Booksh, Karl S

    2018-03-01

    Lunar meteorites provide a more random sampling of the surface of the Moon than do the returned lunar samples, and they provide valuable information to help estimate the chemical composition of the lunar crust, the lunar mantle, and the bulk Moon. As of July 2014, ∼96 lunar meteorites had been documented and ten of these are unbrecciated mare basalts. Using Raman imaging with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS), we investigated portions of polished thin sections of paired, unbrecciated, mare-basalt lunar meteorites that had been collected from the LaPaz Icefield (LAP) of Antarctica-LAP 02205 and LAP 04841. Polarized light microscopy displays that both meteorites are heterogeneous and consist of polydispersed sized and shaped particles of varying chemical composition. For two distinct probed areas within each meteorite, the individual chemical species and associated chemical maps were elucidated using MCR-ALS applied to Raman hyperspectral images. For LAP 02205, spatially and spectrally resolved clinopyroxene, ilmenite, substrate-adhesive epoxy, and diamond polish were observed within the probed areas. Similarly, for LAP 04841, spatially resolved chemical images with corresponding resolved Raman spectra of clinopyroxene, troilite, a high-temperature polymorph of anorthite, substrate-adhesive epoxy, and diamond polish were generated. In both LAP 02205 and LAP 04841, substrate-adhesive epoxy and diamond polish were more readily observed within fractures/veinlet features. Spectrally diverse clinopyroxenes were resolved in LAP 04841. Factors that allow these resolved clinopyroxenes to be differentiated include crystal orientation, spatially distinct chemical zoning of pyroxene crystals, and/or chemical and molecular composition. The minerals identified using this analytical methodology-clinopyroxene, anorthite, ilmenite, and troilite-are consistent with the results of previous studies of the two meteorites using electron microprobe

  11. The PhoP-Dependent ncRNA Mcr7 Modulates the TAT Secretion System in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Benjak, Andrej; Uplekar, Swapna; Rougemont, Jacques; Guilhot, Christophe; Malaga, Wladimir; Martín, Carlos; Cole, Stewart T.

    2014-01-01

    The PhoPR two-component system is essential for virulence in Mycobacterium tuberculosis where it controls expression of approximately 2% of the genes, including those for the ESX-1 secretion apparatus, a major virulence determinant. Mutations in phoP lead to compromised production of pathogen-specific cell wall components and attenuation both ex vivo and in vivo. Using antibodies against the native protein in ChIP-seq experiments (chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing) we demonstrated that PhoP binds to at least 35 loci on the M. tuberculosis genome. The PhoP regulon comprises several transcriptional regulators as well as genes for polyketide synthases and PE/PPE proteins. Integration of ChIP-seq results with high-resolution transcriptomic analysis (RNA-seq) revealed that PhoP controls 30 genes directly, whilst regulatory cascades are responsible for signal amplification and downstream effects through proteins like EspR, which controls Esx1 function, via regulation of the espACD operon. The most prominent site of PhoP regulation was located in the intergenic region between rv2395 and PE_PGRS41, where the mcr7 gene codes for a small non-coding RNA (ncRNA). Northern blot experiments confirmed the absence of Mcr7 in an M. tuberculosis phoP mutant as well as low-level expression of the ncRNA in M. tuberculosis complex members other than M. tuberculosis. By means of genetic and proteomic analyses we demonstrated that Mcr7 modulates translation of the tatC mRNA thereby impacting the activity of the Twin Arginine Translocation (Tat) protein secretion apparatus. As a result, secretion of the immunodominant Ag85 complex and the beta-lactamase BlaC is affected, among others. Mcr7, the first ncRNA of M. tuberculosis whose function has been established, therefore represents a missing link between the PhoPR two-component system and the downstream functions necessary for successful infection of the host. PMID:24874799

  12. Dynamics of poroelastocapillary rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasouri, Babak; Elfring, Gwynn

    2017-11-01

    The surface-tension-driven rise of a liquid between two elastic sheets can result in their deformation or coalescence depending on their flexibility. When the sheets are poroelastic, the flexibility of the immersed parts of the sheets can change considerably thereby altering the dynamical behavior of the system. To better understand this phenomenon, we study the poroelastocapillary rise of a wetting liquid between poroelastic sheets. Using the lubrication theory and linear elasticity, we quantify the effects of the change in material properties of the wet sheets on the capillary rise and the equilibrium state of the system.

  13. Early origins of the Caribbean plate from deep seismic profiles across the Nicaraguan Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, B.; Mann, W. P.

    2012-12-01

    The offshore Nicaraguan Rise in the maritime zones of Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua and Colombia covers a combined area of 500,000 km2, and is one of the least known equatorial Cretaceous-Cenozoic carbonate regions remaining on Earth. The purpose of this study is to describe the Cretaceous to Recent tectonic and stratigraphic history of the deep water Nicaraguan Rise, and to better understand how various types of crustal blocks underlying the Eocene to Recent carbonate cover fused into a single, larger Caribbean plate known today from GPS studies. We interpreted 8700 km of modern, deep-penetration 2D seismic data kindly provided by the oil industry, tied to five wells that penetrated Cretaceous igneous basement. Based on these data, and integration with gravity, magnetic and existing crustal refraction data, we define four crustal provinces for the offshore Nicaraguan Rise: 1) Thicker (15-18 km) Late Cretaceous Caribbean ocean plateau (COP) with rough, top basement surface; 2) normal (6-8 km) Late Cretaceous COP with smooth top basement surface (B") and correlative outcrops in southern Haiti and Jamaica; 3) Precambrian-Paleozoic continental crust (20-22 km thick) with correlative outcrops in northern Central America; and 4) Cretaceous arc crust (>18 km thick) with correlative outcrops in Jamaica. These strongly contrasting basement belts strike northeastward to eastward, and were juxtaposed by latest Cretaceous-Paleogene northward and northwestward thrusting of Caribbean arc over continental crust in Central America, and the western Nicaraguan Rise (84 to 85 degrees west). A large Paleogene to recent, CCW rotation of the Caribbean plate along the Cayman trough faults and into its present day location explains why terranes in Central America and beneath the Nicaraguan Rise have their present, anomalous north-east strike. Continuing, present-day activity on some of these crustal block boundaries is a likely result of intraplate stresses imposed by the surrounding

  14. Pyrosequencing of mcrA and Archaeal 16S rRNA Genes Reveals Diversity and Substrate Preferences of Methanogen Communities in Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, David; Lu, Xiao-Ying; Shen, Zhiyong; Chen, Jiapeng

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea play a key role in biogas-producing anaerobic digestion and yet remain poorly taxonomically characterized. This is in part due to the limitations of low-throughput Sanger sequencing of a single (16S rRNA) gene, which in the past may have undersampled methanogen diversity. In this study, archaeal communities from three sludge digesters in Hong Kong and one wastewater digester in China were examined using high-throughput pyrosequencing of the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and 16S rRNA genes. Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanosarcinales were detected in each digester, indicating that both hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis was occurring. Two sludge digesters had similar community structures, likely due to their similar design and feedstock. Taxonomic classification of the mcrA genes suggested that these digesters were dominated by acetoclastic methanogens, particularly Methanosarcinales, while the other digesters were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The proposed euryarchaeotal order Methanomassiliicoccales and the uncultured WSA2 group were detected with the 16S rRNA gene, and potential mcrA genes for these groups were identified. 16S rRNA gene sequencing also recovered several crenarchaeotal groups potentially involved in the initial anaerobic digestion processes. Overall, the two genes produced different taxonomic profiles for the digesters, while greater methanogen richness was detected using the mcrA gene, supporting the use of this functional gene as a complement to the 16S rRNA gene to better assess methanogen diversity. A significant positive correlation was detected between methane production and the abundance of mcrA transcripts in digesters treating sludge and wastewater samples, supporting the mcrA gene as a biomarker for methane yield. PMID:25381241

  15. Comparative Study of Microstructure and Properties of Thermal Sprayed MCrAlY Bond Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglima, Michael William

    A series of experiments were performed in order to observe certain process-property trends in thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coatings for thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications in gas-turbine engines. Firstly, the basis of gas-turbine operation and design is discussed with a focus on the Brayton cycle and basic thermodynamic properties with respect to both the thermal and fuel efficiency of the turbine. The high-temperature environment inside the gas-turbine engine creates an extremely corrosive medium in which the engineering components must operate with sufficient operating life times. These engineering constraints, both thermal/fuel efficiency and operating life, pose a serious problem during long operation as well as thermal cycling of a civil aerospace engine. The concept of a thermal barrier coating is introduced along with how these coatings protect the internal engineering components, mostly in the hot-section of the turbine, and increase both the efficiency as well as the operating life of the components. The method used to create TBC's is then introduced being thermal spray processing along with standard operating procedures (SOP) used during coating deposition. The main focus of the experiments was to quantify the process-property trends seen during thermal spray processing of TBC's with respect to the adhesion and thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer, as well as how sensitive these properties are to changing variables during coating deposition. The design of experiment (DOE) method was used in order to have sufficient statistical process control over the output as well as a standard method for quantifying the results. A total of three DOE's were performed using two main types of thermal spray processes being high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and atmospheric plasma spray (APS), with a total of five different types of torches which are categorized by liquid-fuel, gas-fuel, and single cathode plasma. The variables used in the proceeding experiments were

  16. Model for the Evolution of an Oceanic Core Complex and its Hydrothermal Vent on the Ultraslow-Spreading Mid Cayman Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, J.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Hayman, N. W.; Grevemeyer, I.; Peirce, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Mid Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC) is an ultraslow-spreading center (15 mm yr-1 full rate) along the Caribbean-North American plate boundary. Despite the paradigm that ultraslow-spreading centers are amagmatic and cold, two hydrothermal vent fields have recently been discovered along the MCSC. The Beebe Vent Field is a black smoker in the northern axial deep, and the Von Damm Vent Field (VDVF) is a moderate-temperature, talc precipitating vent found atop an oceanic core complex (OCC). This OCC, "Mt. Dent", is a large (3 km high) massif that formed beneath a detachment fault, which exhumed lower crustal and upper mantle material. The CaySeis Experiment was conducted in April, 2015 in order to collect wide-angle refraction data of the MCSC crust and upper mantle. We modeled the across-axis crustal structure of Mt. Dent as well as the surrounding lithosphere using 2.5D P-wave tomography. Using this tomographic model, along with geochemistry, we propose a model for the formation and evolution of the OCC Mt. Dent and the VDVF. A detachment fault formed in a magma-poor environment due to a pulse of magmatism, producing a large gabbro body that was then exhumed and rotated into the OCC footwall. Once magmatism waned and the gabbroic body cooled, the OCC was faulted and fractured due to plate flexure and increased tectonic extensional stress in the naturally cold and thick lithosphere. These faults provide a permeable and deep network of hydrothermal pathways that mine deep lithospheric heat and expose gabbro and fresh mantle peridotite. This model is consistent with the basalt geochemistry, hydrothermal fluid geochemistry, and the distribution of brittle vs. ductile structures along the detachment shear zone. The VDVF is therefore a product of a pulse of magmatism in an overall melt-poor environment, conditions that may be found at other ultraslow-spreading ridges.

  17. Speleothems in a wave-cut notch, Cayman Brac, British West Indies: The integrated product of subaerial precipitation, dissolution, and microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian

    2010-12-01

    A wave-cut notch that is deeply incised into the vertical cliff faces of Cayman Brac is adorned with stalactites, stalagmites, and columns. The prefix "notch" is applied to each type of speleothem in order to distinguish them from cave speleothems. These speleothemic deposits must have formed since the highstand, ~ 125,000 years ago, which was responsible for the development of the notch. The laminated notch speleothems are formed largely of aragonite (small and large crystals) and calcite (columnar, fiber, and grain-coating mats) along with minor amounts of dolomite, a Mg-Si precipitate (kerolite?), gypsum, and halite. Laminae, typically < 2 mm thick, are commonly bounded by dissolution discontinuities that truncate the older laminae and their formative aragonite and calcite crystals. The patchy tan, grey, to green surface coloration of the notch speleothems reflects the random distribution of the subaerial biofilms, which are formed of a diverse array of filamentous and non-filamentous microbes. The notch speleothems are the integrated product of precipitation and dissolution that was, in some places, microbially mediated. Interpretations based on their mineralogy and internal structures indicate that the composition of the formative waters must have temporally fluctuated with periods of precipitation being interrupted by periods of dissolution. The microbes that formed the subaerial biofilms may have influenced some of these processes. The aragonite, calcite, and kerolite (?) probably formed as evaporation and loss of Ca through precipitation progressively increased the Mg:Ca and the Si/(Ca + Mg) ratios. The dolomite, gypsum, and halite probably formed during early diagenesis during the evaporation of seawater that percolated into the interiors of the notch speleothems.

  18. Detailed seismic velocity structure of the ultra-slow spread crust at the Mid-Cayman Spreading Center from travel-time tomography and synthetic seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, J.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Hayman, N. W.; Grevemeyer, I.; Peirce, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Mid-Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC), an ultraslow-spreading center in the Caribbean Sea, has formed highly variable oceanic crust. Seafloor dredges have recovered extrusive basalts in the axial deeps as well as gabbro on bathymetric highs and exhumed mantle peridotite along the only 110 km MCSC. Wide-angle refraction data were collected with active-source ocean bottom seismometers in April, 2015, along lines parallel and across the MCSC. Travel-time tomography produces relatively smooth 2-D tomographic models of compressional wave velocity. These velocity models reveal large along- and across-axis variations in seismic velocity, indicating possible changes in crustal thickness, composition, faulting, and magmatism. It is difficult, however, to differentiate between competing interpretations of seismic velocity using these tomographic models alone. For example, in some areas the seismic velocities may be explained by either thin igneous crust or exhumed, serpentinized mantle. Distinguishing between these two interpretations is important as we explore the relationships between magmatism, faulting, and hydrothermal venting at ultraslow-spreading centers. We therefore improved our constraints on the shallow seismic velocity structure of the MCSC by modeling the amplitude of seismic refractions in the wide-angle data set. Synthetic seismograms were calculated with a finite-difference method for a range of models with different vertical velocity gradients. Small-scale features in the velocity models, such as steep velocity gradients and Moho boundaries, were explored systematically to best fit the real data. With this approach, we have improved our understanding of the compressional velocity structure of the MCSC along with the geological interpretations that are consistent with three seismic refraction profiles. Line P01 shows a variation in the thinness of lower seismic velocities along the axis, indicating two segment centers, while across-axis lines P02 and P03

  19. Improved modeling of in vivo confocal Raman data using multivariate curve resolution (MCR) augmentation of ordinary least squares models.

    PubMed

    Hancewicz, Thomas M; Xiao, Chunhong; Zhang, Shuliang; Misra, Manoj

    2013-12-01

    In vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy has become the measurement technique of choice for skin health and skin care related communities as a way of measuring functional chemistry aspects of skin that are key indicators for care and treatment of various skin conditions. Chief among these techniques are stratum corneum water content, a critical health indicator for severe skin condition related to dryness, and natural moisturizing factor components that are associated with skin protection and barrier health. In addition, in vivo Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a rapid and effective method for quantifying component penetration in skin for topically applied skin care formulations. The benefit of such a capability is that noninvasive analytical chemistry can be performed in vivo in a clinical setting, significantly simplifying studies aimed at evaluating product performance. This presumes, however, that the data and analysis methods used are compatible and appropriate for the intended purpose. The standard analysis method used by most researchers for in vivo Raman data is ordinary least squares (OLS) regression. The focus of work described in this paper is the applicability of OLS for in vivo Raman analysis with particular attention given to use for non-ideal data that often violate the inherent limitations and deficiencies associated with proper application of OLS. We then describe a newly developed in vivo Raman spectroscopic analysis methodology called multivariate curve resolution-augmented ordinary least squares (MCR-OLS), a relatively simple route to addressing many of the issues with OLS. The method is compared with the standard OLS method using the same in vivo Raman data set and using both qualitative and quantitative comparisons based on model fit error, adherence to known data constraints, and performance against calibration samples. A clear improvement is shown in each comparison for MCR-OLS over standard OLS, thus supporting the premise that the MCR

  20. Random Initialisation of the Spectral Variables: an Alternate Approach for Initiating Multivariate Curve Resolution Alternating Least Square (MCR-ALS) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Keshav

    2017-11-01

    Multivariate curve resolution alternating least square (MCR-ALS) analysis is the most commonly used curve resolution technique. The MCR-ALS model is fitted using the alternate least square (ALS) algorithm that needs initialisation of either contribution profiles or spectral profiles of each of the factor. The contribution profiles can be initialised using the evolve factor analysis; however, in principle, this approach requires that data must belong to the sequential process. The initialisation of the spectral profiles are usually carried out using the pure variable approach such as SIMPLISMA algorithm, this approach demands that each factor must have the pure variables in the data sets. Despite these limitations, the existing approaches have been quite a successful for initiating the MCR-ALS analysis. However, the present work proposes an alternate approach for the initialisation of the spectral variables by generating the random variables in the limits spanned by the maxima and minima of each spectral variable of the data set. The proposed approach does not require that there must be pure variables for each component of the multicomponent system or the concentration direction must follow the sequential process. The proposed approach is successfully validated using the excitation-emission matrix fluorescence data sets acquired for certain fluorophores with significant spectral overlap. The calculated contribution and spectral profiles of these fluorophores are found to correlate well with the experimental results. In summary, the present work proposes an alternate way to initiate the MCR-ALS analysis.

  1. Rising College Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Today, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Focuses on ways in which parents of school-age children can offset the rising costs of college, including encouraging students to get summer and part-time jobs, putting savings toward students' education in accounts in students' names to save taxes, investigating cooperative work/education plans, and investing in mutual funds. (DB)

  2. Super Moon Rises

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-19

    The full moon is seen as it rises near the National Mall, Saturday, March 19, 2011, in Washington. The full moon tonight is called a "Super Moon" since it is at its closest to Earth. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  3. Epigenetic Segregation of Microbial Genomes from Complex Samples Using Restriction Endonucleases HpaII and McrB.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guohong; Weston, Christopher Q; Pham, Long K; Waltz, Shannon; Barnes, Helen; King, Paula; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T; Forsyth, R Allyn

    2016-01-01

    We describe continuing work to develop restriction endonucleases as tools to enrich targeted genomes of interest from diverse populations. Two approaches were developed in parallel to segregate genomic DNA based on cytosine methylation. First, the methyl-sensitive endonuclease HpaII was used to bind non-CG methylated DNA. Second, a truncated fragment of McrB was used to bind CpG methylated DNA. Enrichment levels of microbial genomes can exceed 100-fold with HpaII allowing improved genomic detection and coverage of otherwise trace microbial genomes from sputum. Additionally, we observe interesting enrichment results that correlate with the methylation states not only of bacteria, but of fungi, viruses, a protist and plants. The methods presented here offer promise for testing biological samples for pathogens and global analysis of population methylomes.

  4. Order-disorder effects on the elastic properties of CuMPt6 (M=Cr and Co) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shuo; Li, Rui-Zi; Qi, San-Tao; Chen, Bao; Shen, Jiang

    2014-04-01

    The elastic properties of CuMPt6 (M=Cr and Co) in disordered face-centered cubic (fcc) structure and ordered Cu3Au-type structure are studied with lattice inversion embedded-atom method. The calculated lattice constant and Debye temperature agree quite well with the comparable experimental data. The obtained formation enthalpy demonstrates that the Cu3Au-type structure is energetically more favorable. Numerical estimates of the elastic constants, bulk/shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, elastic anisotropy, and Debye temperature for both compounds are performed, and the results suggest that the disordered fcc structure is much softer than the ordered Cu3Au-type structure.

  5. Corrosion evaluation of alloys and MCrAlX coatings in molten carbonates for thermal solar applications

    DOE PAGES

    Gomez-Vidal, Judith C.; Noel, John; Weber, Jacob

    2016-07-30

    Here, stainless steels (SS) 310, 321, 347, Incoloy 800H (In800H), alumina-forming austenitic (AFA-OC6), Ni superalloy Inconel 625 (IN625), and MCrAlX (M: Ni, and/or Co; X: Y, Hf, Si, and/or Ta) coatings were corroded in molten carbonates in N 2 and bone-dry CO 2 atmospheres. Electrochemical tests in molten eutectics K 2CO 3-Na 2CO 3 and Na 2CO 3-K 2CO 3-Li 2CO 3 at temperatures higher than 600 °C were evaluated using an open-circuit potential followed by a potentiodynamic polarization sweep to determine the corrosion rates. Because the best-performing alloys at 750 °C were In800H followed by SS310, these two alloysmore » were selected as the substrate material for the MCrAlX coatings. The coatings were able to mitigate corrosion in molten carbonates environments. The corrosion of substrates SS310 and In800H was reduced from ~2500 um/year to 34 um/year when coated with high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) NiCoCrAlHfSiY and pre-oxidized (air, 900 °C, 24 h, 0.5 °C/min) before molten carbonate exposure at 700 °C in bone-dry CO 2 atmosphere. Metallographic characterization of the corroded surfaces showed that the formation of a uniform alumina scale during the pre-oxidation seems to protect the alloy from the molten carbonate attack.« less

  6. Contemporary sea level rise.

    PubMed

    Cazenave, Anny; Llovel, William

    2010-01-01

    Measuring sea level change and understanding its causes has considerably improved in the recent years, essentially because new in situ and remote sensing observations have become available. Here we report on most recent results on contemporary sea level rise. We first present sea level observations from tide gauges over the twentieth century and from satellite altimetry since the early 1990s. We next discuss the most recent progress made in quantifying the processes causing sea level change on timescales ranging from years to decades, i.e., thermal expansion of the oceans, land ice mass loss, and land water-storage change. We show that for the 1993-2007 time span, the sum of climate-related contributions (2.85 +/- 0.35 mm year(-1)) is only slightly less than altimetry-based sea level rise (3.3 +/- 0.4 mm year(-1)): approximately 30% of the observed rate of rise is due to ocean thermal expansion and approximately 55% results from land ice melt. Recent acceleration in glacier melting and ice mass loss from the ice sheets increases the latter contribution up to 80% for the past five years. We also review the main causes of regional variability in sea level trends: The dominant contribution results from nonuniform changes in ocean thermal expansion.

  7. An evaluation of the electric arc spray and (HPPS) processes for the manufacturing of high power plasma spraying MCrAIY coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacriste, D.; Goubot, N.; Dhers, J.; Ducos, M.; Vardelle, A.

    2001-06-01

    The high power plasma torch (PlazJet) can be used to spray refractory ceramics with high spray rates and deposition efficiency. It can provide dense and hard coating with high bond strengths. When manufacturing thermal barrier coatings, the PlazJet gun is well adapted to spraying the ceramic top coat but not the MCrAIY materials that are used as bond coat. Arc spraying can compete with plasma spraying for metallic coatings since cored wires can be used to spray alloys and composites. In addition, the high production rate of arc spraying enables a significant decrease in coating cost. This paper discusses the performances of the PlazJet gun, and a twin-wire are spray system, and compares the properties and cost of MCrAIY coatings made with these two processes. For arc spraying, the use of air or nitrogen as atomizing gas is also investigated.

  8. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Zachery W [Mandan, ND; Zevenbergen, Gary A [Arvada, CO

    2012-04-03

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

  9. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Zachery Warren; Zevenbergen, Gary Allen

    2012-07-17

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising a first electrode, a second electrode, and a voltage attenuator. The first electrode and the second electrode are both electrically connected to the voltage attenuator. A means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential is connected to the voltage attenuator. The device and method further comprises a means for enabling one or more alarms upon the detection of the dangerous ground potential. Preferably, a first transmitter/receiver is connected to the means for enabling one or more alarms. Preferably, a second transmitter/receiver, comprising a button, is electromagnetically connected to the first transmitter/receiver. Preferably, the means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential comprises a means for determining the true RMS voltage at the output of the voltage attenuator, a transient detector connected to the output of the voltage attenuator, or a combination thereof.

  10. Assessment of the effects of As(III) treatment on cyanobacteria lipidomic profiles by LC-MS and MCR-ALS.

    PubMed

    Marques, Aline S; Bedia, Carmen; Lima, Kássio M G; Tauler, Romà

    2016-08-01

    Cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing bacteria present in a wide variety of habitats such as freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. In this work, the effects of As(III), a major toxic environmental pollutant, on the lipidomic profiles of two cyanobacteria species (Anabaena and Planktothrix agardhii) were assessed by means of a recently proposed method based on the concept of regions of interest (ROI) in liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) together with multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). Cyanobacteria were exposed to two concentrations of As(III) for a week, and lipid extracts were analyzed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in full scan mode. The data obtained were compressed by means of the ROI strategy, and the resulting LC-MS data sets were analyzed by the MCR-ALS method. Comparison of profile peak areas resolved by MCR-ALS in control and exposed samples allowed the discrimination of lipids whose concentrations were changed due to As(III) treatment. The tentative identification of these lipids revealed an important reduction of the levels of some galactolipids such as monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, the pigment chlorophyll a and its degradation product, pheophytin a, as well as carotene compounds such as 3-hydroxycarotene and carotene-3,3'-dione, all of these compounds being essential in the photosynthetic process. These results suggested that As(III) induced important changes in the composition of lipids of cyanobacteria, which were able to compromise their energy production processes. Graphical abstract Steps of the proposed LC-MS + MCR-ALS procedure.

  11. Cluster analysis of commercial samples of Bauhinia spp. using HPLC-UV/PDA and MCR-ALS/PCA without peak alignment procedure.

    PubMed

    Ardila, Jorge Armando; Funari, Cristiano Soleo; Andrade, André Marques; Cavalheiro, Alberto José; Carneiro, Renato Lajarim

    2015-01-01

    Bauhinia forficata Link. is recognised by the Brazilian Health Ministry as a treatment of hypoglycemia and diabetes. Analytical methods are useful to assess the plant identity due the similarities found in plants from Bauhinia spp. HPLC-UV/PDA in combination with chemometric tools is an alternative widely used and suitable for authentication of plant material, however, the shifts of retention times for similar compounds in different samples is a problem. To perform comparisons between the authentic medicinal plant (Bauhinia forficata Link.) and samples commercially available in drugstores claiming to be "Bauhinia spp. to treat diabetes" and to evaluate the performance of multivariate curve resolution - alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) associated to principal component analysis (PCA) when compared to pure PCA. HPLC-UV/PDA data obtained from extracts of leaves were evaluated employing a combination of MCR-ALS and PCA, which allowed the use of the full chromatographic and spectrometric information without the need of peak alignment procedures. The use of MCR-ALS/PCA showed better results than the conventional PCA using only one wavelength. Only two of nine commercial samples presented characteristics similar to the authentic Bauhinia forficata spp., considering the full HPLC-UV/PDA data. The combination of MCR-ALS and PCA is very useful when applied to a group of samples where a general alignment procedure could not be applied due to the different chromatographic profiles. This work also demonstrates the need of more strict control from the health authorities regarding herbal products available on the market. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Safety Rises to New Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafo, Joseph; Robillard, Marc

    2001-01-01

    Explains how high-rise residence halls can provide high-level safety and security at colleges and universities. Boston University is used to illustrate high-rise security and fire protection issues. (GR)

  13. Potential use of MCR-ALS for the identification of coeliac-related biochemical changes in hyperspectral Raman maps from pediatric intestinal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Fornasaro, Stefano; Vicario, Annalisa; De Leo, Luigina; Bonifacio, Alois; Not, Tarcisio; Sergo, Valter

    2018-05-14

    Raman hyperspectral imaging is an emerging practice in biological and biomedical research for label free analysis of tissues and cells. Using this method, both spatial distribution and spectral information of analyzed samples can be obtained. The current study reports the first Raman microspectroscopic characterisation of colon tissues from patients with Coeliac Disease (CD). The aim was to assess if Raman imaging coupled with hyperspectral multivariate image analysis is capable of detecting the alterations in the biochemical composition of intestinal tissues associated with CD. The analytical approach was based on a multi-step methodology: duodenal biopsies from healthy and coeliac patients were measured and processed with Multivariate Curve Resolution Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS). Based on the distribution maps and the pure spectra of the image constituents obtained from MCR-ALS, interesting biochemical differences between healthy and coeliac patients has been derived. Noticeably, a reduced distribution of complex lipids in the pericryptic space, and a different distribution and abundance of proteins rich in beta-sheet structures was found in CD patients. The output of the MCR-ALS analysis was then used as a starting point for two clustering algorithms (k-means clustering and hierarchical clustering methods). Both methods converged with similar results providing precise segmentation over multiple Raman images of studied tissues.

  14. Prevalence of the mcr-1 colistin resistance gene in extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli from human faecal samples collected in 2012 in rural villages in Shandong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Bi, Zhenwang; Berglund, Björn; Sun, Qiang; Nilsson, Maud; Chen, Baoli; Tärnberg, Maria; Ding, Lilu; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia; Bi, Zhenqiang; Tomson, Göran; Yao, Jingjing; Gu, Zhanying; Yin, Xiao; Kou, Zengqiang; Nilsson, Lennart E

    2017-04-01

    Since its initial discovery in China in 2015, the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene mcr-1 has been reported in Escherichia coli isolated from clinical samples, animals and meat worldwide. In this study, 706 extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli from 411 persons were detected in a collection of faecal samples from 1000 rural residents in three counties in Shandong Province, China. These isolates were screened for mcr-1 and phenotypic colistin resistance. The gene was found in 3.5% of the isolates (from 4.9% of persons) from all three counties. All isolates with phenotypic colistin resistance carried mcr-1. These data indicate that commensal carriage of ESBL-producing E. coli with mcr-1 among persons in rural China was already present in 2012 and that mcr-1 was the most important colistin resistance mechanism. Interventions are necessary to minimise further dissemination of mcr-1, which would limit the future usefulness of colistin as a last-resort antibiotic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. Corrosion resistance of MCrAlX coatings in a molten chloride for thermal storage in concentrating solar power applications

    DOE PAGES

    Gomez-Vidal, Judith C.

    2017-09-18

    Corrosion evaluations of Incoloy 800 H (In800H) and stainless steel AISI 310 (310SS), in bare and coated conditions, were performed in 34.42 wt% NaCl – 55.47 wt% KCl at 700 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere. This NaCl–KCl composition has a melting point of 657 °C, which makes it suitable for latent-heat thermal energy storage in concentrating solar power applications. Several nickel-based MCrAlX coatings were tested, where M = Ni and/or Co and X = Y, Ta, Hf, and/or Si. Electrochemical testing was carried out to determine corrosion rates. The bare In800H and 310SS alloys corroded rapidly (~2500 and 4500 µm/yr,more » respectively, assuming uniform corrosion). Concentrating solar power plants need containment materials with a lifetime of at least 30 years; thus, these corrosion rates are excessive. Corrosion mitigation approaches are being investigated to obtain degradation on the order of 20 µm/yr or lower. The lowest corrosion rate of 190 µm/yr was obtained for atmospheric plasma spray NiCoCrAlY coatings pre-oxidized in air at 900 °C for 24 h with a heating/cooling rate of 0.5 °C/min. Metallographic characterization of the corroded surfaces showed that the formation of a uniform thin alumina scale before exposure to the molten chloride system considerably reduced the corrosion of the alloy. However, the rates of corrosion determined herein are considerable, highlighting the relevance of testing materials durability in solar power applications.« less

  16. Corrosion resistance of MCrAlX coatings in a molten chloride for thermal storage in concentrating solar power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Vidal, Judith C.

    Corrosion evaluations of Incoloy 800 H (In800H) and stainless steel AISI 310 (310SS), in bare and coated conditions, were performed in 34.42 wt% NaCl – 55.47 wt% KCl at 700 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere. This NaCl–KCl composition has a melting point of 657 °C, which makes it suitable for latent-heat thermal energy storage in concentrating solar power applications. Several nickel-based MCrAlX coatings were tested, where M = Ni and/or Co and X = Y, Ta, Hf, and/or Si. Electrochemical testing was carried out to determine corrosion rates. The bare In800H and 310SS alloys corroded rapidly (~2500 and 4500 µm/yr,more » respectively, assuming uniform corrosion). Concentrating solar power plants need containment materials with a lifetime of at least 30 years; thus, these corrosion rates are excessive. Corrosion mitigation approaches are being investigated to obtain degradation on the order of 20 µm/yr or lower. The lowest corrosion rate of 190 µm/yr was obtained for atmospheric plasma spray NiCoCrAlY coatings pre-oxidized in air at 900 °C for 24 h with a heating/cooling rate of 0.5 °C/min. Metallographic characterization of the corroded surfaces showed that the formation of a uniform thin alumina scale before exposure to the molten chloride system considerably reduced the corrosion of the alloy. However, the rates of corrosion determined herein are considerable, highlighting the relevance of testing materials durability in solar power applications.« less

  17. Choices for a Rising Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obama, Barack

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an essay by the 2008 Democratic Party Presidential Nominee. This essay focuses on the role of the rising generation in bringing about real change in America. The author contends that, at this historic moment, Americans must ask their rising generation to serve their country as Americans always have--by working on a political…

  18. On Capillary Rise and Nucleation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, R.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of capillary rise and nucleation is presented. It is shown that both phenomena result from a balance between two competing energy factors: a volume energy and a surface energy. Such a comparison may help to introduce nucleation with a topic familiar to the students, capillary rise. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  19. High-velocity-oxidation performance of metal-chromium-aluminum (MCrAl), cermet, and modified aluminide coatings on IN-100 and type VIA alloys at 1093 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Cermet, MCrAl, and modified aluminide types of coatings applied to IN-100 and NASA-TRW-VIA alloy specimens were cyclically oxidation tested in a high velocity (Mach 1) gas flame at 1093 C. Several coating compositions of each type were evaluated for oxidation resistance. The modified aluminide coating, Pt-Al, applied to alloy 6A proved to be the best, providing oxidation protection to approximately 750 hours based on weight change measurements. The second best, a CoCrAlY coating applied to 6A, provided protection to 450 hours. The third best was a cermet + aluminide coating on 6A with a protection time to 385 hours.

  20. Application of MCR-ALS to reveal intermediate conformations in the thermally induced α-β transition of poly-L-lysine monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaráz, Mirta R.; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Goicoechea, Héctor; Lendl, Bernhard

    2017-10-01

    Temperature-induced conformational transitions of poly-L-lysine were monitored with Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy between 10 °C and 70 °C. Chemometric analysis of dynamic IR spectra was performed by multivariate curve analysis-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) of the amide I‧ and amide II‧ spectral region. With this approach, the pure spectral and concentration profiles of the conformational transition were obtained. Beside the initial α-helical, the intermediate random coil/extended helices and the final β-sheet structure, an additional intermediate PLL conformation was identified and attributed to a transient β-sheet structure.

  1. Chapter 12: Sea Level Rise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, W. V.; Horton, R.; Kopp, R. E.; LeGrande, A. N.; Romanou, A.

    2017-01-01

    Global mean sea level (GMSL) has risen by about 7-8 inches (about 16-21 cm) since 1900, with about 3 of those inches (about 7 cm) occurring since 1993. Human-caused climate change has made a substantial contribution to GMSL rise since 1900, contributing to a rate of rise that is greater than during any preceding century in at least 2,800 years. Relative to the year 2000, GMSL is very likely to rise by 0.3-0.6 feet (9-18 cm) by 2030, 0.5-1.2 feet (15-38 cm) by 2050, and 1.0-4.3 feet (30-130 cm) by 2100. Future pathways have little effect on projected GMSL rise in the first half of the century, but significantly affect projections for the second half of the century. Emerging science regarding Antarctic ice sheet stability suggests that, for high emission scenarios, a GMSL rise exceeding 8 feet (2.4 m) by 2100 is physically possible, although the probability of such an extreme outcome cannot currently be assessed. Regardless of pathway, it is extremely likely that GMSL rise will continue beyond 2100. Relative sea level (RSL) rise in this century will vary along U.S. coastlines due, in part, to changes in Earth's gravitational field and rotation from melting of land ice, changes in ocean circulation, and vertical land motion (very high confidence). For almost all future GMSL rise scenarios, RSL rise is likely to be greater than the global average in the U.S. Northeast and the western Gulf of Mexico. In intermediate and low GMSL rise scenarios, RSL rise is likely to be less than the global average in much of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. For high GMSL rise scenarios, RSL rise is likely to be higher than the global average along all U.S. coastlines outside Alaska. Almost all U.S. coastlines experience more than global mean sea level rise in response to Antarctic ice loss, and thus would be particularly affected under extreme GMSL rise scenarios involving substantial Antarctic mass loss. As sea levels have risen, the number of tidal floods each year that cause minor

  2. Rising Food Prices: Who's Responsible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lester R.

    1973-01-01

    Rise in food prices can be partially attributed to the high food consumption level throughout Europe and North America, coupled with failure to evolve systems for more production of cattle, soybeans, and fisheries at lower cost. (PS)

  3. The Influence of the Coating Deposition Process on the Interdiffusion Behavior Between Nickel-Based Superalloys and MCrAlY Bond Coats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsaß, M.; Frommherz, M.; Oechsner, M.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, interdiffusion between two nickel-based superalloys and two MCrAlY bond coats is investigated. The MCrAlY bond coats were applied using two different spraying processes, high velocity oxygen fuel spraying (HVOF) and low-pressure plasma spraying. Of primary interest is the evolution of Kirkendall porosity, which can form at the interface between substrate and bond coat and depends largely on the chemical compositions of the coating and substrate. Experimental evidence further suggested that the formation of Kirkendall porosity depends on the coating deposition process. Formation of porosity at the interface causes a degradation of the bonding strength between substrate and coating. After coating deposition, the samples were annealed at 1050 °C for up to 2000 h. Microstructural and compositional analyses were performed to determine and evaluate the Kirkendall porosity. The results reveal a strong influence of both the coating deposition process and the chemical compositions. The amount of Kirkendall porosity formed, as well as the location of appearance, is largely influenced by the coating deposition process. In general, samples with bond coats applied by means of HVOF show accelerated element diffusion. It is hypothesized that recrystallization of the substrate material is a main root cause for these observations.

  4. Identification of Reliable Components in Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS): a Data-Driven Approach across Metabolic Processes.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Hiromi; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Saga, Ayako; Kagami, Tomoko; Inoue, Maki; Toki, Hideaki; Minowa, Osamu; Noda, Tetsuo; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-11-04

    There is an increasing need to use multivariate statistical methods for understanding biological functions, identifying the mechanisms of diseases, and exploring biomarkers. In addition to classical analyses such as hierarchical cluster analysis, principal component analysis, and partial least squares discriminant analysis, various multivariate strategies, including independent component analysis, non-negative matrix factorization, and multivariate curve resolution, have recently been proposed. However, determining the number of components is problematic. Despite the proposal of several different methods, no satisfactory approach has yet been reported. To resolve this problem, we implemented a new idea: classifying a component as "reliable" or "unreliable" based on the reproducibility of its appearance, regardless of the number of components in the calculation. Using the clustering method for classification, we applied this idea to multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). Comparisons between conventional and modified methods applied to proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectral datasets derived from known standard mixtures and biological mixtures (urine and feces of mice) revealed that more plausible results are obtained by the modified method. In particular, clusters containing little information were detected with reliability. This strategy, named "cluster-aided MCR-ALS," will facilitate the attainment of more reliable results in the metabolomics datasets.

  5. Glaciers and Sea Level Rise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Small valley glacier exiting the Devon Island Ice Cap in Canada. To learn about the contributions of glaciers to sea level rise, visit: www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/glacier-sea-rise.html Credit: Alex Gardner, Clark University NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  6. Glaciers and Sea Level Rise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Aerial view of the Sverdrup Glacier, a river of ice that flows from the interior of the Devon Island Ice Cap (Canada) into the ocean. To learn about the contributions of glaciers to sea level rise, visit: www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/glacier-sea-rise.html Credit: Alex Gardner, Clark University NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  7. Glaciers and Sea Level Rise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Melt water ponded at surface in the accumulation zone of Columbia Glacier, Alaska, in July 2008. To learn about the contributions of glaciers to sea level rise, visit: www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/glacier-sea-rise.html Credit: W. Tad Pfeffer, University of Colorado at Boulder NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  8. Glaciers and Sea Level Rise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Summit camp on top of the Austfonna Ice Cap in Svalbard (Norwegian Arctic). To learn about the contributions of glaciers to sea level rise, visit: www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/glacier-sea-rise.html Credit: Thorben Dunse, University of Oslo NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  9. Glaciers and Sea Level Rise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    This ice cave in Belcher Glacier (Devon Island, Canada) was formed by melt water flowing within the glacier ice. To learn about the contributions of glaciers to sea level rise, visit: www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/glacier-sea-rise.html Credit: Angus Duncan, University of Saskatchewan NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  10. Bottlenecks aggravate rising construction costs

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    2008-05-15

    Rising demand for power in developing countries combined with concerns about carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants in developed countries have created a bonanza for carbon-light technologies, including nuclear, renewables and natural gas plants. This, in turn, has put upward pressure on the price of natural gas in key markets while resulting in shortages in critical components for building renewables and nuclear reactors. Globalization of the power industry means that pressures in one segment or one region translate into shortages and rising prices everywhere else.

  11. Colistin and Polymyxin B Susceptibility Testing for Carbapenem-Resistant and mcr-Positive Enterobacteriaceae: Comparison of Sensititre, MicroScan, Vitek 2, and Etest with Broth Microdilution

    PubMed Central

    La, My-Van; Lin, Raymond T. P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Colistin and polymyxin B remain part of the last line of antibiotics for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, such as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Current joint EUCAST-CLSI recommendations are for broth microdilution (BMD) to be performed for MIC testing of colistin. Commercial susceptibility testing methods were evaluated and compared against the reference BMD, using a susceptibility breakpoint of ≤2 mg/liter for both colistin and polymyxin B. Seventy-six Enterobacteriaceae were included, of which 21 were mcr-1 positive (18 Escherichia coli isolates, 2 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates, and 1 Enterobacter aerogenes isolate). Rates of essential agreement (EA) of colistin test results between BMD and Vitek 2, Sensititre, and Etest were 93.4%, 89.5%, and 75.0%, respectively. Rates of EA of polymyxin B test results between BMD and Vitek 2, Sensititre, and Etest were 96.1%, 96.1%, and 48.7%, respectively. A positive MIC correlation with a categorical agreement of >90% was achieved for Sensititre (colistin Spearman's ρ = 0.863, and polymyxin B Spearman's ρ = 0.877) and Vitek 2 (polymyxin B [only] Spearman's ρ = 0.8917). Although a positive MIC correlation (Spearman's ρ = 0.873) with the reference method was achieved for colistin testing with Vitek 2, categorical agreement was <90%, with very major error rates of 36%. Correlation with the Etest MIC was lower, with very major error rates of 12% (colistin) and 26.1% (polymyxin B). MicroScan (colistin) categorical agreement was 88.2%, with a very major error rate of 4%. Colistin MICs for 15 of the 21 mcr-1-positive isolates were >2 mg/liter, and polymyxin MICs for 17 of them were >2 mg/liter by broth microdilution. The use of a lower breakpoint of ≤1 mg/liter further improves detection of mcr-1 for all testing methods. However, further data on the correlation between MICs and clinical outcome are required to determine the most suitable breakpoint to guide clinical management. PMID:28592552

  12. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  13. The Rise of Blog Nation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on the growth of blogs in popular culture, and the fact that they are becoming more widely accepted in the media industry. The rise and popularity of blogs--short for "Web logs"--are causing journalism educators to overhaul their teachings. In fact, blogging's influence varies from one university program to the next, just like…

  14. Helping Students Rise and Shine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Flynn; Gendron, Marcia; Nogar, Dan; Queen, Marjorie

    2018-01-01

    A high-poverty, previously low-performing elementary school in Maine shifted its from looking mainly at achievement and test scores to focusing on ways to create motivated, confident, engaged students. They created Rise and Shine, through which all 3rd-5th graders start each day with a fun, challenging activity chosen from a big menu--from…

  15. The Rise of Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umpstead, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the rise of online learning and describes how educators in Michigan are doing their part to harness the power of online learning to transform today's high school students into lifelong learners, a key component of students' long-term success in the global economy. The author urges schools to prepare for the growing demand in…

  16. High-Rising Rec Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Examines how tight urban sites can yield sports spaces that favorably compare to their more rural campus counterparts. Potential areas of concern when recreation centers are reconfigured into high-rise structures are highlighted, including building codes, building access, noise control, building costs, and lighting. (GR)

  17. What's Behind Rising Insurance Costs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Velma A.

    1970-01-01

    Rising risks, and losses resulting from civil disorders and vandalism are producing a squeeze on profits thus precipitating higher property insurance rates and deductibles, according to the insurance industry; while schoolmen lay the blame on industry panic. The conclusion is that school and insurance representatives must work together toward the…

  18. Aerodynamic investigations on a 0.004 scale model MCR 0074 baseline space shuttle launch vehicle at Mach numbers between 0.6 and 4.96

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, P.; Robertson, M. K.

    1973-01-01

    A test of a 0.004-scale MCR 0074 Baseline Launch Configuration Space Shuttle model was conducted in the NASA-MSFC 14 x 14-inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel (MSFC TWT 566). The objective of the test was to determine the effects of model parametric variations on aerodynamic static stability characteristics over a Mach number range from 0.6 to 4.96. Angles-of-attack from minus 10 deg to plus 10 deg at 0 deg sideslip and angles-of-sideslip from minus 10 deg to plus 10 deg at minus 5 deg, 0 deg, and plus 5 deg angle-of-attack were investigated. The basic configuration investigated was the integrated vehicle consisting of the orbiter, and external tank, and two solid rocket boosters. It was designated 03T9S3.

  19. Theoretical study of the electron affinities of MF6 and MF - 6 (M=Cr, Mo, and W) using a model potential method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yoshiko; Miyoshi, Eisaku

    1987-09-01

    Electronic structures of MF6, MF-6, and MF2-6 (M=Cr, Mo, and W) were calculated using a model potential method in the Hartree-Fock-Roothaan scheme. Major relativistic effects were taken into account for the calculations on MoFq6 and WFq6 (q=0, -1, and -2). It is shown that the calculated electron affinities (EAs) are extremely high for all the MF6 molecules, and that the CrF-6 and MoF-6 anions also have positive EAs, whereas the WF-6 anion has a slightly negative EA. The behaviors of the EAs are interpreted with reference to the electronic structures of the MFq6 systems.

  20. Analysis of pure tar substances (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) in the gas stream using ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and multivariate curve resolution (MCR).

    PubMed

    Weide, Tobias; Guschin, Viktor; Becker, Wolfgang; Koelle, Sabine; Maier, Simon; Seidelt, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of tar, mostly characterized as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), describes a topic that has been researched for years. An online analysis of tar in the gas stream in particular is needed to characterize the tar conversion or formation in the biomass gasification process. The online analysis in the gas is carried out with ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy (190-720 nm). This online analysis is performed with a measuring cell developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology (ICT). To this day, online tar measurements using UV-Vis spectroscopy have not been carried out in detail. Therefore, PAHs are analyzed as follows. The measurements are split into different steps. The first step to prove the online method is to vaporize single tar substances. These experiments show that a qualitative analysis of PAHs in the gas stream with the used measurement setup is possible. Furthermore, it is shown that the method provides very exact results, so that a differentiation of various PAHs is possible. The next step is to vaporize a PAH mixture. This step consists of vaporizing five pure substances almost simultaneously. The interpretation of the resulting data is made using a chemometric interpretation method, the multivariate curve resolution (MCR). The verification of the calculated results is the main aim of this experiment. It has been shown that the tar mixture can be analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively (in arbitrary units) in detail using the MCR. Finally it is the main goal of this paper to show the first steps in the applicability of the UV-Vis spectroscopy and the measurement setup on online tar analysis in view of characterizing the biomass gasification process. Due to that, the gasification plant (at the laboratory scale), developed and constructed by the Fraunhofer ICT, has been used to vaporize these substances. Using this gasification plant for the experiments enables the usage of the measurement setup also for the

  1. Glaciers and Sea Level Rise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Calving front of the Upsala Glacier (Argentina). This glacier has been thinning and retreating at a rapid rate during the last decades – from 2006 to 2010, it receded 43.7 yards (40 meters) per year. During summer 2012, large calving events prevented boat access to the glacier. To learn about the contributions of glaciers to sea level rise, visit: www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/glacier-sea-rise.html Credit: Etienne Berthier, Université de Toulouse NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  2. Glaciers and Sea Level Rise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Calving front of the Perito Moreno Glacier (Argentina). Contrary to the majority of the glaciers from the southern Patagonian ice field, the Perito Moreno Glacier is currently stable. It is also one of the most visited glaciers in the world. To learn about the contributions of glaciers to sea level rise, visit: www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/glacier-sea-rise.html Credit: Etienne Berthier, Université de Toulouse NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  3. Glaciers and Sea Level Rise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-05-15

    An airplane drops essential support on the Austfonna Ice Cap in Svalbard (Norwegian Arctic). The triangular structure is a corner reflector used as ground reference for airborne radar surveys. To learn about the contributions of glaciers to sea level rise, visit: www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/glacier-sea-rise.html Credit: Andrea Taurisano, Norwegian Polar Institute NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  4. Glaciers and Sea Level Rise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Peripheral glaciers and ice caps (isolated from the main ice sheet, which is seen in the upper right section of the image) in eastern Greenland. To learn about the contributions of glaciers to sea level rise, visit: www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/glacier-sea-rise.html Credit: Frank Paul, University of Zurich NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Glaciers and Sea Level Rise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    The Aletsch Glacier in Switzerland is the largest valley glacier in the Alps. Its volume loss since the middle of the 19th century is well-visible from the trimlines to the right of the image. To learn about the contributions of glaciers to sea level rise, visit: www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/glacier-sea-rise.html Credit: Frank Paul, University of Zurich NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  6. Falling and Rising in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz

    2010-01-01

    When an object is immersed in a liquid and released, it may sink to the bottom or rise to the surface and float. If the object's density is greater than that of the liquid, it sinks. If the object's density is less than the density of the liquid, it floats. In the special case when the object's density matches the density of the liquid, it will…

  7. Proton Fall or Bicarbonate Rise

    PubMed Central

    Theparambil, Shefeeq M.; Weber, Tobias; Schmälzle, Jana; Ruminot, Ivàn; Deitmer, Joachim W.

    2016-01-01

    Glycolysis is the primary step for major energy production in the cell. There is strong evidence suggesting that glucose consumption and rate of glycolysis are highly modulated by cytosolic pH/[H+], but those can also be stimulated by an increase in the intracellular [HCO3−]. Because proton and bicarbonate shift concomitantly, it remained unclear whether enhanced glucose consumption and glycolytic rate were mediated by the changes in intracellular [H+] or [HCO3−]. We have asked whether glucose metabolism is enhanced by either a fall in intracellular [H+] or a rise in intracellular [HCO3−], or by both, in mammalian astrocytes. We have recorded intracellular glucose in mouse astrocytes using a FRET-based nanosensor, while imposing different intracellular [H+] and [CO2]/[HCO3−]. Glucose consumption and glycolytic rate were augmented by a fall in intracellular [H+], irrespective of a concomitant rise or fall in intracellular [HCO3−]. Transport of HCO3− into and out of astrocytes by the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1) played a crucial role in causing changes in intracellular pH and [HCO3−], but was not obligatory for the pH-dependent changes in glucose metabolism. Our results clearly show that it is the cytosolic pH that modulates glucose metabolism in cortical astrocytes, and possibly also in other cell types. PMID:27422823

  8. Sea Level Rise Data Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quach, N.; Huang, T.; Boening, C.; Gill, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    Research related to sea level rise crosses multiple disciplines from sea ice to land hydrology. The NASA Sea Level Change Portal (SLCP) is a one-stop source for current sea level change information and data, including interactive tools for accessing and viewing regional data, a virtual dashboard of sea level indicators, and ongoing updates through a suite of editorial products that include content articles, graphics, videos, and animations. The architecture behind the SLCP makes it possible to integrate web content and data relevant to sea level change that are archived across various data centers as well as new data generated by sea level change principal investigators. The Extensible Data Gateway Environment (EDGE) is incorporated into the SLCP architecture to provide a unified platform for web content and science data discovery. EDGE is a data integration platform designed to facilitate high-performance geospatial data discovery and access with the ability to support multi-metadata standard specifications. EDGE has the capability to retrieve data from one or more sources and package the resulting sets into a single response to the requestor. With this unified endpoint, the Data Analysis Tool that is available on the SLCP can retrieve dataset and granule level metadata as well as perform geospatial search on the data. This talk focuses on the architecture that makes it possible to seamlessly integrate and enable discovery of disparate data relevant to sea level rise.

  9. Capillary rise between planar surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, Jeffrey W.; Garboczi, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    Minimization of free energy is used to calculate the equilibrium vertical rise and meniscus shape of a liquid column between two closely spaced, parallel planar surfaces that are inert and immobile. States of minimum free energy are found using standard variational principles, which lead not only to an Euler-Lagrange differential equation for the meniscus shape and elevation, but also to the boundary conditions at the three-phase junction where the liquid meniscus intersects the solid walls. The analysis shows that the classical Young-Dupré equation for the thermodynamic contact angle is valid at the three-phase junction, as already shown for sessile drops with or without the influence of a gravitational field. Integration of the Euler-Lagrange equation shows that a generalized Laplace-Young (LY) equation first proposed by O’Brien, Craig, and Peyton [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 26, 500 (1968)] gives an exact prediction of the mean elevation of the meniscus at any wall separation, whereas the classical LY equation for the elevation of the midpoint of the meniscus is accurate only when the separation approaches zero or infinity. When both walls are identical, the meniscus is symmetric about the midpoint, and the midpoint elevation is a more traditional and convenient measure of capillary rise than the mean elevation. Therefore, for this symmetric system a different equation is fitted to numerical predictions of the midpoint elevation and is shown to give excellent agreement for contact angles between 15° and 160° and wall separations up to 30mm . When the walls have dissimilar surface properties, the meniscus generally assumes an asymmetric shape, and significant elevation of the liquid column can occur even when one of the walls has a contact angle significantly greater than 90°. The height of the capillary rise depends on the spacing between the walls and also on the difference in contact angles at the two surfaces. When the contact angle at one wall is greater

  10. Oligonucleotide microarray chip for the quantification of MS2, ΦX174, and adenoviruses on the multiplex analysis platform MCR 3.

    PubMed

    Lengger, Sandra; Otto, Johannes; Elsässer, Dennis; Schneider, Oliver; Tiehm, Andreas; Fleischer, Jens; Niessner, Reinhard; Seidel, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Pathogenic viruses are emerging contaminants in water which should be analyzed for water safety to preserve public health. A strategy was developed to quantify RNA and DNA viruses in parallel on chemiluminescence flow-through oligonucleotide microarrays. In order to show the proof of principle, bacteriophage MS2, ΦX174, and the human pathogenic adenovirus type 2 (hAdV2) were analyzed in spiked tap water samples on the analysis platform MCR 3. The chemiluminescence microarray imaging unit was equipped with a Peltier heater for a controlled heating of the flow cell. The efficiency and selectivity of DNA hybridization could be increased resulting in higher signal intensities and lower cross-reactivities of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from other viruses. The total analysis time for DNA/RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis for RNA viruses, polymerase chain reaction, single-strand separation, and oligonucleotide microarray analysis was performed in 4-4.5 h. The parallel quantification was possible in a concentration range of 9.6 × 10(5)-1.4 × 10(10) genomic units (GU)/mL for bacteriophage MS2, 1.4 × 10(5)-3.7 × 10(8) GU/mL for bacteriophage ΦX174, and 6.5 × 10(3)-1.2 × 10(5) for hAdV2, respectively, by using a measuring temperature of 40 °C. Detection limits could be calculated to 6.6 × 10(5) GU/mL for MS2, 5.3 × 10(3) GU/mL for ΦX174, and 1.5 × 10(2) GU/mL for hAdV2, respectively. Real samples of surface water and treated wastewater were tested. Generally, found concentrations of hAdV2, bacteriophage MS2, and ΦX174 were at the detection limit. Nevertheless, bacteriophages could be identified with similar results by means of quantitative PCR and oligonucleotide microarray analysis on the MCR 3.

  11. Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) Mapping Coupled with Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) for Studying the Miscibility of Chlorobutyl Rubber/Polyamide-12 Blends.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongjiao; Jing, Nan; Zhang, Pudun

    2015-11-01

    A series of chlorobutyl rubber/polyamide-12 (CIIR/PA-12) blends compatibilized by different amounts of maleic anhydride (MAH) grafted polypropylene (PP-g-MAH) were investigated by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) mapping. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) was used to process the FT-IR images. Both the spectra of pure components in the blends and their concentration distributions in a micro-region were acquired. Our results demonstrated that the blend with 15 parts per hundred rubber PP-g-MAH showed the best miscibility. An amide interphase and an imide interphase were inferred by analyzing the spectra of MCR component 3 of the blends with and without PP-g-MAH, respectively. Correspondingly, two different compatibilizing mechanisms were proposed for these blends.

  12. Evaluation of carbonate diagenesis: A comparative study of minor elements, trace elements, and rare-earth elements (REE + Y) between Pleistocene corals and matrices from Grand Cayman, British West Indies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Jones, Brian

    2014-12-01

    On Grand Cayman, the Pleistocene Ironshore Formation consists of six unconformity-bounded units of limestones that have been partially or completely altered to calcite by post-depositional meteoric diagenesis. In order to examine the diagenetic history from the perspective of geochemical elements, the concentrations of minor element (Sr, Na, Mg), trace elements (Ba, Fe, Mn, Al, Si), and rare-earth elements (REE) and yttrium (Y) were determined for 105 corals and 84 matrices collected from the Rogers Wreck Point (RWP), Western Onshore area (WO), and offshore George Town (GT) areas. With the transformation of aragonite to calcite, the Sr, Na, and Ba values decreased, but Mg increased, which are indicative of diagenetic alteration in an open water system. Due to intrinsic "vital effects" and the extrinsic diagenetic environment, the variations of Sr, Na, Ba, and Mg concentrations between Acropora and Montastrea from the GT area are different to those of their counterparts from RWP and WO. The signatures of Sr, Na, Ba, and Mg are in good agreement with the diagenetic history as determined from petrographic and stable isotopic criteria. The REE + Y (REY) concentrations (ΣREY) are higher in the matrices (0.2-6.9 ppm, average 2.6 ppm) than in the associated corals (0.1-5.4 ppm, average 0.6 ppm). Shale-normalized REY patterns of the Pleistocene Ironshore Formation are similar to those of oxygenated seawater, which are characterized by (1) light REE depletion relative to heavy REE (average DySN/SmSN = 1.7, n = 35), (2) positive La anomalies (average Pr/Pr* = 1.17, n = 53), and (3) negative Ce anomalies (average Ce/Ce* = 0.49, n = 53). The preserved seawater-like REY distribution pattern, the lack of correlation between ΣREY and mineralogy, and the lack of correlation between ΣREY and diagenesis-sensitive stable oxygen isotope (δ18O) indicate that meteoric diagenesis did not have a major impact on the REY distribution patterns. The matrices and corals in the GT area

  13. Combination of Liquid Chromatography with Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least-Squares (MCR-ALS) in the Quantitation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Present in Paprika Samples.

    PubMed

    Monago-Maraña, Olga; Pérez, Rocío L; Escandar, Graciela M; Muñoz de la Peña, Arsenio; Galeano-Díaz, Teresa

    2016-11-02

    This work presents a strategy for quantitating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in smoked paprika samples. For this, a liquid chromatographic method with fluorimetric detection (HPLC-FLD) was optimized. To resolve some interference co-eluting with the target analytes, the second-order multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) algorithm has been employed combined with this liquid chromatographic method. Among the eight PAHs quantified (fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene, chrysene, benzo[a]anthracene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, and benzo[a]pyrene) by HPLC-FLD, only in the case of fluorene, pyrene, and benzo[b]fluoranthene was it necessary to apply the second-order algorithm for their resolution. Limits of detection and quantitation were between 0.015 and 0.45 mg/kg and between 0.15 and 1.5 mg/kg, respectively. Good recovery results (>80%) for paprika were obtained via the complete extraction procedure, consisting of an extraction from the matrix and the cleanup of the extract by means of silica cartridges. Higher concentrations of chrysene, benzo[a]anthracene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, and benzo[a]pyrene were found in the paprika samples, with respect to the maximal amounts allowed for other spices that are under European Regulation (EU) N° 2015/1933.

  14. Thermal Cycling Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings with MCrAlY Bond Coat Irradiated by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Lv, Peng; Guan, Qingfeng; Xu, Xiaojing; Lu, Jinzhong; Wang, Zhiping; Han, Zhiyong

    2016-11-30

    Microstructural modifications of a thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coat subjected to high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) and their relationships with thermal cycling behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were investigated. Microstructural observations revealed that the rough surface of air plasma spraying (APS) samples was significantly remelted and replaced by many interconnected bulged nodules after HCPEB irradiation. Meanwhile, the parallel columnar grains with growth direction perpendicular to the coating surface were observed inside these bulged nodules. Substantial Y-rich Al 2 O 3 bubbles and varieties of nanocrystallines were distributed evenly on the top of the modified layer. A physical model was proposed to describe the evaporation-condensation mechanism taking place at the irradiated surface for generating such surface morphologies. The results of thermal cycling test showed that HCPEB-TBCs presented higher thermal cycling resistance, the spalling area of which after 200 cycles accounted for only 1% of its total area, while it was about 34% for APS-TBCs. The resulting failure mode, i.e., in particular, a mixed delamination crack path, was shown and discussed. The irradiated effects including compact remelted surface, abundant nanoparticles, refined columnar grains, Y-rich alumina bubbles, and deformation structures contributed to the formation of a stable, continuous, slow-growing, and uniform thermally grown oxide with strong adherent ability. It appeared to be responsible for releasing stress and changing the cracking paths, and ultimately greatly improving the thermal cycling behavior of HCPEB-TBCs.

  15. Exploring the interaction between O₃ and NOx pollution patterns in the atmosphere of Barcelona, Spain using the MCR-ALS method.

    PubMed

    Malik, Amrita; Tauler, Roma

    2015-06-01

    This work focuses on understanding the behaviour and patterns of three atmospheric pollutants namely, nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) along with their mutual interactions in the atmosphere of Barcelona, North Spain. Hourly samples were collected for NO, NO2 and O3 from the same city location for three consecutive years (2010-2012). The study explores the seasonal, annual and weekday-weekend variations in their diurnal profiles along with the possible identification of their source and mutual interactions in the region. Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) was applied to the individual datasets of these pollutants, as well as to all of them simultaneously (augmented mode) to resolve the profiles related to their source and variation patterns in the atmosphere. The analysis of the individual datasets confirmed the source pattern variations in the concerned pollutant's profiles; and the resolved profiles for augmented datasets suggested for the mutual interaction of the pollutants along with their patterns variations, simultaneously. The study suggests vehicular pollution as the major source of atmospheric nitrogen oxides and presence of weekend ozone effect in the region. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. UV-visible-DAD and 1H-NMR spectroscopy data fusion for studying the photodegradation process of azo-dyes using MCR-ALS.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Cristina; Pilar Callao, M; Larrechi, M Soledad

    2013-12-15

    The photodegradation process of three azo-dyes - Acid Orange 61, Acid Red 97 and Acid Brown 425 - was monitored simultaneously by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy with diode array detector (UV-vis-DAD) and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR). Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) was applied to obtain the concentration and spectral profile of the chemical compounds involved in the process. The analysis of the H-NMR data suggests there are more intermediate compounds than those obtained with the UV-vis-DAD data. The fusion of UV-vis-DAD and the (1)H-NMR signal before the multivariate analysis provides better results than when only one of the two detector signals was used. It was concluded that three degradation products were present in the medium when the three azo-dyes had practically degraded. This study is the first application of UV-vis-DAD and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy data fusion in this field and illustrates its potential as a quick method for evaluating the evolution of the azo-dye photodegradation process. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Large Volcanic Rises on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Kiefer, Walter S.; Stofan, Ellen R.

    1997-01-01

    Large volcanic rises on Venus have been interpreted as hotspots, or the surface manifestation of mantle upwelling, on the basis of their broad topographic rises, abundant volcanism, and large positive gravity anomalies. Hotspots offer an important opportunity to study the behavior of the lithosphere in response to mantle forces. In addition to the four previously known hotspots, Atla, Bell, Beta, and western Eistla Regiones, five new probable hotspots, Dione, central Eistla, eastern Eistla, Imdr, and Themis, have been identified in the Magellan radar, gravity and topography data. These nine regions exhibit a wider range of volcano-tectonic characteristics than previously recognized for venusian hotspots, and have been classified as rift-dominated (Atla, Beta), coronae-dominated (central and eastern Eistla, Themis), or volcano-dominated (Bell, Dione, western Eistla, Imdr). The apparent depths of compensation for these regions ranges from 65 to 260 km. New estimates of the elastic thickness, using the 90 deg and order spherical harmonic field, are 15-40 km at Bell Regio, and 25 km at western Eistla Regio. Phillips et al. find a value of 30 km at Atla Regio. Numerous models of lithospheric and mantle behavior have been proposed to interpret the gravity and topography signature of the hotspots, with most studies focusing on Atla or Beta Regiones. Convective models with Earth-like parameters result in estimates of the thickness of the thermal lithosphere of approximately 100 km. Models of stagnant lid convection or thermal thinning infer the thickness of the thermal lithosphere to be 300 km or more. Without additional constraints, any of the model fits are equally valid. The thinner thermal lithosphere estimates are most consistent with the volcanic and tectonic characteristics of the hotspots. Estimates of the thermal gradient based on estimates of the elastic thickness also support a relatively thin lithosphere (Phillips et al.). The advantage of larger estimates of

  18. Valorization of onion waste and by-products: MCR-ALS applied to reveal the compositional profiles of alcoholic fermentations of onion juice monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    González-Sáiz, José-María; Esteban-Díez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Tecedor, Sofía; Pizarro, Consuelo

    2008-11-01

    The overall purpose of the project, of which this study is a part, was to examine the feasibility of onion waste as a support-substrate for the profitable production of food-grade products. This study focused on the efficient production of ethanol from worthless onions by transforming the onion juice into onion liquor via alcoholic fermentation with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The onion bioethanol produced could be later used as a favorable substrate for acetic fermentation to finally obtain onion vinegar. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), coupled with the multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method, has been used to reveal the compositional and spectral profiles for both substrates and products of alcoholic fermentation runs, that is, total sugars, ethanol, and biomass concentration. The ambiguity associated with the ALS calculation was resolved by applying suitable inequality and equality constraints. The quality of the results provided by the NIR-based MCR-ALS methodology adopted was evaluated by several performance indicators, including the variance explained by the model, the lack of fit and the agreement between the MCR-ALS achieved solution and the results computed by applying previously validated PLS reference models. An additional fermentation run was employed to test the actual predictive ability of the ALS model developed. For all the components resolved in the fermentation system studied (i.e., total sugars, ethanol, and biomass), the final model obtained showed a high predictive ability and suitable accuracy and precision, both in calibration and external validation, confirmed by the very good agreement between the ALS responses and the reference values (the coefficient of determination was, in all cases, very close to 1, and the statistics confirmed that no significant difference was found between PLS reference models and the MCR-ALS methodology applied). Thus, the proven reliability of the MCR-ALS model presented

  19. Stable plume rise in a shear layer.

    PubMed

    Overcamp, Thomas J

    2007-03-01

    Solutions are given for plume rise assuming a power-law wind speed profile in a stably stratified layer for point and finite sources with initial vertical momentum and buoyancy. For a constant wind speed, these solutions simplify to the conventional plume rise equations in a stable atmosphere. In a shear layer, the point of maximum rise occurs further downwind and is slightly lower compared with the plume rise with a constant wind speed equal to the wind speed at the top of the stack. If the predictions with shear are compared with predictions for an equivalent average wind speed over the depth of the plume, the plume rise with shear is higher than plume rise with an equivalent average wind speed.

  20. Facile controlled synthesis of micro/nanostructure MCrO 4 (M = Ba, Pb) by using Gemini surfactant C 12-PEG-C 12 as a soft template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wengui; Shen, Yuhua; Xie, Anjian; Liu, Xue

    2010-04-01

    Gemini surfactants, double sodium α-sulfonic polyethylene glycol laurate (abbreviated C 12-PEG-C 12), were prepared and applied as soft templates in the controlled synthesis of BaCrO 4 and PbCrO 4 micro/nanocrystals. The template effects were investigated by adjusting the length of the spacer, using PEG400 and PEG4000, of the Gemini surfactant. The results indicated that the size and morphology of BaCrO 4 and PbCrO 4 micro/nanocrystals varied with the change in spacer length of C 12-PEG-C 12, suggesting that the different lengths of the polyethylene glycol group spacers in the Gemini surfactants played a key role in determining the size and shape of the MCrO 4 micro/nanoparticles. The dynamic process of the formation of the novel morphology BaCrO 4 crystals showed that the morphology grew from a round-bar polyhedron, to regular polyhedron, to approximate octahedron to a uniform pistachio nut shape. The growth mechanism of the BaCrO 4 micro/nanocrystals was explained that C 12-PEG-C 12 had a greater interfacial adsorption and would effectively control the shape evolution during the crystal growth, while PbCrO 4 could be explained that the Gemini surfactants can undergo liquid-crystalline phase transitions with long channels providing a soft template effect and derived the nanorods formation. Room temperature fluorescence spectra were studied and these showed that the pistachio-shaped BaCrO 4 microcrystals and PbCrO 4 nanorods possess photoactive luminescence properties with emission peaks at 470 and 549 nm, respectively.

  1. Regional approaches in high-rise construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iconopisceva, O. G.; Proskurin, G. A.

    2018-03-01

    The evolutionary process of high-rise construction is in the article focus. The aim of the study was to create a retrospective matrix reflecting the tasks of the study such as: structuring the most iconic high-rise objects within historic boundaries. The study is based on contemporary experience of high-rise construction in different countries. The main directions and regional specifics in the field of high-rise construction as well as factors influencing the further evolution process are analyzed. The main changes in architectural stylistics, form-building, constructive solutions that focus on the principles of energy efficiency and bio positivity of "sustainable buildings", as well as the search for a new typology are noted. The most universal constructive methods and solutions that turned out to be particularly popular are generalized. The new typology of high-rises and individual approach to urban context are noted. The results of the study as a graphical scheme made it possible to represent the whole high-rise evolution. The new spatial forms of high-rises lead them to new role within the urban environments. Futuristic hyperscalable concepts take the autonomous urban space functions itself and demonstrate us how high-rises can replace multifunctional urban fabric, developing it inside their shells.

  2. The Rise and Fall of Energy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrock, Edith M.

    This paper discusses the rise and fall of energy education, justifies the commitment to achieve the goals of energy education, and suggests some strategies for accomplishing this objective. The rise of energy education is first discussed. Energy is not a newcomer to the K-12 school instructional program. Energy sources, forms, states, and uses…

  3. Spatial and spectral resolution of carbonaceous material from hematite (α-Fe2O3) using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) with Raman microspectroscopic mapping: implications for the search for life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joseph P; Smith, Frank C; Booksh, Karl S

    2017-08-21

    The search for evidence of extant or past life on Mars is a primary objective of both the upcoming Mars 2020 rover (NASA) and ExoMars 2020 rover (ESA/Roscosmos) missions. This search will involve the detection and identification of organic molecules and/or carbonaceous material within the Martian surface environment. For the first time on a mission to Mars, the scientific payload for each rover will include a Raman spectrometer, an instrument well-suited for this search. Hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) is a widespread mineral on the Martian surface. The 2LO Raman band of hematite and the Raman D-band of carbonaceous material show spectral overlap, leading to the potential misidentification of hematite as carbonaceous material. Here we report the ability to spatially and spectrally differentiate carbonaceous material from hematite using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) applied to Raman microspectroscopic mapping under both 532 nm and 785 nm excitation. For this study, a sample comprised of hematite, carbonaceous material, and substrate-adhesive epoxy in spatially distinct domains was constructed. Principal component analysis (PCA) reveals that both 532 nm and 785 nm excitation produce representative three-phase systems of hematite, carbonaceous material, and substrate-adhesive epoxy in the analyzed sample. MCR-ALS with Raman microspectroscopic mapping using both 532 nm and 785 nm excitation was able to resolve hematite, carbonaceous material, and substrate-adhesive epoxy by generating spatially-resolved chemical maps and corresponding Raman spectra of these spatially distinct chemical species. Moreover, MCR-ALS applied to the combinatorial data sets of 532 nm and 785 nm excitation, which contain hematite and carbonaceous material within the same locations, was able to resolve hematite, carbonaceous material, and substrate-adhesive epoxy. Using multivariate analysis with Raman microspectroscopic mapping, 785 nm excitation more effectively

  4. Rising tides, rising gates: The complex ecogeomorphic response of coastal wetlands to sea-level rise and human interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandi, Steven G.; Rodríguez, José F.; Saintilan, Neil; Riccardi, Gerardo; Saco, Patricia M.

    2018-04-01

    Coastal wetlands are vulnerable to submergence due to sea-level rise, as shown by predictions of up to 80% of global wetland loss by the end of the century. Coastal wetlands with mixed mangrove-saltmarsh vegetation are particularly vulnerable because sea-level rise can promote mangrove encroachment on saltmarsh, reducing overall wetland biodiversity. Here we use an ecogeomorphic framework that incorporates hydrodynamic effects, mangrove-saltmarsh dynamics, and soil accretion processes to assess the effects of control structures on wetland evolution. Migration and accretion patterns of mangrove and saltmarsh are heavily dependent on topography and control structures. We find that current management practices that incorporate a fixed gate for the control of mangrove encroachment are useful initially, but soon become ineffective due to sea-level rise. Raising the gate, to counteract the effects of sea level rise and promote suitable hydrodynamic conditions, excludes mangrove and maintains saltmarsh over the entire simulation period of 100 years

  5. Amplitude- and rise-time-compensated filters

    DOEpatents

    Nowlin, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    An amplitude-compensated rise-time-compensated filter for a pulse time-of-occurrence (TOOC) measurement system is disclosed. The filter converts an input pulse, having the characteristics of random amplitudes and random, non-zero rise times, to a bipolar output pulse wherein the output pulse has a zero-crossing time that is independent of the rise time and amplitude of the input pulse. The filter differentiates the input pulse, along the linear leading edge of the input pulse, and subtracts therefrom a pulse fractionally proportional to the input pulse. The filter of the present invention can use discrete circuit components and avoids the use of delay lines.

  6. Climate Adaptation and Sea Level Rise

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA supports the development and maintenance of water utility infrastructure across the country. Included in this effort is helping the nation’s water utilities anticipate, plan for, and adapt to risks from flooding, sea level rise, and storm surge.

  7. Why did employee health insurance contributions rise?

    PubMed

    Gruber, Jonathan; McKnight, Robin

    2003-11-01

    We explore the causes of the dramatic rise in employee contributions to health insurance over the past two decades. In 1982, 44% of those who were covered by their employer-provided health insurance had their costs fully financed by their employer, but by 1998 this had fallen to 28%. We discuss the theory of why employers might shift premiums to their employees, and empirically model the role of four factors suggested by the theory. We find that there was a large impact of falling tax rates, rising eligibility for insurance through the Medicaid system, rising medical costs, and increased managed care penetration. Overall, this set of factors can explain more than one-half of the rise in employee premiums over the 1982-1996 period.

  8. CRISM/HiRISE Correlative Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelos, F. P.; Murchie, S. L.; McGovern, A.; Milazzo, M. P.; Herkenhoff, K. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) are complementary investigations with high spectral resolution and broad wavelength coverage (CRISM ~20 m/pxl; ~400 - 4000 nm, 6.55 nm sampling) and high spatial resolution with broadband color capability (HiRISE ~25 cm/pxl; ~500, 700, 900 nm band centers, ~200-300 nm FWHM). Over the course of the MRO mission it has become apparent that spectral variations in the IR detected by CRISM (~1000 nm - 4000 nm) sometimes correlate spatially with visible and near infrared 3-band color variations observed by HiRISE. We have developed a data processing procedure that establishes a numerical mapping between HiRISE color and CRISM VNIR and IR spectral data and provides a statistical evaluation of the uncertainty in the mapping, with the objective of extrapolating CRISM-inferred mineralogy to the HiRISE spatial scale. The MRO mission profile, spacecraft capabilities, and science planning process emphasize coordinated observations - the simultaneous observation of a common target by multiple instruments. The commonalities of CRISM/HiRISE coordinated observations present a unique opportunity for tandem data analysis. Recent advances in the systematic processing of CRISM hyperspectral targeted observations account for gimbal-induced photometric variations and transform the data to a synthetic nadir acquisition geometry. The CRISM VNIR (~400 nm - 1000 nm) data can then be convolved to the HiRISE Infrared, Red, and Blue/Green (IRB) response functions to generate a compatible CRISM IRB product. Statistical evaluation of the CRISM/HiRISE spatial overlap region establishes a quantitative link between the data sets. IRB spectral similarity mapping for each HiRISE color spatial pixel with respect to the CRISM IRB product allows a given HiRISE pixel to be populated with information derived from the coordinated CRISM observation

  9. Rising Sea Levels: Truth or Scare?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Alan

    2007-01-01

    When "ITV News" ran an item that shocked the author, about rising sea levels that will have caused the entire evacuation of the islands by the end of this year, he began to wonder whether the Pacific Ocean is really rising as fast as this. The media reporting of such things can be a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it brought to the author's…

  10. HiRISE: The People's Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Eliason, E.; Gulick, V. C.; Spinoza, Y.; Beyer, R. A.; HiRISE Team

    2010-12-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera, orbiting Mars since 2006 on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), has returned more than 17,000 large images with scales as small as 25 cm/pixel. From it’s beginning, the HiRISE team has followed “The People’s Camera” concept, with rapid release of useful images, explanations, and tools, and facilitating public image suggestions. The camera includes 14 CCDs, each read out into 2 data channels, so compressed images are returned from MRO as 28 long (up to 120,000 line) images that are 1024 pixels wide (or binned 2x2 to 512 pixels, etc.). This raw data is very difficult to use, especially for the public. At the HiRISE operations center the raw data are calibrated and processed into a series of B&W and color products, including browse images and JPEG2000-compressed images and tools to make it easy for everyone to explore these enormous images (see http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/). Automated pipelines do all of this processing, so we can keep up with the high data rate; images go directly to the format of the Planetary Data System (PDS). After students visually check each image product for errors, they are fully released just 1 month after receipt; captioned images (written by science team members) may be released sooner. These processed HiRISE images have been incorporated into tools such as Google Mars and World Wide Telescope for even greater accessibility. 51 Digital Terrain Models derived from HiRISE stereo pairs have been released, resulting in some spectacular flyover movies produced by members of the public and viewed up to 50,000 times according to YouTube. Public targeting began in 2007 via NASA Quest (http://marsoweb.nas.nasa.gov/HiRISE/quest/) and more than 200 images have been acquired, mostly by students and educators. At the beginning of 2010 we released HiWish (http://www.uahirise.org/hiwish/), opening HiRISE targeting to anyone in the world with Internet access, and already more

  11. Socioecological Aspects of High-rise Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichner, Michael; Ivanova, Zinaida

    2018-03-01

    In this article, the authors consider the socioecological problems that arise in the construction and operation of high-rise buildings. They study different points of view on high-rise construction and note that the approaches to this problem are very different. They also analyse projects of modern architects and which attempts are made to overcome negative impacts on nature and mankind. The article contains materials of sociological research, confirming the ambivalent attitude of urban population to high-rise buildings. In addition, one of the author's sociological survey reveals the level of environmental preparedness of the university students, studying in the field of "Construction of unique buildings and structures", raising the question of how future specialists are ready to take into account socioecological problems. Conclusion of the authors: the construction of high-rise buildings is associated with huge social and environmental risks, negative impact on the biosphere and human health. This requires deepened skills about sustainable design methods and environmental friendly construction technologies of future specialists. Professor M. Eichner presents in the article his case study project results on implementation of holistic eco-sustainable construction principles for mixed-use high-rise building in the metropolis of Cairo.

  12. Strategic advantages of high-rise construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaskova, Natalya

    2018-03-01

    Traditional methods to assess the competitiveness of different types of real estate in the context of huge changes of new technological way of life don't provide building solutions that would be correct from a strategic perspective. There are many challenges due to changes in the consumers' behavior in the housing area. A multiplicity of life models, a variety of opportunities and priorities, traditions and new trends in construction should be assessed in terms of prospective benefits in the environment of the emerging new world order. At the same time, the mane discourse of high-rise construction mainly relates to its design features, technical innovations, and architectural accents. We need to clarify the criteria for economic evaluation of high-rise construction in order to provide decisions with clear and quantifiable contexts. The suggested approach to assessing the strategic advantage of high-rise construction and the prospects for capitalization of high-rise buildings poses new challenges for the economy to identify adequate quantitative assessment methods of the high-rise buildings economic efficiency, taking into account all stages of their life cycle.

  13. Visualizing Sea Level Rise with Augmented Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintisch, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Looking Glass is an application on the iPhone that visualizes in 3-D future scenarios of sea level rise, overlaid on live camera imagery in situ. Using a technology known as augmented reality, the app allows a layperson user to explore various scenarios of sea level rise using a visual interface. Then the user can see, in an immersive, dynamic way, how those scenarios would affect a real place. The first part of the experience activates users' cognitive, quantitative thinking process, teaching them how global sea level rise, tides and storm surge contribute to flooding; the second allows an emotional response to a striking visual depiction of possible future catastrophe. This project represents a partnership between a science journalist, MIT, and the Rhode Island School of Design, and the talk will touch on lessons this projects provides on structuring and executing such multidisciplinary efforts on future design projects.

  14. Sea Level Rise in Santa Clara County

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milesi, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Presentation by Cristina Milesi, First Author, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA at the "Meeting the Challenge of Sea Level Rise in Santa Clara County" on June 19, 2005 Santa Clara County, bordering with the southern portion of the San Francisco Bay, is highly vulnerable to flooding and to sea level rise (SLR). In this presentation, the latest sea level rise projections for the San Francisco Bay will be discussed in the context of extreme water height frequency and extent of flooding vulnerability. I will also present preliminary estimations of levee requirements and possible mitigation through tidal restoration of existing salt ponds. The examples will draw mainly from the work done by the NASA Climate Adaptation Science Investigators at NASA Ames.

  15. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  16. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  17. Raman Microspectroscopic Mapping with Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) Applied to the High-Pressure Polymorph of Titanium Dioxide, TiO2-II.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joseph P; Smith, Frank C; Ottaway, Joshua; Krull-Davatzes, Alexandra E; Simonson, Bruce M; Glass, Billy P; Booksh, Karl S

    2017-08-01

    The high-pressure, α-PbO 2 -structured polymorph of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 -II) was recently identified in micrometer-sized grains recovered from four Neoarchean spherule layers deposited between ∼2.65 and ∼2.54 billion years ago. Several lines of evidence support the interpretation that these layers represent distal impact ejecta layers. The presence of shock-induced TiO 2 -II provides physical evidence to further support an impact origin for these spherule layers. Detailed characterization of the distribution of TiO 2 -II in these grains may be useful for correlating the layers, estimating the paleodistances of the layers from their source craters, and providing insight into the formation of the TiO 2 -II. Here we report the investigation of TiO 2 -II-bearing grains from these four spherule layers using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) applied to Raman microspectroscopic mapping. Raman spectra provide evidence of grains consisting primarily of rutile (TiO 2 ) and TiO 2 -II, as shown by Raman bands at 174 cm -1 (TiO 2 -II), 426 cm -1 (TiO 2 -II), 443 cm -1 (rutile), and 610 cm -1 (rutile). Principal component analysis (PCA) yielded a predominantly three-phase system comprised of rutile, TiO 2 -II, and substrate-adhesive epoxy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) suggests heterogeneous grains containing polydispersed micrometer- and submicrometer-sized particles. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares applied to the Raman microspectroscopic mapping yielded up to five distinct chemical components: three phases of TiO 2 (rutile, TiO 2 -II, and anatase), quartz (SiO 2 ), and substrate-adhesive epoxy. Spectral profiles and spatially resolved chemical maps of the pure chemical components were generated using MCR-ALS applied to the Raman microspectroscopic maps. The spatial resolution of the Raman microspectroscopic maps was enhanced in comparable, cost-effective analysis times by limiting spectral resolution

  18. HIGH RISE OR LOW RISE. A STUDY OF DECISION FACTORS IN RESIDENCE HALLS PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS REPORT IS TO SERVE COLLEGE OFFICIALS, HOUSING ADMINISTRATORS, PLANNING GROUPS AND ARCHITECTS BY FOCUSING ON THE DECISION FACTORS WHICH RELATE TO HIGH-RISE AND LOW-RISE STUDENT HOUSING. DECISION FACTORS INCLUDE--(1) LAND USE IMPLICATIONS, (2) SITE REQUIREMENTS--BUILDING CODES, SUB-SOIL CONSIDERATIONS, NATURAL TERRAIN,…

  19. The Rising Cost of Private Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suttle, J. Lloyd

    1983-01-01

    The informational and analytical bases by which Yale University sets tuition levels and long-term pricing policies are illustrated. The rising cost of private higher education is discussed, considering historical trends, inflation, the institution's financial condition, comparative costs from other schools, and effect on enrollment. (MSE)

  20. Rising Political Consciousness: Transformational Learning in Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamis, Mazalan; Muhamad, Mazanah

    As part of a larger study (not discussed) ten educated Malaysian citizens were interviewed to find whether their rising political consciousness, over a ten year period (1988-1999), indicated that their transformation was influenced by their culture. The subjects were between 35-45 years old, married, with an average of four children. All were…

  1. Why does a spinning egg rise?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2018-03-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented concerning the rise of a spinning egg. It was found that an egg rises quickly while it is sliding and then more slowly when it starts rolling. The angular momentum of the egg projected in the XZ plane changed in the same direction as the friction torque, as expected, by rotating away from the vertical Z axis. The latter result does not explain the rise. However, an even larger effect arises from the Y component of the angular momentum vector. As the egg rises, the egg rotates about the Y axis, an effect that is closely analogous to rotation of the egg about the Z axis. Both effects can be described in terms of precession about the respective axes. Steady precession about the Z axis arises from the normal reaction force in the Z direction, while precession about the Y axis arises from the friction force in the Y direction. Precession about the Z axis ceases if the normal reaction force decreases to zero, and precession about the Y axis ceases if the friction force decreases to zero.

  2. The Enigma of Mercury's Northern Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, P. B.

    2018-05-01

    Various aspects of the "northern rise" make it hard to explain: Its composition and chronology don't stand out from its surroundings, it seems to have uplifted late, and it has a huge gravity anomaly. We'll discuss the possible formation mechanisms.

  3. The Rise of the Digital Public Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKendrick, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing shift to digital offerings among public libraries. Libraries increasingly are fulfilling roles as technology hubs for their communities, with high demand for technology and career development training resources. Ebooks and other digital materials are on the rise, while print is being scaled back. More libraries are turning to…

  4. The Rise of School-Supporting Nonprofits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Ashlyn Aiko; Gazley, Beth

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines voluntary contributions to public education via charitable school foundations, booster clubs, parent teacher associations, and parent teacher organizations. We use panel data on school-supporting charities with national coverage from 1995 to 2010, which we geocode and match to school districts. We document the meteoric rise of…

  5. How To Attack Rising Energy Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents manufacturer and engineer suggestions on how schools can solve their rising energy costs in the face of more demanding classroom needs placing greater demands of Heating and air conditioning ventilation systems. The use of CO2 sensors, boiler technology and two-pipe systems are explored. (GR)

  6. Calculation of Temperature Rise in Calorimetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.; Witt, Jerry

    1988-01-01

    Gives a simple but fuller account of the basis for accurately calculating temperature rise in calorimetry. Points out some misconceptions regarding these calculations. Describes two basic methods, the extrapolation to zero time and the equal area method. Discusses the theoretical basis of each and their underlying assumptions. (CW)

  7. States' Budgets Reflect Rising Tax Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Many state budgets are reaping the benefits of tax revenues that are rising faster than at any time since the economic slowdown ended. Overall tax collections by states rose by 11.7 percent in the first quarter of 2005, giving the legislatures extra cash to shore up school aid, increase teacher pay, and finance new initiatives such as full-day…

  8. Agriculture waste and rising CO2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Currently, there are many uncertainties concerning agriculture’s role in global environmental change including the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. A viable and stable world food supply depends on productive agricultural systems, but environmental concerns within agriculture have to...

  9. Rising Tides: Faculty Expectations of Library Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, Erica Carlson; O'English, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Looking at 2003-2009 LibQUAL+ responses at research-oriented universities in the United States, faculty library users report a significant and consistent rise in desires and expectations for library-provided online tools and websites, even as student user groups show declining or leveling expectations. While faculty, like students, also report…

  10. Sea Level Rise National Coastal Property Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of sea level rise on coastal properties depends critically on the human response to the threat, which in turn depends on several factors, including the immediacy of the risk, the magnitude of property value at risk, options for adapting to the threat and the cost of th...

  11. Sea Level Rise Impacts On Infrastructure Vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqualini, D.; Mccown, A. W.; Backhaus, S.; Urban, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Increase of global sea level is one of the potential consequences of climate change and represents a threat for the U.S.A coastal regions, which are highly populated and home of critical infrastructures. The potential danger caused by sea level rise may escalate if sea level rise is coupled with an increase in frequency and intensity of storms that may strike these regions. These coupled threats present a clear risk to population and critical infrastructure and are concerns for Federal, State, and particularly local response and recovery planners. Understanding the effect of sea level rise on the risk to critical infrastructure is crucial for long planning and for mitigating potential damages. In this work we quantify how infrastructure vulnerability to a range of storms changes due to an increase of sea level. Our study focuses on the Norfolk area of the U.S.A. We assess the direct damage of drinking water and wastewater facilities and the power sector caused by a distribution of synthetic hurricanes. In addition, our analysis estimates indirect consequences of these damages on population and economic activities accounting also for interdependencies across infrastructures. While projections unanimously indicate an increase in the rate of sea level rise, the scientific community does not agree on the size of this rate. Our risk assessment accounts for this uncertainty simulating a distribution of sea level rise for a specific climate scenario. Using our impact assessment results and assuming an increase of future hurricanes frequencies and intensities, we also estimate the expected benefits for critical infrastructure.

  12. Updating Maryland's sea-level rise projections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boesch, Donald F.; Atkinson, Larry P.; Boicourt, William C.; Boon, John D.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Dalrymple, Robert A.; Ezer, Tal; Horton, Benjamin P.; Johnson, Zoe P.; Kopp, Robert E.; Li, Ming; Moss, Richard H.; Parris, Adam; Sommerfield, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    With its 3,100 miles of tidal shoreline and low-lying rural and urban lands, “The Free State” is one of the most vulnerable to sea-level rise. Historically, Marylanders have long had to contend with rising water levels along its Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean and coastal bay shores. Shorelines eroded and low-relief lands and islands, some previously inhabited, were inundated. Prior to the 20th century, this was largely due to the slow sinking of the land since Earth’s crust is still adjusting to the melting of large masses of ice following the last glacial period. Over the 20th century, however, the rate of rise of the average level of tidal waters with respect to land, or relative sea-level rise, has increased, at least partially as a result of global warming. Moreover, the scientific evidence is compelling that Earth’s climate will continue to warm and its oceans will rise even more rapidly. Recognizing the scientific consensus around global climate change, the contribution of human activities to it, and the vulnerability of Maryland’s people, property, public investments, and natural resources, Governor Martin O’Malley established the Maryland Commission on Climate Change on April 20, 2007. The Commission produced a Plan of Action that included a comprehensive climate change impact assessment, a greenhouse gas reduction strategy, and strategies for reducing Maryland’s vulnerability to climate change. The Plan has led to landmark legislation to reduce the state’s greenhouse gas emissions and a variety of state policies designed to reduce energy consumption and promote adaptation to climate change.

  13. Visualization of mcr mRNA in a methanogen by fluorescence in situ hybridization with an oligonucleotide probe and two-pass tyramide signal amplification (two-pass TSA-FISH).

    PubMed

    Kubota, Kengo; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Harada, Hideki

    2006-09-01

    Two-pass tyramide signal amplification-fluorescence in situ hybridization (two-pass TSA-FISH) with a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled oligonucleotide probe was applied to detect prokaryotic mRNA. In this study, mRNA of a key enzyme for methanogenesis, methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcr), in Methanococcus vannielii was targeted. Applicability of mRNA-targeted probes to in situ hybridization was verified by Clone-FISH. It was observed that sensitivity of two-pass TSA-FISH was significantly higher than that of TSA-FISH, which was further increased by the addition of dextran sulphate in TSA working solution. Signals from two-pass TSA-FISH were more reliable compared to the weak, spotty signals yielded by TSA-FISH.

  14. Increasing proportion of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and emergence of a MCR-1 producer through a multicentric study among hospital-based and private laboratories in Belgium from September to November 2015.

    PubMed

    Huang, Te Din; Bogaerts, Pierre; Berhin, Catherine; Hoebeke, Martin; Bauraing, Caroline; Glupczynski, Youri

    2017-05-11

    Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) strains have been increasingly reported in Belgium. We aimed to determine the proportion of CPE among Enterobacteriaceae isolated from hospitalised patients and community outpatients in Belgium in 2015. For the hospitalised patients, the results were compared to a previous similar survey performed in the same hospitals in 2012. Twenty-four hospital-based and 10 private laboratories collected prospectively 200 non-duplicated Enterobacteriaceae isolates from clinical specimens. All isolates were screened locally by carbapenem disk diffusion using European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing methodology. Putative CPE strains with inhibition zone diameters below the screening breakpoints were referred centrally for confirmation of carbapenemase production. From September to November 2015, we found a proportion of clinical CPE of 0.55% (26/4,705) and of 0.60% (12/1,991) among hospitalised patients and among ambulatory outpatients respectively. Klebsiella pneumoniae (26/38) and OXA-48-like carbapenemase (28/38) were the predominant species and enzyme among CPE. One OXA-48-producing Escherichia coli isolated from a hospital was found carrying plasmid-mediated MCR-1 colistin resistance. Compared with the 2012 survey, we found a significant increased proportion of clinical CPE (0.55% in 2015 vs 0.25% in 2012; p = 0.02) and an increased proportion of hospitals (13/24 in 2015 vs 8/24 in 2012) with at least one CPE detected. The study results confirmed the concerning spread of CPE including a colistin-resistant MCR-1 producer in hospitals and the establishment of CPE in the community in Belgium. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  15. Hurricanes, sea level rise, and coastal change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger,, Asbury H.; Wang, Ping; Rosati, Julie D.; Roberts, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    Sixteen hurricanes have made landfall along the U.S. east and Gulf coasts over the past decade. For most of these storms, the USGS with our partners in NASA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have flown before and after lidar missions to detect changes in beaches and dunes. The most dramatic changes occurred when the coasts were completely submerged in an inundation regime. Where this occurred locally, a new breach was cut, like during Hurricane Isabel in North Carolina. Where surge inundated an entire island, the sand was stripped off leaving marshy outcrops behind, like during Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana. Sea level rise together with sand starvation and repeated hurricane impacts could increase the probabilities of inundation and degrade coasts more than sea level rise alone.

  16. Capillary rise and swelling in cellulose sponges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jonghyun; Kim, Jungchul; Kim, Ho-Young

    2015-11-01

    A cellulose sponge, which is a mundane example of a porous hydrophilic structure, can absorb and hold a significant amount of liquid. We present the results of experimental and theoretical investigation of the dynamics of the capillary imbibition of various aqueous solutions in the sponge that swells at the same time. We find that the rate of water rise against the resistance caused by gravitational and viscous effects deviates from Washburn's rule beyond a certain threshold height. We rationalize the novel power law of the rise height versus time by combining Darcy's law with hygroscopic swelling equation and also predict the threshold height. The scaling law constructed through this work agrees well with the experimental results, shedding light on the physics of capillary flow in deforming porous media.

  17. Rising temperatures place cities at risk

    SciTech Connect

    Tickell, C.

    1996-12-31

    This article focuses on vulerability of urban areas as the global temperature rises and the climate changes. Basic resources - food, water, building materials, and fuel - must be brought in; the external resource base is being depleted as a result of deforestation; disposal of wastes both toxic and not is an added stress; and health effected by air and water pollution is vulnerable. This article discusses these aspects along with the sociology of urban areas in our current world. Historical prospectives are included.

  18. Igneous rocks of the East Pacific Rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, A.E.J.; Engel, C.G.

    1964-01-01

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K2O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K2O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO2. Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts.The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 104.

  19. Claritas rise, Mars: Pre-Tharsis magmatism?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, J.M.; Anderson, R.C.; Williams, J.-P.; Ruiz, J.; McGuire, P.C.; Buczkowski, D.L.; Wang, R.; Scharenbroich, L.; Hare, T.M.; Connerney, J.E.P.; Baker, V.R.; Wheelock, S.J.; Ferris, J.C.; Miyamoto, H.

    2009-01-01

    Claritas rise is a prominent ancient (Noachian) center of tectonism identified through investigation of comprehensive paleotectonic information of the western hemisphere of Mars. This center is interpreted to be the result of magmatic-driven activity, including uplift and associated tectonism, as well as possible hydrothermal activity. Coupled with its ancient stratigraphy, high density of impact craters, and complex structure, a possible magnetic signature may indicate that it formed during an ancient period of Mars' evolution, such as when the dynamo was in operation. As Tharsis lacks magnetic signatures, Claritas rise may pre-date the development of Tharsis or mark incipient development, since some of the crustal materials underlying Tharsis and older parts of the magmatic complex, respectively, could have been highly resurfaced, destroying any remanent magnetism. Here, we detail the significant characteristics of the Claritas rise, and present a case for why it should be targeted by the Mars Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and Mars Express spacecrafts, as well as be considered as a prime target for future tier-scalable robotic reconnaissance. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  20. 21 CFR 137.185 - Enriched self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Enriched self-rising flour. 137.185 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.185 Enriched self-rising flour. Enriched self-rising flour... carbon dioxide evolved under ordinary conditions of use of the enriched self-rising flour is not less...

  1. 21 CFR 137.185 - Enriched self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enriched self-rising flour. 137.185 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.185 Enriched self-rising flour. Enriched self-rising flour... carbon dioxide evolved under ordinary conditions of use of the enriched self-rising flour is not less...

  2. 21 CFR 137.185 - Enriched self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enriched self-rising flour. 137.185 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.185 Enriched self-rising flour. Enriched self-rising flour... carbon dioxide evolved under ordinary conditions of use of the enriched self-rising flour is not less...

  3. 21 CFR 137.185 - Enriched self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Enriched self-rising flour. 137.185 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.185 Enriched self-rising flour. Enriched self-rising flour... carbon dioxide evolved under ordinary conditions of use of the enriched self-rising flour is not less...

  4. 21 CFR 137.180 - Self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Self-rising flour. 137.180 Section 137.180 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.180 Self-rising flour. (a) Self-rising flour, self-rising white flour, self-rising wheat flour, is an intimate mixture of flour, sodium bicarbonate, and one or more of the...

  5. Late Cretaceous-recent tectonic assembly of diverse crustal blocks in Central America, the Nicaraguan Rise, the Colombian Basin and northern South America as seen on a 1600-km-long, geologic and structural transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, J.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    We have constructed a 1600-km-long transect from northern Honduras to northern Colombia that crosses northeastward-striking crustal blocks using a combination of offshore seismic data, gravity and magnetic data, well subsidence information, nearby outcrop information, and results from previous thermochronological, geochronological, geochemical and paleostress studies. The transect defines three major crustal and structural provinces: 1) Precambrian-Paleozoic, Chortis continental block whose northern edge is defined by the North America-Caribbean plate boundary. Events in this ~20-25-km-thick province include two major unconformities at the top of the Cretaceous and Eocene, associated southeast-dipping thrust faults related to collision of the Great Arc of the Caribbean (GAC) and Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) with the Chortis continental block. A third event is Eocene to recent subsidence and transtensional basins formed during the opening of the Cayman trough; 2) Late Cretaceous GAC and CLIP of oceanic arc and plateau origin, whose northern, deformed edge corresponds to the mapped Siuna belt of northern Nicaragua. This crustal province has a ~15-20-km-thick crust and is largely undeformed and extends across the Lower Nicaraguan Rise, Hess fault, to the southern limit of the Colombian basin where about 300 km of this province has been subducted beneath the accretionary wedge of the South Caribbean deformed belt of northwestern South America; and 3) Eocene to recent accretionary prism and intramontane basins on continental crust of northern South America, where Miocene accelerated exhumation and erosion of Paleogene and Cretaceous rocks reflect either shallow subduction of the CLIP or the Panama collisional event to the southwest.

  6. Consumerism and wellness: rising tide, falling cost.

    PubMed

    Domaszewicz, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Annual employer-sponsored health plan cost increases have been slowing incrementally due to slowing health care utilization--a phenomenon very likely tied to the proliferation of health management activities, wellness programs and other consumerism strategies. This article describes the sharp rise in recent years of consumer-directed health plans (CDHPs) and explains what developments must happen for genuine consumer-directed health care to realize its full potential. These developments include gathering transparent health care information, increasing consumer demand for that information and creating truly intuitive data solutions that allow consumers to easily access information in order to make better health care decisions.

  7. Modeling pressure rise in gas targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangiri, P.; Lapi, S. E.; Publicover, J.; Buckley, K.; Martinez, D. M.; Ruth, T. J.; Hoehr, C.

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce a universal mathematical model to explain a gas target behaviour at steady-state time scale. To obtain our final goal, an analytical model is proposed to study the pressure rise in the targets used to produce medical isotopes on low-energy cyclotrons. The model is developed based on the assumption that during irradiation the system reaches steady-state. The model is verified by various experiments performed at different beam currents, gas type, and initial pressures at 13 MeV cyclotron at TRIUMF. Excellent agreement is achieved.

  8. Liquid jet pumped by rising gas bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N. A.; Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    A two-phase mathematical model is proposed for calculating the induced turbulent vertical liquid flow. Bubbles provide a large buoyancy force and the associated drag on the liquid moves the liquid upward. The liquid pumped upward consists of the bubble wakes and the liquid brought into the jet region by turbulent entrainment. The expansion of the gas bubbles as they rise through the liquid is taken into account. The continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically for an axisymmetric air jet submerged in water. Water pumping rates are obtained as a function of air flow rate and depth of submergence. Comparisons are made with limited experimental information in the literature.

  9. Measuring temperature rise during orthopaedic surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Manoogian, Sarah; Lee, Adam K; Widmaier, James C

    2016-09-01

    A reliable means for measuring temperatures generated during surgical procedures is needed to recommend best practices for inserting fixation devices and minimizing the risk of osteonecrosis. Twenty four screw tests for three surgical procedures were conducted using the four thermocouples in the bone and one thermocouple in the screw. The maximum temperature rise recorded from the thermocouple in the screw (92.7±8.9°C, 158.7±20.9°C, 204.4±35.2°C) was consistently higher than the average temperature rise recorded in the bone (31.8±9.3°C, 44.9±12.4°C, 77.3±12.7°C). The same overall trend between the temperatures that resulted from three screw insertion procedures was recorded with significant statistical analyses using either the thermocouple in the screw or the average of several in-bone thermocouples. Placing a single thermocouple in the bone was determined to have limitations in accurately comparing temperatures from different external fixation screw insertion procedures. Using the preferred measurement techniques, a standard screw with a predrilled hole was found to have the lowest maximum temperatures for the shortest duration compared to the other two insertion procedures. Future studies evaluating bone temperature increase need to use reliable temperature measurements for recommending best practices to surgeons. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rising synchrony controls western North American ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Black, Bryan A.; van der Sleen, Peter; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele; Griffin, Daniel; Sydeman, William J.; Dunham, Jason B.; Rykaczewski, Ryan R.; Garcia-Reyes, Marisol; Safeeq, Mohammad; Arismendi, Ivan; Bograd, Steven J.

    2018-01-01

    Along the western margin of North America, the winter expression of the North Pacific High (NPH) strongly influences interannual variability in coastal upwelling, storm track position, precipitation, and river discharge. Coherence among these factors induces covariance among physical and biological processes across adjacent marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we show that over the past century the degree and spatial extent of this covariance (synchrony) has substantially increased, and is coincident with rising variance in the winter NPH. Furthermore, centuries‐long blue oak (Quercus douglasii) growth chronologies sensitive to the winter NPH provide robust evidence that modern levels of synchrony are among the highest observed in the context of the last 250 years. These trends may ultimately be linked to changing impacts of the El Niño Southern Oscillation on mid‐latitude ecosystems of North America. Such a rise in synchrony may destabilize ecosystems, expose populations to higher risks of extinction, and is thus a concern given the broad biological relevance of winter climate to biological systems.

  11. Rising synchrony controls western North American ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Black, Bryan A; van der Sleen, Peter; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele; Griffin, Daniel; Sydeman, William J; Dunham, Jason B; Rykaczewski, Ryan R; García-Reyes, Marisol; Safeeq, Mohammad; Arismendi, Ivan; Bograd, Steven J

    2018-06-01

    Along the western margin of North America, the winter expression of the North Pacific High (NPH) strongly influences interannual variability in coastal upwelling, storm track position, precipitation, and river discharge. Coherence among these factors induces covariance among physical and biological processes across adjacent marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we show that over the past century the degree and spatial extent of this covariance (synchrony) has substantially increased, and is coincident with rising variance in the winter NPH. Furthermore, centuries-long blue oak (Quercus douglasii) growth chronologies sensitive to the winter NPH provide robust evidence that modern levels of synchrony are among the highest observed in the context of the last 250 years. These trends may ultimately be linked to changing impacts of the El Niño Southern Oscillation on midlatitude ecosystems of North America. Such a rise in synchrony may destabilize ecosystems, expose populations to higher risks of extinction, and is thus a concern given the broad biological relevance of winter climate to biological systems. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Occurrence of Extended Spectrum β-Lactamases, KPC-Type, and MCR-1.2-Producing Enterobacteriaceae from Wells, River Water, and Wastewater Treatment Plants in Oltrepò Pavese Area, Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Caltagirone, Mariasofia; Nucleo, Elisabetta; Spalla, Melissa; Zara, Francesca; Novazzi, Federica; Marchetti, Vittoria M.; Piazza, Aurora; Bitar, Ibrahim; De Cicco, Marica; Paolucci, Stefania; Pilla, Giorgio; Migliavacca, Roberta; Pagani, Laura

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the water compartment antibiotic-resistance contamination rates, 11 wells, five streams, and four treatment plants located in the Oltrepò Pavese area were screened for the presence of third generation cephalosporins resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Enterobacteriaceae were also characterized for the Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamases (ESBLs), carbapenemases, and mcr-1 genes presence. From December 2014 to November 2015, 246 water samples were filtered, plated on Plate Count Agar, MacConkey Agar, and MacConkey Agar with cefotaxime. Isolates were species identified using AutoSCAN-4-System and ESBLs, carbapenemases, and colistin resistance determinants were characterized by PCR, sequencing, and microarray. Plasmid conjugative transfer experiments, PCR-based Replicon typing, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, Multi-Locus-Sequence-Typing, and in-silico plasmid characterization were performed. A total of 132 enterobacteria isolates grew on MacConkey agar with cefotaxime: 82 (62.1%) were obtained from streams, 41 (31.1%) from treatment plants, and 9 (6.8%) from wells. Thirty out of 132 (22.7%) isolates, mainly belonging to Escherichia coli (n = 15) species, showed a synergic effect with piperacillin-tazobactam. A single ESBL gene of blaCTX−M-type was identified in 19/30 isolates. In further two E. coli strains, a blaCTX−M−1 gene co-existed with a blaSHV-type ESBL determinant. A blaSHV−12 gene was detected in two isolates of E. coli (n = 1) and Klebsiella oxytoca (n = 1), while any ESBL determinant was ascertained in seven Yersinia enterocolitica strains. A blaDHA-type gene was detected in a cefoxitin resistant Y. enterocolitica from a stream. Interestingly, two Klebsiella pneumoniae strains of ST307 and ST258, collected from a well and a wastewater treatment plant, resulted KPC-2, and KPC-3 producers, respectively. Moreover, we report the first detection of mcr-1.2 ST10 E. coli on a conjugative IncX4 plasmid (33.303 bp in size) from a stream of Oltrep

  13. Characterization of C1-Metabolizing Prokaryotic Communities in Methane Seep Habitats at the Kuroshima Knoll, Southern Ryukyu Arc, by Analyzing pmoA, mmoX, mxaF, mcrA, and 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Fumio; Tsunogai, Urumu; Suzuki, Masae; Kosaka, Ayako; Machiyama, Hideaki; Takai, Ken; Nunoura, Takuro; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Horikoshi, Koki

    2004-01-01

    Samples from three submerged sites (MC, a core obtained in the methane seep area; MR, a reference core obtained at a distance from the methane seep; and HC, a gas-bubbling carbonate sample) at the Kuroshima Knoll in the southern Ryuku arc were analyzed to gain insight into the organisms present and the processes involved in this oxic-anoxic methane seep environment. 16S rRNA gene analyses by quantitative real-time PCR and clone library sequencing revealed that the MC core sediments contained abundant archaea (∼34% of the total prokaryotes), including both mesophilic methanogens related to the genus Methanolobus and ANME-2 members of the Methanosarcinales, as well as members of the δ-Proteobacteria, suggesting that both anaerobic methane oxidation and methanogenesis occurred at this site. In addition, several functional genes connected with methane metabolism were analyzed by quantitative competitive-PCR, including the genes encoding particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA), soluble methane monooxygenase (mmoX), methanol dehydrogenese (mxaF), and methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA). In the MC core sediments, the most abundant gene was mcrA (2.5 × 106 copies/g [wet weight]), while the pmoA gene of the type I methanotrophs (5.9 × 106 copies/g [wet weight]) was most abundant at the surface of the MC core. These results indicate that there is a very complex environment in which methane production, anaerobic methane oxidation, and aerobic methane oxidation all occur in close proximity. The HC carbonate site was rich in γ-Proteobacteria and had a high copy number of mxaF (7.1 × 106 copies/g [wet weight]) and a much lower copy number of the pmoA gene (3.2 × 102 copies/g [wet weight]). The mmoX gene was never detected. In contrast, the reference core contained familiar sequences of marine sedimentary archaeal and bacterial groups but not groups specific to C1 metabolism. Geochemical characterization of the amounts and isotopic composition of pore water methane and

  14. Explaining the Paleoproterozoic Rise of O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Rye, R.; Kaufman, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    The Paleoproterozoic rise of atmospheric O2 is not understood. Geochemical evidence indicates pO2 \\leq 5 x 10-4 atm before ~ 2.2 Ga and >= 0.03 atm by 2.0 Ga [1]. Most models of this rapid oxygenation account for the timing in an ad hoc manner. In contrast, we suggest oxygenation was driven by rising solar luminosity, a hypothesis consistent with emerging geochemical evidence. Solar luminosity was { ~} 80 % of present value 2.75 Ga. Climate models indicate that pCO2 > 0.2 atm was required before 2.75 Ga if CO2 alone accounted for greenhouse enhancement that averted global glaciation [2]. Paleosols reveal pCO2 <= 10-1.4 atm between 2.75 and 2.2 Ga [3]. This constraint may extend earlier [4]. Given insufficient CO2, CH4 likely helped maintain surface temperature. pCH4 > 10-4 atm would have been adequate 2.75 Ga; Methanogens could sustain this level as long as pO2 was negligible [5]. Atmospheric CH4 and O2 are incompatible. If CH4 was a critical greenhouse gas, increases in pO2 caused global cooling. Temperature and photosynthetic O2 production are probably positively correlated between 273 and 300 K. Combined, these effects constituted a negative feedback on pO2: Excess O2 production cooled the surface, decreasing O2 production until pCH4 was restored. Methanogenesis was decoupled from this feedback as the bulk of Archean methanogens presumably lived in the deep ocean, insulated from surface temperature. Hence, the CH4 greenhouse acted as a cap on pO2 in the Archean. This cap would have eased as rising solar luminosity permitted "titration" of CH4 by increased O2 production; pO2 increased slowly as pCH4 decreased. This feedback suppressed pO2 until solar luminosity allowed the CO2-H2O greenhouse to maintain equable temperatures without appreciable CH4. This threshold was crossed { ~} 2.5 to 2.0 Ga [2], explaining Paleoproterozoic oxygenation. As Earth approached the threshold the CH4 buffer shrank and the likelihood of the feedback being temporarily overwhelmed by

  15. Analysis of Sea Level Rise in Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, K. M.; Huang, T.; Quach, N. T.; Boening, C.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Sea Level Change Portal provides scientists and the general public with "one-stop" source for current sea level change information and data. Sea Level Rise research is a multidisciplinary research and in order to understand its causes, scientists must be able to access different measurements and to be able to compare them. The portal includes an interactive tool, called the Data Analysis Tool (DAT), for accessing, visualizing, and analyzing observations and models relevant to the study of Sea Level Rise. Using NEXUS, an open source, big data analytic technology developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the DAT is able provide user on-the-fly data analysis on all relevant parameters. DAT is composed of three major components: A dedicated instance of OnEarth (a WMTS service), NEXUS deep data analytic platform, and the JPL Common Mapping Client (CMC) for web browser based user interface (UI). Utilizing the global imagery, a user is capable of browsing the data in a visual manner and isolate areas of interest for further study. The interfaces "Analysis" tool provides tools for area or point selection, single and/or comparative dataset selection, and a range of options, algorithms, and plotting. This analysis component utilizes the Nexus cloud computing platform to provide on-demand processing of the data within the user-selected parameters and immediate display of the results. A RESTful web API is exposed for users comfortable with other interfaces and who may want to take advantage of the cloud computing capabilities. This talk discuss how DAT enables on-the-fly sea level research. The talk will introduce the DAT with an end-to-end tour of the tool with exploration and animating of available imagery, a demonstration of comparative analysis and plotting, and how to share and export data along with images for use in publications/presentations. The session will cover what kind of data is available, what kind of analysis is possible, and what are the outputs.

  16. [Transformer winding's temperature rising and an analysis of its uncertainty].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Lian; Chen, Yu-En; Zhong, Sheng-Kui

    2007-09-01

    This paper introduces the temperature rising experimental process and some matters needing attention when the transformer is normally loading. And an analysis of the uncertainty for transformer's temperature rising is also made based on the practical examples' data.

  17. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise [Estimated Plume Rise (in Meters) Based...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise [Estimated Plume Rise (in Meters) Based...

  19. Sensitivity of air quality simulation to smoke plume rise

    Treesearch

    Yongqiang Liu; Gary Achtemeier; Scott Goodrick

    2008-01-01

    Plume rise is the height smoke plumes can reach. This information is needed by air quality models such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to simulate physical and chemical processes of point-source fire emissions. This study seeks to understand the importance of plume rise to CMAQ air quality simulation of prescribed burning to plume rise. CMAQ...

  20. Can salt marshes survive sea level rise ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambroni, N.; Seminara, G.

    2008-12-01

    Stability of salt marshes is a very delicate issue depending on the subtle interplay among hydrodynamics, morphodynamics and ecology. In fact, the elevation of the marsh platform depends essentially on three effects: i) the production of soil associated with sediments resuspended by tidal currents and wind waves in the adjacent tidal flats, advected to the marsh and settling therein; ii) production of organic sediments by the salt marsh vegetation; iii) soil 'loss' driven by sea level rise and subsidence. In order to gain insight into the mechanics of the process, we consider a schematic configuration consisting of a salt marsh located at the landward end of a tidal channel connected at the upstream end with a tidal sea, under different scenarios of sea level rise. We extend the simple 1D model for the morphodynamic evolution of a tidal channel formulated by Lanzoni and Seminara (2002, Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 107, C1) allowing for sediment resuspension in the channel and vegetation growth in the marsh using the depth dependent model of biomass productivity of Spartina proposed by Morris et al. (2002, Ecology, 83, pp. 2869 - 2877). We first focus on the case of a tide dominated salt marsh neglecting wind driven sediment resuspension in the shoal. Results show that the production of biomass plays a crucial role on salt marsh stability and, provided productivity is high enough, it may turn out to be sufficient to counteract the effects of sea level rise even in the absence of significant supply of mineral sediments. The additional effect of wind resuspension is then introduced. Note that the wind action is twofold: on one hand, it generates wind waves the amplitude of which is strongly dependent on shoal depth and wind fetch; on the other hand, it generates currents driven by the surface setup induced by the shear stress acting on the free surface. Here, each contribution is analysed separately. Results show that the values of bottom stress induced by

  1. Charge Transfer Salts of BO with Paramagnetic Isothiocyanato Complex Anions: (BO)[ M(isoq) 2(NCS) 4]; M=Cr III or Fe III, isoq=isoquinoline and BO=Bis(ethylenedioxo)tetrathiafulvalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setifi, Fatima; Ota, Akira; Ouahab, Lahcéne; Golhen, Stèphane; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi

    2002-11-01

    The preparation, X-ray structures and magnetic properties of two isostructural new charge transfer salts: (BO)[ M(isoq) 2(NCS) 4]; M=Cr III(1), Fe III(2) and isoq=isoquinoline are reported. Their structure consists of alternate organic and inorganic layers, each layer being formed by mixed columns of BO radical cations and paramagnetic metal complex anions. There are short intermolecular contacts between donor and anion (S2 anion· · ·S4 BO<3.5 Å) and between adjacent BO molecules (O· · · O1<3.2 Å). The two compounds are insulators. ESR measurements show single signal without separating the donor and anion spins. The magnetic measurements obey the Curie-Weiss law and revealed dominant antiferromagnetic interactions between anion spin and donor spin, but long-range magnetic ordering did not occur down to 2 K. This is directly related to structural reasons which were deduced from a comparison of the title compounds with other 1:1 salts containing same anion complexes and different donors.

  2. A novel spectral resolution and simultaneous determination of multicomponent mixture of Vitamins B1, B6, B12, Benfotiamine and Diclofenac in tablets and capsules by derivative and MCR-ALS.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Maha A; Abdelwahab, Nada S; Fayed, Ahmed S

    2015-04-05

    A novel method was developed for spectral resolution and further determination of five-component mixture including Vitamin B complex (B1, B6, B12 and Benfotiamine) along with the commonly co-formulated Diclofenac. The method is simple, sensitive, precise and could efficiently determine the five components by a complementary application of two different techniques. The first is univariate second derivative method that was successfully applied for determination of Vitamin B12. The second is Multivariate Curve Resolution using the Alternating Least Squares method (MCR-ALS) by which an efficient resolution and quantitation of the quaternary spectrally overlapped Vitamin B1, Vitamin B6, Benfotiamine and Diclofenac sodium were achieved. The effect of different constraints was studied and the correlation between the true spectra and the estimated spectral profiles were found to be 0.9998, 0.9983, 0.9993 and 0.9933 for B1, B6, Benfotiamine and Diclofenac, respectively. All components were successfully determined in tablets and capsules and the results were compared to HPLC methods and they were found to be statistically non-significant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel spectral resolution and simultaneous determination of multicomponent mixture of Vitamins B1, B6, B12, Benfotiamine and Diclofenac in tablets and capsules by derivative and MCR-ALS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazy, Maha A.; Abdelwahab, Nada S.; Fayed, Ahmed S.

    2015-04-01

    A novel method was developed for spectral resolution and further determination of five-component mixture including Vitamin B complex (B1, B6, B12 and Benfotiamine) along with the commonly co-formulated Diclofenac. The method is simple, sensitive, precise and could efficiently determine the five components by a complementary application of two different techniques. The first is univariate second derivative method that was successfully applied for determination of Vitamin B12. The second is Multivariate Curve Resolution using the Alternating Least Squares method (MCR-ALS) by which an efficient resolution and quantitation of the quaternary spectrally overlapped Vitamin B1, Vitamin B6, Benfotiamine and Diclofenac sodium were achieved. The effect of different constraints was studied and the correlation between the true spectra and the estimated spectral profiles were found to be 0.9998, 0.9983, 0.9993 and 0.9933 for B1, B6, Benfotiamine and Diclofenac, respectively. All components were successfully determined in tablets and capsules and the results were compared to HPLC methods and they were found to be statistically non-significant.

  4. Phenomenological Inquiry into Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sneed, Jenilee; Hammer, Tonya

    2018-04-26

    There is growing recognition within psychology and other disciplines that body experience may be as important as cognitive and emotional experience. However, psychology has few psychotherapeutic interventions to support the integration of mind and body within therapy. Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy (PRYT) is a form of mind-body therapy that uses yoga posture, touch, and psychotherapeutic dialogue to facilitate growth and healing. The current study explored the phenomenological experience of four women who each received five PRYT sessions. Research questions posed were: (1) What are the clients' experiences of the phenomena of PRYT? and (2) How does receiving PRYT sessions impact the clients' lives? The following themes emerged from the data as the essence of PRYT sessions: mindfulness, self-awareness, mind-body connection, in vivo experience of new behaviors, client-directed, empowerment, and life changes. These themes show significance in the mind-body connection and that it is important to consider alternative modalities such as PRYT for clients. Each participant noted greater insight into mind-body connection. They noticed the effect of cognition and emotion on the body, observed how the body can be used to improve coping through movement and breathing, and experienced different thoughts and emotions associated with different areas of their bodies. Although these results are not necessarily generalizable, they offer interesting theoretical implications for embodied interventions.

  5. Rising Expectations: Access to Biomedical Information

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, D. A. B.; Humphreys, B. L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objective To provide an overview of the expansion in public access to electronic biomedical information over the past two decades, with an emphasis on developments to which the U.S. National Library of Medicine contributed. Methods Review of the increasingly broad spectrum of web-accessible genomic data, biomedical literature, consumer health information, clinical trials data, and images. Results The amount of publicly available electronic biomedical information has increased dramatically over the past twenty years. Rising expectations regarding access to biomedical information were stimulated by the spread of the Internet, the World Wide Web, advanced searching and linking techniques. These informatics advances simplified and improved access to electronic information and reduced costs, which enabled inter-organizational collaborations to build and maintain large international information resources and also aided outreach and education efforts The demonstrated benefits of free access to electronic biomedical information encouraged the development of public policies that further increase the amount of information available. Conclusions Continuing rapid growth of publicly accessible electronic biomedical information presents tremendous opportunities and challenges, including the need to ensure uninterrupted access during disasters or emergencies and to manage digital resources so they remain available for future generations. PMID:18587496

  6. Drivers of Pontocaspian Biodiversity Rise and Demise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesselingh, Frank; Flecker, Rachel; Wilke, Thomas; Leroy, Suzanne; Krijgsman, Wout; Stoica, Marius

    2015-04-01

    In the past two million years, the region of the Black Sea Basin, Caspian Basin and adjacent Anatolia and the Balkans were the stage of the evolution of a unique brackish water fauna, the so-called Pontocaspian fauna. The fauna is the result of assembly of genera with a Paratethyan origin and Anatolian origins during the Early Pleistocene. The rapid diversification of the Pontocaspian fauna is the result of the very dynamic nature of the lakes (the Caspian Sea is technically a lake) and seas in the region in the past two million years. In most times the various lake basins were isolated (like today), but in other episodes connections existed. Regional and global climate as well as the regional tectonic regimes were main drivers of lake basin evolution. Over the past 80 years a major biodiversity crisis is hitting the Pontocaspian faunas due to environmental degradation, pollution and invasive species. In the new EU-ETN PRIDE (Drivers of Pontocaspian Biodiversity Rise and Demise)we will be documenting the geological context of past diversifications and turnover events. We present examples of rapid turnover (biodiversity crises) in the Quaternary, assess driving forces and draw implications for the nature of the current human-mediated biodiversity crisis in the region.

  7. China's rising hydropower demand challenges water sector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junguo; Zhao, Dandan; Gerbens-Leenes, P W; Guan, Dabo

    2015-07-09

    Demand for hydropower is increasing, yet the water footprints (WFs) of reservoirs and hydropower, and their contributions to water scarcity, are poorly understood. Here, we calculate reservoir WFs (freshwater that evaporates from reservoirs) and hydropower WFs (the WF of hydroelectricity) in China based on data from 875 representative reservoirs (209 with power plants). In 2010, the reservoir WF totaled 27.9 × 10(9) m(3) (Gm(3)), or 22% of China's total water consumption. Ignoring the reservoir WF seriously underestimates human water appropriation. The reservoir WF associated with industrial, domestic and agricultural WFs caused water scarcity in 6 of the 10 major Chinese river basins from 2 to 12 months annually. The hydropower WF was 6.6 Gm(3) yr(-1) or 3.6 m(3) of water to produce a GJ (10(9) J) of electricity. Hydropower is a water intensive energy carrier. As a response to global climate change, the Chinese government has promoted a further increase in hydropower energy by 70% by 2020 compared to 2012. This energy policy imposes pressure on available freshwater resources and increases water scarcity. The water-energy nexus requires strategic and coordinated implementations of hydropower development among geographical regions, as well as trade-off analysis between rising energy demand and water use sustainability.

  8. Volcanic rocks cored on hess rise, Western Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallier, T.L.; Windom, K.E.; Seifert, K.E.; Thiede, Jorn

    1980-01-01

    Large aseismic rises and plateaus in the western Pacific include the Ontong-Java Plateau, Magellan Rise, Shatsky Rise, Mid-Pacific Mountains, and Hess Rise. These are relatively old features that rise above surrounding sea floors as bathymetric highs. Thick sequences of carbonate sediments overlie, what are believed to be, Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous volcanic pedestals. We discuss here petrological and tectonic implications of data from volcanic rocks cored on Hess Rise. The data suggest that Hess Rise originated at a spreading centre in the late early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian stages). Subsequent off-ridge volcanism in the late Albian-early Cenomanian stages built a large archipelago of oceanic islands and seamounts composed, at least in part, of alkalic rocks. The volcanic platform subsided during its northward passage through the mid-Cretaceousequatorial zone. Faulting and uplift, and possibly volcanism, occurred in the latest Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian stages). Since then, Hess Rise continued its northward movement and subsidence. Volcanic rocks from holes drilled on Hess Rise during IPOD Leg 62 (Fig. 1) are briefly described here and we relate the petrological data to the origin and evolution of that rise. These are the first volcanic rocks reported from Hess Rise. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  9. Historical Perspective on the Rise and Fall and Rise of Antibiotics and Human Weight Gain.

    PubMed

    Podolsky, Scott H

    2017-01-17

    In recent medical and popular literature, audiences have been asked to consider whether antibiotics have contributed to the rising obesity epidemic. Prominent magazines have stated that weight may be adversely affected by antibiotics that destroy existing microbiomes and replace them with less helpful ones. However, there is a long history of efforts to investigate the relationship between antibiotics and human weight gain. In the early 1950s, amid initial findings that low doses of antibiotics served as growth promoters in animal livestock, investigators explored the role of antibiotics as magic bullets for human malnutrition. Nevertheless, early enthusiasm was tempered by controlled studies showing that antibiotics did not serve as useful, nonspecific growth promoters for humans. In subsequent decades, against the backdrop of rising concern over antibiotic resistance, investigators studying the role of antibiotics in acute malnutrition have had to navigate a more complicated public health calculus. In a related historical stream, scientists since the 1910s have explored the role of the intestinal microflora in human health. By the 2000s, as increasing resources and more sophisticated tools were devoted to understanding the microbiome (a term coined in 2001), attention would turn to the role of antibiotics and the intestinal microflora in the rising obesity epidemic. Despite scientific and commercial enthusiasm, easy answers (whether about antibiotics or probiotics) have again given way to an appreciation for the complexity of human growth. History encourages caution about our hopes for simplistic answers for presumed "fat drugs" and slimming probiotics alike.

  10. Rising utilization of inpatient pediatric asthma pathways.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Sunitha V; Rodean, Jonathan; Bekmezian, Arpi; Hall, Matt; Shah, Samir S; Mahant, Sanjay; Parikh, Kavita; Morse, Rustin; Puls, Henry; Cabana, Michael D

    2018-02-01

    Clinical pathways are detailed care plans that operationalize evidence-based guidelines into an accessible format for health providers. Their goal is to link evidence to practice to optimize patient outcomes and delivery efficiency. It is unknown to what extent inpatient pediatric asthma pathways are being utilized nationally. (1) Describe inpatient pediatric asthma pathway design and implementation across a large hospital network. (2) Compare characteristics of hospitals with and without pathways. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional, survey study of hospitals in the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings Network (75% children's hospitals, 25% community hospitals). Our survey determined if each hospital used a pathway and pathway characteristics (e.g. pathway elements, implementation methods). Hospitals with and without pathways were compared using Chi-square tests (categorical variables) and Student's t-tests (continuous variables). Surveys were distributed to 3-5 potential participants from each hospital and 302 (74%) participants responded, representing 86% (106/123) of surveyed hospitals. From 2005-2015, the proportion of hospitals utilizing inpatient asthma pathways increased from 27% to 86%. We found variation in pathway elements, implementation strategies, electronic medical record integration, and compliance monitoring across hospitals. Hospitals with pathways had larger inpatient pediatric programs [mean 12.1 versus 6.1 full-time equivalents, p = 0.04] and were more commonly free-standing children's hospitals (52% versus 23%, p = 0.05). From 2005-2015, there was a dramatic rise in implementation of inpatient pediatric asthma pathways. We found variation in many aspects of pathway design and implementation. Future studies should determine optimal implementation strategies to better support hospital-level efforts in improving pediatric asthma care and outcomes.

  11. The rise and fall of gluten!

    PubMed

    Aziz, Imran; Branchi, Federica; Sanders, David S

    2015-08-01

    Mankind has existed for 2·5 million years but only in the last 10,000 years have we been exposed to wheat. Wheat was first cultivated in the Fertile Crescent (South Western Asia) with a farming expansion that lasted from about 9000BC to 4000BC. Thus it could be considered that wheat (and gluten) is a novel introduction to man's diet! Prior to 1939 the rationing system had already been devised. This led to an imperative to try to increase agricultural production. Thus it was agreed in 1941 that there was a need to establish a Nutrition Society. The very roots of the society were geared towards necessarily increasing the production of wheat. This goal was achieved and by the end of the 20th century, global wheat output had expanded 5-fold. Perhaps as a result the epidemiology of coeliac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy has changed. CD is a state of heightened immunological responsiveness to ingested gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. CD now affects 1 % or more of all adults, for which the treatment is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. However, there is a growing body of evidence to show that a far greater proportion of individuals without coeliac disease are taking a gluten-free diet of their own volition. This clinical entity has been termed non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), although the condition is fraught with complexities due to overlap with other gluten-based constituents that can also trigger similar clinical symptoms. This review will explore the relationship between gluten, the rising prevalence of modern coeliac disease, and the new entity of NCGS along with its associated uncertainties.

  12. Outer Rise Faulting And Mantle Serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranero, C. R.; Phipps Morgan, J.; McIntosh, K.; Reichert, C.

    Dehydration of serpentinized mantle of the downgoing slab has been proposed to cause both intermediate depth earthquakes (50-300 km) and arc volcanism at sub- duction zones. It has been suggested that most of this serpentinization occurs beneath the outer rise; where normal faulting earthquakes due to bending cut > 20 km deep into the lithosphere, allowing seawater to reach and react with underlying mantle. However, little is known about flexural faulting at convergent margins; about how many normal faults cut across the crust and how deeply they penetrate into the man- tle; about the true potential of faults as conduits for fluid flow and how much water can be added through this process. We present evidence that pervasive flexural faulting may cut deep into the mantle and that the amount of faulting vary dramatically along strike at subduction zones. Flexural faulting increases towards the trench axis indicat- ing that active extension occurs in a broad area. Multibeam bathymetry of the Pacific margin of Costa Rica and Nicaragua shows a remarkable variation in the amount of flexural faulting along the incoming ocean plate. Several parameters seem to control lateral variability. Off south Costa Rica thick crust of the Cocos Ridge flexes little, and little to no faulting develops near the trench. Off central Costa Rica, normal thick- ness crust with magnetic anomalies striking oblique to the trench displays small offset faults (~200 m) striking similar to the original seafloor fabric. Off northern Costa Rica, magnetic anomalies strike perpendicular to the trench axis, and a few ~100m-offset faults develop parallel to the trench. Further north, across the Nicaraguan margin, magnetic anomalies strike parallel to the trench and the most widespread faulting de- velops entering the trench. Multichannel seismic reflection images in this area show a pervasive set of trenchward dipping reflections that cross the ~6 km thick crust and extend into the mantle to depths of at

  13. Isotope and trace element insights into heterogeneity of subridge mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Soumen; Dick, Henry J. B.; Sachi-Kocher, Afi; Salters, Vincent J. M.

    2014-06-01

    Geochemical data for abyssal peridotites are used to determine the relationship to mid-ocean ridge basalts from several locations at ridge segments on the SW Indian Ridge (SWIR), the Mid-Cayman-Rise (MCR), and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Based on chemical and petrological criteria peridotites are categorized as being either dominantly impregnated with melt or being residual after recent melting. Those that are considered impregnated with melt also have isotopic compositions similar to the basalts indicating impregnation by an aggregate MORB melt. A SWIR and MCR residual peridotite Nd-isotopic compositions partly overlap the Nd-isotopic compositions of the basalts but extend to more radiogenic compositions. The differences between peridotite and basalt Nd-isotopic compositions can be explained by incorporating a low-solidus component with enriched isotopic signature in the subridge mantle: a component that is preferentially sampled by the basalts. At the MAR, peridotites and associated basalts have overlapping Nd-isotopic compositions, suggesting a more homogeneous MORB mantle. The combined chemistry and petrography indicates a complex history with several depletion and enrichment events. The MCR data indicate that a low-solidus component can be a ubiquitous component of the asthenosphere. Residual abyssal peridotites from limited geographic areas also show significant chemical variations that could be associated with initial mantle heterogeneities related to events predating the ridge-melting event. Sm-Nd model ages for possible earlier depletion events suggest these could be as old as 2.4 Ga. This article was corrected on 9 JULY 2014. See the end of the full text for details.

  14. Sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (SunRISE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Justin C.; SunRISE Team

    2018-06-01

    The Sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (SunRISE) is a NASA Heliophysics Explorer Mission of Opportunity currently in Phase A. SunRISE is a constellation of spacecraft flying in a 10-km diameter formation and operating as the first imaging radio interferometer in space. The purpose of SunRISE is to reveal critical aspects of solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration at coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and transport into space by making the first spatially resolved observations of coherent Type II and III radio bursts produced by electrons accelerated at CMEs or released from flares. SunRISE will focus on solar Decametric-Hectometric (DH, 0.1 < f < 15 MHz) radio bursts that always are detected from space before major SEP events, but cannot be seen on Earth due to ionospheric absorption. This talk will describe SunRISE objectives and implementation. Presented on behalf of the entire SunRISE team.

  15. Rise and Shock: Optimal Defibrillator Placement in a High-rise Building.

    PubMed

    Chan, Timothy C Y

    2017-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) in high-rise buildings experience lower survival and longer delays until paramedic arrival. Use of publicly accessible automated external defibrillators (AED) can improve survival, but "vertical" placement has not been studied. We aim to determine whether elevator-based or lobby-based AED placement results in shorter vertical distance travelled ("response distance") to OHCAs in a high-rise building. We developed a model of a single-elevator, n-floor high-rise building. We calculated and compared the average distance from AED to floor of arrest for the two AED locations. We modeled OHCA occurrences using floor-specific Poisson processes, the risk of OHCA on the ground floor (λ 1 ) and the risk on any above-ground floor (λ). The elevator was modeled with an override function enabling direct travel to the target floor. The elevator location upon override was modeled as a discrete uniform random variable. Calculations used the laws of probability. Elevator-based AED placement had shorter average response distance if the number of floors (n) in the building exceeded three quarters of the ratio of ground-floor OHCA risk to above-ground floor risk (λ 1 /λ) plus one half (n ≥ 3λ 1 /4λ + 0.5). Otherwise, a lobby-based AED had shorter average response distance. If OHCA risk on each floor was equal, an elevator-based AED had shorter average response distance. Elevator-based AEDs travel less vertical distance to OHCAs in tall buildings or those with uniform vertical risk, while lobby-based AEDs travel less vertical distance in buildings with substantial lobby, underground, and nearby street-level traffic and OHCA risk.

  16. The communicative functions of final rises in Finnish intonation.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Richard; Routarinne, Sara

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers the communicative function of final rises in Finnish conversational talk between pairs of teenage girls. Final rises are fairly common, occurring approximately twice a minute, predominantly on declaratives and in narrative sequences. We briefly consider the interplay between voice quality (known to be a marker of transition relevance) and rising intonation in Finnish. We argue that in narrative sequences, rising terminals manage two main interactional tasks: they provide a place for a coparticipant to mark recipiency, and they project more talk by the current speaker. Using a methodology which combines phonetic observation with conversation analysis, we demonstrate participants' orientation to these functions.

  17. The social values at risk from sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sonia, E-mail: sonia.graham@unimelb.edu.au; Barnett, Jon, E-mail: jbarn@unimelb.edu.au; Fincher, Ruth, E-mail: r.fincher@unimelb.edu.au

    Analysis of the risks of sea-level rise favours conventionally measured metrics such as the area of land that may be subsumed, the numbers of properties at risk, and the capital values of assets at risk. Despite this, it is clear that there exist many less material but no less important values at risk from sea-level rise. This paper re-theorises these multifarious social values at risk from sea-level rise, by explaining their diverse nature, and grounding them in the everyday practices of people living in coastal places. It is informed by a review and analysis of research on social values frommore » within the fields of social impact assessment, human geography, psychology, decision analysis, and climate change adaptation. From this we propose that it is the ‘lived values’ of coastal places that are most at risk from sea-level rise. We then offer a framework that groups these lived values into five types: those that are physiological in nature, and those that relate to issues of security, belonging, esteem, and self-actualisation. This framework of lived values at risk from sea-level rise can guide empirical research investigating the social impacts of sea-level rise, as well as the impacts of actions to adapt to sea-level rise. It also offers a basis for identifying the distribution of related social outcomes across populations exposed to sea-level rise or sea-level rise policies.« less

  18. Monitoring simultaneous photocatalytic-ozonation of mixture of pharmaceuticals in the presence of immobilized TiO2 nanoparticles using MCR-ALS: Identification of intermediates and multi-response optimization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathinia, Mehrangiz; Khataee, Alireza; Naseri, Abdolhosein; Aber, Soheil

    2015-02-01

    The present study has focused on the degradation of a mixture of three pharmaceuticals, i.e. methyldopa (MDP), nalidixic acid (NAD) and famotidine (FAM) which were quantified simultaneously during photocatalytic-ozonation process. The experiments were conducted in a semi-batch reactor where TiO2 nanoparticles (crystallites mean size 8 nm) were immobilized on ceramic plates irradiated by UV-A light in the proximity of oxygen and/or ozone. The surface morphology and roughness of the bare and TiO2-coated ceramic plates were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). An analytical methodology was successfully developed based on both recording ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectra during the degradation process and a data analysis using multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). This methodology enabled the researchers to obtain the concentration and spectral profiles of the chemical compounds which were involved in the process. A central composite design was used to study the effect of several factors on multiple responses namely MDP removal (Y1), NAD removal (Y2) and FAM removal (Y3) in the simultaneous photocatalytic-ozonation of these pharmaceuticals. A multi-response optimization procedure based on global desirability of the factors was used to simultaneously maximize Y1, Y2 and Y3. The results of the global desirability revealed that 8 mg/L MAD, 8 mg/L NAD, 8 mg/L FAM, 6 L/h ozone flow rate and a 30 min-reaction time were the best conditions under which the optimized values of various responses were Y1 = 95.03%, Y2 = 84.93% and Y3 = 99.15%. Also, the intermediate products of pharmaceuticals generated in the photocatalytic-ozonation process were identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

  19. The Rise of Conservatism since World War II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Dan T.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the rise of the conservatism movement in the United States since World War II. States that laissez-faire capitalism and the rise of communism contributed to the popularity of conservatism in the United States. Focuses on the role of U.S. Presidents, such as Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan. (CMK)

  20. Bangladesh to prepare for rise in gas demand

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Bangladesh is moving to expand its natural gas infrastructure in response to rising domestic demand. This paper reports that Bangladesh natural gas demand is expected to rise to 700-850 MMcfd in the next few years from the current level of about 500 MMcfd, the Prime Minister Khaleda Zia.

  1. Fast rise times and the physical mechanism of deep earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, H.; Williams, Q.

    1991-01-01

    A systematic global survey of the rise times and stress drops of deep and intermediate earthquakes is reported. When the rise times are scaled to the seismic moment release of the events, their average is nearly twice as fast for events deeper than about 450 km as for shallower events.

  2. High-Rise Housing for Low-Income Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuerst, J. S.; Petty, Roy

    1991-01-01

    Discusses successes and failures of subsidized housing in urban areas and the relationship between architectural environment and quality of life, particularly as regards high-rise buildings. Given that some high-rise projects are successful, most should be maintained because of the scarcity of low-income housing. (DM)

  3. RISE Evaluation and Development System: Student Learning Objectives Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    With the help of teachers and leaders throughout the state, the Indiana Department of Education has developed an optional model teacher evaluation system named RISE. Whether corporations choose to adopt RISE or a model of their own, the department's goal is to assist corporations in developing or adopting models that both comply with IC 20-28-11.5…

  4. The New Woman in "The Sun Also Rises"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Xiaoping

    2010-01-01

    Hemingway is a famous American writer and a spokesman of the Lost Generation. His life attitude of the characters in the novels influenced the whole world. His first masterpiece "The Sun Also Rises" contributes a lot to the rise of feminism and make the world began to be familiar with a term: The New Woman through the portrayal of Brett.…

  5. Reliability and Validity of the Standing Heel-Rise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yocum, Allison; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Bjornson, Kristie F.; Mullens, Pamela; Burton, Gay Naganuma

    2010-01-01

    A standardized protocol for a pediatric heel-rise test was developed and reliability and validity are reported. Fifty-seven children developing typically (CDT) and 34 children with plantar flexion weakness performed three tests: unilateral heel rise, vertical jump, and force measurement using handheld dynamometry. Intraclass correlation…

  6. Optimizing smoke and plume rise modeling approaches at local scales

    Treesearch

    Derek V. Mallia; Adam K. Kochanski; Shawn P. Urbanski; John C. Lin

    2018-01-01

    Heating from wildfires adds buoyancy to the overlying air, often producing plumes that vertically distribute fire emissions throughout the atmospheric column over the fire. The height of the rising wildfire plume is a complex function of the size of the wildfire, fire heat flux, plume geometry, and atmospheric conditions, which can make simulating plume rises difficult...

  7. Detection of Sound Rise Time by Adults with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamalainen, J.; Leppanen, P.H.T.; Torppa, M.; Muller, K.; Lyytinen, H.

    2005-01-01

    Low sensitivity to amplitude modulated (AM) sounds is reported to be associated with dyslexia. An important aspect of amplitude modulation cycles are the rise and fall times within the sound. In this study, simplified stimuli equivalent to just one cycle were used and sensitivity to varying rise times was explored. Adult participants with dyslexia…

  8. Important parameters for smoke plume rise simulation with Daysmoke

    Treesearch

    L. Liu; G.L. Achtemeier; S.L. Goodrick; W. Jackson

    2010-01-01

    Daysmoke is a local smoke transport model and has been used to provide smoke plume rise information. It includes a large number of parameters describing the dynamic and stochastic processes of particle upward movement, fallout, fluctuation, and burn emissions. This study identifies the important parameters for Daysmoke simulations of plume rise and seeks to understand...

  9. Validation of smoke plume rise models using ground based lidar

    Treesearch

    Cyle E. Wold; Shawn Urbanski; Vladimir Kovalev; Alexander Petkov; Wei Min Hao

    2010-01-01

    Biomass fires can significantly degrade regional air quality. Plume rise height is one of the critical factors determining the impact of fire emissions on air quality. Plume rise models are used to prescribe the vertical distribution of fire emissions which are critical input for smoke dispersion and air quality models. The poor state of model evaluation is due in...

  10. Cenozoic seismic stratigraphy of the SW Bermuda Rise

    SciTech Connect

    Mountain, G.S.; Driscoll, N.W.; Miller, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    The seismic Horizon A-Complex (Tucholke, 1979) readily explains reflector patterns observed along the western third of the Bermuda Rise; farther east, basement is much more rugged and gravity flows shed from local topographic highs complicate the stratigraphy. Distal turbidites on the southwestern Bermuda Rise onlap reflector A* from the west, suggesting early Paleocene mass wasting of the North American margin. Locally erosive bottom currents cut into the middle Eocene section of the SW Bermuda Rise; these northward flowing currents preceded those that formed reflector Au along the North American margin near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. Southward flowing currents swift enough tomore » erode the sea floor and to form reflector Au did not reach as far east as the SW Bermuda Rise. Instead, the main effect of these Au currents was to pirate sediment into contour-following geostrophic flows along the North American margin and to deprive the deep basin and the Bermuda Rise of sediment transported down-slope. Consequently, post-Eocene sediments away from the margin are fine-grained muds. Deposition of these muds on the SW Bermuda Rise was controlled by northward flowing bottom currents. The modern Hatteras Abyssal Plain developed in the late Neogene as turbidites once again onlapped the SW Bermuda Rise. Today, these deposits extend farthest east in fracture zone valleys and in the swales between sediment waves. Northward flowing currents continue at present to affect sediment distribution patterns along the western edge of the Bermuda Rise.« less

  11. Disposal of Kitchen Waste from High Rise Apartment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ori, Kirki; Bharti, Ajay; Kumar, Sunil

    2017-09-01

    The high rise building has numbers of floor and rooms having variety of users or tenants for residential purposes. The huge quantities of heterogenous mixtures of domestic food waste are generated from every floor of the high rise residential buildings. Disposal of wet and biodegradable domestic kitchen waste from high rise buildings are more expensive in regards of collection and vertical transportation. This work is intended to address the technique to dispose of the wet organic food waste from the high rise buildings or multistory building at generation point with the advantage of gravity and vermicomposting technique. This innovative effort for collection and disposal of wet organic solid waste from high rise apartment is more economical and hygienic in comparison with present system of disposal.

  12. The advisability of high-rise construction in the city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergievskaya, Natalia; Pokrovskaya, Tatyana; Vorontsova, Natalya

    2018-03-01

    In this article there discusses the question of advisability high-rise construction, the reasons for its use, both positive and negative sides of it. On the one hand, a number of authors believe that it is difficult to avoid high-rise construction due to the limited areas in very large cities. On the other hand, a number of other authors draw attention to the problems associated with high-rise construction. The author of the article analyses examples of high-rise construction in several countries (UAE, Dubai "Burj Khalifa"; Japan "Tokyo Sky Tree"; United States of America, "Willis Tower"; Russia "Federation Tower") and proves the advisability of high-rise construction in the city.

  13. Sea level rise with warming above 2 degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jevrejeva, Svetlana; Jackson, Luke; Riva, Riccardo; Grinsted, Aslak; Moore, John

    2017-04-01

    Holding the increase in the global average temperature to below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels, and pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C, has been agreed by the representatives of the 196 parties of United Nations, as an appropriate threshold beyond which climate change risks become unacceptably high. Sea level rise is one of the most damaging aspects of warming climate for the more than 600 million people living in low-elevation coastal areas less than 10 meters above sea level. Fragile coastal ecosystems and increasing concentrations of population and economic activity in coastal areas, are reasons why future sea level rise is one of the most damaging aspects of the warming climate. Furthermore, sea level is set to continue to rise for centuries after greenhouse gas emissions concentrations are stabilised due to system inertia and feedback time scales. Impact, risk, adaptation policies and long-term decision making in coastal areas depend on regional and local sea level rise projections and local projections can differ substantially from the global one. Here we provide probabilistic sea level rise projections for the global coastline with warming above the 2 degree goal. A warming of 2°C makes global ocean rise on average by 20 cm, but more than 90% of coastal areas will experience greater rises, 40 cm along the Atlantic coast of North America and Norway, due to ocean dynamics. If warming continues above 2°C, then by 2100 sea level will rise with speeds unprecedented throughout human civilization, reaching 0.9 m (median), and 80% of the global coastline will exceed the global ocean sea level rise upper 95% confidence limit of 1.8 m. Coastal communities of rapidly expanding cities in the developing world, small island states, and vulnerable tropical coastal ecosystems will have a very limited time after mid-century to adapt to sea level rises.

  14. The Climate Science Special Report: Rising Seas and Changing Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, R. E.

    2017-12-01

    GMSL has risen by about 16-21 cm since 1900. Ocean heat content has increased at all depths since the 1960s, and global mean sea-surface temperature increased 0.7°C/century between 1900 to 2016. Human activity contributed substantially to generating a rate of GMSL rise since 1900 faster than during any preceding century in at least 2800 years. A new set of six sea-level rise scenarios, spanning a range from 30 cm to 250 cm of 21st century GMSL rise, were developed for the CSSR. The lower scenario is based on linearly extrapolating the past two decades' rate of rise. The upper scenario is informed by literature estimates of maximum physically plausible values, observations indicating the onset of marine ice sheet instability in parts of West Antarctica, and modeling of ice-cliff and ice-shelf instability mechanisms. The new scenarios include localized projections along US coastlines. There is significant variability around the US, with rates of rise likely greater than GMSL rise in the US Northeast and the western Gulf of Mexico. Under scenarios involving extreme Antarctic contributions, regional rise would be greater than GMSL rise along almost all US coastlines. Historical sea-level rise has already driven a 5- to 10-fold increase in minor tidal flooding in several US coastal cities since the 1960s. Under the CSSR's Intermediate sea-level rise scenario (1.0 m of GMSL rise in 2100) , a majority of NOAA tide gauge locations will by 2040 experience the historical 5-year coastal flood about 5 times per year. Ocean changes are not limited to rising sea levels. Ocean pH is decreasing at a rate that may be unparalleled in the last 66 million years. Along coastlines, ocean acidification can be enhanced by changes in the upwelling (particularly along the US Pacific Coast); by episodic, climate change-enhanced increases in freshwater input (particularly along the US Atlantic Coast); and by the enhancement of biological respiration by nutrient runoff. Climate models project

  15. RISE: a database of RNA interactome from sequencing experiments

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jing; Shao, Di; Xu, Kui

    2018-01-01

    Abstract We present RISE (http://rise.zhanglab.net), a database of RNA Interactome from Sequencing Experiments. RNA-RNA interactions (RRIs) are essential for RNA regulation and function. RISE provides a comprehensive collection of RRIs that mainly come from recent transcriptome-wide sequencing-based experiments like PARIS, SPLASH, LIGR-seq, and MARIO, as well as targeted studies like RIA-seq, RAP-RNA and CLASH. It also includes interactions aggregated from other primary databases and publications. The RISE database currently contains 328,811 RNA-RNA interactions mainly in human, mouse and yeast. While most existing RNA databases mainly contain interactions of miRNA targeting, notably, more than half of the RRIs in RISE are among mRNA and long non-coding RNAs. We compared different RRI datasets in RISE and found limited overlaps in interactions resolved by different techniques and in different cell lines. It may suggest technology preference and also dynamic natures of RRIs. We also analyzed the basic features of the human and mouse RRI networks and found that they tend to be scale-free, small-world, hierarchical and modular. The analysis may nominate important RNAs or RRIs for further investigation. Finally, RISE provides a Circos plot and several table views for integrative visualization, with extensive molecular and functional annotations to facilitate exploration of biological functions for any RRI of interest. PMID:29040625

  16. Large Topographic Rises on Venus: Implications for Mantle Upwelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stofan, Ellen R.; Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Bindschandler, Duane L.; Senske, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Topographic rises on Venus have been identified that are interpreted to be the surface manifestation of mantle upwellings. These features are classified into groups based on their dominant morphology. Atla and Beta Regiones are classified as rift-dominated, Dione, western Eistla, Bell, and Imdr Regiones as volcano-dominated, and Themis, eastern Eistla, and central Eistla Regiones as corona-dominated. At several topographic rises, geologic indicators were identified that may provide evidence of uplifted topography (e.g., volcanic flow features trending upslope). We assessed the minimum contribution of volcanic construction to the topography of each rise, which in general represents less than 5% of the volume of the rise, similar to the volumes of edifices at terrestrial hotspot swells. The total melt volume at each rise is approximated to be 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 6) cu km. The variations in morphology, topography, and gravity signatures at topographic rises are not interpreted to indicate variations in stage of evolution of a mantle upwelling. Instead, the morphologic variations between the three classes of topographic rises are interpreted to indicate the varying influences of lithospheric structure, plume characteristics, and regional tectonic environment. Within each class, variations in topography, gravity, and amount of volcanism may be indicative of differing stages of evolution. The similarity between swell and volcanic volumes for terrestrial and Venusian hotspots implies comparable time-integrated plume strengths for individual upwellings on the two planets.

  17. Syria and the Rise of Radical Islamist Groups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Revolution.” 397 David Blair and Richard Spencer , “How Qatar Is Funding the Rise of Islamist Extremists,” The Telegraph, September 20, 2014, http...Islamists in Syria, Officials Say;” Spencer , “How Qatar Is Funding the Rise of Islamist Extremists.” 411 Amena Bakr, “Defying Allies, Qatar Unlikely...Ibid. 416 Spencer , “How Qatar Is Funding the Rise of Islamist Extremists.” 417 Thomas Hegghammer and Aaron Y. Zelin, “How Syria’s Civil War Became a

  18. Coastal Impact Underestimated From Rapid Sea Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, John; Milliken, Kristy; Wallace, Davin; Rodriguez, Antonio; Simms, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    A primary effect of global warming is accelerated sea level rise, which will eventually drown low-lying coastal areas, including some of the world's most populated cities. Predictions from the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) suggest that sea level may rise by as much as 0.6 meter by 2100 [Solomon et al., 2007]. However, uncertainty remains about how projected melting of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets will contribute to sea level rise. Further, considerable variability is introduced to these calculations due to coastal subsidence, especially along the northern Gulf of Mexico (see http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/sltrends/sltrends.shtml).

  19. Leasing instruments of high-rise construction financing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, Olga; Ivleva, Elena; Sukhacheva, Viktoria; Rumyantseva, Anna

    2018-03-01

    The leasing sector of the business economics is expanding. Leasing instruments for high-rise construction financing allow to determine the best business behaviour in the leasing economy sector, not only in the sphere of transactions with equipment and vehicles. Investments in high-rise construction have a multiplicative effect. It initiates an active search and leasing instruments use in the economic behaviour of construction organizations. The study of the high-rise construction sector in the structure of the leasing market participants significantly expands the leasing system framework. The scheme of internal and external leasing process factors influence on the result formation in the leasing sector of economy is offered.

  20. The RiSE climbing robot: body and leg design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, A.; Goldman, D. I.; Full, R. J.; Buehler, M.

    2006-05-01

    The RiSE robot is a biologically inspired, six legged climbing robot, designed for general mobility in scansorial (vertical walls, horizontal ledges, ground level) environments. It exhibits ground reaction forces that are similar to animal climbers and does not rely on suction, magnets or other surface-dependent specializations to achieve adhesion and shear force. We describe RiSE's body and leg design as well as its electromechanical, communications and computational infrastructure. We review design iterations that enable RiSE to climb 90° carpeted, cork covered and (a growing range of) stucco surfaces in the quasi-static regime.

  1. Sea-Level Projections from the SeaRISE Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowicki, Sophie; Bindschadler, Robert

    2011-01-01

    SeaRISE (Sea-level Response to Ice Sheet Evolution) is a community organized modeling effort, whose goal is to inform the fifth IPCC of the potential sea-level contribution from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets in the 21st and 22nd century. SeaRISE seeks to determine the most likely ice sheet response to imposed climatic forcing by initializing an ensemble of models with common datasets and applying the same forcing to each model. Sensitivity experiments were designed to quantify the sea-level rise associated with a change in: 1) surface mass balance, 2) basal lubrication, and 3) ocean induced basal melt. The range of responses, resulting from the multi-model approach, is interpreted as a proxy of uncertainty in our sea-level projections. http://websrv.cs .umt.edu/isis/index.php/SeaRISE_Assessment.

  2. Application of tuned mass dampers in high-rise construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplyshev, Vyacheslav; Mylnik, Alexey; Pushkareva, Maria; Agakhanov, Murad; Burova, Olga

    2018-03-01

    The article considers the use of tuned mass dampers in high-rise construction for significant acceleration and amplitude of vibrations of the upper floors under dynamic wind influences. The susceptibility of people to accelerations in high-rise buildings and possible means of reducing wind-induced fluctuations in buildings are analyzed. The statistics of application of tuned mass dampers in high-rise construction all over the world is presented. The goal of the study is to identify an economically attractive solution that allows the fullest use of the potential of building structures in high-rise construction, abandoning the need to build massive frames leading to over-consumption of materials.

  3. 46 CFR 111.20-5 - Temperature rise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Transformer Construction, Installation, and Protection § 111.20-5 Temperature rise. (a) The... than 40 degrees C, the transformer must be derated so that the total temperature stated in this section...

  4. 46 CFR 111.20-5 - Temperature rise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Transformer Construction, Installation, and Protection § 111.20-5 Temperature rise. (a) The... than 40 degrees C, the transformer must be derated so that the total temperature stated in this section...

  5. 46 CFR 111.20-5 - Temperature rise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Transformer Construction, Installation, and Protection § 111.20-5 Temperature rise. (a) The... than 40 degrees C, the transformer must be derated so that the total temperature stated in this section...

  6. 46 CFR 111.20-5 - Temperature rise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Transformer Construction, Installation, and Protection § 111.20-5 Temperature rise. (a) The... than 40 degrees C, the transformer must be derated so that the total temperature stated in this section...

  7. 46 CFR 111.20-5 - Temperature rise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Transformer Construction, Installation, and Protection § 111.20-5 Temperature rise. (a) The... than 40 degrees C, the transformer must be derated so that the total temperature stated in this section...

  8. Historical Cavern Floor Rise for All SPR Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, Dylan Michael

    2016-09-01

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) contains the largest supply is the largest stockpile of government-owned emergency crude oil in the world. The oil is stored in multiple salt caverns spread over four sites in Louisiana and Texas. Cavern infrastructure near the bottom of the cavern can be damaged from vertical floor movement. This report presents a comprehensive history of floor movements in each cavern. Most of the cavern floor rise rates ranged from 0.5-3.5 ft/yr, however, there were several caverns with much higher rise rates. BH103, BM106, and BH105 had the three highest rise rates. Information from this report willmore » be used to better predict future vertical floor movements and optimally place cavern infrastructure. The reasons for floor rise are not entirely understood and should be investigated.« less

  9. Seismic performance of low-rise wood buildings

    Treesearch

    Lawrence A. Soltis; Robert H. Falk

    1992-01-01

    This article updates a previous literature review paper on the performance of woodframe buildings during earthquakes and summarizes recent research related to understanding seismic behavior of low-rise wood buildings.

  10. Caffeine poisoning and lactate rise: an overlooked toxic effect?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A; Karlson-Stiber, C

    2008-08-01

    Severe caffeine poisoning is rare but associated with a high mortality. The symptoms are mainly attributable to hyperadrenergic stimulation, are relatively well known and described in the literature. Transient rises in plasma lactate levels may occur but are, however, less well described. We present a case of serious caffeine poisoning with a concomitant rise in lactate treated with a non-selective beta-blocker and discuss briefly the symptomatology, the management of caffeine poisoning and the association between lactate and metabolic acidosis.

  11. Hydrothermal germanium over the southern East pacific rise.

    PubMed

    Mortlock, R A; Froelich, P N

    1986-01-03

    Germanium enrichment in the oceanic water column above the southern axis of the East Pacific Rise results from hydrothermal solutions emanating from hot springs along the rise crest. This plume signature provides a new oceanic tracer of reactions between seawater and sea floor basalts during hydrothermal alteration. In contrast to the sharp plumes of (3)He and manganese, the germanium plume is broad and diffuse, suggesting the existence of pervasive venting of low-temperature solutions off the ridge axis.

  12. Adapting to Rising Sea Level: A Florida Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Randall W.

    2009-07-01

    Global climate change and concomitant rising sea level will have a profound impact on Florida's coastal and marine systems. Sea-level rise will increase erosion of beaches, cause saltwater intrusion into water supplies, inundate coastal marshes and other important habitats, and make coastal property more vulnerable to erosion and flooding. Yet most coastal areas are currently managed under the premise that sea-level rise is not significant and the shorelines are static or can be fixed in place by engineering structures. The new reality of sea-level rise and extreme weather due to climate change requires a new style of planning and management to protect resources and reduce risk to humans. Scientists must: (1) assess existing coastal vulnerability to address short term management issues and (2) model future landscape change and develop sustainable plans to address long term planning and management issues. Furthermore, this information must be effectively transferred to planners, managers, and elected officials to ensure their decisions are based upon the best available information. While there is still some uncertainty regarding the details of rising sea level and climate change, development decisions are being made today which commit public and private investment in real estate and associated infrastructure. With a design life of 30 yrs to 75 yrs or more, many of these investments are on a collision course with rising sea level and the resulting impacts will be significant. In the near term, the utilization of engineering structures may be required, but these are not sustainable and must ultimately yield to "managed withdrawal" programs if higher sea-level elevations or rates of rise are forthcoming. As an initial step towards successful adaptation, coastal management and planning documents (i.e., comprehensive plans) must be revised to include reference to climate change and rising sea-level.

  13. Fast Electrically Driven Capillary Rise Using Overdrive Voltage.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung Jin; Hong, Jiwoo; Seo, Hee Won; Lee, Sang Joon; Chung, Sang Kug

    2015-12-29

    Enhancement of response speed (or reduction of response time) is crucial for the commercialization of devices based on electrowetting (EW), such as liquid lenses and reflective displays, and presents one of the main challenges in EW research studies. We demonstrate here that an overdrive EW actuation gives rise to a faster rise of a liquid column between parallel electrodes, compared to a DC EW actuation. Here, DC actuation is actually a simple applied step function, and overdrive is an applied step followed by reduction to a lower voltage. Transient behaviors and response time (i.e., the time required to reach the equilibrium height) of the rising liquid column are explored under different DC and overdrive EW actuations. When the liquid column rises up to a target height by means of an overdrive EW, the response time is reduced to as low as 1/6 of the response time using DC EW. We develop a theoretical model to simulate the EW-driven capillary rise by combining the kinetic equation of capillary flow (i.e., Lucas-Washburn equation) and the dynamic contact angle model considering contact line friction, contact angle hysteresis, contact angle saturation, and the EW effect. This theoretical model accurately predicts the outcome to within a ± 5% error in regard to the rising behaviors of the liquid column with a low viscosity, under both DC EW and overdrive actuation conditions, except for the early stage (

  14. An evaluation of rise time characterization and prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Leick D.

    1994-01-01

    One common method of extrapolating sonic boom waveforms from aircraft to ground is to calculate the nonlinear distortion, and then add a rise time to each shock by a simple empirical rule. One common rule is the '3 over P' rule which calculates the rise time in milliseconds as three divided by the shock amplitude in psf. This rule was compared with the results of ZEPHYRUS, a comprehensive algorithm which calculates sonic boom propagation and extrapolation with the combined effects of nonlinearity, attenuation, dispersion, geometric spreading, and refraction in a stratified atmosphere. It is shown there that the simple empirical rule considerably overestimates the rise time estimate. In addition, the empirical rule does not account for variations in the rise time due to humidity variation or propagation history. It is also demonstrated that the rise time is only an approximate indicator of perceived loudness. Three waveforms with identical characteristics (shock placement, amplitude, and rise time), but with different shock shapes, are shown to give different calculated loudness. This paper is based in part on work performed at the Applied Research Laboratories, the University of Texas at Austin, and supported by NASA Langley.

  15. Temperature rise in ion-leachable cements during setting reaction.

    PubMed

    Kanchanavasita, W; Pearson, G J; Anstice, H M

    1995-11-01

    Resin-modified ion-leachable cements have been developed for use as aesthetic restorative materials. Their apparent improved physical and handling properties can make them more attractive for use than conventional glass-ionomers. However, they contain monomers which are known to contract on polymerization and produce a polymerization exotherm. This study evaluated the temperature rise during setting and the rate of dimensional change of several ion-leachable materials. The resin-modified ion-leachable cements demonstrated greater temperature rises and higher rates of contraction than conventional materials. Generally, the behaviour of these resin-modified materials was similar to that of composite resins. However, some resin-modified cements produced a temperature rise of up to 20 degrees C during polymerization which was greater than that of the composite resin. This temperature rise must be taken into account when using the materials in direct contact with dentine in deep cavities without pulp protection. Longer irradiation time than the recommended 20 s did not significantly increase the maximum temperature rise but slightly extended the time before the temperature started to decline. The temperature of the environment had a significant effect on the rate of dimensional change in some materials. The rate of polymerization contraction of light-activated cements was directly related to the observed temperature rise.

  16. Trend analysis of modern high-rise construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radushinsky, Dmitry; Gubankov, Andrey; Mottaeva, Asiiat

    2018-03-01

    The article reviews the main trends of modern high-rise construction considered a number of architectural, engineering and technological, economic and image factors that have influenced the intensification of construction of high-rise buildings in the 21st century. The key factors of modern high-rise construction are identified, which are associated with an attractive image component for businessmen and politicians, with the ability to translate current views on architecture and innovations in construction technologies and the lobbying of relevant structures, as well as the opportunity to serve as an effective driver in the development of a complex of national economy sectors with the achievement of a multiplicative effect. The estimation of the priority nature of participation of foreign architectural bureaus in the design of super-high buildings in Russia at the present stage is given. The issue of economic expediency of construction of high-rise buildings, including those with only a residential function, has been investigated. The connection between the construction of skyscrapers as an important component of the image of cities in the marketing of places and territories, the connection of the availability of a high-rise center, the City, with the possibilities of attracting a "creative class" and the features of creating a large working space for specialists on the basis of territorial proximity and density of high-rise buildings.

  17. The Green Sea Turtle of the Cayman Islands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Considine, James L.; Winberry, John J.

    1978-01-01

    The green sea turtle is an economically valuable animal because of the many articles produced from it, including food stuffs. This article describes the history of turtle hunting and the attempts that have been made to domesticate and raise this reptile in captivity. (MA)

  18. Building more effective sea level rise models for coastal management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, D.; Buckel, C.; Collini, R.; Meckley, T.

    2017-12-01

    For over a decade, increased attention on coastal resilience and adaptation to sea level rise has resulted in a proliferation of predictive models and tools. This proliferation has enhanced our understanding of our vulnerability to sea level rise, but has also led to stakeholder fatigue in trying to realize the value of each advancement. These models vary in type and complexity ranging from GIS-based bathtub viewers to modeling systems that dynamically couple complex biophysical and geomorphic processes. These approaches and capabilities typically have the common purpose using scenarios of global and regional sea level change to inform adaptation and mitigation. In addition, stakeholders are often presented a plethora of options to address sea level rise issues from a variety of agencies, academics, and consulting firms. All of this can result in confusion, misapplication of a specific model/tool, and stakeholder feedback of "no more new science or tools, just help me understand which one to use". Concerns from stakeholders have led to the question; how do we move forward with sea level rise modeling? This presentation will provide a synthesis of the experiences and feedback derived from NOAA's Ecological Effects of Sea level Rise (EESLR) program to discuss the future of predictive sea level rise impact modeling. EESLR is an applied research program focused on the advancement of dynamic modeling capabilities in collaboration with local and regional stakeholders. Key concerns from stakeholder engagement include questions about model uncertainty, approaches for model validation, and a lack of cross-model comparisons. Effective communication of model/tool products, capabilities, and results is paramount to address these concerns. Looking forward, the most effective predictions of sea level rise impacts on our coast will be attained through a focus on coupled modeling systems, particularly those that connect natural processes and human response.

  19. Specific features of modern multifunctional high-rise building construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manukhina, Lyubov; Samosudova, Natal'ja

    2018-03-01

    The article analyzes the main reasons for the development of high-rise building construction the most important of which-is a limitation of the urban areas and, consequently, the high price of land reserved for construction. New engineering and compositional solutions for the creation of new types of buildings are considered - complex technical designs of a large number of storeys completely meet the new requirements for safety and comfort. Some peculiarities of designing high-rise buildings and searching for optimal architectural and planning solutions are revealed since, with external architectural simplicity, high-rise buildings have complex structural and technological and space-planning solutions. We consider the specific features of a high-rise housing in various countries around the world, including Russia, such as the layout of the multi-storey residential buildings, depending on the climatic characteristics of the regions, assessment of the geological risk of the construction site, the choice of parameters and functional purpose of the sections of the territory of high-rise construction, location of the town-planning object for substantiating the overall dimensions of the building, assessment of changes aeration and engineering and hydrological conditions of the site. A special place in the article on the problems of improvement of the territory, the device of courtyards, landscaping, the device of playing and sports grounds. The main conclusion in the article is the following problem - when developing high-rise housing construction, the development of high-rise housing, and an increase in the population density in the territory of large cities of Russia, necessary to create a comfortable and safe level of residents living and not a decrease, but an improvement in the quality of the urban environment.

  20. Capillary Rise: Validity of the Dynamic Contact Angle Models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pingkeng; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh T

    2017-08-15

    The classical Lucas-Washburn-Rideal (LWR) equation, using the equilibrium contact angle, predicts a faster capillary rise process than experiments in many cases. The major contributor to the faster prediction is believed to be the velocity dependent dynamic contact angle. In this work, we investigated the dynamic contact angle models for their ability to correct the dynamic contact angle effect in the capillary rise process. We conducted capillary rise experiments of various wetting liquids in borosilicate glass capillaries and compared the model predictions with our experimental data. The results show that the LWR equations modified by the molecular kinetic theory and hydrodynamic model provide good predictions on the capillary rise of all the testing liquids with fitting parameters, while the one modified by Joos' empirical equation works for specific liquids, such as silicone oils. The LWR equation modified by molecular self-layering model predicts well the capillary rise of carbon tetrachloride, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, and n-alkanes with the molecular diameter or measured solvation force data. The molecular self-layering model modified LWR equation also has good predictions on the capillary rise of silicone oils covering a wide range of bulk viscosities with the same key parameter W(0), which results from the molecular self-layering. The advantage of the molecular self-layering model over the other models reveals the importance of the layered molecularly thin wetting film ahead of the main meniscus in the energy dissipation associated with dynamic contact angle. The analysis of the capillary rise of silicone oils with a wide range of bulk viscosities provides new insights into the capillary dynamics of polymer melts.

  1. Correcting spacecraft jitter in HiRISE images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutton, S. S.; Boyd, A.K.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Cook, Debbie; Backer, Jean; Fennema, A.; Heyd, R.; McEwen, A.S.; Mirchandani, S.D.; Wu, B.; Di, K.; Oberst, J.; Karachevtseva, I.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical oscillations or vibrations on spacecraft, also called pointing jitter, cause geometric distortions and/or smear in high resolution digital images acquired from orbit. Geometric distortion is especially a problem with pushbroom type sensors, such as the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) instrument on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Geometric distortions occur at a range of frequencies that may not be obvious in the image products, but can cause problems with stereo image correlation in the production of digital elevation models, and in measuring surface changes over time in orthorectified images. The HiRISE focal plane comprises a staggered array of fourteen charge-coupled devices (CCDs) with pixel IFOV of 1 microradian. The high spatial resolution of HiRISE makes it both sensitive to, and an excellent recorder of jitter. We present an algorithm using Fourier analysis to resolve the jitter function for a HiRISE image that is then used to update instrument pointing information to remove geometric distortions from the image. Implementation of the jitter analysis and image correction is performed on selected HiRISE images. Resulting corrected images and updated pointing information are made available to the public. Results show marked reduction of geometric distortions. This work has applications to similar cameras operating now, and to the design of future instruments (such as the Europa Imaging System).

  2. Spontaneous rise in open rectangular channels under gravity.

    PubMed

    Thammanna Gurumurthy, Vignesh; Roisman, Ilia V; Tropea, Cameron; Garoff, Stephen

    2018-05-17

    Fluid movement in microfluidic devices, porous media, and textured surfaces involves coupled flows over the faces and corners of the media. Spontaneous wetting of simple grooved surfaces provides a model system to probe these flows. This numerical study investigates the spontaneous rise of a liquid in an array of open rectangular channels under gravity, using the Volume-of-Fluid method with adaptive mesh refinement. The rise is characterized by the meniscus height at the channel center, outer face and the interior and exterior corners. At lower contact angles and higher channel aspect ratios, the statics and dynamics of the rise in the channel center show little deviation with the classical model for capillarity, which ignores the existence of corners. For contact angles smaller than 45°, rivulets are formed in the interior corners and a cusp at the exterior corner. The rivulets at long times obey the one-third power law in time, with a weak dependence on the geometry. The cusp behaviour at the exterior corner transforms into a smooth meniscus when the capillary force is higher in the channel, even for contact angles smaller than 45°. The width of the outer face does not influence the capillary rise inside the channel, and the channel size does not influence the rise on the outer face. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rising sea level may cause decline of fringing coral reefs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Field, Michael E.; Ogston, Andrea S.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2011-01-01

    Coral reefs are major marine ecosystems and critical resources for marine diversity and fisheries. These ecosystems are widely recognized to be at risk from a number of stressors, and added to those in the past several decades is climate change due to anthropogenically driven increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Most threatening to most coral reefs are elevated sea surface temperatures and increased ocean acidity [e.g., Kleypas et al., 1999; Hoegh-Guldberg et al., 2007], but sea level rise, another consequence of climate change, is also likely to increase sedimentary processes that potentially interfere with photosynthesis, feeding, recruitment, and other key physiological processes (Figure 1). Anderson et al. [2010] argue compellingly that potential hazardous impacts to coastlines from 21st-century sea level rise are greatly underestimated, particularly because of the rapid rate of rise. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimates that sea level will rise in the coming century (1990–2090) by 2.2–4.4 millimeters per year, when projected with little contribution from melting ice [Meehl et al., 2007]. New studies indicate that rapid melting of land ice could substantially increase the rate of sea level rise [Grinsted et al., 2009; Milne et al., 2009].

  4. Technological innovations and the rise of social inequalities in health.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel; Eikemo, Terje Andreas

    2017-11-01

    Social inequalities in health have been categorised as a human-rights issue that requires action. Unfortunately, these inequalities are on the rise in many countries, including welfare states. Various theories have been offered to explain the persistence (and rise) of these inequalities over time, including the social determinants of health and fundamental cause theory. Interestingly, the rise of modern social inequalities in health has come at a time of great technological innovation. This article addresses whether these technological innovations are significantly influencing the persistence of modern social inequalities in health. A theoretical argument is offered for this potential connection and is discussed alongside the typical social determinants of health perspective and the increasingly popular fundamental cause perspective. This is followed by a proposed research agenda for further investigation of the potential role that technological innovations may play in influencing social inequalities in health.

  5. Study on drag coefficient of rising bubble in still water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, M. Y.; Qi, Mei; Yi, C. G.; Liu, D. Y.; Zhang, K. X.

    2017-09-01

    Research on the behavior of a rising bubble in still water is on the basis of Newton's theory of classical mechanics. Develop a calculation analysis and an experimental process of bubble rising behavior in order to search for an appropriate way of valuing drag coefficient, which is the key element toward this issue. Analyze the adaptability of the drag coefficient; compare the theoretical model to the real experimental model of rising bubble behavior. The result turns out that the change rate of radius could be ignored according to the analysis; the acceleration phase is transient; final velocity and the diameter of bubble do relate to the drag coefficient, but have no obvious relation with the depth of water. After series of inference analysis of the bubble behavior and experimental demonstration, a new drag coefficient and computing method is proposed.

  6. Pancreatic rupture in four cats with high-rise syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liehmann, Lea M; Dörner, Judith; Hittmair, Katharina M; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Reifinger, Martin; Dupré, Gilles

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic trauma and rupture are rare after feline high-rise syndrome; however, should it happen, pancreatic enzymes will leak into the abdominal cavity and may cause pancreatic autodigestion and fatty tissue saponification. If not diagnosed and treated, it can ultimately lead to multiorgan failure and death. In this case series, 700 records of high-rise syndrome cats that presented between April 2001 and May 2006 were analysed, and four cats with pancreatic rupture were identified. Clinical signs, diagnosis using ultrasonography and lipase activity in blood and abdominal effusion, and treatment modalities are reported. Three cats underwent surgical abdominal exploration, one cat was euthanased. Rupture of the left pancreatic limb was confirmed in all cases. Two of the operated cats survived to date. High-rise syndrome can lead to abdominal trauma, including pancreatic rupture. A prompt diagnosis and surgical treatment should be considered.

  7. Overestimation of marsh vulnerability to sea level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirwan, Matthew L.; Temmerman, Stijn; Skeehan, Emily E.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Coastal marshes are considered to be among the most valuable and vulnerable ecosystems on Earth, where the imminent loss of ecosystem services is a feared consequence of sea level rise. However, we show with a meta-analysis that global measurements of marsh elevation change indicate that marshes are generally building at rates similar to or exceeding historical sea level rise, and that process-based models predict survival under a wide range of future sea level scenarios. We argue that marsh vulnerability tends to be overstated because assessment methods often fail to consider biophysical feedback processes known to accelerate soil building with sea level rise, and the potential for marshes to migrate inland.

  8. Fertility postponement is largely due to rising educational enrolment

    PubMed Central

    Bhrolcháin, Máire Ní; Beaujouan, Éva

    2012-01-01

    The rise in educational enrolment is often cited as a possible cause of the trend to later childbearing in developed societies but direct evidence of its contribution to the aggregate change in fertility tempo is scarce. We show that rising enrolment, resulting in later ages at the end of education, accounts for a substantial part of the upward shift in the mean age at first birth in the 1980s and 1990s in Britain and in France. The postponement of first birth over that period has two components: a longer average period of enrolment and a post-enrolment component that is also related to educational level. The relationship between rising educational participation and the move to later fertility timing is almost certainly causal. Our findings therefore suggest that fertility tempo change is rooted in macro-economic and structural forces rather than in the cultural domain. PMID:22889178

  9. Timescales for detecting a significant acceleration in sea level rise

    PubMed Central

    Haigh, Ivan D.; Wahl, Thomas; Rohling, Eelco J.; Price, René M.; Pattiaratchi, Charitha B.; Calafat, Francisco M.; Dangendorf, Sönke

    2014-01-01

    There is observational evidence that global sea level is rising and there is concern that the rate of rise will increase, significantly threatening coastal communities. However, considerable debate remains as to whether the rate of sea level rise is currently increasing and, if so, by how much. Here we provide new insights into sea level accelerations by applying the main methods that have been used previously to search for accelerations in historical data, to identify the timings (with uncertainties) at which accelerations might first be recognized in a statistically significant manner (if not apparent already) in sea level records that we have artificially extended to 2100. We find that the most important approach to earliest possible detection of a significant sea level acceleration lies in improved understanding (and subsequent removal) of interannual to multidecadal variability in sea level records. PMID:24728012

  10. Conductivity Rise During Irreversible Electroporation: True Permeabilization or Heat?

    PubMed

    Ruarus, Alette H; Vroomen, Laurien G P H; Puijk, Robbert S; Scheffer, Hester J; Faes, Theo J C; Meijerink, Martijn R

    2018-04-23

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) induces apoptosis with high-voltage electric pulses. Although the working mechanism is non-thermal, development of secondary Joule heating occurs. This study investigated whether the observed conductivity rise during IRE is caused by increased cellular permeabilization or heat development. IRE was performed in a gelatin tissue phantom, in potato tubers, and in 30 patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). Continuous versus sequential pulsing protocols (10-90 vs. 10-30-30-30) were assessed. Temperature was measured using fiber-optic probes. After temperature had returned to baseline, 100 additional pulses were delivered. The primary technique efficacy of the treated CRLM was compared to the periprocedural current rise. Seven patients received ten additional pulses after a 10-min cool-down period. Temperature and current rise was higher for the continuous pulsing protocol (medians, gel: 13.05 vs. 9.55 °C and 9 amperes (A) vs. 7A; potato: 12.70 vs. 10.53 °C and 6.0A vs. 6.5A). After cooling-down, current returned to baseline in the gel phantom and near baseline values (Δ2A with continuous- and Δ5A with sequential pulsing) in the potato tubers. The current declined after cooling-down in all seven patients with CRLM, although baseline values were not reached. There was a positive correlation between current rise and primary technique efficacy (p = 0.02); however, the previously reported current increase threshold of 12-15A was reached in 13%. The observed conductivity rise during IRE is caused by both cellular permeabilization and heat development. Although a correlation between current rise and efficacy exists, the current increase threshold seems unfeasible for CRLM.

  11. Anthropogenic sea level rise and adaptation in the Yangtze estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H.; Chen, J.; Chen, Z.; Ruan, R.; Xu, G.; Zeng, G.; Zhu, J.; Dai, Z.; Gu, S.; Zhang, X.; Wang, H.

    2016-02-01

    Sea level rise is a major projected threat of climate change. There are regional variations in sea level changes, depending on both naturally the tectonic subsidence, geomorphology, naturally changing river inputs and anthropogenic driven forces as artificial reservoir water impoundment within the watershed and urban land subsidence driven by ground water depletion in the river delta. Little is known on regional sea level fall in response to the channel erosion due to the sediment discharge decline by reservoir interception in the upstream watershed, and water level rise driven by anthropogenic measures as the land reclamation, deep waterway regulation and fresh water reservoir construction to the sea level change in estuaries. Changing coastal cities are situated in the delta regions expected to be threatened in various degrees. Shanghai belongs to those cities. Here we show that the anthropogenic driven sea level rise in the Yangtze estuary from the point of view of the continuous hydrodynamic system consisted of river catchment, estuary and coastal sea. Land subsidence is cited as 4 mm/a (2011-2030). Scour depth of the estuarine channel by upstream engineering as Three Gauge Dam is estimated at 2-10 cm (2011-2030). The rise of water level by deep waterway and land reclamation is estimated at 8-10 cm (2011-2030). The relative sea level rise will be speculated about 10 -16 cm (2011-2030), which these anthropogenic sea level changes will be imposed into the absolute sea level rise 2 mm/a and tectonic subsidence 1 mm/a measured in 1990s. The action guideline to the sea level rise strategy in the Shanghai city have been proposed to the Shanghai government as (1) recent actions (2012-2015) to upgrade the city water supply and drainage engineering and protective engineering; (2) interim actions (2016-2020) to improve sea level monitoring and early warning system, and then the special, city, regional planning considering sea level rise; (3) long term actions (2021

  12. Coastal Louisiana in Crisis: Subsidence or Sea Level Rise?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Juan L.; Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.

    2006-11-01

    The drowning of wetlands and barrier islands in coastal Louisiana has become a widely publicized environmental catastrophe in the wake of hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. The devastation caused by these storms has reenergized the debate about restoring the natural coastal-defense system and building higher and sturdier levees, in anticipation of future storms. Understanding the contributions of land subsidence and eustatic (global) sea level rise to Louisiana's wetland loss is crucial to the success of any plan designed to protect coastal communities. It is argued here that accelerated sea level rise in the future may pose a larger threat than subsidence for considerable portions of coastal Louisiana.

  13. Gravitational salt tectonics above a rising basement plateau offshore Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaullier, Virginie; Vendeville, Bruno C.; Besème, Grégoire; Legoux, Gaetan; Déverchère, Jacques; Lymer, Gaël

    2017-04-01

    Seismic data (survey "MARADJA 1", 2003) offshore the Algerian coast have imaged an unexpected deformation pattern of the Messinian salt (Mobile Unit; MU) and its sedimentary overburden (Messinian Upper Unit and Plio-Quaternary) above an actively rising plateau in the subsalt basement. From a geodynamic point of view, the region is undergoing crustal convergence, as attested by the Boumerdes earthquake (2003, magnitude 6.8). The rise of this plateau, forming a 3D promontory restricted to the area offshore Algiers, is associated with that geodynamic setting. The seismic profiles show several subsalt thrusts (Domzig et al. 2006). The data provided additional information on the deformation of the Messinian mobile evaporitic unit and its Plio-Quaternary overburden. Margin-perpendicular profiles show mostly compressional features (anticlines and synclines) that had little activity during Messinian times, then grew more during Plio-Quaternary times. A few normal faults are also present, but are not accompanied by salt rise. By contrast, margin-parallel profiles clearly show that extensional, reactive salt diapiric ridges (symptomatic with their triangular shape in cross section) formed early, as early as the time of deposition of the Messinian Upper Unit, as recorded by fan-shaped strata. These ridges have recorded E-W, thin-skinned gravity gliding above the Messinian salt, as a response to the rise of the basement plateau. We tested this hypothesis using two analogue models, one where we assumed that the rise of the plateau started after Messinian times (initially tabular salt across the entire region), the second model assumed that the plateau had already risen partially as the Messininan Mobile Unit was deposited (salt initially thinner above the plateau than in the adjacent regions). In both experiments, the rise of the plateau generated preferential E-W extension above the salt, combined with N-S shortening. Extension was caused by gravity gliding of the salt from

  14. Rise time measurement for ultrafast X-ray pulses

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter M [Berkeley, CA; Weber, Franz A [Oakland, CA; Moon, Stephen J [Tracy, CA

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  15. Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  16. The Rise and Fall of the Australian DBA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kortt, Michael A.; Pervan, Simon J; Hogan, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss the drivers behind the rise and fall of the Australian Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) and to assess its future. Design/methodology/approach: Data covering the period 1993-2013 was sourced from the Commonwealth Department of Education and Training to provide a comprehensive…

  17. Morphology of Shatsky Rise oceanic plateau from high resolution bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinchang; Sager, William W.; Durkin, William J.

    2017-06-01

    Newly collected, high resolution multi-beam sonar data are combined with previous bathymetry data to produce an improved bathymetric map of Shatsky Rise oceanic plateau. Bathymetry data show that two massifs within Shatsky Rise are immense central volcanoes with gentle flank slopes declining from a central summit. Tamu Massif is a slightly elongated, dome-like volcanic edifice; Ori Massif is square shaped and smaller in area. Several down-to-basin normal faults are observed on the western flank of the massifs but they do not parallel the magnetic lineations, indicating that these faults are probably not related to spreading ridge faulting. Moreover, the faults are observed only on one side of the massifs, which is contrary to expectations from a mechanism of differential subsidence around the massif center. Multi-beam data show many small secondary cones with different shapes and sizes that are widely-distributed on Shatsky Rise massifs, which imply small late-stage magma sources scattered across the surface of the volcanoes in the form of lava flows or explosive volcanism. Erosional channels occur on the flanks of Shatsky Rise volcanoes due to mass wasting and display evidence of down-slope sediment movement. These channels are likely formed by sediments spalling off the edges of summit sediment cap.

  18. Salaries of Head Coaches Are Rising, Survey Shows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naughton, Jim

    1998-01-01

    Salaries of head coaches in college sports are rising, but a large salary gap remains between coaches of men's and women's teams. In a national ranking of institutions by salary averages, men's coaches at the median institution made 43% more than women's coaches. Some institutions provide more salary equity than others. The Justice Department is…

  19. PBF Cooling Tower detail. Camera facing southwest. Wood fill rises ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower detail. Camera facing southwest. Wood fill rises from foundation piers of cold water basin. Photographer: Kirsh. Date: May 1, 1969. INEEL negative no. 69-2826 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Rising Cost of Gasoline Pinches Students at Rural Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Libby

    2008-01-01

    Aware of the increasing burden of fuel costs on their students, administrators of rural community colleges are looking for ways to help students stay on track with their studies even as their monthly transportation bills rise. Two common tactics are increasing the number of online courses and offering block scheduling that allows students to pack…

  1. 11. Buttress rising above stream bed elevation. Concrete mixing plant ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Buttress rising above stream bed elevation. Concrete mixing plant is at right, west tower and placement tower boom are visible. Photographer unknown, November 24, 1926. Source: Ralph Pleasant. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. RISE: The Online Professional Development Choice for Secondary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabor, Kara; Meyers, Jane Slater

    2002-01-01

    Explains San Diego County Office of Education's "Reading in Secondary Education" (RISE), an online series of nine professional development modules for secondary teachers and administrators, intended for use in staff development groups or by individual educators. Notes that the program combines video, Web information, lesson plans, and Internet…

  3. Michael Young's "The Rise of the Meritocracy": A Philosophical Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Ansgar

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines Michael Young's 1958 dystopia, "The Rise of the Meritocracy". In this book, the word "meritocracy" was coined and used in a pejorative sense. Today, however, meritocracy represents a positive ideal against which we measure the justice of our institutions. This paper argues that, when read in the twenty-first century, Young's…

  4. The Rising Cost of Higher Education. APPA Thought Leaders 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 Thought Leaders Symposium, sponsored in part by DTZ, a UGL company, and Jacobs, focused on the topic of the rising cost of higher education. More than three dozen higher education leaders--including presidents, provosts, business officers, consultants, association executives, and facilities professionals--participated in a facilitated…

  5. Thermodynamics of Capillary Rise: Why Is the Meniscus Curved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henriksson, Ulf; Eriksson, Jan Christer

    2004-01-01

    The thermodynamics of capillary rise is explained as the gravitational elevation of the whole column of liquid caused by the positive connection between the liquid, and the solid wall of the capillary tube. The curvature of the meniscus is ascribed to the maintenance of a physiochemical balance throughout the gravitational column of liquid.

  6. Rising Dragon: Infrastructure Development and Chinese Influence in Vietnam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    This thesis will contribute to the on-going debate over whether China’s rise as a regional and potential global power will be benign or disruptive...bilateral and regional initiatives. These infrastructure developments create the mechanisms for future exploitation by expanding China’s economic and military

  7. Suppressing the Morning Rise in Cortisol Impairs Free Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmele, Ulrike; Meier, Flurina; Lange, Tanja; Born, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Elevated glucocorticoid levels impair memory retrieval. We investigated whether retrieval under naturally elevated glucocorticoid levels, i.e., during the morning rise in cortisol can be improved by suppressing cortisol. In a crossover study 16 men retrieved emotional and neutral texts and pictures (learned 3 d earlier) 30 min after morning…

  8. Methods of erection of high-rise buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherednichenko, Nadezhda; Oleinik, Pavel

    2018-03-01

    The article contains the factors determining the choice of methods for organizing the construction and production of construction and installation work for the construction of high-rise buildings. There are also indicated specific features of their underground parts, characterized by powerful slab-pile foundations, large volumes of earthworks, reinforced bases and foundations for assembly cranes. The work cycle is considered when using reinforced concrete, steel and combined skeletons of high-rise buildings; the areas of application of flow, separate and complex methods are being disclosed. The main conditions for the erection of high-rise buildings and their components are singled out: the choice of formwork systems, delivery and lifting of concrete mixes, installation of reinforcement, the formation of lifting and transporting and auxiliary equipment. The article prescribes the reserves of reduction in the duration of construction due to the creation of: complex mechanized technologies for the efficient construction of foundations in various soil conditions, including in the heaving, swelling, hindered, subsidence, bulk, water-saturated forms; complex mechanized technologies for the erection of monolithic reinforced concrete structures, taking into account the winter conditions of production and the use of mobile concrete-laying complexes and new generation machines; modular formwork systems, distinguished by their versatility, ease, simplicity in operation suitable for complex high-rise construction; more perfect methodology and the development of a set of progressive organizational and technological solutions that ensure a rational relationship between the processes of production and their maximum overlap in time and space.

  9. Whither Opportunity? Rising Inequality, Schools, and Children's Life Chances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Greg J., Ed.; Murnane, Richard, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    As the incomes of affluent and poor families have diverged over the past three decades, so too has the educational performance of their children. But how exactly do the forces of rising inequality affect the educational attainment and life chances of low-income children? In "Whither Opportunity?" a distinguished team of economists,…

  10. Rising to the Challenge: Meaningful Assessment of Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Rising to the Challenge: Meaningful Assessment of Student Learning" was envisioned in response to a 2007 request for proposals from the U.S. Department of Education's Fund for Improvement of Post Secondary Education (FIPSE). FIPSE called for national, consortial contributions to improving the knowledge and abilities to assess student…

  11. Disability Rises Gradually for a Cohort of Older Americans

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Dustin C.; Zajacova, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: We study changes in average disability over nearly two decades for a large epidemiological cohort of older Americans. As some people exit by mortality, do average disability levels for the living cohort rise rapidly, rise gradually, stay steady, or decline? Method: Data are from the Study of Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) cohort for 1993–2010. Cohort members are aged 70+ in 1993 (mean = 77.5 years), and the survivors are aged 87+ in 2010 (mean = 90.2 years). Personal care disability (activities of daily living), household management disability (instrumental activities of daily living), and physical limitations are studied. We study average disability for the living cohort over time and the disability histories for decedent and survivor groups. Results: Average disability rises gradually over time for the living cohort. Earlier decedent groups have higher average disability than later ones. Near death, disability rises sharply for all decedent groups. Longer surviving groups have less average disability, and slower disability increases, than shorter surviving groups. All results are repeated for younger cohort members (baseline age = 70–79 years), older ones (baseline age = 80+ years), women, and men. Discussion: As a cohort ages, average disability among living members increases gradually, signaling behavioral, psychological, and biological fitness in very old persons. PMID:26968638

  12. Modern energy efficient technologies of high-rise construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukmanova, Inessa; Golov, Roman

    2018-03-01

    The paper analyzes modern energy-efficient technologies, both being applied, and only introduced into the application in the construction of high-rise residential buildings. All technologies are systematized by the authors as part of a unified model of "Arrows of Energy-Efficient Technologies", which imply performing energy-saving measures in the design, construction and operation of buildings.

  13. Punishing Kids: The Rise of the "Boot Camp"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Martin; Pini, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the rise of 'the boot camp' as a means of addressing "the problem of troubled youth" in contemporary industrialised nations such as Australia and the UK. Drawing on a corpus of publicly available material including press releases and policy documents, media reports, and programme websites, the paper explores…

  14. High-Rise Buildings versus Outdoor Thermal Environment in Chongqing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun; Chen, Jin-hua; Tang, Ying; Feng, Yuan; Wang, Jin-sha

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the over quick urbanization since Chongqing, one of the biggest cities in China, has been a municipality directly under the Central Government in 1997, excessive development and exceeding increase of high-rise buildings because of its special geographical position which finally leads to the worsening of the urban outdoor thermal environment. Then, this paper makes a bright balance to the field measurement and simulated results of the wind speed field, temperature field of one multifunctional high-rise building in Chongqing university located in the city center, and the contrasted results validate the correctness of CFD in the outdoor thermal environmental simulation, expose the disadvantages of high-rise buildings on the aspects of blocking the wind field, decreasing wind speed which results in accumulation of the air-conditioning heat revolving around and periscian region where sunshine can not rip into. Finally, in order to improve the urban outdoor thermal environment near the high-rise buildings especially for the angle of natural ventilation, this paper simulates the wind environment in different architectural compositions and architectural layouts by CFD, and the simulated results show that freestyle and tower buildings which can guarantee the wind speed and take the air-conditioning heat away are much suitable and reasonable for the special Chongqing geography. These conclusions can also be used as a reference in other mountain cities, especially for the one with a great number of populations. PMID:28903222

  15. The Milliken/Georgia Tech Rising Senior Summer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Pradeep K; Sommerfeld, Jude T.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Rising Senior Program at the Georgia Institute of Technology, which is a cooperative education program designed to provide student interns with an opportunity to apply engineering principles to real problems related to the business interests of the Milliken textile manufacturing company. (TW)

  16. Managing Problems of Acceptability through High Rise-Fall Repetitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Trevor; Walker, Traci

    2013-01-01

    This article examines one of the ways in which matters of truth, appropriateness, and acceptability are raised and managed within the course of everyday conversation. Using the methodology of conversation analysis, we show that by repeating what another participant has said and doing so with a high rise-fall intonation contour, a speaker claims…

  17. Falling Enrolments and Rising Expenditures: The School Board's Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharples, Brian

    Previous increases in the costs of Canadian education were easily explained by rising enrollments. In an era of declining enrollments, increased costs are much more difficult to explain. One reason for increased costs is the large proportion of Canadian student population concentrated in high schools where programs are more expensive than at other…

  18. RISING ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rising CO2 concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere could alter Earth's climate system, but it is thought that higher concentrations may improve plant growth by way of the fertilization effect. Forests, an important part of the Earth's carbon cycle, are postulated to sequester a...

  19. Rising Opportunities in the Field of Engineering: Implications for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gloria S.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    In the Endicott Report a survey of businesses and industries indicated a lack of Black engineers, accountants, and graduates in business administration. The report indicated that competition is keen for Blacks talented in these fields. With the rising opportunities for Black talent, a clarification of needs and services must be projected to those…

  20. Knowledge Work: The Rise of the Office Economy. Full Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Leonie; Kurth, Brian; Kerr, Ella

    The rise of the office economy and its impact on vocational education and training (VET) in Australia were examined by replicating the methodology used in Carnevale and Rose's U.S. study on the impact of the new office economy. Both studies took a functional approach to analyzing economic activities and the work force and focused primarily on…

  1. Community Engagement for Collective Resilience: The Rising System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    the community. 3. Los Angeles Police Department The Los Angeles Police Department’s ( LAPD ) Counterterrorism...gives these residents a voice in the decision-making process for their neighborhood. 3. Los Angeles Police Department LAPD engagement regarding...Strategy ........................52 2. Philadelphia— The PhillyRising Collaborative ...............................53 3. Los

  2. Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) for High Rise Construction: Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharehbaghi, Koorosh; Chenery, Rhea

    2017-12-01

    Due to its material element, Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) could be stronger than traditional Concrete. This is due to FRC internal material compounds and elements. Furthermore, FRC can also significantly improve flexural strength when compared to traditional Concrete. This improvement in flexural strength can be varied depending on the actual fibers used. Although not new, FRC is gradually gaining popularity in the construction industry, in particular for high rise structures. This is due to its flexural strength, especially for high seismic zones, as it will provide a better solution then reinforced Concrete. The main aim of this paper is to investigate the structural importance of FRC for the high rise construction. Although there has been numerous studies and literature in justifying the FRC for general construction; this paper will consider its use specifically for high rise construction. Moreover, this paper will closely investigate eight case studies from Australian and United States as a part of the FRC validation for high rise construction. In doing so, this paper will examine their Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) to determine their overall structural performance.

  3. Rising above the Gathering Storm, Revisited: Rapidly Approaching Category 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In the face of so many daunting near-term challenges, U.S. government and industry are letting the crucial strategic issues of U.S. competitiveness slip below the surface. Five years ago, the National Academies prepared "Rising Above the Gathering Storm," a book that cautioned: "Without a renewed effort to bolster the foundations of…

  4. HiRISE Observations of the Polar Regions of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Byrne, S.; Fishbaugh, K.; Russell, P.; Fortezzo, C.; McEwen, A.

    2008-12-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from MRO HiRISE stereo images allow meter-scale topographic measurements in the north polar layered deposits (NPLD) and distinction of slope vs. albedo effects on apparent brightness of individual layers. HiRISE images do not show thin layers at the limit of resolution. Rather, fine layering, if it exists, appears to have been obscured by a more dust-rich mantling deposit which shows signs of eolian erosion and slumping. Stratigraphic sequences within the NPLD appear to be repeated within exposures observed by HiRISE, indicative of a record of periodic climate changes. Granular flows sourced from within the dark, basal unit are suggestive of, but do not require, the presence of water during their formation. Active mass wasting of frost and dust has been observed on steep NPLD scarps in early spring, similar to dry, loose snow avalanches on terrestrial slopes. Bright and dark streaks are seen to evolve during the northern summer, evidence for active eolian redistribution of frost and perhaps dark (non- volatile) material. Relatively dark reddish patches observed within the north polar residual cap during the summer indicate that the cap is very thin (<1 m) or more transparent in places. HiRISE images of exposures of the south polar layered deposits (SPLD) show rectilinear fractures that are continuous across several layers and whose orientation is not affected by the topography of the exposure, suggesting that they were formed before erosion of the SPLD. They appear to extend laterally and vertically through the SPLD, like a joint set. While NPLD tectonism appears limited to isolated grabens, several faults have been observed by HiRISE in the SPLD, showing structural details including reverse fault splays that merge into bedding planes and possible evidence for thrust duplication. The faults may be the result of basal sliding (decollements) ramping into thrust faults near the margin of the SPLD.

  5. Bifurcation of the Kuroshio Extension at the Shatsky Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, Harley E.; Metzger, E. Joseph

    1998-04-01

    A 1/16° six-layer Pacific Ocean model north of 20°S is used to investigate the bifurcation of the Kuroshio Extension at the main Shatsky Rise and the pathway of the northern branch from the bifurcation to the subarctic front. Upper ocean-topographic coupling via a mixed barotropic-baroclinic instability is essential to this bifurcation and to the formation and mean pathway of the northern branch as are several aspects of the Shatsky Rise complex of topography and the latitude of the Kuroshio Extension in relation to the topography. The flow instabilities transfer energy to the abyssal layer where it is constrained by geostrophic contours of the bottom topography. The topographically constrained abyssal currents in turn steer upper ocean currents, which do not directly impinge on the bottom topography. This includes steering of mean pathways. Obtaining sufficient coupling requires very fine resolution of mesoscale variability and sufficient eastward penetration of the Kuroshio as an unstable inertial jet. Resolution of 1/8° for each variable was not sufficient in this case. The latitudinal extent of the main Shatsky Rise (31°N-36°N) and the shape of the downward slope on the north side are crucial to the bifurcation at the main Shatsky Rise, with both branches passing north of the peak. The well-defined, relatively steep and straight eastern edge of the Shatsky Rise topographic complex (30°N-42°N) and the southwestward abyssal flow along it play a critical role in forming the rest of the Kuroshio northern branch which flows in the opposite direction. A deep pass between the main Shatsky Rise and the rest of the ridge to the northeast helps to link the northern fork of the bifurcation at the main rise to the rest of the northern branch. Two 1/16° "identical twin" interannual simulations forced by daily winds 1981-1995 show that the variability in this region is mostly nondeterministic on all timescales that could be examined (up to 7 years in these 15-year

  6. Basement structures over Rio Grande Rise from gravity inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantino, Renata; Hackspacker, Peter Christian; Anderson de Souza, Iata; Sousa Lima Costa, Iago

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we show that from satellite-derived gravity field, bathymetry and sediment thicknesses, it is possible to give a 3-D model of the basement over oceanic areas, and for this purpose, we have chosen the Rio Grande Rise, in South Atlantic Ocean, to build a gravity-equivalent basement topography. The advantages of the method applied in this study are manifold: does not depend directly on reflection seismic data; can be applied quickly and with fewer costs for acquiring and interpreting the data; and as the main result, presents the physical surface below the sedimentary layer, which may be different from the acoustic basement. We evaluated the gravity effect of the sediments using the global sediment thickness model of NOAA, fitting a sediment compaction model to observed density values from Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) reports. The Global Relief Model ETOPO1 and constraining data from seismic interpretation on crustal thickness are integrated in the gravity inversion procedure. The modeled Moho depth values vary between 6 to 27 km over the area, being thicker under the Rio Grande Rise and also in the direction of São Paulo Plateau. The inversion for the gravity-equivalent basement topography is applied for a gravity residual data, which is free from the gravity effect of sediments and from the gravity effect of the estimated Moho interface. A description of the basement depth over Rio Grande Rise area is unprecedented in the literature, however, our results could be compared to in situ data, provided by DSDP, and a small difference of only 9 m between our basement depth and leg 516 F was found. Our model shows a rift crossing the entire Rio Grande Rise deeper than previously presented in literature, with depths up to 5 km in the East Rio Grande Rise (ERGR) and deeper in the West Rio Grande Rise (WRGR), reaching 6.4 km. We find several short-wavelengths structures not present in the bathymetry data. Seamounts, guyots and fracture zones are much more

  7. Integrating wildfire plume rises within atmospheric transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallia, D. V.; Kochanski, A.; Wu, D.; Urbanski, S. P.; Krueger, S. K.; Lin, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Wildfires can generate significant pyro-convection that is responsible for releasing pollutants, greenhouse gases, and trace species into the free troposphere, which are then transported a significant distance downwind from the fire. Oftentimes, atmospheric transport and chemistry models have a difficult time resolving the transport of smoke from these wildfires, primarily due to deficiencies in estimating the plume injection height, which has been highlighted in previous work as the most important aspect of simulating wildfire plume transport. As a result of the uncertainties associated with modeled wildfire plume rise, researchers face difficulties modeling the impacts of wildfire smoke on air quality and constraining fire emissions using inverse modeling techniques. Currently, several plume rise parameterizations exist that are able to determine the injection height of fire emissions; however, the success of these parameterizations has been mixed. With the advent of WRF-SFIRE, the wildfire plume rise and injection height can now be explicitly calculated using a fire spread model (SFIRE) that is dynamically linked with the atmosphere simulated by WRF. However, this model has only been tested on a limited basis due to computational costs. Here, we will test the performance of WRF-SFIRE in addition to several commonly adopted plume parameterizations (Freitas, Sofiev, and Briggs) for the 2013 Patch Springs (Utah) and 2012 Baker Canyon (Washington) fires, for both of which observations of plume rise heights are available. These plume rise techniques will then be incorporated within a Lagrangian atmospheric transport model (STILT) in order to simulate CO and CO2 concentrations during NASA's CARVE Earth Science Airborne Program over Alaska during the summer of 2012. Initial model results showed that STILT model simulations were unable to reproduce enhanced CO concentrations produced by Alaskan fires observed during 2012. Near-surface concentrations were drastically

  8. Sea-level rise risks to coastal cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, Robert J.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the consequence of sea-level rise for coastal cities has long lead times and huge political implications. Civilisation has emerged and developed during a period of several thousand years during which in geological terms sea level has been unusually stable. We have now moved out of this period and the challenge will be to develop a long-term proactive assessment approach to manage this challenge. In 2005 there were 136 coastal cities with a population exceeding one million people and a collective population of 400 million people. All these coastal cities are threatened by flooding from the sea to varying degrees and these risks are increasing due to growing exposure (people and assets), rising sea levels due to climate change, and in some cities, significant coastal subsidence due to human agency (drainage and groundwater withdrawals from susceptible soils). In these cities we wish to avoid major flood events, with associated damage and potentially deaths and ultimately decline of the cities. Flood risks grow with sea-level rise as it raises extreme sea levels. As sea levels continue to rise, protection will have to be progressively upgraded. Even with this, the magnitude of losses when flood events do occur would increase as coastal cities expand, and water depths and hence unit damage increase with sea-level rise/subsidence. This makes it critical to also prepare for larger coastal flood disasters than we experience today and raises questions on the limits to adaptation. There is not an extensive literature or significant empirical information on the limits to adaptation in coastal cities. These limits are not predictable in a formal sense - while the rise in mean sea level raises the likelihood of a catastrophic flood, extreme events are what cause damage and trigger a response, be it abandonment, a defence upgrade or something else. There are several types of potential limits that could be categorised into three broad types: • Physical

  9. PERSPECTIVE: The tripping points of sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Alan D.

    2009-12-01

    When President Nixon created the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1970 he said the environment must be perceived as a single, interrelated system. We are nowhere close to achieving this vision. Jim Titus and his colleagues [1] highlight one example of where one set of regulations or permits may be in conflict with another and where regulations were crafted in the absence of understanding the cumulative impact of global warming. The issue here is how to deal with the impacts of climate change on sea level and the latter's impact on wetland polices, clean water regulations, and ecosystem services. The Titus paper could also be called `The tripping points of sea level rise'. Titus and his colleagues have looked at the impact of such sea level rise on the east coast of the United States. Adaptive responses include costly large- scale investment in shore protection (e.g. dikes, sand replenishment) and/or ecosystem migration (retreat), where coastal ecosystems move inland. Shore protection is limited by available funds, while ecosystem migrations are limited by available land use. The driving factor is the high probability of sea level rise due to climate change. Estimating sea level rise is difficult because of local land and coastal dynamics including rising or falling land areas. It is estimated that sea level could rise between 8 inches and 2 feet by the end of this century [2]. The extensive data analysis done by Titus et al of current land use is important because, as they observe, `property owners and land use agencies have generally not decided how they will respond to sea level rise, nor have they prepared maps delineating where shore protection and retreat are likely'. This is the first of two `tripping points', namely the need for adaptive planning for a pending environmental challenge that will create economic and environment conflict among land owners, federal and state agencies, and businesses. One way to address this gap in adaptive management

  10. Neural processing of amplitude and formant rise time in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Peter, Varghese; Kalashnikova, Marina; Burnham, Denis

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate how children with dyslexia weight amplitude rise time (ART) and formant rise time (FRT) cues in phonetic discrimination. Passive mismatch responses (MMR) were recorded for a/ba/-/wa/contrast in a multiple deviant odd-ball paradigm to identify the neural response to cue weighting in 17 children with dyslexia and 17 age-matched control children. The deviant stimuli had either partial or full ART or FRT cues. The results showed that ART did not generate an MMR in either group, whereas both partial and full FRT cues generated MMR in control children while only full FRT cues generated MMR in children with dyslexia. These findings suggest that children, both controls and those with dyslexia, discriminate speech based on FRT cues and not ART cues. However, control children have greater sensitivity to FRT cues in speech compared to children with dyslexia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduction of temperature rise in high-speed photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Howard A.

    1987-01-01

    Information is provided on filtration with glass and infrared absorbing and reflecting filters. Glass and infrared filtration is a simple and effective method to reduce the radiation heat transfer associated with continuous high intensity tungsten lamps. The results of a filtration experiment are explained. The figures provide starting points for quantifying the effectiveness of various filters and associated light intensities. The combination of a spectrally selective reflector (hot or cold mirror) based on multilayer thin film principles and heat absorbing or infrared opaque glass results in the maximum reduction in temperature rise with a minimum of incident light loss. Use is recommended of a voltage regulator to further control temperature rise and incident light values.

  12. Reduction of temperature rise in high-speed photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Howard A.

    1988-01-01

    Information is provided on filtration with glass and infrared absorbing and reflecting filters. Glass and infrared filtration is a simple and effective method to reduce the radiation heat transfer associated with continuous high intensity tungsten lamps. The results of a filtration experiment are explained. The figures provide starting points for quantifying the effectiveness of various filters and associated light intensities. The combination of a spectrally selective reflector (hot or cold mirror) based on multilayer thin film principles and heat absorbing or infrared opaque glass results in the maximum reduction in temperature rise with a minimum of incident light loss. Use is recommended of a voltage regulator to further control temperature rise and incident light values.

  13. China's rise as a major contributor to science and technology.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu; Zhang, Chunni; Lai, Qing

    2014-07-01

    In the past three decades, China has become a major contributor to science and technology. China now employs an increasingly large labor force of scientists and engineers at relatively high earnings and produces more science and engineering degrees than the United States at all levels, particularly bachelor's. China's research and development expenditure has been rising. Research output in China has been sharply increasing since 2002, making China the second largest producer of scientific papers after the United States. The quality of research by Chinese scientists has also been improving steadily. However, China's rise in science also faces serious difficulties, partly attributable to its rigid, top-down administrative system, with allegations of scientific misconduct trending upward.

  14. Numerical simulation of superheated vapor bubble rising in stagnant liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkhaniani, N.; Ansari, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    In present study, the rising of superheated vapor bubble in saturated liquid is simulated using volume of fluid method in OpenFOAM cfd package. The surface tension between vapor-liquid phases is considered using continuous surface force method. In order to reduce spurious current near interface, Lafaurie smoothing filter is applied to improve curvature calculation. Phase change is considered using Tanasawa mass transfer model. The variation of saturation temperature in vapor bubble with local pressure is considered with simplified Clausius-Clapeyron relation. The couple velocity-pressure equation is solved using PISO algorithm. The numerical model is validated with: (1) isothermal bubble rising and (2) one-dimensional horizontal film condensation. Then, the shape and life time history of single superheated vapor bubble are investigated. The present numerical study shows vapor bubble in saturated liquid undergoes boiling and condensation. It indicates bubble life time is nearly linear proportional with bubble size and superheat temperature.

  15. Exploring the mechanisms of rising bubbles in marine biofouling prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menesses, Mark; Belden, Jesse; Dickenson, Natasha; Bird, James

    2015-11-01

    Fluid motion, such as flow past a ship, is known to inhibit the growth of marine biofouling. Bubbles rising along a submerged structure also exhibit this behavior, which is typically attributed to buoyancy induced flow. However, the bubble interface may also have a direct influence on inhibiting growth that is independent of the surrounding flow. Here we aim to decouple these two mechanisms through a combination of field and laboratory experiments. In this study, a wall jet and a stream of bubbles are used to create two flows near a submerged solid surface where biofouling occurs. The flow structure characteristics were recorded using PIV. This experimental analysis allows for us to compare the efficacy of each flow relative to its flow parameters. Exploration of the mechanisms at play in the prevention of biofouling by use of rising bubbles provides a foundation to predict and optimize this antifouling technique under various conditions.

  16. Humidity Distributions in Multilayered Walls of High-rise Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayunova, Olga; Musorina, Tatiana; Ishkov, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    The limitation of free territories in large cities is the main reason for the active development of high-rise construction. Given the large-scale projects of high-rise buildings in recent years in Russia and abroad and their huge energy consumption, one of the fundamental principles in the design and reconstruction is the use of energy-efficient technologies. The main heat loss in buildings occurs through enclosing structures. However, not always the heat-resistant wall will be energy-efficient and dry at the same time (perhaps waterlogging). Temperature and humidity distributions in multilayer walls were studied in the paper, and the interrelation of other thermophysical characteristics was analyzed.

  17. Plume rise study at Colbert Steam Plant--data presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, T.L.; Coleman, J.H.

    1979-05-01

    This report makes detailed data on plume rise available for independent analysis by other specialists studying atmospheric dispersion. Techniques of data collection and methods of data reduction are detailed. Data from 24 time-averaged observations of the plume at Colbert Steam Plant, its source, and the meteorological conditions are reported. Most of the data were collected during early to midmorning and are therefore characterized by stable atmospheric conditions. The data are presented in both a summary and a detailed format.

  18. Basement structures over Rio Grande Rise from gravity inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantino, Renata Regina; Hackspacher, Peter Christian; de Souza, Iata Anderson; Lima Costa, Iago Sousa

    2017-04-01

    The basement depth in the Rio Grande Rise (RGR), South Atlantic, is estimated from combining gravity data obtained from satellite altimetry, marine surveys, bathymetry, sediment thickness and crustal thickness information. We formulate a crustal model of the region by inverse gravity modeling. The effect of the sediment layer is evaluated using the global sediment thickness model of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and fitting the sediment compaction model to observed density values from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) reports. The Global Relief Model ETOPO1 and constraining data from seismic interpretation on crustal thickness are integrated in the inversion process. The modeled Moho depth values vary between 6 and 27 km over the area, being thicker under the RGR and also in the direction of São Paulo Plateau. The inversion for the gravity-equivalent basement topography is applied to gravity residual data, which is free from the gravity effect of sediments and from the gravity effect of the estimated Moho interface. We find several short-wavelengths structures not present in the bathymetry data. Our model shows a rift crossing the entire Rio Grande Rise deeper than previously presented in literature, with depths up to 5 km in the East Rio Grande Rise (ERGR) and deeper in the West Rio Grande Rise (WRGR), reaching 6.4 km. An interesting NS structure that goes from 34°S and extends through de São Paulo Ridge may be related to the South Atlantic Opening and could reveal an extinct spreading center.

  19. Probabilistic reanalysis of twentieth-century sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Hay, Carling C; Morrow, Eric; Kopp, Robert E; Mitrovica, Jerry X

    2015-01-22

    Estimating and accounting for twentieth-century global mean sea level (GMSL) rise is critical to characterizing current and future human-induced sea-level change. Several previous analyses of tide gauge records--employing different methods to accommodate the spatial sparsity and temporal incompleteness of the data and to constrain the geometry of long-term sea-level change--have concluded that GMSL rose over the twentieth century at a mean rate of 1.6 to 1.9 millimetres per year. Efforts to account for this rate by summing estimates of individual contributions from glacier and ice-sheet mass loss, ocean thermal expansion, and changes in land water storage fall significantly short in the period before 1990. The failure to close the budget of GMSL during this period has led to suggestions that several contributions may have been systematically underestimated. However, the extent to which the limitations of tide gauge analyses have affected estimates of the GMSL rate of change is unclear. Here we revisit estimates of twentieth-century GMSL rise using probabilistic techniques and find a rate of GMSL rise from 1901 to 1990 of 1.2 ± 0.2 millimetres per year (90% confidence interval). Based on individual contributions tabulated in the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, this estimate closes the twentieth-century sea-level budget. Our analysis, which combines tide gauge records with physics-based and model-derived geometries of the various contributing signals, also indicates that GMSL rose at a rate of 3.0 ± 0.7 millimetres per year between 1993 and 2010, consistent with prior estimates from tide gauge records.The increase in rate relative to the 1901-90 trend is accordingly larger than previously thought; this revision may affect some projections of future sea-level rise.

  20. Recruitment and Retention of Indians in Science and Engineering (RISE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karnawat, Sunil

    1997-01-01

    Fifteen students from Turtle Mountain Community College were selected to participate in activities of the RISE project last summer. Eight students successfully completed project activities and received stipends for their participation. These eight students are (1) Jamie Gable, (2) John Morin, (3) Patrick Belgarde, (4) Jason Laducer, (5) Alex Johnson, (6) Eric Houle, (7) Gary Renault, and (8) Kenny DeCoteau. In the fall of 1998, Jamie Gable and Gary Renault went to North Dakota State University to pursue their undergraduate degrees in mechanical engineering, and John Morin and Alex Johnson joined the University of North Dakota's electrical engineering and industrial technology programs, respectively. Remaining four students will continue to participate in the RISE activities this year and transfer to the universities next year. Seven students who failed to complete the RISE project activities during the current award period are encouraged to participate again this fall. The RISE students were enrolled in a special course called "Introduction to Engineering Materials." The project director, Dr. Kamawat, taught the course on Saturdays and Sundays. Theoretical and mathematical background on engineering materials and careers in various engineering professions were discussed in this course. The students attended guest lectures given by engineers and professors and visited local industries. In addition, the students went to North Dakota State University (NDSU) at Fargo, ND, and the University of Minnesota (UMN) at Minneapolis, MN, to tour their engineering departments. At NDSU, they conducted laboratory tests on various engineering materials, such as concrete, steel, wood, plastics, and carbon composites. The students investigated the mechanical behavior of these materials under various loading conditions, collected data, interpreted data, identified possible errors, determined the mechanical properties, and wrote reports on their findings. The students created posters

  1. High rise syndrome with impalement in three cats.

    PubMed

    Pratschke, K M; Kirby, B M

    2002-06-01

    Three cats were presented for management of impalement injuries sustained following falls from second storey windows onto spiked metal railings. Two cats presented with penetrating thoracic wounds and extensive pulmonary parenchymal trauma, while one presented with abdominal impalement and splenic rupture. Following stabilisation, all three cats underwent exploratory surgery. A good outcome was achieved in two of the cats: one with thoracic and one with abdominal penetration. Impalement injury secondary to free fallis a previously unreported variation of 'high rise syndrome' in cats.

  2. Analysis of Sea Level Rise in Singapore Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkalich, Pavel; Luu, Quang-Hung

    2013-04-01

    Sea level in Singapore Strait is governed by various scale phenomena, from global to local. Global signals are dominated by the climate change and multi-decadal variability and associated sea level rise; at regional scale seasonal sea level variability is caused by ENSO-modulated monsoons; locally, astronomic tides are the strongest force. Tide gauge records in Singapore Strait are analyzed to derive local sea level trend, and attempts are made to attribute observed sea level variability to phenomena at various scales, from global to local. It is found that at annual scale, sea level anomalies in Singapore Strait are quasi-periodic, of the order of ±15 cm, the highest during northeast monsoon and the lowest during southwest monsoon. Interannual regional sea level falls are associated with El Niño events, while the rises are related to La Niña episodes; both variations are in the range of ±9 cm. At multi-decadal scale, sea level in Singapore Strait has been rising at the rate 1.2-1.9 mm/year for the period 1975-2009, 2.0±0.3 mm/year for 1984-2009, and 1.3-4.7 mm/year for 1993-2009. When compared with the respective global trends of 2.0±0.3, 2.4, and 2.8±0.8 mm/year, Singapore Strait sea level rise trend was weaker at the earlier period and stronger at the recent decade.

  3. Response of surge protection devices to fast rising pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mindel, I. N.

    1980-01-01

    Two types of lightning protection modules incorporating leadless (pill type) Zener like devices were evaluated with regard to their ability to suppress EMP induced transients. Two series of tests were performed to evaluate the ability of these modules to react to fast rate of rise ( 1Kv/ns) transients, and the attenuation introduced and the ability to limit damped sinusoid pulses which may be induced due to an EMP resulting from a nuclear detonation.

  4. Morphological Studies of Rising Equatorial Spread F Bubbles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-01

    depletions. In the present paper , we wish to discuss equatorial Spread F bubble shapes and vertical rise rates within the context of the collisional...simulation results are needed to ascertain which model fits best. All of the models described in this paper , based on collisional Rayleigh-Taylor type...Analysis of Barium Clouds - Semi-Annual Technical Report, RADC-TR-72-103, Vol. I, Avco Everett Reserach Laboratory, Everett, Mass., January 1972

  5. From Rising Bubble to RNA/DNA and Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Roman; Cieszyńska, Agata; Wereszka, Marzena; Borkowski, Wojciech

    2017-04-01

    In this study we have focused on the movement of rising bubbles in a salty water body. Experiments reviled that free buoyancy movement of bubbles forces displacement of ions, located on the outer side of the bubble wall curvatures. During the short moment of bubble passage, all ions in the vicinity of rising bubble, are separated into anions that are gathered on the bubble upper half sphere and cations that slip along the bottom concave half-sphere of a bubble and develop a sub-bubble vortex. The principle of ions separation bases on the differences in displacement resistance. In this way, relatively heavier and larger, thus more resistant to displacement anions are gathered on the rising bubble upper half sphere, while smaller and lighter cations are assembled on the bottom half sphere and within the sub-bubble vortex. The acceleration of motion generates antiparallel rotary of bi-ionic domains, what implies that anions rotate in clockwise (CW) and cationic in counter-clockwise (CCW) direction. Then, both rotational systems may undergo splicing and extreme condensing by bi-pirouette narrowing of rotary. It is suggested that such double helix motion of bi-ionic domains creates RNA/DNA molecules. Finally, when the bubble reaches the water surface it burst and the preprocessed RNA/DNA matter is ejected into the droplets. Since that stage, droplet is suspended in positively charged troposphere, thus the cationic domain is located in the droplet center, whilst negative ions are attracted to configure the outer areola. According to above, the present study implies that the rising bubbles in salty waters may incept synergistic processing of matter resulting in its rotational/spherical organization that led to assembly of RNA/DNA molecules and bacteria cells.

  6. Geoscience meets the four horsemen?: Tracking the rise of neocatastrophism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriner, Nick; Morhange, Christophe; Skrimshire, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    Although it is acknowledged that there has been an exponential growth in neocatastrophist geoscience inquiry, the extent, chronology and origin of this mode have not been precisely scrutinized. In this study, we use the bibliographic research tool Scopus to explore 'catastrophic' words replete in the earth and planetary science literature between 1950 and 2009, assessing when, where and why catastrophism has gained new currency amongst the geoscience community. First, we elucidate an exponential rise in neocatastrophist research from the 1980s onwards. We then argue that the neocatastrophist mode came to prominence in North America during the 1960s and 1970s before being more widely espoused in Europe, essentially after 1980. We compare these trends with the EM-DAT disaster database, a worldwide catalogue that compiles more than 11,000 natural disasters stretching back to 1900. The findings imply a clear link between anthropogenically forced global change and an increase in disaster research (r 2 = 0.73). Finally, we attempt to explain the rise of neocatastrophism by highlighting seven non-exhaustive factors: (1) the rise of applied geoscience; (2) inherited geological epistemology; (3) disciplinary interaction and the diffusion of ideas from the planetary to earth sciences; (4) the advent of radiometric dating techniques; (5) the communications revolution; (6) webometry and the quest for high-impact geoscience; and (7) popular cultural frameworks.

  7. Separating decadal global water cycle variability from sea level rise.

    PubMed

    Hamlington, B D; Reager, J T; Lo, M-H; Karnauskas, K B; Leben, R R

    2017-04-20

    Under a warming climate, amplification of the water cycle and changes in precipitation patterns over land are expected to occur, subsequently impacting the terrestrial water balance. On global scales, such changes in terrestrial water storage (TWS) will be reflected in the water contained in the ocean and can manifest as global sea level variations. Naturally occurring climate-driven TWS variability can temporarily obscure the long-term trend in sea level rise, in addition to modulating the impacts of sea level rise through natural periodic undulation in regional and global sea level. The internal variability of the global water cycle, therefore, confounds both the detection and attribution of sea level rise. Here, we use a suite of observations to quantify and map the contribution of TWS variability to sea level variability on decadal timescales. In particular, we find that decadal sea level variability centered in the Pacific Ocean is closely tied to low frequency variability of TWS in key areas across the globe. The unambiguous identification and clean separation of this component of variability is the missing step in uncovering the anthropogenic trend in sea level and understanding the potential for low-frequency modulation of future TWS impacts including flooding and drought.

  8. IT Requirements Integration in High-Rise Construction Design Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levina, Anastasia; Ilin, Igor; Esedulaev, Rustam

    2018-03-01

    The paper discusses the growing role of IT support for the operation of modern high-rise buildings, due to the complexity of managing engineering systems of buildings and the requirements of consumers for the IT infrastructure. The existing regulatory framework for the development of design documentation for construction, including high-rise buildings, is analyzed, and the lack of coherence in the development of this documentation with the requirements for the creation of an automated management system and the corresponding IT infrastructure is stated. The lack of integration between these areas is the cause of delays and inefficiencies both at the design stage and at the stage of putting the building into operation. The paper proposes an approach to coordinate the requirements of the IT infrastructure of high-rise buildings and design documentation for construction. The solution to this problem is possible within the framework of the enterprise architecture concept by coordinating the requirements of the IT and technological layers at the design stage of the construction.

  9. RAPIDLY RISING TRANSIENTS IN THE SUPERNOVA—SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA GAP

    SciTech Connect

    Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D. Andrew; Wolf, William M.

    2016-03-01

    We present observations of four rapidly rising (t{sub rise} ≈ 10 days) transients with peak luminosities between those of supernovae (SNe) and superluminous SNe (M{sub peak} ≈ −20)—one discovered and followed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three by the Supernova Legacy Survey. The light curves resemble those of SN 2011kl, recently shown to be associated with an ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), though no GRB was seen to accompany our SNe. The rapid rise to a luminous peak places these events in a unique part of SN phase space, challenging standard SN emission mechanisms. Spectra of the PTF event formallymore » classify it as an SN II due to broad Hα emission, but an unusual absorption feature, which can be interpreted as either high velocity Hα (though deeper than in previously known cases) or Si ii (as seen in SNe Ia), is also observed. We find that existing models of white dwarf detonations, CSM interaction, shock breakout in a wind (or steeper CSM), and magnetar spin down cannot readily explain the observations. We consider the possibility that a “Type 1.5 SN” scenario could be the origin of our events. More detailed models for these kinds of transients and more constraining observations of future such events should help to better determine their nature.« less

  10. Impact of sea level rise on tide gate function.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Sean; Miskewitz, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Sea level rise resulting from climate change and land subsidence is expected to severely impact the duration and associated damage resulting from flooding events in tidal communities. These communities must continuously invest resources for the maintenance of existing structures and installation of new flood prevention infrastructure. Tide gates are a common flood prevention structure for low-lying communities in the tidal zone. Tide gates close during incoming tides to prevent inundation from downstream water propagating inland and open during outgoing tides to drain upland areas. Higher downstream mean sea level elevations reduce the effectiveness of tide gates by impacting the hydraulics of the system. This project developed a HEC-RAS and HEC-HMS model of an existing tide gate structure and its upland drainage area in the New Jersey Meadowlands to simulate the impact of rising mean sea level elevations on the tide gate's ability to prevent upstream flooding. Model predictions indicate that sea level rise will reduce the tide gate effectiveness resulting in longer lasting and deeper flood events. The results indicate that there is a critical point in the sea level elevation for this local area, beyond which flooding scenarios become dramatically worse and would have a significantly negative impact on the standard of living and ability to do business in one of the most densely populated areas of America.

  11. On the rising motion of a drop in stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayareh, M.; Doostmohammadi, A.; Dabiri, S.; Ardekani, A. M.

    2013-10-01

    The rising dynamics of a deformable drop in a linearly stratified fluid is numerically obtained using a finite-volume/front-tracking method. Our results show that the drag coefficient of a spherical drop in a stratified fluid enhances as C_{d,s}/C_{d,h}-1˜ Fr_d^{-2.86} for drop Froude numbers in the range of 4 < Frd < 16. The role of the deformability of the drop on the temporal evolution of the motion is investigated along with stratification and inertial effects. We also present the important role of stratification on the transient rising motion of the drop. It is shown that a drop can levitate in the presence of a vertical density gradient. The drop undergoes a fading oscillatory motion around its neutrally buoyant position except for high viscosity ratio drops where the oscillation occurs around a density level lighter than the neutral buoyancy level. In addition, a detailed characterization of the flow signature of a rising drop in a linearly stratified fluid including the buoyancy induced vortices and the resultant buoyant jet is presented.

  12. Rise of Air Bubbles in Aircraft Lubricating Oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. V.

    1950-01-01

    Lubricating and antifoaming additives in aircraft lubricating oils may impede the escape of small bubbles from the oil by forming shells of liquid with a quasi-solid or gel structure around the bubbles. The rates of rise of small air bubbles, up to 2 millimeters in diameter, were measured at room temperature in an undoped oil, in the same oil containing foam inhibitors, and in an oil containing lubricating additives. The apparent diameter of the air bubbles was measured visually through an ocular micrometer on a traveling telescope. The bubbles in the undoped oil obeyed Stokes' Law, the rate of rise being proportional to the square of the apparent diameter and inversely proportional to the viscosity of the oil. The bubbles in the oils containing lubricating additives or foam inhibitors rose more slowly than the rate predicted by Stokes 1 Law from the apparent diameter, and the rate of rise decreased as the length of path the bubbles traveled increased. A method is derived to calculate the thickness of the liquid shell which would have to move with the bubbles in the doped oils to account for the abnoi'I!l8.lly slow velocity. The maximum thickness of this shell, calculated from the velocities observed, was equal to the bubble radius.

  13. Measures to reduce construction time of high-rise buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolchedantsev, Leonid; Adamtsevich, Aleksey; Stupakova, Olga; Drozdov, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    The organizational and technological solutions for high-rise buildings construction efficiency increase are considered, primarily - decrease of typical floor construction time and improvement of bearing structures concrete quality. The essence of offered technology is: a concrete mixing station and a polygon mainly for load-bearing wall panels with starter bars casting are located on the building site; for reinforced concrete components manufacturing and butt joints grouting the warmed-up concrete mixtures are used. The results of researches and elaborations carried out by the SPSUACE in area of a preliminary warming-up of concrete mixtures are presented. The possibility and feasibility of their usage in high-rise buildings and of excess height buildings construction including cast-in-place and precast execution are shown. The essence of heat-vibro treating of concrete mixture is revealed as a kind of prior electroresistive curing, and the achieved results are: accelerated concrete strength gain, power inputs decrease, concrete quality improvement. It is shown that the location of a concrete mixing station on the building site enables to broaden possibilities of the "thermos" method use and to avoid concrete mixtures warming up in medium-mass structures erection (columns, girders) during the high-rise buildings construction. It is experimentally proved that the splice between precast elements encased with warmed-up concrete mixture is equal with conjugated elements in strength.

  14. The rise-time of Type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Gaitán, S.; Tominaga, N.; Molina, J.; Galbany, L.; Bufano, F.; Anderson, J. P.; Gutierrez, C.; Förster, F.; Pignata, G.; Bersten, M.; Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Carlberg, R.; de Jaeger, T.; Hamuy, M.; Baklanov, P. V.; Blinnikov, S. I.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the early-time light curves of a large sample of 223 Type II supernovae (SNe II) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Supernova Legacy Survey. Having a cadence of a few days and sufficient non-detections prior to explosion, we constrain rise-times, i.e. the durations from estimated first to maximum light, as a function of effective wavelength. At rest-frame g' band (λeff = 4722 Å), we find a distribution of fast rise-times with median of (7.5 ± 0.3) d. Comparing these durations with analytical shock models of Rabinak & Waxman and Nakar & Sari, and hydrodynamical models of Tominaga et al., which are mostly sensitive to progenitor radius at these epochs, we find a median characteristic radius of less than 400 solar radii. The inferred radii are on average much smaller than the radii obtained for observed red supergiants (RSG). Investigating the post-maximum slopes as a function of effective wavelength in the light of theoretical models, we find that massive hydrogen envelopes are still needed to explain the plateaus of SNe II. We therefore argue that the SN II rise-times we observe are either (a) the shock cooling resulting from the core collapse of RSG with small and dense envelopes, or (b) the delayed and prolonged shock breakout of the collapse of an RSG with an extended atmosphere or embedded within pre-SN circumstellar material.

  15. Rumination syndrome: when the lower oesophageal sphincter rises.

    PubMed

    Gourcerol, Guillaume; Dechelotte, Pierre; Ducrotte, Philippe; Leroi, Anne Marie

    2011-07-01

    Rumination syndrome is an uncommon condition characterised by the self-induced regurgitation from the stomach to the mouth of recently ingested meal that is chewed and reswallowed. Rumination is caused by a voluntary rise in intra-abdominal and intra-gastric pressure leading to the reflux of the gastric content into the oesophagus. However, the precise mechanisms preventing reflux at the gastro-oesophageal junction during the rise in intra-gastric pressure remains unknown. In 5 patients, rumination episodes were monitored using combined multiple intra-luminal impedance monitoring, high resolution manometry, and video-fluoroscopic recording. We showed that the gastro-oesophageal junction moved from the abdominal cavity into the thorax creating a "pseudo-hernia". This occurred at a range of 1.4 ± 0.3 s before the rise in intra-oesophageal pressure and the gastro-oesophageal reflux. This displacement of the gastro-oesophageal junction into thorax, rather than a lower oesophageal sphincter opening, explains the mechanism of voluntary regurgitations occurring during rumination syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Distribution of flexural deflection in the worldwide outer rise area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zi-Jun; Lin, Jing-Yi; Lin, Yi-Chin; Chin, Shao-Jinn; Chen, Yen-Fu

    2015-04-01

    The outer rise on the fringe of a subduction system is caused by an accreted load on the flexed oceanic lithosphere. The magnitude of the deflection is usually linked to the stress state beard by the oceanic plate. In a coupled subduction zone, the stress is abundantly accumulated across the plate boundary which should affect the flexural properties of the subducted plate. Thus, the variation of the outer rise in shape may reflect the seismogenic characteristics of the subduction system. In this study, we intent to find the correlation between the flexure deflection (Wb) of the outer rise and the subduction zone properties by comparing several slab parameters and the Wb distribution. The estimation of Wb is performed based on the available bathymetry data and the statistic analysis of earthquakes is from the global ISC earthquake catalog for the period of 1900-2015. Our result shows a progressive change of Wb in space, suggesting a robust calculation. The average Wb of worldwise subduction system spreads from 348 to 682 m. No visible distinction in the ranging of Wb was observed for different subduction zones. However, in a weak coupling subduction system, the standard variation of Wb has generally larger value. Relatively large Wb generally occurs in the center of the trench system, whereas small Wb for the two ends of trench. The comparison of Wb and several slab parameters shows that the Wb may be correlated with the maximal magnitude and the number of earthquakes. Otherwise, no clear relationship with other parameters can be obtained.

  17. How mangrove forests adjust to rising sea level

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, Ken W.; McKee, Karen L.; Lovelock, Catherine E.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Saintilan, Neil; Reef, Ruth; Chen, Luzhen

    2014-01-01

    Mangroves are among the most well described and widely studied wetland communities in the world. The greatest threats to mangrove persistence are deforestation and other anthropogenic disturbances that can compromise habitat stability and resilience to sea-level rise. To persist, mangrove ecosystems must adjust to rising sea level by building vertically or become submerged. Mangroves may directly or indirectly influence soil accretion processes through the production and accumulation of organic matter, as well as the trapping and retention of mineral sediment. In this review, we provide a general overview of research on mangrove elevation dynamics, emphasizing the role of the vegetation in maintaining soil surface elevations (i.e. position of the soil surface in the vertical plane). We summarize the primary ways in which mangroves may influence sediment accretion and vertical land development, for example, through root contributions to soil volume and upward expansion of the soil surface. We also examine how hydrological, geomorphological and climatic processes may interact with plant processes to influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with rising sea level. We draw on a variety of studies to describe the important, and often under-appreciated, role that plants play in shaping the trajectory of an ecosystem undergoing change.

  18. Rapidly Rising Transients in the Supernova - Superluminous Supernova Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcavi, Iair; Wolf, William M.; Howell, D. Andrew; Bildsten, Lars; Leloudas, Giorgos; Hardin, Delphine; Prajs, Szymon; Perley, Daniel A.; Svirski, Gilad; Cenko, S. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of four rapidly rising (t(sub rise) approximately equals 10 days) transients with peak luminosities between those of supernovae (SNe) and superluminous SNe (M(sub peak) approximately equals -20) - one discovered and followed by the PalomarTransient Factory (PTF) and three by the Supernova Legacy Survey. The light curves resemble those of SN 2011kl, recently shown to be associated with an ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), though no GRB was seen to accompany our SNe. The rapid rise to a luminous peak places these events in a unique part of SN phase space, challenging standard SN emission mechanisms. Spectra of the PTF event formally classify it as an SN II due to broad H alpha emission, but an unusual absorption feature, which can be interpreted as either high velocity H alpha (though deeper than in previously known cases) or Si II (as seen in SNe Ia), is also observed. We find that existing models of white dwarf detonations, CSM interaction, shock breakout in a wind (or steeper CSM), and magnetar spin down cannot readily explain the observations. We consider the possibility that a Type 1.5 SN scenario could be the origin of our events. More detailed models for these kinds of transients and more constraining observations of future such events should help to better determine their nature.

  19. Mars Structural and Stratigraphic Mapping along the Coprates Rise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R Stephen

    2009-01-01

    This geologic mapping project supports a topical study of structures in east Thaumasia associated with the Coprates rise. The study examines cuesta-like features on the east flank of the Coprates rise first identified by Saunders et al. [1]. Mapping combines detailed local stratigraphy, structural geology and topography. Hogbacks and cuestas indicate erosion of tilted rock units. The extent of the erosion will be determined in the course of the mapping. The region of interest lies along the eastern margin of Thaumasia bounded by latitudes -15 and -35 and longitudes 50 to 70 W (Figure 1). Three MTM geologic quadrangles are being compiled for publication by the USGS (-20057, -25057, -30057). All existing data sources are used including THEMIS, MOC, CTX, HiRISE, MOLA and gravity, as well as higher level data available through the PDS data nodes at ASU, UA and Washington University. The extremely valuable ASU JMARS tools are used for analysis of many of the data sets. ArcGIS software has been obtained and is being learned for the map compilation.

  20. Sea-level rise: towards understanding local vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Projections of global sea-level rise into the future have become more pessimistic over the past five years or so. A global rise by more than one metre by the year 2100 is now widely accepted as a serious possibility if greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated. That is witnessed by the scientific assessments that were made since the last IPCC report was published in 2007. The Delta Commission of the Dutch government projected up to 1.10 m as a 'high-end' scenario (Vellinga et al 2009). The Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) projected up to 1.40 m (Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research 2009), and the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) gives a range of 0.90-1.60 m in its 2011 report (Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme 2011). And recently the US Army Corps of Engineers recommends using a 'low', an 'intermediate' and a 'high' scenario for global sea-level rise when planning civil works programmes, with the high one corresponding to a 1.50 m rise by 2100 (US Army Corps of Engineers 2011). This more pessimistic view is based on a number of observations, most importantly perhaps the fact that sea level has been rising at least 50% faster in the past decades than projected by the IPCC (Rahmstorf et al 2007, IPCC 2007). Also, the rate of rise (averaged over two decades) has accelerated threefold, from around 1 mm yr-1 at the start of the 20th century to around 3 mm yr-1 over the past 20 years (Church and White 2006), and this rate increase closely correlates with global warming (Rahmstorf et al 2011). The IPCC projections, which assume almost no further acceleration in the 20th century, thus look less plausible. And finally the observed net mass loss of the two big continental ice sheets (Van den Broeke et al 2011) calls into question the assumption that ice accumulation in Antarctica would largely balance ice loss from Greenland in the course of further global warming (IPCC 2007). With such a serious sea-level rise on the horizon

  1. The Impact of Sea Level Rise on Florida's Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senarath, S. U.

    2005-12-01

    Global warming and the resulting melting of polar ice sheets could increase global sea levels significantly. Some studies have predicted mean sea level increases in the order of six inches to one foot in the next 25 to 50 years. This could have severe irreversible impacts on low-lying areas of Florida's Everglades. The key objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of a one foot sea level rise on Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow (CSSS) nesting areas within the Everglades National Park (ENP). A regional-scale hydrologic model is used to assess the sensitivities of this sea-level rise scenario. Florida's Everglades supports a unique ecosystem. At present, about 50 percent of this unique ecosystem has been lost due to urbanization and farming. Today, the water flow in the remnant Everglades is also regulated to meet a variety of competing environmental, water-supply and flood-control needs. A 30-year, eight billion dollar (1999 estimate) project has been initiated to improve Everglades' water flows. The expected benefits of this restoration project will be short-lived if the predicted sea level rise causes severe impacts on the environmentally sensitive areas of the Everglades. Florida's Everglades is home to many threatened and endangered species of wildlife. The Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow population in the ENP is one such species that is currently listed as endangered. Since these birds build their nests close to the ground surface (the base of the nest is approximately six inches from the ground surface), they are directly affected by any sea level induced ponding depth, frequency or duration change. Therefore, the CSSS population serves as a good indicator species for evaluating the negative impacts of sea level rise on the Everglades' ecosystem. The impact of sea level rise on the CSSS habitat is evaluated using the Regional Simulation Model (RSM) developed by the South Florida Water Management District. The RSM is an implicit, finite-volume, continuous

  2. Rising climate variability and synchrony in North Pacific ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Bryan

    2017-04-01

    Rising climate variability and synchrony in North Pacific ecosystems Evidence is growing that climate variability of the northeast Pacific Ocean has increased over the last century, culminating in such events as the record-breaking El Niño years 1983, 1998, and 2016 and the unusually persistent 2014/15 North Pacific Ocean heat wave known as "The Blob." Of particular concern is that rising variability could increase synchrony within and among North Pacific ecosystems, which could reduce the diversity of biological responses to climate (i.e. the "portfolio effect"), diminish resilience, and leave populations more prone to extirpation. To test this phenomenon, we use a network of multidecadal fish otolith growth-increment chronologies that were strongly correlated to records of winter (Jan-Mar) sea level. These biological and physical datasets spanned the California Current through the Gulf of Alaska. Synchrony was quantified as directional changes in running (31-year window) mean pairwise correlation within sea level and then within otolith time series. Synchrony in winter sea level at the nine stations with the longest records has increased by more than 40% over the 1950-2015 interval. Likewise, synchrony among the eight longest otolith chronologies has increased more than 100% over a comparable time period. These directional changes in synchrony are highly unlikely due to chance alone, as confirmed by comparing trends in observed data to those in simulated data (n = 10,000 iterations) with time series of identical number, length, and autocorrelation. Ultimately, this trend in rising synchrony may be linked to increased impacts of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on mid-latitude ecosystems of North America, and may therefore reflect a much broader, global-scale signature.

  3. Use of formwork systems in high-rise construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurakova, Oksana

    2018-03-01

    Erection of high quality buildings and structures within a reasonable time frame is the crucial factor for the competitiveness of any construction organization. The main material used in high-rise construction is insitu reinforced concrete. The technology of its use is directly related to the use of formwork systems. Formwork systems and formwork technologies basically determine the speed of construction and labor intensity of concreting operations. Therefore, it is also possible to achieve the goal of reducing the construction time and labor intensity of works performed by improving the technology of formwork systems use. Currently there are unresolved issues in the area of implementation of monolithic technology projects, and problems related to the selection of a formwork technology, high labor intensity of works, poor quality of materials and structures, etc. are the main ones. The article presents organizational and technological measures, by means of which introduction it is possible to shorten the duration of construction. A comparison of operations performed during formwork installation according to the conventional technology and taking into account the implemented organizational and technological measures is presented. The results of a comparative analysis of economic efficiency assessments are also presented on the example of a specific construction project before and after the implementation of the above mentioned measures. The study showed that introduction of the proposed organizational and technological model taking into account optimization of reinforcing and concreting works significantly improves the efficiency of a high-rise construction project. And further improvement of technologies for the use of insitu reinforced concrete is a promising direction in the construction of high-rise buildings.

  4. The rise of eating disorders in Asia: a review.

    PubMed

    Pike, Kathleen M; Dunne, Patricia E

    2015-01-01

    Once concentrated among adolescent Caucasian females in high-income Western countries, today, eating disorders (EDs) are truly global. Building upon previous work describing the rise of EDs among cultures in transition, we contextualize the emergence of EDs in Asia by locating this development within the broader discourse about the processes of change that have radically transformed Asian societies over the last three decades. By identifying where EDs are emerging in the region, and by examining their particular expression, our aim is to explicate a fuller story of the relationship between culture and eating disorders. Much of the discussion of EDs in non-Western societies is predicated upon the assumption that an increase in EDs is the by-product of "Westernization", the term used to describe the process by which increased cultural contact with the West results in the transmission of so-called 'Western' ideas and cultural norms to a non-Western culture. While the Westernization literature represents a historical anchor in our understanding of EDs in Asia, we propose that this analysis is incomplete in that societal change in the form of industrialization and urbanization occurring independently from, or in tandem with, "Western" influence are critical factors contributing to the rise of EDs in Asia. Further, our review of eating disorders in Asia suggests that an understanding of the diversity and distinctiveness of the individual countries and cultures that comprise 'Asia' is crucial to understanding the emergence and rise of EDs across this vast region, suggesting that eating disorders are not culture-bound or culture-specific, but rather culture-reactive. Taking into account both the historical influence of Western culture and the more contemporary effects of Asian industrialization and urbanization, key distinctions among respective Asian cultures expands our understanding of the development and expression of EDs globally.

  5. SunRISE Mission Concept Step 2 Study Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibay, F.; Kasper, J. C.; Lazio, J.; Neilsen, T. L.

    2017-12-01

    We present an update on the Sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (SunRISE) mission concept, which was selected for a Step 2 study as part of the Small Explorer (SMEX) Mission of Opportunity (MoO) call. SunRISE is space-based sparse array, composed of six 6U CubeSats, designed to localize the radio emission associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun. Radio emission from CMEs is a direct tracer of the particle acceleration in the inner heliosphere and potential magnetic connections from the lower solar corona to the larger heliosphere. Furthermore, CME radio emission is quite strong such that only a relatively small number of antennas is required, and a small mission would make a fundamental advancement. Indeed, the state-of-the-art for tracking CME radio emission is defined by single antennas (Wind/WAVES, Stereo/SWAVES) in which the tracking is accomplished by assuming a frequency-to-density mapping. This type of Heliophysics mission would be inherently cost prohibitive in a traditional spacecraft paradigm. However, the use of CubeSats, accompanied by the miniaturization of subsystem components, enables the development of this concept at lower cost than ever before. We present the most recent updates on this mission concept, starting from the concept's performance as compared to the required science and driving technical requirements. We then focus on the SunRISE mission concept of operations, which consists of six 6U CubeSats placed in a GEO graveyard orbit for 6 months to achieve the aforementioned science goals. The spacecraft fly in a passive formation, which allows them to form an interferometer while minimizing the impact on operations complexity. We also present details of the engineering design and the key trades being performed as part of the Step 2 concept study.

  6. Numerical Investigation of Microgravity Tank Pressure Rise Due to Boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, Sonya; Ibrahim, Mounir; Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control self-pressurization in cryogenic storage tanks is essential for NASAs long-term space exploration missions. Predictions of the tank pressure rise in Space are needed in order to inform the microgravity design and optimization process. Due to the fact that natural convection is very weak in microgravity, heat leaks into the tank can create superheated regions in the liquid. The superheated regions can instigate microgravity boiling, giving rise to pressure spikes during self-pressurization. In this work, a CFD model is developed to predict the magnitude and duration of the microgravity pressure spikes. The model uses the Schrage equation to calculate the mass transfer, with a different accommodation coefficient for evaporation at the interface, condensation at the interface, and boiling in the bulk liquid. The implicit VOF model was used to account for the moving interface, with bounded second order time discretization. Validation of the models predictions was carried out using microgravity data from the Tank Pressure Control Experiment, which flew aboard the Space Shuttle Mission STS-52. Although this experiment was meant to study pressurization and pressure control, it underwent boiling during several tests. The pressure rise predicted by the CFD model compared well with the experimental data. The ZBOT microgravity experiment is scheduled to fly on February 2016 aboard the ISS. The CFD model was also used to perform simulations for setting parametric limits for the Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiments Test Matrix in an attempt to avoid boiling in the majority of the test runs that are aimed to study pressure increase rates during self-pressurization. *Supported in part by NASA ISS Physical Sciences Research Program, NASA HQ, USA

  7. Sediment Sulfur Isotopes Reflect Seawater Oxygen Rise in Neoarchean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhraee, M.; Crowe, S.; Katsev, S.

    2017-12-01

    The oxygenation of the ocean-atmosphere system is recorded in S isotopes preserved in sedimentary pyrites. Disappearance of mass independent fractionation of S (S-MIF) around 2.45 Ga signals the first large-scale oxygenation of the atmosphere (the GOE), while a narrow range of pyritic δ34S during the Archean eon suggests limited oxidative cycling of S. Both δ34S and S-MIF ranges, however, undergo a clear and unexplained expansion in the Neoarchean between 2.7 and 2.45 Ga, indicating a change in global S-cycling. By analyzing the preservation patterns of isotopic signals with a 1D reaction-transport model, we show that the rock record points to the rise of oxygen in shallow marine environments around 2.7 billion years ago. The model tracks d34S and Δ33S isotopic transformations during early diagenesis in a reaction-transport framework. The results indicate that δ34S and MIF signatures in >2.7Ga sulfides require deposition from anoxic or minimally oxygenated seawater, whereas the 2.7-2.4 Ga expansion in both δ34S and D33S ranges points to at least localized accumulation oxygen to low μM levels, accompanied by a moderate rise in sulfate from low μM concentrations to up to 200 μM. In contrast to the role of oxygen in the atmosphere where it suppresses the production of MIF, oxygen in seawater at levels below 25 μM does not necessarily suppress the MIF preservation, which instead depends on the availability of reactive organic matter, sulfate, and electron acceptors for sulfide re-oxidation. The S-isotopes in Neoarchean sulfides thus paint a picture of gradual oxygenation of shallow marine environments under a nearly anoxic atmosphere where the atmospherically produced S isotopic signals are overprinted by increasingly oxidative diagenesis, rising sulfate levels, and increasing organic sedimentation.

  8. Estimating Hardness from the USDC Tool-Bit Temperature Rise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2008-01-01

    A method of real-time quantification of the hardness of a rock or similar material involves measurement of the temperature, as a function of time, of the tool bit of an ultrasonic/sonic drill corer (USDC) that is being used to drill into the material. The method is based on the idea that, other things being about equal, the rate of rise of temperature and the maximum temperature reached during drilling increase with the hardness of the drilled material. In this method, the temperature is measured by means of a thermocouple embedded in the USDC tool bit near the drilling tip. The hardness of the drilled material can then be determined through correlation of the temperature-rise-versus-time data with time-dependent temperature rises determined in finite-element simulations of, and/or experiments on, drilling at various known rates of advance or known power levels through materials of known hardness. The figure presents an example of empirical temperature-versus-time data for a particular 3.6-mm USDC bit, driven at an average power somewhat below 40 W, drilling through materials of various hardness levels. The temperature readings from within a USDC tool bit can also be used for purposes other than estimating the hardness of the drilled material. For example, they can be especially useful as feedback to control the driving power to prevent thermal damage to the drilled material, the drill bit, or both. In the case of drilling through ice, the temperature readings could be used as a guide to maintaining sufficient drive power to prevent jamming of the drill by preventing refreezing of melted ice in contact with the drill.

  9. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-27

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoommore » activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.« less

  10. The Nitrogen Cycle Before the Rise of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, L. M.; Hemp, J.; Fischer, W. W.

    2016-12-01

    The nitrogen cycle on Earth today is driven by a complex network of microbially-mediated transformations. Atmospheric N2 is fixed into biologically available forms that can either be incorporated into biomass or utilized for bioenergetic redox reactions. The cycle is kept in balance by the return of fixed nitrogen to the atmospheric N2 pool by anammox and denitrification. The early evolution and history of the nitrogen cycle is not well resolved, particularly before the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis and rise of atmospheric oxygen ca. 2.3 Gya. Ammonia oxidation is a biochemically difficult reaction requiring activation of ammonia using O2 or oxidized nitrogen species that are produced using O2. Before the rise of oxygen, when O2 was largely unavailable, nitrification could not proceed, trapping fixed nitrogen in reduced forms such as ammonia and biomass. Without production of nitrite and nitrate, anammox and denitrification could not occur, preventing return of fixed nitrogen to the N2 pool and leaving the nitrogen cycle unclosed. While it has been hypothesized that ammonia oxidation could be driven anaerobically by processes such as phototrophy or iron reduction, these metabolisms have not been recovered in extant microorganisms, and would require complex unknown biochemical mechanisms. Furthermore, phylogenetic data for the key organisms and biochemical pathways involved in denitrification and anammox suggest that these metabolisms postdate the rise of oxygen. This is particularly clear for steps utilizing enzymes in the Heme-Copper Oxidoreductase superfamily, which appear to have originally evolved for O2 reduction at non-negligible substrate concentrations. Together, this suggests that the Archean nitrogen cycle was not closed, and that nitrogen fixed to reduced forms—either through biological nitrogen fixation or abiotic processes—was not easily returned to the atmospheric N2 pool. In principle, this could have stripped the atmosphere of N2 over

  11. Child labor: a global problem on the rise.

    PubMed

    Papesca, L K; Joss, D M

    1996-01-01

    This paper intends to review and analyse the literature focusing on the topic of child labor. Child labor is a global problem on the rise despite modern Western beliefs. Today, such complex and interrelated issues as poverty, illiteracy, and politics fuel the growth of the number of children being exploited for economic gain. It is often difficult to imagine that the products we purchase are manufactured in such horrible conditions, but as consumers we must take responsibility for the well-being of these children.

  12. Study of temperature rises and forces on drilling bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikanth Venkataraman, Ananya

    Many different approaches have been used to prepare, store and test bone samples in order to determine its physical properties. The need to establish a standard method of specimen preparation and storage prior to experimental testing, contributed greatly to the primary part of this study. When mechanized cutting tools such as saws and drills are used, heat is produced and this raises the temperature of both the tool and the material being cut. In orthopedic and dental practices, high-speed tools are often applied to bones and teeth, and heat from these operations may result in thermal necrosis [1]. Since this can have a negative impact on the outcome of an orthopedic procedure, temperatures must be kept below the threshold that results in bone necrosis. The initial set of experiments was performed to determine the conditions under which the mechanical properties of the bone changed so as to establish the most suitable testing conditions. The hardness variation of the bone samples, under different annealing treatment conditions was used as the indicating parameter for evaluation of the change in the mechanical properties. Establishing the most appropriate section of the metacarpal sample for testing, by studying the anisotropy of the bone was another determining parameter. The second step was to examine the effects of conventional drilling as well as modulation assisted drilling on the temperature rise generated in the bone during these machining processes. In addition to this, a set of experiments were performed to ascertain how lubrication affected the temperature rise during drilling. The dynamic portions of the torque and thrust traces as well as the specific energies were compared for the different drilling conditions. Modulation showed no significant effect on the mean torque, thrust, specific energies of cutting, or temperature rise. Lubrication (flooding and misting) in both the modulation and no modulation cases drastically reduced the temperature rise

  13. Volcanism on the fossil Galapagos Rise spreading centre, SE Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, K. M.; Stroncik, N. A.

    2002-12-01

    A part of the fossil spreading centre of the Galapagos Rise at 10° S, 95° W in the SE Pacific Ocean was mapped and sampled. This spreading centre was active for about 12 Ma and was abandoned about 6.5 Ma ago when the spreading rate of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) increased. The aim of this study is to understand the tectonic and petrological implications of the ridge jump for the spreading centre and to gain insights into the processes in its melting column. Bathymetric swath mapping of a part of the Galapagos Rise revealed an elongated structure with a NNE-SSW strike direction which is bounded by a large fracture zone in the north. The mapped area can be divided into three segments, each of about 50 km length. The northernmost segment consists of an ~4400 m deep rift which shows similarities to a slow-spreading centre, e.g. the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The southern two segments are volcanic ridges with numerous volcanic flank cones which reach water depths up to 490 m. This volcanic ridge is interpreted as the continuation of the fossil spreading axis. While the northernmost segment is magmatically starved, the volcanic ridges of the southern two segments apparently formed after cessation of spreading. The rock samples from the rift flanks in the north are incompatible element-depleted (K/Ti 0.08-0.28) and plagioclase-phyric basalts resembling typical mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). In contrast, the lavas from the two volcanic ridge segments in the south are highly vesicular incompatible element-enriched alkali basalts with K/Ti of 0.65-1.4. The depleted rift basalts have Sr isotope ratios below 0.7027 while the alkali basalts from the ridge range between 0.7029 and 0.7031. The rift basalts have significantly lower sodium contents than the alkali basalts and thus the southern lavas are probably derived by smaller degrees of partial melting. The relatively low Si contents of the alkali basalts also indicates formation deeper in the melting column than the northern MORB

  14. Suppressing the morning rise in cortisol impairs free recall.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Ulrike; Meier, Flurina; Lange, Tanja; Born, Jan

    2010-04-01

    Elevated glucocorticoid levels impair memory retrieval. We investigated whether retrieval under naturally elevated glucocorticoid levels, i.e., during the morning rise in cortisol can be improved by suppressing cortisol. In a crossover study 16 men retrieved emotional and neutral texts and pictures (learned 3 d earlier) 30 min after morning awakening, following administration of the cortisol synthesis inhibitor metyrapone or placebo. Unexpectedly, the metyrapone-induced cortisol suppression significantly impaired free recall of both materials. Recognition remained unaffected. Thus, not only high, but also very low glucocorticoid levels impair retrieval, with the latter effect possibly reflecting insufficient occupation of hippocampal/amygdalar mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs).

  15. Impact of capillary rise and recirculation on simulated crop yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroes, Joop; Supit, Iwan; van Dam, Jos; van Walsum, Paul; Mulder, Martin

    2018-05-01

    Upward soil water flow is a vital supply of water to crops. The purpose of this study is to determine if upward flow and recirculated percolation water can be quantified separately, and to determine the contribution of capillary rise and recirculated water to crop yield and groundwater recharge. Therefore, we performed impact analyses of various soil water flow regimes on grass, maize and potato yields in the Dutch delta. Flow regimes are characterized by soil composition and groundwater depth and derived from a national soil database. The intermittent occurrence of upward flow and its influence on crop growth are simulated with the combined SWAP-WOFOST model using various boundary conditions. Case studies and model experiments are used to illustrate the impact of upward flow on yield and crop growth. This impact is clearly present in situations with relatively shallow groundwater levels (85 % of the Netherlands), where capillary rise is a well-known source of upward flow; but also in free-draining situations the impact of upward flow is considerable. In the latter case recirculated percolation water is the flow source. To make this impact explicit we implemented a synthetic modelling option that stops upward flow from reaching the root zone, without inhibiting percolation. Such a hypothetically moisture-stressed situation compared to a natural one in the presence of shallow groundwater shows mean yield reductions for grassland, maize and potatoes of respectively 26, 3 and 14 % or respectively about 3.7, 0.3 and 1.5 t dry matter per hectare. About half of the withheld water behind these yield effects comes from recirculated percolation water as occurs in free-drainage conditions and the other half comes from increased upward capillary rise. Soil water and crop growth modelling should consider both capillary rise from groundwater and recirculation of percolation water as this improves the accuracy of yield simulations. This also improves the accuracy of the

  16. Reconciling projections of the Antarctic contribution to sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Tamsin; Holden, Philip; Edwards, Neil; Wernecke, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Two recent studies of the Antarctic contribution to sea level rise this century had best estimates that differed by an order of magnitude (around 10 cm and 1 m by 2100). The first, Ritz et al. (2015), used a model calibrated with satellite data, giving a 5% probability of exceeding 30cm by 2100 for sea level rise due to Antarctic instability. The second, DeConto and Pollard (2016), used a model evaluated with reconstructions of palaeo-sea level. They did not estimate probabilities, but using a simple assumption here about the distribution shape gives up to a 5% chance of Antarctic contribution exceeding 2.3 m this century with total sea level rise approaching 3 m. If robust, this would have very substantial implications for global adaptation to climate change. How are we to make sense of this apparent inconsistency? How much is down to the data - does the past tell us we will face widespread and rapid Antarctic ice losses in the future? How much is due to the mechanism of rapid ice loss ('cliff failure') proposed in the latter paper, or other parameterisation choices in these low resolution models (GRISLI and PISM, respectively)? How much is due to choices made in the ensemble design and calibration? How do these projections compare with high resolution, grounding line resolving models such as BISICLES? Could we reduce the huge uncertainties in the palaeo-study? Emulation provides a powerful tool for understanding these questions and reconciling the projections. By describing the three numerical ice sheet models with statistical models, we can re-analyse the ensembles and re-do the calibrations under a common statistical framework. This reduces uncertainty in the PISM study because it allows massive sampling of the parameter space, which reduces the sensitivity to reconstructed palaeo-sea level values and also narrows the probability intervals because the simple assumption about distribution shape above is no longer needed. We present reconciled probabilistic

  17. Validation and Refinement of the DELFIC Cloud Rise Module

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-15

    Explosion Energy Fraction in the Cloud, f 13 2.4.2 Temper&ture of Condensed-Phase Matter 13 2.4.3 Altitude 14 2.4.4 Rise V0elociy 14 2.4.5 Mass and Volume 15...2.4.1 Explosion Energy Fraction in the Cloud. f. The original NRDL water-surface burst model used an energy fraction of 33%. For the first DELFIC...of explosion energy) is used to heat soil and air to their respective initial tempera- tures. The soil mans and both initial temperatures are

  18. Experimental study on wake structure of single rising clean bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ayaka; Takedomi, Yuta; Shirota, Minori; Sanada, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Masao

    2007-11-01

    Wake structure of clean bubble rising in quiescent silicone oil solution of photochromic dye is experimentally studied. A single bubble is generated, immediately after UV sheet light illuminates the part of the liquid just above the bubble generation nozzle in order to activate photochromic dye. Once the bubble passes across the colored part of the liquid, the bubble is accompanied by some portion of activated dye tracers; hence the flow structure in the rear of the single rising bubble is visualized. We capture stereo images of both wake structure and bubble motion. We study how wake structure changes with the increase in bubble size. We observe the stable axisymmetric wake structure, which is called `standing eddy' when bubble size is relatively small, and then wake structure becomes unstable and starts to oscillate with the increase in bubble size. With further increase in bubble size, a pair of streamwise vortices, which is called `double thread', is observed. We discuss in detail this transition from the steady wake to unsteady wake structure, especially double thread wake development and hairpin vortices shedding, in relation to the transition from rectilinear to spiral or zigzag bubble motions.

  19. Investigation of wind behaviour around high-rise buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Isa, Norasikin; Fitriah Nasir, Nurul; Sadikin, Azmahani; Ariff Hairul Bahara, Jamil

    2017-09-01

    A study on the investigation of wind behaviour around the high-rise buildings is done through an experiment using a wind tunnel and computational fluid dynamics. High-rise buildings refer to buildings or structures that have more than 12 floors. Wind is invisible to the naked eye; thus, it is hard to see and analyse its flow around and over buildings without the use of proper methods, such as the use of wind tunnel and computational fluid dynamics software.The study was conducted on buildings located in Presint 4, Putrajaya, Malaysia which is the Ministry of Rural and Regional Development, Ministry of Information Communications and Culture, Ministry of Urban Wellbeing, Housing and Local Government and the Ministry of Women, Family, and Community by making scaled models of the buildings. The parameters in which this study is conducted on are, four different wind velocities used based on the seasonal monsoons, and wind direction. ANSYS Fluent workbench software is used to compute the simulations in order to achieve the objectives of this study. The data from the computational fluid dynamics are validated with the experiment done through the wind tunnel. From the results obtained through the use of the computation fluid dynamics, this study can identify the characteristics of wind around buildings, including boundary layer of the buildings, separation flow, wake region and etc. Then analyses is conducted on the occurance resulting from the wind that passes the buildings based on the velocity difference between before and after the wind passes the buildings.

  20. Calcium supplementation and cardiovascular risk: A rising concern.

    PubMed

    Tankeu, Aurel T; Ndip Agbor, Valirie; Noubiap, Jean Jacques

    2017-06-01

    Over the past decade, the number of individuals taking calcium supplementation worldwide has been on the rise, especially with the emergence of new pharmaceutical companies specialized in the marketing of dietary supplements; with calcium supplementation being their main business axis. This is mostly because of the established role of calcium in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and, to a lesser extent, its role in the prevention of fractures. Recently, a rising body of evidence on the adverse effect of calcium supplementation on nonskeletal, especially cardiovascular, health has been a cause for concern. In fact, a significant number of studies have reported an association between calcium supplementation and adverse cardiovascular events, even though high dietary calcium intake was shown to have a protective effect. The mechanism by which calcium supplementation could cause a cardiovascular event was still unclear until a recent study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Combining this recent finding with available data associating calcium supplementation with cardiovascular mortality and all-cause mortality, we call on the need for an evidence-based approach to calcium supplementation, while stressing on the safety of dietary calcium intake over the former on cardiovascular health. ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Manganese-oxidizing photosynthesis before the rise of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jena E; Webb, Samuel M; Thomas, Katherine; Ono, Shuhei; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Fischer, Woodward W

    2013-07-09

    The emergence of oxygen-producing (oxygenic) photosynthesis fundamentally transformed our planet; however, the processes that led to the evolution of biological water splitting have remained largely unknown. To illuminate this history, we examined the behavior of the ancient Mn cycle using newly obtained scientific drill cores through an early Paleoproterozoic succession (2.415 Ga) preserved in South Africa. These strata contain substantial Mn enrichments (up to ∼17 wt %) well before those associated with the rise of oxygen such as the ∼2.2 Ga Kalahari Mn deposit. Using microscale X-ray spectroscopic techniques coupled to optical and electron microscopy and carbon isotope ratios, we demonstrate that the Mn is hosted exclusively in carbonate mineral phases derived from reduction of Mn oxides during diagenesis of primary sediments. Additional observations of independent proxies for O2--multiple S isotopes (measured by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry) and redox-sensitive detrital grains--reveal that the original Mn-oxide phases were not produced by reactions with O2, which points to a different high-potential oxidant. These results show that the oxidative branch of the Mn cycle predates the rise of oxygen, and provide strong support for the hypothesis that the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II evolved from a former transitional photosystem capable of single-electron oxidation reactions of Mn.

  2. The Wadden Sea in transition - consequences of sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becherer, Johannes; Hofstede, Jacobus; Gräwe, Ulf; Purkiani, Kaveh; Schulz, Elisabeth; Burchard, Hans

    2018-01-01

    The impact of sea level rise (SLR) on the future morphological development of the Wadden Sea (North Sea) is investigated by means of extensive process-resolving numerical simulations. A new sediment and morphodynamic module was implemented in the well-established 3D circulation model GETM. A number of different validations are presented, ranging from an idealized 1D channel over a semi-idealized 2D Wadden Sea basin to a fully coupled realistic 40-year hindcast without morphological amplification of the Sylt-Rømøbight, a semi-enclosed subsystem of the Wadden Sea. Based on the results of the hindcast, four distinct future scenarios covering the period 2010-2100 are simulated. While these scenarios differ in the strength of SLR and wind forcing, they also account for an expected increase of tidal range over the coming century. The results of the future projections indicate a transition from a tidal-flat-dominated system toward a lagoon-like system, in which large fractions of the Sylt-Rømøbight will remain permanently covered by water. This has potentially dramatic implications for the unique ecosystem of the Wadden Sea. Although the simulations also predict an increased accumulation of sediment in the back-barrier basin, this accumulation is far too weak to compensate for the rise in mean sea level.

  3. Cloud rise model for radiological dispersal devices events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharon, Avi; Halevy, Itzhak; Sattinger, Daniel; Yaar, Ilan

    2012-07-01

    As a part of the preparedness and response to possible radiological terror events, it is important to model the evolution of the radioactive cloud immediately after its formation, as a function of time, explosive quantity and local meteorological conditions. One of the major outputs of a cloud rise models is the evaluation of cloud top height, which is an essential input for most of the succeeding atmospheric dispersion models. This parameter strongly affects the radiological consequences of the event. Most of the cloud rise models used today, have been developed according to experiments were large quantities of explosives were used, within the range of hundreds of kilograms of TNT. The majority of these models, however, fail to address Radiological Dispersion Devices (RDD) events, which are typically characterized by smaller amounts of TNT. In this paper, a new, semi-empirical model that describes the vertical evolution of the cloud up to its effective height as a function of time, explosive quantity, atmospheric stability and horizontal wind speed, is presented. The database for this model is taken from five sets of experiments done in Israel during 2006-2009 under the "Green Field" (GF) project, using 0.25-100 kg of TNT.

  4. Feline high-rise syndrome: 119 cases (1998-2001).

    PubMed

    Vnuk, D; Pirkić, B; Maticić, D; Radisić, B; Stejskal, M; Babić, T; Kreszinger, M; Lemo, N

    2004-10-01

    High-rise syndrome was diagnosed in 119 cats over a 4-year period. 59.6% of cats were younger than one year, and the average height of the fall was four stories. High-rise syndrome was more frequent during the warmer period of the year. 96.5% of the presented cats, survived after the fall. 46.2% of cats had fractured limbs; 38.5% of fractures were of the forelimb, 61.5% of the hindlimb. The tibia was fractured most often (36.4%), followed by the femur (23.6%). 78.6% of femoral fractures were distal. The mean age of patients with femoral fractures was 9.1 months, and with tibial fractures 29.2 months. Thoracic trauma was diagnosed in 33.6% of cats. Pneumothorax was diagnosed in 20% of cats, and pulmonary contusions in 13.4%. Falls from the seventh or higher stories, are associated with more severe injuries and with a higher incidence of thoracic trauma.

  5. The Impacts of Rising Temperatures on Aircraft Takeoff Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffel, Ethan; Thompson, Terence R.; Horton, Radley M.

    2017-01-01

    Steadily rising mean and extreme temperatures as a result of climate change will likely impact the air transportation system over the coming decades. As air temperatures rise at constant pressure, air density declines, resulting in less lift generation by an aircraft wing at a given airspeed and potentially imposing a weight restriction on departing aircraft. This study presents a general model to project future weight restrictions across a fleet of aircraft with different takeoff weights operating at a variety of airports. We construct performance models for five common commercial aircraft and 19 major airports around the world and use projections of daily temperatures from the CMIP5 model suite under the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 emissions scenarios to calculate required hourly weight restriction. We find that on average, 10 - 30% of annual flights departing at the time of daily maximum temperature may require some weight restriction below their maximum takeoff weights, with mean restrictions ranging from 0.5 to 4% of total aircraft payload and fuel capacity by mid- to late century. Both mid-sized and large aircraft are affected, and airports with short runways and high temperatures, or those at high elevations, will see the largest impacts. Our results suggest that weight restriction may impose a non-trivial cost on airlines and impact aviation operations around the world and that adaptation may be required in aircraft design, airline schedules, and/or runway lengths.

  6. The Impact of Rising Temperatures on Aircraft Takeoff Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffel, E.; Horton, R. M.; Thompson, T. R.

    2017-12-01

    Steadily rising mean and extreme temperatures as a result of climate change will likely impact the air transportation system over the coming decades. As air temperatures rise at constant pressure, air density declines, resulting in less lift generation by an aircraft wing at a given airspeed and potentially imposing a weight restriction on departing aircraft. This study presents a general model to project future weight restrictions across a fleet of aircraft with different takeoff weights operating at a variety of airports. We construct performance models for five common commercial aircraft and 19 major airports around the world and use projections of daily temperatures from the CMIP5 model suite under the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 emissions scenarios to calculate required hourly weight restriction. We find that on average, 10-30% of annual flights departing at the time of daily maximum temperature may require some weight restriction below their maximum takeoff weights, with mean restrictions ranging from 0.5 to 4% of total aircraft payload and fuel capacity by mid- to late century. Both mid-sized and large aircraft are affected, and airports with short runways and high tempera- tures, or those at high elevations, will see the largest impacts. Our results suggest that weight restriction may impose a non-trivial cost on airlines and impact aviation operations around the world and that adaptation may be required in aircraft design, airline schedules, and/or runway lengths.

  7. Is the detection of accelerated sea level rise imminent?

    DOE PAGES

    Fasullo, J. T.; Nerem, R. S.; Hamlington, B.

    2016-08-10

    Global mean sea level rise estimated from satellite altimetry provides a strong constraint on climate variability and change and is expected to accelerate as the rates of both ocean warming and cryospheric mass loss increase over time. In stark contrast to this expectation however, current altimeter products show the rate of sea level rise to have decreased from the first to second decades of the altimeter era. Here, a combined analysis of altimeter data and specially designed climate model simulations shows the 1991 eruption of Mt Pinatubo to likely have masked the acceleration that would have otherwise occurred. This maskingmore » arose largely from a recovery in ocean heat content through the mid to late 1990 s subsequent to major heat content reductions in the years following the eruption. As a result, a consequence of this finding is that barring another major volcanic eruption, a detectable acceleration is likely to emerge from the noise of internal climate variability in the coming decade.« less

  8. A High School Project Seminar on Sea Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, M.; Bosch, W.

    2012-04-01

    In Bavaria the curriculum of the upper grade of high school includes a so called project seminar, running over one and a half year. The aims of the seminar are to let the pupils learn to work on a specific topic, to organize themselves in a team, to improve their soft skills and become familiar with the working life. The topic of the project seminar, jointly organized by the Bertold-Brecht-Gymnasium in Munich and the Deutsche Geodätische Forschungsinstitut (DGFI) was on the "Global sea level rise". A team of 13 pupils computed the mean sea level rise by using on the one hand altimetry data of TOPEX, Jason-1 and Jason2 and on the other hand data of globally distributed tide gauges, corrected for vertical crustal movements derived from GPS products. The results of the two independent approaches were compared with each other and discussed considering also statements and discussions found in press, TV, and the web. Finally, a presentation was prepared and presented at school.

  9. Measurements of Martian dust devil winds with HiRISE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, D.S.; Dundas, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    We report wind measurements within Martian dust devils observed in plan view from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) orbiting Mars. The central color swath of the HiRISE instrument has three separate charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and color filters that observe the surface in rapid cadence. Active features, such as dust devils, appear in motion when observed by this region of the instrument. Our image animations reveal clear circulatory motion within dust devils that is separate from their translational motion across the Martian surface. Both manual and automated tracking of dust devil clouds reveal tangential winds that approach 20-30 m s -1 in some cases. These winds are sufficient to induce a ???1% decrease in atmospheric pressure within the dust devil core relative to ambient, facilitating dust lifting by reducing the threshold wind speed for particle elevation. Finally, radial velocity profiles constructed from our automated measurements test the Rankine vortex model for dust devil structure. Our profiles successfully reveal the solid body rotation component in the interior, but fail to conclusively illuminate the profile in the outer regions of the vortex. One profile provides evidence for a velocity decrease as a function of r -1/2, instead of r -1, suggestive of surface friction effects. However, other profiles do not support this observation, or do not contain enough measurements to produce meaningful insights. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Is the detection of accelerated sea level rise imminent?

    SciTech Connect

    Fasullo, J. T.; Nerem, R. S.; Hamlington, B.

    Global mean sea level rise estimated from satellite altimetry provides a strong constraint on climate variability and change and is expected to accelerate as the rates of both ocean warming and cryospheric mass loss increase over time. In stark contrast to this expectation however, current altimeter products show the rate of sea level rise to have decreased from the first to second decades of the altimeter era. Here, a combined analysis of altimeter data and specially designed climate model simulations shows the 1991 eruption of Mt Pinatubo to likely have masked the acceleration that would have otherwise occurred. This maskingmore » arose largely from a recovery in ocean heat content through the mid to late 1990 s subsequent to major heat content reductions in the years following the eruption. As a result, a consequence of this finding is that barring another major volcanic eruption, a detectable acceleration is likely to emerge from the noise of internal climate variability in the coming decade.« less

  11. The rising cost of NIH-funded biomedical research?

    PubMed

    Kennedy, T J

    1990-02-01

    During the last decade, total appropriations for the NIH have grown in current as well as constant dollars. Constant dollar expenditures for indirect costs and research project grants have increased, as also has the number of the latter, while such expenditures for research centers, training, and research contracts have shrunk. The most impressive redistribution in emphasis has been toward traditional research project grants (R01s). The size of the average R01 award, discounted for inflation, has grown at an annual rate of 1.1% during the last decade and 1.3% since fiscal year (FY) 1970; that of the average research program project (P01) has declined over the same periods, after a slight rise in the early 1970s. Factors contributing to the modest rise in the real (constant-dollar) size of the average R01 are explored. The regularity with which current-services-requirements estimates for the NIH exceed inflation reflects real growth in the program, particularly in the category of research project grants; the artifact of basing calculations on the post-rather than pre-"negotiated" levels of awards in the "current" year; and the extent to which the project periods of awards have been extended. The effect of lengthening project periods is slow to become manifest, but inexorably swells the pool of non-competing awards; decisions in this area undertaken in 1985, and continued at least through FY 1988, could very significantly increase current services requirements in FYs 1991 and 1992.

  12. AN ESTIMATE OF THE DETECTABILITY OF RISING FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, A. C.; Braun, D. C.; Fan, Y., E-mail: aaronb@cora.nwra.co

    The physics of the formation of magnetic active regions (ARs) is one of the most important problems in solar physics. One main class of theories suggests that ARs are the result of magnetic flux that rises from the tachocline. Time-distance helioseismology, which is based on measurements of wave propagation, promises to allow the study of the subsurface behavior of this magnetic flux. Here, we use a model for a buoyant magnetic flux concentration together with the ray approximation to show that the dominant effect on the wave propagation is expected to be from the roughly 100 m s{sup -1} retrogrademore » flow associated with the rising flux. Using a B-spline-based method for carrying out inversions of wave travel times for flows in spherical geometry, we show that at 3 days before emergence the detection of this retrograde flow at a depth of 30 Mm should be possible with a signal-to-noise level of about 8 with a sample of 150 emerging ARs.« less

  13. Mangrove sedimentation and response to relative sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodroffe, CD; Rogers, K.; Mckee, Karen L.; Lovelock, CE; Mendelssohn, IA; Saintilan, N.

    2016-01-01

    Mangroves occur on upper intertidal shorelines in the tropics and subtropics. Complex hydrodynamic and salinity conditions influence mangrove distributions, primarily related to elevation and hydroperiod; this review considers how these adjust through time. Accumulation rates of allochthonous and autochthonous sediment, both inorganic and organic, vary between and within different settings. Abundant terrigenous sediment can form dynamic mudbanks; tides redistribute sediment, contrasting with mangrove peat in sediment-starved carbonate settings. Sediments underlying mangroves sequester carbon, but also contain paleoenvironmental records of adjustments to past sea-level changes. Radiometric dating indicates long-term sedimentation, whereas Surface Elevation Table-Marker Horizon measurements (SET-MH) provide shorter perspectives, indicating shallow subsurface processes of root growth and substrate autocompaction. Many tropical deltas also experience deep subsidence, which augments relative sea-level rise. The persistence of mangroves implies an ability to cope with moderately high rates of relative sea-level rise. However, many human pressures threaten mangroves, resulting in continuing decline in their extent throughout the tropics.

  14. The Sea Level Rise Tipping Point of Delta Survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, R. E.; Kearney, M.; Parkinson, R. W.

    2017-12-01

    The estimated rate of global eustatic sea-level rise (RSLR) associated with the formation of thirty-six of the world's coastal deltas was calculated for the last 22,000 years. These deltas are located in a variety of environmental settings in respect to tidal range, isostasy, and climate. After correcting the original uncalibrated radiocarbon age estimates to calibrated years, 90% of the deltas appear to have formed at an average age of 8,109 ± 122 BP and a median age of 7,967 BP. This age corresponds to a period of significant deceleration in the RSLR to between 5 mm yr-1 and 10 mm yr-1, and is in agreement with two regional estimates of vegetation growth limits with respect to RSLR. This RSLR tipping point for delta formation can be used to inform forecasts of delta resiliency under conditions of climate change and concomitant sea level rise. The RSLR is accelerating and will likely be several times higher than the formation tipping point by the end of this century. Hence, the demise of the world's deltaic environments are likely to occur within the same time frame.

  15. Collective space of high-rise housing complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakaeva, Tatyana

    2018-03-01

    The article considers the problems of support of citizens a comfortable living environment in the conditions of the limited territory of the megalopolis, the typological principles of formation of space-planning structure high-rise residence complexes with public space. The collective space for residents of high-rise housing estates on the example of international experience of design and construction is in detail considered. The collective space and the area of the standard apartment are analysed on comfort classes: a social - complex Pinnacle @ Duxton, a business - Monde Condos and an elite - Hamilton Scotts. Interdependence the area of the standard flat and the total area of housing collective space, in addiction on the comfort level, is revealed. In the conditions of high-density urban development, the collective space allows to form the comfortable environment for accommodation. The recommendations for achievement of integrity and improvement of quality of the city environment are made. The convenient collective space makes a contribution to civil policy, it creates the socializing sense of interaction of residents, coagulates social effect.

  16. The hydrodynamics of bubble rise and impact with solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Manica, Rogerio; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y C

    2016-09-01

    A bubble smaller than 1mm in radius rises along a straight path in water and attains a constant speed due to the balance between buoyancy and drag force. Depending on the purity of the system, within the two extreme limits of tangentially immobile or mobile boundary conditions at the air-water interface considerably different terminal speeds are possible. When such a bubble impacts on a horizontal solid surface and bounces, interesting physics can be observed. We study this physical phenomenon in terms of forces, which can be of colloidal, inertial, elastic, surface tension and viscous origins. Recent advances in high-speed photography allow for the observation of phenomena on the millisecond scale. Simultaneous use of such cameras to visualize both rise/deformation and the dynamics of the thin film drainage through interferometry are now possible. These experiments confirm that the drainage process obeys lubrication theory for the spectrum of micrometre to millimetre-sized bubbles that are covered in this review. We aim to bridge the colloidal perspective at low Reynolds numbers where surface forces are important to high Reynolds number fluid dynamics where the effect of the surrounding flow becomes important. A model that combines a force balance with lubrication theory allows for the quantitative comparison with experimental data under different conditions without any fitting parameter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Volcanic rises on Venus: Geology, formation, and sequence of evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senske, D. A.; Stofan, E. R.; Bindschadler, D. L.; Smrekar, S. E.

    1993-01-01

    Large centers of volcanism on Venus are concentrated primarily in the equatorial region of the planet and are associated with regional topographic rises. Analysis of both radar images and geophysical data suggest that these uplands are sites of mantle upwelling. Magellan radar imaging provides a globally contiguous data set from which the geology of these regions is evaluated and compared. In addition, high resolution gravity data currently being collected provide a basis to assess the relationship between these uplands and processes in the planet's interior. Studies of the geology of the three largest volcanic highlands (Beta Regio, Atla Regio, Western Eistla Regio) show them to be distinct, having a range of volcanic and tectonic characteristics. In addition to these large areas, a number of smaller uplands are identified and are being analyzed (Bell Regio, Imdr Regio, Dione Regio (Ushas, Innini, and Hathor Montes), and Themis Regio). To understand better the mechanisms by which these volcanic rises form and evolve, we assess their geologic and geophysical characteristics.

  18. Quantitative modeling of the rise in atmospheric oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claire, Mark W.

    The abrupt rise of molecular oxygen in Earth's atmosphere approximately 2.4 billion years ago was perhaps the most profound event in Earth's history after the evolution of life itself. Biogeochemical cycles in Earth's atmosphere, ocean, and crust were completely reorganized and it also likely marked the first moment when our planet could be deemed "inhabited" across interstellar space via identification of biogenically produced O 2 and O 3 in a spectrum of Earth's atmosphere. This dissertation explores the "Great Oxidation Event" via numerical modeling of evolving ancient atmospheres. In creating a self-consistent description of evolving redox fluxes in the Earth system, we reach the following conclusions. After the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, the atmosphere has two primary stable states--one is methane- rich and produces mass-independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes (MIF-S), and one is oxygen-rich and does not produce MIF-S. These two stable states are separated by only a few percent in the fluxes of O 2 and CH 4 needed to sustain them. The atmosphere evolves rapidly from one state to the other when the net flux of reductants drops below the net flux of oxidants into the atmosphere. The transition between the two states - "the rise of oxygen" - is only feasible once methane levels drop below ~50 ppm. We show numerically that hydrogen escape can drive irreversible oxidation of Earth's crust, leading to decreasing CH 4 concentrations over long timescales. We argue that the disappearance of the MIF-S signal is better described as recording a collapse of atmospheric CH 4 , rather than the appearance of O 2 . As CH 4 levels decrease, a positive feedback between oxidative weathering, oceanic sulfate concentrations, and the anaerobic oxidation of methane further drives atmospheric instability. Once a critical threshold in CH 4 concentration is overcome, the atmosphere transitions from an anoxic to oxic state on the timescale of 10 3 years. The post

  19. The rise of environmental analytical chemistry as an interdisciplinary activity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard

    2009-07-01

    Modern scientific endeavour is increasingly delivered within an interdisciplinary framework. Analytical environmental chemistry is a long-standing example of an interdisciplinary approach to scientific research where value is added by the close cooperation of different disciplines. This editorial piece discusses the rise of environmental analytical chemistry as an interdisciplinary activity and outlines the scope of the Analytical Chemistry and the Environmental Chemistry domains of TheScientificWorldJOURNAL (TSWJ), and the appropriateness of TSWJ's domain format in covering interdisciplinary research. All contributions of new data, methods, case studies, and instrumentation, or new interpretations and developments of existing data, case studies, methods, and instrumentation, relating to analytical and/or environmental chemistry, to the Analytical and Environmental Chemistry domains, are welcome and will be considered equally.

  20. High tides and rising seas: potential effects on estuarine waterbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.; Sanders, G.M.; Prosser, D.J.; Cahoon, D.R.; Greenberg, Russell; Maldonado, Jesus; Droege, Sam; McDonald, M.V.

    2006-01-01

    Coastal waterbirds are vulnerable to water-level changes especially under predictions of accelerating sea-level rise and increased storm frequency in the next century. Tidal and wind-driven fluctuations in water levels affecting marshes, their invertebrate communities, and their dependent waterbirds are manifested in daily, monthly, seasonal, annual, and supra-annual (e.g., decadal or 18.6-yr) periodicities. Superimposed on these cyclic patterns is a long-term (50?80 yr) increase in relative sea-level rise that varies from about 2?4 + mm/yr along the Atlantic coastline. At five study sites selected on marsh islands from Cape Cod, Massachusetts to coastal Virginia, we monitored marsh elevation changes and flooding, tide variations over time, and waterbird use. We found from longterm marsh core data that marsh elevations at three of five sites may not be sufficient to maintain pace with current sea-level rise. Results of the short-term (3?4 yr) measures using surface elevation tables suggest a more dramatic difference, with marsh elevation change at four of five sites falling below relative sea-level rise. In addition, we have found a significant increase (in three of four cases) in the rate of surface marsh flooding in New Jersey and Virginia over the past 70?80 yr during May?July when waterbirds are nesting on or near the marsh surface. Short-term, immediate effects of flooding will jeopardize annual fecundity of many species of concern to federal and state agencies, most notably American Black Duck (Anas rubripes), Nelson?s Sharp-tailed Sparrow (Ammodramus nelsoni), Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow (A. caudacutus), Seaside Sparrow (A. maritima), Coastal Plain Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana nigrescens), Black Rail (Laterallus jamaicensis), Forster?s Tern (Sterna forsteri), Gull-billed Tern (S. nilotica), Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger), and American Oystercatcher (Haemotopus palliatus). Forster?s Terns are probably most at risk given the large proportion of their

  1. [The rise and fall of an physician entrepreneur].

    PubMed

    Dörnyei, Sándor

    2002-01-01

    In 1927 one of the most up-to-date and most beautiful sanatoriums of Central Europe was built on the hills of Buda by László Jakab MD (1875-1940), who at that time had already run - since 1909 - a successful health-resort, the rather popular and successful "Liget-Sanatorium": following a period of expansion and flourishing, his enterprise bankrupted. (The building itself was renewed after World War II - it served first as a hospital for tuberculosis patients and later as a university clinic for internal medicine.) This article tells the story of an entrepreneur physician, including his former and more successful attempts to run a health-care business, and gives detailed account of the rise and fall of private health-resort in prewar Hungary.

  2. Rising dough and baking bread at the Australian synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, S. C.; McCann, T.; Day, L.; Favaro, J.; Tuhumury, H.; Thompson, D.; Maksimenko, A.

    2016-01-01

    Wheat protein quality and the amount of common salt added in dough formulation can have a significant effect on the microstructure and loaf volume of bread. High-speed synchrotron micro-CT provides an ideal tool for observing the three dimensional structure of bread dough in situ during proving (rising) and baking. In this work, the synchrotron micro-CT technique was used to observe the structure and time evolution of doughs made from high and low protein flour and three different salt additives. These experiments showed that, as expected, high protein flour produces a higher volume loaf compared to low protein flour regardless of salt additives. Furthermore the results show that KCl in particular has a very negative effect on dough properties resulting in much reduced porosity. The hundreds of datasets produced and analysed during this experiment also provided a valuable test case for handling large quantities of data using tools on the Australian Synchrotron's MASSIVE cluster.

  3. Toxic disputes and the rise of environmental justice in Australia.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Smith, Mariann E; Bell, Lee

    2003-01-01

    The paper examines the rise of environmental justice issues in Australia, evident in two toxic disputes; the first, in a Perth outer suburb in Western Australia where residents faced both a hazardous waste dump and the nation's biggest chemical fire; and the second, in the Sydney suburb of Botany where residents were confronted with the destruction of what is thought to be, the world's largest stockpile of hazardous hexachlorobenzene (HCB) waste. The paper reviews the range of factors that impacted the local communities' fight for environmental justice. It explores the limitations of risk assessment and risk-based policies, as well as the problematic role of the expert and the communication of risk. The informational inequity and resource disparities so evident in toxic disputes are highlighted. The case studies confirmed the inequitable distribution of chemical risk as a failure to secure environmental justice for all Australians.

  4. Syphilis in the United States: on the rise?

    PubMed

    Peterman, Thomas A; Su, John; Bernstein, Kyle T; Weinstock, Hillard

    2015-02-01

    Syphilis rates and trends vary by population subgroup. Among men who have sex with men (MSM), rates of primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis are high throughout the USA (228.8 per 100,000 in 2013). P&S syphilis among women is much less common (0.9 per 100,000 in 2013) and occurs in isolated outbreaks plus in a few counties with persistent low levels of infection. Congenital syphilis trends closely follow P&S trends among women. These trends have implications for prevention. Routine screening among MSM can prevent tertiary syphilis, but despite interventions, rates of infection continue to rise among MSM and will soon approach those last seen in 1982 (estimate: 340.7 per 100,000). Control of syphilis among women is possible and important because it often leads to congenital syphilis. Outbreaks among heterosexuals can be halted by intensive screening, treatment and partner notification.

  5. Thresholds and the rising pion inclusive cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.T.

    In the context of the hypothesis of the Pomeron-f identity, it is shown that the rising pion inclusive cross section can be explained over a wide range of energies as a series of threshold effects. Low-mass thresholds are seen to be important. In order to understand the contributions of high-mass thresholds (flavoring), a simple two-channel multiperipheral model is examined. The analysis sheds light on the relation between thresholds and Mueller-Regge couplings. In particular, it is seen that inclusive-, and total-cross-section threshold mechanisms may differ. A quantitative model based on this idea and utilizing previous total-cross-section fits is seen to agreemore » well with experiment.« less

  6. Ray tracing study of rising tone EMIC-triggered emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzelka, Miroslav; Santolík, Ondřej; Grison, Benjamin; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    ElectroMagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) triggered emissions have been subject of extensive theoretical and experimental research in last years. These emissions are characterized by high coherence values and a frequency range of 0.5 - 2.0 Hz, close to local helium gyrofrequency. We perform ray tracing case studies of rising tone EMIC-triggered emissions observed by the Cluster spacecraft in both nightside and dayside regions off the equatorial plane. By comparison of simulated and measured wave properties, namely wave vector orientation, group velocity, dispersion and ellipticity of polarization, we determine possible source locations. Diffusive equilibrium density model and other, semi-empirical models are used with ion composition inferred from cross-over frequencies. Ray tracing simulations are done in cold plasma approximation with inclusion of Landau and cyclotron damping. Various widths, locations and profiles of plasmapause are tested.

  7. Modeling rises and falls in money addicted social hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

    2014-08-01

    The emergence of large communities is inherently associated with the creation of social structures. Connections between individuals are indispensable for cooperative action of agents building social groups. Moreover, social groups usually evolve and their structure changes over time. Consequently, an underlying network connecting individuals is not static, reflecting an ongoing adaptation to new conditions. The evolution of social connections is influenced by the relative position (hierarchy) of individuals building the system as well as by the availability of resources. We explore this aspect of human ambition by modeling the interplay of social networking and an uneven distribution of external resources. The model naturally generates social hierarchies. Remarkably, this social structure exhibits a rise-and-fall behavior. A well pronounced quasi-periodic dynamics, which is closely associated with the dissipation of resources that are needed to sustain the social links, is revealed.

  8. Primary Care Practice Transformation and the Rise of Consumerism.

    PubMed

    Shrank, William H

    2017-04-01

    Americans are increasingly demanding the same level of service in healthcare that they receive in other services and products that they buy. This rise in consumerism poses challenges for primary care physicians as they attempt to transform their practices to succeed in a value-based reimbursement landscape, where they are rewarded for managing costs and improving the health of populations. In this paper, three examples of consumer-riven trends are described: retail healthcare, direct and concierge care, and home-based diagnostics and care. For each, the intersection of consumer-driven care and the goals of value-based primary care are explored. If the correct payment and connectivity enablers are in place, some examples of consumer-driven care are well-positioned to support primary care physicians in their mission to deliver high-quality, efficient care for the populations they serve. However, concerns about access and equity make other trends less consistent with that mission.

  9. Rising out-of-pocket costs in disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Chernew, Michael E; Rosen, Allison B; Fendrick, A Mark

    2006-03-01

    To document the rise in copayments for patients in disease management programs and to call attention to the inherent conflicts that exist between these 2 approaches to benefit design. Data from 2 large health plans were used to compare cost sharing in disease management programs with cost sharing outside of disease management programs. The copayments charged to participants in disease management programs usually do not differ substantially from those charged to other beneficiaries. Cost sharing and disease management result in conflicting approaches to benefit design. Increasing copayments may lead to underuse of recommended services, thereby decreasing the clinical effectiveness and increasing the overall costs of disease management programs. Policymakers and private purchasers should consider the use of targeted benefit designs when implementing disease management programs or redesigning cost-sharing provisions. Current information systems and health services research are sufficiently advanced to permit these benefit designs.

  10. Benjamin Rush, Edinburgh Medicine and the Rise of Physician Autobiography.

    PubMed

    Jones, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the place of Scottish medicine in the autobiographical writing of the Philadelphia physician and signer of the American Declaration of Independence, Benjamin Rush, who studied at the University of Edinburgh from 1766 to 1768. It focuses on Rush's 'Scottish journal' (his account of his period of study in Edinburgh), his protracted feud from 1797 over his treatment of yellow fever with the English journalist, politician and agriculturalist William Cobbett, and his account in 'Travels through Life' of that feud and of the influence of Cullen on his medical theory and practice. The different rhetorical strategies used by Rush to defend his character and practice and his role in the rise of physician autobiography are examined.

  11. Imbibition with swelling: Capillary rise in thin deformable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvick, Mathias; Martinez, D. Mark; Hewitt, Duncan R.; Balmforth, Neil J.

    2017-07-01

    The imbibition of a liquid into a thin deformable porous substrate driven by capillary suction is considered. The substrate is initially dry and has uniform porosity and thickness. Two-phase flow theory is used to describe how the liquid flows through the pore space behind the wetting front when out-of-plane deformation of the solid matrix is considered. Neglecting gravity and evaporation, standard shallow-layer scalings are used to construct a reduced model of the dynamics. The model predicts convergence to a self-similar behavior in all regions except near the wetting front, where a boundary layer arises whose structure narrows with the advance of the front. Over time, the rise height approaches the similarity scaling of t1 /2, as in the classical Washburn or BCLW law. The results are compared with a series of laboratory experiments using cellulose paper sheets, which provide qualitative agreement.

  12. Mars methane rises and falls with the seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, Eric

    2018-01-01

    On Earth, atmospheric methane is a prominent sign of life. On Mars, the story is more complicated. Trace detections of methane, alongside glimpses of larger spikes, have fueled debates about biological and nonbiological sources of the gas. Now, NASA scientists have announced a new twist in the tale: Methane regularly rises to a peak in late northern summer in a seasonal pattern. The swings are larger than can be explained by the planet's seasonal freeze-thaw cycles. The wiggles are a mystery within a larger mystery: claims of methane spikes an order of magnitude or two higher than the background. Some scientists say meteor showers could be responsible, by depositing carbonaceous material in the atmosphere that reacts to form methane. A close encounter on 24 January with debris from a comet could provide a chance to test the hypothesis.

  13. Community health centers tackle rising demands and expectations.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Robert; Felland, Laurie; Lauer, Johanna

    2007-12-01

    As key providers of preventive and primary care for underserved people, including the uninsured, community health centers (CHCs) are the backbone of the U.S. health care safety net. Despite significant federal funding increases, community health centers are struggling to meet rising demand for care, particularly for specialty medical, dental and mental health services, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2007 site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. Health centers are responding to these pressures by expanding capacity and adding services but confront staffing, resource and other constraints. At the same time, CHCs are facing other demands, including increased quality reporting expectations, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, developing electronic medical records, and preparing for public health emergencies.

  14. The rise of the ants: A phylogenetic and ecological explanation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Edward O.; Hölldobler, Bert

    2005-01-01

    In the past two decades, studies of anatomy, behavior, and, most recently, DNA sequences have clarified the phylogeny of the ants at the subfamily and generic levels. In addition, a rich new harvest of Cretaceous and Paleogene fossils has helped to date the major evolutionary radiations. We collate this information and then add data from the natural history of the modern fauna to sketch a history of major ecological adaptations at the subfamily level. The key events appear to have been, first, a mid-Cretaceous initial radiation in forest ground litter and soil coincident with the rise of the angiosperms (flowering plants), then a Paleogene advance to ecological dominance in concert with that of the angiosperms in tropical forests, and, finally, an expansion of some of the lineages, aided by changes in diet away from dependence on predation, upward into the canopy, and outward into more xeric environments. PMID:15899976

  15. Design of solar systems in high-rise buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Alexander; Chudinov, Dmitry; Yaremenko, Sergey

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, the renovation program is being implemented in the megapolises of Russia. Innovative high-rise buildings are built instead of morally and physically obsolete houses, where non-traditional renewable energy sources are used to the fullest extent, under the effect of which they are located. The possibility to use solar systems with variation of their design parameters is considered. It is established that solar systems have high technical potential. The share of heat load, that is provided by using solar energy, varies from 4 to 84% depending on the time of the year. Economic indicators restrain the use of such panels. The payback period is about 8 years at the current cost for thermal energy.

  16. Possibilities of using aluminate cements in high-rise construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaddo, Maria

    2018-03-01

    The article describes preferable ways of usage of alternative binders for high-rise construction based on aluminate cements. Possible areas of rational use of aluminate cements with the purpose of increasing the service life of materials and the adequacy of the durability of materials with the required durability of the building are analyzed. The results of the structure, shrinkage and physical and mechanical properties of concrete obtained from dry mixes on the base of aluminate cements for self-leveling floors are presented. To study the shrinkage mechanism of curing binders and to evaluate the role of evaporation of water in the development of shrinkage was undertaken experiment with simple unfilled systems: gypsum binder, portland cement and «corrosion resistant high alumina cement + gypsum». Principle possibility of binder with compensated shrinkage based on aluminate cement, gypsum and modern superplasticizers was defined, as well as cracking resistance and corrosion resistance provide durability of the composition.

  17. Design, construction and operation features of high-rise structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylnik, Alexey; Mylnik, Vladimir; Zubeeva, Elena; Mukhamedzhanova, Olga

    2018-03-01

    The article considers design, construction and operation features of high-rise facilities. The analysis of various situations, that come from improper designing, construction and operation of unique facilities, is carried out. The integrated approach is suggested, when the problems of choosing acceptable constructional solutions related to the functional purpose, architectural solutions, methods of manufacturing and installation, operating conditions for unique buildings and structures are being tackled. A number of main causes for the emergency destruction of objects under construction and operation is considered. A number of measures are proposed on the basis of factor classification in order to efficiently prevent the situations, when various negative options of design loads and emergency impacts occur.

  18. The Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, Joseph; Kasper, Justin; Maksimovic, Milan; Alibay, Farah; Amiri, Nikta; Bastian, Tim; Cohen, Christina; Landi, Enrico; Manchester, Ward; Reinard, Alysha; Schwadron, Nathan; Cecconi, Baptiste; Hallinan, Gregg; Hegedus, Alex; Krupar, Vratislav; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2017-04-01

    Radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is a direct tracer of particle acceleration in the inner heliosphere and potential magnetic connections from the lower solar corona to the larger heliosphere. Energized electrons excite Langmuir waves, which then convert into intense radio emission at the local plasma frequency, with the most intense acceleration thought to occur within 20 RS. The radio emission from CMEs is quite strong such that only a relatively small number of antennas is required to detect and map it, but many aspects of this particle acceleration and transport remain poorly constrained. Ground-based arrays would be quite capable of tracking the radio emission associated with CMEs, but absorption by the Earth's ionosphere limits the frequency coverage of ground-based arrays (ν ≳ 15 MHz), which in turn limits the range of solar distances over which they can track the radio emission (≲ 3RS). The state-of-the-art for tracking such emission from space is defined by single antennas (Wind/WAVES, Stereo/SWAVES), in which the tracking is accomplished by assuming a frequency-to-density mapping; there has been some success in triangulating the emission between the spacecraft, but considerable uncertainties remain. We describe the Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) mission concept: A constellation of small spacecraft in a geostationary graveyard orbit designed to localize and track radio emissions in the inner heliosphere. Each spacecraft would carry a receiving system for observations below 25 MHz, and SunRISE would produce the first images of CMEs more than a few solar radii from the Sun. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  19. Extreme sea levels on the rise along Europe's coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vousdoukas, Michalis I.; Mentaschi, Lorenzo; Voukouvalas, Evangelos; Verlaan, Martin; Feyen, Luc

    2017-03-01

    Future extreme sea levels (ESLs) and flood risk along European coasts will be strongly impacted by global warming. Yet, comprehensive projections of ESL that include mean sea level (MSL), tides, waves, and storm surges do not exist. Here, we show changes in all components of ESLs until 2100 in view of climate change. We find that by the end of this century, the 100-year ESL along Europe's coastlines is on average projected to increase by 57 cm for Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP)4.5 and 81 cm for RCP8.5. The North Sea region is projected to face the highest increase in ESLs, amounting to nearly 1 m under RCP8.5 by 2100, followed by the Baltic Sea and Atlantic coasts of the UK and Ireland. Relative sea level rise (RSLR) is shown to be the main driver of the projected rise in ESL, with increasing dominance toward the end of the century and for the high-concentration pathway. Changes in storm surges and waves enhance the effects of RSLR along the majority of northern European coasts, locally with contributions up to 40%. In southern Europe, episodic extreme events tend to stay stable, except along the Portuguese coast and the Gulf of Cadiz where reductions in surge and wave extremes offset RSLR by 20-30%. By the end of this century, 5 million Europeans currently under threat of a 100-year ESL could be annually at risk from coastal flooding under high-end warming. The presented dataset is available through this link: http://data.jrc.ec.europa.eu/collection/LISCOAST.

  20. Archean evolution of the Leo Rise and its Eburnean reworking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiéblemont, Denis; Goujou, Jean Christian; Egal, Emmanuel; Cocherie, Alain; Delor, Claude; Lafon, Jean Michel; Fanning, C. Mark

    2004-06-01

    Recent geological mapping in southeastern Guinea, supported by zircon dating, has called into question traditional understanding concerning the evolution of the Leo Rise. Gneiss dated at about 3540 Ma appears to constitute the earliest evidence for continental accretion within the Leo Rise. The existence of a Leonian depositional cycle at about 3000 Ma is confirmed, marked by volcanic and sedimentary rocks that can be correlated with the Loko Group in Sierra Leone. The span of ages (3244-3050 Ma) suggests that the Leonian cycle comprises different episodes whose respective chronology is as yet uncertain. Clearly distinct from the Leonian cycle, the Liberian cycle (˜2900-2800 Ma) is represented in Guinea by granite and migmatite (˜2910-2800 Ma), reflecting remobilization of the ancient Archean basement and deformation of the Leonian rocks; no deposition is associated with this cycle. After the Liberian, the Nimba and Simandou successions, containing Liberian detrital zircons, are assigned to the Birimian (˜2200-2000 Ma). Finally, Eburnean tectonism caused intense deformation of the Archean craton, accompanied by high-grade metamorphism and the intrusion of granite and syenite with ages between 2080 and 2020 Ma. The evolution of the Kénéma-Man domain, attributed to the cumulated effect of the Leonian and Liberian cycles, is thus in part Eburnean. We can suppose, therefore, that the NNE-SSW-trending structures attributed to the Liberian in Sierra Leone are, in fact, Eburnean. The Kambui Supergroup, also affected by this tectonism, should thus be assigned to the Birimian rather than the Liberian, which would explain its similarities with the Nimba and Simandou successions.

  1. The direction of evolution: the rise of cooperative organization.

    PubMed

    Stewart, John E

    2014-09-01

    Two great trends are evident in the evolution of life on Earth: towards increasing diversification and towards increasing integration. Diversification has spread living processes across the planet, progressively increasing the range of environments and free energy sources exploited by life. Integration has proceeded through a stepwise process in which living entities at one level are integrated into cooperative groups that become larger-scale entities at the next level, and so on, producing cooperative organizations of increasing scale (for example, cooperative groups of simple cells gave rise to the more complex eukaryote cells, groups of these gave rise to multi-cellular organisms, and cooperative groups of these organisms produced animal societies). The trend towards increasing integration has continued during human evolution with the progressive increase in the scale of human groups and societies. The trends towards increasing diversification and integration are both driven by selection. An understanding of the trajectory and causal drivers of the trends suggests that they are likely to culminate in the emergence of a global entity. This entity would emerge from the integration of the living processes, matter, energy and technology of the planet into a global cooperative organization. Such an integration of the results of previous diversifications would enable the global entity to exploit the widest possible range of resources across the varied circumstances of the planet. This paper demonstrates that it's case for directionality meets the tests and criticisms that have proven fatal to previous claims for directionality in evolution. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Implications of Sea Level Rise on Coastal Flood Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeber, V.; Li, N.; Cheung, K.; Lane, P.; Evans, R. L.; Donnelly, J. P.; Ashton, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    Recent global and local projections suggest the sea level will be on the order of 1 m or higher than the current level by the end of the century. Coastal communities and ecosystems in low-lying areas are vulnerable to impacts resulting from hurricane or large swell events in combination with sea-level rise. This study presents the implementation and results of an integrated numerical modeling package to delineate coastal inundation due to storm landfalls at future sea levels. The modeling package utilizes a suite of numerical models to capture both large-scale phenomena in the open ocean and small-scale processes in coastal areas. It contains four components to simulate (1) meteorological conditions, (2) astronomical tides and surge, (3) wave generation, propagation, and nearshore transformation, and (4) surf-zone processes and inundation onto dry land associated with a storm event. Important aspects of this package are the two-way coupling of a spectral wave model and a storm surge model as well as a detailed representation of surf and swash zone dynamics by a higher-order Boussinesq-type wave model. The package was validated with field data from Hurricane Ivan of 2005 on the US Gulf coast and applied to tropical and extratropical storm scenarios respectively at Eglin, Florida and Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The results show a nonlinear increase of storm surge level and nearshore wave energy with a rising sea level. The exacerbated flood hazard can have major consequences for coastal communities with respect to erosion and damage to infrastructure.

  3. Northern East Pacific Rise: Magnetic anomaly and bathymetric framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klitgord, Kim D.; Mammerickx, Jacqueline

    1982-01-01

    The oceanic crust in the eastern Pacific between 7°N and 30°N and east of 127°W contains a fairly complete history of the spreading centers associated with the East Pacific Rise since 25 m.y. B.P. (late Oligocene). In this paper, we have summarized the seafloor spreading magnetic-anomaly data and the bathymetric data that reflect the record of this tectonic history. The well-defined magnetic lineations north of the Clarion fracture zone, in the mouth of the Gulf of California, and on the east flank of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) are carefully examined and used to provide a guide for interpreting the spreading pattern between the Clarion and Clipperton fracture zones, southward of the Rivera fracture zone over the Mathematician Ridge, and over the entire EPR east of the Mathematician Ridge between the Rivera and Siqueiros fracture zones. The bathymetric data provide a trace of the fracture zone pattern in each of the above mentioned areas. The fracture zone bathymetry and the seafloor spreading magnetic lineations on the EPR south of the Rivera fracture zone have a distinctive fanning pattern caused by close poles of rotation and plate boundary reorganizations. All these data provide a good record of the plate reorganizations in the middle Miocene at magnetic anomaly 5 A time (12.5 to 11 m.y. B.P.), in the late Miocene at magnetic anomaly 3′−4 time (6.5 m.y. B.P.), and in the Pliocene at magnetic anomaly 2′−3 time (3.5 m.y. B.P.). Several abandoned spreading centers, including the Mathematician Ridge, were left behind as a result of these reorganizations. The Mathematician Ridge is shown to be a set of ridges and trough whose origin is related to the tectonic activity associated with each of the above mentioned reorganizations since anomaly 5A.

  4. Projections of Rapidly Rising Temperatures over Africa Under Low Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelbrecht, Francois; Adegoke, Jimmy; Bopape, Mary-Jane; Naidoo, Mogesh; Garland, Rebecca; Thatcher, Marcus; McGregor, John; Katzfe, Jack; Werner, Micha; Ichoku, Charles; hide

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of observed trends in African annual-average near-surface temperatures over the last five decades reveals drastic increases, particularly over parts of the subtropics and central tropical Africa. Over these regions, temperatures have been rising at more than twice the global rate of temperature increase. An ensemble of high-resolution downscalings, obtained using a single regional climate model forced with the sea-surface temperatures and sea-ice fields of an ensemble of global circulation model (GCM) simulations, is shown to realistically represent the relatively strong temperature increases observed in subtropical southern and northern Africa. The amplitudes of warming are generally underestimated, however. Further warming is projected to occur during the 21st century, with plausible increases of 4-6 C over the subtropics and 3-5 C over the tropics by the end of the century relative to present-day climate under the A2 (a low mitigation) scenario of the Special Report on Emission Scenarios. High impact climate events such as heat-wave days and high fire-danger days are consistently projected to increase drastically in their frequency of occurrence. General decreases in soil-moisture availability are projected, even for regions where increases in rainfall are plausible, due to enhanced levels of evaporation. The regional downscalings presented here, and recent GCM projections obtained for Africa, indicate that African annual-averaged temperatures may plausibly rise at about 1.5 times the global rate of temperature increase in the subtropics, and at a somewhat lower rate in the tropics. These projected increases although drastic, may be conservative given the model underestimations of observed temperature trends. The relatively strong rate of warming over Africa, in combination with the associated increases in extreme temperature events, may be key factors to consider when interpreting the suitability of global mitigation targets in terms of African

  5. The Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, J. C.; Lazio, J.; Alibay, F.; Amiri, N.; Bastian, T.; Cohen, C.; Landi, E.; Hegedus, A. M.; Maksimovic, M.; Manchester, W.; Reinard, A.; Schwadron, N.; Cecconi, B.; Hallinan, G.; Krupar, V.

    2017-12-01

    Radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is a direct tracer of particle acceleration in the inner heliosphere and potential magnetic connections from the lower solar corona to the larger heliosphere. Energized electrons excite Langmuir waves, which then convert into intense radio emission at the local plasma frequency, with the most intense acceleration thought to occur within 20 R_S. The radio emission from CMEs is quite strong such that only a relatively small number of antennas is required to detect and map it, but many aspects of this particle acceleration and transport remain poorly constrained. Ground-based arrays would be quite capable of tracking the radio emission associated with CMEs, but absorption by the Earth's ionosphere limits the frequency coverage of ground-based arrays (nu > 15 MHz), which in turn limits the range of solar distances over which they can track the radio emission (< 3 R_S). The state-of-the-art for tracking such emission from space is defined by single antennas (Wind/WAVES, Stereo/SWAVES), in which the tracking is accomplished by assuming a frequency-to-density mapping; there has been some success in triangulating the emission between the spacecraft, but considerable uncertainties remain. We describe the Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) mission concept: A constellation of small spacecraft in a geostationary graveyard orbit designed to localize and track radio emissions in the inner heliosphere. Each spacecraft would carry a receiving system for observations below 25 MHz, and SunRISE would produce the first images of CMEs more than a few solar radii from the Sun. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. Factors accounting for the rise in health-care spending in the United States: the role of rising disease prevalence and treatment intensity.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Kenneth E

    2006-11-01

    To examine the factors responsible for the rise in health- care spending in the United States over the past 15 years. Nationally representative survey data from 1987 and 2003 were used to examine the top medical conditions accounting for the rise in spending. I also estimate how much of the rise is traced to rising treated disease prevalence and rising spending per case. The study finds most of the rise in spending is linked to rising rates of treated disease prevalence. The rise in prevalence is associated with the doubling of obesity in the US and changes in clinical thresholds for treating asymptomatic patients with certain cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the policy solutions offered in the US to slow the growth in spending do not address the fundamental factors accounting for spending growth. More aggressive efforts for slowing the growth in obesity among adults and children should be centre-stage in the efforts to slow the rise in health-care spending.

  7. Using time lapse cameras to monitor shoreline changes due to sea level rise.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-01-01

    Shoreline habitats and infrastructure are currently being affected by sea level rise (SLR) and as : global temperatures continue to rise, will continue to get worse for millennia. Governments : and individuals decisions to adapt to SLR could ha...

  8. 21 CFR 137.290 - Self-rising yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Self-rising yellow corn meal. 137.290 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.290 Self-rising yellow corn meal. Self-rising yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.270 for self-rising white corn meal...

  9. Structural and compositional features of high-rise buildings: experimental design in Yekaterinburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovskaya, Yulia; Lobanov, Yuriy; Temnov, Vladimir

    2018-03-01

    The study looks at the specifics of high-rise development in Yekaterinburg. High-rise buildings are considered in the context of their historical development, structural features, compositional and imaginative design techniques. Experience of Yekaterinburg architects in experimental design is considered and analyzed. Main issues and prospects of high-rise development within the Yekaterinburg structure are studied. The most interesting and significant conceptual approaches to the structural and compositional arrangement of high-rise buildings are discussed.

  10. 21 CFR 137.290 - Self-rising yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Self-rising yellow corn meal. 137.290 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.290 Self-rising yellow corn meal. Self-rising yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.270 for self-rising white corn meal...

  11. Development of national standards related to the integrated safety and security of high-rise buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskresenskaya, Elena; Vorona-Slivinskaya, Lubov

    2018-03-01

    The article considers the issues of developing national standards for high-rise construction. The system of standards should provide industrial, operational, economic and terrorist safety of high-rise buildings and facilities. Modern standards of high-rise construction should set the rules for designing engineering systems of high-rise buildings, which will ensure the integrated security of buildings, increase their energy efficiency and reduce the consumption of resources in construction and operation.

  12. Telling the Story of MindRising: Minecraft, Mindfulness and Meaningful Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Deirdre; Brown, Mark; Críosta, Gar Mac

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a unique project known as MindRising Games. It reports how the innovative use of Minecraft™ combined with the principles of mindfulness and meaningful learning contributed to rich digital story telling. MindRising Games was a competition, which was part of the 100-year commemoration of the Easter Rising, designed to celebrate…

  13. Neural Control of Fundamental Frequency Rise and Fall in Mandarin Tones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Peter; Jiang, Jing; Peng, Danling; Lu, Chunming

    2012-01-01

    The neural mechanisms used in tone rises and falls in Mandarin were investigated. Nine participants were scanned while they named one-character pictures that required rising or falling tone responses in Mandarin: the left insula and right putamen showed stronger activation between rising and falling tones; the left brainstem showed weaker…

  14. SEA-LEVEL RISE. Sea-level rise due to polar ice-sheet mass loss during past warm periods.

    PubMed

    Dutton, A; Carlson, A E; Long, A J; Milne, G A; Clark, P U; DeConto, R; Horton, B P; Rahmstorf, S; Raymo, M E

    2015-07-10

    Interdisciplinary studies of geologic archives have ushered in a new era of deciphering magnitudes, rates, and sources of sea-level rise from polar ice-sheet loss during past warm periods. Accounting for glacial isostatic processes helps to reconcile spatial variability in peak sea level during marine isotope stages 5e and 11, when the global mean reached 6 to 9 meters and 6 to 13 meters higher than present, respectively. Dynamic topography introduces large uncertainties on longer time scales, precluding robust sea-level estimates for intervals such as the Pliocene. Present climate is warming to a level associated with significant polar ice-sheet loss in the past. Here, we outline advances and challenges involved in constraining ice-sheet sensitivity to climate change with use of paleo-sea level records. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Chemostratigraphy at DSDP Sites 386 (Bermuda Rise) and 144 (Demerara Rise), Implications for Euxinic Conditions During OAE-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, P. A.; Maurrasse, F. J.; Sinninghe-Damsté, J. S.; Sandler, A.

    2008-05-01

    Chemostratigraphic studies of DSDP Site 386 on the Bermuda Rise and Site 144 on the Demerara Rise indicate that euxinic conditions developed at these deep-water sites during the time interval that corresponds to Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE 2). The data show a large increase in Fe/Al ratios, and dispersed pyrite aggregates (Site 386 Core 43, Section 3). Such findings at these deep oceanic sites are compatible with earlier studies showing that sediments in euxinic settings display increases in Fe/Al ratios due to the scavenging of dissolved Fe, and is also in agreement with previous Pr/Ph ratio of <1 (Simoneit, 1979). This study further shows that OM, previously believed to show bimodal distribution, which was used to argue in support of turbidity currents at Site 386 as transport mechanism for some of the OM, is predominantly derived from marine phytoplankton and cyanobacteria showing low thermal stress, supporting in situ derivation. Elemental analyses at Site 386 also show that relatively high Sr/CaO ratios are present before and after OAE 2, indicating an increased contribution of biogenic carbonates, but not during the C/T boundary event. When Cr is plotted against Al2O3 in conjunction with a solid line representing the Cr/Al2O3 ratio in average shale, half of the samples fall above and half fall below this line. The values that plot above this line are all from Cores 47, 44, 43, and 42, which contain higher TOC. Their strong Cr enrichment with respect to the average shale can be indicative of an algal source of the OM, as this biota preferentially concentrates Cr. Competitive exclusion due to dominance of opportunistic prokaryotic blooms in combination with oxygen depletion can be invoked to explain the conditions that developed and were unfavorable to most other organisms throughout the water column during OAE 2. Sediments from DSDP Site 144 also reveal increased molecular fossils indicative of green sulfur bacteria, which are further characteristic of euxinic

  16. Communicating uncertainties in assessments of future sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikman-Svahn, P.

    2013-12-01

    How uncertainty should be managed and communicated in policy-relevant scientific assessments is directly connected to the role of science and the responsibility of scientists. These fundamentally philosophical issues influence how scientific assessments are made and how scientific findings are communicated to policymakers. It is therefore of high importance to discuss implicit assumptions and value judgments that are made in policy-relevant scientific assessments. The present paper examines these issues for the case of scientific assessments of future sea level rise. The magnitude of future sea level rise is very uncertain, mainly due to poor scientific understanding of all physical mechanisms affecting the great ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica, which together hold enough land-based ice to raise sea levels more than 60 meters if completely melted. There has been much confusion from policymakers on how different assessments of future sea levels should be interpreted. Much of this confusion is probably due to how uncertainties are characterized and communicated in these assessments. The present paper draws on the recent philosophical debate on the so-called "value-free ideal of science" - the view that science should not be based on social and ethical values. Issues related to how uncertainty is handled in scientific assessments are central to this debate. This literature has much focused on how uncertainty in data, parameters or models implies that choices have to be made, which can have social consequences. However, less emphasis has been on how uncertainty is characterized when communicating the findings of a study, which is the focus of the present paper. The paper argues that there is a tension between on the one hand the value-free ideal of science and on the other hand usefulness for practical applications in society. This means that even if the value-free ideal could be upheld in theory, by carefully constructing and hedging statements characterizing

  17. Sea level rise and variability around Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkalich, Pavel; Luu, Quang-Hung; Tay, Tze-Wei

    2014-05-01

    Peninsular Malaysia is bounded from the west by Malacca Strait and the Andaman Sea, both connected to the Indian Ocean, and from the east by South China Sea being largest marginal sea in the Pacific Basin. As a result, sea level along Peninsular Malaysia coast is assumed to be governed by various regional phenomena associated with the adjacent parts of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. At annual scale, sea level anomalies (SLAs) are generated by the Asian monsoon; interannual sea level variability is determined by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD); whilst long term sea level trend is coordinated by the global climate change. To quantify the relative impacts of these multi-scale phenomena on sea level trend and variability surrounding the Peninsular Malaysia, long-term tide gauge record and satellite altimetry are used. During 1984-2011, relative sea level rise (SLR) rates in waters of Malacca Strait and eastern Peninsular Malaysia are found to be 2.4 ± 0.8 mm/yr and 2.7 ± 0.6 mm/yr, respectively. Discounting for their vertical land movements (0.8 ± 2.6 mm/yr and 0.9 ± 2.2 mm/yr, respectively), their pure SLR rates are 1.6 ± 3.4 mm/yr and 1.8 ± 2.8 mm/yr, respectively, which are lower than the global tendency. At interannual scale, ENSO affects sea level over the Malaysian east coast in the range of ± 5 cm with very high correlation coefficient. Meanwhile, IOD modulates sea level anomalies in the Malacca Strait in the range of ± 2 cm with high correlation coefficient. Interannual regional sea level drops are associated with El Niño events and positive phases of the IOD index; while the rises are correlated with La Niña episodes and the negative periods of the IOD index. Seasonally, SLAs are mainly monsoon-driven, in the order of 10-25 cm. Geographically, sea level responds differently to the monsoon: two cycles per year are observed in the Malacca Strait, presumably due to South Asian - Indian Monsoon; while single

  18. The Rise of Concussions in the Adolescent Population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Alan L; Sing, David C; Rugg, Caitlin M; Feeley, Brian T; Senter, Carlin

    2016-08-01

    Concussion injuries have been highlighted to the American public through media and research. While recent studies have shown increased traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) diagnosed in emergency departments across the United States, no studies have evaluated trends in concussion diagnoses across the general US population in various age groups. To evaluate the current incidence and trends in concussions diagnosed across varying age groups and health care settings in a large cross-sectional population. Descriptive epidemiological study. Administrative health records of 8,828,248 members of a large private-payer insurance group in the United States were queried. Patients diagnosed with concussion from years 2007 through 2014 were stratified by year of diagnosis, age group, sex, classification of concussion, and health care setting of diagnosis (eg, emergency department vs physician's office). Chi-square testing was used for statistical analysis. From a cohort of 8,828,248 patients, 43,884 patients were diagnosed with a concussion. Of these patients, 55% were male and over 32% were in the adolescent age group (10-19 years old). The highest incidence of concussion was seen in patients aged 15 to 19 years (16.5/1000 patients), followed by those aged 10 to 14 years (10.5/1000 patients), 20 to 24 years (5.2/1000 patients), and 5 to 9 years (3.5/1000 patients). Overall, there was a 60% increase in concussion incidence from 2007 to 2014. The largest increases were in the 10- to 14-year (143%) and 15- to 19-year (87%) age groups. Based on International Classification of Disease-9th Revision classification, 29% of concussions were associated with some form of loss of consciousness. Finally, 56% of concussions were diagnosed in the emergency department and 29% in a physician's office, with the remainder in urgent care clinics or inpatient settings. The incidence of concussion diagnosed in the general US population is increasing, driven largely by a substantial rise in the adolescent

  19. Constraining the Antarctic contribution to interglacial sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naish, T.; Mckay, R. M.; Barrett, P. J.; Levy, R. H.; Golledge, N. R.; Deconto, R. M.; Horgan, H. J.; Dunbar, G. B.

    2015-12-01

    Observations, models and paleoclimate reconstructions suggest that Antarctica's marine-based ice sheets behave in an unstable manner with episodes of rapid retreat in response to warming climate. Understanding the processes involved in this "marine ice sheet instability" is key for improving estimates of Antarctic ice sheet contribution to future sea-level rise. Another motivating factor is that far-field sea-level reconstructions and ice sheet models imply global mean sea level (GMSL) was up to 20m and 10m higher, respectively, compared with present day, during the interglacials of the warm Pliocene (~4-3Ma) and Late Pleistocene (at ~400ka and 125ka). This was when atmospheric CO2 was between 280 and 400ppm and global average surface temperatures were 1- 3°C warmer, suggesting polar ice sheets are highly sensitive to relatively modest increases in climate forcing. Such magnitudes of GMSL rise not only require near complete melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, but a substantial retreat of marine-based sectors of East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Recent geological drilling initiatives on the continental margin of Antarctica from both ship- (e.g. IODP; International Ocean Discovery Program) and ice-based (e.g. ANDRILL/Antarctic Geological Drilling) platforms have provided evidence supporting retreat of marine-based ice. However, without direct access through the ice sheet to archives preserved within sub-glacial sedimentary basins, the volume and extent of ice sheet retreat during past interglacials cannot be directly constrained. Sediment cores have been successfully recovered from beneath ice shelves by the ANDRILL Program and ice streams by the WISSARD (Whillans Ice Stream Sub-glacial Access Research Drilling) Project. Together with the potential of the new RAID (Rapid Access Ice Drill) initiative, these demonstrate the technological feasibility of accessing the subglacial bed and deeper sedimentary archives. In this talk I will outline the

  20. Building Stories about Sea Level Rise through Interactive Visualizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, S. H.; DeLorme, D. E.; Hagen, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Digital media provide storytellers with dynamic new tools for communicating about scientific issues via interactive narrative visualizations. While traditional storytelling uses plot, characterization, and point of view to engage audiences with underlying themes and messages, interactive visualizations can be described as 'narrative builders' that promote insight through the process of discovery (Dove, G. & Jones, S. 2012, Proc. IHCI 2012). Narrative visualizations are used in online journalism to tell complex stories that allow readers to select aspects of datasets to explore and construct alternative interpretations of information (Segel, E. & Heer, J. 2010, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comp. Graph.16, 1139), thus enabling them to participate in the story-building process. Nevertheless, narrative visualizations also incorporate author-selected narrative elements that help guide and constrain the overall themes and messaging of the visualization (Hullman, J. & Diakopoulos, N. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comp. Graph. 17, 2231). One specific type of interactive narrative visualization that is used for science communication is the sea level rise (SLR) viewer. SLR viewers generally consist of a base map, upon which projections of sea level rise scenarios can be layered, and various controls for changing the viewpoint and scenario parameters. They are used to communicate the results of scientific modeling and help readers visualize the potential impacts of SLR on the coastal zone. Readers can use SLR viewers to construct personal narratives of the effects of SLR under different scenarios in locations that are important to them, thus extending the potential reach and impact of scientific research. With careful selection of narrative elements that guide reader interpretation, the communicative aspects of these visualizations may be made more effective. This presentation reports the results of a content analysis of a subset of existing SLR viewers selected in order to comprehensively

  1. Modeling storm and sea level rise impacts on marsh transgression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, J. A.; Guntenspergen, G. R.; Kirwan, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal salt marsh systems provide critical ecosystem services, including key habitat and coastal protection. Both lateral extent, and vertical stability of salt marshes to sea level rise have been shown to be functions of both biotic, and abiotic drivers and feedbacks. As a result, the ecogeomorphic evolution of the system can exhibit strong non-linearities, discontinuities and thresholds. We developed a two-dimensional transect model to explore controls on marsh lateral extent, vertical stability and the potential for marsh transgression inland and upland. Salt marsh and upland regions in the model are discretized in 1 m increments with inundation frequency determined by the elevation of the individual cells, organogenic soil formation and mineral deposition rates, and the history of stochastic water levels. The transect extends from an idealized back barrier bay across the salt marsh platform and into the upland forest and is forced with auto and cross correlated synthetic stochastic wind speed, wind direction and water levels. The model incorporates key feedbacks between fetch, wave growth and subsequent lateral erosion rates and sediment supply to the marsh platform. Deposition of mineral sediment from the bay and/or internal ponds onto the marsh platform cells is dependent both on the inundation frequency and distance from a marsh edge. For each element along the transect, a Markov chain successional model was implemented that considers six distinct states, grass/saltmarsh, seedling, sapling, tree, dead standing tree, and bare. A non-static transition probability matrix, dependent on both inundation of the element and the prior vegetation state, was used in order to allow for feedbacks, both positive and negative, among different vegetation states and environmental drivers. The model was used to examine the qualitative behavior of the coupled systems under varied rates of sea level rise, external sediment supply, wind and storm statistics, tidal range, upland

  2. Sea level rise under the Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleussner, C. F.; Nauels, A.; Rogelj, J.; Mengel, M.; Meinshausen, M.

    2017-12-01

    In order to assess future sea level rise and its impacts, we need to study climate change pathways combined with different scenarios of socioeconomic development. Here, we present Sea Level Rise (SLR) projections for the Shared Socioeconomic Pathway (SSP) storylines and different year-2100 radiative Forcing Targets (FTs). Future SLR is estimated with a comprehensive SLR emulator that accounts for latest research on additional Antarctic rapid discharge dynamics from hydrofracturing and ice cliff instability. Across all baseline scenario realizations (no dedicated climate mitigation), we find 2100 median SLR relative to 1986-2005 of 102 cm (likely range: 77 to 135 cm) for SSP1, 118 cm (90 to 151 cm) for SSP2, 118 cm (91 to 149 cm) for SSP3, 107 cm (81 to 137 cm) for SSP4, and 144 cm (112 to 184 cm) for SSP5. The 2100 sea level responses for combined SSP-FT scenarios is dominated by the mitigation targets and yield median estimates of 68 cm (56 to 87 cm) for FT 2.6 Wm-2, 76 cm (61 to 107 cm) for FT 3.4 Wm-2, 90 cm (68 to 120 cm) for FT 4.5 Wm-2, and 105 cm (79 to 136 cm) for FT 6.0 Wm-2. Average 2081-2100 annual rates of SLR are 6 mm/yr and 19 mm/yr for the FT 2.6 Wm-2 and the baseline scenarios, respectively. Our model setup allows linking scenario-specific emission and socioeconomic indicators to projected SLR. For limiting median 2100 SSP SLR projections to below 80 cm, we find that 2050 cumulative CO2 emissions since pre-industrial should not exceed around 860 GtC, with the global coal phase-out nearly completed. For SSP mitigation scenarios, the median 2050 carbon price of 90 US$2005 tCO2-1 would correspond to a median 2100 SLR of around 80 cm. Our results confirm that rapid and early emission reductions are essential for limiting 2100 SLR.

  3. Rising seas and sinking coastal marshes: Implications to Atlantic waterbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.; Prosser, D.J.; Sanders, G.

    2000-01-01

    Along the mid-Atlantic U.S. coast, relative sea level rise (RSLR) is higher than the global average of 1.5-2.0 mm/yr, ranging from about 2.5 in parts of Virginia and Delaware to about 4.0 in New Jersey (Atlantic City and Sandy Hook) and near the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, Virginia. Very few data exist on marsh elevation changes, but information from some areas in Virginia, New Jersey and New York suggest that marsh islands are not 'keeping pace' with this RSLR. We began a study in 1999 that addresses changes in sea level and marsh elevation at sites from Cape Cod to s. Virginia known to be important areas for migratory waterbirds, including waterfowl, shorebirds, wading birds, and seabirds. Marsh monitoring sites have been established and data on microhabitat use by birds during all 4 seasons is being collected at these sites. Species expected to be most vulnerable to RSLR in these marshes are breeding species such as Laughing Gulls, Common, Gull-billed and Forster's terns, Clapper Rails, and American Black Ducks. Most of these species are of special concern at state, regional, or national levels. We show how important this region to these species from a flyway perspective, with> 70% of all Atlantic coast Laughing Gulls and Forster's Terns nesting from New Jersey to Virginia.

  4. Deaths rise in good economic times: evidence from the OECD.

    PubMed

    Gerdtham, Ulf-G; Ruhm, Christopher J

    2006-12-01

    This study uses aggregate data for 23 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries over the 1960-1997 period to examine the relationship between macroeconomic conditions and deaths. The main finding is that total mortality and deaths from several common causes rise when labor markets strengthen. For instance, controlling for year effects, location fixed-effects (FE), country-specific time trends and demographic characteristics, a 1% point decrease in the national unemployment rate is associated with growth of 0.4% in total mortality and the following increases in cause-specific mortality: 0.4% for cardiovascular disease, 1.1% for influenza/pneumonia, 1.8% for liver disease, 2.1% for motor vehicle deaths, and 0.8% for other accidents. These effects are particularly pronounced for countries with weak social insurance systems, as proxied by public social expenditure as a share of GDP. The findings are consistent with evidence provided by other recent research and cast doubt on the hypothesis that economic downturns have negative effects on physical health.

  5. Rise of Racetrack Memory! Domain Wall Spin-Orbitronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkin, Stuart

    Memory-storage devices based on the current controlled motion of a series of domain walls (DWs) in magnetic racetracks promise performance and reliability beyond that of conventional magnetic disk drives and solid state storage devices (1). Racetracks that are formed from atomically thin, perpendicularly magnetized nano-wires, interfaced with adjacent metal layers with high spin-orbit coupling, give rise to domain walls that exhibit a chiral Néel structure (2). These DWs can be moved very efficiently with current via chiral spin-orbit torques (2,3). Record-breaking current-induced DW speeds exceeding 1,000 m/sec are found in synthetic antiferromagnetic structures (3) in which the net magnetization of the DWs is tuned to almost zero, making them ``invisible''. Based on these recent discoveries, Racetrack Memory devices have the potential to operate on picosecond timescales and at densities more than 100 times greater than other memory technologies. (1) S.S.P. Parkin et al., Science 320, 5873 (2008); S.S.P. Parkin and S.-H. Yang, Nat. Nano. 10, 195 (2015). (2) K.-S. Ryu metal. Nat. Nano. 8, 527 (2013). (3) S.-H. Yang, K.-S. Ryu and S.S.P. Parkin, Nat. Nano. 10, 221 (2015). (4). S.S.P. Parkin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 3598 (1991).

  6. Maternal request: a reason for rising rates of cesarean section?

    PubMed

    Kottmel, Andrea; Hoesli, Irene; Traub, Rahel; Urech, Corinne; Huang, Dorothy; Leeners, Brigitte; Tschudin, Sibil

    2012-07-01

    The rising rate of cesarean sections (CS), especially those on maternal request, is an important obstetric care issue. The aim of this two-point cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of CS and their indications. We performed a retrospective chart review of the indications of all CS performed at a tertiary care clinic in Switzerland in 2002 and 2008. Chi-square, Student's t and Mann-Whitney U tests were performed to identify significant differences. The number of CS rose from 23.3% (371 out of 1,594 total life births) in 2002 to 27.5% (513 out of 1,866) in 2008 (p = 0.005). Of all deliveries, the rate of CS on maternal request and, among these, especially those requested after previous CS, increased significantly (2.1 vs. 5.1% and 0.3 vs. 1.2%, respectively). The number of CS due to previous traumatic birth experience nearly doubled (0.7 vs. 1.2%, not significant). Maternal and fetal complications were rare but not negligible in the subset of low-risk patients requesting CS. The study demonstrated a significant increase in CS on maternal request, especially in case of previous CS. The findings of this study support the need for specific counseling strategies for women requesting delivery by CS.

  7. Wind load effects on high rise buildings in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizamani, Z.; Thang, K. C.; Haider, B.; Shariff, M.

    2018-04-01

    Wind is a randomly varying dynamic phenomenon composed of a multitude of eddies of varying sizes and rotational characteristics along a general stream of air moving relative to the ground. These eddies give wind its gustiness, creating fluctuation and results in a complex flow characteristics. The wind vector at any point can be regarded as the sum of mean wind vector and the fluctuation components. These components not only vary with height but also dependant on the approach terrain and topography. Prevailing wind exerts pressure onto the structural surfaces. The effects of wind pressure in the form of shear and bending moments are found to be a major problem in structural failure. This study aims to study the effects of wind load on a fifteen-storey high rise building using EN 1991-1-4 code and MS1553:2002. The simulation results showed that by increasing the wind speed, the storey resultant forces, namely storey shear and storey moment increases significantly. Furthermore, simulation results according to EN 1991-1-4 yield higher values compared to the simulation results according to MS1553:2002.

  8. Intumescent coatings with improved properties for high-rise construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, Andrey; Zybina, Olga; Tanklevsky, Leonid; Lebedev, Vasily; Andreev, Andrey

    2018-03-01

    The paper overviews the way of creating intumescent fire-protective compositions with improved properties by adding nano-and micro-sized supplements into them. Intumescent paints are inert at low temperatures, and at higher temperatures they expand and degrade to provide a charred layer of low conductivity materials. The modified intumescent paints are able to form a more stable charred layer than the classical paints. The stability of a charred layer is crucial if the fire safety in high-rise construction must be secured, because a weak charred layer will not provide a required fire endurance for steel bearing structures and they will break down in case of fire. The fire-protective properties of modified intumescent paints were estimated using an electrical furnace. Also the way of thermal decomposition of the paints was studied with thermogravimetric analysis. Results show that modified intumescent paints form a charred layer with improved fire-protective properties; it can serve as a thermal barrier for a longer period of time. Thermogravimetric analysis confirms this fact showing that the temperatures of full thermal decay in case of modified paints are higher than those of non-modified paints.

  9. Rising incidence and challenges of childhood diabetes. A mini review

    PubMed Central

    Cizza, G.; Brown, R.J.; Rothe, K.I.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 215,000 people younger than 20 yr of age, or 1 in 500 children and adolescents, had diabetes in the United States in 2010 – and the incidence is rising. We still have insufficient knowledge about the precise mechanisms leading to the autoimmune mediated β-cell destruction in Type 1 diabetes, and the β-cell failure associated with insulin resistance in Type 2 diabetes. Long-term complications are similar: micro-and macrovascular disease occurs prematurely and presents an enormous burden on affected individuals, often as early as in middle age. In Type 1 diabetes, technological advances have clearly improved blood glucose management, but chronic peripheral over-insulinization remains a problem even with the most advanced systems. Thus, in Type 1 diabetes our research must focus on 1) finding the stimulus that ignites the immune response and 2) developing treatments that avoid hyperinsulinemia. In Type 2 diabetes in youth, the challenges start much earlier: most young patients do not even benefit from existing therapies due to non-compliance. Therefore, prevention of Type 2 diabetes and improvement of compliance, especially with non-pharmacological interventions, are the greatest challenges. PMID:22572768

  10. Rising HIV infection through blood transfusion worries Nigerian health experts.

    PubMed

    Raufu, A

    2000-01-01

    Blood transfusion is the second largest source of HIV infection in Nigeria, after unprotected sex. The major reason for this problem is the proliferation of illegal and lucrative blood banks that were being established. It has been discovered that most of these blood banks rely on "blood touts" for the supply of blood, which is later sold to needy patients. Lack of modern testing equipment and few private hospitals and government hospitals screening blood that is meant for transfusion compounded this problem. In response to the menace of unscreened blood for transfusion, the Lagos State Government declared a law to regulate blood transfusions and the activities of blood banks in the State. The objectives of this law were to curb the activities of owners of blood banks who were peddling unscreened blood to unsuspecting patients. Among the provisions of the law was that medical laboratories and hospitals that have blood banks should register their blood donors at any of the screening centers in the State. This law further prescribed fines and imprisonment for offenders. The law, however, turned out to be unenforceable because the reagents and testing equipment required were largely unavailable. It is noted that in the absence of a national blood transfusion policy, most blood banks continue to sell unscreened blood; in turn, HIV infections in Nigeria continue to rise.

  11. Rising levels of atmospheric oxygen and evolution of Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Gacesa, Ranko; Dunlap, Walter C; Barlow, David J; Laskowski, Roman A; Long, Paul F

    2016-06-14

    In mammals, the master transcription regulator of antioxidant defences is provided by the Nrf2 protein. Phylogenetic analyses of Nrf2 sequences are used here to derive a molecular clock that manifests persuasive evidence that Nrf2 orthologues emerged, and then diverged, at two time points that correlate with well-established geochemical and palaeobiological chronologies during progression of the 'Great Oxygenation Event'. We demonstrate that orthologues of Nrf2 first appeared in fungi around 1.5 Ga during the Paleoproterozoic when photosynthetic oxygen was being absorbed into the oceans. A subsequent significant divergence in Nrf2 is seen during the split between fungi and the Metazoa approximately 1.0-1.2 Ga, at a time when oceanic ventilation released free oxygen to the atmosphere, but with most being absorbed by methane oxidation and oxidative weathering of land surfaces until approximately 800 Ma. Atmospheric oxygen levels thereafter accumulated giving rise to metazoan success known as the Cambrian explosion commencing at ~541 Ma. Atmospheric O2 levels then rose in the mid Paleozoic (359-252 Ma), and Nrf2 diverged once again at the division between mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates during the Permian-Triassic boundary (~252 Ma). Understanding Nrf2 evolution as an effective antioxidant response may have repercussions for improved human health.

  12. Analysis of the Duration of Rising Tone Chorus Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, S.; Tao, X.; Xie, Y.; Zonca, F.; Chen, L.; Fang, W. B.; Wang, S.

    2017-12-01

    The duration of chorus elements is an important parameter to understand chorus excitation and to quantify the effects of nonlinear wave-particle interactions on energetic electron dynamics. In this work, we analyze the duration of rising tone chorus elements statistically using Van Allen Probes data. We present the distribution of chorus element duration (τ) as a function of magnetic local time (MLT) and the geomagnetic activity level characterized by auroral electrojet (AE) index. We show that the typical value of τ for nightside and dawnside is about 0.12 s, smaller than that for dayside and duskside by about a factor of 2 to 4. Using a previously developed hybrid code, DAWN, we suggest that the background magnetic field inhomogeneity might be an important factor in controlling the chorus element duration. We also report that τ is larger during quiet times and shorter during moderate and active periods; this result is consistent with the MLT dependence of τ and the occurrence pattern of chorus waves at different levels of geomagnetic activity. We then investigate the correlation between τ and the frequency chirping rate (Γ). We show that, from observation, τ scales with Γ as τ∝Γ-1.1, suggesting that statistically the frequency range of chorus elements (τΓ) should be roughly the same for different elements. These findings should be useful to the further development of a theoretical model of chorus excitation and to the quantification of nonlinear wave-particle interactions on energetic electron dynamics.

  13. China’s rising hydropower demand challenges water sector

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junguo; Zhao, Dandan; Gerbens-Leenes, P. W.; Guan, Dabo

    2015-01-01

    Demand for hydropower is increasing, yet the water footprints (WFs) of reservoirs and hydropower, and their contributions to water scarcity, are poorly understood. Here, we calculate reservoir WFs (freshwater that evaporates from reservoirs) and hydropower WFs (the WF of hydroelectricity) in China based on data from 875 representative reservoirs (209 with power plants). In 2010, the reservoir WF totaled 27.9 × 109 m3 (Gm3), or 22% of China’s total water consumption. Ignoring the reservoir WF seriously underestimates human water appropriation. The reservoir WF associated with industrial, domestic and agricultural WFs caused water scarcity in 6 of the 10 major Chinese river basins from 2 to 12 months annually. The hydropower WF was 6.6 Gm3 yr−1 or 3.6 m3 of water to produce a GJ (109 J) of electricity. Hydropower is a water intensive energy carrier. As a response to global climate change, the Chinese government has promoted a further increase in hydropower energy by 70% by 2020 compared to 2012. This energy policy imposes pressure on available freshwater resources and increases water scarcity. The water-energy nexus requires strategic and coordinated implementations of hydropower development among geographical regions, as well as trade-off analysis between rising energy demand and water use sustainability. PMID:26158871

  14. Continental erosion and the Cenozoic rise of marine diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermeño, Pedro; Falkowski, Paul G.; Romero, Oscar E.; Schaller, Morgan F.; Vallina, Sergio M.

    2015-04-01

    Marine diatoms are silica-precipitating microalgae that account for over half of organic carbon burial in marine sediments and thus they play a key role in the global carbon cycle. Their evolutionary expansion during the Cenozoic era (66 Ma to present) has been associated with a superior competitive ability for silicic acid relative to other siliceous plankton such as radiolarians, which evolved by reducing the weight of their silica test. Here we use a mathematical model in which diatoms and radiolarians compete for silicic acid to show that the observed reduction in the weight of radiolarian tests is insufficient to explain the rise of diatoms. Using the lithium isotope record of seawater as a proxy of silicate rock weathering and erosion, we calculate changes in the input flux of silicic acid to the oceans. Our results indicate that the long-term massive erosion of continental silicates was critical to the subsequent success of diatoms in marine ecosystems over the last 40 My and suggest an increase in the strength and efficiency of the oceanic biological pump over this period.

  15. The rise of neglected tropical diseases in the "new Texas".

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J

    2018-01-01

    Within the last five years, the State of Texas has experienced either transmission or outbreaks of Ebola, chikungunya, West Nile, and Zika virus infections. Autochthonous transmission of neglected parasitic and bacterial diseases has also become increasingly reported. The rise of such emerging and neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) has not occurred by accident but instead reflects rapidly evolving changes and shifts in a "new" Texas beset by modern and globalizing forces that include rapid expansions in population together with urbanization and human migrations, altered transportation patterns, climate change, steeply declining vaccination rates, and a new paradigm of poverty known as "blue marble health." Summarized here are the major NTDs now affecting Texas. In addition to the vector-borne viral diseases highlighted above, there also is a high level of parasitic infections, including Chagas disease, trichomoniasis, and possibly leishmaniasis and toxocariasis, as well as typhus-group rickettsiosis, a vector-borne bacterial infection. I also highlight some of the key shifts in emerging and neglected disease patterns, partly due to an altered and evolving economic and ecological landscape in the new Texas, and provide some preliminary disease burden estimates for the major prevalent and incident NTDs.

  16. Partitions for high-rise construction using phosphogypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotukhin, Sergey; Kukina, Olga; Abramenko, Anatoly

    2018-03-01

    Gypsum blocks are usually used to make partitions in highrise construction. Reducing the cost of materials used in high-rise construction is an urgent task of modern material science. Phosphogypsum dihydrate, which has binding properties, is one of the large-tonnage waste. The authors have proved that, after years of storage in heaps, water-soluble phosphates, fluorides and other additives included in the structure of fresh phosphogypsum dissolved in water due to weathering (humidification-drying, freezing-thawing in a water-saturated state), and the calcium hydro-and dihydrogen phosphates ingressed in the lattice underwent complete hydrolysis and disintegration, thereby changing the physicochemical properties of phosphogypsum. The data obtained by the authors on the absence of water-soluble compounds of phosphorus, fluorine in stale phosphogypsum indicate its ecological purity and the possibility of application in housing construction. Having analyzed the data of modern methods of differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy, the authors predicted and proved by the energy of dehydration of phosphogypsum dihydrate, lime, sandy loam, the possibility of obtaining non-flammable materials with sufficient strength for wall materials. Understanding the processes occurring in water films (the thickness of the water film, the pressure, the temperature and the pH of the aqueous extract of the mixture, the drying of the materials produced), made it possible to develop a technology for obtaining wall products from lime-sandy phosphogypsum material using typical silicate brick production equipment and vibropresses for key-cog blocks production.

  17. Continental erosion and the Cenozoic rise of marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Cermeño, Pedro; Falkowski, Paul G; Romero, Oscar E; Schaller, Morgan F; Vallina, Sergio M

    2015-04-07

    Marine diatoms are silica-precipitating microalgae that account for over half of organic carbon burial in marine sediments and thus they play a key role in the global carbon cycle. Their evolutionary expansion during the Cenozoic era (66 Ma to present) has been associated with a superior competitive ability for silicic acid relative to other siliceous plankton such as radiolarians, which evolved by reducing the weight of their silica test. Here we use a mathematical model in which diatoms and radiolarians compete for silicic acid to show that the observed reduction in the weight of radiolarian tests is insufficient to explain the rise of diatoms. Using the lithium isotope record of seawater as a proxy of silicate rock weathering and erosion, we calculate changes in the input flux of silicic acid to the oceans. Our results indicate that the long-term massive erosion of continental silicates was critical to the subsequent success of diatoms in marine ecosystems over the last 40 My and suggest an increase in the strength and efficiency of the oceanic biological pump over this period.

  18. Rising levels of atmospheric oxygen and evolution of Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Gacesa, Ranko; Dunlap, Walter C.; Barlow, David J.; Laskowski, Roman A.; Long, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the master transcription regulator of antioxidant defences is provided by the Nrf2 protein. Phylogenetic analyses of Nrf2 sequences are used here to derive a molecular clock that manifests persuasive evidence that Nrf2 orthologues emerged, and then diverged, at two time points that correlate with well-established geochemical and palaeobiological chronologies during progression of the ‘Great Oxygenation Event’. We demonstrate that orthologues of Nrf2 first appeared in fungi around 1.5 Ga during the Paleoproterozoic when photosynthetic oxygen was being absorbed into the oceans. A subsequent significant divergence in Nrf2 is seen during the split between fungi and the Metazoa approximately 1.0–1.2 Ga, at a time when oceanic ventilation released free oxygen to the atmosphere, but with most being absorbed by methane oxidation and oxidative weathering of land surfaces until approximately 800 Ma. Atmospheric oxygen levels thereafter accumulated giving rise to metazoan success known as the Cambrian explosion commencing at ~541 Ma. Atmospheric O2 levels then rose in the mid Paleozoic (359–252 Ma), and Nrf2 diverged once again at the division between mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates during the Permian-Triassic boundary (~252 Ma). Understanding Nrf2 evolution as an effective antioxidant response may have repercussions for improved human health. PMID:27297177

  19. Complex Plasma Physics and Rising Above the Gathering Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Truell

    2008-11-01

    Research in complex plasma is prevalent across a variety of regimes ranging from the majority of plasma processing environments to many astrophysical settings. Dust particles suspended within such plasmas acquire a charge from collisions with electrons and ions in the plasma. Depending upon the ratio of their interparticle potential energy to their average kinetic energy, once charged these particles can form a gaseous, liquid or crystalline structure with short to longer range ordering. The field of complex plasmas thus offers research opportunities across a wide range of academic disciplines including physics, chemistry, biology, mathematics, electrical engineering and nanoscience. The field of complex plasmas also offers unique educational research opportunities for combating many of the issues raised in Rising Above the Gathering Storm, recently published by the National Academies Press. CASPER's Educational Outreach programs, supported by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Education and the Department of Labor takes advantage of these opportunities through a variety of avenues including a REU / RET program, a High School Scholars Program, integrated curriculum development and the CASPER Physics Circus. Together, these programs impact thousands of students and parents while providing K-12 teachers with curriculum, supporting hands-on material and support for introducing plasma and basic physical science concepts into the classroom. Both research results and educational outreach concepts from the above will be discussed.

  20. Benthopelagic megafauna assemblages of the Rio Grande Rise (SW Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jose Angel Alvarez; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Sumida, Paulo Yukio Gomes; Sant'Ana, Rodrigo; Mastella, Angélica Maffini

    2018-04-01

    The Rio Grande Rise (RGR) is a large and geomorphologically complex structure of the deep SW Atlantic Ocean. In 2013, the 600-1200 m deep plateau of the most prominent topographic component of the RGR (named Alpha) was explored during two dives of the manned submersible Shinkai 6500 (30°22‧15‧‧S - 36°02‧02‧‧W and 31°05‧58‧‧S - 34°02‧40‧‧W). Video profiles recorded during these dives were analyzed for description of benthopelagic megafauna (fish and crustaceans) assemblages, and quantitative assessment of structuring factors (depth, topography and habitat types). Fishes represented over 92% (462) of all benthopelagic megafauna, divided into 11 orders and 17 families. Over half of fish records were Macrouridae, Synaphobranchidae and Chaunacidae. Megafauna abundance varied at different spatial scales, being higher in shallower habitats ( 600 m) dominated by branched suspension feeders (mostly sponges and cnidarians). Beta-diversity and community structure were related to habitat diversity. Because the RGR is vast and may comprise numerous distinctive habitats associated with depth, topography and water mass dynamics, fauna diversity may be high and patchy.